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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Eighty-fifth Annual Report 1955-56 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1957

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Full Text

 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Eighty-fifth Annual Report
1955-56
By the Superintendent of Education
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1957  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Eighty-fifth Annual Report of the Public Schools
of the Province.
Leslie Raymond Peterson,
Minister of Education.
January, 1957.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, 1956
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson, LL.B.
Deputy Minister and
Superintendent of Education:
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed., LL.D.
Assistant Deputy
Minister of Education:
J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Paed., Ed.D.
Chief Inspector of Schools:
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.)
Municipal Inspectors, Assistant Municipal Inspectors,
and Superintendents of Schools:
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Burnaby.
John Gough, M.A., Greater Victoria.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Vancouver.
R. C. Grant, B.A., Assistant, Burnaby.
William Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Psed., Assistant, North
Vancouver.
D. B. Mackenzie, B.A., M.A., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
R.   F.   Sharp,  B.A.,  D.Pasd.,  Superintendent,
Vancouver.
Inspectors of Schools
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Creston.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc, B.Ed., Burns Lake.
N. A. Allen, B.A., Nelson.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., B.Ed., Vancouver.
C. L. Campbell, M.A., Nanaimo.
T. G. Carter, M.C., Vancouver.
D. G. Chamberlain, B.A., B.Ed., Williams Lake.
Joseph Chell, M.A., Mission.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Grand Forks.
E. J. Dunn, B.A., M.A., Cranbrook.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Alberni.
S. J. Graham, B.A., Trail.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Abbotsford.
B. H. Harford, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
H. S. Hurn, B.A., Campbell River.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Pasd., Penticton.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Dawson Creek.
I. H. R. Jefpery, B.A., Chilliwack.
H. P. Johns, Ph.D., Victoria.
Deputy  Superintendent,
M.M.,  B.A.,  Assistant,
R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster.
H. B. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superin
tendent, Vancouver.
O. J. Thomas,  B.A.,
Vancouver.
A.  Turnbull,  M.C.,
Greater Victoria.
F. M. Wallace, B.A., M.A., Vancouver.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Peed., Surrey.
in School Districts:
G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
A. D. W. Jones, B.A., Kitimat.
J. G. Kirk, B.A., M.A., Kimberley.
J. J. McKenzie, B.A., Duncan.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Victoria.
Earl Marriott, B.A., Kamloops.
A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., Salmon Arm.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. John.
F. J. Orme, B.A., B.Paed., Quesnel.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., New Westminster.
C. E. Ritchie, B.A., Prince Rupert.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Langley.
R. B. Stibbs, B.A., Coquitlam.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., B.Ed., M.B.A., Powell
River.
A. S. Towell, M.A., Vernon.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS
Vancouver:
F. C. Boyes, B.A., M.A., Acting-Principal.
W. H. Auld, B.A., Ed.M.
Mrs. G. Birkett, B.Ed., M.A.
R. V. Boughton, B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D.
E. B. Broome, B.A., M.A., B.Ed.
L. E. Brown, B.P.E., M.A.
Miss M. Cottingham, B.A., M.A.
D. C. Gibbard, B.A.(Music), M.A.(Music).
R. Hanslow.
F. C. Hardwick, B.A., M.A.
Miss A. J. Kilgour, B.Ed., M.A.
J. McGechaen, B.A., M.A.
J. A. S. MacDonald, Diploma, Vancouver
School of Art.
Miss M. E. Maynard, B.A., H.E.Spec
Miss K. L. Meredith, B.A.
Miss S. O'Connell, B.A.
P. Penner, B.A., B.Ed.
Miss S. Shopland, B.A., Lib.Sc.(Librarian).
L. H. Slind, B.Sc, B.Mus., D.Ed.
D. C. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., D.Ed.
C. W. Truax, B.A., B.Ed., D.F.C. FF 6 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Model School:
Miss Z. M. Manning. Mrs. J. P. Webber.
Victoria:
H. C. Gilliland, M.A., Acting-Principal. N. A. Swainson, M.A., B.Ed.
G. A. Brand, B.A. R. V. Maclean, B.A., B.Ed., M.Ed.
H. E. Farquhar, MA. F. L. Martens, B.Ed., M.Sc(N.P.E.).
A. W. Johns, B.A. Miss J. B. Fleming, B.A.
Miss W. A. Copeland. Miss M. C. Bray, B.P.E.
Mrs. K. M. Christie, B.A. Mrs. H. M. Gilmour.
A. E. Loft, B.A. Miss G. Tuckey, B.A., B.S.W., Librarian.
D. Boyce Gaddes, A.T.C.M., B.Mus., M.A. J. Elmer Brown, M.A.
A. Hunkin, B.Sc, M.A. Miss N. M. McKillican.
C. Moore, B.A.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Services: W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Pasd., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.
Co-ordinator of Teacher Education: F. H. Johnson, M.A., D.Pasd.
Comptroller: S. E. Espley.
Chief Clerk:  M. J. Davis.
Director of Administration:  G. W. Graham, B.A.
Supervisor of School Construction: J. H. Wilson.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: J. S. White.
Inspectors of Technical Classes: T. Quayle and C. J. Strong, M.A.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Assistant Registrars: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed., and P. E. Wilkinson, B.A.
Director of Home Economics: Miss Bertha Rogers, B.Sc(H.Ec), M.A.
Inspectors of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S., and Miss J. R. Irvine, B.Sc(H.Ec)
Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance:  H. P. Johns, M.A., Ph.D.
Director of Community Programmes: L. J. Wallace, B.A., M.Ed.
Director of Visual Education:  J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc
Director of School Radio Broadcasts: P. J. Kitley, M.A.
Director of Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Pasd.
Director of High School Correspondence: Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch:  P. G. Barr.
Superintendent, Jericho Hill School (for the Deaf and the Blind):
C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D.
Assistant Director of Curriculum: J. R. Meredith, B.A. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report of the Superintendent of Education     11
Report of the Assistant Deputy Minister of Education     31
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools     36
Report of the Division of Teacher Education  39
Summer School of Education  39
Provincial Normal Schools—
Vancouver  43
Victoria  46
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  51
Report of the Director of Community Programmes Branch  54
Report of the Director of Night-schools  58
Report of the Director of Home Economics  59
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver  61
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)  70
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)  72
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)  74
School District No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)  76
School District No. 36 (Surrey)  77
RerTorts of District Inspectors     79
Report of the Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind (Jericho Hill
School)  130
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  131
Elementary School Correspondence  135
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  137
Report of the Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance  141
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts  142
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  143
Report of the Director of Visual Education  145
Report of the Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act "  146
Statistical Returns  149
Information re Examination Papers  155 FF 8
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School.
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex	
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils according to Different Classes of Schools.
Teachers' Certificates	
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education.
Cost per Pupil, on Various Bases, for the School-year 1955-56	
Number of School Districts	
Number of Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District	
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District	
Page
11
12
12
13
13
14
14
15
16
17
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District.
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District     17
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
Each District	
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in
Each District	
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District	
Number of District Supervisors, Relieving Teachers, Visiting Teachers	
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils	
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each Type
of School	
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School	
Classification of Teachers' Salaries	
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1955 by Provincial Government.
Expenditure for Education for the Calendar Year 1955 by School District	
Revenue for Education for the Calendar Year 1955 by School District	
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various
School Districts	
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades	
18
18
19
20
21
i
22
22
23
23
24
27
149
184   Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1955-56
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1957.
To the Honourable Leslie Raymond Peterson,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Eighty-fifth Annual Report of the Public Schools
of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1956.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from 223,-
840 to 240,674, and the average daily attendance increased from 204,239 to 218,303.
The percentage of the regular attendance was 90.70.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School
Numb
;r of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Large
Municipal
Large
Rural
Rural
Total
5,888
14,165
5,939
10,188
18,674
13,067
673
3,270
1,977
77,782
500
5,212
298
1,549
9,548
818
16,789
16,576
190
38,241
19,304
63
1,743
2,285
586
2,664
49,091
13,404
5,459
145,405
Totals                                 	
78,333
125,631
34,714
1,996
240,674
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High School Correspondence classes, regular students (exclusive of the 4,033 officially registered in
high, superior, or elementary schools)        1,965
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular
students       1,417
Under section 13 (g) of the "Public Schools Act," pupils
receiving instruction   34
3,416
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme  9111
Night-schools   29,331
Vancouver School of Art  267
Vancouver Vocational Institute  2,083
High School Correspondence (adults only)   4,261
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)  305
Carried forward     40,574
1 Does not include apprentice training, now operated by the Department of Labour.
11 FF 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Brought forward
40,574
Adult education—Continued
Recreational and Physical Education Classes  129,0352
Summer School of Education (1955 session) _
Normal School, Vancouver	
Normal School, Victoria	
Industrial and vocational teachers-in-training
Victoria College
       1,881
607
336
208
3953
University of British Columbia ._        6,0274
179,063
2 This figure is a total course enrolment, rather than a total of the adults in this category.
3 This figure does not include an enrolment of 651 in the special evening classes.
* This figure does not include the following enrolments:    1955  summer session,  1,420;
classes, 471;   correspondence courses, 567.
1955-56 extra sessional
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade for
the school-year 1955-56:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
Kindergarten        -	
Grade 1            - - -	
1,115
15,112
14,131
14,151
12,302
10,867
10,753
10,841
9,808
8,360
6,817
4,978
3,899
576
1,084
13,624
12,842
13,289
11,760
9,991
10,034
10,269
9,374
8,472
6,947
5,165
3,810
303
2,199
28,736
26,973
Grade 11           	
Grade III                                                    -
27,440
24,062
Grade IV                                                               ..
Grade V            _
20,858
Grade VI          	
20,787
Grade VII                                                   	
21,110
19,182
16,832
13,764
Grade VIII                   -	
Grade IX                                        . .—   .           -	
Grade X                           	
Grade XI           	
10,143
7,709
Grade XII          	
Grade XIII                   . -  	
879
Totals...
123,710
116,964
240,674
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of
pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per teacher
are shown in the following table:—
Number of Teachers
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
Type of School
Grade
Teacher
Special
Instructor
Total
574
1,298
621
96
494
175
4,491
155
373
170
1
41
14
155
32
729
1,671
791
97
535
189
4,646
32
16,576
38,241
19,304
2,285
13,404
5,459
145,405
6.89
15.89
8.01
.95
5.57
2.27
60.42
28 88
29.46
31.08
Elementary-senior high schools...
Elementary-junior high schools...
27.13
31.19
32 38
Totals 	
7,749
941
8,690
240,674
100.00
31.06 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
FF  13
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number
with or without university degrees:—
Number of Teachers
Type of School
With
Degrees
Without
Degrees
Total
577
1,220
545
14
189
60
359
15
152
451
246
83
346
129
4,287
17
729
1,671
791
Superior schools.    ,.., -	
97
535
189
4,646
32
Totals   .         .   — —  	
2,979
5,711
8,690
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR
PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and
also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
Number
Number
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Percent
Government
Total
School-year
of
of
Daily
age of
Expenditure
Expenditure
Teachers
School
Atten
Atten
for
for Public
Employed
Districts
dance
dance
Education
Schools
1877-78
56
45
2,198
1,395
63.49
$48,411.141
1882-83
69
128
267
59
104
169
2,693
6,372
11,496
1,383
3,093
7,111
51.36
48.54
61.85
60,758.751
113,679.361
174,775.43
1887 88
1892-93	
$215,056.22s
1897-98	
429
213
17,648
11,055
62.64
290,255.26
425,555.10
1902-4)3	
607
268
24,499
16,357
66.76
473,802.29
604,357.86
1907-08  	
816
189
33,314
23,195
69.62
544,671.60
1,220,509.85
1912-13  	
1,597
359
57,608
43,274
75.12
1,663,003.34
4,658,894.97
1913-14  ....	
1,859
374
62,263
49,377
79.30
1,885,654.11
4,634,877.56
1917-18...   	
2,246
575
67,516
54,746
81.09
1,653,796.60
3,519,014.61
1922-23
3,118
744
94,888
77,752
81.94
3,176,686.28s
7,630,009.54s
9,261,094.98s
1927-28...... --	
3,668
788
108,179
91,760
84.82
3,532,518.953
1928-29--	
3,784
792
109,588
94,410
86.17
3,765,920.69s
11,149,996.27s
1929-30.  	
3,854
803
111,017
96,196
86.65
3,743,317.08=
10,008,255.66s
1930-31    	
3,948
811
113,914
99,375
87.23
3,834,727.19 =
10,061,387.99 s
1931-32.. -	
3,959
830
115,919
103,510
89.29
4,015,074.37s
9,719,333.81s
1932-33.  	
3,912
821
116,816
104,978
89.86
2,849,972.023
8,941,497.34s
1933-34    	
3,873
827
115,792
103,389
89.30
2,611,937.80s
8,213,369.04s
1934-35
3,942
762
117,233
101,893
86.91
2,835,040 74s
8,458,156.00s
8,775,353.78s
1935-36- - 	
3,956
773
116,722
101,873
87.27
2,972,385.04s
1936-37
4,025
763
118,431
104,044
3,277,660.23s
3,524,962.69s
9,593,562.64s
10,193,367.08s
1937-38  ....	
4,092
741
120,360
106,515
88.49
1938-39 	
4,194
721
120,934
107,660
89.02
3,630,670.78s
10,640,740.47s
1939-40	
4,220
720
120,459
108,826
90.34
3,585,769.00s
10,521,684.92s
1940-41   .- -   -
4,248
730
119,634
103,192
86.26
3,963,848.24s
10,982,364.49s
1941-42   -	
4,224
696
118,405
102,085
86.22
4,028,397.88s
11,120,801.94s
1942-43     -	
4,055
661
115,447
93,473
80.96
3,924,243.53s
11,502,291.35s
4,162
4,354
654
119,043
125,135
102,999
107,599
86.52
85.99
4,244,898.82s
5,022,534.59s
12,231,029.35s
13,683,538.18s
1944-45. - 	
650
4,512
86
130,605
114,590
87.74
5,765,205.50s
14,818,625.81s
1946-47
4,833
89
137,827
121,334
88.03
9,398,473.46s
20,176,930.53s
1947-48 	
5,116
93
146,708
129,859
88.51
12,468,653.18s
25,768,392.09s
1948-49..   -
5,496
97
155,515
138,941
89.34
17,363,430.94s
35,538,079.88s
1949-50. 	
5,873
97
164,212
147,583
89.87
22,809,631.23s
47,726,750.37s
1950-51 	
6,272
98
173,354
154,077
88.88
25,830,076.88s
54,195,133.95s
1951-52  	
6,598
101
183,112
163,364
89.21
26,885,980.43s
57,881,559.48s
1952-53	
~   7,105
100
195,290
176,138
90.19
26,555,080.24s
58,401,121.15s
1953-54   	
7,574
104
210,174
191,061
90.91
24,060,233.15s
70,791,844.25s
1954-55... 	
8,185
104
223,840
204,239
91.24
34,279,302.27s
80,823,263.71s
8,690
102
240,674
218,303
90.70
41,067,740.34
69,314,181.24*
i The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
2 This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
3 This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University.
4 This amount on calendar year 1955, exclusive of capital expenditure from by-law funds. FF 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
COST PER PUPIL, VARIOUS BASES, CALENDAR YEAR 1955
Grand total cost of education	
Deduct—
Capital expenditure from current revenue  $3,128,373.00
Debt charges on school district debt     7,245,840.00
Grant to University of British Columbia     2,989,250.00
$69,314,181.24
Special grant to Victoria College.
Normal School, Vancouver	
Normal School, Victoria	
High Correspondence School
Elementary Correspondence School
Night-schools 	
Adult education	
30,000.00
127,713.66
72,215.06
163,974.17
68,934.04
34,986.92
99,245.90
Net total operating costs
Net operating cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of
218,303 pupils	
Net operating cost per pupil per school-day on average daily attendance
of 218,303 pupils	
Net operating cost per pupil to Provincial Government for year on
average daily attendance of 218,303 pupils	
13,960,532.75
$55,353,648.49
253.56
1.31
162.15
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1955-56:—
Municipal school districts   7
Large municipal school districts  37
Large rural school districts  38
Rural school districts (unattached)  20
Total number of districts
102 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
FF 15
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 16,576; of this
number, 8,263 were boys and 8,313 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1955-56 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
7. Nelson	
10. Arrow Lakes..
11. Trail... 	
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna	
33. Chilliwack..
34. Abbotsford..
36. Surrey.
39. Vancouver- —
40. New Westminster..
41. Burnaby.
42. Maple Ridge	
44. North Vancouver...
45. West Vancouver.	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South..
61. Greater Victoria	
68. Nanaimo..	
71. Courtenay....
Totals..
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
26
13
4
22
18
17
36
19
9
101
35
55
19
28
19
20
14
65
19
14
527
19
4
33
25
23
47
26
12
136
45
73
25
34
24
29
22
99
30
23
729
395
79
712
552
508
1,170
559
284
3,412
986
1,820
603
846
656
580
421
1,969
602
422
16,576 FF   16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 38,241; of
this number, 19,340 were boys and 18,901 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1955-56 in each
district are shown in the following:—
District Number and Name
1.
2.
3.
5.
7.
8.
9.
11.
12.
14.
15.
16.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
27.
28.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
43.
46.
47.
52.
53.
54.
55.
60.
61.
62.
63.
65.
66.
67.
70.
71.
75.
77.
78.
80.
Fernie.	
Cranbrook .
Kimberley...
Creston	
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Trail..	
Grand Forks.
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm. 	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Vernon 	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel 	
Langley	
Surrey 	
Delta _.__.
Richmond	
Vancouver	
Coquitlam	
Sechelt	
Powell River.—
Prince Rupert-
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Peace River North_
Greater Victoria—
Sooke  	
Saanich	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith 	
Alberni- 	
Courtenay 	
Mission	
Summerland..
Enderby	
Kitimat	
Unattached districts-
Totals-
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
7
22
23
22
10
12
22
I8.
14
20
38
8
13
19
12
7
23
36
12
17
42
55
16
25
363
31
13
29
23
11
7
5
11
14
20
26
30
16
14
42
8
27
13
7
11
7
1,221
Number of
Teachers
9
30
34
29
12
12
30
24
19
27
48
11
17
26
16
9
30
47
15
25
59
77
20
33
507
45
14
38
34
14
9
5
14
26
27
37
40
23
21
55
10
38
18
13
15
 9
1,671
Number of
Pupils
182
690
779
620
253
262
589
519
398
551
1,154
220
387
543
336
172
636
1,204
370
601
1,309
1,643
433
903
12,553
919
332
815
742
323
201
126
269
443
540
749
975
470
430
1,339
232
912
404
247
276
190
38,241 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
FF  17
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 19,304; of this
number, 9,884 were boys and 9,420 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1955-56 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
2
17
24
25
22
24
26
25
69
43
57
15
11
50
27
14
9
88
34
24
33
34
28
30
35
34
101
56
77
20
12
65
34
18
13
130
47
514
11,  Trail
741
22. Vernon           	
23. Kelowna _	
807
721
33.   Chilliwack
789
34. Abbotsford _ _ _	
38. Richmond	
863
896
2,395
1,484
1,891
42. Maple Ridge _	
522
390
1,543
757
430
298
3,234
1,029
Totals                             	
26
580
791
19,304
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 2,285; of this number,
1,175 were boys and 1,110 were girls. The number of schools, number of divisions,
number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1955-56 in each district are
shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2
4
2
3
10
9
3
3
5
3
3
2
3
2
7
4
11
3
3
7
4
3
2
4
2
4
10
9
3
3
5
3
3
2
3
2
7
4
11
3
3
7
4
3
40
116
30
75
13. Kettle Valley	
228
264
22. Vernon 	
76
26. Birch Island           	
52
27. Williams Lake     	
118
78. Qiif-snel
78
29. Lillooet...            	
43
36
51. Portland Canal	
56
44
195
55. Burns Lake  	
109
269
62.  Snnke
59
72. Campbell River          	
181
81. Fort Nelson.
    Unattached districts	
63
Totals	
29
96
97
2,285 FF 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was 13,404;
of this number, 6,842 were boys and 6,562 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1955-56 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie	
4. Windermere	
6. Kootenay Lake..
10. Arrow Lakes	
13. Kettle Valley	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
20. Salmon Arm_.
24. Kamloops	
25. Barriere	
26. Birch Island...
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. Ashcroft	
31. Merritt	
32. Fraser Canyon..
39. Vancouver	
46. Sechelt 	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Ocean Falls	
50. Queen Charlotte..
53. Terrace	
54. Smithers	
56. Vanderhoof	
58. McBride	
64. Saltspring	
69. Qualicum..
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River.
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
76. Agassiz..
79. Ucluelet-Tofino..
Totals	
25
18
13
6
9
20
17
7
7
7
8
6
24
27
16
19
19
7
5
22
22
9
7
7
14
11
12
15
12
26
20
12
14
7
30
19
15
6
9
24
18
7
7
7
8
7
27
31
17
23
23
7
5
25
26
9
8
7
16
12
15
20
15
32
21
12
18
9
792
524
362
137
250
652
461
189
196
215
193
145
586
754
542
569
586
189
102
570
696
208
207
184
412
311
331
393
381
867
450
289
456
205
52
470
535
13,404
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was 5,459;
of this number, 2,760 were boys and 2,699 girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1955-56 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
11. Trail	
14. Southern Okanagan..
33. Chilliwack 	
41. Burnaby	
43. Coquitlam	
67. Ladysmith	
69. Qualicum	
Totals..
20
15
9
76
16
15
11
162
23
16
10
91
20
17
12
189
604
504
311
2,664
553
509
314
5,459 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
FF 19
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 145,405; of this
number, 75,446 were boys and 69,959 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1955-56 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere..
Creston	
Kootenay Lake..
Nelson	
Slocan _
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail..	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton .—
Keremeos j*.	
Princeton 	
Golden 	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm _
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Vernon  	
Kelowna	
Kamloops 	
Barriere.. 	
Birch Island 	
Williams Lake  	
Quesnel _ -
Lillooet   	
Ashcroft. 	
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack..	
Abbotsford	
Langley _.
Surrey	
Delta. 	
. Richmond-
Vancouver..
New Westminster..
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam..
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver—
Sechelt.. 	
Powell River	
Howe Sound 	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte.	
Portland Canal 	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George..
McBride 	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Saltspring	
Cowichan _
Lake Cowichan..
6
5
7
5
6
2
11
12
13
4
11
2
4
2
6
3
5
2
6
14
1
8
18
29
5
6
25
18
4
4
3
7
13
22
18
34
9
9
52
6
23
12
13
13
7
11
12
9
6
2
1
7
10
5
13
3
40
10
30
20
32
9
12
3
17
6
15
31
37
6
30
2
49
24
34
12
79
17
6
18
44
12
11
2
22
37
11
55
79
91
5
6
46
43
4
4
4
18
78
75
59
207
37
102
1,008
78
227
52
73
155
67
26
48
14
10
3
1
38
30
14
22
4
97
14
71
35
303
33
41
3
48
25
15
33
38
6
33
2
52
25
34
12
85
17
6
19
45
12
11
2
23
39
12
58
80
94
5
6
47
44
4
4
4
18
79
76
61
212
37
105
1,142
83
239
53
75
166
73
26
50
14
11
3
1
38
426
1,100
1,215
124
937
35
1,678
558
904
365
2,516
574
98
602
1,605
375
280
32
684
1,010
435
1,984
2,729
2,701
83
89
1,176
1,314
56
86
47
489
2,919
2,432
1,932
7,743
1,186
3,595
33,435
2,951
8,289
1,919
2,587
5,782
2,419
745
1,552
279
247
75
9
1,384
31
882
14
412
22
671
4
84
99
2,765
14
288
73
1,979
36
779
319
11,430
35
1,030
43
1,273
3
50
49
1,530
27
825 FF 20                                        PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
5
19
7
8
15
12
7
7
15
3
1
7
1
1
2
5
19
17
79
12
63
58
27
7
8
39
5
14
16
2
21
5
5
56
17
82
12
66
58
27
7
8
40
5
14
16
2
22
5
5
62
515
2,603
311
2,367
1,855
775
80
110
1,356
131
516
387
40
625
142
64
1,743
68. Nanaimo _  	
70. Alberni                                                                              ;■
73. Alert Bay                                                                         -	
78, Bndfrby
79. Ucluelet-Tofino                                                               	
80,   Kitimat
82. Chilcotin                        —
Totals
877
4,386
4,646
145,405
DISTRICT SUPERVISORS, RELIEVING TEACHERS, AND
VISITING TEACHERS
Numt
District Number and Name                                                                                                                        Teac
34. Abbotsford     7
er of
tiers
36. Surrey     	
3
41. Burnaby__              	
       8
57. Prince George   __.       _ _         .
1
61. Greater Victoria    _        __
17
75. Mission       ___ 	
     1
Total	
  32
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools showing number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
District Number and Name
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook
3. Kimberley.
4,
5
6
7,
Windermere..
Creston	
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail	
. Grand Forks..
Kettle Valley-
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos 	
Princeton 	
Golden	
. Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm..
Number of
Schools
5
15
15
14
7
15
3
8
4
7
4
6
5
7
18
Number of
Divisions
47
53
60
26
56
17
92
36
56
22
163
31
25
53
82
20
31
19
35
-72
Number of
Teachers
54
63
72
27
66
19
111
37
64
22
198
36
25
62
93
23
35
20
40
81
Number of
Pupils
1,400
1,790
1,994
688
1,673
427
2,915
820
1,493
581
5,092
972
576
1,657
2,759
595
932
493
1,071
2,006 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
FF 21
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2
12
22
31
6
8
28
21
7
7
4
9
16
25
19
39
10
11
65
8
30
14
17
16
9
13
14
12
8
4
2
8
13
8
15
7
42
11
32
21
41
12
15
5
18
7
7
22
9
9
18
15
11
9
16
4
2
8
2
2
3
5
21
23
108
141
134
12
17
63
69
31
31
20
37
147
120
101
271
53
152
1,560
156
415
86
131
233
113
46
82
38
32
12
4
61
50
35
31
29
131
25
94
46
470
56
67
18
78
41
46
132
38
105
92
60
27
20
66
19
27
23
9
32
9
5
66
28
129
161
148
12
17
67
79
34
35
21
41
166
139
120
304
57
172
1,909
184
488
98
152
265
131
47
93
41
37
12
4
72
55
37
31
31
147
26
108
50
591
65
80
21
89
SO
55
159
44
121
106
66
28
20
79
23
32
29
11
37
9
5
74
771
3,591
4,594
4,101
298
26. Birch Island ~ i  	
334
27. Williams Lake  	
1,664
28. Quesnel        -
2,138
29. Lillooet             _	
685
30. Ashcroft    	
31. Merritt                                                     	
840
589
1,058
33. Chilliwack    „	
5,189
3,854
3,241
9,670
37. Delta    '	
1,619
38. Richmond                                       .     .
5,394
52,381
5,421
14,664
42. Maple Ridge   „   .
3,044
4,449
8,171
3,832
46    Sp.rhe.lt
1,266
47.  Powell River
2,469
885
943
50. Queen Charlotte  	
283
51. Portland Canal	
65
2,126
1,456
992
906
765
57. Prince George  —	
3,775
58. McBride.   	
599
59. Peace River South 	
2,698
1,048
17,076
1,612
2,022
440
2,505
1,295
1,454
4,234
1,018
3,706
2,890
1,823
530
399
2,268
587
920
634
245
901
253
64
1,996
60. Peace Rive.r North
62. Sooke   	
67. Ladysmith 	
68. Nanaimo 	
70. Alberni   	
71. Courtenay -	
72. Campbell River 	
73. Alert Bay   	
76. Agassiz.-	
77. Summerland  	
78. Enderby  .....   	
79. Ucluelet-Tofino 	
80. Kitimat
81. Fort Nelson	
82. Chilcotin	
—.   Unattached districts	
Totals...    	
1,080
7,442
8,690
240,674 FF 22 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of teachers
employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance in each type of
school for the school-year 1955-56:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Average
Daily
Attendance
Total
Male
Female
26
61
26
29
52
9
877
729
1,671
791
97
535
189
4,646
32
16,576
38,241
19,304
2,285
13,404
5,459
145,405
8,263
19,340
9,884
1,175
6,842
2,760
75,446
8,313
18,901
9,420
1,110
6,562
2,699
69,959
14,534.57
34,248.73
17,697.03
2,052.52
Elementary-senior high schools	
12,076.29
4,973.85
132,719.90
Totals            	
1,080
8,690
240,674
123,710
116,964
218,302.89
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars only)
paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals,
and special instructors. Part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers earning less than $1,100 are
excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Teachers
Low
Salary
High
Salary
Average
Salary
550
1,246
596
96
474
166
4,392
$1,500
1,215
1,258
1,575
1,027
1,954
1,008
$7,420
7,445
7,301
5,856
6,895
6,988
7,051
$4,953
4,419
4,217
Superior schools   „	
3,249
3,691
3,430
3,334
Supervising Principals
24
53
25
20
9
98
$6,370
5,475
5,640
4,812
5,332
4,672
$8,451
8,920
8,101
7,795
8,076
7,675
$7,314
7,067
7,195
6,486
6,738
6,642
Special Instructors
155
373
170
41
14
155
32
$1,113
1,187
1 1,260
1,288
2,336
1,164
I        1,988
1
$6,688
6,546
6,620
5,320
5,964
6,370
7,426
$4,651
4,457
4,153
3,657
3,621
3,392
4,859
Unclassified  	 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
FF 23
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary
ers attached to the Bureau of Measurements,
earning less than $1,900 per annum:—
Number of
Salary Range Teachers
$1,900-$ 1,999     31
2,000- 2,099  112
2,100- 2,199     89
2,200- 2,299  230
2,300- 2,399  259
2,400- 2,499  245
2,500- 2,599  258
2,600- 2,699  218
2,700- 2,799  187
2,800- 2,899  287
2,900- 2,999  237
3,000- 3,099  314
3,100- 3,199  286
3,200- 3,299  235
3,300- 3,399  212
3,400- 3,499  220
3,500- 3,599  197
3,600- 3,699  222
3,700- 3,799  257
3,800- 3,899  280
3,900- 3,999  299
4,000- 4,099  282   .
4,100- 4,199  251
4,200- 4,299 _'_  234
4,300- 4,399  259
4,400- 4,499  325
4,500- 4,599  147
4,600- 4,699  247
-groups, excluding part-time teachers, teach-
superintendents and instructors, and teachers
Number of
Salary Range Teachers
$4,700-$4,799     89
4,800- 4,899     84
4,900- 4,999     97
5,000- 5,099  130
5,100- 5,199  180
5,200- 5,299  113
5,300- 5,399  165
5,400- 5,499  128
5,500- 5,599     92
5,600- 5,699     62
5,700- 5,799     93
5,800- 5,899     58
5,900- 5,999  117
6,000- 6,099  141
6,100- 6,199     30
6,200- 6,299  142
6,300- 6,399     32
6,400- 6,499     33
6,500- 6,599  19
6,600- 6,699  28
6,700- 6,799  28
6,800- 6,899  20
6,900- 6,999  18
7,000- 7,099  14
7,100- 7,199  26
7,200- 7,299  13
7,300- 7,399  7
7,400 and over  57
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1955
(Exclusive of Capital Expenditures from By-law Funds)
Total expenditure by school districts	
Add Department of Education expenditures for—
Administration, services, etc  $4,902,794.19
Teachers' Pension Fund 6%     1,822,456.39
Free text-books, maps, etc        350,466.66
$62,238,464.00
7,075,717.24
Total expenditure ■_  $69,314,181.24 FF 24
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
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Sn REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT FF 27
REVENUE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 1955
District Number and Name
Government
Grants
School
District
Requisitions
Sub-total
Miscellaneous
Revenue,
etc.
Surplus
from
Previous
Year
Deficit
from
Previous
Year
Total
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
Fernie	
Cranbrook-
Kimberley	
Windermere	
Creston —
Kootenay Lake..
Nelson —
Slocan —
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes—
Trail  _
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan.
Penticton	
Keremeos 	
Princeton	
Golden  	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen.
Vernon 	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Barriere 	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake~
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo..
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey.... —
Delta 	
Richmond —
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam 	
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver—
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte .
Portland Canal—.
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers —
Burns Lake 	
Vanderhoof —
Prince George	
McBride 	
Peace River South...
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria—
Sooke _	
Saanich	
Saltspring	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan...
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni. 	
Courtenay	
Campbell River..
$319,058
291,607
262,276
117,008
344,148
82,569
508,249
141,462
293,264
128,036
593,259
164,786
96,112
296,017
390,200
132,521
168,482
126,024
170,432
338,221
112,685
565.919
630,398
644,738
66,177
111,424
391,209
459,908
112,656
157,199
93,685
188,570
655,691
685,389
513,261
1,052,840
171,704
650,221
7,588,643
553,225
1,598,616
425,995
503,970
747,190
303,040
207,099
280,837
171,343
111,892
66,466
13,466
98,360
308,532
229,902
193,102
206,963
592,169
152,424
580,227
358,014
1,727,672
345,359
291,765
95,549
360,810
200,125
242,172
507,560
255,735
403,729
493,091
321,514
$139,601
91,661
205,877
32,484
123,654
41.0S0
304,897
65,331
153,810
32,614
901,490
50,744
23,421
116,051
211,802
34,724
55,713
26,160
64,340
115,304
44,576
218,972
347,085
312,475
16,440
36,777
96,803
94,194
207,541
60,013
51,888
60,586
359,826
187,453
170,028
521,863
120,827
361,643
8,393,397
701,580
1,227,479
217,869
501,843
708,371
515,355
130.311
371,351
125,200
178,174
26,804
12,009
359,227
70,400
56,548
31,036
43,960
244,556
32,376
157,115
65,615
1,977,776
181,172
185,187
43,142
225,128
217,189
139,850
619,748
107,912
299,744
179,306
234,181
$458,659
383,268
468,153
149,492
467,802
123,649
813,146
206,793
447,074
160,650
1,494,749
215,530
119,533
412,068
602,002
167,245
224,195
152,184
234,772
453,525
157,261
784,891
977,483
957,213
82,617
148,201
488,012
554,102
320,197
217,212
145,573
249,156
1,015,517
872,842
683,289
1,574,703
292,531
1,011,864
15,982,040
1,254,805
2,826,095
643,864
1,005,813
1,455,561
818,395
337,410
652,188
296,543
290,066
93,270
25,475
457,587
378,932
286,450
224,138
250,923
836,725
184,800
737,342
423,629
3,705,448
526,531
476,952
138,691
585,938
417,314
382,022
1,127,308
363,647
703,473
672,397
555,695
$3,354
10,740
11,675
1,000
19,920
980
6,090
1,670
7,718
1,640
34,970
3,750
2,050
24,750
36,675
6,223
5,872
1,200
2,756
11,605
4,398
16,742
46,765
39,345
3,500
2,775
28,334
3,985
10,591
28,042
4,521
8,900
101,703
7,900
19,450
16,300
14,400
31,179
288,500
38,750
56,023
8,829
14,700
26,550
30,861
5,900
10,745
7,880
18,505
10,820
10,520
15,600
2,000
10,390
9,345
53,500
6,965
71,962
13,596
164,100
54,400
11,150
1,175
15,465
4,900
6,280
51,500
6,610
24,325
21,050
14,793
$3,070
3,947
719
$100
2,419
6,091
101
364
7,935
2,332
23,189
4,968
3,733
12,756
	
2,113
3,062
6,885
1,728
842
2,042
10,626
4,204
7,825
2,204
1,015
16,822
14,188
8,913
1,689
951
5,860
53
2,430
1,626
12,000
25,278
8,290
16,286
489,975
3,618
14,990
17,311
256
6,827
1,005
3,810
13,260
253
347
4,785
9,722
4,500
2,472
100
6,000
5,690
13,153
1,720
10,224
144,196
3,950
10,068
2,374
	
2,000
405
-      	
9,369
2,028
4,898
15,654
14,599
16,933
$461,913
397,078
483,775
148,073
488,441
118,538
819,337
208,827
462,727
164,622
1,506,530
224,248
125,316
449,574
636,564
176,530
236,952
151,656
236,686
467,172
172,285
797,429
1,016,423
998,762
87,132
134,154
502,158
567,000
332,477
246,205
144,234
258,003
1,119,650
882,368
714,739
1,616,281
315,221
1,059,329
16,760,515
1,289,937
2,897,108
670,004
1,020,769
1,488,938
850,261
347,120
676,193
304,676
308,918
104,090
30,260
477,829
392,060
292,950
234,628
266,268
895,915
190,045
822,457
427,001
4,013,744
584,881
498,170
142,240
603,403
422,619
397,671
1,180,836
375,155
743,452
708,046
553,555 FF 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
REVENUE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 1955-
Continued
District Number and Name
Government
Grants
School
District
Requisitions
Sub-total
Miscellaneous
Revenue,
etc.
Surplus
from
Previous
Year
Deficit
from
Previous
Year
Total
73. Alert Bay	
$107,590
39,811
260,569
113,221
115,607
138,048
70,841
30,921
34,883
18,221
4,679
17,151
76,450
258
4,431
5,726
19,129
3,561
5,730
3,074
3,477
1.248
1,333
3,387
18,884
17,250
4,999
$69,973
122,037
231,289
54,488
67,634
31,146
28,366
244,451
1,150
1,701
2,110
3,171
2,610
$177,563
161,848
491,858
167,709
183,241
169,194
99,207
275,372
36,033
19,922
6,789
20,322
76,450
2,868
4,431
5,726
19,129
4,190
6,958
3,409
12,933
2,684
5,400
3,585
29,450
17,817
4,999
3,986
175,005
13,162
$25,127
10,163
6,080
2,150
5,091
4,450
1,560
2,100
7,407
$6,279
3,651
18,105
$208,969
175,662
516,043
74. Quatsino
75. Mission	
	
76. Agassiz  	
$2,696
167,163
2,932
191,264
171,636
78. Enderby	
2,008
79. Ucluelet-Tofino 	
3,599
395
104,366
277,867
36,033
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson	
82. Chilcotin	
Unattached
Atlin 	
67
524
27,396
6,265
20,522
200
Belmont Park
1,592
76,450
Butedale -   ~ 	
1,000
257
5,460
Camp Mile 163	
4,688
Camp Mile 456	
-
3,851
1,607
	
5,726
EE
22,980
629
1,228
335
9,456
1,436
4,067
198
10,566
567
5,797
Kyuquot	
6,958
4,300
922
4,946
	
7,709
9,500
13,855
17,130
5,400
175
3,410
Tahsis River ...	
8,435
250
3,500
1,436
1,169
953
38,135
21,317
6,435
3,986
78,044
2,540
5,155
96,961
10,622
300
550
1,420
173,885
14,665
Totals, all districts
$33,992,023
$25,613,837
$59,605,860
$1,755,527
$1,004,301
$127,224
$62,238,464
EXAMINATION SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS,  1956
University Entrance
The fifteen General Proficiency Scholarships, each of $175, awarded by the University of British Columbia, with the accompanying fifteen scholarships, each of $225,
generously granted by the Chris Spencer Foundation, were won by the following:—
Place
1st in B.C.
2nd in B.C.
Area 1
Area 2
Area 3
Area 4
Area 51
Area 61
Area 7
Area 8
Area 9
Area 10
Area 11
Area 12
Area 13
Name
John Michael Gilliland	
Terrence Samuel Brown	
Myrna Lorene Skapple	
Harald Samuel McGladdery—
Beverley Ruth Green	
Harold Charles Black	
f Michael Melbourne O'Brien
) Donald Nicholson	
f William Herbert New	
) Nelson Matthew Skalbania...
Barry John Shepherd	
Maurice James Clement	
Gordon Edward Willick	
John Quainton Fraser —
Donna Jean Taylor	
Harold Albert Menkes	
Rodney Oliver Brammall	
School
Victoria High School	
John Oliver High School....
L. V. Rogers High School..
Penticton High School-
Kelowna Senior High School-
Kamloops High School..
Langley Junior-Senior High School-
Queen Elizabeth High School	
John Oliver High School..
Gladstone Junior-Senior High School..
Kitsilano High School	
Magee H'gh School.
Burnaby South High School	
West Vancouver Senior High School	
North Peace Junior-Senior High School-
Oak Bay High School-
Royal Oak Junior-Senior High School	
Per Cent
97.25
95.38
93.25
88.75
90.0
91.25
87.38
87.38
89.88
89.88
91.75
92.13
86.13
92.5
82.75
92.0
90.5
!Tie. r
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
FF 29
The Governor-General's Silver Medal for the highest standing in the University
Entrance examinations was won by John Michael Gilliland. The Governor-General's
Bronze Medal for the second highest standing in the University Entrance examinations
was won by Terrence Samuel Brown.
GRADE XIII
The six Royal Institution Scholarships, each of $200, awarded by the University of
British Columbia for general proficiency, were won by the following:—
Name
School
Per Cent
David John Gunning Jones..
Joan Kristin Fladmark	
John Franklin Ogilvie	
Anita Lippens Borradaile..._
Dorothy Jane Hopcott	
Ralph Cluff Harvey	
J. Lloyd Crowe High School	
Salmon Arm Junior-Senior High School..
Senrahmoo High School    	
Chilliwack Senior High School	
Maple Ridge Senior High School	
Vernon High School...  	
91.9
88.7
86.2
85.9
85.4
85.1
GENERAL REVIEW
All branches of the Department continue to give the best service of which each is
capable.   Reports of the branches appear in the following pages.
The major problems facing the Department are associated with growth—growth in
the public demand for education, growth in the number of young people to be educated,
and consequent growth in the need for schools and the need for teachers to staff them.
During the calendar year 1956 the school population increased by some 21,000 pupils.
The College of Education
In September, 1956, a dream of many people for many years came to reality.
Teacher education, which for over fifty years had been a function of the Department of
Education through its normal schools in Vancouver and Victoria, came within the orbit
of the University as a special variety of faculty, known as The College of Education,
University of British Columbia, with a branch at Victoria College.
For the first time in the history of this Province and the second time in the history
of Canada, the education of all teachers became recognized as worthy of academic and
professional status within the fabric of the University. Great credit is due to the officers
and governing bodies of our University for their ready acceptance of the principle and
their assistance in bringing it into effect.
New Municipal Inspectorates
The growth in school population in the various school districts of the Province has
resulted in greatly increased administrative responsibilities for Boards of School Trustees.
To assist School Boards to discharge their functions more adequately, the following
school districts became municipal inspectorates:—
School District Municipal Inspector
No. 43 (Coquitlam) R. B. Stibbs, B.A.
No. 24 (Kamloops) Earl Marriott, B.A.
No. 23 (Kelowna) G. E. Johnson, B.A., B.Ed.
No. 57 (Prince George) K. F. Alexander, B.Sc, B.Ed.
No. 38 (Richmond) J. N. Burnett, M.A., B.Ed.
No. 11 (Trail) S. J. Graham, B.A.
4 FF 30
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
New Appointments to Inspectorial Staff
During the year the following were added to the inspectorial staff and assigned to
the school districts noted (two of these were replacements caused by retirements):
J. E. Beech, B.A.—No. 25 (Barriere), No. 26 (Birch Island), No. 31 (Merritt), and
No. 58 (McBride); L. A. Matheson, B.A., B.Ed.—No. 54 (Smithers), No. 55 (Burns
Lake), and No. 56 (Vanderhoof); W. D. Reid, B.A., B.Ed.—No. 72 (Campbell River),
No. 73 (Alert Bay), and No. 74 (Quatsino).
Retirements from the Inspectorial Staff
After many years of distinguished service as teacher, principal, and as Municipal
Inspector of Schools in North and West Vancouver, Mr. William Gray, M.A., came to
retirement age. His balanced judgment, his wise counsel, and his fine personal, intellectual, and professional qualities will be greatly missed in the Department of Education.
Another Inspector of Schools, Mr. A. S. Matheson, B.A., of Kelowna, retired during the year after serving the Province with distinction for eighteen years as teacher
and principal and twenty years as Inspector of Schools. Mr. Matheson consistently set
for himself and for the schools of his inspectorate a very high standard of attainment,
which was achieved and maintained.
Deaths
During the year a distinguished retired official of the Department passed away in
the person of Dr. H. B. King, formerly Chief Inspector of Schools. Always controversial in his educational thinking but always forward looking and in search of the best,
Dr. King made a most worthy and significant contribution to education in this Province.
Everyone in the Department was greatly saddened by the untimely death of Mr.
Barrie Harford, B.A., B.Ed., Provincial Inspector of Schools at Castlegar. Mr. Harford's warm personality, ready wit, and keen mind will long be remembered by his
colleagues.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. L. CAMPBELL,
Superintendent of Education. CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FF 31
CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. F. K. ENGLISH, B.A., M.A., Ed.D., ASSISTANT
DEPUTY MINISTER OF EDUCATION
A.  Division of Curriculum
One of the central purposes of the curriculum is to prepare young people for life in
adult society. To-day it is evident even to the casual observer that this society is going
through a transition in which great changes are taking place, not only in physical and
technological matters, but also in customs, beliefs, and standards. The impact of these
industrial, economic, and social movements is creating fundamental changes in nations,
in communities, and in the daily lives of individuals. Along with such developments as
new inventions, the discovery of new processes, and new knowledge, there appears to be
a significant alteration in ways of living and a tendency to re-examine things hitherto considered fixed and unalterable.
These conditions impose heavy responsibilities for schools. The curriculum that was
limited to developing literary and academic skills and knowledge required for the professions may have been adequate under earlier conditions. It is no longer sufficient to meet
the demands of present-day living. If our young people are to be adequately prepared,
our curriculum must take into account the conditions under which they live. Basic
courses may be in need of adjustment and revision. New courses may be necessary.
Established values, ideals, and standards may need redefining and re-emphasizing to be
effective in a new setting.
All of this suggests that our curriculum should be subject to a planned programme of
appraisal and adjustment for some years to come. Last year, as reported, the aims and
functions of the public school education in British Columbia were appraised and redefined
with the advice and assistance of the Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board. During the
year under review, this process of appraisal and revision was extended to specific aspects
of the curriculum as follows:—
(a)  Revision of Present Courses:—
(1) English.—A revision of the English programme for intermediate
grades was undertaken, and the first of a series of new courses and texts
was completed for Grade IV. A study of materials for directed reading
for the new junior high-school English programme was also made.
(2) Social Studies.—A new course was prepared and a new text
selected for Social Studies at the Grade X-XI level. History 102 (Canadian History) for Grade XIII pupils was also revised and a new text
selected.
(3) Arithmetic.—A study of the arithmetic programme for elementary grades was begun, with particular attention being given to a revision
of the programme for Grades I and II. The revision of the junior high-
school programme begun last year was continued with the preparation of a
new course and a selection of a new text for Grade VIII.
(4) Science.—A revision of the science programme begun last year
was completed for the intermediate grades. A new text-book was selected
for use at the Grade X-XI level. At the Grade XIII level a new course
was prepared and a new text-book was selected for Chemistry 101.
(5) Music.—A new text-book was selected for the music programme for Grades III and IV. At the senior high-school level, a complete revision of the music programme was prepared and a major in music
was introduced. FF 32 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
(6) French.—A tentative programme was prepared for use experimentally to test the desirability of teaching a second language to pupils at
the Grades V and VI level.   The programme will be given in schools in
selected areas during the year 1956-57.
(b) Selection of New Text-books.—The following new text-books were authorized for use in the public schools for the subjects indicated:—
Language:  Language Journeys, Grade IV.
Music:
Sing Me a Song, Grade III.
World Music Horizons, Music 10.
Mathematics:  Mathematics for Canadians, Mathematics 8.
Science:
Science in Action, Book II, Science 20.
General Chemistry, Chemistry 101.
Outline of Theory and Problems for Students of College Chemistry, Chemistry 101.
Social Studies:
Our World:  Renaissance to Modern Times, Social Studies 20.
Canada, A Political and Social History, History 102.
Agriculture and Industrial Arts:  Draughting for Canadian Schools,
all senior courses.
In connection with the adoption of text-books, there are two points worthy of note.
First, the practice of using texts by Canadian and British authors is being continued. All
but two of the above-named texts are written or edited by Canadians. The above fist
represents the works of seventeen authors, twelve of whom are Canadians—nine of these
are teachers and educators in British Columbia.
A second point that seems important is the fact that a text-book is simply one of
several aids to teaching. It is not intended to be a course in itself nor is it to take the
place of the teacher. Accuracy of content, organization, and interest are all considered
in the selection of books, and, so far as possible, the best book is selected in terms of the
purpose it is to serve.
Report Cards
Report cards for Grades I to XII have been under careful and detailed study for
some time. Revision of these cards has now been completed for use in the schools in
1956-57. This revision has been designed primarily to give a clear picture of the progress
the pupil is making in school in terms of his ability and in terms of the standards expected.
Throughout the process of revision, frequent consultation was held with various organizations and groups. A large number of recommendations were received from parents,
teachers, and others. The Department of Education gave careful consideration to these
views as well as to modern educational thought in revising the cards.
Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board
This Board has completed its second year of existence as an Advisory Board to the
Honourable the Minister of Education. During the year its activities included a study of
particular curriculum problems and an examination of various aspects of the curriculum,
including the counselling programme, the reading programme, and the relationship
between the secondary school and the University. The Board members gave valuable
suggestions on such matters as report cards, driver education, and the preparation of a
booklet outlining the system of public education in British Columbia. CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FF 33
Professional Committee on Curriculum Development
The function of this Committee is primarily to advise on the technical problems
connected with improving and administering the curriculum. The Committee meets at
the call of the Chair to consider such matters as required courses, time allottments, credits,
and to raise curriculum problems that have occurred in particular situations. During the
year the Committee considered proposed changes in the administration of the curriculum,
assessed experiments in new courses, and reviewed plans for changes in courses and
text-books.
The Departmental Library and Library Service
The Department of Education maintains an up-to-date reference library for the
use of its professional staff. This library includes standard educational references,
selected journals and periodicals of major importance to education, and reports, documents, and pamphlets on current educational topics. The work of organizing, cataloguing, and distributing these references as required is undertaken by a Research
Assistant, who collects and reports on materials required in dealing with current educational problems.
The Department has also reorganized the practices and procedures for recommending library and reference books for purchase by schools. Two representative committees of teachers and librarians have been established to review all publications before
approval and to report their findings to the Department. Books to be recommended
are subject to a careful evaluation, and a record of each book reviewed is kept in the
Department. Lists of recommended books are supplied to schools four times a year.
The purpose in providing this service is to assist schools in selecting useful and valuable
materials from among the thousands of publications placed on the market annually.
The conscientious and high-calibre assistance given by the members of the two committees is worthy of special acknowledgment.
Acknowledgments
The work of curriculum development has been greatly assisted by the advice of a
large number of people throughout the Province. Over eighty teachers and others played
an active part as members of the committees formally appointed to undertake revision
work during the year. Occasionally suggestions were received from the School Trustees'
Association and Parent-Teacher Federation. The Curriculum Committee of the British
Columbia Teachers' Federation met several times with the Director to discuss problems
in course development and planning. This would appear to be sound curriculum practice. No single individual or group should have a monopoly in determining the educational programme, but rather the combined wisdom and best judgment of many persons
should be taken into account. The soundness of our curriculum to-day is due in no
small measure to the interest and co-operation received from these various sources.
Close contact is maintained with other branches of the Department, more particularly the office of the Chief Inspector of Schools, the Division of Tests, Standards, and
Research, and the Registrar. The Text-book Branch works closely with the Division
of Curriculum. The co-operation of all these Departmental divisions is gratefully
acknowledged.
May I pay a tribute to Mr. J. R. Meredith, Assistant Director of Curriculum, for
his keen interest and for the able manner in which he discharges his duties; to Mr. Bruce
Barr, Research Assistant; and to the staff for their painstaking work during the year.
B.  General Educational Services
Certain general areas of education come within the jurisdiction of the Assistant
Deputy Minister. In some cases, detailed statements appear elsewhere in this Annual
Report, but a passing reference is made to the more important activities, as follows:—
I ff 34 public schools report, 1955-56
Jericho Hill School
Jericho Hill School, formerly known as the School for the Deaf and the Blind, is
a Government school located in the 4100 block, West Fourth Avenue, Vancouver.
The report of the Superintendent describes in detail the work of the school. Matters of general policy are referred to an Advisory Committee presently composed of
Inspectors William Gray and J. N. Burnett; Mr. D. B. MacKenzie, Assistant Superintendent and Inspector of Elementary Schools, Vancouver school system; the president
of the Blind Department, P.-T.A.; the president of the Deaf Department, P.-T.A.; the
Superintendent of the School, Dr. C. E. MacDonald; and the Assistant Deputy Minister.
Inspector William Gray, who retired in June of this year from his position as
Municipal Inspector of Schools in North Vancouver, served on this and previous Advisory
Committees for almost ten years. By virtue of his long experience in education and
sound judgment, he has contributed much to the development of the present programme
of the Jericho Hill School.
Provincial Junior Red Cross
It is a pleasure once again to state that Junior Red Cross continues to flourish in
both the elementary and the secondary schools of the Province. Statistics for enrolments
are as follows:—
Grades I to VIII  107,353 pupils in 3,022 branches
Grades IX to XIII     18,919 pupils in      68 branches
Totals   126,272 pupils in 3,090 branches
Pupils engaged in Junior Red Cross work comprised 53.6 per cent of those in the
elementary- and secondary-school grades.
The Provincial Junior Red Cross Committee has been enlarged to include three
Inspectors of Schools, one Municipal and two Provincial. A number of teachers, in
recognition of their work in Junior Red Cross throughout the Province, have been added
as corresponding members. In addition, the Provincial Normal School, the Department
of Health and Welfare, and the British Columbia Teachers' Federation are actively represented. The Chairman is an ex officio member of the Health Centre for Children,
Vancouver General Hospital.
(The detailed annual report of Junior Red Cross activities may be found in the
Thirty-seventh Annual Report, 1955, Canadian Red Cross Society, British Columbia
Division.)
Education Information Committee
In January, 1955, the Education Information Committee was set up. Membership
in this body includes representatives from the British Columbia Teachers' Federation,
the British Columbia School Trustees' Association, the British Columbia Parent-Teacher
Federation, and the Department of Education. Briefly, the function of the Committee
is to find ways and means of providing information more effectively to the public about
the education system of the Province. As a means to this end, during the year the
Committee arranged for the C.B.C. to sponsor a series of radio broadcasts on education
over its network. The Committee also endorsed the principle of teacher-parent conferences, as well as the bulletin prepared by the Department entitled " Public Elementary
and Secondary Education in British Columbia."
It is hoped in time that local education committees will be established within each
school district of the Province. Membership there would comprise representatives of the
district School Board, the local teachers' organization, the parent-teacher groups, as well
as the Inspector of Schools. CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
FF 35
Miscellaneous
During the year successful teacher tours of industry were arranged in co-operation
with the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada at Trail and with Mac-
Millan & Bloedel Limited at Port Alberni. In both instances the Department of Education called for applications from among the science, social studies, and guidance teachers
of the Province. Arrangements were made by the Department and local School Boards
for these teachers to be released during the last week in June. The Trail group was
limited to twenty teachers, while the one at MacMillan & Bloedel was restricted to twelve.
On tour the teachers were guests of the companies. It is felt that the teachers and the
school system generally profit by these visits to industrial enterprises. FF 36
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), CHIEF INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
The end of the school-year 1955-56 saw the retirement of Mr. William Gray, Senior
Municipal Inspector of Schools for North and West Vancouver, and Mr. A. S. Matheson,
Inspector of Schools at Kelowna. The long and devoted services of these gentlemen in
the cause of education are deeply appreciated both by their colleagues in the Department
and by the people of this Province.
Four Inspectors of Schools were added to the Department during the year: Mr.
K. F. Alexander, Mr. N. A. Allen, Mr. B. H. Harford, and Mr. G. H. Nelson. Dr. D. C.
Smith was granted leave of absence to serve on the staff of the Provincial Normal School
at Vancouver.
A total of forty-four Provincial and Municipal Inspectors were responsible for the
general supervision of the 6,844 teachers in public schools outside the City of Vancouver, the average number of teachers per Inspector being 156, as compared with 157 in
the previous year. These Inspectors reported making 13,191 classroom visits and issuing
3,241 formal reports. Inspectors of Home Economics and of Technical Education
issued 359 reports on Home Economics and Industrial Arts teachers. In addition, Inspectors attended a total of 1,798 School Board meetings, 710 staff meetings, and 240
attendance area meetings.
With the growth of school population there is a trend apparent toward the furnishing
of more supervisory staff at the local district level. A new departure is the appointment
on a short-term basis of teacher-consultants, experienced teachers in special fields who
assist the new or inexperienced teachers with their instructional problems. In the past
year there were twenty-one such teacher-consultants employed, as well as thirty-one
supervisors in some of the larger districts. Both consultants and supervisors work under
the direction of the Inspector or Superintendent of Schools.
The supervisory duties of principals were also officially recognized in the Rules and
Regulations of the Council of Public Instruction, where principals of all schools of ten or
more divisions are now required to furnish reports on the teachers on their staffs to the
Inspector of Schools. There were 209 full-time supervising principals employed, in addition to forty-seven relieving teachers who permit the part-time release of principals of
smaller schools for supervisory duties. The full responsibility of the principal for the
organization, administration, and supervision of his school is now a recognized principle
in efficient school systems.
Another advance in the in-service training of school administrators was made in the
month of July when a five-day conference of principals and inspectors was held in Victoria to study the general topic of "Individual Differences in the Secondary School"
under the conference chairmanship of the Assistant Deputy Minister.
During the course of the year, visits were paid to various inspectorates in the Cariboo, the North Central Interior, the North Coastal Area, the Fraser Valley and Fraser
Canyon, the Mainline Area, and the Kootenays, as well as shorter visits to other centres.
A major advance was made in the field of special education by statutory provision for
financial assistance to those schools maintained by local chapters of the Association for
Retarded Children of British Columbia for the severely retarded. As at November, 1955,
there were 168 children in such schools, with an additional 118 on waiting-lists. It is
hoped that this provision for those children who require special training beyond that
possible to provide within the public school system will prove an outstanding example of
co-operation between the Government and citizens who have already rendered devoted
and dedicated service. INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES FF 37
Within the public school system there was an extension of special classes designed
for handicapped children of various types.   The following table shows the number and
population of these classes:—                                                     ... ...
*   *                                                                                                                                              Number Number
Type of Class                                                                                              of Classes of Pupils
Slow learners      56 898
Remedial training       7 121
Mixed handicapped       3 42
Home instruction       2 38
New Canadians     15 296
Rehabilitation        4 38
Hospital        7 133
Cerebral-palsied        2 12
Detention home       1 19
Preventorium        1 25
Sight-saving        2 27
Hard of hearing       1 14
Totals  101        1,663
The Accrediting Committee met regularly during the months of November, December, and January to consider applications for accrediting from all schools enrolling Grade
XII pupils. The total number of schools considered was 129. Of these, eighty-two
schools were accredited for terms of one to three years and twelve for the first time.
Comments and recommendations for improvement were sent to Inspectors of Schools on
each of the 129 schools considered.   .
The entitlement of teachers for each school in the Province was reviewed during the
months of October and November in accordance with the Rules and Regulations of the
Council of Public Instruction.
In addition to the routine duties of this office, the following activities may be
significant:—
(1) During the year an experiment in acceleration at the secondary level was
carried out in three centres with four classes. An interim report is being
compiled.
(2) A survey of methods and curricula in classes for slow learners was made.
A report will be issued soon.
(3) Other shorter surveys and reports were made on the following topics:
" Present Developments in the Field of Special Education," " Summary
of Information on Teacher Entitlement," " Report on Certain Phases of
Organization of Secondary Schools," " Register of ' Special' Classes in
the Public Schools," " Data Derived from Accrediting Booklets," " Report
on Workbooks Used in the Public Schools," " Retention in Secondary
Schools."
(4) Special investigations of local problems were carried out at the request of
the Minister or the Deputy Minister to assist local Boards.
(5) The usual liaison with other Departmental branches was maintained by
participation in various committees on such matters as curriculum,
examinations, survey-testing, teacher-training, vocational education, and
other matters.
(6) Advisory and other duties were carried out in regard to the Association for
Retarded Children, the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, the
Welfare Institutions Licensing Board, and other similar organizations.
(7) Several weeks were spent in inspection of teachers at the Jericho Hill
School. FF 3c
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
(8) A number of teacher organizations and fall conventions were addressed.
(9) A series of tests in Social Studies at the Grade VI level was prepared for
the use of Inspectors of Schools.
In conclusion, there are some very encouraging signs in the general instructional
picture in British Columbia's public schools. Scholarship results at the University
Entrance level showed a gratifying high scholastic standard for the best of our secondary
pupils. In addition, each of the seventeen candidates awarded scholarships had taken
far more than the minimum number of courses required, while two-thirds of them had
completed four or five majors rather than the prescribed three.
Teachers themselves are showing a growing pride in their profession and a readiness
to study instructional problems at a local level, as exemplified by their own organization
of study groups and workshops.
A study of options elected by students at the senior levels of the secondary school
shows that students are not, in general, following the " easy " path, as they are often
accused of doing. Sixty-four per cent of all students in Grades IX to XII are following
the University Programme. The advanced electives showing the greatest enrolment are,
in order: Chemistry 91, Mathematics 91, Biology 91, English 91, Physics 91, and
History 91. Foreign languages have fallen behind, but are again beginning to show
increasing enrolments.
The problem of a shortage of fully qualified secondary teachers will be a major difficulty in the next few years. To maintain existing standards and to improve them if
possible will exercise the ingenuity and industry of all those engaged in the education of
children at that level. DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
FF 39
Summer School of Education
REPORT OF ROBERT T. D. WALLACE, M.A., DIRECTOR
The 1956 session of the Summer School of Education marked the forty-third and
last such school to be operated by the Department of Education. These forty-three
sessions have been most beneficial and valuable to the teachers of this Province, having
given thousands of them the opportunity of improving their professional competence by
stimulating, challenging, and interesting courses.
Much of the success of these Summer Schools has been due to the following persons
who have acted as Directors: The late Mr. J. W. Gibson, Mr. John Kyle, Dr. H. L.
Campbell, Dr. C. B. Conway, Dr. H. P. Johns, and Dr. F. H. Johnson. In addition to
these, Miss Catherine Cameron, Registrar, has made a contribution of inestimable value,
and the smoothness of the administration has been a direct result of her wit and wisdom.
Since its inception in 1914 the Summer School has used facilities of the Greater
Victoria School Board, and the friendly and genuine help and co-operation of the past
and present members of this Board has made a very substantial contribution to the success
of the school. This year's school was again held in the Victoria College and Lansdowne
Junior High School buildings, and these facilities proved to be most satisfactory.
The faculty included many outstanding educationists from British Columbia as well
as others from other parts of Canada and the United States, and the contribution of each
of them is much appreciated.
The 1956 Summer School is again indebted to the following groups and organizations for considerable help and co-operation: School Boards of Greater Victoria and
Vancouver, the University of British Columbia, Victoria College, the Victoria and Vancouver Normal Schools, the Public Library Commission, the Vancouver Teachers' Professional Library, and the Victoria Public Library.
Courses and Enrolment
Figures for the numbers of courses offered, numbers of instructors, and total enrolment for the past five years are shown in the table below:—
Courses
Instructors
Enrolment
72
34
6
47
15
3
1,637
190
Vancouver Section—
54
Totals for 1956                                                      	
112
111
102
104
100
65
71
68
66
61
1,881
2,017
1,799
1,711
1,608
Totals for 1955                                         	
Totals for 1954	
Totals for 1953                                                      .	
Totals for 1952
Courses Offered
Victoria Section
Enrolment
Philosophy, Psychology, Methods, and Administration of Education:
15. Introduction to Educational Sociology     66
52. Organization and Administration of the British Columbia
School System  233
63. Introduction to Educational Supervision     47 FF 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Philosophy, Psychology, Methods, and Administration of Education
 Continued Enrolment
66. Organization and Administration of the Elementary School 68
67. Home, School, and Community Relations  55
110. Educational Psychology  199
116. Psychology of Learning  211
132. Tests and Measurements  100
150. Growth and Development of Children  178
156. Disciplinary Problems in the School  164
159. Mental Hygiene  116
Kindergarten-Primary Education:
584. Art Education for the Kindergarten-Primary Grades  111
590. Principles and Practices of Primary Education  73
591. Primary Observation and Laboratory  43
592. Social Studies and Science in the Primary Grades  169
593. Reading in the Kindergarten-Primary Grades  155
596. Language and Literature in the Primary Grades  175
597. Arithmetic in the Kindergarten-Primary Grades  148
Intermediate Grades Education:
200. Language Arts in the Intermediate Grades  74
212. Creating Writing  26
216. Speech Arts  34
261. Arithmetic in the Intermediate Grades  119
277. Teaching Elementary Science  54
278. Natural History of British Columbia  53
346. Modern Canada  94
Secondary Grades Education:
100. Principles and Techniques of Secondary Education  62
21 OX. Oral French  20
425A. Canadian Literature, Part I  48
425B.  Canadian Literature, Part II  56
Physical Education:
P.E.   92. Physical Education  Activities  for the  Elementary
Classroom Teacher  87
P.E. 111. Advanced Basketball  42
P.E. 118. Grass Hockey  25
P.E. 132. Life Saving  27
P.E. 142. Advanced Modern Dance  15
P.E. 145. Folk Dance for the Secondary School  30
P.E. 173. Methods and Materials in Health Education  56
P.E. 175. First Aid, Safety Education, and Athletic Injuries  39
Home Economics:
650B. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  49
650C. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  21
651. Problems in Home Economics Education  32
653. Foods and Nutrition  29
Art:
357. Art Education in the Elementary School _:  96
367. Design III -— 19
381. Drawing and Painting I  37
384. Art Criticism I  26
385. Print-making   46 DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION FF 41
Art Continued Enrolment
391. Drawing and Painting II  20
394A. History of Art I  20
394B. History of Art II  23
401. Art Education in the Secondary School  14
Music:
440A. School Music—Kindergarten-Primary  150
440B. School Music in the Intermediate Grades  37
443. Choral Music and Conducting  54
445. Music Theory II  14
453. Music Theory I  18
465. Advanced Choral Literature and Conducting  10
469. Summer School Chorus  222
Library Science:
410. Library Procedure and Administration  34
412A. Children's Literature, Part I—History  40
412B. Children's Literature, Part II—Current  42
413. Cataloguing and Classification  31
Guidance and Counselling:
192. The Use and Interpretation of Tests in Guidance  16
Grade XIII (Senior Matriculation):
213. Grade XIII English (English 100 and 101)  215
313. Grade XIII World History (History 101)  129
316. Grade XIII Canadian History (History 102)  235
Commercial Education:
620. Stenography Theory and Teaching Methods  27
623. Typewriting (Teaching Methods)  24
624. Typewriting Practice  16
625. Elementary Book-keeping (Teaching Procedure)  31
627. Applied Typewriting  10
629. Correspondence and Filing  24
Industrial Arts Education:
1. Principles and Techniques of Elementary Education  20
110. Educational Psychology  20
14. The Curriculum:   Its Objectives and Procedures  53
220. Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Junior High
School   37
238. Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Senior High
School   8
223. Plane and Solid Geometrical Drawing  17
224. Freehand Sketching Applied to Industrial Arts  32
225. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  8
241. Practical Geometry  33
242. Freehand Sketching  14
234. Art Metalwork  13
235. Elementary Sheet-metal Work  14
249. Advanced Sheet-metal Work  5
231. Elementary Electrical Theory  18
232. Elementary Electrical Shopwork  18
229B. Farm Mechanics (Electricity)  18
227. Elementary Woodwork  13
245. Advanced Woodwork  15 FF 42
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Industrial Arts Education—Continued Enrolment
246. Advanced Wood-turning  15
247. Practice in the Use of Woodworking Machinery;   Care
and Maintenance  14
229A. Farm Mechanics (Woodwork)  14
248A. Farm Mechanics (Woodwork)  14
236. Elementary Machine-shop Work  16
250. Advanced Machine-shop Work  24
229C. Farm Mechanics (Metalwork)  13
248B. Farm Mechanics (Metalwork)  13
251. Welding:  Arc and Oxy-acetylene  10
Advanced Carpentry  14
Metallurgy   22
Pattern-making and Foundry Practice  14
Small-boat Building  14
Wood-finishing       6
Student Courses1
Totals in 1956  5,642
Totals in 1955  6,083
Totals in 1954  5,456
Totals in 1953  5,150
Totals in 1952  5,776
1 These figures are totals of all course enrolments.
Registration
Table I—Teaching Experience of Those Registered
13 or more years  289
10 to 12 years  126
7 to 9 years  146
4 to 6 years  239
1 to 3 years  846
Less than 1 year      169
Unreported         66
Total  1,881
Table II.—Type of School in Which Teachers Taught in 1955-56
      110
More than 10 rooms  739
7 to 10 rooms  279
4 to 6 rooms  215
3 rooms     66
2 rooms  106
1 room	
Unreported, or did not
teach this year      366
Total  1,881
Table III.—Grades Taught by the Teachers Enrolled
Grade XIII
Grade XII .
Grade XI _
Grade X ____
Grade IX ___
  7
  203
  236
  272
  325
Grade VIII  380
Grade VII  399
Grade VI  257
Grade V  311
Grade IV  327
Grade III  421
Grade II  450
Grade I  394
Kindergarten   4
Special classes   17
Unreported, or did not
teach this year  292 DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
FF 43
Table IV.—Advanced Certificates Sought
Primary       315
Intermediate
Art 	
Commercial
Music 	
Library 	
Home Economics
Industrial Arts	
214
69
63
66
35
92
170
Physical Education
Counsellor	
S.A. (Instructor)	
Handicapped	
Not specified	
61
17
73
5
41
Total.
1,221
Student Activity Society
Auditing dates do not permit the inclusion here of the 1956 accounts. The following
statement is of the accounts of the preceding or 1955 session, as audited by Ismay,
Boiston, Dunn & Company, chartered accountants.
Receipts
Activity fees paid by students (less refunds)  $5,712.00
Additional income (receipts from dances)     1,500.13
Total
$7,212.13
Disbursements
Fees and expenses of artists, lecturers, etc  $2,677.42
Social affairs, dances, picnics, entertainment  1,151.95
Equipment and supplies  3,235.41
Service charges and incidentals  1,393.80
Total	
Excess of disbursements over receipts.
$8,458.58
$1,246.45
Funds on hand, December 31st, 1955  $2,492.62
Provincial Normal School, Vancouver
REPORT OF F. C. BOYES, M.A, PRINCIPAL
The fifty-fifth session of the Provincial Normal School, Vancouver, B.C., commenced
on September 12th, 1955, and closed on June 15th, 1956. The following table indicates
the enrolment and results:-—
Men
Women
Total
208
176
399
371
607 FF 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Some 700 men and women submitted applications during the summer. As a result
of failure in examinations, disabilities discovered during medical examinations, interviews with applicants, and some changes in plans, we opened with the numbers shown
above.
The following students were granted distinction standing: Jacquelyn Barwell, Mer-
vine Dawn Beagle, Isobel Bissett, Margaret Anne Brett, Margaret Helen MacGregor
Campbell, Dorothy Ellen Cassells, Madeleine Helen Cross, Mary Victoria Gillard, Margaret Nan Hartley, Patricia Jean Hill, Mrs. Jessie Margaret Hoffman, Albert Arthur
Jacobsen, Ronald Way Hon Joe, Virginia Anne Kalmakoff, Patricia Claire McConville,
Norma Evelyn MacDonald, Mrs. Jessie MacDonald Mikulko, Mrs. Alice Neale, John
Raymond Osborne, Harry Keith Ralston, Gail Aldyen Ree, Donald Wright Robertson,
Robert Kenneth Robinson, Geraldine Louise Saunders, Anita Muriel Sharp, and Mrs.
Vera Eileen Wescott.
The range in academic standing is as follows: University Entrance, 37 per cent;
University Entrance, +24 per cent; Senior Matriculation and First Year, 26 per cent;
Second Year, 4 per cent; Third Year, 2 per cent; Degrees, 5.5 per cent; Art and Music
diplomas, 1.5 per cent.   The range is quite similar to that of the previous year.
Another type of breakdown might be of interest. Fifty per cent of our students
came to us from high schools, 25 per cent came from universities, and 25 per cent from
industry. I have included in the latter group women who have come from homes as well
as those who have come from other positions. These figures seem to indicate that teaching is now able to attract many of our more mature young people, who have experience
as well as knowledge to offer to their pupils.
The year has been a hectic one in many ways. For our huge enrolment we needed
more accommodation. A four-room addition was promised for September but through
unfortunate delays' it was not ready until late in October. The poor old school was
crammed. Classes met in the cafeteria, auditorium, gymnasium, and library. There were
not enough chairs, so boxes and window ledges were used freely. Through it all, staff
and students accepted conditions with a smile, but certainly all looked forward to the
opening of the new classrooms. When they were finished, everyone was pleased. The
rooms were bright and well equipped. The classes had room to breathe and chairs to
sit on.   The work of the year was now well on its way.
The large enrolment made it necessary for us to add to our staff. The Vancouver
School Board, with its usual generosity, loaned us the services of Dr. R. Boughton, Miss
Mollie Cottingham, Miss Sheila O'Connell, Mr. Ralph Hanslow, and Mr. James Macdon-
ald. The Department of Education allowed us to use the services of Dr. Dennis Smith.
Dr. L. Slind came to us from Florida and Mr. Phillip Penner from Chilliwack. We
needed these people, and we sincerely appreciate the contribution which they have made
to our students this year.
Again because of our numbers our auditorium periods suffered. We could accommodate only half of the students at one time. For a full assembly we had to use the
gymnasium, which, in the cold weather, was not too comfortable. In spite of these difficulties much useful work was accomplished in both situations.
The staff and students of our two practice-schools suffered from the extra heavy load.
We cannot speak too highly of the way in which they accepted the flood of students which
descended upon them. The principals, Mr. Franklin and Mr. Wark, and staffs put in
a hectic twelve weeks in the early fall, coaching our beginners in their early efforts at
teaching. They never lost their patience nor yet their enthusiasm. Not only did they
perform this heavy duty with a smile, but they prepared and presented some of the best
demonstration lessons that students have ever been privileged to observe. Our thanks
to these wonderful teachers is deep and sincere. We shall miss them very much next
year.   I feel that our training programme will be much poorer without their help. DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION FF 45
The three ungraded classrooms have functioned as smoothly as ever. More students
than ever before were privileged to teach in these rooms and to observe three most able
teachers handle a multi-grade situation. Those who find themselves in rural schools
next fall will look back on these experiences as rich sources of information and inspiration. Miss Manning, Miss Grier, and Mrs. Webber deserve great commendation for
the work they have done for us. Their classes could truthfully be called " opportunity
classes." Their pupils learned much more than is the case in many ordinary class situations, and these teachers displayed their skills and knowledge to our students in regular
classroom work and in special concerts which they staged for us on several occasions
during the year. We are pleased to acknowledge our debts to both staff and pupils of
these three rooms.   Replacing these services will be most difficult.
I would be remiss if I failed to pay tribute to the office staff in charge of our secretary, Miss MacLaine, and to our maintenance staff, headed up by Mr. Birkett. These
people have been truly members of the staff and have entered whole-heartedly into the
work and activities of the school.   We do appreciate their efforts to the full.
I should say thanks also to the six retired teachers and Inspectors who helped us
with the supervision of practice-teaching during the winter and spring terms. These
people found the work heavy but carried on with enthusiasm. Their judgment was sound
and their help to the students was deeply appreciated.
We owe a special debt of gratitude to the Vancouver School Board, its officials and
teachers, for opening its schools so fully to us during both practice periods. We sincerely
appreciate this courtesy and would like all principals and staff members to know how
much we appreciate their efforts on behalf of our students.
More and more School Boards throughout the Lower Mainland and in the Interior
have opened their schools to us. We must thank the Inspectors in these areas for their
active interest in this work and, through them, the principals and teachers on whom the
heavy burden of critical instruction falls. We do appreciate the gracious manner in which
this burden has been accepted and the thoroughness with which the work has been done.
I must also thank the Metropolitan Health Committee for its invaluable assistance
to us. Dr. Stewart Murray has always been most actively interested in our work and has
allowed Dr. Willits to give us a great deal of her time. Miss Parrett has been another
staff member to us, and her contribution is hard to measure. Our genuine thanks to all
for many wonderful services cheerfully and efficiently rendered to our students.
During the year we missed the services of Dr. Grantham and Mr. Ozard. Dr.
Grantham has decided to remain with UNESCO on a permanent basis. Mr. Ozard, after
a year of travel and study in Europe, will return this fall to take his place on the staff of
the College of Education. During their absence this year Dr. Boughton carried on for
Dr. Grantham while Mr. Ralph Hanslow took Mr. Ozard's place in the Art Department
of the Normal School.   I would like to commend their work.
I could not close this report without a thank-you to the members of the Department
of Education and of the Department of Public Works for the manner in which they have
listened to our requests and have tried to supply our needs. It has not been easy for
them at times, but in the end a solution to our problems has been found. I hope that
the needs of the new college will meet with the same spirit of co-operation.
It has been a privilege for me to be in charge of this honourable old institution
during the last four years of its existence. My hope is that its many virtues may carry
on and that its faults may be corrected in the new setting on the campus. For the old
school may I say " au revoir." FF 46
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Provincial Normal School, Victoria
REPORT OF HENRY C. GILLILAND, M.A, PRINCIPAL
Enrolment and Results
The forty-second session of the Provincial Normal School at Victoria commenced on
September 12th, 1955, and closed on June 15th, 1956. This last session of the school
was marked by its greatest enrolment and largest number of graduates, as shown in the
following table:—
Men
Women
Total
104
93
232
222
336
315
Honour Standing and Awards
The following students graduated with honours: Ruth Donaldson, Victoria; Rosie
Franz, Osoyoos; Mavis Jowsey, Alberni; Tannis Killough, Castlegar; Donna Landers,
Courtenay; Sister Mary Jeannine Loftus, Victoria; Shirley Lynch, Penticton; Joan Miller, Marysville; Evelyn Mouat, Ganges; Jacqueline Ormond, Victoria; Sister Ellen
Maureen O'Sullivan, Victoria; Margaret Rounce, A.R.C.T, Vernon; Frances Smigol,
Vernon; Kathleen Thornbery, Victoria; Violet Tonzetich, Nanaimo; Sister Mary Dolorosa Trudeau, Victoria.
The Denton Memorial Award for all-round achievement and leadership was won
by Tannis Killough, of Castlegar. This award is the gift of the Normal School class of
1943-44.
The Maxwell Cameron Memorial Award, given by the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation for high scholarship and teaching ability, was won by Rosie Franz, of Osoyoos.
Scholarships and Bursaries
It is heartening to report an increase in the number of scholarships and bursaries
awarded by private organizations to assist young people of merit to enter the teaching
profession.   Our appreciation is extended to all of the following organizations:—
1. Service Clubs.—Courtenay Rotary Club, $50; Cranbrook Gyro Club, $100;
Grand Forks Business and Professional Women's Club, $50; Kimberley Ladies' Liberal
Association, $50; Kimberley Lions Club, $250; Summerland Kiwanis Club, $50; Trail
Kiwassa Club, $50; Vancouver University Women's Club, $100; total, $700.
2. Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire.—Major John Hebden Gillespie
Chapter, Victoria, $100; Municipal Chapter, Victoria, three scholarships of $100 each;
Vernon Chapter, $75; total, $475.
3. Teachers' Associations.—British Columbia Teachers' Federation, $200; Castlegar and District Teachers' Association, $100; Comox District Teachers' Association,
$100; Cowichan District Teachers' Association, Duncan, $100; Joint School Board and
Teachers' Scholarship, School District No. 57, Prince George, $150; Nanaimo District
Teachers' Association, $100; Okanagan Border Teachers' Association, Oliver, $100;
South Okanagan Teachers' Association, Penticton, two bursaries of $100 each; Salmon
Arm Teachers' Association, $50; School District No. 59 Teachers' Association, Dawson
Creek, $100; Trail District Teachers' Association, $100; total, $1,200.
4. Parent-Teacher Associations.—Armstrong-Spallumcheen P.-T.A, $100; Stanley Humphries P.-T.A, Castlegar, $100;  Courtenay High School P.-T.A, $50;  Cran- DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION FF 47
brook P.-T.A, $100; Kamloops P.-T.A, $100; Prince George P.-T.A, two scholarships
of $125 each; Booth Memorial High School P.-T.A, Prince Rupert, two scholarships of
$100 each; Royal Oak High School P.-T.A, $100; Summerland P.-T.A, $100; Tsolum
P.-T.A, $75;  Trail P.-T.A, $50;  total, $1,225.
5. Miscellaneous.—The Duncan Fraser Award, Qualicum Beach High School, $100;
the Henry Meyerhoff Scholarship, Penticton High School, $250; total, $350.
In many instances these organizations not only provided scholarships for students,
but also showed an informed, practical, and continued interest in their welfare—an interest
that made a marked contribution to their success.
Future Teachers Clubs
The Future Teachers Clubs have been a powerful influence in helping young people
of ability to realize what a valuable service they can give to their country by becoming
teachers. Under the leadership of able sponsors, all the clubs in Greater Victoria and
some of the clubs from up-Island visited the school. In turn, our student-teachers found
opportunity to visit these clubs and speak to their members. Members of the faculty
visited these organizations across the Province and found them carrying on work of great
value. Congratulations are due to the sponsors of the Future Teachers Clubs for their
excellent leadership.
Our System of Teacher Education
The pattern of instruction at Victoria Normal School was a combination of several
main factors. There was a study of children and their ways of learning rather than a
general study of psychology. Methods of teaching in each subject were very definitely
combined with a study of the actual subject-matter to be taught in the elementary and
junior high schools and with a concern for the ways in which it could be educative for
children. All three of these factors were centred in and informed by a continuous weekly
system of observation, followed at intervals throughout the year by unbroken periods of
teaching, thereby to centre attention on the whole process of teaching. The time spent
in the schools thus working with children amounted to over ten weeks during the year.
Along with the above process went another — that of developing each student-
teacher's ability to take responsibility for groups of people. This undertaking was carried
on by providing a wide variety of activities for the student-teachers to manage—literary
meetings, dramatic activities, debating and public speaking, musical activities, athletics,
publications, and a regular programme of social events. Strong attention was given to
physical education and to individual and team games. Regular weekly instruction in
speech-training was complemented by plentiful opportunity for practice in daily and
weekly assemblies of the whole school. At all times there was a policy of helping students
to burnish their personality and their leadership abilities by a stress on the development
of good public relations, a cultivation of forcefulness, a steadfast emphasis on reliability
and dependability, and by the assumption of responsibility for the success of many
undertakings.
The whole process was very strongly marked by continuous opportunity for practical
experience, designed to build success upon growing success.
Observation and Student Teaching
Our system of observation was to send into each classroom a very few student-
teachers only—four at the beginning, soon afterwards reduced to two—thereby to permit
the observation of an undisturbed and normal classroom procedure. Supervising teachers
uniformly expressed their preference for this method of observation. Carefully guided
observation on one day each week was started at the beginning of October and carried
into November—a process by which the lectures at the Normal School were kept con- FF 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
stantly in contact with actual procedures being carried on in the classrooms of the city.
One improvement on this system might rest in the provision of a laboratory school close
to the campus.
This period of observation was followed by two and one-half weeks of student-
teaching from November 9th to 25th, 1955—a session marked by a study of the class
during the first two or three days, followed by the taking-over of most of the teaching
duties by the two student-teachers.
Observation was resumed on one day each week throughout January and early
February, and was followed by a second two and one-half weeks of student-teaching
from February 8th to 24th, 1956.
During these first two periods of practice-teaching we used all the schools and nearly
every classroom in School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria). Our kindest thanks are
extended to Municipal Inspectors John Gough and Alex. Turnbull and to the principals
and teachers who gave kindly guidance to these student-teachers, a professional service
of the highest order.
• The final period of student-teaching occupied the month immediately following
Easter, April 9th to May 4th, inclusive. Our student-teachers returned for that time to
their home areas throughout the Province, the Greater Victoria student-teachers being
accommodated in the main by the schools of School Districts No. 62 (Sooke), 63
(Saanich), 64 (Saltspring Island), and other Vancouver Island districts. One student-
teacher was assigned to each classroom, in most cases being given complete charge of the
classroom. Although faculty members followed their student-teachers into the various
school districts to give assistance, an important part of the guidance of these beginners
fell to Inspectors, principals, and supervising teachers. On behalf of present and past
staffs of the Victoria Normal School, may I take this opportunity to thank these, our
colleagues, for their strong professional interest in the success of this student-teaching
and for their earnest and skilful help.
The year's total of practice-teaching was nine weeks, to which must be added observation carried on in advance of practice-teaching, making a total of 263 hours of observation and practice-teaching.
Work of the Staff
In his usually efficient way, Mr. George Brand, B.A, continued the management
of many important administrative duties. Mr. Hugh Farquhar, M.A, provided able
co-ordination of our widespread athletic activities, obtaining splendid assistance from
many members of the faculty. As always, Mrs. Marjorie Hoey's happy management of
the general office was a source of pleasure to faculty and students alike.
Because of our great increase in enrolment, it was necessary to obtain more instructors. We were able to get the assistance of the following instructors on loan from their
own school districts: Mr. Richard V. Maclean, B.A, B.Ed, M.Ed, from Nanaimo; Mrs.
Helen M. Gilmour, from Alberni; Miss Maureen C. Bray, B.P.E, Miss Jessie B. Fleming,
B.A, and Mr. Fred L. Martens, B.A, B.Ed, M.S. in P.E, from Greater Victoria. The
choice of these fine teachers was an exceptionally happy one. They merged into our
faculty with amazing rapidity and gave highly efficient service. To them and to their
School Boards, we extend our sincere appreciation.
For the important work of assisting our student-teachers in the classroom, we were
fortunate to secure the skilled services of the following able supervisors: Mr. J. Elmer
Brown, M.A. (former Inspector of Schools in Sooke and Saanich); Mr. Arthur Hunkin,
B.Sc, M.A. (former principal of Central Junior High School, Victoria); Miss N. Margaret
McKillican (former teacher at North Ward-and Margaret Jenkins Schools, Victoria);
and Mr. Clarence Moore, B.A. (former principal of Brandon Normal School and
Inspector of Schools in Manitoba). Their help was an important factor in the success
of our practice-teaching programme. DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION FF 49
Our faculty was bound together by a happy spirit of friendship and by vigorous and
effective teamwork in a vitally important task. For the loyal assistance of this splendid
group of outstanding leaders in education, I express my grateful thanks.
Health Services
Dr. R. M. Lane, Medical Director of the Vancouver Island Chest Centre, was in
charge of the highly effective supervision of the health of our students. In the fall term
all students were given a thorough physical examination which included chest X-rays.
These examinations were carried out by Dr. R. M. Lane, Dr. C. F. Ballam, and Dr. P. F.
d'Estrube, with Miss L. Warne, R.N, and Miss H. MacAleese, P.H.N, assisting. During
the year many re-examinations and special examinations were given. Wherever necessary, students were referred to their own doctors for treatment. In the spring term,
immunizatiens against diphtheria, tetanus, and smallpox were offered to the student-
teachers. Two hundred of them received testing, with ninety-one receiving diphtheria
and tetanus toxoid and 156 being vaccinated or revaccinated against smallpox.
Dr. Lane also gave instruction to the student-teachers by addressing them concerning tuberculosis and other diseases. The field of the teacher's relation to public health
services was dealt with in a challenging series of panel discussions organized by Mr. Keith
MacDonald, Public Health Educator for Victoria, who acted as chairman. The other
able participants in these panel discussions were Mr. E. S. Gropp, of the Victoria-
Esquimalt Health Unit; Mrs. M. Wiley, teacher at Doncaster Elementary School; Miss
Helen MacAleese, P.H.N, Saanich Health Unit; and Dr. A. N. Beattie, Medical Health
Officer, Saanich Health Unit. We enjoyed these discussions and learned how the teacher
may take advantage of many public health services to the great advantage of his pupils.
It is a pleasure to extend to the Provincial Department of Health and Welfare our
sincere appreciation for the wonderful health services provided for this School down
through the years of its existence.
Visits to the Legislature
Through the courtesy of the Honourable Thomas J. Irwin, Speaker of the House of
Assembly, each class was able to spend an afternoon studying the Legislature at work.
These visits were made more valuable by an address given by the Speaker to a joint
meeting of students of Victoria College and of the Normal School on the history of
parliament.
Work of British Columbia Teachers' Federation
The British Columbia Teachers' Federation has shown a steadily increasing co-operation with this School. In another place in this Report is to be found a record of the
financial help given by the federation and by its constituent associations to encourage
the right kind of candidate to come into teaching. Record is also made of the B.C.T.F.
medal and award given to our leading graduate.
Through the year Mr. Stan Evans, assistant secretary of the federation, visited the
School on several occasions and gave sterling help to our student-teachers in many ways.
Mr. W. E. Whatmough, principal of Rhodes Elementary School in Vancouver, explained
the work of the B.C.T.F. Medical Services Association. It was through the good offices
of Mr. Charles Ovans, general secretary of the federation, that we had the pleasure of
hearing an address by Dr. S. R. Laycock, the author of the psychology text-book we
were using.
An outstanding event in the year was the workshop organized by the federation and
the Greater Victoria Teachers' Association to bring our student-teachers into deeper
understanding of how to deal happily with the problems faced by young teachers. This
workshop was organized by a committee of our students' council working in conjunction FF 50
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
with a committee of the Greater Victoria Teachers' Association under its president, Mr.
W. Donald Oliver, with Mr. Stan Evans representing the federation. The president of
the federation, Mr. Joe Phillipson, and many other leaders in the field of education found
time to come to this School on a Saturday to give assistance to their young colleagues.
This splendid contribution to the building of competence in our student-teachers to face
their important work confidently is recorded with pleasure.
Brief History of the Victoria Normal School
The Provincial Normal School at Victoria opened its first session in January, 1915.
There were eighteen students in the advanced course and twenty-six in the preliminary
course.   Its forty-second and final session was closed on June 15th, 1956.
The first principal of the School was Donald L. MacLaurin, B.A, Ph.D., whose
service continued from January 1st, 1915, for over seventeen years until October, 1932,
when he was made Assistant Superintendent of Education for British Columbia. He was
followed by Vernon L. Denton, B.A, D.C.L., whose term of office was from October,
1932, to May 24th, 1944. Harry O. English, B.A, B.S.A, was principal from September
1st, 1944, until August 4th, 1954. The writer was in charge from August 15th, 1954,
until August 31st, 1956.
The vice-principals of the School were: H. L. Campbell, B.A, M.Ed, LL.D,
September 1st, 1938, to August 31st, 1941 (made Municipal Inspector of Schools for
Victoria, now Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education); H. O. English, B.A,
B.S.A, December, 1941, to August 31st, 1944; Miss H. R. Anderson, M.A, Ph.D.,
September 1st, 1944, to July, 1946 (superannuated); H. C. Gilliland, M.A, September
1st, 1946, to August 14th, 1954.
The administration of the School continued in operation during the summer of 1956
to conclude its affairs. Its other function, in friendly co-operation with Dr. W. H. Hickman, principal of Victoria College, was to prepare for a new session of teacher education
and for the opening of the Victoria branch of the new College of Education as part of
a new Victoria College created by the union of the Normal School and the old Victoria
College on September 1st, 1956. May this union be productive of great progress in
teacher education.
The Departments of Education and of Public Works
In closing this final report of the Provincial Normal School at Victoria, may I offer
my sincere thanks to Dr. H. L. Campbell, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education, for kindly assistance and valued support. This is an appropriate time also to take
note of a long period of happy co-operation with Mr. Harry Evans, Registrar of the
Department of Education, and in expressing thanks to remark on the efficiency of his
many services to this School. In like manner we are indebted to many members of
headquarters at the Department of Education.
We have equal pleasure in reiterating our appreciation of the cheerful and friendly
services of members of the Department of Public Works under the direction of Mr. Percy
Mackereth, Superintendent of Works. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
FF 51
REPORT OF J. S. WHITE, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL
AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
The year 1955-56 saw a steady growth in both vocational and technical education.
To meet the growing demands of industry, new courses were established under the
Vocational Training Agreement, a Federal-Provincial agreement, wherein all operating
costs are shared equally between the Federal and Provincial Governments.
With the building of the trans-mountain oil pipe-line in British Columbia, it was
brought to our attention that the labour forces of our Province were not able to meet the
demands for skilled pipe-line welders. Therefore, it was decided that a training and
testing school should be established within our Province wherein Canadian welders would
have an opportunity to obtain skilled instruction.
Classes in downhill welding on flat plate were held in Vancouver and Victoria,
following which successful trainees were given training in downhill techniques on pipe
at the welding-school which was established at the Federal-Provincial Vocational Training School, Nanaimo, B.C. For the period that this report covers, 148 men were
successfully trained.
The logging industry required qualified men for work in the woods. This necessitated the establishment of courses to meet their needs. At the Federal-Provincial Vocational Training School in Nanaimo, a course in bulldozer operation was started in April.
This has proved to be a very successful course, with sufficient applications on hand at the
present time to keep the course in operation for another year. The course is of eight
weeks' duration, and at the close of the period that this report covers the first class of
twenty was completing training.
At the Canadian Forest Products Division at Harrison Mills, courses in log-scaling
have been in operation since the beginning of May. Only ten men can be trained at one
time, and the third class is now in training.
The following is a breakdown of the enrolment under the various schedules of the
Vocational Training Agreement for the past year:—
Schedule O
Sub-schedule C (Urban Occupational Training).—Training given to young men
and women, not previously employed, in heavy-duty mechanics and power-sewing.
Training in bulldozer operation was given under this sub-schedule. Total number trained:
Men, 52; women, 36; total, 88.
Sub-schedule E (Rural Occupational Training).—Training under this sub-schedule
is given in a variety of subjects to young men and women from the rural areas of the
Province at an eight weeks' course at the University of British Columbia. The enrolment
for the past year was:   Men, 27; women, 11; total, 38.
Sub-schedule H (Student Aid).—Assistance was granted in the form of bursaries
and loans to students in financial need who were continuing with their education beyond
the secondary-school level.   Assistance was given to 540 students.
Schedule R (Training of Disabled Persons)
Training under this schedule is increasing. Training is given to disabled young men
and women, who are screened by a selection committee, to fit them for gainful employment. Where necessary a subsistence allowance and a transportation allowance is paid
to the trainee as well as the full cost of his or her training. The number trained during
the past year is as follows:  Men, 30; women, 22; total, 52. FF 52
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Schedule M (Training of Unemployed Workers)
Training was given to unemployed young men and women, who were screened by
a selection committee, to fit them for employment. Where necessary a subsistence
allowance and a transportation allowance was paid to the trainee as well as the full cost
of his or her training. The number trained under this schedule for the past year was:
Men, 152; women, 41; total, 193.
The full cost of training under the various schedules of the Vocational Training
Agreement is shared equally between the Federal and Provincial Governments.
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement
Under this Agreement, courses are offered in the secondary schools of this Province
in three areas of training—(a) Commercial, (b) Agriculture, and (c) Industrial—in day
and night classes for which extra grants are paid to the local School Boards. The cost
is shared equally between the Provincial Department of Education and the Federal
Department of Labour, Ottawa. The enrolment for the past year was as follows:—
Day-school—
Commercial   4,325
Agriculture       147
Industrial   2,329
Night-school—
Commercial
Industrial _
6,801
  3,177
  5,863
9,040
Under this Agreement, teacher-training classes are held for the training of Industrial
Arts and Vocational teachers for the schools of this Province. As the need for these
teachers continues to increase, additional classes were held at night during the past year
as well as the regular day-time classes. The enrolment was as follows: Night-time, 37;
daytime, 14; total, 51.
Industrial Arts
(Report prepared by T. A. Quayle and C. J. Strong, M.A, Inspectors
of Technical Classes.)
During the year additional accommodation was provided for Industrial Arts when
several schools were completed. New senior high schools were opened at Abbotsford,
Nelson, and New Westminster. Junior-senior high schools were completed in Tsolum,
Vanderhoof, and Kitimat, and, in addition, junior high schools were opened in Maple
Ridge, North Vancouver, Nanaimo, and two in Coquitlam. An elementary-junior high
school in South Okanagan at Osoyoos included a general shop, thus relieving the shops
in the junior-senior high school in Oliver.
Approximately fifty Industrial Arts teachers were required to staff the new schools
and replace teachers leaving the profession. To meet this challenge, in addition to the
teacher-training class at the Vancouver Vocational Institute, two night classes were set
up. Thirty-seven men were approved for training, and of this number twenty-three
completed the programme and eighteen accepted teaching positions. It is increasingly
apparent that men who have been living in the Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley Districts are very reluctant to consider teaching positions in the Interior and northern parts
of the Province. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION FF 53
A very successful Summer School for Industrial Arts teachers has just been completed. Shops and classroom facilities of the Vancouver Technical School were used for
this purpose. The splendid co-operation of the officials of the Vancouver School Board
is very much appreciated. Their willingness to assist the Summer School staff at all
times was an important factor in making Summer School problems easier to handle.
A class in metallurgy was held at the University of British Columbia for a group of
teachers working toward Secondary Advanced certificates. In all, 208 men were in
attendance at our Summer School this summer.
The total number of individual junior, junior-senior, and senior high-school shops
in the Province exclusive of Vancouver is 318. The total number of Industrial Arts
teachers is 330. The total number of pupils in the Province participating is as follows:
Junior high schools, 14,821; senior high schools, 13,381; total, 28,202.
High School Correspondence
(Report prepared by Edith E. Lucas, B.A, D. es L, Director.)
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the school-
year 1955-56 was 10,259. Of this number, 21.9 per cent or 2,256 were between the
ages of 18 and 20, and 41.8 per cent or 4,283 were 21 years or over. Thus 63.7 per cent
of our students can be classified as adults. This is an increase of 0.1 per cent over the
figures of 1954-55. There was an increase of 457 students in the number of students
over 21 years and an increase of 76 in the number of students between the ages of 18
and 20 years.
There were adult students among those registered for every course offered by this
department, as indicated in my report of High School and Vocational Courses.
The following is a classification of the occupations of students 18 years of age and
over who gave information as to their employment:—
Apprentices       100
Army, Navy, Air Force        68
Civil Servants      143
Police        27
Domestic workers       100
Farming and ranching        59
Firemen, engineers       318
Forestry      107
Housewives      196
Lumbering ,       160
Merchants         33
Mining         32
Office-workers .      591
Professional—
Teachers      300
Nurses        51
Miscellaneous        25
Railroad .,        24
Skilled labour      484
Unskilled labour      318
Miscellaneous        32
Total  3,168 FF 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
REPORT OF LAWRENCE J. WALLACE, B.A, M.Ed, DIRECTOR
Throughout the past year the Community Programmes Branch has been called upon
to extend its services to many communities and to expand its services to previously established Recreation Commissions. It is most encouraging that so many persons throughout
the Province have realized the importance of recreation in the community and have given
so freely of their time and talents in this regard.
One of the most notable features of the past year has been the great increase in the
enthusiasm of persons connected with the activities of the Community Programmes
Branch. This enthusiasm is most apparent at the various regional conferences, clinics,
and the Provincial Recreation Leadership School.
The Regional Consultants of the Community Programmes Branch continue to do
outstanding work for the communities. As the most effective and best programmes of
recreation are those which the local citizens of the community plan and administer, the
Consultants' availability and guidance is of great importance. The following are the
Regional Consultants, together with their headquarters and their area of responsibility:—
Consultant
Headquarters
Region
K. K. Maltman..
B. Ostrom —
R. Stangrooni—.
J. Panton	
W. Mayers	
T. Ruben 	
J. Mathisen ...	
A. Thiessen	
G. J. Pynn 	
Quesnel	
Cranbrook—
Nelson.	
Kelowna	
Kamloops—
Abbotsford..
New Westminster-
Vancouver 	
Victoria 	
Northern British Columbia.
East Kootenay.
West Kootenay.
Okanagan.
Central British Columbia.
Fraser Valley.
New Westminster and District and Howe Sound.
Greater Vancouver and Queen Charlottes.
Vancouver Island.
The Department of Education lost one of its most valuable workers in the person of
Mr. A. C. Batcheler, Regional Consultant for Vancouver Island, when he left to take up
residence in England early in 1956. Mr. Batcheler contributed much to recreation in
British Columbia over the last twenty years and he will be missed by a large number of
friends.
The Regional Consultants have an important role to play in the forthcoming
centenary of British Columbia. As members of the Community Activities Sub-committee
and official representatives of the British Columbia Centennial Committee, it will be
their responsibility to assist in organizing and guiding the local centennial celebrations
committees throughout the Province. The British Columbia Centennial Committee is
most fortunate to be able to call upon the Consultants for this most important and
essential organizational and community activity.
Mr. Joseph Lewis, Director of Recreation for the Blind Citizens of the Province,
and an employee of this Branch, continues to do outstanding work in this his chosen field.
The Branch's services are being extended to the native Indian people, in co-operation
with the office of the Superintendent of Indian Affairs and the Indian Advisory Council
of the Department of Labour, and to the Air Force stations in British Columbia. These
experiments in recreation co-operation should prove most valuable to the persons
concerned.
The Community Programmes Branch is very proud of its association with the Adult
Education Conference held in the Province of British Columbia throughout the past
year. In November the conference was hosted by the Pacific National Exhibition in the
British Columbia Building, Vancouver, and in May by the commandant of the Tri-services
College at beautiful Royal Roads, near Victoria.    Some 130 persons from numerous COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH FF 55
Provincial agencies interested in adult education attended these two conferences to share
ideas and to co-operate for the betterment of adult education methods in the Province.
The Branch again co-operated with the Red Cross, St. John Ambulance, and other
agencies in the sponsoring of Water Safety Week early in June. The matter of water
safety is one which should receive more and more attention in this recreationally conscious
Province of British Columbia.
In early June the Director of the Branch met in Edmonton with Mr. K. L. Young,
Director of the Community Programmes Branch for the Province of Ontario; Mr. W.
Stinson, Director of Physical Fitness and Recreation, Province of Saskatchewan; Miss
Elsie McFarland, Community Recreation Supervisor, Province of Alberta; and Mr. John
Farina, Recreation Division, Canadian Welfare Council. This meeting afforded an
excellent opportunity for representatives of these Provinces to share plans concerning
recreation and to survey the situation on a national basis.
The resource material contained in the library of the Community Programmes
Branch has continued to be in heavy demand and has been of great value to all the
communities which have made use of it. The films, books, and other instructional
material available to the Recreation Commissions through the Catalogue of Recreation
Resource Material cover recreational activities of all interests.
Leadership training in recreation is of the utmost importance. Just as a home is in
need of good parents and a school in need of well-trained teachers, so a community
recreation programme, to be effective, is in need of well-trained and suitable recreation
leaders. Recreational facilities in the community are often wasted because of the lack
of vital leadership. The Community Programmes Branch, through its leadership training
programme, stresses the need for the discovery and the actual training of community
recreation leaders and offers the opportunity for this training through regional conferences, local and regional clinics and workshops, and through the Provincial Recreation
Leadership School.
The Third Annual Provincial Recreation Leadership School was held in the Oak
Bay Junior High School in Victoria from July 16th to 27th, 1956. More than 100
delegates from all sections of the Province attended the two-week course. Courses were
offered in the following subjects: Recreation Administration, Music in the Community,
Elementary Square Dancing, Advanced Square Dancing and Calling, Ballroom Dancing,
Discussion of the Use of Recreation Resource Material, Community Centre Organization
and Administration, the Proper Conduct of a Meeting, Volunteers in Recreation, Recreation for Senior Citizens, Swimming and Life-saving, Women's Keep Fit and Recreation
for Men, How to Instruct in Badminton and Volleyball, Play Production and Stagecraft,
Jewellery-making, Copper Enamelling, Flowercraft, Braiding and Knotting in Plastic.
Type of Leadership Training Number Attending
Regional conferences     8 380
Clinics and workshops  66 2,209
Provincial Recreation Leadership School     1 103"
Totals  75 2,692
Drama activity throughout the Province continues to flourish. During the past year
thirty drama festivals were held, of which nine were for school groups, thirteen for adults,
and eight for both adults and students. The Provincial Drama Festival was most successfully held in Nanaimo from May 30th to June 2nd, 1956. The following drama groups,
all regional winners in British Columbia, participated in the Festival: Comox Valley
Drama Club of Courtenay, Vancouver Repertory Players, Nanaimo Little Theatre, Yellow
Point Drama Club, White Rock Players' Club, Oyama Players' Club, Trail Little Theatre,
Prince George Players, Grand Forks Players, and Terrace Little Theatre. For the third
successive year, the White Rock Players' Club was successful in taking top honours. FF 56
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Miss Dorothy Somerset, drama supervisor of the University of British Columbia Extension Department, and Mr. Raymond Whitehouse, drama producer of the Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation, Vancouver, acted as adjudicators, and their outstanding contribution to the success of the festival was greatly appreciated.
In conjunction with the festival, a workshop conducted by Mr. Sydney Risk and an
adjudicators' meeting were held. Twenty of the Province's outstanding drama enthusiasts
attended this meeting to discuss methods of adjudication. A new constitution was ratified
at the annual meeting of the British Columbia Drama Association in Nanaimo on June
2nd. The Honourable R. G. Williston, Dr. H. L. Campbell, and Mr. H. S. Hum were
returned as honourary presidents. Mr. Ross A. Lort, after years of generous and fruitful
service to drama in the Province, retired as president, and Mrs. Gerald Rushton was
elected in his place.
Many persons, both students and adults, were afforded the opportunity to study
further through the awarding of several drama scholarships during the past year. Scholarships were awarded by the U.B.C. Summer School of the Theatre and the Banff School of
Fine Arts, as well as those given by the British Columbia Drama Association, the Community Arts Council of Vancouver, and local festival committees.
Recreational courses in the regularly organized night-schools greatly increased during the past year.   The statistics of these classes are contained in the night-school report.
Community recreation in British Columbia has passed the stage where it is spasmodic and unplanned. Forward-looking communities are aware that well-planned and
co-ordinated recreation activities are essential for the betterment of both the individual
and the community. Recreation Commissions, together with the Regional Consultant,
plan, organize, and co-ordinate recreational activities for the good of all citizens on a year-
around basis in the community. Nominal grants-in-aid are available to Recreation Commissions to assist them in their work; however, these grants are always supplementary to
the communities' efforts.
The following 160 communities have Recreation Commissions which have either
been elected or appointed in accordance with the " Municipal Act":—
*Abbotsford.
tAlert Bay.
*Alexandria.
*Argenta.
*Armstrong.
*Arrow Park.
Barnston Island.
*Bear Creek.
*Blue River.
*Bonnington-Corra Linn.
* Boston Bar.
*Boswell.
*Bouchie Lake.
*Bowen Island.
Bralorne.
tBritannia Beach.
*Brocklehurst.
tBurnaby.
tCampbell River.
*Canoe.
*Canyon.
*Cedar.
*Central Saanich.
*Chase.
*Cherry Creek.
*Christina Lake.
*Copper Mountain.
tCoquitlam.
tCourtenay.
tCranbrook.
♦Crawford Bay.
*Crescent Valley.
tCreston.
*Cultus Lake.
*Decker Lake.
*Delta.
*Dewdney.
*Dragon Lake.
* Edgewater.
*Enderby.
*Ferndale.
Fort St. John.
*Fraser Lake.
*Fruitvale.
*Gabriola Island.
*Giant Mascot Mines.
*Gibsons.
*Glenmore.
*Golden.
*Grand Forks.
*Gray Creek.
* Great Central.
*Greenwood.
*Grindrod.
*Groundbirch.
*Halfmoon Bay.
*Harrison Hot Springs.
Hatzic Prairie.
*Hazelton.
*Horsefly.
*Houston.
*Invermere.
*Ioco.
*Jordan River.
*Kaleden.
*Kaslo.
tKelowna.
tKimberley.
*La France.
Laidlaw.
*Langley.
*Lavington.
*Lillooet.
*Lister.
Little Fort.
*Lone Butte.
*Lumby.
*Lytton.
*McConnell Creek.
*Mara.
*Marysville.
* Receiving grant for recreation expenses.
t Receiving grant for full-time director(s) or part-time director(s) of recreation. r
COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
FF 57
* Merritt.
*Metchosin.
*Michel-Natal.
*Midway.
*Minto.
*Mission City.
*Moose Heights.
*Mount Sheer.
*Nakusp.
tNanaimo.
*Nanoose.
*Naramata.
*Narcosli Creek.
tNelson.
*Noralee-Clemretta-Colleymount.
*North Bend.
tNorth Cowichan.
*North Kamloops.
tNorth Vancouver.
*Okanagan Centre.
Oliver.
''Osoyoos.
*Palling.
*Parksville.
*Peachland.
* Pemberton District.
*Pender Harbour.
tPenticton.
*Popkum.
*Port Coquitlam.
*Port Mellon.
*Port Moody.
* Pouce Coupe.
tPrince George.
tPrince Rupert.
*Procter.
*Quadra.
* Qualicum.
* Quesnel.
*Revelstoke.
tRichmond.
*Riondel.
♦Roberts Creek.
*Roe Lake.
*Salmo.
* Salmon Arm.
*Sayward.
*Sechelt.
* Sidney.
*Slocan City.
*Smithers.
*Soda Creek.
*Sooke.
*South Hazelton.
*Spences Bridge.
*Squamish.
*Straiton.
*Summerland:
*Surrey.
*Tarrys and District.
*Tatla Lake.
*Tatlayoko Lake.
*Tchesinkut and Francois Lake.
*Telkwa.
tTerrace.
*Topley.
tTrail-Tadanac.
tVancouver.
*Vernon.
*Warfield.
Westbank.
*West Vancouver.
*Windermere.
*Winfield.
*Woodfibre.
*Wynndel.
Yale.
*Ymir.
*Zeballos.
* Receiving grant for recreation expenses.
t Receiving grant for full-time director(s) or part-time director(s) of recreation.
During the past year the Community Programmes Branch has published a booklet
entitled "A Guide for Recreation Commissions." This Guide has been welcomed by the
Commissions and has proved to be most useful to them.
The Branch has assisted several communities with special recreation projects throughout the year. These projects included swimming, life-saving, playgrounds, basketball,
and recreation activity, and resulted from recommendations of School Boards, School
Inspectors, Regional Consultants, and Recreation Commissions. In all, during 1955-56
fifty-six communities and 14,963 persons benefited through these special recreation
projects.
A special word of thanks must be extended to School Boards which have, in so
many instances, shown great co-operation with the Recreation Commissions throughout
the Province. This co-operation in the essential field of adult education and recreation
will result in great benefit to individual citizens and to the community as a whole. FF 58
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
NIGHT-SCHOOLS
REPORT OF LAWRENCE J. WALLACE, B.A, M.Ed, DIRECTOR
Night-schools, operated by the local School Board, are of two types, namely:—
(1) Courses which are Vocational, Technical or Industrial, operating under
Dominion-Provincial agreements; and
(2) Courses which are cultural or recreational, or fall into the field of general
adult education.
All night-school classes which are approved by the Department of Education receive
grants on behalf of the instructors' salaries. Grants are provided also for the salaries of
night-school directors or principals.
The first Provincial Conference of Night-school Directors and Principals, held in
Victoria in conjunction with the Summer School of Education in July, 1955, proved to
be a most stimulating and valuable one. Some three dozen persons took part in the
conference and were rewarded handsomely through the exchange of ideas and methods.
Most School Boards in British Columbia, through their adult education programmes
in the night-schools, are offering a large variety of courses and opportunities to the citizens
of this Province. Both the variety of the courses offered and the number of students
enrolled in the night-schools of British Columbia have been on the steady increase.
Students Enrolled in British Columbia Night-schools
1953-54   19,969
1954-55  22,280
1955-56  29,331
The following School Boards conducted night-school classes during the academic
year 1955-56: Abbotsford, Arrow Lakes, Burnaby, Campbell River, Castlegar, Chilliwack, Coquitlam, Courtenay, Cowichan, Cranbrook, Creston, Delta, Enderby, Fernie,
Fraser Canyon, Grand Forks, Howe Sound, Kamloops, Kelowna, Keremeos, Kettle
Valley, Kimberley, Kitimat, Lake Cowichan, Langley, Lillooet, Maple Ridge, Mission,
Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, North Vancouver, Ocean Falls, Peace River North,
Peace River South, Penticton, Princeton, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Qualicum,
Quesnel, Revelstoke, Richmond, Salmon Arm, Southern Okanagan, Summerland, Surrey,
Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria (Greater), West Vancouver, and Windermere.
Night-school Statistics for 1955—56
Number of
Number of Persons
Instructors Enrolled
Vocational      357 9,040
Non-vocational      8 29 20,291
Totals   1,186 29,331
In addition to the above, some 1,710 persons received apprenticeship training
throughout the Province from more than 100 instructors in the night-schools. These
apprenticeship classes were under the jurisdiction of the Director of the Apprenticeship
Branch, Department of Labour.
It is with deep regret that the passing of Mr. Frank Morris, principal of the New
Westminster Night-schools, must be reported here. Mr. Morris was a real pioneer in the
adult education field, having started the first night-school in the Interior of the Province
in 1917.   New Westminster and the Province as a whole will miss him. HOME ECONOMICS FF 59
HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, B.Sc.(H.Ec), M.A, DIRECTOR
Total number of students taking Home Economics:—
Elementary schools      2,234
Junior high schools  18,977
  21,211.
In Grade VII     8,473
In Grade VIII     8,490
In Grade IX .     4,178
Special classes (Vancouver)  70
21,211
Jericho Hill School  21
Senior high schools     9,152
High-school boys     62
Technical students     23
Private schools  593
Indian schools     89
        682
In elementary grades (Grades VII and VIII).. 266
In high school (senior grades)  416
682
Correspondence courses taken under supervision of teacher
who is not qualified to teach senior Home Economics
courses         325
31,391
(Included in the above figures are 1,521 students who took Homemaking 91, which
is the final course for the Home Economics Major.)
In the public schools throughout the Province there are 143 Home Economics
centres, ten in private schools and two in Indian schools. This shows an increase of
thirteen centres over the 1954-55 total. centres Rooms
One-room centres     74 74
Two-room centres      50 100
Three-room centres     21 63
Four-room centres         2 8
Five-room centres       5 25
Six-room centres        1 6
Seven-room centres       2 14
Totals   155 290
During the 1955-56 session, Home Economics centres were opened for the first
time at:—
Kitimat:  Kitimat Junior-Senior High School.
Osoyoos:  Osoyoos Elementary-Junior High School. FF 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Parksville:  Parksville Junior High School.
Tsolum:  Tsolum Elementary-Senior High School.
Vanderhoof:  Nechako Valley Elementary-Senior High School.
New centres were opened as follows:—
Burnaby:  Nelson Annex, temporary room.
Dawson Creek:  Dawson Creek Junior High School, temporary room.
New school buildings with Home Economics centres were opened in the following
districts already offering instruction in this subject:—
Abbotsford:   Abbotsford Senior High School.
Burnaby:   Burnaby North Senior High School.
Coquitlam:  Viscount Alexander Elementary-Junior High School.
Haney:  Maple Ridge Junior High School.
Nanaimo:  Woodlands Junior High School.
Nelson:   L. V. Rogers Senior High School.
New Westminster:  Lester Pearson High School.
North Vancouver:  Hamilton Junior High School.
Additional Home Economics rooms were opened at the following centres:—
Castlegar: Stanley Humphries Junior-Senior High School.
Gibsons Landing:  Elphinstone Junior-Senior High School.
Revelstoke: Revelstoke Junior-Senior High School.
Sooke: Belmont Junior-Senior High School.
Victoria:   Esquimalt Junior-Senior High School and Victoria Senior High
School.
West Vancouver:  Inglewood Junior High School.
There are 278 teachers of Home Economics on the staffs of the schools of this
Province, showing an increase of 22 over last year.
Ninety-two teachers attended Home Economics courses at the Summer School of
Education, Victoria, during the 1956 session. An additional number of Home Economics
graduates took the third summer session of teacher-training at the Summer School of
Education in Victoria or at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
The following courses in Home Economics were offered at the Summer School of
Education during the 1956 session:—
650B. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics (two classes).
650C. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics.
651.     Problems in Home Economics Education.
653.     Foods and Nutrition. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER) FF 61
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER)
REPORT OF R. F. SHARP, B.A, D.P/ED, SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
The school-year 1955-56 has been one of continued progress. The Assistant Superintendents in charge of the elementary and secondary schools have striven to increase
the instructional assistance given to teachers. Efforts have been made to further
strengthen the relationships between the school and the home. Considerable time has
been devoted to the improvement of physical facilities and the provision of additional
accommodation.
The Adult Education Department, with the assistance of the Department of Education, has once again established a new attendance record in its evening classes. During
the past year the adult enrolment in evening classes has exceeded the total enrolment in
secondary-school grades.
The demands made on the Department of Research and Special Services for information and assistance have continued to increase, and it appears that these demands will
increase in the future, especially in the personnel section.
The Department of Construction and Maintenance completed during the year a very
heavy programme of maintenance, renovation, and construction. One of the more
interesting achievements of this Department has been the progress it has made toward the
establishment of an in-service training programme for engineering and janitor personnel.
The secretary-treasurer's department is continuing to grow and expand with the
greater demands constantly made upon it.
Department of Elementary Education
An assessment of the administrative and suppervisory activities in this Department
during the past year indicates that the greatest success has been achieved in the strengthening of classroom instruction through assistance to teachers.
The intensity of the effort directed toward helping the teacher in the classroom is
indicated by the following nineteen activities. These were mainly in three areas—
improved consultative services, stronger relations with the home, and improved physical
facilities and equipment.
(1) The Inspector of Elementary Schools and the supervisors of Art, Music,
Physical Education, Primary, Special Classes, Home Economics, and
Industrial Arts made 1,216 visits to classrooms to observe the progress of
the class and to assist and encourage the teacher.
(2) The five teacher-consultants visited all new appointees regularly and also
discussed teaching procedures and problems with 785 teachers who asked
their advice.
(3) The Inspector and supervisors held eighty meetings with groups of teachers
and conducted nine in-service courses. The consultants taught 850 demonstration lessons and led forty-seven staff discussion groups on problems
that the principals or teachers wished to discuss.
(4) In order to encourage the exchange of ideas, arrangements were made
with the principals for visits of teachers between classes and between
schools. The intermediate consultants, with the co-operation of dozens
of teachers, presented a week-long display of teaching aids and pupils'
work.
(5) A handbook, " When School Opens in September," has been produced for
new appointees to the elementary staff. It contains suggestions on classroom techniques and on relationships within the school and with parents,
as well as sources of assistance for the teacher. FF 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
(6) Eight elementary schools were served by a mental health co-ordinator.
As a result of the training programme carried on by the Board this year,
this service will be provided to most of our elementary schools starting this
September.
(7) The Inspector, supervisors, and teacher-consultants spoke to 144 parent-
teacher and community groups on various aspects of elementary education.
(8) This spring every school held teacher and parent conferences, during which
each parent was invited to talk with his child's teacher. The conferences
were far more successful than we anticipated.
(9) The Board continued to improve facilities in the older schools in an
attempt to bring them up to present-day standards. Included in the
modernization plan were libraries, artrooms, special classrooms for the
slower learners, lunchrooms, gymnasiums, staffrooms, and offices. Much
work was also done on playgrounds.
(10) Following the recommendations of the Standardization Committee, a good
start was made in bringing equipment in all schools up to the standard
considered essential for efficient teaching.
(11) Classroom libraries were established in Grade III classes, similar to those
already in Grades I and II classes.
(12) The elementary schools' library pool was built up further and now contains
124,691 volumes, or approximately eight volumes per pupil in Grades IV
to VIII. The pool books, of course, are in addition to those provided
by school and P.-T.A. funds. The high circulation figures reflect the
interest in reading created by the librarian-teachers, who are assisted by
an adequate number of suitable books and attractive facilities. During
the term, pupils in Grades IV to VIII borrowed 243,714 books or approximately sixteen books per pupil.
(13) The Board's audio-visual education service provided 15,181 audio-visual
aids to elementary teachers, a new record for this service. In addition,
teachers borrowed 907 films and 298 filmstrips from the film library of
the Department of Education.
(14) Teachers made greater use of mimeographed material from the Board's
duplicating service. The use of exercises has been encouraged in reading,
social studies, science, and arithmetic to emphasize the importance of drill.
(15) With the approval of the Board of School Trustees, primary classes have
been kept to a reasonable size, averaging 32.8 pupils per teacher. This
has necessitated the employment of sixty-eight teachers not eligible for
grant.
(16) In co-operation with the Department of Research and Special Services, the
standardized arithmetic tests, developed by a committee of principals, were
given again this year. These tests were most helpful in assessing strengths
and weaknesses.
(17) Again this year, through funds provided by the Board, it has been possible
to purchase more supplementary readers, thus bringing the elementary
schools closer to a satisfactory standard.
(18) The teacher-consultants did much to strengthen our remedial-reading programme. Even greater progress in that phase of teaching may be expected
in the future.
(19) Improvements were made in the learning situation in special classes and
in learning conditions for children confined to the hospitals or to home
through illness or physical handicap. A total of sixty-five full-time and
two part-time teachers were working with these pupils. Parents were most
appreciative of the special teaching services.   This has been particularly SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER)
FF 63
noticeable with the pupils in classes for slow learners.   Although five more
classes were added during the year, there were 116 pupils on the waiting-
fist in June.
The foregoing points indicate some of the directions in which additional emphasis
was placed during the year.
The extent of the administrative and supervisory responsibilities assigned to the
Assistant Superintendent in charge of Elementary Schools is suggested by the following
September statistics of his department: 53 elementary schools, 13 primary annexes,
32,203 pupils, 1,114 teachers, 8 supervisors (7 elementary and secondary), 5 teacher-
consultants, and 1 Inspector.
Department of Secondary Education
During the past school-year the administrative staff in this Department emphasized
the giving of assistance to new appointees and the providing of more accommodation and
teachers for the rapidly increasing enrolment in the secondary schools.
Mr. F. M. Wallace, who commenced his duties as Inspector of Schools in September,
1955, gave valuable assistance in the supervisory programme. With his assistance more
than 300 visits were made to teachers teaching in the secondary schools for the first time.
The supervisors of Industrial Arts, Home Economics, Music, Art, Physical Education, Special Classes, and Visual Education continued to render valuable service to the
classroom teachers. They also assisted greatly in the planning of new schools and in the
standardizing of equipment.
The training course for mental health co-ordinators, instituted in September, was
very successful and represents a major advancement for the school system. Under this
scheme, which was recommended by the Board's sub-committee on mental health services,
eight particularly well-qualified counsellors spent each afternoon under the direction of
Mr. R. K. MacKenzie studying the principles of mental health and the techniques for
helping children with problems. The eight co-ordinators have been assigned to secondary
schools and will serve the group of elementary schools tributary to the secondary school.
I would like to mention one particular development in our six classes for slower
learners. This past year they were given instruction in typing and more time in the shops.
At the same time the principals made every effort to make these pupils part of the school
even though they are in special classes.
An experimental course in Industrial Mechanics was another step forward in our
effort to provide greater practical educational opportunities for certain boys. The keen
interest and improved citizenship of the seventy-two students who took the course at the
John Oliver School showed that it was worth while.
As a result of a recommendation made by the Board of School Trustees, a committee
of principals and counsellors spent considerable time during the ye,ar reviewing units in
the course of study dealing with narcotic drugs. The committee prepared a handbook on
the subject, to be used this coming term by teachers of the Health and Personal Development course.
Another committee prepared a booklet, entitled " Just for Parents," for parents of
pupils starting their secondary-school education. These booklets were distributed in June
through the elementary schools.
A major concern during the year was the provision of accommodation and teaching
staff for increased numbers of pupils. From September, 1954, to September, 1955, the
enrolment grew from 17,073 to 18,225, an increase of 1,152 students. The teaching staff
increased from 722 to 755.
The predicted enrolment for the next few years is shown in the following table:—
1956  19,262      1959  23,509
1957  19,989      1960  24,557
1958  21,482      1961  25,572 FF 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
It is imperative that our school building programme proceed on schedule. Sir
Winston Churchill School will be ready for this September, and it is expected that
Killarney will open in September, 1957. Sketch plans for David Thompson School are
now in course of preparation, and this school must be ready for September, 1958. The
architects are also working on plans for Sir Charles Tupper and Prince of Wales
Secondary Schools.   All of these schools are junior-senior high schools.
Department of Adult Education
The 1955-56 school-year saw a continuation of keen public interest in the Vancouver School Board's adult education programme, with its daytime classes at the Vancouver Vocational Institute, the Vancouver School of Art, and the Radio Communication Centre, and its evening classes scattered over twenty-eight different locations in
the city. Increased enrolments were noted in all divisions, and there was every indication of even greater demands for instruction in the year to follow.
Day Classes for Adults
The Vancouver Vocational Institute, in its twenty-one regular divisions, gave instruction to 1,840 students during the year. A further 243 persons were enrolled for
special short-term courses. Most of the short courses were planned for indentured
apprentices in Lathing, Plastering, Bricklaying, and Painting and Decorating, and apprentices who were directed by the Provincial Apprenticeship Branch to report for studies
intended to supplement their on-the-job training. However, up-grading work for persons of journeyman status was represented by a special Hair Styling course offered for
beauty-parlour workers wishing to devote off-duty days to training, and by Blue-print
Reading instruction made available during certain afternoons for shift workers employed
in a number of metal-fabricating plants.
Marked gains in enrolment were noted in the Draughting and Stationary Engineering Divisions, in each of which an extra instructor was added during the latter part of
the school-year. Waiting-lists for admission to certain classes with limited training
facilities—principally Welding, Diesel Operating, Electricity, and Electronics—continued
to be lengthy. At the same time the demand for the services of the graduates of the
various divisions appeared greater than at any previous time, so much so in fact as to
cause the Vancouver School Board to undertake a study on building alterations and
additions with a view to making adequate facilities available for growing demands in
fields in which instruction is given and in new fields as well.
The Vancouver School of Art reported an unusually active year, with registrations
reaching a total of 267. Staff members and students gained signal successes during the
year in national and international competitions. Outstanding honours were won by
Instructor J. L. Shadbolt, who was one of the three Canadian artists selected to display
work at the Venice Biennial Art Show and who was granted a Canadian Government
fellowship for a year's study in France. Appreciation of the standard of the students'
efforts was evident in the employment opportunities open to the graduating group and
in the fact that the year's prize-list from public and private donations was by far the
largest in the School's history.
The Radio Electronics Centre showed a decided increase in enrolment, from 60
the previous year to 108 in the 1955-56 school session, which necessitated the services
of one additional staff member. Twenty-eight of the trainees were on a ten-month
subsidy from the Federal Department of Transport while preparing for special duties
on the Distant Early Warning line. Twenty others completed successfully the requirements for Government second-class communication certificates, qualifying them for
employment as communications officers on land and sea and in the air. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER)
FF 65
Evening School Classes
The evening school programme included a total of 297 courses in 193 different
subjects. Classes were conducted in twenty-eight centres, and the total registration for
the year was 19,907, an increase of 2,114 over the 1954-55 enrolment. Largest centres were the King Edward High School with 5,364 registrations, the Vancouver Vocational Institute with 3,543, the Point Grey Junior High School with 2,227, and the Vancouver Technical School with 2,000.
As in previous years, numerous programme changes were made to meet existing
conditions. Twenty-nine new courses were added to the list, with the major increase
in vocational business studies. Meanwhile, twenty-seven courses offered in the previous
year were dropped. Most of this latter group were in the teacher-training field, where
impending changes in the Provincial scheme made minimum offerings appear advisable.
An interesting experiment was conducted during Education Week, when students,
visitors, and staff members were invited to submit their suggestions of new courses for
the 1956-57 school-year. Nearly 400 responses were received, many of which appeared
suitable for adoption.
A table follows giving numbers of subjects and courses offered in different fields,
as well as the number of classes conducted, the number of subject registrations, and the
number of instructors engaged in each of the fields. Total subject registrations for the
previous year have been included to permit comparisons.
Analysis of Enrolment in
Vancouver Evening Class Programme, 1955—56
Classification of Courses
Number
of
Subjects
Number
of
Courses
Number
of
Classes
Subject Registrations
Number
of
Male
Female
Total
1954-55
Total
Instructors
32
59
20
10
21
22
2
11
16
59
101
37
10
24
28
4
14
20
97
178
88
10
102
66
37
18
47
2,290
4,813
1,031
46
114
485
777
254
351
1,638
236
1,895
220
2,666
1,043
414
468
1,166
3,928
5,049
2,926
266
2,780
1,528
1,191
722
1,517
3,635
4,626
1,718
757
2,373
1,320
1,446
540
1,378
68
148
45
Teacher-training, including kindergarten-
10
Homemaking. 	
48
37
English and citizenship for the foreign-born—
30
35
34
11
Totals
193
297
643
10,161
9,746
19,907
17,793
467
Department of Research and Special Services
The number of requests from the Board and the five administrative departments for
special data and services continued to increase, with the result that this Department had
its busiest year on record.
The following figures indicate the volume as well as the variety of work done. First,
however, mention should be made of two research studies which have had a marked
influence on our administrative and educational programmes.
In June all Grades II to VI classes were given the revised Vancouver survey test in
arithmetic as part of an intensive study of achievement standards in the basic subjects.
While the pupils' achievement is relatively high, we are anxious to increase the standards
further.
The following is a tabulation of activities according to the major activities of this
Department:— FF 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1955-56
(a) Testing:—
1,652 Individual Intelligence Tests.
9,933 Group Intelligence Tests.
4,650 Achievement Tests to Grades VI to VIII (pupils entering secondary schools).
5,800 Detroit Beginning I.Q. Tests to all Grade I pupils.
24,500 Bryant Reading Tests to Grades II to VI.
24,500 Vancouver Test in Arithmetic Fundamentals to Grades II to VI.
39 tests to underage pupils entering Grades II and III from other
schools.
(b) Testing in co-operation with the Department of Education:—
Grade III pupils were given the Otis Quick-scoring Mental Ability Test,
Alpha A-s, and the Stanford Achievement Test Battery, Primary J.
Grade VI pupils were given the Otis Self-administering Test of Mental
Ability and the Stanford Achievement Test, Intermediate Battery
Partial, Form J.
Survey achievement tests were given in Social Studies 10 and French 10.
Terminal survey tests in Science 20.
(c) Statistics compiled:—
Predicted enrolments.
Age-grade census.
Enrolment by grades.
Programme selection in secondary grades.
Racial origin of pupils.
Salary schedules for school employees in other cities.
Size of teaching groups in secondary schools.
(d) School attendance:—
1,054 cases investigated (elementary schools).
1,151 cases investigated (secondary schools).
273 cases of truancy investigated.
2 cases taken to Juvenile Court.
2,317 home visits made.
55 special cases investigated.
177 home visits by psychologists mostly concerning special class placement.
(e) Publications and relations:   This Department prepared the following publications:—
When School Opens in September.
1954 Annual Report of the Board of School Trustees.
Among Ourselves.
Looking Ahead.
Just for Parents.
Handbook of Information.
Lunchroom Procedures.
School Boy Patrols.
The Board was assisted in its relationships with the press, Parent-Teacher Associations, Parent-Teacher Council, Teacher Associations, and radio stations.
The newspaper advertising and news stories for the Adult Education Department as well as its " Course of the Year Contest" were also prepared.
The preceding represents a large portion of the year's work by the staff of the
Department of Research and Special Services.   It indicates some of the contributions SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER) FF 67
made to the operation of the school system through the administrative organization which
functions on the basis of interdepartmental co-operation and support.
Department of Construction and Maintenance
This Department is responsible for the operation of school plants, general maintenance of buildings and equipment, and for the planning and supervision of new school
construction.
During the year the Board approved of an in-service training programme in engineering and janitor personnel. A course of study was developed, and it is hoped that this
programme will get under way in the fall of 1956.
The gradual replacement of the older heating plants has been continued, and new
boilers were installed at Florence Nightingale Elementary School. It has been noted that
following the modernization of the refineries, the character of residual fuel-oil has gradually changed. This is causing some difficulties, and it will be necessary to install fuel-oil
heating equipment in many of our schools to cope with this situation.
It has been the policy of the Board to gradually bring our older buildings up to the
standards of educational efficiency, cleanliness, and appearance represented by the newer
construction. As a consequence, the Maintenance Division, in addition to its regular and
routine duties and several major repairs, undertook a number of rehabilitation and renovation projects. Major repairs included renewal of window frames and sash in fifteen
schools, renewal of roofs in sixteen schools, and extensive repairs to masonry in eleven
schools. Other work included interior painting in twenty-eight schools, exterior painting
in twenty-five schools, renovation of boys' and girls' toilet-rooms in twelve schools, provision of floor coverings in forty-two schools, conversion of classrooms to libraries in
twelve schools and to artrooms in twenty-one schools, and the provision of acoustic tile
in three schools. In addition, the grounds development at five schools was substantially
completed, and the reconditioning of some 9,000 pieces of equipment of all types, including students' desks, etc, was undertaken.
The following list of new schools completed during the year, those under construction, and others in the planning stage indicates the progress made by the Architectural
Division of this Department:—
Projects completed since June, 1955:—
Brock Elementary School—additions and alterations:  Seven classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium with dressing-rooms, lunchroom, covered play area.
Edith Cavell Elementary School—alterations: Remodelling present auditorium
to provide library and artroom.
Sir Wilfred Grenfell Elementary School (formerly Norquay No. 2):   Eight
classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium with dressing-rooms, lunchroom, covered play area.
Kerrisdale Elementary School—alterations:   Remodelling present assembly-
room to provide four classrooms.
Laurier Elementary School—addition:   Four classrooms,  gymnasium-auditorium with dressing-rooms, covered play area.
Livingstone Elementary School—addition:   Six classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium with dressing-rooms, play space-lunchroom, covered play area.
Quilchena Elementary School—addition:  Four classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium with dressing-rooms, play space-lunchroom, covered play area.
Sexsmith Elementary School—additions and alterations:  Six classrooms, play
space.
Southlands Elementary School—addition:   Six classrooms, covered play area.
Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith Elementary School:   Sixteen classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium with dressing-rooms, lunchroom, covered play area.
I FF 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Buildings under construction, but not completed, between July 1st, 1955, and June
30th, 1956:—
Sir Winston Churchill Secondary School: Twenty-two classrooms (standard),
fourteen special classrooms, four home economics rooms, four shops, one
double gymnasium and dressing-rooms, one cafeteria.
Capt. James Cook Elementary School (formerly Carleton No. 2 addition):
Eight classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium with dressing-rooms, covered
play area.
Killarney Secondary School: Twenty-two standard classrooms, fourteen special
classrooms, four home economics rooms, four shops, one double gymnasium and dressing-rooms, one cafeteria.
John Oliver music-room (third addition): One music-room with practice-
rooms and storage.
Hastings No. 2 Elementary School: Five classrooms, activity-room, one special
classroom, one covered play area.
Department of Business Administration
Additional changes in organization, affecting the financial side of our education
system, were made under the direction of the secretary-treasurer during the current year.
The punched-card accounting section mentioned in the last annual report has been
expanded to cover practically all functions of the accounting division of the Board. These
operations include preparation of payrolls, vendors' statements of payments and vendors'
cheques, school ledger, expense distribution ledger, historical cost records, commitment
reports, semi-weekly costs to date on costed jobs, records of employees' pay to date, and
various other types of statements and reports. The economy of this system is best illustrated by the fact that the original cards key-punched from the source material—for
example, invoices, time-sheets, etc.—are reprocessed so as to produce from five to ten
different reports.
In co-operation with the Director of Adult Education, a complete reorganization of
night-school student registration and fee collections was completed. The objects of the
reorganization were to achieve better control of cash received for fees, reduction of
handling cash and records by the instructors, and to improve the records maintained. The
system is applicable to both large and small entries, and in all cases provides a mechanical
receipt of the registration form.
For many years financial statements have become more technical, with the result
that interpretation, by other than an accountant, has become more and more difficult.
Many factors have contributed to this condition in financial reporting, Government legislation being a significant one. With this thought in mind an endeavour has been made to
simplify the annual financial reporting of the Board's operation by means of an annotated
financial statement. This annotated statement has all the financial statements on the right-
hand side of the report and the explanatory information on the left-hand side. While the
1955 report was rushed and on an experimental basis, the comments received and its
general acceptance have been very gratifying, so much so that it is intended to prepare
the annotated statement annually.
Continued progress is reported for 1955 by the Standardization Committee. The
standard list of furniture and equipment was completed for the elementary schools and
considerable headway made on a similar list for the secondary grades.
In conclusion, it should be stated that 1955 was a year in which there was continued
growth and expansion within all divisions of the secretary-treasurer's department in line
with the general expansion of the school system as a whole.
In concluding this report I would like to pay tribute to the excellent contribution
made to the Vancouver school system by the following teachers and principals who retired SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER)
FF 69
from the service during the past year: Mrs. I. M. Allen, Miss M. S. Bell, Mr. R. B.
Crummy, Miss M. J. Estey, Mr. R. D. Fletcher, Miss H. E. Johnston, Mr. W. L. Lock-
hart, Mr. T. C. MacCaughie, Miss R. P. McCaul, Miss S. E. McKay, Mr. L. C. McNeill,
Miss M. Macpherson, Miss G. H. Patrick, Miss G. A. Patrick, Mr. H. E. Patterson (principal), Mr. T. Peddie, Miss E. A. Robinson, and Mr. C. C. Smith.
It is a pleasure to report that the trustees once again recognized the retirement of
these members of the staff at an official function, which included a dinner in their honour.
I should like to draw attention also to the retirement of Mrs. Ada Crump, after
twenty-two years devoted to the cause of education as a member of the Vancouver Board.
Her untiring efforts in the performance of her duties will remain an outstanding example
of the fullest acceptance of civic responsibility. FF 70
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
School District No. 61  (Greater Victoria)
REPORT OF JOHN GOUGH, M.A, MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS,
AND ALEX. TURNBULL, M.C, M.M, B.A, ASSISTANT MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
It is with a very gratifying sense of accomplishment in all departments that we look
back upon the school term of 1955-56. It was a "building year," marked by definite
progress in the perennial struggle to find school accommodation. Following the lengthy
and frustrating planning stage, tangible results are now evident.
School opening last fall saw twenty-six elementary-school classes on shift. By June
this had been reduced to four, and completion of units presently under construction will
make it possible to eliminate them by September. However, the growth continues at a
steady rate, and in order to avoid a similar situation in the secondary schools, a new
building programme must be launched for next year.
Fourteen construction projects were undertaken, ten of which were completed and
occupied during the year. Three new elementary schools were opened, as well as additions to seven others. In all, sixty classrooms were added to the system and thirty more
will be ready by September. It is a tribute to the co-operation and industry of Board
officials and principals that this achievement has been made possible.
The following table shows in summary the distribution and organization of staff and
students:—
Elementary schools...-
Junior high schools	
Senior high schools—
Administrative centre-
Totals	
Number
of Schools
29
4
5
Enrolment
10,438
3,961
1,981
16,380
Teachers
319
129
125
13
586
The above figures represent an increase of from 8 to 10 per cent over those of the
preceding year, a trend which estimates indicate will continue for some time to come.
Four kindergarten centres are in operation, a service which is to be expanded to nine
rooms next term. Two teachers work with sick children in the city hospitals. Needless
to say, their efforts are appreciated and their time fully occupied.
Promotions and retirements accounted for several staff changes. At the end of June
five teachers with long and enviable records terminated their service with the Board. Dr.
J. M. Thomas, Mr. John Dee, Miss Ella Cameron, Miss Henrietta Bradshaw, and Miss
Eva Haverstock were honoured by trustees, fellow-teachers, parents, pupils, and ex-pupils
in the many farewell ceremonies arranged for them. All best wishes go with them for
many happy years. Two senior promotions removed Mr. Robert Heywood and Mr.
William D. Reid when the former was appointed to the Faculty of the University of
British Columbia and the latter to the Department of Education as a School Inspector.
An unusually large number of promotions to advanced positions in the district took
place during the year.
The schools co-operated in the usual manner with the training institutions when
many student-teachers observed and taught in our classes. With the assistance of these
young people, it was possible for the principals to arrange many parent-teacher interviews
when pupil reports were issued. Members of Future Teachers Clubs in the five high
schools also were given an opportunity to visit elementary classes in action.   The regular
J REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS FF 71
teachers are to be commended for their generous assistance in this important phase of professional training.
Supervision and improvement of instruction received a major amount of attention
in meetings of principals and supervisors. Several months of study and discussion, in
which all participated, clarified and evolved policies dealing with individual differences at
all ability levels.   It was an in-service training experience of real value to all concerned.
As a further means of improving the work in the classrooms, two teacher-consultants,
Miss U. Jacobson and Miss L. Smethurst, were appointed at the primary and intermediate
levels. This service has been established as acceptable and helpful to teachers. In order
to extend more effective assistance to the intermediate grades, Mr. H. O'Donnell was
made supervisor to this rapidly expanding division; he assumes his duties in September.
It is a matter of great regret that due to the severe illness of Miss Marion James, the
primary supervisor, the district was deprived of her services for many weeks. All members of the supervisory staff rendered competent guidance, leadership, and service in their
various fields of interest. They are making a valuable contribution to the operation of the
schools.
Results of local and Departmental testing programmes indicate that a good standard
of academic achievement continues to be maintained. The highest standing for the Province in the University Entrance examinations was again won by a student of Victoria High
School when John Gilliland secured an outstanding record to receive the honour. At
graduation ceremonies and special-awards assemblies, recognition of scholastic ability
was given further prominence in the schools.
Special services are developed to an increasing degree by the various departments.
Mental health, speech defects, and retarded groups receive attendtion, to the advantage
of all pupils. A splendid audio-visual aids organization of exceptional scope is readily
available to the teachers. Music, both choral and instrumental, shows a steady advancement. Interest in bands and orchestras continues to increase, and there were many
splendid performances in dramatic and musical festivals, with credit to instructors and
students concerned. In April this district was host to a band conference which, organized
with great industry, drew young musicians from all parts of the Province. The culminating event of the season was the magnificent performance of S. J. Willis Junior High School
band when it received top honours in the band festival held at Waterloo, Ont.
Teachers take full advantage of the able guidance provided to organize and carry out
an active programme of physical education. An excellent public service was rendered
once again by providing swimming classes for Grade V pupils; over 1,300 children
received basic swimming instruction as well as a life-saving demonstration of high order.
A marked degree of interest continues in adult education. For several months over
2,100 persons were actively engaged in 110 classes representing a wide variety of skills,
academic studies, English for new Canadians, and recreational pursuits. These courses
of a practical nature supplement the work of Home Economics, Industrial Arts, and
vocational instruction in the schools.
Victoria College has just completed another succeessful academic year, the fifty-
third and last session to be administered by the School Board. Under new organization,
the association of over half a century will be terminated. However, this institution is an
integral part of the educational system of this area, and thus it can expect the continued
support and interest of the school authorities.
The Parent-Teacher Association continues to expand in interest, assistance, and
membership throughout the various schools. The active support of this important group
has become a very vital and stimulating influence within the district. Another active
organization is the Junior Red Cross, which provides a contact with the less fortunate
members of society. FF 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Consistent attention to the health of all children is effectively given by the members
of the medical and dental services. The fine work of the doctors and nurses is deserving
of great commendation.
In closing, it is fitting to express sincere appreciation for the faithful and dedicated
attention to duty on the part of the school trustees. Under the chairmanship of Mr. H.
Golby, this Board guides the destiny of District No. 61 with judgment and sincerity. It
is a pleasure to be associated with all members of the school system.
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)
REPORT OF ROY S. SHIELDS, B.A, MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 40 is fortunate in having a Board of School Trustees with foresight and enthusiasm, who give of their time and ability freely and without remuneration
that the youth of this city shall have every opportunity to become worthy citizens.
For many months much time and thought has been given to building requirements
and a progressive programme is nearing completion; in September, 1955, the Lester
Pearson High School was opened by the Honourable Ray Williston, Minister of Education. Cost of building is $1,276,204.45 and the capacity is 1,100 pupils. This
magnificent school takes the place of the Duke of Connaught High School and the T. J.
Trapp Technical High School.
I wish to pay tribute to Mr. Ian F. Douglas, his staff of forty-eight teachers, the
student-body, and the Board of School Trustees for the outstanding atmosphere of mutual
understanding in the amalgamation of the student-bodies—no easy task when the tradition of the former schools is appreciated.
The Duke of Connaught High School has been demolished. The T. J. Trapp Technical High School has been remodelled as an elementary school at a cost of $75,714.26
and is now a most up-to-date institution; in May, 1956, it was reopened as the John
Robson School, and pupils, teachers, etc, were transferred without a break in school work.
The new administration offices of the Board were opened in March, of which all
interested are justly proud.
A referendum for $145,000 was placed before the people and passed, providing for
four additional rooms on the Vincent Massey Junior High School, remodelling of two
classrooms formerly occupied by the Board offices, enlargement of the junior high school
cafeteria to a 600-pupil capacity, and an additional four classrooms to be added to the
Sir Richard McBride Elementary School.
Splendid progress was made during the year in supervision and the establishing of
remedial classes for slow learners.
Mr. W. O. Hudson, principal of Lord Tweedsmuir Elementary School, and Mr.
W. D. W. Clarke, principal of Herbert Spencer Elementary School, were designated
supervising principals and have made a worth-while contribution toward improvement of
instruction and supervision,, examining more closely teaching techniques and standards
of achievement in basic subjects.
A remedial class was opened at the John Robson Elementary School, and provision
has been made for similar classes at the Sir Richard McBride Elementary School and at
the Vincent Massey Junior High School.
Our school libraries functioned smoothly and effectively. The library pool collection
now totals 5,000 volumes, supplementing the basic library collections of the six elementary REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
FF 73
schools with book loans twice a year of between 400 and 500 books, the size of the loan
being based on the need of the school and the enrolment. Total circulation this year was
5,100 books.
It is a pleasure to record the success of our schools in music this past year, and
especially in the secondary schools, under the supervision and teaching of Mr. Fred S.
Turner—the Junior High School Concert Band, Senior Girls' Choir, Boys' Glee Club,
Junior High School Choir, Senior High School Concert Band, Senior Girls' Trumpet and
Drum Band, as well as the regular courses in music, all bespeak a genuine interest and
success in music.
The twelfth annual drama festival, held under the auspices of the Community Programmes Branch of the Department of Education, took place on the evenings of March
5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th in the Vincent Massey Junior High School auditorium. All eight
public schools in the city were represented in the plays that were enacted, involving some
forty teachers and over 300 pupils. Mr. Franklin Johnson, of the White Rock Players'
Club, was adjudicator. This year the Drama Festival Committee offered a scholarship
for further drama study, the recipient being Miss Delma Tuningley.
Standardized tests have been given according to a testing programme outlined by
Mr. Arthur F. Sweet, principal of Queen Elizabeth Elementary School. Results have been
most helpful in diagnosing pupil progress and remedial needs.
Extra-curricular activities continue to be well organized and efficiently carried out—
May Day, Citizen's Day, etc.
Night-school, under the principalship of Mr. Frank G. Morris, had a most successful
year; a record attendance of 951 was attained and a total of forty classes were offered.
Non-vocational Classes
Art.
Basic English I.
Basic English II.
Basic English III.
Basic English IV.
Automobile Driving Theory.
Cabinet-making.
Canadian Foods.
Ceramics.
Charming Woman.
Copper Tooling.
Dressmaking, Beginners.
Dressmaking, Intermediate.
Flower Arrangements.
Golf.
Ladies' Keep Fit.
Journalism.
Leathercraft.
Mathematics.
Millinery.
Projectionist.
Public Speaking.
Vocational Classes
Book-keeping.
Building Construction.
Business Machines.
Draughting.
Dressmaking, Advanced.
Electricity.
Machine-shop.
Shorthand.
Steam Engineering.
Tailoring.
Television.
Typing I.
Typing II.
Blue-print Reading.
It would seem that the offering of night-school courses is for the present almost
complete. Appreciation is expressed herewith to Mr. Morris and teachers for their
splendid contribution.
Progress achieved this past year has been made possible through the untiring efforts
of the Board of School Trustees, the co-operation of the Department of Education, and
the excellent and willing assistance of all connected with the New Westminster schools. FF 74
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)
REPORT OF C. J. FREDERICKSON, B.A, AND R. C. GRANT, B.A,
MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS OF SCHOOLS
Constant increase in enrolment and the need for accommodation continues to present major problems in the Burnaby School District. Despite the absorption of nearly
6,000 pupils in four years, the district has been able to avoid shift classes, to renovate
many of its older schools, and to demolish most of the oldest buildings. The close of
the school-year saw Burnaby with a thoroughly modernized plant. In December, 1955,
a by-law for the construction of a new composite senior high school, additions to two
new junior high schools (construction of which had not yet commenced), construction
of and additions to several elementary schools was endorsed by the ratepayers. It is of
interest to note that the Board adopted the policy of constructing its major buildings of
non-combustible materials, and that the cost of such buildings proved to be fully competitive with that of the less durable frame buildings. The by-law also provided funds
for the construction of a new building to house the administration.
In-service Programme
The continued development of the in-service programme is, perhaps, the most important of the long-range policies of the Board. No part of this programme is more
encouraging than the increased involvement of the teachers themselves in its growth.
Statistics mean nothing if, behind them, there does not exist the willingness and even
eagerness of the teaching body to initiate and participate in the organization of those
activities which result in professional development. Space does not permit an adequate
record of the activities of Dr. C. C. Watson, director of the in-service programme; Miss
J. Bailey, intermediate supervisor; Miss K. Collins, primary supervisor; and of their
consultants, Mr. J. Young and Mrs. R. Chivers, but it is estimated 11,000 teacher-hours
were devoted to some form of credit and non-credit courses and group activities.
Testing Programme and School Social Service
Of invaluable assistance to the school system have been the activities of Mr. H. J.
McPherson, who has maintained a close relationship between the schools and the homes
and, in addition, is responsible for the over-all conduct of the testing programme. The
rapid increase in the size of the school population indicates, however, that the efficient
dispatch of these two functions has become too heavy a burden for one official.
Mental Health Co-ordinator
In keeping with the general objective of ensuring for each pupil the greatest possible utilization of educational opportunity through the development and maintenance
of a maximum degree of mental health, Mr. J. Findlay has devoted his attention during
the year to helping teachers and parents in their efforts to assist children toward such a
goal. His specific activities and objectives included group work with teachers and parents, consultative activity with individual teachers and parents, and the maintenance of
a liaison between the school system and other agencies working with the children.
Approximately 1,200 contacts and consultations of some type were made during the year.
Music
Last year it was reported that, in a matter of a few months, approximately 150
students were participating in the development of the school bands. It may be of some
interest to note that, at the close of this school-year, approximately 300 boys and girls REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS FF 75
were playing instruments of some type. The development of the school bands has been
gratifying to the point of astonishment. Their success is due, however, to the great
enthusiasm of the teachers concerned and to the response and co-operation extended
by the parents. This development has not taken place at the expense of other methods
of musical expression.   The number of choral groups has not diminished.
While the bands have developed to a remarkable degree, the policy remains that
it is not the purpose to produce bands as such, but rather to extend to as many children
as possible the opportunity to discover means of musical expression other than that of
choral music only. No child can play an instrument without acquiring some degree of
skill and knowledge in music.
Library
For the first time the school district had the services of a full-time librarian in the
person of Mr. D. Nelson. The provision of an adequate professional library was a
necessary adjunct to the development of the in-service programme, and the response of
the administrators and teachers was most gratifying. Despite the inadequate quarters
in a portable school building, the library under the direction of Mr. Nelson is proving
to be a cultural and professional centre of the district for the teachers, administrators,
and trustees. In addition to his duties as librarian, Mr. Nelson also distributes a growing
library of filmstrips and teaching aids. The operation of five pools for the efficient use
and distribution of supplementary readers continues to be most satisfactory.
NiGHT-SCHOOLS
During the year, 674 adult students were enrolled in the two night-schools. Thirty-
two courses were available for these students. The rapid urbanization of Burnaby with
the accompanying growth of its industrial and commercial enterprises points to the need
for continued expansion in the field of adult education.
After a number of years of effective directorship of the night-schools, Mr. Pratt
retired from this field and was replaced by Dr. C. C. Watson.
Health
Under the somewhat peculiar metropolitan health agreement, the fourteen public
health nurses are employees of the School Board while the Director of Health for
Burnaby, Dr. W. Sunderland, is employed by the municipality. This arrangement has,
however, in no way impaired the efficiency of the services rendered nor the excellent
spirit of co-operation that exists at all levels between the school officials and the health
service. The school system is deeply indebted to the splendid work being done by
everyone connected with the health services department.
Retirements
The end of the school-year brought to an official close the long and valued services
of several highly esteemed principals and teachers: Mr. G. B. Carpenter, principal of
the Burnaby North Senior High School; Mr. J. A. Scutt, principal of the Suncrest Elementary School; Mr. A. J. Richards, principal of the Windsor Street Elementary School;
Miss E. M. McCammon, teacher at the McPherson Park Junior High School; and Mrs.
K. Muir, teacher at the Inman Avenue Elementary School.
Space does not permit a proper tribute to these men and women nor to their great
contribution to education in this district and Province.
School Board
Burnaby is fortunate in having a School Board which is fully cognizant of its great
responsibilities in the provision of adequate and modern accommodation and for the FF 76
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
expanding needs of an urban district. The year saw the regrettable retirement from
public life of Mr. E. Crampton, but also provided the happy occasion of welcoming
once again a lady member of the Board in the person of Mrs. D. McKee-Wilson. The
fine attitude of the Board toward its heavy responsibilities would be largely nullified if
it were not for the highly efficient dispatch of its business operations under the direction
of Mr. A. C. Durkin, secretary-treasurer.
School Districts No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)
REPORT OF WILLIAM GRAY, M.A, MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS,
AND W. E. LUCAS, B.A, B.P^D, ASSISTANT MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS.
The rapid growth and development of the North Shore is indicated in the following
table:—
Year
Number of
Pupils
Number of
Schools
Number of
Teachers
1046-47
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)
3,414
5,597
6,319
7,041
7,901
1,358
2,482
2,894
3,235
3,718
11,619
10
13
13
13
16
3
7
8
8
9
25
107
1QS?_53
174
] 953-54
196
10*/l   «
224
1955-56    .
264
104fi_47
District No. 45 (West Vancouver)
47
]Q'i?1-53
83
1953-54                                      	
96
10>i__-SS
110
tots sf.
128
Totals, June 30th,
1956
392
North Vancouver
To meet the increase in school population in September, the North Vancouver School
Board opened (a) the Queensbury Elementary School, comprising six classrooms and an
activity-room, and (b) the Hamilton Junior High School, with sixteen standard classrooms, three general science rooms, two home economics laboratories, three industrial
arts shops, library, gymnasium-auditorium, cafeteria, special rooms for art, music, and
commerce, staffroom, medical room, and administrative offices.
In October, 1955, the ratepayers approved a referendum by-law authorizing the
North Vancouver School Board to sell debentures for an amount of $1,252,000. This
will provide funds for (a) a new senior high school in Delbrook area, (b) an addition to
and renovation of the North Vancouver Senior High School, (c) playing-ground for the
North Vancouver High School, and (d) school district administration office.
West Vancouver
In September, 1955, the four-room Irwin Park Elementary School was opened and
occupied. During the school-year two rooms and an activityTroom were added to the
Gleneagles Elementary School.   Activity-rooms were added to the Cedardale Elementary REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS FF 77
School and the West Bay Elementary School.   In June, 1956, the twenty-two-room addition to the West Vancouver Senior High School was completed.
In September, 1955, ratepayers of the school district approved a referendum by-law
empowering the Board to sell debentures totalling $390,000.  This sum will provide for
(a) the purchase of school-sites in the British Properties, Caulfeild, and Glenmore, and
(b) new elementary schools in the British Properties and Caulfeild.
General
Standardized achievement tests were administered to all pupils in Grades III to IX,
inclusive, and surveys of scholastic aptitude were carried out in Grades I, III, VI, and
VIII.   Results of the achievement tests were found to be very satisfactory.
Two classes for handicapped children were held at Queen Mary Elementary School
in North Vancouver. Three teachers were employed in West Vancouver to do remedial
teaching, one in the junior high school and the other two in the elementary schools of the
district.
At the request of the Department of Education, an experimental programme in
acceleration was introduced during the year in the West Vancouver Senior High School.
Two classes of superior Grade IX students were selected to complete the four years of
high school in three years. The parents of the children concerned were given the opportunity to take their children off the accelerated programme at the close of the present
school term. The results of the experiment are being closely watched by the Department
and school staff.
In June of this year, John Q. Fraser, a student of West Vancouver Senior High
School, brought distinction to himself and to the school by winning one of the General
Proficiency Scholarships awarded by the University of British Columbia to successful
students in the University Entrance examination.
Mr. William Gray retired on superannuation in July of this year after twenty-one
years as Municipal Inspector for North and West Vancouver. He and Mrs. Gray were
honoured at various functions given by the Teachers' Associations, School Boards, and
Parent-Teacher Associations for their services to education and to this community in
general.
School District No. 36 (Surrey)
REPORT OF K. B. WOODWARD, B.A, B.P/ED, MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
In the school-year 1955-56 the enrolment continued to increase steadily at the
fairly constant rate of the past few years, a little over 10 per cent, and in June stood at
9,372. There were in operation thirty-four elementary schools, and five high schools
enrolling Grades IX to XII. Two of the high schools also enrolled Grade XIII. In the
June examinations a Grade XIII pupil of Semiahmoo, John Ogilvie, placed third in the
Province and Gwendolyn Murphy was seventh. Donald Nicholson, of Queen Elizabeth,
won a scholarship for high standing in Grade XII. There were three Grade VIII classes
in the high schools. The other Grade VIII pupils were all in the elementary schools.
They were transported to central schools for Industrial Arts and Home Economics.
During the year thirty-nine new classrooms were opened, so we ended the year with
eighty classes on shift. FF 78 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
The teaching staff numbered 305, including three supervisors. The supervisors of
elementary grades, Miss Stephenson and Mr. Niedzielski, continued to render very fine
service. In September the principal of Johnston Road School, Mr. Kinvig, was placed
in charge of music instruction in the elementary schools. He has done very fine work in
promoting interest in his subject and has been able to get excellent co-operation from the
teachers and from the School Board.
It was still found necessary to employ teachers without secondary certificates for the
special subjects in the high schools, but without exception each did good work in his
special field.
This year we had about fifty beginning teachers. Almost all did satisfactory work
from the first. In the past few years there has been a definite improvement in the standard of work done by beginning teachers. I feel the staffs of the normal schools are to be
complimented.
Each of our high schools had a flourishing Future Teachers Club, and each member
had the opportunity of learning what it is like to stand before a class. We feel that they
definitely stimulated interest in teaching as a career.
Last September a remedial-reading teacher, Miss Elizabeth White, was placed in
Grosvenor Road School. She gave individual attention to a number of pupils and was
able during the year in each case to raise their reading levels to the standard expected of
pupils of their mental abilities.
The Board placed filmstrip projectors in all schools and instituted a filmstrip library.
It was of considerable help to the teachers during the year.
This year we had two exchange teachers from England, Miss Brooks, a primary
teacher, and Miss Abram, in the commercial department. We enjoyed having them and
feel their pupils also benefited from the experience.
In September Mr. Leslie Martin was appointed Director of Night-schools. He did
a very fine job, and under him classes were carried on in several centres in the municipality.
In June Mr. L. A. Matheson, principal of Queen Elizabeth High School for the past
sixteen years, was appointed Inspector of Schools. We are sorry to lose Mr. Matheson.
He is being succeeded by his vice-principal, Mr. Longfield.
In order to assist in the preparation of a by-law, the Board engaged the Lower Mainland Planning Board to make a survey of their needs. At present they are hoping to put
a by-law in December.
In closing I wish to thank the officials of the Department of Education, the School
Board, and the teachers of Surrey for their help and co-operation during the past year. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
FF 79
School Districts No. 5  (Creston)  and No. 6  (Kootenay Lake)
REPORT OF H. D. ABBOTT, M.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 5 (Creston)
During the past year an addition containing two classrooms and principal's office
was built at Crawford Bay; Sirdar School was reconstructed; and a School Board administration building was erected at Creston. This district has made excellent secondary-
school facilities available to all students of the area through the use of a large fleet of
buses. Operation of this transportation system as well as maintenance of buildings are
efficiently cared for by the School Board's supervisor.
The main features of the educational programme of the district are a complete
secondary-school programme, which is well adjusted to local needs, and an elementary-
school system stressing provision for individual differences and including an effective
kindergarten. The Community Programmes Branch has been very active in establishing
several centres in the area. A local unit of the Society for Handicapped Children has
been established. The Vocational Agriculture programme is well integrated with the
farming community and the Future Farmers of Canada.
School District No. 6 (Kootenay Lake)
Expansion in this district has taken place in the Riondel area, where it has been
necessary to add two classrooms and auxiliary rooms. A new rural school has been
opened at Meadow Creek and named in honour of former Inspector Jewett. Some reconstruction and redecoration has been provided for the Kaslo School. The J. A. Cochran
School has become an elementary-senior high school. The school-bus system has been
reorganized in the area north of Kaslo.
General
Educational progress in the two districts is generally satisfactory. The schools are
staffed with conscientious teachers, who are stressing fundamentals, while not overlooking
other aspects of educational growth. Extensive use of tests has assisted in diagnosis.
Students have participated in varied co-curricular activities, including art, dramatics,
folk dancing, music, and athletics. Principals are giving good leadership in their schools
and have attended not only to efficiency of operation, but also to in-service training.
School Board members continue to offer a high standard of public service.
School Districts No. 7  (Nelson)  and No. 8  (Slocan)
REPORT OF NELSON A. ALLEN, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 7 (Nelson)
This district stretches from Balfour on the West Arm of Kootenay Lake to the U.S.
border and contains fifteeen schools employing 108 teachers. Seventy-five of the teachers are in the schools of Nelson City, which consist of a senior high (Grades X to XIII), FF 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
a junior high, and two large elementary schools. During the year a new senior high
school, named the L. V. Rogers (after a former principal), was officially opened by
the Minister of Education. It is a magnificent building and should prove adequate for
years to come. The old high-school building is being completely renovated and will
open in September, 1956, as the South Nelson Elementary School. This will relieve
the pressure on the other two elementary schools, one of which (Central) is seriously
overcrowded.
In September, 1956, Procter Superior School will be reduced to an elementary
school, and all secondary students in the vicinity will be taken by bus to Nelson. The
parents of the pupils concerned voted overwhelmingly for this to be done.
A fine new bridge, replacing the ferry from Nelson to the North Shore, will be
completed in the spring of 1957 and will undoubtedly cause a further increase in the
ribbon development along the highway. This will necessitate new school buildings on
the North Shore in the not-too-distant future.
Salmo Elementary School is having two classrooms added this fall.
Academically the district had a good year. There were very few staff changes in
June, 1956, and an even better year may be expected in 1956-57. Six Grade XII students at Nelson High wrote the Departmental examinations for scholarship, and one of
them, Myrna Skapple, brought lustre to herself and her school by winning the Area 1
scholarship of $400 with an average of 93.5 per cent. This was also the top mark for
girls in the Province.   Four of the other five had averages well over 80 per cent.
Growth in the district is slow and steady, about 100 pupils per year, and there has
never been any question of putting classes on shift.
School District No. 8 (Slocan)
This district stretches from New Denver in the north to South Slocan in the south,
a distance of some 55 miles. The Slocan Valley is a beautiful one but is sparsely settled
due mainly to lack of electric power and poor roads. Both these matters are receiving
attention. Approval has recently been given by the Public Utilities Commission to the
West Kootenay Power and Light Company for electrification of the valley from South
Slocan to Slocan City at a cost of $252,000, and this summer a great deal of black-topping
is being done on the valley's main highway.
There are fifteen schools, three of which are four-roomed junior-senior high schools.
At New Denver there is a dormitory under the supervision of Mr. John Clarkson,
principal of New Denver Elementary School. This dormitory was opened in September,
1953, to accommodate the children of Sons of Freedom who refused to send them to
school. Until May 1st, 1955, it was run by the Department of Welfare. On that day
the Department of Education, through the School Board, assumed the responsibility of
directing it. The children, of course, remain wards of the Province of British Columbia.
A competent staff has been assembled and the institution is running very smoothly. At
this point I would like to pay tribute to the matron, Miss Sinclair, and to the principal,
Mr. Clarkson, for their hard work and for the way in which they have accepted the
challenge of looking after these children. Parents are allowed to visit for one hour
every second Sunday. The visit usually concludes with a religious service and choral
singing (at which the Doukhobors are experts). There are about a hundred children,
varying in age from 7 to 15. At age 15 the child is released to his parents. The children go to New Denver Elementary School (which is about a half-mile from the dormitory) and are integrated with the local children in their respective grades. Some of the
children cannot read or write a word of English, and these are enrolled in a special
beginners' class, often completing two or three years' work in one. The children are
model students and their behaviour in school is excellent. Since the dormitory operates
twelve months of the year, the problem of looking after a hundred children during July REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS FF 81
and August is a big one. Water sports, hiking, picnics, and outdoor games form a large
part of the summer programme. The children seem happy, are in good health, and will
most likely grow up to be good Canadian citizens.
Three portable school units have been erected in New Denver during the past year
to take care of these extra children. An extra room is being added at Crescent Valley
to replace the old and obsolete Crescent Valley Community Hall.
Population growth in the Slocan Valley is practically nil, but with the advent of
power and good roads things may change.
General
To all teachers and principals in my inspectorate, may I say " thanks " for your
co-operation and hard work, and also to the school trustees and secretary-treasurers for
their never-failing courtesies to me in this, my first, year as their Inspector.
School Districts No. 54  (Smithers), No. 55  (Burns Lake), and
No. 56  (Vanderhoof)
REPORT OF K. F. ALEXANDER, B.Sc, B.Ed, INSPECTOR    OF SCHOOLS
Although perhaps not as spectacular as in some parts of the Province, the school
population growth in these districts remains steady. With about a 10-per-cent increase
over the previous year, School District No. 55 (Burns Lake) leads the other two in actual
rate of growth. Two additional schools were opened in this district after the commencement of school last fall; one school added a teacher during the year and at least three
additional teachers will be needed for the 1956-57 year.
Definite progress has been made in all districts to solve the divers racial problems
which exist. The orthodox Mennonites in School Districts No. 55 (Burns Lake) and
No. 56 (Vanderhoof) tend to isolate themselves in communities and to offer resistance
to our educational system. With the co-operation of the more progressive type of
Mennonites from the Fraser Valley area, this problem is gradually being solved. Progressive members of the sect are entering the teaching profession and are being placed in
these communities. Nine such teachers were in charge of classes during this past year,
and effective results are being obtained. School District No. 54 (Smithers) seems to be
a popular area for the settling of new Canadians from Europe, particularly from the
Netherlands, Switzerland, and the Scandinavian countries. These people, who are very
anxious to learn our ways, are assimilating very nicely, and I have no doubt they will
make excellent Canadian citizens. Progress with the native populations is much slower,
and infinite patience will be required for many years to come.
The building programmes at Grassy Plains, Decker Lake, and Burns Lake are now
completed and ready for operation in the fall. This means that the major accommodation
problems of all three school districts are solved for the year 1956-57. After one year of
operation the dormitory at Vanderhoof has proven its value to the district. With applications surpassing the limited accommodation in the dormitory, the Board has, very wisely,
decided upon a priority rating based almost solely on scholastic achievement.
A number of practical steps have been taken this year, or will be taken in the fall,
which should materially improve the standard of education in this inspectorate. Part-
time stenographic help was introduced in the larger schools of School Districts No. 54
(Smithers) and No. 55 (Burns Lake) last term and should enable principals to devote FF 82
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
time to improving instruction in their schools. In addition, School District No. 54
(Smithers) is employing a relieving teacher for the coming year in order to further this
same aim. School District No. 55 (Burns Lake) will be using the services of a teacher-
consultant this next year, which, I have no doubt, will prove invaluable in this large area
of many small schools.
During the year a very successful track and field clinic, sponsored by the Community
Programmes Branch, was held in the Burns Lake area. This was made possible through
the efforts of the Palling Women's Institute with the co-operation of Mr. K. Maltman, the
Regional Director. An informative visit by the Chief Inspector to all three districts in the
early fall was appreciated by the Boards of School Trustees as well as by me. For the first
time the teachers of the Smithers district travelled west to Prince Rupert for their annual
convention. Later in the year the trustees of this school district severed their connections
with the Northern Interior Branch in order to form a branch association with those in the
west.
Finally, I cannot resist a remark on the high quality of teaching done in this part
of the Province. Those responsible for the training and certification of teachers can
justly feel proud of the fact that, in general, the standard of teaching in British Columbia
is independent of the locality of the school. I have enjoyed my first year as an Inspector
of Schools, and the reason for this is not only because of the excellent co-operation
received from school trustees, secretary-treasurers, principals, and teachers, but also
because of the fact that my work has taken me into this most beautiful part of the
Province.
School District No. 38 (Richmond)
REPORT OF J. N. BURNETT, M.A, B.Ed, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School Organization
Type of School
Number
Regular
Teachers
Relieving
Teachers
Special-class
Teachers
Pupils
Junior-senior high-
Junior high	
Elementary-
33
34
100
Elementary annexes.
Totals, 1955-56	
Totals, 1954r55	
Increase	
843
854
3,501
17
14
167
141
5,198
4,669
26
529
In the fall of 1955 two new six-room elementary schools (Blundell and Cook), a
two-room addition to Siddaway Elementary annex, the Tait Elementary two-room annex,
and a one-room addition to East Richmond Elementary annex were opened. These
provided much-needed classroom accommodation and put an end to the double-shifting
of classes which has been necessary for the past three years in this district.
During the year the Mort four-room elementary school was completed, as was also
a two-room addition to the Thompson Elementary annex. These were not required this
school-year, but will be brought into use in September, 1956.
The Mitchell Elementary School renovation was carried out during the summer and
fall of 1955. This old structure has been brought up to an acceptable modern standard
and will provide a brighter environment and much-improved facilities for the staff and
pupils. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
FF 83
In April the new School Board administration office was occupied, and, for the first
time in the history of the district, quarters were provided for the Board and its officials
outside of a school building. This modern structure contains a boardroom, space for the
business administrative staff, a School Inspector's office, and facilities to operate a limited
central distribution centre. Provision has been made for second-story expansion, which
will be needed probably within a few years. The proposed maintenance building is now
in the process of construction.
The development of the municipality has proceeded at a greater rate than anticipated, and consequently the Board's school construction programme, planned in 1953
to cover a five-year period, has been accelerated. It is quite evident that this fall, or early
next spring at the latest, a referendum providing for further school expansion will have
to be placed before the taxpayers. Anticipating this, the Board has initiated surveys by
the town planning authorities in conjunction with their own educational staff, and a
preliminary report has already been made. Sites recommended for future schools are
now in the process of being appraised. It is expected that this new building programme
will be ready for presentation to the Department of Education in October.
The year has seen an increased degree of co-operation between the Municipal
Council and the Board of School Trustees concerning school needs. Two combined
meetings were held, and the problems facing the community in providing present and
future school accommodation were fully discussed. This close liaison between the two
responsible elected bodies augurs well for successful educational planning in this district.
For some time it has been apparent that a special class for the very slow learners
was needed in the area, but because of lack of accommodation its organization was held
in abeyance. In September this class was established at Bridgeport Elementary School
under the patient and capable direction of Mrs. H. E. Tokarak. Children attending come
from all schools in the municipality, and this in itself created an extremely difficult transportation problem. Thanks to the sympathetic co-operation of the principals and bus
operators, a satisfactory workable arrangement was effected. The class has been firmly
and soundly established, and public relations have been given careful attention, thus
ensuring the necessary parental understanding and support.
.The class for new Canadians was continued at Lord Byng Elementary School and
catered to an undiminishing flow of immigrants.
Under the principals concerned, good practical testing programmes were carried out.
Readiness tests were given to all beginning pupils, and in scholastic aptitude to all pupils
in Grades II, VI, and IX. Diagnostic testing was extensively used in the fundamental
subjects, and the results of these made the bases of remedial instruction where the need
was indicated. Metropolitan achievement tests were administered to all Grade VI pupils
on entering junior high school.
Provision for the very slow and bright learners is being made within possible limitations. In the elementary grades, class ability grouping and adaptation of the programme
are employed with fairly good results. In the junior high schools some ability grouping
has been attempted in a few classes, but, in the main, homogeneous grading with course
adaptation has been employed. Completion of the primary and intermediate divisions in
decelerated or accelerated periods is also being given attention.
In-service training was given more emphasis this year. Meetings were held of the
staff as a whole, the secondary group, the elementary group, and of most of the various
subject groups. The form of these gatherings was varied, aimed at discovering teacher
preference in this field of activity. While all types appeared to fill some need, it was quite
apparent that the most valuable and satisfactory from the teacher point of view was the
organization of grade groups at the primary level and subject groups above Grade III for
predetermined problem discussions.
The work of the Metropolitan Health Committee continued with its excellent cooperation in the health interests of our pupils.   In September Dr. J. C. White succeeded FF 84 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Dr. J. K. Whittal as the School Medical Health Officer, and the staff of public health
nurses was increased from five to six. The polio-prevention programme was an outstanding achievement, and it is gratifying to note that all the 5-year-old children in the district,
together with all pupils in Grades I to IX, inclusive, were given their first injections of
polio vaccine.
The district dental clinic under Dr. Marion B. Deverell again demonstrated its
efficiency and popularity with the parents. In addition to the pre-school and Grade I
pupils, the Grade II students were inspected this year; 1,652 children were examined or
rechecked during the year, and of these, 554 required and were given dental treatment.
Teacher-supply continues to be adequate in this area, but it is becoming difficult to
obtain fully qualified specialist teachers, particularly in Home Economics, Secondary
Music, and Physical Education.
Acknowledgment is made herewith of the sympathetic co-operation of the district
School Board and its officials and my colleagues in the Department of Education.
School District No. 68 (Nanaimo)
REPORT OF C. L. CAMPBELL, M.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The steady increase in growth of school population in this district is indicated in
1955-56
the following table:— 1954-55
Nineteen elementary schools  2,578 2,603
Two Junior high schools      920 1,029
One senior high school      515 602
Totals  4,013 4,234
To staff these schools required the services of 159 teachers, an increase of nine
over the preceding year. With the exception of a few teachers of special subjects in
the high schools, all of these were fully qualified. The greatest shortage at present seems
to be in the field of home economics, physical education, and music.
Two new schools were officially opened during the year. On January 27th, 1956,
the Honourable the Minister of Education opened the Woodlands Junior High School,
designed to accommodate 600 pupils. On March 28th Dr. Giovando, the local M.L.A,
opened the three-roomed Quarterway Elementary School. The junior high school was
occupied in the autumn but not fully completed until Christmas. The Quarterway pupils
had been transported to the old Thomas Hodgson School for the whole of the first term.
A second junior high school, similar in size and design to the Woodlands and situated in the southern area, was started this year and should be ready for occupancy in
the autumn of 1956.
A portable classroom unit was constructed and put into operation this year. It has
proved quite satisfactory and will be moved about as required. This type of accommodation serves a very useful purpose where permanent additions have been authorized
but cannot be completed before term opening.
The night-school classes are becoming steadily more popular in this district. In
1955-56 the number of pupils increased by 57 per cent and the number of classes by
66 per cent. Two classes were carried on which enabled teachers to improve their certificates. A good balance is maintained in these classes between the cultural and the
strictly vocational. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS FF 85
The special class for slow learners was conducted very successfully again this year,
and requests for similar classes in other areas have been received. It is anticipated
that a second unit will be opened in the Harewood-Bayview district next year.
Results of the Grades XII and XIII Departmental examinations were very satisfactory again this year, but if the difficulty in procuring and retaining competent qualified
secondary teachers continues, such results cannot be expected indefinitely.
An experiment in introducing instrumental (band) music into some of the elementary schools has proved very popular. It is planned to expand this next year so that all
schools will receive some attention.
The appointment of a registered civil engineer as works superintendent in charge
of construction and maintenance of school plant and equipment has been a great step
forward in that department. Urgent work is promptly completed and long-range planning is being carried out.
As the major part of the school construction authorized under the 1952 referendum
is now nearing completion and the school population growth continues unabated, it
seems essential that a new by-law be prepared for presentation within the next two or
three years.
School Districts No. 37 (Delta), No. 48 (Howe Sound),
and University Hill  (Unattached)
REPORT OF T. G. CARTER, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Delta
The recent announcement that a tunnel would be constructed under the South Arm
of the Fraser River has stimulated interest in this area. Population growth continued
steadily and school accommodation was taxed to capacity. During the year four divisions were on shift in the Richardson School and temporary accommodation was in use
at Kennedy and East Delta.
A referendum for extensive construction was approved by the ratepayers in September. As a result, new schools are being built at Annieville, Delta Manor, and East Delta,
and a four-room addition at Richardson. The referendum provides for a new gymnasium-
auditorium at the Delta Junior-Senior High School and a complete new junior-senior
high school in North Delta, from which area pupils have been enrolling in Surrey schools
for their secondary education. Activity-rooms are to be built at Sunbury and Boundary
Bay and new schools at Boundary Beach, Sunset Bluff, and Peck Road. A new School
Board administration office is also planned.
Mr. Nelson A. Allen, principal of the Delta Junior-Senior High School for four
years, was appointed to the inspectoral staff, with headquarters at Nelson. Mr. Allen
contributed to his duties in Delta a high standard of service and efficiency, and it is
anticipated that he will do well in his new sphere.
Howe Sound
Through the year there has been much activity in this district. The southern extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway is near completion, and the new highway from
North Vancouver to Squamish is under construction. A dam is being built near Garibaldi
to harness the water of the Cheekye River, which will be diverted through a 7-mile tunnel
to the Squamish Valley. This development will supply much additional power to the
Sechelt and Powell River areas. FF 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
A referendum to meet the growing school needs was passed in March by an overwhelming majority. Provision is now made for new elementary schools at Alta Lake,
Mamquam, Parkhurst, Pemberton Meadows, Southridge, and Squamish; additions to the
existing schools at Birken, Brackendale, Britannia Beach, Creekside, Garibaldi, Pemberton, and Woodfibre; and a new School Board administration centre. Plans are also
included for a considerable number of teacherages, including a sixteen-teacher apartment
building in Squamish, thus ensuring adequate and modern living accommodation for
teachers throughout the district. In this connection all the members of the School Board
are to be commended on their sympathetic and progressive attitude toward their
employees.
University Hill
A comprehensive plan by Dr. David Turner and associates for the future development of the University Endowment Lands, has been submitted. To meet present needs
and anticipated growth, a referendum for new construction was passed by the ratepayers
of the area in May. This referendum provides for two new elementary schools and for an
eight-room addition to the existing high school. During the year the elementary school
was completely renovated and extensive improvements were made to the high-school
grounds.
School Districts No. 27 (Williams Lake) and No. 30 (South Cariboo)
REPORT OF D. G. CHAMBERLAIN, B.A, B.Ed,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
The population of this area continued to increase rapidly with a corresponding rise
in school enrolment. The effects were particularly noticeable in the elementary school
at 150 Mile House, Lac la Hache, and 100 Mile House, as well as in Williams Lake.
By making use of all possible space that could be rented and by reopening schools previously abandoned, the Board of School Trustees was able to provide sufficient classroom space in all but two areas. A referendum designed to cover the building needs
of the district for the next five years was presented to the ratepayers on January 24th but
failed to gain the necessary support. No plans have been developed, as yet, for the
presentation of another referendum. The Board is making plans to place the elementary
pupils from the vicinity of Williams Lake on shift in September.
The increase in enrolment in the southern portion of the district has made it advisable to organize another secondary school at 100 Mile House. Present plans envisage
the setting-up of a superior school in September which will, in due course, develop into
a junior-senior high school.
In spite of the difficulties presented by inadequate housing and by the difficulty in
obtaining fully qualified teachers, the progress of the pupils has been highly satisfactory.
Principals have worked to direct their schools and to assist enthusiastically their teachers,
who have responded well. The dormitory has continued to serve the students from the
remote parts of the district in a capable manner.
The Board of School Trustees has worked hard in its efforts to provide for the needs
of the pupils and is to be commended for its patience and perseverance. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS FF 87
School District No. 30 (South Cariboo)
The past year has been one of steady and satisfactory progress, although some disappointment has been experienced. The staff turnover was relatively small, and consequently the schools had a satisfying year. The school buildings are crowded and lack
special-room facilities. The lack of gymnasia is especially serious in the centres of
Ashcroft, Clinton, and Lytton and adversely affects the school programme. The Board
of School Trustees planned a rather ambitious building programme to serve district
needs for the ensuing five years. This would have provided a much needed dormitory
in Clinton as well as special rooms and some new buildings. Unfortunately, the referendum, when presented in June, was defeated. No further plans have been developed
to present a new referendum.
The long bus routes, which often follow very poor roads, create a serious problem
in this district. The Board has plans which will reduce much of this excessive bussing,
but as these involve building they will have to wait upon the successful passing of a
referendum.
The Board has worked hard and often spent long hours in the service of the district, for which the members are to be commended.
General
Within the inspectorate, affairs have progressed satisfactorily throughout the year.
I have been particularly pleased with the work done by the teachers, and especially so
with the desire they have shown to improve their work and their qualifications. Many
attended summer schools. The principals, working with others in neighbouring districts,
have organized the Cariboo Administrators' Council. Three good conferences were
held throughout the year, and a foundation has been laid for future development.
I have enjoyed working with the teachers, principals, secretary-treasurers, and
trustees, and wish to express my sincere thanks for the many courtesies extended to me.
School Districts No. 42 (Maple Ridge) and No. 75  (Mission)
REPORT OF J. CHELL, B.A, M.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
For the school-year 1955-56 seventeen teachers were added to the staff of the
previous year.   School closed in June with 177 teachers employed.
District No. 42 (Maple Ridge)
This district is growing rapidly, and as it lies not more than 20 miles from Greater
Vancouver it will continue to grow. On September 1st, 1955, the new junior high school
was officially opened by the Honourable R. G. Williston, Minister of Education. This
building makes possible separate administration for junior and senior high schools.
Originally the school was planned for Grades VII, VIII, and IX, but so many people
have moved to the district that the school opened full with Grades VII and VIII. The
Board is already thinking of another junior high school. Over the Easter recess enough
new pupils moved to the Central School area to warrant the opening of another division.
A relieving teacher was approved and appointed. With this help, principals have been
able to give more time to supervision. The next need is for some clerical assistance; it
seems inevitable that organization means more and more paper work. FF 88 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
An outstanding feature of each year is the principals' dinner. At the gathering this
year Dr. Dennis Smith outlined a topic which created valuable discussion.
Quite a number of principals are attending evening and summer sessions at the
University. This is very commendable. The arrangement whereby some of these classes
are held in New Westminster makes it possible for many more from the Fraser Valley
to attend.
The Board has been concerned with building maintenance and has set a policy. This
plan, coupled with the new buildings should give the district a high standard of school
housing.
District No. 75 (Mission)
There is no marked increase in enrolment in this district. Several factors may be
contributing to this, with possibly the most important being the collapse of the Mission-
Matsqui Bridge. This disaster has had an effect on the economic life of the community.
The increase in enrolment is mostly at secondary level; two portable units are planned
for the junior-senior high school next year.
The Board appointed a teacher-consultant to serve the rural schools and primary
grades of the district. The consultant has been a real helping teacher, bringing ideas and
encouragement to new teachers and sharing with the more experienced. The Board is to
be congratulated on its willingness to try out a new idea, particularly since it turned out
to be such a good one.
The junior-senior high school is experimenting with some work in the field of forest
conservation. The community has given much support, and an area has been set aside
as a school forest where practical work may be done. So far the course has been a
development of the agriculture programme.
This has been a good year. Teachers have given much more than academic work;
they have worked with pupils as individuals and as people, and they have shared in
community life. Trustees have had foresight, which is another way of saying there has
been a realization that progress and change are not necessarily synonymous, they are
inevitable. A trustee plays a big role in wise direction.
May I express my thanks to the Department for permitting me to attend the C. E. A.
Kellogg course in Edmonton. I would hope that this experience may be the opportunity
for all Inspectors.
Again my thanks to the health unit officials for the very generous way in which
matters of mutual interest have been shared during the year.
School Districts No. 12 (Grand Forks), No. 13  (Kettle Valley), and
No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
REPORT OF C. E. CLAY, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
There have been 124 teachers employed in this district during the year, sixty-two
of them in School District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan), twenty-five in School District
No. 13 (Kettle Valley), and thirty-seven in School District No. 12 (Grand Forks). The
growth in the area has not been as spectacular as it has been in so many others. By early
next fall the classroom accommodation should be adequate for some time unless there is
unforeseen growth. A comparison of the attendance in 1951 and again in 1956 shows
an over-all increase of 336 pupils, made up as follows:— REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 12 (GRAND FORKS)
FF 89
Year
Grade
Total
I    1   II
1
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
1951
93
110
84
89
78
95
100
92
96
102
83
74
78
84
70
78
45
103
57
57
15
40
35
31
5
834
1956 	
960
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 13  (KETTLE VALLEY)
1951...       	
1956	
61
73
51
82
51
60
50
63
39
47
43
58
36
45
37
51
37
48
26
24
10
15
19
10
	
460
576
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 14 (SOUTHERN OKANAGAN)
1951  ..
158
166
161     159
154     174
155
161
1
150     152 1 151
149      133   1   163
117
139
86
136
84
80
78
77
51
52
6
211
1,508
1956..              	
1,605
1 Includes 16 special.
The junior high-school addition to the Osoyoos Elementary School was completed
early in the term. By enrolling the Grade IX Osoyoos students there, it relieved the
transportation problem in that area.
During the year the ratepayers of School District No. 13 (Kettle Valley) approved
a by-law for $140,000. This enabled the Board to proceed with the enlargement of the
Greenwood Elementary-Junior High School, as well as adding a room to and modernizing
the Beaverdell School. These additions should be ready for occupancy for the fall term.
Unless there is a sudden upsurge in the population in these districts, there should be little
major building for some time.
Prior to the opening of school in September, a workshop for primary teachers was
held at Osoyoos. This was of great benefit, particularly to the incoming teachers, as it
served as an induction period for them and gave them an opportunity of working with
the teachers who had been on the staff previously. Again in November a workshop in
art was held at Grand Forks under the direction of Mr. John Lidstone, supervisor of art
for Vancouver. There was good response on the part of the teachers to both of these
and they were most successful. Thanks must be extended to Dr. Sharpe, Superintendent
of Schools for Vancouver, and the Vancouver School Board for their co-operation in
releasing Mr. Lidstone, and to the three Boards in the districts concerned, who so kindly
co-operated in making these workshops a success. The teachers in School District
No. 14 (Southern Okanagan) co-operated in an O.V.T.A. in-service training plan, and
it was felt that this was sufficient call upon their time to eliminate any further workshops
for the year. Their programme was quite successful and was well attended by the
teachers.    Plans are under way to carry these on next year.
The special class for slow learners operated in Oliver has been most successful.
Seventeen pupils have been enrolled, and their progress and the changes in the attitudes
of many of them have been gratifying to both parents and teachers. It is regrettable
that the programme cannot be carried further. The Board has been most fortunate in
having a well-trained and keenly interested teacher in the person of Mrs. A. Wilson.
In all schools every possible provision has been made to take care of the needs of the
brighter students: some have expanded their cultural programme, while others have
been encouraged to carry an increased academic load. In one Grade XII group of
twenty-nine pupils on the University Entrance Programme, only eleven are carrying the
minimum load of 120 credits and three majors. Seventeen had four majors while one
had five, and the number of credits ranged from 157 down. FF 90
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Two very successful drama festivals were held this spring—the International Drama
Festival in Oliver and the West Kootenay in Grand Forks. The former was competitive
and the latter non-competitive. Both were very well organized, and the high quality of
the productions drew loud praise from the adjudicators.
As a grand finale for Education Week in the Southern Okanagan, a commercial
competition was held. This consisted of competitions in taking shorthand and in typing.
There were several divisions, with the result that a large entry list was received. Competitors were entered from as far north as Salmon Arm, as far east as Grand Forks, and
from Princeton on the west.   The programme created keen interest and was successful.
School Districts No. 12 (Grand Forks) and No. 13 (Kettle Valley) have had their
health programme somewhat curtailed owing to the lack of public health nurses, and it
is hoped that nurses can be found for both districts next year. In School District No. 14
(Southern Okanagan) a full health programme has been carried out under the direction
of Dr. Clark, M.H.O. Here there has been excellent co-operation between the school
and the Department of Health and Welfare. The Salk inoculation programme was well
supported in all three districts.
Once again I must thank the trustees, secretaries, teachers, principals, public health
nurses, and welfare workers in the inspectorate for their co-operation.
School Districts No. 1  (Fernie) and No. 2  (Cranbrook)
REPORT OF ERIC J. DUNN, M.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate, which is situated in the extreme south-eastern corner of the
Province, continues to show a steady, but relatively small, growth in population. It is
staffed by 117 teachers in fifteen schools.
School District No. 1 (Fernie)
The year was one of efficient and harmonious progress in this district. The new
school at Sparwood and the new addition at Fernie added considerably to the educational
environment.
At Waldo, progressive deterioration of the building reached a point where the Board
deemed it advisable to proceed with plans for a new elementary-senior high school to be
more centrally located at Jaffray, where an admirable site was acquired. The Board has
also obtained a teacherage in this area. This action should aid considerably in holding
and obtaining qualified teachers.
In general, the quality of work done in the schools has been very gratifying, and,
despite the current teacher shortage, the calibre of teaching personnel very high.
Much of the credit for the smooth operation of this district should go to the secretary-
treasurer, Mr. J. F. Bennett, whose co-operation and efficiency have been much appreciated by me.
School District No. 2 (Cranbrook)
Overcrowding and consequent shift conditions seriously hampered educational
progress in this district during the year.
At the Mount Baker Junior-Senior High School the increasing difficulty of obtaining
adequately qualified teachers showed some effects on the standard of work accomplished,
in compelling curtailment of co-curricular activities, and in restriction of curricular
offerings such as music. The new wing of the school, now under construction, should be
available for occupancy in September and will alleviate the situation. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
FF 91
Results of testing programmes carried on during the year indicated excellent academic progress at the Cranbrook Central School.
The Board proposes establishing opportunity classes at both secondary and elementary levels in the year 1956—57.
Under the energetic leadership of Trustee Arthur Draper, the Society for Handicapped Children has organized a day-school in the area.
A referendum for the construction of much-needed additional elementary accommodation at Cranbrook and Yahk was endorsed by the rate-payers, over 92 per cent being
in favour.
The people of Cranbrook honoured a local teacher, Miss Ellen Paterson, by naming
her as the year's good citizen. The action reflects the esteem in which the teaching
profession is held in the area.
At the close of the year, Miss Laura Henderson retired from teaching at the Cranbrook Tenth Avenue School, after many years of faithful and excellent service.
General
For the school-year 1956-57, the Fernie and Cranbrook School Boards are
co-operating to provide a teacher-consultant at the elementary level.
In conclusion, I should like to record my appreciation of the co-operation I have
received from the members of both Boards of School Trustees. The interest and effort
they have expended have been well above that for which the office called.
School Districts No. 70 (Alberni), No. 79 (Ucluelet.Tofino), and Unattached
School Districts at Bamfield, Esperanza, Kyuquot, Muchalat, R.C.A.F.
Station  (Torino), Sarita River, Sydney Inlet, Tahsis River, and Zeballos.
REPORT OF H. C. FERGUSON, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
As a result of reorganization effected at the beginning of the current school term,
School District No. 69 (Qualicum), comprising forty-six teachers and 1,000 pupils, was
transferred to the Courtenay inspectorate. This reduction in boundaries and personnel
has made it possible to give more time and attention to the educational needs of the
remaining districts. It is interesting to note that for the five-year period ended June
30th, 1956, a 30-per-cent increase in staff strength and school enrolments has been
experienced. This growth has not been confined to any one district or area. To-day
the twenty operating schools are staffed by 149 teachers, who instruct a combined enrolment of approximately 4,200 pupils. Paralleling the growth in Provincial schools is
the continued increased enrolments in Indian day-schools. On the reserves at Ucluelet,
Ahousat, Friendly Cove (Nootka), and Kyuquot, some 180 pupils are taught by a staff
of eight instructors.
School District No. 70 (Alberni)
Industrial expansion in this district has made the Board aware of the limitations of
its educational facilities. Although all pupils have been accommodated without recourse
to emergency measures, this has only been possible by making maximum use of all
available accommodation. The ten-year building programme planned some four years
ago has moved very slowly. First units will not be available until the new term. Only
the lack of adequate housing in the area has saved the district from a very difficult school
accommodation problem.    It is anticipated that with the availability of fourteen new FF 92 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
classrooms in September and the completion of remaining units by the fall of 1957 the
district may be fortunate in at least keeping pace with present demands. Already some
thought is being given to a further building programme which would provide more elementary classrooms in the north end of the district and, possibly, a junior high school
for pupils in the Port Alberni area.
Educationally the schools have given a good report of themselves during the year.
The quality of instruction has been good and educational standards have been well
maintained. Except in some of the specialized fields at the secondary-school level,
most teachers were fully qualified, As a group they gave generously of their time,
training, and experience for the educational welfare of their pupils. In general, principals and head teachers have given sound professional leadership and schools have operated smoothly and efficiently. Results of district and Department standardized testing
indicate that pupils are performing well in line with their abilities and that very satisfactory progress is being made in both skill and content subjects.
School District No. 79 (Ucluelet-Tofino)
During the summer and early fall the Board carried out considerable maintenance
work on its buildings and sites. In November a survey was made of existing school
facilities in the light of anticipated future requirements. On the basis of this survey a
referendum was prepared calling for an expenditure of a quarter million dollars for
reconstruction and new school buildings. The major projects are additional classrooms,
regulation shops for Home Economics and Industrial Arts and a full-sized auditorium-
gymnasium. The question was put to the taxpayers in June but was defeated. The
Board has since decided to return to the ratepayers with the original programme at the
earliest possible date.
Although the teacher turn-over in this district is considered to be high, the Board
has been very successful in securing experienced and capable teacher replacements.
The detrimental effects of too frequent teacher change have been minimized by a nucleus
of able teachers who have given continuity to the educational programme. The fine
quality of instruction given by new appointees has also assisted. Standards of performance and accomplishment have shown a steady improvement during the past few years.
Educational opportunities and facilities in this district compare very favourably with
those in other parts of the Province.
Unattached School Districts
At Bamfield the three-room Eric Godson Memorial Superior School continues to
meet quite adequately the educational needs of the community. The building is functional, well equipped, and carefully maintained. Instruction has been good, and sound
progress has been made. The small school at Esperanza has had a successful year under
the able direction of a young experienced teacher. A second classroom is to be constructed at Kyuquot, where increased enrolment is sorely overcrowding the facilities of
the one-room school. The appointment of a second teacher should prove a decided
benefit to pupils and the teacher, who has given such fine service under increasingly trying
circumstances. At mid-term the resignation of the teacher at Muchalat caused some
interruption in the school programme. The replacement has carried the ever-increasing
load satisfactorily. With the completion of a new two-room school, interruptions which
have adversely affected the work of the pupils should be considerably diminished.
A second teacher was added to the staff at R.C.A.F. Station (Tofino).   The school has REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS FF 93
operated smoothly and efficiently, much to the credit of the teachers, the R.C.A.F, and
the fine co-operation of station personnel. A new two-room school at Sarita River was
opened. The many details in connection with the construction of such a fine building
were very ably handled by Official Trustee E. H. Horning, who works untiringly in the
best interests of education in his community.
At Tahsis River a fourth classroom was put into operation and instruction in work
at the Grade IX level was offered for the first time. Pupils in this school are making
good progress as a result of the able instruction they have had during recent years.
Trustee George Long and the Tahsis Company are to be commended for their part in
making available increasingly improved school facilities and accommodation. The small
school at Sydney Inlet continues to function efficiently and serve effectively the educational requirements of this small community. Zeballos School still retained sufficient
enrolment to require the services of two teachers. The diminishing number of school-age
children has probably reached its lowest ebb. The Board and residents of this community are most interested in the educational welfare of their children and give generously
of their time and resources to make available the best possible school plant. The two
teachers are giving a fine service to pupils and community. Some instruction at the
secondary level will be undertaken next term in order to meet the needs of a number of
pupils who would otherwise be denied this opportunity. The co-operation, interest, and
friendliness of residents, ratepayers, Boards and staffs of these west coast communities
continue to be valued assets in the process of administering to the educational requirements of these settlements.
Indian Day-schools
The four Indian schools in this inspectorate provide good teacher and pupil
accommodation, which is being very satisfactorily maintained. Increased enrolments
necessitated the opening of an additional classroom at Friendly Cove (Nootka), and
a new one-room school was constructed and occupied at Ahousat to take the overflow
from the existing two-room building. The day-school is a very recent institution in these
communities, whose beginnings pre-date the romantic history of our Province. The
conscientious work being done by teachers and Indian Affairs officials, coupled with the
interest and co-operation of the residents, should result in a lasting and beneficial
educational effect on the young people now passing through these schools. The happy,
eager enthusiasm found in so many classrooms speaks well for the instructional approach
being employed.
General
Throughout the year a close liaison has been maintained between this office and
Boards, official trustees, and principals. Teachers and pupils have been most conscientious and co-operative in our joint effort to improve the level of instruction. Boards
and official trustees have given generously of their time and energy to meet the problems
resulting from increased enrolments. Courtesies extended by Board secretaries and
officers in the Department of Education have considerably assisted in the year's work.
Public Health and Welfare officials have given generously of their services for the good
of the pupils. P.-T.A. groups have been active. In general, the normal administrative
and supervisory functions of this office have been carried out as planned, and a very
satisfactory school-year has been brought to a successful conclusion. To all those who
have so ably assisted in making this possible, appreciation is herewith acknowledged.
* FF 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
School District No. 11  (Trail)
REPORT OF S. J. GRAHAM, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment and staff of District No.  11   (Trail) during the school-year 1955-56
were as follows:  Number Number
of students of teachers
High schools  2,163 101
Elementary schools  2,886 95
Opportunity classes        22 2
Totals  5,071 198
My first year in the Trail District inspectorate has been a most happy one. It is
unique in these days of expanding school population to find a district where the problem
of adequate school accommodation has been met more than adequately. This condition
reflects the far-sighted planning of members of the School Board and the excellent counsel
of Inspectors who have served in this area.
It has been gratifying to witness the enthusiastic support for education which is
forthcoming from citizens and organizations of the city and district. Each school has
an active and largely attended Parent-Teacher Association. The Consolidated Mining
and Smelting Company has been particularly active in its assistance to the schools. An
Education Liaison Committee, consisting of three members of management of the
company, under the chairmanship of Dr. C. H. Wright, meets regularly with the principals
of the district schools to discuss problems of mutual interest. On many occasions
throughout the year the Committee has arranged for the resources of the company to be
made available to assist in solving problems such as assisting teachers to find adequate
housing and providing holiday and other employment for students and teachers.
Students from this district again did splendidly in the Junior and Senior Matriculation examinations, which is a continuing evidence of the high academic standards maintained in the senior high schools under the principalsh.ps of Mr. A. E. Allison and
Mr. Edward Davies.
During the year extensive testing programmes were carried out under the direction
of the various principals. General ach'evement tests were administered in Grades II to
IX. Scholastic aptitude tests were given to pupils of Grades III, VI, VIII, and X.
District prepared arithmetic and spelling tests were given monthly in Grades II to VI.
The Ayres writing tests was administered for Grades IV to VI.
Test results were compiled and analysed in this office and, after study by the principals, were made the basis for such remedial and drill procedures as were needed.
Throughout the year regular meetings of the principals were held and upon occasion
with the counsellors of the four high schools.
Under the direction of an able committee of the district local of the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation a one-day in-service training institute was held. As an outgrowth
of this meeting, several subject committees established continuing study groups.
In June of this year Mr. A. E. Allison retired after serving thirty-one years as
principal of the Trail High School. In giving the graduation address at the J. Lloyd
Crowe Senior High School, the Deputy Minister of Education, Dr. H. L. Campbell,
paid suitable tribute to the distinguished service which Mr. Allison has rendered to
education in this Province.
I would like to acknowledge the exceptionally friendly and valuable assistance which
has been given to me by the members of the School Board, the secretary-treasurer,
Mr. R. C. Smith, and the able teaching staff. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
School District No. 34 (Abbotsford)
FF 95
REPORT OF WILLIAM H. GRANT, B.S.A, B.Ed, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The reorganization of inspectorates which took place at the beginning of this school-
year resulted in a reduction of the number of school districts in this inspectorate from two
to one, with a consequent increase of time available for the more creative aspects of the
functions of the Inspector of Schools. The general result of this has been a smoother
operation of the school system, a closer supervision of teachers, and the institution of
additional practices for the betterment of education in the district.
In the matter of accommodation, the Board of School Trustees completed the last
unit in what has proved to be a five-year plan with the opening in October of the new
Abbotsford Senior High School, accommodating 600 to 650 pupils. This released two
portable units for supplying much-needed classroom space in two of the rural schools,
as well as the old Philip Sheffield building, which becomes an annex of the Abbotsford
Elementary School. In addition, an activity-room was added to the six-room school at
North Poplar. At the same time the planned maintenance and progressive modernization of older buildings went forward. Board policy of providing needful equipment as it
can be afforded continued in effect during the year. The Board has also established
satisfactory general repair and has maintenance shops, with bus-parking facilities in the
same area. This establishment has added greatly to the efficiency of the operation of this
department. It is safe to say that few districts in the Province have secured finer working
conditions for teachers and better learning environments for pupils than this, credit for
which must be attributed to the wise planning and unstinted devotion to their tasks of the
members of the Board of School Trustees.
Mention has been made in earlier reports of the policy in this district on transportation. At the time of the initiation of present Departmental policy, School Board policy so
closely coincided with it that little adjustment was necessary, and general acceptance with
little complaint has resulted.
Analysis of the- following table reveals the levels and extent of increase in enrolment:—
Year
Grades I-VI
Grades VII-IX
Grades X-XIII
Grades I-XIII
June, 1955  	
June, 1956  :	
2,354
2,386
808
842
452
512
3,614
3,740
Increase   	
32
(1.36%)
34
(4.33%)
60
(13.3%)
126
(3.5%)
Attendance throughout the year has been maintained at a high level, varying from
89 per cent of the possible aggregate for the senior high school to a high of 96 per cent
in one of the smaller elementary schools.
The district staff of teachers increased from 138 in 1954-55 to 139 in 1955-56.
Certification is shown in the following table:—
E.T.
e.c.
E.B.
E.A.
S.T.
s.c
S.B.
S.A.
Total
Elementary 	
12
1
62
7
2
2
__
7
38
2
6
78-
61
Totals  	
13
69
4
-      1        1
1
38
8
139
In addition to the fact that the staff is highly certificated for the level of the different
schools, a generally high quality of teaching was maintained. Several in-service training
workshops were .operated during the year, with excellent response from teachers. FF 96 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
The Departmental survey testing, along with the annual standardized testing, has
proven stimulating to principals and teachers. As in the past, during the first two weeks
in May all elementary pupils were given the Metropolitan Achievement Tests, and all
junior high-school pupils the California Achievement Tests. The tabulated results
indicated an average achievement considerably above those for the tests, a slight improvement over those for the previous year, and again a good year's growth educationally.
During the year a successful night school was operated. While there was a falling-
off in interest and enrolment in the standard courses offered, an increase in interest in
Community Programmes courses largely offset this. It was thought that some of the lack
of interest in the standard courses was due to the incidence of television sets. In part it
was due also to the restriction on credit-carrying courses for teachers.
Under the sponsorship of the local Nurses' Association a chapter of the Association
for the Education of Mentally Handicapped Children was formed this year, and was able
to establish a school that operated for the last two months of the school-year. Twelve
children were in attendance, and it is expected that the school will continue to operate
during the coming year.
The various agencies in this district working for the advancement of education—
Board of School Trustees, British Columbia Teachers' Federation, Upper Fraser Valley
Health Unit, Welfare Branch, and Community Programmes Branch—have worked
together during the year with the greatest harmony and, in so doing, have immensely
lightened the task of the Inspector of Schools.    To them all I am deeply grateful.
School Districts No. 9  (Castlegar)  and No. 10  (Arrow Lakes)
REPORT BY THE LATE B. H. HARFORD, B.A, B.Ed,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 9 (Castlegar)
The School Board of this district employed sixty-four full-time teachers and three
relieving teachers for an enrolment of 1,492 pupils.
From the start of the fall term a double-shift programme at the Stanley Humphries
Junior-Senior High School at Castlegar was inaugurated; this terminated with the completion of the new addition early in December.
Improvement to the Pass Creek Road, planned for this summer, will result in the
bus transportation to the junior-senior high school of Grades VII and VIII pupils who
formerly attended the Pass Creek and Gibson Creek Elementary Schools. Also, plans
have been made to have all Grades VII and VIII pupils from the Ootischenia Elementary
School transported by bus to the junior-senior high school. This will mean that all
secondary-school pupils in the district, except the very few from the Champion Creek
area, will be attending the junior-senior high-school unit.
The attendance on school-opening day of some twenty-one Doukhobor pupils at the
Tarrys Elementary School, who normally should have attended school at least one year
previous to this date, necessitated the opening of the second room of the old former
Thrums School building. Voluntary attendance of these pupils was an encouraging sign;
in early May, however, parents withdrew these pupils from school for the remainder of
the term.
A two-room addition and an activity-room at the Tarrys Elementary School have
been started and should be completed early in the fall term. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS FF 97
Three supervising principals now have jurisdiction over the more accessible elementary schools of the district. Frequent meetings with these principals have been held
during the year. Increased benefits from this plan for elementary education in this district
can be clearly visualized.
Regular meetings of the West Kootenay and Boundary Administrators' Association
have been held this year. Inspectors of the area were again invited and many worth-while
educational topics were discussed.
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Trail again displayed its genuine
interest in education by sponsoring several luncheon meetings with district school
administrators and the company's advisory committee. Also, a tour of the plant was
arranged for all district teachers, followed by a banquet and hockey game.
The official opening in March of the Tarrys Elementary School and the new addition
to the Stanley Humphries Junior-Senior High School by the Honourable R. G. Williston,
Minister of Education, was a highlight of the year.
School District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
Twenty-two teachers were employed in this district for an enrolment of 581 pupils.
Following the pattern of the two previous years, an institute for all teachers in the
district was held early in September. The afternoon session of the institute was devoted
to the discussion of administrative and classroom problems; following this the district
School Board entertained at a banquet which yearly assists in the fostering of good
teacher-school board relations.
A great need was answered in the successful passing in April of a $214,000 referendum which provided for the building in Nakusp of a six-room junior-senior high school
with auditorium-gymnasium. The Board of School Trustees of District No. 10 is to be
commended for its untiring efforts in the preparation and presentation of this referendum,
which, by its passing, should introduce to the district a new era in secondary education.
Completion of this unit is expected in the late fall.
Because of the limited enrolment in the elementary section in the Needles-Fauquier
area, it was decided to close the Fauquier Elementary School for 1956—57.
The resignation in December of Mr. W. J. Claridge as Chairman of the Board was
accepted with deep regret. For nine years Mr. Claridge has given outstanding leadership
to his Board and has unselfishly given of his time and talent in the best interests of
education in the Arrow Lakes District. It is to be hoped that his health will permit him
to continue to serve the district as a regular Board member.
General
Education in both districts during the year has maintained a good standard; a well-
qualified and co-operative staff has made this possible. District No. 9 experienced a small
enrolment increase, while District No. 10 showed no appreciable change from the previous year. A standardized testing programme, supplemented by tests from the Division
of Tests, Standards, and Research, was carried on during the year at both the elementary
and secondary levels.
I wish to acknowledge with sincere thanks the fine co-operation extended to me by
the trustees, principals, secretary-treasurers, and teaching staffs of both districts.
'■■■■■
'Mr-':" FF 98
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
School Districts No. 72  (Campbell River), No. 73  (Alert Bay),
and No. 74 (Quatsino)
REPORT OF H. S. HURN, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate comprises the School Districts of Campbell River (No. 72), Alert
Bay (No.73), and Quatsino (No. 74), all three being formerly areas included in three
separate inspectorates. Campbell River Village is the base of operations; its suitability
will be more effective when the road to the northern end of the Island is completed.
Schools and Enrolments
Campbell River
Alert Bay
Quatsino
Total
+_.
«_
*_
*_
Type of School
W)
<u
a
w
in
Q
0J
B
Efl
a>
I
(.
Cfl
V
E
42
o
43
U
c
J=
c
4=
c-
c
.S
c.
c
W
H
W
w
H
w
CO
H
W
in
H
w
Elementary-high._ "
i
32
816
4
21
453
2
14
289
7
67
1,558
Superior.-  	
2
7
178
	
2
7
178
Graded elementary-	
3
19
446
	
3
19
446
9
9
126
7
7
90
1
6
2
6
50
111
1
22
2
22
50
327
Totals   	
15    1      67    1  1.566
11
28
543
9
22
450
35
117
2,559
There are, in addition, several Indian schools with approximately sixteen teachers.
Growth
There has been no appreciable growth in pupil population during the past year, apart
from the Campbell River Village area. The elementary-high and Campbellton schools are
filled, and use will be made next year of the old school. It would appear from surveys
and indications of development in this particular area that a school building programme
will soon have to be undertaken.
Quathiaski Problem
Whether or not students should cross daily by ferry from Quadra Island to Campbell
River has been the subject of considerable discussion during the past year. The Board,
activated by requests from the island citizens, has undertaken to provide accommodation
for the Grade IX students at Quathiaski and will await definite indications of growth
before proceeding with the establishment of a high school.
Elsewhere in the inspectorate there has been little change. There is a considerable
degree of transiency of population, however, and it is always difficult to estimate school
population in the small settlements. There is at the same time a considerable turnover
of teachers, so that each new school-year presents new situations in many of the schools,
but it is pleasing to report that, in general, schools settle down to their tasks very well and
good school spirit is developed.
The Future
There exists in this northern end of the Island a considerable degree of optimism
about the future. The stress placed upon population stability in the logging industry, the
promise of development in the mining industry, and the expectation of a road from
Sayward north have resulted in building programmes in the Beaver Cove and Port McNeill
areas. The Beaver Cove project, following upon the construction of the logging-railroad
from Nimpkish, will consolidate the three one-room schools in the area and will provide REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS FF 99
the base for expansion which it is confidently expected will take place within a few years.
The Port McNeill project will provide a school which will replace the old building that
is not particularly suitable.
It is expected, too, that the Federal Government will construct a larger school at the
San Josef R.C.A.F. camp, and it is hoped that it will be able to serve children of all grades.
Buildings and Equipment
The pupils in this inspectorate are well housed. The schools are well equipped.
Further evidence of the generous spirit of the school Boards are the comfortable teacher-
ages, those of Quatsino and Alert Bay being most satisfactory.
By-law
The by-law submitted in the Alert Bay district during the year passed by a large
majority, approximately 92 per cent being in the affirmative. This result is most pleasing,
especially in view of the fact that the areas of development could contribute but one vote
each.
In-service Training
Owing to difficulties of transportation and the expense involved, it is rarely possible
to assemble teachers. In the Campbell River area an institute was held in early October
with a fair representation from the Island schools. It is expected that a similar function
will be held in the Alert Bay district during the coming year.
Two study groups were formed at Campbell River, for primary and intermediate
teachers. Owing to unavoidable circumstances, these and a testing committee were unable
to undertake effective tasks this year but are ready for next. One task will be the giving
of assistance to teachers in the distant places.
General
There is still a considerable loss of students at the Grade X level in spite of continuing
efforts on the part of principals and teachers. This situation is not pleasing, even if understandable.
A reasonably successful night-school is held at Campbell River, and efforts are to
be made to add to the courses offered next season.
The intention of the Federal Government to build a new Indian school at Alert Bay
may or may not affect the public school, which at present has 100 Indian pupils at the
junior and senior high-school level.
The " culture " in this area is very vigorous and vital. One sees it everywhere and
pays tribute to it. As a balance, schools are beginning to lay stress on music, drama, and
art, and in some spots these are very commendable. An operetta was produced at
Campbell River, a band was organized at Port Alice, and so on. With the partial completion of the sports field at Campbell River, the staff undertook the task of hosting the
Northern Vancouver Island Track Meet and did so very successfully. Inter-school sports
are organized and are carried on whenever the weather permits. Schools are making an
increasingly good effort to develop children along broad lines.
Conclusion
Tribute to the Boards of School Trustees and teaching staff is paid for their efforts
on behalf of education in the inspectorate. Teacher-Board relationship is generally very
satisfactory, that in the Campbell River area having improved considerably during the
year. To all may I express appreciation for their help and understanding in a difficult
period. FF 100 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
School Districts No. 15  (Penticton), No. 16  (Keremeos), and
No. 77   (Summerland)
REPORT OF E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A, B.Pjed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
A modification of the Penticton inspectorate occurred this year when School District
No. 17 (Princeton) was transferred to Inspector C. T. Rendle, and in its place School
District No. 77 (Summerland) was received from Inspector A. S. Matheson. It was
pleasing to observe the esteem in which Mr. Matheson was held by the Board members,
the teachers, and the residents of Summerland. It provided an inspiration and a challenge
to give equivalent service to the community.
Except for the Keremeos School District, which saw a slight reduction of school
population following cessation of operations by the Kelowna Exploration Mining Company, these districts continued to grow. In Penticton a new eight-classroom elementary
school with activity-room was completed for school opening in September. When it was
officially opened by the Honourable Ray G. Williston, Minister of Education, the School
Board was complimented on being the first to produce such a school for less than
$100,000.
An additional two classrooms are being added to the Queen's Park School for
September, and basement rooms in the high school are being repaired for occupancy.
The Penticton Board is to be congratulated on the recent completion of an economical
but very functional administration building. It is an overdue effort to centralize the
various activities of the Board and its administrative and maintenance staff. Plans are
also being completed for an activity-room for the Jermyn Avenue Elementary School.
Overcrowding in both elementary and high schools resulted in a referdum being
held in the Summerland School District. The public support received was a credit to the
joint effort of the School Board and the Municipal Council and to the fine public spirit in
this enlightened community. A two-division elementary school will be opened early in
September in the Trout Creek area and will reduce the transportation needs. Standard
plans which provide for expansion to eight classrooms are being used. Early September
commencement of the high-school addition is planned.
The Teaching Staff
One hundred and forty-nine teachers were employed in these three districts. The
quality of the elementary-school teaching was the best observed for a number of years.
However, not only are qualified teachers of specialist subjects, such as Commerce,
Physical Education, and Home Economics, almost unobtainable for high schools, but
many of those applying for other secondary subjects are less than satisfactory. These
Boards may find it advisable to establish a policy of promoting able teachers with First
Class certificates into Grades VII and VIII to meet this ever-increasing problem. It is
fortunate that these areas have a solid core of sound and capable teachers who have
remained for several years. It is with these able teachers that the credit for a satisfactory
standard of secondary education lies.
The retirement of four outstanding teachers in these areas is reported. Mrs. Mary
Astell Morley, librarian, and Mrs. Helen King Colquhoun, commercial, have provided
excellent leadership in their fields for many years in the Penticton High School and will
be greatly missed. Miss Porsis Vida Sherwood, commercial, was four years on the
Summerland staff and completed twenty-nine years of teaching. Mr. S. A. MacDonald
leaves after thirty-seven years as principal of the MacDonald Elementary School. Few
people retire from service in any field of activity who have equalled the esteem in which
he is held by his colleagues and by the community. reports of "district inspectors ff 101
Supervision
Approximately 110 formal reports were written on classroom visits. Those teachers
on whom reports were not written were all superior and had been reported on previously
many times. Where assistance was considered necessary, some classrooms were visited
on numerous occasions. Additional contact with classroom progress was maintained
by co-operative monthly tests; these included Grade VI and Grade VIII Arithmetic
Fundamental Tests, Grade IV and Grade VII Test Paragraphs, Grade V and Grade IX
Spelling Tests, the Chief Inspector's Unit tests in Grade VI Social Studies, and his
Grammar Test for Grades VII and VIII. District, school, and class medians were
provided following each test. Satisfaction was felt when the Grade VI Stanford Achievement Battery Test revealed that these districts were well above test and Provincial norms.
The theme promoted for this year was "Education for the Exceptional Child."
Ten bulletins were issued on various aspects of this subject, several of which were the
volunteer efforts of interested teachers. The district was fortunate in being able to hear
two talks related to the subject by Dr. S. A. Laycock. An opportunity class was
established at the elementary-school level in Penticton. Its worth after a very successful
year is being recognized in this community. Under the guidance of the Chief Inspector
an acceleration programme for a class of superior Grade IX pupils was initiated on an
experimental basis in the Penticton Junior-Senior High School. It is anticipated that this
class and succeeding classes will complete an enriched four-year programme in three
years.   The year-end evaluation by teachers, parents, and pupils was highly favourable.
Harold Samuel McGladdery was winner of the University Entrance Scholarship for
District No. 2, and he was also winner of the CKOV Scholarship in competition with all
centres in the Okanagan. It is interesting to note that a Penticton student has won the
district scholarship nine times in the past eleven years. Wayne Marshall Lougheed,
a Grade XIII student in Penticton, was successful in the Knights of Pythias Oratorical
Contest, not only in this district, but in the semi-finals for the entire Northwest. He is
now competing in the international finals in New Orleans. The junior division of the
Canadian Forestry Association Poster Contest was won by Penticton student Louise
Woodburn, with Joanne Hill in fourth place. In the Cancer Poster Contest, Joyce Stani-
forth, of the Penticton High School, received first place for this division. George Hackett,
of Penticton, received honourable mention among the 20,000 entries in the B.C. Products
Bureau Job Study Contest.
Night-school
Evening classes were established in three centres—Keremeos, Penticton, and Summerland. A varied and popular programme flourished under Co-directors H. D.
Pritchard and R. B. Cox in Penticton. This year there were 650 registrations (100
more than last year) in twenty-six courses. This night-school is developing as a recreational, cultural, and vocational centre of an area extending beyond the boundaries of this
school district.
Administration
The administrative affairs of these districts are being ably handled by the three
secretary-treasurers. Although newly appointed to the Penticton position, Mr. William
J. Mertz has already a thorough grasp of his duties. Each of these districts is developing
efficient procedures and has consistently revealed a willingness to co-operate fully with
Department and school officials. The three Board Chairmen, Messrs. F. P. Eraut
(Penticton), Ross McLachlan (Summerland), and Dale Evans (Keremeos), are providing fine leadership and wisdom in formulating policy. Both they and their Board
members have reason to be proud of the progress in school affairs in these districts. FF  102
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
School District No. 59 (Peace River South)
REPORT OF FLOYD L. IRWIN, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Commencing on September 1st, 1955, the boundaries of this inspectorate were
redefined and now include the area of the Peace south of the Peace River and coinciding
with the boundaries of School District No. 59 (Peace River South). This has resulted
in my being able to give more and closer classroom visitation and more constant and
effective assistance to the School Board.
The continuing growth of this district (Peace River South) of recent years was very
considerably accelerated this year, as is illustrated by the following table of growth in net
enrolment in the schools of this district:—
Year
Net Enrolment*
Increase
Schools
1951-52   	
1,939
2,054
2,212
2,359
2,699
115
158
147
340
31
1952-53 _	
1953-54	
29
30
1954-55         	
1955-56   .,,    	
31
32
1 These figures do not include the enrolment in the Elementary Correspondence Branch located at Pouce Coupe,
whose enrolment for this district for this year was thirty-nine.
Certification of teachers shows a gradual improvement and is as follows for this
year: E.T, 8; E.C, 23; E.B, 41; E.A, 7; S.T, 0; S.C, 2; S.B, 25; S.A, 3; Total, 109.
During the year one rural school did not open due to insufficient enrolment. Three
rural schools increased from one to two rooms.   One two-room rural school was opened.
The number of schools and distribution of staff is as follows:—
Schools Staff
One-room rural  18 18
Two-room rural  8 16
Graded elementary  3 35
Elementary-junior high   1 3
Junior high  1 13
Senior high  1 22
Elementary Correspondence (Pouce Coupe)  1 2
Totals  32 109
A new junior high school was organized, comprised of Grades VII and VIII, and
accommodated in temporary quarters pending the construction of its own school, which
will be completed next year. The second graded school in Dawson Creek, the Grandview
Elementary, organized last year and accommodated in temporary quarters for the year,
moved into its new school late in September. The district was honoured by the presence
of the Honourable Ray Williston, Minister of Education, who officially opened the school
on April 13th, 1956.
In strictly agricultural rural attendance areas the school enrolment is either rather
static or tending to shrink, due to a general movement to the urban centre and fewer
young people taking up the farming industry. Other rural areas, particularly along the
John Hart Highway, show considerable growth, due to one or more of the following factors: Construction of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, gas pipe-line, and (or) sawmill
operations. These, however, are likely to be more temporary than permanent, but doubtless some permanent increases will result. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
FF  103
Dawson Creek and Pouce Coupe are growing rapidly. Home-building, while very
extensive, lags behind industrial construction and is of particular concern to the School
Board as it becomes increasingly difficult to find suitable accommodation for many new
teachers it is endeavouring to attract to the district.
Instruction in the schools is of a very satisfactory standard. Remedial instruction
and instruction of handicapped children is receiving due attention throughout the district,
and it is expected that this will be accelerated next year. Adequate attention has also been
directed toward providing additional stimulus and opportunity for gifted students. The
principals' and vice-principals' conference held at Prince George proved profitable to this
district.
Finally, I wish to extend my thanks to the trustees and the secretary-treasurer and
staff for the splendid co-operation and harmony that has characterized this year's work in
this inspectorate.
School Districts No. 33 (Chilliwack) and No. 76 (Agassiz)
REPORT OF I. H. R. JEFFERY, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The inspectorate comprised the two large municipal school districts of Chilliwack,
with 167 teachers, and Agassiz, with twenty-three teachers, for the school-year of
1955-56. Additional inspection service was given to four civilian secondary academic
teachers employed by the Royal Canadian School of Military Engineering for the Apprentice Training Squadron at Camp Chilliwack. Regular inspection included the three
Federal Government Indian day-schools of Chehalis, Douglas, and Seabird Island, with
five teachers.   This made a total-of 199 teachers in the inspectorate.
School District No. 76 (Agassiz)
Alternate year net enrolment for the past nine years and actual attendance for June,
1956, is as follows: —
Annual Report Net Number
June,
1955-56
(Actual)
1947-48
1949-50
1951-52         1953-54
1955-56
292
92
67
278
96
63
1
317                  356
113                  118
56                    76
388
128
71
587
390
Junior High Grades VII to IX	
122
Senior High Grades X to XII
61
Totals	
451
437
486                  550
1
573
The above table indicates generally the gradual upward trend in school-population
totals for the district. Future school-accommodation estimate revision should be affected
by the completion of the Agassiz-Rosedale Fraser River Bridge and its general impact on
local social and economic life. The supervising principal made a valuable detailed school-
population survey during the past year.
In the four Agassiz District schools, eighteen of the twenty-three teacher total for
the year were stationed at the excellent recently built Agassiz Elementary-Senior High
School. Harrison Hot Springs Elementary School is also fairly new and likewise has fine
appointments. The Board plans to make early improvements to Harrison River Elementary School. Bear Creek Elementary School was officially reopened at the beginning of
October after enrolment closure last June. A suitable Board office at present is being
constructed on the Agassiz school-grounds. FF 104
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
The testing programme conducted by the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research
was supplemented by a minimum standardized programme in both school districts.
In general the performance and calibre of the two district teaching staffs has been
superior. One marvels at their keen contented co-operative attitude in the effecting of
high standards. Principals and teachers are studying the possibilities of raising academic
and general standards at various ability levels.
School District No. 33 (Chilliwack)
Alternate year net enrolment for the past nine years and actual attendance for June,
1956, is as follows:—
Annual Report Net Number
June,
1955-56
(Actual)
1947-48
1
1949-50    I    1951-52
1953-54
1955-56
2,284
721
431
32
1
2,432              2,599
902                  962
554                526
37                  32
2,899
1,059
605
29
3,150
1,208
787
44
3,024
1,136
711
Junior High Grades VII to IX 	
Senior High Grades X to XII 	
35
Totals 	
3,468
3,925      I      4,119
1
4,592
5,189
4,906
In 1947, after the first two years of British Columbia's large school units following
the Cameron Report, Agassiz and Chilliwack divided into separate school districts. The
preceding two school-population tables are representative of the nine-year period 1947
to date.
Chilliwack District school population advanced steadily and rapidly over the period,
approximately 50 per cent increase. The peak enrolment for any month was 4,996
in October, 1955. The supply of new classrooms and organization of maintenance have
kept pace. Through unforeseen circumstances two classes at Sardis Elementary School
and thirteen classes at Vedder Elementary School were on swing shift until the end of
September, when the superior three-room addition at Sardis Elementary School and the
equally fine six-room Watson Elementary School were opened for use. The six-room,
new, modern Little Mountain School was used during the school-year as an annex for
Chilliwack Central Elementary School and Chilliwack Senior High School.
Colonel Cunnington, commandant at Camp Chilliwack, officially opened Watson
Elementary School in November.
In accordance with the ratepayers' voted sanction, the Chilliwack trustees are now
completing a general-purpose activity-room at six-room Greendale Elementary School
and a new junior high school in the Sardis area with a rated pupil capacity of over 600.
The use of the second junior high school will relieve the central senior high school of
Grade IX class organization and will temporarily provide needed accommodation for
senior high-school grades.
The Chilliwack District Elementary School Principals' Association continued to
work very co-operatively with the Inspector of Schools in effecting uniformity of purpose
and programme during the year. They were untiring in their school-population survey
efforts with a pupil pin-mount culmination on a large map prepared by this office.
The Chilliwack Junior High School principal and vice-principal, together with the
Chilliwack Senior High School principal and his two assistant principals, provided
pleasant and efficient teamwork with the local Inspector in advance secondary-school
organization in preparation for the advent of a second junior high-school unit and change
for mainly accommodation reasons for at least the immediate future to the 6-3-3 plan
in place of a 6-2-4 plan.
Night-school continued to function as a splendid community service at Chilliwack.
The trustees have taken commendable initial steps to organize and promote night classes
under an enlarged committee basis. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
FF 105
A principals' relieving teacher was engaged at the first of last October to relieve nine
Chilliwack full-time teaching principals in four- to nine-division schools for administration
and the supervision of instruction. Due to initial success, a second principals' relieving
teacher has been engaged for next year.
A Chilliwack District primary consultant has been appointed for next school-year.
Study and preparation were made this year in readiness.
Transportation continues as a major issue in Chilliwack District, but efficiency of
Board committee and hired personnel solves its problems as in the case of a multitude
of varied instances.
My appreciation to the Boards of Trustees, the secretary-treasurers, the principals,
the teachers, and associated personnel for their efforts to maintain a sound educational
climate is acknowledged.
School Districts No. 63 (Saanich) and No. 64 (Saltspring)
REPORT OF THE LATE HAROLD P. JOHNS, Ph.D.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The passage of a by-law permitting extensive additions to schools in the Saanich
School District marked the commencement of the 1955-56 year. As a result, additions
to six elementary schools and to two high schools were carried out. One new elementary
school was also constructed. Still in the planning stage are additions to a third high
school and the building of two additional elementary schools. While these new classrooms have effectively eliminated the overcrowding existing in September, 1955, there
is a continued development of student population, with the result that classes are being
filled to capacity as rapidly as they are constructed. Little, if any, reserve for future
class needs will be available from the by-law, even for the immediately successive years
for which the additions were originally contemplated.
Significant progress must be reported in educational matters of a more professional
nature. Chief among these is the successful operation of two special classes, at the
elementary and secondary levels, for pupils of low-learning capacity. The District Testing Committee again functioned with creditable results. A thoroughly co-ordinated
testing programme is now in operation at the elementary level, and it is hoped that this
plan will be extended to the secondary schools during the coming term. Considerable
attention was given during the 1955-56 term to the improvement in methods of reporting
to parents.
In School District No. 64 some thought will shortly have to be given to future building needs, especially on Saltspring Island. The School Board is to be complimented
on major improvements carried out to the playing-fields at Ganges and to the development
of a more active Physical Education programme at the secondary-school level. FF  106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
School Districts No. 57  (Prince George) and No. 58 (McBride)
REPORT OF G. E. JOHNSON, B.A, B.Ed, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 57 (Prince George)
During the year forty-three schools were in operation, with a staff of 146 teachers
and an enrolment of 3,600 pupils.
There were the usual problems connected with a large and expanding school district.
Some classes in Prince George City remained on a shift system, but the end of shifting
is in sight with the completion, during the summer of 1956, of the new senior high school.
The large number of small schools in this district makes supervision difficult. The
employment of a teacher-consultant has helped to relieve this situation and has been
a valuable service, particularly to the teachers in the smaller and more isolated schools.
Staffing of the schools continued to be a major problem, the situation with respect
to the secondary teachers being particularly difficult. Fully 50 per cent of the secondary-
school teachers had elementary or temporary qualifications only, as indicated in the
following table:—
Type of School
Teacher Certification
S.A.
S.B.
S.C
S.T.
E.A.
E.B.
E.C.
E.T.
!   Total
1
Secondary  	
Elementary	
2
....
18
3
3
2
2
4
15
62
3
26
1
5
46
|    100
Totals	
2
21
3
2
6
77
29
6
1    146
1
The Board of School Trustees has gone far afield in an effort to find qualified
teachers, and it is interesting to note that nearly one-half of the 146 teachers in the school
district received their basic teacher-training outside of British Columbia.
Teacher-training Number of Teachers
British Columbia  79
Other Canadian Provinces  37
United Kingdom   18
Other European countries  2
Asiatic countries   2
United States  3
No teacher-training '  5
Total
146
Another interesting fact is that fully 40 per cent of the district's 146 teachers were
married women.
An important development during the school-year was the formation in Prince
George of a local branch of the British Columbia Society for Handicapped Children.
A small class was formed and operated on a part-time basis during the last three months
of the school-year. An attempt will be made to secure a full-time teacher for September,
1956.   The Board of School Trustees will make a grant toward the school's operation.
Toward the end of the school-year the appointment of Mr. J. E. Beech, supervising
principal of the Prince George Senior High School, as Inspector of Schools was announced
by the Department of Education. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
FF  107
School District No. 58 (McBride)
. A new school was in operation at Lucerne in temporary quarters.
At Valemount, on the main line of the Canadian National Railway, a superior school
has been established to commence operation in September, 1956.
In the Village of McBride a dormitory has been completed during the year, and
four classrooms added to the high school. It is expected that courses in Home Economics and Industrial Arts will be offered for the 1956-57 school-year.
A teacher-consultant will be employed in the school district commencing September, 1956.
General
Rural schools in the area continued to be served with reference material and recreational reading through the Prince George branch of the Public Library Commission.
Because of the large number of schools served by the Commission throughout the Central
Interior, it will be necessary to limit the service to one-room schools only, effective in
the fall of 1956. As a result of this change, a start has been made to setting up school
district libraries centrally located in Prince George and McBride and administered by the
local School Boards.
The second conference of principals and Inspectors was held during the year, this
time in Prince George. Representatives attended from the following school districts:
Fort Nelson, Peace River North, Peace River South, McBride, Vanderhoof, Burns Lake,
Smithers, Quesnel, and Prince George.
Trustees in both districts have displayed a keen interest in the educational problems
facing their areas.    It has been a pleasure to work with them.
School Districts No. 49 (Ocean Falls), No. 53 (Terrace), No. 80 (Kitimat),
Unattached School District of Butedale, Kemano Private School, and
Indian Day-schools of the Skeena, Babine, Bella Coola, and Alert Bay
Agencies.
REPORT OF A. D. JONES, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 49 (Ocean Falls)
During the year Mr. Frank Reder, secretary-treasurer for the district, was posted to
the office of liaison officer on the staff of the British Columbia School Trustees' Association. His sincere effort in service to the district was soundly appreciated by this office
and the Board of Trustees. Mr. Rex Holloway was appointed by the Board as Mr.
Reder's replacement.
Student enrolment advanced generally throughout the district. Noticeable gains
were recorded at Charleson Elementary High, Sir Alexander Mackenzie, Bella Coola
Elementary, and Namu Schools. Additional staff was required to meet the increases in
each case. Pupil Enrolment rjunes
School 1955 1956
Bella Coola   119 151
Charleson    517 550
Sir Alexander Mackenzie  125 148
Namu  i  35 41
Totals  796 890 1950
1956
,100
5,100
599
1,448
FF 108 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Enrolment in the rural schools at Takush, Shearwater, Bella Bella, and South Ben-
tinck remained steady.
School District No. 53 (Terrace)
Terrace is growing. Population checks in 1950 and again in 1956 reveal startling
increases, as follows:—■
Total population, Terrace	
School population, district	
Construction plans for the coming year include the addition of four classrooms to
the Skeena Junior-Senior High School in Terrace. This will increase staff requirements
to eighteen teachers in this very pleasant, modern, and well-equipped high school.
Increasing elementary enrolment requires the provision of extra classrooms immediately. Decentralization of schools and the building of new schools is under consideration by the Board, to fill the needs of the spreading urban population.
Further integration of Indian day-schools with the Provincial schools in the Hazelton
District seems likely and desirable. The provision of a dormitory in Hazelton would
accelerate integration and give this community increased educational facilities.
School District No. 80 (Kitimat)
School populations are growing everywhere, but nowhere is the expansion as explosive as it is in Kitimat. In September, 1952, a three-roomed private school was constructed on Smeltersite. It opened inauspiciously with three teachers and forty pupils
in attendance. At time of writing this report there are 870 pupils enrolled under thirty-
seven teachers and the Board is making provision in the coming term for a staff increase
close to 100 per cent. By June, 1960, there could be more than 3,500 pupils and 170
teachers in the Kitimat schools.
The school building programme in Kitimat for the next six years calls for an expenditure of $750,000 per year and an additional $250,000 every third year. This programme
will result in the construction of fourteen elementary classrooms and one stage of a high
school yearly. Each third year the building of a gymnasium and auditorium would absorb
the additional $250,000.
Each fall, school organization is set up to function and to carry through to June in
the following year without staff additions or internal reorganization. In September the
enrolment per class is of necessity very low, but as houses are completed and families
move in, classes blossom and flourish. By June elementary enrolment reaches maximum
numbers. This pattern of growth will be projected in each new townsite. Thus the large
Neighbourhood "A" School (Nechako Elementary) will become reasonably stable in
1956-57 as this neighbourhood will have assumed maturity and its full allotment of
houses and apartments.
Teaching conditions in the new classrooms are close to ideal where the neighbourhood is settled. Coming from many parts of Europe, South America, and every Province
of Canada, the pupils present an interesting, cosmopolitan, and challenging group. Generally the teachers and schools enjoy excellent public relations, and parents and townspeople have been most co-operative in all phases of school activities. The Board and
the parents are quite aware of the unique problems that confront their teachers and have
been most helpful.   There are active and enthusiastic P.-T.A. groups at all schools.
The schools have been the community workshop, the place of education, worship,
and entertainment for the townsfolk. Weekly there meet in the schools about 100 adult
groups which range from church services, lodge groups, and night-school classes to square
dancing and theatre clubs.
It is confidently expected that the Municipality of Kitimat will continue to grow
according to plan.   In six years there could be nine Grade VI elementary schools, five
J REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
FF 109
primary schools, one junior-senior high school, one junior high school, and one senior
high school.   By that time the population will have soared to 25,000.
Opportunity for advancement, interesting and stimulating living conditions offer
attractive teaching placements.
Kemano Private School
Enrolment at Kemano surged upward and staff requirements increased from two to
six teachers.   High-school classes were reopened at Wach-was.
General
The Department of Indian Affairs is most co-operative in every respect. Indian day-
schools in this inspectorate are widespread and fourteen in number. Many are one-
roomed schools. Twenty-one teachers administer to their needs. Education of our
native children is of prime value, and these little folk have shown positive reaction and
marked ability under good instruction.
Butedale continues to operate as an unattached centre under an official trusteeship.
School Districts No. 3 (Kimberley), No. 4 (Windermere), and No. 18 (Golden)
REPORT OF J. G. KIRK, M.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The Inspectorate
This inspectorate extends for almost 200 miles through the scenic Kootenay and
Columbia Valleys, from Marysville in the south to Donald on the Big Bend Highway north
of Golden. A one-room school at the Mineral King mine is 28 miles west of Invermere
in the Jumbo Pass and a three-room elementary-senior high school is situated at Field,
36 miles east of Golden in the heart of the Rockies. The valley north of Kimberley is
served by six elementary-senior high schools ranging from three to ten rooms, a result
of the increasing tendency of the young people of our Province to remain at school to the
end of Grade XII.
School Organization
District
Schools
Teachers
Pupils
Elem.
Sup.
El.-Sr.
High
Jr.-Sr.
High
Elem.
Sec.
Elem.
Sec.
5
5
2
1
3
3
1
39
17
12
34
9
7
1,189
481
319
771
No. 4 (Windermere).	
No. 18 (Golden).  -.
230
150
Totals 	
12
1
6
1
68
50
1,989
1,151
District No. 3 (Kimberley)
The appointment of a full-time relieving teacher in September allowed supervision
time for the principals of the smaller elementary schools. Later in the year, part-time
stenographic service was also provided for these schools.
A conference of all the primary teachers was held on Saturday, November 5th. Sections were organized and continued to hold meetings periodically throughout the year. FF  110 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Any information of value to other primary teachers in the inspectorate was published in
the " School News."
Two classes remained on double shift at Marysville Elementary School until the
new wing was opened on January 4th. The addition included one classroom, one general-
purpose room, and a principal's office.
Work continued throughout the year on the addition of four classrooms, an activity-
room, nurse's quarters, and a principal's office at the Blarchmont School.
The construction of the new Selkirk Senior High School was started in the spring,
and it is expected will be completed for opening in September, 1957. Administrators for
the separate junior high and senior high schools have been chosen so they may proceed
with plans for the organization of their respective schools.
The night-school offered a very full programme for adult education and was well
attended.
Panel discussions on education were sponsored by the Parent-Teacher Association
and by the local Teachers' Association.
A special class for slow learners has been approved in this district for the year
1956-57.
District No. 4 (Windermere)
As a result of a referendum passed on September 10th, this district is in the midst
of a building programme which gives an additional two rooms at Canal Flats, one room
at Windermere, and three rooms at Edgewater, a new one-room primary school at
Radium, and a new six-room junior-senior high school at Invermere. It is expected that
all except Edgewater will be open in September, 1956.
During the year prefabricated one-room schools were opened at the Mineral King
mine and at the Giant Mascot mine.
Book-keeping and typing were offered at night classes during the winter.
District No. 18 (Golden)
Golden seems to be passing through a period of expansion. The unexpected increase
in enrolment in September necessitated the hiring of an additional teacher. There are
many indications that the boom is permanent, and the School Board is considering
possible sites for a junior-senior high school to be built sometime in the future.
In December a referendum to provide three additional rooms at Golden and an
activity-room at Parson was passed with a majority of 81 per cent.
On March 12th the new section of Golden Elementary-Senior High School was
destroyed by fire, but in two weeks classes were resumed in temporary quarters in the
Community Centre and the Masonic Hall. Plans were started immediately on a new
building and the contract was let on August 1st.
General
Annual meetings in all three districts reflected a spirit of satisfaction and co-operation.
Formal reports were issued to all teachers in the inspectorate, with the exception of
two who were holding positions temporarily.
A local testing programme was used to supplement that of the Department of Education during the year. The Arithmetic Computation Tests given in October and again
in May showed a marked improvement in the use of fundamentals in classes of all three
districts.
At a meeting of representatives of all three Boards on March 18th it was decided
to hire a teacher-consultant for the year 1956-57 on the basis of quarter time in District
No. 18, quarter time in District No. 4, and half time in District No. 3. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
FF  111
School District No. 24 (Kamloops), No. 25 (Barriere), and
No. 26  (Birch Island)
REPORT OF E. MARRIOTT, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 24 (Kamloops)
Organization of Schools
During the school-year 1955-56 this district employed 150 teachers for a total
population of 3,962 pupils.
The following schools were in operation:—
Elementary:  One-room schools, 17; two-room schools, 4; three-room school,
1; four-room school, 1; schools of ten or more divisions, 4.
Secondary:  One large junior-senior high school employing fifty teachers; one
elementary high school of seven divisions.
Overcrowding at the Kamloops High School necessitated enrolling five classes of
Grade VII students in the elementary schools.
One special class for retarded children was opened at the Allan Matthews School in
September, 1955.   This class enrolled fifteen pupils of the age range from 10 to 14 years.
The appointment of a teacher-consultant to assist the teachers of the primary grades
and of the rural schools provided much-needed assistance in the supervision of instruction
at the elementary level.
An organization was formed to establish a school for mentally handicapped children.
Plans have progressed favourably, and the Pleasant Street School will be opened early
in the fall of 1956.
A dental clinic was organized for School District No. 24 to provide preventive
treatment for pre-school and Grade I pupils. This clinic began operation late in August,
1956.
Completion of New Accommodation
The following new schools and additions were completed for occupancy in September, 1955: Lloyd George Primary annex, six classrooms and activity-room; North
Kamloops Primary annex, six classrooms and activity-room; addition to Valley view, two
classrooms and activity-room; addition to Savona, one classroom; addition to Westsyde,
one classroom;  addition to Chase, one activity-room.
As well as the above, a new two-room school was completed for occupancy in
January, 1956, at Heffley Creek. Two teacherages were completed. These are located
at Westsyde and at Heffley Creek.
School District No. 25 (Barriere)
A survey of pupil-population potential for the next five years was made and a
referendum was approved by the ratepayers in January. Provisions include a two-room
school at Louis Creek, one classroom addition at Little Fort, one-room replacement at
Chu Chua, a duplex teacherage at Barriere, and a high-school wing addition to the
Barriere Elementary-High School with specialized classrooms, gymnasium-auditorium,
and administration suite.
Pending completion of construction, some classes are operating on swing shifts and
some in rented quarters.
School District No. 26 (Birch Island)
The school-year 1955-56 saw the awarding of contracts for the construction of the
elementary schools at Clearwater and Birch Island and the purchase and remodelling of
teacherage accommodation at these points, as authorized under Referendum No. 2. FF  112 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
These projects have proceeded with the beginning of the construction season in
1956 and the buildings will be occupied in September. The completion of these projects
will provide adequate school accommodation throughout the district for the next several
years-, while carrying out the other projects authorized will bring nearly all schools and
teacherages of the district to acceptable standards.
The shortage of teachers, particularly at the secondary level, had become more acute.
For the first time this district will likely open schools in September with insufficient staff
and consequent partial disruption of educational service to the students concerned.
General
A very distinct upward trend in costs of all goods and services has been noted,
particularly during the latter months of the year.
In general, educational standards have been maintained at a satisfactory level during
the past year. The increasing awareness and attention to the exceptional child and the
continued efforts of the principals and teachers through in-service training to improve
the organization of the schools in order to make better provision for individual differences
has characterized the planning and thinking of the teachers during the past school-year.
May I again record my appreciation for the full co-operation of the teaching staff,
the commendable work of the secretary-treasurers, and the worthy contribution of the
many school trustees in bettering education within our area.
School District No. 23 (Kelowna)
REPORT OF A. S. MATHESON, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
At the beginning of the school-year this inspectorate was reduced in size by the
transfer of School District No. 77 (Summerland) to the Penticton inspectorate. It now
includes only one school district and is relatively compact. The significant statistics may
be summarized as follows: 22 schools (18 elementary, 4 secondary); 4,594 pupils
(2,729 elementary, 1,865 secondary); and 161 teachers (80 elementary, 81 secondary).
As compared with last year, the net enrolment shows an increase of 193 pupils—
102 in the elementary grades and 91 in the secondary grades. This slightly more than
maintains the average annual increase of about 4 per cent established during the preceding
four years.
The certification of the teaching staff was as follows: 19 Secondary Advanced, 50
Secondary Basic, 1 Secondary Conditional, 5 Elementary Advanced, 80 Elementary
Basic, 4 Elementary Conditional, and 2 Temporary.
All openings in the elementary schools were filled without difficulty, but in the
special fields of the secondary schools fully qualified instructors were frequently unobtainable. Of the eighty-one teachers in the secondary schools, sixty-nine or 85 per cent were
fully qualified. Under-qualification, in most cases, was in respect to the lack of a
university degree rather than the required professional and technical training. Most of
the academically under-qualified teachers were in the fields of girls' Physical Education,
Home Economics, and Music.
School building during the year has been limited to the completion of the projects
discussed in my report of last year. However, when the new two-classroom school at
Lakeview Heights was opened in September it was found that the number of pupils who
had taken up residence in the area had so increased that only Grades I to IV could be
accommodated; consequently the pupils of Grades V and VI continued to be conveyed REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS FF  113
to the Westbank School. In June a two-classroom addition was commenced at Lakeview,
and in September next the school will enrol pupils of Grades I to VI. Overcrowding has
become serious in both the Kelowna Elementary and the Kelowna Senior High schools,
and new accommodation will have to be provided in the immediate future.
Three special classes are operated at the elementary-school level—two by the School
Board (one at Kelowna and one at Rutland) for very slow learners and the Sunnyvale
School by the Kelowna Branch of the Association for the Training of Mentally Retarded
Children. The last named now receives financial support from the School Board and the
Department under authority of the 1956 legislation.
As reported for the past three years, systematic provision has been made for fast-
learning pupils in the elementary grades so that they may complete the work of the
elementary school in five years instead of six. Our records show that 138 pupils have
been on this programme this year and that they are carrying the work successfully and
without undesirable concomitants. Further, a considerable number of such pupils have
already passed into the junior high-school grades and, in each case, pupil adjustment and
progress continue well up to expectation.
In the course of supervision throughout the year, emphasis in all grades has been
placed on the mastery of the fundamentals of English and Arithmetic. Frequent tests
have been given and the teachers have been encouraged to make the greatest possible
use of the results for the diagnosis of weaknesses and to direct reteaching and drill. The
principals and teachers have cheerfully co-operated in the programme and, in the main,
gratifying results have been achieved.
At the end of June two valued members of the teaching staff retired on superannuation. They were Miss Helen Dewar, of the Kelowna Elementary School staff, and
Mrs. Sadie deCocq, of the Okanagan Mission staff. Both are teachers of high character
and have served with unreserved devotion in the best interest of the children in their
charge. Both will be greatly missed by their colleagues and the communities they served
so well.
The writing of this report terminates twenty years of service with the Department
as Inspector of Schools for the Kelowna inspectorate. To mark the occasion the teachers
of the inspectorate, on June 25th, entertained Mrs. Matheson and the writer at a dinner
and special programme in the Kelowna Aquatic Ballroom. More than 150 teachers
were in attendance, and generous gifts with unforgettable words of appreciation were
presented. We were, indeed, deeply moved by this manifestation of friendship and
goodwill.
To the Superintendent of Education, to all my colleagues in the Department, to all
my teachers, to the trustees and other local officials with whom I have worked, I wish to
say a heart-felt " thank you " for the courtesy and co-operation that have made our united
effort on behalf of our children and youth a most satisfying endeavour.
School Districts No. 66 (Lake Cowichan) and No. 67 (Ladysmith)
report of j. j. Mckenzie, b.a, inspector of schools
This inspectorate, with offices in Duncan, now comprises School District No. 66
(Lake Cowichan) and School District No. 67 (Ladysmith). It formerly included
School District No. 65 (Cowichan), which is now handled from Victoria.
I would like to thank my predecessor, Mr. B. Thorsteinsson, for the excellent condition in which he left the two districts now forming this inspectorate. FF  114
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
The staffing of all schools was completed before the opening of school, although
the secondary schools experienced some difficulty in filling all positions with fully qualified
teachers.
There were no spectacular developments in this area during the year.
School District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)
Enrolment
School-year
Grades
I-VI
Grades
VII-XII
Total
Teachers
1949-50     -  	
709
768
787
800
832
816
318
361
379
393
427
469
1,027
1,129
1,166
1,193
1,259
1,285
37
1950-51 	
41
1951-52  	
44
1952-53     ...    .  _ _ 	
1953-54...  	
46
49
1954-55    	
50
The school-population increase in this area has been gradual during the past five
years, averaging about thirty pupils per year. The existing school accommodation has
proved adequate to date. With the construction of one-room units at Mesachie Lake
and Honeymoon Bay, the pressure on the Lake Cowichan Elementary School will be
somewhat relieved. These new units will house primary pupils who were formerly being
transported into Lake Cowichan.
A considerable amount of maintenance and new work has been planned for the
summer vacation. This work is part of the Board's long-range programme of providing
the best facilities possible to improve the function of the schools and to maintain good
plants.
Such improvements included lino coverings for floors in the elementary and secondary schools, grading and levelling of school-grounds, and redecorating of classrooms.
Many groups from the schools took part in the Cowichan festival. The results of
their efforts brought honour to their schools and to the teachers.
Instruction throughout the district as a whole was very satisfactory. The Lake
Cowichan Elementary School made provision for a remedial class which proved very
worth while and is being continued. This year the junior-senior high school was accredited for the first time.    Matriculation examination results were very satisfactory.
The possible closure of the Gordon River Camp may result in the school being
closed, as families will move elsewhere in order to find employment.
School District No. 67
(Ladysmith)
School-year
Enrolment
Grades
I-VI
Grades
VII-XII
Total
Teachers
1949 50                                            -	
662
700
714
808
835
837
848
418
405
413
469
512
542
606
1,080
1,105
1,127
1,277
1,347
1,379
1,454
35
1950-51                                        	
38
1951 52	
42
1952 53 — 	
1953-54	
47
50
1954-55                                                        	
54
1955 56
55
The rate of school-population increase in the district as a whole has been gradual.
However, the rate of increase in the Chemainus area is greater than in other parts of the
district.   The construction of the pulp-mill at Crofton may increase further the school REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
FF  Ji5
population, causing additional accommodation to be provided at Chemainus.   This may
not take place for another year or so.
The Board of School Trustees is planning gradually to change the Chemainus
Junior High School into a junior-senior high school in order to eliminate transportation
costs and to take care of the increasing number of secondary pupils in the area. This
will eventually call for additional construction.
The completion of the new ten-room Ladysmith Elementary School brought together
for the first time since 1938 the elementary pupils of Ladysmith. The building was
officially opened by Dr. H. L. Campbell, Deputy Minister of Education, on January 13th,
1956.
During the coming year the Board of School Trustees plans to go ahead with new
construction at the Mount Brenton Elementary School. When completed, all elementary-
pupils in this geographical area will be accommodated in their own school. At present
some are accommodated in the Chemainus Elementary School. This will also eliminate
transportation for those presently attending Chemainus.
Some of the schools of the district participated in the Cowichan festival and at
Nanaimo.    Groups entered distinguished themselves in their specialized fields.
The basketball team of the Ladysmith Junior-Senior High School brought honour
to the school and community by winning the British Columbia high schools' basketball
championship.
The standard of education provided in the district was very satisfactory. Emphasis
was given to basic and fundamental skills. The junior-senior high school made a very
creditable showing in the Matriculation examination.
Now School Board offices are under construction and should be ready for use in
September.
A regular programme of buildings and grounds maintenance has provided good
facilities in this district.
General
During the year a rather extensive testing programme was conducted throughout
the inspectorate. Tests administered were both standardized and subject achievement
tests in Arithmetic, Social Studies, and English Grammar.
The Parent-Teacher Associations in both districts were active during the year and
made valuable contributions to the cause of education. These contributions are acknowledged and appreciated.
In conclusion, I wish to express my sincere appreciation to members of the School
Boards, secretary-treasurers, principals, and teachers for the courtesy and consideration
extended to me, and for their whole-hearted support and co-operation during my first
year in the area.
School Districts No. 62 (Sooke), No. 65 (Cowichan), No. 82 (Chilcotin),
and Unattached School District at Belmont Park
REPORT OF F. A. McLELLAN, M.A, B.Paed, INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 62 (Sooke)
During the year a further one-room addition was made to the Happy Valley Elementary School, and this unit was occupied in January of 1956.   An addition to the Langford FF  116 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Elementary School, consisting of three classrooms and an administration unit, was commenced in the fall of 1955, and at the time of this report is substantially completed.
The completion of this unit will allow the demolition of the old Langford School, which
has served the area for some fifty years. In preparation for the proposed 1956 referendum, the Board of School Trustees early in the year engaged Mr. Brahm Wiesman, of
the Capital Region Planning Board of British Columbia, to prepare a report on a school
building programme for the district; this report was received in May of 1956.
The steady increase in school population continues, and the Wiesman Report indicates that the next five years should show a 50-per-cent increase. While the semi-urban
area in the eastern portion of the district accounts for much of this increase, the general
trend is evinced throughout the district, and the proposed referendum will allow for
expansion of accommodation in nearly all areas.
During the year under review a floor covering and painting programme will effect
a partial modernization of many of the older and less efficient buildings in the district, and
will make such buildings more attractive and, from the instructional aspect, more efficient.
School District No. 65 (Cowichan)
A revised referendum, from that defeated in April, 1955, was submitted in December and gained the necessary support to pass. The referendum provided for a six-room
secondary school in the Mill Bay area and eighteen elementary classrooms in various
parts of the district. When this programme has been fully implemented, it will be possible
for the Board to vacate a number of old and undesirable buildings.
For the past several years this district has shown a steady growth of from 150 to
200 pupils annually. In 1955-56 there were 2,400 pupils enrolled and a staff of eighty-
nine teachers.
A reconditioning programme for the older schools has been developed by the Board
over the past two years. A number of schools in the district have been modernized,
making it possible for the maintenance to be well kept up.
A change in the method of election of trustees for the rural area of the district was
made at the end of the year. Election by ballot superseded the school representative
system previously in effect.
Frequent Board meetings were held during the year, which were well attended by
Board members, who proved untiring in their efforts to improve the school facilities of
the district.
School District No. 82 (Chilcotin)
At the beginning of the school-year several small school districts of this area were
formed into a large rural school district called the Chilcotin.
On a temporary basis an official trustee has been put in charge. As the population
increases, it is hoped eventually to have a School Board elected for this area.
In conclusion, I wish to commend the keen interest and co-operation that have been
displayed by the trustees, secretary-treasurers, and teachers in all my districts throughout
the past school-year. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
School Districts No. 19 (Revelstoke), No. 20 (Salmon Arm),
and No. 78  (Enderby)
FF  117
REPORT OF W. J. MOUAT, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
As of May 31st, 1956, 152 teachers were employed in this inspectorate, teaching
some 3,625 pupils. It is noteworthy that the proportion enrolled in the secondary grades
is relatively high and that retention is good throughout the Inspectorate. Generally speaking, pupils are interested in their studies and are advancing the effort required to ensure
success. Teachers are becoming increasingly conscious of the necessity of providing each
student with the type of challenge requisite for the development of his capacities to the
highest degree practicable.
The Boards of School Trustees were composed of people of high calibre who have
devoted much time and thought to their problems and provided the necessary funds.
In consequence, the schools are generally well equipped, adequately staffed, and of
desirable physical standards. They have encouraged principals and teachers to develop
broad curricular and extra-curricular programmes. Good leadership has been given by
principals, individual teachers, and locals of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation
in the development of curricula, extra-curricular activities, and teaching methods to meet
the needs and aptitudes of individual students of all ages. Finally, for the good educational situation which has developed and is developing, a great deal of credit must go to
the constructive leadership given by my immediate predecessors.
School District No. 19 (Revelstoke)
The Revelstoke District opened a new eight-room school in September, 1955.
Immediately it found that it had every room full and was forced to house one elementary
class in the junior high-school building and two senior high-school classes in basement
rooms.
As a result, the Board decided to survey the situation carefully, to determine present
and future needs, to add to its high school all the facilities necessary to carry out its
philosophy of secondary education, and to make what improvements might be required
to give the rural pupil as nearly as possible equal opportunity to the city pupil.
The resulting by-law provided for a modern six-room elementary school, addition
and reconstruction to the high school plant, an activity-room at Mountain View School,
a modern teacherage and school at Twelve Mile, a school administration building, needed
sites for future development, and other improvements. The ratepayers displayed their
confidence in the Board and the district by giving it a very substantial majority. Part
of the buildings are presently under construction.
It appears that the district will have to face a further expansion as power is developed
on the Upper Columbia River. However, the Board and its secretary-treasurer are
happy to have the challenge presented by progress and have done some initial planning
to prepare for it. It is safe to say that they will master these problems as they arise and
continue to maintain the high educational standards that have characterized Revelstoke.
School District No. 20 (Salmon Arm)
This year has been a very busy one for the Board of School District No. 20. During
the year it effected a decentralization of its elementary schools, which will result in a
termination of double-shifting and using temporary quarters, by September.
To do this it built three-room schools at South Broadview and Salmon Arm West;
two-room schools at North Canoe, South Canoe, and Gleneden; and a one-room school
at Mount Ida.   This has resulted in a transfer of approximately 400 elementary pupils FF  118 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
from a city school on double shift to local municipal schools. The past year has been
particularly difficult because of unusually severe winter conditions which bogged down
its building programme, with the result that teachers, transportation and maintenance
staffs, pupils, Board members, and others were forced to work under unfavourable conditions.
Other sections of the Board's building programme completed or under construction
include the addition of four rooms and an activity-room at Eagle River, activity-rooms at
Carlin and Falkland, the addition of one room and an activity-room at North Shuswap,
the addition of another classroom and playroom at Silver Creek, and the building of a
four-room annex to the Salmon Arm Junior-Senior High School. In addition to this,
the Board's maintenance department has modernized the one-room school at North
Broadview and a primary room at Falkland and has made other very considerable
improvements to its school plant.
The Board is to be complimented on having provided a very good educational system,
consisting of a central high school giving excellent opportunities for pupils from Grades
VII to XIII, good local elementary schools, and smaller high schools or superior schools
where necessary. It has provided, also, special classes for remedial reading and for
handicapped pupils and slow learners.
School District No. 78 (Enderby)
Enderby School District is happy in the fact that it has overcome most of its accommodation problems. Its Board and secretary-treasurer are giving a good deal of attention
to maintaining and improving the existing buildings and grounds and to modernizing
their rural schools wherever possible.
The Enderby High School and Enderby's elementary-school system give excellent
service to this school district. This Board has every reason to feel proud of its school
system.
School Districts No. 60 (Peace River North), No. 81 (Fort Nelson), and
Unattached Districts at Atlin, Camp Mile 163, Camp Mile 456, Cassiar,
Lower Post, and Telegraph Creek.
REPORT OF G. H. NELSON, B.A, B.Ed, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 60 (Peace River North)
The North Peace Junior-Senior High School at Fort St. John continues to give
excellent accommodation to the secondary-school population of the district. Well staffed,
it provided a full programme for the young people of the area. The dormitory operated
in conjunction with this school housed fifty-five students this year and is being extended
for a considerable increase in the 1957-58 term. The school was distinguished this year
by the success of Miss Donna Taylor in winning the University Entrance scholarship for
the area.
Although Fort St. John Elementary School threatens to become seriously crowded,
the old building and auxiliary buildings are very well maintained and are proving adequate
up to the present. The Board has immediate plans for relieving the pressure of elementary-school population by building expandable schools on the periphery of the rapidly
growing village. This will also reduce the amount of transportation required for elementary-school children. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
FF  119
Twenty rural schools were in operation this year, of which seven were two-room and
the remainder one-room schools. One new school was opened this year in the Flatrock
area. The Cecil Lake School was merged with Transpine School. Mostly for these rural
schools, it was necessary to employ eleven teachers with temporary certification. The
district staff was forty-nine. All teachers did creditable work in the direction of studies
in their schools. The Board is to be congratulated on its success in the solution of
repeated problems of shifting population and teacher shortage to keep these schools
operating efficiently.
School District No. 81 (Fort Nelson)
This was the first full year of operation of the Fort Nelson schools by School District
No. 81. After six months of organization and work by the provisional Board, the regular
Board was elected at the first annual meeting on November 9th, 1955. The year has been
marked by clear progress in the district. The new one-room school, with attached
teacherage at Fort Nelson (River), was ready for occupation by January, 1956. A six-
room expandable school for Fort Nelson has reached final planning stages, and should be
completed before the end of the coming school-year. Population in the high-school
grades has grown sufficiently to justify an establishment of an elementary-senior high
school at Fort Nelson.
Unattached Schools
Schools on the Alaska Highway and in other unattached districts remain static in
population. The exception is at Cassiar, where a splendid new two-room school was
opened at the first of the year. A new duplex house for the teaching staff was completed
at the same time.
General
Survey tests directed by the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research showed that
students of this area were progressing favourably in relation to Provincial averages. In
remote areas where the educational background of the pupils was weak, teachers were
found to be giving the necessary impetus and understanding for commendable progress.
This new inspectorate, based at Fort St. John, stretches from the Peace River to the
Yukon border, and from the Alberta border to Atlin. My thanks are due to the School
Boards and their servants and to area representatives throughout the districts for their
steady support and assistance during the year. The prospects are for rapid growth in
School Districts No. 60 and No. 81, keeping pace with the development of resources and
of transportation facilities in the far north of British Columbia.
School Districts No. 28  (Quesnel)  and No. 29  (Lillooet)
REPORT OF F. J. ORME, B.A, B.Paed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 28 (Quesnel)
School enrolments increased from 1,921 in June, 1955, to 2,033 in June, 1956,
or by 5.8 per cent. This continued increase, most noticeable in and around Quesnel,
taxed accommodation and transportation facilities to the limit.
Eight temporary classrooms were required in September, 1955. The situation was
relieved somewhat in February with the completion of an addition to the Quesnel Elementary School.   This provided four additional classrooms and a much-needed activity- FF 120 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
room. Increased enrolment necessitated the opening of a second room at Cinema.
The one-room Green Acres School did not reopen in September.
The crowded conditions of the schools will soon be relieved by the passage in
February, 1956, of a school by-law referendum by a majority of 88.8 per cent. This
provides for the construction of (1) a fourteen-room junior-senior high school in West
Quesnel, (2) a dormitory in Quesnel to house forty pupils, (3) three four-room expandable elementary schools to serve the fringe area of Quesnel, (4) eight one-room schools
with teacherages, and (5) eleven teacherages. It is hoped that this programme will
take care of the educational needs of the district for the next five years.
The problem of transporting school-children is being met most effectively. A very
efficient system enables the Board of School Trustees to transport 605 pupils daily on
its eight buses.   An additional bus will be required for school reopening in September.
School District No. 29 (Lillooet)
The school population has remained approximately the same as in the previous
year. If present plans for large construction projects materialize, there could be a large,
but probably temporary, increase in school enrolment, particularly in the Bridge River
area.
The small elementary school at Minto was closed in September, 1955. The pupils
affected were transported to Gold Bridge School.
The school-year saw the completion of remodelling work on the elementary section
of the Bralorne Consolidated School and the addition of two secondary classrooms at that
centre.   A very fine teacherage was built at the Blackwater Creek School.
The School Board office at Lillooet was expanded to furnish badly needed accommodation and to provide office space for the public health nurse. This project, financed
jointly by the Board of School Trustees and the Health Branch, was the first of its kind
in British Columbia.
All schools in this district are modern and well equipped.
General
Some difficulty was experienced in obtaining qualified teachers. This was partly
due to the problem of securing living accommodation at a reasonable cost.
The teachers in both school districts are making a sincere effort to improve the
educational growth of their pupils.
In conclusion, I wish to extend my thanks to the Department of Education, the
Boards of School Trustees, principals, and teachers for their kindness and co-operation
during my first year in this inspectorate.
School Districts No. 17 (Princeton), No. 31 (Merritt), and
No. 32 (Fraser Canyon)
REPORT OF C. T. RENDLE, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The above school districts were designated as a new inspectorate in August, 1955,
with headquarters established at Hope.
During the school-year 1955-56 ninety-eight teachers were employed in this inspectorate for an enrolment of approximately 2,500 pupils. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS FF  121
The following new schools were opened in the inspectorate during the year: Coqui-
halla and Yale Elementary Schools in School District No. 32 and Merritt Junior-Senior
High School and Brookmere Elementary School in School District No. 31. The elementary schools in Hope and Yale and the junior-senior high school in Merritt were opened
officially by the Honourable Ray G. Williston, Minister of Education.
The occupancy of the junior-senior high school in Merritt was a notable event and
marked the fulfilment of the efforts of the Board of School Trustees to provide an
adequate and modern secondary-school plant with shops, gymnasium, library, and other
special facilities. It is now possible to offer a broadened secondary programme suited to
the requirements and abilities of the students. It is also reasonable to expect a marked
increase in the retention of pupils at the secondary level.
It is noted that double shifts for the elementary pupils were eliminated with the transfer of the secondary pupils to the new building.
While present accommodation for the elementary pupils is sufficient, one of the
buildings is in a very poor state of repair. Future planning includes the replacement of
this school.
The completion of the Coquihalla Elementary School in Hope terminated double
shifts and released much-needed classrooms for the secondary pupils. The construction
of a two-room school at Silver Creek, to be opened in September, will make it possible
to accommodate the secondary pupils in Hope for the school-year 1956-57 without
difficulty.
In School District No. 17 a referendum was approved, and a further addition is being
made to the elementary-senior high school. The addition to the present buildings makes
provision for four classrooms and an activity-room. At present two classrooms and the
activity-room are to be completed, and the remaining two classrooms will be left
unfinished until required.
In each district the Boards of School Trustees are giving attention to maintenance
of existing buildings, furnishing of supplies and essential equipment, and the establishment
of reasonable libraries in all types of schools.
The Hope Junior-Senior High School was accredited for the first time, and the
Princeton Junior-Senior High School was reaccredited. With the new school in Merritt,
it is reasonable to expect that it will be accredited during the next school-year.
A standardized testing programme was carried on throughout the inspectorate.
This programme was supplemented by tests from the Division of Tests, Standards, and
Research.
Staffing at the secondary level in particular continued to present problems, and it was
necessary to employ teachers with less than secondary qualifications. All teachers and
principals in the inspectorate were visited during the course of the year and reports issued.
The school population in Districts No. 31 and No. 32 includes a relatively large
number of native Indian children. The Boards of School Trustees are to be commended
for their considered interest and efforts to provide a good education for these children.
Mr. L. E. Morrissey, supervising principal of the Merritt City Schools, retired in June
of this year after forty-three years of service in the cause of education. Mr. Morrissey
was suitably honoured upon the occasion of his retirement and carried with him the good
wishes of all for a happy and fruitful retirement.
In closing this report, I wish to thank the Boards of School Trustees, sercretary-
treasurers, principals, and teachers for their splendid co-operation throughout the year. FF 122 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
School Districts No. 50 (Queen Charlotte), No. 51 (Portland Canal),
No. 52  (Prince Rupert), and Tulsequah  (Unattached)
REPORT OF C. E. RITCHIE, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 50 (Queen Charlotte)
The four public schools in this district are distributed over a distance of approximately 100 miles. The difficulty and expense of transportation and communication have
added to the problems of the trustees in the operation of the schools. There has been
a gradual increase in school population over the last five years, from 145 pupils in 1951
to 283 pupils in 1956, and from seven to twelve teachers in the same period. All schools,
with the exception of the one-room school at Port Clements, will require additions. It is
anticipated these will be completed during the coming term. This district will then have
new and modern schools throughout the area. The Board is to be commended for its
efforts in arranging dental services for primary pupils.
School District No. 51 (Portland Canal)
The three-room superior school at Stewart has continued to expand, with renewed
activity in mining and logging in the area. The Board is maintaining this building well
and has added to its facilities to make it attractive and modern. The school population
at Torbrit mine on Alice Arm has remained comparatively stable. Mr. W. S. Orr, who
has served as trustee for a long period, retired this year. Mr. Roy Sharp, a capable
secretary-treasurer over many years, was forced to relinquish this post because of illness.
Both of these men merit the thanks and appreciation of those whom they served.
School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)
In the eight schools of this district there are seventy-three teachers and 2,052 pupils.
A familiar landmark, Borden Street School, built in 1914, has served its last term and
will be demolished. It will be replaced by Roosevelt Park School in September. All
elementary schools in the city will now be first-class buildings. The Board is already
giving consideration to the replacement of Booth Memorial High School, a building
erected in 1920 and now inadequate for the present programme and population. A new
one-room school and teacherage is being erected on Digby Island and should be ready
for occupancy in September. A good maintenance programme has been established in
this district. Monthly meetings with elementary principals were held throughout the year.
Four meetings to discuss and co-operate with auxiliary services were convened, at which
staff members of medical health, welfare, probation, and employment met with principals
and counsellors.   They proved helpful to all concerned.
An ungraded school was in operation at Tulsequah on the Taku River.
There are twelve Indian day-schools within this inspectorate. The co-operation of
the Indian Agencies of Queen Charlotte and Skeena was much appreciated.
J REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
School District No. 35  (Langley)
FF  123
REPORT OF H. D. STAFFORD, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
During December, 1956, the Board of School Trustees placed before the ratepayers
a referendum to provide school-sites, buildings, and equipment for children in the
elementary and secondary schools of the district. For the third successive time the school
referendum was defeated, in failing to obtain the necessary 60 per cent of favourable
votes, the figure being 1,643 for and 1,171 against.
The overcrowding and needed school facilities are most obvious and urgent for
secondary education. A total of 1,250 pupils were in attendance at the only secondary
school in the district. As a result of careful planning by the school administrative staff
and excellent co-operation by all teachers, a modified school programme was offered
students of both the General Programme and the University Programme.
The school was organized on a three-shift basis. The first group of pupils began
school at 7.54 a.m., the second at 8.38 a.m., and the third at 12.44 p.m. The school-
day ended at 5.08 p.m.
During 1956-57 this school will operate on a double-shift basis. Two distinct teaching bodies will use the same facilities. Each shift will have some 700 pupils and thirty-
three teachers. The morning shift will open at 7.40 a.m. and close at 12.27 p.m. The
afternoon shift will begin at 12.31 p.m. and end at 5.28 p.m.
Not only will there be a lessening of the actual hours of schooling, but there is every
indication that the excellent extra-curriculum programme might be seriously modified if
not eliminated.
The year 1958 appears to be the earliest date by which necessary accommodation
could be provided for normal operation of the secondary school.
During the year three classrooms were opened for elementary pupils, one room of
which is at Willoughby School and two rooms at Glenwood School.
While overcrowding has not become as acute a problem for the eighteen elementary
schools as at the secondary school, nevertheless the steady growth in school population
at the elementary level indicates these schools will soon be required to seat an excessive
number of pupils, with a resultant loss in teaching efficiency.
During the past year the only direct steps taken toward solving the problem have
been by the Board of School Trustees' employment of the Lower Mainland Regional
Planning Board to conduct a survey of population growth, and to report upon areas in
the school district in need of additional school facilities.
The Board of School Trustees made financial provision in the 1956 budget for the
most ambitious maintenance programme ever attempted by the district. It is to be hoped
that the objective so effectively planned will be successfully completed.
A spirit of co-operation was demonstrated by the Board of School Trustees and its
various groups of employees as they negotiated with each other regarding salaries and
working conditions. All discussions were conducted in a dignified manner, characterized
by mutual respect and confidence.
Typical of the agreements was that determined for the salary of teachers. On the
basis of certification and experience, a scale was agreed upon which ranges from a starting
salary of $2,050 for a beginning teacher with an Elementary Conditional certificate to a
maximum of $5,600 for a teacher possessing a Secondary Advanced classification and
thirteen years of experience.
Examination of the educational programme reveals neither startling innovations nor
spectacular developments. The students compete to gain scholarships, athletic and
dramatic honours, as well as awards for artistic abilities. Their successes are evidence of
a school system concerned with maintenance of high standards of performance as it tries FF 124 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
to meet the educational requirements of all pupils in attendance in a free public school
system.
The schools are staffed by teachers who, for the most part, are competent in their
work. Some are outstandingly successful. The competent teachers are ever improving
their professional status by active participation in local meetings concerned with professional problems, and by attendance at winter and (or) summer courses offered by
universities and by the Department of Education for the improvement of certification.
The successful work of the teachers is only possible through the co-operation of
many people. Among them are to be noted the engineers and janitors, who are ever
faithful in the performance of their allotted duties. There are also the carefully selected
bus operators, who skilfully drive the district-owned buses to carry the pupils safely to and
from school each day.
The smooth functioning of the day-to-day operation of the schools is taken for
granted. Pride in the system is reflected by the stability of the staff and attendance of
pupils. Seldom is a report presented where a pupil is charged with wilful destruction of
school property.
The parents, too, contribute to the pupils' successful growth at school each day. It
has been interesting to observe how the teachers and parents meet in groups, or by
appointment, to inform each other about the abilities and idiosyncrasies of pupils so that
both may the better serve the learning child. The use of the teacher-parent conference
technique is almost a standard form of reporting in all of the elementary schools and will
in due time appear at the secondary level of instruction.
In addition to their normal teaching responsibilities, most of the teachers give freely
of their time and money in their coaching of athletes, or training of pupils in music,
dramatic activities, and other extra-curricular activities. Appreciation for the teachers'
concern with the over-all development of children is shown by parents as they attend the
Christmas concert, elementary schools' musical evening, the secondary school's variety
show, and the many competitive sport-days.
With the opening of the school-year, for the first time School District No. 35
(Langley) has a resident Inspector of Schools devoting his full time to the educational
affairs of the school district. Early in 1956, on request by the Board of School Trustees,
the Superintendent of Education designated the Inspector of Schools the Education
Administrative Officer for the school district, and assigned him duties over and above
those performed by an Inspector of Schools as set forth in the " Public Schools Act."
In concluding this report, I would be remiss did I not express my sincere appreciation for the courtesies extended and assistance given by the many individuals and groups
with whom I have come in contact in the course of my work.
School District No. 43 (Coquitlam)
REPORT OF B. A. STIBBS, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The Coquitlam School District, which includes loco (rural), the Municipalities of
Coquitlam and Fraser Mills, and the Cities of Port Coquitlam and Port Moody, became
a single administrative unit at the beginning of the school-year. It is a compact area
with considerable desirable residential land available in which large subdivisions are being
developed or considered. The following facts indicate some extent of this expansion:
From June, 1955, to June, 1956, teachers increased by twenty-five, or 20 per cent, while REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS FF 125
pupils increased by 428, or 11 per cent, with the percentages being about the same for
elementary and secondary schools.
It is also of interest to note that thirty-eight classrooms, eight activity-rooms, and
one gymnasium-auditorium were completed and occupied during the year. The Honourable R. G. Williston and Dr. H. L. Campbell, Minister and Deputy Minister of Education
respectively, accepted invitations to officially open two of the larger schools. However,
surveys are already under way to provide pertinent data for future needs.
Unfortunately the Winslow School was not completed until Easter. This made it
necessary to continue with shift classes in the Como Lake Junior-Senior High School for
most of the year.
The principals and other key personnel met regularly once a month during the year
under the chairmanship of the Inspector of Schools. Some very fine projects were initiated and studied by the principals and others. These included the setting-up of a
minimum district testing programme, a survey of the English language fundamentals in
Grade IX, a study of report-card ratings, and a study of lesson planning, preview, and
day-book requirements. Two very successful meetings were held with Dr. J. F. K.
English, Assistant Deputy Minister of Education, and Dr. Henry Johnston, of the College
of Education.
Under the guidance of Miss A. Andrew, primary consultant, some fine studies were
undertaken by the teachers of Grades I, II, and III. Through the efforts of Miss Andrew,
standards were maintained and improved in the primary division.
Considerable stress is placed upon the community use of the schools by the Board,
and especially the activity-rooms and gymnasiums. Through night-school classes and
other organized activities, these are widely in demand.
Future Teachers Clubs were well organized in the two high schools. Members of
both staffs take an active interest in these, and the results should be successful.
It is a pleasure to acknowledge the active co-operation extended to me in my first
year in this area by the trustees, secretary-treasurer and staff, and principals and teachers.
Their friendly assistance is greatly appreciated.
In conclusion, I wish to pay tribute to the fine work the Chairman of the Board, Dr.
A. J. Berkeley, and the trustees are doing for education in this area.
School Districts No. 69 (Qualicum), No. 71  (Courtenay), and
Comox Airport Rural School District
REPORT OF C. I. TAYLOR, B.A, B.Ed, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 69 (Qualicum)
This school district must have one of the most stable school populations in British
Columbia. It has not varied more than ten pupils in the past three years. In May, 1956,
the number stood at an even 1,000.   There were forty-four teachers employed.
The Board completed its building programme in the fall with Parksville Junior High
School and Bowser and Home Lake Schools. This accommodation should be very
adequate for years to come.
Schools are well organized for teaching—one-room schools (Grades I to III), two-
and three-room schools (Grades I to VI), an elementary-junior high, and an elementary-
senior high. FF 126 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
An effort has been made this year to improve the grounds of the schools. This is
much needed. Schools are very well equipped, and janitor and maintenance service is
excellent.
School District No. 71 (Courtenay)
As in previous years, the school population of this district increased by approximately 150 pupils, from 2,699 in June, to 2,859 in September. The district had a staff
of 106 teachers in June, 1956.
The building programme as set forth in the referendum is nearing completion. The
new Lake Trail School was opened at Easter. It will be occupied by junior high-school
grades next fall. A two-room addition was opened at Cumberland Elementary School.
Home economics, industrial arts, library, classroom, and administration offices were
occupied at Tsolum Elementary-Senior High School in January. This makes this school
a complete unit for a full programme, Grades I to XII. Cumberland Junior-Senior High
School addition will be completed by school opening in the fall. Comox Elementary
School (Robb Road addition) is at present under construction.
The Board adopted a five-year plan for organization and building of schools.
A separate Junior High School for Courtenay for next year and for Comox in 1959 are
the main features of the plan.
Much attention has been paid to grounds this year. Purchase of property in Cumberland will give adequate playground space for Cumberland schools. The Segrue property, long held by the Board, is the most perfect site for the new Lake Trail School.
A groundsman is now fully employed. This addition to the staff has long been needed
and many improvements have already been effected.
Comox Airport Rural School District
This unattached school district provides school accommodation, Grades I to VI,
for children of R.C.A.F. personnel living on Department of National Defence property.
Enrolment continues to increase: 265 pupils are enrolled and there are seven teachers.
Accommodation for one class had to be found in a barracks block, but the addition of
two rooms this spring will adequately house this school next September.
The latest Air Force housing units are situated in the Village of Comox. The school
is therefore not likely to increase much beyond 300. The junior and senior high school
pupils of this district attend School District No. 71 schools. The Royal Canadian Air
Force continues to give generous co-operation and help in the operation of this school.
General
This year the in-service training programme was handled by a committee of the local
British Columbia Teachers' Federation with the co-operation of the Inspector and the
Board. This is a departure from the traditional methods in District No. 71. Teachers
taking responsibility for their own professional improvement is an important and worthwhile development.
District No. 69 was host to the British Columbia Trustees' Association annual convention at Qualicum. At Courtenay, District No. 71 took over the North Vancouver
Island fall teachers' convention for the first time in many years.
In June Miss Leila Carroll retired from the staff of District No. 71 after thirty-six
years' service in the Courtenay elementary schools. The district loses the services of a
fine teacher.
In conclusion, may I again pay tribute to the teachers, the Board members, and the
secretary-treasurers of these three districts. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS FF  127
School Districts No. 46 (Sechelt) and No. 47  (Powell River)
REPORT OF B. THORSTEINSSON, B.A, B.Ed, M.B.A,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate comprises two school districts, with enrolments and staffs as
follows, as at June, 1956:—
Pupils
Schools
Teachers
District
Elementary
Secondary
Elementary
Secondary
Elementary
Secondary
Total
District No. 46 (Sechelt) 	
741
1,590
495
816
11
12
2
2
30
51
17
42
47
District No. 47 (Powell River)      .  . .
93
Totals    .  .
2,331
1,311
73          I           4
81
59
140
School District No. 46 (Sechelt)
The school population in this area is experiencing steady and rapid growth. To meet
this situation a referendum in the amount of $587,600 was put to the ratepayers on April
7th, 1956. A careful and adequate explanation was made to the ratepayers by the Board
of School Trustees, and as a result the referendum passed with an 80-per-cent majority.
The building plan includes the following: (1) A five-room high school at Kleindale,
(2) a two-room addition to the elementary school at Pender Harbour, (3) a two-room
school at Davis Bay, (4) an activity-room at Sechelt, (5) a one-room addition at Roberts
Creek, (6) a seven-room addition at the Elphinstone Junior-Senior High School, and
(7) a three-room elementary school at Gibsons. During the coming year it is hoped that
these projects will be completed. The signs of recent growth in the area foreshadow
greater needs in the not too far distant future.
Within the classrooms good work has been carried on by an earnest and conscientious staff. A plan of periodic testing has been established, and results to date are generally good. It is especially gratifying to note that in the June examinations all the pupils
from the Pender Harbour School who wrote Matriculation examinations passed. This
school has only three high-school teachers.
During the year a beginning was made to teach instrumental music to interested
pupils in the Elphinstone High School. An itinerant teacher was engaged, who visited the
school at periodic intervals.
The vexatious problem of providing means of getting isolated groups of pupils to
school by water transport has increased rather than decreased during the year. However,
the improvement of roads in some areas will eventually obviate the need for water routes
to some extent.
A word of commendation should be offered to the school trustees of this district.
It would be hard to find a group of people more sincerely interested in their important
work than those on the local Board. Through their constant and abiding interest and
effort, education has been progressing well in this area during the past year.
School District No. 47 (Powell River)
Much educational progress has taken place in this area during the year. On September 16th, 1955, the following new schools were formally opened by the Honourable
R. G. Williston, Minister of Education: (1) a four-room elementary school at Grief
Point, (2) a four-room elementary school at Edgehill, and (3) a two-room addition to FF 128 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
the James Thomson Elementary School in Wildwood. During the year a one-room
addition and an activity-room were opened at Cranberry.
The new Max Cameron High School, located in Westview, will be completed and
ready for occupancy in September. Plans are well under way for the construction of a
new elementary school to replace the outmoded Henderson School in Powell River.
Finally, a five-room high school has been planned for Vananda on Texada Island.
During the year the organization of the school district was somewhat altered by the
incorporation of Powell River, Westview, Cranberry, and Wildwood into one municipality, now known as Powell River. Resultant changes in the mode of choosing trustees
eliminated appointed members. All members are now elected in the manner usual in such
school districts.
The operation of an opportunity class in one of the elementary schools continued,
as in the past, to offer its value to the normal school offering. Specific steps were taken
to measure progress with this group and the resultant efforts were well rewarded.
Provision was made in the Brooks High School to meet the needs of some of the
slower learners by organizing some smaller classes.   Results here were also gratifying.
One of the main difficulties in this area, as elsewhere, is the matter of adequate and
suitable housing for teachers. This problem was attacked by an interested group, and as
a result a committee was formed which consists of a representative from the teachers, one
from the parent-teacher organization, and one from the School Board. This committee
took its task seriously, and as a result much better housing for teachers ensued.
In this community there has operated for some years a class for the handicapped.
The Board has supplied a place to meet, and this year, under the new regulations, regular
operating grants are now paid toward its maintenance.
No body of trustees deserves more sincere commendation than those who serve the
Powell River District. They are sincerely interested in the real work of education and
bend their every effort toward the betterment of the schools.
School Districts No. 21  (Armstrong-Spallumcheen) and No. 22 (Vernon)
REPORT OF A. S. TO WELL, M.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
A reorganization of inspectorates, effective September, 1955, brought some lessening of the workload in this area through the transfer of School District No. 78 (Enderby)
from the Vernon to the Salmon Arm inspectorate. Though the relief was appreciated, it
was with regret that I said "good-bye" to the trustees and staff of that district, with all
of whom I had enjoyed the most cordial relations for several years.
School District No. 21 (Armstrong-Spallumcheen)
In this highly consolidated district there are only two schools, a six-grade elementary
school and a junior-senior high school. This organization, made possible by the construction of a new high school in 1954, was now in its second year of operation and has
continued to function very satisfactorily, in gratifying contrast to the almost impossible
conditions which prevailed during the early 1950's and which were described in my
previous reports.
During the year an event occurred which is perhaps worth recording because it is
highly unusual in so small a school district. This was the election of Mr. L. W. Wood,
Chairman of the Board of School Trustees, to the presidency of the British Columbia REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
FF 129
School Trustees' Association.    To this position Mr. Wood brings a degree of ability,
energy, and interest which should make his term of office a highly successful one.
School District No. 22 (Vernon)
In this district the continued increase in enrolment reached the point where additional teaching space had once more become necessary, and a referendum by-law to
provide $540,000 was put before the electors. Its passing made possible a construction
programme of which the major items are (a) an eight-room and a six-room addition to
the senior and the junior high schools respectively, (b) a third in the series of peripheral
primary schools planned for the City of Vernon, and (c) a much-needed gymnasium to
complete the facilities at the new Lumby High School. These buildings, now under construction, will come into service during the 1956-57 school-year.
I am pleased to report another development in the improvement of facilities for the
education of Indian children. For some years a few of the older boys and girls from the
Okanagan Indian Reserve had been attending senior high school in Vernon. This year
the Indian Affairs Branch has put into use a new fifty-five-passenger bus which also brings
to our junior high school the pupils of Grades VII, VIII, and IX. While this will bring
considerable relief to the two overcrowded day-schools on the reserve, the main benefit
is that it makes a full programme of secondary education available to all the Indian
children of the district, and an increasing proportion of them may be expected to take
advantage of it. It is at any rate one more step in the distressingly slow process of bringing to the Indian population equality of opportunity with the whites.
Another development has been the initiation of an experimental fourth year of
junior high school for very slow learners. Perhaps in next year's report I may be able to
say something as to how this has turned out.
Again I take the opportunity of acknowledging how much easier and pleasanter my
work is made by the willing co-operation of all who have to do with school matters in
my area. FF 130 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(A Special School for Aurally or Visually Handicapped Children)
REPORT OF C. E. MACDONALD, LL.B, B.S, LL.D, SUPERINTENDENT
The enrolment for the year 1955-56 was 184, divided as follows:—
Day
Resident
Total
16
47
21
100
37
147
Totals
63
121
184
In addition to the foregoing, ten city deaf children from 3 to 5 years of age were
given special instruction with their mothers twice weekly during the year. Home-training
instructions were sent to three out-of-town parents. In co-operation with the Canadian
National Institute for the Blind, seventy-three pre-school blind children and their parents
were given guidance and home training. Magna-type text-books were sent to thirty-nine
partial-sighted students throughout the Province, and four students were resident in the
School whilst attending a special class for the partial sighted at Kitsilano High School.
General Remarks
Personnel in charge of the extra-curricular programme for resident students were
reclassified on June 1st from supervisors to resident instructors, and a new salary schedule
introduced. The new position offers greater opportunity for advancement through professional growth and should facilitate the recruitment of teachers and other equally
qualified persons to this important role.
A proposed revision of teachers' salary ranges, more closely approximating the Provincial averages for various certificates, was submitted early in the spring.
The script for a documentary film on the Deaf Department of the school was
approved, and most of the filming completed before the close of School.
A transportation assistance allowance plan was agreed upon by School Boards of the
Lower Mainland area and the Department of Education, to become effective in September, 1956. Under this plan an allowance of $1 for each day of attendance will be paid
to those living more than 3 miles from the School or a special class operated by the
School, and 50 cents for those within the 3-mile zone.
Work is nearing completion on the new Braille unit and the recreational building.
The classroom wing should be completed and in operation by September. The building
is designed to meet the special needs of the blind in both classroom facilities and dormitory accommodation.
It was recommended by the Advisory Committee and approved by the Department of
Education that eligible students be normally enrolled in off-campus intermediate deaf
classes for a period of two years.
The Director of Technical and Vocational Training, Mr. J. S. White, and his
assistants have recommended certain changes in our vocational training programme, to
be implemented in the fall. Special equipment will be acquired over the next few years
to provide the range of experience prescribed by the technical advisers.
In concluding my report, I wish to gratefully acknowledge the sympathetic co-operation given me by officials of the Department of Education, the Advisory Committee under
the chairmanship of Dr. J. F. K. English, and all members of the School staff. CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
FF 131
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
High School and Vocational Courses
REPORT OF EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A, D. es L, DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the year
1955-56 was 10,259.   This figure shows an increase of 824 over 1954-55.
Correspondence courses were taken by students in the following classifications:—
Students registered in school— Per cent
1. School age students registered in high and superior schools (throughout this report the term
"school-age" refers to students under 18 years
of age) 	
2. School-age  students registered in elementary
schools 	
2,780
205
3.
Total number of school-age students     2,985
Students of 18, 19, and 20 years registered in
their local schools	
Students of 21 years or over registered in their
local schools	
1,026
22
Total number of students registered in
their local schools taking one or
more correspondence courses     4,033
Students not registered in schools—
1. School-age students unable to attend school because of physical disability	
2. School-age students gainfully employed	
3. School-age students studying courses at home
because of the distance factor _._	
4. School-age students in institutions — Girls' Industrial School, Boys' Industrial School, Oakalla
Prison Farm, British Columbia Penitentiary	
5. School-age students not registered in schools for
other reasons 	
6. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years not registered
in their local schools	
101
129
236
100
169
1,230
39.3
Total number of students under 21 years
not registered in their local schools
and obtaining their education by
correspondence      1,965
7. Adult students (21 years and over)     4,261
19.2
41.5
Total number of students
10,259      100.0 FF 132 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1955-56
The students enrolled may be classified as to age in the following three groups:—
Per cent
1. Pupils under 18 years of age     3,720        36.3
2. Pupils 18, 19, and 20 years     2,256        21.9
3. Pupils of 21 years of age and over     4,283        41.8
Totals  10,259 100.0
Some of these students took a full year's work in six high-school courses. Others
registered for only one or two courses. The number of students who enrolled in each of
the high-school subjects during the year was as follows:—
English Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  1,443
English Grammar and Composition 10, 20, 30, 40  1,578
English 91  131
English 99  35
Social Studies 10, 20, 30, 33  1,086
History 91  96
Science 10, 20  568
Mathematics 10, 20, 30, 91  2,167
Latin 10, 20, 91, 92  324
Spanish 10, 20, 91, 92  153
French 10, 20, 91, 92  596
German 10, 20  90
Health and Personal Development 10, 20, 30  644
Agriculture 10, 38, 39  242
Geography 91   124
Economics 92  24
Homemaking 10, 20, 30, 91  634
Art 10, 20  327
Record-keeping 11   492
Business Fundamentals  186
Book-keeping 34, 91, 95  553
Mathematics 12  186
Shorthand 21, 31  239
Typewriting 10, 20  928
Secretarial Practice 92  9
English 93 (Business English)  78
English 32 (Journalism)  17
Biology 91   126
Chemistry 91   138
Physics 91  121
Bible Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  48
Mechanical Drawing 10, 20  281
Sheet-metal Work 20  2
Metal-mining   9
Auto Mechanics 91, 92  314
Diesel Engines 91  86
Electricity 20  189
Radio and Wireless 30  137
Elementary Geology 29  112
Forestry 30  169
Art 39  48
Frame-house Construction 20  86 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS FF 133
Home Furnishing 23  50
Extramural Music 11, 21  27
Total  14,893
This figure is, of course, larger than the figure given for the number of students
enrolled, since the majority of the students were registered for more than one course.
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Senior Matriculation courses
was as follows:—
English Literature 100      171
English Composition 101      148
Mathematics 101       182
Mathematics 100        46
French 120        23
French 110        87
Latin 120  8
Latin 110        19
Spanish 110  5
Agriculture 100  6
History 101         70
History 102       109
Chemistry 101         40
Physics 101        32
German 90      161
Total  1,107
The number of students who enrolled in each of the non-credit courses may also be
classified in the following tables:—
Steam Engineering, 4th, 3rd, and 2nd Class  454
House Painting and Decorating  8
Aviation I  10
Industrial Mathematics  119
Practical Design  34
Glove-making   9
Air Navigation I, II  16
Mathematics for Steam Engineering, 2nd Class  42
Accountancy for Credit Unions  13
Spherical Trigonometry  16
English 19  487
Dressmaking   44
Preparation for Citizenship  197
Total  1,449
Students in rural elementary schools and superior schools, hospitals, and inmates of
public institutions were not required to pay fees. Students of small high schools were
required to pay an annual fee of $3. Other students paying fees were those who have
the privilege of attending a high school having six or more teachers, employed students
of 16 years or over, students enrolled for Senior Matriculation courses, and students
living outside this Province.
Most students paid their own fees. However, in the case of 899 students the fees
were paid by their School Boards. FF 134 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
The following is a classification of students who were exempted from tuition fees:—
1. Hospital cases  331
2. British Columbia Penitentiary  138
3. Oakalla Prison  212
4. Girls' Industrial Home  17
5. Provincial Industrial School for Boys  63
6. New Haven  60
7. On relief or equivalent  5
8. Disabled students at home  38
9. Students needed at home  22
TotaL  886
All students were asked to indicate their chosen vocations.   The following summary
shows the choices of those who gave this information:—
Professional—
Teachers   865
Nurses  628
Medicine   166
Science  3 8
Law   52
Art   69
Theology  51
Pharmacy __„  50
Miscellaneous  106
Commercial   927
Skilled labour (mechanics, technicians, steam engineers, etc.) 473
Police  47
Aviation  52
Her Majesty's Forces  82
Civil Service  8
Agriculture and farming  106
Forestry   157
Mining   18
Journalism   68
Diesel and steam engineering  773
Radio  75
Miscellaneous   72
Not given     5,376
Total  10,259
Completion of Courses
A total of 124,031 papers were marked during the year, which is an increase of 711
over the number of papers marked in the preceding year. We have five-, ten-, twelve-,
eighteen-, and twenty-paper courses.
Instructional Staff
An inside staff of four course-writers and an outside staff of sixty-six instructors
were employed during the year. CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
FF  135
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 4,197 students with material from our course
in English I for New Canadians, 1,027 students were supplied with material from the
English II for New Canadians, and 487 students took the course in English II (English 19)
by correspondence. In addition, 197 students were enrolled in the course "Preparation
for Citizenship." Classes in English were held in sixty-nine night-school centres, and
material was supplied for other classes and individuals in 125 small isolated places
throughout the Province.
New Courses
Social Studies 33, Economics 92, Mathematics 12, German 10, German 20, English
Literature 30, English Composition 30, Homemaking 20a, Homemaking 91b, Art 39,
Secretarial Practice 92, Mathematics 30, English 93, and Industrial Mathematics were
the new courses offered during the year.
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1955-56 there were 1,417 pupils enrolled in the Elementary
Correspondence School. Of these, 1,294 were enrolled at Victoria and the remaining
123 were enrolled at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District. The tabulation below
shows the enrolment by month and grade for each locality.
ENROLLED AT VICTORIA
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Total
I
II
III
rv
V
VI
VII
VIII
September  	
159
138
101
94
71
97
62
58
780
October
181
149
118
111
87
107
82
77
912
November 	
197
160
125
124
98
120
90
87
1,001
December  	
209
165
129
126
103
121
103
94
1,050
January
221
166
139
134
108
131
107
103
1,109
February
227
173
140
138
120
132
110
109
1,149
234
237
177
183
146
153
146
157
123
126
132
138
119
121
117
120
1,194
1,235
May. - -	
239
189
159
161
127
146
123
129
1,273
232
193
159
169
130
144
130
137
1,294
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE (PEACE RIVER BRANCH)
September	
October	
November	
December	
January	
February	
March	
April.
May-
June..
11
13
11
7
7
6
6
4
14
16
14
9
8
7
9
6
15
23
15
12
8
10
8
7
15
24
15
12
9
10
8
7
16
25
15
12
10
11
9
8
17
27
18
12
11
11
13
8
17
29
18
12
11
11
14
9
17
27
20
12
11
11
14
11
17
27
20
12
11
11
14
11
17
27
20
12
11
11
14
11
65
83
98
100
106
117
121
123
123
123
The number of papers marked in the two centres was as follows: Victoria, 135,560;
Pouce Coupe, 13,267; total, 148,827.
The staff in Victoria consisted of the Director, thirteen full-time instructors, one
part-time instructor, and an office staff of five members; in Pouce Coupe, one full-time
instructor in charge and one full-time assistant. FF 136 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
During the year a new course in Grade VII Art was produced. A kindergarten
course and kit for the pre-school training of the 5-year-old children in the homes of our
regularly enrolled pupils was also produced. Both these courses were devised, written,
and illustrated by staff instructors.
In addition to the numbers shown above, adult students enrolled for courses from
Grades I to VIII as follows:—
September     59 February   231
October  135 March   253
November   177 April   284
December  195 May  288
January   209 June   305
A total of 5,450 papers were marked in the adult section during the year. TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
FF 137
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE
In presenting my twenty-fifth annual report, I am still optimistic enough to hope that
the Text-book Branch may some day occupy a building especially designed and with space
enough for convenient and efficient operation.
During the twenty-five years the profits from sales have amounted to nearly a quarter
of a million dollars, a good but legitimate profit from an efficiently operated business, and
one which might be converted now into better accommodation.
The year under review was as usual bigger and better than the preceding one, and
all operations were concluded to the satisfaction of our clients.
We continue to receive many requests from officials of other Provinces in connection
with the operation of our Rental Plan, which has proven of considerable benefit to the
British Columbia school system.
The Text-book Branch supplied the required free text-books and the various forms,
etc, to schools and School Boards as and when required. Curriculum and other bulletins
were distributed to schools, and orders for books from the various dealers throughout the
Province were processed and completed in a satisfactory manner.
To purchase and distribute the free supplies to public and private schools and to
correspondence students during the school-year 1955-56 required an expenditure of
$340, 699.78; 4,317 free requisitions were received and filled.
Combined orders, free and saleable, reached the large total of 21,143, and from these
orders the sum of $670,867.56 was collected.
A total of 2,527 Rental Plan requisitions were received, checked, and completed,
and $369^203.24 in rental fees and remittances for lost and damaged books was collected.
During the school-year $4,617.34 was refunded to pupils who left the school system prior
to March 31st.
To carry out the detail involved in the above necessitates the willing co-operation of
a loyal and efficient staff and school officials, particularly secretary-treasurers. For this
assistance, I am happy to officially record my thanks.
The accompanying financial statements, presented in the form required by the Audit
Branch, include the seventh covering the Text-book Rental Plan.
Stock
The stock on hand in our warehouse, $322,089.54, is valued at publisher's price plus
incoming freight. The rental stock in the various schools, $508,401.06, is valued on the
same basis, less depreciation. No allowance is made for the costs involved in moving
the stock from the text-book warehouse to the several schools.
Sales
The sales to dealers, etc, amounted to $816,877.76, less discount of $156,636.47,
and our revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year is $45,793.27, after deducting
salaries, wages, and other overhead.
Rentals
We received $356,605.90, an increase of 8.7 per cent over the previous year. It will
be noted that the deficit for the year is $152,860.17. In spite of increasing costs, transportation, etc, the excess of expenditure over revenue is less than was estimated in this
subsidized scheme. FF 138 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31st, 1956
Sales
Revenue—
Sales _
Less discount _
Net sales
$816,877.76
156,636.47
$660,241.29
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31st, 1955  $407,277.40
Purchases  for  year   (cost,  freight,
duty)       481,021.94
Inventory, March 31st, 1956 .
Cost of sales	
Gross profit	
$888,299.34
322,089.54
566,209.80
$94,031.49
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages	
Packing and general expenses
Freight and delivery	
Sundry expenses 	
$35,483.04
3,620.26
8,205.55
929.37
       48,238.22
Excess of revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1956     $45,793.27 Rental fees collected
Opening rental inventory, March 31st, 1955
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
Text-book Rental Plan Operations
FF 139
$356,605.90
  $455,172.67
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, duty, and S.S. tax)    520,969.57
$976,142.24
Inventory, March 31st, 1954 .___ $387,609.57
Less three years' depreciation at 33V3 per cent
per annum     387,609.57
1955-56
Depreciation1
Inventory, March 31st, 1955 ___... $483,264.03
Less two years' depreciation
at 33V3  per cent per
annum      322,176.02
$132,996.65
$161,088.01
161,088.01
Inventory, March 31st, 1956 ___.- $520,969.57
Less one year's depreciation
at 33VS  per cent per
annum     173,656.52
$347,313.05
173,656.52
Closing rental inventory at March 31st, 1956     508,401.06
Total depreciation for year 1955-56   $467,741.18 $467,741.18
Add expenses—
Salaries and wages	
Packing and general expenses
Freight and delivery 	
Sundry expenses	
$30,691.97
3,131.43
7,097.60
803.89
41,724.89
509,466.07
Excess expenditure over revenue for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1956  $152,860.17
i See footnote to balance-sheet. FF 140
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1956
Assets
Imprest Account—
Cash on hand
Cash in bank __
Inventory—
Stock on hand
Consigned text-books _
Less depreciation1
Accounts receivable 	
Outstanding publishers' credit notes
i Third year depreciation on 1953-54 inventory	
Second year depreciation on 1954-55 inventory
First year depreciation on 1955-56 inventory	
Liabilities
Customers' credit balances carried as back orders	
Treasury advances for petty cash, Imprest Account
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund	
$100.00
750.00
$976,142.24
467,741.18
$850.00
322,089.54
508,401.06
19,706.23
31.84
$851,078.67
$132,996.65
161,088.01
.    173,656.52
$467,741.18
$1,661.76
850.00
848,566.91
$851,078.67 DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE FF 141
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE
REPORT OF THE LATE HAROLD P. JOHNS, Ph.D., DIRECTOR
With the deletion of courses for school counsellors from the course offerings given
at the Summer School of Education in Victoria, counsellor-training for the first time was
concentrated at the University of British Columbia in 1956. In all, three courses were
given, as follows:—
Education 550: Introduction to Guidance.
Education 551: Counselling Techniques.
Education 553: Occupational Information for Counsellors.
Of the above courses, Education 553, " Occupational Information for Counsellors,"
was an entirely new one for the University. It is interesting to note that it attracted an
enrolment of seventy-five.
Of special interest, too, was the Occupations Conference sponsored by the University
of British Columbia during the past summer. Organized under the combined sponsorship
of the Vancouver Board of Trade, the University, and the Department of Education, the
conference was attended by approximately 100 principals and counsellors during its
week-long sessions. Discussion leaders at each of the six sessions were representatives
of business and of the University. This was the first conference of its kind held in British
Columbia and its distinct success augurs well for future endeavours of this kind.
The Division of Educational and Vocational Guidance continued its policy of supplying secondary schools throughout the Province with new issues of guidance monographs,
twenty-eight such monographs being sent to each school during the school-year. In
addition, 360 monographs were listed and classified as a service to schools in their own
purchasing of materials.
A total of 13,571 job studies were submitted in connection with the Annual Job
Study Competition sponsored by the Vancouver Board of Trade and the Pacific National
Exhibition, in co-operation with the Department of Education. Winners of bursary
awards were as follows:—
(1) Grand award (senior high schools, for the study of a single vocation):
John M. Gilliland, Victoria High School, Victoria. Subject, " Nuclear
Physics and Nuclear Engineering."
(2) Second award (senior high schools, for the study of a single vocation):
Roy Robel, Kamloops High School, Kamloops. Subject, " The Draftsman."
(3) First award (junior high schools, for the study of jobs in an industry, or
a general field of employment): Zenna Jones, Alpha Junior High School,
Burnaby.   Subject, " The Pulp and Paper Industry." FF 142 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
REPORT OF MARGARET A. MUSSELMAN, ACTING-DIRECTOR OF
SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
Programme Organization
During the year 147 half-hour broadcasts were made available to schools. On a
time basis, 40 per cent of the programmes were shared by the four western Provinces,
with Manitoba and British Columbia each originating 20 per cent of the broadcasts.
National School Broadcasts comprise 20 per cent.
Distribution of programmes allows a large proportion of time for intermediate and
junior high school grades. This is appropriate, as course content here lends itself most
effectively to this tool and there are fewer administrative problems than in senior high-
school grades.
Music programmes, well established, were used most widely. In the case of the
regular primary music, 1,025 classrooms used it. Art, safety, and French have extensive
participation, with other more specialized series having smaller but enthusiastic reception.
Series which were initiated this year with plans for their continuation are " Canada
and the Commonwealth " and " Builders of B.C." The latter was planned as a preview
to the centenary year projects. " Health Highways," with its concluding ten minutes
devoted to discussion for parents and teachers, will be continued in 1956-57 with mental
health as its theme.
We constantly try to assess the end product of our work by enlisting the co-operation
of teachers, either as individuals or in committees, for day-to-day evaluation. Of paramount importance also is school visiting throughout the Province. This has been sorely
but unavoidably neglected this year during Mr. P. J. Kitley's absence.
Teacher Training and Assistance
The Teachers' Bulletin, Young Canada Listens, and auxiliary pamphlets for use in
primary and intermediate music, art, and French were sent to all schools. The demand
exceeded our increased supply. Teachers report these aids of value as reference material
even when circumstances prevent them using the broadcasts.
The three teacher-training centres and the Summer School of Education in Victoria
very kindly provided us with time for demonstration and discussion of the use of school
broadcasts.   We appreciate this opportunity of meeting teachers.
Television
The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation presented the second experimental series of
school telecasts, in which about forty schools participated. Evaluations were sent to
Toronto. My personal reaction was that there was considerable improvement over the
first experimental series but that there are obstacles yet to be surmounted aside from the
obvious financial one. The evaluation summary for Canada will be published in due
course.
Equipment
More and more schools are making use of tape recorders to enable teachers to have
radio broadcasts at the most appropriate time, both as regards course coverage and timetabling. In many cases (particularly Ecoutez and Shakespeare), tapes are kept for subsequent year's use. We would like to look forward to the time when staff, budget, and
agreement with actors' and musicians' unions would allow us to make well-recorded tapes
available to schools having tape recorders. This is, of course, the solution for schools
where radio reception is not adequate.   Seventy-one schools report having no radios. DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
FF  143
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P/ed, DIRECTOR
Before this report is published, the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research will be
10 years old. Like all 10-year-olds, it has reached a stage at which it should start to
grow rapidly, it is only beginning to achieve what it may later be expected to accomplish,
it is inclined to make many mistakes, and its activities may be considered a great nuisance
by some of the teachers and principals with whose routine it interferes. Nevertheless, it
has made some progress.
In 1946 it had a staff of three; it now has a staff of four. In 1946 approximately
80,000 copies of standardized tests, valued at $6,000, were sold by the Division. In
1955-56 over 400,000 copies, valued at $32,000, were distributed in addition to 121,300
used in Provincial surveys. In 1946 one test battery and three arithmetic tests had been
standardized on rather small samples of British Columbia pupils. By 1956, forty-two
tests had been standardized on a Province-wide basis at over sixty subject or sub-test
grade-levels. Over 500,000 pupils have now been tested and over a million scores are
on file.
Testing completed in 1955-56 included the following: The Stanford Achievement
Test Battery, Primary, Form J, and the Otis Quick-scoring Test of Mental Ability, Alpha,
A-s, each of which was given to 25,300 Grade III pupils in October; the Stanford
Achievement Test Battery, Intermediate Partial, Form J, and the Otis Self-administering
Test of Mental Ability, Intermediate, Form C, each of which was given to 20,100 Grade
VI pupils in January; an initial form of a B.C. French 10 test which was given to 7,710
pupils for preliminary standardization; a final form of a B.C. Social Studies 10 test, given
to 13,600 pupils in 1955 and to 15,020 in 1956, and now standardized for use by
teachers; and a Terminal Course test in Science 20 written by 9,230 students.
For several years it has been apparent that methods of identification of individual
differences, the establishment of standards, and assistance in diversifying methods of
instruction and improving such techniques as the construction of classroom tests were
among the chief needs of teachers. It is now evident that considerable progress along
these lines is being made. The teacher-training institutions and Inspectors have been
responsible for instruction in the skills that are necessary, and the Division has attempted
to provide some of the tools. The policy of the Division during the past decade has been
to emphasize the fact that the same standards of achievement should not be expected from
all schools, all classes, and all pupils, and to relate achievement to the ability of individual
pupils. While this theory is by no means unique, it now seems to be more widely accepted
in British Columbia than in any other Province. The Principals' Conference on Individual Differences, held in the summer of 1956, indicated that the principle of individual
standards for pupils, particularly for the brighter ones, has now been adopted in almost
all British Columbia schools. Most teachers now consider it just as bad for an "A"
student to have a " C+" in achievement as for a " C " student to be given a " D."
Another development which is receiving much wider acceptance throughout the
Province, and has received considerable publicity elsewhere, is the method of basing
matriculation standards in different courses on the ability of the students who are enrolled.
A step-by-step revision of the method of scaling University Entrance and Senior Martricu-
lation examination scores has been carried out since 1952. As a result, the courses that
formerly were considered " hard " now have the lowest failure rates, while the " easy "
or non-selective courses have the highest ones. As the procedures of scaling have become
more generally understood, it has been realized that scaling, properly used, will help to
maintain standards rather than to lower them. FF 144
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
It has always been considered one of the duties of the Division to " view with alarm "
any unfavourable trends that could be detected. That does not mean, of course, that only
weaknesses were being sought, or that any weakness that has been found is a criticism of
the whole system of education. Unfortunately, we have never administered a single test
that did not reveal a certain proportion of weak students, but in about 80 to 90 per cent
of the sub-tests for which grade equivalents were available, the average B.C. student has
exceeded any external norms that have been published. The stage of development is now
being reached where repeat studies are possible, and in some fields distinct progress has
been shown. In Science, H. H. Grantham found higher achievement in 1949 than had
been found in the Weir-Putman survey in 1925. Our Terminal Course test in Science 20
showed further improvement from 1952 to 1956. We are chiefly concerned, however,
with defects that occur, and consequently can be dealt with on a Province-wide basis.
For example, a situation that is being " viewed with alarm " at present, is the widespread
retardation of boys. Beginning in Grade I and continuing throughout the grades, the
number of under-achieving boys exceeds that of girls by 60 to 100 per cent. In elementary-school Arithmetic Computation the B.C. norm has been lowered considerably
by the boys' low scores. Although the better students in high-school mathematics courses
are males, that is due to greater selection. The average I.Q. of the high-school boys is
higher and their average mathematics score is better because the proportion of male dropouts has been greater. The problem of weakness in arithmetic is being attacked by a
revision of the elementary-school courses, but the problem of sex differences may have
to be dealt with by a complete re-examination of our elementary-school methodology.
During the past year a large amount of time was spent on a survey of personnel
responsibilities and duties in the Department of Education. Three articles were published,
two conferences and one workshop were attended, and lecture and advisory assistance
was provided for the C. E. A. Kellogg Foundation short course for school superintendents
that was held at the University of Alberta in May.
The results of the tests in French 10, Social Studies 10, and Science 20 were distributed to the schools early in September in the form of raw scores and equivalent percentiles and letter grades. A summary of the results of the Stanford Achievement Test
surveys is given in the following table in terms of the grade equivalents issued with the
tests:—
Stanford
Achievement
Battery
Grade
Norm
Paragraph
Meaning
Word
Meaning
Spelling
Language
Usage
Arithmetic
Reasoning
Computation
3.2
6.5
3.4
6.4
3.4
6.8
3.6
6.7
6.7
3.2
6.9
2.9
Intermediate Partial J	
6.5 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
FF 145
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Circulation Report, September 1st, 1955, to August 31st, 1956
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
District Number and Name
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
554
227
213
261
76
238
952
361
275
318
455
452
262
266
322
466
181
337
678
408
214
354
1,066
811
99
235
149
151
161
37
85
478
213
101
152
247
204
103
133
190
247
88
198
303
216
95
238
590
432
36
193
21
34
34
35
364
337
136
23
142
19
29
32
30
174
271
122
8
11. Trail   	
165
85
66
103
98
59
131
98
300
139
73
306
600
335
18
26
149
66
13   Kettle Valley                     .                .   .                 	
49
71
75
54
102
87
204
116
41
131
395
247
25. Barriere
15
244
28
27
92
108
588
235
100
11
9
47
76
335
184
13
29. Lillooet.           .	
12
39
353
324
87
459
747
241
177
788
700
7
624
870
1,336
36
67
376
334
72
270
122
9
30   Smith Carihoo
31
31.  Merritt
227
247
33.   rtiilliwarV
81
34.   Ahhot.forri
830                   530
358
968
937
604
1,039
3,252
653
2,955
1,283
1,400
555
342
446
776
401
610
126
4
183
148
25
124
109
272
50
530
144
5,042
267
451
525
249
496
2,161
276
1,470
562
676
382
240
229
376
192
322
89
4
83
65
11
49
33
127
19
262
73
2,834
181
484
36. Surrey           _	
198
37    Delta
118
523
563
7
470
47. Maple Ridge
554
885
28
63
46   Sechelt
267
47.  Powell River
234
48   Hnw. Sound
46
49. Ocean Falls
181
50. Queen Charlotte
102
51. Portland Canal
57.  Prince Rupert
80
50
18
112
46
25
11
446
10
156
68
53. Terrace
42
54.  Smithers
13
55.  Rirrns.T_.ln>.
67
56. Vanderhoof
38
57. Prince George
22
58   McRrirle
7
259
60.  North Peace
10
67   Sooke
122 FF 146 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1955-56
Circulation Report, September 1st, 1955, to August 31st, 1956—Continued
District Number and Name
Motion Pictures
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Filmstrips
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
63. Saanich	
64. Saltspring.
65. Cowichan..
66. Lake Cowichan-
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay	
72. Campbell River..
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz.
77. Summerland..
78. Enderby..
79. Ucluelet-Tofino..
80. Kitimat	
81. Fort Nelson..
82. Chilcotin	
Unattached schools.
Miscellaneous	
286
172
240
295
33
500
517
613
405
1,107
167
410
1,228
42
404
159
10
135
1,271
1,019
144
102
115
158
12
360
258
399
221
505
81
197
642
13
230
77
7
60
621
877
205
49
829
46
73
252
147
46
515
90
295
572
29
41
17
28
12
316
288
143
39
623
28
60
180
128
28
335
63
219
486
9
33
10
23
11
205
177
Totals..
44,256
23,890
16,624
11,766
This Division supplied on schedule visual aids to 615 schools during the term.
On the shelves of the library were 2,326 motion pictures, 4,016 filmstrips, 782
picture sets, and 65 dioramas.
In addition, pictorial material was distributed to each school in the Province.
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT'
REPORT OF MRS. FREDA KINSMAN, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1955-56 a total of 168 applications were considered by the
Commission. Of these, fifteen were turned down, the chief reason being that family
income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes; namely, $110
for a family of two, $160 for a family of three, plus $40 for each additional dependent.
One hundred and fifty-three applications were approved for grants, sixty-seven
receiving assistance for the first time, forty-nine for the second year, twenty-six for the
third year, and eleven for the fourth year. Students were distributed by grades as
follows: Grade IX, 43; Grade X, 46; Grade XI, 38; Grade XII, 26. During the year
twelve students dropped out and grants were discontinued. Of the Grade XII students,
sixteen completed the General Programme and eight gained partial standing.
The grant per pupil was $106.50 for the year, payable as follows: September, $50;
December, $25; March, $31.50. r
STATISTICAL RETURNS  STATISTICAL RETURNS
FF 149
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