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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1956 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1957

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 PROVINCE   OF  BRITISH   COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1956
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1957  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department of
Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31st, 1956.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Victoria, B.C.  Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, B.C., January 15th, 1957.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of this Department
for the year ended December 31st, 1956.
Since the real-property tax is the backbone of municipal finance, we report year by
year the significant changes in the assessed values of real property in the muncipalities.
It is noteworthy that as late as 1949 the total assessed values of land and improvements
within municipalities were just over 1 billion dollars. Six years later the amount just
topped the 2-billion-dollar figure, although the latter figure includes landlord and tenant
machinery and equipment to the extent of some 7 per cent of the total.
For 1956 the assessment rolls of cities, districts, and villages within the Province contained assessed values of land and improvements totalling $2,432,313,912, an increase of
approximately $324,000,000 (15 per cent) over values appearing on the 1955 rolls.
This increase in gross assessed values resulted in an increase of approximately
$293,000,000 in values taxable. The increase in values actually taxed in 1956 for
municipal purposes amounted to approximately $194,000,000 and for school purposes
approximately $236,000,000.   Figures are shown in the following tables:—
Total Assessed Value of Land and Improvements
1955 Total
Land
Improvements
Other than Landlord and Tenant
Machinery and
Equipment
Landlord and
Tenant
Machinery and
Equipment
1956 Total
$524,709,335
707,155,164
86,565,375
$104,277,621
154,639,894
14,956,594
$431,406,657
595,703,306
83,332,521
$35,538,152
85,208,590
4,385,754
$571,222,430
835,551,790
102,674,869
Totals    	
$1,318,429,874
790,028,509
$273,874,109
216,524,985
$1,110,442,484
649,358,267
$125,132,496
56,981,571
$1,509,449,089
922,864,823
$2,108,458,383
$490,399,094
$1,759,800,751
$182,114,067
$2,432,313,912
Values Taxable
$412,803,021
603,579,500
69,917,387
$82,381,360
134,847,330
13,246,439
$341,656,578
503,311,584
65,921,953
$32,377,448
83,491,225
2,700,957
$456,415,386
721,650,139
81,869,349
Totals     .
$1,086,299,908
655,781,137
$230,475,129
173,668,875
$910,890,115
549,080,602
$118,569,630
52,858,648
$1,259,934,874
775,608,125
$1,742,081,045
$404,144,004
$1,459,970,717
$171,428,278
$2,035,542,999 EE 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Values Actually Taxed
Municipal Purposes
1955 Total
Land
Improvements
1956 Total
$229,536,050
384,354,861
44,767,426
$82,118,360
134,814,290
13,239,424
$180,644,927
344,194,338
45,159,289
$262,763,287
479,008,628
Villages
58,398,713
$658,658,337
385,381,938
$230,172,074
173,668,875
$569,998,554
264,550,706
$800,170,628
438,219,581
$1,044,040,275
$403,840,949
$834,549,260
$1,238,390,209
School Purposes
Cities                              	
$324,578,365
460,358,615
$82,051,320
134,846,630
13,012,004
$267,948,364
428,835,557
49,794,808
$349,999,684
Districts _	
563,682,187
62,806,812
$784,936,9S0
565,919,895
$229,909,954
173,668,875
$746,578,729
436,470,045
$976,488,683
610,138,920
$1,350,856,875
$403,578,829
$1,183,048,774
$1,586,627,603
As a result of amendments to the " Municipal Act " and the " Village Municipalities
Act " passed at the last session of the Legislature, villages were given the responsibility of
collecting taxes for school purposes within their municipalities. This change simplified
the tax compliance problems of this taxpayer but did increase the work of the village staff.
In an effort to relieve the village clerks of some of this additional work, it was arranged
to have the taxation notices processed through the special equipment of the Department
of Finance. The same equipment was also used to produce the collector's roll for villages.
Due to technical difficulties it was only possible to process the rolls for those villages
taxing 100 per cent of land and 75 per cent of improvements for both municipal and
school purposes.
During the year approximately $10,200,000 in new debentures were approved,
which is an increase of nearly $1,450,000 compared with 1955. The amount and
purpose for which new debentures were approved are set out below (Vancouver debentures do not require approval):—
Distribution of Debenture Debt by Purposes for the Year 1956
Purpose
Cities
Districts
Villages
Total
Civic projects.
Hospitals..
Local improvements 1	
Protection to persons and property..
Roads and sidewalks	
Sewers 	
Waterworks	
Miscellaneous..
$308,000
74,389
150,000
848,000!
125,000
676,800
80,000
$647,000
1,182,000
180,498
47,000
358,000
1,602,000
2,774,1032
38,000
$14,000
318,500
784,500
Totals..
$2,262,189
$6,828,601
$1,117,000
$955,000
1,182,000
254,887
211,000
1,206,000
2,045,500
4,235,403
118,000
$10,207,790
1 $448,000 issued under " Local Improvement Act."
2 $72,103 issued under " Local Improvement Act." REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
EE 7
The latest figures available for total debenture debt as at December 31st, 1955, are
summarized as follows:-—■
Total Debenture Debt as at December 3 1st, 1955
Issued, Sold,
and Outstanding
Unissued
and Unsold
Total
$37,511,121
31,272,939
3,562,073
$305,603
2,486,931
19,900
$37,816,724
33,759,870
Villages      	
3,581,973
Totals               	
$72,346,133
117,913,263
$2,812,434
4,597,000
$75,158,567
Vancouver...                  ...                           -.	
122,510,263
$190,259,396
$7,409,434
$197,668,830
This Department has been advised by the Department of Finance of the Federal
Government that all semi-annual repayments have been made on loans which were
obtained under the provisions of the " Municipalities Improvements Assistance Act,
1938."    The following table shows the outstanding amounts as at January 1st, 1957:—
Loans Made under the Provisions of the " Municipalities Improvements Assistance Act, 1938," Guaranteed by the Province of British Columbia, as at
January 1st, 1957.
Municipality
Loan
No.
Amount
Advanced
Balance
Outstanding
Greater Vancouver Water D .'strict  _.
City of Vancouver..   	
District of Saanich  	
City of Nanaimo    	
City of Prince George..  	
City of Grand Forks  	
District of Summerland    ~	
City of Trail   _ 	
City of Port Alberni   	
City of Alberni   	
City of Prince Rupert  	
Westview Light, Power, and Waterworks District-
District of Coquitlam	
District of Penticton1    	
District of Surrey 	
Annable-Warfield Waterworks District2  	
Connaught Heights Waterworks District 	
District of West Vancouver 	
Grandview Waterworks District	
City of Salmon Arm 	
City of Armstrong	
Totals 	
1
2
21
22
31
32
33
54
56
57
59
60
67
68
69
81
84
85
89
94
95
$750,000.00
390,000.00
39,224.15
200,000.00
18,750.00
11,000.00
140,192.50
130,000.00
66,000.00
10,000.00
40,000.00
40,000.00
8,400.00
41,000.00
12,500.00
44,000.00
39,200.00
100,000.00
8,000.00
15,000.00
11,491.05
$281,619.87
79,915.36
8,037.47
6,899.00
55,661.40
22,945.62
13,524.14
20,962.80
7,236.71
10,253.59
20,543.55
43,948.26
1,639.28
7,861.04
|      $2,114,757.70
$581,048.09
1 Changed from district to city status, April 30th, 1948.
2 This liability now assumed by The Corporation of the Village of Warfield.
Amortized payments due December 31st, 1956, and January 1st, 1957, made by all municipalities.
All money by-laws, before being approved for submission to the electors, were carefully examined as to necessity, the estimated cost, the financial ability of the municipality
to repay the loan, and the relation of the life of the works to the maturity date of the
debentures. Care was also taken to see that the debt burden resulting from combining
the existing and proposed debt charges was not unduly excessive for any particular year.
When local improvement debentures were submitted for certification, evidence was
required that proper assessments had been levied and all statutory requirements complied
with.
The year 1956 witnessed a very serious deterioration in the means available to
finance municipal capital works.    Councils were forced to offer interest rates far in EE 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
excess of that experienced for many years, but even with this inducement, as the year
advanced, they found it increasingly difficult to market their securities under any reasonable set of terms or conditions, nor does any immediate respite appear in sight. This has
been a particularly serious problem for growing municipalities, chiefly the districts, which
are faced with the necessity of providing sewers and waterworks for a rapidly expanding
population. Reference to the table on debt shows that over 60 per cent of the amount
authorized to be issued in 1956 was for these two purposes. Because of this restricted
supply of money, a number of Councils delayed consideration of by-laws for projects
which, while very worthy, were not of an essential nature.
Five inquiries were held into applications for certificates of approval to money
by-laws.   In all cases the certificates were granted.
Certain municipalities requested that the Department investigate specific phases of
their affairs.   These were carried out and recommendations made.
At the end of 1955, reserve funds amounted to $7,569,508, which is an increase
over the previous year of $670,750. These funds are available for general or specific
capital expenditures, such as construction, renewal, or purchase of utilities and public
works projects, as well as the purchase of equipment. The practice of setting up reserve
funds appears to be growing, and the municipalities which have adopted this policy are to
be commended.
Due to the pressure of other work, the Board of Examiners held only cursory meetings during the year, and a number of major questions still remain to be dealt with, but
it is expected that these will be taken up by the Board during the coming year.
The course in municipal administration being offered by the Faculty of Commerce
and Business Administration of the University of British Columbia under the sponsorship
of the Department is now well into its fourth year. Total enrolment for the 1956-57
year is made up of:  First year, 53; second year, 30; third year, 26; and fourth year, 28.
Four-day institutes were held at the University in May, 1956, for last year's classes,
and the results of the examinations were as follows: Completing first year, 27; second
year, 17; and third year, 23. These totals were increased later by students successful
in supplemental examinations.
Junior diplomas were granted by the University to all students successfully completing the second year of the course.
It should be stressed that, although employees of municipalities in British Columbia
have priority in regard to registration for the course, any person interested in municipal
administration is eligible to become a student, providing the fees are paid.
The Seventeenth Annual Conference of the Municipal Officers' Association was held
in Victoria on May 28th and 29th, 1956. Certain proposed changes and innovations in
the projected municipal legislation were discussed, and the view-points of the members
proved helpful. The attendance surpassed all previous records. It is gratifying to note the
increase in attendance and in particular that there were members from smaller municipalities not previously represented.
As a result of your representations to the members attending the convention of the
Union of British Columbia Municipalities held at Prince George in 1955, a special committee was set up by the union to assist the Department in drafting the new " Municipal
Act." During the year 1956 members of the Deparment worked with this committee a
total of some twelve days, and I am happy to report to you that the exchange of views
was conducted in a most amicable atmosphere and that the members of the committee
contributed faithfully and unstintingly of their time and talent in reviewing the proposals
for the new legislation. During the Union of British Columbia Municipalities convention
held in 1956 at Penticton, this committee submitted to the members a series of general
questions to ascertain the thinking of the Council representatives with respect to various
questions and problems being considered in the revision of the new Act.   I wish to record REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
EE 9
it here that the Department is indebted beyond measure to the members of this committee for their helpful guidance and suggestions during the long task of preparing draft
legislation for your consideration.
Five communities were incorporated as village municipalities in 1956.   They are:—
Village
Date of
Incorporation
Area
(in Acres)
Population
The Corporation of the Village of Hazelton.—
The Corporation of the Village of Sechelt	
The Corporation of the Village of Montrose ....
The Corporation of the Village of Pemberton _
The Corporation of the Village of Keremeos...
Feb.15
Feb.15
June 22
July 20
Oct. 30
27.9
467.0
217.0
301.0
403.0
210
431
707
125
457
In 1956, extensions of boundaries were granted to the City of Slocan and the Villages
of Ashcroft, Burns Lake, Creston, Fort St. John, Lillooet, North Kamloops, Sidney, and
Telkwa.   The following table shows the increase in area as well as population:—
Area (in Acres)
Population
Municipality
Before
Extension of
Boundaries
Contained in
Area Added
After
Extension of
Boundaries
Before
Extension of
Boundaries
Contained in
Area Added
After
Extension of
Boundaries
City
196.0
124.0
283.8
655.2
495.5
152.0
545.0
431.0
404.0
31.5
104.4
66.7
41.0
833.6
128.0
535.0
5.0
200.0
227.5
228.4
350.5
696.2
1,329.1
280.0
1,080.0
436.0
604.0
374
621
801
1,626
884
469
1,979
1,035
489
81.
35
106
125
257
678
16
91
374
Village
Ashcroft	
702
836
Creston .„- ■
Fort St. John - _   „_ ■
1,732
1,009
726
2,657
Sidney   	
Telkwa	
1,051
580
The population in the 1951 Census or, in the case of Ashcroft, Sidney, and Telkwa,
is at the date of incorporation, plus additions brought about by extensions of boundaries
since then to December 31st, 1956.
The boundaries of the Cities of Duncan and Penticton and the Districts of North
Cowichan and Saanich were redefined to make for greater certainty in each case.
During 1956 the Districts of North Vancouver and West Vancouver surrendered
their Letters Patent, and other Letters Patent were issued in their place in order to adjust
the boundaries between the two municipalities to fit the topography.
The most significant changes or additions enacted by the 1956 Session of the Legislature which affected municipalities are as follows:—
" Fireworks Regulation Act."—The purpose of this Act is to regulate and control
the sale of fireworks. A municipality must by by-law declare that the Act applies to that
municipality.
" Gas Act."—In so far as municipalities are concerned, the principal amendment
gives a municipality the opportunity of applying to the Minister of Public Works for a gas
inspection service.
"Housing Act."—This Act has been broadened to include slum clearance and
redevelopment. Power is given to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to make a grant to
a municipality to defray a part of the municipality's costs incurred in slum clearance and
urban redevelopment.
"Milk Industry Act."—Several Acts and provisions of portions of other Acts, including the " Municipal Act," are consolidated in this Act. It is designed to operate for
the benefit of the general public as well as producers and distributers. EE 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
"Municipal Act."—An amendment was made which allows employees of a School
Board to be elected and to serve on Municipal Councils, but they cannot vote on school
matters. Power was given to prohibit the parking or leaving of vehicles on private property without authority from the owner or occupier of the property. Section 65 was
broadened to permit a district municipality to merge areas and consolidate works or
services under certain conditions. Further provisions were made regarding the use of
sinking fund surplus. An amendment was made which is the final step in making village
municipalities the sole authority for taxation on real property within the municipal area.
A change was made regarding the levying of a tax on that portion of a business operating pursuant to licences issued by the Liquor Control Board. Permission to borrow
from the reserve fund set up pursuant to section 537 was given subject to certain restrictions. The " Village Municipalities Act " was amended by the " Municipal Act Amendment Act, 1956," to extend the same privilege of taxation of liquor outlets to village
municipalities as for city and district municipalities. An amendment was made to the
" Local Improvement Act" which allows for newly created lots to bear their just share
of local improvement assessments. Other amendments of a minor and technical nature
were made.
As a result of an appeal to the Supreme Court, the definition of " improvements "
in the "Assessment Equalization Act, 1953," "Municipal Act," "Public Schools Act,"
and " Taxation Act" has been clarified to show that the intent on the part of the Legislature is to tax an improvement, irrespective of whether owned by the landlord or his
tenant.
"Municipalities Aid Act, 1955."—An increase was made in the scale of the per
capita grant to local governments.
"Pollution-control Act."—This Act is designed to control and prevent the pollution of the water of the Province. Permission of the Pollution-control Board is required
for the discharge of sewage or other waste material into the waters of the area or areas
under the jurisdiction of the Board.   ■
"Soil Conservation Act."—This is a new Act authorizing the Minister of Agriculture to take steps as set out in the Act to conserve or rehabilitate agricultural land which,
by reason of erosion or because of neglect, mismanagement, or carelessness, has or is
likely to become debilitated. The Act applies to both organized and unorganized territory.
"Chilliwack Dyking District Act, 1949."—Among the changes to this Act is power
for the Council to borrow where it is considered that the levy would be too great for a
single year. The assent of the electors is not required if the amount is to be repayable
within five years or less.
"The Corporation of Delta Enabling Act, 1956."—Power was conferred to enable
The Corporation of Delta and the trustees of Annacis Island to enter into the agreement
shown as Schedule A to the Act.
"Kitimat Incorporation Act, 1953."—Due to additional projected industrial expansion, the special borrowing power of The Corporation of the District of Kitimat for the
years 1956 and 1957 was extended until 1961.
"City of Ladysmith By-law No. 315 Validation Act."—Due to an oversight there
was an error in the 1955 annual rates by-law of The Corporation of the City of Ladysmith.   This Act validates the by-law.
"District of North Cowichan Hospital Grant Enabling Act."—Power was conferred
to enable the municipality to implement local hospital arrangements.
"Powell River Incorporation Act."—Corrects an error in the description of the mill-
site area.
"Greater Vancouver Sewerage and Drainage District Act."—The purpose of this
Act is to implement a report upon sewage and storm drainage for the Greater Vancouver REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
EE 11
metropolitan area and repeals the " Vancouver and Districts Joint Sewerage and Drainage Act," which was inadequate to cope with the conditions of to-day and the future.
Regulations were made pursuant to both clauses (c) and (/) of section 9 of the
" Village Municipalities Act." The sections of the " Municipal Act " which were made
applicable to all village municipalities are 185 and 534. The former deals with power
in case of an emergency and the latter with the management and disposal of assets. It
was also necessary to pass regulations making portions of the " Municipal Act" and in
one case the " Water Act" applicable to specific village municipalities.
Power was conferred upon the Council or Board of Commissioners of all city, district, and village municipalities to grant aid to any duly established local committee set
up to organize and arrange for the celebration of the centennial anniversary of the
Province.
I need hardly state that a tremendous amount of work and thought has been put
into the drafting of the new " Municipal Act." This task has employed the full time of
Mr. B. C. Bracewell, the former Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs, and a great deal
of time of the various members of the staff in the Department. In addition, there was
the time and advice given so freely and willingly by the members of the special committee set up by the Union of British Columbia Municipalities. While it is too much
to hope that the new Act will be free from defects, nevertheless it is believed it will
represent a major advance on existing legislation.
The staff of the Department are to be particularly commended for their efforts
during the past year. In spite of the additional work involved as a result of the preparation of the new Act, they have carried out their responsibilities promptly and effectively,
and to the best of my knowledge no municipal business has been delayed solely as a
result of this extra work load.
I would again like to express my thanks to the municipal officials, both elected and
appointed, for their courtesy and assistance, and to the executive and staff of the Union
of British Columbia Municipalities, to the departmental heads and staff of the other
departments of Government, and again to you, Sir, for your continued support and
encouragement.
J. E. BROWN,
Deputy Minister.
■
■
■
■- EE 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF MUNICIPALITIES
Victoria, B.C., January 10th, 1957.
/. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—In spite of the increasing work due to the enlarging municipal field in British
Columbia and the extra pressure of duties entailed in the revision of Statutes relating to
municipal government, the members of the staff have kept up with the tasks imposed
upon them in the year 1956.
Every municipality, with the exception of two villages, has been visited at least
once by a senior member of the Department. Many public meetings have been attended
and certain investigations and inquiries of a minor nature carried out.
As a consequence of the foregoing, staff holidays were cheerfully fitted in on a
piece-meal basis and many extra hours and days of work were willingly undertaken.
The hard work and loyalty of the members of the Department is appreciated and worthy
of commendation.
The following is a compilation of some of the functions of the Department during
1956:—
(1) One hundred and thirty-eight visits were made to municipalities. The
number of municipalities actually visited was 109, some receiving more
than one visit.
(2) Two hundred and fifty-three Orders in Council were prepared and subsequently approved.
(3) Sixty-nine certificates of approval for municipal loan by-laws were issued.
(4) Fifty-four debenture issues were certified by the Inspector of Municipalities, consisting of 10,464 debentures with coupons attached, which were
examined, checked, sealed, and certified.
(5) Five hundred and eighty-six village by-laws were examined, checked, and
filed. Many of these required advice and correspondence resulting in
resubmittal in amended form.
(6) Hundreds of draft by-laws were submitted and resulted in considerable
correspondence.
The first village submitting 1955 financial returns in 1956 was Ashcroft; the first
city, Ladysmith; and the first district, Kent.
The various financial and statistical returns from municipalities continues to show
improvement both as to content and earlier dates of submission. The Department is
indeed grateful for the splendid co-operation of the municipal officials during the past
year in all aspects of municipal government and administration.
There is, however, one aspect of local government administration of a perennial
nature which could be improved upon by municipal administrators, particularly those
who are elected members of Council. I refer to the annual avalanche of " priority,"
" urgent," and " special consideration " approvals requested for by-laws to be submitted
to the electors at the municipal elections in December. Due to the technical knowledge
required, this Department cannot engage extra staff to cope with the problem. It therefore must be a case of first come, first served. The Department is besieged with letters,
telegrams, and telephone calls requesting that certain by-laws be dealt with as being
most urgent and worthy of first consideration. It is to the interest of all municipalities
to allow more time for the implementation of this type of by-law so that proper consideration can be given by both Council and the Department.
At the Municipal Officers' Association conference held in May of this year, most
of the agenda was taken up with discussion by the members on suggestions for the proposed new " Municipal Act," and the results were of help and benefit to all concerned. REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
EE 13
In view of the studies going on concerning revision of legislation governing municipalities, it is of interest to note that at this date there are ten Orders in Council in existence making certain sections of the " Municipal Act" applicable to all villages and
twenty-eight Orders in Council making certain sections of the " Municipal Act" applicable to specific villages. All these latter Orders were made at the request of the villages
concerned.
The undersigned attended a week's conference at the Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa,
as a member of the Continuing Committee of the Dominion-Provincial Conference on
Municipal Accounting. The time was devoted to matters pertaining to the revision of
the Manual of Instructions on Municipal Accounting and Reporting issued by the Public
Finance Division of the Bureau. The Continuing Committee is scheduled to meet again
early in 1957.
This report continues the previous practice of including analytical studies relating
to municipal administration.
Table 1 shows the gross and net debenture debt of all cities (exclusive of Vancouver),
all districts, and of Vancouver from 1921 to 1955, inclusive, and is graphed on Chart 1.
In the cities (exclusive of Vancouver) the net debenture debt for 1955 is practically
identical to the net debt of 1922. Vancouver, however, has almost double the net debt
in 1955 compared to 1922. The most striking change is in districts reflecting the urban
expansion, with the consequent immediate need for works and services. The net debt
of districts in 1955 is about four times that of 1922.
However, the following comparisons of these two years for assessed taxable values
and estimated population figures puts the foregoing comparisons into better focus:—
' '
(Values in thousands of dollars.)
.
Cities (Other than
Vancouver)
Districts
Vancouver
Assessed
Values
Population
Assessed
Values
Population
AvSd   | P°PUIation
1922 _ 	
$155,800      1      134,720
385.600      1      260.000
$186,700
541,700
123,660
390,000
$211,700
608,000
125,000
1955	
398,000
Table 2 shows the percentages of municipal revenues according to major sources
for four basic years.
Table 3 relates the major sources of municipal revenue to a per capita basis for
the same basic years.
Table 4 compares expenditures by functions on a per capita basis for two basic
years.
Table 5 compares the municipalities of British Columbia to the average for all
municipalities in Canada in respect to expenditures on a functional basis for the year
1954.
Table 6 tabulates by years the value of tax-sale lands owned by municipalities in
the years 1924 to 1955, inclusive, based on the valuations as reported by the municipalities.
J. D. Baird,
Supervisor of Municipalities. EE 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table 1.—Gross and Net Debenture Debt for All Cities (Exclusive of Vancouver) and Districts and Vancouver, as at December 31st, in Each Year
for the Years 1921 to 1955, Inclusive.
(In thousands of dollars.)
All Cities (Exclusive
of Vancouver)
Gross
Debenture
Debt
Net
Debenture
Debt
All Districts
Gross
Debenture
Debt
Net
Debenture
Debt
Vancouver
Gross
Debenture
Debt
Net
Debenture
Debt
1921..
1922..
1923.
1924
1925..
1926.
1927.
1928.
1929..
1930
1931.
1932.
1933..
1934
1935.
1936
1937.
1938 .
1939
1940
1941..
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945..
1946.
1947.
1948.
1949..
1950.
1951..
1952.
1953..
1954
1955-
$39,112
40,256
39,401
39,660
39,586
39,665
39,736
40,312
40,273
41,066
40,673
40,592
39,780
39,417
39,141
38,417
35,939
35,323
35,387
35,017
32,924
31,846
30,290
29,416
29,304
31,690
35,015
37,422
39,383
38,442
38,466
39,606
39,533
39,456
37,512
$33,459
35,825
33,279
33,276
34,081
31,773
31,010
30,663
29,726
29,191
29,034
28,817
28,060
27,568
27,016
26,135
27,190
26,996
27,156
26,726
24,863
24,004
23,503
22,643
22,775
24,993
29,511
32,325
34,091
33,000
33,474
34,568
34.121
33,973
33,845
$9,615
9,458
9,322
9,327
9,461
9,928
10,505
11,021
11,414
12,254
12,670
12,684
12,525
12,259
11,656
11,712
11,406
11,468
11,418
10,780
11,047
10,498
10,112
9,827
10,202
11,803
14,290
16,032
18,053
17,652
18,561
23,215
23,752
28,656
31,273
$7,966
7,754
7,514
7,303
7,169
7,386
7,737
7,996
8,625
9,206
9,608
9,642
9,504
9,076
8,034
7,920
7,367
7,238
7,014
6,733
7,153
6.692
6,279
6,232
6,428
7,798
11,542
13,237
15,117
14,864
15,872
20,581
21,230
26,554
29,488
$48,770
49,048
47,552
47,121
50,010
53,262
57,136
58,794
66,798
72,513
76,573
76,058
75,790
75,498
76,576
75,712
75,437
74,381
73,181
71,459
69,023
66,328
64,454
61,510
64,565
65,512
66,346
74,442
83,839
88,578
93,786
101,005
105,085
115,001
117,914
$39,091
36,805
38,042
37,970
38,219
42,482
45,639
46,760
53,765
58,548
61,568
60,946
60,794
59,725
60,113
58,921
58,102
56,691
55,317
53,254
51,010
47,630
44,799
41,837
42,991
44,302
42,970
45,207
54,240
58,683
62,718
73,320
81,361
88,927
89,328 REPORT of department of municipal affairs
EE 15
Table 2.—Percentage of Municipal Revenues by Major Sources
for the Years 1931, 1941, 1951, and 1955
Year
Municipal Taxation
For Schools
Total
Provincial
Grants
Utilities
Licences,
Fines, and
Other
Revenue
Total
Revenue
1931
All Cities except Vancouver
1941	
1951	
1955	
1931	
Vancouver
1941   	
1951   ... ....
1955....   	
1931
All Districts
1941      	
1951      	
1955..     .
1931  -
All Villages
1941	
1951              	
1955  	
29.10
21.80
22.50
18.15
24.62
24.60
24.70
21.62
30.30
29.20
31.85
25.24
69.25
65.60
49.00
54.20
85.45
79.10
63.20
73.02
68.60
82.20
60.00
66.27
41.65
64.24
34.90
37.55
7.16
7.10
23.25
15.69
5.32
8.95
22.95
11.44
9.82
11.32
27.20
17.77
28.20
10.93
34.90
32.20
3.20
8.55
9.77
10.19
0.64
1.09
0.89
1.33
2.73
1.88
3.76
5.27
20.39
18.75
17.98
19.92
9.23
11.31
12.76
14.55
21.58
6.48
11.47
13.23
30.15
22.94
26.44
24.98
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
Table 3.—Per Capita Municipal Revenues by Major Sources
for the Years 1931, 1941, 1951, and 1955
Year
Municipal Taxation
For Schools
Total
Provincial
Grants
Utilities
Licences,
Fines, and
Other
Revenue
Total
Revenue
All Cities except Vancouver
1931. .
1941	
1951
1955 -  - -   	
1931	
Vancouver
1941        . -
1951    - ..
1955    - - 	
1931	
All Districts
1941  - -	
1951 	
1955   .. -   -'	
1931
All Villages
1941
1951   	
1955	
13.35
9.35
19.80
16.98
19.95
11.95
21.10
23.18
9.62
5.75
18.15
15.52
31.80
28.20
43.15
50.69
44.80
38.40
54.00
78.32
21.80
16.20
34.20
40.75
5.60
5.81
11.14
13.96
3.29
3.05
20.45
14.66
2.79
4.35
19.60
12.39
3.12
2.23
15.50
10.92
3.78
0.99
11.13
11.97
1.47
3.67
8.60
9.53
0.31
0.93
0.95
0.76
1.67
0.17
1.20
1.96
9.39
8.03
15.80
18.62
4.91
5.54
10.97
15.59
6.83
1.27
6.54
8.14
4.04
2.08
8.43
9.28
45.95
42.95
88.00
93.50
52.50
48.60
85.50
107.25
31.75
19.70
57.00
61.48
13.42
9.05
31.90
37.17 EE  16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 4.—Comparison of per Capita Expenditure by Functions for All Cities
except Vancouver, for Vancouver, and for All Districts for the Years
1921 and 1955.
All cities except
Vancouver
Vancouver
All Districts
1921
1955
1921
1955
1921
1955
$2.72
2.71
2.42
1.10
4.21
.57
.38
.79
11.45
16.46
.51
6.14
1.14
$8.04
5.62
5.01
2.11
10.11
4.00
1.03
1.67
14.97
14.92
1.10
1.74
5.51
6.59
7.96
1.28
$1.85
3.09
3.86
.75
6.12
1.77
.48
1.73
12.02
15.65
1.26
4.79
1.37
$4.82
9.00
12.09
2.83
6.59
3.73
2.65
2.33
20.35
21.41
2.26
5.52
9.45
.60
$2.70
.17
1.13
.31
8.40
.22
.11
.96
8.32
5.54
1.99
4.90
.26
$5.09
2.23
Fire 	
2.17
.88
10.36
1.45
Public health 	
.69
Hospital care     	
1.06
13.76
Debt  	
7.04
1.33
1.50
1.49
4.85
Capital out of revenue	
5.28
.69
$50.60
$91.66
$54.74
$103.63
$35.01
$59.87
Table 5.—Expenditures by Functions for All Municipalities in British
Columbia and Canada for the Year 1954 (Latest Figures Available)
(Amounts in thousands of dollars.)
British Columbia
Canada
Amount
Percentage
Amount
Percentage
$5,827
13,254
9,775
2,937
2,648
6,833
30,540
3,811
15,715
210
716
436
3,168
150
991
6.01
13.66
10.07
3.03
2.73
7.04
31.48
3.93
16.20
0.22
0.74
0.45
3.26
0.15
1.03
$72,878
119,329
144,616
39,947
49,650
38,929
275,581
29,103
167,947
6,225
5,877
9,941
30,125
4,657
9,360
7.26
11.88
14.40
3.98
Health              	
4.94
3.88
27.44
Recreation and community services  	
Debt charges—
Debenture     — —	
Other	
2.90
16.72
0.63
Utilities and other municipal enterprises—Deficits and levies
0.58
0.99
3.00
Joint or special expenditures.  	
Miscellaneous expenditures  	
0.47
0.93
Totals                                              	
$97,011
100.00
$1,004,165
100.00 report of department of municipal affairs
EE 17
Table 6.—Reported Values of Tax-sale Lands
(In thousands of dollars.)
Cities (except
Vancouver)
Districts
Villages
Vancouver
1924              -
$4,350
4,361
3,932
3,883 ■
3,935
3,911
3,915
4,644
4,473
4,725
5,231
6,058
6,037
6,354
6,313
6,169
5,977
5,563
5,321
4,927
4,311
3,899
2,967
2,769
2,519
2,380
2,207
1,912
1,722
1,626
1,934
1,529
$1,817
1,812
1,813
1,814
1,806
1,892
1,958
2,165
2,368
2,597
3,059
2,990
3,272
4,315
4,126
4,152
4,086
3,945
3,860
3,602
3,311
3,113
2,599
2,360
2,080
2,029
2,101
2,005
1,730
1,523
1,386
1,276
$1
1
2
2
2
2
2
3
5
3
2
2
4
6
4
3
3
3
12
12
12
11
11
11
11
11
1
1
4
4
1
$2,302
1925  	
2,510
1926      	
1927  	
1928
2,486
2,339
1,841
1929                  	
2,101
1930 	
2,001
2,029
2,469
1931	
1932	
1933    	
1934                            	
2,588
2,740
1935                	
1936...	
2,632
4,127
1937    	
1938    	
1939
4,044
5,634
5,596
1940	
5,454
1941...    	
1942   	
1943  	
5,147
4,977
4,442
1944...          	
3,862
1945   	
1946	
3,284
2,621
1947  	
2,265
1948.   	
1,992
1949   	
1,703
1950   _	
1,610
1951 _  ...
1,706
1952 .  ....
1,797
1953
1,764
2,009
1954	
1955	
Cities includes former District of Penticton.
Vancouver includes former Districts of Point Grey and South Vancouver.
- EE 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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LEGEND
NET  DEBENTURE  DEBT  FOR  ALL   CITIES    EXCEPT    VANCOUVER
IN   TENS   OF   MILLIONS   OF   DOLLARS
NET  DEBENTURE   DEBT  FOR   VANCOUVER   IN    TENS   OF   MILLIONS
OF    DOLLARS
NET   DEBENTURE  DEBT   FOR   DISTRICTS   IN   MILLIONS     OF DOLLARS
/
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u REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS EE 19
REPORT OF DIRECTOR, REGIONAL PLANNING DIVISION
Victoria, B.C., January 11th, 1957.
J. E. Brown, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—The Regional Planning Division was established in 1946 as a recognition
that attention should be paid to the application of planning principles to community
growth. At that time not one municipality in British Columbia had on its staff anyone
engaged specifically in community planning. To-day six of the larger municipalities
have permanent planning staffs and Vancouver has a planning staff of about thirty.
Many of the remaining municipalities use the services of the Regional Planning Division,
or the staff of the Regional Planning Board of their region, or engage a private planning
consultant. Unfortunately not all Councils are yet aware of the importance of planning
as it pertains to their own community or of how to make effective use of planning information or advice.
Planning
Nevertheless, general interest in community planning in the Province did not
slacken in 1956. The Division prepared plans and reports which, in their effect, applied
to a larger total population than in any previous year. All community plans prepared
by the Division are based on an analysis of the local environment and the potential growth
of the community. Such an analysis makes it possible to assess the future physical
development of the area and increases the value of any plans prepared to guide such
development.
The Division also drafted sixteen zoning by-laws during the year for municipalities,
largely in conjunction with a more detailed plan. The preparation of these by-laws also
required direct physical examination of the areas concerned.
The work of the Division is primarily to encourage good planning practices by precept and example. Therefore, there is no obligation upon the Council to adopt any of
the recommendations of a planning report. Nevertheless, it is gratifying to report that
many Councils are beginning to give serious thought to the future development of the
communities for which they are responsible.
The Division also drafted seventeen physical development by-laws other than zoning. These include subdivision, building, house numbering, and Town Planning Commission by-laws. A number of similar by-laws were prepared independently by municipalities and were sent to the Division for review and comment.
Another aspect of the Division's work last year was to design subdivision layouts
for both municipal and Provincial authorities. Discussions were held with officials of
the Pacific Great Eastern Railway regarding layouts for townsites. Private subdivision
designers and developers also submitted draft plans for comment.
The Division has given advice to the Municipal Branch on the question of suitable
boundaries in the case of a number of new municipalities and in the revision of boundaries of existing municipalities.
The Municipal Atlas is being constantly reviewed in an effort to keep it as up to
date as possible. Arrangements have been made with the Legal Surveys Division of
the Department of Lands and Forests and with other Government offices to make available for this purpose the latest known data, and a duplicate of the atlas is on file in the
office of the Legal Surveys Division for general information.
■
Regulated Areas
The amount of construction during 1956 in the regulated areas was 20 per cent
less than in 1955. EE 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
However, due to changes in the boundaries of certain areas, the figures are not
completely comparable. Confining the comparison to nine areas in which this factor
was not present, the number of living-units in respect of which building permits were
issued decreased by 6.6 per cent, while for the same time period the total value of construction decreased 8.5 per cent from that of the year 1955. Such decrease in value was
greatest in the second quarter of the year—that is, from April to June, inclusive—when
decreases were shown in seven out of the nine regulated areas and only two showed a
slight increase. The number of areas showing decreases was four in the first quarter,
three in the third quarter, and five in the fourth quarter. The statistics indicate that
there has been a reduction in construction, chiefly residential, in the regulated areas in
1956 compared to 1955, in line with a similar reduction throughout Canada, but that
the decline, if anything, was more moderate.
Regulated Area
Year
Established
Value of
Construction,
1956
Number of
Residence
Permits
Kelowna.
Vernon....
Connaught Heights..
View Royal :
North Saanich	
Prince George District-
Nanaimo District....	
Kamloops District	
Golden District	
Quesnel District	
Alberni	
Woodhaven.. 	
Dawson Creek 	
Campbell River 	
Thetis.... 	
1947
1947
1948
1948
1948
1949
1949
1950
1952
1952
1953
1954
1954
1955
1955
$725,260
194,655
33,980
144,490
475,750
173,850
1,168,182
680,700
382,121
317,150
22,110
42,300
844,969
600
66
14
4
12
36
20
82
39
14
19
__
3
1
Totals for year 1956..
$5,206,117
315
The total of residence units constructed in regulated areas since their inception up
to December 31st, 1956, numbered 3,508, while the total value of all construction during the same period was $34,266,000.
Due to progress in settlement and development, there is a continuing need for revision of the zoning of the regulated areas. In consequence, a large number of requests
were funnelled through the Boards of Appeal set up to consider requests for rezoning.
While some of these requests were refused by the Boards as being frivolous or unjustified,
a number were forwarded for attention. Each of these was investigated, and, as a result,
eighteen were approved and six were rejected. In some of these cases, investigation
showed that the proposed rezoning was of sufficient importance to warrant calling a
public hearing in the area concerned, to ascertain the views of those likely to be affected
by the proposed changes. To date no changes have been made which were patently
contrary to majority opinion as expressed at a public hearing.
In one district a petition was signed by almost all the residents and forwarded asking for the establishment of a regulated area. This represents a departure from the usual
procedure of establishing such areas on the basis of the reaction of the residents at a
public hearing.
The provisions of Part IV of the " Town Planning Act" now have been extended
to a third area. The Planning Area of Greater Nanaimo was organized and took its
place alongside the Lower Mainland Planning Area (covering the Lower Fraser Valley
from Hope to the Gulf of Georgia) and the Capital Regional Planning Area (made up
of the area centred upon the City of Victoria).
J. H. Doughty-Davies,
Director, Regional Planning Division.
860-257-6809

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