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Department of Trade and Industry REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1956 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1957

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Trade
and Industry
REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1956
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1957  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the year ended December 31st, 1956.
EARLE C. WESTWOOD,
Minister of Trade and Industry. The Honourable Earle C. Westwood,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the year ended December 31st, 1956.
THOMAS L. STURGESS,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
J Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
For the Year Ended December 31st, 1956
The activities of the Department of Trade and Industry detailed in the following
pages of this Report encompass a year when practically all economic indicators reached
all-time highs in British Columbia.
Such well-known indicators as retail sales, cheques cashed, life insurance sales,
electric power consumed, employment, income, and production all showed increases over
the previous year, which had also been one of high economic activity.
Undoubtedly one of the highlights of business activity has been the tremendous
capital-investment programme. There have been vast capital investments in British
Columbia during the past few years, but investment this year reached a new high, with
about $1,200,000,000 being invested in new industries and the expansion and repair of
existing industry. Another noteworthy feature of this expansion has been its diversity
as regards area and type of industry. These large-scale investments have covered primary and extractive basic industries, secondary or manufacturing industries, and tertiary
or service industries. These investments have been widely spread throughout the Province, with considerable investments noted in northern areas. The economy of British
Columbia, in other words, has shown a tremendous growth and is becoming a more
mature economy, whereby it is not dependent on its extractive industries alone nor upon
employment in one area for its economic health. The vast road programme, coupled with
the extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, has materially assisted in the development of regional areas.
British Columbia consumers have contributed to a record year by pushing retail
sales to an all-time high of over $1,550,000,000. Employment reached new highs, wages
showed a moderate increase, and the cost-of-living increased slightly.
Both exports and imports continued to increase, with exports reaching an estimated $770,115,000 and imports about $528,891,000. While the total value of exports
increased, the value of wood and wood products exported decreased. Dollar shortages,
high shipping rates, and increased foreign competition have combined to make our
traditional United Kingdom market a difficult one for British Columbia exporters. The
non-metallic mineral exports showed the greatest increase over 1955 figures. The
increase in exports of crude petroleum and asbestos milled fibres were responsible for
most of this increase. An increase in the exports of iron ore, lead, zinc, copper, and
aluminium was noticed during 1956. The value of our exports to the United States and
Japan showed substantial increases, while our exports to the United Kingdom declined
materially. Almost all categories of imports showed increases during 1956. The growth
in business activity, especially in the construction, manufacturing, and engineering classifications, called for increases in imports of structural steel, construction and industrial
machinery. The value of our imports for the first seven months of 1956 increased from
the United Kingdom 57 per cent, the United States 53 per cent, and from Japan 136 per
cent over the 1955 figures.
In the transportation field the notable developments have been the completion of
the Pacific Great Eastern Railway from North Vancouver to Prince George and its continued development toward Fort St. John and Dawson Creek, the extensive bridge and
highway programme, and the progress of the gas pipe-line from the Peace River area to
Vancouver.
There were also noteworthy developments in the electric power industry to take care
of the rapid expansion taking place in British Columbia.   The Aluminum Company of Y 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Canada has added 150,000 horse-power to its installed capacity during 1956. The
British Columbia Electric Company Limited has added some 88,000 horse-power, and
the British Columbia Power Commission has added 51,500 horse-power to its capacity.
The research and statistical staff of the Department has been active in providing an
economic research, data collection, and tabulation service for business and industry and
Government departments, in addition to the preparation of periodic reports.
Many inquiries were handled for business, industry, other governments, and individuals, and the volume of industrial establishment and trade inquiries dealt with by the
Department shows no signs of slackening. As far as possible, all industrial promotion
techniques, including advertising, have been employed.
The tourist industry enjoyed another good year, marked by increased travel by
residents of other Provinces to British Columbia and sustained travel within the Province
by our own residents. The standard of accommodation is rising year by year, and this,
in combination with good food, good roads, and good service, will increase the goodwill
British Columbia now enjoys. Every opportunity was taken to publicize the Province
through the media of articles, advertising, pamphlets, and films. The foregoing activities
of the Department are detailed in the following pages of this Report.
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
The Minister of Trade and Industry, in his capacity as Chairman of the Board of
Management of the British Columbia Research Council, presided at regular meetings of
the Board during the year.
The broad objectives of the British Columbia Research Council are to provide
scientific and technical services not otherwise available to the industry of the Province
and to conduct basic studies leading to the establishment of new industries and the
development of the natural resources of British Columbia. In order to meet these
objectives the Research Council, through its laboratories, provides a wide range of
services and facilities to industries of all types. The work carried out by the Council
generally falls into a number of categories:—
(1) Fundamental or Basic Research.
(2) Product and Process Research and Development.
(3) Industrial Trouble-shooting.
(4) Specialized Testing.
(5) Approvals Testing.
(6) Economic Research and Industrial Survey Studies Related to Scientific
and Technical Developments.
During the year the Council completed a new wing of the laboratory building,
increasing the floor area to approximately 28,000 square feet. One floor of the new wing
is devoted entirely to a new gas-approvals testing laboratory. This laboratory, which was
equipped through a special grant from the Provincial Department of Public Works, is the
best-equipped laboratory of its kind in Canada at the present time, and as a result
British Columbia manufacturers are placed in a very favourable position to secure
approvals on newly developed gas-burning equipment and appliances.
The growing importance of the work of the Research Council is indicated by the
fact that the volume of project work for industry showed a healthy growth again in 1956.
The Research Council continues to make a significant contribution to the industrial
development of the Province.
The Board of Management of the Research Council consists of the following:—
The Honourable Earle Cathers Westwood, Minister of Trade and Industry of
the Province of British Columbia, Victoria, B.C. (Chairman).
G. S. Allen, Dean, Faculty of Forestry, University of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C. REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956
Y 7
P. R. Bengough, 3292 West Tenth Avenue, Vancouver 8, B.C.
J. K. Clarke, Assistant to the Manager, Buckerfield's Limited, foot of Rogers
Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.
P. E. Cooper, Director, Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited, 1386 Nicola Street,
Vancouver 5, B.C.
Ian McTaggart-Cowan, Head, Department of Zoology, University of British
Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
K. G. Fensom, Superintendent, Forest Products Laboratory, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Aird Flavelle, Director, Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd., 566 Hornby
Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
M. J. Foley, President, Powell River Company Limited, 510 West Hastings
Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
S. J. Hammitt, President, Vancouver Rolling Mills Limited, 490 South-east
Marine Drive, Vancouver 15, B.C.
W. C. Koerner, President, Alaska Pine and Cellulose Limited,  1111 West
Georgia Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
R. B. McDonell, General Manager, McDonell Metal Manufacturing Company
Limited, 1250 Boundary Road, Vancouver 6, B.C.
William MacGillivray, Deputy Minister of Agriculture, Province of British
Columbia, Victoria, B.C.
A. W. H. Needier, Director, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries Research
Board of Canada, Nanaimo, B.C.
H. L. Purdy, Executive Vice-President, British Columbia Electric Company
Limited, 425 Carrall Street, Vancouver 4, B.C.
R. V. Robinson, Manager, British Columbia Division, Canadian Manufacturers
Association, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
E. G. Rowebottom, 2631 Cavendish Street, Victoria, B.C.  (Honorary Life
Member).
C. A. Rowles, Department of Agronomy, University of British Columbia,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
G. M. Shrum, Director, British Columbia Research Council, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
T. L. Sturgess, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry, Province of British
Columbia, Victoria, B.C.
J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines, Province of British Columbia, Victoria, B.C.
Paul Walrod, General Manager, B.C. Tree Fruits Limited and B.C. Fruit
Processors Limited, 1165 Ethel Street, Kelowna, B.C.
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON
Grateful acknowledgment is made of the fine spirit of co-operation tendered to this
Department by Mr. W. A. McAdam, C.M.G., Agent-General for British Columbia at
London, and by all of his staff.
During the year, the Industrial and Trade Representative, Mr. H. F. E. Smith,
formerly a member of the staff of this Department attached to British Columbia House,
was transferred to the Agent-General's staff. For some years Mr. Smith reported his
activities in the Annual Report of this Department.
Industrial, trade, and settlement inquiries are dealt with in considerable volume
between the two offices. Toward the end of the year British Columbia House reported
an unprecedented demand for information on this Province and was supplied with extra
stocks of literature prepared by this Department. Y 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
During 1956 British Columbia House provided facilities for 816 showings of British
Columbia films to a total audience of 72,570.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
This office is responsible for the promotion of new industrial and commercial enterprises throughout the Province. Special attention is provided to industries seeking new
plant locations, with specific information being furnished on planned industrial sites zoned
for exclusive industrial uses. Assistance is also given to established businesses when
required, and promotion of the domestic and export trade is practised.
This work is carried out in co-operation with other Provincial Government departments, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce, the
British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, industrial commissions, railway industrial agents, and foreign trade representatives in Canada and
overseas.
NEW INDUSTRIES AND PRODUCTS
The year 1956 was one of accelerating activity in every phase of industrial expansion.
Many new industries reported as under way in 1955 commenced operation during the
year, and construction began on numerous other projects. This amazingly large and
varied expansion programme took place not only in our densely populated areas, but also
in all sections of the Province, thus bringing about a gradual but much-required decentralization of industry in British Columbia. In addition to the establishment of new
industries in our Province, our economy was further rounded out by startling expansions
in the pulp and paper industry, by construction of the natural-gas line from the Peace
River, by the increase in building construction, by extension of the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway, and by the unabated development of hydro-electric and diesel-electric projects.
The $15,000,000 mill at Duncan Bay—mentioned as under way in last year's Report—
commenced operation with an initial capacity of 400 tons daily. This completed the first
phase of a $29,500,000 expansion programme, with the remaining portion to be completed in 1957. The same company also constructed a large plant in Richmond Municipality for the production of paper-board boxes, gummed tape, fruit-wrap paper, paper
bags, and table napkins. This new factory covers an area of 81/. acres, and is the largest
plant of its kind in Western Canada. Other developments in the pulp and paper field
included a $63,000,000 newsprint, kraft pulp, paper, and paper-board plant under way
at Port Alberni on Vancouver Island, and the commencement of construction of a
$36,000,000 sulphate-pulp mill, also on the Island at Crofton, near Duncan.
The laying of the multi-million-dollar gas pipe-line from the Peace River of the
Province was well under way during the year, and gas should be flowing through this pipe
late in 1957. Construction of a $23,000,000 artery, to carry natural gas to the Okanagan
and Interior points, also proceeded at a rapid pace.
The increase in building construction continued throughout the Province, with the
values of permits soaring above that of 1955. Construction in the Greater Vancouver
area alone was over $86,000,000, making this figure an all-time high.
Capital investments in new hydro-electric, thermal gas, and diesel-electric projects
amounted to several million dollars. These additional installations were necessary to
meet the challenging requirements of our expanding industries. Some of the new projects
announced and under way during the year included a $43,000,000 British Columbia
Electric expansion programme for the addition of four new generators at Bridge River,
the construction of a second 2^-mile tunnel through Mission Mountain, and the building
of a new power station about one-half mile from the present plant. The $25,000,000
7-mile Cheakamus Tunnel, to harness an additional 190,000 horse-power, was well under
way and should be completed in 1957. The British Columbia Power Commission commenced construction on a $13,000,000 gas-turbine generating station near Chemainus on REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956 Y 9
Vancouver Island, to develop an additional 100,000 horse-power for Island industries.
When completed this plant will be the largest of its type in the world, and will supplement
hydro sources on the Island during peak-load times. Construction of a similar plant by
the British Columbia Electric Company, costing $7,000,000, was also under way for the
Mainland area. During the year a new underwater cable, with a capacity of 120,000
volts, was laid between the Mainland and Vancouver Island, bringing still more power
to the industries on the Island.
Further signs of diversification and rounding-out of our economy were evident with
the myriad of other new industries that commenced operation or were under construction
at the year's close. Some of these included a $2,000,000 fir-plywood plant at New
Westminster with an annual production of 40,000,000 square feet, a plant manufacturing structural glued laminated beams and arches, and erection of a plywood plant near
Kelowna employing 150 men.
In the field of electronics, two new plants representing an investment of approximately $500,000 were opened in Vancouver and Burnaby. At Dawson Creek a new
$2,000,000 refinery went on stream in May, and contracts were let at Fort St. John for
construction of an $18,000,000 natural-gas absorption plant, which will remove sulphur,
propane, butane, and other valuable by-products from natural gas. The $1,000,000
plant at Marpole, mentioned as under way in 1955, went into production during the year
manufacturing an additive from hemlock bark for rock-drilling. This plant will serve
oil and gas fields in Western Canada, the United States, and other markets. The demand
for greater and greater quantities of cement resulted in two companies announcing their
expansion plans. Construction of a large cement-manufacturing plant by French interests
on Lulu Island, involving $14,000,000, was under way, while a Vancouver Island cement
firm commenced work on a site on the Mainland for the erection of a million-dollar
distributing warehouse.
Completing this picture of unprecedented industrial expansion in 1956 were the
reports that a basic steel-smelting industry was proposed for the Lower Mainland, and
a $3,500,000 copper plant was proposed to be constructed in the Greater Vancouver
area for the manufacture of copper tubing and allied products.
BRANCH-PLANT INQUIRIES
During the year under review there was a considerable increase over 1955 in the
number of branch-plant inquiries. These were received from Eastern Canada, United
States, England, and Europe, and many of them were the result of the continued selective
mailing programme carried out by this office. Response to letters directed to special
contacts was most gratifying, with the west coast of the United States showing much more
interest in our economic activity than in past years. United States firms requesting information on British Columbia included a large paint and glass manufacturer, a manufacturer of chemicals, men's apparel, wire-manufacturers, paper cups, and a manufacturer
of valves for oil pipe-lines. Interest was shown by German firms in the manufacturing
of stockings and printing-ink. Eastern Canada contacts provided inquiries on the possibility of setting up branch plants, warehouses, and agencies. These included inquiries
from manufacturers of automatic screws, paints and varnishes, sporting-goods equipment,
and woollen, asbestos, and cotton driers. Inquiries from England requested information
on the possibility of manufacturing weighing-machines, aluminium fabrication, and the
manufacture of mercuric oxide and chloride for use in our paper, paint, and leather
industries. Personal contact with manufacturers was carried out when possible during
the year. At the close of the California State Fair, the Industrial Commissioner spent
a week in the San Francisco area making contacts. Several firms requested data on
British Columbia, with two companies in particular expressing a keen interest in establishing branch plants. Y 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CALIFORNIA STATE FAIR AND EXPOSITION
For the first time, British Columbia was represented by an exhibit at the California
State Fair, held in Sacramento from August 29th to September 9th. This fair is the fifth
largest of its type in the United States, and has been running for 102 years. The attendance for the twelve days totalled 823,887, with well over 500,000 visiting the Counties
Building, where fifty-eight counties' displays were located, as well as the exhibits of ten
foreign countries. Foreign countries exhibiting were Canada (British Columbia and
Alberta), United Kingdom, Sweden, Pakistan, Germany, India, Korea, Finland, Japan,
and Denmark. Free exhibiting space of 40 by 14 feet was shared between British Columbia and Alberta. Our display featured large mounted photographs depicting the Province's major industries (see picture).    Centring the exhibit was a large plywood map,
8 by 6 feet, indicating a wide range of information from natural resources, transportation
facilities, and geographical features. Coloured slides, both industrial and tourist, were
shown daily from 10 a.m. until 10 p.m. through the use of a projectograph. On International Day, Governor Goodwin Knight of California paid a personal visit to the British
Columbia and Alberta exhibits. A substantial supply of literature was distributed,
including our " Invitation to Industry," " Facts and Statistics," " Trade Index," and
tourist pamphlets. Great interest was shown in our exhibit, with hundreds of requests
received for information on travel, settlement, business opportunities, and industrial
development in British Columbia. With its large attendance and the fact that approximately 14,000,000 people reside in the State of California, it would seems that this fair
is one of the best mediums for advertising the potentialities of our Province. The exhibit
was manned by a member of this office, ably assisted by British Columbia's representative
in San Francisco. REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956 Y  11
COMPOSITE INDUSTRIAL MAP OF THE LOWER MAINLAND
The demand for this map during the past year has been extremely heavy. Requests
for copies were received from manufacturers and industrial planning associates throughout
Canada and the United States.
The map proved most useful in answering inquiries on establishment of branch
plants in the Vancouver metropolitan area, as it indicates at a glance the occupied and
zoned areas for heavy and light industry. Numerous requests for copies were received
from real-estate firms, with some firms purchasing twenty-five to fifty copies at a time.
The map can be purchased for $1 per copy, which includes the 5-per-cent social
services tax.
HANDICRAFT DIRECTORY
Distribution of the 1955 Directory was continued through the year to retail and
wholesale firms, resorts, and other outlets. The Department received several reports of
sales being made through listings appearing in this Directory, and also received many
additional inquiries from new handicraft producers requesting their names and products
be listed in the next edition. Contact was maintained as usual with Eastern Canadian
Provinces interested in handicraft development, and with the District Weavers' Guild
Exhibition held in London, Ont., for the fifth year. Plans are under way for the Seventh
Directory to be published in 1957.
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
The British Columbia Industrial Design Committee was active during the year in
working with designers and manufacturers in promoting good design throughout the
Province. The Committee also made arrangements for several lectures on industrial
design, with prominent speakers from the United Kingdom, United States, and Canada
taking part.
Assistance was also given to the Vancouver Art Gallery, which sponsored a Design
Fair from January 24th to February 19th. The fair consisted of four shows on industrial
design, featuring (1) Good Design in Aluminium, (2) New French Designs, (3) The
Streets We Live In, and (4) Toys.
The British Columbia Industrial Design Committee includes representation from
the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce, Provincial Department of Trade and
Industry, University of British Columbia, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver Board of Trade, Vancouver School of Art, and the British Columbia Research Council.
REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
During the year the field representatives located at Nelson and Victoria continued
their close co-operation with industrial establishments, research groups, Boards of Trade
and Chambers of Commerce, and other agencies engaged in the industrial expansion of
the Province of British Columbia.
The regions covered by the fieldmen from the Field Service offices are as follows:
Regions One and Two (East and West Kootenay), Region Three (Okanagan), and
Region Six (Kamloops and South Central British Columbia), covered by the Nelson
office; Region Four (Lower Mainland), Region Five (Vancouver Island and Gulf
Islands), and Region Seven (Central Mainland Coast), covered by the Victoria office.
Committees of several Boards of Trade were assisted in preparing special industrial
and tourist brochures for their respective areas. Numerous business and industrial
inquiries were handled by the regional offices during the year, and close contact was
maintained with the British Columbia Research Council by the channelling of many
inquiries to that organization. Y 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The field representatives assisted in arrangements for regional visits of Commonwealth trade representatives and members of the British Columbia Research Council.
The continued co-operation received from Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce,
industrial establishments, research groups, and all other agencies interested in the field
of regional development was appreciated by the Department and was of great value to
the field representatives.
PUBLIC RELATIONS, ITINERARIES, AND INTRODUCTIONS
This field has again proved to be one of the more important functions of the Industrial and Trade Office. Assistance has been given under six main headings where the
Industrial Commissioner or the Administrative Assistant has been actively concerned:—
(1) Itineraries and other arrangements for business visitors from Eastern
Canada and overseas.
(2) Arrangements for visits of commodity officers and other officials from
Ottawa, Department of Commerce, and for tours of Federal Trade Commissioners from different parts of the world.
(3) Arrangements for visits from teams of Immigration Officers, Ottawa,
Department of Immigration and Citizenship, on tour of industries prior
to overseas postings.
(4) Co-operation with United Kingdom and other trade missions. Practical
assistance has been given in their surveys and itineraries.
(5) Arrangements for visits of diplomatic representatives, Department of
External Affairs Officials, and High Commissioners of Commonwealth
countries, or their staffs.
(6) Co-operation with local consular corps and with offices in Commonwealth
and foreign governments. Special reference is made to the happy and
effective basis of co-operation maintained with the Vancouver consular
corps.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN
This Bulletin has now completed seven years of publication and has proved to be
a worth-while contribution to the commercial life of the Province. It reports trade inquiries, licence manufacturing opportunities, new products, publications, manufacturing
news, and other information of interest to importers, jobbers, manufacturers, Boards of
Trade, and similar agencies. As a check on the acceptability of the Bulletin, a reply card
was included with the February Bulletin asking recipients to advise if they wished to be
kept on the mailing-list. The percentage of " yes " replies returned was very gratifying.
At present some 400 copies are sent out.
Many of the trade inquiries originate with the Industrial and Trade Representative
at British Columbia House, London. The majority of United Kingdom firms interested
in this market are seeking suitable agents to represent their products in British Columbia.
Other trade inquiries are received from the local consular corps in Vancouver and
by direct contact with foreign manufacturers.
Opportunities for licence manufacture are received through the co-operation of the
Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, and include the manufactures of many
foreign countries.
The Department appreciates the co-operation of the Journal of Commerce in reprinting the Trade and Industry Bulletin as a public service feature.
EXPORT SURVEYS
During the past year this office, in co-operation with the western representative of
the Department of Trade and Commerce and the B.C. Products Bureau of the Vancouver REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956
Y 13
Board of Trade, has undertaken a survey of secondary industries in the Province to ascertain what products could be exported to foreign markets. So far some 100 firms have
been visited, and lists of products available for export have been forwarded to Canadian Government Trade Commissioners all over the world.
At the present time, markets are being sought for electronic equipment, cellophane
bags, roof trusses, hydraulic and pneumatic machinery, portable sawmills, and specialized
chemicals.
It is the Department's intention to continue this service, and it is hoped a greater
volume of products from our secondary industries will find their way into overseas
markets.
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS' TRADE AND INDUSTRY COUNCIL
This organization is composed of representatives from the ten Canadian Provincial
industrial and trade promotion departments. Associated with the Provincial representatives in this co-ordinated effort to develop industry and encourage trade are other agencies,
including the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce, the banks, transportation
companies, and other interested industrial and trade promotion groups.
This Council is active throughout the year and meets in convention once each year.
In 1956 Prince Edward Island was the host Province, and it is expected that the annual
meeting will be held in British Columbia in 1957. A current project of the Council is the
stimulation of production in Canada of goods presently being imported. This is being
done in co-operation with all Provinces, the Federal Government, and associations composed of manufacturers in Canada.
INDUSTRIAL ADVERTISING
A programme of industrial advertising was again put under way in the closing
months of 1956 to carry over in the first quarter of 1957. A new field has been tapped
in this advertising in that publications in West Germany, The Netherlands, France, and
Italy have been used, and copy has been prepared in the language of the country concerned. An expanded campaign has been carried out in the United Kingdom, and, in
addition, leading publications in the United States and Canada are being used in this
campaign.   An illustration of one of the advertisements is shown in this Report.
In addition and throughout the year, industrial and trade promotion advertising has
been placed in special issues of trade and other publications. Y 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
->
X5> «
Since 19af a billion dollars in
new industries
During the past two years
some of the ranking industries
of Europe and North America
have selected British Columbia
for new plant location . . .
representing a total industrial
investment exceeding 1 billion dollars.
New industries build opportunities
for  others.  For industrial information
on British Columbia, write:
Department of Trade and Industry,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., Canada.
Hon. E. C. Westwood, Minister.
T. L. Sturgess, Deputy Minister. REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956
Y 15
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics during 1956, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is, as its name
implies, a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is to
provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into economic
questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and compile economic
statistics of interest to the Province.
In order to carry out these objectives, the Bureau is divided into the following
divisions: Economic Research, Trade and Transportation, Market Research, Statistical,
and Mechanical Tabulation. To ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured
to follow the policy of building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who can
be relied upon to perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been the
policy to make the services of the technical personnel continuously available to all other
departments of the Government.
Since other Governmental agencies are also concerned with the collection of statistics,
a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication has been
arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, Provincial Secretary, and Health and Welfare. During 1956 the essential statistical services performed
for the other Provincial departments, as well as for the Department of Trade and Industry,
were maintained. Before proceeding with a description of the services performed by the
various divisions during the year, a brief review of business activity in British Columbia
is presented.
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Business and economic activity in British Columbia reached an all-time high during
1956 according to preliminary economic indicators. While economic activity in the
primary industries was not much higher in total than during 1955, activity in the secondary
industries continued to show spectacular growth.
Increases were noticed in production, employment, consumer expenditures, and
capital investment.
Incomplete returns indicate the net value of production of primary and secondary
industries amounted to some $1,527,000,000 in 1955, compared with $1,330,261,000
in 1954 and $1,320,534,000 in 1953. Y 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Economic Indicators in British Columbia
CONSUMER   PRICES
^^
j 1949  =   100 |
WHOLESALE    PRICES
225
W   15°
5
|1935-1939   =   100 |
1940 2942 1944
1946 1948 1950
YEARS
1952 1954 1956 1940 1942 1944
1950 1952 1954 1956
BUILDING   PERMITS
AVERAGE WEEKLY WACES
J.
f
7
I
f
7*
7
J_
_£*>—*./
T
7
^7
--</'
1940 1942 1944 1946 1948 1950 1952 1954 1956 1940 1942 1944 1946 1948 1950 195 2 1954 1956
YEARS YEARS
1956 Figures Subject to Re REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956
Economic Indicators in British Columbia
Y 17
15.0
13.5
12.0
Z 10-5
O
H   9.0
u.
o
»    7.5
! ..o
3 4.5
3.0
1.5
0
FREIGHT
LOADED
/
1942-    1944       1946       1948        1950
YEARS
1952       1954       1956
RETAIL TRADE
1600
1500
/
/
/
/
1300
/
/
5 1200
/
Q
t^. 1000
0
z
J
600
X
5
4
3
2
BANK DEBITS
/
0
9
8
7
6
5
/
160
140
120
100
1942  1944  1946  1948   1950
YEARS
EMPLOYMENT
1952   1954  1956
1949   -    100  |
1942  1944  1946  1948   1950  1952   1954  1956
YEARS
1940   1942  1944  1946  1948   1950  1952   1954  1956
YEARS
CONSUMPTION OF ELECTRICAL. POWER
6.0
4.5
3.0
1.5
320
SALES OF LIFE INSURANCE
280
i
1
Z40
i
i
200
1
/
160
y
/
120
80
40
1940   1942  1944  1946  1948   1950  1952   1954  1956
YEARS
1940   1942  1944  1946  1948   1950  1952   1954  1956
YEARS
1956 Figures Subject to Revision Y  18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1954, 1955, and 1956
Unit or
Base
Period
1956
Preliminary
Estimates
1955
1954
Mining—
Total value of production-
Gold production-
Silver production	
Copper production-
Lead production	
Zinc production-
Coal production	
Forestry—
Total value of production-
Timber scaled	
Lumber production	
Paper production	
Fisheries—
Total value of production-
Pack of canned salmon	
Agriculture—
Total value of production-
Apples—
Total shipments-
Domestic shipments-
Export shipments	
External trade—
Exports of canned salmon-
Exports of planks and boards, Douglas fir-
Exports of red-cedar shingles 	
Internal trade—
Total retail sales  	
Department stores	
Motor-vehicle dealers..
Gasoline consumed	
Railway freight loaded in British Columbia-
Consumption of electric power	
Sales of life insurance	
Construction—
New residential units completed	
Building permits issued	
Finance—Bank debits...
Tourist trade—Auto entries on sixty-day permit-
Employment—
All employment  	
Manufacturing-
Iron and steel products-
Lumber products	
Pulp and paper 	
Mining-
Logging	
Construction..
Communication-
Transportation—
Services	
Trade	
Salaries and wages...
Mb.m.
M b.m.
Tons
$
Cases
Boxes
Boxes
Boxes
Cwt.
Mft.
Sq.
$000
$000
$000
Gals.
Tons
000 kwh.
$000
Units
$000
$000
Number
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
$
190,000,000
6,800,000
8,500,000
17,000,000
46,000,000
59,000,000
9,950,000
628,586,963
6,307,319
4,793,122
708,016
67,522,000
1,112,830
125,000,000
323,038
1,526,562
1,959,352
1,557,207
209,669
342,764
277,572,000
14,500,000
6,422,673
307,223
14,990
253,893
15,231,473
282,926
120.9
125.9
147.9
125.6
143.5
97.2
100.5
138.6
151.4
116.3
123.3
113.8
1,400,000,000
174,710,606
8,587,920
6,942,113
16,932,549
45,161,245
52,048,909
8,986,501
631,699,562
6,109,202
4,914,285
688,873
60,668,000
1,406,100
127,018,693
4,128,691
2,090,220
2,038,471
455,920
1,784,910
2,470,903
1,411,640
189,220
301,186
246,763,000
14,194,840
5,895,502
251,566
14,034
230,545
12,812,854
283,469
111.3
118.3
120.7
124.2
141.3
95.0
97.9
105.2
144.2
110.7
111.2
107.8
1,216,605,269
153,383,860
9,042,246
8,153,108
14,599,693
45,482,505
34,805,755
9,154,544
528,022,783
5,567,423
4,378,695
647,119
70,071,000
1,742,736
132,220,588
4,808,306
2,799,564
2,008,742
702,261
1,537,160
2,285,907
1,249,499
173,960
237,079
220,679,669
12,359,945
5,209,683
198,311
9,158
164,840
11,956,325
278,376
106.2
109.2
109.2
112.6
137.2
92.5
91.3
106.9
145.7
110.6
102.4
103.0
1,107,897,363
L REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956
Y 19
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savnoa do snoitiiw Y 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ECONOMIC RESEARCH DIVISION
One of the major functions of this Division is to provide economic counsel to the
Government. On a general basis this is done through the medium of a weekly report
sent to the Premier's Office and to the Minister of each department. The report contains
a review of economic events which are considered to be of particular significance to the
Province. The report also contains an article illustrating trends in our economy.
A section of statistical information is included, which provides a current summary of
business indicators.
In addition to providing general economic data, as described above, the Economic
Research Division also prepares reports on special subjects for many branches of the
Government. Technical assistance of this nature has been given in the past year to the
following branches: Department of Labour, Department of Finance, the Hospital Insurance Commission, and the Civil Service Commission.
This Division prepares various publications designed to keep government and industry informed on current business conditions within the Provincial economy. Three widely
distributed publications of this nature are the Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity, the
Quarterly Bulletin of Economic Conditions in British Columbia, and the Annual Summary
of Business Activity. The monthly publication contains a brief description of current
changes in monthly business indicators, such as production, trade, and employment.
Statistical tables and charts, including a table showing the imports and exports through
British Columbia customs ports, supplement the text of each issue. The quarterly publication is a commentary on changes in economic conditions for each quarter of the year.
The annual publication is a record of the past year's performance. In addition to providing a description of recent progress in business and industrial endeavour, it contains
numerous charts and historical series illustrating business growth.
A number of requests for information dealing with the Provincial economy have
been received during the past year from private individuals, corporations, trade-unions,
newspapers, business publications, and Boards of Trade. In some cases such inquiries
call for the provision of statistical information readily available from our files and library.
In other cases they require lengthy tabulations and a considerable amount of research.
The helpful co-operation of the staff of the Provincial Library and other departments of
the Government is worthy of mention in this regard.
The annual study of wage rates in the metropolitan areas of Vancouver and Victoria
was again prepared. This year the survey was extended to include centres in the northern
and southern areas of the Province. A questionnaire was sent to all large firms in these
areas asking for the going wage rates in selected occupations, as at the last pay period in
April, 1956.
As a result of the survey, the Civil Service Commission was provided with comparative wage rates paid by private firms and by the Provincial Government. Considerable
demand for the information collected was also shown by other Government branches and
by the public.
Trade-union Statistics
Each year a survey of trade-union locals operating in British Columbia is conducted
for the Labour Relations Board. Data collected from each local include the following:
Names and addresses of officers, affiliation, membership, and jurisdiction of the local
organization. A directory of trade-union locals operating in British Columbia is compiled
from the returns and is published in the Provincial Department of Labour's Annual
Report.
Reported labour-organization membership in British Columbia (including non-
trade-union membership of less than 1,000 members) totalled 191,952 members at
lanuary 1st, 1956, compared to 186,951 members at January 1st, 1955, an increase of
2.7 per cent. REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956 Y 25
Expressed as a percentage of paid workers, organized-labour membership with the
corresponding distribution for 1955 is as follows:—       Jan. 1,1955 Jan. 1,1956
(PerCent) (Percent)
Wood and wood products     20.18 20.77
Public service ~~     20.96 21.04
Construction       9.97 10.09
Other transportation       8.60 8.44
Foods       8.32 9.90
Railway transportation       7.09 5.17
Metals       7.09 6.54
Mining and quarrying       5.16 5.31
Personal service        4.36 4.73
Light, heat, and power       3.22 3.05
Communication       2.46 2.29
Printing and publishing       1.53 1.55
Clothing and footwear         .59 .61
All others         .47 .50
100.00 100.00
As indicated last year, the survey of organized labour in British Columbia is now
carried out jointly with the Federal Department of Labour. Advantages of combining
surveys of this type are elimination of duplication and increased coverage.
TRANSPORTATION AND TRADE DIVISION
Transportation Section
A wide variety of services were provided in 1956 by the Transportation Section of
the Bureau of Economics and Statistics to other Government departments, business, and
industry. More particularly, the Transportation Section was actively involved in two
major rate cases of importance to British Columbia shippers and consumers. The first
case was heard by the Board of Transport Commissioners in Vancouver during February.
It dealt with a proposed equalized commodity scale for domestic grain. The Bureau of
Economics and Statistics co-operated with producer, consumer, and business organizations in the preparation of submissions to the Board and prepared the main Provincial
brief. As a result of the hearing, a proposed 10-per-cent increase was suspended indefinitely and the interested parties given further opportunity to study and prepare a more
equitable scale of domestic grain rates, so important to British Columbia agriculture.
The staff of the Bureau conducted a survey of British Columbia freight movements
during the summer months in order to assist the Provincial freight-rates counsel in opposing the proposed 15-per-cent increase in rates requested by the railways.
Much effort has been devoted to research for the Pacific Great Eastern Railway,
particularly dealing with traffic projections, economic surveys of the Peace River region,
route and rate studies. Briefs and reports were prepared to assist in Federal-Provincial
financial discussions relative to the Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
Basic studies were initiated dealing with rail and freight-rate problems pertinent to
British Columbia. During the year the Transportation Section received splendid cooperation and assistance from University of British Columbia personnel, Vancouver
Board of Trade, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, many trade associations, and
numerous business firms, industries, and producer and consumer organizations. Y 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
External Trade Section
The agreement between this Bureau and the External Trade Branch, Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, consummated in the fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under this
agreement the Bureau receives monthly a duplicate set of punch-cards showing in detail
the importation and exportation of every commodity normally listed in the Federal trade
reports which has been recorded at customs ports located in this Province. While these
records do not distinguish the exported merchandise originating in British Columbia nor
the imports destined for consumption in this Province from the other goods passing
through these customs ports, the records do provide the basis for a very comprehensive
annual report on the foreign trade of British Columbia.
Preliminary statements showing the external trade through British Columbia customs
ports covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over are now published annually. Until June, 1950, detailed monthly statements were also published. For
reasons of economy, this publication has been combined in an abbreviated form with the
Bureau's monthly bulletin.
The discontinuance of detailed monthly published external-trade figures has resulted
in increased requests for import and export information, which has been supplied to all
inquirers.
Tables 2 and 3 show the trends of British Columbia's commodity exports and imports
from 1945 to 1955. The value of exports increased by 15 per cent over 1954. Imports
were 20 per cent higher than in 1954.
Preliminary figures for the first eight months of 1956 show that both exports and
imports will be considerably higher than they were in 1955 or in any previous year.
L REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956
Y 27
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Y 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 4.—Twelve Leading Exports of British Columbia, 1955
Value
Rank Commodity ($000,000)
1. Planks and boards, Douglas fir  137.4
2. Newsprint paper  59.6
3. Planks and boards, hemlock  55.7
4. Planks and boards, cedar  39.2
5. Zinc spelter  35.3
6. Planks and boards, spruce   33.4
7. Shingles, red cedar  28.8
8. Lead in pigs, refined lead  22.1
9. Copper, fine in ore  15.0
10. Fertilizers, phosphate      14.8
11. Nitrogen fertilizer     13.4
12. Aluminium in primary form     12.4
The products of British Columbia's forests again were the most important exports.
Six of the twelve most important commodities exported were either wood or paper products. Mining products ranked next in importance, with a new export, aluminium (from
the Kitimat smelter), becoming one of the top twelve exports for the first time.
The United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan were our most important customers in 1955, taking over 80 per cent of the total value of our exports. The value of
exports to the United States increased to $444,000,000 in 1955, from $407,000,000 in
1954. However, the United States purchased only 63.5 per cent of our total exports in
1955, compared to 67 per cent in 1954.
Exports to the United Kingdom were valued at $112,000,000, as against $107,000,-
000 in 1954. The percentage of total exports taken by the United Kingdom was 16.2
in 1955, compared to 17.6 in 1954. The value of exports to Japan dropped from
$21,000,000 in 1954 to $18,000,000 in 1955.
It can be concluded that our exports were more diversified in 1955 than in 1954.
The following table shows that countries other than the United Kingdom, the United
States, and Japan purchased almost 18 per cent of our exports in 1955, compared to
12 per cent in 1954.
Table 5.—The Ten Leading Countries to Which British Columbia
Products Were Exported in 1955
Percentage
Rank Country Value of Total
1. United States   $444,215,365 63.5
2. United Kingdom  112,499,388 16.2
3. Japan   18,084,759 2.6
4. Australia   17,467,037 2.5
5. Union of South Africa  14,018,439 2.0
6. New Zealand  5,163,174 0.7
7. Korea   4,649,185 0.7
8. Netherlands    4,313,679 0.6
9. Hawaii   3,748,674 0.5
10. Belgium           3,656,520 0.5
11. All other countries       71,151,731 10.2
Totals    $698,967,951 100.0
The pattern of exports of British Columbia products by continental area shows
North America took almost 64 per cent, North-west Europe 18 per cent, the Orient
J REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY, 1956 Y 29
almost 5 per cent, Africa 3 per cent, Oceania 4 per cent, with Central America, South
America, Southern Europe, Eastern Europe, and the Middle East each taking around
1 per cent.
Table 6.—The Twelve Leading Imports from Foreign Countries
for Consumption in British Columbia, 1955
Rank Commodity Value
1. Coffee, green  $16,304,368
2. Tourist purchases, dutyfree  13,679,214
3. Logging, machinery and parts  10,288,951
4. Tractors, internal combustion  10,213,805
5. Casings, gas, water, or oil-well  8,568,893
6. Bauxite alumina for refining  8,350,061
7. All machinery, n.o.p. and parts  7,184,573
8. Sugar, raw, for refineries  7,151,030
9. Tractor parts  5,560,006
10. Heavy fuel-oils, Nos. 4, 5, and 6       5,453,925
11. Automobiles, new passenger (under $1,200)        5,268,016
12. Tea, black       3,352,534
The 20-per-cent increase of 1955 imports over their 1954 value was due to
increased purchases of iron and steel products, chemicals, and food. It is of interest
to note that bauxite alumina imports (by the smelter at Kitimat) now rank sixth in
importance among our imports. As usual, citrus fruits, tea, coffee, and sugar were the
most important food products imported.
The purchases of goods from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Japan
constituted over 80 per cent of the total value of our imports. Imports from the United
States increased to $248,000,000 in 1955, compared to $207,000,000 in 1954. This
increase pushed the United States share of our imports from 64 per cent in 1954 to
almost 67 per cent in 1955. British Columbia's imports from the United Kingdom
dropped to $40,000,000 in 1955 from $44,000,000 in 1954, accounting for only 11 per
cent of our total imports. Imports from Japan showed a strong increase, rising from
almost $9,000,000 in 1954 to $16,000,000 in 1955. The share of Japanese goods in
our total imports was 4.4 per cent, compared to 2.7 per cent in 1954. The countries
listed in the following table supplied by value 90 per cent of our total imports.
Table 7.—Ten Leading Countries from Which British Columbia Imported
Products for Domestic Consumption, 1955
Rank Country
1. United States _
2. United Kingdom
3. Japan 	
4. Brazil 	
5. Jamaica  	
6. West Germany
7. Fiji
Colombia 	
9. India 	
10. Belgium 	
11. All other countries
Value
Percentage
of Total
$248,047,100
66.5
39,897,049
10.8
16,212,972
4.4
7,369,302
2.0
7,110,829
1.9
5,172,000
1.4
5,015,769
1.4
5,008,733
1.3
4,054,259
1.1
3,319,275
0.9
31,583,693
8.3
Totals   $372,790,693 100.0 Y 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A breakdown of the 1955 imports by area of origin shows that North America
(except Canada) supplied 67 per cent, North-west Europe 15 per cent, the Orient 7 per
cent, Central America 4.2 per cent, South America 3.5 per cent, Oceania 2.4 per cent,
with Africa, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and Southern Europe each purchasing less
than 1 per cent of the total value of imports.
The difference in value between exports and imports in 1955 remained about the
same as in 1954. The value of imports was approximately 53 per cent of the value of
exports.
STATISTICAL DIVISION
This Division is responsible for the collection, compilation, analyses, interpretation,
and publication of statistical information. Also it is the duty of this Division to assist
other departments in the compilation of statistical information and to assist in establishing
uniform statistical methods throughout the service. In addition, it co-operates with other
statistical bureaux in the elimination of duplication, and answers inquiries relating to
statistical data.   Following is a brief outline of the statistics compiled in this Division.
Co-operative Statistical Agreements
The co-operative statistical agreements with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and
other Federal offices increased during 1956. The fields of co-operation and dates of the
original agreements are as follows: (1) Mining Statistics, 1926; (2) External Trade
Statistics, 1938; (3) Cost of Food Statistics, 1939; (4) Provincial Government Payroll
Statistics, 1949; (5) Forecast of Capital and Repair and Maintenance Expenditures for
Provincial, Municipal, and Other Local Authorities, 1950; (6) Census of Construction
Statistics—Building Permits, 1951; (7) Census of Industry Statistics, 1954; (8) Nature
of Business Statistics, 1955; (9) Trade-union Statistics, 1955. In addition, copies of
Dominion Bureau of Statistics monthly reports on production, shipments, and stocks on
hand in British Columbia sawmills have been received since 1948. Commencing in 1953
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics agreed to supply this office with duplicates of their
Operations in the Woods forms. In return, the Bureau assists the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics by checking mailing-lists, estimating production of delinquent forms, and other
services.
Conferences between the Provincial and Federal statistical bureaux are now held
annually. As a consequence, it is anticipated that continued progress toward the elimination of duplication in this field will be made.
Conferences are now held periodically with the Federal Department of Labour, and
the elimination of duplication is under way, especially in the fields of trade-union statistics
and working-conditions statistics. The co-operative agreements have resulted in savings
to both Governments, to union secretaries, and to private industry.
Prices Section
Prices during 1956 have shown a moderate rise. Retail prices in 1956, as reflected
in the Consumer Price Index, were higher than 1955 prices, with some variations during
the year due to seasonal effects on food, clothing, and fuel prices.
Wholesale prices averaged slightly higher in 1956 than in 1955.
Consumer Price Index—Description
In October, 1952, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics began publication of the Consumer Price Index, which is the successor to the old Cost-of-living Index.
The new index remains, in character and general purposes, the same as the old
Cost-of-living Index. However, the goods and services selected for purposes of computing the new index conform with post-war expenditure patterns and should reflect more
realistically current changes in living costs due to prices. REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956
Y 31
In order to determine the items and proportions to be used in the new base budget,
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics conducted a survey of family expenditure covering
some 3,600 urban Canadian families. The survey covered the year ended August 31st,
1948. It was decided that the central core of family types whose expenditure patterns
were enough for their changes in living costs resulting from price changes to be adequately
represented by one index could be defined as those families (a) living in twenty-seven
Canadian cities with over 30,000 population, (b) ranging in size from two adults to two
adults and four children, and (c) with annual incomes during the survey year ranging
from $1,650 to $4,050.
Detailed information on expenditures was submitted by 1,517 families with these
attributes.
The year 1949 is the base period of the new Consumer Price Index. This index
measures the percentage change in prices between 1949 and, for example, January,
1952, rather than between January, 1952, and 1935-39, as in the case of the old Cost-
of-living Index. Calculations of the percentage change between any two points in time
will yield exactly the same result regardless of the base period used.
Publication of the old Cost-of-living Index ceased after September 1st, 1953.
East month the Bureau of Economics and Statistics releases the latest Consumer Price
Index figures to a mailing-list of some 180 individuals and organizations.
British Columbia Cost of Food
During the year this Bureau continued to calculate its quarterly Cost-of-food Index
covering selected British Columbia centres. Information regarding comparative food
costs in the various centres is available upon request.
Table 8.—Canadian Consumer Price Index, 1913-56
(Base:   1949=100.!)
Year
1913 	
Index
 49.2
1914	
 49.6
1915	
 50.3
1916	
 54.2
1917	
 63.7
1918 _
72.0
1919 . 	
  78.8
1920
 90.5
1921 .
  80.9
1922
 74.9
1923 . 	
 75.2
1924
74.0
1925
74.6
1926 _
 75.9
1927	
 74.6
1928	
 75.0
1929
75.8
1930 .
  . 75.3
1931 	
  67.9
1932 .
 61.7
1933 	
1934	
 58.8
  59.6
Year
1935 	
Index
59.9
1936 	
61.1
1937	
    63.0
1938 . _
63.7
1939 _ _
63.2
1940	
    65.7
1941 	
  69.6
1942	
  72.9
1943 	
    74.2
1944	
    74.6
1945 	
75.0
1946 __ _ _ _
77.5
1947	
84.8
1948 	
  97.0
1949  100.0
1950  102.9
1951   113.7
1952  116.5
1953   115.5
1954  116.2
1955  116.4
1956  118.1
1 The Consumer Price Index prior to January, 1949, is the Cost-of-living Index, inclusive of all tobacco taxes, linked
to the Consumer Price Index, 1949=100. Y 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 9.—Total and Main Components of the Canadian Consumer Price Index,
by Years, 1939-54, and by Months, 1955-56
(1949=100.)
Date
Total
Food
Shelter
Clothing
Household
Operation
Other
Commodities and
Services
1939...
1940...
1941...
1942._
1943...
1944...
1945...
1946...
1947...
1948...
1949...
1950...
1951...
1952...
1953...
1954...
1955 (average)..
January..	
February....
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August.	
September-
October	
November.	
December	
1956 (average)..
January._
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July-
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
63.2
65.7
69.6
72.9
74.2
74.6
75.0
77.5
84.8
97.0
100.0
102.9
113.7
116.5
115.5
116.2
116.4
116.4
116.3
116.0
116.1
116.4
115.9
116.0
116.4
116.8
116.9
116.9
116.9
118.1
116.8
116.4
116.4
116.6
116.6
117.8
118.5
119.1
119.0
119.8
120.3
120.4
50.2
52.6
57.9
63.4
65.2
65.6
66.3
70.0
79.5
97.5
100.0
102.9
117.0
116.8
112.6
111.4
112.1
112.1
111.5
110.7
111.0
112.3
110.0
111.5
112.4
113.7
113.5
113.0
112.4
113.4
111.5
109.9
109.1
109.7
109.3
112.5
114.4
115.9
115.5
117.4
117.9
117.5
84.6
86.6
89.2
90.7
90.9
91.2
91.4
91.8
95.1
98.3
100.0
106.2
114.4
120.2
123.6
126.5
129.5
128.4
128.5
128.6
128.7
128.8
129.2
129.6
129.8
130.0
130.2
130.6
131.0
132.5
131.3
131.5
131.6
131.9
132.1
132.6
132.7
133.0
133.1
133.3
133.4
133.5
54.9
59.9
63.6
65.8
66.1
66.6
66.9
69.2
78.9
95.6
100.0
99.7
109.8
111.8
110.1
109.4
108.0
108.1
108.1
108.0
107.9
107.9
107.8
107.8
107.8
107.8
107.8
107.9
108.5
108.6
108.6
108.6
108.7
108.7
108.8
108.6
108.6
108.4
108.4
108.5
108.4
108.6
66.5
70.3
73.8
76.0
76.1
75.7
74.9
77.2
86.2
96.8
100.0
102.4
113.1
116.2
117.0
117.4
116.4
117.1
117.1
117.0
116.9
116.4
116.1
115.8
115.8
115.9
116.1
116.5
116.6
117.1
116.5
116.7
116.8
116.6
116.5
116.7
116.7
116.8
117.1
117.7
118.1
118.6
77.2
77.9
80.0
82.0
84.8
86.1
86.4
88.7
91.6
96.5
100.0
103.1
111.5
116.0
115.8
117.4
118.1
118.2
118.2
118.3
118.2
118.3
117.8
117.7
118.0
117.9
118.1
118.3
118.3
119.4
119.0
119.3
119.9
120.1
120.5
120.6
121.1
121.3
121.4
121.6
122.8
122.8 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956
Y 33
Table 10.—Consumer Price Indexes, Vancouver, B.C.
(1949=100.)
Date
Total
Food
Shelter
Clothing
Household
Operation
Other
Commodities and
Services
1949 	
1950	
1951 	
1952	
1953	
1954	
1955.  	
1956 (average)..
January..
February..
March	
April	
May	
June	
July-	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
100.0
103.6
114.3
117.4
116.1
117.4
117.9
119.6
120.0
118.5
118.6
118.6
117.7
118.4
119.3
119.6
120.5
121.2
121.5
121.7
100.0
104.5
117.8
117.3
112.1
111.7
111.6
114.4
114.9
111.4
111.4
111.8
111.1
111.9
113.3
114.8
116.6
118.5
118.4
118.4
100.0
107.7
113.2
118.2
122.1
124.9
127.0
128.4
128.0
128.0
128.2
128.2
128.2
128.4
128.7
128.9
128.9
128.9
128.3
128.4
100.0
99.1
110.6
115.1
112.5
112.9
112.4
112.9
112.8
112.8
112.9
113.3
113.5
113.7
113.7
112.5
112.5
112.5
112.5
112.3
100.0
101.4
115.3
122.2
122.7
125.2
125.1
127.8
130.9
128.6
128.6
128.0
124.1
125.0
127.8
127.2
128.8
128.4
128.1
128.6
100.0
103.3
109.4
115.1
117.0
119.2
120.5
120.9
119.7
119.7
120.4
120.2
120.1
120.7
120.7
120.7
120.8
121.6
122.9
122.9
Source:  Dominion Bureau of Statistics, "Prices and Price Indexes.'
Table 11.—Principal Wholesale Price Indexes, Canada
(Base:   1935-39=100.)
Date
General
Wholesale
Price
Index
Raw and
Partly
Manufactured
Fully and
Chiefly
Manufactured
Industrial
Materials
Canadian Farm Products
Field
Animal
Total
1913-
1920-
1926.
1929-
1933-
1938-
1939..
1940..
1941-
1942-
1943-
1944-
1945-
1946-
1947-
1948...
1949...
1950 -
1951-
1952..
1953...
1954...
1955...
1956 (average)	
January-
February	
March	
April	
May _
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
83.4
203.2
130.3
124.6
87.4
102.0
99.2
108.0
116.4
123.0
127.9
130.6
132.1
138.9
163.3
193.4
198.3
211.2
240.2
226.0
220.7
217.0
218.9
225.6
222.0
222.2
223.3
224.5
225.3
226.5
226.6
227.0
227.4
227.1
226.6
228.1
85.1
194.7
129.1
126.1
79.3
99.4
94.9
103.1
114.4
123.0
131.1
134.4
136.2
140.1
164.3
196.3
197.1
212.8
237.9
218.7
207.0
204.8
209.7
215.9
212.9
213.4
214.7
216.2
217.3
219.2
219.0
217.0
216.2
214.4
213.5
216.4
86.2
208.2
133.0
123.7
93.3
103.5
101.9
109.9
118.8
123.7
126.9
129.1
129.8
138.0
162.4
192.4
199.2
211.0
242.4
230.7
228.8
224.2
224.5
231.3
227.3
227.4
228.3
229.4
230.3
231.3
231.6
233.3
234.3
232.2
234.6
235.3
144.3
132.8
78.3
95.8
99.0
113.3
125.2
135.1
140.0
143.1
143.2
148.6
187.0
222.7
218.0
244.6
296.1
252.6
232.3
223.5
226.0
248.2
246.1
247.2
248.8
248.9
247.8
248.5
247.4
249.2
249.5
247.7
247.7
249.3
158.5
137.2
69.3
100.9
83.7
85.4
88.9
109.7
129.0
144.5
162.5
177.9
184.1
200.6
191.9
191.9
200.4
223.0
175.1
162.1
165.6
168.9
158.4
159.5
164.0
168.7
177.5
182.6
196.9
171.1
160.3
159.9
163.1
164.4
130.2
144.4
69.2
104.8
101.5
106.7
124.4
144.6
161.8
166.1
170.2
181.2
200.2
263.7
265.4
281.4
336.9
277.5
263.8
256.2
245.1
246.8
235.0
232.3
231.1
232.0
238.0
251.7
256.4
257.6
259.3
256.0
255.7
256.2
144.4
140.8
69.3
102.9
92.6
96.1
106.6
127.1
145.4
155.3
166.4
179.5
192.2
232.1
228.7
236.7
268.6
250.2
219.5
209.2
205.3
207.8
196.7
195.9
197.5
200.4
207.7
217.2
226.6
214.4
209.8
208.0
209.4
210.3
Source:  Dominion Bureau of Statistics, "Prices and Price Indexes.' Y 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Tourist Trade Section
The volume of tourist travel between British Columbia and the United States increased slightly in 1955 over 1954, both in the number of tourists entering the Province
and the number of British Columbia residents entering the United States. The total of
United States travel expenditures in Canada reached a new high in 1955, but British
Columbia's share in the total was down slightly from 1954. These expenditures were
$302,900,000; British Columbia's share of total expenditures was 14.1 per cent in 1955,
16.2 per cent in 1954, 14.6 per cent in 1953, 15.5 per cent in 1952, and 15.3 per cent
in 1951. A table showing United States travel expenditures for the years 1945 to 1956
is given below:—
United States United States
Travel Expenditures Travel Expenditures
Year in Canada Year in Canada
1945  $163,300,000 1951  $258,000,000
1946  216,100,000 1952  257,000,000
1947  241,100,000 1953  282,200,000
1948  267,400,000 1954  283,200,000
1949  267,100,000 1955  302,900,000
1950  259,700,000 1956  308,000,000
Source:  Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
The balance of payments on travel account between Canada and other countries
has, since 1951, shown a debit balance. This debit balance has increased from $6,000,000
in 1951 to $162,000,000 in 1956. The following table shows the balance of payments
for the years 1946 to 1956:—
(In millions of dollars.)
Year
Account with
United States
Account with
Overseas Countries
Account with
All Countries
Credit
Debit
Net*
Credit
Debit
Net
Credit
Debit
Net1
1946	
$216
241
267
267
260
258
257
282
283
303
308
$130
152
113
165
193
246
294
307
320
363
391
+$86
+ 89
+ 154
+ 102
+67
+ 12
—37
—25
-37
—60
—83
$6
10
13
18
15
16
18
20
22
25
27
$6
15
22
28
33
34
47
58
69
86
106
$222
251
280
285
275
274
275
302
305
328
335
$136
167
135
193
226
280
341
365
389
449
497
+$86
1947-	
-$5
—9
— 10
— 18
-18
—29
-38
-47
-61
-79
+S4
1948
+ 145
1949 	
1950  	
1951	
+92
+49
—6
1952	
1953 	
—66
—63
1954	
1955	
—84
— 121
1956= -	
— 162
1 Net credits (+), net debits (—).
2 Subject to revision.
Source:  Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
Tables 12 and 13 give a breakdown of tourist travel between British Columbia and
the United States for the years 1945 to 1956. Preliminary estimates indicate that travel
volume in 1956 is somewhat higher than 1955.
Chart I gives a breakdown of automobiles visiting Canada from the United States
by State of origin, with the number visiting British Columbia and the Yukon shown in
red. In 1955, automobiles originating in California, Oregon, and Washington comprised
85.5 per cent of the total number of cars visiting British Columbia from the United
States. The average length of stay of cars from the above States was 6.03 days and
expenditures averaged $13.83 per car per day.
Interprovincial tourist-travel figures are not compiled by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, but this travel is undoubtedly important and adds considerably to the total of
tourist expenditures in British Columbia.
J REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY, 1956
Y 35
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J REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956 Y 37
Forest Section
The primary and secondary forest industries of British Columbia comprise the most
important industrial group in the Province. In recent years this industrial group has
accounted for approximately 40 per cent of the net value of production, and in 1955
provided employment for some 69,000 people, who received some $247,000,000 in
salaries and wages.
During 1955 the primary industry of logging cut an all-time high of 6,109,202 M
board-feet, valued at $235,260,000. Operations in the Coast region accounted for
3,931,642 M board-feet, with Douglas fir the leading species at 1,426,961 M board-feet
and hemlock next with 1,145,694 M board-feet. At the same time, Interior regions cut
2,177,560 M board-feet, with Douglas fir again the leading species at 954,661 M board-
feet and spruce at 649,331 M board-feet. The forest cut in 1956 of 6,150,000 M board-
feet is substantially the same as the 1955 cut.
The traditional conversion enterprise for British Columbia timber has been saw-
milling. This industry has grown tremendously since its inception a hundred years ago,
so that to-day it is the most important single industry in the Province and produces 60 per
cent of the total Canadian output of sawn lumber. During 1955 sawmills in British
Columbia produced an all-time high of 4,840,000 M board-feet of lumber, valued at
$337,000,000. Mills in the Coast region produced 2,742,000 M board-feet of sawn
lumber, valued at $211,100,000, while those in the Interior produced 2,098,000 M board-
feet, valued at $125,900,000.
The pulp and paper mills of the Province during 1955 used 1,582,960 cords of pulp-
wood, valued at $32,042,173, as well as 666,503 cords of waste wood (for example,
sawmill and veneer-mill chips, slabs, edgings, etc.) valued at $12,973,056. From this
material these mills produced 1,363,761 tons of pulp, valued at $107,637,777. Over
half of the pulp produced was used in the Province to make 725,096 tons of paper, valued
at $86,193,930.
During 1956 the Forest Section prepared the information on forestry contained in
the Government's submissions to the Royal Commission on Canada's Economic Prospects. Assistance was given the Royal Commission on Forestry as well as other Government departments and agencies, for example, Forest Service, Pacific Great Eastern Railway, and the Power Commission. In addition, numerous requests from industry were
handled. A research assistant (forestry) with the Bureau, presented a paper at the
Ninth British Columbia Natural Resources Conference entitled " Forest Utilization in
British Columbia—Past, Present, and Future." During the year further information was
prepared for the Natural Resources Atlas. Y 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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rt  rt i-i REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956 Y 39
Mining Section
The mineral production of British Columbia in 1955 had a value of $174,710,606,
which ranks next to the record value of $175,613,693 reached in 1951. The 1955 value
exceeds that of 1954 by $21,000,000, and was generally brought about by higher prices
for the principal metals, a substantial increase in zinc production, and a higher valuation
for miscellaneous metals, industrial minerals, and structural materials. The value for
fuel is slightly less than in 1954, and in the main represents the output of coal but includes
a small production of natural gas.
The price for newly mined Canadian gold as paid by the Royal Canadian Mint,
Ottawa, was higher in 1955 than in 1954 because the United States dollar was at a lesser
discount. The prices for silver, lead, and zinc were higher than in 1954, but lower than
the 1951 prices. The price for copper in 1955 was an all-time record. Prices for the
principal metals are averages for the year in Canadian funds.
The value of principal metals produced—gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc—was
$129,455,122, zinc leading the group with a value of $52,048,909, followed by lead,
$45,161,245; copper had a value of $16,932,549; lode gold was valued at $8,370,306,
silver had a valuation of $6,942,113, and placer gold showed a decrease at $217,614.
Miscellaneous metals—antimony, bismuth, cadmium, indium, iron ore, mercury, tin, and
tungsten (W03)—had a total value of $12,935,887, compared with $11,866,409 in
1954. Cadmium and indium, both recovered as by-products at the Trail smelter, set
records for production and had a combined value of $2,909,622. The remainder of the
group had an aggregate value of $10,026,265, with tungsten (W03) leading all miscellaneous metals with a valuation of $5,460,967.
Industrial minerals had a total valuation of $7,798,098 and included asbestos,
$4,265,971, and sulphur, $2,624,171. The remainder—barite, diatomite, fluxes,
granules, gypsum and products, and mica—made up the balance of $907,956.
Structural materials also exceeded their value for any previous year, with increases
in most items. The increase in the production of common brick is a notable contrast to
the previous five years, in which the production of concrete brick and clay brick imported
from Alberta had apparently to a great extent replaced British Columbia common brick.
Fine brick, blocks, cement, and lime and limestone added substantially to the total of
$15,299,254 for structural materials.
Dividends from all classes of mining operations in British Columbia for the calendar
year 1955 amounted to $35,071,583.
The valuation of natural gas is noted as $18,130 for 1955 and $6,545 for 1954.
The production reported is of natural gas sold in Fort St. John, where commercial
distribution was started in 1954.
The average number employed in 1955 was 14,102 in all branches of the industry.
Major expenditures covered by placer-mining, lode-mining, coal-mining, industrial minerals, and structural-material mining included: Salaries and wages, $51,890,246; fuel
and electricity, $5,632,549; process supplies, $24,643,057; Federal taxes, $18,591,258;
Provincial taxes, $5,576,066; municipal and other taxes $907,645; levies for workmen's
compensation (including silicosis), unemployment insurance, and other items, $1,647,642.
The lode-mining industry expended $30,696,044 in freight and smelter treatment charges
on ores and concentrates. Expenditures recorded in exploration for petroleum and
natural gas in 1955 was $8,529,964. Y 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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U.S REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956 Y 41
Table 16.—British Columbia Mines Production, 1954 and 1955
Description
1954
Quantity
1955
Quantity
Value
Gold—
Placer-
Lode—.
Silver	
Copper	
Lead	
Zinc	
Principal Metals
..crude oz.
. fine „
Totals-
Miscellaneous Metals
Antimony	
Bismuth	
Cadmium	
Indium  -
Iron ore—	
Mercury	
Platinum-	
Tin 	
Tungsten (W03)_
Totals..—
..tons
— lb.
_oz.
—lb.
Industrial Minerals
Asbestos.-
Barite	
Flux (quartz, limestone) _
Diatomite	
Granules (slate and rock)..
Gypsum and products	
Mica    —
Sulphur	
Totals-
Brick—
Common.-
Structural Materials
..No.
Face, paving, sewer-
Firebrick, blocks.	
Clays 	
Structural tile, hollow blocks	
Drain-tile, sewer-pipe, fiue-liningS-
Pottery—glazed or unglazed	
Other clay products _	
Cement...
Totals                       ....___      	
Fuel
Coal                                	
Natural gas	
   M c.f.
Provincial totals..
8,684
258,388
9,825,153
50,150,087
332,474,456
334,124,560
$238,967
8,803,279
8,153,108
14,599,693
45,482,505
34,805,755
7,666
242,477
7,902,145
44,328,031
302,567,640
429,198,565
$217,614
8,370,306
6,942,113
16,932.549
45,161,245
52,048,909
$112,083,307
I $129,672,736
1,302,333
225,351
680,734
477
535,746
 4
587,528
2,206,443
$382,104
493,519
1,123,211
1,281
3,733,891
408
280,437
5,851,558
2,021,721
160,767
1,593,591
104,774
610,930
75
391,228
1,914,000
$667,776
356,903
2,677,233
232,389
3,228,756
250
311.613
5,460,967
| $11,866,409
| $12,935,887
5,056
39,897
4,541
175,480
284,000
219,999
$2,920,751
115,337
40,804
65,507
421,734
5,326
2,308,422
$5,877,881
1,289,911
5,651,262
6,609
317,976
920,707
3,055
$35,550
316,676
372,528
36,425
122,903
753,297
31,081
32,697
4,935,298
1,555,002
1,253,856
4,850,469
99,392
$14,395,174
1,308,284
60,883
9,154,544
6,545
$153,383,860
9,465
111,759
14
6,355
149,719
505,300
216,520
$4,265,971
238,825
208,198
280
73,858
383,934
2,861
2,624,171
$7,798,098
4,853,940
3,901,866
8,033
318,152
890,613
26,079
$232,139
248,913
578,578
46,757
144,460
801,019
38,035
55,514
5,474,875
1,711,348
962,272
4,886,890
148,454
$15,299,254
1,332,874
168,651
$8,986,501
18,130
$174,710,606 Y 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Labour Section
Completion of the current yearly statistical review of industrial labour information
for the Department of Labour was again the primary work of this Section during the year,
the summarization and presentation of factual material relating to 1955 being published
under heading of " Statistics of Trades and Industries" in the Annual Report of the
Department of Labour for that year.
Close co-operation between the Department of Labour and the Department of Trade
and Industry in the collection and compilation of annual labour statistics has again proven
the value of the existing plan of mutual assistance in effect between these two departments.
The growing concentration of industrial weight in newly developed areas and the
spread of city coverage to include adjoining municipalities and districts under common
headings of " Metropolitan Areas " has necessitated changes in the presentation of relevant
statistical information, and such changes and improvements are made from year to year
in line with new growth and development noted in the surveys.
Many additional projects completed by the Labour Section for 1955 include an
alphabetical index of firms reporting in the survey on the basis of industrial classification
and geographical location, the preparation of regional segregations of industrial employment and payroll data, the current edition of a list of industrial firms arranged in size
groups by employment, and various supplementary projects resulting from requests for
statistical information from industry, business, and other Governmental departments.
For purposes of reference and comparison, the census map (Chart 2) is again
presented, together with a table (Table 17) showing the industrial payroll totals by area
for the last four years. In conjunction with the regional totals showing the degree of
growth and expansion in the census divisions, a separate table (Table 18) is included
which outlines the coverage of the metropolitan areas of Vancouver and Victoria, together
with the computed industrial payroll of these areas on the basis of the 1955 survey.
Table 17.—British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas
for the Comparative Years 1952 to 1955
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1952
1953
1954          i          1955
i
No. 1           	
$27,425,293
40,455,349
20,422,805
358,233,779
109,412,278
11,015,136
20,160,757
20,771,777
32,163,701
2,266,598
4,703,401
$19,495,380
42,633,966
20,361,133
370,901,521
111,953,368
15,781,535
21,111,044
18,367,655
44,702,234
3,304,619
4,501,909
$17,125,372        $18,197,303
32,519,954    [      35,044,981
20,790,437    j      25,599,069
389,154,398    [    417,102,635
117,023,841     |    127,543,124
12,487,726    |      15,313,185
22,351,967    |      26,336,337
18,012,903    |      23,336,723
23,458,261    j      36,329,470
3,387,399    |        4,591,602
5,224,932    |        2,421,348
No. 2                                     -   .          	
No. 3                                    	
No 4
No. 5                                  -     	
No. 6                        -   -
No. 7                                    	
No 8
Mo o
No 10                                                	
$647,030,874
$673,114,364
$661,537,190    | $731,815,777
Table 18.—Industrial Payroll Totals Reported for the Census
Metropolitan Areas of Vancouver and Victoria, 1955
Area
Payroll, 1955
(Salaries and Wages)
Census metropolitan area of Vancouver, including
Vancouver City, North Vancouver City and District, West Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Fraser Mills, Richmond, Surrey, Port Coquitlam, and Port Moody  $371,640,166
Census metropolitan area of Victoria, including Victoria City, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich, and
Central Saanich       50,163,395 REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956
Chart 2.—Census Divisions
Y 43
CENSUS
DIVISION
MARKET RESEARCH DIVISION
An increasing number of general requests for market and industry data were handled.
Such requests frequently involved an examination of market potential and the possibilities
for commercial and industrial expansion. Preliminary work has been undertaken on
certain industry studies on the basis of market potential and industrial facilities.
The revision of the Departmental publication " Regional Industrial Index of British
Columbia " is currently under way.
Personnel have been assigned for special studies undertaken by the Department of
Finance, the Civil Service Commission, and others.
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION
The Mechanical Tabulation Division was originally formed to handle the tabulation
of statistical information for the Bureau of Economics and Statistics. To do this work
a fairly complete installation of punched-card equipment was rented, and to help fill idle
time and cover the cost of the equipment, work was undertaken for other branches of
the Government. With the progression of time the various departments have realized
the advantages of making large-scale tabulations, both statistical and accounting, by the
punched-card method, the result being the work done for other departments has now
reached 90 per cent of our total production. The actual distribution of work by departments is shown graphically in Fig. I. Y 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
For operating purposes the Division is divided into five sections, each headed by
a senior machine operator, who is responsible for a unit of work. These work units are
established by volume and nature of work, and at present the following sections are in
operation: Health and Welfare Section, Liquor Control Board Section, Forestry Section,
General Statistics Section, and Annual Report Section.
Fig. II shows the distribution of work done by the various sections of the Division.
As key-punching is included in these figures, the percentages are slightly distorted; for
example, the volume of work processed for Health and Welfare is equitable to the other
sections, but all key-punching and verifying is handled by a key-punch section within its
own establishment. Similarly the use of pre-punched and mark sensed cards reflects on
the figure for the Liquor Control Board Section. The Annual Report Section used cards
accumulated during the year, in which case the punching operation has been charged to
regular work done in other sections.
To meet the diversified demand of the various departments, a complete set of
punched-card equipment is rented, which includes seven alphabetic printers, eight sorters,
two reproducing gang summary punches, two end-printing document punches, one alphabetic interpreter, two collators, two multiplying punches, one accumulating reproducer,
one facsimile poster, twelve punches, and seven verifiers.
To operate the equipment, a well-trained staff has to be maintained, and at present
consists of a senior supervisor, assistant supervisor, four senior machine operators, nine
machine operators, a senior key-punch operator, nineteen key-punch operators, a senior
clerk-stenographer, and two clerks. In addition, three members of the Liquor Control
Board staff are attached to the Division to maintain liaison and perform necessary clerical
functions. Table 19 shows a comparative statement of the cost of work done for the
various Government agencies during the past four years. Job costs are available through
an accurately kept time-card system, which permits the study of costs and machine
utilization.
In general the cost of jobs has been reduced, due mainly to revision and simplification of procedures. The installation of the 528 accumulating reproducer early in the year
is responsible for saving many hours of machine time. This machine is capable of doing
a summary punching operation at 500 cards per minute that formerly took an alphabetic
printer and summary punch at a maximum speed of 150 cards per minute.
No new large-scale applications were instigated during the year as the equipment is
being operated at maximum capacity. To handle more work we would require more
equipment, and to house more equipment we would require additional space.
Major revisions or new work effected during the year are listed briefly under the
various sections.
Health and Welfare Section
Hospital Insurance work has dropped some $10,000 over last year, this being accomplished by eliminating many hours of calculating to produce what proved to be unnecessary percentages and averages. It was felt these could readily be calculated for specific
groups as required.
Liquor Control Board Section
The work for the Liquor Control Board shows a decided drop through the discontinuance of Vendor's Inventory Control procedures in the Esquimalt and Pender Street
stores.
Forestry Section
The steady growth of work for the British Columbia Forest Service is indicated
by a $43,000 increase over the last four years, a growth of $11,000 being recorded last
year. It is estimated that a million and a half forest-inventory cards were processed
during the year and 5,000 new cards punched and verified each working-day for the REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY, 1956 Y 45
preparation of the various statistical and analytical reports for the Forest Service. Some
of these reports are tabulated on to multilith masters, which facilitates the production of
many copies for distribution to district offices and industry.
Work for the Forest Surveys Division falls into two major groups: (a) Unit Surveys
and (b) Survey Statistics.
Under the Unit Surveys (formerly known as the Working Plan and Special Surveys)
200,000 cards were punched, processed, and listed or tabulated to present working statements of the thirty-six approved or proposed public working circle areas. Each of these
circle areas is made up of numerous smaller units called " compartments." Working
statements were also tabulated for compartments. These statements form the basis for
management planning in regard to the annual allowable cut, etc. In addition, 150,000
cards were punched, processed, and tabulated to present working-lists pertinent to the
controlling compilation of the inventory of the forest resources of the Province.
Under Survey Statistics there are actually three jobs — Volume Analysis, Decay
Analysis, and Standing Samples.
Volume Analysis is the basis for compiling cubic-foot volume tables and is currently being punched and verified.    It will later be turned over to the
machine section for balancing and the calculation of extensions so that
the necessary tabulations and listings can be made.
Decay Analysis is the basis for compiling loss factors from decay and waste and
breakage when logged.    Runs for the previous years' analyses have been
compiled and distributed to the Forest Service, but as yet the current year's
work has not been received for punching.
Standing Samples.—Five hundred thousand cards were punched, processed,
and summarized to prepare a working-file of data pertinent for preparing
average estimates of the volume of usable wood which is applied to the
compilation of the inventory of the Province.   The 150,000 summarized
cards, together with detail cards, were sorted and tabulated as a basis for
compiling the public working circles.    Various groups of control cards
used in indexing the above tabulations were also processed.
Numerous cards were punched to increase the already existent file of data used in
preparing tables of volume content of trees, and, similarly, cards were punched for use
is preparing tables of loss of volume due to decay and waste in logging.
These tables form the basis for compiling the detail cards used in preparing average
estimates.
This outline covers the general procedure and does not include the many special
tabulations as required during the year.
General Statistical Section
Water Rights Billing.—The introduction of a transfer poster ledger card for each
account eliminated all difficulties previously experienced by the clerical staff of the Water
Rights Branch. The power, irrigation, and water-users' ledger records were punched and
added to the existing punched-card files. The mechanical preparation of delinquent
notices was introduced and mailed in August and did much to reduce the accounts
receivable.
Motor-vehicle Accidents.—Several minor changes were introduced which necessitated the designing of a new card form. Most of these changes were required to meet
the demands of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, which is endeavouring to correlate
accident statistics from all Provinces, each quarter. The preparation of the quarterly
reports has naturally increased the volume of work on this job. Y 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Report Section
The biggest change in this Section was the increase in the amount of work for the
Herd Improvement Branch of the Department of Agriculture. Previously only selected
records with a pre-calculated mature efficiency factor were punched for certain breeds.
Under the revised plan all records are punched and the mature efficiency factor calculated
mechanically from the age, times milked, and other determining factors shown in the
record. The calculating-punch is also being used to determine the breed-class average,
which it is felt will eventually replace the mature efficiency factor as the standard for
comparative methods.
Three small surveys were undertaken by this section for (a) Forest Engineering
Division on " Right-of-way Clearing Costs," (b) Parks and Recreation Division Survey
of " Visitors to Specified Camp-sites," and (c) British Columbia Travel Bureau Tourist
Survey.
Electronic Data-processing
It is recommended that a committee should be appointed to study the possibility of
establishing an electronic data-processing centre for the Government service. The volume
of work within the service would appear to justify such an installation. Many of the
jobs currently being handled on punched-card equipment, such as Liquor Control Board,
Hospital Insurance, forest inventory, tax billing, and payroll, are logical applications that
would benefit by the memory unit and ability of the arithmetic unit to add, subtract,
multiply, and divide at electronic speeds. The computing unit could also be used to great
advantage for solving individual problems in research and engineering. REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956
Y 47
O
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to
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w 2
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8 o
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 19.—Comparative Cost Statement
Department and Branch
1952-53
1953-54
1954-55
1955-56
$1,056.65
$685.20
$1,010.26
$1,681.48
Attorney-General—
$6,049.88
27,111.60
$5,423.86
33,784.56
$5,165.46
38,295.26
$7,355.49
27,721.24
$33,161.48
$39,208.42
$43,460.72
$35,076.73
Education—
$1,124.98
$1,626.06
1,358.68
$1,388.84
714.80
$1,386.24
Totals                                                         	
$1,124.98
$2,984.74
$2,103.64
$1,386.24
$628.94
1
.   . ..
Health and Welfare—
$15,704.14
1,236.76
$16,384.44
6,986.86
$14,525.24
17,867.14
$11,967.42
7,732.71
$16,940.90
$23,371.30
$32,392.38
$19,700.13
$3,493.04
$2,627.24
$3,621.80
$3,954.83
Lands and Forests—
$468.40
746.18
4,196.98
$288.88
5,064.96
12,880.46
971.02
$7,235.38
31,130.98
$718.83
8,722.76
39,754.31
202.91
2,140.98
1,220.12
1,881.64
Totals  ,      ~     .
$7,552.54
$19,205.32
$39,586.48
$51,280.45
Municipal Affairs—
1
|
$132.24
     1      	
222.36
Total                                                              	
I
$354.60
Provincial Secretary—
$4,735.54
12,822.20
$4,929.00
11,741.00
$6,918.86
11,701.68
$7,191.02
10,068.90
Totals
$17,557.74
$16,670.00
$18,620.54
$17,259.92
$647.77
$946.73
Trade and Industry—
$14,068.06
$12,421.30
$14,849.50
549.00
$15,706.12
$14,068.06
$12,421.30
$15,398.50
$15,706.12
$95,584.33
$117,821.29
$156,194.32
$147,347.23
J REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956 Y 49 Y 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
PUBLICATIONS
Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity.—This publication has been continued and
expanded. Special articles of current interest have been included at various times
throughout the year. Included are statistical summaries of business indicators relating
to British Columbia's economy.
Quarterly Bulletin of Economic Conditions in British Columbia.—This publication
is a new release, and in textual form outlines the current economic picture in British
Columbia.
Summary of Business Activity in British Columbia.—This publication is a companion of the two above-mentioned publications and, in fact, takes the place of the
fourth-quarter Quarterly Bulletin. It summarizes the current year's economic picture
and presents historical series relating to business activity in the Province.
External Trade.—Summary of monthly statistics covering external trade are contained in the aforementioned monthly bulletin. A statement of external trade through
British Columbia customs ports and covering commodities with an aggregate value of
$50,000 and over is published annually.
British Columbia Trade Index.—This publication lists the products manufactured
by British Columbia industries.   A new issue was released early in 1956.
British Columbia Regional Industrial Index.—This index contains available statistics
on a wide range of subjects covering all areas of the Province. Material is now being
assembled in preparation for publication in 1957 of a revised index.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.—The tenth edition of this publication will be
released in 1957. This publication provides graphic, general, and historical facts and
statistics relating to British Columbia under the following headings: Population, Education, Government and Finance, Judiciary, Banking, Transportation, Communication,
Retail Trade, Agriculture, Fisheries, Mining, Forestry, Manufacturing, Water Power,
Tourist, and Economic Activity.
Establishing a Business in British Columbia.—A revised edition of this brochure
will be ready for release in January of 1957. This publication gives to prospective
investors information relating to the establishment of a business in British Columbia. REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956 Y 51
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT
TRAVEL BUREAU
GENERAL
In 1956, visitors from the United States equalled British Columbia's population.
The Province was also host to a large number of visitors from other parts of Canada and
her tourist economy was further supported by a large number of British Columbians
who elected to take vacations and holidays in their own Province.
The only firm statistics are of entries from the United States. Some 1,300,000
United States citizens visited the Province by automobile during the calendar year, and
over a quarter of a million foreign travellers entered the Province by rail, bus, boat, and
aeroplane. These figures are, in general, an approximation of the 1956 tourist traffic,
the value of which was estimated at $90,000,000.
Across Canada the tourist business, as reflected by Traveller's Vehicle Permit entries,
levelled off, and for the first eleven months a slight decrease was noted over the preceding
calendar year. British Columbia, rating third in volume of tourist traffic, reflected a
slight increase in Traveller's Vehicle Permits, and this appreciation was supplemented
by an increase in non-permit-class entries and by a considerable increase in foreign-
traveller entries by public carrier.
To the end of the heavy tourist season, travellers entering British Columbia by
common carrier increased 16 per cent. Those coming by rail from the United States
decreased 9 per cent over the first eight months of 1955, but this was more than offset
by those entering by bus, boat, and aeroplane. Boat entries, which totalled 40 per cent
more than all the others combined, increased by 27 per cent. Aeroplane traffic increased
by 14 per cent.
The Travel Bureau's 1955 survey of auto courts, resorts, and hotels indicated that
United States visitors occupied 34 per cent of the tourist accommodation, British Columbians 47 per cent, and other Canadians 19 per cent. However, the tremendous amount
of publicity which British Columbia enjoys as a result of her industrial and commercial
expansion and her well-publicized opportunities undoubtedly brought many thousands
of additional Canadian visitors into the Province, and it is conservatively estimated that
in 1956 they accounted for 23 to 24 per cent of the room occupancy. On this basis, the
total number of visitors from outside the Provincial border in 1956 exceeded 2x/2 million.
British Columbians used their own highways as never before, and altogether the
tourist industry experienced a very satisfactory year. The Province enjoyed good weather
in all sections throughout the tourist season, and this fact definitely increased beyond all
reasonable anticipation the use and patronage of parks and camp-sites, both private and
public.
However, while the tourist industry in British Columbia appeared very healthy,
Travel Bureau officials were not satisfied that the situation called for complacency.
British Columbia reflects the Canadian tourist economy to a very large extent, and it
was felt that in a year when United States tourist expenditures exceeded all previous
records, the levelling-off of our own receipts from this source called for some study, particularly in view of the fact that our potential market on the Pacific Coast had increased
considerably in the past few years. This tourist-market study is a continuing one, supplemented by surveys and investigations currently being conducted by transportation
companies, other Provinces, and the Canadian Tourist Association. The findings and
observations are exchanged and, in British Columbia, will be related to the Travel
Bureau's promotional and advertising programme.
While some adverse reports on sections of our highways under construction were
circulated in the United States, these did not deter a great deal of travel to and through
the western part of the Province, but construction conditions in the Kicking Horse Pass Y 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
and general road conditions in the National parks discouraged a great deal of tourist
traffic which otherwise would have crossed the Alberta border.
Automobile clubs, oil company travel bureaux, and other directional offices were
kept well informed of actual conditions on British Columbia's highways and co-operated
very fully.
Sponsors of organized and packaged tours report heavy bookings through the season
and good prospects for 1957. The Wally Byam Trailer Caravan again toured British
Columbia, reporting very favourably on its reception and on the treatment accorded by
communities along the way. Over a hundred trailers participated in the caravan, visiting
the Okanagan and winding up on Vancouver Island.
The continent-wide publicity accorded the Byam organized caravan and the facilities
offered roving trailers by the British Columbia camp-sites have increased this type of
business considerably, and as greater facilities are provided, British Columbia may anticipate a much greater trailer traffic.
PROMOTION
The promotions of the Bureau were based upon the premises laid down in the 1955
Annual Report, and the advertising concentration was again largely on the West Coast
and through British Columbia, with some interest being taken in Eastern Canada and the
Western Provinces. The major exception was a full-page colour advertisement in Holiday
magazine, run in co-operation with the States of Washington and Oregon. This advertisement appeared early in the season and was very effective in stimulating inquiry response.
Approximately 5,000 inquiries could be traced to this one advertisement. Sunset, Fortnight, Westways, Family Circle, Highway Traveller, and National Motorist also shared
in the magazine programme, which was supported in the Coastal papers by black and
white advertisements. Radio was used to encourage British Columbians to spend their
own vacations in the Province, and was also used on the Prairies to some extent, response
being very good. A one-minute spot-announcement film was used on television over
several Pacific Coast stations.
A departure this year was a poster programme, billboards being used in the early
season through Washington, Oregon, and Northern California. Two large bulletin-boards
were secured north of San Francisco and added to the regular outdoor programme.
OLOR  O      II
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
Highway bulletin-board used in Travel Bureau advertising campaign.
The poster campaign may have been reflected in the increased traffic by boat
and undoubtedly contributed to the maintenance of the general traffic volume. It was
supported to a very large extent by outdoor promotions of the three transportation companies, the Vancouver Tourist Association, and the Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau.
The weight of this outdoor advertising may very reasonably have contributed to the
increase of non-permit class traffic (less than forty-eight hours).
J REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956
Y 53
PUBLICITY
The general publicity secured by the Bureau, and which was supplementary to the
scheduled advertising campaign, added materially to the over-all promotion of our tourist
interests.
A steady flow of articles and captioned photographs was maintained, with a high
rate of acceptance.   Requests for material came in with almost every mail.
The Bureau acknowledges the interest of British Columbia and foreign newspapers
and magazines in featuring British Columbia scenery and attractions. Radio and television stations also performed a great service in this respect, affording opportunities of
which the Bureau was very glad to take advantage. A limited mat service was also
made available to daily and weekly newspapers across Canada and in Washington and
Oregon.
Response to the promotions, as reflected by the number of mail inquiries, was good.
To the end of the tourist season, inquiries totalled 34,300 and continued to pour into
the Bureau at the rate of a little more than a hundred a day during the off season. The
Bureau was fortunate in having a competent staff, which handled this volume intelligently
and expeditiously.
LITERATURE
In 1956 the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau distributed over a million pieces of literature, the demand far outstripping estimates. One hundred and
twenty-five thousand copies of the accommodations directory were distributed on request,
and over 300,000 maps, including the general British Columbia map, the camp-site edition, and the Alberta-British Columbia joint production. The Bureau has arranged for
the production of a single map in 1957 which will embrace all the information on highways, camp-sites, fishing regulations, and other information contained in the two major
map productions of 1956. The new production will be one-third larger, giving even
greater readability.
All basic folders were brought up to date as required, some appearing under new
cover. As desired and feasible, more colour is being introduced into these folders, all
of which are designed to meet particular promotional problems in given areas or fields.
One new folder, " West of the Rockies," is in course of preparation. This folder is
designed to encourage traffic from east of the Rockies through the Columbia, Kootenay,
Arrow, and Okanagan Valleys, connecting Highways Nos. 1 and 3.
The Bureau did not publish a road report in 1956 as in previous years, but, through
the co-operation of the Highways Department, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police,
and Canadian Pacific Telegraphs, a daily teletype service was maintained to press and
radio outlets and to the automobile clubs in British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon.
Travel bureaux and other directional bureaux were furnished the same information by
air mail from the Travel Bureau. This system proved more satisfactory than previous
arrangements, and it is proposed to supplement this in 1957 with a basic mileage and
driving-time chart, which will be reissued through the season as conditions change, and
will also be available to the public.
" Sport Fishing " came out with an entirely new format and in a more informative
and authoritative text. Listing of marine service-stations with a map and in folder form
was the Bureau's recognition of a rapidly developing and comparatively new interest in
this recreational field. Designed originally for the use of United States yachtsmen and
boat-owners visiting Provincial waters, this leaflet has also proved very popular with
British Columbia boat-owners. The Calendar of Events was in such demand that it was
found necessary to make two runs. In 1957 it is planned to print the Calendar in two
editions, with a third edition in the late season, to promote the 1958 Centennial Year
events. Y 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
While all promotional efforts in early 1957 will be designed to promote traffic for
the current season, advantage will be taken of every opportunity to mention the forthcoming centenary.
The acceptance of " Alluring British Columbia " was such that it was necessary
to reorder a 50,000 run in October.
TOURIST INFORMATION CENTRE
In its second season of operation, the Tourist Information Centre at the Port of
Douglas on Highway No. 99 proved of great value to the travelling public and to the
economy of the Province.
Here the in-coming tourist was given a warm, personal welcome and supplied with
all the necessary information to make his stay within the boundaries of the Province a
pleasant, well-planned vacation.
Complete information concerning road conditions, camp-sites, stopping-places,
hotel and motel accommodation, hunting and fishing locations, as well as ferry schedules
and directions to the main points of interest are available from the courteous staff.
Assistance was given to drivers of over 12,000 cars, who brought with them well
over 35,000 people during the three summer " tourist " months. Many of these parties,
entering British Columbia for the first time, had no advance plans, and through the service at the centre extended both their time and mileage in the Province.
This service is available eleven hours a day, seven days a week, during the busy
season and an eight-hour service is maintained throughout the balance of the year.
It was found necessary to increase the staff at the Centre to four during the height
of the season.
The visitors' register has recorded the names of travellers from each of the forty-
eight States, all Provinces, and many from such points as England, France, Hawaii,
Alaska, Puerto Rico, Mexico, Korea, Southern Rhodesia, Norway, and the Argentine.
Many notes of appreciation of the service provided are also recorded in the register.
During the year the Bureau surveyed and made application for sites at Osoyoos
and Curzon Junction for the establishment of additional information centres. It is hoped
to have these established well in advance of the 1957 season.
" TOURIST ACCOMMODATION REGULATION ACT "
Under authority of the " Tourist Accommodation Regulation Act" and the regulations pertaining thereto, tourist accommodation in British Columbia was star-rated
under a formula revised to meet the modern standards of acceptance. The new formula
was one generally accepted by the four Western Provinces in agreement. Under the
new formula the accommodation was rated on a rental-unit basis rather than on an
over-all establishment basis, and the findings will be published in the 1957 accommodations directory. Some 10,000 rental units were star-rated, in all of which the star
rating as well as the maximum rates will be posted in 1957.
Since the rating formula had not been adjusted since 1948, the percentage in four-
star brackets dropped considerably, but the over-all inspections show a generally high
standard.   Fifty-one per cent of accommodation rated three stars or four.
There are over 1,500 establishments eligible for registration under the "Tourist
Accommodation Regulation Act." There were eighty-nine new registrations to the end
of the calendar year, with thirty registered establishments ceasing to operate. The percentage of unit star rating is as follows: Four stars, 15 per cent; three stars, 36 per cent;
two stars, 17 per cent; one star, 12 per cent; and no star, 20 per cent.
The Bureau was fortunate in securing the services of three trained and experienced
people as temporary star-rating officers, whose work, constantly checked, resulted in a
uniformity of rating.   While the star rating was designed originally to serve as a guide REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY, 1956
Y 55
to the travellers, that it has also served the purpose of encouraging the maintenance and
improvement in the over-all standards is evidenced by the requests for rerating from
operators who made adjustments following the inspections. In the majority of cases
the adjustments required for improved rating were of a minor nature, but will contribute
greatly to the comfort and convenience of the tourist.
The Travel Bureau staff associated with the work under the " Tourist Accommodation and Regulation Act" were frequently called upon to serve in an advisory capacity, particularly by persons contemplating a new enterprise or remodelling existing
premises. Appreciation of this service is reflected in the steadily increasing request for
it and in the many expressions received.
SETTLEMENT
Settlement inquiries were received in considerable volume during 1956. There
were many inquiries from other Provinces, from practically every State in the Union,
and from Britain, South Africa, The Netherlands, and Germany. Where, in previous
years, the heaviest volume has been from agricultural workers, in 1956 the greater number of inquiries were from artisans and professional people who wished to establish
themselves in Canada. There was, of course, the usual volume of inquiries from people
who wish to spend their declining years in a beneficent climate and also a considerable
volume from people who were attracted by British Columbia's advantages in respect of
social service and assistance.   The Department of Citizenship and Immigration, National
Members, associate members, and guests at 1956 Tourist Council meeting,
October 18th and 19th, Empress Hotel, Victoria, B.C.
Standing (left to right):   Mr. John Buckley, Mr. Karl Severson, Inspector C. Ledoux, Mr. Harry Taylor, Mr. Frank
R. Butler, Mr. D. F. Shaw, Mr. T. D. Rosling, Mr. George I. Warren, Mr. Eric Druce, Mr. J. Pound, Mr. R. M. Thomson, Mr. Willard Ireland, Mr. R. Parkinson, Mr. H. G. McWilliams, Mr. J. Melville, Mrs. E. Dickey.
Seated (left to right):   Mr. E. G. Rowebottom, Miss E. Trimmer, Mr. E. Evans, Honourable Earle C. Westwood,
Mr. T. L. Sturgess, Mr. J. V. Fisher, Mr. Arthur Peers. Y 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Employment Service in Vancouver and Victoria, the Agent-General for British Columbia and the Canadian Department of Labour in London, England, were important and
useful references, and the Bureau appreciatively acknowledges their assistance. The
Travel Bureau does not solicit immigration, but such inquiries as are directed to it are
given the information and references most suitable and helpful.
TOURIST COUNCIL
The seventeenth annual meeting of the Tourist Council was held in Victoria on
October 18th and 19th. Regional reports were heard from all sections of the Province.
The activities of the Travel Bureau were reviewed, and, as a result of the discussions,
several recommendations were made for forwarding to interested authorities and for the
help, guidance, and action of the Travel Bureau.
FIELD WORK AND EXHIBITIONS
Travel promotion in the Western United States was augmented by the personal
contact work of the tourist trade representative, sponsored jointly by the Provinces of
Alberta and British Columbia. The representative's headquarters are in San Francisco,
Calif. Principal efforts of this work were directed toward keeping the personnel of the
many travel offices informed on the wide variety of the Provinces' recreational facilities.
Regular calls were made on travel agents and transportation companies prominent
in the planning of both individual and group tours. A great deal of time was devoted
to automobile clubs, whose touring counsellors always welcome more information on
highway conditions, tourist accommodations, and other matters of general interest to
Alberta-British Columbia exhibit in California. REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956 Y 57
the travelling public. These clubs, with offices in all main centres of population, are
responsible for directing a very large proportion of the United States-to-Canada traffic.
Frequent visits were made to the touring bureaux of the major oil companies. During
1956 the oil companies and automobile clubs reported routing more cars into our area
than in any previous year.
Government Travel Bureau films were often used to illustrate talks given to clubs
and similar organizations. These films were also shown on television, and good use
was made of them at sport shows and fairs.
Assistance was given to travel editors of newspapers and magazines in the preparation of material for travel articles.
During the year, emphasis was placed on making direct personal contact with prospective travellers and, with this in mind, exhibits were placed in the Minneapolis Vacation Show, San Francisco Sport, Travel, and Boat Show, San Mateo Vacation Show,
San Francisco World Trade and Travel Fair, San Diego County Fair, and the California
State Fair in Sacramento—a total attendance of approximately 1,800,000 persons. The
public interest shown in our exhibits indicated this to be a most effective means of publicizing British Columbia and Alberta.
Direct personal contact was also maintained between the Government Travel Bureau
and the State tourist offices of Washington and Oregon, and the city tourist bureaux,
automobile clubs, and other directional offices in these States, by the Commissioner.
British Columbia was again represented at the Canadian National Exhibition. While
staffing the exhibit in Toronto, Miss Barbara Tubman made very valuable contacts and
also secured for the Province valuable newspaper publicity.
HISTORIC SITES
Two historic sites were marked as follows:—
Fish Trap Earthworks
In 1864 Alexander McDonald and seven companions defended these earthworks against Chilcotin, Tatla and Sitlecee
Indians. McDonald and two of his party were slain and four
others were wounded in the ensuing withdrawal toward Bella
Coola. This tablet commemorates the courage and fortitude of
those who trod the trails of early British Columbia.
Osoyoos Custom House
On this site the first Colonial Custom House in the Okanagan
Valley was erected in 1861, lohn Carmichael Haynes in charge.
Following the discovery of gold in British Columbia in 1858, the
old fur-trade brigade trail, which passes nearby, became one of
the routes to the Cariboo used by the gold seekers.
There is correspondence which will lead to further site-marking in 1957, when the
forthcoming centenary will stimulate interest in historic references. The British Columbia
Government Travel Bureau has furnished a standard-size bronze plaque which is affixed
to a permanent base by the local interests.
REPRESENTATION
During the year the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau was represented
at meetings of the Canadian Tourist Association, Okanagan-Cariboo Trail Association,
British Columbia Hotels Association, British Columbia Auto Courts and Resorts Association, and Canadian Rockies Tourist Association. At the Federal-Provincial Tourist
Conference the Bureau was represented by the Minister and his Deputy. The Bureau was
also represented at meetings of the regional and district Boards of Trade and of various Y 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Bronze plaque marking historic site.
tourist bureaux throughout the Province.
Association of Travel Organizations.
Membership was maintained in the National
CO-OPERATIVE ACTIVITIES
The duties and responsibilities of the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau
are essentially those of a sales organization. Its functions are very similar to those of
sales management in industry, and it is necessary that the Department keep in close touch
with those responsible for the "commodity, packaging, and distribution." Its public
relations work and promotions, therefore, call for close liaison with the Game and Parks
Branches and also the various sections of the catering industry as well as the Chambers
of Commerce and tourist bureaux in Canada and abroad, which function as retail outlets
in the merchandising set-up of tourism.
Liaison with all Government departments has been extremely good, and we acknowledge appreciatively their quick and ready co-operation at all times. Especial appreciation
is extended management and personnel of the Queen's Printer for technical assistance and
ready co-operation at all times. The officers of the Game Branch and Parks Branch have
likewise gone out of their way to serve our interests.
The Bureau also appreciatively acknowledges the co-operation of the Department of
Economic Affairs for Alberta and the Director and staff of the Alberta Travel Bureau for
co-operative efforts beyond what would normally be called for.
No joint staff meetings were held in 1956 as in previous years, but exchanges
between Alberta and British Columbia staff members were maintained in the interests of
betterment of service and advancement of knowledge in the industry, and it is hoped that
the meetings will be resumed in 1957. British Columbia has also received the generous
co-operation of the Automobile Club of Southern California, the National Automobile
Club, the State automobile clubs of California, Oregon, and Washington, and the automobile clubs of British Columbia.   The oil companies' travel bureaux co-operated very
J REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956 Y 59
closely without exception and were also considerate of our interests when discussing road
reports and accommodations. The regional and community travel bureaux at Kamloops,
Nanaimo, Hope, Vernon, New Westminster, Chilliwack, Trail, Kimberley, Kelowna,
Revelstoke, Nelson, Cranbrook, Courtenay, and a score of other centres co-operated fully
with the Bureau and helped it to round out a comprehensive programme of promotion
and service. The Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau and the Vancouver Tourist Association rendered a tourist service which extended beyond their immediate interests and
should be especially credited.
At all times the Canadian Customs and Immigration Officers at border points cooperated fully. Without exception, they handled the Bureau's literature and furnished
information when requested in a manner which has been very frequently and favourably
commented on.
Particularly friendly liaison has been maintained and full co-operation is gratefully
acknowledged between the Bureau and the Canadian Government Travel Bureau in
Ottawa, its offices in New York and Chicago, and the Canadian consulates in Los Angeles,
San Francisco, and Seattle. At all times the resources and facilities of these offices have
been placed at the disposal of the Bureau and the travel representative, and frequently
taken advantage of.
PHOTOGRAPHIC BRANCH
Field work for our four photographers commenced in early June and continued
through until the end of September.
Still Assignments
A special trip was made into the Interior of British Columbia for the purpose of
photographing picnic and camp sites as well as other facilities offered the tourist to British
Columbia. A wide selection of black and white photographs as well as colour transparencies resulted from this trip. An extensive trip was taken in the Highway No. 16
area, concentrating mainly on sport fishing and the historical Indian villages near Kispiox.
Another trip was taken for the purpose of obtaining new photographs of the Okanagan
Valley, East and West Kootenays, and the Revelstoke-Big Bend area. Scenic shots were
taken of Vancouver Island, centring mainly on the northern cities and tourist focal points.
Full coverage was given the Swiftsure and P.I.Y.A. Yacht Races, as well as the carving, erection, and dedication ceremonies of the world's tallest totem-pole in Victoria.
Approximately 1,200 negatives were taken to cover the above-mentioned assignments.
During the year the Photographic Branch completed still assignments for the
Department of Agriculture, Department of Health and Welfare, Department of Lands
and Forests, Department of Mines, Provincial Archives, Provincial Museum, Department of the Provincial Secretary, Department of Public Works, Queen's Printer, Department of the Attorney-General, Department of Highways, Department of Fisheries, as
well as the British Columbia Power Commission, British Columbia Resources Conference, Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company, and Government House. These assignments included Chilliwack and Haney Fall Fairs, cattle inoculation in Saanich, hospitals
throughout British Columbia, historical sites and events, Indian lore in British Columbia,
opening of Legislature and M.L.A. portraits, new buildings throughout British Columbia,
highway and bridge construction throughout British Columbia, Hells Gate fishways,
Ladore Dam, railway construction and inaugural trip on Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
Motion Pictures
During the year the Photographic Branch released three films, namely: " Forward,"
a film on British Columbia secondary industries; "Legend of the West," travelogue of
the Cariboo and Chilcotin areas; and "The Road Home," a film showing the services
provided by the Department of Health and Welfare to the rehabilitation of polio patients. Y 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The industrial film " Forward," a sequel to " Johnny's Heritage," was previewed in the
Hotel Vancouver at a joint meeting of the British Columbia Products Bureau and the
Advertising and Sales Bureau. There was an approximate attendance of 320. " Legend
of the West" was previewed in Williams Lake and Quesnel, with a capacity audience
in both cities. The film " Road Home " was distributed through the Department of
Health and Welfare and previewed in Ottawa, Regina, and Montreal to a large representation of Health Department officials, and reports show that it was highly recommended by all who saw it.
The major motion-picture project of this year is the filming of sport fishing in
British Columbia for the Government Travel Bureau. Although this assignment provided
the problem of being in the right location when the fish were running, a good coverage
was obtained and field shooting completed. The major fishing areas covered by this
film will be Vancouver Island for salmon, Kamloops to represent trout-fishing, and Kispiox River for steelhead.
The International Yachting Regatta was covered by both still- and motion-picture
cameramen. A good selection of motion pictures of the races, with a back-drop of the
Gulf Islands, were taken.   These, now on file, will prove very useful in future films.
A complete coverage was made for the Pacific Great Eastern of the first work-train
trip from Squamish to North Vancouver, inaugural trip of the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway from North Vancouver to Prince George, and the extended trip into the Peace
River area. Along with the motion pictures, a complete still photographic coverage was
made for publicity purposes and Pacific Great Eastern records.
One of the major motion-picture projects of the year is a film for the Department
of Highways. Numerous field-trips have been made by our staff throughout all the major
and several of the smaller highway networks of the Province, to show the various steps
in the large highway programme, from highway location to the completed highways.
Upon completion, the purpose of this film will be to show not only what is required to
build a highway in this Province, but also to publicize the vast improvements that have
and are being made for automobile travel in this Province. These assignments also gave
several good opportunities for the Department to take numerous scenic and highway
photographs for our files.
On all motion-picture assignments, priority has been given to the film in production.
However, where at all possible, small still assignments in the areas have been covered
for the Government departments and additional scenic and industrial photographs taken
for our own files.
Film was provided from our footage library for a ten-minute television short for
use on one of Canada's better-known eastern programmes. Besides this, further footage
was also supplied to film companies in need of British Columbia scenes for motion pictures which would publicize the Province.
Darkroom Production
This year shows an increase in the darkroom services for this and other Government
departments. The number of prints produced in the year reached a total of 17,002.
In all, 3,240 negatives were processed. This figure covers our summer field work, photographs taken for other departments, and approximately 1,000 reproductions made from
old prints and paintings for the Provincial Archives. Approximately ninety official portraits were taken in our studio during the year.
General Office
The number of letters received and sent out from the general office this year has
exceeded that of previous years, which shows that our services are being brought to the
attention of the public.   The film library has shown a marked increase in over-the-counter REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY,  1956
Y 61
requests as well as requests from television stations across Canada. A system of grading the condition of films has been installed so that we are able to judge which prints
are suitable for television and other major shows.
During the year the Photographic Branch received thirteen films from the National
Film Board for distribution purposes. Another valuable addition to our library is the
film " Kitimat Story," which was placed in our library by the Aluminum Company of
Canada, in Vancouver. "B.C.—Canada's Evergreen Playground," produced for the
Standard Oil Company of Canada, is also a new addition to our library.
Remarks
A print from our files this year won the Gaevart Silver Medallion, and a total of
eleven honourable mentions were taken for the Department.
A total of 300 large photographs illustrating scenic and industrial aspects of British
Columbia were requested and supplied for display purposes.
Summary
Summarizing, the year 1956 has shown a substantial increase in demands for services
available through this branch of the Travel Bureau. Government departments are now
realizing the necessity and importance of the medium of still photography and motion
pictures in publicity, research, and for record purposes. This has added considerably to
the pressure and demands on all members of the staff.
A list showing production and distribution follows.
Motion Picture Shows
To various organizations in Victoria and environs  33
Preview shows in the Branch theatre  52
Motion-picture Circulation (Other than Television)
Total audience in British Columbia     60,000
Total audience in other Provinces       1,500
Total audience in United States (through National Film
Board)  459,731
Total audience in England (through B.C. House)     72,570
Total audience.
593,801 Y 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Television Showings
Films
CKWS-TV, Kingston, Ont  16
CHEX-TV, Peterborough, Ont  16
CKGN-TV, North Bay, Ont  9
CFPA-TV, Port Arthur, Ont  4
CKRS-TV, Jonquiere, Que  16
CFCM-TV, Quebec City, Que  1
CBMT-TV, Montreal, Que.____  1
CHSJ-TV, Saint John, N.B  6
CKCW-TV, Moncton, N.B  1
  1
  2
  5
  14
  1
CJON-TV, St. John's, Nfld.__
CBWT-TV, Winnipeg, Man..
CFQC-TV, Saskatoon, Sask._
CFRN-TV, Edmonton, Alta._
CJLH-TV, Lethbridge, Alta._
CHEK-TV, Victoria, B.C.—-
Estimated Audience
per Show
269,300
35,000
14,500
14,010
22,000
110,000
1,401,000
135,848
60,000
57,723
207,000
65,000
159,000
39,600
30,000
Total.
2,619,981
Still Photographs
During the year, photographs were sent complimentary to writers, publishers, and
advertising agents, as follows:—
British Columbia  5,900
Other Provinces  1,048
United States    549
Foreign   82
Total released for publication.
7,579
General Office
During the year the general office work consisted of running the Branch film library,
selecting and captioning photographs, keeping records, filing and dealing with correspondence.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1957
810-157-6481  

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