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DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL of the Health Branch Department of Health and Welfare ANNUAL REPORT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1957

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIVISION OF
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
of the Health Branch
Department of Health and Welfare
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year 1955
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1956 r Victoria, B.C., May 28th, 1956.
To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report on Tuberculosis in the Province of British Columbia for the year 1955.
ERIC MARTIN,
Minister oj Health and Welfare. Department of Health and Welfare, Health Branch,
Victoria, B.C., May 28th, 1956.
The Honourable E. C. Martin,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to December
31st, 1955.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT, M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health.
Department of Health and Welfare, Health Branch,
Division of Tuberculosis Control,
2647 Willow Street,
Vancouver 9, B.C., May 28th, 1956.
G. F. Amyot, Esq., M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to December
31st, 1955.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. KINCADE, M.D.,
Director, Division of Tuberculosis Control, TABLE OF CONTENTS
Letter of Transmittal.
Letter of Transmittal.
Page
.    3
List of Tables  7
List of Charts  10
Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control  11
Report of the Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Control  13
Statistical Section.
(a)  Clinics...
21
23
(b) New Cases Examined by Clinics  29
(c) General Summaries  36
(d) Institutions  39
(e) B.C.G. Vaccinations  55
(/) Known Cases of Tuberculosis  56
(g) Notifications of Tuberculosis  61
(h) Tuberculosis Mortality  76  INDEX
LIST OF TABLES
Clinics
Page
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent at Each Centre
and Number of Persons Examined by Mobile Unit, 1955  24
Table 2.—Persons Examined at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1955  26
Table 3.—Treatment and Tests at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1955  26
Table 4.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1955  27
New Cases Examined by Clinics
Table 5.—New Examinations and Re-examinations in the Units Operated by This
Division, 1951-55 (Excluding Indians)  29
Table 6.—New Diagnoses Other than Negative in Persons Examined by Diagnostic
Clinics, by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age-group, 1955 (Excluding Indians)  30,
Table 7.—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Examined by Clinics, by Infection
and Condition, 1955 (Excluding Indians)  32
Table 8.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Survey Clinics, and General-
hospital Units, 1946-55  33
General Summaries
Table 9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1955  36
Table 10.—Laboratory Report, 1955  37
Table 11.—Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics, 1946-55  37
Table 12.—Dental Report, 1955  38
Table 13.—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report, 1955  38
Institutions—Summaries
Table 14.—Institutions—General Summaries, 1955  39
Table 15.—Number of Pneumothoraces  (Initial and Refill)  Given by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1946-55  40
Institutions—Admissions
Table 16.—Total Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions in Each
Age-group, 1951-55  40
Table 17.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1955  42
Table 18.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1955  44
Table 19.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1955  44
Table 20.—Total Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1955  45
Table 21.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1951-55  45
Table 22/—First Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1955  45
Table 23.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1951-55  45
Table 24.—Readmissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1955  47
Table 25.—Readmissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1951-55  47
Table 26.—Review Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1955  47
Table 27.—Review Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1951—55____ 47
7 C 8 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Institutions—Discharges
Page
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1951-55  48
Table 29.—Discharges from Institutions of First Admissions, by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1955  50
Table 30.—Discharges from Institutions by Diagnosis upon Admission for Total
Admissions, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1955  51
Table 31.—Discharges from Institutions by Diagnosis upon Admission for First
Admissions, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1955  51
Table 32.—Discharges from Institutions by Diagnosis upon Admission for Readmissions, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1955 _•_  52
Table 33.—Discharges from Institutions by Types of Discharge, Sex, and Length of
Stay, 1955  52
Table 34.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length
of Stay, 1955  53
Table 35.—Discharges from Institutions by Type of Discharge, Condition on Discharge, and Sex, 1955  54
B.C.G. Vaccinations
Table 36.—B.C.G. Vaccinations Completed according to Group Listed, 1955  55
Table 37.—B-C.G. Vaccinations Completed according to Age-group, 1955  55
Known Cases of Tuberculosis
Table 38.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1951-55  56
Table 39.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population
of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1951-55  56
Table 40.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1951-55  56
Table 41.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District of
Residence and Sex, 1955 (Excluding Indians)   57
Table 42.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District of
Residence and Sex, 1955 (Indians Only)  58
Table 43.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition, and Age-
group, 1955 (Excluding Indians)  59
Table 44.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition, and Age-
group, 1955 (Indians Only)  60
Table 45.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
amongst the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1946-55  61
Notifications of Tuberculosis
Table 46.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1951-55  61
Table 47.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1951-55  62
Table 48.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1951-55  62
Table 49.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases by Statistical Area, by
Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1955  62
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, 1955 (Excluding Indians)  63 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955 C 9
Page
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, 1955 (Indians only)  65
Table 52.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1946-55  66
Table 53.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition, and Age-
group, 1955 (Excluding Indians)  68
Table 54.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition, and Age-
group, 1955 (Indians only)  69
Table 55.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1955 (Excluding Indians)  70
Table 56.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group, Sex, and
Diagnosis, 1955 (Indians only)  71
Table 57.—Tuberculosis Notifications by Age-groups and Sex for British Columbia,
1941-55, Rates per 100,000 Population (Excluding Indians)  73
Table 58.—Ratio of new Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis in British
Columbia, 1951-55  76
Tuberculosis Mortality
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1951-55  76
Table 60.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Other-
than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1951-55  77
Table 61.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Indian
Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1951-55  77
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1955 (Excluding Indians)  78
Table 63.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1955 (Indians only)  78
Table 64.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-group, 1955  79
Table 65.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese Populations,
and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals, 1946-55  80
Table 66.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia
by Age-group, 1951-55  82
Table 67.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by Age-group, 1951-55  82
Table 68.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by
Age-group, 1951-55  82
Table 69.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-group, 1951-55 _■  83
Table 70.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-group, 1951-55  84
Table 71.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by Length
of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1955  86 C 10
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
LIST OF CHARTS
Chart 1.—Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control..
Page
    11
Chart 2.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics, 1946-55
(Excluding Indians)  28
Chart 3.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics, 1946-55
(Excluding Indians)  29
Chart 4.—X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary
Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals, 1946-55  34
Chart 5.—X-ray Examinations Made by Institutions, Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals,
1946-55  35
Chart 6.—Percentage Distribution of Admissions to Institutions by Age-group,
1951-55  41
Chart 7.—Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1955  43
Chart 8.—First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution),
1946-55  46
Chart 9.—Percentage Distribution of Discharges from Institutions according to Condition on Discharge, 1946-55  49
Chart 10.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1946-55  67
Chart 11.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1955  72
Chart 12.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group and Sex,
1941-55, Rates per 100,000 Population (Excluding Indians)  74
Chart 13.—Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese Populations,
and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals, 1946-55  81
Chart 14.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-group, 1951-55  83
Chart 15.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-group, 1951-55  84
Chart 16.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population and the
Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1955  85 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 11
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TRAVELLING
DIAGNOSTIC CLINICS
Interior
Coast*
Island
Kootenay
Fraser Valley
1_  Report of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, 1955
Dr. G. F. Kincade, Director
INTRODUCTION
This is the Twentieth Report of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, and it covers
the calendar year January 1st to December 31st, 1955.
The Report is divided into six major sections of statistical tables showing the general
summaries of the clinics of the Division, institutional admission and discharge summaries, B.C.G. summaries, tables on known cases and new cases of tuberculosis, and
tuberculosis mortality.
Certain amendments have been made to existing tables with a view to improving
their usefulness. Brief narrative comments have been made as a guide to the more
important features of these statistics, and graphs have been included with some of the
tables to assist the reader in following time trends.
Organizations set up for the control of tuberculosis must approach the problem and
organize their forces for attack along four major fronts, namely, treatment, case-finding,
prevention, and rehabilitation. Treatment for many years at the outset of the campaign
demanded all the Division's attention, and the other phases gradually developed and
increased in importance. As success was achieved on one front, greater resources could
be shifted to strengthen the attack on other fronts.
In the natural history of any disease, alleviation of suffering and prevention of
death always becomes the first concern. When treatment becomes mastered, death rates
fall, and in the broader aspects of control the emphasis must change from therapy to
other phases of the problem. With the improvements that have taken place in therapy
of tuberculosis, the cure of the disease now appears possible. For those developing
the disease, recovery is almost a certainty. One might wish for more effective drugs,
and undoubtedly they will be developed; but even with the tools presently at hand the
treatment of tuberculosis can be said to be in a very satisfactory state. Therefore, the
control of tuberculosis can be said to be in a very satisfactory state. Therefore, the
control of tuberculosis is well into the transition stage and the emphasis in the Division's
programme must shift from mortality to morbidity. This finds its expression in the new
emphasis on case-finding and epidemiology, and the marshalling of forces for greater
effort along this line.
The case-finding effort in the Province is reflected in 354,025 chest X-rays taken
in this programme throughout the Province during 1955. This represents a slight
increase over the previous year and more than double the effort over the past ten years.
A breakdown of the total examinations shows that 111,987 were done on hospital X-ray
units, 83,852 of these having been taken as part of the admission X-ray survey and the
rest as out-patients referred to local hospitals. A total of 105,700 examinations were
done by the mobile X-ray units, one operating entirely in Vancouver and the other
covering chiefly the smaller centres in the Province where X-ray facilities are not
available. The remainder of the survey examinations, totalling 89,403, were done in
the stationary units.
Out of 307,090 survey examinations analysed, 381 new cases of tuberculosis were
found. The active cases numbered 126, with the hospital admission surveys finding
26 cases and other surveys finding 100. The incidence of new active tuberculosis cases
was 1 for every 2,437 survey examinations. However, in addition to new active cases,
71 previously known tuberculosis cases were relocated and found to be active by survey
13
L C 14
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
X-rays—24 by hospital admission X-rays and 47 by other surveys. This gave a case-
finding rate for all active cases found of 1 per 1,677 hospital admission examinations
and 1 per 1,518 examinations by other surveys. It is worthy of note that 24 or 48
per cent of the 50 active cases found through hospital admission surveys were previously
known cases, whereas only 47 or 31.9 per cent of the 147 active cases found by other
surveys were previously known. The case-finding rates vary in different localities, and
the effectiveness of the Division's work is shown by the following analysis of active
cases found in selected operations.
Active Cases, 1955 (New and Previously Known Cases of Tuberculosis)
Total
Examined
Number
Rate
Oakalla Prison Farm      	
Metropolitan Health Unit  _	
Health unit at Courtenay 	
Willow Chest Centre ...
5,222
120,214
1,603
30,072
41,759
82,852
10,362
11,232
4,668
35
38
2
36
47
88
11
7
1
1 in 149
1 in 535
1 in 801
1 in 835
1 in 888
General hospitals—admissions  	
1 in 941
1 in 942
1 in 1,604
1 in 4,668
The hospital admission X-ray surveys are gradually becoming more effective. The
percentage of admissions examined by miniature X-ray has risen from under 40 per cent
in 1951 to over 60 per cent in 1955. For those hospitals taking large X-rays, the percentage of admissions X-rayed gradually increased from 38.6 per cent at the beginning
of 1953 to 55 per cent for the fourth quarter in 1955.
The majority of hospitals are doing a good job of having their admissions X-rayed,
while a few are falling down badly.    For the last quarter of 1955 the results are as
follows:— Hospitals Using-
Miniature Standard
X-ray X-ray
70 per cent or more of admissions X-rayed  14 14
50 to 70 per cent of admissions X-rayed  15 5
25 to 50 per cent of admissions X-rayed     9 13
Under 25 per cent     1 9
  	
Totals   39 41
Every effort is being made to stimulate all the hospitals throughout the Province
to provide adequate coverage for this programme. The programme is endorsed by the
British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service and the British Columbia Hospital Association, and a spirit of competition is being developed amongst hospital administrators
to do a good job, realizing the importance of finding tuberculosis for the protection of
their staff, not to mention the economic significance to the hospitals when a case of tuberculosis is found and transferred to the Division of Tuberculosis Control, thus relieving
themselves of the financial burden. Quarterly summaries of the results of the admission
X-ray programme in each hospital are prepared and distributed to all hospitals and interested agencies. Those hospitals showing less than 50 per cent of their admissions X-rayed
are brought to the attention of the local health authorities in hopes that they can be
impressed with the importance of doing a better programme.
When, through National health grants, it became possible to provide miniature
X-ray equipment to all the major hospitals in the Province, as well as to a few health
units and institutions, the idea of mass X-ray surveys was generally abandoned because
it was possible to provide continuous X-ray coverage throughout most of the Province
by the use of hospital equipment on an out-patient basis.   For the outlying areas without
J TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955 C  15
X-ray service, a mobile unit was made available to give a complete coverage on a biennial
basis. The Division has now had four years' experience with case-finding in practically
all centres in the Province, and these have been surveyed at least twice in that period.
In this way it has been possible to establish incidence rates to determine how effective
this work has been and to show where efforts should be directed in the future.
On the basis of the figures prepared, it seems that while continuing to make X-ray
facilities available throughout the Province, mass X-ray surveys are indicated in some
centres, while in other areas this type of effort would be wasted. There is a tendency
to judge the effectiveness of the survey by the number of people examined, and, by the
same token, some surveys are planned on the easy accessibility of large groups of people
and on the ease with which they can be organized for X-ray purposes. This obviously
should not be a criterion; rather the Division must be guided by the tuberculosis experience in the area under consideration.
Since the beginning of the streptomycin era in 1946, the Division has been reporting a marked reduction in mortality rates, which declined from 57.4 per 100,000 at that
time to 9.7 per 100,000 in 1954. In 1954 the downward trend was slackened, having
only been reduced from 11.5 in the previous year. This trend has now been reversed,
and there were 137 deaths from tuberculosis during 1955. This changing trend has been
noted in other parts of the world as early as 1951, but is only now apparent in British
Columbia, and by many is considered to be in the nature of a delayed mortality of a
number of advanced cases as a result of treatment with antimicrobials.
The death rate in 1955 from the 137 tuberculosis deaths recorded was 10.5 per
100,000 population, as against a rate of 9.7 per 100,000 in 1954. This increase in
tuberculosis deaths of approximately 15 per cent occurred chiefly among the older age-
groups, where 83 deaths occurred in persons over 50 years, compared to 75 deaths
recorded in 1954 for the same age-group. A continued reduction in deaths is evident
in persons under 20 years of age. In 1954 there were 7 deaths in persons under 20
years, 4 of them being Indians. This year there were only 2 deaths reported for this
age-group—1 white and 1 Indian. Tuberculosis deaths amongst whites increased by
14.6 per cent, from 89 deaths in 1954 to 102 in 1955, while deaths among Orientals
for the same cause increased from 11 in 1954 to 14 in 1955. The Indian figure of 21
deaths in 1955 was a decrease of 2 deaths from 1954.
In common with other places throughout America, the demand for beds for the
treatment of tuberculosis in British Columbia continues to decrease. At the beginning
of 1954 the Division of Tuberculosis Control was operating 935 beds. As the demand
for beds decreased, the bed capacity was reduced to 788 with the closing of Jericho Beach
Hospital one year ago. The highest occupancy of beds in the Division during the past
year was in January, when there were 757 patients in institution. The highest number
of patients at Tranquille during the past year was 337 in February. The bed capacity
of the Division was further reduced to 773 in April of 1955 when it was determined that
Tranquille Sanatorium should operate with the bed capacity of 325. At the end of
October there were 770 beds within the Division for the treatment of tuberculosis and
only 627 were occupied, with Tranquille Sanatorium having only 217 patients in the
325 beds provided, or 65 per cent occupancy. The units in Vancouver were operating
to over 90 per cent of their capacity. In Victoria the administration of St. Joseph's
Hospital found that the beds in Vernon Villa, presently and for many years used for
tuberculosis cases, could be used for other types of illness, and with the demand for
tuberculosis beds lessening, it was agreed that Vernon Villa would cease to operate as
a tuberculosis institution.   This further reduced the beds in the Division by 34 in number.
For the fiscal year 1956-57 it has been decided that Tranquille Sanatorium will
operate at a capacity of 278 beds, this being accomplished by the closure of the main
building, and starting in April of next year the total capacity within the Division of C 16 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Tuberculosis Control will be 689 beds, being a reduction of 241 beds in slightly over
two years.
In this connection it should also be noted that at the same time Shaughnessy Chest
Unit has been almost entirely converted from a tuberculosis hospital to a non-tuberculosis
hospital. At one time that institution was treating approximately 100 cases of tuberculosis. The Division of Tuberculosis Control has absorbed these cases and is now able
to fulfil its contract to treat tuberculosis cases that are the responsibility of the Department of Veterans' Affairs.
It had been expected that the admission of non-pulmonary tuberculosis cases to
the Division of Tuberculosis Control might create a demand for large numbers of beds.
However, this has not occurred. In 1955 there were only 20 cases of pleurisy and 56
with other extra-pulmonary tuberculosis out of 1,226 admissions to the Division's
institutions.
The census of the sanatoria populations taken on October 31st, 1955, revealed
that there were 615 patients in these institutions. Of these, 364 patients were under
50 years of age and 251 over 50. There were 96 cases over 60 years old, 51 cases over
70 years of age, and 17 over 80 years of age. The sanatoria population over 50 years
of age in institutions, and this represents 40.8 per cent of the total, has increased steadily
from 32.3 per cent in 1952. A year ago there were 284 patients over 50 years of age
in institutions, and this represented 39.5 per cent of the population. However, the greatest number of deaths is occurring in this group, and the reduction of 33 in total numbers
of older persons in the Division's beds is probably accounted for by this fact. In persons over 50 years of age occupying beds, the males predominate in the ratio of 8 to 1,
there being 223 males and only 28 females. Of the total admissions to sanatoria in 1954,
the group of persons over 50 years of age represented 32.6 per cent, an increase from
26.6 per cent in the previous year. In bed occupancy, there are twice as many male
patients as female in the institutions of the Division.
An analysis of the length of treatment of discharged cases following first admission
during the past year shows that of 706 discharges, 529 were treated under one year,
representing 75.0 per cent of first admissions.   These are as follows:—
Cases Per Cent
Treated 1 month     75 10.6
Treater 1 to 3 months   129 18.3
Treated 4 to 7 months  195 27.7
Treated 8 to 11 months  130 18.4
Among first admission cases, 56.6 per cent were treated under eight months. The
length of treatment has shortened appreciably over the past year, when 45 per cent of
the cases were treated less than eight months and 65.1 per cent were treated less than
one year.
An important development in the control of tuberculosis in the Province occurred
in the past year, with the completion and opening of a tuberculosis hospital of 265 beds
at the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale. For many years, segregation of the known
tuberculous cases at Essondale has been practised under rather unsatisfactory conditions,
with the patients isolated in wards in various buildings. The new building, which was
specially planned and designed as an infectious-disease hospital, is most admirably suited
to this purpose and provides excellent facilities for the treatment of mental patients with
tuberculosis.
Throughout the years the Division of Tuberculosis Control has worked very closely
with those in charge of the mental-health programme, but with the opening of the new
building an even closer relationship has been established. One of the specialists from
the Division of Tuberculosis Control has been placed on the staff of Essondale Mental
Hospital to supervise the tuberculosis treatment programme in that institution, and to TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1955 C 17
carry on a programme of tuberculosis-control amongst the other patients and amongst
the staff of that institution. This programme includes admission and periodic re-examination chest X-rays, as well as a tuberculin-testing and B.C.G. vaccination programme
for all patients admitted to the institution, and a similar programme for the members of
the staff. The present arrangement has greatly facilitated the handling of the mentally
ill patient in institutions of this Division, and those problem cases can now be transferred
in and out of Essondale in much the same manner as transfers between the Division's
regular tuberculosis units. With a closer relationship established between the two services, a better understanding of the problem has been brought about, and better continuity in the treatment of the patient is possible.
It is approximately two years now since it was decided that action should be taken
under the health regulations to forcibly commit to our institutions tuberculous patients
who are creating a public health problem in their community. Since then thirteen cases
have been committed—eleven to Tranquille Sanatorium and one each to Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital and Shaughnessy Hospital. One case was committed in 1953, three
cases in 1954, and nine cases this year. Eleven cases are still in institution, one having
been discharged after a satisfactory treatment period and one having gone absent without leave. Seven of these patients are now at Tranquille Sanatorium, one at Essondale
Mental Hospital, one at Shaughnessy Hospital Chest Unit, one at Willow Chest Centre,
and one at Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital. The areas from which they have been committed embrace most of the Province and are as follows: Vancouver, 3; Victoria, 2;
Powell River, 2; Fraser Valley, 2; Okanagan, 2; Peace River, 1; and White Rock, 1.
Although committal powers have been used in only thirteen cases, their existence
and the knowledge that they are being enforced has had a very salutary effect in many
other instances. On numerous occasions when patients were threatened with committal,
they finally submitted to voluntary admission. In many other instances, when warned
of these regulations, patients in hospital who were about to leave against advice have
remained in institution.
For the most part, those patients committed to hospital under these regulations
have not proved too troublesome and have accepted treatment when they found it was
easier to co-operate than to continue to resist. However, it was necessary to transfer
two patients to Essondale, one of whom has now returned to Tranquille Sanatorium.
One would feel that the results of this method so far have been satisfactory, but it is
apparent that the accommodation for the confinement of some of these patients in
restraining areas within the Division is stretched to the limit, and only available at Tranquille Sanatorium. At the same time it is obvious that there are still many cases outside
of institutions who are creating a public health problem and should be committed. In
any future expansion, adequate facilities for the handling of this type of patient will be
provided, but in the meantime each of this Division's institutions must be provided with
properly constructed rooms for the confinement of recalcitrants.
People who are suffering from tuberculosis and who are committed to penal institutions present a greater problem. When treatment has been needed, these cases have
been transferred to Provincial institutions. For the most part, they are drug addicts and
chronic alcoholics. These people are entirely unreliable, unco-operative, and unmanageable, and, in fact, objectionable to other patients and to the staff. In the recent case
of a notorious drug addict and pedlar, the Division was requested by the Provincial Gaol
to accept him because he was unmanageable in that institution. It is the considered
opinion of this Division that proper hospital facilities should be provided at the Provincial Gaol for the treatment and management of many of these cases.
There has again been a slight increase in the amount of money made available for
tuberculosis-control through Federal health grants, the amount for the fiscal year 1955-56
being $366,070.   During the previous year, projects were submitted and approved in r
C 18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
the amount of $313,477 or 89.2 per cent of the grant. Actual expenditures, however,
amounted to only $249,417.14 or 71 per cent of the grant. This was in large part due
to the fact that it was impossible to obtain delivery of equipment ordered by the cut-off
date. This year, projects have been submitted and approved in the amount of $308,602
or 84.5 per cent of the amount available.
In previous years a considerable portion of the grant has been used for the purchase
of new equipment for the institutions and clinics, but this year the only approved requests
have been for photographic equipment and an X-ray Vu-graph for the Willow Chest
Centre and a Stryker bed for the Vancouver Island Chest Centre. Requests have been
received for office equipment, but this is not normally provided from Federal health
grants.
The largest single project is for the hospital admission X-ray programme. The
amount for this project is $109,574, which includes provision of survey X-ray equipment for three additional hospitals and payment to all general hospitals for admission
films and for miniature films on out-patients. Some of the other major projects are as
follows: Provision of antimicrobials, $48,000; community survey programme, $32,000;
and rehabilitation programme, $26,000. The sum of $88,846 has been allocated for
salaries. These positions are all within the Division of Tuberculosis Control, with the
exception of two nursemaids at the Vancouver Preventorium and four X-ray technicians
with the Metropolitan Health Committee.
Under the professional education project, two members of the nursing staff are at
present receiving postgraduate training at the University of British Columbia. A sum
of $2,000 has been provided for short postgraduate courses, but, to date this year, little
of this money has been utilized.
All the projects during the current year have been continuations of projects from
previous years, this being the first year that no new projects have been initiated.
In an endeavour to promote a closer working relationship between local health
services and the Division of Tuberculosis Control, and to provide a better understanding
of the problems of the tuberculosis patient in the community and in the sanatorium,
a co-ordinating committee was set up, composed of three representatives of the Division
of Tuberculosis Control, three from the Medical Health Officers' group, and three from
the central office of the Health Branch. This committee was to concern itself with those
tuberculosis practices which have direct influence on and require a working relationship
with local health services. The committee met on five occasions during the past year and
discussed patient education, discharges from sanatorium, the significance of the positive
culture in tuberculosis, criteria for admission, transportation of patients to sanatorium,
records, and chest X-ray surveys.
Through the deliberations of this committee, many troublesome problems have had
a thorough discussion, with the result that a better understanding of common problems
has come about.
The success of the tuberculosis-control effort depends on many individuals and
various organizations, both voluntary and official, that work in close co-operation with
the Division to carry out the several phases of the programme. With post-sanatorium
care developing to a greater degree and with case-finding and follow-up being intensified,
the field health services have been called on to devote considerably more time to tuberculosis work, and a close working relationship has been developed between the Division
and the field health services. The success of the programme depends entirely on the
very close co-operation of these two groups, and this has been achieved and continues
to be fostered by creating a better understanding of common problems.
The British Columbia Tuberculosis Society, as in the past, has whole-heartedly
supported the campaign both financially and through provision of services, particularly in
the fields of case-finding and education.   The Vancouver Preventorium Board continues TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C  19
to provide hospital facilities for the treatment of children, as it has for many years,
and this group operates the only hospital for tuberculous children in the Province.
The work of the Division of Tuberculosis Control also depends on the co-operation
of many other departments and branches of government, such as the Welfare Branch,
the Department of Public Works, the Civil Service Commission, and the Purchasing
Commission. For all this assistance, without which the Division could not carry out
a successful programme, sincere gratitude is offered. It is also desired to express sincere
appreciation to all organizations and individuals who have co-operated so enthusiastically
in the preventive programme of clinics and surveys, to the hospitals for their co-operation
in carrying out the admission X-ray project, and to all the voluntary groups who continue
to support the work of tuberculosis-control. To all the staff of the clinics and institutions
of the Division who continue to maintain such a high standard of service, sincere
appreciation of their loyal support is recorded.  STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
for the Year January 1st to
December 31st, 1955  TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 23
CLINICS
Map of British Columbia Showing Statistical Publication Areas
Province of British Columbia—
Population, 1,305,000.
Area, 366,255 square miles.
Travelling clinics—
Kootenay Clinic (Nelson)—Statistical Areas 1 and 2.
Interior Clinic (Kamloops)—Statistical Areas 3, 6, 8, 10c, lOd.
Coast Clinic (Vancouver)—Statistical Areas 4, 7, 9c, 9d, 9e (excluding Fraser Valley).
Island Clinic (Victoria)—Statistical Area 5.
Fraser Valley Clinic (New Westminster)—Statistical Area 4 (excluding Lytton and Lillooet).
Mobile clinics.
Stationary clinics—
Victoria.
Vancouver.
New Westminster.
Tranquille. C 24
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent at Each
Centre and Number of Persons Examined by Mobile Unit, 1955
Travelling Diagnostic Clinics
Interior
Centre Visited Days
Armstrong       3
Ashcroft
Burns Lake	
Dawson Creek
Enderby 	
Fort St. John _
1
2
3 !/2
3
2
Kamloops        6
Kelowna
Lytton h_
Merritt _
McBride
Oliver	
12
1/2
1
1
71/2
Centre Visited Days
Penticton  10
Prince George  8
Princeton   5
Quesnel   11
Revelstoke
Salmon Arm ..
Summerland ...
Vernon	
Vandorhoof 	
Williams Lake
3
5
2
71/2
3
4
Total (22 centres)  101
Coast
Centre Visited Days
Alert Bay  IVi
Hazelton   2
Kitimat   1
Marpole Infirmary  4
Ocean Falls  2
Powell River   10
Prince Rupert  21
Centre Visited
Smithers 	
Squamish	
Terrace  (2 days
Aged)   	
Days
4
5
at Home for
Total (10 centres)     60^2
Centre Visited
Abbotsford _
Agassiz
Fraser Valley
Days
4
2
Centre Visited
Hope
Days
3
AIlco Infirmary       1
Chilliwack     12
Total (5 centres)     22
Island
Centre Visited Days
Campbell River  12
Chemainus   6
Courtenay   VTVi
Duncan   12
Ganges   2
Ladysmith  6
Centre Visited Days
Lake Cowichan  8
Nanaimo   24
Port Alberni   16
Qualicum   3
Total (10 centres)  IO61/2
Kootenay
Centre Visited
Castlegar	
Cranbrook 	
Creston 	
Fernie	
Golden 	
Grand Forks
Greenwood _.
Invermere .	
Kaslo	
Nelson	
Kimberley ....
Days
4
8
61/2
4
1
6
2
1
2
60
61/2
Centre Visited Days
Michel  71/2
Mount  St.  Francis  Infirmary
(Nelson)     2
New Denver  7
Rossland   6
Salmo   4
Trail   15
Nakusp   4
Total (18 centres)  146Vi TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 25
Table  1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia,  Showing Time Spent at Each
Centre and Number of Persons Examined by Mobile Unit, 1955—Continued
Mobile Survey Clinic
Interior
Centre Visited Days
Adams Lake  1
Armstrong   2
Arrowhead   1
Ashcroft  2
Barriere   1
Bralorne  2
Canoe  2
Celista   1
Chase  1
Clearwater   1
Clinton  1
Enderby   2
Falkland  1
X-rays
90
494
52
190
93
426
164
95
68
253
194
392
92
Centre Visited
Grindrod	
Lillooet 	
Lumby	
Lytton 	
Merritt 	
Monte Lake ...
Pioneer	
Shalalth	
Days
Sicamous      2
Sorrento 	
Vernon	
X-rays
97
342
315
186
281
86
139
40
244
66
239
Total (24 centres)  31        4,638
Fraser Valley
Centre Visited Days
Chilliwack (Army Base) 4
Hammond  Vi
Haney (high school) .. 5V2
New Westminster—
B.C. Penitentiary ..... 2
Industry   11
Centre Visited Days
Gibsons      2
Madeira Park     1
Port Mellon     2
X-rays
1,012
609
1,446
767
2,547
Coast
X-rays
743
134
229
Centre Visited                  Days X-rays
Pitt Meadows     1 153
Port Coquitlam      VA i,TS
Port Moody     6]/2 978
Total (7 centres).. 31        7,985
Centre Visited
Sechelt	
Days
2
X-rays
369
Total (4centres).
.    7
1,475
Centre Visited Days
Big Rock     1
Black Creek     1
Bloedel (camps)      1
Campbell River  10
Cumberland      3
Denman Island     1
Elk Falls      2
Fanny Bay     1
Franklin River     2
North and Central Island
X-rays                      Centre Visited                  Days X-rays
76 Great Central Lake .._.    1 119
147 KelseyBay     2 369
111 Ladore Dam     1 122
1,915 PortAlberni   14 3,693
346 Royston     1 38
56 Union Bay     1 128
244 Willow Point     1 254
131 	
147                        Total (16 centres)  43 7,896
South Island (Including Gulf Islands)
Centre Visited             Days X-rays
Brentwood      1 280
Colquitz Mental Home    1 302
Esquimalt   11 2,926
Fulford Harbour     1 61
Ganges      2 401
James Island     1 154
Jordan River     1 82
Centre Visited
Oak Bay	
Sidney 	
Sooke 	
Victoria   55
Total (11 centres) 79      19,775
Days
X-rays
3
647
2
711
1
330
55
13,881 C 26 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 2.—Persons Examined at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1955
Item
Stationary
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
New
Westminster
Travelling
Coast
Kootenay
Interior
Island
Fraser
Valley
Total
Patient visits	
Cases examined—
X-ray..
Physical-
Type of case—'
Re-examination..
First examination-.
23,542
18,085
7,218
12,906
3,547
1,604
1,604
291
1,329
275
Referred X-rays, large films_
5,161
4,992
4,784
3,737
1,255
3,366
2,755
116
2,048
709
1,627
1,627
177
1,464
163
2,652
2,752
2,590
226
1,858
732
900
2,611
2,301
388
2,611
1,108
2,301
798
388
2,016
594
3,586
1,905
396
2,342
273
115
502
43,352
36,953
14,718
27,536
7,786
9,982
Table 3.—Treatment and Tests at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1955
Item
Stationary
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
New
Westminster
Travelling
Coast
Kootenay
Interior
Island
Fraser
Valley
Total
Pneumothorax-
Initial	
Refill	
Pneumoperitoneum—
Initial	
Refill..
Bronchoscopy	
B.C.G. vaccinations-
Aspirations .
Fluoroscopes	
Tuberculin tests given..
249
1,293
153
403
25
1,767
5,701
111
10
34
131
328
1
90
13
16
1,743
57
130
81
4
223
209
1
40
421
1,433
154
608
43
2,137
8,021 BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST SERVICE
FOREST SURVEYS AND INVENTORY DIVISION
Key Map Showing Availability of
Lithographed Interim Forest-cover Maps
at 2 miles to 1 inch
Each available sheet encloses an area of 1 Degree of Latitude
by 1 Degree of Longitude and comprises one-half of one letter
of the National Topographic Series.
Areas for which Lithographed Interim Forest-
cover Maps at 2 miles to 1  inch are available.
Areas for which Lithographed Interim Forest-
cover Maps at 2 miles to 1 inch are in the
course of preparation, and will be available
in 1958.
Address all orders and inquiries to:
Forester-in-charge,
Forest Surveys and Inventory Division,
B.C. Forest Service, Victoria.
NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHIC  SERIES
BRITISH COLUMBIA
80 MILES
iff
Lithographed interim forest-cover maps constitute an index-map series to the one-half mile to
1 inch interim forest-cover maps, and depict forest-
cover in very broad classes. These classes, which
are derived from the more detailed forest-cover
types on the one-half mile to 1 inch map series,
include mature timber, immature timber, not satisfactorily restocked areas, non-commercial stands,
and non-productive and non-forested lands. Each
class of cover is distinguished by a different colour.
Every lithographed map shows the appropriate
map-sheet reference numbers of the National Topographic Series and also the regions and compartments recognized in the Forest Inventory Area
Reference System. BRITISH COLUMBIA FOREST SERVICE
FOREST SURVEYS AND INVENTORY DIVISION
Key Map Showing the Progress of Forest-cover Mapping
by Regions in the Provincial Forest Inventory
Areas for which Interim Compartment Forest-
cover Maps, at Vi mile to 1 inch, and summaries are available.*
— Areas for which Preliminary Compartment
Forest-cover Maps, at Vi mile to 1 inch, are
available* and for which Summaries are in the
course of preparation.
Areas for which Forest-cover Maps, at 1 mile
to 1 inch, and Summaries are in the course of
preparation.
GEOGRAPHIC DIVISION. DEPARTMENT OF LANDS AND FORESTS, VICTORIA. B.C tuberculosis control report, 1955
Table 4.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1955
C 27
Clinics
Mobile
Stationary
Metropolitan
Health
Unit,
Courte-
nay
General Hospitals
Willow
Chest
Centre
Victoria
New
Westminster
Provincial
Metropolitan
Outpatients
Admissions
Total
Total examined	
New tuberculosis cases	
30,072
36
3
24
6
13
9,644
17
3
8
10,362
23
41,759
65
1
54
17
18
11
8
6
2
1
3
63,941
38
37,722
72
3
38
9
11
3
15
21
13
4
1
3
10
9
1,603
4
2
28,135
21
83,852
105
7
64
12
11
5
36
25
13
8
3
1
3
1
307,090
381
19
17
1
5
27
10
7
2
8
10
7
2
15
3
2
2
8
5
2
3
247
58
Activity undetermined	
3
4
1
6
4
2
70
27
5
5
4
1
11
6
4
1
92
84
49
22
7
1
1
1
1
6
3
3
3
3
2
1
1
1
23
	
19
1
1
1
6
322
1
201
4
11
38
148
96
13
4
25
54
24
7
4
5
8
2
1
91
1
55
9
10
8
28
25
8
4
5
8
6
4
2
1
31
1
106
2
69
8
1
1
59
1
40
2
3
1
2
102
2
68
5
2
10
51
26
4
3
4
15
6
4
715
Primary 	
8
18
3
1
3
11
13
2
3
1
7
454
Active
23
	
3
36
30
30
2
1
28
Arrested 	
5
33
13
3
100
1
	
1
303
203
Active   	
32
Activity undetermined	
	
14
	
12
16
4
5
5
5
1
52
	
105
Far advanced 	
45
Active „ ...
16
1
2
1
1
33
51
12
32
41,245
213
5
Arrested      ■	
1
1
8
4
2
4
54
45
25
54
37,108
385
16
Non-pulmonary	
2
55
13
14
9,444
98
5
32
40
20
53
29,620
240
5
5
31
27
21
34
63,628
179
1
4
1
4
1,576
10
24
44
31
297
27,349
267
no
180
263
703
80,915
1,254
292
Pleurisy
451
386
13
10,288
28
1,204
301,173
Other     	
2,674 C 28
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 2.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics,
1946-55
(Excluding Indians)
No. OF CASES
(in 000's]
1OT^|--.
4
---
\
\
I
t
<         __   —
/
/
/
s
/            Nf
W KAM1NATIO
MS
X
\
\
\
\
\
•I
	
^         '
**'
1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 29
Chart 3.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics,
1946-55
(Excluding Indians)
No. OF CASES
(in OOO'sl
TOTAt      EXAMINATIONS
i
-~	
	
RUXAMIN
cnpi*. — -
..     -             NEW EXAMINATIONS
—          ■»■        »H"
'"■——•«
1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955
NEW CASES EXAMINED BY CLINICS
Table 5.—New Examinations and Re-examinations in the Units Operated
by This Division, 1951-55
(Excluding Indians)
Total
Examinations
Stationary Clinics
Travelling Clinics
Mobile1
Year
New
Examinations
Re-.
examinations
New
Examinations
Reexaminations
Survey
Clinics
1951	
1952	
1953 	
1954 -	
1955	
119,099
99,836
127,757
128,805
127,937
26,110
21,603
25,159
25,173
28,505
55,481
59,205
56,928
51,291
48,157
3,116
3,170
2,462
2,059
2,000
7,958
8,204
7,698
7,841
7,516
26,434
7,654
35,510
42,441
41,759
1 Excludes mobile unit operated by Vancouver Metropolitan Health Committee (see Table 8). C 30
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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samjsajui jo -gx
:"
-    |
r
uiajsAs AiEuun
-oinragjogx
„-H
i M
Tf en
1    j
uiajsAg
oireqduiAV-i jo gx
^H   tS
|r
CS      |
rH cS
i-h m
i"
i-h CS
i-
m-isj°ax
i        i
-^
^ i
*■*
1^
sjuior pus
sauog jo gx
! !
H   |
- i
—
!-
-  |
uuiniOQ
IBJqajjaAJogx
i        1
;-
--
-"-
(JstlJO) urajsAs
XjojBjidsa^ *gx
1 !
iw
1   j
UOISUJjg
jnoqjiAV Xsijnaij
1 !
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i i
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l~
uoisnjjg ijji/a Xsunajj;
1 |
r
cs •-
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Tt   CS
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rt
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O
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3
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AJEUouimj jejox
00  i-h
^ *■
Tt cn
r- ^
<n Tt
en cn
oo tn
en tn
r- vo
O QO
ON CS
vo r-
*-h   OO
oo cn
cs vo
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cs oo
vo
pajEJS jon 3dAx
! !     ! 1     i i     I i     i !     i !     ! 1     ! !     i  i     i  i     1 i
sisoDtng qji*
pSOUEApV JEJ
1 1
"    1
~ 1
P3DUEAPV JBJ
" 1
cn cn
Tt cs
l-H vo
Tt   -H
i-h CS
ON       |
m cs
paDUEApv
XpjEjapojAi
1  1
i  !
Tt        j
f- 00
oo vt
Tt QO
CS  >-h
© tn
CS i-h
on i>
2-
vo en
1EUIT.UIJ/\I
" 1
« 1
00 en
Tt cn
cs CS
nO vo
cs cn
CS CS
v-> vo
*n vo
Tt   Tt
© On
tn cs
OO   l-H
m cs
© cn
Tt
AJElUUd
00 —
en rt
n m
m i-h
-    !
. cs
a
3
O
t
BO
<
l-H
OS
U
>>
Tt
i
1*
Os
1
tn
Tt
3
Ov
Tt
CS
CS
ON
CS
1
tn
<N
ON
cn
i
en
ON
Tt
©
Tt
i
On
*n
i
ON
VO
1
VO
ON
r-
o TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 31
f* ©      cs in
m cs      en cs
ON  rH
r— on
t^So
Cs"i-h"
©
r-
en
Tt
Ov ©      i-h in
cn cs      cn cs
VO CS
rH  ON
0\_Tt
CO
©
Tt
cn
in en      Tt Tt
Tt   VO
tn vo
©
cs
es
m Tt      oo m
cn vo
r- >-h
ON
CO
cs
— m      cc m
r- vo
VO VN
CO 00
cn
cs
t~- in      i-h m
ON    l-H
es cs
cs
o
CO tH         i-h CS
Tt m
Tt cn
ON
r-
53 vo
CS cs
Tt
I     !       t-h i-h       en r-
i     I                          cn rH
o
in
^h     !       CS    !
1                  !
Ov      1
ON
vn
||        M     |
Tt  ON
cn
en
Tt
II           II
vo r-
cn
cs
f- cs      Tt m
Tt   ON
es Tics PH
tn
cn
cs   i        !   :
i        i   1
rH  Tt
Tt   Tf
m
CO
Mi!
! M
cs
!  I     !  !
l-H   CS
cn
II     1!
m vo
-
II'     II
vo CS
CO
II     I  I
en en
VO
"1     I  I
tn CS
o
-  I      ;  ;
cn en
VO
I  I     II
j-
*
cs rt
Tt
VO   rH
cs
S 1   " 1
Tt   i-H
O   Tf
m cn
tn
Tt
CO
I  I     II
1
II     I  I
CS     1
cs
I  I     I  I
CO VO
en cs
Tt
VO
00      !         i-h      |
(S  PH
cs r-
en
ON
CC     !            II
cn en
l-H   CS
en cS
VO
tn
!  !     !  !
ON  rH
CS  CS
o
>n
80 yrs. and over M.
F.
Not stated    M.
F.
c
h
t/i
O
•o
a
a
H
0 C 32
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
There has been an increase in the number of cases of tuberculosis diagnosed by the
clinics of the Division from 717 in 1954 to 845 in 1955. The inactive cases increased
from 137 to 200, whereas the active decreased from 365 to 349. The number of minimal
active cases was exactly the same at 143; moderately advanced active cases decreased
from 134 to 113, whereas the far advanced active increased from 49 to 59 cases.
Table 7.—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Examined by Clinics,
by Infection and Condition, 1955
(Excluding Indians)
Stationary
Travelling
Infection and Condition
Willow
Chest
Tranquille
Victoria
New
Westminster
North
Lawn
Coast
Kootenay
Interior
Island
Fraser
Valley
Total
23
2
2
15
4
238
71
26
86
54
1
89
9
5
60
15
34
1
1
32
83
34
193
73
1
6
1
1
4
3
1
2
4
4
1
1
9
2
10
1
8
1
100
18
34
21
26
1
33
6
17
10
11
1
10
18
42
56
37
1
6
1
3
2
68
36
6
6
20
18
3
1
11
3
3
1
1
1
41
11
20
23
12
6
2
1
3
6
1
3
2
2
2
6
3
6
5
5
5
26
10
10
6
7
1
4
2
3
3
11
22
8
2
2
31
14
4
4
9
10
9
1
1
1
16
4
14
10
27
17
4
2
4
15
1
5
2
7
1
1
18
10
4
11
2
2
21
2
10
5
4
10
4
5
1
7
6
1
2
14
18
6
2
2
7
3
4
2
1
1
4
7
50
5
6
Active _
34
5
536
178
87
143
126
2
193
15
22
113
43
66
2
Arrested. —	
4
59
Activity undetermined	
Total pulmonary—
Inactive	
Arrested	
1
200
119
349
Activity undetermined	
Not stated .,
175
2
Totals	
384
13
154
95
20
41
44
43
40
11
845
Source: Case Examination, Form TB. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 33
An increasing number of X-rays are being taken by the institutions of the Division,
with 5,196 taken in 1947 and 9,503 in 1955, in spite of a marked reduction in the bed
capacity. This indicates the more exhaustive X-ray studies that are now carried out on
the patients in institution because of the more advanced methods of treatment and the
need for extensive investigations prior to surgery.
Table 8.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Survey Clinics, and
General-hospital Units, 1946-55.
Institutions
Stationary
Travelling
Mobile
Stationary
Gen°r^'-
hospital
Units
Year
Diagnostic
Survey
Diagnostic
Survey
Provincial
Metropolitan
Metropolitan
Total
1946	
1947	
6,667
5,196
6,111
6,432
6,412
6,361
7,106
8,395
9,297
9,503
16,781
20,986
24,144
27,695
28,500
29,192
27,450
29,001
27,482
27,436
45,810
44,196
57,428
56,374
54,585
52,399
53,380
53,089
48,982
48,982
11,289
12,996
13,399
13,508
13,360
11,074
13,374
10,160
9,900
9,517
763
1,063
91
99,1031
155,6741
127,0811
140,7221
80,686i
26,434
7,654
35,510
42,441
41,759
57,509
58,579
65,207
53,243
63,941
	
	
180,413
240,111
1948
1949 	
45~210
71,410
80,795
95,054
105,860
111,987
228,254
244,731
1950.	
1951	
1952 	
24,355
32,182
35,879
35,845
27,722
228,753
278,734
281,319
1953	
1954	
1955	
332,295
332,996
340,847
1 No breakdown available for mobile units prior to 1951.
Source: X-ray Ledger TB. 73 and Clinic Ledgers TB. 71 and TB. 41. C 34
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 4.—X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals,
1946-55.
No OF EXAMINATIONS
(in OOO'l)
>-
^
/
	
---
>5C
4
'Jgcf'l
	
t*-**^^
\-''
£■*
y —
---•
*
*' >v
*
t
TRAVELLING
:unics
19-16 1947 1948 1949 1950 .951 '952 1953 1954
Nncludei "ilolionofy metiopolitai." from 195. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1955
C 35
Chart 5.—X-ray Examinations Made by Institutions, Diagnostic and Treatment
Clinics, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General
Hospitals, 1946-55.
^
p/
/
\
/
/
\
\
\
\
/
1
\
\ MOBILE
\
UNITS
•>•
•**
\
„._- —
>:^
— —
^
y4
STATIONARY
suRvrv-
/
/
.--
DIA
NOSTIC AND T
FATMENT CLINI
5
 —
	
INSTITUTIONS
1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955
'Include! "stationary metropolitan". C 36 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
GENERAL SUMMARIES
Table 9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1955
Willow
Chest
Tranquille
Victoria
New Westminster
Pearson
X-rays taken 	
Chest X-rays—
Flat-
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division..
Stereoscopic—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Planograph—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Other chest—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Gastrc-intestinal—
In-patient-
Out-patient-
Bones and joints—
In-patient-
Out-patient..
V.D. Division-
Other—
In-patient	
Out-patient.	
Fluoroscope—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division-
Electrocardiogram-
In-patient-
Out-patient.
V.D. Division-
Indian Department examinations-
Lipiodol injection—
In-patient-
Out-patient..
25,245
1,877
19,120
462
258
470
644
2,161
26
5
84
47
5
32
3
109
1,777
142
272
3
155
32
34
13
4,238
1,776
1,551
325
15
414
9
20
3
65
36
1
20
1
120
122
90
3
7,683
663
5,115
17
167
111
248
1,051
109
151
28
14
3,015
2,940
43
20
2,985
232
43,166
1,604
5,920
222
28,948
479
3
4
	
2
564
1,314
2
641
344
1,650
3,241
29
76
9
178
436
10
246
6
23
103
18
188
425
2,131
151
50
414
6
155
	
38
6
44
13
Source: X-ray Ledger TB. 73. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 37
It is interesting to note that there are 1,499 sensitivity tests recorded. These tests
were both for the sensitivity of the tubercle bacillus to antibiotics and for the staphylococcus aureus, which is beginning to present a problem in the tuberculosis institutions.
Table 10.-
—Laboratory Report, 1955
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
New Westminster
Kootenay
Pearson
Total.
1955
Sputum tests—
Routine _	
4,155
2
154
218
3,229
791
121
18
16,786
1,809
433
512
505
303
921
2,002
1,999
14
470
10
75
442
206
1,829
129
343
2,500
707
209
315
234
659
1,111
1,004
402
447
468
447
133
1,109
1,814
8
138
5
49
122
4,601
421
231
223
3
5
31
103
3,005
11
98
16
265
236
192
186
176
99
105
72
511
61
31
58
2,127
44
123
2,136
6
1,314
102
1,025
260
122
10
1,029
1,161
517
601
602
541
302
89
1,651
10
12
302
421
9,022
Cultures done at institution—
936
Gastric-  .   	
214
320
1,499
657
Cultures  collected for Provincial
Laboratory—
7,259
1,164
341
703
Blood tests—
21,441
Haemoglobin  	
4,210
1,544
1,746
1,751
1,390
1,461
3,272
5,975
71
Collected  for  Provincial  Laboratory V.D.R.L.
Other special blood tests	
Urinalysis—
34
Spirometry  	
608
15
Bronchospirometry  	
M.B.C.                            	
124
564
206
1,829
129
5,277
Source: Daily Laboratory Ledger TB. 72.
Table 11.—Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics, 1946-55
Total
Institutions
Clinics
Year
rt
o
H
OJ
H
2,«
£o
5.
'3
c
3
a
H
e
o
t/1
H
rt
fl.
.2
V.
o
o
>
"rt
O
H
o
h
a
u
o
'3
a
rt
HH
H
a
o
tn
HH
u
fl.
o
o
>
rt
O
H
c
4)
2*
£o
1
s
g
H
.2
Q
o
>
1946   ..            	
353
452
700
683
652
721
738
796
674
562
334
366
415
437
485
539
545
519
470
393
3
72
258
210
146
145
154
151
110
100
75
77
61
16
14
27
36
21
37
39
51
17
8
174
297
552
554
486
513
553
602
430
408
160
211
273
308
319
332
360
333
233
240
3
72
252
210
146
145
154
150
110
100
75
77
61
11
14
27
36
21
36
39
44
10
7
179
155
148
129
166
208
185
194
244
154
174
155
142
129
166
207
185
186
237
153
6
1
5
1947                   	
1948                      -
1949                     -	
1950                      -
1951                      -
1
1952                   —- ~
1953                         - 	
7
1954                       	
7
1955                      	
1
Source: Institutional Ledger TB. 70 and Clinic Ledger TB. 71. C 38
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 12.—Dental Report, 1955
^oJr.tS1651     -'"■^li.illc i'^;"
Pearson
Total
Patient-visits—
In-patient   —
Out-patient 	
Examinations—
In-patient 	
Out-patient-  	
Consultations—
In-patient	
Out-patient _	
Extractions—
In-patient-  	
Out-patient 	
Fillings, including cement bases—
In-patient 	
Out-patient 	
Prophylactic treatment—
In-patient  __
Out-patient	
Surgical removal of impacted teeth
In-patient _ 	
Out-patient	
Denture fittings—
In-patient.  	
Out-patient-   	
X-rays—In-patient _	
Other	
633
405
123
160
131
19
264
59
270
211
27
12
13
5
314
156
629
50
1,956
215
153
1,601
441
130
958
2,635
5
446
17
247
8
65
3
267
2
138
5
69
189
18
561
169
1,331
171
534
35
580
908
50
4,366
422
849
168
520
22
2,656
61
1,383
216
260
12
95
5
2,041
174
4,733
274
Source: Ledger TB. 74.
Table 13.—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report, 1955
Willow Chest
Centre
Victoria
Tranquille Pearson
Total
Patient-visits, E.E.N.T.—
In-patient	
Out-patient 	
Eye—
Examinations—
In-patient	
Out-patient._	
Prescriptions—■
In-patient-
Out-patient	
Refractions—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Other treatment-
In-patient.
Out-patient-
Consultations—
In-patient-
Out-patient..
Ear, nose, and throat—
Examinations—
In-patient 	
Out-patient 	
Treatments—
In-patient-
Out-patient-
Consultations-
In-patient	
Out-patient-
Surgical procedures..
54
16
33
3
21
2
27
2
25
18
25
14
234
74
74
68
236
154
80
136
86
549
16
275
3
175
2
166
2
187
18
56
1
16
10
Source: Ledger TB. 75. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 39
INSTITUTIONS—SUMMARIES
During the year a tuberculosis institution was opened on the grounds of the
Provincial Mental Hospital. This accounted for 261 admissions. Actually this does not
represent 261 new tuberculosis cases under treatment in that institution, but for the first
time they are all being brought together in one building.
It is noted that the pneumoperitoneum refills in the institutions of the Division have
been reduced from 2,614 in 1954 to 377 in 1955. There were eighteen pneumoperitoneum treatments initiated, against forty in the previous year.
During 1955 the bed capacity at Tranquille Sanatorium was reduced from 340 to
268, at which point the main building at Tranquille Sanatorium was closed. In August,
1955, the bed occupancy reached its lowest point, with 217 beds occupied. The high
point in occupancy during the year was in February, when 337 beds were occupied.
There has been a decrease in the number of thoracoplasties, from 114 in 1954 to
74 in 1955, with an increase in the number of resections from 203 to 233. The increase
in resections is in the number of lobectomies done.
Table 14.—Institutions—General Summaries, 1955
Item
Willow
Chest Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
Pearson
North
Lawn
Total.
1955
33,945
195
226
95,664
280
335
24,354
136
169
90,779
354
364
244,742
261
32
1,226
Discharges, including deaths _	
Treatments—
Pneumothoraces—
1,126
4
2
7
176
13
12
48
55
61
19
6
Pneumoperitoneum—
10
78
70
800
674
78
240
18
7
8
3
4
27
3
1
88
51
41
4
1
104
59
157
18
Refill -	
19
11
3
3
377
153
2
974
725
172
100
7
	
305
Examinations—
7
5
408
1
50
Thoracic surgery—
Thoracoplasties—
1
7
9
10
4
15
	
 .	
42
Special—
6
6
3
Resections—
1
10
25
12
2
98
76
53
4
7
7
1
77
53
8
1
Other surgery—
6
70
9
1
4
48
26
1
88
19
2
190
7
52
1
Source:   Clinic Ledgers TB. 71 and TB. 41 and Institutional Ledger TB. 70;  Admission Form TB. 78 and Discharge
Form TB. 79. C 40
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
This is the first year no initial pneumothoraces have been given. From this it is
evident that pneumothorax has been discarded as a treatment for tuberculosis, although
there are still many cases initialed in the former era who are still receiving refills. However, the pneumothorax refills have been reduced by 78 per cent in the past year, and
there has been a reduction from 20,251 refills in 1951 to 2,385 in 1955.
Table 15.—-Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) Given by
Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1946-55
Total
Initial
Refill
Year
Total
Initial
Institutions
Stationary
Clinics
Traveling
Clinics
Total
Refill
Institutions
Stationary
Clinics
Traveling
Clinics
1046
21,883
21,919
21,788
22,393
21,139
20,251
15,369
8,345
2,385
427
413
354
339
334
286
207
125
39
2
397
350
336
328
279
201
119
39
2
5
1
2
5
7
6
6
11
3
1
1
21,470
21,565
21,449
22,059
20,853
20,044
15,244
8,306
2,383
427
12,347
12,698
12,745
11,066
9,174
6,769
5,031
1,983
254
6
8,799
8,616
8,617
10,873
11,649
13,247
10,160
6,281
2,114
421
324
1947
251
1948 ...
87
1949
120
1950....
30
1951   .. .
28
1952          ...    —   ..
53
1953
42
1954       	
15
1955	
Source: Clinic Ledgers TB. 71 and TB. 41 and Institutional Ledger TB. 70.
INSTITUTIONS—ADMISSIONS
It is noted that there has been a reduction in the percentage admitted from each age-
group under 40 and an increase in the percentage from each age-group over 40.
Table 16.—Total Admissions by Age and
in Each Age-group
Percentage
, 1951-55
of Total Admissions
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
Age-group
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
5
42
262
241
151
109
82
36
0.6
4.5
28.2
26.0
16.3
11.7
8.8
3.9
9
58
219
245
178
126
95
59
0.9
5.9
22.1
24.8
18.0
12.7
9.6
6.0
3
42
196
243
231
115
94
53
8
0.3
4.3
19.9
24.7
23.4
11.7
9.5
5.4
0.8
9
45
210
225
190
153
112
67
4
0.9
4.4
20.7
22.2
18.7
15.1
11.0
6.6
0.4
10
35
202
252
262
188
160
116
1
0.8
10-1O
2.9
20-29    „    .
16.5
30-39    „
20.6
40^19    „	
21.3
50-59    „          	
15.3
60-69   „          	
13.0
70 years and over. 	
Not stated	
9.5
0.1
Totals	
928
100.0
989    1  100.0
985
100.0
1,015
100.0
1.226    1  100.0
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, TB. 78. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 41
in
in
in
ON
fl.
o
w
«
w
z
o
H
a
H
H
to
Z
h-I
o
H
to
Z
2
tn
§
o
<C
o
z
o
H
P
S
2
H
t«
o
<
H
Z
rt
u
a.
«
Ph
H
a
U C 42
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The increase in admissions is largely in the minimal group, from 293 in 1954 to
392 in 1955.   This increase is accounted for by 123 minimal admissions to North Lawn.
Table 17.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1955
Diagnosis
CO
>,
"rt
0
H
Age-group
u
rt
|
H
Oh
6
5
i
H-   CJ
rt o
S3
•3 |
T3
u
a
L. >
<*3
»-5
3--
2 *
3 >,C
U.S2 °
-O 3 3
3 uiC
Hcutt)
3.2 3
HOh o
ea
y
o
u C
ci5
o
H
T3
C
as
Ih
O
 M.
1
2
1
5
1
1
i
9
5
15
21
24
20
6
4
12
15
26
19
1
6
5
11
14
26
28
43
20
53
6
45
3
33
2
2
2
1
4
3
3
2
1
1
1
—
i
i
3
1
3
4
2
3
6
8
9
3
6
2
2
2
1
2
2
5
2
2
20
11
35
42
68
57
133
119
165
97
145
43
129
31
98
18
1
5- 9    „
10-14   „	
F.
- M.
F.
 M.
3
7
15-19    „     	
F.
 M.
4
?0-74   „
F.
 M.
31
25-29    „       	
F.
 M.
77 ■
F.
125
44
42
52
31
57
43
61
37
5:n_"to
 M.
1
F.
	
252
40-49    „    	
 M.
1
F.
 M.
262
50-59    „     	
38
44
F.
 M.
18
16
188
«n_69
1
34
11
43
14
F.
160
70 years and over	
 M.
F.
21
5
1
42
9
116
 M.
F.
 M.
1
Totals                 .          . -
5
9
238
154
291
157
217
15
33
23
799
427
F.
1,226
14
392
448
296
20
56
1,226
1,226
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955 C 43
Chart 7.—Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1955
0 20 40 60 60 100 120 140 160 ISO
AGE
GROUP
40-49 YRS.
60 60 100 120
No. OF ADMISSIONS C 44                                 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 18.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1955
Racial Origin
Diagnosis
Total
by Sex
Grand
Total
Primary
Minimal
Moderately
Advanced
Far
Advanced
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
with
Effusion
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
without
Effusion
Other
Diagnoses
White  - M.
F.
Chinese  — —- M.
F.
3
7
2
2
205
134
24
1
6
1
2
8
11
263
143
21
2
2
2
1
1
4
9
179
65
21
1
13
5
2
27
21
4
2
2
690
375
72
4
4
10
4
3
29
35
1,065
76
14
7
64
Japanese   ,.M.
F.
Hindu M.
F.
Half-breed and Indian M.
F.
2
13
11
	
Totals -  M.
F.
5
9
238
154
291
157
217
79
15
5
33
23
799
427
1,226
Grand totals
14
392
448
296
20
56
1,226
1,226
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 19.-
—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex,
and Type of Case, 1955
Diagnosis
Total
by Sex
Type of Case
Primary
Minimal
Moderately
Advanced
Far
Advanced
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
with
Effusion
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
without
Effusion
Other
Diagnoses
Grand
Total
m
2
1
1
2
2
6
188
127
43
25
4
2
3
176
88
100
58
4
7
9
2
2
2
108
35
102
35
3
2
1
5
5
13
5
516
278
249
119
10
14
14
3
10
13
29
22
2
1
1
F.
M
794
2
—
Review   —
Continuation of treat
F.
M.
F.
M
368
24
	
F.
M
17
	
1
F.
M
23
Totals 	
5
9
238
154
291
157
217
79
15
5
33
23
799
427
IF.
1,226
14
392
448
296
20
56
1,226
1,226
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. tuberculosis control report, 1955 c 45
Table 20.—Total Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1955
Total
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
Pearson
North Lawn
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary 	
14
392
448
296
20
56
1.2
32.0
36.5
24.1
1.6
4.6
11
47
72
50
1
14
5.6
24.1
37.0
25.6
0.5
7.2
74
110
84
7
5
26.4
39.3
30.0
2.5
1.8
52
44
27
10
3
38.2
32.3
19.9
7.4
2.2
96
141
108
1
8
27.1
39.8
30.5
0.3
2.3
3
123
81
27
1
26
1.2
47.1
Moderately advanced-
31.0
10.3
Tuberculous pleurisy-
0.4
10.0
Totals	
1,226
100.0
195
100.0
280
100.0
136
100.0
354
100.0
261
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 21.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis
[Percentage Distribution), 1951-55
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary-	
19
288
402
209
4
6
2.0
31.1
43.3
22.5
0.5
0.6
50
324
383
209
7
16
5.1
32.8
38.7
21.1
0.7
1.6
4
303
393
262
10
13
0.4
30.8
39.9
26.6
1.0
1.3
12
293
414
239
20
37
1.2
28.9
40.8
23.5
2.0
3.6
14
392
448
296
20
56
1.2
32.0
36.5
24.1
1.6
Other diagnosis	
4.6
Totals 	
928
100.0
989
100.0
985
100.0
1,015
100.0
1,226
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 22.—First Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1955
Total
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
Pearson
North Lawn
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary-- 	
Minimal-   -
Moderately advanced-
3
315
264
143
18
51
0.4
39.7
33.2
18.0
2.3
6.4
22
19
14
1
12
32.4
27.9
20.6
1.5
17.6
51
68
40
7
5
29.8
39.8
23.4
4.1
2.9
43
27
15
8
3
44.8
28.1
15.6
8.4
3.1
88
84
58
1
6
37.1
35.5
24.5
0.4
2.5
3
111
66
16
1
25
1.3
50.0
29.7
7.2
Tuberculous pleurisy-
0.5
11.3
Totals	
794
100.0
68
100.0
171
100.0
96
100.0
237
100.0
222
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 23.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1951-55
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary - -	
11
203
214
106
3
4
2.0
37.5
39.6
19.6
0.6
0.7
35
236
188
91
4
12
6.2
41.7
33.2
16.1
0.7
2.1
2
217
195
129
5
9
0.4
39.0
35.0
23.1
0.9
1.6
3
222
219
114
19
33
0.5
36.4
35.9
18.7
3.1
5.4
3
315
264
143
18
51
0.4
39.7
33.2
18.0
Tuberculous pleurisy.-	
2.3
6 4
Totals  -	
541
100.0
566
100.0
557
100.0
610
100.0
794
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. C 46
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 8.—First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis
(Percentage Distribution), 1946-55
KttVi
*t>v.
2*ca
N
-X
y^
y^.
/
/	
X
tow^b
/
\
1946        1947        1948        1949        1950        1951        1952        1953        1954       1955 tuberculosis control report, 1955
Table 24.—Readmissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1955
C 47
Total
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
Pearson
North Lawn
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary	
68
158
137
2
3
18.5
42.9
37.2
0.5
0.9
18
32
23
24.7
43.8
31.5
22
37
42
21.8
36.6
41.6
8
17
11
2
21.1
44.7
28.9
5.3
8
57
50
2
6.8
48.7
42.8
1.7
12
15
11
1
30.8
Moderately advanced.
38.5
28.2
Tuberculous pleurisy-
Other diagnosis	
2.5
Totals 	
368
100.0
73
100.0
101
100.0
38
100.0
117
100.0
39
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 25.—Readmissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1951-55
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary	
Minimal  -	
Moderately advanced 	
2
65
148
97
1
0.6
20.8
47.3
31.0
0.3
8
74
174
112
1
3
2.1
19.9
46.8
30.1
0.3
0.8
67
141
107
21.2
44.8
34.0
1
62
166
117
1
3
0.3
17.7
47.4
33.4
0.3
0.9
68
158
137
2
3
18.5
42.9
37.2
0.5
Other diagnosis	
0.9
Totals 	
313
100.0
372
100.0
315
100.0
350
100.0
368
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 26.—Review Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1955
Total
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
Pearson
North Lawn
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary	
Minimal  	
Moderately advanced-
3
6
11
3
1
12.5
25.0
45.8
12.5
4.2
3
4
9
1
1
16.8
22.2
50.0
5.6
5.6
1
2
1
25.0
50.0
25.0
1
50.0
50.0
—
	
Tuberculous pleurisy..
Other diagnosis	
Totals 	
24
100.0
18
100.0
4
100.0
2
100.0
----- 1         1   	
1             1
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 27.—Review Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1951-55
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
6
20
40
6
2
8.1
27.0
54.1
8.1
2.7
3
14
19
6
7.2
33.3
45.2
14.3
1
15
48
11
5
3
1.2
18.1
57.8
13.3
6.0
3.6
7
6
24
2
1
17.5
15.0
60.0
5.0
2.5
7
6
24
2
1
60.0
5.0
Other diagnosis -	
2.5
Totals	
74
100.0
42
100.0
83
100.0
40
100.0
40
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. C 48
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
INSTITUTIONS—DISCHARGES
The number of persons dying in the institutions increased from sixty-seven to
ninety-five, but in this total number there were more than a third who died of non-
tuberculous conditions. Over the past five years there has been a decreasing percentage
of patients discharged in the active unimproved category. The percentage of those
discharged in the active classification has not altered greatly and 48 per cent were
discharged in this classification. Because many were discharged on out-patient antimicrobial therapy although being negative, sufficient time had not elapsed to warrant
them being placed in the arrested classification.
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1951-55
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
Condition
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Inactive.	
166
517
121
102
36
17.6
54.9
12.9
10.8
3.8
41
191
382
139
113
24
4.5
21.4
42.8
15.6
13.0
2.7
20
274
508
153
54
17
1.9
26.7
49.5
14.9
5.3
1.7
31
353
492
115
67
32
2.8
32.4
45.1
10.6
6.2
2.9
36
321
541
105
95
28
3.2
28.5
Active improved... 	
Active unimproved	
Dead1 	
48.1
9.3
8.4
Other diagnosis.     .
2.5
Totals	
942
100.0
890
100.0
1,026
100.0
1,090
100.0
1,126
100.0
1 Includes 34 deaths occurring in tuberculosis institutions in which the underlying cause of death was other than
tuberculosis.
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 49
Chart 9.—Percentage Distribution of Discharges from Institutions according
to Condition on Discharge, 1946-55
/
H^.
/
\
ACTIVE
/
IMPROVED
/
\
\
1
/
\
/
\
/
\
1
/
\
/
\
/
\
/
/
N
*
\
f
V
/
N
4
r
/
/
o^**"
•
/
/
/
^V     •*
*K«5-ED
_        —     —•
/
**
/
N
m
t
/
*
-Sr-
—        —          _
*
\
\
ACTIVE UNIMPROVED
s
s
-  —  — ""
— —  —
s
>
-^
^^ „
-."^
"* »m ,jF
— ■■-'^
1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 C 50                                 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 29.—Discharges from Institutions of First Admissions, by Condition on
Discharge, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1955
Length of Stay in Institution
Total
by Sex
Grand
Total
Condition on Discharge
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7          8-11
Months 1 Months
1
1
Year
2
Years
3-5
Years
Over 5
Years
Inactive   M.
11
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
18
5
23
Arrested  M.
F.
7
1
11
7
19
24
24
21
39
29
7
2
3
1
111
84
195
Active improved  M.
4
4
41
28
102
30
48
25
39
19
8
2
3
245
108
353
Active unimproved        M.
F.
9
9
16
3
4
3
2
3
2
2
36
17
53
Non-pulmonary   M.
F.
1
1
2
2
Non-tuberculous -M.
F.
6
1
5
1
1
2
1
1
-
13
5
18
Undiagnosed   M.
3
1
1
3
2
5
Dead M.
F.
12
6
11
3
4
1
3
1
5
4
5
2
46
11
Totals  M.
F.
52
23
85
44
133
62
81
49
88
50
21
4
11                3
--      |      ....
474
232
706
Grand totals
75
129
195
130
138
25
11      |        3
i
706
706
Source:  Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79.
■
• TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 51
It is noted that of 1,126 people discharged in 1955, only 248 had been in the institution over one year. It is interesting to note that there were almost twice as many male
discharges in the total as there were female, which might contradict the popular belief
that the males are accumulating in our institutions to a greater extent than the females.
Table 30.—Discharges from Institutions by Diagnosis upon Admission for
Total Admissions, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1955
Length of Stay
Diagnosis
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7
Months
8-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3-5
Years
Over 5
Years
Total
2
7
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
9
F.
12
Minimal 	
 M.
32
42
50
19
22
2
167
F.
10
23
42
22
21
2
120
Moderately advanced 	
M.
F.
34
21
58
29
97
34
44
35
55
35
11
2
4
303
156
Far advanced  _	
 M.
29
47
41
35
35
20
15
2
224
F.
19
14
15
10
13
4
75
 M.
8
3
6
4
3
1
2
19
F.
8
 M.
11
4
4
2
4
5
2
1
20
F.
... .  M.
13
Totals 	
108
61
160
72
201
103
102
71
116
69
31
8
21
3
742
F.
384
169
232
304
173
185
39
21
3
1,126
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79.
This table shows that of 706 discharges, 177 or 24.9 per cent had been in institution
over one year.
Table 31.—Discharges from Institutions by Diagnosis upon Admission for
First Admissions, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1955
Length of Stay
Diagnosis
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7
Months
8-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3-5
Years
Over 5
Years
Total
2
2
17
4
8
7
14
6
11
4
1
1
33
19
25
15
15
4
7
3
4
2
3
42
35
58
13
22
5
6
4
2
5
1
16
19
33
21
28
6
3
1
2
21
19
39
21
25
10
2
1
8
1
13
3
1
3
7
1
2
8
F.
 M.
3
130
Moderately advanced 	
F.
M.
F.
 M.
96
174
78
126
F.
 M.
34
18
F.
 M.
8
18
F.
 M.
13
Totals  ..
52
23
85
44
133
62
81
49
88
50
21
4
11
3
474
F.
232
75
129
195
130
138
25
11
3
706
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79. C 52
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 32.—Discharges from Institutions by Diagnosis upon Admission for
Readmissions, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1955
Length of Stay
Diagnosis
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7
Months
8-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3-5
Years
Over 5
Years
Total
9
4
33
14
32
10
1
3
8
7
39
21
19
10
2
1
3
3
11
14
7
4
1
1
2
16
14
10
3
2
3
1
7
1
1
1
8
....
1
F.
 M.
5
15
6
25
14
15
13
9
37
Moderately advanced 	
F.
M.
F.
 M.
24
128
78
98
F.
 M.
41
1
F.
 „M.
2
F.
 M.
Totals 	
55
38
75
28
68
41
21
22
28
19
10
4
10
—
267
F.
152
93
103
109
43
47
14
10
1    419
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79.
Table 33.—Discharges from Institutions by Types of Discharge, Sex, and
Length of Stay, 1955
Length of Stay in Institution
Total
by
Sex
Grand
Total
Type of Discharge
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7
Months
8-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3-5
Years
Over 5
Years
On medical advice - M.
F.
47
21
34
12
37
16
25
8
41
31
7
5
5
1
197
93
290
Against medical advice  M.
F.
4
5
15
4
13
6
2
5
4
1
1
40
20
60
On medical advice to continue antimicrobial treatment  — -M.
F.
16
11
64
34
104
69
57
43
59
35
11
1
7
318
193
511
Against medical advice to continue
anti-microbial treatment  M.
F.
8
3
24
13
27
7
6
11
3
2
3
1
71
37
108
To   continue   anti-microbial   treat
ment   (nature   of   discharge   not
stated)     -   M-
F.
7
3
1
11
11
Disciplinary   M.
F.
	
6
5
1
3
2
1
1
	
16
3
19
Transfer   M.
F.
12
10
3
3
1
1
1
	
1
18
14
32
Death1       — - M.
21
11
14
6
7
4
5
1
7
1
7
1
8
2
71
24
F.
95
Totals      M.
F.
108
61
160
72
201
103
102
71
116
69
31
8
21
3
742
384
1,126
169
232
304
173
185
39
21
3
1,126
1,126
1 Includes 34 deaths occurring
tuberculosis.
in tuberculosis institutions in which the underlying cause of death was other than
J TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 53
Table 34.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and
Length of Stay, 1955
rge
Leng
th of Stay
in Institution
Total
by
Sex
Grand
Total
Condition on Discha
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7
Months
8-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3-5
Years
Over 5
Years
M.
14
4
1
4
3
2
2
2
3
1
—
23
13
F.
36
Arrested  	
M.
F.
17
15
28
16
43
38
30
27
48
39
9
5
6
181
140
321
Active improved	
M
26
15
72
40
138
52
61
38
54
26
10
2
7
—
368
173
F.
541
Active unimproved
M.
F.
20
14
40
4
7
5
2
2
4
2
5
78
27
105
Non-pulmonary    	
-M.
F.
1
1
....
1
3
3
M
7
1
5
1
2
2
1
1
....
15
5
F.
20
Undiagnosed  	
M.
F.
3
1
1
Z
3
2
5
Dead1 	
M
21
11
14
6
7
4
5
1
7
1
7
1
8
2
71
24
F.
M.
F.
95
Totals 	
108
61
160
72
201
103
102
71
116
69
31
8
21
3
742
384
1,126
Grand totals
169
232
304
173
185
39
21
3
1,126
1,126
1 Includes 34 deaths occurring in tuberculosis institutions in which the underlying cause of death was other than
tuberculosis.
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79. C 54
DEPARTMENT
OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
in .22
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scharges.
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medical advice to continue anti-microb:
ainst medical advice to continue anti-mi.
continue   anti-microbial   treatment   (n
CU
3
d
Q
5
o
1>
00
d
"iH
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One hundred an
r cent of the total di
ercises more contro
to
W
►J
«
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H
t
•c
rt
a
t,
T
Oi
E
a
_u
'>
•a
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S
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t-l
d
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o
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a
1
c
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cfl
jd
rt
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M             B              M        o                   .2              S
o
Dh    <D
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<
O
<
H
a
H
Q TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
B.C.G. VACCINATIONS
C 55
The 523 B.C.G. vaccinations recorded here were practically all done within the
Division of Tuberculosis Control. It is interesting to note that there were no complications from B.C.G. vaccination by the scratch method, and that 91.6 per cent of all those
vaccinated converted.
The two large groups who were vaccinated were contacts under 4 years of age and
student-nurses.
Table 36.—B.C.G. Vaccinations Completed according to Group Listed, 1955
w
O
cn
CO
u
o
t-i
CJ
E
3
Z
Post-B.C.G. Tuberculin Test Positive
Post-B.C.G.
Tuberculin Test Negative
Group Vaccinated
Number of Cases
Positive by
Type of Test
Cfl
<D
tfl
cu
U
*w
0
j5.g
S'55
Cfl
u
Cfl
rt
u
o
d <u
rj >
OS
fcH   CO
<U   0
A.B.
Complications
Number of Cases
Negative by
Type of Test
Cfl
y
rt
0
o
k£
*>43
•°3
d rt
a to
3 <u
ZZ
Cfl
5
Cfl
CO
U
%
o
ci
a
o
Ch.
2
CO CJ
►35
•o
Ef'o
•as
WO
i *o
si
§■«
51
ci
a
o
cs
a
o
oh
a
o
d >
144
1
57
281
6
34
102
1
23
228
6
4
25
~15
26
5
127
1
55
260
6
30
88.2
100.0
96.5
92.5
100.0
88.2
—
—
—
15
17
2
6
4
17
2
21
4
Student-nurses -	
17
6
21
11.8
Hospital employees	
3.5
7.5
Othprs
11.8
Totals   .  ...
523
44
364
71
479
91.6
—
-----
15
29
44
8.4
Note.—All scratch method of vaccination.
Source: Tuberculin Testing Reports, Form TB. 77.
Table 37.—B.C.G.
Vaccinations Completed according to Age-group
1955
Cfl
CJ
Cfl
CO
O
o
VH
CJ
-o
6
3
z
Post-B.C.G. Tuberculin Test Positive
Post-B.C.G.
Tuberculin Test Negative
Group Vaccinated
Number of Cases
Positive by
Type of Test
Cfl
CJ
Cfl
CO
U
o
ss
11
= o
ZfL.
Cfl
«
U
o
3 CJ
CJ >
o;a
cj o
D-Oh
Complications
Number of Cases
Negative by
Type of Test
n
o
rt
■iH
O
Xi
Is?
ZZ
cfl
cu
CO
U
a
©
CN
a
o
-15
T3
co 3
ii
wo
cfl
i "o
ol
ao
tfl
a
o
cs
Si.
a
o
^H.
a
bit
a
*H    O
3 >
CJ-rn
ojcj
o<Z
184
51
24
132
82
16
18
6
1
9
5
1
6
20
8
4
163
41
18
91
27
3
9
5
1
6
8
5
2
27
20
3
4
1
1
176
47
20
124
67
14
17
6
1
7
95.7
92.2
83.3
93.9
81.7
87.5
94.5
100.0
100.0
77.8
-=
	
5
3
1
8 1    4 3
5- 9    „      	
3
1
4   1     7.8
10-14          	
-----
3
2
1
1
6
15
2
1
4
8
15
2
1
2
16.7
15-19    „   	
20-24    ..              	
—
6.1
18.3
25-29    „
12.5
30-39    „	
5.5
40-49    „
50 years and over 	
22.2
Totals   	
523
44
364
71
479
91.6
—
15
29
44
8.4
Note.—All scratch method of vaccination.
Source: Tuberculin Testing Reports, Form TB. 77. C 56
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
KNOWN CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS
There has been an increase of 652 known cases in the Province during the past
year. In British Columbia, cases of pulmonary tuberculosis are only removed from the
central index on death.
Table 38.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of
British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1951-55
Area
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
Area 1                  	
336
821
889
10,371
2,768
949
472
942
1,001
160
316
776
862
10,543
2,822
938
458
996
1,045
171
301
698
869
10,776
2,942
1,014
469
1,159
1,157
205
295
675
896
11,096
2,974
1,077
487
1,257
1,235
214
314
Area 2 	
Area 3 	
655
901
11,418
Area 5,. .            	
3,125
Area 6- '  	
Area 7      	
1,190
488
1,284
Area 9  	
Area 10                               	
1,255
228
Totals                  	
18,709
18,927
19,590
20,206
20,858
Amongst the other-than-Indian known cases there was an increase of 462, while in
the Indians there was an increase of 190 known cases.
Table 39.—Known Cases1 of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Popu-
tion of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1951-55
Area
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
275
816
789
9,872
2,167
548
200
355
304
78
258
770
754
10,058
2,181
511
192
359
331
83
247
690
751
10,311
2,277
511
190
390
348
92
237
667
767
10,615
2,265
559
204
404
342
91
254
647
Area 3                                                   	
768
Area 4 ,	
Area 5    	
10,917
2,403
588
189
403
Area 9	
Area 10                                                  	
345
99
Totals    ..           -	
15,404
15,497
15,807
16,151
16,613
1 Excludes 1,975 cases of unknown address and 1,862 ex-Province cases.
Table 40.—Known Cases1 of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of
British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1951-55
Area
1951
1952
1953
1954
19552
61
6
100
499
601
401
271
587
697
82
58
6
108
485
641
427
266
637
714
88
54
8
118
465
665
503
279
769
809
113
58
8
129
481
709
518
283
853
893
123
60
Area ">■■      	
Area 3
8
133
501
Area 5	
722
602
299
Area 8	
881
910
129
Totals  	
3,305
3,430
3,783
4,055
4,245
1 Excludes 36 cases of unknown address and 28 ex-Province cases.
- Includes 192 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 57
Table 41.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and
School District of Residence and Sex, 1955
(Excluding Indians)
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1	
47
41
33
11
30
6
7
89
30
12
27
90
25
7
41
72
5
18
105
22
25
51
7
78
18
195
5
4
24
20
15
19
47
12
15
70
10
13
93
56
89
230
32
95
3,917
41
38
21
6
34
9
7
91
25
16
25
106
16
12
28
61
5
18
115
23
27
33
10
82
5
174
2
18
17
10
28
44
12
14
58
5
23
116
48
56
195
36
88
3,023
88
79
54
17
64
15
14
180
55
28
52
196
41
19
69
133
10
36
220
45
52
84
17
160
23
369
7
9
42
37
25
47
91
24
29
128
15
36
209
104
145
425
68
183
6,940
Metropolitan Health Committee
Vancouver—Continued
School District No. 41	
School District No. 44-          .
School District No. 45	
356
237
86
315
287
74
56
11
73
64
47
9
7
130
55
20
34
8
436
220
37
40
28
51
29
31
112
33
60
4
60
23
24
82
28
10
12
28
356
[     191
69
269
249
49
41
9
67
70
40
16
2
83
38
23
39
14
359
135
32
30
13
54
29
48
78
8
75
3
40
27
20
58
34
8
6
30
1
School District No. 2	
712
School District No. 3	
428
155
School District No. 5	
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 40 _ 	
584
School District No. 43*	
536
North Fraser, Mission—
School District No. 42 _
School District No. 75	
School District No. 7 	
123
97
School District No. 10
School District No. 76	
20
West Kootenay, Trail—■
School District No. 9
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47	
140
School District No. 11
School District No. 71 	
134
School District No. 12
School District No. 72	
87
School District No. 13.	
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50	
School District Nn  51
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14
25
9
School District No. 15 	
School District No. 52.   ...
School District No. 53	
213
School District No. 16
93
School District No. 17. _	
School District No. 54	
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59	
43
School District No. 23	
School District No. 77
73
School District No. 60 	
22
School District No. 19
School District No. 81	
School District No. 20	
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of
Health-
School District No. 61 (part)2
Saanich and South Vancouver
Island—
School District No. 61 (part)3
School District No. 62	
School District No. 21	
School District No. 22 	
795
School District No. 78 	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24	
355
School District No. 25
69
School District No. 26	
School District No. 63	
School District No. 64	
Central Vancouver Island,
Nanaimo—
School District No. 65  	
School District No. 66	
School District No. 67-	
School District No. 68.	
School District No. 69 	
70
School District No. 29	
41
School District No. 30.	
School District No. 31	
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 27
105
58
School District No. 28	
79
School District No. 55.. 	
School District No. 56
190
41
School District No. 57	
School District No. 58 	
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack—
School District No. 32	
School District No. 70 	
School District No. 79 	
School districts not covered by
health units—
School District No. 46 	
School District No. 48 	
School District No. 49 	
School District No. 61 (part)*
School District No. 73  .
School District No. 74....	
School District No. 80- 	
135
7
School District No. 33	
100
School District No. 34	
50
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35   .
School District No. 36	
School District No. 37 	
Metropolitan Health Committee
44
140
62
18
18
58
Totals	
School District No. 39.   . .
9,075
7,538
16,613
1 Includes 197 males and 142 females at Mental Health Services, Essondale.
2 Includes Victoria and Esquimau.
3 Excludes Victoria, Esquimau, and Oak Bay.
4 Includes Oak Bay only. C 58
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 42.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and
School District of Residence and Sex, 1955
(Indians Only1)
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
2
4
9
26
10
19
2
7
7
11
E
1
5
6
5
7
7
19
9
19
2
3
8
21
1
2
12
34
1
12
27
13
30
36
72
5
11
1
49
92
64
130
37
81
84
167
17
32
43
81
82
169
18
30
22
45
31
76
7
10
6
10
9
20
2
7
1
2
34
54
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1	
School District No. 2-	
School District No. 3	
School District No. 4	
School District No. 5	
School District No. 18	
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 6	
School District No. 7	
School District No. 8	
School District No. 10	
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 9	
School District No. 11-
School District No. 12-
School District No. 13..
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14	
School District No. 15	
School District No. 16	
School District No. 17	
School District No. 23	
School District No. 77	
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19	
School District No. 20	
School District No. 21	
School District No. 22	
School District No. 78 	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24	
School District No. 25..	
School District No. 26	
School District No. 29	
School District No. 30	
School District No. 31	
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 27	
School District No. 28	
School District No. 55	
School District No. 56 -—
School District No. 57	
School District No. 58	
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack—■
School District No. 32	
School District No. 33 	
School District No. 34	
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35	
School District No. 36	
School District No. 37	
Metropolitan Health Committee
Vancouver—
School District No. 38	
School District No. 39	
1
22
1
15
17
36
6
1
43
66
44
83
15
38
87
12
23
45
3
4
11
5
1
20
Metropolitan Health Committee
Vancouver—Continued
School District No. 41	
School District No. 44  	
School District No. 45	
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 40	
School District No. 432	
North Fraser, Mission—
School District No. 42	
School District No. 75	
School District No. 76	
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47 	
School District No. 71  	
School District No. 72	
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50	
School District No. 51 	
School District No. 52	
School District No. 53	
School District No. 54	
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59	
School District No. 60	
School District No. 81	
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of
Health-
School District No. 61 (part)3	
Saanich and South Vancouver
Island—
School District No. 61 (part)4	
School District No. 62	
School District No. 63  _
School District No. 64  _.
Central Vancouver Island,
Nanaimo—
School District No. 65	
School District No. 66	
School District No. 67	
School District No. 68 	
School District No. 69 	
School District No. 70	
School District No. 79	
School districts not covered by
health units—
School District No. 46 	
School District No. 48	
School District No. 49	
School District No. 61 (part)5	
School District No. 73	
School District No. 74. 	
School District No. 80	
Unorganized	
Totals. 	
1 I
34
4
7
4
3
44
9
3
18
66
111
112
191
3
50
2
26
18
2
34
22
21
47
72
83
13
20
309
2,094
1
41
3
10
5
38
21
5
26
61
117
140
190
5
14
3
17
2
58
3
14
16
4
24
31
90
15
27
314
2
75
3
4
17
12
8
82
30
127
228
252
381
8
6 5 11
47 |       36 |       83
  I 3 3
25
34
3
108
5
40
34
6
58
53
16 |       37
50 97
83        155
173
28
47
623
2,151
4,245
1 Includes 192 Indians of white status.
2 Includes 15 males and females at Mental Health Services, Essondale.
3 Includes Victoria and Esquimau.
* Excludes Victoria, Esquimau, and Oak Bay.
5 Includes Oak Bay only. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 59
This table shows that there are 2,325 known cases which are classified as active.
This is a reduction from 2,657 in 1954. These cases are being reviewed at the present
time to determine the accuracy of the central index as against the actual case records.
Table 43.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition,
and Age-group, 1955
(Excluding Indians)
Age-group
Diagnosis ,
H
rt
u
><
4
Cfl
U
a
>
3
US
H
rt
2
n
u
rt
1
CJ\
to
H
rt
1
2-
CN
to
rt
o
in
es
M
es
V
ft
Os
tn
en
H
rt
&
Os
1
u
ei
1
Os
in
5.
<U
fc
Os
sO
2
u
rt
<u
fc
Os
i
T3
S |-
rt <u
So
•0
V
0 «
Zvi
3
0
H
Primary—	
Inactive _ 	
36
7
11
2
14
2
184
66
64
3
5
32
4
10
4
4
164
72
51
2
12
12
1
14
24
5
11
2
1
2
1
2
4
106
50
29
5
6
7
3
6
71
26
22
8
1
7
4
3
31
3
11
1
1
9
6
10
3
4
3
43
14
20
1
1
2
5
276
108
100
9
3
28
14
14
113
15
56
14
2
17
4
5
29
4
6
6
1
10
2
3
1
49
9
24
4
2
2
8
600
286
202
33
24
37
12
6
270
78
109
25
18
26
10
4
82
13
30
15
7
13
1
3
2
2
386
51
11
19
1
1
1
18
2,177
1,200
690
66
70
54
54
43
971
335
383
71
63
67
35
17
251
63
90
30
28
26
5
9
12
6
1
1
4
1.609
14
3
1
7
2
3
3
1
1
4
1
1
3
1
664
237
224
14
2
8
2
1,474
821
452
35
32
37
45
52
676
206
286
50
42
56
23
13
247
49
76
38
31
40
6
7
16
2
7
1
1
5
1,080
824
124
105
134
74
79
1
1,198
657
388
26
30
34
35
28
559
145
248
53
23
60
20
10
179
23
52
24
28
43
4
5
22
5
13
2
1
1
831
702
103
83
138
60
44
29
1
1
761
410
248
20
18
21
25
19
388
93
161
26
23
57
16
12
125
11
47
19
15
29
2
2
19
3
13
1
74
Activity undetermined	
187
79
75
7
3
5
8
10
96
22
45
6
9
7
5
2
44
5
12
4
7
10
6
4
2
1
2
58
28
18
2
2
12
74
2,113
8,943
Inactive _„ _	
1,232
608
69
61
47
51
45
931
366
353
63
59
4,852
2,818
277
245
4
4
26
5
10
2
1
6
1
1
13
2
2
3
1
5
2
1
276
249
226
4,065
Inactive  	
1,268
	
2
1,664
Active improved	
311
	
241
3
1
53
22
15
55
87
21
49
358
	
2
6
1
1
4
136
87
	
2
2
1,343
257
437
187
36
154
43
11
8
222
32
54
16
6
2
8
1.688
96
	
	
=t
12
48
Active improved.	
1
7
1
3
2
1
141
183
30
7
58
18
27
2
518
470
65
56
109
43
36
1
108
132
22
13
17
20
19
1
36
28
6
4
13
2
13
23
Totals, all foregoing types—
7
11
68
67
77
64
4
14
15
2
79
65
14
8
27
7
18
6,628
36711.18811.089
5,190
2|       3
 I       «
14|     32
21       4
731   148
53      95
78|   168
251   163
211     91
181
158
145
84
84
775
602
948
504
  |     10|     22
464
36
190
1
198
4
1
58
218
7
62
464
18
3
87
1,003
24
2
Ul
3,462
43
6
325
3,429
18
6
259
2,420
13
5
159
1,961
4
2
115
1,297
331
102
15,111
Other-
132
1
66
26
7
19
36
40
1,344
Totals.	
43!    2101    261
287
572
1.14013.83613.712
2,597
2.082
1,364
367
142
16,613
1 Includes 48 cases of far advanced tuberculosis with silicosis. C 60
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 44.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition,
and Age-group, 1955
(Indians Only1)
Age-group
Diagnosis
co
S
rt
u
>>
2
to
H
a
u
><
1
co
l-i
ci
6
>-
2
to
Ih
rt
fi
7
2
«
to
fc
2
tN
to
I-I
rt
u
ca
i-i
a
fc
o\
<±
e*.
cfl
§
fi
1
CQ
I-I
rt
■0
;*
2
l-l
tU
;*
5
CO
rt
u
fc
Os
r-
i
r-
■a
gjH
ooO
•a
§
o «
Zoo
rt
O
H
Primary  	
67
1
29
283
50
162
12
1
54
2
2
7
422
180
192
16
11
19
2
2
22
6
11
312
159
131
12
4
5
1
84
20
46
4
3
8
3
78
12
37
5
3
20
1
29
1
11
3
6
7
1
1
199
129
58
4
3
3
2
154
78
46
13
3
10
2
2
119
17
67
11
7
14
3
60
2
34
13
5
6
2
68
41
19
4
2
1
1
194
100
66
10
5
5
5
3
139
34
57
19
15
12
2
26
15
8
6
4
1
3
3
1
1
—
3
2
1
1,390
582
603
	
49
21
35
2
2
	
150
100
36
5
4
4
1
80
25
33
7
3
9
2
1
31
5
7
7
4
6
1
1
81
47
23
5
5
1
60
21
19
1
3
13
3
16
3
3
1
3
6
118
36
24
10
1
1
38
13
14
2
2
6
1
12
18
13
3
6
3
2
7
1
258
151
79
8
3
12
4
1
157
46
72
10
9
15
5
1
171
114
46
4
1
2
3
1
112
40
45
12
3
10
2
10
1,181
656
3
371
50
3
4
15
54
11        1
1
1
13
4
7
1
1
6
1
2
1
1
1
25
	
7
15
7
67
1
1
1
4
2
8
1
4
1
2
8
9
1
4
1
3
2
112
20
2
Activity undetermined	
56
6
19
11
9
11
3
61
3
24
9
13
10
2
33
17
4
3
4
321
Inactive „ 	
25
4
4
1
2
1
3
3
1
127
48
59
2
2
1
	
10
	
1
Arrested _	
	
	
	
Active unimproved 	
Activity undetermined
161
109
20
7
16
5
2
133
76
19
7
19
7
3
1
29
36
2
51
169
12
3
63
2
187
214
17
11
34
1
192
225
24
16
40
3
4
2
226
205
41
18
33
5
6
3
181
161
44
31
28
8
7
1
216
183
27
25
39
11
3
71
45
7
6
24
4
37
29
7
3
9
2
17
10
3
4
1
1
1
4
4
1
1
1
1
9
Totals, all foregoing types—
1,477
1,459
222
Active unimproved  .	
132
343
Activity undetermined 	
51       3
2|       4
56
33
Sub-totals 	
681   3051   470
504
14
7
70
534
26
9
76
460
21
9
57
504
10
7
56
320
5
1
27
264
3
2
13
157
2
87
1
37
1
12
3,722
95
Other-
.1
 1    -
- -1       2
10J     24
10
3
46
40
7
1
 j       1
388
Totals
78
333
529
595
645
547
577
353
282
166
89
38
13
4,245
1 Includes 192 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 61
Table 45.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-
Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1946-55.
Total
Other than Indians
Indians
Year
Known
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Known
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Known
Cases1
Deaths2
Ratio
1946 	
1947. ..	
1948
14,069
15,408
16,812
18,483
19,428
18,709
18,927
19,590
20,206
20,858
576
536
442
406
313
292
214
146
123
137
24.4:1
28.7:1
38.0:1
45.5:1
62.1:1
64.1:1
88.0:1
134.2:1
164.3:1
152.3:1
12,254
13,430
14,528
15,738
16,438
15,404
15,497
15,807
16,151
16,613
369
362
286
295
239
212
179
122
100
116
33.2:1
37.1:1
50.8:1
53.3:1
68.8:1
72.7:1
86.1:1
129.6:1
161.5:1
143.2:1
1,815
1,978
2,284
2,745
2,990
3,305
3,430
3,783
4,055
4,245
207
174
156
111
74
80
35
24
23
21
8.8:1
11.4:1
14.6:1
1949	
1950	
1951  	
1952	
24.7:1
40.4:1
41.3:1
98.0:1
1953	
157.6:1
1954	
1955
176.3:1
202.1:1
1 These figures include: 1947, 141 Indians of white status; 1948, 84 Indians of white status; 1949, 93 Indians of
white status; 1950, 160 Indians of white status; 1951, 127 Indians of white status; 1952, 159 Indians of white status;
1953, 125 Indians of white status;  1954, 122 Indians of white status;  1955, 15 Indians of white status.
2 These figures include deaths of: 1947> 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 8 Indians
of white status; 1950, 4 Indians of white status; 1951, 10 Indians of white status; 1952, 3 Indians of white status; 1953,
3 Indians of white status;   1954, 3 Indians of white status;   1955, 2 Indians of white status.
NOTIFICATIONS OF TUBERCULOSIS
This table shows that there has been a reduction in new cases diagnosed in 1955,
from 1,450 in 1954 to 1,403. There were 1,163 in the other-than-Indian group and 240
Indians newly diagnosed as tuberculosis.
Table 46.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1951-55
Area
1951
1952
1953
1954
19551
48
94
80
852
198
71
56
133
121
17
5
13
27
44
53
748
178
72
27
113
92
11
2
15
It
30
48
742
170
76
34
166
155
43
3
23
13
21
52
760
209
63
25
139
131
22
14
37
44
736
Area 5.	
Area 6	
Area 7 - - —	
Area 8    	
271
95
26
91
49
Area 10 	
16
Unorganized   	
2
Totals 	
1,688
1,382
1,501
1,450
1,403
1 Includes 31 dead cases.
Source: Case Examination, Form TB. 1. C 62
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 47.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian
Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1951-55
Area
1951
1952
1953
1954
19551
Area 1   	
38
20
10
7
26
Area 2     	
94
43
27
21
36
Area 3    	
67
44
40
38
39
Area 4  	
816
730
720
740
709
Area 5.            _       	
151
134
136
169
244
Area 6	
29
28
29
27
19
Area 7 _	
19
15
12
16
7
Area 8  „ .„   .
58
39
37
49
39
Area 9 	
36
29
40
41
23
Area 10  	
6
1
18
10
12
5
2
3
2
13
15
22
13
7
Totals  	
1,332
1,100
1,094
1,131
1,163
1 Includes 27 dead cases.
Source: Case Examination, Form TB. 1.
Table 48.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population
of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1951-55
Area
1951
1952
1953
1954
19551
Area 1 	
10
7
1
6
3
Area 2  	
1
3
1
Area 3  	
13
9
8
14
5
Area 4 	
36
18
22
20
27
Area 5 	
47
44
34
40
27
42
44
47
36
76
Area 7	
37
12
22
9
19
Area 8	
75
74
129
90
52
Area 9   -	
85
63
115
90
26
Area 10     -   -
11
10
25
12
4
	
1
1
Totals
356
282
407
319
240
1 Includes 4 dead cases.
Includes 19 Indians of white status.
Source:  Case Examination, Form TB. 1.
The incidence of tuberculosis in the total population shows no change at 1.1 new
cases per thousand population. However, the incidence amongst Indians has been reduced from 10.2 per thousand to 7.5 per thousand. Further, it is noted that there is a
marked reduction in new cases, both Indians and other than Indians in Area 9, which for
some time has been the highest incidence area in the Province. In that area the number
of new other-than-Indian cases has been reduced from 41 to 23 and the Indians from 90
to 26. The total incidence in this area has been reduced from 5.8 per thousand to 2.1
per thousand. It, however, still remains higher than the Provincial average of 1.1 per
thousand.
Table 49.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases by Statistical Area,
by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1955
Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
0.9
0.2
6.3
0.6
0.3
7.2
0.5
0.4
4.3
1.0
1.0
6.7
1.1
0.7
4.4
2.0
0.6
14.5
1.3
0.9
7.9
2.0
1.3
8.6
2.1
2.3
4.6
1.0
0.7
5.0
1.1
0.9
Indian   —
7.5 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 63
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1955
(Excluding Indians)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Male        Female       Total
Dead
Male Female       Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1  	
School District No. 2 	
School District No. 3 	
School District No. 4 	
School District No. 5    _
School District No. 18  	
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 6  	
School District No. 7 	
School District No. 8  	
School District No. 10. 	
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 9- 	
School District No. 11.   _
School District No. 12 	
School District No. 13 	
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14	
School District No. 15 	
School District No. 16  	
School District No. 17	
School District No. 23  	
School District No. 77 	
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19 	
School District No. 20„  „
School District No. 21	
School District No. 22- 	
School District No. 78~_ 	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24  	
School District No. 25  	
School District No. 26	
School District No. 29  	
School District No. 30 _ 	
School District No. 31 __
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 27. 	
School District No. 28- 	
School District No. 55 — _.
School District No. 56  	
School District No. 57_ 	
School District No. 58 	
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack—
School District No. 32 	
School District No. 33- _ 	
School District No. 34  	
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35 _.
School District No. 36 	
School District No. 37   	
Metropolitan Health Committee, Vancouver-
School District No. 38	
School District No. 39 	
School District No. 41   _
School District No. 44... 	
School District No. 45 _
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 40	
School District No. 431... _.
North Fraser, Mission—
School District No. 42 _	
School District No. 75... 	
School District No. 76 	
4
19
7
243
22
13
4
23
17
13
4
7
11
3
183
23
7
5
5
13
5
2
6
1
11
2
5
1
4
2
1
7
4
1
13
2
7
5
2
3
2
3
8
5
T5"
2
22
12
11
30
3
15
426
45
20
9
31
31
11
6
1
17
1
I      ......      I
20
1
1 Includes 17 males and 14 females reported alive and 1 male and 2 females reported dead from Mental Health
Services, Essondale. C 64
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1955—Continued
(Excluding Indians)
2 Includes Victoria and Esquimau only.
3 Excludes Victoria, Esquimau, and Oak Bay.
i Includes Oak Bay only.
Health Unit and School District
Live
Dead
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47  	
School District No. 71  	
School District No. 77
3
6
1
1
7
4
3
5
2
52
36
2
7
2
12
4
1
7
8
4
3
3
1
9
2
1
4
2
6
2
3
7
1
3
1
1
5
34
14
5
7
2
1
1
4
4
4
1
1
6
3
1
1
3
10
7
1
1
10
5
4
10
2
86
50
7
14
4
12
5
2
11
8
8
7
4
2
15
5
1
4
3
7
2
1
	
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50 	
School District No. 51	
School District No. 52 	
School District No. 53
School District No. 54
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59
School District No. 60
School District No. 81
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of Health—
School District No. 61 (part)2  	
Saanich and South Vancouver Island—
School District No. 61 (part)3
School District No. 62
1
School District No. 63 	
School District No. 64    .   	
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
School District No   65
School District No. 67
School District No. 68    	
School District No. 69
School District No. 70
School District No. 79	
School districts not covered by health units—
School District No. 46 '	
School District No. 48            . .
School District No. 49	
School District No. 61 (part)4.	
School District No. 73 _	
Si-linnl nistrir-t Nn   74
School District No. 80
Ex-Province  -  ,   —
659
477
1,136
21
6
27 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 65
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1955
(Indians Only1)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Dead
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1	
......
1
1
1
1
2
1
5
17
4
16
2
1
4
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
......
i
i
2
1
1
1
8
13
2
9
5
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
4
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
13
30
6
25
7
2
5
1
1
3
2
1
5
2
3
1
6
	
1
School District No. 2  „	
School District No. 3 	
School District No. 18.	
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 6   	
School District No. 7	
	
School District No. 8.. _  .
School District No. 10   	
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 9.       	
School District No. 11	
School District No. 12	
School District No   1 3
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14	
School District No. 15	
School District No. 16  	
School District No. 17 	
School District No. 23	
School District No. 77  	
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19 	
School District No. 20 -	
School District No. 21— 	
School District No. 22.    	
School District No. 78	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24   	
School District No. 25  ...
School District No. 26  ...
School District No. 29    .
School District No. 30	
School District No. 31  	
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 27 	
School District No. 28- 	
School District No. 57 	
School District No. 58     	
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack—
School District No. 32   	
School District No. 33    	
School District No. 34	
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35 	
School District No. 36	
School District No. 37.    	
Metropolitan Health Committee, Vancouver—
School District No. 38 	
School District No. 39	
1
School District No. 41	
School District No. 44	
School District No. 45	
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 40  	
School District No. 432 _	
North Fraser, Mission—
School District No. 42	
School District No. 75  	
School District No. 76	
	
1 These figures include 19 Indians of white status.
2 Includes 2 males and 1 female reported alive from Mental Health Services, Essondale.
L C 66
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1955—Continued
(Indians Only1)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Dead
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47
2
1
3
1
14
1
3
1
3
3
5
"22
::::
4
3
1
3
2
2
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
19
—
6
3
2
6
3
16
4
1
2
1
1
3
2
4
5
8
1
41
1
......
School District No. 71
School District No. 72-	
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50	
School District No. 51 	
School District No. 52...    .
School District No. 53 	
School District No. 54 ._	
1
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59.....  	
1
School District No. 60
1
1
School District No. 81 	
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of Health—
School District No. 61 (part)3	
Saanich and South Vancouver Island—
School District No. 61 (part)4	
School District No. 67
School District No. 63                     	
School District No. 64
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
School District No. 65 	
—
School District No. 67                 	
1
School District No. 68  _
1
School District No. 69 	
School District No. 70   '	
School District No. 79      	
School districts not covered by health units—
School District No. 46  	
School District No. 48   	
School District No. 49. .  	
School District No. 61 (part)5 	
School District No. 73     _
School District No. 74 	
—
School District No. 80 — 	
127
109
236
2
2
4
1 These figures include 19 Indians of white status.
3 Includes Victoria and Esquimau only.
* Excludes Victoria, Esquimau, and Oak Bay.
5 Includes Oak Bay only.
Table 52.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1946-55
Racial Origin
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
Total          -
2,373
1,973
256
120
24
2,616
1,864
645
81
26
2,108
1,448
553
88
19
2,202
1,525
578
78
21
1,699
1,220
373
86
20
1,688
1,209
356
100
23
1,383
999
282
85
17
1,501
926
407
140
28
1,450
1,040
319
80
U
1,501
White _ . .
1,065
240
92
Japanese 	
6
1 Includes notifications of: 1947, 21 Indians of white status; 1948, 27 Indians of white status; 1949, 34 Indians of
white status; 1950, 10 Indians of white status; 1951, 21 Indians of white status; 1952, 26 Indians of white status; 1953,
25 Indians of white status;  1954, 22 Indians of white status;  1955, 19 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 67
Chart 10.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1946-55
Mo. OF CASES
2000
^s,
TOTAL
WHITE
/
—,_
/
s.
/
N.
/
/
	
^^_
s^
■>..
t
^
^>
\
Oft
v».
"-   ««^
V
•.
90
^s
**"■■'— ^
^ —■*
X
-H.     ^^
60
_— •»
JAPANESE
-     -*
*
s
s
\
\
/
s
\
\
\
s
^
\
s
N
1946 1947 1948 1949
1952 1953 1954 1955 C 68
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Of the total new cases diagnosed, there were 587 classified as active, there being
446 new active cases amongst the other than Indians and 141 Indians. This compares
with a total of 646 new active cases diagnosed in 1954, with 486 other than Indians and
180 Indians. It is interesting to note that in 1955 there were 27 cases notified on death,
as compared with 56 in 1954. In breaking down the active cases we find that 84 were
primary, 197 minimal, 200 moderately advanced, and 106 far advanced.
Table 53.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition,
and Age-group, 1955
(Excluding Indians)
Age-group
Diagnosis
«
Q
1
GO
rt
2
HI
a
u
rt
T
O
CO
fi
On
5
W
H
rt
o
><
o
ts
1/1
Ih
rt
u
!*
ON
1/,
Ch
CQ
li
a
!*
Os
cn
i
Cfl
H
rt
u
>>
o\
ci
Cfl
I-I
«
fi
<o
ci
CO
Ih
rt
CJ
Os
so
2
t/J
Ih
rt
a
PH
Os
S
>
o
3
o
00
u
rt
o
S5
"rt
12
28
3
4
16
5
5
2
3
6
1
5
1
1
2
1
1
i
i
122
40
25
33
24
98
34
14
28
22
	
—
	
	
55
5
7
11
1
84
28
14
20
22
83
31
12
23
16
1
27
3
1
13
8
2
22
18
1
3
37
6
1
1
1
1
11
1
6
4
53
15
6
20
12
65
17
9
21
17
1
49
16
7
12
13
1
26
2
1
18
3
2
20
9
2
2
3
2
9
1
1
4
3
6
2
1
1
1
1
578
186
91
166
132
2
6
18
31
2
4
19
6
53
6
5
29
13
44
1
6
29
7
1
19
1
3
15
35
1
3
24
6
18
17
250
16
2
13
2
1
24
6
155
48
Dead -  	
6
1
	
7
8
1
7
11
1
10
2
	
7
11
9
2
4
1
1
Dead               -	
1
17
Dead   -  	
20
14
48
23
1
47
31
72
37
36
23
72
29
1
29
17
61
28
2
34
13
54
25
1
5
18
8
41
16
12
Totals, all foregoing types—
11
1
4
4
16
5
3
4
2
17
4
15
8
41
14
1
3
3
9
5
4
1
2
209
126
446
187
3
Dead  	
	
	
	
24
12
3
29
5
7
3
6
23
3
4
79
9
7
106
11
16
187
7
1611 137
132
2
95
24
3
995
Other-
3
2
40
25
31
12
6
2
4
1
2
4
125
3
Totals         -	
15
34
16
30
95
133
219
195
151
142
100
26
7
1,163
1 Three cases of far advanced tuberculosis with silicosis reported. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 69
Table 54.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition,
and Age-group, 1955
(Indians Only1)
Age-group
Diagnosis
Cfl
Ih
rt
Hi
tn
H
d
CO
J"
Ih
rt
u
Tt
3
co
H
PS
to
><
o\
*7
«o
Ih
a
u
Tf
CM
2
CN
Cfl
Ih
rt
u
s*
CN
1
>n
CN
Cfl
Ih
c3
u
>H
Os
en
i
cn
Cfl
tH
rt
u
t*
ej\
Tf
CO
H
rt
o
OS
tn
i
CO
H
CO
2
VO
Cfl
•h
ci
u
►•
4
u
OJ
>
o
■o
5
rt
o
00
•o
rt
w
o
Z
Is
o
H
17
28
1
9
18
21
7
3
11
6
3
2
1
1
_   -
2
1
1
7
7
4
i
i
12
1
1
8
2
3
3
3
8
2
3
1
2
4
4
13
8
2
3
8
7
1
1
9
5
1
2
1
5
4
1
3
—
	
74
11
1
15
1
15
47
1
Dead                          - —
3
5
5
5
1
1
3
4
1
3
	
66
17
1
1
1
1
4
5
12
31
	
6
Dead 	
1
3
8
5
2
2
48
1
3
8
5
2
1
1
1
1
45
2
Dead— ■■
1
4
4
21
4
3
4
3
3
5
1
9
2
1
1
19
1
8
2
10
1
1
Dead  "
1
2
1
12
1
1
15
2
2
3
5
2
Dead  _
Totals, all foregoing types—
1
15
1
1
10
20
1
7
4
18
3
2
18
1
1
12
1
1
5
2
1
28
27
142
9
Dead- ,	
1
3
17
32
29
1
23
15
2
13
1
3
19
3
1
12
1
2
22
1
17
1
6
3
1
209
Other-
5
4
4
2
1
4
25
Dead, non-pulmonary    _
1
Totals	
21
36
32
24
21
17
23
15
23
18
6
3
1
240
1 Inculdes 19 Indians of white status.
2 No cases of far advanced tuberculosis with silicosis reported.
In Table 55 it is noted that there is a further reduction in cases found in the younger
age-groups. In 1954 there were 119 notifications in persons under the age of 19 years,
compared with 95 in 1955. It is also of interest that in the non-pulmonary new diagnoses
there has been a reduction in cases from 177 to 154. C 70
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 55.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1955
(Excluding Indians)
Diagnosis on Notification
Age-group
6>
£--
O   Cv
Z55
Pulmonary—
Primary _     M.
F.
Minimal   M.
F.
Moderately advanced     M.
F.
Far advanced  — —M.
F.
Far advanced with silicosis _M.
F.
Type not stated — M.
F.
Dead1   _ M.
F.
Total pulmonary - M.
F.
T.
Tuberculous pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion — M.
F.
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion M.
F.
Dead1     M.
F.
Total tuberculous pleurisy  _M.
F.
T.
Non-pulmonary—
Meninges   .M.
F.
Intestines and peritoneum  M.
F.
Vertebral column    M.
F.
Tuberculoma    -M.
F.
Bones and joints  _Mi
F.
Skin    M.
F.
Lymphatic system .  M.
F.
Genito-urinary system M.
F.
Miliary  _.   _M.
F.
Other respiratory system  - _M.
F.
Other non-pulmonary M.
F.
Dead1 _ M.
F.
Total non-pulmonary  M.
F.
T.
Total notifications - M.
F.
 T.
1 Dead on notification.
Source:  Case Examination, Form TB. 1.
2 3
1       6
3 9
26
80
99 81
187| 161
98
39
137
58
75
133
1031 931 103
1161 102 48
219|  1951  151
44
100
32
132
30
25
335
242
159
85
59
34
19
5
31   604
....    391
3|   995
105
37
142
85
15
100
25]      5
II      2
261      7
20
16
22
18
40
10
7
9
24
18
19
54
74
128
680
483
1,163 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 71
Table 56.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1955
(Indians Only1)
Age-group
Diagnosis on Notification
to
H
Hd"     rt
i   w
eg
Ih
ON 2
2§
Si*
2 S2
tN^
ON   »
ifi
ON   «
m h*h
NO?"'
ON   «
7«
r~i>"
•a
5 »
rt u
So
•a
o rt
Zd
rt
O
Pulmonary—
. --M.
n
6
18
10
2
1
1
9
12
2
3
1
2
5
1
3
2
2
6
3
1
1
2
3
4
1
3
2
1
6
2
2
7
5
1
2
2
2
1
1
l
i
l
1
4.
Minimal    - 	
F.
M.
F.
_ ..M.
l
5
7
2
1
2
1
5
3
3
1
7
6
4
4
30
32
34
24
F.
.... M.
23
12
F.
2
7
—:
1
F.
 M.
	
	
F.
.    M.
2
F.
.... M.
	
1
1
11
6
17
20
11
32
121    13
10
5
15
5
8
13
9
10
19
8
4
12
12
10
22
8
9
17
3
3
6
2
1
3
1
1
114
F.
T.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
T.
 M.
17
29
10
23
95
209
Tuberculous pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion —
2
1
	
1
	
	
	
	
1
	
1
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion
Dead2  .,	
	
1
	
	
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
	
	
	
1
2
5
Non-pulmonary—
1
2
1
_
__
1
1
1
2
1
	
	
1
	
F.
.. M.
4
F.
_.   M.
1
	
1
F.
 M.
1
F.
 M.
1
_
2
1
1
1
2
_
1
Skin       	
F.
 M.
1
F.
M.
8
F.
 M.
5
1
F.
 _M.
2
	
F.
 M.
F.
M.
	
	
	
F.
 M.
1
Dead2      	
1
F.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
1
2       2
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
4
2
1
3
1
3
4
1
1
2
1
1
1
I
11
2
4
2
4
	
15
26
Total notifications	
13
8
21
23
13
36
13
19
32
13
11
24
13
8
21
8
9
17
10
13
23
10
5
15
12
11
23
9
9
18
3
3
6
2
1
3
1
1
129
111
240
1 Includes notification of 19 Indians of white :
2 Dead on notification.
Source:  Case Examination, Form TB. 1. C 72 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 11.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia
by Diagnosis, 1955
EXCLUDING  INDIANS
DEAD   NON-PULMONARY   0.3
DEAD j
PULMONARY 2.1%
TUBERCULOSIS
PLEURISY 3.4%
INDIANS
DEAD  NON-PULMONARY   0.4%.
PRIMARY
30.8%
MINIMAL
27.5%
DEAD                        _P£rr
PULMONARY 1-3% T-—-
TUBERCULOSIS \Z-
PLEURISY 2.1% V"^
MODERATELY
\       /     NON-          /
V/   PULMONARY  /
\           10.4%        /
ADVANCED
19.6% TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 73
Z
o
H
<
>-l
P
P-.
O
Pi
O
O
CO
o"
O
W
P-C
c*>
w
H
■a!
in"
in
I
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0 C 74
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 12.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group1
and Sex, 1941-55, Rates per 100,000 Population
(Excluding Indians)
400
300
RATE
0-4 YRS
RATE
5-9 YRS.
400
• m %\
i    %
•A*
*«^ " "
£*<£
0
^
0
(•OFEMA
r*         1
LE
i
,
;""*
**""
1941 42 43 44 45 44 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 1955     1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 1955
1
'
1
— I
I
FEMALE
\
\
MALE   '
/       N
^ ^
,ffrS<
%
1
'
ATE
5-19 YRS.
FEMALE %
t
%
\
1     \
1        \
'.A   »
i
A
^ALE-^
%
•fN
0
i
i
1
!
i
i
i
1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 1955      1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 1955
RATE
2
0-29 YRS.
300
MALE
/ x
i
St>sL
/ FEMA
E          \
V
\
\
\
TV                \
0
i
i
RATE
30 ■ 39 YRS.
i
MALE
if \
y
j*  ""
•
FEMALE
\      X
l&.^r
100
0
l
i
1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 1955      1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 1955
1 Breakdown by sex was not available for the 10-14 and 15-19 age-group from 1941 to 1943. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 75
Chart 12.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group
and Sex, 1941-55, Rates per 100,000 Population—Continued
(Excluding Indians)
"■ 1
i
1
1
\male
r*
'    FEMA
\
--''
\
r
1
1
1
1
l^„.
*•■**
RATE
50 ■ 59 YRS.
4UU
(
1
\ MALE
"ADO
4
1
a
i
V FEMALE                      \.
\                                           T
N   ,"
V      »       / V
— x'
_  1
\>
\
*'
+ *
0
1
,
i
|
'
1
,
1941 42   43    44    45   46   47   48    49   50   51    52    53    54 1955 1941 42   43    44    45    46    47   48    49    50    51    52    53    54 1955
60-69 YRS RATE
400
300
1-
\
I
A
male/
I
A
\
FEMALE'
/
1
/
/
\
\
\
•h.
V
vX
^ —-
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-*
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0
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1
IMALE
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\
1
v
1
1
<
1...^
V*
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1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 1955     1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 1955
(ATE
80 YRS. AND OVER
(ATE
TOTAL
1
i
I
1
i
^AlE
200
100
mm*
/
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t
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4*<»
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f
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t
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i
0
i
1
i
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i
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,
1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 1955      1941 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 1955 C 76
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
It is noted for the first time we are beginning to show a reduction in the ratio of new
cases to deaths, the present ratio being 11.0 to 1 as compared with 11.8 to 1 in 1954.
Table 58.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
in British Columbia, 1951-55
Total
Other than Indians
Indians
Year
New
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
New
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
New
Cases1
Deaths2
Ratio
1951	
195?
1,688
1,383
1,501
1,450
1,501
292
215
146
123
137
5.8:1
6.4:1
10.3:1
11.8:1
11.0:1
1,332
1,101
1,094
1,131
1,261
212
180
122
100
116
6.3:1
6.1:1
9.0:1
11.3:1
10.9:1
356
282
407
319
240
80
35
24
23
21
4.S:1
8.1:1
1953	
1954	
17.0:1
13.9:1
1955              -.-	
11.4:1
1 Includes notifications of:   1951, 10 Indians of white status;   1952, 26 Indians of white status;   1953, 25 Indians of
white status;  1954, 22 Indians of white status;   1955, 19 Indians of white status.
2 Includes deaths of:   1951, 10 Indians of white status;   1952, 3 Indians of white status;   1953, 3 Indians of white
status;  1954, 3 Indians of white status;  1955, 2 Indians of white status.
TUBERCULOSIS MORTALITY
There has been an increase in the total deaths, to 137 in 1955 from 123 in 1954,
giving an increased rate from 9.7 to 10.5 per 100,000.
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1951-55
Total Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Vrea
Area
Area
8
9
10
28
22
10
15
8
1
13
5
2
8
8
2
16
5
69.5
105.6
69.5
36.3
37.4
6.8
30.6
22.7
13.0
18.3
35.3
12.9
35.5
21.4
Total
Mortality—
1951	
1952	
1953	
1954..
1955..
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1951  	
1952  __
1953  	
1954    _
1955  	
14.5 I
10.6 |
6.9 |
6.7
9.7
9
11
6
3
4
15.0
17.8  |
9.7 I
4.6
5.9
12.9
10.0
4.9
7.1
3.4
144
129
86
72
78
22.2
19.3
12.5
10.2
10.7
42 13
27 10
18 |      9
12 |      8
21 4
19.5
12.2
8.2
5.1  |
8.7  j
31.1
23.3
20.0
17.6
8.4
10
2
1
2
3
54.8
10.7
4.6
10.1
14.7
292
214
146
1231
137
25.1
17.9
11.9
9.7
10.5
1 Excludes deaths of 2 ex-Province residents.
Preliminary figures for 1955. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 77
There has been a decrease in Indian deaths from 23 to 21, with a decrease in the
rate from 73.17 to 65.2. The rate for other than Indians is 9.1 per 100,000, having
increased from 8.1 per 100,000.
Table 60.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area,
1951-55.
Other-than-Indian Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
Area
Area
9
10
8
1
2
	
2
1
1
2
2
50.8
7.2
12.2
12.0
7.0
5.8
13.6
11.3
  |
Total
Mortality—
1951	
1952	
1953	
1954	
1955	
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—■
1951	
1952 	
1953 	
1954
1955..
11.0
10.7
7.0
6.8
6.6
9
11
6
3
15.0
17.8
9.5
4.6
6.0
10.5
8.9
4.9
6.0
3.5
135
125
86
70
77
20.9
18.8
12.6
10.0 I
10.6 j
33
20
15
9
17
15.8
9.3
6.8
4.0
7.3
21.5
15.7
5.1
5.0
7.2
31.7
5.9
11.4
11.1
5
5
3
4
6
14.3
14.0
8.2
10.6
15.4
215
179
122
1001
116
18.9
15.3
10.2
8.1
9.1
1 Excludes deaths of 2 ex-Province residents.
Preliminary figures for 1955.
Table 61.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1951-55
Indian Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality—
195l1    	
1
1
9
9
5
5
23
14
9
77
19521   -	
  1      1
4
7
4
2
10
6
1
35
19531 	
3
7
10
3
1
24
19541
1
2
3
6
4
1    23
19551-	
1
1
4
1
1
10
3
  1    21
Mortality rate per 100,000 popula
1
tion—
j
1951  	
228.3
  1 175.0
302.2
157.4
105.9
216.5
428.6
278.6
1,267.6
270.4
1952   .	
  1           93.9
114.4
120.6
83.3
90.6
180.6
115.6
136.4
119.1
1953...	
  1     |   ...   ..
50.1
141.5
	
175.2
56.1
132.6
79.2
1954 	
-  1     ]    88.7
53.9 .
48.7
117.8
68.1
127.1
73.7
1955	
210.5          .... 1     .   .
24.8
64.9
19.0
41.3
164.9
52.7
65.2
1 Includes deaths of:   1951, 7 Indians of white status;   1952, 3 Indians of white status;
status;  1954, 3 Indians of white status;  1955, 2 Indians of white status.
1953, 3 Indians of white C 78
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1955
(Excluding Indians)
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
8
1
3
1
1
1
1
53
2
49
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
13
1
9
2
1
2
2
11
5
66
3
58
3
2
Area No. 5a	
8
5
3
2
2
3
2
1
1
1
7
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
15
9
2
4
Fernie —	
Area No. 5c—	
Area No. 5d 	
Area No. 3a	
Area No. 6f  	
Lillooet	
Area No. 7c —
Unorganized  ' '
2
2
3
3
Kent
3
Langley. 	
Quesnel 	
Unorganized	
Area No. 9d 	
2
1
2
2
North Vancouver .
Totals...	
87
29
116
North Vancouver District	
Table 63.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1955
(Indians Only1)
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
Area No. 8c.— —
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
Area No. 8d 	
2
2
5
Unorganized —-	
Unorganized	
Area No. 8f	
Unorganized	
5
Area No. 9c	
Unorganized	
Area No. 9f 	
Unorganized 	
Totals 	
2
2
10
11
21
1 Includes deaths of 2 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955                                     C 79
There were 2 deaths under 20 years of age—one an Indian in the 15-19-year age-
group and one other than Indian who was under 1 year of age.   Of the 137 deaths, 127
were due to pulmonary tuberculosis, 2 to tuberculous meningitis, 3 to disseminated tuberculosis, and 5 to other forms of non-pulmonary tuberculosis.
Table 64.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-group, 1955
Excluding Indians
Age-group
Diagnosis
o
H
o
es -
H05M
2
"So
B'l
TB. of
Intestines
and
Peritoneum
Is
Uh£  c
°S §
m So
H>U
T3
C
es
• S a
m os
H«5
o
rt _
oag
TB. of
Genitourinary
System
<*_<           Cfl
°S§
Poo
.AS*
EHS
s'ga
Under 1 year	
1- 4 years	
5-9    „    	
5
15
17
15
33
19
4
i
i
1
--
....
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
17
17
15
35
21
4
10-14    „         _   	
15-19    „      	
20-24   „      	
25-29    „     	
30-39    „ -
40-49    „ 	
50-59    „    	
60-69   „    	
70-79    „   	
80 years and over  	
Totals	
108
2
1
....      |      ....
1
2
1
2
116
Indians Only1
Under 1 year 	
2
1
6
1
1
3
4
....
1
....
—
—
1
1
2
1
7
2
1
3
4
5- 9    „    	
10-14    „	
15-19    „     	
20-24    „    „ 	
25-29    „    -   .
30-39    „    —	
40-49    „    ..   .   .
50-59    „        	
60-69    „    	
70-79    „     	
80 years and over  .
Totals .   	
19
1
.-.
....
—
1
21
1 Includes 2 Indians of
Source: Death Registr
white st£
ations, 19
tus.
55. C 80
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
There were no deaths in the Japanese population, but the Chinese group accounted
for 14 deaths, and at 188.9 produced the highest rate amongst all races.
Table 65.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals, 1946-55.
Total Province
Indians
Excluding Indians
Year
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100.000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
1946    	
576
536
442
406
313
292
214
146
123
137
1,003,000
1,044,000
1,082,000
1,114,000
1,138,000
1,165,210
1,198,000
1,230,000
1,266,000
1,305,000
57.4
51.3
40.9
36.4
27.5
25.1
17.9
11.9
9.7
10.5
207
1741
1561
Ul1
741
771
351
241
231
21i
26,400
27,000
28,000
28,500
29,000
28,478
29,400
30,300
31,200
32,200
784.1
644.4
557.1
389.5
255.2
270.4
120.7
79.2
73.7
65.2
369
362
286
295
239
215
179
122
100
116
976,600
1,017,000
1,054,000
1,085,000
1,109,000
1,136,732
1,168,600
1,199,700
1,234,800
1,272,800
37.8
1947	
35.6
1948
1949	
1950	
1951.    	
27.2
21.6
18.9
1952 ■    	
15.3
1953           .      .   _
10.2
1954	
8.1
1955     	
9.1
Chinese
Japanese
Excluding Indians and
Orientals
Year
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
1946
44
40
33
22
24
31
23
17
9
14
15,600
15,400
15,200
14,900
15,000
15,933
15,900
15,800
15,750
15,750
282.1
359.7
217.1
147.7
160.0
194.6
144.7
107.6
57.1
88.9
13
12
8
5
6
4
2
2
2
7,000
7,000
7,000
7,500
8,000
7,169
7,400
7,450
7,500
7,600
185.7
171.4
114.3
66.7
75.0
55.8
27.0
26.8
26.7
312
310
245
268
209
180
154
103
89
102
954,000
994,600
1,031,800
1,063,100
1,086,000
1,113,630
1,145,400
1,176,450
1,211,550
1,259,450
32 7
1947 	
31.2
1948	
23.8
1949   	
25.2
1950          	
19.2
1951	
16.2
1952  	
13.4
1953-   	
1954	
8.8
7.4
1955	
8.1
1 Includes deaths of; 1947, 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 8 Indians of white
status; 1950, 4 Indians of white status; 1951, 7 Indians of white status; 1952, 3 Indians of white status; 1953, 3 Indians
of white status;  1954, 3 Indians of white status;  1955, 2 Indians of white status.
Note.—"Indian deaths" includes all deaths of persons of Indian racial origin, whether they were Indians under the
meaning of the "Indian Act" or not, except in 1946.
Source:  Mortality—Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1946 to 1954, inclusive (1955 figures preliminary only). TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 81
Chart 13.—Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals, 1946-55. C 82
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 66.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of
British Columbia by Age-group, 1951-55
Age-group
Year
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Total
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
1951	
11
4
2
7
8
6
19
21
29
58
25
3
193
1952.. .....         	
6
2
1
8
3
3
16
12
28
39
27
4
149
1953 	
4
	
1
1
4
6
11
16
27
25
5
100
1954	
2
.
1
1
3
15
24
18
17
6
87
1955
1
1
2
1
10
10
14
30
22
6
97
Preliminary figures for 1955.
Source: Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1951 to 1954.
Table 67.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of
British Columbia by Age-group, 1951-55
Age-group
Year
Total
0-4
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
80 and
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Over
1951	
8
1
4
11
12
8
22
11
4
4
11
3
99
1952     	
1
3
2
2
4
10
15
10
5
7
3
3
65
1953 :	
7
1
1
2
3
8
6
6
1
7
4
46
1954
4
1
1
1
4
5
12
14
4
9
1
2
4
5
4
2
1
2
36
1955 	
40
Preliminary figures for 1955.
Source: Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1951 to 1954.
Table 68.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of
British Columbia by Age-group, 1951-55
Age-group
Year
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Total
1951       ,1           	
1952	
19
7
11
6
1
5
5
1
1
6
3
1
1
18
10
1
1
1
20
7
3
3
14
13
7
5
6
41
31
14
15
24
32
22
17
19
19
33
33
22
25
16
62
46
28
22
35
36
30
31
21
24
6
7
8
1
8
292
214
1953 ....	
1954
146
123
1955.      I	
137
Preliminary figures for 1955.
Source: Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1951 to 1954. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 83
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o vo -i tn r-
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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
CQ
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Cm CO TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1955
C 85
Chart 16.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population and
the Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1955
EXCLUDING  INDIANS
INDIANS C 86
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 71.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by
Length of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, .1955
Length of Residence in British Columbia
Place of Death
1-5
Months
6-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3
Years
4
Years
5
Years
Over 5
Years
Not
Stated
Total
Hospitals and other institutions1	
2
1
1
1
36
53
1
6
3
1
40
61
3
7
1
6
Home   —
Other                         	
8
1
Totals	
2
1
....
1
1     1     100
11
116
1 Includes 9 cases dead on arrival at hospital.
2 Excludes 34 deaths occurring in tuberculosis institutions in which the underlying cause of death was other than
tuberculosis.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1956
235-656-3732  

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