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Civil Service Commission Thirty-eighth Annual Report JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 31ST 1956 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1957]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Civil Service Commission
Thirty-eighth Annual Report
JANUARY 1st TO DECEMBER 31st
1956
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1957  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C., LL.D.,
Lieutenant-Governor oj the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Report of the Civil Service Commission,
Province of British Columbia, from January 1st to December 31st, 1956.
WESLEY D. BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1957. The Honourable Wesley D. Black,
Provincial Secretary,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—In conformity with the provisions of section 7 of the " Civil Service Act"
(chapter 51, " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948,"), I have the honour to submit
herewith the Report of the proceedings and work of the Civil Service Commission from
January 1st to December 31st, 1956.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. M. MORRISON,
Chairman, Civil Service Commission.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1957. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Chairman: Hugh M. Morrison. Member: J. V. Fisher.
Administrative Assistant: A. Partridge.
PERSONNEL STAFF
Victoria
Chief Personnel Officer: R. L. W. Ritchie.
Classification Officer: A. G. Richardson.
Personnel Officer: Miss J. Meryl Campbell.
Personnel Officer: D. J. Slader.
Personnel Technician: R. D. Higgins.
Vancouver
Personnel Officer: S. B. Williscroft.
Essondale
Personnel Officer: G. L. Tomalty.
Clerical Staff
Miss W. E. Brown.
Mrs. S. M. Burns.
Miss E. L. Christie.
Miss P. D. Clarke.
Miss M. E. Clegg.
Miss V. M. Dixon.
Miss V. Evan.
Mrs. R. M. Frankling.
Miss M. E. Jackson.
Mrs. G. Knott.
Mrs. M. M. Lester.
Miss J. McCuaig.
Mrs. E. A. B. Mayne.
Mrs. A. M. Robertson.
Mrs. P. Russell.
Mrs. V. E. Turpin.
Vancouver Office
Mrs. M. M. Young. Miss D. H. Thomson.
Essondale Office
Mrs. W. G. Matheson. GG 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
HIGHLIGHTS DURING 1956
1,786 persons were appointed to permanent positions.
923 persons were appointed to casual or temporary positions.
2,637 persons terminated their services.
There was a 28.45-per-cent turnover of staff.
There was a 6-per-cent average increase in Civil Service salaries.
361 Civil Servants gained promotion through open competition with other employees
and with candidates from outside the Service.
117 supervisors took supervisory training courses.
Thirty senior employees started on a three-year Civil Service-University executive
development training plan.
Merit promotion based on written examination and work performance was formalized
in the nursing ranks of the Mental Health Services.
There was a 20-per-cent increase in the number of positions reviewed for purposes of
checking salary classifications.
Average sick-leave taken was practically the same as last year.
There were no formal grievances.
The Premier and Executive Council paid honour to employees with over twenty-five
years of continuous service.
Organization and work procedures were still being studied and savings were being
made along with increased efficiency. .?._ . ...        •■:.••■•::;::•.•. CONTENTS
Report of the Civil Service Commission.
Report of the Chief Personnel Officer....
Report of the Classification Officer	
Report of the Personnel Officer, Vancouver.
Report of the Personnel Officer, Essondale...
Appendix—Statistics.
Page
.    9
. 16
19
. 22
. 23
25 Report of the Civil Service Commission
Pursuant to Section 7 of the "Civil Service Act," from
January 1st to December 31st, 1956
The year 1956 was another year similar to preceding ones in the general post-war
pattern, characterized by the Province's expanding economic activity. This activity was
reflected to even greater intensity than heretofore in respect to the duties of the Civil
Service Commission and its staff. Recruitment efforts were intensified in a growing
competitive market to meet increasing departmental demands; implementation of revised
salaries was effected along with an increased burden of position evaluations; progress
was made in departmental organization studies; supervisory training was continued
(regrettably on a lessened scale); and a new administrative management training scheme
was launched in co-operation with the University of British Columbia.
SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF THE CIVIL SERVICE
The expanding activities of Government were again reflected in a continued upward
trend of Civil Service enrolment. On December 31st, 1955, the total number of probationary and permanent Civil Servants was 8,138 {see Appendix, Table 3, Annual Report,
1955); the corresponding number at December 31st, 1956, was 8,398 {see Appendix,
Table 3) an increase of 260. The gross total (including temporary employees) at the end
of 1955 was 8,893; the corresponding number at the end of 1956 was 9,270 {see
Appendix, Tables 3 and 4), an increase of 377. The natural-resources and construction
services—namely, forests, lands, land registry, highways, and public works—accounted
for 283 of this 377 increase in personnel.
AMENDMENTS TO CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS
Only minor and routine amendments to the regulations were authorized.
Because of a change of position classification title of "Senior Clerk—Grade 2" to
" Principal Clerk," a corresponding change was effected by Order in Council No. 688/
56 in the Overtime Regulations.
Order in Council No. 2634/56 provided that the hours of general attendance of
school-teachers in the Civil Service shall be within the normal ten-month period of the
public-school year, as the yearly salaries for such teachers are now on the ten-month
basis, and the vacation-leave is to be taken within this ten-month-period.
APPOINTMENTS
During the year 2,709 appointments were made {see Appendix, Table 2), as compared with 2,626 appointments made during 1955, an increase of 83 or 3.1 per cent.
The number of permanent appointments to permanent positions amounted to 1,786; the
remainder, 923, were appointments to casual or temporary positions. Because some
vacancies create many promotional opportunities, the increase in the number of requisitions processed in connection with these appointments was substantially greater. As
reported by the Chief Personnel Officer, the number of requisitions rose 69 per cent, from
2,626 in 1955 to 4,404 in 1956.
SEPARATIONS
The number of separations of all types from the Civil Service was 2,637, which is
an increase of 249 or 10.4 per cent over the 2,388 for 1955.   Using a formula of— GG 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Number of separations
X 100
Total enrolment, including casual employees, at end of calendar year
as a measure of the degree of staff turnover, the turnover for 1956 was—
2,637
 X100 = 28.45.
9,270
For comparison purposes this formula is applied to similar figures for post-war years,
as follows:—
Year
Total
Separations
Enrolment1
Turnover
Rate
1949      	
1,255
1,418
1,963
1,992
2,187
2,529
2,388
2,637
7,345
7,694
7,994
8,543
8,543
8,523
8,893
9,270
17.09
1950  	
1951 	
18.43
24.56
1952  	
23.32
1953     	
25.60
1954  .
29.67
1955 	
26.85
1956        ..   ... .. ..
28.45
1 Including casual employees at December 31st.
An analysis of the Commission's separations statistics reveals that the rate for
female personnel is approximately twice that of male personnel. This is what could be
expected and is not dissimilar to what is occurring in business and industry. A fact, however, which is disturbing is the excessive turnover in respect to male junior clerical personnel. Of only seventy-seven male clerks, 25 years of age and under in the Service in the
grades of Junior Clerk, Clerk 1, and Clerk 2, forty-four terminated their services during
1956. There were 301 female employees in the same grades in the same age category. It
would appear that the female clerks are taking hold of these and higher clerical grades,
a trend that is noticeable also in business, particularly banks and financial firms. The
Commission has been operating for years a special clerical apprenticeship scheme, but
its task, in the face of the great industrial competition for male personnel, has to date been
difficult.
The Chief Personnel Officer has compiled in his report a very illuminating analysis of
staff turnover according to the occupational nature of the positions. As might be expected,
the highest rates were in the positions where there is a high degree of occupational movement or female personnel. With a few exceptions, the separation rate in the technical
and professional positions was not as large, but very likely substantially higher than
normal. Turnover in such positions must be viewed critically, because many key positions
are involved. There are indications, however, that turnover of female personnel in the
technical and professional positions has significantly boosted this rate. According to the
Chief Personnel Officer's calculations, the turnover rate in the four broad groupings are
ranked as follows: Manual, 33 per cent; clerical, 32 per cent ; technical, 26 per cent;
and professional-administrative, 18 per cent.
The reasons for turnover remain relatively stable from year to year, with some
increase in the number of employees leaving for other jobs.
Table 8 in the Appendix indicates other reasons for staff separations. During the
year forty-two employees were dismissed, and fifty-six had their probationary periods
extended.   In addition, two suffered suspensions without dismissal.
The following tabulation indicates the extent of the disciplinary trend during the past
six years, an indication that the Civil Service insists on competent personnel:— CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
GG  11
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Number   of  Civil  Servants   whose  probationary  periods
43
12
66
68
8
53
49
11
64
61
10
54
59
4
56
Number of Civil Servants who were suspended from duty
but not dismissed  	
Number of Civil Servants who were dismissed	
2
42
GENERAL ELIGIBILITY EXAMINATIONS
As in previous years, generally assembled stenographic, clerical, and draughting
examinations for the establishment of eligibility lists in the junior classifications were held
as necessity dictated in Victoria. An addition to the usual list of junior examinations was
one for Trainee Sanitary Inspector. A detailed list is given in the Chief Personnel Officer's
report (page 16). A total of 992 candidates were examined. Of this number, 616 or 62
per cent qualified.
The usual condition of it being impossible to maintain eligibility lists for a reasonable
period of time pertained in the Vancouver and Essondale offices. Hence applicants were
continuously examined upon individual or small grouping basis. In the Vancouver area
418 candidates were examined, of which 347 or 83 per cent qualified for appointment.
A detailed list is given in the Personnel Officer's report on page 22. At Essondale forty-
two appointments in the junior clerical and stenographic grades were made, being 68
per cent of the sixty-one who applied.
The records of these centres during the past few years are as follows:—
Percentage of Qualifications on General Eligibility Examinations for Initial
Entrance to Junior Level Grades
Centre
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Per Cent
Victoria  	
71
67
64
66
61
66
62
Vancouver       .....
C1)
88
72
84
89
69
83
Essondale2 	
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3>
69
68
i No record.
2 Includes only steno-clerical grades and not other beginning institutional positions.
3 No centre.
COMPETITIONS FOR PROMOTION
The policy of maintaining a just balance between promotional opportunities to personnel within the Service and the prevention of Service "inbreeding" through competition
from outside the Service has been rigidly followed. All vacancies are publicly advertised,
as well as posted prominently on bulletin-boards throughout the Service. In this sense
the competitions are truly open. The number of positions filled by such competitions was
100 per cent, of which 361 or 36 per cent were filled from within the Service and 646
or 64 per cent were filled from outside the Service. The large percentage of outside
opportunities was largely due to the increased requirements involving specialist and professional personnel, and junior grade appointments in Interior Provincial centres where
competitions for single positions are often held under the supervision of the Government
Agents.
A significant fact about the in-Service promotions is that 18.5 per cent of these
promotions were made by transfer from one department to another. The Civil Service
Commission is very pleased to point to this fact as it may indicate that extreme departmentalization does not exist in the Civil Service of British Columbia.
J GG  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Most of the promotional competitions in the Mental Health Services are in the nursing and clerical grades, and are generally supervised by the Commission's Personnel
Officer stationed at Essondale. This official reports that there were 123 competitions held
at his office, including local postings, for which there were 770 applicants, of which 429
were interviewed and 133 appointments were made. In respect to the eligibility list
established by examination for appointments to Charge Psychiatric Nurse and Assistant
Psychiatric Charge positions, there were forty-six appointments in 1956.
IN-SERVICE TRAINING
Normal in-service training courses of a specialized character peculiar to the departments concerned were conducted during the year by these departments.
Training courses in the techniques of supervision, regrettably still on a reduced scale,
were continued under the direction of Personnel Officer Miss J. Meryl Campbell. However, 117 key personnel (107 from the Lands Service and ten from the Municipal Affairs
Department) were able to take advantage of the intensive five-lecture courses. Since the
inauguration of these courses in 1950, more than 1,400 supervisors have been exposed
to these courses
Year
1950
1951.
1952.
1953.
1954
1955.
1956
Reference was made in last year's Annual Report to the fact that the Commission
was in touch with the University of British Columbia, with the objective of securing the
University's assistance in the establishment of an executive development training plan.
With the approval in principle by the Government and the provision by the Legislature
of the necessary funds, a training plan was organized, and the first classes were enrolled in
September. Two meetings of the Commission with departmental heads and University
authorities were held, from which were struck several standing committees on such matters
as curricular content, on-job training, and contractual obligations.
In broad outline it was determined that the training plan would extend over a three-
year period, entailing the study of University courses taught by University professors, and
a directed system of an on-the-job service on an interdepartmental basis. The academic
subjects would be taught through the admixture of winter lectures, correspondence assignments, and a concentrated final two-week summer institute on the University campus.
The plan calls for three such courses a year, as follows: —
First year:
(1) Introductory Economics.
(2) Psychological Problems in Employment Situations.
(3) Public Administration.
Second Year:
(1) Business Mathematics or Report and Precis Writing.
(2) Introduction to Canadian Business Law.
(3) Fundamentals of Accounting.
Third year:
(1) Business Mathematics or Report and Precis Writing.
(2) Personnel Management or Statistics.
(3) Public Finance.
s, as follows: —
(
Number of
Supervisors
Enrolled
      101
      132
      317
      287
                                                       405
       108
       117
Total	
  1,467 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
GG 13
Two classes (one in Victoria and one in Vancouver) not exceeding thirty pupils in
total were to be started each September. Postings inviting applications were posted
throughout the Service. From 180 applicants, thirty were chosen, being a good distribution from the various departments of key personnel from middle and senior management.
It is, of course, fully realized by all concerned that, with time, changes in curricular
content and procedures will be necessary. By the end of the year the reports as to the
likely success of the venture were, upon the whole, encouraging. The general aims of
the plan are apparent; that is, that specialists must have a liberal background of understanding in order to successfully administer their duties in the light of general Government
policy. As Robert T. Sheen, president of the Milton Roy Company writes, " the engineer's slide rule alone does not provide solutions to problems in administration."*
The Commission wishes through you, Sir, to record its appreciation of the understanding support it has received from the Government and the Legislature in respect to
this plan, and also to you for your courtesy and inspiration in addressing the opening
conference of departmental heads with the Commission.
THE VANCOUVER OFFICE
The Commission's Personnel Officer stationed in Vancouver continued his usual
functions of recruiting personnel for the offices, establishments, and institutions in Greater
Vancouver and New Westminster, exclusive of the Mental Health Services; of assisting
the Classification Officer in assessing positions and studying staff organizations; and in
general carrying on effective and useful liaison work between the Commission and the
various departments of Government and their local staffs.
These services were extended, as in the past, to non-Civil Service agencies, particularly the Gaol Service and the Toll Highways and Bridges Authority. In all, the number
of appointments made through this office amounted to 846, being 134 over the total
for 1955. A summary is given in Table 15 of the Appendix. Reports where submitted
on the evaluation of forty-eight positions, and important organizational studies were
reported upon in the Old-age Assistance Board and the Game Commission, while
assistance was continued in the studies being made in the Mental Health Services.
THE ESSONDALE OFFICE
The Commission's Personnel Officer stationed at the Provincial Mental Hospital at
Essondale continued his functions, serving the Mental Health Services on parallel lines
to the Vancouver Office. This office reports that there were 929 appointments made, an
increase of 310 over the previous year {see Table 16, Appendix).
A system of examination for the purpose of building an eligibility list for promotions
of psychiatric nurses to positions of Charge and Deputy Charge Nurses was established
and put into operation. The photograph reproduced is a picture of one of these examinations. The Personnel Officer, in his report, gives a few figures about the examinations
(pages 23 and 24).
The usefulness of this office placed in a local situation is indicated by the liaison
which is afforded;  in short, a good example of controlled decentralization.
CLASSIFICATION AND SALARY PLAN
The Classification Officer, in his report, indicates that 1956 was another intensively
active year for his division. Some assistance was afforded in the addition of a technician
to the division. Even with the extra task of implementing a major revision in the Civil
Service pay structure, and also similar advice and service to the non-Civil Service estab-
* " Industry and Government Co-operate in Management Development," Good Government, November-December,
1956, page 59. GG 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
lishments, there was a 21-per-cent increase in the number of classification reviews—
803, as against 659 reviews in 1955 {see Table 17, Appendix). The increase in the
percentage of downward and rejected reclassifications appears to the Classification
Officer to indicate a degree of irresponsibility in connection with some departmental
recommendations.
The work of conducting surveys of prevailing salary of like occupations in business,
industry, and other public authorities continued at an even greater pace than in former
years. In addition to the main annual survey conducted for the Commission by the
Bureau of Economics and Statistics covering firms with over 100 employees throughout
the Province, there are fifty-two individual occupational surveys listed by the Classification
Officer in his report {see pages 19 and 20). This substantiates his statement that " during
the year salary surveys were made for every position where comparisons outside the Civil
Service could be made."
The remarks of the Classification Officer about the trend of the various professions
to have qualifications for positions raised constantly upwards, if valid, would appear to
be rather unrealistic in these times of increasing shortages of professional workers. This
is a problem that needs to be watched very carefully in order to ensure that professional
workers are making full use of their qualifications and talents.
DEPARTMENTAL ESTABLISHMENTS
The system of staff establishment control, sometimes involving organization and
work procedure studies, was continued. During the year there were 531 positions added
to establishment and 134 deleted, being a net gain of 397 positions, many of which were
required to staff the North Lawn Building at Essondale and the Mental Health Centre in
Burnaby. Requests for sixty-three additional positions were not approved following
investigation, and thus a saving of approximately $130,000 per annum may be claimed.
Except for a few branches in two departments, all survey checks of staff have been
completed. Reports on two or more departments are being studied by the departments
concerned. All other reports have been studied by this Commission and have been
submitted. In most cases, whenever possible, action has been taken, with resultant
efficiency and sometimes, through improved organization, staff decreases have been
effected. In December the Commission submitted a progress report, summarizing progress to that month.
SICK AND SPECIAL LEAVE
A total of 51,4681$ days' sick-leave was granted during the year October 1st, 1955,
to September 30th, 1956—43,771 days with pay and 7,697^ days without pay {see
Table 5, Appendix), an average of 5.6 days. This is a slight increase over the average
for the previous twelve months—5.5. Not included in the above totals is sick-leave
granted under the Workmen's Compensation Board and under the Department of
Veterans' Affairs section of the Sick-leave Regulations. The average number of days'
sick-leave per employee during recent years is shown hereunder. For comparison
purposes these will be found interesting:—
ear Ended
Sept. 30
1950	
Average per
Employee
 5.3
Year Ended
Sept. 30
1954	
Average per
Employee
 6.6
1951
 6.2
1955	
        5.5
1952	
 6.0
1956	
 5.6
1953	
 6.4
The average daily salary during the year October 1st, 1955, to September 30th,
1956, was $12.87, so that the cost of sick-leave granted with pay during the twelve-month
period was $563,333. In the majority of instances the sick-leave was of short duration,
requiring no payment for relief assistance. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT GG  15
Three employees are on leave of absence for the purpose of serving with units of
the armed forces, under the provisions of the regulations governing enlistment of Provincial Government employees in the forces of the Crown, and during the year thirty-
four employees were granted special leave for the purpose of training with Reserve units
of Her Majesty's Forces or to permit them to take further qualifying courses with the
forces.
One employee is serving with the Military Component, Canadian delegation, and
two are serving with United Nations Organizations.
Forty-one employees were granted leave of absence for varying periods for the
purpose of further training and study, some with assistance provided, as in previous years,
from Federal Health Grant funds.
The Employees' Health Service in Victoria has completed its second calendar year,
in that year extending its services in some 3,300 cases, an increase of some 800 over
that of 1955. A full report of the activity of that health service is included in the annual
report of the Health Branch, Department of Health and Welfare.
GRIEVANCES
For the fifth consecutive year it is with pleasure that the Commission is able to
report that no formal grievances where heard. This does not mean that there were no
grievances. It does mean that the continuous process of personnel counselling and
administration was functioning satisfactorily. In this process the Commission itself met
once with representatives of the Government Employees' Association to examine a point
of representation.
GENERAL OBSERVATIONS
In June the Honourable the Premier and Executive Council recognized long service
of Government employees by presenting each employee with twenty-five years or more
of continuous service with a testimonial certificate {see frontispiece).
Such certificates were presented and the employees with the longest service in each
department represented such department at a testimonial luncheon graciously extended
by the Premier and his colleagues.
The Chairman of the Commission, in September, paid official visits to Prince Rupert,
Terrace, Smithers, Burns Lake, and Prince George. The main purpose of the visit was to
inquire into recruiting problems and housing difficulties reported in this booming area of
the Province. Resulting from this visit, a survey team of inquiry was dispatched to make
more detailed investigations.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Once more the Commission wishes to express its appreciation of the co-operation
given by the various departments of Government and by the Federal and various Provincial Civil Service Commissions. In this respect particular reference should be made
to the Government Agents of the Department of Finance, who readily, cheerfully, and
faithfully assisted with recruitment in their respective centres. It also wishes to express
to you, as Provincial Secretary, its keen appreciation of your continual goodwill and
wise understanding.
To each member of its technical and clerical staffs, the Commission wishes again to
express its keen appreciation for continuous and loyal support.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.
H. M.  Morrison, Chairman.
J. V. Fisher, Member. GG 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF PERSONNEL OFFICER
R. L. W. Ritchie, B.A.
1. RECRUITMENT
The following table shows the nature and number of competitions in 1956:—
Number Per Cent
Number of positions filled by open competition 1,007 100
Filled by promotion within Service      361 36
Filled by appointment outside Service      646 64
Of in-service promotions, 18.5 per cent were made by transfer from one department
to another.
During the year the task of recruiting persons with certain technical and specialized
qualifications has become acute with the general shortage of such persons. It has been
found necessary to extend the scope of advertising considerably in this regard, notably
through professional journals and newspapers throughout Canada. This has resulted
in a substantial increase in advertising costs over previous years.
The volume of recruiting generally has increased considerably over previous years.
In 1955 the total number of requisitions processed was 2,626; in 1956 there were 4,404,
an increase of nearly 69 per cent.
The fact that a greater proportion of positions were filled by outside appointments
is due largely to the increased requirements involving specialist and professional personnel.
2. EXAMINATIONS
Written examinations for eligibility lists in Victoria were held as follows:—
Classification
Number
Examined
Number
Qualified
Per Cent
Qualified
Typists. 	
Junior Clerks  	
Clerks—Grade 1  	
Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 1_
Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 2.
Junior Draughtsmen 	
Draughtsmen—Grade 1	
Draughtsmen—Grade 2	
Mapping Assistant—Grade 3.....
Senior Draughtsmen	
Sanitary Inspector (trainee)	
Totals 	
338
255
149
53
65
53
15
22
5
1
36
164
165
119
36
52
44
3
7
4
1
21
41
65
80
68
80
83
20
32
80
100
58
99.
616
62
3. TRAINING
Supervisory training courses were administered in 1956 under the direction of
Miss J. M. Campbell, as follows:—
Department and Branch Number Attending
Municipal Affairs, Victoria     10
Lands Service, Victoria  107
The Chief Personnel Officer is working closely in liaison with Professor D. C.
Corbett, of the University of British Columbia, with respect to the organization and
administration of the executive development training programme undertaken by the Civil
Service Commission in conjunction with the University. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT GG 17
4. STAFF TURNOVER
The following is an analysis of staff separations recorded for the past five years:—
Per Cent
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
14
17
14
7
19
10
19
9
17
12
8
18
7
29
8
18
12
8
19
4
1
30
9
19
13
7
25
4
1
22
7
22
14
111 health              _   ....
9
To accept other employment 	
36
4
Enlisted in Her Majesty's Forces    	
1
7
Totals     	
100
100
100
100
100
It is interesting to note that the reasons for separating are relatively stable from year
to year, with the exception of those who leave to accept other employment, the number
of which has risen considerably over the past two years. This increase is partly due to
better reporting of separations, there being comparatively few " unknown " cases in 1956.
However, it is apparent that during these years of industrial activity and high employment
more employees are inclined to leave the Civil Service for other jobs.
The following is a distribution by classification of all separations in 1956. Figures
in parentheses show the percentage of separations relative to the number employed in
each category:—
Clerical
General   386 (26)
Business-machine operators     61 (39)
Stenographic   436 (40)
Storekeepers        8 (13)
Total
Manual
Animal care	
Cleaning service	
Culinary service	
Equipment maintenance and operation
Housekeeping service	
Maintenance services and trades 	
Personal services 	
891 (32)
17 (74)
127 (26)
119 (40)
23 (13)
13 (20)
47 (18)
3(14)
Total
449 (33) GG 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Professional and Administrative
Accounting and auditing
Administrative 	
Agriculture	
Economics and statistics
Education	
Engineering
Laboratory services
Legal	
Library  	
Total
Technical
Accounting, auditing, and assessing 	
Agricultural	
Draughting, surveying,  and photography
Engineering	
Instructional	
Investigational and inspectional 	
Marine services 	
Marine services 	
Medical and nursing	
Occupational therapy	
Total
0 (0)
1 (1)
6 (6)
0 (0)
7 (4)
36(10)
10 (20)
1 (5)
5(24)
26 (20)
128 (31)
9 (82)
Medical and dental 	
Nursing 	
Nutrition  and  dietetics  	
Sociological and psychological      88 (31)
Survey        0   (0)
Research        3   (8)
320(18)
14(11)
3(11)
55 (23)
22 (7)
39 (33)
37 (8)
23 (42)
9(14)
633 (36)
22 (58)
857 (26)
Over-all turnover, 27 per cent.
In commenting on the foregoing, it appears that the greatest relative number of
separations occur in the " Clerical " and " Manual " classifications. In the former group,
stenographers have the highest turnover rate. This is generally to be expected, since
the demand for such persons is in excess of the supply, and the Civil Service is required
to compete for this service with all types of private employers who are able in some
instances to offer very attractive salaries.
In the " Manual" group the highest turnover occurs in the " animal care " and
" culinary service " groups (cattle stockmen, cooks, kitchen helpers, scullery maids, etc.),
which is traditionally an area of transient labour.
It is interesting to note that the turnover amongst professional staffs is relatively
small (18 per cent, compared to the over-all rate of 27 per cent). The highest rate
occurred amongst dieticians, nine of a total staff of eleven leaving during the year.
In the " Technical" group the highest turnover rate is shown by hospital staffs
(occupational therapists, laboratory technicians, psychiatric nurses, nurses' aides, etc.). CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT GG 19
REPORT OF THE CLASSIFICATION OFFICER
A. G. Richardson, M.A.
CLASSIFICATION AND JOB EVALUATION
During the first three months of 1956 the Classification Division was occupied mainly
in preparing for and implementing a major revision of the Civil Service pay structure.
This, along with the determining of appropriate wage levels for non-Civil Service employees in the outside services of the Forest Service, Department of Highways, Liquor Control
Board, and Gaol Service, occupied the staff to the extent that classification studies were
held in abeyance. The estimated cost of the approved increases in salaries amounted to
$1,700,000.
During the remaining nine months of 1956, classification reviews continued, along
with a concentrated wage and salary survey programme. Mr. R. D. Higgins was added to
the staff in September to provide assistance in the latter. Table 17 in the Appendix indicates the number of classification reviews conducted in 1956, with comparative figures for
the preceding five years. It indicates a 21-per-cent increase in the number of reviews over
both 1955 and 1954. This is a sizeable increase considering that in the main the reviews
were concentrated into nine months of the year. On a proportional basis the percentage
of individual reviews resulting in downward classification and no change in classification
increased considerably, which indicates that departments and employees were attempting
to use the methods of classification and job evaluation to increase salaries of individuals
which they considered to be low. This tendency was particularly noticeable in the case
of senior positions, where some of the recommendations received had the earmarks of
being irresponsible since, if approved, they would have disrupted proper salary relationships, not only in the Service, but within the particular department.
During the year, salary surveys were made for every position where comparisons
outside the Civil Service could be made. The main survey of clerical and related positions
was conducted by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics and included all firms in the
Lower Mainland area employing more than 100 employees together with municipalities,
all firms in the Victoria area employing more than fifty employees including the municipalities, and this year was broadened to include employees in the northern and central
areas of the Province. Eighty per cent of employers returned questionnaires. The survey
included Clerks, Accountants, Typists, Stenographers, Book-keepers, Business-machine
Operators, Switchboard Operators, Janitors, Civil Engineers, Draughtsmen, Architects,
Stationary Engineers, Labourers, Truck-drivers, Mechanics, Carpenters, and Heavy-
equipment Operators.
In addition, separate salary surveys were conducted by the Division as follows:—
(1) Agriculturists.
(2) Bacteriologists.
(3) Bakers.
(4) Barbers.
(5) Building Service Workers.
(6) Butchers.
(7) Conciliation Officers.
(8) Cooks.
(9) Dentists.
(10) Dental Technicians.
(11) Dieticians.
(12) Electroencephalograph Technicians.
(13) Engineers-in-training. GG 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
(14) Ferry crews.
(15)
Farm staffs.
(16)
Fire-fighters.
(17)
Foresters-in-training.
(18)
Gardeners.
(19)
Hairdressers.
(20)
Industrial Relations Officers
(21)
Industrial Therapists.
(22)
Kitchen Helpers (male).
(23)
Kitchen Maids.
(24)
Laundry staffs.
(25)
Launch crews.
(26)
Librarians.
(27)
Meat-cutters.
(28)
Mechanics.
(29)
Nurses' Aides.
(30)
Nurses—Psychiatric.
(31)
Nurses—Public Health.
(32)
Nurses—Staff.
(33)  Occupational Therapists.
(34)
Orderlies.
(35)
Personnel Officers.
(36)
Pharmacists.
(37)
Psychiatrists.
(38)
Projectionists.
(39)
Psychiatric Aides.
(40)
Psychologists.
(41)
Rangers.
(42)
Research Assistants.
(43)
Right-of-way Agents.
(44)
Shoemakers.
(45)
Social Workers.
(46)
Stockmen.
(47)
Stationary Engineers.
(48)
Tailors.
(49)
Teachers.
(50)
Waitresses.
(51)
Ward Assistants.
(52)
X-ray Technicians.
One problem of classification was particularly evident during the year which concerned the determination of appropriate qualifications for positions, particularly professional positions. There is a distinct tendency among professional workers to strive to
have qualifications raised higher and higher, producing a shortage of so-called qualified
workers and higher and higher salaries. The Classification Division considers that it is
responsible to the Civil Service Commission, which in turn is responsible to the Government and the people, to guard against specifying high qualifications for positions which
may not be entirely needed.
The Division also conducted several reviews of classification in organizations which
are not included in the Civil Service, such as the Liquor Control Board, Gaol Service,
Game Commission, Official Administrator's Office, and the Civil Defence organization. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
GG 21
ESTABLISHMENTS
The Division continued a system of establishment control whereby all requisitions
for appointment were checked for both classification and need. These studies are time
consuming and in some instances involve a determination of the value of a proposed
additional service. In other instances organizational studies and work method studies
are required in order to determine whether or not changes could be made to obviate the
necessity to increase staff. The staff of the Division could quite easily be occupied full
time on these types of reviews.
Table 19 of the Appendix indicates the additions to and deletions from each departmental establishment. There are 531 additions to establishments and 134 deletions, a net
gain of 397 positions during the year. The majority of these positions were required to
staff the North Lawn Building at Essondale and the Mental Health Centre in Burnaby.
There were requests for sixty-three additional positions, which were not approved following investigation. The cost in salaries of these positions would have amounted to approximately $130,000 per annum. GG 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF PERSONNEL OFFICER, VANCOUVER
S. B. WlLLISCROFT, B.COMM.
During 1956 the work of this office comprised the recruitment and placement of
personnel, the assessment of positions for classification purposes, the conduct of staff and
organizational surveys, the investigation of grievances, and the maintenance of liaison
with local Government officials on matters relating to personnel practices.
Recruiting and placement activities toward the end of 1956 differed somewhat to
that carried out in previous years as this office became actively engaged in rendering
assistance in this field to Government agencies whose staff are not subject to the " Civil
Service Act." These agencies include the Gaol Service and the Toll Highways and
Bridges Authority, and while the actual number of recruits obtained for those was small
during 1956, it is anticipated that a great activity will result from the opening of the new
penal institutions and toll-bridges. In all a total of 846 recruitments were made during
the past year to fill a wide variety of manual, clerical, technical, and professional positions.
This number is an increase of 134 over the total of 1955. A summary is given in
Table 15 of the Appendix, showing the distribution of these appointments by position
classification.
During 1956 all candidates for clerical and stenographic positions were subjected to
qualifying examinations. A summary of the examinations given is contained in the
following table:— Passed Failed
Junior Clerk      47 7
Clerk—Grade 1   119 28
Clerk-Typist—Grade 1 and 2      69 25
Clerk-Stenographers  112 11
Totals    347 71
Grand total, 418.
Extreme difficulty was experienced in obtaining suitable recruits for employment in
many of the classifications requiring technical skills, but through the medium of advertising and selective examinations satisfactory results were obtained. The shortage of trained
stenographers continued through 1956, and it is anticipated that there will be little change
in this situation during the current year due to intense local competition.
During 1956 the office assisted the Classification Officer by investigating forty-
eight positions relative to position specifications and organizational requirements. In
addition, organizational studies were carried out in the Old-age Assistance Board, were
continued in the Provincial Mental Health Services, and are being continued in repect to
the organization of the Game Commission. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
GG 23
REPORT OF PERSONNEL OFFICER, ESSONDALE
G. L. Tomalty, B.A., M.P.A.
The purpose of the Essondale office was maintained in 1956 in carrying out the
recruitment and placement of personnel, classifications, and organizational surveys, with
the dominant activity being recruitment.
There were 929 appointments made in 1956, an increase of 310 from the previous
year. These appointments were made in 119 classifications {see Table 16, Appendix).
A percentage of this increase resulted from additional staff requirements for the Tubercular
Building at Essondale and new staff for the opening of the Mental Health Centre in
Burnaby
Civil Servants at Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, writing one of the Civil Service
examinations for placement on eligibility list, from which promotions to positions of Deputy
Charge and Charge Psychiatric Nurse are made.
A year has passed since the eligibility list came into effect for promotion of the
nursing staff to Assistant Charge and Charge Psychiatric nursing positions throughout
the Mental Health Services. From all indications this method of promotion has proved
satisfactory. There was considerable time required to accustom the staff to this new
promotional method, but the recent eligibility examination held in December of this year
more than indicated acceptance to this change, as 196 members of the nursing staff wrote
the examination out of a total of 199 who applied. With the expansion of last year and
the small number of female psychiatric nurses who applied for the promotional examination at that time, the eligibility list for Assistant Charge positions became exhausted.
The current list for the coming year has not been finalized, but it would appear with the
number applying that more than sufficient qualified applicants are available for the
Assistant Charge female eligibility list.
There were forty-six appointments made in 1956 to Charge Psychiatric Nurse and
Assistant Charge positions, male and female, made from the eligibility list.    The time GG 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
saved by all concerned is quite apparent in filling these positions from the eligibility list
compared to the previous panel method of interviewing numerous applicants.
There were 123 competitions held at this office this year, including local postings,
for which 770 applicants applied, 429 were interviewed, and 133 appointments were
made.
During the year nineteen requests for reclassification by the Classification Officer
were carried out, besides investigations into organizational requirements.
During the year the local branch of the Government Employees' Association invited
the Personnel Officer to a special meeting of the Essondale branch to answer questions
that would clarify any aspect of the role of the Civil Service Commission office at Essondale.
In order to assist in the recruitment of staff for the Mental Health Services and the
Public Works Department at Essondale, a very close liaison has resulted with the National
Employment office in New Westminster, in particular their graduate-student programme.
The Personnel Officer also has carried out speaking engagements with various organizations in the Greater Vancouver area in order to promote good relations and also help in
recruiting. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT                                   GG 25
APPENDIX
STATISTICS
Table 1.—Enrolments in the Civil Service from 1933 to 1956
(as at December 31st, since 1946)
Year                                                Enrolment                  Year                                                   Enrolment
1933-34    1,424                Apr. 1, 1945, to Dec. 31, 1946 4,664
1014-35                                   ...    1.484                 1947  5.425
1935-36                                   .   1,541
1948	
6,417
1936-3 7    1,607
1937-38        1,718
1949	
1950	
1951	
1952
7,345
7,694
1938-39   1,889
1939-40   1,941
1940-41  1,951
7,994
8,543
1953	
8,543
1941-42   1,851
1942-43   1,822
1943_44   2,018
1954	
1955	
1956	
	
7,9451
8,1382
8,3983
1944-45              2,159
the Civil Service Commission
mber 3 1st, 1956
i Exclusive of 578 casual employees.
2 Exclusive of 755 casual employees.
3 Exclusive of 872 casual employees.
Table 2.—Appointments Made by
from 1933 to Dece
Year
Probationary
Casual
Permanent
Total
1933-34  	
1934-35  	
1935-36..        	
1936-37  	
........
1,230
984
1,191
1,417
1,193
1,149
1,264
170
248
258
279
297
328
342
356
352
474
491
547
2,058
2,048
2,041
507
441
600
673
473
533
1,030
923
98
85
78
104
185
133
146
121
88
173
184
155
1,245
815
867
370
290
339
378
390
438
332
1,786
268
333
336
383
1937 38
482
1938-39        	
1939 40
461
488
1940-41                                                                           	
477
1941-42       	
1942-43   	
440
647
1943-44
675
1944-45      - _
April 1st, 1945, to December 31st, 1946 	
1947  	
1948     	
1949  _
1950      .
1951                                                                                       	
702
3,303
2,863
2,908
2,107
1,715
2,130
2,468
2,056
2,120
2,626
2,709
1952	
1953     .	
1954    	
1955-	
1956..	
Note.—From 1945 to 1948, probationary appointments are included in the " Casual " c
1956, probationary appointments are counted as permanent, and are not counted again
olumn.   From and including
;vhen officially confirmed as GG 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 3.—Number of Civil Servants Enrolled in Departments of Government as at
December 3 1st, 1956, according to Appointment and Sex
Department
Permanent and Probationary
Male
Female
Total
Premier's Office .
Agriculture..
Attorney-General.
Education _
Finance. 	
Fisheries	
Health 	
Labour	
Lands  	
Mines 	
Municipal Affairs	
Provincial Secretary..
Public Utilities	
Highways	
Railways..
Trade and Industry _
Public Works... _
Hospital Insurance .
Welfare 	
Forests 	
Totals .
119
303
141
421
3
344
47
264
56
13
1,135
26
384
5
46
475
96
162
624
4,664
2
52
242
217
282
2
807
41
37
21
5
1,149
33
122
2
32
34
109
347
198
3,734
2
171
545
353
703
5
1,151
88
301
77
18
2,284
59
506
7
78
509
205
509
822
8,398
Table 4.—Number of Casual Employees Enrolled in Departments of Government
as at December 3 1st, 1956, according to Sex
Department
Casual
Male
Female
Total
2
15
9
20
48
11
3
91
51
2
103
4
14
42
5
67
33
35
109
4
6
54
36
11
8
21
68
7
82
42
55
Health
157
15
9
145
Public Utilities   .            _                      .	
87
2
114
12
Welfare 	
35
110
Totals	
415
457
872 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
GG 27
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 6.—Number of Civil Servants Appointed to Departments of Government from
January 1st to December 31st, 1956, according to Nature of Appointment and Sex
Department
Permanent and Probationary
Male
Female
Total
8
39
10
59
58
4
41
6
220
2
27
10
31
10
23
27
17
87
66
84
1
263
21
13
5
2
361
10
49
12
6
32
116
66
25
126
76
143
1
Health	
321
25
54
11
2
581
Public Utilities _	
12
76
22
Public Works       ..                                                  	
37
42
139
93
Totals       	
575
1.211            I            1.7R6
Table 7.-
-Number of Casual Employees Appointed to Departments of Government from
January 1st to December 31st, 1956, according to Sex
Department
Male
Female
Total
Agriculture  —   - -
1
16
9
10
1
50
15
4
119
1
30
1
90
2
24
22
6
62
39
51
127
2
5
4
65
7
46
1
13
12
26
62
7
78
Education  —	
48
61
1
Health                                                      	
177
2
20
8
184
8
76
2
Public Works    .           	
103
14
50
84
Totals   	
395
528
923 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT GG 29
Table 8.—Number of Separations in 1956 according to Department of Government
Department
Superan-
uated
Resigned
Died
Dismissed
Finished
Transferred O.S.
Cancelled
1
6
2
8
1
4
3
12
1
7
5
1
6
26
133
84
156
1
452
21
62
11
1
725
17
114
1
23
54
48
153
146
4
1
4
1
3
1
3
4
14
9
2
4
2
4
5
12
45
16
2
28
1
6
46
6
13
1
13
5
15
8
2
7
1
1
10
1
4
Education  	
1
2
Fisheries   	
Health    	
9
Mines   	
1
Provincial Secretary   	
Public Utilities 	
12
1
3
2
1
1
Welfare  	
Forests  	
5
3
Totals	
57
2,228
14
42
222
28
46
Table 9.—Number of Civil Servants and Casual Employees Appointed to Departments of
Government from January 1st to December 31st, 1956, according to Certain Age Intervals as at December 31st, 1956.
Interval
Appointed during 1956
Male
Female
Total
113
148
144
132
125
104
87
74
52
17
25
3
469
394
245
185
172
149
87
56
31
16
1
5
582
542
26 to 30    ,,                 ..                   -          - 	
389
31 to 35    „                                      	
317
36 to 40    „                                                           ..                          	
297
41 to 45    „                                      —
253
46 to 50   „                  _ 	
174
51 to 55    „        	
130
56 to 60   „
83
61 to 64   „        	
33
26
8
Totals
1,024                   1,810                  2,834
301           1          528
829 GG 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 10.—Civil Service and Casual Employees Enrolment according to Certain
Age Intervals, as at December 31st, 1956
Interval
Civil Service and Casual Employees
Male
Female
Total
103
301
555
802
761
778
572
516
388
239
44
20
561
768
550
518
543
543
338
161
143
35
6
25
664
1,069
76 to 30    „
1,105
31 to 35    „
1,320
36 to 40    „                                          	
1,304
41 to 45    „                         	
1,321
46 to 50   „                       _          .   .
910
51 to 55    „            	
677
56 to 60   „       .. ..             	
531
61 to 64   „	
274
50
45
5,079
4,191
9,270
Table 11.—Salary Statistics
(Median salary, $250 per month;  average salary, $276 per month.)
Basic
lonthly Salary
$50-$100	
Number
of
Employees
          9
Percentage
of
Employees
0.09708
101- 150	
      520
5.60949
151- 200	
  1,500
16.18123
201- 250                   	
               2,769
29.87055
251- 300                  	
     1,739
18.75943
301- 350 	
     1,035
11.16504
351- 400     	
667
7.19525
401- 450                  	
          363
3.91586
451- 500                         	
        244
2.63214
501- 550       	
.               134
1.44552
551- 600     ...                         	
              77
0.83063
601- 650                   	
          95
1.02481
651- 700             	
            29
0.32283
701- 750     . -                        	
          52
0.56094
751- 800     	
        21
0.22653
801- 850         ..                       	
                 1
0.01078
851- 900                                  	
                   7
0.07551
901
8
0.08629
Totals	
  9,270
100.00991
Table 12.—Basic Monthly Salary Commitment according to Classification
Groups, as at December 31st, 1956
Group
Administrative (AD)
Clerical (CL)	
Manual (ML) 	
Executive (EX)	
Professional (PR) —
Technical (TE) 	
Number of
Employees
___     119
... 2,911
___ 1,323
16
... 1,654
... 3,247
Totals..
9,270
Total Amount of
Basic Salary
Involved
$53,263
630,560
311,063
14,400
653,338
897,084
$2,559,708 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
GG 31
Table 13.—Number of Male Veterans Appointed during the Period
January 1st, 1956, to December 31st, 1956
Veterans       274
Total males appointed      970
Percentage of veterans   28.25
Table 14.—Total Number of Male Veterans in Provincial Civil Service
Veterans 	
Total male employees ..
Percentage of veterans
2,764
5,079
54.42
Table 15.—Distribution of Appointments by Position Classification
Initiated and Tabulated in the Vancouver Office
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
Assistant Director,
School Radio Broadcasts
Audit Accountant	
Administrative Assistant
Bacteriologist 	
Barber 	
  1
  1
  1
  15
  1
Building Service Worker   50
  3
  87
  62
  16
  21
  6
Carpenter 	
Clerk—Grade 1 ....
Clerk—Grade 2 ...
Clerk—Grade 3 .....
Clerk, Junior	
Clerk, Senior	
Clerk-Stenographer-
Clerk-Typist 	
Cook 	
Deck-hand 	
Dentist 	
Deputy Fire Marshal
Dietician 	
-Grades 1 and 2.. 112
  69
  2
  4
  1
  1
  2
Draughtsman, Electrical  2
Draughtsman, Senior Electrical  4
Driver   1
Driver's Examiner   16
Engineer, Ferry  3
Engineer, Stationary   12
  3
  1
  1
  6
  4
  6
  3
Examiner of Titles, Senior
Ferry Captain 	
Forester Assistant
Gardener 	
Industrial Relations Officer
Inspector, Boiler	
Inspector, Credit Unions
Inspector, Dairy Barns       1
Inspector, Electrical             8
Inspector, Fire Marshal
Inspector, Gas
Inspector, Industrial Transport
Inspector, Pipe-lines
Instructor, Handicrafts	
Instructor, Resident, Jericho Hill
School	
Instructor, Travelling Unit	
Kitchen Helper (Male) 	
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
Laboratory Technician
Labourer 	
Laundress 	
Maid 	
Mate-Purser 	
Mechanical Maintenance Foreman
Mechanic 	
Mechanic, Business Machines
Nurse's Aide 	
Nurse, R.N.	
18
2
2
29
1
1
2
1
52
31
Occupational Therapist      3
Oiler        3
Operator, Office Equipment     12
Operator, Mobile X-ray Unit       2
Operator, Radio       1
Operator, Switchboard      3
Orderly      26
Outfits-maker and Glassware Cleaner..      3
Painter        8
Physiotherapist	
Pharmacist 	
Purser 	
  2
  2
  1
Physician, Resident  7
Senior Scaler  11
Scaling Supervisor  2
Scaling Dispatcher   2
Secretarial Stenographer   3
Stenographer, Legal
Social Worker—Grade 1
Social Worker—Grade 2
Stockman 	
Stockman, Animal 	
  2
  2
  1
  6
  4
Supervisor, Girls' Industrial School ... 8
Supervisor, Jericho Hill School   4
Teacher
Toll Collector __.
Toll Sergeant	
Towmotor Operator
Utility Man 	
Waitress	
Ward Assistant 	
Watchman t	
X-ray Assistant	
X-ray Technician 	
1
5
1
1
1
3
24
7
1
1 GG 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 16.—Distribution of Appointments by Position Classification
Initiated and Tabulated in the Essondale Office
1
2. Bacteriologist—Grade 2
3. Baker—Grade 2 	
4. Barber—Grade 1 	
Bacteriologist—Grade  1         4
3
1
1
16
3
1
1
1
7
14
2
2
1
13
5. Building Service Worker—Grade 1
6. Building Service Worker—Grade 2
7. Building Service Worker—Grade 3
8. Building Service Worker—Grade 4
9. Business Manager (Chief Clerk) ____
10. Carpenter 	
11. Clerk—Grade 1 	
12. Clerk—Grade 2 	
13. Clerk—Grade 3 	
14. Clerk, Junior	
15. Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 1 	
16. Clerk-Stenographer-
17. Clerk-Stenographer-
-Grade 2     16
-Grade 3       4
18. Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 4       2
19. Clerk-Typist 	
20. Clinical Director	
21. Cook—Grade 1 	
22. Cook—Grade 2	
23. Cook—Grade 3 	
24. Co-ordinator of Voluntary Workers
25. Dairyman, Head	
26. Dairyman 	
13
1
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
2
4
1
1
5
2
1
1
1
13
1
1
1
2
1
1
46. Housekeeper (Home Supervisor)      13
27. Dental Assistant—Grade 2
28. Dietician 	
29. Dietician Administrator	
30. Dining-room Steward	
31. Driver 	
32. Driver, Bus 	
33. Driver-Mechanic 	
34. Driver, Truck 	
35. Electrician 	
36
37
38
Electrician's Helper
Engineer, Assistant Chief Stationary .
Engineer, Maintenance	
39. Engineer, Stationary—Grade 2	
40. Engineer, Stationary—Grade 4	
41. Engineer, Stationary, Helper	
42. Electroencephalograph Technician 	
43. Gardener—Grade 1 	
44. Gardener—Grade 3 	
45. Hairdresser	
47. Housekeeper, New Vista
48. Industrial Therapist—Grade 1 _.
49. Industrial Therapist—Grade 2
50. Instructor, Handicrafts	
51. Instructor, Nurses—Grade 1 	
52. Instructor, Nurses—Grade 3	
53. Instructor, Recreational 	
54. Kitchen Helpers (Male) 	
55. Laundress—Grade 1	
56. Laundress—Grade 2       8
57. Laundry Helper—Grade 1        6
2
5
1
20
1
1
2
54
1
58. Laundryman—Grade 1 	
59. Laundryman—Grade 2 	
60. Meat-cutter, Chief 	
61. Meat-cutter, Assistant Chief
62. Meat-cutter	
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
90.
91.
92.
93.
94.
95.
96.
97.
98.
99.
100.
101.
102.
103.
104.
105.
106.
107.
108.
109.
110.
111.
112.
113.
114.
115.
116.
117.
118.
119.
Meat-cutter's Helper
1
2
1
1
30
Medical Superintendent—Grade 2
Medical Superintendent—Grade 3
Music Therapist 	
Nurse, Psychiatric (Male) 	
Nurse, Psychiatric (Female)    112
Nurse, Psychiatric, Assistant Charge
(Male)       13
Nurse, Psychiatric, Assistant Charge
(Female)      20
Nurse, Psychiatric, Charge (Male)....
Nurse, Psychiatric, Charge (Female)
Nurse, Psychiatric, Dining-room
(Male) 	
Nurse, Psychiatric, Dining-room,
Charge 	
Nurse, Head	
Occupational Therapist, Supervisor	
Occupational Therapist—Grade 1	
Occupational Therapist—Grade 2	
Operator, Switchboard—Grade 2 	
Physiotherapist 	
Psychiatric Aide (Male)
Psychiatric Aide (Female) 	
Psychologist, Clinical—Grade 1
Psychologist, Clinical—Grade 2
Psychologist, Clinical—Grade 3
Painter 	
Painter, Foreman 	
Pharmacy Student 	
Plasterer and Tile-setter
Plumber	
Plumber's Helper
Public Health Nurse	
Resident Physician—Grade 2
Sculleryman 	
Seamstress 	
Social Worker—Grade 2	
Social Worker—Grade 3 	
Social Worker—Grade 4	
Speech Therapist	
Specialist in Psychiatry	
Stenographer—Grade 1 	
Stenographer—Grade 2 	
Senior Stenographer	
Staff Nurse—Grade 1 	
Staff Nurse—Grade 2 	
Stockman, Cattle	
Stores—Grade
Stockman
Stockman
Stockman
Stockman
Stores—Grade
Stores—Grade
Stores—Grade
Superintendent of Nurses—Grade 1 __
Superintendent of Nurses—Grade 2 ._
Superintendent of Nurses—Grade 3 __
Supervisor, Dairy Herd 	
Upholsterer 	
Upholsterer, Assistant 	
Watchman 	
Watchman-Driver	
X-ray Technician—Grade 2 	
1
4
1
7
10
6
9
128
147
3
5
2
24
1
1
2
3
1
4
9
1
2
4
1
7
1
9
1
17
1
14
1
2
1
1
6
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
GG 33
Table 17.—■ Classification Reviews by Department in 1956 with Comparative
Figures for 1951, 1952,   1953, 1954, and 1955
1
CO
ll
ba °
C_T_ ■—
JEs! o
Dob.
Vi
a
o
">
u
■as
»!_.
1=3.2
Q on.
"j.
a s «
or;, o
'?'->£
u o _,
PJB..S
Upward Revisions
of Positions
Including Several
Employees
Downward Revisions
of Positions
Including Several
Employees
Reviews of Positions
Including Several
Employees Resulting in No Change
Reviews of Positions
Including a Number
of Employees in
Several Departments
o
H
12
41
31
83
2
36
77
9
60
5
25
71
7
1
62
3
1
57
9
3
1
4
2
3
1
1
2
1
8
2
1
17
1
25
11
11
1
13
2
13
12
19
3
6
1
14
2
2
1
8
..._.
3
1
6
3
	
13
61
46
109
2
Health .  ._   	
53
90
13
Highways   	
79
8
41
Forests   _ -
93
7
1
95
Public Utilities 	
6
Railways    	
1
68
10
Totals, 1956  _
Totals, 1955 __.__	
592
479
513
480
505
585
28
17
49
80
55
61
136
94
87
130
143
296
27
36
12
19
97
14
2
1
1
6
1
13
10
7
7
5
20
7
21
9
11
7
3
803
659
Totals, 1954      .
678
Totals, 1953
728
Totals, 1952 	
980
Totals, 1951	
708
Table 18.—Number of Employees by Length of Service in Five-year Steps,
as at December 31st, 1956
Interval
Male
Female
Total
723
1,636
1,494
387
280
118
90
32
3
4
2
310
1,282
1,948
562
172
72
31
31
7
4
1
2,005
3,584
6 to 10    „        	
2,056
11 to 15    „           	
559
16 to 20   „                                                 .    	
352
21 to 25    „    	
149
26 to 30    „      	
121
31 to 35    „      	
39
36 to 40    „                    	
7
41 to 45    „	
5
46 to 50    „        	
2
81
391
Totals	
5,079
4,191
9,270 GG 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 19.—Additions to and Deletions from Establishments
Department of Agriculture
Additions—
1 Inspector, Animal Brands.
5 Inspectors, Dairy Barns.
1 Agriculturist—Grade 2.
3 Agriculturist—Grade 3.
1 Inspector,  Dairy Herd Improvement
Association.
1 Laboratory Technician—Grade 3.
1 Inspector, Dairy—Grade 2.
1 Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 2.
1 Pathologist, Animal and Veterinary
Inspector, Assistant.
Department of Finance
Additions—
1 Buyer—Grade 1.
2 Clerks—Grade 2.
5 Accountants, Audit—Grade 1.
1 Clerk, Junior.
1 Office Equipment Operator—Grade 1.
2 Clerks—Grade 1.
1 Government Agent—Grade 1.
1 Stockman—Grade 2.
1  Building Service Worker—Grade 1.
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 2.
2 Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 2.
Department of Attorney-General
Additions—
4 Examiners of Drivers.
1 Examiner of Titles, Senior.
1 Departmental Solicitor, Assistant.
1 Inspector, Assistant Chief, Credit Unions.
1 Superintendent of Insurance and Real
Estate.
1 Registrar, Court—Grade 1.
1 Registrar, Land, Deputy—Grade 3.
1 Draughtsman—Grade 1.
4 Court Reporters—Grade 1.
6 Clerks—Grade 2.
1 Legal Stenographer.
1 Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 2.
1 Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 1.
1 Clerk-Typist—Grade 2.
3 Clerk-Typists—Grade  1.
1 Clerk, Junior.
Deletions—
2 Clerks—Grade 2.
1  Registrar, Land, Deputy—Grade 4.
Department of Education
Additions—
4 Clerk-Typists—Grade 1.
7 Clerks, Junior.
1 Librarian, Branch.
2 Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 2.
1 Clerk—Grade 2.
1 Clerk—Grade 1.
1 Teacher—Grade 2.
1 Librarian—Grade 1.
1 Supervisor—Grade 2.
1 Supervisor—Grade 1.
3 Ward Assistants.
Deletions—
2 Principals, Normal School.
2 Vice-Principals, Normal School.
20 Instructors, Normal School—Grade 3.
2 Instructors, Normal School—Grade 2.
1 Teacher—Grade 4.
2 Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 4.
1 Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 1.
1 Clerk—Grade 2.
1 Clerk, Junior.
Department of Fisheries
Additions—
1 Research Assistant—Grade 3.
1 Supervisor of Fisheries.
Deletions—
1 Deputy Minister.
1 Inspector of Fisheries.
Department of Health and Welfare
Additions—
6 Supervisors—Grade 1.
1 Nurse, Staff—Grade 2.
16 Public Health Nurses—Grade 1.
1 Public Health Nurse—Grade 2.
1 Laboratory Technician—Grade 3.
4 Laboratory Technicians—Grade 2.
2 Bacteriologists—Grade 3.
1 Bacteriologist—Grade 2.
1 Bacteriologist—Grade 1.
8 Ward Assistants.
1 Pharmacist—Grade 2.
4 Social Workers—Grade 2.
5 Inspectors, Sanitary—Grade 2.
1 Research Assistant—Grade 2.
6 Building Service Workers—Grade 1.
6 Building Service Workers—Grade 2.
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 4.
4 Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 2.
4 Clerk-Typists—Grade 1.
4 Clerks—Grade 1.
1 Clerk—Grade 2.
1 Clerk—Grade 3.
1 Driver.
1 Stockman—Grade 4.
1 Nurse's Aide.
Deletions—
1 Clerk—Grade 3.
1 Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 2.
1 Laboratory Technician—Grade 2.
1 X-ray Assistant.
1 Superintendent of Nurses—Grade 1.
1 Laundress—Grade 3.
2 Laundresses—Grade 2.
1 Laundress—Grade 1.
2 Dieticians.
15. Building Service Workers—Grade 1. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
GG 35
Table 19.—Additions to and Deletions from Establishments—Continued
Department of Highways
Additions—
2 Engineers, Design and Structural—
Grade 2.
1 Clerk—Grade 1.
4 Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 2.
3 Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 3.
1 Engineering Assistant—Grade  1.
1 Engineer, Resident—Grade 2.
2 Right-of-way Agents—Grade 1.
Deletions—
1 Deck-hand.
4 Foremen, Road Maintenance—Grade 3.
2 Foremen, Road Maintenance—Grade 1.
1  Power-grader Operator—Grade 2.
1 Stockman—Grade 4.
4 Mechanics—Grade 3.
1 Mechanic—Grade 4.
1 Mechanic—Grade 2.
1 Operator, Utility.
1 Operator,  Reaction  Ferries.
1 Tender, Bridge (Eburne).
1 Foreman, General.
1 Mate, Ferry—Grade 1.
1 Foreman, Road Maintenance—Grade 2.
Department of Labour
Additions—
1 Administrative Assistant—Grade 1.
1 Industrial Relations Officer—Grade 1.
Department of Lands and Forests
Additions—
1 Clerk, Chief.
1 Administrative Assistant—Grade 1.
1 Clerk—Grade 3.
3 Clerks—Grade 2.
6 Clerks—Grade 1.
2 Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 2.
3 Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 1.
1 Clerk-Typist—Grade 2.
3 Clerk-Typists—Grade 1.
1 Draughtsman, Senior.
2 Rangers, Forest—Grade 2.
4 Rangers, Forest—Grade 1.
2 Engineers, Assistant—Grade 2.
1 Engineer, Assistant—Grade 1.
1 Forester—Grade 1.
1 Forest Assistant—Grade 4.
4 Forest Assistants—Grade 3.
2 Forest Assistants—Grade 2.
4 Foresters-in-training.
2 Forester Assistants—Grade 2.
1 Investigator, Forest Products
Accounting.
1 Mechanic—Grade 5.
19 Scalers.
Deletions—
1 Clerk, Senior.
1 Clerk—Grade 2.
Department of Mines
Additions—
1 Technician, Petroleum.
1 Draughtsman, Junior.
1 Engineer, Petroleum—Grade 1.
1 Engineering Assistant—Grade 1.
1 Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 2.
Department of the Provincial Secretary
Additions—
1 Dietetics Administrator.
1 Dietetics Administrator, Assistant.
3 Dieticians—Grade 2.
10 Stockmen, Cattle.
2 Superintendents of Nurses—Grade 2.
1 Superintendent of Nurses—Grade 3.
3 Superintendents of Nurses—Grade 1.
5 Nurses, Psychiatric.
6 Nurses—Head.
14 Nurses, Staff—Grade 2.
11 Nurses, Staff—Grade 1.
3 Nurses, Psychiatric, Charge.
10 Nurses, Psychiatric, Assistant Charge.
26 Nurses, Psychiatric.
43 Psychiatric Aides.
1 Nurse, Psychiatric, Special.
1 Physiotherapist.
1 Social Worker—Grade 4.
24 Social Workers—Grade 3.
6 Occupational Therapists—Grade 1.
1 Occupational Therapist—Grade 2.
3 Laundry Helpers—Grade 2.
3 Laundry Helpers—Grade 1.
1 Laundress—Grade 1.
8 Laundresses—Grade 2.
1 Clinical Director.
4 Specialists in Psychiatry.
4 Physicians, Resident—Grade 2.
1 Superintendent, Medical—Grade 2.
1  Housekeeper, Hospital.
1 X-ray Technician—Grade 1.
1 Electroencephalograph Technician—
Grade 2.
1 Bacteriologist—Grade 2.
1 Psychologist, Clinical—Grade 3.
1 Psychologist, Clinical—Grade 2.
2 Drivers, Truck (Institutions).
1 Hairdresser.
14 Kitchen Helpers.
2 Cooks—Grade 3.
2 Cooks—Grade 2.
6 Cooks—Grade 1.
1 Driver-Mechanic.
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 4.
2 Building Service Workers—Grade 2.
6 Building Service Workers—Grade 1.
1 Stockman—Grade 2.
1  Clerk, Chief.
1 Clerk, Senior.
4 Clerks—Grade 1.
1 Clerk—Grade 2.
1 Clerk, Junior.
1 Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 3. GG 36                                                      BRITISH
COLUMBIA
Table 19.—Additions to and Deletions from Establishments—Continued
Additions—Continued
Deletions—
5 Clerk-Stenographers—Grade 2.
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 1.
1 Instructor, Handicrafts.
1 Operator, Switchboard—Grade 2.
Deletions—
Department of Railways
1 Dietician, Chief.
3 Milkers.
Additions—
1 Instructor, Psychiatric Nursing (Male).
1 Administrative Assistant—Grade 1.
1 Nurse, Psychiatric, Chief—Grade 1.
Deletions—
1 Nurse, Psychiatric, Supervisor.
1 Draughtsman—Grade 2.
2 Nurses, Psychiatric, Charge.
12 Nurses, Psychiatric, Assistant, Charge.
4 Superintendents of Nurses—Grade 1.
Department of Trade and Industry
3 Nurses, Head.
Additions—
1 Dietician—Grade 1.
1 Cook, Chief.
1 Field Representative.
1 Research Assistant—Grade 1.
1 Cook—Grade 5.
1 Cook—Grade 3.
1 Clerk-Typist—Grade 1.
1 Clerk—Grade 3.
1 Cook—Grade 2.
1 Cook—Grade 1.
Deletions—
Nil.
6 Kitchen Helpers.
2 Occupational Therapists—Grade 1.
2 Building Service Workers—Grade 1.
1  Intermediate Clerk—Grade 2.
Positions Transferred from One Department
to Another
Public Utilities Commission
Additions—
Nil.
Deletions—
1 Superintendent,  Motor Carrier  Branch,
Deputy.
Department of Public Works
Additions—
1 Gardener—Grade 1.
2 Inspectors, Gas.
4 Inspectors, Electrical—Grade 1.
1 Carpenter.
3 Building Service Workers—Grade 1.
1 Inspector, Boiler.
Transferred from Department of Health and
Welfare to Department of Provincial Secretary—
1 Supervisor, Psychiatric Social Work.
2 Supervisors of Welfare—Grade 1.
9 Social Workers—Grade 4.
22 Social Workers—Grade 3.
9 Social Workers—Grade 2.
Transferred   from   Department   of   Lands   and
Forests to Department of Agriculture—
1 Commissioner, Dyking.
1 Commissioner, Dyking, Deputy.
2 Clerks, Senior.
1 Clerk-Stenographer—Grade 2.
1 Inspector, Land Settlement Board.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1957
260-457-7323

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