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DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL of the Health Branch Department of Health and Welfare ANNUAL REPORT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1958

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIVISION OF
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
of the Health Branch
Department of Health and Welfare
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year 1956
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1957  .
Victoria, B.C., June 3rd, 1956.
To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report on Tuberculosis in the Province of British Columbia for the year 1956.
ERIC MARTIN,
Minister of Health and Welfare. Department of Health and Welfare, Health Branch,
Victoria, B.C., June 3rd, 1956.
The Honourable E. C. Martin,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to December
31st, 1956.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT, M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health.
Department of Health and Welfare, Health Branch,
Division of Tuberculosis Control,
2647 Willow Street,
Vancouver 9, B.C., June 3rd, 1956.
G. F. Amyot, Esq., M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to December
31st, 1956.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. KINCADE, M.D.,
Director, Division of Tuberculosis Control. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Letter of Transmittal  3
Letters of Transmittal  4
List of Tables  7
List of Charts  10
Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control  11
Report of the Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Control  13
Statistical Section  21
(a) Clinics  23
(b) New Cases Examined by Clinics  30
(c) General Summaries  3 7
(d) Institutions  40
(e) B.C.G. Vaccinations  56
(/) Known Cases of Tuberculosis  58
(g) Notifications of Tuberculosis  63
(/z) Tuberculosis Mortality  78
4  INDEX
LIST OF TABLES
Clinics
Paob
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent at Each Centre and
Number of Persons Examined by Mobile Unit, 1956  24
Table 2.—Persons Examined at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1956  27
Table 3.—Treatment and Tests at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1956  27
Table 4.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1956  28
New Cases Examined by Clinics
Table 5.—New Examinations and Re-examinations in the Units Operated by This
Division, 1952-56 (Excluding Indians)  30
Table 6.—New Diagnoses Other than Negative in Persons Examined by Diagnostic
Clinics, by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age-group, 1956 (Excluding Indians)  31
Table 7.—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Examined by Clinics, by Infection
and Condition, 1956 (Excluding Indians)  33
Table 8.—Number of X-ray examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Survey Clinics, and General
Hospital Units, 1947-56  34
General Summaries
Table 9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1956  37
Table 10.—Laboratory Report, 1956  38
Table 11.—Dental Report, 1956  39
Table 12.—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report, 1956  39
Institutions—Summaries
Table 13.—Institutions—General Summaries, 1956  40
Table 14.—Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) Given by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1947-56  41
■
Institutions—Admissions
Table 15.—Total Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions in Each
Age-group, 1952-56  41
Table 16.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1956  43
Table 17.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1956  45
Table 18.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1956  45
Table 19.—Total Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1956  47
Table 20.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1952-56  47
Table 21.—First Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1956  47
Table 22.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1952-56  48
Table 23.—Readmissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1956  48
Table 24.—Readmissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1952-56  48
Table 25.—Review Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1956  49
Table 26.—Review Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1952-56.... 49
Table 27.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1952-56  50
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions of First Admissions, by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1956  50
Table 29.—Discharges from Institutions by Diagnosis upon Admission for Total
Admissions, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1956  52
7 F 8
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Page
Table 30.—Discharges from Institutions by Diagnosis upon Admission for First
Admissions, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1956  52
Table 31.—Discharges from Institutions, by Diagnosis upon Admission for Readmissions, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1956  53
Table 32.—Discharges from Institutions, by Types of Discharge, Sex, and Length of
Stay, 1956 ,  53
Table 33.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length
of Stay, 1956  54
Table 34.—Discharges from Institutions by Type of Discharge, Condition on Discharge, and Sex, 1956  55
B.C.G. Vaccinations
Table 35.—B.C.G. Vaccinations Completed according to Group Listed, 1956  57
Table 36.—B.C.G. Vaccinations Completed according to Age-group, 1956  57
Known Cases of Tuberculosis
Table 37.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1952-56  58
Table 38.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of
British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1952-56  58
Table 39.—Known cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1952-56  58
Table 40.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District of
Residence and Sex, 1956 (Excluding Indians)  59
Table 41.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District of
Residence and Sex, 1956 (Indians Only)  60
Table 42.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition, and Age-
group, 1956 (Excluding Indians)  61
Table 43.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition, and Age-
group, 1956 (Indians Only)  62
Table 44.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1947-56  63
Notifications of Tuberculosis
Table 45.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1952-56  63
Table 46.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1952-56  64
Table 47.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1952-56  64
Table 48.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases by Statistical Area, by Place
of Residence, British Columbia, 1956  64
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, 1956 (Excluding Indians)  65
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, 1956 (Indians Only)  67
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1947-56  68
Table 52.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition, and Age-
.'"     group, 1956 (Excluding Indians).— _  70 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 9
Page
Table 53.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition, and Age-
group, 1956 (Indians Only)  71
Table 54.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1956 (Excluding Indians)  72
Table 55.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1956 (Indians Only)  73
Table 56.—Tuberculosis Notifications by Age-groups and Sex for British Columbia,
1942-56, Rates per 100,000 Population (Excluding Indians)  75
Table 57.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis in
British Columbia, 1952-56  78
Tuberculosis Mortality
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1952-56  78
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Other-
than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1952-56  79
Table 60.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Indian
Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1952-56  79
Table 61.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and
Sex, 1956 (Excluding Indians)  80
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1956 (Indians Only)  80
Table 63.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-group, 1956  81
Table 64.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese Populations,
and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals, 1947-56  82
Table 65.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia
by Age-group, 1952-56  84
Table 66.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by Age-group, 1952-56  84
Table 67.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by
Age-group, 1952-56  84
Table 68.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-group, 1952-56   85
Table 69.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-group, 1952-56  86
Table 70.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by Length
of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1956  88 F 10
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
LIST OF CHARTS
Page
Chart 1.—Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control  11
Chart 2.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics, 1947-56
(Excluding Indians)  29
Chart 3.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics, 1947-56
(Excluding Indians)  30
Chart 4.—X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary
Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals, 1947-56  35
Chart 5.—X-ray Examinations Made by Institutions, Diagnostic and Treatment
Clinics, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals, 1947-56  36
Chart 6.—Percentage Distribution of Admissions to Institutions by Age-group,
1952-56  42
Chart 7.—Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1956  44
Chart 8.—First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution),
1947-56  46
Chart 9.—Percentage Distribution of Discharges from Institutions according to Condition on Discharge, 1947-56  51
Chart 10.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1947-56  69
Chart 11.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1956  74
Chart 12.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group and Sex,
1941-56, Rates per 100,000 Population (Excluding Indians)___   76
Chart 13.—Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for the Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese Populations, and
the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals, 1947-56  83
Chart 14.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-group, 1952-56  85
Chart 15.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-group, 1952-56  86
Chart 16.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population of British
Columbia by Place of Death, 1956  87 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
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_J - Report of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, 1956
Dr. G. F. Kincade, Director
INTRODUCTION
This is the Twenty-first Report of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, and it covers
the calendar year January 1st to December 31st, 1956.
The Report is divided into six major sections of statistical tables showing the general
summaries of the clinics of the Division, institutional admission and discharge summaries,
B.C.G. summaries, tables on known cases and new cases of tuberculosis, and tuberculosis
mortality.
Certain amendments have been made to existing tables with a view to improving
their usefulness. Brief narrative comments have been made as a guide to the more
important features of these statistics, and graphs have been included with some of the
tables to assist the reader in following time trends.
In reviewing the tuberculosis problem to-day one cannot help but be impressed by
the encouraging results that have been achieved in the past ten years. However, these
results have been mostly confined to one phase of the tuberculosis programme—namely,
treatment. The reduction in deaths from tuberculosis and the saving of lives are well
known, and, of course, to those suffering from tuberculosis and their families nothing
could be of more importance. Still, even in treatment, the greatest benefits from improved
methods have accrued chiefly to the younger age-groups.
Prevention, case-finding, and rehabilitation have never at any time in tuberculosis-
control work deserved more attention than they do to-day. We cannot assume, because
of the spectacular results of treatment, that tuberculosis is rapidly on its way out and is
no longer a major health problem. The incidence of tuberculosis as shown by the new
cases found is only slowly decreasing. The need for education was never more evident,
and our efforts in vocational rehabilitation are as yet only in their developmental stages.
The rapidly changing picture in tuberculosis-control to-day underlines the need for
finding those undetected individuals in our population who are suffering from tuberculosis
and, being unrecognized, are the source of spread of tuberculosis to those susceptible
individuals with whom they associate. Once discovered, tuberculosis is readily treated
and the spread of disease can be prevented. When it is unrecognized, we are incapable
of doing anything about it. This, of course, is not a new concept, but from past experience we are now better able to mobilize our forces to bring these unknown cases to light.
These unknown cases constitute the reservoir which will continue to produce new tuberculosis, and unless they are detected the eradication of the disease cannot become a possibility. Intensive case-finding, therefore, is clearly indicated. Moreover, compared to
sanatorium treatment, case-finding is a relatively inexpensive procedure, and the money
saved in operating even a small institution would more than pay for the most elaborate
case-finding programme that would be necessary for this Province.
CASE-FINDING PROGRAMME
The tempo of the case-finding programme was continued at a high level during 1956.
Chest X-rays totalled 386,465 during the year, which represent a slight decrease over
the previous year. Three hundred and eight thousand one hundred and forty-nine were
taken on miniature films in hospitals, survey clinics of the Division, health units, and by
the mobile units. Seventy-nine thousand and eighteen standard-size X-rays were taken
by the diagnostic clinics of the Division, the hospital admission X-ray programme, and
through referred X-rays from outlying centres, which are paid for by the Division. The
following is an analysis of these figures:—
13 F 14 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Standard-size X-rays—
Diagnostic clinics ...... 37,859
Referred films  11,678
General hospital admissions. .  29,481
Total     79,018
Survey (miniature)—
General Hospitals—
Admissions  87,236
Out-patients   26,647
	
Total  113,883
Mobile—
Provincial  37,881
Metropolitan Vancouver  64,267
Total  102,148
Other surveys—
Willow Chest Centre  28,539
Vancouver Island Chest Centre  10,598
New Westminster Clinic     9,621
Metropolitan  Health  Committee   (stationary units)   41,382
Health unit at Courtenay.     1,276
Total     91,416
Total miniature X-rays  307,447
Total all X-rays  386,465
There were 307,447 miniature X-rays taken, in comparison with 307,090 the
previous year, an increase of 357.
As it is in most fatal diseases, the mortality rate for many years was the chief index
of progress in the fight against tuberculosis. With the low death rates that have now been
achieved, this index has become less useful and we are thinking more in terms of the
incidence of tuberculosis as shown by the new cases found each year, particularly the new
active cases.
The incidence rate for "other than Indians" has dropped from 211.1 per 100,000
in 1946 to 114.3 in 1951 and reached its lowest point in 1956 with a rate of 80.8. The
total number of cases reported in 1954 was 1,450, and in 1955 there was a drop to 1,403
cases. These included 646 active cases in 1954 and 587 active cases in 1955. A total
of 1,311 new cases of tuberculosis were reported during 1956, of which 668 were active
cases. The active cases, of course, are the most significant because of their need for
treatment and the danger of infection from them. It is interesting to note that over
half of the cases notified each year are in a healed condition.
The basic concepts of case-finding have not changed, and it will always be necessary
that people be X-rayed to establish a diagnosis of tuberculosis.
Principles of control in tuberculosis do not differ from those used in epidemic
diseases, although its insidious nature requires modified techniques. Our problem is to
direct our efforts to those individuals and groups who are most likely to be suffering from
tuberculosis. Fortunately, over the years a good deal of experience and a considerable
volume of statistics have been accumulated which shed a good deal of light on the problem. Naturally, further information will be required so that our efforts may be refined
and pin-pointed. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 15
So as to direct our case-finding efforts along productive lines, a survey planning
committee was formed and has been in operation during the past year. This group
represents the clinical, epidemiological, statistical, and organizing experience of those
concerned in tuberculosis-control. Its endeavour has been to determine the high incidence areas throughout British Columbia and to mobilize our resources for concentrated
efforts in these areas. The plan already in operation is to carry out total population
X-ray surveys in those communities and to repeat these surveys a short intervals until
such time as the findings indicate that the development of new cases has been reduced to
a Provincial average. As an integral part of the organization of the X-ray survey, a
pre-registration of the population is carried out so that those who do not participate in
the survey can be known and later canvassed in a further effort to have them submit to
a chest X-ray examination. In this way it is hoped that most of the hard core of these
non-participants will eventually be broken down.
As would be expected, case-finding is more productive in some centres than others,
and the following table shows the case-finding rates of active cases found in selected
operations:—
Operation
Examinations
Active Tuberculosis Found
New
Previously
Diagnosed
Total
Oakalla Prison Farm-
Metropolitan Unit No. 1 (Vancouver).
General hospitals, out-patients...
Metropolitan Unit No. 4 (Vancouver).
Courtenay Health Unit	
Willow Chest Centre— 	
General hospitals, admissions-
Provincial Mobile	
New Westminster Clinic	
Pacific National Exhibition-
Vancouver Island Chest Centre-
Metropolitan Mobile (Vancouver Industries).
University of British Columbia	
5,222
20,214
28,135
7,618
1,603
30,072
83,852
41,759
10,362
11,232
9,644
63,941
4,668
4
22
6
4
1
13
26
22
5
4
4
18
1
16
3
13
1
5
24
2
~1
6
20(1
25 (1
19 (1
5(1
1(1
18 (1
50(1
24(1
5(1
5(1
4(1
24(1
1(1
in 261)
in 808)
in 1,481)
in 1,524)
in 1,603)
in 1,671)
in 1,677)
in 1,740)
in 2,072)
in 2,246)
in 2,411)
in 2,664)
in 4,668)
The programme to provide a chest X-ray for all patients admitted to hospital in
British Columbia continues to expand, and four additional miniature X-ray machines
have been put in operation. These were in the hospitals at Quesnel, White Rock, Oliver,
and Revelstoke. The total number of hospitals so equipped now numbers forty-two,
and there are also thirty-seven hospitals doing a routine chest X-ray admission programme using their own equipment and standard-size X-ray films.
The total number of admission X-rays taken in 1956 was 131,062, an increase of
10,543 over the previous year, when 120,519 chest X-rays were taken. The percentage
of admissions X-rayed has increased from 40 per cent in 1951 to 61 per cent for the
first nine months of 1956 in those hospitals provided with miniature equipment, while
in hospitals using their own equipment the increase has been from 40.9 per cent when
this programme was first initiated to 57.6 per cent in the first nine months of 1956.
Many hospitals are doing an excellent job on this programme, and of the forty-two
with miniature equipment, eighteen hospitals are X-raying from 50 to 70 per cent of
their admissions. In hospitals using their own equipment, fourteen out of thirty-seven
are X-raying over 70 per cent of their admissions and another nine are doing 50 to 70
per cent of their admissions. While realizing that it is almost impossible to have a chest
X-ray for everybody admitted to a general hospital on account of the acute nature of
some of the conditions for which they are admitted and the fact that many people have
frequent admissions and, therefore, do not need repeated X-rays on every admission,
every effort is still being made to stimulate the hospitals to do as complete a programme
as possible.   The benefits of this programme are well recognized, in the earlier detection F 16
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
of tuberculosis and in the protection of staff against unrecognized cases. There has been
a marked reduction in the incidence of tuberculosis amongst hospital employees in recent
years, and a great part of this reduction can be attributed to the admission chest X-ray
programme.
Analysis of Hospital Admission Chest X-ray Programme
Hospitals with Equipment for Taking Miniature Films
Hospitals Taking
Standard Films Only
Total
Admission
X-rays
Year
Number of
Miniature
X-rays
Number of
Standard-
size X-rays
Percentage
of
Admissions
Examined
Active TB. Found
Number of
X-rays
Percentage
of
Admissions
Examined
New
Old
1951.
1953	
1955- •"'
1956	
52,919
62,492
83,852
91,466
C1)
6,757
14,068
16,909
40.0
54.5
62.4
61.5
23
23
26
23
19
15
24
23
11,077
22,599
22,689
40.9
55.7
57.4
52,919
80,326
120,502
131,062
1 Not known.
MORTALITY FROM TUBERCULOSIS
Much comment has been made on the reduction of deaths in tuberculosis since the
beginning of the streptomycin era in 1946. It has previously been recorded that the
death rates declined from 57.4 per 100,000 at the beginning of this era to 9.7 per 100,000
in 1954. In 1955 there was an increase in death rates to 10.5 per 100,000 and in total
deaths from 123 in 1954 to 137 in 1955. Preliminary figures recorded for 1956 show
109 deaths from tuberculosis for a rate of 7.8 per 100,000 population, the lowest yet
recorded.
Of the 109 deaths that occurred, only thirty-one were under 50 years of age and
only three of these were under 20 years of age. All three were Indians. There were
ho deaths under 5 years of age. It is not too long since that children under 5 years of
age were particularly prone to develop acute tuberculous conditions, such as meningitis,
and many deaths used to be recorded in this age-group. Seventy-eight deaths occurred
in persons over 50 years of age, sixty-five being male and thirteen female. Of these
deaths, forty-four were in persons over 70 years of age, thirty-eight being male and six
female.
The economic implications to the Province in this saving of lives and restoration to
health of the younger age-group is of the greatest importance. This represents a tremendous saving in man-power and money, not to mention the alleviation of suffering
and saving of the family unit, so often disrupted when young parents are afflicted with
chronically disabling diseases such as tuberculosis.
BED OCCUPANCY
The decline in bed occupancy throughout the Division of Tuberculosis Control,
which has been apparent over the last three years, continues its downward trend at an
almost constant rate, with only a few upward fluctuations. At the end of 1954 the
seasonal increase caused a rise in occupancy of 47 beds, but the downward trend continued in the spring, summer, and fall of 1955, with an increase of only 27 beds in the
first three months of 1956. Since then the trend has continued to be downward, with
no apparent rise this fall. The bed occupancy was 866 in January, 1954; 757 in January, 1955; 603 in January, 1956; and 536 in November of 1956. This shows a
decrease of 330 persons in the beds operated by the Division of Tuberculosis Control in
a three-year period. During this time Jericho Beach Hospital was closed, the tuberculosis beds at St. Joseph's Villa were converted to other uses, and at Tranquille the Main
Building and East Pavilion are no longer in use. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956 F 17
In 1954 provision was made for the operation of 935 beds within the Division, while
at the present time provision is made for the operation of 672 beds, and this will be
decreased to 571 beds at the beginning of the next fiscal year, an over-all reduction of
364 beds in slightly over three years. This is a reduction of 38.9 per cent. During the
year all of the tuberculosis patients have been cleared from Shaughnessy Chest Unit,
and all those tuberculosis patients who are the responsibility of the Department of
Veterans' Affairs are now being taken care of by the Division of Tuberculosis Control.
...
Bed Occupancy
Beds
Bed
Operating
Occupancy
January, 1954	
  935
866
January, 1955 	
  788
755
January, 1956	
  680
602
January, 1957	
.  672
499
Budgeted for 1957-
-58
  571
The reduction in bed occupancy at Tranquille Sanatorium has been particularly
apparent. There were 341 patients in Tranquille Sanatorium in January, 1954, and in
November, 1956, there were 188 patients. The decline in occupancy in that institution
has been gradually downward for three years, except in the early part of 1955, when,
due to the seasonal increase and the transfer of many patients from Jericho when it
closed, there was a definite up-trend. However, at the present time it is almost impossible to persuade patients from the metropolitan centres of the Coast to go to the Interior
for treatment, so that Tranquille is used mainly for patients from the Interior of the
Province. With the decreasing numbers of patients in the Interior needing treatment,
the occupancy of the institution declines and will apparently continue to do so. The
decreasing bed complement at Tranquille has created an administrative problem in staffing the institution. Every endeavour has been made to avoid partially occupied wards
and to transfer patients so that wards could be closed and the staff reduced as quickly
as possible. In spite of this and because of the impossibility of making much reduction
in the maintenance and general upkeep services, the per diem rate has increased. However, there has been a marked reduction in the total budget for the institution.
The ageing of the population of the sanatorium has for some time been apparent,
and again this year the percentage of persons in sanatoria over 50 years of age continues
to increase. While the total bed occupancy decreased rather rapidly during the past
year from 615 to 533 patients, those beds occupied by persons over 50 are showing very
little decrease, with the decline being only from 251 to 241. At the present time 241 of
the 533 patients or 45.2 per cent are over 50 years of age. This has increased from
40.8 per cent in 1955 and from 32.2 per cent in 1952. Only thirty of the 241 patients
over 50 years of age are female, representing a ratio of 7 to 1 of males to females. This
has decreased slightly from 8 to 1 a year ago, and, in fact, there has been a slight increase
in the female patients over age 50 from twenty-eight to thirty in numbers. Tranquille
Sanatorium has the highest percentage of these older people, with 93 out of 188 patients
or 49.4 per cent, while Pearson Hospital has 101 out of 233 patients or 43.4 per cent.
Recently a spot check was made of the patients in our institutions to determine how
many no longer need institutional treatment for tuberculosis and would normally be
discharged if accommodation were available. It was felt that many of the older patients,
although they had some tuberculosis, were suffering from other diseases and conditions
that were of much more significance than their tuberculosis and required more care and
attention. Having been diagnosed as tuberculosis and being very difficult to manage,
they were not acceptable to general hospitals and nursing homes so had been admitted
to sanatorium because of a need for medical and nursing care.
Of 536 patients in sanatoria at the time of the survey, it was found that thirty-six
patients fall into this category.   These people were of the older age-group and practically F 18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
all males. They ranged in age from 58 to 94, and twenty-five of them were 70 years of
age and over. Thirteen had positive sputum tests, and twenty-three were considered to
be negative. It was felt that ten of these people could be discharged to boarding homes,
but that twenty-six of them would require nursing-home care.
Out of the 101 older persons at Pearson Hospital, it was found that only twenty-
seven had been in the institution over a year. There were 100 of the older age-group in
Pearson Hospital one year before, and of these, thirteen had died. This indicates that
sixty others had been discharged from the hospital during the year. Actually there is
a considerable turnover in the older-age patients in our institutions, and every effort is
being made to treat them and restore these patients to their normal activities and surroundings, with considerable success. The increasing number of these cases in our
institutions is due to the fact that tuberculosis is now recognized as a serious problem
in the older person, with more attention being paid to this group and more cases being
found which need sanatorium care.
COMMITTALS TO SANATORIUM
The power of the Deputy Minister of Health to commit to sanatorium patients who
are infectious and refusing treatment for tuberculosis has been enforced now for three
years. In all, seventeen patients have been committed to our sanatoria, but the order
was only used on four occasions in 1956. In one instance the patient made a hasty exit
from the Province before the order could be served.
Of the sixteen actual committals, six have been discharged and ten remain in our
institutions. Three of the discharges followed successful resectional surgery. One has
been discharged to his home on probation when arrangements satisfactory to the local
Health Officer had been provided for the man. Two of the patients who were admitted
with very far advanced disease in 1955 died in 1956. At the present time there are
seven patients under committal at Tranquille, two in Victoria, and one in Pearson
Tuberculosis Hospital. Two of the patients at Tranquille Sanatorium are of necessity
confined in a restraining area because of the fact that they will not co-operate and in the
past have shown a defiance to the committal order and have left sanatorium without
permission. For the most part, the other patients are reasonably co-operative and have
not shown themselves to be a security problem.
The regulations for the committal of patients have been responsible for many others
taking treatment who did not wish to do so. The order is only used as a last resort, and
every method of persuasion is used to convince the patient of the necessity of treatment
before recourse is made to actual committal.
We have been very fortunate that most of those committed have become co-operative
after committal, because within the Division there is very little accommodation available
to handle patients of this type when they become hostile. There are several patients who
are infectious and refusing treatment who would create a real problem in handling if it
were not for the fact that they are the criminal element who are no sooner out of a penal
institution than they commit another offence and are soon apprehended. This group is
completely anti-social and impossible to handle in our sanatoria.
NATIONAL HEALTH GRANTS
The total amount of the Federal health grant for tuberculosis-control in British
Columbia is slightly less for the fiscal year 1956-57, being $360,190, as compared with
$366,070 in the previous year. In 1955-56 projects were submitted and approved in
the amount of $313,070 or 85.5 per cent of the grant. Actual expenditures, however,
amounted to $282,738 or 77.2 per cent of the grant. This was due to the fact that it is
impossible to estimate accurately the amounts that will be spent in our larger projects, TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 19
such as payment for admission chest X-rays. We are pleased to report that the under-
expenditure was not due to delay in delivery of approved equipment.
This year, projects have been submitted and approved in the amount of $319,992
or 88.6 per cent of. the amount available.
Under the Tuberculosis Grant there are eighteen projects, with the largest being the
hospital admission X-ray programme, which covers, for the most part, payments for
X-ray examinations and provides free chest X-rays for all persons admitted to hospitals
in the Province. The total amount of this project is $101,750, of which $90,000 is for
the payment of chest X-rays. This fiscal year only one new miniature X-ray machine
has been provided, that being in Smithers. Under National health grants, throughout
the years over a quarter of a million dollars has been spent on the provision of forty-two
miniature X-ray machines in hospitals and health centres. All hospitals with over 2,000
admissions a year have been provided with these machines, so that this phase of tuberculosis-control is considered to be practically complete.
Other large projects are: $48,000 for the provision of antimicrobials for the treatment of tuberculosis, $34,068 for community X-ray surveys, $41,962 for the provision
of staff and equipment at the Willow Chest Centre, and $19,599 for the rehabilitation
project.
All the projects during the current year have been continuations of projects from
previous years, there having been no new projects initiated. Through an extension of
the project for staff and equipment for the Willow Chest Centre, it has been possible to
extend the services of the Respiratory Physiology Department. When this work was first
initiated, the investigations were confined to the patients of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control. The importance of this work was recognized and requests were obtained from
general hospitals for investigation of their patients, and some were accepted. In view of
the fact that this is a highly specialized department, which requires the services of a
specially trained physician as well as specially trained technicians, and with the need for
this work increasing in Vancouver, it was felt that the services of this laboratory should
be extended to any patient who needed this type of investigation. Moreover, it would
not be justifiable to duplicate these services in Vancouver. It has therefore been arranged
that non-tuberculous patients from other hospitals in Vancouver and, in fact, throughout
the Province, as well as out-patients, will be investigated by this department, provided
that this investigation will assist in the diagnosis or treatment of their conditions.
Of the total budget, $94,839 has been allocated for salaries of personnel, all within
the Division of Tuberculosis Control, except for two nursemaids at the Vancouver
Preventorium and four X-ray technicians with the Metropolitan Health Committee.
Under the Professional Training Grant, four nurses were given postgraduate training
during the past year and five short-term postgraduate training courses were provided—
four for the medical staff and one in the rehabilitation department.
We would again thank all those groups and agencies that have helped so much in
carrying on the various phases of activities throughout the Division. Much is contributed
in time, money, and effort on the part of innumerable people throughout the Province.
Many groups contribute to the comfort and entertainment of patients in all of our
institutions. Others assist in the organization and operation of our X-ray surveys, and,
indeed, the surveys could not be carried on successfully without them. In the voluntary
agencies the British Columbia Tuberculosis Society gives strong support in all our
endeavours and meets many needs that could not otherwise be taken care of. The
Vancouver Preventorium Society provides the only hospital accommodation for the
treatment of children suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis. The Canadian Red Cross
Society contributes greatly, not only in the blood that is so vital in such large quantities
for the type of chest surgery that we are doing, but also in comfort and entertainment
to the patients in our institutions. F 20
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Many of the official agencies contribute to the operation of this Division, and our
relationships with them have been of the highest order. Mention should be made of the
close co-operation that exists between this Division and the Federal Department of
National Health and Welfare through its Indian Health Service, which co-operates so
closely and provides such an excellent service in tuberculosis for their wards.
The keen and enthusiastic support and the high level of service that is exhibited by
the staff of the Division of Tuberculosis Control is also recorded and much appreciated. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
for the Year January 1st to
December 31st, 1956  TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
CLINICS
Map of British Columbia Showing Statistical Publication Areas
F 23
Province of British Columbia—
Population, 1,398,500.
Area, 366,255 square miles.
Travelling clinics—
Kootenay Clinic (Nelson)—Statistical Areas 1 and 2.
Interior Clinic (Kamloops)—Statistical Areas 3, 6, 8, 10c, lOd.
Coast Clinic (Vancouver)—Statistical Areas 4, 7, 9c, 9d, 9e (excluding Fraser Valley).
Island Clinic (Victoria)—Statistical Area 5.
Fraser Valley Clinic (New Westminster)—Statistical Area 4 (excluding Lytton and Lillooet).
Mobile clinics.
Stationary clinics—
Victoria.
Vancouver.
New Westminster.
Tranquille. F 24
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table  1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent at Each
Centre and Number of Persons Examined by Mobile Unit, 1956
Centre Visited
Armstrong	
Burns Lake	
Dawson Creek ..
Enderby 	
Fort St. John
Kamloops 	
Kelowna 	
Merritt  	
Oliver 	
Penticton 	
Travelling Diagnostic Clinics
Interior
Days
1
Centre Visited
Princeton     	
Days
          3
3
Quesnel  _ _        ._
8
4
2
Revelstoke    	
Salmon Arm .   	
       3
4
2
3V2
12
Summerland   .
Vanderhoof 	
Vernon   	
         2
       2
               5Vi
1
Williams Lake     ...	
4
AV-2.
Total (19 centres) —
6
     781/2
Prince George
Coast
Centre Visited
Alert Bay	
Hazelton	
Powell River	
Prince Rupert
Squamish
Days
IVl
3
IVi
18
4
Terrace (including 2 days at Home for
Aged) 	
Centre Visited
Smithers 	
Queen Charlotte City	
Vancouver (Marpole Infirmary) 	
Total (9 centres)
Days
4
1
2
50
Centre Visited
Abbotsford 	
Agassiz 	
Chilliwack	
Haney (including
mary 	
1 day at Allco Infir-
Fraser Valley
Days
6
3
18
Centre Visited
Hope	
Mission	
Total (6 centres)
Days
3
1
33
Island
Centre Visited Days
Campbell River   12
Courtenay   14
Chemainus   6
Duncan  12
Ganges   2
Ladysmith     5Vz
Centre Visited
Lake Cowichan
Nanaimo	
Port Alberni	
Qualicum	
Total (10 centres)
Days
8
22
16
2
991/2
Kootenay
Centre Visited
Castlegar	
Cranbrook 	
Creston	
Fernie	
Golden 	
Grand Forks
Greenwood	
Invermere	
Kaslo 	
Days
5Vi
8
3V2
5
1-Vi
8
2
1
2
Centre Visited
Kimberley 	
Michel 	
Nakusp 	
Nelson  	
New Denver	
Rossland	
Trail 	
Total (16 centres)
Days
5
6
4
60
4
4i/4
10
130 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 25
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent at Each
Centre and Number of Persons Examined by Mobile Unit, 1956—Continued
Mobile Survey Clinics
Unattached School District
Centre Visited
Bamfield 	
Chamis Bay 	
Gold River	
Mahatta River ..
Nitinat   	
Sarita River 	
Tahsis   	
Zeballos   	
Days
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
Totals  (8 centres)  11
X-rays
117
50
101
18
58
128
435
114
1,021
School District No. 32
Centre Visited
Boston Bar	
Hope	
North Bend	
Days
X-rays
2
104
2
840
1
108
Totals  (3 centres)    5
School District No. 33
Centre Visited
Wells	
Days
m
1,052
X-rays
186
School District No. 14
School District No. 35
Centre Visited
Okanagan Falls
Oliver 	
Osoyoos  	
Days
1
Totals  (3  centres)  14
School District No. 16
Centre Visited
Hedley 	
Keremeos   	
Days
1
3
Totals  (2 centres)    4
School District No. 17
Centre Visited
Copper Mountain
Princeton  	
Days
1
4
Totals  (2 centres)     5
School District No. 19
Centre Visited
Revelstoke 	
Days
7
School District No. 24
Centre Visited
Chase 	
Kamloops 	
Totals (2 centres).
Days
1
6
School District No. 28
Centre Visited
Macalister	
Quesnel	
X-rays
142
2,095
991
3,228
X-rays
102
600
702
X-rays
139
483
622
X-rays
2,241
X-rays
175
403
578
Totals (2 centres)  12
2,882
Centre Visited
Langley	
Days
5
School District No. 36
Centre Visited
Cloverdale  	
Whalley  	
White Rock _..._.
Days
5
4
5
Totals  (3 centres)  14
School District No. 40
Centre Visited Days
New   Westminster   (commercial
and industrial)   39
School District No. 52
Centre Visited
Port Edward	
Prince Rupert _.
Days
4
11
■
Totals  (2 centres)  15
School District No. 53
Centre Visited
Terrace 	
Hazelton	
Cedarville 	
Totals  (3 centres)  11
School District No. 54
X-rays
1,469
X-rays
1,372
1,154
1,180
3,706
X-rays
5,964
X-rays
283
1,893
2,176
Days
X-rays
5
938
5
276
1
56
1,270
Centre Visited
Days
X-rays
Days
X-rays
Smithers .. .... 	
     2
450
1
117
Houston 	
     1
298
11
2,765
Telkwa 	
     2
170
Totals (3 centres)     5
918 F 26
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent at Each
Centre and Number of Persons Examined by Mobile Unit, 1956—Continued
Mobile Survey Clinics—Continued
School District No. 55
Centre Visited
Burns Lake	
Decker Lake _.
Grassy Plains _
Pendleton Bay
Days
5
1
1
1
Totals  (4 centres)     8
School District No. 56
Centre Visited
Vanderhoof	
Days
3
School District No. 57
Centre Visited
Summit Lake 	
Red Rocky Creek
Days
1
1
Totals (2 centres)    2
School District No. 61
Centre Visited
Victoria	
Days
7
Chinatown, 278;   Colquitz, 699;   industry, 145.
School District No. 65
X-rays
476
106
170
235
987
X-rays
392
X-rays
134
85
219
X-rays
1,222
Centre Visited Days
Bamberton      2
Duncan     2
Hillcrest    2
Totals (3 centres)    6
School District No. 66
Centre Visited
Gordon River 	
Honeymoon Bay
Days
1
3
Lake Cowichan     2
Youbou     1
Totals (4 centres)    7
X-rays
187
560
315
1,062
X-rays
50
410
291
552
1,303
School District No. 67
Centre Visited Days
Chemainus      3
Ladysmith    2
Centre Visited
Nanaimo	
Totals  (2 centres)     5
School District No. 68
Days
School District No. 69
Centre Visited
Qualicum 	
Days
1
School District No. 73
Centre Visited
Beaver Cove
Englewood 	
Port McNeill ....
Sointula 	
Days
1
1
1
2
Totals (4 centres)    5
School District No. 74
Centre Visited
Coal Harbour _
Holberg
Jeune Landing
Port Alice	
Port Hardy	
Winter Harbour
Quatsino 	
Total   (7   centres)     9
School District No. 79
Centre Visited
Tofino 	
Ucluelet 	
Days
2
2
Total   (2   centres)     4
X-rays
617
384
1,001
X-rays
1,399
X-rays
265
X-rays
62
108
204
320
694
ays
X-rays
1
31
2
215
1
47
2
427
1
317
1
27
1
36
1,100
X-rays
66
256
322
Grand totals (69 centres)_...220V£   37,881 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956 F 27
Table 2.—Persons Examined at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1956
Stationary
Travelling
Item
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
New
Westminster
Coast
Kootenay
Interior
Island
Fraser
Valley
Total
24,608
15,330
4,157
9,465
1,478
1,047
431
319
5,462
3,938
1,311
5,141
4,182
2,340
479
551
1,323
1,176
147
287
4,071
2,368
1,708
536
262
909
2,294
1,893
401
1,315
3,853
2,279
1,781
478
1,167
2,371
722
543
163
16
474
44,716
Type of case—
29,756
8,103
Physicians' interview 	
Referred X-rays, large films..
18,523
11,678
Table 3.—Treatment and Tests at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1956
Stationary
Travelling
Item
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
New
Westminster
Coast
Kootenay
Interior
Island
Fraser
Valley
Total
5,398
383
85
718
175
11
252
33
21
26
2,296
160
1,107
101
8
82
29
	
64
	
	
	
9,117
677
114
	
	
826
175
9
49 F 28
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The number of examinations carried out in the survey clinics showed a slight, but
significant, increase, while the number of new tuberculous cases found in survey clinics
dropped from 381 to 328. The new active cases dropped from 126 to 102, and there
was a drop in those classified as " activity undetermined " from 92 to 89.
Table 4.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1956
Clinics
Mobile
Stationary
Metropolitan
Health
Unit,
Courtenay
General Hospitals
Willow
Chest
Centre
Victoria
New
Westminster
Provincial
Metropolitan
Outpatients
Admissions
Total
28,539
44
2
30
7
9
14
5
1
3
1
6
4
1
10,598
9
8
4
2
1
1
9,621
6
1
3
3
2
~ 1
1
37,881
56
46
16
15
3
12
10
5
3
2
64,267
22
16
5
5
1
5
6
2
2
2
72
49
41,382
60
2
36
10
13
3
10
20
12
6
2
2
2
99
53
1,276
1
1
1
1
26,647
34
27
5
7
15
4
2
2
" I
2
1
88
2
60
2
2
7
49
24
1
2
7
14
2
1
87,236
96
65
10
14
3
38
21
10
6
1
4
5
3
1
1
5
408
4
237
7
11
46
173
132
8
7
46
71
27
8
1
10
8
8
133
186
84
695
84,212
1,422
307,447
328
5
232
58
63
12
99
69
33
23
4
Inactive	
9
16
Active . .	
11
3
8
4
2
2
4
4
	
	
1
1
31
24
2
4
18
6
4
2
1
1
48
40
12
11
27,951
402
2
6
128
2
95
8
6
27
54
25
1
835
|j
1
1
9
38
17
5
12
4
4
2
60
49
12
20
63,733
299
5
3
11
34
32
5
3
13
11
10
3
1
3
3
4
96
63
14
15
40,593
442
1
2
~~I
1,264
7
23
25
107
368
Moderately advanced-
240
15
16
11
13
5
2
2
1
1
31
40
8
25
37,401
192
86
123
49
14
5
7
6
9,568
29
2
1
~ 2
34
41
18
196
25,881
353
17
3
95
12
18
10,269
184
16
17
410
523
160
987
300,872
Other                  	
3,330
Does not include 795 miniature films taken at Pearson Hospital. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 29
Chart 2.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary
Clinics, 1947-56
(Excluding Indians)
No. OF CASES
(In 000's)
90
80
TOTAL 1
XAMINATIO
MS
70
60
50
J<",
"*** "^
\
•s
v
/
/
/
/
RE-EX/
M|NATIONS
/
^^»
/
30
20
I
10
0
■ ^  ^
	
NEW EXAM
V
\
\
NATIONS
\
\
\
:>-:'
	
,---
s
s
1947     1948     1949      1950      1951      1952     1953      1954     1955     1956 F 30
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 3.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling
Clinics, 1947-56
(Excluding Indians)
No. OF CASES
(In 000's)
20
10
**^^       TOTAL EXAMINATIONS
"-"ft* ft^ ^
RE-EXAMIN
ATIONS..—
---
""-..„	
NEW EXAMINATIONS
	
!■»_■» ««Ma
—— -
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
NEW CASES EXAMINED BY CLINICS
While the total number of examinations in stationary clinics appears about the
same, there has been a considerable drop in the number of new examinations, which is
offset by an equal rise in the number of re-examinations. This is probably because of
the more frequent examinations of known cases on antimicrobial therapy.
Table 5.—New Examinations and Re-examinations in the Units
Operated by This Division, 1952-56
(Excluding Indians)
Total
Examinations
Stationary Clinics
Travelling Clinics
Mobile
Year
New
Examinations
Reexaminations
New
Examinations
Reexaminations
Survey
Clinics
19"!?,
99,836
127,757
128,805
127,937
124,317
21,603
25,159
25,173
28,505
21,709
59,205
56,928
51,291
48,157
56,857
3,170
2,462
2,059
2,000
1,725
8,204
7,698
7,841
7,516
7,121
7,654
1QS1
35,510
1954. .                    .   ..
42,441
1955
41,759
1956	
36,905 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 31
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w TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956
F 33
There has been a slight increase in the number of minimal cases diagnosed by the
clinics and a decrease in far advanced, while the moderately advanced remain exactly
the same. The total active cases at 351 is very little changed from 349 in the previous
year. There was a decrease in the number of primary cases diagnosed from 50 to 38.
However, it is most remarkable that there is so little difference in the cases found in 1955
and 1956.
Table 7.—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Examined by Clinics,
by Infection and Condition, 1956
(Excluding Indians)
Stationary
Travelling
Infection and Condition
Willow
Chest
Tranquille
Victoria
New
Westminster
North
Lawn
Coast
Kootenay
Interior
Island
Fraser
Valley
Total
Primary
22
1
2
13
6
264
85
26
82
68
3
90
8
12
45
25
28
2
2
21
3
96
42
161
102
3
12
2
1
6
2
1
9
1
8
2
2
2
2
16
2
1
3
3
83
16
18
35
13
1
29
5
2
20
2
4
3
1
21
20
61
16
1
6
2
1
2
1
82
36
7
16
23
17
7
7
3
2
2
45
8
27
27
7
2
4
1
6
4
2
2
2
2
10
3
1
1
17
6
7
4
9
8
1
3
2
1
6
18
6
1
1
17
7
7
3
12
1
7
4
2
2
8
16
8
3
3
41
22
4
10
4
1
10
1
1
6
2
5
2
2
1
25
5
21
7
1
1
1
43
2
10
11
20
11
2
5
4
4
1
3
2
13
20
24
1
~I
8
7
1
7
1
1
38
3
Arrested   .	
3
24
Activity undetermined	
8
574
Inactive-	
185
Arrested	
66
Active .. . .
178
Activity undetermined.
Not stated	
139
6
193
22
18
Moderately advanced	
Inactive	
110
Activity undetermined	
43
52
Inactive	
Arrested	
4
3
Active	
39
Activity undetermined	
Total pulmonary—
6
214
90
351
Activity undetermined	
196
6
Totals
404
23
119
107
15
30
32
59
59
9
857 F 34
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 8.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Survey Clinics, and
General-Hospital Units, 1947-56.
Institutions
Stationary
Travelling
Mobile
Stationary
Metropolitan
General-
hospital
Units
Year
Diagnostic
Survey
Diagnostic
Survey
Provincial
Metropolitan
Total
1947
5,196
6,111
6,432
6,412
6,361
7,106
8,395
9,297
9,503
8,782
20,986
24,144
27,695
28,500
29,192
27,450
29,001
27,482
27,436
29,013
44,196
57,428
56,374
54,585
52,399
53,380
53,089
48,982
50,856
49,553
12,996
13,399
13,508
13,360
11,074
13,374
10,160
9,900
9,517
8,846
1,063
91
155,674!
127,081*
140,722»
80,6861
26,434
7,654
35,510
42,441
41,759
36,905
57,509
58,579
65,207
53,243
63,941
64,267
24^355
32,182
35,879
35,845
27,722
41,382
45,210
71,410
80,795
95,054
105,860
111,987
113,883
240,111
1948	
1949	
1950
1951
228,254
244,731
228,753
278,734
1952	
281,319
1953
332,295
1954
332,996
1955
1956
342,721
342 631
1 No breakdown available for mobile units prior to 1951.
Source: X-ray Ledger TB. 73 and Clinic Ledgers TB. 71 and TB. 41.
. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 35
Chart 4.—X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals, 1947-56.
No. OF EXAMINATIONS
(In 000's)
350
325
275
250
225
200
■V  TOTAL
125
100
4
f>
.	
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m m ^^^-^
V"
y
STATIONS
CU1NICS_
f              \
•
if
■t*M
50
25
A
i
/
i
•JSTITUT10N!
rRAVELLING
CLINICS
m — — """
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0
I       l
1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956
'Includes "Stationary Metropolitan" from 1951. F 36
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 5.—X-ray Examinations Made by Institutions, Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, Stationary Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals,
1947-56.
No. OF EXAMINATIONS
(In 000's)
■^S
\
\
\
\
>"
**
s
\
\
\
\
60^2?
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s
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BY SURVEY-
//
/
/
f
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---
	
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DIAGNOSTIC
AND TREAT
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s ""~ """
	
NSTITUTION
s
1
1947 1948 1949 1950. 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956
•Includes "Stationary Metropolitan" from 1951. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956 F 37
GENERAL SUMMARIES
Table 9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1956
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
New Westminster
Pearson
Total
X-rays taken	
Chest X-rays—■
Flat-
In-patient..
Out-patient.
V.D. Division-
Stereoscopic—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Planograph—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Other chest—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Gastro-intestinal—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Bones and joints—■
In-patient-
Out-patient ..
V.D. Division-
Other—
In-patient-
Out-patient-
Fluoroscope—
In-patient	
Out-patient .
V.D. Division-
Electrocardiogram—
In-patient-
Out-patient	
V.D. Division-
Indian Department examinations-
Lipiodol injection—
In-patient-
Out-patient..
24,167
1,751
19,113
240
211
352
601
1,633
13
69
44
1
56
12
29
798
77
210
5
79
37
22
9
3,851
1,571
1,426
356
13
310
17
16
3
79
37
72
45
76
1
7,727
563
5,180
2
1
146
156
157
1,109
13
1
92
223
1
23
25
35
2,820
2,750
42
14
89
2,950
41,515
1,617
5,502
200
28,669
	
242
5
7
3
532
1,245
3
566
387
1,455
1
2,774
27
69
4
94
334
7
320
	
2
65
161
	
37
109
210
933
77
81
367
6
79
	
72
8
35
	
9
Source:  X-ray Ledger TB. 73. F 38
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
It is noted that the volume of work in the Respiratory Physiology Department in the
Willows Chest Centre has shown a reduction in practically all phases. This is due to a
lesser amount of surgery being done.
Table 10.—Laboratory Report, 1956
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
New Westminster
Kootenay
Pearson
Total,
1956
Sputum tests—
Routine      ,	
Concentrated	
Cultures done at institution—
2,867
2,266
725
168
179
52
26
1
5
3
110
3,258
46
124
171
132
133
122
117
91
200
63
211
25
1
	
10
87
2,613
1,339
272
1,468
432
71
1,027
1,321
620
697
702
571
314
64
2,133
212
10
7,798
751
	
169
184
328
253
3,461
817
153
12,069
1,739
427
467
438
294
549
1,792
1,626
1
9
331
11
58
345
107
1,833
1,670
597
2
2
1
648
693
742
354
397
411
340
224
1,272
1,411
3
14
89
12
89
85
2,100
1,232
Cultures collected for Provincial
Laboratory—
8,189
Gastric  	
Other cultures. -     ,
1,392
349
648
Blood tests—
16,147
3,934
1,534
	
1,683
Differential-	
Collected for Provincial Laboratory
V.D.R.L.   - -	
1,668
1,296
1,287
3,191
5,381
Urinalysis—
Quantitive- -	
	
241
33
Spirometry     	
420
	
11
70
M.B.C  	
434
449
107
	
1,834
95
286
7,680
46
95
Other tests 	
8,461
Source:  Daily Laboratory Ledger TB. 72. tuberculosis control report, 1956
Table 11.—Dental Report, 1956
F 39
^Centre"168'     Tranquille Victoria
Pearson
Total
Patient-visits—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Examinations—
In-patient-
Out-patient..
Consultations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Extractions—
In-patient..
Out-patient-
Fillings, including cement bases-
In-patient-
Out-patient_
Prophylactic treatment—
In-patient-
Out-patient.
Surgical removal of impacted teeth—
In-patient-
Out-patient..
Denture fittings-
In-patient-
Out-patient	
X-rays—In-patient-
Other	
333
233
67
102
60
4
82
20
98
192
182
25
72
10
1,903
5
168
208
1,408
426
426
968
10
1,792
9
210
7
156
22
76
131
6
23
30
2
58
2
320
57
1,202
6
168
181
1
456
522
6
43
10
549
3
1,636
62
3,648
251
559
102
471
5
2,022
20
1,177
204
499
43
2
1,757
40
3,820
138
Source: Ledger TB. 74.
Table 12.—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report, 1956
Willow Chest
Centre
Victoria
Tranquille
Pearson
Total
Patient-visits, E.E.N.T.—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Eye-
Examinations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Prescriptions—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Refractions-
In-patient	
Out-patient-
Other treatment—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Consultations—
In-patient	
Out-patient-
wui-paiiciu	
Ear, nose, and throat—
Examinations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Treatments—
In-patient.
Out-patient-
Consultations—
In-patient..
Out-patient-
Surgical procedures
43
17
30
6
12
15
2
18
12
10
2
2
1
201
71
60
4
8
37
11
1
~4
255
170
94
139
22
91
41
505
17
281
6
160
34
150
12
52
1
"24
Source: Ledger TB. 75. F 40
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
INSTITUTIONS—SUMMARIES
The use of pneumoperitoneum is becoming further restricted, and there were only
11 induced during 1956 as compared to 18 in 1955, with the total number of refills
being reduced from 2,604 in 1954 to 181 in 1956. No pneumothoraces were instituted
during 1956.
Patient-days at Tranquille Sanatorium were reduced during the year by 3,174. The
bed occupancy in that institution rose to 255 in April, but dropped to 175 at the end of
the year. The other institutions were fairly constant except Victoria, where in the latter
part of the year the bed capacity was reduced as it had been decided to close the institution
at the end of the fiscal year.
The patient-days at Pearson Hospital increased by 19,512.
This represents the first full calendar year of operation of North Lawn Tuberculosis
Unit on the grounds of the Provincial Mental Hospital, which accommodates approximately 240 patients. It will be noted that the turnover of patients in this institution is
not great as compared with Tranquille Sanatorium, which operated about the same
number of beds during the year.
Table 13.—Institutions—General Summaries, 1956
Item
Willow
Chest Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
Pearson
North
Lawn
Total,
1955
Patient-days..
Admissions..
Discharges, including deaths-
Treatments—
Pneumothoraces—
Initial	
Refill..
Pneumoperitoneum—
Initial 	
Refill-
Chest aspirations..
Blood transfusions	
Intravenous injections..
Other treatments	
Examinations—■
Bronchoscopy..
Spinal puncture..
Cystoscopy-
Thoracic surgery—
Thoracoplasties—
Stage 1-
Stage 1 with apicolysis—
Stage 2-
Post-resection.—
Special—
Plumbage	
Paulino	
Schede- 	
Resections—
Pneumonectomy
Lobectomy	
Segmental	
Wedge
Multiple wedge  —
Intra-pleural pneumolysis	
Extra-pleural pneumothorax..
Phrenic-
Other surgery—
Major	
Minor	
Autopsy	
30,233
202
205
1
5
38
60
614
361
96
239
10
2
4
24
5
82
53
37
54
51
13
92,490
240
281
5
63
40
103
31
89
1
2
3
1
9
1
3
12
19
6
1
10
30
9
17,370
105
126
17
13
5
3
2
1
12
1
110,291
372
422
1
80
15
6
20
56
45
10
1
10
26
14
19,281
64
73
11
28
269,665
983
1,107
11
181
132
736
397
214
375
22
3
6
27
1
9
4
94
72
43
1
74
119
37
Source:  Clinic Ledgers TB. 71 and TB. 41 and Institutional Ledger TB. 70, Admission Form TB. 78 and Discharge
Form TB. 79. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956
F 41
Table 14.—Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) Given by
Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1947-56
Total
Initial
Refill
Year
Total
Initial
Institutions
Stationary
Clinics
Traveling
Clinics
Total
Refill
Institutions
Stationary
Clinics
Traveling
Clinics
1947
21,919
21,788
22,393
21,139
20,251
15,369
8,345
354
339
334
286
207
125
39
2
350
336
328
279
201
119
39
2
1
2
5
7
6
6
3
1
1
21,565
21,449
22,059
20,853
20,044
15,244
8,306
2,383
427
12,698
12,745
11,066
9,174
6,769
5,031
1,983
254
8,616
8,617
10,873
11,649
13,247
10,160
6,281
2.114
251
1948
87
1949
120
1950	
1951
30
28
1952   	
53
1953
42
1954	
2,385
427
116
15
1955   	
6    1         421
1956 .          	
116    1             2    1          114    1
Source: Clinic Ledgers TB. 71 and TB. 41 and Institutional Ledger TB. 70.
INSTITUTIONS—ADMISSIONS
There has been a reduction of approximately 20 per cent in the number of admissions
in 1956 as compared with 1955. The admissions in 1955 were high, 1,226, due in great
part to the 261 patients admitted to North Lawn Hospital, which was opened during the
year. There has been very little change in the number of cases admitted to the other
institutions, particularly when the figures are compared with 1954, when there were 1,015
admissions, and 983 in 1956, including 64 admissions to North Lawn. This is a drop of
10 per cent as compared with 1954.
Table 15.—Total Admissions by Age and
in Each Age-group
Percentage
, 1952-56
of Total Admissions
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Age-group
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
0.3
4.3
9
45
210
225
190
153
112
67
4
0.9
4.4
20.7
22.2
18.7
15.1
11.0
6.6
0.4
10
35
202
252
262
188
160
116
1
0.8
2.9
16.5
20.6
21.3
15.3
13.0
9.5
0.1
18
31
150
198
174
153
147
111
1
9
58
0.9
5.9
3
42
1.8
3.1
10-19   „   	
20-29    „     . -	
219
245
178
126
95
59
22.1
24.8
18.0
12.7
9.6
6.0
196
243
231
115
94
53
8
19.9
24.7
23.4
11.7
9.5
5.4
0.8
15 3
3(1-39    ■
40-49     „
sn-59   „
60-69    „     . 	
11 3
0 1
Totals 	
989
100.0
985
100.0
1,015
100.0
1,226
100.0
983
100.0
Source:   Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.  TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
Table 16.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1956
F 43
Age-group
Diagnosis
•■S"5
fc<
s?
5 w o
I si
HO.W
3^S
oS-2
H0.5
O  50
x: c«
oo
H
    M.
F.
5-9    „    	
 M.
F.
10-14    „            	
M.
F.
15-19    „  ..
  M.
F.
20-24    „     	
M.
F.
25-29    „   -
-M.
F.
30-39   „            -
 M.
F.
40-49    „     	
 ':   ..   M.
F.
50-59    „	
 M.
F.
60-69    „            	
M.
F.
 M.
F.
M.
F.
Totals          	
 M.
F.
Grand totals
10
18
11
17
14
27
33
52
27
24
30
15
32
6
22
14
176
165
341
14
12
36
28
35
22
58
15
57
30
3
239
98
337
10
20
15
35
16
27
4
33
3
33
163
52
215
11
9
20
28
24
52
10
17
26
28
44
52
95
103
106
68
117
36-
125
22
92
19
627
356
983
10
27
54
96
198
174
153
147
111
627
356
983
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. F 44
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 7.—Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1956
0     20     40     60     80     100    120    140    160    180
AGE
GROUP
10-19 YRS.
r
20-29 YRS.
30-39 YRS.
40-49 YRS.
50-59 YRS.
60-69 YRS.
70 YRS. AND
OVER
MINIMAL
MODERATELY ADVANCED
I
FAR ADVANCED
I
MODERATELY ADVANCED
FAR ADVANCED
MINIMAL
I
MODERATELY ADVANCED
FAR ADVANCED
MINIMAL
MODERATELY ADVANCED
FAR ADVANCED
MODERATELY ADVANCED
FAR ADVANCED
MODERATELY ADVANCED
FAR ADVANCED
MINIMAL
MODERATELY ADVANCED
FAR ADVANCED
20 40 60 80 100 120
No. OF ADMISSIONS
140 160 180 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956 F 45
Table 17.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1956
Diagnosis
Total
by Sex
Racial Origin
Primary
Minimal
Moderately
Advanced
Far
Advanced
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
with
Effusion
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
without
Effusion
Other
Diagnoses
Grand
Total
White     M.
7
144
201
145
9
25
531
F.
5
147
87
43
8
—
23
313
844
	
25
5
27
4
8
1
—
1
62
9
F.
71
Japanese M.
F.
1
4
6
4
3
3
3
	
z:
—
11
13
24
Hindu  M.
1
1
1
1
4
F.
1
2
	
—
	
3
7
Half-breed and Indian M.
3
3
6
6
1
19
F.
2
6
2
6
1
1
18
37
Totals     ..    -M.
10
176
239
163
11
	
28
627
627
F.
8
165
98
52
9
—
24
356
356
Grand totals-
18
341
337
215
20
1
"
983
983
Source: Institutions,
\dmissions
, Form TB
78.
The decrease in the total admissions is for the most part in those cases coming to
institution for the first time, although there has been a slight drop also in the readmission
cases.
Table 18.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex,
and Type of Case, 1956
Diagnosis
Total
by Sex
Type of Case
Primary
Minimal
Moderately
Advanced
Far
Advanced
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
with
Effusion
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
without
Effusion
Other
Diagnoses
Grand
Total
First admission  M.
F.
Readmission M.
F.
4
2
1
3
2
3
3
141
124
29
33
2
4
4
4
130
56
102
37
3
5
4
61
17
91
28
1
3
1
7
6
10
9
1
—
20
23
5
1
3
366
231
228
99
9
12
7
1
17
13
597
327
F.
Continuation of treatment    M.
F.
Transfers               .. M.
F.
21
8
30
Totals ...       M.
F.
10
8
176
165
239
98
163
52
11
9
—
28
24
627
356
627
356
Grand totals
18
341
337
215
20
—
52
983
983
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. F 46
Chart 8.
PERCENT
60
department of health and welfare
—First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis (Percentage
Distribution), 1947-56
50
X MODERATELY ADVANCED
\
40
-**-
y_
y
/
v
\
1947     1948      1949      1950      1951      1952      1953      1954      1955     1956 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956 F 47
Table 19.—Total Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1956
Total
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
Pearson
North Lawn
Diagnosis
Num
Per
Num
Per
Num
Per
Num
Per
Num
Per
Num
Per
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
Primary	
18
1.8
15
7.4
1
0.4
2
0.5
Minimal.	
341
34.7
55
27.2
76
31.7
41
39.1
139
37.4
30
46.9
Moderately advanced..
337
34.3
61
30.2
86
35.8
39
37.1
141
37.9
10
15.6
Far advanced	
215
21.9
53
26.3
58
24.2
16
15.2
79
21.2
9
14.1
Tuberculous pleurisy-
20
2.0
1
0.5
7
2.9
6
5.7
6
1.6
	
Other diagnosis	
52
5.3
17
8.4
12
5.0
3
2.9
5
1.4
15
23.4
Totals	
983
100.0
202   lt100.O
240
100.0
105
100.0
372
100.0
64
100.0
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
There has been an increase in the percentage of minimal cases admitted, with a
further decrease in the number of far advanced cases admitted.
Table 20.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis
(Percentage Distribution), 1952-56
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary 	
50
324
383
209
7
16
5.1
32.8
38.7
21.1
0.7
1.6
4
303
393
262
10
13
0.4
30.8
39.9
26.6
1.0
1.3
12
293
414
239
20
37
1.2
28.9
40.8
23.5
2.0
3.6
14
392
448
296
20
56
1.2
32.0
36.5
24.1
1.6
4.6
18
341
337
215
20
52
1.8
34.7
Moderately advanced	
Far advanced	
34.3
21.9
2.0
5.3
989
100.0
985
100.0
1,015
100.0
1,226
100.0
983
100.0
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 21.—First Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1956
Total
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
Pearson
North Lawn
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary
6
265
186
78
19
43
1.0
44.4
31.1
13.1
3.2
7.2
3
30
20
11
1
15
3.7
37.5
25.0
13.7
1.3
18.8
1
58
53
22
7
10
0.7
38.4
35.1
14.6
4.6
6.6
38
27
5
5
3
48.7
34.6
6.4
6.4
3.9
2
120
80
35
6
4
0.8
48.6
32.4
14.2
2.4
1.6
19
6
5
11
46.4
Moderately advanced-
Far advanced          . -
Tuberculous pleurisy-
Other diagnosis	
14.6
12.2
26~!i
Totals      	
597
100.0
80
100.0
151
100.0
78
100.0
247
100.0
41
100 0
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. f
F 48
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The increase in the percentage of minimal cases is more marked in the first admissions than in the total admissions. The moderately advanced group has altered very
little, although there has been a slight reduction. There has been a definite drop in the
percentage of cases in the far advanced category.
Table 22.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1952-56
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary	
35
236
188
91
4
12
6.2
41.7
33.2
16.1
0.7
2.1
2
217
195
129
5
9
0.4
39.0
35.0
23.1
0.9
1.6
3
222
219
114
19
33
0.5
36.4
35.9
18.7
3.1
5.4
3
315
264
143
18
51
0.4
39.7
33.2
18.0
2.3
6.4
6
265
186
78
19
43
1.0
44.4
Moderately advanced	
31.1
13.1
Tuberculous pleurisy	
Other diagnosis-
3.2
7.2
Totals	
566
100.0
557
100.0
610
100.0
794     1     100.0
597     1     100.0
|
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 23.—Readmissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1956
Total
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
Pearson
North Lawn
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
1
62
139
119
1
5
0.3
19.0
42.5
36.4
0.3
1.5
1
16
37
31
1.2
18.8
43.5
36.5
16
30
35
1
19.5
36.6
42.7
1.2
3
11
11
1
11.6
42.3
42.3
3.8
17
57
39
15.1
50.4
34.5
10
4
3
4
Minimal  .
Moderately advanced-
Far advanced 	
Tuberculous pleurisy-
Other diagnosis	
47.7
19.0
14.3
19.0
Totals 	
327
100.0
85
100.0
82
100.0
26
100.0
113
100.0
21
100.0
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 24.—Readmissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1952-56
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary...   _ .    _	
8
74
174
112
2.1
19.9
46.8
30.1
0.3
0.8
67
141
107
21.2
44.8
34.0
1
62
166
117
1
3
0.3
17.7
47.4
33.4
0.3
0.9
68
158
137
2
3
18.5
42.9
37.2
0.5
0.9
1
62
139
119
1
5
0.3
19.0
42.5
36.4
1
3
0.3
1.5
Totals
372
100.0
315
100.0
350
100.0
368
100.0
327
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. tuberculosis control report, 1956 f 49
Table 25.—Review Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1956
Total
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
Pearson
North Lawn
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary—	
5
6
8
1
1
23.8
28.5
38.1
4.8
4.8
5
4
4
1
35.7
28.6
28.6
7.1
2
3
1
M.3
50.0
16.7
	
	
1
100.0
1
	
Moderately advanced-
	
Tuberculous pleurisy-
Other diagnosis 	
	
Totals   	
21
100.0
14
100.0
6
100.0
	
1
100.0 1
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 26.—Review Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1952-56
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
3
14
19
6
7.2
33.3
45.2
14.3
1
15
48
11
5
3
1.2
18.1
57.8
13.3
6.0
3.6
7
6
24
2
1
17.5
15.0
60.0
5.0
2.5
3
6
11
3
1
12.5
25.0
45.8
12.5
4.2
5
6
8
1
1
23.8
28.5
38.1
4.8
4.8
Totals	
42
100.0
83
100.0
40
100.0
24
100.0
21
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
There was some decrease in the number of persons dying in tuberculosis institutions,
from 95 in 1955 to 88 in 1956. Approximately 40 per cent of those people dying in
tuberculosis institutions died of non-tuberculous conditions, although they also had tuberculosis. This is an indication of the large number of older people in institutions who,
while confined because of tuberculosis, are chiefly disabled because of other chronic,
debilitating diseases.
There was considerable increase in the percentage of inactive cases discharged, from
3.2 to 5.3 per cent, and at the same time there was a definite decrease in those discharged
in the active categories in spite of the fact that practically all patients are discharged to
continue antimicrobial therapy outside of institution.
There was an increase from 0.3 per cent in 1955 to 1.7 per cent in 1956 of discharges
classified as " other tuberculous diagnosis." These are cases of non-pulmonary tuberculosis. The number of non-tuberculous cases discharged from institution has more than
doubled in 1956 as a result of many cases of suspected tuberculosis being brought in for
investigation and found to be non-tuberculous. I
..   _
Table 27.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1952-56
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Condition
Num
Per
Num
Per
Num
Per
Num
Per
Num
Per
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
41
191
4.5
21.4
20
274
1.9
26.7
31
353
2.8
32.4
36
321
3.2
28.5
59
287
5.3
25.9
Arrested
Active improved
382
139
42.8
15.6
153
14.9
115
45.1
10.6
541
105
48.1
9.3
514
87
46.4
7.9
Dead—
116
C1)
13.0
44
10
4.3
1.0
45
22
4.1
2.0
61
34
5.4
3.0
53
35
4.8
3.2
Non-tuberculous	
Other diagnosis—
2
0.2
4
0.4
5
0.5
3
0.3
19
1.7
Non-tuberculous
22
2.5
13
1.3
27
2.5
25
2.2
53
4.8
Totals	
890
100.0
1,026
100.0
1,090
100.0
1,126
100.0
1,107
100.0
1 Tuberculous and non-tuberculous breakdown not available for dead cases.
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
The non-pulmonary cases practically all remained in hospital under one year.
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions of First Admissions, by Condition on
Discharge, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1956
Length of Stay in Institution
Condition on Discharge
Under 1
1-3
4-7
8-11
1
2
3-5
Over 5
by Sex
Total
Month
Months
Months
Months
Year
Years
Years
Years
Inactive M.
1
1
3
7
4
16
F.
—
1
2
11
4
....
—
—
18
34
Arrested M.
2
9
31
35
28
4
1
1
111
F.
—
8
26
18
13
4
1
—
70
181
7
52
70
41
33
1
3
1
208
F.
7
40
43
28
21
1
140
348
Active unimproved —M.
12
4
8
1
_
1
_
26
F.
5
5
2
—
—
1
—
—
13
39
Non-pulmonary            M.
1
4
3
4
1
13
F.
1
2
2
—
1
—
—
—
6
19
8
7
2
1
18
F.
13
7
1
3
3
—
....
—
27
45
Undetermined               M.
2
_
2
F.
	
1
	
	
	
	
	
	
1
3
Dead—
Tuberculous              M.
9
6
2
5
1
1
3
4
31
F.
1
-
1
1
1
—
—
—
4
35
Non-tuberculous M.
3
4
2
3
6
1
1
1
21
F.
2
_..
—
—
—
—
—
_..
2
23
Totals M.
43
89
121
96
74
8
8
7
446
F.
29
64
77
61
43
6
1
—
281
727
Grand totals	
72
153
198
157
117
14
9
7
727
727
Source: Institutions, D
isc
harges,
Form TB
79. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 51
Chart 9.—Percentage Distribution of Discharges from Institutions
according to condition on discharge, 1947-56
PERCENT
55
■/
ACTIVE IMPROVED
/
V
7
'*»^/
\
-V
/
\
45
4-
\
JL
/
A
\
\
y_
/
y
/
V
/
\
/
\
/
20
5
1947     1948     1949     1950     1951     1952     1953     1954     1955     1956 F 52
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
In 1956 out of 1,107 people discharged, only 191 or 17 per cent had remained in
institution over eleven months.
Table 29.—Discharges from Institutions by Diagnosis upon Admission
for Total Admissions, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1956
Length of Stay in Institution
Diagnosis
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7
Months
8-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3-5
Years
Over 5
Years
Total
Primary . ..
Minimal
Moderately advanced .
-M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
7
9
17
20
18
12
31
14
3
2
2
8
13
3
7
53
40
53
25
29
8
3
4
4
2
9
7
2
6
53
46
81
28
54
15
3
4
4
2
2
1
3
3
33
29
48
37
34
15
1
6
3
21
13
32
19
39
20
1
1
1
3
1
2
3
9
4
1
2
8
2
3
5
1
15
25
179
148
239
124
209
F.
M.
79
10
Other diagnosis—
Tuberculous . 	
F.
.   M.
8
17
F.
 M.
7
20
F.
M.
F.
27
Totals	
86
70
154
93
199
102
125
87
94
56
12
7
11
2
8
1
689
418
156
247
301      1    212
150
19
13
9
1,107
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79.
Out of 727 discharges of first-admission patients, 147 or approximately 20 per cent
remained in institution over eleven months.
Table 30.—Discharges from Institutions by Diagnosis upon Admission
for First Admissions, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1956
Length of Staj
in Institution
Diagnosis
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7
Months
8-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3-5
Years
Over 5
Years
Total
Primary	
.M.
F.
4
5
3
7
1
6
3
3
—
-
-
-
11
21
Minimal 	
M.
F.
10
4
39
28
39
41
27
26
21
11
	
	
—
136
110
Moderately advanced  	
M.
F.
6
1
24
15
49
17
37
23
22
14
2
2
2
2
144
72
.  .  .M.
11
4
8
1
23
6
22
6
29
14
6
4
6
1
5
110
F.
36
M.
2
3
4
3
4
1
—
—
—
—
9
F.
8
Other diagnosis—
M.
2
2
4
2
4
2
6
1
1
—
—
—
17
F.
7
Non-tuberculous
M.
F.
M.
F.
8
13
8
7
2
1
3
1
3
—
—
—
19
27
Totals
43
29
89
64
121
77
96
61
74
43
8
6
8
1
7
446
281
72
153
198       1     157
117
14
9
7
727
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956
F 53
Table 31.—Discharges from Institutions by Diagnosis upon Admission
for Readmissions, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1956
Length of Stay in Institution
Diagnosis
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7
Months
8-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3-5
Years
Over5
Years
Total
Primary
M.
F.
3
4
-
1
—
....
-
—
—
4
4
Minimal               	
M.
F.
7
16
14
12
14
5
6
3
2
1
1
	
43
38
Moderately advanced
M.
F.
12
11
28
10
32
11
11
14
10
5
1
—
1
94
52
Far advanced 	
M.
F.
20
10
21
7
31
9
12
9
10
6
3
2
1
1
99
43
Tuberculous pleurisy   ~  ~
. _M.
1
1
Other diagnosis—
Tuberculous
F.
.     .. M.
F.
—
:
—
—
—
—
—
Non-tuberculous   .   .   .
...M.
—
1
—
—
—
—
—
-
1
F.
M.
F.
	
Totals 	
43
41
64
29
78
25
29
26
20
13
4
1
3
1
1
1
242
137
84
93
103
55
33
5
4
2
379
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79.
Table 32.—Discharges from Institutions by Types of Discharge,
Sex, and Length of Stay, 1956
Length of Stay in Institution
Total
by
Sex
Grand
Total
Type of Discharge
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7
Months
8-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3-5
Years
OverS
Years
21
32
5
5
22
11
5
1
2
13
15
12
3
7
2
23
12
10
4
81
63
19
14
3
5
7
6
■    32
7
16
1
118
77
18
14
3
6
4
3
2
18
21
3
3
80
58
9
3
2
1
1
1
7
1
4
26
19
4
6
47
27
5
2
1
1
3
2
7
4
3
3
3
1
1
3
1
3
1
2
3
3
1
1
1
4
1
2
128
94
38
20
354
239
57
34
10
2
13
1
14
15
43
10
32
3
F.
Against medical advice   .  .   _M.
F.
On medical advice to continue antimicrobial treatment       — M.
F.
Against medical advice to continue
anti-microbial treatment      M.
F.
To   continue   anti-microbial  treatment   (nature  of  discharge  not
stated)                           .M.
F.
Disciplinary                                    M.
F.
Transfer                                             M.
F.
Deaths—
Tuberculous                                  M
F.
Non-tuberculous                       M.
F.
222
58
593
91
12
14
29
53
35
Totals                              M
F.
86
70
154
93
199
102
125
87
94
56
12
7
11
2
8
1
689
418
1,107
156
247
301
212
150
19
13
9
1,107
1,107
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79. F 54
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 33.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge,
Sex, and Length of Stay, 1956
rge
Length of Stay
in Institution
Total
by
Sex
Grand
Total
Condition on Discha
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7
Months
8-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3-5
Years
Over 5
Years
Inactive	
M.
F.
2
7
4
3
10
3
8
11
4
7
—
—
—
28
31
59
Arrested
M.
F.
10
10
34
19
53
33
42
26
32
14
6
4
2
1
1
180
107
287
Active improved	
F.
21
21
73
54
111
56
55
44
43
29
1
2
3
1
308
206
514
Active unimproved ._
-M.
F.
22
12
16
7
14
4
5
2
3
1
1
	
—
61
26
87
M
1
1
4
2
3
2
4
1
1
	
	
	
13
6
F.
19
M
8
13
8
7
2
1
3
1
3
	
—
—
19
27
F.
46
Undetermined
Dead-
Tuberculous
M.
F.
M
3
1
12
3
7
2
2
1
7
6
4
3
2
7
1
4
3
2
7
3
1
3
3
1
4
1
2
5
2
43
10
7
F.
M.
F.
M
53
Non-tuberculous
32
3
35
Totals
86
70
154
93
199
102
125
87
94
56
12
7
11
2
8
1
689
418
F.
1,107
Grand totals
156
247
301
212
150
19
13
9
1,107
1,107
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 55
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Q F 56 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
B.C.G. VACCINATIONS
These tables show a marked increase in the number of B.C.G. vaccinations. This
indicates better reporting by those doing vaccinations outside the Division of Tuberculosis
Control. However, it does not represent all that is being done in British Columbia. The
largest group vaccinated is the contacts of tuberculosis, and it is interesting to note that
there is an increasing number of non-converters. In 1956 this has increased to 10.3 per
cent. Further, it will be noted that the percentage of non-converters following B.C.G.
vaccination increased gradually from 5.1 per cent in the 0-4-year age-group to 23.0
per cent in the 25-29-year age-group. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 51
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ts F 58
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
KNOWN CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS
There has been an increase of 623 known cases of tuberculosis in the Province
during 1956, as compared to an increase of 652 in 1955. This represents an increase of
139 in non-Indians and an increase of 484 other than Indians.
Table 37.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of
British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1952-56
Area
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
316
776
862
10,543
2,822
938
458
996
1,045
171
301
698
869
10,776
2,942
1,014
469
1,159
1,157
205
295
675
896
11,096
2,974
1,077
487
1,257
1,235
214
314
655
901
11,418
3,125
1,190
488
1,284
1,255
228
302
648
932
11,717
3,265
1,231
497
1,346
Area 9	
Area 10
1,299
244
Tola's
18,927
19,590
20,206
20,858
21,481
Table 38.—Known Cases1 of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1952-56
Area
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Area 1~
Area 2_
Area 3~
Area 4~
Area 5~
Area 6	
Area 7	
Area 8—..
Area 9	
Area 10..
258
770
754
10,058
2,181
511
192
359
331
83
247
690
751
10,311
2,277
511
190
390
348
92
237
667
767
10,615
2,265
559
204
404
342
91
Totals..
15,497
15,807
16,151
254
647
768
10,917
2,403
588
189
403
345
99
16,613
246
639
802
11,204
2,520
597
188
433
362
106
17,097
1 Excludes 2,030 cases of unknown address and 2,008 ex-Province cases.
Table 39.—Known Cases1 of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of
British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1952-56
Area
1952
1953
1954
1955
19562
Area 1_
Area 2_
Area 3	
Area 4	
Area 5	
Area 6—
Area 7	
Area 8	
Area 9	
Area 10~
58
6
108
485
641
427
266
637
714
54
8
118
465
665
503
279
769
809
113
58
8
129
481
709
518
283
853
893
123
Totals..
3,430
3,783
4,055
60
8
133
501
722
602
299
881
910
129
4,245
56
9
130
513
745
634
309
913
937
138
4,384
1 Excludes 40 cases of unknown address and 32 ex-Province cases.
2 Includes 221 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956
F 59
Table 40.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1956
(Excluding Indians)
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1	
School District No  9
47
40
30
12
28
6
7
88
29
11
25
83
25
8
45
79
6
22
100
26
31
54
9
86
16
196
5
3
21
23
18
31
48
13
17
81
11
13
100
60
94
254
31
100
3,887
33
35
22
7
36
13
8
91
23
14
24
102
16
12
34
67
6
17
107
26
30
34
9
84
6
165
4
6
17
19
14
34
43
9
15
64
4
25
118
54
61
223
38
90
3,090
80
75
52
19
64
19
15
179
52
25
49
185
41
20
79
146
12
39
207
52
61
88
18
170
22
361
9
9
38
42
32
65
91
22
32
145
15
38
218
114
155
477
69
190
6,977
Metropolitan Health Committee,
Vancouver—Continued
School District No. 41	
School District No. 44	
School District No. 45	
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 40	
407
251
85
329
294
76
52
10
70
61
57
13
9
132
55
19
37
10
455
231
37
45
23
62
34
29
118
30
68
4
61
25
24
87
29
10
20
24
388
206
78
271
246
56
45
11
66
67
52
16
3
84
37
19
40
16
377
148
31
36
14
58
26
47
81
14
82
5
44
31
22
58
26
9
10
26
795
School District No. 3	
School District No. 4	
School District No. 5	
457
163
600
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 6 _	
School District No. 7.      .   	
School District No. 8	
School District No. 43-1 	
North Fraser, Mission-
School District No. 42    ..
School District No. 75	
School District No. 76-	
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47	
540
132
97
School District No. 10	
21
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 9	
SchoolDistrictNo.il-.  _   	
School District No. 12-	
School District No. 13 ... 	
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
136
School District No. 71....	
School District No. 72	
128
109
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50	
29
School District No. 51	
12
School District No. 15  	
School District No. 52
216
School District No. 53. 	
92
School District No. 17   	
School District No. 23	
School District No. 77  ..
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19	
School District No. 20    	
School District No. 54	
38
Peace River, Dawson Creek—-
School District No. 59	
School District No. 60-
77
26
School District No. 81	
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of
Health-
School District No. 61 (part)2
Saanich and South Vancouver
Island—
School District No. 61 (part)'	
School District No. 62	
School District No. 21	
School District No. 22	
School District No. 78 	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24	
School District No. 25 	
School District No. 26	
School District No. 29. . 	
School District No. 30	
School District No. 31	
Cariboo, Prince George—
832
379
68
School District No. 63    	
81
37
Central Vancouver Island,
Nanaimo—
School District No. 65
120
School District No. 66	
School District No. 67	
60
School District No. 28	
School District No. 55
School District No. 56
76
School District No   68
199
School District No. 69            	
School District No. 70	
44
150
School District No. 58	
School District No. 82	
Schinl District No, 79
9
School districts not covered by
health units—
School District No. 46	
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack—
School District No. 32-	
105
School District No. 48	
56
School District No. 49	
46
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35	
School District No. 61 (part)4	
145
School District No. 74.   .
19
School District N" «tt
30
Metropolitan Health Committee,
Vancouver—
Sch""l District Nil. 38
50
Totals     ..    -
9,302
7,795
17,097
School District No. 39 	
1 Includes 192 males and 141 females at Mental Health Services, Essondale.
2 Includes Victoria and Esquimalt.
' Excludes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
4 Includes Oak Bay only. F 60
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 41.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1956
(Indians only1)
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1
2
17
8
5
1
1
1
2
11
11
13
1
25
1
14
15
38
6
1
43
71
44
86
16
37
94
15
5
22
44
3
4
12
5
2
20
2
9
~10
2
7
1
4
5
8
11
2
7
1
11
1
12
12
41
5
49
69
37
89
18
41
84
19
6
22
30
8
6
7
2
1
38
4
26
~~18
7
8
1
1
5
7
19
22
2
20
2
36
2
26
27
79
11
1
92
140
81
173
34
78
178
34
11
44
74
11
10
19
7
3
58
Metropolitan Health Committee,
Vancouver—Continued
School District No   41
2
35
6
7
3
3
52
9
3
19
67
114
112
196
2
6
51
1
3
14
4
16
1
56
3
29
19
2
33
25
21
48
74
87
12
18
310
4
41
3
1
6
8
6
39
20
5
27
63
124
150
202
5
5
38
5
4
15
3
17
3
65
3
19
14
4
21
32
16
49
87
90
14
23
317
School District No, 7
6
School District No, 3
School District No. 44 ....   	
School District No  45
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 40	
School District No. 432 	
North Fraser, Mission—
School District No. 42 .   ..
76
Schno] District No. 4
3
7
Selkirk.Nelson—
School District No. 6	
13
11
School District No. 75
9
School District No. 76	
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No   47
91
West Kootenay, Trail—
29
SchoolDistrictNo.il	
School District No. 71	
School District No. 72
8
46
,Schnol District No   13
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No   5(1
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14   	
School District No. 15..
School District No. 16	
School District No. 17	
School District No. 23.
130
School District No. 51	
238
262
School District No. 53	
398
School District No. 54	
7
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59-	
11
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19..
School District No. 20	
School District No. 60	
School District No. 81
89
6
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of
Health-
School District No. 61 (part) a	
Saanich and South Vancouver
Island—
School District No. 61 (part)*	
School District No. 62	
School District No. 22	
School District No. 78	
South Central Kamloops—
School District No. 24     .
7
29
7
School District No. 26	
School District No. 29	
School District No. 30   ..   .
School District No. 63
School District No 64
33
4
Central Vancouver Island,
Nanaimo—
School District No. 65	
School District No. 31	
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 27 	
School District No. 28-
School District No. 55	
121
School District No. 66..
School District No. 67	
School District No. 68..
School District No. 69	
6
48
33
6
School District No. 57	
School District No. 58	
School District No. 82     .   .
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack—
School District No. 32 	
School District No. 70	
School District No. 79	
School districts not covered by
health units—
School District No. 46	
School District No  48
School District No. 49	
54
57
37
97
161
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35-   .
School District No. 61 (part)5	
School District No  73
School District No. 74	
School District No. 80..   .
177
26
School District No, 37
41
Metropolitan Health Committee,
Vancouver—
School District No. 38	
School District No. 39	
627
Totals
2,159
2,225
4,384
1 Includes 221 Indians of white status.
2 Includes 7 males and 5 females at Mental Health Services, Essondale.
3 Includes Victoria and Esquimalt.
* Excludes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
15 Includes Oak Bay only. This table shows that there were 1,829 known cases other than Indians who were
classified as active, as compared to 2,335 in 1955 and 2,657 in 1954. This reduction is
partly accounted for by the fact that the clinics reviewed active cases on the register during
the year, which resulted in some corrections in the classification of known cases.
While there was an increase of 484 known cases, those classified as minimal increased
almost 500 and those classified as far advanced decreased by 61.
Table 42.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection,
Condition and Age-group, 1956
(Excluding Indians^
Age-group
Diagnosis
■
H
a
u
r»
i
l-H
rt
U
>i
io
Va
H
«
2
Efl
c
rt
s
r*
*T
\s
rt
at
"ft*
2
H
rt
u
(S
1
w-t
CN
S
rt
S
r»
OS
tn
i
eg
■u
Os
2
■-■■*■
-u
as
m
Efl
Ih
rt
u
r»
as
2
ta
U
rt
as
r-
<A
■-0
5 fc
So
•a
3
o
H
38
4
10
3
20
1
166
79
58
4
16
2
7
5
3
1
1
148
84
37
1
3
9
2
12
16
5
10
1
4
1
1
2
3
104
57
28
4
4
3
2
6
68
21
30
10
2
1
4
30
5
10
4
1
4
1
5
6
2
1
45
19
19
1
1
1
4
269
132
84
14
1
18
9
11
99
25
42
12
2
12
2
4
27
4
8
4
1
7
51
12
26
1
2
1
9
586
332
177
19
7
26
15
10
233
89
88
16
9
21
5
5
75
16
25
10
6
12
3
3
3
2
52
10
22
1
1
1
17
2,239
1,378
623
51
44
52
52
39
930
432
323
52
39
39
30
15
235
75
84
23
21
16
7
9
8
3
20
S
6
1
3
3
1
1
3
1
1
	
5
2
1
641
275
2
208
10
2
	
i
14
54
1
852
461
288
18
12
26
27
20
430
no
189
28
23
48
23
9
123
11
55
17
13
21
4
2
18
3
12
225
108
85
7
3
5
7
10
115
33
53
5
7
8
6
3
45
7
15
5
5
7
6
4
2
1
2
61
9
11
2,214
1,432
566
45
38
47
46
40
988
466
360
40
45
41
20
2
1,602
961
480
22
23
34
32
50
684
263
275
26
31
64
14
11
245
65
83
32
21
29
7
8
14
2
7
1,269
766
364
21
15
41
37
25
574
177
250
43
18
54
25
7
184
30
58
27
24
36
5
4
22
5
14
71
9 Ana
331   5 637
15
2
1
4
2
4
25
6
9
2
2
4
1
1
13
2
2
1
1
2
5
2
2,723
210
144
255
228
214
4,112
1,606
	
	
1,600
228
	
1
177
Active (not stated)	
296
127
16
78
1,282
301
91
129
33
27
33
6
6
14
461
153
119
1
1
165
32
3
2
3
1
51
86
fi
12
	
	
	
	
1
46
	
	
	
	
1
449
318
45
23
61
24
28
1
4
1,895
1,055
127
105
107
91
84
1
	
1
1
1
979
687
91
58
132
68
37
1
2
586
545
63
48
96
54
34
1
3
1
1
43
27
5
5
10
3
13
2
4
10
3
20
1
82
59
1
4
17
2
7
89
48
1
3
10
2
— 18
83
70
19
5
10
4
17
180
154
31
5
38
11
22
7
1,994
1,063
118
111
123
72
80
5
1,292
848
80
75
127
53
76
1
150
154
17
15
20
13
20
22
Totals, all foregoing types—
Inactive  „ „ _.         	
7,826
5,038
601
457
771
398
436
38
172
2
20
171
4
1
47
208
15
62
441
16
3
84
94813,464
3,561
2,551
2,052
1,426
389
106
3
41
15,527
Other-
5
32
1
120
47
8
312
26
6
277
14
5
178
7
2
114
3
78
37
169
Pleurisy without effusion	
26
1,375
Totals
431    1941   773
285
544
1,101
3.83113.870
2,748
2,175
1,507
426|
150117.097
1 Includes 55 cases of far advanced tuberculosis with silicosis. F 62
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 43.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection,
Condition and Age-group, 1956
(Indians Only1)
Age-group
Diagnosis
ta
H
a
u
fc
i
co
Ih
rt
u
i*
in
CO
Ih
rt
<L>
fc
--*
2
tn
cS
u
i»
i
to
ta
H
rt
CM
cn
rt
><
m
ta
cS
<u
r»
Os
2
cn
ta
H
rt
u
Os
2
-*
Ih
rt
u
Os
m
in
cd
u
fc
3
vo
CO
Ih
rt
D
as
r-
<£
13
s •«
cd o
So
•a
o ca
3
64
1
25
1
35
254
37
165
4
1
45
2
7
3
427
164
204
16
9
23
8
3
17
2
8
313
173
123
8
2
2
3
2
89
20
42
3
2
17
5
81
15
42
5
3
13
2
1
26
1
13
2
2
7
1
1
227
142
69
7
5
2
2
153
67
56
7
4
12
6
1
114
14
76
12
2
8
2
58
34
12
4
7
1
2
94
62
24
4
2
1
1
198
104
64
11
4
4
7
4
149
36
67
15
13
14
3
1
54
7
24
12
5
6
2
30
17
10
5
3
1
4
4
—
2
1
1
42
27
13
1
	
2
2
1,422
603
624
39
20
1
no
2
17
12
4
6
3
2
16
2
277
156
90
10
3
9
9
176
50
87
10
7
15
7
76
7
38
8
16
6
1
3
2
1
177
115
48
5
1
3
4
1
115
40
46
11
1
12
5
36
4
22
2
4
4
10
153
97
41
4
3
6
2
91
27
43
6
3
8
3
1
29
3
10
5
3
7
1
86
50
22
5
7
2
61
18
28
2
3
8
2
18
3
7
2
3
3
1,222
653
393
46
14
	
3
1
1
1
6
1
17
6
1
1
	
65
41
40
13
15
2
1
8
1
1
15
3
9
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
10
862
217
420
65
35
1
1
7
1
3
1
2
10
7
1
5
1
97
25
3
11
6
2
1
3
1
1
330
27
5
3
1
1
1
164
47
42
45
4
1
	
	
2
10
	
2
	
	
	
	
	
	
2
209
179
42
24
25
11
7
1
232
225
28
26
31
17
3
	
1
26
38
172
4
2
50
3
2
167
223
17
9
40
9
5
1
209
220
18
9
39
10
5
2
223
235
38
15
29
9
5
40
34
6
2
11
2
15
15
2
4
1
1
4
4
1
1
1
8
Totals, all foregoing types—
162
117
18
6
19
9
2
131
94
15
6
18
10
3
71
57
9
6
18
4
1,502
1,601
197
1
35
2
111
317
86
Not stated -	
32
65
~To
269
2
2
18
470
12
3
48
510
29
9
50
554
37
5
70
497
26
11
55
562
13
8
60
333
9
1
26
277
3
2
14
165
4
7
95
2
1
38
1
11
1
3,846
138
Other-
41
360
Totals
75
291
533
598
666
589
643
369
296
176
98
39
12
4,385
1 Includes 221 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 63
Table 44.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-
Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1947-56.
Year
Total
Known
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Other than Indians
Known
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Indians
Known
Cases1
Deaths2
Ratio
1947...
1948...
1949..
1950..
1951...
1952...
1953._
1954...
1955_
1956-
15,408
16,812
18,483
19,428
18,709
18,927
19,590
20,206
20,858
21,482
536
442
406
313
292
214
146
123
143
109
28.7
38.0
45.5
62.1
64.1
88.0
134.2
164.3
152.3
197.1
13,430
14,528
15,738
16,438
15,404
15,497
15,807
16,151
16,613
17,097
362
286
295
239
212
179
122
100
120
90
37.1:1
50.8:1
53.3:1
68.8:1
72.7:1
86.1:1
129.6:1
161.5:1
143.2:1
190.0:1
1,978
2,284
2,745
2,990
3,305
3,430
3,783
4,055
4,245
4,385
174
156
HI
74
80
35
24
23
23
19
11.4:1
14.6:1
24.7:1
40.4:1
41.3:1
98.0:1
157.6:1
176.3:1
202.1:1
230.8:1
1 These figures include: 1947, 141 Indians of white status; 1948, 84 Indians of white status; 1949, 93 Indians of
white status; 1950, 160 Indians of white status; 1951, 127 Indians of white status; 1952, 159 Indians of white status;
1953, 125 Indians of white status; 1954, 122 Indians of white status; 1955, 15 Indians of white status; 1956, 221 Indians
of white status.
2 These figures include deaths of: 1947, 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 8 Indians
of white status; 1950, 4 Indians of white status; 1951, 10 Indians of white status; 1952, 3 Indians of white status; 1953,
3 Indians of white status; 1954, 3 Indians of white status; 1955, 2 Indians of white status; 1956, 1 Indian of white
status.
NOTIFICATIONS OF TUBERCULOSIS
These tables include all new tuberculous cases diagnosed, both active and inactive.
There has been a further reduction in new cases from 1,403 in 1955 to 1,311 in 1956.
The reduction is both in the Indian and other-than-Indian population, with the new cases
in Indians being reduced from 240 to 208 and the other than Indians from 1,163 to 1,103.
Table 45.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1952-56
Area
1952
1953
1954
1955
19561
27
44
53
748
178
72
27
113
92
11
2
15
11
30
48
742
170
76
34
166
155
43
3
23
13
21
52
760
209
63
25
139
131
22
14
1
29
37
44
736
271
95
26
91
49
16
2
7
10
35
48
705
251
57
17
77
70
Ari»s( 10
18
22
Totals
1,382
1,501
1,450
1,403
1,311
1 Includes 32 dead cases.
Source:  Case Examination, Form TB. 1. F 64
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 46.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian
populaton of british columbia by statistical area, 1952-56
Area
1952
1953
1954
1955
19561     =
20
43
44
730
10
27
40
720
7
21
38
740
169
27
16
49
41
10
~13
26
36
39
709
244
19
7
39
23
12
2
7
:   10
Area 2.. .                     _
Area 3                         .     .                .	
34
43
680
134
28
15
39
29
1
2
15
136
29
12
37
• 40
18
.' 3
22
210
22
7
Area 8   .....   	
28
37
Area 10 ... _  .     ...
9
Unorganized	
22
1
Totals    	
1,100
1,094
1,131
1,163
1,103
1 Includes 26 dead cases.
Source:   Case Examination, Form TB. 1.
Table 47.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population
of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1952-56
Area
1952
1953
1954
1955
19561
Area 1	
Area 2 	
Area 3.               .    	
7
1
9
18
44
44
12
74
63
10
1
3
8
22
34
47
22
129
115
25
1
6
14
20
40
36
9
90
90
12
1
1
3
1
5
27
27
76
19
52
26
4
1
5
25
41
Area 6„     _	
Area 7     	
35
10
49
Area 9  	
Area 10	
33
9
	
Totals   _
282
407
319
240
208
1 Includes 6 dead cases and 22 Indians of white status.
Source:   Case Examination, Form TB. 1.
There has been a further reduction in the incidence of tuberculosis from 1.1 per
thousand to 0.9 per thousand. It is noted that the incidence of new cases in the Indian
population is seven times that of the white population.
Table 48.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases by Statistical Area,
by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1956
Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Total	
0.3
0.3
0.5
0.5
10.0
0.6
0.5
3.7
0.9
0.9
7.3
1.0
0.8
5.9
1.1
0.5
6.2
0.8
0.4
3.8
1.2
0.5
8.0
1.8
1.2
5.9
0:9
0.5
12.6
0.9
0.8
6.3 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956
F 65
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1956
(Excluding Indians)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Dead
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
S-~h"--il District No, 1
2
2
1
1
4
1
4
2
5
2
1
1
2
3
4
2
6
7
2
3
4
3
1
7
1
1
8
7
2
19
13
231
32
10
6
13
13
2
3
1
1
1
i
2
8
2
1
3
1
1
4
2
2
4
2
3
1
~ 3
1
4
"~2
1
3
3
1
3
2
6
4
5
17
2
6
182
21
15
7
8
15
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
2
~12
1
2
1
7
1
3
9
4
1
3
6
5
7
3
9
1
11
2
1
2
6
7
3
2
10
1
3
14
11
7
36
2
19
413
53
25
13
21
28
6
6
1
1
	
1
1
13
1
4
School District No   5
School District No   1 R
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 6 1	
School District No. 7               	
—
School District No. 8	
School District No. 10	
—
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 9    	
School District No. 11
1
School District No. 12                . 	
School District No. 13...
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14	
School District No. 15	
—
School District No. 16-	
School District No. 17..      	
—
School District No. 23        .          	
School District No. 77 	
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19	
School District No. 20	
School District No. 71
School District No. 72
School District No. 78—	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 74
School District No. 25                              	
School District No. 26. 	
School District No. 29           ...   .     .
School District No   30
School District No. 31	
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No  77
School District No. 28	
School District No   55
—
School District No. 56                 	
School District No. 57-    	
School District No. 58	
—     -
"Schnnl District Mn   S?
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack—
School District No. 32                         	
School District No. 33 	
1
School District No. 34	
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35
School District No. 36   -	
1
School District No. 37 .   ~          . .
Metropolitan Health Committee, Vancouver—■
17
School District No. 44                 . ..
School District No. 45     	
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No 41
1
North Fraser, Mission—
1 Includes 8 males and 10 females reported alive from Mental Health Services, Essondale. F 66
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1956—Continued
(Excluding Indians)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Male        Female        Total
Dead
Male       Female       Total
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47—
School District No. 71._
School District No. 72—
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50—
School District No. 51	
School District No. 52—.
School District No. 53	
School District No. 54—
Peace River, Dawson Creek-
School District No. 59—
School District No. 60—
School District No. 81—
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of Health—
School District No. 61 (part)2	
Saanich and South Vancouver Island—
School District No. 61 (part)3	
School District No. 62	
School District No. 63	
School District No. 64  	
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
School District No. 65	
School District No. 66	
School District No. 67	
School District No. 68	
School District No. 69	
School District No. 70	
School District No. 79	
School districts covered by health units—
School District No. 46	
School District No. 48	
School District No. 49	
School District No. 61 (part)*-
School District No. 73	
School District No. 74	
School District No. 80	
Unorganized	
Ex-Province.. 	
Unknown..	
Totals-
1
9
1
1
11
2
1
5
1
33
22
3
7
4
12
9
1
6
1
2
2
5
6
2
9
1
19
1
609
2
2
3
4
4
13
1
2
3
5
16
1
3
1
2
1
6
2
3
39
12
1
4
2
468
72
34
4
11
2
7
12
1
11
3
14
3
1
4
4
7
6
2
12
2
22
1
1,077
20
26
2 Includes Victoria and Esquimalt only.
3 Excludes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
4 Includes Oak Bay only. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956
F 67
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1956
(Indians Only1)
Health Unit and School District
Male       Female       Total
Dead
Male        Female       Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1	
School District No. 2	
School District No. 3	
School District No. 4	
School District No. 5	
School District No. 18	
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 6	
School District No. 7	
School District No. 8	
School District No. 10	
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 9	
School District No. 11	
School District No. 12	
School District No. 13	
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14	
School District No. 15	
School District No. 16	
School District No. 17	
School District No. 23	
School District No. 77	
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19	
School District No. 20	
School District No. 21	
School District No. 22	
School District No. 78	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24	
School District No. 25	
School District No. 26	
School District No. 29	
School District No. 30	
School District No. 31	
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 27	
School District No. 28	
School District No. 55	
School District No. 56	
School District No. 57	
School District No. 58	
School District No. 82	
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack-
School District No. 32	
School District No. 33	
School District No. 34	
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35	
School District No. 36	
School District No. 37	
Metropolitan Health Committee, Vancouver—
School District No. 38	
School District No. 39	
School District No. 41	
School District No. 44	
School District No. 45	
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 40	
School District No. 432_
1
12
2
11
1
3
7
4
1 These figures include 22 Indians of white status.
2 Includes 2 males reported alive from Mental Health Services, Essondale. F 68
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1956—Continued
(Indians Only1)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Male       Female       Total
Dead
Male       Female       Total
North Fraser, Mission—
School District No. 42—
School District No. 75—
School District No. 76—
Upper Island, Courtenay—-
School District No. 47—
School District No. 71—
School District No. 72..~
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50—
School District No. 51—
School District No. 52—
School District No. 53—
School District No. 54—
Peace River, Dawson Creek-
School District No. 59....
School District No. 60—
School District No. 81..
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of Health-
School District No. 61 (part)3- 	
Saanich and South Vancouver Island-
School District No. 61 (part)*	
School District No. 62 	
School District No. 63	
School District No. 64	
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
School District No. 65	
School District No. 66	
School District No. 67	
School District No. 68	
School District No. 69	
School District No. 70	
School District No. 79-
School districts covered by health units—
School District No. 46	
School District No. 48-  —
School District No. 49-
School District No. 61 (part) 5-
School District No. 73	
School District No. 74..
School District No. 80_
Unorganized	
Ex-Province	
Unknown	
Totals .
91
3
4
10
18
6
6
11
26
5
1
1
1
11
16
1
202
1 These figures include 22 Indians of white status.
3 Includes Victoria and Esquimalt only.
1 Excludes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
5 Includes Oak Bay only.
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1947-56
Racial Origin
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Total
2,616
1,864
645
81
26
2,108
1,448
553
88
19
2,202
1,525
578
78
21
1,699
1,220
373
86
20
1,688
1,209
356
100
23
1,383
999
282
85
17
1,501
926
407
140
28
1,450
1,040
319
80
11
1,403
1,065
240
92
6
1,311
White
Indian1 	
Chinese	
Japanese-	
1,012
208
71
20
1 Includes notifications of: 1947, 21 Indians of white status; 1948, 27 Indians of white status; 1949, 34 Indians of
white status; 1950, 10 Indians of white status; 1951, 21 Indians of white status; 1952, 26 Indians of white status;
1953, 25 Indians of white status; 1954, 22 Indians of white status; 1955, 19 Indians of white status; 1956, 22 Indians
of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 69
Chart 10.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1947-56
No. OF CASES
5,000
4,000
3,000
2,000
TOTAL
.^WHITE
1,000
900
800
700
600
500
■»»_
^^ ■
_— — -
X
■^INDIAN
400
300
200
100
— —  -
■*.	
"**^
^
""-"■..	
CHINESE
*
->*	
\
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
__ _ —-
~^-.
_ _—.
*
'       N
JAPANESE
_.---
S^
V
\
\
^
*^
**
\
\
\
\
X
/
1
I
1
I
t
8
V
f
6
V
1
5
4
3
2
1
1947      1948      1949      1950      1951      1952      1953      1954      1955     1956
" F 70
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Of the new cases diagnosed, there was an increase in those classified as minimal and
a decrease in the moderately and far advanced cases. Of the total 1,103 new cases,
421 were classified as active and 201 activity undetermined, a total of 622 potentially
active; 220 were classified as inactive and 91 arrested,
Table 52.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition,
and Age-group, 1956
(Excluding Indians)
Age-group
Diagnosis
ta
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1
2
16
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10
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2
4
5
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70
33
5
22
9
134
45
16
41
30
102
30
14
29
29
96
31
11
25
26
1
78
29
9
21
18
1
—
1
1
4
52
14
7
16
15
7
1
7
3
30
9
1
8
42
6
4
22
9
1
16
3
1
11
1
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2
1
599
190
4
2
4
3
67
1
193
141
Peart
2
1
23
1
4
16
2
2
42
4
4
25
9
34
6
4
21
3
13
1
1
8
2
1
.  2
36
5
3
25
3
9
1
6
1
1
41
3
2
24
9
3
16
14
1
1
6
1
3
26
12
14
21
if
1
9
1
4
2
2
3
1
2
' 1
1
2
1
228
22
1
2
1
18
140
45
3
8
1
6
1
16
1
2
9
4
90
4
	
	
2
3
58
	
	
6
2
1
19
1
35
9
46
12
1
50
22
75
39
4
2
37
19
58
34
1
—
1
14
7
39
30
9
1
	
Dead      	
37
14
56
30
2
2
32
11
59
28
5
1
7
4
2
6
4
1
1
1
2
16
3
1
1
10
1
9
5
35
10
Totals, all foregoing types—
1
8
1
3
6
5
220
91
421
Activity undetermined  	
201
24
1
7
22
10
1
14
2
13
6
60
4
103
10
192
4
149
4
141
1
14
135
1
7
1
100
2
14
11
1
964
Other-
36
1
5
4
3
8
12
18
18
1
7
4
101
Dead, non-pulmonary	
2
Totals               	
23
16
20
22
72
125
214
172
156
144
1fiQ!    ^A
16
1,103
1 Includes 2 cases of far advanced tuberculosis with silicosis. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 71
In the new cases diagnosed amongst Indians, 129 were classified as active and
11 actively undetermined, making a total of 140 potentially active out of 208 new cases.
Table 53.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition,
and Age-group, 1956
(Indians Only1)
Age-group
Diagnosis
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28
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26
14
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12
10
i
6
2
1
6
3
1
1
1
16
1
1
13
1
12
3
4
4
1
1
1
—
7
4
2
1
2
2
6
5
1
3
3
4
3
1
2
~2
i
i
2
2
—
	
57
1
5
47
3
Denri
1
1
9
3
3
3
6
5
1
5
2
1
2
8
1
1
6
68
7
21
1
6
33
7
Dead
1
4
6
2
2
2
1
1
	
37
1
1
1
4
6
2
34
1
Dead	
2
4
3
2
3
1
1
1
17
2
4
3
2
2
1
1
—
15
TVarf
	
1
	
1
	
2
	
	
	
Dead           „ ..                                   	
3
3
12
1
1
3
9
2
4
6
1
1
5
4
1
6
1
Totals, all foregoing types-
1
16
2
1
1
2
22
2
3
4
10
1
2
9
2
26
2
14
27
129
11
1
Dead	
3
28
16
1
20
3
27
3
18
19
1
1
15
1
2
1
12
1
1
10
7
7
5
2
	
179
Other-
10
4
1
1
3
2
1
	
16
Dead, non-pulmonary	
3
Totals. .                            	
32
19
26
32
18
211    19
14
12
7
5
3
	
208
1 Includes 22 Indians of white status.
This shows that there was a reduction in the new cases of non-pulmonary tuberculosis as well as in pulmonary tuberculosis.
: F 72
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 54.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1956
(Excluding Indians)
Age-group
Diagnosis on Notification
*
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5
6
2
1
3
6
1
2
20
22
6
10
2
2
32
38
13
10
4
4
65
69
23
19
4
8
52
50
20
14
7
5
55
40
26
10
4
4
60
17
30
8
12
2
1
34
18
25
1
8
3
1
1
2
5
3
1
1
4
3
Pulmonary—
Primary	
M.
F.
M.
1
15
6
4
21
25
327
F.
-.,   j i;».v  -j j                                             1U
270
F.
M.
	
1
1
1
77
43
F.
M.
	
26
2
F.
	
	
	
	
1
F.
Dead1	
M.
F.
M.
	
	
	
2
2
1
1
1
5
7
2
2
1
19
5
7
15
22
6
4
10
5
9
14
5
8
13
28
32
60
51
52
103
94
98
192
80
69
149
86
55
141
108
27
135
76
24
100
8
6
14
7
4
11
561
F.
T.
M.
403
964
Tuberculous pleurisy—
1
2
2
4
3
1
6
4
1
4
3
1
1
1
1
1
T
20
F.
.  M.
15
2
Dead1     .                -   —                 	
F.
M.
F.
.M.
	
	
	
	
....	
	
1
1
2
2
2
4
6
3
1
4
7
4
11
4
4
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
	
l
l
22
F.
T.
__M.
15
37
Non-pulmonary—
1
1
F.
 M.
	
	
	
1
1
2
1
„
2
1
i
1
2
2
1
3
3
2
2
1
3
.    1
2
	
1
3
1
F.
M.
2
3
F.
M.
6
i
2
2
1
2
2
3
2
1
3
F.
M.
7
F.
.M.
10
Skin                                	
1
E.
M.
F.
M.
—
1
2
1
2
Lymphatic system                   	
2
3
1
2
1
1
4
7
1
1
5
2
1
2
_
	
l
3
7
1
1
1
2
1
15
21
F.
M.
16
F.
M.
z
""
~"
1
1
	
	
F.
1
Other non-pulmonary
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
T.
■    M.
1
Dead1
1
	
	
	
1
	
1
1
Total non-pulmonary
1
1
2
3
5
2
2
4
2
1
3
4
4
8
3
8
11
9
9
18
11
8
19
3
11
14
3
5
8
4
3
7
	
3
1
4
46
56
102
7
16
23
9
7
16
9
11
20
9
13
22
35
37
72
61
64
125
103
111
214
95
77
172
90
66
156
112
32
144
81
28
109
8
6
14
10
6
16
629
F.
T.
474
1,103
1 Dead on notification.
Source:   Case Examination, Form TB. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 73
Table 55.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1956
(Indians Only1)
Age-group
Diagnosis on Notification
t/>
u
•h- ta
Ifi
H
„, ta
.A*
2*2
7 rt
22
7 rt
* 2
evil*
3 2
7 rt
in v
Or*
OS »
Ifi
ov g
in •*
ov £
fa
VOi*
ov E«
t-r*
R  Ih
rt to
So
•a
O ti
ZSi
rt
O
H
Pulmonary—
Primary                            ...         	
M.
F.
14
14
5
9
5
4
l
2
1
	
1
	
26
30
Minimal                                     -	
M.
F.
1
2
4
5
11
5
7
5
4
5
4
3
3
3
4
1
1
__
29
39
Moderately advanced
M.
F.
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
3
3
3
5
2
2
1
2
1
1
l
17
20
Far advanced                           	
M.
F.
M.
	
2
3
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
-
	
	
11
4
	
F.
	
——
M.
	
	
	
—
F.
M.
Dead2 	
l
	
1
F.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
1
„ .
1
	
2
Total pulmonary
141      5
141    11
28l    16
9
11
20
11
16
27
9
9
18
10
9
19
4
11
15
6
6
12
6
4
10
6
1
7
3
2
5
l
l
2
	
84
95
179
Tuberculous pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion
	
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
	
	
5
5
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion..
M.
F.
M.
F.
_ -M.
Dead2
	
	
	
Total tuberculous pleurisy    .
1
1
2
1
3
2
1
3
—
_
1
1
1
1
1
	
	
5
F.
T.
M.
F.
5
10
Non-pulmonary—
Meninges
1
1
	
	
	
	
1
1
Intestines and peritoneum
M.
F.
	
	
	
	
	
	
	
Vertebral column
M.
F.
	
	
	
1
1
	
2
Tuberculoma
M.
F
	
	
	
	
	
M.
1
1
Skin                         	
F.
M.
F.
	
	
	
	
	
	
Lymphatic system
M.
F.
3
	
1
1
1
	
6
Genito-urinary system
M.
	
	
1
.
;.:
.,-.
	
1
F.
M.
F.
1
Miliary
2
	
	
 .
—"-
2
Other respiratory system
-  .M.
	
	
	
	
F.
	
Other non-pulmonary
M.
F.
1
	
	
1
Dead2
M.
F.
M.
F.
T.
M.
1
	
	
	
1
	
	
—
1
2
1
Total non-pulmonary
1
3
4
1
1
2
3
3
1
1
2
	
 1      1
1       2
it      3
1
1
2
2
1
1
	
5
14
19
Total notifications
15
17
32
7
12
19
11
15
26
14
18
32
9
9
18
101       5
6!       6
6
1
7
31       7
1      94
F.
T.
11
21
14
19
8
14
6
12
I
1
3
114
208
1 Includes 22 Indians of white status.
2 Dead on notification.
Source:   Case Examination, Form TB. 1.
: .... ''..  ■'  ■..,. F 74 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 11.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia
by Diagnosis, 1956
excluding indians
DEAD NON-PULMONARY
0.2%
INDiANS
DEAD NON-PULMONARY \A%
DEAD PULMONARY '•4%Tp^^LO^*^
The notification rate has reached a new low of 80.8 per 100,000, having dropped
from a peak of 211.1 in ten years. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956
F 75
55
O
H
<
■-4
P
CU
o
PM
o
o
<p
o"
o
1—I
Pi
W
tu
03
w
H
<
Pi
VO
<n
I
(M
Ov
m
S
P
j
o
U
UJ
S g
CQ .2
S3
Is
X   If
ta t3
0.3
z 3
3»EH
jsqtunivi
3JEH
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3JEH
J3qum>i
3JBH
jsqiunj^
in o
■rn *-«
00 cn      n«
TS   00
SO  CS
00 as
T-l   CS
17.7
14.3
55.8
17.7
so t-
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CS Tf
Tf cs
00 wi
O CN
tN m
© CN
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on r- cn o
rtTS       \Q 00 00 Cn      ISO f;       °^^:
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JsqiunM
CS CS       rH rH
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CS VO        "(fTt
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CS Tf       CN t-
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©■Tf rn ts
jsqainjsl
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vo m
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tN © © O
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m m
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m «n
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t~- CN
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Os  tN
cN tn
ts tN
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Tf ts"
tN VD
cn t>
© rf
ts r»
Tf cs
J9qmnj^[
OO (N
so «n
TS   ^
r-i T-l CS 1
9}E^
m m so r-
Tf On tS O
ts CS
CS Os
as d
vo 00
cs cs
vo 00
t- cs
cs cs
t- o
in**
Tf O
cn cs
r- vo
t- m
ts ts
Tf o       f cs
3JEH
m r-
in d
tN »n
tS 00 oc c-^
SO Os Os Os
tn ts 00 os
00 in
in \o
OV   Tf
CS rH
cn r»
00 ts
O CS
o m
CS  rn
J9quin>4
CS CS rH rH
ts O
ON t--
On VO
s;bh
00 CN
ts as
rH fN tS
tS cn
cn tn
vo Os
joquinjsf
00 m
o o
ts ts
a;e>r
00 On
ON   Tf
l-H   tS
Tf    Tf
rH   ON
m os
tA m
Os r~-
O rf
Tf cn
m x>
tA rt
r- m
cn 00      m cs
jaquin^sj
«n tj-
o m
3JBH
t-; r^
cn ts
rH as
CS  rH
VO ON
*-* Tf ON  Tf
Tf cs da
o m Ov m
CS   rH rH
VO 00
cs d
jaqiunjsl
a
3 x
0 <u
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w a
<
^fe   ^fe   ^^sfe   s*   ^fe   ^^   Sfe   Sfc    S*   lfe   ^^2^
0
H F 76
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 12.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group1
and Sex, 1941-56, Rates per 100,000 Population
(Excluding Indians)
RATE
0-4 YRS.
300
1
1     1
200
100
0
1  1
'     1
yCX
si-;
1
V*
"  i^V*
5-9 YRS.
100
1941.42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 551956      1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 551956
'/     V A*.
A W „'/       N|   aT\
aT   JV?      / aSP&W "—X\
RATE
10-14 YRS.
300
200
300
—I—
1
I
—I	
1   "
 1	
1     1
200
%
\
%
100
\
%
%
1
W
t
1
\
s\
%
0
1
t    ■
i
1
1
*
I     1
194142 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 551956 194142 43 44 45 ih 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 551956
400
300
200
100
RATE
20-29 YRS.
1
\       /
.//
M
%
\
\
\
%
\
s>
■XN.V
0
1
1
i
>
i
1         1
RATE
30-39 YRS.
1
1
200
y*
/"
/
\  "*%
\
'*<^
100
0
'
i
l
'
i
i '
1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51  52 53 54 55 1956 1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53  54 55 1956
i Breakdown by sex was not available for the 10-14 and 15-19 age-group from 1941 to 1943. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 77
Chart 12.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group
and Sex, 1941-56, Rates per 100,000 Population—Continued
(Excluding Indians)
RATE
400
300
200
100
0
■  1
1
1
1        ^N
,'-"
/
/
J
%
\
>/
\
^Scx.
1
t
1
w-
V
1    '
400
RATE
50-59 YRS.
i
1
i
i
1     i
300
200
100
/
/
A.
1
V
\
\
A.''
n
1
,
■■ i
i
i
,
,                      ,
1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 1956     1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 1956
v./.A
—^ aT7i	
100
1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 1956     15,4, 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 1956
RATE
?0-79 YRS.
1
A
t* **
%
1
/
t
1
1
1
400
300
RATE
80 YRS. AND OVER
1
200
100
0
\
1
t
1
t
'
1
4
/
imm<r
1
1
A
» 1
RATE
TOTAL
400
1
1
1
1
1
1      1
*s
A*
>
*•—
%
y
'
1
,   1
'
\-
'      '
1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 1956     1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 551956 F 78
department of health and welfare
Table 57.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
in British Columbia, 1952-56
Year
Total
New
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Other than Indians
New
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Indians
New
Cases1
Deaths3
Ratio
1952_
1953_
1954-
1955„
1956._
1,383
1,501
1,450
1,501
1,311
215
146
123
143
109
6.4:1
10.3:1
11.8:1
11.0:1
12.0:1
1,101
1,094
1,131
1,261
1,103
180
122
100
120
90
6.1
9.0
11.3
10.9
12.2
282
407
319
240
208
35
24
23
23
19
8.1:1
17.0:1
13.9:1
11.4:1
10.9:1
1 Includes notifications of:   1952, 26 Indians of white status;   1953, 25 Indians of white status;   1954, 22 Indians of
white status;   1955, 19 Indians of white status;  1956, 22 Indians of white status.
2 Includes deaths of:   1952, 3 Indians of white status;   1953, 3 Indians of white status;   1954, 3 Indians of white
status;   1955, 2 Indians of white status;   1956, 1 Indian of white status.
TUBERCULOSIS MORTALITY
In 1956 the lowest death rate from tuberculosis at 7.8 per 100,000 is recorded.
This was a reduction in total deaths from 143 to 109.
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1952-56
Total Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality—
1952	
1953	
1954..
1955...
1956-
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1952.
1953_
1954..
1955..
1956..
10.6
6.9
6.7
9.7
11
6
3
4
6
17.8
9.7
4.6
5.9
9.1
I
10.0
4.9
7.1
3.4
5.9
129
86
72
79
59
19.3
12.5
10.2
10.9
7.7
27
18
12
23
19
12.2
8.2
5.1
9.5
7.4
10
9
23.3
20.0
17.6
10.7
7.4
10.7
4.6
10.1 |
14.7 I
9.5
15
13
17
9
.3 37.4
.6 22.7
.3 |    35.3
7 I    21.4
0 13.4
I
214
146
1231
143
109
17.9
11.9
9.7
11.0
7.8
1 Excludes deaths of 2 ex-Province residents.
Preliminary figures for 1956. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 79
This shows that the decrease in deaths from tuberculosis in other than Indians was
6.6 per 100,000, with a reduction from 120 to 90 deaths.
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area,
1952-56.
Other-than-Indian Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality—
1952	
1953_
1954.-
1955..
1956..
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1952  —
1953	
1954-
1955.
1956..
3 11
2 6
2     |      3
2 4
6
10.7
7.0
6.8
6.6
17.8
9.5
4.6
6.0
9.2
8.9
4.9
6.0
3.5
3.6
125
86
70
78
57
18.8
12.6
10.0
10.8
7.4
I
20
15
9
19
14
9.3
6.8
4.0
8.1
5.6
15.7
5.1
5.0
9.6
6.2
5.9
11.4
11.1
6.1
14.0
8.2
10.6
15.4
5.5
12.2
12.0
5.8
11.3
6.3
179
122
| 1001
120
90
15.3
10.2
8.1
9.4
6.6
1 Excludes deaths of 2 ex-Province residents.
Preliminary figures for 1956.
The Indian death rate shows a drop to 57.6 per 100,000, which, as in the other-
than-Indian group, is the lowest recorded.
Table 60.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1952-56
Indian Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality—
19521
19531 	
19541                    	
1
210.5
—
1
1
2
93.9
88.7
147.5
4
2
1
2
114.4
53.9
24.8
58.2
7
3
3
4
5
120.6
50.1
48.7
64.9
71.7
4
7
6
1
1
83.3
141.5
117.8
19.0
17.7
2
1
1
90.6
41.3
38.4
10
10
4
11
6
180.6
175.2
68.1
181.3
98.5
6
3
7
3
2
115.6
56.1
127.1
52.7
35.8
1
1
1
136.4
132.6
124.5
35
24
1    23
19551
19561
23
19
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1952               	
1953         ...
1954
119.1
79.2
73.7
1955
71.4
1956
57.6
i Includes deaths of:   1952, 3 Indians of white status;   1953, 3 Indians of white status;
status;   1955, 2 Indians of white status;  1956, 1 Indian of white status.
1954, 3 Indians of white
- F 80
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
There were no deaths recorded in Area 1, which includes the four large communities
of Kimberley, Cranbrook, Fernie, and Michel.
Table 61.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1956
(Excluding Indians)
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Place of Residence
Female
Total
4
1
3
2
1
1
2
1
1
6
1
1
1
2
1
42
2
31
3
2
1
2
1
5
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
8
6
1
1
5
1
3
1
4
1
3
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
7
2
1
1
2
1
50
2
37
4
2
1
3
1
10
1
3
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
Unorganized	
Area Nn. 5r.
Area No. 5e	
Area No. 6b
Delta    	
Area No. 7c	
Unorganized- -  	
Area No. 8e	
Richmond                        .   ._ .
Area No. 8f                 	
3
3
Totals              	
70
20
90
Table 62.—
-Tuber
CULOSI
5 MORr
fALiTY by Statistical
Area
AND
City of Residence and Sex, 1956
(Indians Only1)
Place of Residence
Male      Female     Total
Place of Residence
Male      Female     Total
Area No. 3a	
Unorganized-
Area No. 3b-	
Unorganized-
Area No. 4a	
Mission City..
Area No. 4b—
Vancouver-
Area No. 5a..
Unorganized-
Area No. 5c.
Unorganized..
Area No. Se-
Toflno	
Unorganized-
Area No. 6d_
Unorganized-
Area No. 7a	
Unorganized-
Area No. 8c	
Unorganized-
Area No. 8e	
Unorganized-
Area No. 8f	
Unorganized-
Area No. 8g	
Unorganized-
Area No. 9d	
Unorganized-
Area No. 9f_
Unorganized-
Totals-
11
19
i Includes 1 Indian of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956
F 81
Except for Indians there were no tuberculosis deaths in persons under 25 years of
age and there were no Indian deaths under 4 years of age. Eighty-nine per cent of all
tuberculous deaths were due to respiratory tuberculosis and there were only 3 deaths
from tuberculous meningitis. There were no deaths from bone or lymphatic tuberculosis
and there was only 1 death from miliary tuberculosis.
Table 63.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-group, 1956
Excluding Indians
Diagnosis
■
Age-group
o
-■fa
.2
1
B'l
TB.of
Intestines
and
Peritoneum
UAjU   C
ta So
H><->
c
«
"ft-1 vi cn
O   Vaa
HB3°
o
oag
rn^'tri
TB.of
Genitourinary
System
HOO
Q c£
rt
O
H
Under 1 year	
1
6
10
14
16
23
12
7
i
1
—
~
—
i
~i
l
~l
_i
—
5- 9   „
10-14   „   .  .          	
15-19   „
20-24   ,	
25-29    „            .   ...
1
30-39   „
8
40-49    „    .. ..            	
10
50-59    „
15
60-69    „
17
70-79    „    _              	
26
80 years and over
13
Totals
82
2
1
—
—
—
4
—
l
90
Indians Onlyi
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
—
-
~
—
1
1
—
5- 9    „
1
10-14    „   _
1
15-19    „   	
1
20-24   „    .
2
25-29    „
1
30-39   „
40-49    „
4
2
50-59    „	
1
60-69    „
1
70-79    „       	
2
3
Totals
15
1
1
—
—
—
—
2
—
19
i Includes 1 Indian of white status.
Source:   Death Registrations, 1956. F 82
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
There were 77 tuberculosis deaths in the group excluding Indians and Orientals
for a rate of 5.7 per 100,000 population. This represents a decline of 32 per cent from
the previous year.
Table 64.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals, 1947-56.
Total Province
Indians
Excluding Indians
Year
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Rate
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
Population
per
100,000
per
100,000
1947
536
442
406
313
292
214
146
123
143
109
1,044,000
1,082,000
1,114,000
1,138,000
1,165,210
1,198,000
1,230,000
1,266,000
1,305,000
1,398,464
51.3
40.9
36.4
27.5
25.1
17.9
11.9
9.7
11.0
7.8
1741
156i
llli
74i
77i
351
24i
231
231
19
27,000
28,000
644.4
557.1
362
286
295
239
215
179
122
100
120
90
1,017,000
1,054,000
1,085,000
1,109,000
1,136,732
1,168,600
1,199,700
1,234,800
1,272,800
1,365,500
35.6
1948
27 1
1949
1950
28,500
29,000
28,478
29,400
30,300
31,200
32,200
33,000
389.5
255.2
270.4
120.7
79.2
73.7
71.4
57.6
27.2
21.6
1951
18.9
195?
15.3
1953
10.2
1954
8.1
1955
9.4
1956
6.6
Chinese
Japanese
Excluding Indians and
Orientals
Year
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100.000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100.000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100.000
1947
40
33
22
24
31
23
17
9
14
12
15,400
15,200
14,900
15,000
15,933
15,900
15,800
15,750
15,750
15,750
359.7
217.1
147.7
160.0
194.6
144.7
107.6
57.1
88.9
76.2
12
8
5
6
4
2
2
2
1
7,000
7,000
7,500
8,000
7,169
7,400
7,450
7,500
7,600
7,600
171.4
114.3
66.7
75.0
55.8
27.0
26.8
26.7
13.2
310
245
268
209
180
154
103
89
106
77
994,600
1,031,800
1,063,100
1,086,000
1,113,630
1,145,400
1,176,450
1,211,550
1,259,450
1,342,150
31.2
1948
23 8
1949
25.2
1950
19.2
1951
16.2
195?
13.4
1953
1954
8.8
7.4
1955
8.4
1956
5.7
1 Includes deaths of: 1947, 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 8 Indians of white
status; 1950, 4 Indians of white status; 1951, 7 Indians of white status; 1952, 3 Indians of white status; 1953, 3 Indians
of white status;  1954, 3 Indians of white status;   1955, 2 Indians of white status;   1956, 1 Indian of white status.
Note.—" Indian deaths " includes all deaths of persons of Indian racial origin, whether they were Indians under the
meaning of the " Indian Act" or not.
Source:  Mortality—Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1947 to 1955, inclusive (1956 figures preliminary only). TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1956
F 83
Chaft 13.—Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals, 1947-56.
RATE
400-
\
>
\
~
INDIANS
\
\
.   CH1NKE,
0-*"
V
N
\
\
/
ts, .^^
\
^»»
X
"\ JAPA
NESE"
\
s
N
V
*
/
\
30
EXCLUDING"
^TOTAL
\
■^
^^^
•mm              .
""■"'   ■  mm
EXCL
INDI/
1
JDING   * «.
VNS AND
IRIENTALS
^
sZ^s
>
*
^v
*i»*<
^   X
^*
A»^
v'^
v>
5
1947               1948                1949               1
"No Tuberculosis Deaths in 1955.
>50              1951
1 Tuberculosis Death in 1956.
ft
■ .
■
1954
1955
■• F 84
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
This table shows a decreased male death rate in all age-groups except those 70 years
of age and over. Eighty-three per cent of all male deaths were in persons 50 years of
age and over.
Table 65.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of
British Columbia by Age-group, 1952-56
—
Age-group
Year
0-4
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-24
25 29
30-39
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Total
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
195?
6
4
2
1
2
1
1
1
8
1
3
1
3
4
1
1
1
16
6
3
10
4
12
11
28
16
39
27
18
30
15
27
25
17
22
24
4
5
6
6
14
149
1953
100
1954 	
1955	
1956
1
1
2
1
15
10
6
24
17
12
87
101
78
Preliminary figures for 1956.
Source:   Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1952 to 1955.
Table 66.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of
British Columbia by Age-group, 1952-56
Age-group
Year
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Total
1952  ..
1
7
3
1
2
1
2
1
1
4
2
10
3
15
8
12
15
8
10
6
4
9
6
5
6
1
7
1
4
3
7
4
2
4
3
4
1
3
2
65
1953 	
46
1954
4
1
1
1
4
5
1
36
1955    -
1
2
4
5
3
42
1956	
31
Preliminary figures for 1956.
Source:   Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1952 to 1955.
Table 67.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of
British Columbia by Age-group, 1952-56
Age-group
Year
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Total
195?
7
11
6
1
5
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
10
1
1
1
1
7
3
3
2
13
7
5
6
2
31
14
15
25
12
22
17
19
19
12
33
22
25
19
16
46
28
22
35
18
30
32
21
24
28
7
9
7
9
16
214
1953
1954
146
123
1955— 	
1956
143
109
Preliminary figures for 1956.
Source:   Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1952 to 1955. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956
F 85
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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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<
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Tt
V
vd
lr
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0
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Ov TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1956
F 87
Chart 16.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population of
British Columbia by Place of Death, 1956
EXCLUDING INDIANS
DEATHS IN
MENTAL     I o 0% .2 DEATHS
INSTITUTIONS \22^___± uQfAt
i TV* *
INDIANS ONLY F 88 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 70.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by
Length of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1956
Length of Residence in British Columbia
Place of Death
1-5    I   6-11
Months, Months
1
Year
2
Years
3
Years
4
Years
5
Years
Over 5
Years
Not
Stated
Total
1
1
1
1
1
25
47
2
4
3
1
3
29
Tuberculosis institutions 	
50
2
6
Other 	
3
Totals-	
1
1
1       2
1    1       1
1
78
7
90
1 Includes 3 cases dead on arrival at hospital, and includes general and private hospitals only.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1957
235-657-8289

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