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Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1956 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1958]

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1956
PRINTED BY
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY.  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1956
is herewith respectfully submitted.
LYLE WICKS,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
August, 1957. The Honourable Lyle Wicks,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Thirty-ninth Annual Report on
the work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1956.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
WILLIAM SANDS,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., August, 1957. Department of Labour
OFFICIALS
Honourable Lyle Wicks, Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Mrs. G. Murray, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
William H. Sands, Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
B. W. Dysart, Chief Administrative Officer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
G. A. Little, Administrative Assistant, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
R. M. Purdie, Chief Inspector of Factories, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
E. L. Allen, Director of Apprenticeship, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
B. H. E. Goult, Chief Executive Officer, Labour Relations Act, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
W. Fraser, Chief Conciliation Officer, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Francis C. Dickins, Compensation Counsellor, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Director, Equal Pay Act and Fair Employment Practices Act, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C.
BRANCH OFFICES
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
523 Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C.
Court-house, Nanaimo, B.C.
301, 1411 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C.
Goodchild Building, Mission City, B.C.
Court-house, Kelowna, B.C.
P.O. Box 820, Terrace, B.C.
P.O. Box 1317, Cranbrook, B.C.
Court-house, Nelson, B.C.
P.O. Box 1032, Dawson Creek, B.C.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
(Headquarters: Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. J. Young, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
P. Baskin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
D. J, Baldwin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD
(Headquarters: Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
William H. Sands, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Fraudena Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. Murdoch, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. J. Young, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
P. Baskin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
D. J. Baldwin, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
N. deW. Lyons, Registrar, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
PROVINCIAL APPRENTICESHIP COMMITTEE
(Headquarters:   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
W. H. Welsh, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Thomas McGibbon, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
James Walker, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
John Tucker, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Hamilton Crisford, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Clifford A. Mason, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
TRADE-SCHOOL REGULATIONS OFFICERS
(Headquarters: 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
Fraudena Eaton. E. L. Allen. Hamilton Crisford.
Clifford A. Mason, Government Representative, Board of Examiners in Barbering.
5 H 6 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
PROVINCIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS
Professor E. H. Morrow, LL.D., 1050 Jefferson Avenue, West Vancouver, B.C.
Chief William Scow, Member, Alert Bay, B.C.
Ernest Brewer, Member, Vernon, B.C.
Edward Bolton, Member, Port Essington, B.C.
Capt. Charles W. Cates, Member, 266 Fourth Street West, North Vancouver, B.C.
L. P. Guichon, D.Sc, Member, Quilchena, B.C.
Miss J. R. Wright, Acting-Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C. Summary of Contents
Page
List of Acts Affecting Labour Inside front cover
Highlights of 1956 Report  9
Statistics of Trades and Industries  11
Employers' Returns  11
Payroll  12
Previous Provincial Payrolls ..  12
Comparison of Payrolls  13
Census Divisions  14
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries  16
Clerical Workers' Average Weekly Earnings  17
Industrial Wage  18
Firms with Large Payrolls  20
Employment  21
Statistical Tables  26
Summary of All Tables  39
" Hours of Work Act "  40
Average Weekly Hours  41
Statistics of Civic and Municipal Workers  43
Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour  45
Board of Industrial Relations  47
Meetings and Delegations  47
Orders and Regulations Made during 1956  47
Statistics Covering Women and Girl Employees  49
Summary of All Occupations .  55
Comparison of 1956 Earnings to Legal Minimum  56
Statistical Summary Covering Hospital-workers (Female)  56
Statistics for Male Employees ..  59
Investigations and Wage Adjustments  61
Court Cases  61
Special Licences  65
Conclusion -.  65
" Labour Relations Act "—Report of Labour Relations Branch ..  66
Table I.—Summary of Cases Dealt With, 1951-56  68
Table II.—Conciliation, 1956  69
Table III.—Boards of Conciliation, 1956  84
Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards by Predominant Cause  110
Table IV.—Summary of Industrial Disputes, 1956  110
Table V.—Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British Columbia, 1939-56  112
Chart Showing Percentage of Total Working-time Lost through Industrial Disputes, 1942-56  113
Table VI.—Analysis of Time-loss by Industry, 1956  114
Legal Proceedings Involving Labour Relations Board (British Columbia)  114
Summary of Prosecutions for 1956  114
Annual Survey of Organized Labour  115
Table VII.—Number of Labour Organizations Making Returns, etc  116
Chart Showing Distribution of Trade-union Membership by Industrial Classifications, 1957 .  116
Organizations of Employees  117
Organizations of Employers  133 H 8 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Page
Control of Employment of Children  135
" Equal Pay Act "  136
" Fair Employment Practices Act "  137
Inspection of Factories  138
Factories  138
Industrial Homework  138
Elevators  138
Elevator Inspections  140
New Elevator Installations  140
Elevator Operators' Licences  140
Factory Inspections  140
.   Conclusion  140
Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Branch  141
Trade-schools Regulation Branch  143
Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs  147
J ■
Highlights of the 1956 Annual Report
This Annual Report for the year 1956, being the thirty-ninth issued by the Department, presents the record of another year of vigorous enterprise in the continuing advance
of industrial progress and prosperity for British Columbia.
In the new look for 1956, a widespread programme of development, particularly in
engineering and heavy construction, the building of roads and transportation facilities,
and penetration of the northern regions in the constant search for new wealth in minerals,
oil, natural gas, and potential hydro power produced a continuing high level of industrial
activity throughout the year.
Further construction and expansion in the utilization of our natural resources and
the opening-up of new areas continued apace, with extensive capital expenditure producing new plants and payrolls, and a growing need for additional labour force to cope with
increased production schedules.
With production levels at record heights, it is noted with satisfaction that British
Columbia products found ready markets not only in the steady flow of goods and materials
to meet domestic consumer demand, but also in the field of foreign trade.
The forest industries continued to set new records in 1956, with both primary and
secondary phases of the business producing a sustained high output, in spite of operating
difficulties experienced during the year. Extensive expansion and modernization continued in the field of pulp and paper, with construction of new mills and progressive
improvement in the production capacities of existing plants and facilities. In spite of a
moderate decline in residential construction during the latter months of 1956, the manufacture of building materials, veneers, and plywoods increased substantially during the
year, the drop in residential building being offset by an increasing demand for materials
for business and industrial construction.
Stronger metal prices and increased production totals highlighted a record year for
the mining industry, the continuing demand for basic metals hastening a programme of
exploration and mining development unparalleled in recent years. Resulting payrolls in
the mining industry increased considerably over the previous year.
Earnings for industrial workers continued higher, the rate of increase in 1956 being
almost twice that of the previous year.
The average industrial-wage figure computed for all male wage-earners included in
coverage of the 1956 survey was $73.62, an increase of $3.15 from the previous high of
$70.47 reported in 1955.
Industrial payroll totals continued higher in twenty-four of the twenty-five classifications mentioned in the statistical section of this Report for 1956.
Heaviest increase during the year was in engineering and construction payrolls, increased by some $43,600,000 from the 1955 total. Metal-trades industries reported the
second largest increase, with payroll totals up $16,400,000. Public utilities showed an
increase of $7,500,000, while payrolls in the forest industries also increased in excess of
$7,000,000. Miscellaneous trades and industries showed a gain of $6,400,000, while
ship-building and boat-building increased by some $5,700,000. Payrolls in wood-
manufacturing (not elsewhere specified) were higher by $4,700,000, while smelting and
concentrating were also some $4,000,000 above the total for the previous year. For
others in order of increase, see " Comparison of Payrolls " in the Report data-
Employment totals were again higher in most industries, with the largest increases
apparent in the construction group, metal trades, cartage and warehousing, public utilities,
wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.), ship-building and boat-building, house furnishings, and
9 H 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
others in lesser degree. Peak employment continued to appear during the month of
August, the 1956 summary total of industrial workers employed during this month rising
to a record high mark of 221,732, as compared with 205,195 noted for the month of
August in 1955.
The industrial work-week strengthened slightly from the record low of 41.34 hours
noted for an average week in 1955, but remained below the averages for previous years.
For all wage-earners reported in the 1956 survey, the average working-week was recorded
at 41.36 hours. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 11
Statistics of Trades and Industries
An evaluation of progress made and a brief review and commentary on the changes
occurring during the past twelve months are presented in the statistical summary for
1956, which outlines the progressive variations of vital importance in the economic field
and their general effect on the welfare of the worker.
Employers' Returns Total 9,570
Scope of the 1956 survey was maintained at just above the coverage of the previous
year, a total of 9,570 industrial firms completing returns in time for tabulation in this
Report, as compared with a total of 9,537 submitting returns in 1955.
Consideration and assistance on the part of employers in the prompt return of statistical information has again contributed largely to the success of the current survey, and
in this respect the Department is indeed grateful for their continued co-operation and
support.
io.ooo g =;=        :s:
9,000 9
8,000 Si ij U     "M isNr^
7,oooA-{— f -|- |Lili- '-'•]!. ■•'"'!! -f" |
6,000 S  ■- SSSS it
s.oooH-is-HSHi^-i'—!--'
*
INDUSTRIAL FIRMS REPORTING
1946-1955 H 12 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Where mentioned throughout the text of the Report, the term " number of firms
reporting " has reference actually to the number of returns tabulated, since many firms
when reporting file separate returns in more than one industrial classification.
Payroll
The industrial payroll for 1956 was assessed at $850,334,399, this amount representing the total amount of salaries and wages reported by the 9,570 industrial firms
filing returns in time for classification in the tables of this Report. In order to approximate the entire Provincial estimated payroll, however, a supplementary list of additional
items of labour expenditure as noted below is added to the industrial total. This accumulative figure, comprising the industrial summary together with supplementary items listed,
was estimated at $1,400,000,000 for 1956.
Payrolls of 9,570 firms making returns to Department of Labour      $850,334,399
Returns received too late to be included in above
summary   2,010,121
Transcontinental railways (ascertained payroll)  49,813,299
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers
covered by the survey but not filing returns,
and additional services not included in the
tables—namely, Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, and miscellaneous (estimated payroll)         497,842,181
$1,400,000,000
Previous Provincial Payrolls
Provincial payroll totals since 1928 have been estimated as follows:—
1928   $183,097,781      1943   $394,953,031
1929   192,092,249      1944        388,100,000
1930  167,133,813      1945  ...   383,700,000
1931   131,941,008      1946 ....   432,919,727
1932   102,957,074      1947  ___   557,075,508
1933      99,126,653      1948        639,995,979
1934     113,567,953 1949 ......     671,980,815
1935   125,812,140 1950       718,202,028
1936   142,349,591 1951 = _   815,173,090
1937   162,654,234 1952      979,364,603
1938    158,026,375 1953      1,066,979,019
1939   165,683,460 1954  1,107,897,363
1940     188,325,766 1955     1,216,605,2691
1941   239,525,459 1956     1,400,000,0002
1942   321,981,489
1 1955 total revised since 1955 Report.
2 1956 preliminary total subject to revision.
The accumulative annual totals shown above as representative of the estimated
yearly Provincial payrolls are regarded as preliminary figures during the first twelve
months of publication. As additional information becomes available, they are subject
to revision in the following year's issue of this Report.
Labour force included in the coverage of the industrial surveys is segregated into
three main classifications involving executive, clerical, and wage-earner groups. The
following table expresses in terms of percentage of total the proportion of the known
industrial payroll expended annually in each of these three sections:— STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 13
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Per Cent
9.71
11.98
78.31
Per Cent
9.90
12.92
77.18
Per Cent
10.85
13.20
75.95
Per Cent
10.99
12.88
76.13
Per Cent
10.56
13.30
76.14
Totals               . .     .
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
Comparison of Payrolls
The spectacular advance of industrial payroll totals continued through 1956, with
major increases recorded beyond comparison with those of recent years. As indicated
in the previous year's Report, continuation of a vast programme of new development,
industrial expansion, and heavy construction resulted in an upward sweep of labour costs
which topped the 1955 payroll figure by some $118,518,622, an increase of 16.2 per cent.
Greatest 1956 increase was in major engineering and heavy construction industries,
with payrolls in this section some $43,683,956 above the level of the previous year.
Continued rapid expansion in metal-trades industries provided an additional $16,442,447
over and above the 1955 total, while public utilities was third in line with payroll increases
amounting to $7,503,894. In spite of difficulties encountered during the year in many
phases of the business, the forest industries continued to report higher over-all payroll
figures in 1956, to show a final increase of $7,383,622 above the total for the previous year. Miscellaneous trades and industries classification reported an increase of
$6,406,952, followed by ship-building and boat-building, up an additional $5,706,831.
Payroll totals in wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) gained by $4,768,896, while smelting
and concentrating industries were next in order of increase with payrolls up an additional
$4,233,500 from the 1955 figure. Labour costs in food-products manufacturing increased by $3,845,382; cartage, trucking, and warehousing registered a gain of
$3,451,097; metal-mining advanced by $3,004,321; builders' materials showed an
increase of $2,864,731. The oil refining and distributing industries reported payroll
increases amounting to $1,825,442; house furnishings, an increase of $1,670,177; coast
shipping, up an additional $1,457,896; pulp and paper manufacturing, a gain of
$1,204,350; laundries, cleaning and dyeing industries, an increase of $818,118; followed by printing and publishing totals, increased by $816,641. Breweries, distilleries,
and aerated-water manufacturers reported payrolls up an additional $687,586; leather-
and fur-goods manufacturing, an increase of $285,136; coal-mining, up $267,444;
garment-manufacturing, a gain of $109,097; jewellery manufacturing and repair, an
increase of $96,361; and paint-manufacturing, an increase of $53,079.
Only decrease noted was of a minor nature and occurred in the over-all payroll total
for explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals manufacturing, which was off some $68,334
from the all-time record high set for this section in 1955. H 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Industry
1954
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
1955
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
1956
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers	
Builders' materials— 	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing..
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals..
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing 	
House furnishings-
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing..
Lumber industries	
Metal trades 	
Metal-mining 	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing-
Printing-and publishing	
Pulp and paper manufacturing—
Ship-building and boat-building..
Smelting and concentrating^
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc.
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)..
Totals	
44
180
473
12
135
1,856
45
576
98
140
34
178
87
2,146
1,708
97
584
89
17
185
13
75
10
116
178
9,076
$6,183
11,575
12,948
4,521
28,934
86,443
8,392.
46,654.
4,239.
5,373
955,
7,250.
1,877.
146,950.
65,909
22,562
33,384
15,182
1,945.
16,313.
32,316.
14,677
22,685
,469.00
,878.00
,511.00
,916.00
,155.00
,701.00
,067.00
,923.00
,252.00
,774.00
,766.00
,039.00
,836.00
,848.00
,869.00
,576.00
,947.00
,552.00
,720.00
,306.00
,119.00
,419.00
,338.00
43,112,065.00
21,145,144.00
$661,537,190.00
46
190
506
12
140
2,067
40
582
86
144
33
157
80
2,329
1,776
115
551
96
19
181
15
77
10
109
176
$6,457.
12,959.
14,664.
4,685.
30,113.
104,687.
8,912.
48,466.
4,049.
5,389.
992.
7,047.
1,960.
162,695.
74,813.
24,010.
36,805.
15,490.
2,149,
17,047.
34,861,
15,191,
28,208,
296.00
818.00
293.00
.181.00
.737.00
,077.00
,460.00
,195.00
,382.00
,426.00
141.00
,830.00
,155.00
,375.00
385.00
,841.00
.107.00
704.00
905.00
391.00
760.00
667.00
052.00
45,734,807.00
24,421,792.00
9,537 $731,815,777.00
45
196
535
16
129
2,156
50
563
79
143
36
152
69
2,302
1,782
116
539
87
17
175
14
79
9
108
173
9,570
$7,144,882.00
15,824,549.00
18,115,390.00
4,952,625.00
31,571,633.00
148,371,033.00
8,844,126.00
52,311,577.00
4,158,479.00
7,059,603.00
1,088,502.00
7,865,948.00
2,245,291.00
170,078,997.00
91,255,832.00
27,015,162.00
43,212,059.00
17,316,146.00
2,202,984.00
17,864,032.00
36,066,110.00
20,898,498.00
32,441,552.00
53,238,701.00
29,190,688.00
$850,334,399.00
Census Divisions
Distribution of the annual industrial payroll throughout the ten census areas of the
Province is recorded each year in this section, with summary totals presented in the table
referring to the numbered census divisions outlined on the accompanying map.
The concentration of heavy industrial operations in the opening-up of new regions,
a gradual expansion beyond the boundaries of the metropolitan areas, and the spread of
industrial growth throughout the far reaches of the Province may be studied in the shifting
weight of labour costs recorded annually for each division.
Commencing in 1955, separate payroll totals have also been shown for the "Census
Metropolitan Area of Vancouver " and the " Census Metropolitan Area of Victoria," with
mention of the various municipalities and districts included in the coverage of these totals.
J STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 15
CENSUS
DIVISION
British Columbia industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas for the Comparative
Years 1953 to 1956
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1953
1954
1955
1956
No. 1~
No. 2~
No. 3~
No. 4~
No. 5..
No. 6..
No. 7~
No. 8~
No. 9..
No. 10	
Not specified-
Totals..
$19,495,380
42,633,966
20,361,133
370,901,521
111,953,368
15,781,535
21,111,044
18,367,655
44,702,234
3,304,619
4,501,909
$673,114,364
$17,125,372
32,519,954
20,790,437
389,154,398
117,023,841
12,487,726
22,351,967
18,012,903
23,458,261
3,387,399
5,224,932
$18,197,303
35,044,981
25,599,069
417,102,635
127,543,124
15,313,185
26,336,337
23,336,723
36,329,470
4,591,602
2,421,348
$661,537,190
$731,815,777
$20,519,964
39,484,744
25,595,831
489,455,851
142,538,408
19,244,778
31,397,256
27,477,359
47,205,898
5,286,187
2,128,123
$850,334,399 H 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Industrial Payroll Totals Reported for the Census Metropolitan Areas of
Vancouver and Victoria, 1955 and 1956
Area
Payroll (Salaries and Wages)
1955
1956
Census Metropolitan Area of Vancouver, including Vancouver City, North Vancouver City and District, West Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Fraser
Mills, Richmond, Surrey, Port Coquitlam, Coquitlam, and Port Moody.
Census Metropolitan Area of Victoria, including Victoria City, Esquimau,  Oak
Bay, and Saanich  	
$371,640,166
50,163,395
$438,319,529
55,182,266
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries
Increases in the average weekly earnings for industrial workers ranged higher in
1956 than during the previous year, with a percentage gain for wage-earners recorded at
4.47 per cent, compared with increases amounting to 2.58 per cent for this group in 1955.
With few exceptions, weekly pay-cheque figures were substantially higher for both
sections of employment—the wage-earners and those employees in clerical occupations.
Shown in the table immediately following are the average weekly earnings for male
wage-earners, based on one week of greatest employment in each industry under survey
for the years 1949 to 1956.
Average Weekly Earnings in Each Industry (Male Wage-earners)
Industry
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers	
Builders' materials   	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing-
Co al-mining	
Coast shipping. 	
Construction. 	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals..
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing 	
House furnishings  	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing..	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing-
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining...
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing-
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building	
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways, gas, water, power,
phones, etc.
tele-
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)..
$44.67
48.lt
46.41
52.68
44.21
50.97
49.33
46.47
43.03
42.41
43.93
41.36
38.75
51.40
45.63
53.51
42.22
53.90
37.21
50.74
54.10
53.37
51.73
51.15
44.07
$46.86
50.90
49.52
54.22
46.43
53.57
51.72
47.17
44.51
41.93
45.71
42.70
40.21
55.49
47.94
56.25
43.95
57.47
43.17
53.18
56.34
52.68
54.29
50.83
48.82
$51.42
54.34
55.10
58.86
53.29
61.57
59.50
53.82
47.49
46.78
54.88
47.57
44.18
61.89
53.77
63.58
48.14
63.88
47.31
58.87
63.74
62.51
63.76
56.88
54.85
$57.75
60.19
58.20
62.97
54.05
65.16
61.92
56.23
52.69
51.71
54.37
50.75
47.63
64.70
57.82
67.29
51.05
64.00
50.36
61.94
65.79
66.03
64.95
60.72
59.29
$61.11
64.33
64.09
66.11
58.46
70.62
66.86
58.71
54.531
53.94
56.54
51.35
48.98
67.68
61.40
71.35
54.71
70.23
52.511
68.33
71.22
70.64
69.32
66.36
60.96
$63.41
67.77
66.55
66.89
60.39
74.06
69.44
61.10
56.56
54.46
59.85
54.88
51.26
71.08
63.68
70.15
56.48
74.98
56.40
73.26
77.38
76.72
72.88
73.10
63.26
$68.43
68.34
69.34
66.53
61.63
74.96
71.77
62.62
57.55
58.97
62.11
56.44
54.82
72.50
65.54
73.62
60.89
79.36
60.38
74.72
78.99
77.51
76.11
74.67
65.56
$69.53
70.42
70.03
71.99
64.43
78.41
76.82
65.94
62.70
64.67
69.35
63.13
55.79
74.62
70.22
78.04
65.00
80.99
60.53
77.51
81.18
82.89
79.19
76.34
67.85
1 Revised since 1953 Report.
J STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 17
Increases noted in the average weekly earnings for male wage-earners in the 1956
survey are as follows:—
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers 	
Builders' materials 	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing .
Coal-mining  	
Coast shipping	
Construction  	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals .
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing 	
House furnishings .
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing _
$1.10
2.08
0.69
5.46
2.80
3.45
5.05
3.32
5.15
5.70
7.24
6.69
0.97
Lumber industries
Metal trades 	
Metal-mining
Miscellaneous trades and industries
Oil refining and distributing 	
Paint-manufacturing     	
Printing and publishing .
Pulp and paper manufacturing
Ship-building and boat-building
Smelting and concentrating .
Street-railways,  gas,  water,  power, telephones, etc _ 	
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) 	
$2.12
4.68
4.42
4.11
1.63
0.15
2.79
2.19
5.38
3.08
1.67
2.29
Clerical Workers1 Average Weekly Earnings
It may again be observed that the broad classification of clerical employees used in
this section is also inclusive of sales personnel, which accounts for the somewhat higher
average earnings noted in some instances for employees in this group. However, as the
earnings of sales personnel are directly affected by market conditions, supply and demand,
and good or poor business cycles in the particular industry concerned, considerable fluctuation does occur, and may be noted in some industries from year to year.
Both male and female employees in clerical occupations shared generally in the
higher earnings for 1956, and with few exceptions the amount of increase was substantially greater than reported during 1955.
Average weekly earnings for male clerical workers in all industries under survey
increased to $78.35 in 1956, up from $75.36 reported for this group in 1955. For female
employees the 1956 average for clerical occupations was recorded at $48.20, increased
from $45.84 reported during the previous year.
Shown in the following table are the comparative average weekly earnings for male
and female clerical workers in the various industries under survey for the years 1955 and
1956:—
Industry
1955
1956
Males
Females
Males
Females
$70.04
76.21
66.97
63.68
68.43
73.53
84.23
68.90
66.96
70.45
60.06
70.67
63.12
79.98
72.13
87.15
65.30
77.32
68.79
73.83
85.24
76.86
88.15
76.87
78.21
$44.15
44.07
39.53
39.17
46.75
45.28
47.12
44.16
47.08
41.62
42.48
39.84
41.15
48.34
43.39
50.44
46.41
53.30
44.33
42.67
51.27
39.46
52.00
48.04
48.79
$75.72
74.09
70.94
78.75
71.44
76.39
86.42
71.62
61.54
72.80
65.42
72.26
67.65
83.23
73.94
89.97
70.33
79.87
70.65
74.83
88.85
81.50
92.47
80.76
82.32
$48.95
45 09
42 16
43 00
48.13
47 28
48.76
45.60
49.17
47.49
47.32
40.93
43.49
Lumber industries      	
50.40
46.54
52.37
Miscellaneous trades and industries  - -
49.64
54.09
44.39
44.56
53.38
43.25
55.01
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc  - 	
50.29
51.39
$75.36
$45.84
$78.35
$48.20 H 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Industrial Wage
In spite of an appreciable increase in the level of consumer prices during 1956, the
increase in industrial earnings was substantially ahead, and it may be assumed that the
British Columbia worker was able to enjoy the greater portion of extra income as additional spending power for goods and commodities beyond his reach in previous years.
The average figure representing weekly earnings for male wage-earners in all industrial occupations included in the annual survey reached a new mark of $73.62 in 1956,
up $3.15 from the figure of $70.47 recorded for 1955.
The annual figures representing average weekly industrial earnings for the comparative years 1918 to 1956 are as follows:—
1918...
1919..
1920..
1921-
1922...
1923...
1924..
1925...
1926..
1927..
1928...
1929..
1930...
1931..
1932..
1933..
1934-
1935..
1936...
1937_
$27.97
1938 	
29.11
1939  	
31.51
1940...	
27.62
1941   	
27.29
1942    .
28.05
1943	
28.39
1944	
27.82
1945     	
27.99
1946	
28.29
1947......	
28.96
1948       	
29.20
1949	
28.64
1950 	
26.17
1951   .. . 	
23.62
1952..	
22.30
1953 	
23.57
1954  .
24.09
1955 _
26.36
1956	
26.64
$26.70
26.80
28.11
30.67
35.24
37.19
38.70
38.50
39.87
43.49
47.30
49.21
51.88
58.67
61.78
65.61
68.70
70.47
73.62 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 19
Based on the computed average figures for each year, the chart shows the trend of
average weekly earnings for all male wage-earners during the period 1918 to 1956.
Average Weekly Earnings of Male Wage-earners, 1918-56
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
EARNINGS
YEAR
1918
™
920
(921
1922
1923
192*
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
I94J
1942 1943 1944 1945
1946
1947
1948
1949 1950
1951
1952
1953
I9W
1955
1956
73.00
72.00
71.00
70.00
69.00
68.00
67.00
66.00
65.00
64.00
63.00
62.00
61.00
60.00
59.00
58.00
57.00
56.00
55.00
54.00
53.00
52.00
51.00
50.00
49.00
48.00
47.00
46.00
45.00
44.00
43.00
42.00
41.00
40.00
39.00
38.00
37.00
36,00
35.00
34.00
33.00
32.00
31.00
30.00
29.00
28.00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24.00
23.00
22.00
•
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(1956 figure, $73.62.) H 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Wage Distribution
302;-
25%-
20%-
15*-
10%-
5%-
1955
1956
*
■
III
■
1
- ■ 11 I
1
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The above bar diagrams indicate the varying percentages of male wage-earners in a series of fixed wage classifications through the years 1955 and 1956.
Firms With Large Payrolls
Distribution of new capital investment and the rapid expansion and development of
various sections of our industrial economy are reflected in the annual survey of firms in
the higher payroll bracket of $100,000 or over. Concentration of the labour force in
the direction of new growth is pictured in this survey of the larger firms, the figures, however, referring to industrial firms only, since this inquiry is not inclusive of wholesale or
retail trade, transcontinental railways, or payrolls of public authorities (Federal, Provincial, or municipal). STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES H 21
Firms reporting in the higher payroll category continued to increase during the year,
the 1956 survey showing a total of 1,189 industrial firms in the payroll group of $100,000
or over, an increase of 119 above the previous year's high of 1,070.
Continuing in the lead with the greatest number of firms in the larger payroll group,
the lumber industry reported a total of 271 firms in this classification, the 1956 total,
however, representing only a small increase over the previous year's figure of 261. Most
pronounced increase in the number of larger payrolls came in the construction industry,
which reported a total of 226 firms in the upper brackets for 1956, some 46 in addition
to the 1955 figure. Metal trades accounted for a total of 173 firms with larger payrolls,
an increase of 25 from the previous year. Fourth in order of greatest number, the food-
products manufacturing section reported a total of 95 firms with payrolls exceeding
$100,000, this group having increased by 1 from the 1955 total. Miscellaneous trades
and industries reported 79 firms in the upper brackets, an increase of 11; coast shipping,
43, increased by 2; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) listed 35 firms in the larger payroll
class, this figure representing an increase of 5; cartage, trucking, and warehousing
reported 32, an increase of 6; builders' materials, 26, an increase of 4; metal-mining,
26, a gain of 3; printing and publishing, 27, increased by 3; public utilities group, 21,
an increase of 1; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 18, no change from the previous figure;
oil refining and distribution, 16, increased by 2; ship-building and boat-building, 16,
up 1; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers, 15, also increased by 1;
garment-manufacturing, 13, a decrease of 1; house furnishings, 14, increased by 1 from
the previous year; pulp and paper manufacturing, 12, unchanged from the previous
year; explosives, fertilizers and chemicals, 8, a decrease of 2; leather and fur goods, 6,
an increase of 1; paint-manufacturing, 6, a decrease of 1; coal-mining, 4, also decreased
by 1; smelting and concentrating, 4, unchanged from the previous year; and jewellery
manufacturing and repair, 3, an increase of 1.
Compared with a previous year's total of 96, there were 117 industrial firms who
reported 1956 payrolls of over $1,000,000. Of this latter group, the returns showed 17
exceeding $5,000,000, 8 between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, 10 between $3,000,000
and $4,000,000, 17 between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and 65 between $1,000,000
and $2,000,000.
Employment
Employment summaries for 1956 continued to show higher levels in most industries
than during the previous year, with the largest single increase in actual working force
accounted for by the construction industries. Population figures continued to grow
rapidly during the year, the additional labour-supply being quickly absorbed by the
expansive programme of new development and industrial construction already under
way within the Province, resulting in higher employment totals in those industries affected.
Representing peak employment for all industries included in the survey, the total
working force reported during the highest month in 1956 was 8.1 per cent greater than
during a similar period of greatest employment in 1955.
Highest employment month during the year was again the month of August, as in
1955, although the 1956 summary showed a total of 221,732 persons employed during
that month, as compared with 205,195 recorded for the August high during the previous
year.
Seventeen of the twenty-five industries under survey reported top employment totals
for 1956 above those of the previous year, with increases ranging from 1 to 25 per cent.
Most important increases in the working-force totals were noted in the construction
industries, metal trades, cartage and warehousing, public utilities, wood-manufacturing
(N.E.S.), ship-building and boat-building, house furnishings, and others in lesser degree. H 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Of the eight industries reporting lower employment totals than during the previous
year, explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals recorded a drop of 4.7 per cent; paint-
manufacturing, a decrease of 3.5 per cent; and the lumber industries, a reduction
of 3 per cent; while minor decreases occurred also in coast shipping, food-products
manufacturing, garment-manufacturing, printing and publishing, and pulp and paper
manufacturing.
Comparative employment information showing the high and low monthly totals in
each industry is recorded in the following table, together with similar data for the previous
year. Also included in this section are charts showing the trend of employment for
clerical workers, the wage-earner group, and total industrial employment for 1956 and
previous years.
Table Showing the Amount or Variation of Employment in Each Industry
in the Last Two Years1
Industry
1955
oogS
ZM
52BS
£2
£&
Zw
1956
o o a §
.So
i!
Zw
Month of
Least
Employment
1,956
Feb	
3,968
Feb	
5,048
Jan.  .  .
1,476
Sept	
8,817
Oct	
36,796
Jan	
2,104
July	
20,404
Feb	
1,584
June	
2,147
Jan	
462
Feb	
3,326
Jan.	
739
Jan	
43,236
Dec.
22,283
.Tan.
5,967
Dec.
12,179
Feb	
3,429
Apr	
549
Dec	
4,194
Jan.   .
7,268
Jan	
5,403
Jan	
7,566
Jan	
14,692
Feb	
8,335
Jan	
221,732
Jan	
Zoa
Breweries,   distilleries,   and   aerated-
water manufacturers	
Builders' materials	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing-—
Coal-mining	
Coast shipping	
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals...
Food-products manufacturing—	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings   —
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing
Lumber industries	
Metal trades	
Metal-mining	
Miscellaneous trades and industries	
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing.. 	
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building	
Smelting and concentrating	
Street-railways,   gas,   water,   power,
telephones, etc 	
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) 	
All industries	
June..
Oct.-
Oct—
Jan.—
July...
Sept...
Aug...
Aug—
Oct...
Nov...
Nov...
July...
Oct.-
Aug._
Nov...
July...
Sept...
Jan	
Aug.-
Nov...
June-
Dec.-.
Sept...
July...
Oct.-
Aug..
1,859
3,515
4,112
1,447
9,010
29,410
2,202
20,447
1,592
1,730
438
3,124
718
44,528
19,304
5,893
11,468
3,387
568
4,206
7,316
4,294
6,782
13,378
7,029
205,195
Jan   .
1,590
Aug	
Jan.
2,799
July	
Jan	
3,377
Sept	
Sept	
1,398
Jan	
Oct	
8,042
Aug	
Jan.-	
18,393
Aug	
Apr	
2,075
Apr	
Feb.
11,633
Aug	
May	
1,421
Feb.
Feb	
1,424
Nov.
Mar	
362
Nov.
Feb	
2,759
Aug.
Feb	
616
Aug	
34,746
16,750
Aug	
Oct.
Jan	
Jan	
4,947
July	
Jan.  .   .
8,267
Aug	
Oct	
2,907
Dec	
Jan..	
505
July-Aug.
Jan.
3,883
Aug	
Jan.   .  .
6,656
July	
Jan	
3,387
Dec.  . .
Mar.
5,662
Sept	
Feb	
12,428
Nov. 	
Jan.
6,011
Oct.
Jan.
163,684
Aug	
1,563
3,403
3,916
1,277
7,712
26,205
1,978
12,024
1,418
1,864
371
2,892
658
33,106
19,006
5,287
9,630
2,964
493
3,983
6,764
4,241
6,423
12,896
7,135
179,194
1 Industrial employment totals include clerical and sales staffs in addition to wage-earners, and are based on the
numbers of employees reported on the payrolls on the last day of each month or nearest working-date. STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Employment of Clerical Workers in Industry, 1955 and 19561
H 23
32,000
31,500
31,000
30,500
30,000
29,500
29,000
28,500
28,000
27,500
27,000
26,500
26,000
25,500
25,000
24,500
24,000
23,500
23,000
1,500
1,000
500
0
(1956)
(1955)
A
k
y
1 Employment as at the last day of each month.    Figures include clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc., but not
salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff.
January  ..
February
March
April	
27,610
27,851
27,894
28,261
Clerical Workers, 1956
(Male and Female)
May .
June
July
29,039
29,696
30,195
August     30,539
September   30,563
October   30,578
November   30,766
December    30,778 H 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Average Monthly Number of Wage-earners (Male and Female)
1941, 1945, 1949, 1954, 1955, and 1956
| Jan.    | Feb.   |Mar.  |Apr.   | May   | June   | July    |Aug.  |Sept.  | Oct.   [ Nov. | Dec.
195,000
190,000
185,000
180,000
175,000
170,000
165,000
160,000
155,000
150, 000
145,000
140,000
135, 000
130,000
125,000
120,000
115,000
110,000
105,000
loo.ooo
95,000
90, 000
85, 000
1956
1955
1954
1949
1945
1941
X
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E
1
U—^     —   REFERENCE
-nployment in —
S<
y
./
1945
1954 "          "
1955 "          "
1956
s*
->
	
1956
January ..
February
March
April	
151,584
154,398
158,793
166,939
May 	
June	
July  	
August   „
  176,394
  181,966
 188,796
 191,193
September
October 	
November
December
... 187,172
_ 182,259
._ 174,810
... 161.015 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Total Employment in Industry, 1955 and 19561
H 25
15,000
10,000
5,000
0
£«;£<:S35<£ozq
1 Employment as at the last day of each month.   Figures do not include salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff.
Monthly Totals of Industrial Employment, 1956
(Male and Female)
January     179,194
February   182,249
March     186,687
April     195,200
May 	
June 	
July
August
205,433
211,662
218,991
221,732
September
October 	
November
December
217,735
212,837
205,576
191,793 H 26
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
CONTENTS OF TABLES
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades
included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries, Distilleries, and Aerated-water Manufacturers.—Also is inclusive of wineries, and comprises firms in
or incidental to the manufacture, bottling, and distribution of
malt liquors, spirits, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and
carbonated water.
No. 2. Builders' Material, Producers of.—Includes manufacturers of brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and
firebrick; also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and
crushed rock.
No. 3. Cartage, Trucking, and Warehousing.—Comprises
firms engaged in the business of freight and baggage hauling,
moving, storage, packing, shipping, and transfer services.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation of coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both
general and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not
include the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Construction.—Here are grouped building trades,
painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-
metal works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-
steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves,
dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing, and automatic
sprinklers. Firms making returns as building contractors, constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces,
electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and
bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Fertilizers, and Chemicals.—Includes all
firms engaged in the manufacture of these commodities.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacturing of.—This table includes bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries and dairies, fish, fruit, and vegetable canneries; packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces,
coffee,  ketchup,   and  spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton
goods, shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery, and ladies'
outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in
the manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery Manufacturing and Repair.—Includes the
repair as well as the manufacturing of jewellery, watches, and
optical instruments  (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these
industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacturing of.—Comprises manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks,
and leather Indian novelties;   also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No.   14. Lumber  Industries.—In this group are included
logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.-—This group includes marine black-
smithing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops, galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of handsaws,
nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill machinery, and
repairs to same.
No. 16. Metal-mining.—Includes all metalliferous mining.
. No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous enough to
warrant special categories, and others for which separate tables
are not at present maintained. They include manufacturers of
soap, paper boxes, hags, and containers, brooms and brushes,
tents, awnings, and other canvas goods, aircraft and aircraft
parts, motor and aerial transportation, ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil Refining and Distributing.—Includes also the
manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead
corroders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing,
lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building and Boat-bulldlng.—Comprises both
wooden- and steel-ship building and repairing, also construction and repair of small craft and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting and Concentrating.—Comprises only firms
engaged in these industries.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Light, Power, Telephones, etc.—This group comprises generating and distribution
of light and power, manufacture of domestic and industrial
gases, operation of street-railways, waterworks, and telephones.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—
Here are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior
finish, water-proof plywood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden pipes
and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets, coffins, and
undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1
BREWERIES, DISTILLERIES, AND
AERATED-WATER MANUFACTURERS
Returns Covering 45 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers .
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc. 	
... $1,041,134
768,095
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     5,335,653
Total.
$7,144,882
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
1,154
228
129
77
February	
1,143
217
124
79
1,139
244
129
77
April 	
1,183
237
134
79
May 	
1,224
248
152
78
June  — 	
1,288
319
142
82
July  	
1,377
309
150
89
August.	
1,384
325
156
91
September 	
1,296
330
138
86
October	
1,252
363
130
85
November -	
1,234
358
143
88
December	
1,273
205
149
88
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males    Females
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00	
to $29.99
to 34.99.
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99.
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
43
26
24
26
20
38
36
90
414
424
115
77
132
15
16
12
63
38
44
190
84
5
1
1
3
3
8
7
16
18
28
25
12
29
1
2
3
11
17
22
14
8
4
2
3
J ^
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 27
Table No. 2
Table No. 3
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF
CARTAGE, TRUCKING, AND
WAREHOUSING
Returns Covering 196 Firms
Returns Covering 535 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,954,993
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $2,078,058
Clerks, stenographers, salesme
Wage-earners (including piece
1.873.268
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)
Total 	
       11,487,573
workers)
     14,164,064
  $15,824,549
Total   ..
  $18,115,390
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
2,772
10
370
258
January 	
3,314
12
289
301
February 	
2,758
11
373
261
February	
3,352
11
282
297
2,841
14
363
263
March	
3,426
12
285
302
April. 	
2,989
13
374
269
April 	
3,518
12
287
303
May  	
3,238
17
399
270
May 	
3,747
18
285
317
3,178
3,246
3,186
3,113
20
396
284
3,908
16
303
338
July 	
August	
September	
21
413
288
July
4,115
24
306
358
25
427
294
4,170
25
310
363
24
428
284
September	
4,264
24
376
384
October	
3,000
24
425
287
October 	
4,240
25
384
395
2,879
2,741
23
430
275
4,168
17
377
403
December.	
13
424
280
December	
3,990
16
379
404
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00
131
5
6
17
Under $25.00	
232
10
11
32
$25.00 to $29.99	
33
6
5
$25.00 to $29.99	
53
5
2
18
30.00 to   34.99	
21
3
3
18
30.00 to   34.99	
54
6
8
42
35.00 to   39.99	
37
6
11
40
35.00 to   39.99	
72
4
8
71
40.00 to   44.99	
89
4
8
70
40.00 to   44.99	
87
2
6
89
45.00 to   49.99	
81
2
16
62
45.00 to   49.99	
108
3
17
59
50.00 to   54.99	
153
1
19
37
50.00 to   54.99	
178
1
14
41
55.00 to   59.99..	
202
25
19
55.00 to   59.99	
227
24
18
60.00 to   69.99	
981
1
86
19
60.00 to   69.99	
1,327
1
74
15
70.00 to   79.99	
685
79
7
70.00 to   79.99	
972
74
8
80.00 to   89.99	
379
	
73
80.00 to   89.99	
622
60
2
90.00 to   99.99	
240
49
90.00 to   99.99	
310
40
100.00 and over
374
1
49
1
100.00 and over
495
26
2 H 28
Table No. 4
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 5
COAL-MINING
Returns Covering 16 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)	
Total	
$557,239
76,938
4,318,448
$4,952,625
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Males    Females
January	
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
July.	
August	
September-
October.	
November	
December	
1,446
1,431
1,429
1,387
1,345
1,312
1,285
1,280
1,247
1,258
1,294
1,329
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
21
20
20
20
20
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
10
10
10
10
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00	
$25.00 to $29.99	
30.00 to   34.99	
35.00 to   39.99	
40.00 to   44.99	
45.00 to   49.99	
50.00 to   54.99.	
55.00 to   59.99	
60.00 to   69.99	
70.00 to   79.99	
80.00 to   89.99	
90.00 to   99.99	
100.00 and over	
Wage-earners
Males    Females
4
13
4
7
18
6
30
67
344
616
117
61
38
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
COAST SHIPPING
Returns Covering 129 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers .
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc _
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)..
Total.
$2,809,232
2,197,843
26,564,558
$31,571,633
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
7,047
7,134
7,257
7,405
97
375
220
96
377
216
92
371
221
April	
102
376
220
7,778
7,953
145
384
227
June..    ....
166
385
234
July	
7,917
188
395
240
August   .. .
7,985
201
391
240
September
7,657
141
379
226
October	
7,022
98
367
225
November.	
7,199
86
368
218
December	
7,292
86
364
212
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males    Females
Under $25.00	
$25.00 to $29.99—
30.00 to 34.99—
35.00 to 39.99—
40.00 to 44.99—
45.00 to 49.99._
50.00 to 54.99—
55.00 to 59.99—
60.00 to 69.99—
70.00 to 79.99—
80.00 to 89.99—
90.00 to 99.99—
100.00 and over	
772
120
78
88
199
329
832
2,210
773
1,701
1,496
515
486
22
2
13
20
9
72
48
11
4
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
3
3
6
2
13
15
24
26
93
56
45
34
40
10
3
7
69
67
29
26
15
5
2
1 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 29
Table No. 6
Table No. 7
CONSTRUCTION
EXPLOSIVES, FERTILIZERS, AND
CHEMICALS
Returns Covering 2,156 Firms
Returns Covering 50 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $14,158,857
Officers, superintendents, and managers    .. .. ..     $847,232
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc. —      13,040,275
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc     2,360,751
Wage-earners (inclu
Total  .. ..
ling piece-workers)
5,636,143
Total
$148,371,033
.                           $8,844,126
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
22,808
121
2,034
1,242
January..  	
1,406
39
445
149
February  ...
23,212
124
2,074
1,250
February  	
1,402
40
445
150
24,867
150
2,085
1,261
1,425
39
444
150
27,874
157
2,126
1,297
1,470
36
439
159
May 	
29,890
215
2,199
1,357
May.	
1,441
41
451
157
June .	
31,009
261
2,259
1,379
June   	
1,410
46
458
155
July	
32,281
266
2,297
1,394
July 	
1,339
49
434
156
32,755
259
2,380
1,402
1,383
1,355
47
431
158
31,609
202
2,403
1,418
51
438
156
31,639
191
2,405
1,437
1,343
49
441
157
29,977
193
2,420
1,551
1,386
45
443
158
December	
25,336
188
2,400
1,529
December ~
1,372
43
430
159
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00
944
59
38
134
Under $25.00	
22
15
$25.00 to $29.99	
299
26
17
46
$25.00 to $29.99	
12
3
30.00 to   34.99	
290
23
31
75
30.00 to   34.99	
6
18
5
35.00 to   39.99	
383
53
48
140
35.00 to   39.99	
8
2
2
15
40.00 to   44.99	
584
103
61
218
40.00 to   44.99	
22
10
6
32
45.00 to   49.99	
667
13
75
234
45.00 to   49.99	
14
2
9
47
50.00 to   54.99	
1,435
16
145
218
50.00 to   54.99	
69
5
13
29
55.00 to   59.99	
1,569
14
115
111
55.00 to   59.99	
58
2
17
16
60.00 to   69.99	
8,288
9
334
179
60.00 to   69.99	
331
33
7
70.00 to   79.99	
5,567
7
383
58
70.00 to   79.99	
336
1
66
4
80.00 to   89.99	
4,272
2
375
27
80.00 to   89.99	
370
59
3
90.00 to   99.99	
6,949
241
4
90.00 to   99.99	
252
82
100.00 and over
9,345
2
545
7
100.00 and over	
147
	
183
	 H 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 8
Table No. 9
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF
GARMENT-MAKING
Returns Covering 563 Firms
Returns Covering 79 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $6,375,753
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $575,032
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.      7.609,981
Clerks, stenographer
Wage-earners (inclu
Total	
s, salesme
ling piece
515,498
3,067,949
Wage-earners (inclu
ding piece-workers)
     38,325,843
workers)	
Total	
     $52,311,577
 -  $4,158,479
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
7,486
2,520
1,202
948
January  	
313
1,126
45
64
February 	
7,390
2,473
1,207
954
February—	
318
1,157
46
63
7,657
2,497
1,200
946
March. 	
316
1,159
43
63
April. -
8,300
2,826
1,212
959
April	
312
1,106
43
64
9,093
3,107
1,233
974
302
1,017
1,002
44
66
June	
10,062
4,212
1,243
1,015
June	
304
48
64
July 	
10,918
6,104
1,261
1,047
July...    	
318
1,038
44
66
August	
11,271
6,816
1,254
1,063
August  —
310
1,093
46
63
September	
10,506
6,771
1,228
1,059
September	
311
1,123
47
63
October 	
9,445
5,231
1,192
1,033
Ortnhpr
311
1,088
50
66
November	
8,263
3,281
1,211
1,044
November	
303
1,051
45
67
December	
7,709
2,345
1,213
1,016
December	
307
1,041
43
65
Classil
ted Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
1
Males   I Females
1
Males
Females
Males
Females
Utid»r $'5 00
613
1,372
8
32
Under $25.00
9
152
5
2
3
$25.00 to $29.99	
202
797
4
39
$25.00 to $29.99	
12
207
1
30.00 to   34.99	
299
876
38
160
30.00 to   34.99	
13
196
2
5
35.00 to   39.99	
215
1,086
15
113
35.00 to   39.99-	
13
181
7
40.00 to   44.99	
431
1,230
35
174
40.00 to   44.99	
22
189
4
9
45.00 to   49.99	
490
1,130
42
201
45.00 to   49.99	
25
131
2
10
50.00 to   54.99	
819
1,011
98
168
50.00 to   54.99	
28
96
2
8
55.00 to   59.99	
1,108
524
90
88
55.00 to   59.99	
22
47
5
7
60.00 to   69.99	
3,384
557
261
79
60.00 to   69.99	
68
53
9
5
70.00 to   79.99	
2,394
186
232
22
70.00 to   79.99	
55
34
6    1          2
80.00 to   89.99	
1,279
78
199
6
80.00 to   89.99	
35
15
4
3
90.00 to   99.99	
596
24
94
1
90.00 to   99.99	
18
5
2
,      ,
100.00 and over
1,002
79
137
3
100.00 and over	
16
1
5
1 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 31
Table No. 10
HOUSE FURNISHINGS-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 143 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers   $1,018,619
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        918,450
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)..    5,122,534
Total.
$7,059,603
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January.. .   —
1,304
314
79
167
February	
1,326
325
82
162
1,300
1,300
324
81
161
336
81
161
May	
1,507
342
80
163
June.	
1,339
359
78
166
July,    	
1,408
371
78
167
August 	
1,454
400
80
167
September     . .
1,432
422
77
168
October	
1,447
434
77
173
November	
1,459
431
80
177
December 	
1,428
408
81
178
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
55
27
47
73
88
70
130
118
395
278
180
75
109
24
32
56
72
81
70
42
37
32
5
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1
3
4
11
15
5
7
12
7
20
5
18
17
30
20
37
18
21
5
2
Table No. 11
JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING AND
REPAIR
Returns Covering 36 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers .
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc. 	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)-
Total  	
$116,449
182,366
789,687
$1,088,502
Employment
Month
January-
February..
March	
April	
May	
June 	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December...
Wage-earners
Males    Females
151
148
149
152
154
158
165
160
161
163
170
167
168
145
155
150
154
168
173
167
166
174
207
192
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
12
11
11
11
11
11
12
12
11
11
12
12
66
67
63
65
67
69
71
69
69
72
73
74
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
7o;oo
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00—
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to ; 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
3
4
3
5
7
10
29
42
28
6
29
32
15
61
19
34
27
17
10
2
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
5
3
11
10
10
13
5
14
8
3
1
2 H 32 DEPARTME
Table No. 12
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING
Returns Covering 152 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc. 	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)	
Total.
$681,927
669,798
6,514,223
$7,865,948
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
777
1,846
74
195
February	
779
1,840
76
200
788
1,899
76
195
April	
798
1,973
78
203
May..:  	
799
2,000
77
209
June	
790
2,114
82
214
July..	
830
2,186
83
204
August     	
840
2,206
82
198
September 	
815
2,124
78
210
October ,.'
821
2,042
85
218
November	
811
1,969
87
216
808
1,971
85
214
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00—
$25.00 to $29.99.
30.00 to 34.99.
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99.
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 69.99
70.00 to 79.99
80.00 to 89.99
90.00 to 99.99
100.00 and over
Wage-earners
Males    Females
29
26
22
31
42
42
89
105
183
131
66
31
68
227
244
334
427
477
286
154
72
61
19
2
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1
1
1
8
11
11
8
5
3
9
17
31
38
44
20
16
6
10
1
2
OF LABOUR
Table No. 13
LEATHER AND FUR
GOODS—
MANUFACTURE
OF
Returns Covering 69 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers .
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)..
Total 	
$401,971
277,358
1,565,962
$2,245,291
Employment
Month
January	
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
Wage-earners
Males    Females
292
309
319
314
332
323
302
331
330
335
335
307
286
305
314
318
326
325
318
330
324
301
302
287
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
37
37
37
36
37
36
37
37
37
37
37
37
43
42
42
42
41
43
42
41
44
42
42
44
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $25.00	
$25.00 to $29.99.
30.00 to 34.99.
35.00 to 39.99
40.00 to 44.99.
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 69.99
70.00 to 79.99
80.00 to 89.99
90.00 to   99.99
100.00 and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
12
8
9
13
26
30
104
51
85
28
12
4
4
23
36
120
84
62
32
17
1
2
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
4
1
3
4
2
4
11
3
1
3
2
7
13
12
3
2
1 Table No. 14
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Table No. 15
H 33
LUMBER INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 2,302 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $15,638,001
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc         8,777,863
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     145,663,133
Total.
$170,078,997
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
31,534
317
1,111
792
February	
33,592
335
1,115
791
March 	
34,430
370
1,128
794
April	
36,199
347
1,139
803
May	
39,297
366
1,147
827
June 	
40,572
434
1,158
831
July 	
40,691
455
1,173
847
August. „
40,755
443
1,178
860
September 	
39,661
392
1,176
850
October...  	
38,816
469
1,175
860
November	
36,330
437
1,158
850
30,724
295
1,147
940
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Males
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 ...
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
1,144
361
382
442
632
711
1,213
2,184
13,808
8,932
6,690
4,130
7,754
20
28
69
85
77
40
27
138
51
28
18
23
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
18
6
12
15
24
17
17
35
108
155
198
189
389
Females
48
14
46
61
139
180
126
83
142
41
18
6
METAL TRADES
Returns Covering 1,782 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers   $16,148,082
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      17,285,345
.    57,822,405
Wage-earners (including piece-workers).
Total.
91,255,832
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
14,309
578
2,368
1,751
February	
14,525
578
2,396
1,768
March	
14,913
600
2,416
1,779
April 	
15,461
619
2,440
1,807
May	
15,779
619
2,509
1,849
June	
16,074
615
2,542
1,910
July     	
16,536
621
2,573
1,969
August     	
16,742
618
2,576
1,956
September 	
16,887
657
2,640
1,947
October .   	
16,939
679
2,651
2,016
November	
16,979
661
2,638
1,985
December. ..—
16,555
626
2,667
1,938
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00....
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
645
244
357
409
696
700
1,113
1,236
3,386
4,012
3,322
1,714
1,684
45
42
92
102
73
75
117
41
109
72
3
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
54
22
26
50
81
124
141
171
469
308
317
249
532
104
56
131
248
388
345
330
174
152
54
23
3
7 H 34
Table No. 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 17
METAL-MINING
Returns Covering 116 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $1,963,699
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.       3,477,317
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     21,574,146
Total -    $27,015,162
Employment
Month
January—
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July.	
August	
September
October.—
November.
December.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
4,784
4,743
4,796
4,868
5,134
5,226
5,223
5,112
4,995
4,870
4,863
4,580
79
78
80
88
92
95
104
105
96
89
89
87
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
509
508
511
512
518
526
522
533
524
514
513
505
92
95
98
98
103
107
118
118
117
96
114
115
Classified Weekly Earnings
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND
INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 539 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
$5,707,216
8,691,800
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     28,813,043
Officers, superintendents, and managers
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc. .
$43,212,059
Employment
Month
January—
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October—
November-
December.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
6,223
6,050
6,406
6,618
7,189
7,075
7,666
7,875
7,399
6,941
6,787
6,622
1,235
1,231
1,233
1,255
1,581
1,470
1,616
1,706
1,837
1,458
1,401
1,315
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1,235
1,249
1,262
1,270
1,292
1,312
1,315
1,352
1,347
1,366
1,341
1,331
1,071
1,100
1,090
1,129
1,174
1,193
1,226
1,246
1,236
1,241
1,207
1,208
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00	
84
8
4
6
Under $25 00
589
169
$25.00 to $29.99	
27
4
$25.00 to $29.99	
134
143
6
26
30.00 to   34.99	
21
1
3
30.00 to   34.99	
169
560
20
57
35.00 to   39.99	
47
10
2
8
35.00 to   39.99	
243
210
40
99
40.00 to   44.99.....
60
14
1
17
40.00 to   44.99	
413
281
64
252
45.00 to   49.99	
59
7
	
31
45.00 to   49.99	
499
275
69
258
50.00 to   54.99..	
163
7
1
8
50.00 to   54.99	
701
237
51
205
55.00 to   59.99	
534
8
8
26
55.00 to   59.99......
704
231
125
124
60.00 to   69.99—..
798
21
34
19
60.00 to   69.99	
1,732
139
249
141
70.00 to   79.99	
1,184
11
50
4
70.00 to   79.99	
2,000
56
230
76
80.00 to   89.99.......
1,117
5
89
5
80.00 to   89.99	
901
12
170
19
90.00 to   99.99	
717
	
71
1
90.00 to   99.99	
383
3
124
1
100.00 and over
1,029
248
1
100.00 and over
827
2
177
2 Table No. 18
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Table No. 19
H 35
OIL REFINING AND DISTRIBUTING
Returns Covering 87 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) ~
Total   	
$3,245,961
4,941,384
9,128,801
$17,316,146
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
2,084
15
775
410
February 	
2,060
15
769
421
March	
1,849
13
769
421
April—	
1,751
14
774
425
May 	
1,834
25
798
428
June  	
1,888
16
809
452
July   .  .
1,888
28
835
465
August	
1,992
26
833
487
September...	
1,998
23
815
466
October    	
1,819
9
814
476
November  	
1,893
14
817
483
December  ...
2,112
15
821
481
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00....
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males   I Females
90
20
20
24
33
39
50
77
253
424
477
377
746
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
1
1
1
12
19
43
29
34
91
158
152
110
199
Females
5
2
5
23
31
108
135
81
77
21
11
2
1
PAINT-MANUFACTURING
Returns Covering 17 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers       $525,795
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       675,665
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     1,001,524
Total.
$2,202,984
Employment
Month
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December-.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
265
273
279
287
280
283
288
288
270
256
254
249
50
52
51
51
57
61
61
61
57
56
49
49
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
121
122
125
123
122
123
124
123
124
126
124
123
75
74
72
74
73
72
76
77
77
75
73
72
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 —
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
4
1
11
17
24
14
29
24
112
41
18
3
5
3
1
2
11
15
14
14
1
3
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
6
5
5
11
32
26
17
12
4
3
1
8
11
16
14
13
4
5 H 36
Table No. 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 21
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING
Returns Covering 175 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $2,181,202
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       6,132,416
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)      9,550,414
Total.
$17,864,032
Employment
Clerks,
Month
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January. 	
2,035
367
854
727
February.	
2,047
358
862
729
March	
2,069
366
853
729
2,086
371
865
730
May   	
2,100
399
871
753
2,140
399
882
751
July	
2,143
378
880
763
August—. 	
2,140
391
896
767
September.. 	
2,132
401
890
758
October   -
2,144
380
872
751
November	
2,160
390
878
756
December	
2,138
362
867
748
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 ....
to $29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
67
58
79
66
90
53
78
61
160
188
361
352
657
Females
Males
86
11
29
22
54
26
50
26
52
25
56
25
73
71
25
44
15
113
3
80
3
107
3
149
3
183
52
28
100
145
142
92
72
44
36
24
7
18
PULP AND PAPER-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 14 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers )..
Total.
$3,545,001
5,052,740
27,468,369
$36,066,110
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February 	
5,557
5,562
5,560
5,677
5,770
5,858
5,958
5,934
5,827
5,876
5,896
5,872
123
127
127
129
136
143
154
147
144
152
140
133
739
746
752
746
767
773
786
791
772
768
766
770
345
359
356
April 	
May	
June	
July        ..    	
355
367
374
370
370
369
October	
November  —
365
370
367
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00....
to $29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males   I Females
82
33
31
42
44
37
47
119
871
1,484
1,037
862
1,329
12
7
2
3
9
11
44
31
20
11
4
3
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males   j Females
5
3
5
5
2
9
54
106
129
132
329
2
7
23
64
65
59
64
56
24
4
1
2 Table No. 22
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Table No. 23
H 37
SHIP-BUILDING AND BOAT-BUILDING
Returns Covering 79 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)..
Total.
$791,038
1,649,991
18,457,469
$20,898,498
Employment
Month
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December...
Wage-earners
Males    Females
3,854
4,037
4,273
4,654
4,537
4,445
4,474
4,295
4,391
4,654
4,858
4,928
5
4
5
7
10
II
11
9
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
248
262
258
260
268
266
278
282
290
298
308
311
134
130
136
137
138
141
146
156
149
155
162
158
Classified Weekly Earnings
SMELTING AND CONCENTRATING
Returns Covering 9 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $1,564,197
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.       6,456,989
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    24,420,366
Total.
$32,441,552
Employment
Month
January	
February	
March  _
April	
May	
June	
July.	
August	
September	
October.	
November	
December	
Wage-earners
Males    Females
5,119
5,352
5,413
5,472
5,629
5,707
5,841
5,882
6,064
6,057
6,010
5,867
58
57
57
56
60
57
59
60
57
59
58
59
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
I
Males  I Females
I
984
1,003
1,022
1,027
1,051
1,079
1,094
1,129
1,127
1,118
1,132
1,143
262
265
261
263
274
305
314
327
318
330
335
340
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $25.00   ..   .
81
3
3
6
Under $25.00
29
10
$25.00 to $29.99	
33
3
4
5
$25.00 to $29.99	
56
27
30.00 to   34.99	
47
2
4
11
30.00 to   34.99	
8
	
2
1
35.00 to   39.99	
50
3
48
35.00 to   39.99	
27
4
23
40.00 to   44.99	
77
1
3
43
40.00 to   44.99	
9
9
1
39
45.00 to   49.99	
62
1
9
18
45.00 to   49.99	
24
	
79
50.00 to   54.99	
77
8
9
50.00 to   54.99	
37
2
53
55.00 to   59.99	
76
16
8
55.00 to   59.99	
35
4
7
46
60.00 to   69.99	
296
	
44
13
60.00 to   69.99	
368
9
35
48
70.00 to   79.99	
812
	
16
1
70.00 to   79.99	
2,922
1
119
33
80.00 to   89.99 —
1,615
2
46
2
80.00 to   89.99 .
1,759
.    .
168
7
90.00 to   99.99	
1,206
61
90.00 to   99.99	
713
	
194
1
100.00 and over	
887
	
88
	
100.00 and over
243
	
600
3 H 38
Table No. 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 25
STREET-RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns Covering 108 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers  	
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc 	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)... 	
Total...
$3,752,457
14,858,726
34,627,518
$53,238,701
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
6,042
3,253
1,943
1,739
6,162
3,027
1,977
1,730
March	
6,269
3,108
1,999
1,718
April 	
6,602
3,144
2,019
1,762
May 	
6,709
3,214
2,145
1,794
June— 	
6,879
3,231
2,205
1,883
July 	
7,100
3,384
2,245
1,930
7,055
3,372
2,289
1,917
September	
6,967
3,351
2,318
1,919
October	
7,021
3,378
2,282
1,902
November _	
7,092
3,342
2,323
1,935
December 	
6,935
3,377
2,350
1,965
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 .
to $29.99
to 34.99.
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males
145
41
28
71
91
141
175
208
1,581
1,782
1,120
1,296
698
Females
130
6
706
407
722
311
724
195
42
27
7
5
1
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
44
4
10
6
33
32
117
120
352
334
318
287
743
Females
29
10
46
261
422
272
343
267
241
64
24
WOOD-MANUFACTURING  (N.E.S.)
Returns Covering 173 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $2,090,004
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.       2,235,986
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)...     24,864,698
Total.
$29,190,688
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Males    Females
January	
February-
March 	
April—	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September .
October .	
November .
December ..
5,804
5,835
5,852
6,044
6,205
6,341
6,670
6,891
6,879
6,937
6,779
6,409
857
862
862
871
892
907
902
889
878
895
879
846
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
287
286
264
271
284
295
294
296
297
304
306
307
187
189
182
184
179
193
190
195
200
199
197
194
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 ...
to $29.99
to 34.99.
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 69.99
to 79.99
to 89.99
to 99.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males
242
40
72
77
116
94
203
468
3,360
1,590
581
296
380
Females
30
6
5
19
48
30
51
130
530
71
3
3
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
7
3
9
41
47
50
37
102
Females
4
2
8
20
27
38
31
25
32
11
1
1
1 STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
H 39
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES
Returns Covering 9,570 Firms
Total Salary and Wage Payments during Twelve Months Ended
December 31st, 1956
Officers, superintendents, and managers...
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)..
Returns received too late to be included in above summary-
Transcontinental railways (ascertained payroll) 	
$89,769,149
113,108,826
647,456,424
$2,010,121
49,813,299
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers covered by the survey but not filing returns,
and additional services not included in the tables—namely, Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, and miscellaneous (estimated payroll)  —   	
497,842,181
$850,334,399
$549,665,601
Total..
$1,400,000,000
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
January—
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July.	
August	
September-
October.	
November-
December...
137,880
140,930
145,022
152,721
161,313
165,522
169,979
171,470
167,566
164,606
159,379
147,050
13,704
13,468
13,771
14,218
15,081
16,444
18,817
19,723
19,606
17,653
15,431
13,965
16,286
16,450
16,505
16,664
17,145
17,432
17,650
17,905
17,980
17,912
17,977
17,979
11,324
11,401
11,389
11,597
11,894
12,264
12,545
12,634
12,583
12,666
12,789
12,799
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of Employment of Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males
Females
6,079
2,516
1,887
1,678
2,095
3,170
2,485
2,900
3,916
3,550
4,338
2,672
7,796
2,905
11,563
1,500
43,327
1,759
38,600
559
27,969
165
21,183
67
28,484
116
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Under
$25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
100.00
$25.00 weekly..
to $29.99....	
to   34.99.	
to   39.99	
to   44.99	
to   49.99.	
to   54.99 	
to   59.99 	
to   69.99	
to   79.99	
to   89.99	
to   99.99	
and over 	
Totals	
199,722
23,557
257
100
203
255
407
526
786
924
2,563
2,583
2,640
2,185
4,635
18,064
549
287
797
1,448
2,358
2,270
1,990
1,279
1,325
470
172
50
57
13,052"" H 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Hours of Work Act
The average normal working-week of 41.34 hours as reported for all industrial
workers in the 1955 survey was the lowest yet recorded in this section of the Report.
Following an amendment to the " Hours of Work Act " which became effective in 1946,
the general trend has been toward a shorter work-week, which may be noted in the average figures for subsequent years mentioned in the data below.
During one week of normal employment in each industry, the average working-time
is reported, and a single figure based on a summary of all returns is retained as an annual
indicator of the general trend in hours of work.
For the year 1956 now under review, the average industrial work-week was computed at 41.36 hours, a fraction above the record low mark of 41.34 set in 1955. Comparative average figures for the years 1930 to 1956 were as follows:—
1930 	
1931 	
1932 	
1933 	
1934 	
1935	
1936 .
1937
1938 .
1939 .
1940 .
1941 .
1942 .
1943 .
48.62
1944
47.37
1945
47.69
1946
47.35
1947
47.32
1948
47.17
1949
47.63
1950
47.25
1951
46.84
1952
47.80
1953
46.91
1954
46.90
1955
48.12
1956
47.19
. 46.02
45.59
. 43.63
. 42.24
. 42.21
42.24
41.89
. 42.01
. 42.00
41.60
. 41.37
. 41.34
. 41.36
The table to follow sets out for each year from 1947 to 1956 the total number of
firms covered in the hours-of-work inquiry, together with the number of wage-earners
reported by all firms filing returns, and the proportion of the reported total in line with
the legal maximum of 44 hours or less, and the percentage still remaining in excess of
this limit.
Comparative Figures, 1947 to 1956 (Wage-earners)
Year
Firms
Rep'orting
Wage-earners
Reported
44 Hours or
Less per
Week
In Excess of
44 Hours
1947  	
8,410
8,736
9,020
9,509
9,635
9,200
9,008
9,076
9,537
9,570
159,300
165,411
161,945
169,342
178,909
180,107
172,174
169,757
177,025
189,578
Per Cent
80.63
81.59
81.86
83.06
82.24
83.20
85.56
85.93
84.75
84.68
Per Cent
19.37
1948   	
1949    	
1950    	
1951 	
1952	
18.41
18.14
16.94
17.76
16.80
1953    .        	
1954          	
1955 -	
1956   —  - 	
14.44
14.07
15.25
15.32
In completing the section of the questionnaire relating to hours of work, the 9,570
employers filing returns for 1956 reported a total of 189,578 wage-earners, male and
female.
Working-time in most instances showed little change from the previous year, with
slight increases for some industries offset by further decreases in the average working-
hours for others.
The average work-week in 1956 for wage-earners was shorter in eleven of the
twenty-nine industrial classifications covered in the hours^of-work inquiry, while for
clerical employees average working-time decreased in nineteen of the industries listed.
Increases were noted generally in the construction industries, builders' materials,
metal trades, ship-building and boat-building, oil refining and distributing, and others HOURS OF WORK ACT'
H 41
in lesser degree, but were met with corresponding decreases in working-time for the forest
industries, coast shipping, metal-mining, and various manufacturing industries.
Increased activity in some industries normally accounting for a large proportion of
the over-all employment was responsible for a further slight rise in the percentage of the
total wage-earner group working in excess of the 44-hour week. The 1956 percentage
above the 44-hour mark was 15.32 per cent, while some 84.68 per cent of the 189,578
wage-earners reported were shown as working at or below the 44-hour limit.
In relating to clerical workers, the hours-of-work survey showed a total of 29,811
in this classification for 1956, as compared with 26,855 clerical employees covered in
1955. Most industries reported shorter working-time for clerical workers, the 1956
average week for this entire group being computed at 37.75 hours, down from 38.07 for
an average week during the previous year.
Average Weekly Hours of Work, by Industries
Separate information dealing with the hours of work of wage-earners and clerical
workers is presented in tables which follow, the figures representing the 1956 average for
each of the various industrial classifications covered, in comparison with related averages
computed for previous years. H 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Average Weekly Hours of Work
Wage-earners
Industry
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
40.39
42.98
44.42
40.08
44.26
43.91
40.29
43.47
39.16
39.95
38.17
41.26
40.28
41.77
42.61
42.18
41.07
39.62
41.39
45.04
40.84
43.40
40.25
37.98
40.82
41.48
40.07
38.49
40.22
40.50
42.26
44.78
39.97
42.84
41.86
41.56
43.05
39.391
40.03
37.57
40.72
40.76
42.11
42.59
42.29
41.05
39.68
42.10
43.88
40.39
43.88
40.711
37.36
41.75
41.08
40.89
39.98
40.04
40.21
41.59
43.79
36.26
43.28
41.25
40.52
42.91
39.15
40.10
38.20
39.21
40.39
42.09
42.23
42.30
41.06
40.08
41.15
43.49
40.39
43.90
40.79
37.91
42.74
42.08
41.79
38.46
40.21
40.28
41.00
42.92
40.08
42.60
41.51
40.75
42.65
38.75
40.45
37.58
39.32
40.68
42.05
42.49
41.26
40.99
39.82
40.97
44.23
40.48
44.14
39.87
37.07
42.42
41.16
41.61
38.63
40.87
40.61
Builders' materials  -   	
41.76
43.19
40.33
41.72
42.09
40.91
41.78
39.27
House furnishings    ...	
39.81
36.10
39.62
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing	
Lumber industries—
Logging      —..   ..
40.22
42.20
41.81
40.97
Sawmills.   .	
40.68
39.84
41.45
42.93
40.58
44.74
39.97
37.08
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
42.67
42.85
41.56
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc 	
38.74
39.64
Clerical Workers
37.74
37.22
39.42
38.90
38.39
40.11
38.99
40.07
39.83
39.43
37.38
41.69
37.51
39.16
38.57
40.33
39.36
38.44
39.68
42.50
38.87
36.63
38.53
37.08
38.10
38.33
41.08
35.74
38.10
37.80
36.80
40.07
39.68
38.37
39.08
39.09
40.45
39.221
39.04
37.09
41.22
36.46
41.04
39.89
40.46
38.51
37.24
39.39
42.17
38.73
36.81
38.281
36.42
38.50
37.47
40.41
35.93
37.69
38.30
36.43
39.71
39.81
37.82
38.07
38.46
39.33
39.06
38.23
37.05
40.23
38.43
40.32
39.66
41.42
37.55
36.04
39.02
41.75
38.15
36.90
37.83
36.45
37.67
37.16
40.71
35.89
37.11
38.04
36.64
39.38
39.82
38.00
37.77
38.64
39.04
38.59
38.13
37.54
39.62
37.87
39.51
39.71
40.96
36.91
37.13
38.73
41.97
38.05
37.20
36.99
38.39
38.07
36.92
39.60
35.87
36.12
37.91
37.09
38.52
40.00
37.32
38.04
38.45
Food-products manufacturing   .  	
39.07
38.57
37.84
Jewellery manufacturing and repair    . ..
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing... —   	
37.13
40.17
35.78
Lumber industries—
Logging    —
39.10
38.27
Planing-mills    —	
39.56
36.80
37.81
38.59
41.18
37.95
36.62
37.29
36.25
Pulp and paper manufacturing... —	
37.08
37.11
40.42
35.41
36.34
Revised since 1953 Report. STATISTICS OF CIVIL AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS
H 43
Statistics of Civil and Municipal Workers
Statistical returns are received from cities and municipalities reporting in the regular
annual survey, the returns including payroll information concerning workers employed
in public works, generation and distribution of light and power, and similar operations
owned and operated by the reporting bodies.
While the totals appearing in this section are already included with statistical summaries appearing elsewhere in this Report (as a portion of the total Provincial payroll),
they are shown separately in this section in comparison with similar figures for previous
years.
A total of 147 civic and municipal administrations completed returns in time for
tabulation in the 1956 survey, reporting labour costs amounting to $23,381,573, this
figure representing an increase of $2,023,218 from the payroll total of $21,358,355 noted
in 1955.
Comparative payroll totals reported for each of the three main employee classifications covered in the 1956 survey of civic and municipal workers are shown in the following
table, together with similar figures for 1954 and 1955:—
1954
1955
1956
$2,033,828
2,813,855
14,903,062
$2,169,471
2,613,945
16,574,939
$2,595,703
3,512,842
17,273,028
Totals
$19,750,745
$21,358,355
$23,381,573
Employment totals of persons on civic and municipal payrolls showed considerable
increase in 1956, particularly with respect to the number of clerical workers.
During the high employment month of July, 1956, the total workers reported in all
categories reached a high of 6,919, some 8 per cent above the total of 6,403 reported as
the July total in 1955.
Separate monthly employment totals for wage-earners and clerical workers in civic
and municipal occupations are shown in the table following, with comparative totals for
the preceding year 1955. H 44 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Employment Totals1 of Civic and Municipal Workers, 1955 and 1956
Month
Wage-earners
Males        Females
Clerks,
Stenographers, etc.
Males      Females
1956
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks,
Stenographers, etc.
Males      Females
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July.	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
4,536
4,550
4,648
4,829
5,050
5,225
5,356
5,328
5,164
4,979
4,771
4,661
54
62
49
78
107
126
142
146
61
69
54
68
551
557
557
557
564
567
580
577
579
577
579
583
296
297
299
303
304
322
325
329
322
331
334
331
4,624
4,547
4,754
4,987
5,262
5,424
5,570
5,514
5,447
5,173
5,065
4,869
63
57
63
63
114
166
187
157
67
66
67
67
658
682
683
685
706
736
746
750
752
746
753
760
379
373
370
375
392
408
416
410
410
419
420
416
1 Totals represent the number of employees on payroll on the last day of each month or nearest working-date.
A percentage distribution of the total male wage-earners on civic and municipal
payrolls is shown below, in relation to their weekly earnings during the years 1954, 1955,
and 1956.
Weekly Earnings
Percentage of Employees
1954
1955
1956
TTndfr $?5 on
2.63
1.23
1.23
1.06
2.45
6.74
7.88
24.52
35.49
10.34
3.93
1.95
0.55
3.55
0.64
1.09
1.76
3.21
4.50
9.63
14.26
40.56
11.89
4.16
2.33
2.42
4.36
$?5 0(1 tr. $79 99
0.80
Id (into    34 99
0.71
35 nn tn    3999
0.58
40n0fn   44 99
1.90
4Snntn    49 99
2.36
so on to   54 99
9.11
55 nn tn    59 99
10.15
fin nn tn  fi9 99
42.01
70.00 to   79.99                                               .   	
15.86
sn nn tn  s9 99
6.82
9n nn to   99 99
3.14
100.00 and over.  	
2.20
As indicated in the above wage distribution, the upward movement of employment
percentages in the higher wage brackets was responsible for increased average earnings,
both for the wage-earner group and also for clerical employees.
Average weekly earnings for civic and municipal workers in the wage-earner classification reached a new high mark of $64.08 for 1956, increased by $2.13 from the average figure of $61.95 recorded in this section for the previous year.
Pay-cheques for clerical staffs were also considerably higher than during 1955.
For male employees in clerical occupations, the average climbed to $69.26 in 1956, up
from $65.20 noted for an average week during the previous year. For female workers
in clerical occupations, the average pay-cheque amounted to $46.52, as compared with
an average of $44.73 for this class of employee in 1955.
Shorter working-time was again apparent for both wage-earners and clerical employees on civic and municipal payrolls. During 1956 the average work-week for the
wage-earner section was computed at 39.95 hours, down from 40.11 hours noted for a
similar week in 1955. The average weekly hours for clerical workers was recorded at
36.07, also representing a further decrease from the 36.69 hours shown for this group
during 1955.
J SUMMARY OF NEW LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR H 45
Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1957)
"Annual Holidays Act, 1956, Amendment Act, 1957'
Minor amendments were made to this Act to (1) enable an employee to be granted
an annual holiday before it has been earned, and (2) ensure that the employee's pay in
lieu of an annual holiday will be paid in one payment, and (3) clarify the computation
of holiday pay for employees when the new Act takes effect July 1st, 1957.
"Blind Workmen's Compensation Act"
This Act is designed to provide special protection for employers of blind workmen
and to encourage the employment of blind workmen by relieving employers of the apprehension they might otherwise be under of employing blind workmen, and thereby increasing the possibility of accident and cost of compensation. It is similar to legislation in
effect in several other Provinces.
"Boiler and Pressure-vessel Act Amendment Act, 1957"
This amendment enables a second-class engineer to take charge of a steam plant of
a capacity of up to 1,000 horse-power, which is desirable in view of the larger capacity
of the new steam plants.
" Deceased Workmen's Wages Act Amendment
Act, 1957"
Under the " Deceased Workmen's Wages Act" the widow of a deceased workman
is required to produce a certificate of a Justice of the Peace setting forth that the Justice
is satisfied that the person claiming to be the widow of the deceased is in fact his widow
before she is entitled to the deceased workman's wages. As the services of a Justice of
the Peace were not always conveniently available, this amendment was made so that a
widow might obtain a similar certificate from a Magistrate.
" Indian Advisory Act"
This Act replaces the " Indian Inquiry Act." The main changes are that in this Act
no limit is placed on the number of members on the Advisory Committee, and any other
duties of the former Committee have now been given to the Director. The Director replaces the Secretary under the former Act and assumes those duties which were performed
by the Secretary. Many of the duties commonly incumbent upon the Committee were,
in fact, carried out by the Secretary, and in this Act those duties have been specifically
assigned to the Director.
"Mechanics' Lien Act, 1956, Amendment Act, 1957"
The time-limit of ninety days within which to seize an automobile for an account
owing to a garage-keeper was found to be impracticable, especially in outlying areas. This
amendment will allow six months in which to locate the automobile.
A further amendment provides that the services of bailiffs properly appointed may
be utilized for the purpose of seizing a motor-vehicle, as vesting that authority only in the
Sheriff or Sheriff's bailiff created certain hardship in outlying areas of the Province. H 46 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
"Truck Act Amendment Act, 1957"
The " Truck Act" is very specific and rigid regarding deductions that may be made
by employers from employees' wages. Some alleviation from the stringency of the Act
was considered desirable, and in order to permit such deductions as were authorized by
a workman's written assignment for payments with respect to charitable organizations,
pensions and superannuation plans, etc., and any plan which in the opinion of the Board
of Industrial Relations is for the benefit of the employee and is authorized in writing by
the Board, this amendment was made. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 47
Report of the Board of Industrial Relations
Members of the Board
Chairman:
W. H. Sands, Deputy
Minister of Labour   -      -    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Members:
Fraudena Eaton
G. A. Little -
H. J. Young -
C. Murdoch -
P. Baskin
D. J. Baldwin
Secretary:
C. R. Margison
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
-    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Offices
Head office -----    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch office      - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Regional offices:
Court-house, Nanaimo. Department of Labour, Prince George.
Court-house, Kelowna. Department of Labour, Terrace.
Court-house, Nelson. Department of Labour, Cranbrook.
523 Columbia St., Kamloops.   Department of Labour, Mission.
Department of Labour, Dawson Creek.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the twenty-third annual report of the Board
of Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1956.
Meetings and Delegations
During the year the Board held fifty meetings, forty-nine of which were held in the
City of Vancouver and one in the City of Victoria.
Public hearings were held by the Board in Vancouver and Victoria in connection
with Minimum Wage Orders applicable to bus operators, electronic technicians, first-aid
attendants, the mercantile industry, milk sales drivers, the office occupation, and resort
hotels in unorganized territory.
Orders and Regulations Made during 1956
Minimum Wage Orders
1. Bicycle-riders and Foot-messengers on Delivery—Male and Female Minimum
Wage Order No. 29 (1956).—This is the first Order made specifically to cover bicycle-
riders and foot-messengers. Such employees were previously included in the application
of the Minimum Wage Order applicable to employees in the mercantile industry. It
establishes a minimum wage of 50 cents per hour for employees covered by the Order.
2. Cook- and Bunk-house Occupation in Unorganized Territory—Male and Female
Minimum Wage Order No. 4 (1956).—The previous Order had been in effect for over H 48 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
two years and had presented many administrative problems, particularly in connection
with establishing the overtime pay to be allowed employees in lieu of accumulated rest
periods. Both employers and employees' representatives had requested the Board to
amend the Order to clarify many of the problems that had arisen.
Due to the nature of the occupation, it is extremely difficult to arbitrarily restrict the
employees' hours of work and at the same time afford a certain amount of protection in
this connection. Many logging camps, fishing stations, and mining camps are in isolated
areas where it is impossible to employ additional staff for short periods in order to give
the employees time off. The Order, therefore, provides a certain flexibility with respect to
the payment of penalty rates which, except in certain instances, do not apply until the
employee has worked in excess of 191 hours in a month. In exceptional cases the Board
is also given authority to vary the conditions under which penalty rates become payable.
A new clause is included in the Order which clarifies the manner in which an
employee's hourly rate is to be established when he is paid by the day, week, or month.
3. Electronic Technicians—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 7 (1956).
—By this Order the minimum wage for radio and electronic technicians was increased
from 80 cents to $1.50 per hour, which rate is in line with minimum wage rates established by the Board for other tradesmen.
4. First-aid Attendants—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 39 (1956).
—Following representations by the Industrial First-aid Attendants' Association of British
Columbia, the International Woodworkers of America, and representatives of the employers' associations, the Board established a minimum wage of $1.25 per hour for first-
aid attendants.
5. Manufacturing Industry—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 25
(1956).—Following public hearings this Order was made, which includes in its application employees previously covered by the Order applicable to the baking industry.
Subject to the " Equal Pay Act," a minimum wage of 75 cents per hour is established for
male employees and 60 cents per hour for female employees, with lesser rates for a six-
week period applicable to employees classified as learners.
6. Mercantile Industry—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 24 (1956).
—This Order increased the minimum wage from 47 to 65 cents per hour and reduced the
period for which learners' permits will be issued from six months to six weeks, which is
the same period established by the Board for employees in the manufacturing industry.
Regulations made under the " Hours of Work Act" permit certain classes of employees in drug-stores, retail florists' establishments, and mercantile establishments to
exceed the eight-hour day and the forty-four-hour week under certain conditions. Previously, multiple rates did not apply to such employees until their hours of work exceeded
those authorized by these regulations. This practice has been removed under the Order,
and employees who work in excess of eight hours in the day and forty-four hours in the
week under these regulations are required to be paid multiple rates for the additional
hours.
7. Office Occupation—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 34 (1956).—
Prior to receiving submissions from interested parties with respect to the revision of the
Order applicable to employees in the office occupation, a proposed draft was forwarded
to interested associations and organizations for their consideration, as it was intended to
broaden the application of the Order to include male employees in its coverage and consolidate the Office Order with the Telephone and Telegraph Order. The circulation of
the draft order created considerable interest, and the several hearings held by the Board
were well attended by representatives of employers and employees. At the time of the
hearings, no opposition was made to the inclusion of male employees in the application
of the Office Order. The Order establishes a minimum wage of 75 cents per hour for
employees in this occupation. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 49
8. Pipe-line Construction Industry—Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No.
28 (1956).—Due to the increased activity in the construction of pipe-lines and due to
the special problems connected therewith, a new and separate Order was made applicable
to employees in this industry. Representations were made to the Board that due to the
nature of the work it is impossible to arbitrarily restrict the hours of work of employees
in his type of work, and the Order does not therefore impose any limitation in this connection. As the representatives of the employers and employees agreed that overtime
should be payable after forty hours in the week, the Order provides for the payment of
penalty rates for hours worked in excess of forty in the week, which is a condition not
included in any other Order of the Board. Penalty rates are also applicable for work
performed in excess of 8 hours in the day.   (See also Regulation No. 42 below.)
Regulations Made pursuant to the " Hours of Work Act"
Mercantile Industry—Christmas Regulation.—This regulation permitted employees
in retail establishments in the mercantile industry to work up to ten hours in the day on
any two days of the week ended December 22nd, 1956, and fours in excess of the weekly
limit during that week.
Regulation No. 21 (1956)—Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Industry.—This regulation
exempted the industry from the operation of the " Hours of Work Act" for the period
June 1st, 1956, to and including November 30th, 1956.
Regulation No. 43—Logging Industry.—This regulation allowed employees in the
logging industry to work forty-eight hours per week during the period April 19th to and
including November 30th, 1956, provided the daily limit of eight hours was not exceeded.
Regulation No. 42 (1957)—Pipe-line Construction Industry.—This regulation exempted employees in the pipe-line construction industry as defined from the operation of
the " Hours of Work Act" for the calendar year 1957.
(A summary of the above-mentioned orders and regulations, together with existing
and new orders and regulations made prior to the Report going to press, may be obtained
from the Department of Labour free of charge upon request.)
Statistics Covering Women and Girl Employees
The vital role of women workers in industry and business has long since been established in the history of our growing Provincial economy.
Improvement in their working conditions, the advance of opportunities for their
profitable employment, and development of their welfare and general standards of living
have become a story of successful endeavour and achievement in the annals of the British
Columbia Department of Labour.
From information obtained in the yearly survey of women workers in occupations
within the coverage of minimum-wage legislation, the section to follow contains a five-
year summarization for each basic classification, showing comparative figures with reference to employment and firms reporting, weekly payroll totals, average weekly earnings,
and hours of work. H 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Reporting on the period of greatest employment, a total of 8,107 firms completed
returns in the 1956 survey, the reports indicating a summary total of 70,299 women
workers on payroll during one week of that year. Coverage of the survey was a little
below that of the previous year, the above figures comparing with some 70,776 female
workers reported by 8,170 employers in 1955.
Mercantile Industry (Female)
1956
1955
1954
1953
1952
Number of firms reporting—
Total number of employees-
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week_
1,694
13,088
$442,336.00
$33.80
34.04
1,698
14,374
(,771.00
$34.00
36.05
1,717
13,728
$464,712.00
$33.85
37.08
1,813
12,206
$384,169.00
$31.47
36.31
1,889
12,534
$364,716.00
$29.10
35.56
The week of greatest employment in the mercantile industry is generally during the
Christmas period, and, depending on the extent of casual employment at that time, extra
staff, overtime hours, shorter working-time, and such emergent factors, considerable fluctuation may occur in the recorded average figures for this industry.
The mercantile industry continues to account for the second largest single section
of female employment, the 1,694 firms in this classification reporting a total of 13,088
women workers on payroll during the week of the survey in 1956.
Average weekly earnings for mercantile employees was a little below the high figure
established during the previous year, the 1956 average being recorded at $33.80, as compared with $34 in 1955, the drop being largely due to shorter working-time during the
survey period. For the week of the survey, average working-time was recorded at 34.04
hours, as compared with 36.05 hours noted for the previous year.
Laundry, Cleani
ng and Dyeing Industries (Female)
1956
1955
1954
1953
1952
234
2,682
$95,712.00
$35.69
37.34
236
2,797
$97,185.00
$34.75
37.69
248
2,604
$90,153.00
$34.62
37.46
235
2,739
$90,398.00
$33.00
38.07
258
2,743
$87,558.00
$31.92
39.41
Average weekly earnings^	
Average hours worked per week 	
Laundry, cleaning and dyeing establishments reporting in the 1956 survey numbered
234, with a total employment of 2,682 female employees, this total comparing with 2,797
women workers shown in 1955, when the number of firms reporting was a little higher.
For laundry occupations the average weekly earnings for female workers increased
to $35.69 in 1956, from $34.75 recorded in this industry during the previous year.
Average working-time in this classification was slightly less than during 1955, the
1956 average week being computed at 37.34 hours, as compared with the previous year's
figure of 37.69. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 51
Hotel and Catering
ndustry (Female)
1956
1955
1954
1953
1952
Number of firms reporting   __„.
1,241
11,765
$364,994.00
$31.02
35.11
1,237
11,197
$340,848.00
$30.44
36.10
1,276
11,328
$335,405.00
$29.61
36.55
1,296
10,807
$313,723.00
$29.03
37.22
1,351
10,620
$288,432.00
$27.16
37.63
The hotel and catering section again accounted for one of the larger groups of female
employment, with a total of 1,241 firms reporting for 1956, a little above the previous
year's figure. Summary total of female workers shown in this classification increased to
11,765, compared with employment of 11,197 recorded in similar occupations during
1955.
Higher earnings and shorter working-time continued to be apparent for women
workers in hotel and catering occupations, with average weekly earnings increasing to
$31.02 in 1956, up from $30.44 noted for 1955. The average work-week was computed
at 35.11, considerably lower than the average of 36.10 hours listed for this group in 1955.
Office Occupation (Female)
1956        1         1955
1
1954
1953
1952
Number of firms reporting  	
1
3,519                 3,538
23.050                21.214
$8
3,483
20,069
56,551.00
$42.68
37.66
3,588
19,143
$781,343.00
$40.82
37.65
3,555
18,851
$1,059,939.00
$45.98
37.50
$924,867.00
$732,206.00
S43.60  1
$38.84
Average hours worked per week  	
37.30
38.38
Female employment in office occupations continued to increase during 1956, the
3,519 firms who reported women in clerical jobs accounting for a total of 23,050 employees in this type of work, a substantial increase from the 21,214 included in the returns
for 1955, and representing almost 33 per cent of the total coverage of the entire survey.
For office-workers increasing employment opportunities in 1956 also meant higher
earnings, the average weekly salary for female office-workers rising to $45.98, increased
from $43.60 noted for the previous year.
Average working-time remained almost at the 1955 level, showing only a fractional
increase to 37.50 hours from 37.30 previously recorded.
Hairdressing Occupation (Female)
1955
1954
1953
1952
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings  ...
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week.
92
380
$17,834.00
$46.93
38.78
95
375
$16,025.00
$42.73
38.74
97
345
$13,844.00
$40.13
38.02
97
283
$10,447.00
$36.92
38.83
113
308
$11,116.00
$36.09
38.85
The annual survey of hairdressing and beauty-parlour establishments is restricted
to only those firms reporting employees, and as a large percentage of firms in this business
are owner-operated and employ no outside help, the group included in the above figures
remains comparatively small. H 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Employment reported in beauty-parlour and hairdressing occupations, however, has
continued to show an increase during the past three years, and in spite of slightly less
firms reporting, the 1956 total weekly payroll for this group was well ahead of the previous year.
Average weekly earnings of female operators in hairdressing and beauty-parlour
occupations increased to $46.93 in 1956, to set a new high mark for this occupation.
Comparative weekly earnings were $42.73 during the previous year, and an average of
$40.13 for the week under survey in 1954.
Working-time in this classification remained almost at the level of the previous
year, the average work-week being computed at 38.78 hours in 1956, compared with
38.74 hours previously noted.
Fishing Industry (Female)
1956
1955
1954
1953
1952
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees-.	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings 	
Average hours worked per week-
20
1,629
$70,579.00
$43.33
30.92
21 38
2,108 2,291
S.449.00 j   $106,559.00
$32.47 I             $46.51
26.63 38.67
30
2,424
$99,940.00
$41.23
38.72
26
2,058
$92,234.00
$44.82
39.67
I
Broad fluctuations in numbers employed, time worked, and resultant average earnings are common in the section dealing with the fishing industry, largely due to seasonal
variation in the size of the catch, processing difficulties, and various emergent factors
peculiar to the industry itself.
The 1956 survey covered a period of lower employment than during the previous
year, with a total of 1,629 female workers reported by the twenty firms filing returns, as
compared with employment of 2,108 females shown in 1955, when the firm count was
twenty-one.
In addition to full-time employees, piece-workers are used extensively during seasonal
processing operations in this industry, where the employment of large numbers of workers
for comparatively short working periods is often necessary.
Average earnings during the week under survey in 1956 was considerably higher
than in 1955, the 1956 figure showing at $43.33, up from $32.47 for a somewhat shorter
work-week during the pervious year. Compared with previous averages, the higher
earnings in 1956 were due in part to a longer work-week, the average working-time for
women workers in the fishing industry during the survey period being computed at 30.92
hours, increased from 26.63 hours for the week under survey in 1955.
Telephone
and Telegraph
Occupation (Female)
1956
1955
1954
1953
1952
318
4,233
$180,335.00
$42.60
37.47
310
4,194
$175,661.00
$41.88
37.87
264
4,507
$186,712.00
$41.43
37.73
253
4,523
$184,752.00
$40.85
38.06
$143,582.00
$36.33
Firms reporting female employees in telephone and telegraph occupations continued
on the increase during 1956, a total of 318 firms filing returns in 1956, as compared with
310 previously noted. The returns indicated a total of 4,233 women workers, up from
4,194 reported in 1955. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 53
Not restricted to firms in the actual business of communications, the above tabulations are also inclusive of earnings and hours-of-work information submitted by firms
employing females in switchboard work, and similar occupations closely related to the
coverage of the telephone and telegraph industry.
Earnings continued to rise in this section, the 1956 average wage figure climbing to
a record high of $42.60 for switchboard occupations, up from $41.88 shown in 1955
and $41.43 noted for 1954. Despite the higher earnings which were generally apparent,
there was no corresponding increase in working-time, the average work-week actually
being recorded at 37.47 hours, a little below the average of 37.87 hours listed for the
previous year.
Manufacturing Industry (Female)
1956
1955
1954
1953
1952
703
7,916
$348,400.00
$44.01
37.91
747
7,779
$331,754.00
$42.65
38.41
746
7,468
$302,609.00
$40.52
38.24
750
7,758
$306,103.00
$39.46
38.72
781
8,044
Total weekly earnings	
$306,820.00
$38.14
38.62
Employment and payrolls were generally higher in the manufacturing industries, the
1956 returns indicating a continuation of the upward trend of increasing activity noted
during the previous year. Although the total of firms reporting was a little below the
1955 coverage, employment summaries of female workers gained considerably, with
a total of 7,916 being shown for 1956, up from 7,779 reported during the previous survey.
Payroll for the week under review amounted to $348,400, representing a per capita
average weekly wage of $44.01 for the 7,916 female workers included in this classification. Compared with the average for a similar week in 1955, the 1956 figure was $1.36
higher than the previous year.
A slight decrease in the weekly working-hours for manufacturing occupations
occurred in 1956, the figure being recorded at 37.91 hours, down slightly from the 38.41
hours shown for this group in 1955.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female)
1956
1955
1954
1953
1952
86
4,685
$184,402.00
$39.36
42.61
79
5,703
$216,078.00
$37.89
41.73
85
4,992
$183,278.00
$36.71
42.11
87
5,533
$198,886.00
$35.95
41.99
Total number of employees  	
5,688
$202,265,00
$35.56
43 94
Average weekly earnings 	
Adverse effects of weather and resultant crop conditions in some sections of the
fruit and vegetable industries were apparent in the summary figures for 1956. Considerable variation was again noted in labour activity in processing establishments, the 1956
totals of female employment here suffering a sharp decrease in comparison with the
previous year.
Compared with some 5,703 females reported in 1955, the eighty-six firms completing
returns for 1956 showed a reduced total of 4,685 women workers on payroll during the
week under survey in that year.
Earnings continued to advance considerably for those employed, although with
fewer workers on payroll, individual time worked was also somewhat above 1955
averages. H 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Average weekly pay-cheque for female employees in fruit- and vegetable-processing
operations was computed at $39.36 for 1956, up from $37.89 during the previous year.
Working-time during the week under survey in 1956 increased to 42.61 hours, as compared with 41.73 hours noted for an average week in this section during 1955.
Transportation Industry (Female)
Number of firms reporting ...
Total number of employees..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week..
1956
I
1955
61
159
$6,288.00
$39.55
38.19
57
128
1,560.00
$35.63
38.64
1954
1953
58
135
$4,689.00
$34.73
37.39
i
48
122
$3,970.00
$32.54
38.11
1952
58
157
$4,789.00
$30.50
39.38
Some increase during 1956 was apparent in the number of female workers employed
in occupations relating to the transportation industry, a total of 159 employees in this
category being reported in the current survey, increased from 128 noted in 1955, although
a slight increase was also shown in the total firms reporting.
Women workers included in this classification are generally considered as engaged
in delivery, trucking, messenger work, and occupations of a similar nature.
While employment in this group remained small, considerably higher earnings were
evident for transportation workers in 1956, the weekly average for females in this section
rising sharply to $39.55 for the period under review, increased from $35.63 shown for
a similar week in 1955.
Average working-time was a little below the previous year, the 1956 work-week
being recorded at 38.19 hours, down slightly from the 38.64 hours listed for an average
week in 1955.
Public Places of Amusement (Female)
1956
1955
1954
1953
1952
103
540
$13,427.00
$24.86
27.40
108
709
$19,447.00
$27.43
31.27
107
606
$13,258.00
$21.88
27.14
108
646
$14,336.00
$22.19
28.41
107
612
Total weekly earnings   	
$11,362.00
$18.57
26.20
Average hours worked per week 	
A total of 103 firms reported in the classification dealing with public places of
amusement, as compared with 108 submitting returns in this section during the previous
year. Compared with summary totals of female employment previously reported, the
1956 figures indicated some curtailment in operating activities for this group, the
employment figure decreasing to 540 female workers, from the high of 709 recorded
in 1955.
Included in the returns tabulated in this section are reports concerning females
employed as theatre ushers, check-room attendants, and in similar occupations in connection with swimming-pools, bowling-alleys, sports centres, and other such establishments.
Due to the casual and part-time nature of the employment mentioned, the weekly
averages of earnings and hours worked, as referred to in the table above, should therefore
be considered as representative of a partial week, rather than to full-time employment
comparable to other types of work.
Average working-time for the week under survey in this section was somewhat less
than during a similar period in 1955, with a resultant decrease in the average earnings
based on the shorter week.   Compared with the per capita weekly wage figure of $27.43
J BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 55
for employees in this classification during 1955, which was the highest year recorded,
average earnings for the week of the survey in 1956 declined to $24.86, based on a workweek of 27.40 hours, as against 31.27 hours noted for an average week during the
previous year.
Personal-service Occupations (Female)
1956
1955
1954
1953
36
172
$8,295.00
$48.23
34.79
44
198
$8,689.00
$43.88
37.22
32
166
$7,150.00
$43.07
39.11
26
66
$2,793.00
$42.32
36.98
The above table is based on information taken from the returns relating to female
workers in personal-service occupations, such as those engaged in the work of massage,
physiotherapy, chiropody, chiropractic, osteopathy, electrical treatments, general and
specialized therapeutics, and all work of a like nature.
Some difficulty arises in the correct classification of female workers in medical
offices where the employee may engage in personal-service work in addition to regular
clerical duties. The data should therefore be considered as a sampling in these specialized
occupations, rather than representing total coverage of any one group.
Average individual earnings of females classified as personal-service workers in
the 1956 survey increased to $48.23 for the week under review, up from $43.88 on
record for a similar period during the previous year.
Shorter working-time was apparent in this section, the average work-week showing
at 34.79 hours for 1956, down from 37.22 hours noted for employees in this classification
during 1955.
Summary of All Occupations (" Female Minimum Wage Act")
1956
1955
1954
1953
1952
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings — 	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week-
8,107
70,299
$2,792,541.00
$39.72
36.61
8,170
70,776
$2,692,334.00
$38.04
37.02
8,151
68,239
$2,564,920.00
$37.59
37.69
8,331
66,250
$2,390,860.00
$36.09
37.82
8,449
65,567
$2,245,080.00
$34.24
38.18
I
Summary totals of employment and earnings shown in the above table for 1956 were
based on returns from 8,107 firms reporting a total of 70,299 women employed in all
occupations within the scope of the survey.
Although the 1956 totals of firms reporting and recorded employment were down
appreciably from the 1955 level, higher average earnings and a shorter work-week
continued to be apparent for most female workers in occupations for which minimum
wages have been set by the Board.
During the survey week in 1956 a total payroll of $2,792,541 was reported for the
70,299 female workers employed, compared with $2,692,334 in salaries and wages paid
to 70,776 women employees during one week of the 1955 survey.
The single figure representing average per capita weekly earnings for female workers
in all occupations included in the survey climbed to a new high mark of $39.72 in 1956,
substantially above the previous year's figure of $38.04.
Minimum Wage Orders in effect during 1956 established a basic range of weekly
salaries for female employees from $17.60 to a high of $28.60 in one instance, and with
the computed average figure of $39.72 representing the 1956 weekly earnings for all H 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
occupations included in the survey, it is again apparent that earnings for female workers
in this Province continue at levels well above the legal minima set by the Board.
The average work-week for all female workers under survey dropped to an all-time
low of 36.61 hours in 1956, the shortest week yet recorded in the annual summary table.
The 1956 summary total of 70,299 female employees reported in the survey is
representative only of those workers in occupations and industries for which Minimum
Wage Orders have been set by the Board, and is not inclusive of farm-labourers, fruit-
pickers, or domestic servants, these occupations being exempt from coverage under the
provisions of the " Female Minimum Wage Act." Federal workers and bank employees
are also excluded from the coverage of the Provincial legislation.
Table Showing Comparative Relation of 1956 Earnings to Legal Minimum
Industry or Occupation
Number
of
Firms
Reporting
Number
of
Employees
Reported
Total
Weekly
Payroll
Legal
Minimum
Weekly
Wage for
Full-time
Employees
Actual
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Percentage
by Which
1956 Average
Earnings Exceed Legal
Minimum
Mercantile  	
Laundry  	
1,694
234
1,241
3,519
92
20
318
703
86
61
103
36
13,088
2,682
11,765
23,050
380
1,629
4,233
7,916
4,685
159
540
172
$442,336
95,712
364,994
1,059,939
17,834
70,579
180,335
348,400
184,402
6,288
13,427
8,295
$28,601
17.601
22.002
18.003
25.00*
19.205
20.16=
26.401
26.401
(•)
18.002
20.00s
$33.80
35.69
31.02
45.98
46.93
43.33
42.60
44.01
39.36
39.55
24.86'
48.23
18.2
102.8
41.0
Office                                .
155.4
Hairdressing
87.7
125.7
111.3
Manufacturing  ~	
66.7
49.1
(6)
38.17
Personal service  	
141.2
8,107
70,299
$2,792,541
$39.72
125.7
i Forty-four hours per week.
2 Forty to forty-four hours per week.
3 Thirty-six to forty-four hours per week.
4 Thirty-nine to forty-four hours per week.
5 Forty-eight hours per week.
6 In the transportation industry it is impracticable to set a weekly rate owing to the variation of minimum wages in
the Order, depending on whether the work in done on foot, on bicycle, by motor-cycle, or other types of motor-vehicles.
7 Earnings represent partial week only.
In relation to the established legal minimum for each occupational classification, the
above table shows the actual average weekly earnings in each case, also indicating to what
extent the 1956 figures exceed the basic rate. It will be noted that for all occupations
within the coverage of the 1956 survey the average weekly wage figure of $39.72 mentioned in the summary was 125.7 per cent above the lowest legal minimum set by the
Board.
Statistical Summary Covering Hospital-workers (Female)
Further growth in our Provincial population figures continues to point up the
problems which exist in the constant need for additional health and welfare services,
institutional care, housing, and accommodation. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 57
In the provision of adequate hospital and institutional services, the rapid expansion
of existing facilities, and the progressive development of additional accommodation continue to provide a growing source of vocational opportunities for female workers. Maintenance of the modern hospital unit generally requires, in addition to the professional
staff, a full complement of workers engaged in functional occupations comprising almost
every type of job classification adaptable to female employment.
On completion of the 1956 survey of women workers in industry and business, a
separate inquiry dealing with payroll information was again directed to public and private
hospitals, nursing and rest homes, solariums, homes for the aged and infirm, and like
institutions. With the exception of nursing staffs, which were omitted from the coverage
of the survey, all other female workers were classified according to the nature of the
occupation, and are summarized in the following section with particular reference to
employment, earnings, and hours of work in each classification.
Payroll information resulting from the 1956 survey of public and private hospitals
is summarized in the table below, based on one weekly period of greatest employment
during the year:—
Occupational Classification
Number
Employed
Total
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Hours
Laundry 	
Housekeeping and catering..
Office    	
Hairdressing —	
Telephone and telegraph..
Manufacturing 	
Personal service 	
Transportation-
Technicians, X-ray	
Technicians, laboratory	
Technicians, miscellaneous-
Technicians' helpers	
Pharmacists 	
Dieticians  	
Physiotherapists	
Therapists, occupational-
Nurses' aides. 	
809
2,435
826
1
93
34
92
1
87
148
25
15
5
44
11
4
1,265
$27,057
85,865
35,314
62
4,011
1,307
3,872
47
4,860
8,023
1,267
563
354
2,670
643
189
43,673
$33.44
35.26
42.75
62.00
43.13
38.44
42.09
47.00
55.86
54.21
50.68
37.53
70.80
60.68
58.45
47.25
34.52
All occupations-
5,895
$219,777
$37.28
36.9
37.2
37.6
40.0
36.8
39.7
32.8
40.0
38.7
37.8
39.4
38.7
34.2
39.0
37.5
36.5
37.7
37.3
A total of 136 establishments submitted returns covering the period of the 1956
inquiry, the survey including public and private hospitals, nursing and rest homes,
solariums, homes for the aged and infirm, and like institutions.
As compared with a total coverage of some 5,576 female employees in 1955, employment reported in the 1956 survey increased to a total of 5,895 women workers in all
occupational classifications exclusive of nursing staffs, which were omitted from the
returns. Working-hours for most employees were fractionally below the level of the
previous year, while earnings were somewhat higher, with increases noted in eleven of
the fifteen main occupational categories listed in previous surveys.
While employment totals were generally higher than for the previous year, the
greatest increases appeared in the laundry, housekeeping, and catering departments, an
indication, no doubt, of the problems of servicing additional accommodation and providing for an increasing number of bed patients. Compared with the previous year, employment of female hospital employees in laundry occupations increased to a total of 809,
from 689 reported in this section for 1955. Housekeeping and catering employment rose
to 2,435, as compared with 2,300 female workers listed in this department during the
previous year. Average weekly earnings increased for employees in both the above-
mentioned classifications, the average for laundry-workers increasing to $33.44, from
$32.41 previously reported for a weekly average in this section, although some increase H 58 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
was also apparent in the working-hours for these employees. Earnings for housekeeping
and catering occupations averaged $35-26 for the week of the survey, up from a figure of
$32.96 recorded in this department for 1955. As in the previous year, this classification
continues to represent the greatest number of female employees on hospital payrolls, in
addition to nursing staff. Employment of office and clerical workers in hospitals and
similar institutions remained almost at the level of the previous year, with a total of 826
female employees reported in this category, as compared with 839 previously noted.
Average weekly earnings were fractionally higher for this group than in 1955, the weekly
figure rising to $42.75 from $42.33 recorded in the previous survey, with a slight decrease
in working-time. One institution continued to show a female employee engaged in the
hairdressing occupation at $62 per week, this figure being unchanged from the previous
year. In occupations relating to the telephone and telegraph classification, the number
of switchboard operators in hospital work increased to ninety-three from eighty shown
in this section during 1955, the average earnings for this occupation increasing to $43.13
for the week under review in 1956, as against $40.44 recorded for the previous year.
A fractional decrease in working-hours was also noted. A small group of workers
engaged in manufacturing jobs earned additional wages in 1956, the average for this
group of thirty-four employees being noted at $38.44, up from $37.32 previously shown.
Slightly longer working-time, however, was apparent for these workers. Under heading
of personal service a group of ninety-two workers engaged in various specialized occupations earned an average of $42.09 each for the period surveyed, this figure representing
an increase from the previous year, when earnings were $40.82 for an average week in
this classification. One female transportation-worker employed in hospital work was
paid a salary of $47 for a forty-hour week.
In occupations more closely related to the actual work of hospitalization, a segregation has been made where possible from the returns to classify the employment, hours,
and earnings in each department. A considerable increase in the number of technicians
reported was noted in most returns for 1956, the total female technicians in X-ray, laboratory, and miscellaneous specialized departments rising to 260, compared with 203
reported in 1955. Of this total, some 87 were classified as X-ray technicians, 148
laboratory technicians, and 25 shown as technicians in specialized fields such as cardiology, pathology, and others. Earnings for X-ray technicians increased in 1956, the
average figure representing weekly earnings rising to $55.86 for the period under review,
as compared with $52.15 recorded for this group in 1955. Laboratory technicians were
paid an average of $54.21 for the week of the survey, this figure having increased from
a per capita average of $53.59 recorded in this category during 1955. Increased employment resulted in shorter working-hours for most technicians in comparison with the
previous year. A group of twenty-five technicians engaged in miscellaneous specialized
occupations earned an average of $50.68 each for the period under survey, while technicians' helpers were paid an average $37.53 for a similar work-week. A sampling of
female employees engaged as pharmacists showed this occupation as most remunerative
for female workers, a small group of five pharmacists averaging $70.80 per week. Dieticians reported in the returns increased considerably over the previous year, some forty-
four females being shown in this classification, as compared with thirty-four a year ago.
With increased employment in the lower categories, the average earnings in this group
was $60.68, a fraction below the 1955 figure of $61.35. Therapy-workers listed in the
returns included eleven physiotherapists whose weekly earnings were averaged at $58.45,
up from $52.86 noted for this occupation in 1955. A small group of four occupational
therapists earned a weekly average of $47.25, a little below the average for the previous
year, although the work-week was correspondingly shorter for this classification in 1956.
Nurses' aides continue to represent the second largest single section of female employment
in hospital occupations. Second only in numbers to the housekeeping and catering staff,
a total of 1,265 women workers were listed as nurses' aides in the 1956 survey, increased BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 59
from 1,240 in this section during the previous year. With shorter working-time evident
for females in this occupation, the 1956 average figure for earnings was off slightly at
$34.52 in this category, compared with $35.79 noted in 1955. The work-week for
nurses' aides in 1956, however, was computed at 37.7 hours, down from 39.1 hours
reported for the previous year.
Representing individual earnings for the 5,895 female workers in all hospital occupations under survey in 1956, the average weekly figure for all classifications increased to
$37.28, up from $36.25 recorded for a similar week covering all occupations in 1955.
A further decrease was apparent in the weekly working-hours for female employees
in all hospital occupations, the 1956 average declining to 37.3 hours for the week under
review, as compared with 37.8 hours for hospital-workers in 1955.
Statistics for Male Employees
The trend of employment and earnings for male workers in many of the more
important occupational groups may be examined in the section which follows, the tables
referring specifically to male wage-earner personnel in the various industries mentioned.
Based on payroll information reported during one representative weekly period of
greatest employment, the tables summarize for each industrial classification the comparative survey data recorded for the past four years.
Baking Industry (Male)
1956
1955
1954
1953
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings— —	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
156
1,433
$100,266.00
$69.97
39.12
156
1,336
$93,249.50
$69.80
39.83
158
1,457
$97,052.50
$66.61
39.75
169
1,408
$88,549.00
$62.89
39.86
Construction (Male)
Number of firms reporting... 	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings —
Average hours worked per week..
2,156
40,592
$3,182,719.50
$78.41
42.09
2,067
33,006
$2,474,233.50
$74.96
41.51
1,856
31,118
$2,304,695.50
$74.06
41.25
1,794
34,775
$2,455,735.50
$70.62
41.86
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings -
Average hours worked per week~
91
2,810
$165,073.50
$58.75
47.57
96
3,362
$176,687.50
$52.55
45.93
House Furnishings (Male)
Number of firms reporting —
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week..
143
1,645
$106,385.00
$64.67
39.81
144
1,279
$75,420.00
$58.97
40.45
140
1,432
$77,990.00
$54.46
40.10
130
1,425
$76,862.50
$53.94
40.03 H 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Logging (Male)
1956
1955
1954
1953
Number of firms reporting..
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
1,238
19,606
$1,616,816.00
$82.47
42.20
1,225
18,806
$1,511,815.50
$80.39
42.05
1,106
17,354
$1,358,691.50
$78.29
42.09
1,057
16,606
$1,214,803.50
$73.15
42.11
Painting and Paper-hanging (Male)
Number of firms reporting  —
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings 	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
182
1,111
$84,760.00
$76.29
40.04
169
953
$70,112.00
$73.57
39.94
169
965
$68,383.00
$70.86
40.41
Plumbing and Heating Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting..
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week~
277
2,156
$166,244.50
$77.11
40.84
270
1,872
$134,731.50
$71.97
40.32
254
1,654
$120,680.00
$72.96
40.68
225
1,576
$108,067.50
$68.57
40.86
Sheet-metal Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week..
84
1,310
$95,788.50
$73.12
40.42
I
75
1,091
$76,685.00
$70.29
40.01
80
1,037
$72,755.50
$70.16
39.76
77
904
$59,906.50
$66.27
39.45
Sawmills (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings-
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week~
811
23,628
$1,632,921.50
$69.11
40.68
854
23,890
$1,601,877.00
$67.05
40.99
798
23,030
$1,525,404.50
$66.24
41.06
781
21,471
$1,382,433.50
$64.39
41.05
Shingle-mills (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week-
60
1,860
$141,411.50
$76.03
39.84
56
2,397
$181,458.50
$75.70
39.82
46
2,140
$158,069.00
$73.86
40.08
45
2,504
$173,718.00
$69.38
39.68
Ship-building and Boat-building (Male)
Number of firms reporting..
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings... 	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week~
79
5,319
$440,880.50
$82.89
42.85
77
4,510
$349,565.00
$77.51
41.16
75
4,253
$326,272.00
$76.72
42.08
70
4,155
$293,503.50
$70.64
41.08
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.) (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings 	
Average weekly earnings
Average hours worked per week~
173
7,519
$510,196.00
$67.85
39.64
I
176
6,093
$371,438.00
$60.96
40.04 BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
H 61
Investigations and Wage Adjustments
During the year 1956 the Industrial Relations Officers of the Department made
18,332 investigations, and, through the efforts of the Department and the co-operation
of the employers, adjustments made during 1956 amounted to $100,162.06. Department
cars travelled 131,394 miles in connection with the legislation administered by this office.
As certain employees exercised their civil rights under the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts through the Courts without coming to the Board, it may be presumed
that the amount of money paid to employees as a result of legislation administered by
this Department is considerably in excess of that recorded in the following table:—
Comparison of Investigations and Wage Adjustments
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
15,676
20
139
208
$8,981.31
93
127
$3,575.67
874
2,891
$27,049.21
17,413
20
71
148
$10,194.54
123
208
$4,332.57
694
1,911
$17,540.88
16,542
20
36
76
$2,074.92
52
68
$1,246.08
500
1,470
$14,817.02
18,860
22
70
298
$9,911.02
19
56
$841.34
529
1,242
$16,270.82
18,670
21
78
441
$11,178.85
11
27
$549.56
453
1,129
$11,361.02
18,332
Number of Industrial Relations Officers1	
" Male Minimum Wage Act "—■
22
123
648
$17,813.00
" Female Minimum Wage Act "—
32
168
$2,121.02
"Annual Holidays Act "—
480
1,210
$15,175.20
Total collected    	
$39,606.19
$32,067,99
$18,138.06
$27,023.18
$23,089.43
$35,109.222
1 Average.
2 In addition to the adjustments made under the Minimum Wage and Holidays Acts, 601 firms paid 1,044 employees
$65,052.84 under the provisions of the " Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act." Total adjustments for 1956 were therefore $100,162.06.   Total adjustments for 1955 were $93,712.64.
Court Cases
When employers fail to co-operate with the Department in the manner of compliance
with the provisions of the orders and regulations of the Board, it is necessary to resort
to the Courts in order that the necessary compliance with the legislation will be obtained.
A summary of Court cases during the year 1956 follows:—
Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act"
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Academy Cleaners, 3920 Fraser St., Vancouver
Alberni Cedar Products Ltd., Alberni	
Arakl, R. (Watch Lake Lumber Co.), Kam-
loops
Baird, J. (Totem Timber), Flood..
Belanger, J. W., Trail	
Bon-Rik   Cafe    (P.   Linscott   and   H.   G.
Dugale), 4345 Dunbar St., Vancouver
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Two charges; fined $25 on each charge
and ordered to pay arrears of
$92.61.
Twenty charges; ordered to pay arrears of $1,445.12; directors posted
a bond to pay arrears jointly.
Six charges; fined $25 on each charge
and ordered to pay arrears of
$978.56 within twelve months or
eight months in gaol; court costs,
$4.50.
Fined $25 and $5.50 costs and ordered to pay arrears of $300.
Two charges; dismissed.
Dismissed. H 62                                                  DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act"-
—Continued
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Bradford  Vernon J, RR 3, Nanaimo	
Failure to pay wages as often as
Two charges; fined $25 and ordered
semi-monthly
to   pay   arrears   of   $157.64;   one
charge dismissed.
C. & J. Lumber Co. Ltd. (Garnet Jackson),
Failure to pay wages as often as
Sixty-day suspended sentence;  costs,
Kitwanga
semi-monthly
$3.50;  arrears of $126.75 paid by
defendant prior to Court hearing.
Pntilln   T    T3eir Creek
Failure to pay wages as often as
Two   charges;   fined   $25   and   $4.50
v^uuialj, J *r J1"**-  viwft— —■ .—-—-
semi-monthly
costs on each charge.
Dahl   George   Williams Lake        -
Failure to pay wages as often as
Fined $25 and $3.50 costs; ordered to
semi-monthly
pay arrears of $286.97, to be paid
by December   19th,   1956,  or two
months in gaol.
T»<nM"Hcnti    FHwnrH    Pnrr   Crawford         - —
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Fined $25 and $5.50 costs; ordered to
make  good  post-dated  cheque  of
$63.20 by February 29th or serve
ten days in gaol.
Dobbyn,  C. W„ 951 Tattersall Drive, Vic
Failure to pay wages as often as
Fined $25; in default, five days.
toria
semi-monthly
"r^m/ci-TiAr   T-Tpnrv   Prince Georse            	
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Fined  $25 and  $2.50 costs, payable
December  21st,   1956,   or  twenty-
S^JyJy SLIICl ,    JTlwlll y 3     x unvt    KJ\**jir 5V-. **r
one days in gaol; ordered to pay
arrears   of   $208.66,   payable   $10
monthly;   in   default,   twenty-one
days in gaol.
Eleanor    Sawmills    (Joe    E.    Stonehouse),
Failure to pay wages as often as
Two charges;   fined $25 and costs of
Mitchell Island
semi-monthly
$6 and ordered to pay arrears of
$195.25.
Guthrie,   Harold,  20523  Twenty-first  Road,
Failure to pay wages as often as
Two   charges;   on   one   charge,   sus
Hammond
semi-monthly
pended   sentence   and   ordered   to
pay arrears of $49.05 within sixty
days;   in   default,   fifteen   days  in
gaol;   on  other  charge,  fined  $25
and   ordered   to   pay   arrears   of
$46.50;  in  default,  thirty days in
gaol.
Hamblin   T   F , Houston         	
Failure to pay wages as often as
Fined $25 and $5 costs, and ordered
semi-monthly
to   pay   arrears   of   $164.10   two
months from date of trial.
Hicks,  Edward   (Club Tango),  St. Patrick
Failure to pay wages as often as
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs; in default,
St., Victoria
semi-monthly
five days in gaol.
Kiss, Edmund, Whonock	
Failure to pay wages as often as
Fined $25 and $5.50 costs;  ordered
semi-monthly
to pay arrears of $166.30.
Landis   Ben   Crescent Valley           ■
Failure to pay wages as often as
Fined $25 and costs;  ordered to pay
semi-monthly
arrears of $75.20; in default, thirty
days in gaol.
Lee,  Raymond   (Lakeview Cafe), Williams
Failure to pay wages as often as
Five   charges;   fined   $25   on   each
Lake
semi-monthly
charge   and   $3   costs;   ordered   to
pay arrears of $149.76.
Leong, J. (Watch Lake Lumber Co.), Kam-
Failure to pay wages as often as
Six  charges;   fined   $25  on   each  of
loops
semi-monthly
three charges;  ordered to pay arrears of $353.91 within six months
or six months in gaol.
Meers Sawmill (E. J. Meers), Soda Creek—..
Failure to pay wages as often as
Two   charges;   fined   $25   on   each
semi-monthly
charge and ordered to pay arrears
of $120.
Mercier,   Maurice,  3751   East  Pender   St.,
Failure to pay wages as often as
Dismissed.
Vancouver
semi-monthly
Neufelt Daniel, Williams Lake     	
Failure to pay wages as often as
Seven charges; fined $25 on each of
seven charges and costs of $6, pay
semi-monthly
able December 23rd, 1956, or two
months in gaol; ordered to pay ar
rears of $1,516.91 at $100 monthly
commencing   January   23rd,   1957,
or four months in gaol.
Patenaude  Wilfred  Horsefly          	
Failure to pay wages as often as
Five charges; fined $25  on each of
semi-monthly
five charges and costs of $3, payable December 21st, 1956, or two
months in gaol; ordered to pay arrears of $1,424.35, $400 to be paid
December   21st,    1956,    or   three
months   in    gaol;    balance,    $100
monthly or three months in gaol.
R R  Lumber Supply, loco         	
Failure to pay wages as often as
Six charges; fined $50 and $5 costs;
semi-monthly
ordered to pay arrears of $619.96. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "—Continued
H 63
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Raymond,    Joe,    642    Gillette    St.,    Prince
George
Ritco, George, Grand Forks..
Rohra, Eric, Evelyn	
Seavan   Development   Co.   Ltd.,   850   West
Hastings St., Vancouver
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly-
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Shoal Harbour Marine Service Co., Sidney.-.
Speedy  House  Wrecking   (H.  L.  Harnett),
4772 Elgin St., Vancouver
Superior Building Wrecking Ltd., 763 Cam-
bie St., Vancouver
Tiede,   Oscar,   740   East   Fifty-third   Ave.,
Vancouver
Vicic,  C,  Quesnel  	
Wagner, Joseph, 3590 Hudson St., Vancouver
Woods, E. H., Abbotsford 	
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly"
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Failure to pay wages as often as
semi-monthly
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs or fourteen days in gaol; fine paid; ordered to pay arrears of $160 by
February 15th, 1956; arrears paid
forthwith.
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears
of $180.
Fined $25 and costs of $5.50; ordered to pay arrears of $255 by
August 16th, 1956.
Five charges; on one charge suspended sentence and ordered to
pay forthwith balance of wages
owing; fined $50 on two charges
and ordered to pay arrears of
$306.51; suspended sentence on
two charges and ordered to pay
forthwith balance of wages owing
in the amount of $295.56.
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears of $203.46.
Three charges; fined $75 and ordered
to pay arrears of $217.68.
Six charges; fined $150 and ordered
to pay arrears of $659.22 and costs
of $22.50.
Dismissed.
Suspended sentence; wages paid prior
to Court opening.
Four charges; fined $100 and ordered
to pay arrears of $290.80.
Fined $25 and $14.10 costs; in default, fifteen days in gaol.
Hours of Work Act"
Brown, Lloyd, Enterprises, 2204 Mannering
Ave., Vancouver
Canadian Comstock Co. Ltd., Kitimat 	
Charles Hotel Ltd., Boston Bar	
Delmar Service   (Henry Ross),  8655 Granville St., Vancouver
Henning Cleaners Ltd., Castlegar 	
Herman Sawmills Ltd., Mission City-
Hotel Radium Co. Ltd., Radium Junction _
Howard, Rex, Campbell River..
Larson,  Henry A.,  Logging Co.  Ltd.,   510
West Hastings St., Vancouver
Penny Spruce Mills Ltd., Penny	
Saguenay-Kitimat Co., Kitimat	
Shirley's Bakery, 6470 Main St., Vancouver-
Failure to produce records on demand
Working employees excessive hours
Working employees excessive hours
Failure to produce records and
working an employee excessive
hours
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to post notices of hours of
work and failure to supply
Board of Industrial Relations
with a copy of payroll
Working employees excessive hours
Working   employees   longer   than
forty-four hours in week
Working employees excessive hours
Working employees excessive hours
Working employees excessive hours
Failure to keep true and  correct
records
Fined $25 or ten days in gaol.
Two charges; fined $50.
Fined $10 and $5 costs; in default,
distress.
Two   charges;   fined   $20   and   one
charge dismissed.
Fined $10 and $5.50 costs.
Two charges; fined $35 and $2 costs.
Five charges; fined $25 on each
charge ($125) and $3.50 costs on
each charge ($19.50).
Two charges; fined $70 and $6 costs;
in default on or before February
9th, 1956, fourteen days in gaol.
Fined $25.
Four charges; all dismissed.
Two charges: fined $50.
Fined $10 or three days in gaol.
"Annual Holidays Act"
Alberni Cedar Products Ltd., Alberni	
Failure to pay employees holiday
Ten charges; suspended sentences for
credits
nine charges;  ordered to pay  arrears of $72.88 and fined $25 on
one charge.
Academy Cleaners, 3920 Fraser St., Vancou
Failure to pay employees holiday
Two charges; fined $50 and ordered
ver
credits
to pay arrears of $20.92. H 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Annual Holidays Act "—Continued
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Better   Value   Furniture    (Prince   George)
Ltd., 1132 Third Ave., Prince George
Hall, Robert D., Ltd., 475 Howe St., Vancouver
Hereon Petroleums Ltd., 675 West Hastings
St., Vancouver
Hotel Radium Co. Ltd., Radium Junction-
Howard, Rex, Campbell River	
J.B.'s Public Accounting Service, 193 East
Hastings St., Vancouver
Jackson, E. D., 1004 Cook St., Victoria	
Kiss, Edmund, Whonock	
Pridy Bros. Freightways Ltd., Nanaimo_
R.R. Lumber Supply, loco	
Failure to
credits
Failure to
credits
Failure to
credits
Failure to
credits
Failure to
credits
Failure to
credits
Failure to
credits
Failure to
credits
Failure to
credits
Failure to
credits
pay employees holiday
pay employees holiday
pay employees holiday
pay employees holiday
pay employees holiday
pay employees holiday
pay employees holiday
pay employees holiday
pay employees holiday
pay employees holiday
Superior Building Wreckers Ltd., 763 Cam-
bie St., Vancouver
Failure to pay employees holiday
credits
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears of $63.36 on or before August 29th, 1956.
Fined $25 and costs; ordered to pay
arrears of $17.76; in default, distress.
Five charges; fined $50 and ordered
to pay arrears of $145.04; suspended sentence on three charges.
Fined $25 and $3.50 costs.
Four charges; fined $30 and $3 costs;
ordered to pay arrears of $29.96;
three charges dismissed.
Three charges; fined $125 and $11.25
costs or eight days in gaol; ordered
to pay arrears of $9.89.
Fined $25 and ordered to pay arrears of $20.16.
Fined $25 and $2.50 costs and ordered to pay arrears of $11.
Five charges; fined $130 and ordered to pay arrears of $20.34; one
charge dismissed.
Three charges; fined $25 and $2.50
costs; ordered to pay arrears of
$17.28; also ordered to pay arrears of wages at $50 per month,
March 5th, 1956, and 5th of each
month thereafter.
Six charges; fined $300 and $22.50
costs; ordered to pay arrears of
$69.24.
" Male Minimum Wage Act"
Allied   Maintenance   Ltd.,   2628   Yew   St..
Vancouver
Charles Hotel Ltd., Boston Bar	
Hansen, Martin, 736 Dupplin St., Victoria-
Herman Sawmills Ltd., Mission City-
Hotel Radium, Radium Junction	
J.B.'s Accounting Service, 193 East Hastings
St., Vancouver
Relies, Thos. (Plaza Cafe), 636 Johnson St.,
Victoria
Mooney, Millard H, 937 View St., Victoria.
Penny Spruce Mills Ltd., Penny.	
Pridy Bros. Freightways Ltd., Nanaimo.-
Ritco, George, Grand ForkS-
Star Construction (John Doette), 729 Fourth
Ave., New Westminster
Failure to produce records.
Failure to pay minimum wage to
employees re Minimum Wage
Order No. 52
Failure to pay minimum wage to
an employee
Failure to pay employee minimum
wage
Failure to post and keep posted a
schedule
Failure to keep true and correct
records in principal place of
business
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to pay minimum wage to
employees
Failure to pay overtime to employees
Failure to keep true and correct
records and failure to pay minimum wages
Failure to pay minimum wage to
employees
Failure to produce records	
Fined $15.
Four charges; dismissed.
Fined $50; in default, fifteen days in
gaol; ordered to pay arrears of
$761.75; in default, sixty days in
gaol.
Fined $50 and $3 costs; ordered to
pay arrears of $44.37.
Fined $25 and $3.50 costs.
Fined $10; in default, ten days in
gaol.
Fined $25.
Two charges; fined $100.
Four charges; dismissed.
Four charges; fined $125 and ordered
to pay arrears of $170; one charge
dismissed.
Three charges; fined $50 and ordered
to pay arrears of $75.18.
Fined $10 and $2.50 costs.
Female Minimum Wage Act"
Charles Hotel Ltd., Boston Bar..
J.B.'s Public Accounting Service, 193 East
Hastings St., Vancouver
Failure to pay minimum wage to
employees
Failure to pay minimum wage to
employees
Four charges; all charges dismissed.
Three charges; fined $25; in default,
thirty days in gaol; ordered to pay
arrears of $409. BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Female Minimum Wage Act "—Continued
H 65
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Merck  &  Co.  Ltd.,  2675  Boundary  Road,
Vancouver
West   Coast   Development   Co.   Ltd.,   2594
West Broadway, Vancouver
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Contravention of section 9 of Office Order No. 34
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs.
Fined $25.
" Employment Agencies Act"
Universal Personal Services Ltd., 712 Rob-
son St., Vancouver
Unlawfully receiving a fee from a
person seeking employment
Fined $20.
Special Licences
Provision is made in a few of the Orders of the Board for a graduated scale of
wages to inexperienced employees for whose employment permits in writing have been
obtained from the Board. Trie following table shows the number of licences issued in
the various lines of work in 1953, 1954, 1955, and 1956:—
1953
1954
1955
1956
Telephone and telegraph-
Laundry	
Mercantile	
Office	
Practical nurse (students).
Manufacturing-
Automotive repair and gasoline service-station..
Household furniture	
Hospitals	
Totals..
17
3
71
4
1
12
2
66
2
2
61
2
2
97
85
67
16
1
89
49
155
During the year 1956 two part-time employment permits were issued.
Conclusion
At this time the Board would like to acknowledge its appreciation of the co-operation
extended during the year 1956 to its officials in the administration of the various labour
laws by the employers and employees of the Province.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
W. H. Sands, Chairman.
Fraudena Eaton.
G. A. Little.
H. J. Young.
C. Murdoch.
P. Baskin.
D. J. Baldwin. H 66
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Labour Relations Branch
Personnel
Labour
Relations
Branch
Chief Executive Officer:
B. H. E. Goult
Chief Conciliation Officer:
William Fraser -
Conciliation Officers:
R. G. Clements,
Robert Forgie,
George Carmichael,
E. A.Ivay,
J. A. Laffling
John Sherlock
W. T. McLaughlin
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Labour
Relations
Board
Chairman:
W. H. Sands -
Members:
Mrs. Fraudena Eaton
D. J. Baldwin
Penrod Baskin    -
G. A. Little,
Charles Murdoch,
J. H. Young -     -     -
Registrar:
N. deW. Lyons
Assistant Registrar:
David Coton
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Court-house, Kelowna.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Dollarton.
Vancouver.
Dollarton.
Vancouver.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to present the annual report of the Labour Relations Branch
for the year ended December 31st, 1956.
The Labour Relations Board met during the year on fifty occasions.
In accordance with the provisions of the " Labour Relations Act," chairmen were
named by the Minister for sixty-six Conciliation Boards. The nominees of the disputant
parties selected their own chairman on fifty occasions.
Conciliation Officers Succeed
There were 333 cases referred to Concilation Officers during the year. Thirty-seven
cases were carried over from the preceding year since they were unterminated on December 31st, 1955.
Conciliation Officers settled 166 cases, and 126 cases were referred to Conciliation
Boards.    In nine cases conciliation proceedings were terminated, and in three cases LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 67
settlement was reached before the Conciliation Officer made his report. In two cases
application for Conciliation Officer was withdrawn, and in twenty cases the responsible
Conciliation Officer did not recommend a Conciliation Board. There were forty-four
cases unterminated at the year's end.
Of the 126 references to Conciliation Boards during the year, 113 Boards were
appointed as a result of recommendations of Conciliation Officers, and three Boards were
appointed without prior reference to Conciliation Officers. Five cases were carried over
from 1955 when Boards had not been appointed by December 31st, 1955. Settlement
eventuated in six cases before the Boards were appointed, and in the remaining nine
cases Boards had been recommended but not appointed at December 31st, 1956.
The Labour Relations Board authorized the issuance of 493 certificates and rejected
119 applications for certification. Administrative personnel conducted thirty representation votes and seventy-six strike votes.
The Board entertained forty applications for decertification, of which sixteen were
rejected and twenty-two authorized.    Decision upon two applications was deferred.
Analysis of Certificates Issued in 1956
Number of
Certificates
Industry or Occupation
Construction  178
Logging     64
Manufacturing	
Transportation and warehousing-
Hotel, restaurant, and catering.	
Mercantile	
Office employees	
Civic administration	
  48
  44
  39
  33
  19
  13
Automotive  13
Hospitals :  9
Food-processing  7
  7
  6
  6
  5
  2
Miscellaneous-
Printing trades	
Building maintenance-
Mining	
Laundry	
Totals.
- 493
1 This figure includes 2,092 employees of Aluminum Company.
2 This figure includes 429 employees of the Empress Hotel, Victoria.
3 This figure includes 1,110 employees of B.C. Electric.
Total Number
of Employees
Affected by
Certificates
Issued
2,096
2,531
3,457i
730
1,1192
392
1,3023
290
176
735
138
88
29
22
134
70
13,309
Arbitration Boards
On the joint application of both parties in cases where grievance procedure under
collective agreements had been invoked, chairmen were named to eighteen Arbitration
Boards.
B. H. E. Goult,
Chief Executive Officer,
Labour Relations Branch. H 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table I.—Summary of Cases Dealt With, 1951-56
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Number of applications for certification dealt with-
961
727
142
92
78
357
120
1
4
173
816
640
93
83
53
414
176
3
14
229
664
467
119
78
48
343
129
6
36
221
667
467
133
47
49
333
103
6
44
75
706
486
180
40
40
268
91
2
15
61
663
493
Applications—
119
51
30
333
116
Grievance procedure provided  — ~ ..    —
6
16
76
Summary of Cases Dealt With in 1956, Showing Comparison for 1955
Number of applications dealt with.
Certificates granted	
Applications—
Rejected 	
1955
486
180
Withdrawn _ 40
Representation votes conducted	
Conciliation Officers appointed	
Conciliation Boards established	
Grievance procedures provided	
Permissions to prosecute granted	
Strike votes supervised..
1956
493
119
51
1955
706
40
268
91
2
15
61
1956
663
Industrial Inquiry Commissioners appointed	
30
333
116
6
16
76
1
Totals.
1,183
1,241 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 69
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H H 110
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards by Predominant Cause
Wages and other causes  68
Wages only  7
All terms of collective agreement  33
Hours of work and other causes  3
Vacations and other causes  5
Total  116
Strikes and Lockouts in British Columbia, 1956
A lockout or an industrial condition that is undeniably a lockout is rarely encountered, and lockouts and strikes are therefore recorded together in the statistical tables.
The term " dispute " refers to either strike or lockout.
The figures shown are inclusive of all work stoppages which have come to the attention of the Department. While methods taken to procure this information preclude
the possibility of serious omission, revisions are sometimes made in the light of later
information.
Estimates of time-loss are computed by multiplying the number of days a stoppage
lasts by the number of employees directly affected and not replaced. The summaries
include only the record of time lost by workers directly involved.
Disputes are listed in the order of the date of their commencement.
Table IV.—Summary of Industrial Disputes, 1956
Industry or
Occupation
Particulars
Number
of Employers
Affected
Number
of Employees
Affected
Time-
loss in
Man-
days
Warehousemen    and    pipe-
shop workers, Vancouver
Sawmill-workers, Wasa .
Bus and truck drivers, Trail..
Hard-rock     miners,     Ains-
worth
Carpenters   and   labourers,
Victoria
Truck-drivers, Duncan	
Sawmill-workers, Whonock-
Pipe-line construction crews.
Kamloops
Bakery-workers, Vernon	
Summary of Disputes in Progress prior to January 1, 1956
Commenced December 8, 1955, for wage increases, paid
vacations, and other conditions of employment following reference to Conciliation Board; employment conditions reported no longer affected at end of April, 1956
Total for disputes commencing in 1955	
Summary of Disputes Commencing in 1956
Commenced  February  8   against  alleged  unsafe  working
conditions   and   dismissal   of  two   workers;    terminated
February   15;    referred   to   Workmen's   Compensation
Board      — 	
Commenced February 10 for reduction of work-week, and
wage increases recommended by Conciliation Officer;
terminated April 2 when company resumed partial operation after disposing of some equipment
Commenced March 21 for reduction in hours and increase
in wages following reference to Conciliation Board;
terminated June 4;  negotiations	
Commenced March 28 when work done by carpenters was
claimed by bridgemen; job postponed; dispute recommenced October 3;   terminated October 6;   negotiations
Comemnced April 2, against lay-off of certain employees;
terminated April 10; negotiations; union agreement
signed
Commenced April 9 against classification of workers
affected by lay-off;   terminated April   10;    negotiations
Commenced April 26 for board allowance or wage increase;  terminated same day;  return of workers	
Commenced May 1 for increased wages and working conditions following reference to Conciliation Board; employment conditions no longer affected May 5, when
plant closed pending company reorganization 	
19
19
12
10
67
4-5
6
87
31
1,397
1,397
72
340
3,819
22
36
87
4
28 LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH H 111
Table IV.—Summary of Industrial Disputes, 1956—Continued
Industry or
Occupation
Particulars
Number
of Employers
Affected
Number
of Employees
Affected
Time-
loss in
Man-
days
Operating engineers, Kitimat
Carpenters, Kelowna	
Mill-workers, Stump Lake—
Planing-mill   workers,    Va-
venby
Sawmill-workers, Vavenby..
Construction-workers, Kam-
loops
Loggers, Gordon River	
Truck-drivers     and     warehousemen, Kitimat
Truck-drivers, Nanaimo	
Textile-workers, Vancouver..
Maintenance-workers, Prince
Rupert
Plumbers   and   pipe-fitters,
Duncan Bay
Plumbers   and   pipe-fitters,
Kitimat
Plumbers   and   pipe-fitters,
Port Alberni
Mechanics and service men,
Courtenay
Foundry-workers, Vancouver
Pipe-line construction workers, Kamloops
Construction-workers, Buttle
Lake
Carpenters, Kitimat	
Garage mechanics, Victoria-
Welders, Merritt-
Labourers and tunnel-construction workers, various
localities
Loggers, Kelsey Bay	
Electrical workers, Kitimat-
Electrical    workers,
loops
Kam-
Warehousemen    and    shippers, Vancouver
Commenced May 3 against dismissal of workers; terminated May 5; return of workers;  arbitration	
Commenced May 9 for increase in wages and new union
agreement, following reference to Conciliation Board;
terminated May 14;  negotiations	
Commenced June 19 following refusal of certain workers
to join union;   terminated July 4;   replacement of workers
Commenced June 22 following rejection of Conciliation
Officer's report, and for wage increases which might
accrue from industry-wide negotiations; terminated
August 24, when contract signed   	
Commenced June 22 following rejection of Conciliation
Officer's report, and for wage increases which might
accrue from industry-wide negotiations; terminated
August 24, when contract signed „ - 	
Commenced July 5 following jurisdictional dispute, and
for signed agreement and wage increases; terminated
July 19;  negotiations;  wage increases granted  ...
Commenced July 10 against working early shift without
guarantee of eight hours' work; terminated August 22;
negotiations
Commenced July 12 against dismissal of worker and for
his reinstatement prior to arbitration; terminated July
23;  return of workers;    arbitration   _3	
Commenced July 19 for wages set forth in union agreement;   terminated July 19;  replacement of workers
Commenced July 24 for wage increase similar to that
offered to another division of the same company following reference to Conciliation Board; terminated November 7; negotiations;  agreement signed ....
Commenced July 25 against grievance then being processed
concerning dismissal of worker; terminated August 1;
return of workers pending consideration of grievance	
Commenced July 30 when men ceased work before strike
deadline in industry-wide negotiations; terminated July
31; return of workers   	
Commenced August 2 against charges for room and board;
terminated August 4;   negotiations 	
Commenced August 2 for wage increase; terminated
August 6 following general settlement of wage problem
Commenced August 9 for wage increases, union security,
and other terms and conditions of employment following
reference to Conciliation Board; terminated October 4;
negotiations;  agreement signed  	
Commenced August 15 for increased wages following reference to Conciliation Board; terminated August 20; negotiations;   agreement signed   	
Commenced August 16 for increased wages; terminated
August 17;  return of workers; indefinite	
Commenced August 23 for improved board; terminated
August 27;  negotiations
Commenced August 28 for signing of union agreement;
terminated August 29 when agreement signed	
Commenced September 5 and 6 for improvement of wages
and working conditions following reference to Conciliation Board; terminated September 17; negotiations;
agreement signed  	
Commenced September 9 for one extra hour travelling
time;   terminated September 14;   negotiations 	
Commenced September 12 following jurisdictional dispute
between unions; terminated October 16-18; return of
workers          .„_—	
Commenced September 14 for revision of wages during
currency of agreement; terminated September 27; negotiations 	
Commenced September 28 for increased wages and improved working conditions following reference to a Conciliation Board; terminated October 3; negotiations;
agreement signed _   	
Commenced October 18 for increased wages and other
terms and conditions of employment following reference
to Conciliation Board;  negotiations;  agreement signed	
Commenced October 25 for increased wages and union-
shop provisions on new agreement following reference to
Conciliation Board; terminated December 14; negotiations      	
Totals   — -   	
1
1
1
1
10
1
119
24
26
45
180
28
65
161
400
19
343
21
400
185
206
18
178
33
96
1,200
1,300
495
5,580
75
637
6
6
26
1,937
250
1,500
179
268
45
90
104
156
1,120
195
161
337
19
2,987
105
12,400
1,665
515
120
306
69      |    3,197    1    39,211 H 112 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table V.—Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British Columbia, 1939-56
Year
Working-
force1
Number of
Disputes
Beginning
during
Year2
Number of
Disputes
during
Year
Number of
Employers
Affected
Number of
Employees
Affected
Time-loss
in
Working-
days
Time-loss as
Percentage
of Estimated
Total
Working-
time of Wage
and Salary
Earners3
1939... ...... .
1940
180,000
187,000
218,000
265,000
304,000
298,000
282,000
322,000
334,000
338,000
340,000
335,000
341,000
356,000
356,000
351,000
368,000
392,000
4
1
7
50
43
15
18
21
25
8
9
22
26
35
34
21
23
34
4
2
8
50
43
15
18
21
25
10
11
22
26
36
36
24
24
35
4
2
8
82
43
15
18
524
65
63
44
46
120
381
113
119
63
69
822
204
1,408
18,804
21,704
6,379
6,810
40,014
6,386
3,216
3,007
13,579
3,326
46,806
8,207
12,622
3,695
3,197
13,803
8,510
7,594
35,024
75,129
4,510
69,595
1,294,202
153,168
106,230
31,692
105,792
74,722
1,234,120
260,335
140,958
44,020
39,211
0.028
0 016
1941   	
1942
0.012
0.046
1943   	
1944	
1945
0.088
0.006
0.093
1946
1.870
1947
0.202
1948
0.138
1949
0.042
1950
0.138
1951                 .    .
0.093
1957
1.496
1953
0.314
1954
0.172
1955             	
0.051
1956..
|       0.043
1 Paid workers in non-agricultural industries.
2 In this table, figures for disputes extending over the year are counted more than once.
3 Figures in this column revised in 1953 as a result of revised estimates of total working-time of wage and salary
earners.
Source;  British Columbia Department of Labour Annual Reports.   Working-force data obtained from reports of the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH H 113
CHART SHOWING PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL WORKING TIME LOST
THROUGH INDUSTRIAL DISPUTES, 1942 - 1956
I.V
1.8
1.7
1.6
1.5
1.4
1.3
—s>^
.3
\
\ /
\
A
/
V
1942      1944      1946      1948       1950      1952      1954      1956 H 114
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table VI.—Analysis of Time-loss by Industry, 1956
Industry
Number of
Disputes
Number of
Employers
Number of
Employees
Man-days
Lost
Construction..    	
14
2
2
5
1
6
2
3
30
2
14
8
1
6
2
6
1,645
365
371
467
67
163
28
91
14,725
7,245
Service  (business and personal, garage mechanics and
4,107
3,838
Hard-rock mining    	
Miscellaneous   wood   products   (planing   and   sawmill
3,819
2,791
1,703
Transportation rhus and truck drivers)
983
Totals _          .     ... .
35
69
3,197
39,211
Legal Proceedings Involving the Labour Relations Board
International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local No. 1661, vs.
Labour Relations Board
On July 11th, 1956, the Labour Relations Board decided and ruled that the application of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local No. 1661, to be certified for certain employees of the Aluminum Company of Canada Limited at Kitimat and
Kemano be rejected for the reason that the unit is not appropriate for the purposes of
collective bargaining.
The union made application to the Supreme Court of British Columbia to have the
ruling of the Board quashed. The union claimed that the Board acted without jurisdiction, or in excess of its jurisdiction, in ruling that the unit applied for was not appropriate
for collective bargaining and that the decision was bad in law in that there was no
evidence or argument presented to the Board on which the Board could find as a fact
that the unit was not an appropriate unit for collective bargaining.
The application was heard by the Honourable the Chief Justice on January 30th
and 31st and February 1st, 1957. Mr. Justice Lett's reasons for judgment are dated
April 4th, 1957. The full text of those reasons appears in the Weekly Summary of
Activities of the Department of Labour for the week ended April 27th, 1957, Vol. 4,
No. 17.
The Chief Justice found that the Board "had jurisdiction to determine if the group
applied for by the I.B.E-W-, Local 1661, was otherwise appropriate as a unit for collective
bargaining and that there was material before the Board from which it could properly
make that determination." He found further that it had not been established by the
applicant (union) that the Board "acted without jurisdiction, or in excess of its jurisdiction, or was influenced by some extraneous consideration which would render its decision
invalid in law. Nor has it been shown that its decision was made arbitrarily or
capriciously."
The application was denied.
SUMMARY OF PROSECUTIONS
There were no charges laid during the year by the Labour Relations Board.
The Board considered applications for permission to prosecute sixteen charges,
granted ten and rejected five, and one was withdrawn.
It
I LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH H  115
Annual Survey of Organized Labour
Certain information is required annually from associations of industrial workers or
trade-unions pursuant to the provisions of section 5 (a) of the "Department of Labour
Act." This return requires the name and address of the organization, its affiliation (if
any), and its total paid-up membership, in this instance, to January 1st, 1957. Members
over three months in arrears are not included in this figure.
The inclusion of the name of any organization in the listing "Organizations of
Employees (Labour Organizations)" does not necessarily constitute its recognition as a
trade-union within the meaning of the "Labour Relations Act."
The survey of organized labour in British Columbia was again conducted by the
Bureau of Economics and Statistics of the Province in co-operation with the Federal
Department of Labour.   Results of the survey are summarized in Table VII.
Membership Shows Gain
Organized labour membership expressed as a percentage of total paid workers in the
British Columbia labour force now stands at 55.18 per cent, up nearly 3 percentage
points over the previous year. The gain in the proportion of the labour force is explained
by the fact that reported membership increased over 12 per cent, while paid workers in
the British Columbia labour force increased 6.5 per cent. Part of the increase in
reported membership is attributable to the increased coverage of the survey.
Chart 1 shows the distribution of organized labour by major industrial groups, each
local having been classified into the group in which the majority of its members are
employed. The chart indicates the industrial fields which have the greatest number of
union members. It does not, however, show which groups are most highly organized,
since comparable employment data is not available in the various categories.
Service Group Leads
It will be noticed that the Services group (public and personal) again leads all others
with its share of membership. Public Services, consisting largely of government employees, is the largest single item with 22.8 per cent of total membership. The Wood and
Wood Products group is next in size with 17.2 per cent of total membership. The relative importance of this group has declined from last year owing to cutbacks in the logging industry. The largest organizations in this group are the International Woodworkers of America, the International Brotherhood of Papermakers, and the International
Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Makers.
Third in importance is the Construction group with approximately 10 per cent of
the total membership. The United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America
is the largest organization in this group. The remainder of the group includes other craft
organizations whose members are solely or chiefly employed in the construction industry.
Relative gains in the industrial distribution of membership were recorded by the Metals
group and Light, Heat, and Power, while a decline is noted in the Other Transportation
group. The latter includes all trades and occupations connected with transportation,
other than railway. Seamen, longshoremen, electric and motor coach employees, teamsters, chauffeurs, and warehousemen are represented in this category.
The Railway Transportation group includes the four large independent railway
unions in the running trades and also the large membership of the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers.
The Metals group contains such unions as the International Association of Machinists and the Shipyard General Workers Federation of British Columbia. H 116
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table VII.—Number of Labour Organizations Reported, Membership and Percentage Increases, and Membership as a Percentage of Paid Workers in Non-
agricultural Industries as of January 1st of Each Year, 1945-57.
Year
Number
of
Organizations
Total
Membership
Percentage
Increase
over 1945
Percentage
Increase
Yearly
Total1 Paid
Workers
in B.C.
Labour
Force2
Organized
Labour
Membership
as a Percentage of Total
Paid Workers
1945
617
636
642
715
745
761
770
772
766
795
865
869
907
110,045
108,125
119,258
135,326
142,989
146,259
157,287
170,036
174,894
178,533
186,951
191,952
216.070
— 1.77
8.37
22.98
29.94
32.43
42.93
54.51
58.20
62.23
69.88
74.43
96.30
1.77
10.30
13.47
5.67
2.29
7.54
8.10
2.86
2.08
4.71
2.68
12.56
283,000
322,250
339,800
338,250
332,250
334,750
340,750
355,800
356,300
351,300
367,600
391,600
1946
38.20
1947
35.89
1948
39.82
1949                                      - .
42.27
19-in
44.02
1951
46.97
1957
49.90
19S1
49.15
19S4
50.10
19S-5
53.21
19S6
52.21
1957
55.18
1 Almost exclusively workers in non-agricultural industries.
2 Canadian Labour Force Estimates, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
Chart Showing Distribution of Trade-union Membership by Industrial
Classifications, 1957
Personal Services
Construction
Services
Public Service:
Metals
Mining and
Quarrying
Communications
Clothing and
Footwear
Railway
Transportation
Other
Transportation
Wood and
Wood Products
Light, Heat and Power
Printing and Publishing'  All Other LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 117
Organizations of Employees (Labour Organizations)
The list of British Columbia labour organizations, which follows, is arranged alphabetically, according to location. It shows the post-office addresses of those who have
furnished the Bureau of Economics and Statistics with data. Names and addresses of
officers have been revised to the date of publication in all cases where such information
could be obtained. Organizations which have come into existence subsequent to January 1st, 1957, are not included in the list, but wiU be shown in the next publication.
A list of employers' organizations follows that of the labour organizations. Returns
in the former category number 62 for 1956—57. Returns in previous years are as follows: 1939 and 1940, 25; 1941, 27; 1942, 32; 1943, 34; 1944, 36; 1945 to 1948
(inclusive), 37; 1949, 48; 1950, 46; 1951, 43; 1952, 48; 1953 to 1956 (inclusive),
45.
Listings have been compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics in conjunction with the Labour Relations Branch, Department of Labour.
Abbotsford
Brick and Clay Workers of America, United, Local No.
629.—Recording Secretary, H. Tarasenko, Glenmore
Road, R.R. 1, Matsqui.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Recording Secretary, A. H. Dueck, Abbotsford.
Packinghouse Workers of America Joint Council, Local
No. 432.—Secretary, J. Klein, R.R. 5, Jackson Road,
Abbotsford.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — Secretary,
E. M. Szigety, 1304 McCallum Road, R.R. 5, Abbotsford.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, Mrs. A. Sterry,
R.R. 2, Abbotsford.
Agassiz
Civil  Servants  of Canada,  Amalgamated.—Secretary, R.
Klein, Box 258, Agassiz.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, Miss Rhonda Jef-
fers, Box 13, Agassiz.
Alberni
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — Secretary,
Miss Lillian Bigmore, Box 218, Alberni.
Teachers'  Federation,  B.C.—Secretary, Miss Marjorie J.
Kay, 607 Argyle Street, Port Alberni.
Albert Canyon
Maintenance of Way Employees, Canadian Pacific System.—Secretary, G. Hlady, Albert Canyon.
Alert Bay
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 30.—-
Secretary, P. W. Connolly, Box 157, Alert Bay.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., District No. 73.—Secretary,
H. Todd, Sointula.
Alice Arm
Mine, Mill & Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 906.—Secretary, J. Parent, Alice Arm.
Annieville
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 10.—
Secretary, H. Palleson, 10284 Unwin Road, R.R. 10,
New Westminster.
Armstrong
Teachers' Federation, B.C., District No. 21.—Secretary,
Miss Rhonda Revel, Box 404, Enderby.
Avola
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 15.—Secretary, C. Adcock, 505-506 Scott Block,
272 Main Street, Winnipeg, Man.
Bamberton
Cement, Lime and Gypsum Workers' International Union,
Local No. 272.—Secretary, R. Brown, R.R. 1, Cobble
Hill.
Bankeir
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1023.—Secretary, E. J. Lautard, Bankeir.
Barriers
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.—Secretary,   Mrs.   Margaret
Brown, Darfield.
Beaton
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 920.—Secretary, A. Randle, Beaton.
Belmont Park
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, Mrs. Herbert Man-
son, John Stubbs Memorial School, Belmont Park.
Bella Bella
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 20.—
Secretary, A. Newman, Bella Bella.
Beaverdell
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 900.—Secretary, H. Devries, Box 18, Beaverdell.
Bella Coola
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 27.—
Secretary, I. P. Melkild, Bella Coola.
Birch Island
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, Miss Jean Shook,
Clearwater Station.
Blubber Bay
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 898.—Secretary, A. Johnson, Box 172, Blubber Bay.
Blue River
Railroad Employees and Other Transport Workers,
Brotherhood of, Local No. 143.—Secretary, William
Haluk, Blue River.
BONNINGTON FALLS
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 999.—Secretary, E. A. Jones, P.O. Box 12, Bonning-
ton Falls.
Bralorne
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 271.—President, G. Osborne, Bralorne.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, R. Marshall, Bralorne. H 118
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Burnaby
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Burnaby, Local No. 23.—
Secretary, John Knight, 6565 Wiltshire Street, Vancouver 14.
Elevator Constructors, International Union of.—Secretary,
H. MacKichan, 4633 Elmwood Street, South Burnaby.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Burnaby, Local
No. 323.—Secretary, D. G. McDonald, 1915 Sussex Avenue, Burnaby.
School Board Employees' Federal Union, Burnaby, Local
No. 379.—Secretary, C. J. McCrea, 3309 Lane Street,
Burnaby.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Burnaby, District No. 41.—
President, F. H. Alder, 2146 East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. (B.C. School Administrators),
District No. 41.—President, T. S. Julian, 927 Second
Street, New Westminster.
Trainmen's Union, Canadian.—Secretary, C. W. Young,
4751 Union Street North, Burnaby.
Burns Lake
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 872.—Secretary, George H. Brown, P.O.
Box 322, Burns Lake.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — Secretary,
Miss C. E. Small, Box 288, Burns Lake.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, Miss Joyce Mac-
Donald, Burns Lake.
Campbell River
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of.—Secretary,   A.   W.   Davidson,   Box  296,   Campbell
River.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Quathiaski, Local
No. 17.—Secretary, J. Hewison, R.R. 1, Campbell River.
Municipal Employees' Association, Local No. 623.—Secretary, I. B. Sandberg, Box 224, Campbell River.
Paper Makers,  International Brotherhood of, Local No.
630.—Financial   Secretary,   R.   G.   Heslop,   Box   896,
Campbell River.
Postal    Employees,    Canadian. — Secretary,    Charles   F.
Wood, 160 Tenth Avenue, Campbell River, B.C.
Retail, Wholesale and  Department Stores Union, Local
No.   535. — Secretary,   Margaret   A.   Welsh,   Box   333,
Campbell River.
School   Board   Employees,   District   No.   72.—Secretary,
Bernard T. Carlyle, R.R. 2, Campbell River.
Sulphite,   Paper   Mill   and   Pulp   Workers,   International
Brotherhood   of,   Local   No.   742. — Secretary,   W.   G.
Luck, R.R. 1, Campbell River.
Teachers'  Federation,  B.C.,  District No.  72.—Secretary,
Miss Heather Muir, Box 993, Campbell River.
Cassiar
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 927.—Secretary, S. Ghostkeeper, Cassiar.
Castlegar
Carpenters and Joiners of America, International Brotherhood of.—Secretary, T. G. Chutskoff, Robson.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., District No. 9.—Secretary,
Mrs. A. Harshenin, Box 662, Castlegar.
Chemainus
Longshoremen's & Warehousemen's Union, International,
Local No. 508.—Secretary, H. E. Irving, Box 332, Chemainus.
Office Employees' Union, North Cowichan, Local No.
724.—Secretary, June Iris Dwyer, P.O. Box 240, Chemainus.
Chilliwack
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1843.—Secretary, Don Cameron, 531
Young Street North, Chilliwack.
Civic Employees' Association, Local No. 712.—Secretary,
Dorothy M. Davis, 325 Edward Street, Chilliwack.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Local Council.—
Secretary, K. S. Henderson, 227 Wellington Avenue,
Chilliwack.
Employees, School District No. 33, Local No. 411.—
Secretary, H. G. Palmer, 660 East Trans-Canada Highway, R.R. 1, Rosedale.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — Secretary,
R. J. Barrett, 105 Edward Street, Chilliwack.
Municipal Employees' Association, Local No. 458.—Secretary, Clifford English, 119 Hocking Avenue, Chilliwack.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — Secretary,
Gordon H. Piers, Chilliwack.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, Mrs. Lillian H.
Clare, 10 Williams Street South, Chilliwack.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Employees' Association.—Secretary, V. Rempel, 538 Camp River Road,
R.R. 2, Chilliwack.
Cloverdale
Municipal Employees' Association, Surrey, Local No.
402.—Secretary, Vera King, 18382 Sixtieth Avenue,
R.R. 4, Cloverdale.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—R. G. Beau-
champ, Reid Road, R.R. 2, Cloverdale.
COLQUITZ
Government Employees' Association, B.C., Colquitz Mental Home.—Secretary, R. R. Hilton, 3936 Helen Road,
Victoria.
Comox
Government Employees' Association, B.C., Comox District.—Secretary, T. Tarns, Box 789, Courtenay.
Copper Mountain
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union
of. — Secretary, R. E. Archibald, Box 42, Copper
Mountain.
Coquitlam
Municipal Employees' Union, Coquitlam District, Local
No. 386.—Secretary, H. Roberge, 1061 Delestre Avenue,
New Westminster.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Coquitlam, District No. 43.—
President, W. Ashwell, c/o Rushnaki, Coast Meridian
Road, R.R. 2, Port Coquitlam.
Courtenay
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1638.—Secretary, Lome E. Paisley, Box
515, Courtenay.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary, W. J.
Fidler, Box 1012, Courtenay.
Civic Employees, Courtenay.—Secretary, H. Sharp, Box
461, Courtenay.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Courtenay,
P.O.—President, G. F. Harrison, Box 597, Courtenay.
School Board Employees' Courtenay and District.—Secretary, L. Mark, Box 621, Courtenay.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—President, J. R. Hindle, Box
443, Courtenay.
Cranbrook
Carpenter  and Joiners of America,  United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1719.—Secretary, R. Jenkins, Box 1023,
Cranbrook.
Electrical Workers,  International  Brotherhood  of, Cran-
brook-Kimberley.—Secretary,   J.   E.   Broadhurst,   Box
1103, Kimberley.
General Workers' Union, East Kootenay, Local No. 212.—■
Secretary, O. C. Wile, 333 Sixteenth Avenue, Box 1082,
Cranbrook.
Government Employees' Association, B.C., Cranbrook.—■
Secretary, D. J. Kidd, Box 699, Cranbrook.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 563.—
President, C. W. Morris, Box 399, Cranbrook.
Locomotive   Firemen   and   Enginemen,   Brotherhood   of,
Local No. 559.—Secretary, K. W. Jolliffe, Box 92, Cranbrook.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 229.—President, A. Downey, Box 162, Cranbrook.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian. — President,
Marvin Fennessy, Post Office, Cranbrook.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of.—Secretary, H. Con-
roy, Masonic Hall, Eleventh Avenue South, Cranbrook.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and   Station   Employees,   Brotherhood   of. — Secretary,
L. E. Kary, Box 1325, Cranbrook. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 119
Railway Carmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 173.—Secretary, F. S. Caminity, 302 Eighth Avenue South, Cranbrook.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Cranbrook, District No. 2.—
President, Shirley Fraser, General Delivery, Cranbrook.
Trainmen's Union, Canadian, Local No. 5. — President,
D. B. Ferg, Box 1336, Cranbrook.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-
405.—Secretary, Len Lancaster, Newgate.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union, Local No. 405. — Secretary, Ray Masse, Box 1144, Cranbrook.
Creston
Fruit   and   Vegetable  Workers'   Union,   District  No.   7,
Local No. 48.—Secretary, G. Plumb, Creston.
Government Employees' Association, B.C., Creston Valley
Branch.—Secretary, George T. Dodd, Box 8, Creston.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, Local No. 3014.—
Secretary, George A. Clarke, Box 532, Creston.
Postal   Employees'   Association,    Canadian. — Secretary,
Mrs. K. Irving, Creston.
School Employees' Association, General, Creston,  Local
No. 435.—Secretary, J. R. Gilmore, Box 182, Creston.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., District No. 5.—Secretary,
Miss Inga Hendrickson, Box 226, Creston.
Crowsnest
Lime Product Workers, Canadian Union of, Local No.
306.—Secretary, Joseph Wavrecan, P.O. Box 110, Coleman, Alta.
Cumberland
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—Secretary, Jack A.
Thomson, Box 77, Cumberland.
Mine Workers of American, United, Local No. 7293.—
Secretary, John H. Cameron, Box 288, Cumberland.
Dawson Creek
Carpenters and Joiners of America, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1237.—Secretary, A. L. Coutts, Box 1625, Dawson
Creek.
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers, International Union
of, Local No. 16/673.—Secretary, D. Brummond, General Delivery, Dawson Creek.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary, H.
Bowman, Dawson Creek.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 293.—Secretary, Malcolm Nicholson, Box 1142, Dawson Creek.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Peace River South, District
No. 59.—President, Walter Schuen, General Delivery,
Dawson Creek.
Dewdney
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — Secretary,
D'Arcy Dellart, Box 728, Mission City.
Duncan
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1812.—Secretary, D. Chandler, P.O. Box
1532, Duncan.
Civic and Municipal Employees' Union, Local No. 358.—
Secretary, Mrs. Leslie Alexander, Drinkwater Road,
R.R. 2, Duncan.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — Secretary,
Miss A. Melvin, P.O. Box 102, Duncan.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — President,
R. W. Smillie, General Delivery, Duncan.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—President, G. Corsan, Box 97,
Duncan.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Employees' Association, Upper Island Branch.—Secretary, D. P. Chambers, c/o National Employment Office, Duncan.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-80.—
Secretary, Percy Clements, Box 4301, Duncan.
Enderby
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — President, Miss Enid V.
Hardman, Box 191, Enderby.
Engen
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of.—Secretary, J. Wall, Engen.
Esquimalt
Marine Engineers' National Association, Esquimalt Council, Local No. 20.—Secretary, J. Ashcroft, 2346 Arbutus
Road, Victoria.
Municipal Employees' Union, Esquimalt. — Secretary,
Thomas Bennett, 489 Nelson Street, Esquimalt.
Essondale
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C.,   Essondale
Branch.—Secretary,  W.   R.  Low,   355   Munday  Road,
R.R. 2, New Westminster.
Fernie
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers, International Union of, Local No. 308.—Secretary,
J. Savage, Box 1071, Fernie.
Civic Workers' Union, Fernie and District, Local No. 316.
—Secretary, Ernest Boulet, 620 Houston, Nelson.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 921.—Secretary, R. Battersby, Box 339, Fernie.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — Secretary,
James Ryley, Box 697, Fernie.
Mine Workers of America, United, District 18, Local No.
7310.—Secretary, Robert Lilley, Box 486, Fernie.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary, Elizabeth Payne, Box 752, Fernie.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, Miss A. Chivers,
Box 1077, Fernie.
Field
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1454.—Secretary, W. M. Brown, Field.
Fort Nelson
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Fort Nelson.
Fort St. John
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Department of
Transport.—Secretary, A. Gorieu, Fort St. John.
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — Secretary,
J. H. MacKinnon, Box 614, Fort St. John.
Teachers' Federation,  B.C., Peace River North, District
No. 60.—President, Mrs. Jean Gross, Fort St. John.
Gibsons-Pender
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—Secretary, H.
Lucken, Wilson Creek.
Fishermen  and Allied  Workers'  Union,   Gibsons,  Local
No. 21.—Secretary, D. Triggs, Gibsons.
Golden
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — Secretary,
D. K. Piggot, Golden.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, C.P.R.—
Secretary, E. H. Dillon, Third Avenue North, Golden.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., North Columbia, District No.
18.—Secretary,   Miss   Jean   Soles,   General   Delivery,
Golden.
Grand Forks
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of.—Secretary, Henry A. Negraeff, R.R. 1, Grand Forks.
Civic Employees' National Union, Local No. 453.—Secretary, S. Beasley, Box 243, Grand Forks.
Government Employees' Association, B.C., Grand Forks-
Greenwood.—Secretary, E. A. Johnson, Box 425, Greenwood.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary, Mrs.
R. E. Lenius, Box 633, Grand Forks.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — Secretary, Mrs. Margaret
Rank, Box 611, Grand Forks.
Greenwood
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — President, J. A. Young,
Greenwood.
Haney
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 3.—
Secretary, Dan Gordon, Haney.
Government Employees' Association, B.C., Allco Branch,
Haney.—President, J. H. Brown;   Secretary, G. Tasko,
Box 574, Haney. H 120
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Municipal Employees' Federal Union, District of Maple
Ridge, Local No. 622, Haney.
Packinghouse Workers of America, Local No. 517.—Secretary, C. Baker, Haney.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Haney P.O.
Branch.—President, R. T. Franklin, Nineteenth Avenue,
Haney.
Public Employees, School District No. 42, Maple Ridge,
, Local No. 703.—Secretary, Jean Grevelling, General Delivery, Haney.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Haney, District No. 42.—Secretary, Miss Margaret Fargey, c/o Mrs. Strong, Eighth
Avenue, Haney.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-367.
—Secretary, A. Corey, R.R. No. 1, Hammond.
Holberq
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Holberg, District No. 74.—
President, Gordon W. Moffat, San Josef School, Holberg.
Hope
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — Secretary,
C. A. Patterson, Box 624, Hope.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—President, Harold Carlaw,
Hope.
Invermere
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, Miss D. Worsley,
Invermere.
James Island
Chemical   and   Explosives   Workers'   Union,   Canadian,
James Island.—Secretary, C. R. Nunn, Lochside Road,
Saanichton.
Jordan River
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of.—
Secretary, E. Retzloff, Jordan River.
Kaleden
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of.—Secretary, T. L. Harter, Box 29, Kaleden.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers'  Union, District 4, Local
No. 48.—President, Ann Bolen, Kaleden.
Kamloops
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of.—Secretary, Wm. E. Westman, 1404 River Street,
R.R. 2, Kamloops.
Civil Servants, Amalgamated, R.C.N.A.D., Kamloops.—
Secretary, Douglas A. Daws, c/o R.C.N.A.D., Kamloops.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 993.—Secretary, H. Gleis, Box 306, Kamloops.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 913.
—Secretary, W. A. Miner, 125 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops.
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — Secretary,
A. C. Norberg, 845 Nicola Street, Kamloops.
Letter Carriers' Federal Union, Local No. 80.—Secretary,
John W. Reeves, 688 Leigh Road, Kamloops.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 821.—
President, J. J. Waugh, 543 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 930.—Secretary, E. T. Dewhaniuk, 1307 Columbia Street, Kamloops.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 748.—
Secretary, J. MacDonald, 629 Columbia Street, Kamloops.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 31.—Secretary, G. Werenko, Kamloops Junction.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1332. — Secretary, W. J. Mooney, 838 Pleasant
Street, Kamloops.
Municipal Employees' Association, Kamloops.—Secretary,
D. Embury, 1227 Battle Street, Kamloops.
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers, International Union
of.—Secretary, Ted Charlesworth, 812 Columbia Street,
Kamloops.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary, F.
B. Tedder, R.R. 2, Kamloops.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of.—Secretary, V. H.
Mott, Elks Hall, 409 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Kamloops, District No. 24.—
Secretary, Miss A. Pojf, 922 Nicola Street, Kamloops.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 8.—
Secretary, W. Mann, 1159 Pine St., Kamloops.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 15.—
President, Miss S. Charters, 43 Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Kaslo
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, C.P.R.
System, Local No. 173.—President, W. Kuit, Kaslo.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Kootenay Lake, District No.
6.—Secretary, Miss Irene Bisbee, Kaslo.
Kelowna
Bakery and Confectionery Workers* International Union,
Local No. 335.—Secretary, G. M. Jennens, 1974 McDou-
gall Street, Kelowna.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1370.—Secretary, Abe Harder, Box 370,
Kelowna.
City Hall Employees' Union, Kelowna, Local No. 472.—
Secretary, Pamela F. Dyson, 1435 Water Street, Kelowna.
Civic Employees, Kelowna, Local No. 338.—Secretary,
Stan Chatham, 690 Cambridge Avenue, Kelowna.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary, C. B.
Arnold, 2054 Ethel Street, Kelowna.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1409. — Secretary, B. R. Schmidt, 821 Stockwell
Avenue, Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, Kelowna.—Secretary, D. R. Leckie, Kelowna.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—Secretary, D.
R. Dean, c/o Department of Highways, Court-house,
Kelowna.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian, Kelowna
Branch.—Secretary, D. J. Munro, c/o Post Office, Kelowna.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Okanagan Valley, Local No. 445.—Secretary, E. J. W. Adkins, 563
Central Avenue, Kelowna.
School Employees' Union, Okanagan Valley.—Secretary,
T. R. Prior, 419 Royal Avenue, Kelowna.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, Miss Elinor Miller, 556 Leon Avenue, Kelowna.
Woodworkers of America, International Union of.—Secretary, Samuel A. Muir, 249 Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
Keremeos
Fruit and Vegetables Workers' Union, Keremeos.—Secretary, H. Egli, Keremeos.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., District No. 16.—President,
Y. Wiens, R.R. 1, Keremeos.
KlMBERLEY
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No.   1675. — Secretary,  J.  N.   Broadhurst,   Box   1103,
Kimberley.
Fire Fighters, Association of, Local No. 1253.—Secretary,
M. Ringheim, 505 Fifth Avenue, Kimberley.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local   No.   651. — Secretary,   J.   Patterson,   Box  989,
Kimberley.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary, Mrs.
E. Luberg, Post Office, Kimberley.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, Miss O. Johnston,
Box 1456, Kimberley.
Trades' and General Workers' Union, U.M.M. & S.W.
Union, Local No. 935.—Secretary, H. Bradley, Box 989,
Kimberley.
Kitimat
Aluminum Workers, District Trades and Labour Council,
Local   No.   315,   Kitimat   and   Kemano. — Secretary,
George Maynes, Box 2129, Smeltersite, Kitimat.
Bricklayers, Masons and Plasterers, International Union
of, Local No. 5.—Secretary, A. W. Sprosan, Box 4053,
Riverside Postal Station, Kitimat.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1081.—Secretary, Oscar B. Waage, Box
789, Smeltersite, Kitimat. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 121
Construction and General Labourers' Union, Local No.
384.—Secretary, William Major, Box 846, Station A,
Kitimat.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1661.—Secretary, John F. Buckley, Box 242, Ne-
chako Postal Station, Kitimat.
Fire Fighters' Association, Alcan.—Secretary, Frank M.
Grogan, Box 415, Nechako P.O., Kitimat.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1802.—Secretary, F. Middlemass,
Box 2070, Anderson Creek, Kitimat.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — Secretary,
Mrs. N. Kitlar, Box 1133, Smeltersite Post Office,
Kitimat.
Public Employees and School Board Employees, Kitimat,
Local No. 707.—Secretary, R. B. Hyde, Box 638, Nechako Post Office, Kitimat.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Kitimat, District No. 80.—
Secretary, E. Hampson, Box 433, Station A, Kitimat.
Lac la Hache
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, P.G.E.
—Secretary, V. J. Cardin, Wright Station Road, Lac la
Hache.
Ladner
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated. •— Secretary,
D. O. White, V Wireless Station, Ladner.
Fire Fighters' Association, Federal, Vancouver Wireless
Station.—Secretary, L. Orr, Ladner.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 4.—
Secretary, Nick Spilchen, Ladner.
Municipal Employees' Union, Delta Branch, Local No.
23.—Secretary, A. L. M. Robbins, 4995 Central Avenue, Ladner.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian. — Secretary,
D. A. Robertson, c/o Post Office, Ladner.
Ladysmith
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, C.P.R.
System, Ladysmith.
Public Employees' Union, Ladysmith, Local No. 237.—
Secretary, William Orr, Box 243, Ladysmith.
Teachers'  Federation,  B.C.,  District No.  67.—Secretary,
H. Morgan, Box 513, Chemainus.
Lake Cowichan
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 905.—Secretary, G. Mackus, Box 607, Lake
Cowichan.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. — President, G. W. Brown,
Lake Cowichan.
Langford
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — Secretary,
W. H. Slugget, 1477 Saanich Road, Victoria.
Langley Prairie
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 32.—
Secretary, E. Burnell, R.R. 5, Langley Prairie.
Government Employees' Association, B.C., Fraser Valley
District.—Secretary, J. Buckley, 19617 Forty-eighth Avenue, R.R. 2, Langley Prairie.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian. — Secretary,
S.  M.  Inkster, 4306 Two Hundred and Thirty-second
Street, Langley Prairie.
Teachers'  Federation, B.C., Langley, District No.  35.—
President, Mrs. Alice E. Greenwood, R.R. 7, Langley
Prairie.
LlLLOOET
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — Secretary,
E. A. Beaumont, Box 5, Lillooet.
Railwaymen, Canadian Association of, Local No. 27-74-85.
—Secretary, F. E. C. Smith, Box 128, Lillooet.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—President, J. M. B. Johanne-
son, Box 248, Lillooet.
Lytton
Teachers' Federation, B.C., South Cariboo, District No.
30.—Secretary, Miss Mary Lawrence, Lytton.
Matsqui
Packinghouse  Workers  of America,  United,  Local No.
501.—Secretary, A. Gustafson, Matsqui.
McBride
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — Secretary,
G. G. Callaghan, McBride.
Railway and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 247.—Secretary, J. A. Carstairs,
McBride.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., McBride, District No. 58.—
President, Miss Shirley Galloway, McBride.
Merritt
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — Secretary,
J. H. Goldie, Box 1601, Merritt.
Teachers'  Federation,  B.C.,   Merritt,  District No.  31.—■
President, H. C. Parr, Box 378, Merritt.
Mission City
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of.—Secretary, D. J. Sewell, Box 425, Mission City.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Mission City, District No. 75.
—Secretary, Ralph L. Tortorelli, Box 873, Mission City.
Mount Sheer
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Britannia.—Secretary, G. A. Bennett, Box 174, Mount
Sheer.
Nakusp
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Arrow Lakes, District No. 10.
—President, S. Bryant, General Delivery, Nakusp.
Namu
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 29.—
Secretary, R. Giesel, Namu.
Nanaimo
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 527.—Secretary, Patrick R. Houlihan, 528
Sterling Avenue, Nanaimo.
Civic Employees' Union, National, Local No. 401.—Secretary, David T. Jacques, 656 Victoria Road, Nanaimo.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Nanaimo Local.
—Secretary, J. C. Zasburg, West Road, Northfield.
Dry Cleaning and Laundry Workers' Union, Local No.
1.—Secretary, Mrs. Hazel Rogers, 480 St. George Street,
Nanaimo.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
905.—Secretary, T. McDonald, 50 Giggleswick Place,
Nanaimo.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 15.—
Secretary, F. W. Meabry, 1630 Waddington Street,
Nanaimo.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—Secretary,
R. W. R. Heard, 533 Kennedy Street, Nanaimo.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 619.—Secretary, Ebenezer
Muir, 275 Skinner Street, Nanaimo.
Lathers' International Union, Wood, Wire and Metal,
Local No. 546.—Secretary, J. M. Berger, Cedar P.O.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 501.—
President, Austin Craven, 805 Wentworth Street, Nanaimo.
Mine Workers of America, United, Local No. 7355.—
Secretary, George Bryce, 60 Robins Street, Nanaimo.
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Operative, International
Association of.—Local No. 28.—Secretary, H. Hack-
wood, 218 Haliburton Street, Nanaimo.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary,
J. E. Campbell, c/o Post Office, Nanaimo.
Public Employees, School Board, Local No. 606.—Secretary, Michael Krall, 644 Haliburton Street, Nanaimo.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 695.—Secretary, W. Young-
husband, 250 Kennedy Street, Nanaimo.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1187.—Secretary, C. D. Barrie, 625 Brechin Hill Road,
Nanaimo. H 122
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Nanaimo, District No. 68.—■
President, H. Johnson, 1723 Brechin Road, Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 3.—
President, C. Tallman, 507 Bradley Street, Nanaimo.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 12.—
President, Mrs. F. Waugh, 618 Kennedy Street, Nanaimo.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 337.—
Secretary, A. R. Glen, Box 166, Nanaimo.
Naramata
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, District No. 11,
Local No. 48.—Secretary, Helen H.Vaughan, Naramata.
Natal
Mine Workers of America, United, Local No. 7292.—Secretary, Simeon Weaver, Drawer C, Natal.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Natal, District No. 1.—Secretary, A. Grigoruk, Box 33, Natal.
Nelson
Barbers', Hairdressers', Cosmetologists' and Proprietors'
International Union of America, Local No. 196.—Secretary, M. N. Olson, 463 Josephine Street, Nelson.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers'
International Union of America, Local No. 292.—Secretary, Lawrence Chaluck, 714 Silica Sreet, Nelson.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2458.—Secretary, Frank Tough, 1023
Eighth Street, Nelson.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 1900, Nelson.—Secretary, T. G. Rain, 408 Victoria
Street, Nelson.
Firemen and Oilers' International Union, Local No.
1141.—Secretary, W. E. Rusnack, R.R. 1, Nelson.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—Secretary,
Mrs. M. E. Emmott, Court-house, Nelson.
Hotel and Restaurant Employes' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 707. — Secretary, W. H.
Vickers, General Delivery, Nelson.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 579.—
President, R. C. Wright,   110 Houston Street, Nelson.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 631.—Secretary, D. McGinn, 809 Cottonwood
Street, Nelson.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 663.—
Secretary, J. E. Baldock, 300 Kerr Block, Nelson.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 181.—Secretary, T. Imming, 513 Latimer Street,
Nelson.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — Secretary,
H. L. Mason, 820 Mill Street, Nelson.
Public Employees, Nelson Civic, Local No. 339.—Secretary, Miss K. Maras, Box 77, Nelson.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 558. ■—■
Secretary, F. H. Lowe, Legion Hall, Victoria Street,
R.R. 1, Nelson.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
98.—Secretary, J. A. Niven, 702 Mill Street, Nelson.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1291.—Secretary, Ermila Gri, 615 Davies Street, Nelson.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No.
2318.—Secretary, B. J. Monteleons, 314 Hart Street,
Nelson.
Trainmen's Canadian Union, Local No. 4. — Secretary,
W. C. Chapman, Box 343, Nelson.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Nelson, District No. 7.—Secretary, Miss Kathlyn M. Porter, 715 Kokanee Avenue,
Nelson.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Nelson, Local
No. 4.—President, W. Ludlow, 609 Cedar Street, Nelson.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Nelson, Local
No. 13.—President, Miss A. McDonald, 1017 Hoover
Street, Nelson.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Employees' Association, Nelson Branch.—Secretary, Mrs. P. Harrison,
c/o 356 Baker Street, Nelson.
New Denver
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — Secretary,
Mrs. D. M. Harris, New Denver.
New Hazelton
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union
of.— Secretary, P. Mullin, New Hazelton.
New Westminster
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1251.—Secretary, Harold Taft, 248 Chestnut Street, New Westminster.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2534.—Secretary, George Chernoff, 2630
South-east Marine Drive, New Westminster.
Civil Servants, Amalgamated.—Secretary, H. W. Darby,
381 Gorit Road, R.R. 8, New Westminster, B.C.
Cordage Industrial Rope and Twine Workers' Union,
Local No. 1.—Secretary, G. St. Laurent, 2217 Lorraine
Avenue, R.R. 2, New Westminster.
Distillery, Rectifying, Wine and Allied Workers' International Union of America, Local No. 69.—Secretary,
Russell A. Cyr, 1890 Second Street, New Westminster.
Fire Fighters', International Association, of, Local No.
256.—Secretary, Lloyd C. Bussey, 47 Seventh Avenue,
New Westminster.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 5.—
Secretary, Jack Furiak, 232 Wood Street, New Westminster, B.C.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—Secretary,
William Morgan, 610 Fourth Street, New Westminster.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union.—
Secretary, Thomas Popper, 1505 Sixth Street, New
Westminster.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union.—Secretary, J. F. Thomson, 70 Eighth
Street, New Westminster.
Lathers, Wood, Wire and Metal Workers, International
Union of, Local No. 356.—Secretary, M. J. Johnson,
140 Lougheed Highway, New Westminster.
Letter Carriers' Federated Association, Local No. 32.—
Secretary, A. Broughton, 9125 One Hundred and Sixtieth Street, R.R. 5, North Surrey.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 502.—Secretary, Roland R. Cope,
1409 Eighth Avenue, New Westminster.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 511.—Secretary, J. M. Kendrick, 2019
Eighth Avenue, New Westminster.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 131.—
Secretary, W. G. Waterman, 9410 River Road, R.R. 1,
New Westminster, B.C.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 151.—
Secretary, J. Westloke, 575 East Fourteenth Avenue,
New Westminster.
Marine Engineers' National Association.—Secretary, G.
Tighe, 465 Rousseau Street, New Westminster.
Millwrights' Local, Union of United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, Local No. 2736.—Secretary, John Thiesen, 11410 Two Hundred and Fourteenth Street, North Surrey.
Newspaper Guild, Local No. 220.—Secretary, Miss Mary
Mahovlic, 5 East Eighth Avenue, New Westminster.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
180.—Secretary, G. Baxter, 375 Keary Street, New Westminster.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
412.—Secretary, J. Bleackley, 1517 Seventeenth Avenue,
New Westminster.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
499.—Secretary, B. Wright, 918 Fourteenth Avenue,
New Westminster.
Paper Makers, International Brotherhoood of, Local No.
456.—Secretary, Miss G Christine, 226 Tenth Street,
New Westminster.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of United States and
Canada, Journeymen and Apprentices of the.—Secretary, J. Reid, 906 Fifth Street, New Westminster.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — Secretary,
J. W. McElgunn, 328 Eleventh Avenue, New Westminster. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 123
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Local No.
427.—Secretary, Thomas William, 1041 Holly Street,
Burnaby.
Public Employees' Union, Coquitlam Municipality, Local
No. 386.—Secretary, T. L. Mitchell, 602 Clarke Road,
New Westminster.
Public Employees' Union, New Westminster Local No.
386.—Secretary, Tony Nikkei, 207 East Durban, New
Westminster.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
280.—Secretary, C. Hartley, 1078 Eighteenth Avenue,
New Westminster.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 226.—Secretary, L.
Donelan, 1605 Tenth Avenue, Burnaby.
School Board Employees' Union, District No. 43, Local
No. 561.—Secretary, Mrs. M. Spill, 647 Rochester
Road, New Westminster.
School Maintenance Union, Local No. 409.—Secretary,
R. Hedley-Rhodes, 323 Tenth Street, New Westminster.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 5432.—Secretary, R. Stewart, Box 336, New Westminster.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3495.—Secretary, E. S. McKenzie, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver
10.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of
America, Amalgamated Association of, Local No.
134.—Secretary, N. Cox, 2025 Marine Drive, New Westminster.
Switchmen's Union of North America, Local No. 111.—
Secretary, F. E. Barlow, 2304 West Fifteenth Avenue,
New Westminster.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., New Westminster.—Secretary,
Miss Diana Julian, 307 Fifth Street, New Westminster.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., New Westminster Secondary
District No. 40.—Secretary, Miss Isobel Ferguson Steele,
414 Royal Avenue, New Westminster.
Teachers' Federation, B.C. Principals, New Westminster,
District No. 40.—Secretary, H. M. Campbell, 1108 Crest
Drive, New Westminster.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 7.—
President, G. Heselton, 2561 Burns Street, South Burnaby.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 632. —
Secretary, W. J. Calhoun, Suite 6, Carlton Court, 317
Third Avenue, New Westminster.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Employees' Association.—Secretary, T. E. Michell, Suite 1, 4303 Main
Street, Vancouver 10.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-357.
—Secretary, Rae Eddie, 612 Carnarvon Street, New
Westminster.
North Burnaby
Bricklayers', Masons' and Plasterers' International Union
of North America, Local No. 1.—Secretary, T. Hallmark, 4321 Cambridge Street, North Burnaby.
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers' International Union,
Local No. 16-601.—Secretary, N. B. Malloy, 4737 East
Hastings Street, North Burnaby.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
162.—Secretary, J. Longmuir, 3727 Douglas Road,
North Burnaby.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 10.—
President, Mrs. H. Meldrum, 6615 Charles Street, North
Burnaby.
Terrazzo Workers', Tile and Marble Setters' International
Association, Local No. 3.—Secretary, D. P. Evan, 4116
Dominion Street, North Burnaby.
North Kamloops
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 258.—Secretary, R. J. Perry, 265 Perry Avenue, North Kamloops.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
148.—Secretary, T. Piccolo, 484 Mulberry Avenue,
North Kamloops.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 150.—Secretary, R.
Lombardi, 156 William Street, North Kamloops.
North Surrey
Boilermakers,   Iron   Ship   Builders,   Blacksmiths,   Forgers
and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
194.—Secretary, A. V. Delcourt, 5662 One Hundred and
Forty-fourth Street, R.R. 15, North Surrey.
Gypsum Workers' Union, Local No. 578.—Secretary, A.
Halcro, 11089, 130A Street, North Surrey.
Teachers'  Federation,  B.C., District No.  36.—President,
C. Bless, 13737 Trans-Canada Highway, R.R. 4, North
Surrey.
North Vancouver
Civic Employees'  Association,   North  Vancouver,   Local
No. 389.—Secretary, Miss Nora K. Slade, 2958 Mahon
Avenue, North Vancouver.
Employees' Union of the University of B.C.—Secretary,
A. Leathern, 518 East Eighth Street, North Vancouver.
Fire  Fighters'  Association,  Local   No.   914. — Secretary,
R. J.  Hallaway, 645 St. David's Avenue, North Vancouver.
Fire Fighters' Union, District of North Vancouver, Local
No. 1183.—Secretary, David J. Dean, 1450 Laing Drive,
North Vancouver.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 30.—Secretary, W. B. Ramsay, 1692 Brooks Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and   Station   Employees,   Brotherhood   of,   Local   No.
404.—Secretary, A. E. Lawton, 1140 West Keith Road,
North Vancouver.
Teachers'  Federation,  B.C.,  District No.  44.—Secretary,
J.  S. Thompson,  930 Whitechurch, North Vancouver.
Ocean Falls
Operating Engineers,  International Union of, Local No.
880.—Secretary,   Archie   M.   Lauch,   Box   455,   Ocean
Falls.
Paper Makers,  International Brotherhood of, Local No.
360.—Secretary, W. J. Scott, Box 250, Ocean Falls.
Pulp,   Sulphite   and   Paper   Mill   Workers,   International
Brotherhood   of,   Local   No.   312. — Secretary,   John
Mathieson, Box 190, Ocean Falls.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Ocean   Falls,   District   No.
49.—Secretary, Miss E. Brownell, Box 572, Ocean Falls.
Okanagan Centre
Fruit and Vegetable Workers, Federated, Okanagan
Centre, District 48, Local No. 8.—Secretary, E. Cooney,
Okanagan Centre.
Oliver
Fruit and  Vegetable  Workers'  Union.—Secretary,  Mary
Wilson, Oliver.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian. — Secretary,
Robert S. Potter, Oliver.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Okanagan   Border,   District
No. 14.—President, D. Wood, Oliver.
Osoyoos
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, District 48, Local
No. 3.—Secretary, Sophie Townrow, Osoyoos.
Pender Harbour
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 16.—
Secretary, J. Cameron, Madeira Park.
Penticton
Civic Employees' Union, Penticton, Local No. 308.—Secretary, D. C. Gunn, c/o City Hall, 101 Main Street,
Penticton.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Penticton.—Secretary, J. J. Waddell, 556 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
953.—Secretary, Frank Bain, 4559 Belmont Avenue,
Vancouver.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, District 48, Local
No. 1, Penticton.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—Secretary,
Miss D. M. Tarchuk, 888 Fairview Road, Penticton.
Letter Carriers' Federated Association, Local No. 95.—
Secretary, Ralph Johnson, Box 86, West Bench, Penticton. H 124
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 886.—
President, A. R. Fulkerson, 978 Argyle Street, Penticton.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 889.—Secretary, P. N. Coulter, 101 Manor
Park Drive, Penticton.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary, Joe
Gonda, 472 Forestbrook Drive, Penticton.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 914.—Secretary, S. D. Marshall, 295 Nelson Avenue, Penticton.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 303.—Frank Quest, 964
Dynes Avenue, Penticton.
Railroad Trainmen, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No.
3.—Secretary, H. R. Kinsey, 678 Winnipeg Avenue, Penticton.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Penticton, District No. 15.—
Secretary, Mrs. Odette Mathias, Box 552, R.R. 1, Penticton.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 541.—Secretary, N. L. Duncan, 130 Jermyn Avenue, Penticton.
Pioneer Mines
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 693.—Secretary, H. H. Ashby, Pioneer Mines.
Port Alberni
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 513.—Secretary, R. M. Foxcroft, 614
Ninth Avenue North, Port Alberni.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 25.—
Port Alberni.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Beverage Dispensers' Union, Local No. 697.—Secretary, Gordon S.
Deugan, 722 Hilton Avenue, Port Alberni.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, Local No.
503.—Secretary, C. Anderson, 110 Anderson Avenue
South, Port Alberni.
Painters, Decorators and Paper Hangers of America,
Brotherhood of, Local No. 1642.—Secretary, Don Mcintosh, 211 Seventh Avenue North, Port Alberni.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary,
S. R. Stocken, 714 Tenth Avenue, Port Alberni.
Public Employees' Civic Union, Port Alberni and District.
—Secretary, J. Stanley Wilson, 905 Bute Street, Port
Alberni.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 592.—Secretary, W. Krai-
vetz, 1001 Ninth Avenue South, Port Alberni.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-85.—
Secretary, J. A. Moore, 708 Eleventh Avenue South,
Port Alberni.
Port Alice
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 514.—Secretary, Thomas C.
Eve, Box 375, Port Alice.
Port Coquitlam
Public Employees' Union, Local No. 25.—Secretary, G.
Bracewell, 2015 Shaughnessy Street, Port Coquitlam.
Port Hardy
Civil   Servants   of  Canada,   Amalgamated,   Port  Hardy
Branch.—Secretary, J. S. Fenton, Airport, Port Hardy.
Port Mellon
Pulp,   Sulphite  and  Paper  Mill Workers,   International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 297.—Secretary, A. Lock-
wood, Box 97, Port Mellon.
Port Moody
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 5404.—Secretary, J. H. Cuddeford, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Pouce Coupe
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C.—Secretary,
T. C. Chapman, Pouce Coupe.
Powell River
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2068.—Secretary, R. B. Lawson, Box 700,
Powell River.
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C.—Secretary,
Miss E. Cook, Box 116, Powell River.
Paper Makers,  International Brotherhood of, Local No.
142.—Secretary,   W.   J.   McDonald,   Box   531,   Powell
River.
Pulp,   Sulphite   and   Paper   Mill   Workers,   International
Brotherhood  of,  Local No.  76.—Secretary,  R. Bryce,
Box 810, Powell River.
School Board Employees, Powell River, District No. 47.—
Secretary, J. W. Bagnall, Box 762, Powell River.
Teachers'  Federation,   B.C.,   Powell  River,  District No.
47.—President, K. S. Thibodeau, Box 83, Powell River.
Prince George
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of,   Local  No.   1998.—Secretary,   A.  W.   Wilson,   530
Freeman Street, Prince George.
Civic Employees' Union, Prince George, Local No. 399.—
Secretary,  M.   Sakamoto,   231   George   Street,   Prince
George.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary, G. B.
Allingham, Prince George.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 242.—Secretary, F. R. Freeman, 2610 Pine Street.
Box 201, Prince George.
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C.—Secretary,
Mrs. F. P. Vernon, c/o B.C. Forest Service, 1411 Third
Avenue, Prince George.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 843.—
President, R. T. MacKenrot,   1674 Oak Street, Prince
George.
Locomotive   Firemen   and   Enginemen,   Brotherhood   of,
Local No. 827.—Secretary, R. M. Walker, 582 Winnipeg
Street, Prince George.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 202.—Secretary, C. Adcock, 505-506 Scott Block,
272 Main Street, Winnipeg, Man.
Operating Engineers, International Union of, Local No.
858.—Secretary, A. E. Chapman, 1515 Redwood Street,
Prince George.
Postal  Employees   and  Federated  Association  of Letter
Carriers, Local No.  127.—Secretary, G. W. Meadows,
1704 Maple Street, Prince George.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry  of the  United States
and Canada, Journeymen and Apprentices of the, Local
No.   238.—Secretary,   Mylo   G.   Sandberg,   1255   Fifth
Avenue, Prince George.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 869.—Secretary,   A.   S.   Clapperton,  711   Burden   Street,   Prince
George.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 28.—Secretary, David
Ross, Jr., 1692 Tenth Avenue, Prince George.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Prince George, District No.
57.—Secretary,   Miss   M.   Dale   Maclnnes,   Connaught
Elementary School, Prince George.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Employees' Association.—President,   N.   Forscutt,   1294  Third  Avenue,
Prince George.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-424.
—Secretary, C. H. Webb, 1331 Fourth Avenue, Prince
George.
Prince Rupert
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of (Pile Drivers' Section), Local No. 1549.—Secretary,
J. S. Black, Box 94, Prince Rupert.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No.   1735.—Secretary, J. S. Black, Box 94,
Prince Rupert.
Civic Employees' Union, Prince Rupert, Local No. 5.—
Secretary, E. A. Evans, Box 83, Prince Rupert.
Civil Servants  of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary, A.
Lance Rossitor, 240 Fourth Avenue West, Prince Rupert.
Deep Sea Fishermen's Union, Local No. 80.—Secretary-
Treasurer, W. H. Brett, Box 49, Prince Rupert.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No.   344.—Secretary,   L.   C.   Crampton,  Room  2,   111
Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3.
Fire   Fighters,   International  Association  of,   Local  No.
559.—Secretary, J. Furness, 1307 First Overlook Street,
Prince Rupert. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 125
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Prince Rupert
Shoreworkers, Local No. 31.—Secretary, R. L. Gardiner,
Metropole Hall, Third Avenue, Prince Rupert.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 37.—
Secretary, R. L. Gardiner, Metropole Hall, Third Avenue, Prince Rupert.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—Secretary,
G. L. Brodie, c/o Government Agency, Prince Rupert.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 636.—Secretary, N. A. Pav-
likis, Box 144, Prince Rupert.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, Local No. 505.—Secretary, Fred Viger, Box 531,
Prince Rupert.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 335.—Secretary, C. Adcock, 505-506 Scott Block,
272 Main Street, Winnipeg, Man.
Operating Engineers, International Union of, Local No.
510.—Secretary, M. B. O'Toole, 330 Fifth Avenue West,
Prince Rupert.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United States
and Canada, Journeymen and Apprentices of the, Local
No. 180.—Secretary, S. Julian, Box 146, Prince Rupert.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary,
A. G. Clibbett, c/o Post Office, Prince Rupert.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 708.—Secretary, P. J. Lester,
601 Fifth Avenue East, Prince Rupert.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1016.—,
Secretary, R. D. Ewart, 1160 Park Avenue, Prince
Rupert.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
426.—Secretary, R. Pollock, P.O. Box 496, 252 Eighth
Avenue West, Prince Rupert.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 154. — Secretary,
G. W. H. Lindelauf, 516 Sixth Avenue West, Prince
Rupert.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Prince Rupert, District No.
52.—Secretary, Miss Bernice A. Dyer, 715 Eighth
Avenue, Prince Rupert.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 413.—Secretary, G. Clarke McLean, P.O. Box 53, Prince Rupert.
Princeton
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers
of America, International Union of, Local No. 367.—
Secretary, William Burton, Jr., Box 745, Princeton.
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—Secretary,
A. Ryder, Box 464, Princeton.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary,
R. M. Boswell, Post Office, Princeton.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Princeton, District No. 17.—
Secretary, Miss Maria Mathieu, Princeton.
Qualicum Beach
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2412.—Secretary, H. Large, Box 44,
Qualicum Beach.
School Board Employees, District No. 69, Local No. 721.
—Secretary, E. Lessard, R.R. 1, Qualicum Beach.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Mount Arrowsmith (Qualicum), District No. 69.—President, Frank Holloway,
Box 13, Qualicum Beach.
Queen Charlotte City
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, Miss A. Anton,
Queen Charlotte City.
Quesnel
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 493.—Secretary, Guy Canning, General
Delivery, Quesnel.
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C.—Secretary,
R. Stephenson, Box 879, Quesnel.
Postal    Employees'    Association,    Canadian.—Secretary,
J. T. Kelly, Quesnel, B.C.
Teachers'  Federation, B.C., District No.  28.—President,
G. E. Brunelle, Box 1149, Quesnel.
Radium Hot Springs
Civil   Servants   of   Canada,   Amalgamated. — Secretary,
G. R. H. Cameron, Radium Hot Springs.
Revelstoke
Boilermakers,  Iron  Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers,
Welders  and Helpers, Local No.  466.—President,  G.
Fuoco, 805 Downie Street, P.O. Box 168, Revelstoke.
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers
of America, International Union of, Local No. 352.-—
Secretary, M. Tisdale, 1303 Victoria Road, Revelstoke.
Civic  Employees'  Union,  Revelstoke,  Local  No.   363.—
Secretary, Frank P. Muzzilo, 325 Downie Street, Revelstoke.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 381.—Secretary, J. F. Collen, Box 738, Revelstoke.
Fruit   and   Vegetable   Workers'   Union. — Secretary,   I.
Clough, Revelstoke.
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C.—Secretary,
Mrs. M. Geoghan, Box 52, Revelstoke.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 657.	
Secretary, V. J. Crosby, Victoria Road, Revelstoke.
Locomotive   Firemen   and   Enginemen,   Brotherhood   of
Local   No.   341.—Secretary,   W.   S.   King,   Box   389!
Revelstoke.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 258 —
Secretary, Guy Micieli, 720 Railroad Avenue East  P O
Box 209, Revelstoke.
Postal   Employees'    Association,    Canadian. Secretary
Ronald Belton, 307 First Street West, Revelstoke.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No
481.—Secretary, A. S. Parker, 313 First Avenue East'
Revelstoke.
Railroad  Trainmen,  Brotherhood   of,  Local  No.   51 —
Secretary,   S.   A.   Webster,   412   First   Avenue   West
Revelstoke.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Revelstoke, District No   19 —
Secretary,  Miss Dorothy J. Lindsay, Box 357   Revelstoke.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 16 —
President,  Miss  A.   Devlin,   400  Second   Street West
Revelstoke.
Trainmen's  Union,  Canadian,  Local  No.   6.—Secretary
S. A. Webster, 412 First Street West, Box 681, Revelstoke.
Richmond
Civic Employees' Association, Richmond, Local No   718
—Secretary, Miss V. McKendrick, 800 Blundell Road'
Richmond. '
Public  Employees'  Union,   Richmond,  Local  No    19 —
Secretary, J. Van Iterson, 1064 Westminster Way, Richmond.
School Board Employees' Union, Richmond.—Secretary
William Hunter, 363 Sexsmith Road, Richmond.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., District No.  37.—Secretary
Abram Enns, 1050 Bird Road, Richmond.
Teachers'  Federation,  B.C., District No.  38.—Secretary
Mrs. Kathleen Alexander, 942 Odlin Road, Richmond.
Rossland
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — Secretary
B. I. Dudley, Box 2024, Rossland.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian. — Secretary,
E. L. L'Ecluse, Box 4, Rossland.
Rutland
Timber & Sawmill Woodworkers of America.—Secretary
Raymond Hoffman, Box 114, Rutland.
Saanich
School Board Employees' Union, Saanich, Local No. 441.
—Secretary, Joseph H. Nunn, Box 42, Sidney.
Teachers' Federation,  B.C.,  Saanich, District No. 63.—
Secretary, Miss Helen L. Horel, East Saanich Road,
Saanichton P.O.
Salmo
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of
(Diamond Drillers, Western District), Local No. 1005
—Secretary, R. Griffiths, c/o Box 39, Salmo.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local  No.   901. —Secretary,  W.  Rudychuk,  Box 39^
Salmo. H 126
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Salmon Akm
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—Secretary, D.
Cameron, Box 123, Salmon Arm.
Postal   Employees'   Association,    Canadian. •— Secretary,
John E. Delaville, Salmon Arm.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Salmon Arm, District No. 20.
—Secretary, Mrs. G. A. Graham, R.R. 3, Salmon Arm.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-417.
—Secretary, W. J. Thompson, Box 880, Salmon Arm.
Saltspring Island
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Saltspring Island, District No.
64.—Secretary, Mrs. Jean Demacedo, Ganges.
Sandspit
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary, Donald Staryk, Radio Range Station, Sandspit.
Saudis
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Army Camp,
Sardis.—Secretary, J. D. Henderson, Cultus Lake.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
430.—Secretary, S. Preston, 515 South Sumas Road,
Sardis.
Sechelt
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Halfmoon Bay, District No.
64.—President, R. G. Stuckery, Halfmoon Bay.
Sidney
Air Line Traffic Employees, Trans-Canada Air Lines, Sidney Branch.—Secretary, J. Reid Hannan, 1142 Beacon
Avenue, Sidney.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Patricia Bay
Branch.—F. Edlington, R.R. 1, Sidney.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 23.—
Secretary, V. Jacobsen, 1902 Fifth Street, Sidney.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 456.—
Secretary, John Pedlow, 1325 Queens Avenue, Sidney.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — Secretary,
S. W. Hambley, c/o Post Office, Sidney.
Skidegate
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 28.—
Secretary, E. Regnery, Skidegate.
Slocan
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—President, J. Sheppy, Slocan.
Smithers
Government Employee's Association, B.C. — Secretary,
Miss M. E. Trueman, Box 822, Smithers.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 111.—
President, G. H. Duke, Jr., Box 132, Smithers.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1415.—Secretary, E. Piper, General Delivery, Smithers.
Railway and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 93.—Secretary, P. B. Emerson,
Box 247, Smithers.
Sointula
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 26.—
Secretary, A. Hilton, Sointula.
Sooke
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 24.—
Secretary, D. McFarlane, Sooke.
School   Board   Employees'   Association. — Secretary,   F.
Stones, General Delivery, Sooke.
Teachers'   Federation,   B.C.,   Sooke,   District   No.   62.—
President, R. Pauwels, 3110 Rutledge Street, Victoria.
South Burnaby
Automotive, Aircraft and Agriculture Implement Workers
of America, United, Local No. 432.—Secretary, R. W.
Fakeley, 2315 Frederick Avenue, South Burnaby.
Employees' Association, Nabob Food Products Branch of
Kelly,  Douglas  Co.—Secretary,  Miss Joyce E.  Roop,
13721   One   Hundred   and   Thirteenth   Avenue,   North
Surrey.
Firemen and Oilers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 289.—Secretary, J. E. Fairbairn, 3250 Pioneer Avenue South, Burnaby.
Packinghouse  Workers  of America,  United,   Local  No.
350.—Secretary, B. Moran, 1535 McKay Avenue, South
Burnaby.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union, Local No. 427.
—Secretary, Thomas Williams, 1041 Holly Street, South
Burnaby. >.
Stone Cutters of North America, Journeymen, Association
of.—Secretary,   Frank   Hall,   2148   Randolph   Avenue,
South Burnaby.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 20.—
President,   L.   Mitchell,   3637   Portland   Street,   South
Burnaby.
Squamish
Locomotive   Firemen   and   Enginemen,   Brotherhood   of,
Local No. 972.—Secretary, W. H. Hodsmyth, General
Delivery, Squamish.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 861.—
Secretary, J. E. Aldridge, Box 204, Squamish.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 215.—President, H. Prestwich, Alta Lake.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood  of, Local No.   1080.—
Secretary, G. E. Belair, 721 West Victoria Road, North
Vancouver.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
1419.—Secretary, W.  Curran, General Delivery,  Squamish.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Howe Sound, District No. 48.
—President, W. J. Tinney, Squamish.
Steveston
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 7.—
Secretary, Jim Ross, Box 308, Steveston.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Steveston Shore-
workers, Local No. 8.—Secretary, Ted Foort, 138 East
Cordova Street, Vancouver.
Stewart
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Portland Canal, District No.
51.—President, C. G. Powell, Stewart.
Summerland
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary, J. M.
McDougald, Experimental Farm, Summerland.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, District 48, Local
No. 12, Summerland.
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—President, Frank Bevis, West
Summerland.
Telkwa
Teachers' Federation, B.C., District No. 54.—Secretary,
Miss E. Thran, Box 21, Telkwa.
Terrace
Government Employees' Association, B.C.—Secretary, D.
Warren, Government Agency, Terrace.
Teachers'  Federation,  B.C.,  Terrace,  District No.  53.—
President, J. R. Scollon, Terrace.
Thetis Island
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Gulf Islands,
Local No. 13. — Secretary, T. E. Lestrange, Thetis
Island.
Trail
Civic Workers' Union, Trail and District, Local No. 343.
—Secretary, E. A. Heaven, Rossland.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 871.
—Secretary, R. Houndle, 2025 Fifth Avenue, Trail.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No. 941.
—Secretary,  Charles N.  Bogyo,   1573  Fourth Avenue,
Trail.
General Workers, Trail District, Local No. 931   (branch
of   International   Union   of   Mine,   Mill   and   Smelter
Workers).—Secretary, M. Walton, 910 Portland Street,
Trail.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 76.—
Secretary, H. C. Nesmith, 1265 Tamaic Avenue, Trail. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 127
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 480.— Secretary, R. Norandini, 910 Portland
Street, Trail.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — Secretary,
D. D. Weis, 869 Byers Lane, Trail.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Trail, District No. 11.—Secretary, Miss H. Hill, 925 Celia Crescent, Trail.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 340.—
Secretary, A. S. Morton, 528 Turner Street, Trail.
Tranquille
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — Secretary,
W. A. Philip, 805 Victoria Street East, Kamloops.
Tulsequah
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 858.—Secretary, T. Ross Knowles, Tulsequah.
Ucluelet
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary, F. R.
Blank, R.C.A.F. Station, Tofino, Ucluelet.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Ucluelet-Tofino, District No.
79.—President, R. D. Hall, Ucluelet.
Vananda
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Quarry and Mine Workers, Local No. 816.—Secretary,
R. Buriey, Box 22, Vananda.
Vancouver
Air Line Dispatchers' Association, Canadian, Local No.
1.—Secretary, B. M. Thompson, 1872 Barclay Street,
Vancouver 5.
Air Line Flight Attendants' Association, Canadian, Vancouver Local.—Secretary, Ross St. John, 5807 Yew
Street, Vancouver.
Air Line Navigators' Association, Canadian, Vancouver
Local.—Secretary, D. M. G. Cliffe, 4021 West Twenty-
ninth Avenue, Vancouver 8.
Air Line Pilots' Association, Canadian Local No. 1.—
Secretary, W. M. Fairey, 400-401 Electric Railway
Chambers, Winnipeg, Man.
Air Line Pilots' Association, C.P.A., Local No. 2.—
Secretary, W. M. Fairey, 400-401 Electric Railway
Chambers, Winnipeg, Man.
Air Line Pilots' Association, C.P.A., Local No. 4.—
Secretary, W. M. Fairey, 400-401 Electric Railway
Chambers, Winnipeg, Man.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers, International Union
of, Local No. 468.—Secretary, Melvin J. Kemmis,
Room 105, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Bakery Salesmen's Union, Local No. 189.—Secretary, A.
Wylie, 942 Sixteenth Avenue, Vancouver.
Barbers', Hairdressers', Cosmetologists' and Proprietors'
International Union of America, Local No. 120.—Secretary, C. E. Herrett, 109, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers
and Helpers, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
359.—Secretary, M. H. Hadley, 136 West Fifth Street,
North Vancouver.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of. — Secretary,
Francis J. Milne, 977 Broughton Street, Vancouver.
Boot and Shoe Workers' Union, Local No. 505.—Secretary, J. P. Roody, 2982 Carolina Street, Vancouver 10.
Brewery Workers' Union, Local No. 300.—Secretary, J.
Humphreys, 2460 West Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers, Machinery Movers' and Riggers, International Association
of, Local No. 97.—Secretary, George Sinclair, 222 West
Broadway, Vancouver.
Bridge, Structural and Ornamental Iron Workers, Machinery Movers and Riggers, International Association
of, Local No. 712.—Secretary, V. E. Steers, 222 West
Broadway, Vancouver.
Broadcast Employees and Technicians, National Association of, Local No. 73.—Secretary, Alan MacMillan,
3356 Heather Street, Vancouver.
Brush Workers' Federal Union, Local No. 564.—Secretary, F. H. Allan, 2615 East Twentieth Avenue, Vancouver.
Building Material, Construction and Fuel Truck Drivers'
Union, Local No. 213.—Secretary, J. Whiteford, 490
East Broadway, Vancouver.
Building Service Employees' International Union, Local
No. 244.—Secretary, Ben A. R. Morley, 216, 603 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 452.—Secretary, P. J. Deplissey, 2137
Dunblane Avenue, South Burnaby.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1928.—Secretary, G. L. Gillett, 117, 307
West Broadway, Vancouver.
Chemical Workers' Union, International, Local No. 511.—
Secretary, George Hygh, 4007 Dunbar Street, Vancouver.
City Hall Employees' Association, Vancouver, Local No.
15.—Secretary, Thomas H. Lewis, 204, 1645 West
Twelfth Avenue, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' National Union, Local No. 407.—Secretary, T. Alsbury, 200, 307 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Union, Outside Workers, Vancouver
Local.—Secretary, Jack Phillips, 1328 Kingsway, Vancouver.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary, T. P.
Dunik, 556 Granville Street, Vancouver.
Clothing Workers of America, Amalgamated, Local No.
178.—Secretary, George M. Droneck, 617, 193 East
Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Club, Cabaret and Construction Camp Culinary and Service Employees' Union, Local No. 740.—Secretary,
G. W. Faulkner, 504, 402 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Communications Association, Canadian, Local No. 4.—
Secretary, Gerald L. Gordon, 2146 York Street, Vancouver.
Counsellors' Association, B.C.—Secretary, Anne Winton,
3236 West Twenty-ninth Avenue, Vancouver.
Distillery, Rectifying, Wine and Allied Workers' International Union, Local No. 92.—Secretary, Ed Case,
1534 East Forty-first Avenue, Vancouver 15.
Distillery, Rectifying, Wine and Allied Workers' International Union, Local No. 153.—Secretary, Wilfred J.
Tremblay, 1765 East Twenty-eight Avenue, Vancouver.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 213.—Secretary, S. M. Morrison, 525 Riverside
Drive, North Vancouver.
Enamel Workers' Federal Union, Local No. 291.—Secretary, William Giesbrecht, 2390a West Broadway,
Vancouver.
Film Exchange Employees, Local No. B-71.—Secretary,
George Hislop, 1211 Leroi Street, Vancouver.
Film Exchange Employees, Local No. F-71.—Secretary,
Mrs. Elsie Bronger, 7155 Cliff Road, Vancouver.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
18.—Secretary, Frank Bavin, 4559 Belmont Avenue,
Vancouver 8.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, B.C. University
Area, Local No. 901.—Secretary, W. R. Darlington, 2
Acadia Circle, Vancouver 8.
First Aid Attendants', Industrial, Association, of B.C.—
Secretary, H. W. Mahler, 130 West Hastings Street,
Vancouver 3.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, United (Headquarters).—Secretary, H. J. Stevens, Fishermen's Hall,
138 East Cordova Street, Vancouver 4.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 1.—
Secretary, M. J. Canic, 138 East Cordova Street, Vancouver.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Shoreworkers,
Local No. 2.—Secretary, Jack Cook, 138 East Cordova
Street, Vancouver.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Sunbury, Local
No. 9.—Secretary, Carl Liden, 138 East Cordova Street,
Vancouver.
Garment Workers of America, United, Local No. 190.	
Secretary, Isabelle Rogers, 436 East Thirty-fifth Avenue,
Vancouver 15.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies', Local No.
276.—Secretary, Mrs. Anne Marshall, 113, 119 West
Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
Garment Workers' Union, International Ladies', Local
No. 287.—Secretary, Anne Marshall, 113, 119 West
Pender Street, Vancouver 3. H 128
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
General Workers' Union, Mainland, Local No. 307.—Secretary, Miss Freda Haskin, 501, 736 Granville Street,
Vancouver.
Glaziers' and Glassworkers' Union, Local No. 1527.—
Secretary, William C. Horton, 5850 Cree Street, Vancouver.
Glove Workers' Federal Union, Local No. 528.—Secretary, Eileen Gaston, 2124 East Fourth Avenue, Vancouver.
Government Employees' Association, B.C., Vancouver-
New Westminster Branch.—Secretary, E. P. Fox, 8, 407
West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Grain Workers' Union, Local No. 333.—Secretary, A. R.
Hammond, 3071 Grant Street, Vancouver 6.
Granite Cutters of America, International Association of.
—Secretary, A. Forbes, 712 East Sixty-second Street,
Vancouver.
Heat and Frost Insulators and Asbestos Workers, International Association of, Local No. 118.—Secretary, J. D.
McElrea, 4402 Kaslo Street, Vancouver.
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union,
Local No. 602.—Secretary, C. H. Savage, 1607 East
Thirty-fourth Avenue, Vancouver.
Hospital Employees' Organization of St. Paul's Hospital.
—Secretary, Jack Johnston, 3855 Hillcrest, North Vancouver.
Hospital Employees' Union, Zone 10 of B.C.—Secretary,
Alex. Paterson, 2774 East Sixteenth Avenue, Vancouver.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 28.—Secretary, D. Brown,
406, 402 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Beverage Dispensers' International Union.—Secretary, Robert G.
Beddome, 9126 Topham Road, R.R. 5, Langley.
Jewelry Workers' Union, International, Local No. 42.—
Secretary, Mrs. Mona S. Hawken, 339 West Pender
Street, Vancouver 3.
Lathers' International Union, Wood, Wire and Metal,
Local No. 207.—Secretary, M. G. Finlayson, 3720
Nelson Avenue, South Burnaby.
Laundry and Dry Cleaning Drivers' Union, branch of
Teamsters', Chauffeurs', etc., International Union, Local
No. 129.—Secretary, E. Hardy, 594 South-west Marine
Drive, Vancouver.
Laundry and Dry Cleaning Driver Salesmen Union, Local
No. 334.—Secretary, E. Matheson, 3040 East Third
Avenue, Vancouver.
Laundry Workers' International Union, Local No. 292.—
Secretary, J. H. Irving, 7660 One Hundred and Forty-
fourth Street, R.R. 15, New Westminster.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 12—
Secretary, F. Anselmo, 1009 East Fourteenth Avenue,
Vancouver.
Lithographers of America, Amalgamated, Local No. 44.—
Secretary, Earl Kinney, 199 East Eighth Avenue, Vancouver.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 320.—
President, William Perfonic, 1450 Cypress Street, Van-
couver.
Locomotive Engineers, Brotherhood of, Local No. 907.—
President, H. S. Smith, 2614 East Third Avenue, Vancouver 12.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 656.—Secretary, Michael Geluch, 4230 Price
Crescent, South Burnaby.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 939.—Secretary, L. J. Sallow, 750 Duthie
Street, Burnaby.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 501.—Secretary, Wilf J. Demerais, 4553
Brentlawn Drive, North Burnaby.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 507.—Secretary, J. Urquhart, 792 Powell
Street, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 509.—Secretary, H. Gillies, Burns Road,
Port Coquitlam.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 510.—Secretary, James B. Browne, 3677
Nineteenth Avenue, Vancouver.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's International Union,
Local No. 512.—Secretary, John Berry, 792 Powell
Street, Vancouver.
Lumber Inspectors' Union, Local No. 1.—Secretary, J. O.
Simpson, 1887 West Fifty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver 14.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 182.—
Secretary, W. F. Stock, 3591 Dunbar Street, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 692.—
Secretary, H. Fishman, 17, 2414 Main Street, Vancouver 10.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 764.—
Secretary, J. S. Hunt, 4502 West Eleventh Avenue,
Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, Local No. 876.—
Secretary, A. J. Bradford, 5362 Westminster Avenue,
P.O. Box 365, Ladner.
Machinists, International Association of (B.C. Auto
Workers), Local No. 1857.—Secretary, L. W. Burkin-
shaw, 2414 Main Street, Vancouver 10.
Mailers' Union, Local No. 70.—Secretary, D. H. Durno,
4325 Valley Drive, Vancouver.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, C.P.R.
System, Local No. 167.—Secretary, P. J. Doyle, 2638
West Twenty-first Avenue, Vancouver.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, C.P.R.
System, Local No. 210.—Secretary, R. Halliday, 3449
Turner  Street,  Vancouver.
Marble Polishers, Rubbers, Sawers and Helpers, Local
No. 179.—Secretary, John Steel, 1307 East Eighth
Avenue,  Vancouver.
Marine Checkers' and Weighers' Association, International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union,
Local No. 506.—Secretary, A. G. Smith, 878 East
Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Marine Engineers of Canada, National Association of.
Inc., Vancouver Local.—Secretary Richard G. Greaves,
1862 William Street, Vancouver.
Marine Workers' and Boilermakers' Industrial Union,
Local No. 1.—Secretary, W. Stewart, 339 West Pender
Street, Vancouver 3.
Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen of North America,
Local No. 212.—Secretary, George Johnston, 203, 307
West Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Merchant Service Guild, Inc., Canadian, Masters, Mates
and Pilots, Vancouver Branch.—Secretary, G. F. Bullock, 600-606 Ford Building, 193 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Milk Sales Drivers' and Dairy Employees' Union, Local
No. 464.—Secretary, J. Brown, 107, 490 East Broadway,
Vancouver.
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 289.—Secretary, C. G. Woods, 3995 Dundas
Street,  Vancouver.
Miscellaneous Workers, Wholesale and Retail Delivery
Drivers' and Helpers' Union, Local No. 351.—Secretary, J. Brown, 102, 490 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Molders' and Foundry Workers' International Union,
Local No. 281.—Secretary, M. Bjornson, 2309 Fraser-
view, Vancouver.
Municipal Foremen's Union, Vancouver and District,
Local No. 349.—Secretary, L. T. Emmery, 1920 West
Forty-first Avenue, Vancouver.
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, American Federation
of Musicians, Local No. 145.—Secretary, George E.
Leach, 315, 402 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
Native Brotherhood of British Columbia (Fraternal),
Headquarters.—Business Agent, Ed Nahanee, P.O. Box
182, North Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, Local No. 1.—Secretary,
Miss Allison, 2645 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver.
Newspaper Guild, Vancouver, Local No. 207.—Secretary,
Miss Jean Howarth, 4579 West Eleventh Avenue, Vancouver.
Newspaper Pressmen, Vancouver, Local No. 25.—Secretary, V. W. Griffiths, 2614 Ottawa Avenue, West Vancouver.
Office Employees' Association, B.C. Electric, Local No.
378.—Secretary, E. King, Social Club, 425 Carrall
Street, Vancouver 4.
Office Employees' Association, International, Local No.
15.—Secretary, Miss Tillie Collins, 1790 Adanac Street,
Vancouver 6. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 129
Operating Engineers, International Union of, Local No.
115.—Secretary, E. McLean, 5804 Fraser Street, Vancouver.
Operating Engineers, International Union of, Local No.
882.—Secretary, Henry A. Berger, 5502 Balsam Street,
Vancouver.
Operating Engineers, International Union of, Local No.
963.—Secretary, George Zailo, 380 East Fifteenth Avenue,  Vancouver.
Operators' Union, South Westminster, Special Local No.
1007, International Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers of
Canada.—Secretary, Harry Remier, 13379 Eightieth
Avenue, North Surrey.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
249.—Secretary, J. Atkinson, 3335 Windsor Street, Vancouver 10.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
283.—Secretary, E. Taylor, 1147 East Sixty-first Avenue,
Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
341.—Secretary, W. Doig, 1377 West Seventieth Avenue,
Vancouver 14.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
445.—Secretary, H. Lindman, 3702 Quebec Street, Vancouver 10.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
453.—Secretary, A. Lavallee, 4148 Pandora St., Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
472.—Secretary, G. Bason, 836 West Twenty-seventh
Avenue, Vancouver 9.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
541 (Headquarters).—Secretary, E. Quinell, 3, 45 Kings-
way, Vancouver 10.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, Local No.
541.—Secretary, E. Shorrock, Room 3, 45 Kingsway,
Vancouver 10.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, Local No. 138.—Secretary, John Hines, 2142
Grant Street, Vancouver.
Paint and Varnish Workers' Union, Local No. 1550.—
Secretary, Otto Tiedje, 3756 Ontario Street, Vancouver,
10.
Pattern Makers' Association, Vancouver and District,
Local No. 1260.—Secretary, E. Westmoreland, 4504
Mountain Highway, North Vancouver.
Photo Engravers' International Union of North America,
Local No. 54.—Secretary, W. Blenkin, 4516 Parker
Street, North Burnaby.
Pile Drivers', Bridge, Dock and Wharf Builders' Union,
Local No. 2404.—Secretary, S. C. Allen, 2737 Randolph
Street, South Burnaby.
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Operative, International
Association of, Local No. 779.—Secretary, W. E.
McMynn, 4860 Eton Street, North Burnaby.
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Operative, International
Association of, Local No. 919.—Secretary, Ralph Baker,
101, 119 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United States and
Canada, Journeymen and Apprentices of the, Local No.
170.—Secretary, J. L. Fisher, 6921 Union Street, North
Burnaby.
Policemen's Federal Labour Union, Local No. 12.—Secretary, Daniel Brown, 75 East Fifty-third Street, Vancouver.
Porters, Brotherhood of Sleeping Car.—Secretary, Ernest
Lawrence, 3696 East Georgia Street, Vancouver.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary, J. P.
Doyle, 4509 West Ninth Avenue, Vancouver.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' International Union,
Local No. 69.—Secretary, Thos. S. Ewart, 303 East
Sixtieth Street, Vancouver 15.
Printing Specialties and Paper Products Union, Local No.
598.—Secretary, R. C. Banninger, 2753 Horley Street,
Vancouver 16.
Projectionists' Union, International Alliance of Theatrical
Stage Employees, Local No. 348.—Secretary, Don G.
Foli, 3460 Prince Albert Street, Vancouver 10.
Public Employees  (B.C.  Division), Joint Council of.—
Secretary, John Knight, 6565 Wiltshire Street, Vancouver 14.
5
Public Employees, National Union of, Local No. 392.—
Secretary, Thomas Buchanan, 2762 McGill Avenue,
Vancouver 6.
Public Employees, Sewerage and Drainage Board, Local
No. 393.—Secretary, R. Skinner, 571 West Twenty-
second Avenue, Vancouver.
Public Library Staff Association, Main Library, Local No.
395.—Secretary, Mrs. Constance Devine, Main Library,
Vancouver 14.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 433.—Secretary, O. Braaten,
Ste. 1, 525 West Pender Street, Vancouver.
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 655.—Secretary, Kay Gibson,
7021 East Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Pursers' and Chief Stewards' Association, Local No. 608.
—Secretary, Norman Davidson, 1074 West Pender
Street, Vancouver.
Radio and Television Employees' Association of Canada,
Vancouver Local.—Secretary, Miss Margaret Gillis, c/o
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Vancouver.
Radio and Television Artists' Association of Canada,
Vancouver Local.—Secretary, Leonard Hayman, Apt.
31, 1243 Thurlow Street, Vancouver 5.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 144.—
Secretary, W. R. Wright, K. of P. Hall, 303 East
Eighth Ave., Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 987.—
Secretary, William Basil, 226 Flack Block, 163 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1040.—
Secretary, W. E. Doyle, Labour Headquarters, 307 West
Broadway, Vancouver.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
58.—Secretary, H. Holmes, 2510 West Twenty-first
Avenue, Vancouver 8.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local No.
773.—Secretary, R. B. Thompson, 3207 Venables Street,
Vancouver.
Railway Conductors and Brakemen, Order of, Pacific
Lodge.—Secretary, W. J. Boston, 1841 Whyte Avenue,
Vancouver 9.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 59.—Secretary, Bill
Schlamp, 3228 Napier Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 82.—President, T. Jack,
8030 Oak Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 162.—Secretary, R.
Doty, 1050 Handsworth Street, Noth Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 221.—Secretary, Garry
Palmer, 2406 West Eighth Street, Vancouver.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 275.—Secretary, Frank
Fellner, 3115 West Twenty-eighth Avenue, Vancouver.
Railway Mail Clerks' Association, Vancouver Local.—
Secretary, R. H. Busch, 4660 Arbour Street, South
Burnaby.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 46.
—Secretary, L. Ramsay, 2761 Brighton Street, New
Westminster.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 526.
—Secretary, J. H. Vallance, 4497 Quebec Street, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 630.
—Secretary, L. M. Zachariasis, 4464 Forrest Street,
South Burnaby.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1241.
—Secretary, Fred Palmer, 3869 Union Street, South
Burnaby.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1321.
—Secretary, Evelyn P. Leece, 2156 East Forty-fourth
Avenue, Vancouver. H 130
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No, 1322.
—Secretary,   Mrs.   Nora  M.   Titchener,  4980  Walden
Street, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1370.
—Secretary, Mrs. J. G. Cairns, 3595 East Twenty-ninth
Avenue, Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 2315.
—Secretary,  J. E.  Battye, 525 East Sixtieth Avenue,
Vancouver.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 3016.
—Secretary, Mrs. G. R. Dore, 2601 Twenty-fifth Avenue
North-east, Calgary, Alta.
Refrigeration Service and Installation Workers, Local No.
516.—Secretary,  Lionel R.  Wintle,   137 West Fortieth
Avenue, Vancouver.
Registered Nurses' Association of B.C.—Secretary, Miss
Alice Wright, R.N., 2524 Cypress Street, Vancouver 8.
Retail Food and Drug Clerks' Union, Local No. 1518.—
Secretary,  David A.  Wade,  4620 Irmin Street,  South
Burnaby.
Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, Local No.
535.—Secretary,  Miss Lois J.  Mcintosh,  Room  1, 49
West Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, Local No.
580.—Secretary,   Miss   L.   Hauser,   Room   1,  49  West
Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Seamen's International Union, Vancouver Branch.—Business  Agent,  N.   Cunningham,  298   Main  Street,  Vancouver.
School Service Employees' Association, Vancouver, Local
No.   392.—Secretary,   Mrs.   E.   C.  Begg,  5246  Rhodes
Street, Vancouver 16.
Sheet   Metal  Workers'   International  Association,   Local
No. 280.—Secretary, A.  McGee, 307 West Broadway,
Vancouver.
Sheet  Metal  Workers'   International  Association,   Local
No.  314.—Secretary, T. R. Owen, 920 East Fifty-fifth
Avenue, Vancouver 15.
Shingle Weavers' Union of United Brotherhood of Carpenters   and   Joiners   of  America,   Local  No.   2802..—
Secretary, J.  E.  Hird,   1524  West  Sixty-fifth  Avenue,
Vancouver 14.
Shipwrights', Boat Builders', Joiners' and Caulkers' Union,
Local No. 506.— Secretary, James T. Best, 411 West
Cordova Street, Vancouver.
Sign   and   Pictorial   Painters'   Union,   Local  No.   726.—
Secretary,   William   O.   Clarkson,   5802   Larch   Street,
Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 2655.—Secretary, J. Thomas, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 2821.—Secretary, A. Whittaker, 1837 East Third Avenue, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 2952.—Secretary, H. Cook, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3229.—Secretary, R. Summers, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3253.—Secretary, N. Canavor, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3302.—Secretary, F. Horton, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3376.—Secretary, L. Magda, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3452.—Secretary, R. L. Symons, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3546.—Secretary, W. M. Elder, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Steelworkers of America, United, Local No. 3910.—Secretary, George Jones, 33 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Sterotypers' Union,  International, Local No.  88—Secretary,   R.   J.   Millmen,   323   East  Twenty-fourth   Street,
North Vancouver.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of
America, Amalgamated Association of, Local No. 101.
—Secretary, Charles Stewart, 125 East Eighth Avenue,
Vancouver 10.
Structural Draftsmen, Association of, Vancouver Local.—
Secretary, W. R. Baker, 1040 Mount Royal Boulevard,
North Vancouver.
Sugar Workers' Union, affiliated with the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, Local No. 517.—
Secretary, G. C. Emery, Room 1, 49 West Hastings
Street, Vancouver.
Taxi-cab, Stage, Bus Drivers and Dispatchers, Local No.
151.—Secretary, C. E. Youngs, 42 East Thirty-ninth
Avenue, Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Elementary Schools, Local
No. 39a.—Secretary, Miss Jean T. Fraser, 4040 West
Thirty-fifth Avenue, Vancouver 16.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., School Administrators, District No. 39.— Secretary, A. A. Hards, 2251 Colling-
wood Street, Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Secondary Schools, Local No.
39b.—Secretary, William Alsbury, 2772 East Fifth
Avenue, Vancouver 12.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., School Supervisors.—Secretary, Miss Marjorie McGregor, 1595 West Tenth Avenue,
Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., University Hill District.—
President, O. Erwin, 5395 Chancellor Boulevard, Vancouver 8.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Headquarters. ■— Secretary,
D. C. Ovans, 1644 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 1.—
President, W. Miller, 2112 Cornwall Street, Vancouver.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 5.—
President, W. Hamilton, Room 2, 1879 Barclay Street,
Vancouver 5.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 14.—
President, Miss L. Asher, 326 East Fifty-sixth Avenue,
Vancouver 15.
Textile Workers' Union of America, Local No. 12.—
Secretary, Mrs. Annie Armstrong, 3535 Vining Crescent,
Vancouver.
Textile Workers' Industrial Union of B.C., Local No. 221.
—Secretary, W. Skurjat, 4275 Lynn Valley Road, North
Vancouver.
Theatre Employees' Union, Local No. B-72.—Secretary,
John R. Foster, Room 6, 1004 Wolfe Avenue, Vancouver 9.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Machine
Operators of the United States and Canada, International Alliance of, Local No. 118.—Secretary, S. A.
Summers, 1055 Handsworth Road, North Vancouver.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Machine
Operators of the United States and Canada, International Alliance of, Local No. 348.—Secretary, D. G.
Foli, 3460 Prince Albert Street, Vancouver.
Tile and Marble Setters' and Terrazzo Workers' International Association, Local No. 78.—Secretary, R. R.
Walsh, 1095 West Fourteenth Avenue, Vancouver.
Traffic Employees' Association, Trans-Canada Air Lines.—
Secretary, Miss W. N. Smith, 3879 West Thirty-first
Street, Vancouver.
Truck Drivers' and Helpers' Union, General, Local No.
31.—Secretary, R. A. Lenfesty, 1151 Sperling Street,
North Burnaby.
Truck and Bag industrial Workers' Union, Local No. 1.—
Secretary, Anthony Michelson, 2945 Clarke Drive, Vancouver.
Tunnel and Rock Workers' Union, branch of International
Hod Carriers', Building and Common Labourers' Union,
Local No. 168.—Secretary, Harry Croft, 337 West
Broadway, Vancouver.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 226.—
Secretary, Peter Campbell, 1063 Adderley Street, North
Vancouver.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Employees' Association, Vancouver Local.—Secretary, Charles Emeny,
2235 Nelson Avenue, West Vancouver.
Upholsterers' Industrial Union, Local No. 1.—Secretary,
Karl Reich, 2815 Graveley Street, Vancouver 6.
Warehousemen, General, Union of, Local No. 842.—
Secretary, Louis Janze, 490 East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Watchmakers' Union of the International Jewelry Workers' Union, Local No. 57.—Secretary, Mrs. Mona Haw-
ken, 339 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-71.—
Secretary, Fred Fieber, 18 West Hastings Street, Vancouver. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 131
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-217.
—Secretary, N. P. Neale, 6, 45 Kingsway, Vancouver 10.
Vanderhoof
Government   Employees'   Association,   B.C. — Secretary,
E. R. Ziemer, Vanderhoof.
Teachers'  Federation,  B.C., District No.  56.—President,
K. Gardner, Vanderhoof High School, Vanderhoof.
Vedder Crossing
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian.—Secretary,
G. O. Burgess, Vedder Crossing.
Vernon
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1346.—Secretary, W. J. Forsythe, 3300
Forty-second Avenue, Vernon.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 326.—Secretary, I. F. Bickert, 3908 Thirty-first Street, Vernon.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—Secretary, Miss
E. Cail, Box 740, Vernon.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 821.—Secretary, A. G. Smith, 4100 Kamloops
Road, Vernon.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Okanagan
Valley, Local No. 953.—Secretary, K. M. Little, Vernon Fire Hall, 3005 Thirtieth Street, Vernon.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, District 6, Local
No. 48.—Secretary, C. E. Holmes, Vernon.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — Secretary,
Miss Berna Cosgrove, Box 353, Vernon.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Canadian.—
Secretary, Robert W. Hodgson, 2000 Thirty-first Street,
Vernon.
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union of United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America, Local No.
2861.—Secretary, Lionel Desnoyer, R.R. 4, Vernon.
Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of United States and
Canada, Journeymen and Apprentices of the, Local No.
423.—Secretary, John R. Price, R.R. 3, Vernon.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — Secretary,
William C. Miller, 3102 Twenty-eighth Avenue, Vernon.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., District No. 22.—President,
E. S. Bamford, 2104 Thirty-third Street, Vernon.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 6.—
President, W. Bryan, Okanagan Landing.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 22.—
President, Miss H. Ziemer, Box 653, Vernon.
Unemployment Insurance Commission Employees' Association, Local No. 151.—Secretary, Mrs. Vera M. Bil-
lard, Okanagan Landing.
Victoria
Automotive Maintenance Workers' Union, Local No. 151.
—Secretary, Thomas Emerson, 748 Gladiola Road,
Victoria.
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union
of America, Local No. 267.—Secretary, J. F. Lister,
1324 Hillside Avenue, Victoria.
Barbers', Hairdressers', Cosmetologists' and Proprietors'
International Union of America, Local No. 372.—Secretary, W. J. Singer, 545 Dunedin Street, Victoria.
Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Drop
Forgers and Helpers, International Brotherhood of,
Local No. 191.—Secretary, James McConachy, 802
Esquimalt Road, Victoria.
Bookbinders, International Brotherhood of, Local No.
147.—Secretary, R. Foster, 2021 Carnarvon Street, Victoria.
Brewery, Flour, Malt, Yeast, Soft Drink and Distillery
Workers of America, Local No. 280.—Secretary, H. J.
Nowotniak, 4147 Carey Road, R.R. 3, Victoria.
Bricklayers', Masons' and Plasterers' International Union,
Local No. 2.—Secretary, J. W. Cooper, 2033 Kings
Road, Victoria.
Building Service Employees' International Union Secretary, James Richardson, 1818 Julie Street, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 1508.—Secretary, Arthur Learn, 855 Selkirk Avenue, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2415.—Secretary, D. S. Bushell, 101, 615
Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 2527.—Secretary, V. Midgley, 615 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Civic Employees' Protective Association, Local No. 50.—-
Secretary, J. A. Bleakley, 2567 Prior Street, Victoria.
Civilian Workers' Federal Union, National Defence, Local
No. 129.—Secretary, George S. Portingale, 215 Suzanne
Place, Victoria.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated, Victoria Branch.—
Secretary, Miss Lily B. Northam, 2644 Rose Street,
Victoria, B.C.
Construction and General Labourers' Union, Local No.
1093.—Secretary, Earl B. Allen, 501 Niagara Street,
Victoria.
Dock and Shipyard Workers' Union, Local No. 1204.—
Secretary, W. W. Prosky, 920 Russell Street, Victoria.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, Local
No. 230.—Secretary, C. A. Peck, 613 Pandora Avenue,
Victoria.
Employees' Association, Victoria City Hall, Local No.
388.—Secretary, Roy A. Stewart, c/o City Hall, Victoria.
Employees' Federal Union, Royal Oak Burial Park, Local
No. 479.—Secretary, L. E. Jones, 3850 Rowland Avenue, Victoria.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
730.—Secretary, Eric Simmons, 626 Cormorant Street,
Victoria.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, Local No.
967.—Secretary, T. Jennings, 3919 Cedar Hill Road,
Victoria.
Firemen and Oilers' Helpers, Roundhouse Railway Shop
Employees, Local No. 289, Sub-local of Local No. 289,
Vancouver.—Secretary, G. H. Davidson, 1546 Hillside
Avenue,   Victoria.
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 19.—
Secretary, F. J. Smele, 1852 Chestnut Street, Victoria.
Fuel Distributors' Union, Local No. 150.—Secretary, B. E.
Alexander,  1324 Balmoral Road, Victoria.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. — Secretary,
H. A. Carney, Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Government Employees' Federal Union, U.S. Government,
Local No. 59.—Secretary, H. O. Stains, Box 484, Victoria.
Hospital Employees' Association of Royal Jubilee Hospital.—Secretary, Mrs. Laura Agar, 1757 Bank Street,
Victoria.
Hotel and Restaurant Employees' and Bartenders' International Union, Local No. 513.—Secretary, John Lindsay, 823 Colville Street, Victoria.
Laundry Workers' Union, Local No. 1.—Secretary, Mrs.
Aleta Ritchie, 1013 Collinson Street, Victoria.
Letter Carriers, Federated Association of, Local No. 11.—
Secretary, James Coe, 953 Dunn Avenue, Victoria.
Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of,
Local No. 690.—Secretary, J. E. Wilkinson, 320 Walter
Street, Victoria.
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International,
Local No. 504.—Secretary, W. Norman Scott, 613 Pandora Avenue,  Victoria.
Mailers' Union, Local No. 121.—Secretary, C. H. Miller,
1961 Watson Street, Victoria.
Maintenance Workers, C.P.R., B.C. Federal Union, Local
No. 493.—Secretary, George E. Hardy, 3920 Prestwood
Drive, Victoria.
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 2824.—Secretary, C. Adcocks, 505-506 Scott Block,
272 Main Street, Winnipeg, Man.
Marine Engineers of Canada, Inc., National Association
of, Local No. 6.—Secretary, J. Ashcroft, 2346 Arbutus
Road, R.R. 5, Victoria.
Molders' and Foundry Workers' International Union of
North America, Local No. 144.—Secretary, Sam Emery,
864 Old Esquimalt Road, Victoria.
Municipal Employees' Association, Oak Bay, Local No.
311.—Secretary,  P.  Rayment,  4011  Blenkinsop  Road,
Victoria. H 132
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Musicians' Mutual Protective Union, Local No. 247.—
Secretary, V. R. Butter, 1534 Hampshire Road, Victoria.
Newspaper Guild, Victoria, Local No. 219.—Secretary,
Mrs. Barrie Hagar, 2631 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Office Employees' Association, B.C. Electric Office, Local
No. 300.—Secretary, Miss N. Wood, 544 Herald Street,
Victoria.
Painters, Decorators and Paper Hangers of America,
Brotherhood of. Local No. 1163.—Secretary, F. W.
Britt, 101, 605 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Operative, International
Association of, Local No. 78.—Secretary, Frank Williams, 1750 Pembroke Street, Victoria.
Plasterers and Cement Masons, Operative, International
Association of, Local No. 450.—Secretary, F. C. Towns-
end, 2020 Oak Bay Avenue, Victoria.
Policemen's Union of the City of Victoria.—Secretary,
Robert Mair, 622 Barton Road, Victoria.
Postal Employees' Association, Canadian. — Secretary,
H. E. Bower, 1229 Old Esquimalt Road, Victoria.
Printing Pressmen and Assistants' International Union of
North America, Local No. 79.—Secretary, F. H. Lars-
sen, 1236 McKenzie Street, Victoria.
Public Employees, National Union of, Local No. 50.—
Secretary, J. A. Bleackley, 2567 Prior Street, Victoria.
Public Library Staff Association, Victoria, Local No. 410.
—Secretary, Percy Rayment, 615 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Local No. 613.—Secretary, A. E. Mummery, Elks Hall, 732 Cormorant
Street, Victoria.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Local
Lodge No. 50.—Secretary, J. Davison, 721 Pine Street,
Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Local No. 1137.
—Secretary, Miss D. Williams, 434 Quebec Street, Victoria.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express
and Station Employees ,Brotherhood of, Local No. 2320.
—Secretary, R. E. Whiting, 834 Craigflower Road, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 222.—Secretary, H. E.
Tebo, 1430 Thurlow Road, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 234.—Secretary, J. S.
Skinner, 715 Johnson Street, Victoria.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, Local No. 276.—Secretary, Richard Little, 1535 York Place, Victoria.
Retail Clerks, International Association of, Local No. 279.
—Secretary, Mrs. F. Pellett, 1107 Haultain Street, Victoria.
School Board Employees' Association, Greater Victoria,
Local No. 382.—Secretary, A. L. Grover, P.O. Box 295,
Victoria.
Sheet Metal Workers' International Association, Local No.
276.—Secretary, Charley Lewis, 866 Newport Avenue,
Victoria.
Shipwrights', Joiners' and Caulkers' Industrial Union,
Local No. 9.—Secretary, Don Douglas, 1338 Wood
Street, Victoria.
Street, Electric Railway and Motor Coach Employees of
America, Amalgamated Association of, Local No. 109.—
Secretary, Joseph F. Belton, 2575 McDonald Drive,
Victoria.
Structural Iron Workers, Bridge and Ornamental, Ship
Yard Riggers, Benchmen and Helpers, International
Association of, Local No. 643.—Secretary, Andrew
Manson, 3981 Douglas Street, Victoria.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Victoria, District No. 61.—
Secretary, Miss K. M. Thompson, 832 Linkleas Avenue,
Victoria.
Teamsters' Union, Lower Vancouver Island, Local No.
885.—Secretary, R. Milliken, 501 Davida Street, Victoria.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 2.—
President, B. Johns, 5023 Old West Road, R.R. 2, Royal
Oak, Victoria.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 21.—
President, C. Scobi, 2533 Margate Street, Victoria.
Telephone Workers' Federation of B.C., Local No. 11.—
President, Miss M. Nunn, 2658 Quadra Street, Victoria.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Operators
of the United States and Canada, International Alliance
of, Local No. B-70.—Secretary, John C. McRae, Box
241, Victoria.
Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Operators
of the United States and Canada, International Alliance
of, Local No. 168.—Secretary, A. C. Archer, 2101 Al-
lenby Street, Victoria.
Typographical Union, International, Local No. 201.—Secretary, H. Warren, 615 Pandora Avenue, Victoria.
Unemployment Insurance Employees' Association, Local
No. 101.—Secretary, V. Caldwell, 3820 Cadboro Bay
Road, Victoria.
Water District Employees' Federal Union, Local No. 598.
—Secretary, E. C. Laurie, 1 Drickrill Road, Victoria.
Wood, Wire and Metal Lathers' International Union,
Local No. 332.—Secretary, C. Wescott, 3829 Shelbourne
Street, Victoria.
Woodworkers of America, International, Local No. 1-118.
—Secretary, E. W. Haw, 715 Johnson Street, Victoria.
Walcott
Maintenance of Way Employees, Brotherhood of, Local
No. 340.—Secretary, C. Adcock, 505-506 Scott Block,
272 Main Street, Winnipeg, Man.
Wells
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
Local No. 685.—Secretary, A. McLean, Box 352, Wells.
Wellington
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, Local No. 527.—Secretary, F. O. E. Murphy, R.R.
1, Wellington.
West Summerland
Lumber and Sawmill Workers' Union, Local No. 2742.—
Secretary, T. F. Reid, Box 145, West Summerland.
Westsyde
Trainmen's   Union,   Canadian,  Local  No.   2.—Secretary,
A. R. Tremblay, R.R. 1, Westsyde.
Westview
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No. 41.—
Secretary, Carl Miettenen, Westview.
West Vancouver
Municipal Employees' Association, West Vancouver, Local
No. 395.—Secretary, J. M. Smeal, 2676 Haywood Avenue, West Vancouver.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., West Vancouver, District
No. 45.—Secretary, Miss Shirley G. Tindall, 1175
Pacific Street, Vancouver 5.
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Secondary Schools, West Vancouver, District No. 45.—Secretary, Miss Irene M.
Simonson, 5388 Cambie Street, Vancouver 15.
White Rock
Civil   Servants   of   Canada,   Amalgamated,   White   Rock
Branch.—Secretary, George S. Hill, 2788 Stayte Road,
R.R. 4, White Rock.
Postal   Employees'   Association,   Canadian. — Secretary,
John Dilworth, 16517 Sunnyside Road, R.R. 4, White
Rock.
Whonock
Gillnetters' Association of B.C., Whonock Branch.—Secretary, F. Rolley, Whonock.
Williams Lake
Government Employees' Association, B.C. ■— Secretary,
Douglas Matthew, Box 594, Williams Lake. LABOUR RELATIONS BRANCH
H 133
Teachers' Federation, B.C., Williams Lake, District No.
27.—Secretary, Mrs. J. Buckvale, Box 175, Williams
Lake.
Woodfibre
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper Mill Workers, International
Brotherhood of, Local No. 494.—Secretary, C. Walton,
Woodfibre.
Woodward Slough
Fishermen and Allied Workers' Union, Local No.  11.—
Secretary, J. Hill, 934 Finn Road, R.R. 3, Richmond.
Zeballos
Teachers' Federation, B.C.—Secretary, Mrs. M. I. Adams,
Zeballos.
Organizations of Employers
Calgary
Coal Operators' Association of Western Canada.—President, F. J. Harquail; Secretary, S. W. Foss, 204 Alberta
Block, Calgary, Alta.
Creston
Milk Producers' Association, Creston Co-operative.—
President, Hugo Sommerfeld; Secretary, Herbert W.
Michalke, Creston.
Kelowna
Fruit Growers' Association, British Columbia.—President,
A. R. Garrish; Secretary, J. Maclennan, 1473 Water
Street, Kelowna.
Shippers' Association, Inc., Okanagan Federated.—President, K. W. Kinnard; Secretary, L. R. Stephens, 1485
Water Street, Kelowna.
Penticton
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, Interior.—President,
G. W. Eriksson; Secretary, L. J. A. Rees, 109, 304
Martin Street, Penticton.
Prince George
Lumbermen's Association, Northern Interior.—President,
T. H. Dilworth; Secretary, R. J. Gallagher, 305, 1705
Third Avenue, Prince George.
Vancouver
Automotive Retailers' Association.—President, T. D. Hammond; Secretary, J. L. Kinneard, 1687 West Broadway,
Vancouver 9.
Automotive Transport Association of B.C.—President,
E. D. Charles; Secretary, K. D. Large, 810, 207 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Bakers' Association, British Columbia.—President, J. L.
Johnston; Secretary, W .G. Welsford, 199 East Eighth
Avenue, Vancouver 10.
Building and Construction Industries Exchange of British
Columbia.—President, J. F. Sigurdson; Secretary, Harold Cole, 342 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
Contractors' Association, General.—President, L. J. Bennett; Secretary, Harold Cole, 342 West Pender Street,
Vancouver 3.
Electrical Association, Vancouver.—President, S. C. Mur-
kin; Secretary, Fred Moore, 706, 509 Richards Street,
Vancouver.
Electrical Service League of British Columbia.—President,
S. V. Grisdale; Secretary, H. C. Way, 970 Burrard
Street, Vancouver.
Feed Manufacturers' Association, British Columbia.—
President, H. A. Kellington; Secretary, R. V. Robinson,
608, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Fisheries Association of British Columbia.—Chairman,
J. M. Buchanan; Secretary, J. Macdonald, 510 Shelly
Building, 119 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
Fishermen's Independent Co-operative Association, British
Columbia.—President, James K. Pope; Secretary, Donald Baker, 476 West Twenty-sixth Avenue, Vancouver.
Fishing Vessel Owners' Association of British Columbia.—
President, Capt. Charles Clarke; Secretary, Harold A.
Christenson, Ford Building, 193 East Hastings Street,
Vancouver.
Fuel Oil Dealers' Association.—President, S. McLeod;
Secretary, Cyril G. Hayman, 906 Credit Foncier Building, Vancouver 1.
Grain Exporters' Association, Vancouver. — President,
G. T. London; Secretary, W. A. Sankey, 355 Burrard
Street, Vancouver 1.
Hairdressers' Association of British Columbia.—President,
Mrs. Edna Huff; Secretary, R. Matthews, 605 Province
Building, Vancouver 3.
Heating and Sheet Metal Association of British Columbia.
—President, Kenneth H. Meadow; Secretary, Maurice
L. Tucker, 2265 West Forty-first Avenue, Vancouver 13.
Heavy Construction Association of British Columbia.—
President, Calvin P. Baker; Secretary, James D. Lay-
den, 8, 1161 Melville Street, Vancouver 5.
Hospitals' Association, British Columbia.—President, J. A.
Abrahamson; Secretary, Percy Ward, 129 Osborne
Road East, North Vancouver.
Hotels' Association, British Columbia.—Acting-President,
J. J. Custock; Secretary, E. V. Ely, 948 Howe Street,
Vancouver.
House Builders' Association, Vancouver Metropolitan.—
President, Gerald E. Parfitt; Secretary, J. S. Don, 1,
969 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
Industrial Association of British Columbia.—President,
J. H. Cates; Secretary, J. R. Edgett, 1024 Marine Building, Vancouver 1.
Jewellers' Association, Canadian (B.C. Section).—President, William Ewert; Secretary, Robert S. Deacon, 17
East Broadway, Vancouver 10.
Laundry, Dry Cleaners and Linen Supply Association,
Vancouver.—President, George McConnell; Secretary,
J. H. Taylor, 300, 1111 West Georgia Street, Vancouver.
Lithographers' Association, British Columbia.—President,
M. Collins; Secretary, R. A. Mahoney, 826, 510 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Loggers' Association (Inc.), British Columbia.—Chairman, Otis D. Hallin; Secretary, John N. Burke, 401,
550 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1.
Lumber Manufacturers' Association, British Columbia.—
President, B. B. Gattie; Secretary, N. R. Dusting, 302,
550 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1.
Lumber Survey Limited, British Columbia.—President,
J. C. Walsh; Secretary, W. J. Andrew, 1490 West
Broadway, Vancouver.
Manufacturers' Association, Canadian (B.C. Division).—
Chairman, M. J. Foley; Manager, R. V. Robinson, 608
Marine Building, Vancouver 1.
Master Plumbers and Heating Contractors of Canada,
National Association of.—President, S. W. Welsh; Secretary, A. F. Rawlings, 342 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3.
Merchants Exchange Ltd., Vancouver.—President, J. C.
Whittle; Secretary, W. A. Sankey, 355 Burrard Street,
Vancouver 1.
Metal Trades Association, British Columbia.—President,
L. Mitten; Secretary, R. A. Mahoney, 826, 510 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver.
Milk Producers' Association, Fraser Valley.—President,
D. R. Nicholson; Secretary, H. S. Berry, 425 West
Eighth Avenue, Vancouver 10.
Millwork Institute, Mainland.—President, John F. Sigurdson; Secretary, Herbert F. Fleming, 3032 Main Street,
Vancouver 10.
Millwork Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver.—President, George William Clark; Secretary, Ronald H.
Poole, 5920 Joyce Road, Vancouver 16.
Mining Association of British Columbia.—President, L. T.
Postle; Secretary, R. W. Nesbitt, 837 West Hastings
Street, Vancouver. H 134
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Motor Transport Labour Relations Council.—Chairman,
J. S. McLean; Secretary, K. D. Large, 810, 207 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver 3.
Morticians, British Columbia Society of.—President, Donald V. Lock; Secretary, Harry O. Brown, 1349 Commercial Drive, Vancouver 6.
Pulp and Paper Association, Canadian.—Chairman, B. M.
Hoffmeister; Secretary, Leander Manley, 402 Forest
Industries Building, 550 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1.
Red Cedar Shingle Association of British Columbia, Consolidated.—President, James R. Gray; Secretary, Miss
M. E. Welte, 202, 550 Burrard Street, Vancouver.
Restaurant Association, Canadian. — President, R. C.
Brown; Secretary, P. H. Edgcumbe, 130 West Hastings
Street, Vancouver  3.
Retail Fuel Dealers' Association, Greater Vancouver.—
President, T. C. Boyd; Secretary, Cyril G. Hayman,
906 Credit Foncier Building, Vancouver 1.
Retail Hardware Association, British Columbia.—President, Joe Sarginson; Secretary, Ralph Kline, 2505
Jubilee Avenue, South Burnaby.
Retail Lumbermen's Council of Canada, National.—
President, F. J. Overend; Secretary, W. J. Andrew,
9,  1490 West Broadway, Vancouver.
Shipping Federation of British Columbia. — President,
K. C. Middleton; Secretary, W. L. Hurford, 45 Dun-
levy Avenue, Vancouver 4.
Taxi-cab Owners' Association, Vancouver. — President,
N. F. Taggart; Secretary, T. A. Horan, 5017 Main
Street, Vancouver 15.
Towboat Owners' Association, British Columbia.—President, Capt. W. Cliff; Secretary, W. A. Sankey, Marine
Building,  Vancouver  1.
Truck and Construction Equipment Operators of British
Columbia.—President, Rudolph H. Werk; Secretary,
Richard Armstrong, 969 West Broadway, Vancouver 9.
Truck Loggers' Association.—President, Harry C. McQuillan; Secretary, C. J. Bennett, 19, 425 Howe Street,
Vancouver 1.
Vernon
Dairy Industries Co-operative Association, Shuswap-Oka-
nagan.—President, S. E. Halksworth; Secretary, T.
Everard Clarke, 3204 Twenty-seventh Avenue, Vernon.
Victoria
Automobile Dealers' Association, Victoria. — President,
Newell Morrison; Secretary, Roy T. Lougheed, 816
Wharf Street, Victoria.
Building Industries Exchange, Victoria.—President, W. B.
Dillabough; Secretary, Roy T. Lougheed, 816 Wharf
Street, Victoria.
Contractors' Association, Victoria.—President, S. J. Kin-
sey; Secretary, W. H. McMurray, 1677 Hollywood
Crescent, Victoria.
Electrical Contractors' Association (B.C.), Victoria.—
President, Colin Fensham; Secretary, Alex. M. Downie,
3255 Rutledge Street, Victoria.
Hotels' Association, Greater Victoria. — President, A.
Mawer; Secretary, W. L. Gouge, 533 Admirals Road,
Esquimalt.
Jewellers' Association, Victoria.—President, R. H. Rose;
Secretary, Roy Hebden, 1006 Blanshard Street, Victoria.
Manufacturers' Association, Canadian (Victoria and Vancouver Island Branch).—President, H. L. Lauder Ramsay; Secretary, Albert W. Reid, 816 Wharf Street,
Victoria.
Taxi Operators' Association of Victoria.—President, C.
Rawlings; Secretary, A. N. Westwood, 629 Broughton
Street, Victoria.
J CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN
H 135
Control of Employment of Children
Unless a permit has been granted to the employer by the Minister of Labour, or
a person duly authorized by him to issue such permits, the employment of children under
15 years of age in certain designated occupations or industries is prohibited by the " Control of Employment of Children Act."
In order that the health and scholastic standing of the children will not be adversely
affected by their work in industry or business, the Department works in close co-operation
with the school authorities and the parents or guardians of the children. Permits are
issued only when it has been established that the child's health will not suffer, and that
the work will not expose the boy or girl to unsafe conditions or interfere with their
standing at school.
The Schedule to the Act specifies and defines the occupations or industries for which
permits are required; these include:—
(1) Manufacturing industry.
(2) Ship-building industry.
(3) Generation of electricity or motor power of any kind.
(4) Logging industry.
(5) Construction industry.
(6) Catering industry.
(7) Public places of amusement.
(8) Mercantile industry.
(9) Shoe-shine stands.
(10) Automobile service-stations.
(11) Transportation industry.
(12) Laundry, cleaning, and dyeing industry (added August 26th, 1955).
The following table contains a summary of permits issued from January 1st to
December 31st, 1956, inclusive:—
Summary of Permits Issued for
Year
1956
District
Vancouver
Victoria
Cranbrook
Kamloops
Kelowna
Mission
City
Nelson
Prince
George
Terrace
Total
Boys - - —
Girls  	
170
28
58
15
2
1
7
5
4
4
4
2
2
2
2
12
2
261
59
Totals   	
198
73      |        3             12              8
4
4
4
14
320
Manufacturing	
Ship-building 	
14
3
3
14
41
116
4
3
3
3
16
29
20
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
6
1
1
1
1
4
1
3
1
2
1
1
"T
....
2
2
4
8
25
8
11
35
71
161
6
3
Total issued	
198
73
3
12
8
4
4
4
14
320 H 136
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Equal Pay Act
a
This Act, which was proclaimed December 31st, 1953, prohibits discrimination
between male and female employees with respect to rates of pay under certain circumstances.
Section 4 of the Act provides that the Minister of Labour may, on the recommendation of the Director, designate an Industrial Relations Officer to inquire into the complaint
of a person that she has been discriminated against in that she has been paid at a rate
of pay less than the rate of pay paid to a male employee employed by her employer for
the same work done in the same establishment.
There were five complaints received by the Director during the year 1956, all of
which were settled by the Industrial Relations Officers appointed by the Minister.
Summary of Proceedings under the " Equal Pay Act " during 1954, 1955, and 1956
1954
C.
E.I.
E.I.
1956
C.
E.I.
Complaints received	
Complaints referred to Industrial Relations Officers-
Complaints settled by Industrial Relations Officers	
Complaints referred to the Board	
Complaints withdrawn	
271
25
17
1
1 In the case of one complaint the Act did not apply.
C.=Complaints. E.I.=Employers involved. "FAIR EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES ACT" H 137
"Fair Employment Practices Act"
This Act, passed by the Legislature in 1956, makes statutory the principle that it is
contrary to public policy to discriminate against men and women in respect of their
employment or membership in trade-unions because of race, religion, colour, nationality,
ancestry, or place of origin. The use or circulation of application for employment forms
or advertisements in connection with employment which express, directly or indirectly,
any limitation or preference as to the race, etc., of any person is prohibited, unless the
preference or limitation is based upon a bona fide occupational qualification.
Section 6 of the Act provides that the Director may designate an officer of the
Department to inquire into the complaint of any person that he has been discriminated
against contrary to the Act.
During the year under review two complaints under the Act involving one employer
were received and investigated by an officer of the Department. Investigation disclosed
that an American firm had been engaged to carry on for several weeks a sales-promotion
programme. The type of promotion involved the employment of staff by the American
employer. By the time the complaint had been filed and an inquiry initiated, the sales
programme had been completed and the representatives of the employer had returned to
the United States, thereby removing the possibility of discussing the complaints with the
persons alleged to have violated the Act. As it was not feasible to continue the investigation by correspondence, the matter was not pursued further. H 138 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Report of the Factories Inspection Branch
Administrative Office    -    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Official of the Branch
Robert M. Purdie     - Chief Inspector of Factories.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the annual report of the Factories Inspection
Branch for the year 1956.
The year 1956 proved to be an eventful year in the history of the Branch; the
passing of Bill No. 36, an Act to amend the "Factories Act," and a Provincial Government Elevator Inspectors' course of instruction held in Ontario were two of the major
changes of the year.
Factories
Previous to the passing of Bill No. 36, laundries, cleaning, dyeing, pressing, or
dressmaking establishments were restricted to operation between the hours of 7 o'clock
in the forenoon and 7 o'clock in the afternoon, and much valuable time was spent by the
Inspectors enforcing this clause. BiU No. 36 removes this restriction, thus releasing
Inspectors for more important duties.
Factory construction continued at a steady pace throughout the Province, and
examination of preliminary plans, progressive inspections, and final checks take many
hours of arduous work on the part of the Inspectors.
Richmond, North Vancouver, Port Moody, Annacis Island, the Lougheed Highway,
and the Grandview Highway are fast becoming primary-industry areas and the type of
factories being constructed are a credit to any Province, this being in part due to the
continued efforts of the Inspectors to maintain a high standard of sanitation, ventilation,
lighting, lunchroom and locker facilities, and safe and healthful conditions for employees
in the various industries.
Early this year the Examiner of Plans, Department of Labour, Ontario, called on
this Branch, he being on a tour of the North American Continent gathering data on
artificial radiation in industry. This visit proved very beneficial to the Branch as we
have an ever-increasing use of artificial radiation being used in engineering shops, pulp
and paper mills, pipe-line installations, etc., in this Province.
Toward the end of the year an extensive survey was conducted pertaining to lunchroom facilities, and a number of directives were issued, with gratifying results.
In November the first British Columbia Safety Council Conference was held in
Vancouver. A wealth of valuable information was gained at this conference as practically
all the leading industries were represented and the various speakers were of a high calibre.
Industrial Homework
Permits authorizing industrial homework to be performed in the home decreased
slightly from the previous year.
Elevators
The elevator-inspection field continues to expand year by year. With the introduction of so many automatic devices, Inspectors are hard pressed to keep up with the
• INSPECTION OF FACTORIES H 139
changing designs and still perform routine inspections. During the year many new
installations have been made throughout the Province, with the trend being to high-speed
automatic operation. A few years ago it would have been hard to visualize an elevator
running at a speed of 800 feet per minute and operated by the general public, as is the
case to-day.
The advance in safe and speedy operation has so developed that a child who can
reach the buttons in a car panel can operate an elevator with perfect safety. However,
we do not recommend this, as in our opinion all children should be accompanied by
a grown-up while travelling on an elevator or escalator.
During the latter part of 1954 some of the larger elevator-manufacturers in Canada
were approached by the Chief Inspector, Department of Industries and Labour for
Alberta, to determine whether it would be possible to set up an instruction and study
course for Provincial Government Elevator Inspectors. This idea was discussed at a
meeting of the Elevator Division of the Canadian Electrical Manufacturers' Association,
who agreed unanimously to sponsor such a course if the Provinces so desired. After
careful planning a very comprehensive agenda was drawn up and eventually carried out
February 20th, 1956, to March 2nd, 1956, in Hamilton and Toronto.
The course opened in Hamilton at the plant of the Otis Elevator Company, where
the class was welcomed by the president of the company. The class then convened in
a large sample-room, suitably laid out with tables and chairs. The chief engineer of the
Otis Elevator Company took the chair and gave a brief outline of the proposed course.
The following Provinces were represented: Quebec, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, Ontario,
Manitoba, Alberta, and British Columbia.
The class was divided into groups of three, and each group was assigned to an
engineer of the Otis Company, who conducted a tour of the whole plant. This tour was
of great interest and demonstrated the manufacturing procedure to perfection. If a customer could only see the planning, machining, inspection, and intricate testing that is
required to build an elevator, escalator, or dumb-waiter, I am sure that he would have
a good idea of how the cost is compiled.
Following the plant tour the class assembled and convened each day for the
remainder of the week to discuss the Canadian Standards Safety Code B 44 for freight
and passenger elevators. Code discussions were tempered periodically with lectures and
displays of various pieces of safety equipment, governors, safeties, door locks, and
elevator ropes, all being thoroughly covered by competent authorities.
The last meeting in Hamilton was given over to a general discussion and review of
the week's activities, and it was the general opinion that the knowledge gained as a result
of these meetings was invaluable to both manufacturers and Inspectors alike. The
courtesy of the Otis Elevator Company was very much appreciated by all.
Proceeding to Toronto, a different type of instruction ensued. The class was
conducted through four of the leading companies' plants. Here again safety equipment
was laid out in order, inspected, and discussed at the various plants. A full day was
spent at the Turnbull Elevator Company factory. There a demonstration of a high-speed
elevator-controller in operation was given.
The final day of the course was taken up with a discussion of section 38 of the
Canadian Electrical Code, Part 1. This section deals with electrical requirements
pertaining to elevators.
It is the opinion of the writer that the foregoing course was of great benefit to the
Provinces. The knowledge gained by the respective Inspectors was invaluable, and this
knowledge should be of great help in consolidating a universal code throughout Canada.
A regrettable accident occurred this year, a young boy losing a finger on an escalator.
The spacing on the escalator tread in question has since been altered to present-day
standards, thus eliminating this potential hazard.   Apart from the above, we are again H 140 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
proud to report that no serious or fatal accident pertaining to elevator equipment was
recorded in the Province during the past year.
The following are the pertinent facts regarding the year's activities for 1956:—
Elevator Inspections
Passenger-elevators  604
Escalators  51
Freight-elevators  697
Hydraulic elevators  68
Hand-power elevators  80
Dumb-waiters  150
Man-lifts ,  38
Reinspections  212
Total              	
1,900
New Elevator Installations
Plans Received
Passenger-elevators        _   	
Freight-elevators     -     	
39
33
Dumb-waiters      	
17
Escalators
3
Total	
Of the above, five were replacements.
Elevator Operators' Licences
Temporary	
Permanent             _     '-'   l                        .   _                 .
92
462
364
Renewals
1,239
Total                             _'_              	
2.065
Factory Inspections
Factory inspections totalled 1,498 and child employment investigations 4.   Number
of interviews pertaining to new factories and alterations totalled 120.
Conclusion
We take this opportunity to acknowledge the assistance given our Branch by other
Governmental departments and the continued co-operation of members of the staff.
Also, we wish to thank all officials and employees connected with industry for their
co-operation during the past year.
Respectfully submitted.
R. M. Purdie,
Chief Inspector of Factories. APPRENTICESHIP AND TRADESMEN'S QUALIFICATION BRANCH H 141
Report of the Apprenticeship and
Tradesmen's Qualification Branch
Head office       -----      411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Branch office    -    Department of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Provincial Apprenticeship Committee
Chairman:
Hamilton Crisford    -      -      411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Members:
T. McGibbon        - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
J. Tucker      -.--.,..- 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
J.Walker      - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
W.H.Welsh        -      -      - 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Official of the Branch
Edmund L. Allen     ------      Director of Apprenticeship.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith tender a report of the activities of the Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Branch for the year ended December 31st, 1956, another year, I am
pleased to report, of steady growth and expanded training.
Apprentices in Training
The number of apprentices registered by the Apprenticeship and Tradesmen's Qualification Branch at December 31st, 1956, was 2,337. This is a gain of more than 17
per cent over the total number in training at December 31st, 1955. Their distribution
by years and trades was as follows:— H 142
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Trade or Occupation and Length of
Apprenticeship in Years
Year of Apprenticeship Being Served
First
Prob.      Reg.
Second
Third
Fourth
Fifth
Total
Number
of
Apprentices in
Training
Completed
1956
Automotive maintenance and repair (4)..
Barbering (2)  	
Boilermaking (4)  —
Bricklaying (4)  	
Carpentry (4)— 	
Electrical work (4-5) 	
Floorlaying (3)	
Glassworking (4)   - 	
Hairdressing (2)  	
Jewellery work (5)  	
Lathing (3 )  	
Lithography (2-6) _ 	
Machinist and fitter (5)— 	
Moulding (4) —   	
Office-machine mechanic (4)	
Painting and decorating (3)	
Pattern-making (5)	
Plastering (4)  - — -	
Plumbing and steam-fitting (4) 	
Refrigeration (4) .— 	
Sheet-metal work (5) - 	
Ship and boat building (4)	
Sign-painting (4)_ 	
Steel fabrication (4) 	
Miscellaneous trades	
Totals  _ 	
60
15
3
3
75
73
2
5
25
16
27
1
6
4
6
51
2
40
12
11
1
98
50
8
6
105
59
10
3
42
2
1
3
56
4
9
6
3
15
82
2
43
9
2
18
16
652
79
3
84
31
2
2
3
1
8
3
56
7
12
1
19
49
4
37
8
3
12
1
64
4
4
68
45
1
5
5
33
3
4
4
12
46
2
29
6
2
5
2
66
10
10
76
63
5
39
6
3
7
58
3
30
11
2
13
1
433
347    |    408
29
22
367
65
33
26
408
277
14
14
70
4
30
16
240
14
30
26
9
59
286
13
201
46
9
59
21
52
50
10
3
44
38
3
20
2
1
5
54
1
4
11
3
5
23
1
14
5
5
1
59
2,337
355
Technical and Vocational Training
Members of the various Trade Advisory Committees set up under the Act in accordance with the Dominion-Provincial Apprenticeship Agreement have given unsparingly
of their time, and in showing keen interest and co-operation in the technical training being
provided have been of great assistance to the Branch.
Evening classes provided 103,633 student-hours of instruction. There were 2,100
enrolments in 125 different evening classes in trade theory and related subjects. While
the majority of these classes were held in Vancouver and Victoria, classes were also held
in the Cities of Nanaimo, Port Alberni, and Trail, and a new programme was started
in Kitimat.
Daytime training was provided to 388 apprentices for a total of 64,215 student-hours
of instruction. These classes were held in Vancouver, Victoria, and Nanaimo and
attended by apprentices from all parts of the Province for periods of one and two months.
A subsistence allowance while attending these classes was paid to the apprentices by
the Branch, together with the cost of return transportation between their place of residence and the training centre. Daytime instruction was given in the trades of automotive maintenance, barbering, bricklaying, carpentry, electrical work, joinery, lathing,
painting and decorating, plastering, sheet-metal work, and welding.
Edmund L. Allen,
Director of Apprenticeship. TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH H 143
Report of the
Trade-schools Regulation Branch
Administrative Offices    -    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Administrative Officers
Chairman: Members:
Hamilton Crisford. Mrs. Rex Eaton.
Edmund L. Allen.
The Honourable Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I herewith submit the annual report of the Trade-schools Regulation Branch
for the calendar year 1956.
The majority of schools were contacted this year and made conversant with our Act
and regulations, and the number of complaints dealt with was small.
The following is the list of registered schools:—
Alexander Hamilton Institute Ltd., 57 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ont.: Modern
business course, special elective course.
American School of Correspondence, Drexel Avenue at East Fifty-eighth Street,
Chicago 37, 111.: Engineering and commerce subjects as covered by the school
bulletin.
Canadian Institute of Science and Technology Ltd., 263 Adelaide Street West,
Toronto, Ont.: Civil, mechanical, electrical, radio, and aeronautical engineering, and other groups as per school bulletin " Engineering Opportunities."
Capitol Radio Engineering Institute, Inc., 3224 Sixteenth Street North-west, Washington 5, D.C.:   Radio-electronic engineering.
Chicago Vocational Training Corporation Ltd., 12520 One Hundred and Second
Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.: Diesel and auto mechanics, refrigeration and air-
conditioning, oxy-acetylene and electric welding.
The Creative School of Art Ltd., 12520 One Hundred and Second Avenue, Edmonton, Alta.: Showcard-writing (including the art of lettering, silk-screen processing, air-brush technique in connection with illustrative art).
School of Creative Photography Ltd., 12520 One Hundred and Second Avenue,
Edmonton, Alta.:  Photography.
Columbia Business Institute, 617 Dekum Building, 519 South-west Third Avenue,
Portland 4, Ore.:   Railroad telegraphy.
DeVry Technical Institute, Inc., 4141 Belmont Avenue, Chicago 41, 111.: Television,
radio, and electronic training.
Institute of Commercial Art (Famous Artists School), 106 Adelaide Street West,
Toronto, Ont.:  Commercial art.
International Correspondence Schools Canadian Limited, 7475 Sherbrooke Street
West, Montreal, Que.:  Art, architecture, business training, chemical engineer-
' ing, civil engineering, electrical engineering, general education, mechanical
engineering, mining, railroading, domestic engineering, navigation, pulp and
paper making, textile-manufacture, and other courses as per prospectus.
International Accountants Society, Inc., 209 West lackson Boulevard, Chicago 6,
111.: Accountancy. H 144 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
La Salle Extension University, 417 South Dearborn Street, Chicago 5, 111.: Business
management, higher accountancy, La Salle salesmanship, practical book-keeping, traffic management, law, stenotypy (less machine), foremanship and production methods, industrial management, stenographic-secretarial training, and
other courses as per prospectus.
M.C.C. Schools, 303 Mitchell-Copp Building, Winnipeg 1, Man.: Kindergarten,
commercial home study.
National Radio Institute, Inc., Sixteenth and U Streets North-west, Washington,
D.C.:  Practical radio and television servicing, professional television servicing.
National Schools, 4000 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles 37, Calif.: Diesel, automotive, and allied mechanics; radio, television, and electronics; advanced
television.
Primary School of Drafting, 134 Combe Avenue, Downsview, Ont.: Engineering
drafting.
Radio College of Canada, 86 Bathurst Street, Toronto 2b, Ont.: Radio and television technology, radio operating, electronic communications, radio engineering, television servicing.
Shaw Schools Ltd., 1130 Bay Street, Toronto, Ont.: Commercial course, short-story
writing, stationary engineering.
Sprott-Shaw Radio School, 812 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Radio and
television servicing.
Television-Electronics Institute Ltd., 12520 One Hundred and Second Avenue,
Edmonton, Alta.: Television and radio service and repair, advanced television
servicing course.
Utilities Engineering Institute, 2525 North Sheffield Avenue, Chicago 14, 111.: Auto
body and fender, diesel, mechanical refrigeration, air-conditioning, refrigeration
and heating, and scientific motor tune-up, diesel and scientific motor tune-up,
welding.
Autolec National Educational Master and Group Program, 1025 Howe Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:  Automotive electricity, carburetion, and tune-up.
The Barclay's Dance Studio, 720 Granville Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Professional
dancing.
Bel-Parker Business College, 1574 West Sixth Avenue, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
B.C. School of Floral Design, 2523 East Hastings Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.:
Floristry.
B.C. Tree Fruits Limited, Kelowna, B.C.:  Fruit-packing.
British Columbia Advanced Hair Design School, 768 Granville Street, Vancouver 2,
B.C.: Advanced hairdressing.
Carlyle Schools Limited, 640 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Physicians' office
assistants.
Central Business College, 8 Dahlstrom Building, 19 Nowell Street, Chilliwack, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
ChiUiwack Business College, 142 Yale Road East, Chilliwack, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Club, cabaret and Construction Camp Culinary and Service Employees' Union,
Local No. 740, Bar-tending School, 440 West Pender Street, Vancouver 3,
B.C.: Bar-tending.
The Comptometer School, 308 Randall Building, 535 West Georgia Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:  Comptometer operation.   ■
Duffus School of Business Ltd., 522 West Pender Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental). TRADE-SCHOOLS REGULATION BRANCH H 145
Elizabeth Leslie Ltd., 1102 Hornby Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Personal development and modelling.
El-Mar Handcraft School, 3057 Granville Street, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Dressmaking,
designing and pattern-making, tailoring, millinery.
Fenton Commercial Schools Ltd., 2015 West Forty-first Avenue, Vancouver 13,
B.C.:   Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
General Business School Ltd., 602 Broughton Street, Victoria, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Georgian House School of Charm, 938 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Personal
development and modelling.
Gondo's Sewing School, 779 Cadder Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.: Dressmaking, designing, and kindred arts.
Herbert Business College, Room 3, Casorso Block, Kelowna, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Kinman Business University, Howard Street at First Avenue, Spokane, Wash.:
Business education.
The Lorrain Marie Charm School, 3234 Patrick Street, South Burnaby, B.C.:
Personal development and modelling.
Lownds School of Commerce Ltd., 80 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Loyd Willton School of Ladies Haircutting, 1107 Lonsdale Avenue, North Vancouver, B.C.:  Ladies' haircutting.
Marvelle Beauty School, 25 Eighth Avenue, Cranbrook, B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Maxine Beauty School, 619 Granville Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Moler Barber School, 615 Main Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.:  Barbering.
Moler Hairdressing School, 303 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Arthur Murray Studios (Canada) Ltd., 646 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:
Professional dancing.
Mount Royal College, 1135 Seventh Avenue, Calgary, Alta.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
McEwen-Wilkie Business College, 3300 Thirty-first Street, Vernon, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Nelson Commercial Training School, 701 Front Street, Nelson, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster Commercial College, 622 Royal Avenue, New Westminster, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
New Westminster School of Hairdressing, 228 Sixth Street, New Westminster, B.C.:
Hairdressing.
O.K. Valley Hairdressing School, 453 Lawrence Avenue, Kelowna, B.C.: Hairdressing.
Olga's School of Hairdressing, 3201 Tronson Avenue, Vernon, B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Penticton College of Commerce, 19 Craig Building, 221 Main Street, Penticton, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Pitman Business College Ltd., 1490 West Broadway, Vancouver 9, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Prince George Business College, 1330 Third Avenue, Prince George, B.C.: Office
occupations (commercial and governmental).
Sprott-Shaw Schools (Vancouver) Ltd., 812 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental), radio and television
servicing. H 146 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Sprott-Shaw (Victoria) Business Institute Ltd., 1012 Douglas Street, Victoria, B.C.:
Office occupations (commercial and governmental), Elmer Wheeler sales
course.
St. Ann's Convent, Commercial Department, Nanaimo, B.C.: Office occupations
(commercial and governmental).
St. Paul's School of Dressmaking and Designing, 255 Dunlevy Street, Vancouver 4,
B.C.:  Dressmaking, designing, and kindred arts.
Sun Electric Technician's Course, 9732 King George Highway, R.R. 4, North
Surrey, B.C.:  Automotive testing.
Trail Business College, 625 Victoria Street, Trail, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Vancouver Engineering Academy, 407 West Hastings Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.:
Stationary, marine, and diesel engineering.
Vancouver Sales and Merchandising Institute, 3104 West Fifteenth Avenue, Vancouver 8, B.C.: Sales training.
Victoria Hairdressing School, 738 Fort Street, Victoria, B.C.:  Hairdressing.
Welding Construction School, 148 East First Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.: Welding.
Weldor Training Centre, 1368 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.:  Welding.
Western Radio Academy, 1356 Haro Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.: Radio broadcasting.
Western Radio Electronic Television Schools Ltd., 1065 Howe Street, Vancouver 1,
B.C.: Radio, electronics, television.
Western School of Commerce, 712 Robson Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.: Office occupations (commercial and governmental).
Edmund L. Allen,
Administrative Officer. ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS
Provincial Advisory Committee
on Indian Affairs
H 147
Head office
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
The Committee
Chairman:
Professor Ellis H. Morrow, B.A., M.B.A.,
F.C.I.,LL.D. Vancouver.
V ice-Chairman:
Chief William D. Scow     - Alert Bay.
Members:
Edward N. Bolton     ----- Port Essington.
Ernest Brewer   ------ Vernon.
Capt. Charles Cates ----- North Vancouver.
Lawrence P. Guichon, D.Sc.   -     -     - Quilchena.
Secretary
Miss Joanna R. Wright -     -     - Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the Seventh Annual Report of the Provincial
Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs for the year ended December 31st, 1956.
The Advisory Committee was authorized by a Provincial Order in Council in 1953
to investigate means of improving Federal-Provincial co-operation in the administration
of health and welfare services to Indians, and to co-ordinate the efforts of both Governments in this particular branch of Indian affairs in British Columbia.
In the interim period, a considerable amount of information relating to these matters has been correlated and acted upon by the Advisory Committee. During the past
year, certain specific problems allied to the need for increased welfare assistance and
health supervision have been made the subject of special investigation.
Health and Welfare
The harmonious co-operation between the Provincial Department of Health and
Welfare, the Director of Indian Health Services, and the Indian Affairs Branch has continued to create healthier and happier living conditions for many Indian people in the
Province.   Nevertheless, there are a number of problems yet to be overcome.
Members of the Committee are particularly concerned over the high rate of mortality
among Indians in this Province, especially among infants. Vital statistics for 1955 record
that the infant mortality was 90.2 per 1,000 live births in the Indian population during
that year, as compared with 21.6 among non-Indians. It is considered that these figures
indicate an urgent need for increased health and welfare services on Indian reserves.
During 1956, fourteen additional Indian communities obtained services from Provincial health units, making a total of fifty-eight reserves now receiving such assistance
through Federal-Provincial agreements. H 148 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
During her tours throughout the Province, the Secretary has made a point of contacting Provincial social welfare officials wherever possible, and gathering information
about their work on Indian reserves. Much of this consists of collecting statistical
information needed before Old-age Assistance pensions can be granted. In addition,
eligibility for Provincial bonuses must be determined for recipients of Old Age Security
and Old-age Assistance pensions.
Provincial Social Welfare workers also carry out investigations relating to the
apprehension of Indian children under the "Protection of Children Act" of British
Columbia. As of December, 1956, thirty-five children with Indian status were wards of
the Superintendent of Child Welfare, six were non-wards, and ten were wards of the
Children's Aid Society for whom the Indian Affairs Branch was paying per capita costs.
In addition, nineteen wards of the Superintendent and one ward of the Children's Aid
Society were attending Indian residential schools at no cost to the Provincial Government.
All Social Welfare officials contacted by the Secretary were in agreement regarding
the need for more welfare work to be done among Indians living on reserves. The case
load carried by Provincial officials in their normal duties outside Indian reserves does
not allow time to meet this need adequately.
During the summer, the Deputy Minister of Social Welfare met the Deputy Minister
of Citizenship and Immigration and the Director of Indian Affairs to discuss ways and
means of extending welfare service on Indian reserves.
As a result of this conference, the Social Welfare Branch of the Provincial Department of Health and Welfare plans to carry out a pilot study in the Okanagan and Lytton
areas in order to determine the feasibility of granting welfare services to the Indian
population of British Columbia on the same basis as is extended to other citizens. In this
investigation the Social Welfare Branch will estimate the over-all cost of such a programme, and submit its findings to the Government of British Columbia with a view to
providing extended welfare services to Indians with the co-operation of the Federal
Government.
Such a scheme could be established on either a per capita cost payment by the
Federal Government for Provincial services to Indians living on reserves or by the employment of more Indian Affairs Branch welfare workers in British Columbia.
Another aspect of welfare which has been the subject of study by the Provincial
Advisory Committee during 1956 is the after-care and rehabilitation of Indian prisoners
released from gaols. A considerable amount of research has been devoted to this
problem throughout the year by the Secretary.
Annual General Meeting
The annual general meeting of the Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs
was held in the Parliament Buildings, Victoria, on November 13th, 14th, and 15th.
Distinguished guests invited to attend the sessions on November 14th were Mr.
F. G. S. Hahn, M.P., Mr. W. J. Asselstine, M.L.A., Mr. W. A. McAdam, Agent-
General for British Columbia in the United Kingdom, and Mr. W. S. Arneil, Commissioner for Indian Affairs in British Columbia.
The theme of discussion on this day was "Indians and Crime—-After-care, Rehabilitation, and Prevention." Guest speakers included the Warden of the Kamloops Gaol,
the Matron of the Women's Division, Oakalla Prison Farm; Probation Officers from
Vancouver and Abbotsford; the executive director of the John Howard Society; the
president of the Elizabeth Fry Society; the prison representative of the Salvation Army;
and the Superintendents of the Vancouver and Okanagan Indian Agencies.
Many special problems confronting Indians on their release from prison were discussed. Some valuable suggestions were made by speakers concerning probationary
supervision for Indians, their post-sentence employment, and general welfare. Addresses ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS H 149
and discussions on this subject provided a wealth of material for study by the Advisory
Committee.
On November 14th, honoured guests and speakers were invited by the Minister of
Labour and members of the Advisory Committee to a dinner at the Empress Hotel. Mr.
W. J. Asselstine, M.L.A., was guest speaker on this occasion. During the evening a
model British Columbia Indian totem-pole was presented to Mr. W. A. McAdam, Agent-
General for British Columbia in the United Kingdom, by Chief William Scow, Vice-
Chairman of the Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs. The presentation
concluded an induction ceremony during which Mr. McAdam was named an honorary
chief of the Kwicksutaineuk Indian Nation. This tribute was paid to Mr. McAdam in
recognition of his friendship to Chief Scow, a member of the Kwicksutaineuk Indian
Nation, when he attended the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II as a representative of the
Native Indians of Canada.
Before the annual general meeting of the Advisory Committee ended, the Honourable Lyle Wicks commended the members for their progressive work of inquiry into the
welfare of the Indians. The Minister was confident that the efforts of the Advisory
Committee would continue to have a vital impact upon the welfare of the native people
of this Province.
Optional Insurance of the "Workmen's
Compensation Act"
The "Workmen's Compensation Act" of British Columbia was amended in April,
1955, to enable independent operators to obtain insurance benefits for themselves and
their families in case of injury or death.
As a result of a recommendation made to the Minister of Labour by the Provincial
Advisory Committee during the month of February, it was decided that the optional
insurance clauses of the "Workmen's Compensation Act" ought to be more widely
known among the independent native fishermen of this Province.
After consultation with the Indian Affairs Branch, chief counsellors from eighty-five
band councils were invited to attend various meetings, in order to hear an officer of the
Workmen's Compensation Board explain how independent Indian fishermen could apply
for coverage under the Act.
Meetings took place at Steveston, Port Alberni, and Alert Bay in March, and in
Prince Rupert at the end of June. A representative of the Advisory Committee was
present on each occasion. Mr. H. Robertson, assessor of the Workmen's Compensation
Board in Vancouver, addressed these meetings and explained to Indian delegates how
much the coverage would cost them, and the kind of benefits which they or their families
would receive if they were injured in their employment as independent fishermen.
The attendance at the meetings by Indian leaders was disappointing. Nevertheless,
the Advisory Committee considered its efforts had not been wasted. The circularization
of information to Indian bands, through letters and pamphlets, brought the insurance
clauses of the "Workmen's Compensation Act" to the attention of many independent
Indian fishermen for the first time, and it is anticipated that more of them will apply for
coverage in the future.
Joint Community Projects
The Honourable the Minister called a one-day conference at the Court-house, Vancouver, on Wednesday, June 27th, 1956, for the purpose of discussing ways and means
whereby the Indian population of British Columbia could be more fully integrated into
the life of the Province at a community level. H 150 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
At this conference, members of the Advisory Committee were invited to meet Provincial presidents and leading officials of the following organizations: The Boy Scout
and Girl Guide Associations, the Junior Red Cross, the Parent-Teacher Association, the
Provincial Council of Women, the St. John Ambulance, the Women's Institutes, the
Y.M.C.A., the 4-H Clubs, the Indian Affairs Branch, and the Community Programmes
Branch of the Department of Education.
Delegates agreed unanimously that more Indians should be encouraged to join social
organizations as a means of encouraging neighbourly contacts between the Indians and
their fellow-citizens of this Province. Lack of trained leaders appeared to be an outstanding problem for most of the organizations represented at the conference. The
Advisory Committee was asked for guidance as to how more Indians could be approached
by group leaders and interest aroused in social activities. Owing to segregation on
reserves, many Indians are diffident about making the first move to join organizations
which are sponsored by non-Indian communities. Delegates to the conference agreed,
therefore, that more encouragement would have to be given by group leaders to Indians
than in the past.
A motion was adopted that each delegate to the conference should discuss with his
or her organization as to how it could help to integrate the Indian population into the life
of this Province on a community level, and to submit specific proposals to the Advisory
Committee.
Reports were subsequently submitted, and studied at the general meeting of the
Advisory Committee in November. The Minister of Labour conveyed the comments of
the Advisory Committee on these reports to the organizations concerned, and expressed
his hope that another meeting of delegates could be arranged in 1957.
Enfranchisement of Metlakatla
In March of 1956 the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration appointed a committee consisting of the Honourable Mr. Justice J. O. Wilson, of the Supreme Court of
British Columbia; Mr. D. L. Brown, of the Indian Affairs Branch in Ottawa; and Mr.
Edwin D. Ryan, a representative of the Metlakatla Indian Band. This committee was
requested to inquire into all matters relevant to the application for enfranchisement by
the Metlakatla Indian Band, to report its opinions on the advisability of enfranchisement,
and to make such recommendations and comments as it deemed desirable.
The Minister of Citizenship and Immigration invited the Government of British
Columbia to appoint an observer to attend the meetings of the committee, to be held at
Prince Rupert on April 4th and 5th, 1956. The Secretary of the Provincial Advisory
Committee on Indian Affairs was delegated to represent the Provincial Government on
this occasion.
Approximately sixty members of the Metlakatla Indian Band were present at
the hearings, and the findings of the committee were later forwarded to the Federal
Government.
Public Relations
The Honourable the Minister, with two members of the Advisory Committee and
the Secretary, attended the Twenty-fourth Convention of the Native Brotherhood of
British Columbia, which was held at Cape Mudge from April 9th to 12th, 1956.
Some 300 Indian delegates and guests took part in the discussions, which covered a
variety of subjects, including health and welfare, education, vocational training, fishing,
and coverage for independent fishermen under the insurance clauses of the " Workmen's
Compensaion Act." ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS H 151
The Minister of Labour addressed the convention on the third day, and the Secretary spoke at a meeting of the Native Sisterhood.
Two members of the Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs attended the
Annual Provincial Game Convention which was held at Prince George in May.
The Secretary of the Advisory Committee was invited to the leadership training
course held by the Indian Affairs Branch in British Columbia, which was held on the
Kamloops Indian Reserve from April 9th to 13th, 1956. Twenty-one Indian delegates
were present. The course was conducted by the social worker for the Indian Affairs
Branch, and is the second of its kind to be held in British Columbia.
Provincial Government officials invited to address the Indian delegates included Mr.
R. Fry, Assistant District Agriculturist at Kamloops, and Mr. W. Mayers, of the Community Programmes Branch of the Department of Education, who spoke on the organization of recreational activities at a community level. The Secretary of the Provincial
Advisory Committee on Indian Affairs also addressed the delegates, and outlined ways
in which the Government of British Columbia is co-operating with the Federal Government to improve the social and economic welfare of the Indians of this Province.
Capt. Charles Cates, in his capacity as Mayor of North Vancouver and a member
of the Advisory Committee, availed himself of numerous opportunities throughout the
year to talk about the welfare and culture of the native Indians of British Columbia.
Captain Cates was honoured in 1956 by being appointed a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Society of Great Britain.
The Secretary also addressed meetings of various organizations and Indian band
councils during the year.
Secretary's Tours
Five Indian Agencies were visited by the Secretary in 1956. On these visits she
gained greater knowledge of the various problems existing on Indian reserves, and of the
measures being taken to overcome them.
In March the Superintendent of the West Coast Agency conducted the Secretary on
a tour of the reserves neighbouring Port Alberni, and she was invited to address a council
meeting of the Sheshaht Band.
In August the Secretary went to the Okanagan Agency, where the Superintendent
arranged an extensive and interesting tour of his district. She met many Indians in that
area and attended a band council meeting.
In October the Secretary went to the Stuart Lake Agency and was conducted on
a most comprehensive tour of reserves in the Stuart Lake and Fraser Lake districts.
The Roman Catholic schools at Lejac and Fort St. James were visited, and the Secretary
had conferences with health and welfare workers as well as officials of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
The Williams Lake Indian Agency was also toured in October, when the Superintendent and the health nurse accompanied the Secretary to neighbouring and outlying
Indian reserves. Here the Secretary had an opportunity to learn first hand of the field
work being done in remotely situated Indian villages by officials of the Indian Affairs
Branch.
The Lytton Agency was also visited in October, when the Superintendent conducted
the Secretary on a most instructive tour of various reserves and schools in his district.
An interesting departure in St. George's Anglican Residential School at Lytton is the
instruction of Indian pupils in the making of jewellery and ornaments from jade and
other semi-precious stones which are to be found locally. It is hoped that the Indians
will thus learn again to make use of the jade deposits from which their weapons and
utensils were fashioned in their early civilization. H 152 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Great tribute was paid by the Secretary to the active co-operation of the Commissioner for Indian Affairs, and the willing assistance of Superintendents which made her
tours so instructive and enjoyable.
Education
There are numerous examples of co-operation between the British Columbia Department of Education and the Indian Affairs Branch. Last year, Inspectors of the Provincial Department of Education inspected eighty-five Indian day-school classrooms,
and in so doing evaluated the progress of approximately 2,100 Indian children.
During 1956, public-school facilities at Queen Charlotte City were expanded to
admit Indian children, as a result of a joint agreement being reached between the Federal
and Provincial Governments for cost of constructing the additional accommodation.
There are now fourteen such contracts in force in British Columbia.
By agreement with local School Boards, Indian children are enabled to attend
Provincial public schools. Latest statistics show that there were approximately 2,000
Indian pupils attending Provincial public schools in 1956, as compared with 1,650 in
1955.
The Provincial Department of Education makes available to schools operated on
Indian reserves its education curriculum, teaching aids, and various circulars. In addition, information on school buildings' standard plans have been made available to the
officials of the Indian Affairs Branch as a courtesy.
Community Programmes
The Community Programmes Branch of the Department of Education offers a
variety of services to the Indian communities in this Province. Regional Consultants
of the Branch are prepared to co-operate with Indian Superintendents in the organization
of Recreation Commissions on Indian reserves. It is considered that Recreation Commissions can do much to assist the Indian people to co-ordinate their resources and to
plan for recreation on a community basis. Already there are some all-Indian Recreation
Commissions operating in the Province.
Included in the services of the Community Programmes Branch are counselling
and advisory assistance of Regional Consultants; leadership training courses; recreation
resource material, including books and films; and grants of money for basic recreation
needs.
Apprenticeship and Vocational Training
The Advisory Committee notes with interest that the Director of Apprenticeship
Training, of the Provincial Department of Labour, has had numerous meetings throughout the year with officials of the Indian Affairs Branch. Methods of increasing pupil
selection and training facilities for Indians in pre-employment programmes were discussed. As a result, a number of young Indians have attended carpentry, heavy-duty
mechanic, and bulldozer pre-employment courses during 1956.
Kanaka Christian Vocational Training Institute
On instructions from the Minister of Labour, the Secretary of the Advisory Committee and the Apprenticeship Counsellor of