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Minister of Mines PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT For the Year Ended 31st December 1955 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1957

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 Minister of Mines
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year Ended 31st December
1955
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1956 BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
VICTORIA, B.C.
Hon. W. K. Kiernan, Minister.
John F. Walker, Deputy Minister.
H. C. Hughes, Chief Inspector of Mines.
G. Cave-Browne-Cave, Chief Analyst and Assayer.
Hartley Sargent, Chief, Mineralogical Branch.
P. J. Mulcahy, Chief Gold Commissioner.
J. D. Lineham, Chief, Petroleum and Natural Gas Conservation Branch. To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Mining Industry of the Province for the year 1955 is
herewith respectfully submitted.
W. K. KIERNAN,
Minister of Mines.
Minister of Mines' Office.
May, 1956.  CONTENTS
Page
Introduction     A 7
Review of the Mineral Industry     A 9
Statistics—
Method of Computing Production  A 13
Table I.—Total Mine Production for All Years Up to and Including 1955— A 17
Table II.—Production for Each Year from 1836 to 1955, Inclusive  A 17
Table III.—Quantity and Value of Mine Products for Years 1946 to 1955— A 18
Table IV (Graph).—Mineral Production Value, 1895-1955  A 20
Table V (Graph).—Principal Lode-metals Production, 1913-55  A 21
Table VI.—Production of Principal Metals, 1858-1955  A 22
Table VIIa.—Production, 1954 and 1955, by Mining Divisions—Summary— A 24
Table VIIb.—Production, 1954 and 1955, by Mining Divisions — Principal
Lode Metals  A 25
Table Vila—Production, 1954 and 1955, by Mining Divisions—Miscellaneous
Metals  A 26
Table VIId.—Production, 1954 and 1955, by Mining Divisions — Industrial
Minerals  A 27
Table VIIe.—Production, 1954 and 1955, by Mining Divisions—Structural
Materials  A 28
Table VIIIa.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Summary  A 29
Table VIIIb.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions — Principal Lode
Metals  A 30
Table VIIIc.—Production   to   Date  by  Mining  Divisions — Miscellaneous
Metals   A 31
Table VIIId.—Production to  Date by Mining Divisions—Industrial Minerals    A 3 3
Table VIHe.—Production to Date by Mining Divisions—Structural Materials A 35
Table IXa.—Quantity (Gross) and Value of Coal per Year to Date  A 36
Table IXb.—Coal Production (Gross) by Districts and Mining Divisions  A 36
Table IXc—Quantity and Value of Coal Sold and Used, 1946-55  A 37
Table X.—Coke and By-products Production for Years  1895 to 1925 and
1926 to 1955  A 38
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1955  A 39
Table XII.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for Mining Operations
of All Classes  A 43
Table XIII.—Average Number Employed in the Mining Industry, 1901-55.— A 44
Table XIV.—Lode-metal Mines—Tonnage, Number of Mines, Net and Gross
Value of Principal Metals, 1901-55  A 45
Table XV.—Lode-metal Producers in 1955  A 46
Table XVI.—Lode-metal Mines Employing an Average of Ten or More Men
during 1955  A 50
Departmental Work  A 51
Offices  A 51
Administrative Branch  A 51
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)  A 51
Mining Divisions Amalgamated since 1949  A 52
List of Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-mining Recorders   A 52
Gold Commissioners' and Mining Recorders' Office Statistics, 1955  A 54
Coal, Petroleum and Natural Gas  A 55
Mining Laws and Laws Related to the Mineral Industry  A 56
Analytical and Assay Branch  A 57
A 5 A 6 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
Departmental Work—Continued page
Inspection Branch  A 5 8
Mineralogical Branch  A 59
Petroleum and Natural Gas Branch  A 61
Grub-staking Prospectors  A 61
Museums  A 65
Publications  A 65
Maps Showing Mineral Claims, Placer Claims, and Placer-mining Leases  A 65
Joint Offices of the British Columbia Department of Mines and the Department
of Mines and Technical Surveys, Canada  A 65
Topographic Mapping and Air Photography  A 67
Department of Mines and Technical Surveys  A 69
Geological Survey of Canada  A 69
Field Work by the Geological Survey in British Columbia, 1955  A 69
Publications of the Geological Survey  A 70
Mines Branch  A 70
Lode Metals         1
Placer       81
Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals       87
Petroleum and Natural Gas     103
Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries     109
Coal     129
Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations     165
List of Publications     183
List of Libraries     189
Lode-metal Deposits Referred to in the 1955 Annual Report     191
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Photographs
Camp and snowmobile on upper Salmon Glacier       15
Aeroplane at head of south fork of Leduc Glacier       15
Highland Valley region, looking up Witches Brook on the left to Quiltanton Lake to
right of centre.  Pukaist Creek valley near right margin.  Junction of Thompson
and Nicola Rivers in centre distance       35
Highland Valley region, looking north past Pimainus Lake to Quiltanton Lake.
Forge Mountain on centre line of photo. Kamloops at upper right distance _ 35
Highland-Bell, Beaverdell, from the air.   No. 4 adit and old Bell dumps at left; new
2900 adit at bottom of photo; Beaverdell on right margin       49
Reeves MacDonald mine and camp, looking north       49
Placer drilling in the Pundata Creek area, Barkerville       84
Kumhila washing plant in Conklin Gulch, Barkerville       84
Imperial KahntahNo. 1 well     106
Drilling seismic holes in muskeg     106
Ten-ton cars at "A" North mine, Michel     153
Stripping overburden on Baldy Mountain     153
Drawings
Figure
1. Deer Horn Mines Limited—principal showings       27
2. Block diagram of Yreka orebody       77
3. Average dust counts obtained each year since 1937     124 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MINISTER
OF MINES, 1955
Introduction
A Report of the Minister of Mines of the Province of British Columbia has been
published each year since 1874.
The Annual Report records the salient facts in the progress of the mineral industry,
also much detail about individual operations, including those undertaken in the search
for, exploration of, and development of mineral deposits, as well as the actual winning
of material from mineral deposits.
The Annual Report of the Minister of Mines now contains introductory sections
dealing with Statistics and Departmental Work, followed by sections dealing with Lode
Metals; Placer; Structural Materials and Industrial Minerals; Petroleum and Natural
Gas; Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries; Coal; and Inspection of
Electrical Equipment and Installations at Mines and Quarries, each with its own table
of contents. A table listing the properties described, in geographic groupings, precedes
the index.
An introductory review of the mineral industry and notes at the first of several of
the main sections deal generally with the industry or its principal subdivisions. Notes
in the various sections deal briefly with exploration or production operations during
the year or describe a property in more complete detail, outlining the history of past work
and the geological setting as well as describing the workings and the mineral deposits
exposed in them.   Some notes deal with areas rather than with a single property.
The work of the branches of the Department is outlined briefly in the section on
Departmental Work. This section is followed by notes dealing briefly with the work of
the British Columbia or Federal Government services of particular interest to the mineral
industry of British Columbia. Information concerning mine operations and some of the
activities of the Inspection Branch of the Department of Mines is contained in the section
on Inspection of Lode Mines, Placer Mines, and Quarries, early in the section on Coal
and in the section on Inspection of Electrical Equipment and Installations at Mines and
Quarries.
The section on Statistics begins with an outline of current and past practice in
arriving at quantities and calculating the value of the various products.
A 7  Review of the Mineral Industry in British
Columbia, 1955
By Hartley Sargent
The mineral production of British Columbia in 1955 had a value of $174,710,606,
exceeded only by the record value of $175,613,693 reached in 1951. The 1955 value
exceeds that of 1954 by $21,000,000, reflecting higher prices for all the principal metals,
a substantial increase in the output of zinc, and increased values for miscellaneous metals,
industrial minerals, and structural materials. The value for fuel is somewhat less than in
1954; it is derived dominantly from coal but includes production of some natural gas.
The mint price for newly mined Canadian gold* was higher in 1955 than in 1954
because the United States dollar was at a lesser discount. The prices for the other
principal metals were greater than in 1954 by the following approximate percentages:
Silver, 5.9; lead, 9.1; zinc, 15.4; and copper, 31.5. The 1955 copper price was an
all-time record. The prices for silver, lead, and zinc, although higher than in 1954, were
well below the 1951 prices.
The quantities of gold, silver, copper, and lead were less than in 1954, but the
quantity of zinc was materially greater than in 1954 or any previous year. The combination of quantity and price gave values for gold and silver that were somewhat below
the 1954 values, and a value for lead about equal to the 1954 value, whereas copper and
zinc greatly exceeded their 1954 values but did not reach the records set for copper in
1929 and for zinc in 1951. The values for precious metals were below those of recent
years, but the increased values for zinc and copper offset this decline and gave the
principal metals group a value well above that reached in any previous year except 1951
and 1952.
Most of the increase in output of zinc was zinc recovered by " fuming " current and
reclaimed slags at the Trail smelter, which is in the tables as " not assigned " {see Table
VIIb ). Next in volume was the increase from the Nelson Mining Division, reflecting the
beginning of production from the H.B. mine in May, the resumption of production at
the Reeves MacDonald mine in October, and substantially increased production from the
Jersey mine. Increased output from the Golden, Revelstoke, and Slocan Mining Divisions
stemmed mainly from the increased output of the Mineral King, Spider, and Bluebell
mines. Along with the increases in zinc from the mines named went increased production
of lead and silver that partly offset the decreased output of these metals from the Fort
Steele Mining Division.
The year witnessed the closing of the historic Nickel Plate mine at Hedley. In two
periods, 1904 to 1931 and 1931 to 1955, this mine produced gold valued at more than
$37,000,000; that is, about 9 per cent of the British Columbia lode-gold production
to date.
The value of miscellaneous metals in 1955 was higher than in 1954 but lower than
in 1953. The 1955 figure reflects record production of cadmium and indium, both
recovered as by-products at the Trail smelter. Antimony also had a value materially
higher than in 1954, but bismuth, iron, tin, and tungsten were somewhat lower than in
1954. The value for the group, although greater than in 1954, was less than in 1953,
when the iron output was 50 per cent higher and was valued at more than twice the 1955
figure. The increases in sales of by-product metals recovered at the Trail smelter are
noteworthy. Increases were recorded for antimony (as antimonial lead), cadmium, and
indium.   Indium production was 104,744 ounces, valued at $232,389 in 1955, the first
* Prices are averages for the year, in Canadian funds, unless otherwise stated.    The prices for the principal metals
and coal are listed on page A 16.
A   9 A 10 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
year that production has exceeded 7,000 ounces or a value of $15,000. This metal has
very specialized uses, including use in superior bearings.
In the lode-mining field, exploration interest was focused most strongly on copper,
and in addition to the continued exploration campaign on the Granduc property there
was much activity elsewhere, including Vancouver Island, the Highland Valley-Kamloops-
Nicola area, the old Boundary camp, and the Hope-Princeton area. Exploration and
development of silver-lead-zinc deposits was at a satisfying level and produced encouraging results at Ainsworth and Silverton, at properties in the Golden Mining Division, and
at the Highland-Bell mine at Beaverdell.
Dividends from lode-metal operations amounted to $34,823,111. Two lode-mining
companies, Canadian Exploration Limited and Yale Lead & Zinc Mines Limited,
distributed dividends for the first time.
The 1955 value for industrial minerals was higher than for any previous year because
of record output of asbestos, sulphur, and barite. Structural materials also exceeded their
value for any previous year, reflecting increases in most items, notably common brick,
firebrick and blocks, cement, and lime and limestone. The materially increased output
of common brick is in noteworthy contrast to that of the preceding few years, in which
it might appear that concrete brick and clay brick imported from Alberta had largely
replaced British Columbia common brick.
The output of coal was greater than in 1954, but reduced output of higher-priced
coal from Vancouver Island and Bulkley Valley and increased output of low-priced coal
from the Princeton-Merritt area resulted in a lower average price per ton in 1955, even
though three-quarters of the output came from the Crowsnest Pass area, where the price
was unchanged.
Statistics for the commercial production of natural gas in British Columbia are
published for the first time in this Report. The production reported is of natural gas sold
in Fort St. John, where commercial distribution was started in 1954.
Search for oil and gas continued to be pressed by many companies that undertook
geological and geophysical work and the drilling of wells.
Most of the drilling was done in northeastern British Columbia. Drilling operations
in that part of the Province extended from the Lone Mountain area to the Fort Nelson
area, although most wells were located north of the Peace River in the Fort St. John
district.
Texaco N.F.A. Boundary Lake 1, near the British Columbia-Alberta boundary north
of the Peace River, was completed in February, 1955, as the first commercial oil well in
British Columbia.
The successful completion of gas wells indicated the discovery of six new gas areas,
namely, Cameron River, Milligan Creek, Paddy, Doig River, Bougie Creek, and North
Blueberry.
Construction of a pipe-line to bring natural gas from northeastern British Columbia
and near-by Alberta to the major British Columbia markets has been contingent upon
finding a market for a substantial volume of gas in northwestern United States. In the
latter part of 1955, after a long period of negotiations, the United States Federal Power
Commission approved importation into the northwestern United States of 300 billion
cubic feet of natural gas daily. The pipe-line proposal has been under study for several
years, and construction was started before the end of 1955 on building a 650-mile 30-inch
pipe-line from Dawson Creek to the Vancouver area for Westcoast Transmission Company Limited. Westcoast is a Canadian company with head office in Calgary. Completion
of the pipe-line is expected in 1957.
Construction of the pipe-line with its pumping stations, and with plants for removing
sulphur and liquid fractions, will be a tremendous undertaking. Assurance of market for
gas will undoubtedly result in an intensified exploration programme in the northeastern
part of the Province. REVIEW OF THE MINERAL INDUSTRY
A  11
The average number employed throughout 1955 in placer, lode, coal, industrial-
mineral, and structural-material mining was 14,102. Major expenditures by those
branches of the industry included: Salaries and wages, $50,892,369; fuel and electricity,
$5,401,548; process supplies, $24,598,773; Federal taxes, $18,591,258; Provincial
taxes, $4,476,066; municipal and other taxes, $907,645; levies for workmen's compensation (including silicosis), unemployment insurance, and other items, $1,647,642.
Dividends amounted to $35,071,583. The lode-mining industry spent $30,696,044 in
freight and treatment charges on ores and concentrates. Expenditure in exploration for
petroleum and natural gas in 1955 was $8,529,964.  Statistics
The statistics of the mineral industry are collected and compiled and the statistical
tables for this Report are prepared by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of Trade and Industry.
In the 1951 Report, extensive rearrangements of tables and of their order were made.
The tables in the present Report closely parallel those presented in Reports for years
preceding 1951, but additional details have been incorporated, and the present order is
considered to make more apparent the relationship between summary tables and the
tables giving the details summarized.
METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION
The tables of statistics recording the mineral production of the Province for each
year are compiled from certified returns made by the operators, augmented by some data
obtained from the Royal Canadian Mint (Assay Office) and from the operators of customs smelters. The value of each mineral product, in Canadian funds, is calculated at the
average price for the year (see p. A 16). The quantities of metals are net after making
deductions for losses in smelting and refining.
Metals
Prior to 1925 the average prices for gold and copper are true average prices, but,
as a means of correcting for losses in smelting and refining, the prices of other metals
were taken at the following percentages of the year's average price for the metal: Silver,
95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc, 85 per cent. For 1925 and subsequent years
the value has been calculated using the true average price and the net metal contents, in
accordance with the procedures adopted by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the
co-operating Provincial Departments of Mines.
Beginning with the Annual Report for 1948, production figures for individual lode-
mining operations are the assay contents of the products shipped (ore, concentrates, or
bullion), no deductions being made for losses in smelting and refining. In previous
Annual Reports the production figures given for individual properties are net, after
deductions for smelting and refining losses.
Placer Gold
The data on placer-gold production were very largely obtained from the Gold Commissioners until 1925. The value of placer gold in dollars is now obtained from returns
received annually from the operators. At the old standard price, $20.67 per ounce of
fine gold, $17 was regarded as a close approximation of the average value per ounce of
crude placer gold produced in British Columbia. Dividing the production reported in
dollars by 17 gave the equivalent in crude ounces. The average value $17 per ounce is
equivalent to a fineness of 822Vi. Beginning with 1932 the average value per crude
ounce has been based on the same fineness but has recognized the varying price of gold.
The average price per ounce of crude placer gold for the year is listed on page A 16.
Lode Metals, Gross and Net Contents
The gross contents are the gold and silver contents of bullion and for ores and concentrates the total assay contents, obtained by multiplying the assay by the weight. The
quantities for gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc in Table XV and in " Notes on Metal
Mines " are gross.
Calculations of the value of production are based on the total assay content for
gold and on net content for the other principal metals.   These are:   in lead ores and
A  13 A  14 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
concentrates and zinc concentrates, for silver 98 per cent, lead 95 per cent, and zinc
85 per cent of the total assay content; and in copper concentrates, 95 per cent of the
silver and the total assay content of copper less 10 pounds per ton of concentrates.
Quantities for silver, lead, zinc, and copper in Tables I to VIII, inclusive, are net.
Average Metal Prices
In the interests of uniformity the Statistical Bureaux of the Provinces and the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics use the same average metal prices in valuing mineral
production. Up to and including the year 1939 the prices used in evaluating metal and
mineral production were:—
Gold and silver:  The average United States price for the year, as quoted in
the Engineering and Mining Journal, converted into Canadian funds at
the average exchange rate.
Copper, lead, and zinc: For lead and zinc, the average London Metal Market
prices for the year converted into Canadian funds at the average exchange
rate; for copper, until 1932 the New York price for copper was used,
thereafter the average London Metal Market price was used.
Suspension of trading on the London Metal Exchange in September, 1939, and the
controls of metals during the war years necessitated changes from the procedures which
had been followed.
The method of arriving at the price for gold continued unchanged, but the prices for
the metals controlled were those set by the Canadian Metals Controller. In 1945 the
controls were largely removed from sales but not from prices. Control of metal prices
ended on June 6th, 1947. For 1945 and subsequent years the prices are those computed
by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, using information supplied by the principal Canadian refiners of silver and the base metals.
In the period 1945-47 the prices received for silver, lead, and zinc sold for use in
Canada were substantially less than the prices received for these metals exported to the
United States. The prices for silver in 1945 and 1946 and for copper, lead, and zinc in
1946 and 1947 are weighted averages, taking into consideration sales in Canada at the
ceiling prices and sales abroad at New York prices converted into Canadian funds.
Prices are now arrived at by the methods as given in the footnotes to table of average
prices on page A 16.
Fuel
Coal
In 1926 a change was made in computing coal and coke statistics. The practice in
former years had been to list as coke production only the coke made in bee-hive ovens,
the coal used in making it not being listed; coke made in by-product ovens was not
listed as coke, but the coal used in making this coke was credited as coal production.
The result was that both the coal and the coke production figures were incomplete.
Starting with the 1926 Annual Report, the standard practice of the Bureau of Statistics,
Ottawa, was adopted. This consists of crediting all coal produced, including that used
in making coke, as primary mine production. Coke-making is considered a manufacturing industry. As the data are of interest to the mining industry, Table X is included
in the Report to show the total coke produced in the Province, together with by-products,
and the values given by the producers. The pre-1926 data have now been reworked and
brought into conformity with current practice. Table IXa lists the full mine output
(gross) produced and its net value, and these figures are incorporated in Table I, in the
total mine production for the Province. Table X gives the complete data for coke, gas,
and by-products manufacture for the period 1895 to 1925, and for each year subsequent
to 1925. STATISTICS
A 15
Up to and including the year 1947, production was recorded in long tons (2,240
pounds). Beginning in 1948, production is given in short tons (2,000 pounds). The
quantity of coal produced in the preceding years has been recalculated in short tons.
The average price for coal, listed year by year (see p. A 16), is the total value
divided by the quantity. Up to and including 1945, the quantity is the gross mine output;
for 1946 and subsequent years, the quantity is the quantity sold and used. For 1946 and
subsequent years, the value (Tables I, III, VIIa, IXa, IXb, and IXc) is the amount
realized from sales of coal, at colliery loading points, plus the colliery valuation of coal
used under companies' boilers and in making coke. For 1946 and subsequent years the
quantity sold and used is shown in Table IXc. " Use " includes coal used under company
stationary and locomotive boilers, and used in making coke. Washery loss and changes
in stocks, year by year, are shown in the table " Collieries of British Columbia, Production and Distribution by Collieries and by Districts," page 132 of this Report.
Natural Gas
Commercial production of natural gas began in 1954. The production shown in
Tables I, III, VIIa, and VIIIa is gas sold in Fort St. John in 1954 and 1955. The figures
are compiled from the Crown royalty statements filed monthly with the Department of
Mines by the producer. The quantity is reported as thousands of cubic feet at standard
conditions (14.4 pounds per square inch pressure, 60° F. temperature). A 16
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
Average Prices Used in Valuing Provincial Production of Gold,
Silver, Copper, Lead, Zinc, and Coal
Year
Gold.i
Crude,
Oz.
Gold.
Fine.
Oz.
Silver,
Fine,
Oz.
Copper,
Lb.
Lead,
Lb.
Zinc,
Lb.
Coal.
Short
Ton
1901	
$
17.00
19.30
23.02
28.37
28.94
28.81
28.77
28.93
29.72
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
31.66
30.22
28.78
28.78
29.60
31.29
30.30
28.18
28.31
28.39
$
20.67
	
23.47
28.60
34.50
35.19
35.03
34.99
35.18
36.14
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
38.50
36.75
35.00
35.00
36.00
38.05
36.85
34.27
34.42
34.07
34.52
Cents
56.002 N.Y.
49.55
50.78 „
53.36 „
51.33      „
63.45       „
62.06      „
50.22
48.93
50.812    „
50.64 „
57.79 „
56.80
52.10
47.20      „
62.38
77.35       „
91.93
105.57      „
95.80
59.52      „
64.14      „
61.63
63.442    „
69.065 „
62.107    „
56.37 „
58.176    „
52.993    „
38.154    „
28.700    „
31.671    „
37.832    „
47.461    „
64.790    „
45.127    „
44.881    „
43.477    „
40.488    „
38.249 „
38.261    „
41.166    „
45.254    „
43.000    „
47.000    „
83.650    ,.
72.000    „
75.000 Mont.
74.250 U.S.
80.635    „
94.55       ,.
83.157    „
83.774    „
82.982    ,,
87.851     „
Cents
16.11    N.Y.
11.70      „
13.24
12.82      „
15.59
19.28
20.00      „
13.20      ,,
12.98      „
12.738    ,,
12.38      ,,
16.341    „
15.27      „
13.60      „
17.28
27.202    „
27.18      „
24.63       „
18.70      „
17.45
12.50      ,,
13.38
14.42      „
13.02      „
14.042    „
13.795    ,,
12.92
14.570    „
18.107    „
12.982    „
8.116    „
6.380 Lond.
7.454    „
7.419    „
7.795    „
9.477    „
13.078 „
9.972    „
10.092    „
10.086    ,,
10.086    „
10.086    „
11.75
12.000    „
12.550    „
12.80      ..
20.39
22.35    U.S.
19.973    ,,
23.428    „
27.70      „
31.079 ,,
30.333    „
29.112    ,.
38.276    „
Cents
2.577 N.Y.
3.66 „
3.81      „
3.88      „
4.24      „
4.81      „
4.80      „
3.78      ,,
3.85       „
4.00
3.98
4.024    „
3.93      „
3.50      „
4.17      „
6.172    „
7.91       „
6.67 „
5.19
7.16
4.09      „
5.16      „
6.54      „
7.287    „
7.848 Lond.
6.751    „
5.256    „
4.575    „
5.050    „
3.927    „
2.710    „
2.113    „
2.391    „
2.436    „
3.133    „
3.913    „
5.110    ,.
3.344    ,,
3.169    „
3.362    „
3.362    „
3.362    „
3.754    „
4.500    „
5.000    „
6.750    „
13.670    .,
18.040    „
15.800 U.S.
14.454    „
18.4
16.121    „
13.265    „
13.680    „
14.926    ..
Cents
$
2 679
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
3.125
1908	
1909	
1910	
4.60 E. St. L.
4.90      .,
5.90
4.80      „
4.40      „
11.25      „
10.88      „
7.566    „
6.94 „
6.24
6.52      „
3.95 „
4.86      „
5.62      „
5.39      „
7.892 Lond.
7.409    „
6.194    „
5.493    „
5.385    „
3.599    „
2.554    „
2.405    „
3.210    „
3.044    „
3.099    „
3.315    „
4.902    ,,
3.073    „
3.069    „
3.411    ,,
3.411    „
3.411    „
4.000    .,
4.300    „
6.440    „
7.810    „
11.230    „
13.930    „
13.247 U.S.
15.075    „
19.9
15.874    „
10.675    „
10.417    ,,
12.127    „
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
4.464
1919	
1920   	
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
1926	
1927	
1928	
1929	
1930	
1931	
4.018
1932   	
3.795
1933   	
1934	
1935	
1936   	
1937	
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943   	
1944   	
1945	
1946   	
4.68
1947   	
5.12
1948	
6.09
1949	
6.51
1950	
6.43
1951	
6.46
1952	
6.94
6.88
1954	
7.00
1955   	
6.74
1 Unrefined p
lacer gold,
average pri
ce per ounce, is
taken as $17 divi
ded by $20.67 tir
nes the price of ■
in ounce of
fine gold.
Prices for fine gold are the Canadian Mint buying prices. Prices for other metals are those of the markets indicated,
converted into Canadian funds. The abbreviations are: Mont.=Montreal; N.Y.=New York; Lond.=London; E. St. L.
=East St. Louis;  and U.S.=United States.
Prior to 1925 the prices for gold and copper are true average prices, but the prices of other metals were taken at
the following percentages of the year's average price for the metal: Silver, 95 per cent; lead, 90 per cent; and zinc.
85 per cent.
For coal see last paragraph under " Fuel," page A 15.
The bases for the prices listed are discussed in detail on pages A 14 and A 15. STATISTICS A  17
Table I.—Total Mine Production for All Years Up to and Including 1955
Total Quantity
Total Value
Quantity, 1955
Value, 1955
Silver
    lb.
 lb.
  , lb.
Structural materials3   	
Coal	
       M r.f.
Totals -	
5,193,495
14,721,151
386,292,041
2,835,394,382
11,719,223,118
8,999,949.689
137,688,559'
229,534
$95
421
225
45(1
795
672
102
52
202
523
764,719
095,172
352,853
,904,188
,756,879
,156,466
817,144
,538,931
,482,770
521,783
24,675
7
44
302
429
7,666
242,477
902,145
238,031
567,640
198,565
,332,874*
168,651
$217,614
8,370,306
6,942,113
16,932,549
45,161,245
52,048,909
12,935,887
7,798,098
15,299,254
8,986,501
18,130
$3,542,415,580
$174,710,606
1 For individual miscellaneous metals, see Tables III and Vlllc, pages A 18 and A 31.
2 For individual industrial minerals, including sulphur, see Tables III and VIIId, pages A 18 and A 33.
3 For individual structural materials, see Tables III and VIIIe, pages A 18 and A 35.
4 Total quantity is gross mine output; it includes material discarded in picking and washing.   The quantity shown for
1955 is that sold and used (see also Table IXc).
Table II.—Production for Each Year from 1836 to 1955, Inclusive
1836-95 (incl.)
1896	
1897	
1898	
1899	
1900	
1901	
1902	
1903	
1904	
1905	
1906	
1907	
1908	
1909	
1910	
1911	
1912	
1913	
1914	
1915	
1916	
1917	
1918	
1919	
1920	
1921	
1922	
1923	
1924	
1925	
$95,355,010
7,507,956
10,455,268
10,906,861
12,429,707
16,344,751
19,671,572
17,486,550
17,495,954
18,977,359
22,461,325
24,980,546
25,882,560
23,851,277
24,443,025
26,377,066
23,499,072
32,440,800
30,296,398
26,388,825
29,447,508
42,290,462
37,010,392
41,782,474
33,296,313
35,543,084
28,066,641
35,162,843
41,304,320
48,704,604
61,492,242
1926      $67,188,842
1927-
1928,
1929.
1930
1931
1932.
1933
1934.
1935.
1936.
1937.
1938.
1939.
1940..
1941..
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946
60,729,358
65,372,583
68,245,443
55,391,993
34,883,181
28,798,406
32,602,672
42,305,297
48,821,239
54,081,967
74,475,902
64,485,551
65,681,547
75,701,145
78,479,719
75,551,093
65,892,395
54,923,803
63,343,949
72,319,951
1947      113,314,314
1948      151,436,039
1949      131,100,468
1950      148,289,687
1951      175,613,693
1952      171,309,429
1953      152,628,683
1954      153,383,860
1955      174,710,606
Total... $3,542,415,580 A 18
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
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11,460
1,382,180
18,558
1,240,215
4,974,741
3,978
190,451
24,252,775
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REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
Table IXa.—Quantity (Gross1) and Value of Coal per Year to Date
Year
Tons
(2,000 Lb.)
Value
Year
Tons
(2,000 Lb.)
Value
1836-59 - 	
1860         	
41,871
15,956
15,427
20,292
23,906
32,068
36,757
28,129
34,988
49,286
40,098
33,424
55,4582
55,4582
55,459s
91,334
123,362
155,895
172,540
191,348
270,257
299,708
255,760
315,997
238,895
441,358
409,468
365,832
462,964
548,017
649,411
759,518
1,152,590
925,495
1,095,690
1,134,509
1,052,412
1,002,268
999,372
1,263,272
1,435,314
1,781,000
1,894,544
1,838,621
1,624,742
1,887,981
2,044,931
2,126.965
2,485,961
$149,548
56,988
55,096
72,472
85,380
115,528
131,276
100,460
124,956
176,020
143,208
119,372
164,612
164,612
164,612
244,641
330,435
417,576
462,156
522,538
723,903
802,785
685,171
846,417
639,897
1,182,210
1,096,788
979,908
1,240,080
1,467,903
1,739,490
2,034,420
3,087,291
2,479,005
2,934,882
3,038,859
2,824,687
2,693,961
2,734,522
3,582,595
4,126,803
4,744,530
5,016,398
4,832,257
4,332,297
4,953,024
5,511,861
5,548,044
7,637,713
1908	
1909	
1910 	
1911                            	
2,362,514
2,688,672
3,515,944
2,573,444
3,388,795
2,879,251
2,426,399
2,209,290
2,783,849
2,686,561
2,888,170
2,698,022
3,020,387
2,877,995
2,890,625
2,848,146
2,226,037
2,737,607
2,609,640
2,748,286
2,829,906
2,521,402
2,113,586
1,912,501
1,719,172
1,416,516
1,508,741
1,330,524
1,508,048
1,618,051
1,466,559
1,655,217
1,867,966
2,018,635
2,170,737
2,040,253
2,165,676
1,700,914
1,639,277
1,923,573
1,809,018
1,917,296
1,756,667
1,824,384
1,650,619
1,576,105
1,447,608
1,484,066
$7,356,866
8,574,884
1861         -	
11,108,335
1862
8,071,747
1863
1912   	
10,786,812
1864           - 	
1913  - 	
1914  	
1915 	
1916 	
1917     - .	
1918 	
1919-.. -    - .
9,197,460
1865        	
7,745,847
1866       _. 	
1867  	
1868  -	
1869 -
7,114.178
8,900,675
8,484,343
12,833,994
1870
11,975,671
1871  	
1920  	
1921	
13,450,169
12,836,013
1873
1922                        -
12,880,060
1874
1923                             -    -  —
12,678,548
1875
1924                           	
9,911,935
1925                              	
12,168,905
1877
1926                          	
11,650,180
1878
1927                  	
12,269,135
1879 	
1880  	
1881 	
1882
1928 	
1929 _ .. 	
1930 	
1931                       	
12,633,510
11,256,260
9,435,650
7,684,155
1883
1932      	
6,523,644
1933                              	
5,375,171
1885                      	
1934  	
1935... 	
1936                         	
5,725,133
1886  	
1887
5,048,864
5,722,502
1888
1937               	
6,139,920
1889                                   	
1938     	
5,565,069
1890 _ _
1891        -   	
1939	
1940  —
1941                              	
6,280,956
7,088,265
7,660,000
1893         -	
1942 	
1943                        .	
8,237,172
7,742,030
1895                             	
1944	
8,217,966
1896
1945                           	
6,454,360
1897          - —
1946 	
1947	
6,732,470
1898                       	
8,680,440
1899	
1948         	
9,765,395
1900        	
1949          	
10,549,924
1901                 	
1950                            	
10,119,303
1902        _	
1951                         	
10,169,617
1903         	
1952
9,729,739
1904         	
1953                              	
9,528 279
1905         	
1954
9,154,544
1906	
1955 _  	
|       8,986,501
1907 -	
ry.    .    .
137,688,559
'$523,521,783
Table IXb.—Coal Production (Gross1) by Districts and Mining Divisions
District and Mining Division
Total to Date
1954
1955
Period
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Vancouver Island District
Nanaimo Mining Division	
Nicola-Princeton District
Kamloops Mining Division —
1836-1955
1893-1945
1907-1955
1926-1927
1909-1955
Tons
79,284,503
14,995
2,926,121
1,122
4,563,035
$
290,741,699
59,765
11,041,565
5,008
19,072,182
Tons
205,920
$
2,029,099
Tons
209,784
$
1,769,682
Nicola Mining Division —	
Osoyoos Mining Division.	
1,256
12,769
1,259
12,904
Similkameen Mining Division.	
29,713
138,080
73.475
379,511
1893-1955
7,505,273
30,178,520
30,969
150,849
74,734
392,415
Northern District
Cariboo Mining Division 	
1942-1944
1923-1955
1918-1955
290
78,943
392,980
1,100
510,920
2,371,523
4,359
36.572
33,079
292,862
3,650
31,460
32,850
227,010
Omineca Mining Division	
1918-1955
472,213
2,883,543
40,931
325,941
35,110
259,860
East Kootenay District
Fort Steele Mining Division	
1898-1955
50,426,570
199,718,021
1,169,788
6,648,655
1,164,438
6,564,544
1836-1955
137,688,559
523,521,783
1,447,608
9,154,544
1,484,066
8,986,501
1 Gross mine output, including washery loss and coal used in making coke (see Table X and discussion under
" Fuel," page A 14).
2 A combined total for 1871, 1872, and 1873 has previously been noted in Annual Reports and the above breakdown
is estimated. statistics a 37
Table IXc.—Quantity3 and Value of Coal Sold and Used,4 1946-55
Year
District and Mining
Division
Total
Sales4'
Used
under
Companies'
B oilers 4t
Used in
Making
Coke4i
Total Sold
and Used4
District Totals,
1955
Vancouver Island	
Nanaimo 	
Tons
Tons
Tons
Tons
$
Tons
174,326
$
1,769,682
1946
502,406
450,968
365,328
451,074
472,690
391,687
267,346
204.931
181,534
173,861
4,396
3,786
2,801
3,925
4,329
3,425
2,986
1,798
536
465
506,802
454,754
368,129
454,999
477,019
395,112
270,332
206,729
182,070
174,326
3,474,182
3,625,348
3,219,868
4,055,572
4,060,337
3,486,615
2,749,206
2,059,828
2,029,099
1,769,682
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
19SS
 _	
74,734   |       392,415
1946
Nicola	
1,711
1,997
1,777
1,672
1,125
899
1,139
1,040
1,256
1,259
43,556
49,324
49,859
49,906
16,784
3,941
6,306
7,047
29.713
73,475
81
261
1,792
2,258
1,777
1,672
1,125
899
1,139
1,040
1,250
1,259
43,556
49,324
49,859
49,906
16,784
3,941
6,306
7,047
29,713
73,475
8,957
15,493
15,281
14,809
9,926
8,640
11,493
10,400
12.769
12,904
214,098
329,179
299,387
298,293
87,483
28,094
48,760
51,012
138,080
379,511
	
1947
1948
"
1949
1950
1951
"       	
1952
1953
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1954
1955
"
"
"
1951
"
1952
1953
1954
1955
Northern  	
33,665   [      259,860
I
1946
2,501
5,958
8,570
12,364
12,250
3,199
3,854
4,815
4,359
3,650
12,087
10,751
10,920
11.468
13,037
27,904
37,270
42,079
36,572
30,015
78
59
60
2,579
6,017
8,630
12,364
12,250
3,199
3,854
4,835
4,359
3,650
12,138
10,810
10,986
11,531
13,099
27,904
37,270
42,079
36,572
30,015
14,540
35,012
52,721
76,697
82,258
26,095
42,606
50,895
33.079
32,850
67,928
63,375
85,981
92,865
104,790
206,799
285,732
324,986
292,862
227,010
1947
1,050,149
1948
„       	
1949
1950
1951
1952
20
1954
1955
1946
51
59
66
63
62
1947
1948
1049
"
1950
1951
1952
„   	
1954
1955
6,564,544
1946
Fort Steele	
744,941
973,358
990,530
842,979
825,315
889,669
822,071
878,865
820,081
803,125
21,161
24,163
20,227
19,025
15,196
15,977
15,813
12,729
15,310
16,560
106,122
175,665
154,342
228,792
213,218
236,871
245,528
230,814
218,923
230,464
872,224
1,173,186
1,165,099
1,090,796
1,053,729
1,142,517
1,083,412
1,122.408
1,054,314
1,050.149
2,952,765
4,612,033
6,092,157
6,011,688
5,774,509
6,413,374
6,591,942
7,031,158
6,648,655
6,564,544
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
,,        	
1946
1947
1948
1949
Provincial totals.
1,307,202
1,492,356
1,426,984
1,369,463
1,341,201
1,317,299
1,137,986
1,138,777
1,073,515
1,085,385
25,767
28,328
23,154
23,013
19,587
19,402
18,799
14,547
15,846
17,025
106,122
175,665
154,342
228,792
213,218
236,871
245,528
230,814
218,923
230,464
1,439,091
1,696,349
1,604,480
1,621,268
1,574,006
1,573,572
1,402,313
1,384,138
1,308,284
1,332,874
6,732,470
8,680,440
9,765,395
10,549,924
10,119,303
10,169,617
9,729,739
9,528,279
9,154,544
8,986,501
1950
1951
„       	
1952
1953
1954
„       	
1955
1.332.874   t   8.986.501
3 For differences between gross mine output and coal sold refer to table " Production and Distribution by Collieries
and by Districts" in section headed "Coal" or "Coal-mining" in Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines.
4 The totals "sold and used" include: —
* Sales to retail and wholesale dealers, industrial users, and company employees.
f Coal used in company boilers, including steam locomotives.
t Coal used in making coke.
See also discussion under " Fuel," page A 14. A 38
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES, 1955
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0   M STATISTICS
A 39
Table XI.—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1955
Dividends Paid during 1954 and 1955
1954
Bralorne Mines Ltd	
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co. Ltd.
Bulkley Valley Collieries Ltd	
Canadian Exploration Ltd	
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co.
of Canada, Ltd.	
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd	
Granby Consolidated Mining Smelting
and Power Co. Ltd	
Island Mountain Mines Co. Ltd	
Kelowna Mines Hedley Ltd	
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C. Ltd	
Silver Standard Mines Ltd	
Torbrit Silver Mines Ltd	
Violamac Mines (B.C.) Ltd	
Yale Lead and Zinc Mines Ltd.	
Others	
Totals	
$579,899
6,000
22,113,331
248,472
225,116
735,501!
180,000
218,969
192,974
150,000
400,000
318,000
1955
$187,050
4,722,000
28,665,451
248,472
225,116
157,6071
175,175
42,883
240,000
92,840
314,989
$25,368,262  $35,071,583
1 First and second "liquidating" payments.
Dividends Paid Yearly, 1917 to 1955, Inclusive
Year Amount Paid
1917  $3,269,494
1918  2,704,469
1919  2,494,283
1920  1,870,296
1921   736,629
1922  3,174,756
1923  2,983,570
1924  2,977,276
1925  5,853,419
1926  8,011,137
1927  8,816,681
1928  9,572,536
1929  11,263,118
1930  10,543,500
1931  4,650,857
1932  2,786,958
1933  2,471,735
1934  4,745,905
1935  7,386,070
1936  10,513,705
Year Amount Paid
1937  $15,085,293
1938-
1939.
1940
1941..
1942.
1943.
1944-
1945-
1946-
12,068,875
11,865,698
   14,595,530
.   16,598,110
   13,627,104
11,860,159
11,367,732
10,487,395
.   15,566,047
1947   27,940,213
1948   37,672,319
1949   33,651,096
1950   34,399,330
1951   40,921,238
1952   32,603,956
1953   22,323,089
1954   25,368,262
1955   35,071,583
Total...... $529,899,423 A 40
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
Table XL—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1955—Continued
Lode-gold Mines1
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Arlington ...
Athabasca..
Bayonne
Bralorne Mines Ltd..
Belmont-Surf Inlet	
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co. Ltd......	
Cariboo-McKinney Con. M. & M. Co	
Canadian Pacific Exploration (Porto Rico)..
Centre Star.    _	
Fairview Amalgamated .
Fern Gold Mining & Milling Co. Ltd-
Gold Belt Mining Co. Ltd	
Goodenough (leasers)..
Hedley Mascot Gold Mines Ltd.	
Island Mountain Mines Ltd.  	
LX.L    	
Jewel-Denero      __
Kelowna Exploration Co. Ltd. (Nickel Plate)..
Kelowna Mines Hedley Ltd..  	
Kootenay Belle Gold Mines Ltd	
Le Roi Mining Co     	
Le Roi No. 2 Ltd    __
Lome (later Bralorne)  	
Motherlode   	
Mount Zeballos Gold Mines Ltd  	
Nickel Plate (Hedley Gold Mining Co. Ltd.)-
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C. Ltd  	
Poorman  	
Premier Gold Mining Co. Ltd.
Privateer Mine Ltd	
Queen (prior to Sheep Creek Gold Mines Ltd.)..
Relief Arlington Mines Ltd. (Second Relief)	
Reno Gold Mines Ltd.  	
Sheep Creek Gold Mines Ltd 	
Silbak Premier Mines Ltd _  	
Spud Valley Gold Mines Ltd _
Sunset No. 2    —-	
Surf Inlet Consolidated Gold Mines Ltd	
War Eagle    _ 	
YmirGold	
Ymir Yankee Girl    	
Miscellaneous mines	
Total, lode-gold mines..
Erie	
Nelson .
Tye Siding _
Bridge River _	
Princess Royal Island .
Wells	
Camp McKinney	
Nelson	
Rossland	
Oliver	
Nelson	
Sheep Creek.
Ymir	
Hedley	
Wells 	
Rossland ,
Greenwood...
Hedley	
Hedley 	
Sheep Creek...
Rossland	
Rossland	
Bridge River _
Sheep Creek...
Zeballos	
Hedley	
Bridge River..
Nelson	
Premier	
Zeballos 	
Sheep Creek..
Erie 	
Sheep Creek ..
Sheep Creek-
Premier	
Zeballos 	
Rossland	
Surf Inlet	
Rossland	
Ymir	
Ymir	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold _„
Gold 	
Gold-copper
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold --	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold  -
Gold --	
Gold 	
Gold-copper
Gold-copper
Gold _	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold 	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
Gold-copper
Gold	
Gold-copper
Gold	
Gold	
Gold	
$94,872
25,000
25,000
16,886,600
1,437,500
1,679,976
565,588
37,500
472,255
5,254
9,375
668,595=
13,731
1,290,553
2,411,3822
134,025
11,751
2,040,000
780,0003
357,856
1,475,000
1,574,640
20,450
163,500
165,000
3,423,191
9,868,712
25,000
18,858,075*
1,914,183
98,674
308.0002
1,43 3,6402
3,609,375E
2,425,0004
168,000
115,007
120,279
1,245,250
300,000
415.0022
108,623
$76,541,414
1 The gold-copper properties of Rossland are included in this table.
2 Includes "return of capital" and "liquidating" payments.
3 Former Kelowna Exploration Company Limited;   changed in January, 1951.
4 Up to and including 1936, dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company Limited were derived from operations
of the company in British Columbia. Subsequent dividends paid by Premier Gold Mining Company Limited have been
derived from the operations of subsidiary companies in British Columbia and elsewhere and are not included in the
figure given. In 1936, Silbak Premier, a subsidiary of Premier Gold Mining Company, took over the former gold
operations of that company in British Columbia.   Dividends paid by Silbak Premier are given above.
5 In several years, preceding 1953, company revenue has included profits from operation of the Lucky Jim zinc-lead
mine. STATISTICS
A 41
Table XL—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1955—Continued
Silver-Lead-Zinc Mines
Company or Mine
Antoine    —   	
Base Metals Mining Corporation Ltd, (Monarch and
Kicking Horse)   - 	
Beaverdell-Wellington -   -.-
Beaver Silver Mines Ltd  	
Bell             	
Bosun (Rosebery-Surprise)..
Canadian Exploration Ltd,™
Capella .
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd..
Couverapee - - — - 	
Duthie Mines Ltd    -
Florence Silver  _
Goodenough— — - - 	
H.B. Mining Co      	
Highland Lass Ltd       —	
Highland-Bell Ltd     —
Horn Silver    -	
Idaho-Alamo    	
Iron Mountain (Emerald)..
Jackson  	
Last Chance 	
Lone Bachelor 	
Lucky Jim..  	
Mercury— - 	
Meteor 	
Monitor and Ajax..
Mountain Con	
McAllister	
Noble Five.—	
North Star-	
No. One —-	
Ottawa...- 	
Payne	
Providence	
Queen Bess	
Rambler-Cariboo—
Reeves MacDonald Mines Ltd..
Reco   	
Ruth Mines Ltd...
St. Eugene-
Silversmith and Slocan Star4-
Silver Standard Mines Ltd -
Spokane-Trinket-
Standard Silver Lead	
Sunset and Trade Dollar..
Torbrit Silver Mines Ltd..
Utica- 	
Violamac Mines (B.C.) Ltd—
Wallace Mines Ltd. (Sally) —
Washington -
Western Exploration Co. Ltd—
Whitewater  	
Yale Lead and Zinc Mines Ltd...
Miscellaneous mines   _
Total, silver-lead-zinc mines..
Locality
Rambler-
Field 	
Beaverdell	
Greenwood—
Beaverdell	
New Denver..
Salmo	
New Denver-
Trail 	
Field	
Smithers	
Ainsworth	
Cody	
Hall Creek.	
Beaverdell	
Beaverdell	
Similkameen -
Sandon	
Salmo	
Retallack -
Three Forks...
Sandon	
Three Forks ..
Sandon —	
Slocan City—.
Three Forks -
Cody	
Three Forks.-
Cody	
Kimberley	
Sandon 	
Slocan City—
Sandon _
Greenwood-
Alamo —
Rambler	
Remac —
Cody—	
Sandon.—	
Moyie	
Sandon —
Hazelton	
Ainsworth—
Silverton	
Retallack	
Alice Arm...
Kaslo 	
New Denver-
Beaverdell	
Rambler Station.
Silverton.—	
Retallack- -
Ainsworth 	
Class
Silver-lead-zinc -
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver!
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-I
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-I
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver!
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver-1
Silver!
Silver-!
Silver!
Silver!
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc.	
lead
zinc	
lead-
zinc	
lead-
zinc	
le a ri
zinc	
le ad-
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc ...-
lead-
zinc	
lead
zinc	
-lead
zmc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc _
lead
zmc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead-
zinc	
lead
zmc _____
lead
zinc _
lead
zinc	
lead-
zinc	
lead-
zinc.	
lead
zinc... .
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zmc	
lead
zinc.	
-lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc. 	
lead
zinc. —
lead
zinc	
lead-
zinc	
lead-
zmc	
lead-
zinc	
lead-
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc.._._
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
-lead
zinc	
lead
zinc	
-lead
zinc	
1 Includes $466,143 "return of capital" distribution prior to 1949.
2 Earnings of several company mines, and customs smelter at Trail.
3 Includes $10,504 paid in 1944 but not included in the yearly figure.
4 These two properties were amalgamated as Silversmith Mines Limited in August, 1939.
Amount
Paid
$10,000
586,1431
97,200
48,000
388,297
25,000
4,722,000
5,500
406,551.2442
5,203
50,000
35,393
45,668
8,904
132,464
1,398,025
6,000
400,000
20,000
20,000
213.000
50,000
80,000
6,000
10,257
70,500
71,387
45,088
72,859
497,901
6,754
110,429
1,438,000
142,328s
25,000
467,250
1,169,000
334,992
125,490
566,000
1,267,600
1,715,333
10,365
2,734,688
88,000
390,000
64,000
850,000
135,000
20,000
30,867
592,515
92,840
70,239
$428,118,723 A 42
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
Table XL—Dividends Paid by Mining Companies, 1897-1955—Continued
Copper Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Britannia M. & S. Co.1 _ - 	
Copper	
Copper 	
Copper _	
Copper____	
Copper	
Copper	
Copper__	
$18,803,772
615,399
8,500
29,760,168
175,000
233,280
261,470
Greenwood  	
Texada Island	
Copper Mountain _
Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co.2...            	
$49,857,589
1 Britannia Mining and Smelting Company Limited is a subsidiary of the Howe Sound Company, which is the holding company for Britannia and for other mines in Canada, Mexico, and the United States. Dividends paid by the Howe
Sound Company, therefore, cannot be credited to British Columbia. Dividends in the above table for Britannia have
been paid by that company, none being paid subsequent to 1930, until 1939. In making comparison with yearly totals,
the amounts shown as paid by the Howe Sound Company have been deducted for the years shown, so the total in the
annual report concerned will show the higher figure.
2 The Granby Consolidated Mining Smelting and Power Company dividends commenced in 1904 and cover all company activities in British Columbia to date, the present operations being conducted at Allenby and Copper Mountain.
The dividends as set out in the table in the Minister of Mines Annual Report for 1942 were incorrect; the correct total
is as above. The figure now includes all dividends, capital distributions, and interim liquidating payments, the latter
being $4,500,000, paid, in 1936, prior to reorganization.
Coal Mines
Company or Mine
Locality
Class
Amount
Paid
Wellington Collieries Ltd 	
Bulkley Valley Collieries Ltd.                 	
Nanaimo. —
Telkwa  ~	
Fernie 	
Nanaimo  	
Coal	
Coal	
Coal  	
Coal 	
$16,000,000
24,000
Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co. Ltd  	
15,725,310
563,272
$32,312,582
Aggregate of All Classes
Lode-gold mining  $76,541,414
Silver-lead-zinc mining and smelting  428,118,723
Copper-mining   49,857,589
Coal-mining   32,312,582
Miscellaneous, structural, and placer gold  5,958,159
Total  $592,788,467
Note.—The term "miscellaneous" noted in each class of dividend covers all payments of $5,000 and under, together
with payments made by companies or individuals requesting that the item be not disclosed.
In compiling the foregoing table of dividends paid, the Department wishes to acknowledge the kind assistance given
by companies, individuals, and trade journals in giving information on the subject. STATISTICS
A 43
Table XII.—Principal Items of Expenditure, Reported for
Mining Operations of All Classes
Class
Salaries and
Wages
Fuel and
Electricity
Process
Supplies
$38,931,020
132,116
5,798,913
3,043,748
3,984,449
$2,206,289!
11,300
673,682
795,286
1,945,992
$18,332,3801
42,406
4,321,565
904,980
1,041,726
Totals, 1955
$51,890,246
48,702,746
55,543,490
02,256,631
52,561,952
42,738,035
41,023,786
38,813,506
32,160,338
26,100,200
22,620,975
23,131,874
26,051,467
26,913,160
26,050,491
23,391,330
22,357,035
22,765,711
21,349,690
17,887,619
16,753,367
$5,632,5491
7,128,669
8,668,099
8,557,845
7,283,051
6,775,998
7,206,637
6,139,174
5,319,470
5,427,458
7,239,726
5,788,671
7,432,585
7,066,109
3,776,747
3,474,721
3,266,0002
3,396,106
3,066,311
2,724,144
2,619,639
$24,643,0571
Totals, 1954 _ ... 	
19,654,724
1953              	
20,979,411
1952.     	
1951  	
27,024,500
24,724,101
1950...	
1949      	
1948      	
17,500,663
17,884,408
11,532,121
1947  	
13,068,948
1946  	
8,367,705
1945        	
1944      	
5,756,628
6,138,084
1943...   _
1942  	
6,572,317
6,863,398
1941     	
1940  	
7,260,441
6,962,162
1939
6,714,347
1938   	
1937                	
6,544,500
6,845,330
1936   	
4,434,501
1935                   	
4,552,730
Grand totals, 1935-55.   ,	
$701,153,649
$117,989,709
$254,024,076
1 A major operator reported fuel, electricity, and process supplies for 1955 as a combined figure under the heading
"Process Supplies." For that reason the lode-mining item "Fuel and Electricity" is unduly small and "Process
Supplies " unduly large.
2 Estimated.
Note.—"Process supplies" include explosives, chemicals, drill-steel, lubricants, etc. A 44
REPORT OF THE
MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
Table XIII.-
-Average Number Employed in the Mining Industry,
1901-55
Lode-mining
o
Coal-mining
Structural
Materials
n
Year
c
c
EO
V
o
u
c
rt
u
u
u
__
a
o
u
E
b,
u
__
E£
M
"3
r_.
o
«
S
c
5
o
J_
<
fi
U
c
CO
s
T3
G
o
<
o
Ob
c
a
E
(A
o
1901	
2,736
1,212
3,948
3,041
931
3,974
7,922
1902	
2,219
1,126
3,345
3,101
910
4,011
7,356
1903	
1,662
1,088
2,750
3,137
1,127
4,264
7,014
1904	
2,143
1,163
3,306
3.278
1.175
4,453
7,759
1905	
2,470
1,240
3,710
3,127 1 1,280
4,407
8,117
1906	
2,680
1,303
3,983
3,415
1,390
4,805
8,788
1907	
2,704
1,239
3,943
2,862
907
3,769
7,712
1908	
2,567
1,127
3,694
4,432
1,641
6.073
9,767
1909	
2,184
1,070
3,254
4,713
1,705
6,418
9,672
1910	
2,472
1,237
3,709
5,903
1,855
7,758
11,467
1911	
2,435
1,159
3,594
5,212
1,661
6,873
10,467
1912	
2,472
1,364
3,837
5.275
1.855
7,130
10,967
1913	
2,773
1,505
4,278
4.950 1 1.721
6,671
10,949
1914	
2,741
1,433
4,174
4,267
1,465
5,732
9,906
1915	
2,709
1,435
4,144
3,708
1,283
4,991
9,135
1916	
3,357
2,036
5,393
3,694
1,366
5,060
10,453
1917	
3,290
2,198
5,488
3,760
1,410
5,170
10,658
1918   	
2,626
1,764
4,390
3 658
1,769
5,247
9,637
1919	
2,513
1,746
4,259
  I 4.145
1,821
5,966
10,225
1920	
2,074
1,605
3,679
4,191
2,158
6,349
10,028
1921   	
1,355
975
2,330
4,722
2,163
6,885
9,215
1922	
1,510
1,239
2,749
4,712
1,932
6,644
9,393
1923	
2,102
1,516
3.618
4,342
1,807
6,149
9,767
1924	
2,353
1,680
4,033
3,894
1,524
5,418
9,451
1925	
2,298
2,840
5,138
3,828
1,615
5,443
10,581
1926	
299
2,606
1,735
4,341
808
2,461
3,757
1,565
5,322
493
324
124
14,172
1927	
415
2,671
1,916
4,587
854
2,842
3,646
1,579
5,225
647
138
122
14,830
1928	
355
2,707
2,469
5,176
911
2,748
3,814
1,520
5,334
412
368
120
15,424
1929	
341
2.926
2,052
4,978
966
2,948
3,675
1,353
5,028
492
544
268
15,565
1930	
425 | 2,316
1,260
3,576
832
3,197
3,389
1,256
4,645
843
344
170
14,032
1931	
688 1 1 463
834
2,297
581
3,157
2,957
1,125
4,082
460
526
380
12,171
1932	
874
1,355 |     900
2,255
542
2,036
2,628
980
3,608
536
329
344
10,524
1933	
1,134
1,786 | 1,335
3,121
531
2,436
2,241
853
3,094
376
269
408
11,369
1934	
1,122
2,796 | 1,729
4,525
631
2,890
2,050
843
2,893
377
187
360
12,985
1935	
1,291
2,740 [ 1,497
4,237
907
2,771
2,145
826
2,971
536
270
754
13,737
1936	
1.124
2.959 1 1.840
4,799
720
2,678
2,015
799
2,814
931
288
825
14,179
1937	
1,371 | 3,603 | 1,818
5,421
1,168
3,027
2,286
867
3,153
724
327
938
16,129
1938	
1,303 | 3,849 | 2,266
6,115
919
3,158
2,088
874
2,962
900
295
369
16,021
1939          	
1,252 [ 3,905 | 2,050
996
3,187
2,167
809
2,976
652
311
561
15,890
1940	
1,004 | 3,923 | 2,104
6,027
1,048
2,944
2,175
699
2,874
827
334
647
15,705
1941        	
939 | 3,901 | 1,823
5,724
1,025
3,072
2,229
494
2,723
766
413
422
15,084
1942	
489 | 2,920 | 1,504
4,424
960
3,555
1,892
468
2,360
842
378
262
13,270
1943	
212 | 2,394 | 1,699
4,093
891
2,835
2,240
611
2.851
673
326
567
12,448
1944    	
255 | 1,896 | 1,825
3,721
849
2,981
2,150
689
2,839
690
351
628
12,314
1945	
209 | 1,933 | 1,750
3,683
822
2,834
1,927
503
2,430
921
335
586
11,820
347 | 1,918 | 1,817
3,735
5,262
672
2,813
1,773
532
2,305
827
555
679
11,933
1947	
360 | 3,024 | 2,238
960
3,461
1,694
731
2,425
977
585
869
14,899
1948   	
348 1 3,143 | 2,429
5,572
5,758
1,126
3,884
1,594
872
2,466
1,591
656
754
16,397
1949	
303 1 3 034 1 2.724
1,203
3,763
1,761
545
2,306
2,120
542
626
16,621
1950  	
327 1 3,399
2,415
5,814
7,480
1,259
3,759
1,745
516
2,261
1,916
616
660
16,612
1951	
205 | 3,785
3.695
1,307
4,044
1,462
463
1,925
1,783
628
491
17,863
1952   	
230 | 4,171
3,923
8 094
1.516
4 120
1.280
401
1.681
1,530
557
529
18.257
1953	
132 | 3,145
2,589
5,734
1,371
I 3.901 I 1.154
396 1 1.550
1,909
559
634 | 15,790
1954	
199 | 2,644
2,520
5,164
1,129
3,119 | 1,076 [     358
1,434
1,861
638
584 | 14,128
2.553
5,117
1,091
3,304 [1,100 |     378
I              I
1,478
1,646
641
722 | 14,102
I
1         !
i The average nun
iber employed in the industry
is the
um of the averages for indivi
dual c(
>mpanie
s.   The average
for each company is ol
stained by taking the sum of t
le num
>ers employed each month anc
divid
ng by 1
2, regardless of
the number of months
worked. STATISTICS
A 45
Table XIV.—Lode-metal Mines—Tonnage, Number of Mines,
Net and Gross Value of Principal Metals,4 1901-55
Year
Tonnagei
Number
of
Shipping
Mines
Number
of Mines
Shipping
over 100
Tons
Gross Value
as Reported
by Shipper2
Freight
and
Treatment2
Net Value
to Shipper3
Gross Value
of Lode
Metals
Produced*
1901
926,162
1,009,016
1,288,466
1,461,609
1,706,679
1,963,872
1,805,614
2,083.606
2,057,713
2,216,428
1,770,755
2,688,532
2,663,809
2,175,971
2,720,669
3,229,942
2,797,368
2,912,516
2,146,920
2,215,445
1,586,428
1,592,163
2,447,672
3.413,912
3,849,269
4,775,327
5.416,411
6,241,672
6,977,903
6,804,276
5,549,622
4,354,904
4,063,776
5,141,744
4,927,204
4,381,173
6,145,244
7,377,117
7,212,171
7,949,736
8,007,937
6,894,844
5,786,864
4,879,851
4,377,722
3,705,594
5.011,271
5,762,321
6,125,460
6,802,482
6,972,400
9,174,617
9,660,281
8,513,865
9,126,902
119
124
125
142
146
154
147
108
89
83
80
86
110
98
132
169
193
176
144
121
80
98
77
86
102
138
132
110
106
68
44
75
109
145
177
168
185
211
217
216
200
126
48
51
36
50
76
97
118
112
119
95
80
63
53
78
75
74
76
79
77
72
59
52
50
45
51
58
56
59
81
87
80
74
60
35
33
28
37
40
55
52
49
48
32
22
29
47
69
72
70
113
92
99
92
96
76
32
31
27
32
33
61
54
68
64
58
48
40
34
$14,100,282
1902..
11,581,153
1903
12,103,237
1904
12,909,035
1905	
15,980,164
1906	
18,484,102
17,316,847
1908
15,847,411
1909
15,451,141
1910
14,728,731
1911
11,454,063
1912
17,662,766
17,190,838
1914
15,225,061
1915
19,992,149
31,483,014
26,788,474
27,590,278
19,750,498
19,444,365
1921	
1922	
12,920,398
19,227,857
25,347,092
35,538,247
46,200,135
$38,558,613
27,750,364
29,070,075
34,713,887
21,977,688
10,513,931
7,075,393
13,976,358
20,243,278
25,407,914
30,051,207
43,954,077
35,278,483
40,716,869
43,670,298
46,681,822
45,199,404
33,293,703
26,449,408
31,383,625
46,016,841
76,311,087
100,128,727
79,814,604
86,751,361
117,493,684
106,601,451
66,739,892
77,088,160
88,343,241
51,508,031
1927	
44,977,082
48,281,825
61,174,859
40,915,395
1931	
1932	
1933	
22,535,573
19,700,235
25,007,137
33,895,930
40,597,569
1936	
1937	
1938	
1939	
43,666,452
$48,617,920
40,222,237
45,133,788
50,004,909
52,354,870
50,494,041
37,234,070
29,327,114
34,154,917
48,920,971
81,033,093
118,713,859
99.426,678
108,864,792
142,590,427
140,070,389
94,555,069
106,223,833
119,039,285
$4,663,843
4.943,754
4,416,919
6,334,611
5,673,048
5,294,637
3,940,367
2,877,706
2,771,292
2,904,130
4,722,010
18,585,183
19,613,185
22,113,431
25,096,743
30,444,575
27,815,152
29,135,073
30,696,044
62,912,783
53,877,333
53,522,098
1940	
1941 	
62,848,642
62,216,019
1942	
55,359,479
1943	
46,089,042
1944	
1945	
39,315,910
49,997,071
1946	
56,519,691
1947	
93,176,165
1948	
125,979,961
1949	
1950	
105,259,001
121,635,457
1951	
146,140,477
1952	
134,111,567
1953	
1954	
110,341,548
111,844,340
1955	
129,455,122
1 Includes mercury ores, tungsten ores, iron ores, and silica (flux).
2 Data not collected before 1937.
3 Previous to 1937 the shipper reported "Net Value at Shipping Point," no indication being given as to how the net
value was computed. From 1937 on, the shipper has reported "Gross Value," from which deduction of freight and
treatment gives "Net Value."
4 Gross value as represented by valuing gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc at yearly average prices. A 46
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
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A 47
o-
OC
OC
V£
CM
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m
OS
1,159
381,266
8,269
1,128,833
1,355,188
2,476
263,061
15,743
i        j
16,624,387
407,943
16,309
j
1,819,593
89,872
2,092
253
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526,682
529
14,177
10,880
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65,525
53,920
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Silver-lead   concentrates,   1,655
tons;   silver bullion
Copper   concentrates   and   precipitates,   27,708   tons;    zinc
concentrates, 16,372 tons; iron
pyrite    concentrates,     55,662
tons
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Lead   concentrates,   421    tons;
zinc   concentrates,   312   tons;
jig concentrates, 113 tons
Crude ore    	
Bullion;   gold concentrates,
2,807 tons
Gold precipitates, 3.67 tons	
Gold  precipitates and  contents
included in Nickel Plate
151,863
878,661
3,749
162
16
13,229
40
166,831
89,063
28,269
90,572
3,250
Torbrit Silver Mines Ltd., Toronto	
Britannia Mining and Smelting Co.
Ltd., Britannia Beach
Cowichan   Copper   Co.   Ltd.,   Lake
Cowichan
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6 A 48
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
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A 49
31,027
129,773
86
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2,504
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5,608,261
28,353,216
25,162
34
769
102
7,198
1,278,956
1,508
147,326
155,683
890
89
913
56,038
330,411
6,337
3,361
590
38,165
207,396
19
3,797,249
3,082
5,143,334
24,972,006
18,583
61
9,935
159
9,178
4,949,118
15,220
11,660
3,559
931
2,080
852
29,949
38,179
7,843
12,050
4,091
32,909
337,506
51
6,500,206
7,287
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326,828
345,905
1,130
72
158
136
1,923
94,834
1,078
614
1,915
304
121
368
2,146
6,406
273
233
25
16,260
18,380
398
450,351
455
25
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Lead   concentrates,  3,832  tons;
zinc concentrates, 4,625 tons
Lead concentrates, 17,085 tons;
zinc concentrates, 27,777 tons
Crude ore, 8 tons; lead concentrates, 6 tons; zinc concentrates, 20 tons
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Lead concentrates, 20 tons; zinc
concentrates, 48 tons
Crude ore and 212 tons of zinc
concentrates from 1952 stockpile
Oxidized   lead   ore   and   crude
lead ore
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Crude ore, 23 tons;   lead concentrates, 205 tons, and zinc
concentrates,   161   tons,  from
ore milled at Western Exploration Co.
Crude ore 	
Crude ore, 288 tons;   lead concentrates,    4,072    tons;     zinc
concentrates, 3,056 tons
Clean-up material  _., ■
Crude ore   	
Tonnage estimated;   45 tons of
concentrates produced
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Sunshine Lardeau Mines Ltd., Vancouver
Cons.   Mining   &   Smelting   Co.   of
Canada, Ltd., Trail
O. E. McCreadv. Kasin
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Triumph Mines, Inc., c/o C. Lind,
Kaslo
H. Lyon and E. Merrill, lessees,
Silverton
Yale Lead & Zinc Mines Ltd., Ainsworth
W. D. Pensellv. Silverton	
Jackson Basin Mining Co. Ltd., Vancouver
Cody-Reco Mines Ltd., Toronto, Ont.
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Slocan-Charleston Mining  Co. Ltd.,
Seattle, Wash.
Western  Exploration  Co.   Ltd.,  Silverton
D.  H.  Norcross  and A.  Endersby,
Jr., Nelson
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Lessees from Slocan Van Roi Mines
Ltd., Vancouver
A. Archibald et. at, Slocan City	
Snowdrop Mining Co. Ltd., Rossland..
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> A 50
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
Table XVI.—Lode-metal Mines Employing an Average of Ten
or More Men during 19551
Name of Mine or Operator
Days
Operating
Tons
Average
Number
Employed
Mine
Mill
Mined
Milled
Mine
Mill
Shipping Mines
365
282
278
365
255
273
365
365
204
365
264
280
304
228
365
237
261
55
255
306
365
305
283
365
365
365
365
175
365
274
273
365
365
273
365
356
343
212
237
245
59
263
347
365
341
365
365
196,700
108,652
10,048
151,863
878,661
13,229
166,831
96,725
93,8222
1,966,999
241,788
56,530
595
700
22,253
247,303
519,605
65,071
2,836,577
161,962
169,269
29,055
3,749
643,032
420,721
196,700
108,652
10,048
151,863
878,661
13,229
166,831
89,063
93,8222
1,966,999
241,788
56,530
199
243
79
108
656
48
403
242
59
379
267
56
13
25
82
109
297
32
1,115
83
102
53
31
87
79
19
17
34
11
45
20
Cariboo Gold Quartz Mining Co. Ltd 	
18
6
Torbrit Silver Mines Ltd _  .. 	
24
215
Highland Bell Ltd.                                             	
5
21
Pioneer Gold Mines of B.C. Ltd.                      	
23
Nickel Plate and French mine (Kelowna Mines Hedley Ltd.)
Copper Mountain (Granby Cons. M.S. & P. Co. Ltd.)._	
Bluebell (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada, Ltd.) 	
44
145
20
14
Jackson (Jackson Basin Mining Co. Ltd.)	
Standard, Enterprise, and Mammoth (Western Exploration
Co. Ltd.)    	
541
21,965
247,303
519,605
65,071
2,836,577
161,962
169,269
28,345
13
H.B. (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada, Ltd.)... -	
Jersey and Emerald-Dodger-Feeney (Canadian Exploration
Ltd.)         	
11
42
Reeves MacDonald Mines Ltd. „ 	
Sullivan (Cons. M. & S. Co. of Canada, Ltd.) 	
Mineral King and Paradise (Sheep Creek Gold Mines Ltd.).
6
385
12
15
Spider (Sunshine Lardeau Mines Ltd.).. 	
Blue Grouse (Cowichan Copper Co. Ltd.)..__. 	
12
643,032
421,936
19
10
Non-shipping Mines
Northwestern Explorations,  Ltd.   (exploration, Cranbrook
Canam Copper Co. Ltd 	
1 The average number employed includes wage-earners and salaried employees.   The average is obtained by adding
the monthly figures and dividing by 12, irrespective of the number of months worked.
2 Includes ore mined and milled from French mine. Departmental Work
OFFICES
The Department of Mines offices in Victoria are on the fourth floor of the Douglas
Building. The analytical laboratories are housed in the one-story building that originally
housed the Legislative Assembly and now faces Superior Street.
ADMINISTRATION BRANCH
The Administration Branch is responsible for the administration of the Provincial
laws regarding the acquisition of rights to mineral and to coal, petroleum and natural gas,
and deals with other departments of the Provincial service for the Department or for any
branch. P. J. Mulcahy is Chief Gold Commissioner and K. B. Blakey is Deputy Chief
Gold Commissioner. Under the terms of the "Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, 1954,"
which became effective on April 1st, 1954, P. J. Mulcahy was appointed Chief Commissioner, and K. B. Blakey was appointed Deputy Chief Commissioner.
Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-Mining Recorders, whose duties
are laid down in the " Mineral Act" and the " Placer-mining Act," administer these Acts
and other Acts relating to mining. Mining Recorders, in addition to their own functions,
may also exercise the powers conferred upon Gold Commissioners with regard to mineral
claims within the mining division for which they have been appointed. Similar duties
may be performed by Mining Recorders with regard to placer claims but not in respect
of placer-mining leases. Recording of location and of work upon a mineral claim as
required by the "Mineral Act" and upon a placer claim or a placer-mining lease as
required by the " Placer-mining Act" must be made at the office of the Mining Recorder
for the mining division in which the claim or lease is located. Information concerning
claims and leases and concerning the ownership and standing of claims and leases in any
mining division may be obtained from the Mining Recorder for the mining division in
which the property is situated or from the Department's offices at Victoria, and Room
104, 739 West Hastings Street, Vancouver. Sub-Mining Recorders, who act as forwarding agents, are appointed at various places throughout the Province. They are authorized
to accept documents and fees, and forward them to the office of the Mining Recorder for
the correct mining division. Officials and their offices in various parts of the Province
are listed in the table on pages A 52 and A 53.
Central Records Offices (Victoria and Vancouver)
The transcripts of all recordings made in Mining Recorders' offices throughout the
Province are sent to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner in Victoria twice each
month, and include the names of lessees of reverted Crown-granted mineral claims.
These records and maps showing the approximate positions of mineral claims held by
record and of placer-mining leases may be consulted by the public during office hours
at Victoria and at the office of the Gold Commissioner at Vancouver, Room 104, 739
West Hastings Street. The maps conform in geographical detail, size, and number to
the reference and mineral reference maps issued by the Department of Lands, and the
approximate positions of mineral claims held by record and of placer-mining leases are
plotted from details supplied by the locators. Provision has been made to supply the
general public, on request to the office of the Chief Gold Commissioner, with copies of
the maps. The charge for these maps is $1 plus 5 per cent tax for each sheet.
A marked upsurge in staking took place in 1955, 12,567 mineral claims being
recorded, more than twice the number recorded in 1954. The major centre of interest,
in this respect, was in the Highland Valley area in the Kamloops Mining Division.
A 51 A 52
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
Mining Divisions Amalgamated since 1949
Date
Mining Divisions Amalgamated
New Name
Mining
Recorder's
Office
Oct. 1, 1949
Dec. 1, 1949
Apr. 1,1951
Mar 1  1952
Revelstoke and Lardeau   	
Kamloops and Ashcroft ___ _ ■	
Revelstoke 	
Kamloops 	
Revelstoke.
Kamloops.
Liard  	
Slocan 	
Cariboo	
Aug. 2, 1954
May 1, 1955
Slocan and Ainsworth  -  	
Cariboo and Quesnel—   _	
Kaslo.
Quesnel.
List of Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-Mining Recorders
in the Province
Mining Division
Location of Office
Gold Commissioner
Mining Recorder
Sub-Mining Recorder
Alberni   ,	
T. G. O'Neill 	
T. G. O'Neill.
W. W. Deans.
Nanaimo ._.  	
Quatsino	
W. H. Cochrane.
R. R. Barr.
W. Gilchrist.
Atlin        -	
Atlin .  	
W. E. McLean _	
W. E. McLean.
H. O. Callahan.
Telegraph Creek 	
Mrs. S. E. Brand.
H. L. Abbott.
F. E. P. Hughes 	
F. E. P. Hughes.
Barkerville  	
Fort McLeod 	
Fort St. James	
D. H. Bruce.
J. E. Mclntyre.
C. W. Speed.
McBride -.__. 	
S. M. Carling.
Clinton   	
Clinton  	
Haylmore 	
Williams Lake	
Cranbrook 	
W. H. Cope - 	
W. H. Cope.
Fort Steele._  	
E. L. Hedley	
E. L. Hedley.
B. J. H. Ryley.
Golden _._.  ."..
Golden   _   	
Invermere __- 	
Grand Forks 	
Greenwood.	
W. T. McGruder-	
W. T. McGruder.
T. N. Weir.
R. MacGregor , 	
R. MacGregor.
G. A. Hartley.
Kamloops 	
Ashcroft 	
Chu Chua        	
D. Dalgleish _	
D. Dalgleish.
G. M. Fennell.
Likely  ,. 	
Salmon Arm	
C. W. Speed.
H. S. Tatcbell.
R. H. McCrimmon.
Atlin	
W. E. McLean.
W. H. M. Collison.
Fort St. James	
Fort St. John _-	
N. Henry.
R. W. Sangster.
Lower Post  	
S. M. Carling.
Telegraph Creek	
E. B. Offin.
E. B. Offin	
Haylmore 	
W. Haylmore.
W. H. Cochrane - -
W. H. Cochrane.
T. G. O'Neill.
D. J. Phillips.
G. W. McFarland
J. V. Gaspard.
Nelson.. _._. 	
Creston 	
K. D. McRae -	
K. D. McRae _ 	
F. S. MacKay.
R S. Allen
New Westminster	
Chilliwack.  	
J. F. McDonald   	
G. C. Kimberley.
Sub-office  	
Hope  	
J. H. Richmond. DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 53
List of Gold Commissioners, Mining Recorders, and Sub-Mining Recorders
in the Province—Continued
Mining Division
Location of Office
Gold Commissioner
Mining Recorder
Sub-Mining Recorder
Nicola   	
Omineca	
Merritt  	
Smithers 	
D. Dalgleish (Kamloops)
G. H. Beley 	
T. S. Dobson.
G. H. Beley.
W. H. M. Collison.
Dorreen 	
Fort St. James 	
Fort St. John
W. E. Horwill.
R. W. Sangster.
Hazelton 	
Manson Creek	
Prince George	
C. H. Drake.
T. C. Hamilton.
Telkwa 	
Terrace 	
Vanderhoof	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Oliver 	
Revelstoke	
T. S. Dalby.
L. D. Sands.
Osoyoos  	
T. S. Dalby	
Revelstoke  	
W. G. Fleming	
W. G. Fleming.
J. T. Slater.
Similkameen 	
Princeton 	
B. Kennelly - 	
T. H. W. Harding
B. Kennelly.
T. H. W. Harding.
A. D. York.
W. H. M. Collison.
Queen Charlotte	
Mrs. S. E. Brand.
Slocan 	
Kaslo	
C. Macdonald —	
B. F. Palmer.
A. Robb.
W. E. Graham.
Trail Creek	
W. L. Draper	
J. Egdell	
W. L. Draper.
Mrs. F. Sherman
(Deputy).
Vancouver 	
Alert Bay	
D. J. Phillips.
G. F. Forbes.
R. H. McCrimmon.
J. V. Gaspard.
E. R. Oatman.
Vernon  _	
Vernon „_	
Kelowna	
G. F. Forbes	
R. H. McCrimmon
Lake Cowichan	
W. W. Deans. A 54
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
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i> DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 55
Coal, Petroleum, and Natural Gas
The Administration Branch has been responsible for the administration of the
"Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, 1954," and for the "Coal Act, 1944," since April 1st,
1953. Information concerning applications for permits and leases issued under the
"Petroleum and Natural Gas Act" and concerning the ownership and standing of them
may be obtained upon application to the office of the Chief Commissioner, Department of
Mines, Victoria, B.C. Similar information may be obtained respecting licences and leases
issued under the " Coal Act." A series of maps showing the locations of permits and leases
under the " Petroleum and Natural Gas Act" is provided, and copies may be obtained
upon application to the office of the Department of Mines, Victoria, B.C., accompanied
by payment of $3 per sheet. Monthly reports listing additions and revisions to permit-
location maps and giving information listing changes in title to permits, licences, and
leases and related matters are available from the office of the Chief Commissioner upon
application and payment of a fee of $1 per annum.
Permits-
Issued 	
Renewed
Assigned
Leases—
Issued	
Renewed
Assigned
Petroleum and Natural-gas Statistics, 1955
50
273
92
96
4
2
Permits—
Fees .
Petroleum and Natural-gas Revenue, 1955
      $86,825.00
Rent   2,873,036.15
Cash in lieu of work      505,434.26
$3,465,295.41
Leases—
Fees
Rent
$2,450.00
75,838.13
Tender bonus	
Assignment fees	
Operators' licences
Royalties—
Gas	
Oil 	
$2,611.67
16.65
Miscellaneous
78,288.13
605,306.64
1,740.00
8,870.00
2,628.32
1,782.50
$4,163,911.00 A 56 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
Coal Revenue, 1955
Licences—
Fees   $775.00
Rent   5,750.35
$6,525.35
Leases—
Fees  $700.00
Rent   2,982.53
Cash in lieu of work  700.00
 4,382.53
Miscellaneous  20.00
$10,927.88
Mining Laws and Laws Related to the Mineral Industry
Synopses of mining laws and of laws related to mining are available on application.
The titles of the various Acts and the price charged for each are listed below. Upon
payment of the price, plus 5 per cent tax, a copy of any Act may be obtained from the
office of the Queen's Printer, Victoria. Prlce
Department of Mines Act  $0.15
Mineral Act  .25
Placer-mining Act  .25
Metalliferous Mines Regulation Act  .50
Coal-mines Regulation Act  .70
Mines Right-of-way Act  .15
Iron and Steel Bounties Act  .15
Indian Reserves Mineral Resources Act  .15
Prospectors' Grub-stake Act  .15
Taxation Act  .75
Forest Act  .80
Greater Vancouver Water District Act  .80
Security Frauds Prevention Act  .30
Coal Sales Act  .15
Coal Act  .15
Petroleum and Natural Gas Act  .25
1Drilling and Production Regulations under Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act, 1954 (including tax)  .40
iGeophysical Regulations, Petroleum and Natural Gas Act,
1954 (including tax)  .25
1Permit and Lease Grid System, Petroleum and Natural Gas
Act, 1954 (including tax)  1.00
1 Schedule of Wells Drilled for Oil and Natural Gas (including
tax)   1.25
1 Obtained from Chief Commissioner, Petroleum and Natural Gas, Victoria. DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 57
ANALYTICAL AND ASSAY BRANCH
By G. C. B. Cave, Chief Analyst
Rock Samples
During 1955 the chemical laboratory in Victoria issued reports on 2,278 samples
from prospectors* and Departmental engineers. A laboratory examination of a prospector's sample generally consists of the following: (1) A spectrographic analysis to
determine if any base metals are present in interesting percentages; (2) assays for precious metals, and for base metals shown by the spectrographic analysis to be present in
interesting percentages. The degree of radioactivity is measured on all samples submitted
by prospectors and Departmental engineers; these radiometric assays are not listed below
in the table.
The laboratory reports were distributed in the following manner among prospectors
who were not grantees, prospectors who were grantees under the "Prospectors' Grub-stake
Act," and Departmental engineers:—
Samples
Spectrographic
Analyses
Assays
1,418
272
588
1,368
273
391
2,960
592
1,356
2,278
2,032
4,908
Prospectors (not grantees)..
Prospectors (grantees)	
Departmental engineers	
Totals	
Mineralogical specimens submitted for identification and rocks for classification are
examined by the Mineralogical Branch of the Department.
Coal, Petroleum, and Gas Samples
A total of eighty-seven samples was analysed. Of these, four were samples of coal
for proximate analysis and calorific value; sixty-three were samples of formation water
from wells being drilled for oil and gas in the Province; three were samples of suspected
oil seepages; five were gas samples, four of which were of mine air to be analysed for
carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and oxygen, and one was of gas seepage; and twelve
were samples of diesel exhaust gas to be analysed for aldehydes and nitrogen oxides.
Police and Coroners' Exhibits
For the Attorney-General's Department and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police,
sixty-seven cases of a chemico-legal nature were undertaken. They involved a scientific
examination of 141 exhibits.
Seven of the sixty-seven cases required analysis for narcotics under the " Opium and
Narcotic Drug Act," sixteen were toxicological analyses for possible poisons in viscera,
fifteen were determinations of the alcoholic content of blood, twelve were for analysis of
liquor for alcoholic content, and eight samples required the identification of marker
dyestuff in gasoline for the " Coloured Gasoline Tax Act." The remaining nine cases
were of a diversified nature and required examinations of metal, paint, explosives, and
soil.   Expert evidence was presented in Court on seven occasions.
Miscellaneous Samples
For the Purchasing Commission, specification tests were made on nine samples of
anti-freeze, on eight samples of fibre and cloth, on six samples of soap, on three samples
of jelly powder, and on three spoons for the thickness of the plating.
* A reasonable number of samples are assayed, without charge, for a prospector who makes application for free
assays and who satisfies the Chief Analyst that prospecting is his principal occupation during the summer months.
A form for use in applying for free assays may be obtained from the office of any Mining Recorder. A 58 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
For the Taxation Branch of the Department of Finance, five samples of gasoline
were analysed for marker dyestuff, and the dyestuff in ten envelopes was weighed.
For the Department of Agriculture, sixteen samples of soil were analysed for twelve
constituents, one sample of limestone was analysed for lime and magnesia, one sample of
limestone was analysed spectrographically and for lime, and one sample of tinsel was
analysed spectrographically for all constituents.
For the Department of Lands and Forests, 180 samples of foliage were analysed for
their fluorine content. The preparation of samples prior to their analysis was completed
in 1954.   One sample of ammonia reagent was analysed for ammonia.
For the Department of Public Works, one sample of gravel and a water extract
therefrom were analysed spectrographically and chemically.
For the Department of Health, sixteen samples of duplicator-machine fluid were
analysed for methyl alcohol.
For H.M.C.S. " Naden " hospital, Esquimalt, one sample of blood was analysed for
alcohol.
For the British Columbia Research Council, spectrographic analyses were made on
three mineral samples and on four metal samples. A chemical assay was made on one
metal sample.
For the Department of Mining and Metallurgy, University of British Columbia,
spectrographic analyses were made on three mineral samples.
Research
A study of analytical methods for the inorganic analysis of oilfield waters was
commenced, in order to select more rapid methods which are at least as accurate as the
classical methods. Calcium and magnesium were chosen for study first. Recently
developed volumetric methods for these two metals were found to provide more accurate
results than the routine gravimetric methods, and took less than one-quarter the time
required for the gravimetric methods. Accordingly, these methods were adopted for
routine work.   The determination of bromide and iodide is now being studied.
Spectrographic analyses for trace metals in oilfield waters was begun on a routine
basis this year. A quantitative spectrographic method was established to determine the
concentrations of thirteen trace metals in feldspar.
Examinations for Assayers
Provincial Government examinations for certificates of competency and licence to
practise assaying in British Columbia were held in May and in December. In May five
candidates were examined; three passed and two failed. In December three candidates
were examined, and all three passed.
INSPECTION BRANCH
Organization and Staff
Inspectors and Resident Engineers
H. C. Hughes, Chief Inspector Victoria
Robert B. Bonar, Senior Inspector of Mines Victoria
J. D. Lineham, Senior Inspector and Acting Chief Conservation Engineer Victoria
L. Wardman, Electrical Inspector Victoria
J. A. Mitchell, Senior Inspector of Mines Victoria
J. W. Patterson, Inspector and Resident Engineer Lillooet
Robert B. King, Inspector and Resident Engineer Vancouver DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 59
A. R. C. James, Inspector and Resident Engineer Prince Rupert
J. E. Merrett, Inspector and Resident Engineer Cranbrook
E. R. Hughes, Inspector and Resident Engineer Princeton
J. W. Peck, Inspector and Resident Engineer Nelson
D. R. Morgan, Inspector and Resident Engineer Fernie
R. R. McLeod, District Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineer	
 Dawson Creek
The Inspectors are stationed at the places listed and inspect coal mines, metalliferous
mines, and quarries in their respective districts. They also examine prospects and mining
properties.
J. A. Mitchell supervises the Department's programme as regards roads and trails
and grub-stakes.
J. D. Lineham is responsible for the administration of regulations governing the
drilling, completion, and abandonment of all wells drilled for oil and gas in British
Columbia.
R. R. McLeod undertakes inspection work in connection with drilling, completion,
and abandonment of all wells drilled for oil and gas in the Peace River area.
Instructors, Mine-rescue Stations
Arthur Williams Cumberland Station
T. H. Cunliffe Princeton Station
Joseph J. Haile Fernie Station
H. W. Aitchison Nelson Station
Board of Examiners for Coal-mine Officials
H. C. Hughes, Chairman Victoria
Robert B. Bonar, Secretary Victoria
E. R. Hughes, Member Princeton
R. B. Bonar, E. R. Hughes, and the Inspectors for the district in which an examination is being held form the Board for granting certificates of competency to coal-miners.
In the absence of the Inspector, the mine-rescue instructor is authorized to act in his stead.
An Inspector is empowered to grant provisional certificates to coal-miners for a
period not exceeding sixty days between regular examinations.
MINERALOGICAL BRANCH
Field work by officers of the Mineralogical Branch includes geological mapping and
examination of mineral deposits, and studies related to groundwater and engineering
geology. The results are published partly in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines
and partly in a series of bulletins. The Mineralogical Branch supplies information
regarding mineral deposits and the mineral industry, in response to inquiries received
in great number. The activities of the Branch also include identification of rock and
mineral specimens submitted by prospectors and others, including, if required, the
identification of rocks and mineral submitted by prospectors to the Analytical Branch.
Since April 1st, 1953, the Mineralogical Branch has been responsible for preparing and
logging samples representing the bit cuttings from wells drilled for petroleum and natural
gas and cores from the wells.
Professional Staff
On December 31st, 1955, the professional staff included the following engineers
classified as geologists or mineral engineers: H. Sargent, Chief of the Mineralogical
Branch; M. S. Hedley, S. S. Holland, W. R. Bacon, J. W. McCammon, N. D. McKechnie,
G. E. P. Eastwood, J. T Fyles, A. Sutherland Brown, S. S. Cosburn, H. W. Nasmith,
A. F. Shepherd, R. A. Stuart, C. G. Hewlett, and J. E. Hughes. A 60 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
Technical editing of the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines and of other
publications was directed by M. S. Hedley. Copy for printing was prepared under the
direction of Mrs. C. C. Savage, who serves as editor for English. Messrs. Hedley and
Holland assisted in directing and supervising field work. Most of the other members of the
professional staff are assigned to mapping the geology of the selected areas and of mineral
deposits. The following have special assignments: J. W. McCammon, industrial minerals
and structural materials; H. W. Nasmith, groundwater and engineering geology; S. S.
Cosburn, preparation and logging of well samples; A. F. Shepherd, records and library.
Staff Changes
Mr. Stuart was on leave of absence throughout 1955 and resigned in December.
Field Work
Twelve field assistants were employed for the 1955 season to work under members
of the professional staff who had the following assignments.
W. R. Bacon examined the Harrison property on Lindquist Lake in June, and spent
the major part of the season mapping the bedrock geology in the area bounded by the
Summit Lake-Salmon Glacier valley, the Alaska boundary, and 56° 15' north latitude.
The mapping was 1 inch to one-half mile. The area mapped includes the Granduc
property and the route under study for an access tunnel to the property.
A. Sutherland Brown completed mapping in the Rocher Deboule Range which was
begun in 1953. This work included study of mineral deposits and their relation to the
Rocher Deboule granodiorite stock. Reconnaissance in the Cariboo Mountains (Bowron
Lake Game Reserve), begun in 1954, was continued.
S. S. Cosburn spent six weeks on reconnaissance in the Lone Mountain area and
visiting wells being drilled for oil and gas in northeastern British Columbia.
G. E. P. Eastwood continued mapping in the Lardeau area at 1 inch to 1,000 feet.
Much of the work has been in a strip designed to cross the Lardeau group; this part of
the work in 1955 was in the area east of the north end of Trout Lake, along Lardeau
and Gainer Creeks. Mapping was also done between Beaton and Trout Lake and on
Pool Creek.
J. T. Fyles and C. G. Hewlett concluded the field study of the stratigraphy and
structure of the lead-zinc belt in the Salmo-Pend d'Oreille River area of southeastern
British Columbia. More detailed study of some of the mineral deposits in the area is
required in order to complete this programme of work begun in 1951.
S. S. Holland spent the early part of the field season studying the application of a
method of prospecting for uranium and niobium. Heavy mineral concentrates obtained
by panning stream gravels are sprinkled on a stainless-steel plate. The plate is heated to
fuse the heavy mineral grains with a sodium fluoride flux. When cool the plate is
examined under an ultra-violet light; golden-yellow fluorescence indicates the presence
of uranium and bluish-white fluorescence indicates the presence of niobium. On the
North Thompson River, uranium was detected on Foghorn Creek below the Rexspar
property but not downstream on the main river.
Mr. Holland examined mineral prospects in the McDame Creek-Dease River area,
including an occurrence of the beryllium mineral, helvite, on Needlepoint Mountain,
some 25 miles by road from the Cassiar asbestos mine, and occurrences of beryl in the
Horseranch Range east of Dease River. He also examined a uranium prospect near
Surprise Lake east of Atlin, a uranium-niobium prospect on Granite Creek in the
Wolverine Mountains, and an occurrence of secondary uranium mineral in rhyolite on
Nithi Mountain 6 miles from Fraser Lake.
J. E. Hughes continued mapping stratigraphy and structure in the area traversed by
the John Hart Highway between Commotion Creek and the West Pine bridge. DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 61
J. W. McCammon devoted the 1955 field season to reconnaissance geological
examinations of dam-site areas on the upper Fraser River, the West Road (Blackwater),
and the lower Nechako Rivers. For the first month of the season Mr. Nasmith and Mr.
McCammon worked together on the project. Nineteen dam-sites were examined. The
geology was plotted on air photos and on topographic maps supplied by the Water Rights
Branch of the British Columbia Department of Lands and Forests.
The examinations were made to check rock conditions that might affect dams about
100 feet high. Bedrock was mapped to a minimum height of 200 feet above high-water
level and at least half a mile upstream and downstream from the proposed sites. At
several sites the extent of outcrop was well below the limits set. In such cases all rock
showing was examined.
H. W. Nasmith spent the first month of the 1955 field season collaborating with
J. W. McCammon in mapping proposed dam-sites on the Fraser River, referred to more
specifically in the preceding note. Thereafter Mr. Nasmith continued studies of groundwater and glacial geology in the southern part of the Okanagan Valley. Features formed
during the melting of glacial ice were examined in detail in areas near Summerland and
between Okanagan Falls and Oliver, and studies relating to municipal water-supplies and
to engineering problems were made. A study to determine the effect of excess irrigation-
water on the chemical quality of the water from a spring was started at Westbank.
PETROLEUM AND NATURAL GAS CONSERVATION BRANCH
This Branch was established officially on April 1st, 1956, although it has functioned,
nominally under the Inspection Branch, since the administration of the " Petroleum and
Natural Gas Act " was transferred to the Department of Mines on April 1st, 1953.
The main responsibility of the Branch is the enforcement of the " Regulations
Governing the Drilling, Production, and Working of Wells and the Conservation of
Petroleum and Natural Gas," and part of the Geophysical Regulations. These regulations were made pursuant to the provisions of the " Petroleum and Natural Gas Act,
1954."
The chief purpose of the regulations is to protect the interests of the Crown and of
the operator by ensuring that all operations are conducted in accordance with acceptable
practices so as to prevent waste and effect conservation of this expendable natural resource. The regulations also protect the public and the land-owner against such hazards as
fire, uncontrolled flow of oil, gas, or water, and the results of careless well abandonments.
In addition to the enforcement of the regulations, the Branch is responsible for the
collection and consolidation of technical information and data gained from each drilling
operation. This material is compiled and recorded for use by the Department when
field studies will be required. Well information is also reproduced and is available to
anyone interested, within the limits provided by Regulation 34; that is, two years following the date of completion or abandonment of an exploratory well or thirty days in the
case of a development well.
The staff, on April 1st, consisted of two engineers—J. D. Lineham, Chief of the
Branch and Chief Conservation Engineer in Victoria, and R. R. McLeod, Petroleum and
Natural Gas Engineer stationed at Dawson Creek. Clerical and stenographic work is
done by some members of the staff of the Central Records Office and the stenographic
pool. In view of the increased activity it is expected that two additional engineers and
other personnel will be required this year.
GRUB-STAKING PROSPECTORS
Under authority of the " Prospectors' Grub-stake Act," as amended in March, 1944,
the Department of Mines has provided grub-stakes each year since 1943 to a limited A 62
REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
number of applicants able to qualify.   The maximum grub-stake is $300, but an additional
amount up to $200 may be added for travelling expenses to and from the prospecting area.
To qualify at the present time the Department requires that the applicant shall be a
physically fit male British subject, holder of a valid free miner's certificate, who has been
resident in the Province during the year preceding his application for a grub-stake, or who
has been honourably discharged from Her Majesty's services, who is between the ages of
18 and 70, and who can identify common rocks and minerals.
It is required that in order to obtain the maximum grub-stake he agree to spend at
least sixty days actually prospecting for lode occurrences in one area of his choice in
British Columbia considered favourable by officers of the Department of Mines. If he
prospects a lesser time, the grant will be reduced proportionately. In the past, rebates
have been recovered from grantees to whom payments have exceeded the proper amount
for the time and effort devoted to prospecting.
The grantee must not accept pay from any other source for services rendered during
the period credited to the grub-stake. At the end of the season he shall provide the
Department with a diary and maps outlining his activities while working under the
grub-stake. Any discoveries made, staked, and recorded are exclusively his own
property.
Statistical information covering the grub-stake programme since its inception is
given in the following table:—
Grub-stake Statistics
Field Season
Approximate
Expenditure
Men
Grub-staked
Samples and
Specimens
Received at
Department
Laboratory
Mineral
Claims
Recorded
1943	
1944        ....                                  	
$18,500
27,215
27,310
35,200
36,230
35,975
31,175
26,800
19,385
19,083
17,850
19,989
21,169
90
105
84
95
91
92
98
78
63
50
41
48
47
773
606
448
419
469
443
567
226
255
251
201
336
288
87
135
1945                                                                            	
181
1946
162
1947	
142
1948	
138
1949                                                                        	
103
1950	
95
1951	
137
1952 . .                             	
95
1953                                                              _ -
141
1954	
123
1955 	
183
Samples and specimens received from grub-staked prospectors are spectrographed,
assayed, and tested for radioactivity.   Mineralogical identifications are made on request.
Of the forty-seven grantees in 1955, twenty were given grants for the first time, and
only four of these proved unsatisfactory. Two grantees who had received previous grubstakes were also struck from the list for unsatisfactory work. Generally speaking,
however, the 1955 performance was very satisfactory and several new discoveries were
recorded. Two groups in particular did excellent work, and one of these groups has more
than one worth-while discovery to its credit. Options have been taken on at least three
of the discoveries recorded.
Since the start of the programme, D. H. Rae has given invaluable service interviewing
applicants and supervising grantees in the field. It is necessary that he work long hours,
and that he make many arduous trips by every means of travel each year in all kinds of
country and weather in order to visit as many of the grantees as possible, for the purpose
of providing whatever aid or advice they may require.
The following notes have been largely compiled by Mr. Rae from information
provided in the diaries of the grantees, and from his own observations while in the field.
- DEPARTMENTAL WORK A 63
Atlin Mining Division.—In the Taku area some prospecting was done on the south
slope of Mount Manville, up the Stuhini valley, and up Ryans Creek. No discoveries of
apparent importance were reported.
In the Stikine River area, prospecting was done in the vicinity of Mount Kirk,
Helveker Creek, behind Jacksons Landing, and in the Contact Creek, Anuk River, and
Jack Wilson Creek areas. Large pieces of float well mineralized with galena and chalco-
pyrite were found but were not traced to their source. At the end of the season the same
man prospected the Iskut and Inhini Rivers area, but his work there was stopped by
inclement weather.
A well-organized group worked northwesterly from a base camp on Jennings Lake
and followed McNaughton Creek as far as the Alaska Highway. They reported no
discoveries of interest.   It appears that the rocks are largely granodiorite.
A reconnaissance was made from Crescent Lake just north of the Whiting River at
the Alaska boundary through to Disella Lake in the Teslin River watershed. One copper
occurrence was reported, but it was considered of little importance.
Liard Mining Division.—The group based at Jennings Lake prospected easterly
from there into the Blue River watershed. There was much coarse granodiorite close to
Jennings Lake, but no mineral occurrences were found. At the headwaters of the Blue
River, outcrops of basic rocks, principally dunites and peridotites, were thoroughly
prospected, and outcrops of chromite were found over an extensive area. Claims were
staked and later optioned to a mining company which intends to do exploratory work on
the property in 1956.
Another grantee located claims to the north of this occurrence, but information
regarding the nature of the mineral has not been made available.
Following float discovered last year in his first year of prospecting, a grantee
discovered copper minerals in place in the Toad River area and promptly optioned the
property to one of the larger mining companies. Farther up the Toad River and in the
Racing River area another prospector has been successful in locating copper minerals.
Copper mineralization has also been discovered in the Smith River area but at
present does not appear particularly important. An occurrence of hematite in sedimentary rocks was discovered in the vicinity of the airport.
Vancouver and Skeena Mining Divisions.—In the early part of the season, prospectors using their boats as a base of operations worked along the coast-line around
Blenkinsop Bay, Minstrel Island, Wakeman Sound, Wolfe Cove, Bullock Channel, Poison
Cove River, Emily Lake, and Kynoch Lagoon. These areas are underlain mainly by
granite and granodiorite.   No discoveries of ore minerals were reported.
Skowquiltz Creek area was prospected for a distance of 3 miles upstream. Some
metamorphic rocks and granite were observed, and much magnetite was found in the
stream gravels.
Omineca Mining Division.—A well-organized and hard-working group of prospectors which has several discoveries to its credit continued to prospect in the Wolverine
Range, in the vicinity of Manson Creek, in the vicinity of Discovery Creek north of the
Omineca River, around Mission Mountain and Murray Ridge in the vicinity of Trembleur
and Stuart Lakes, and near Tchentlo and Tsayta Lakes. It was reported that some
indications of nickel were found and will be further investigated in 1956.
South of the Canadian National Railway the same group prospected shear zones on
Sinkut Mountain, the serpentine belt on Bobtail Mountain, and mineralization and rock
alteration along the margin of diorite and granodiorite intrusives in the Hallett Lake area.
It again met with success near the east end of Francois Lake where a radioactive quartz
porphyry dyke was discovered on Nithi Mountain. A wide area showing autunite and
torbernite, apparently in commercial amounts, was uncovered. Claims were staked and
the property optioned for further investigation. A 64 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
Another prospector, a grantee for the first time, discovered strongly mineralized
chalcopyrite-bornite zones near Twenty Mile Creek, 10 miles north of the Germansen-
Silver Lake road.   Further work is contemplated here in 1956.
The discoverers of the Gordon and Davies groups near Nina Lake in the Osilinka
valley continued prospecting in the vicinity of these groups and found float which led to
other well-mineralized zones which were investigated.
Another prospector spent a very discouraging season combating bad weather and
rugged mountain country northwest of Dorreen. His work was largely confined to the
Lome Creek watershed.   Nothing of interest was discovered.
Quesnel Mining Division.—On the north side of Horsefly Lake near the east end a
limestone belt was investigated, and 20 miles south of the east end of the lake some
difficult terrain was prospected. Interesting float was found in the latter area, but nothing
was found in place.   Further work will be done here next season.
Clinton Mining Division. — Some prospecting was done near Quartz Mountain,
Lorna Lake, Tyaughton Lake, Spruce Lake, and in the Poison Mountain area. Some
time was also spent in the area close to the Taylor Windfall mine. A few claims were
located but probably on old discoveries. At the south end of Chilco Lake, work was
carried on for part of the season without interesting results.
Kamloops Mining Division.—In the North Thompson area near Lempriere, prospecting was done in an area underlain by mica schist, gneiss, and limestone. Pegmatite
dykes were prospected in the valleys of Gravel Creek, Serpentine Creek, Bone Creek,
and Thunder River. Small beryl and tourmaline crystals were found in a dyke in the
Thunder River valley.   An occurrence of nepheline syenite was reported at Paradise Lake.
Similkameen Mining Division.—The Pasayten River valley and adjoining area, from
where the river joins the Similkameen south to Peeve Creek, was under investigation
during the season.
Vernon Mining Division.—Inconclusive work was done in the area between Vernon
and Lumby.
Greenwood Mining Division.—Sutherland Creek in the old Union mine area, the
terrain close to the Rock Candy mine, Tenderloin Mountain area, and the ground adjacent
to Lynch Creek were prospected during the season. Some good samples were brought in,
but nothing of economic importance was reported.
Nelson Mining Division.—In the vicinity of Creston, intensive prospecting was
carried on throughout the season in the Sanca valley up to a point 8 miles from Kootenay
Lake, in the Cultus Creek area, along the west side of Kootenay Lake, 14 miles up Summit
Creek, and 6 miles up Corn Creek. Claims were located mostly on old showings, which
may be of interest at the present time. The Goat River valley was also given some
attention.
Slocan Mining Division.—Near Nakusp a great deal of work was done over a wide
area. Arrowpark Creek, Fosthall Creek, Scalping Knife Mountain, Caribou Creek, and
Burton Creek areas were included. Some pegmatite dykes were investigated, several
mineralized limestone outcrops were reported, and some interesting radioactive material
was found on Snow Creek.   Further work is to be done in this area.
Golden Mining Division.—On Holt Creek southwest of Moberly, on Gorman and
Lang Creeks, and in the area close to Gorman Lake, careful prospecting was done
throughout the season but was not productive.
New Westminster Mining Division.—Some prospecting was done in difficult country
and under very bad weather conditions in the Dewdney valley and up Cedarflat Creek.
Nothing of interest was reported.
Alberni Mining Division.—On the west coast of Vancouver Island, boat-based
prospectors investigated areas where float quartz, limonite, and graphite were found. The
head of Pipestem Inlet and Cataract Creek areas were also prospected. Work was also
done in the area of Effingham Inlet and Vernon Bay.   Nothing of interest was reported.
. DEPARTMENTAL WORK
A 65
In the Zeballos area, work was continued some 6 miles northwest of the town of
Zeballos.   Additional finds were not reported.
Nanaimo Mining Division.—Further prospecting was done in the Humpback Bay
and Rock Bay areas and on Thurlow Island.   Nothing of interest was found.
MUSEUMS
The Department has a large exhibit of mineral rock specimens in the Douglas
Building, Victoria; collections are also displayed in the joint office in Vancouver and in
the offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert.
Information regarding collections of specimens of rocks and minerals available to
prospectors and schools in British Columbia will be found on page 187.
Specimens from the collection in Victoria, accumulated in a period of nearly sixty
years, are displayed in cases on the fourth floor of the Douglas Building. The collection
includes specimens from many of the mines and prospects in the Province, and also
specimens of type rocks and special minerals from British Columbia and elsewhere.
British Columbia material includes specimens collected by officers of the Department of Mines and specimens donated by property-owners. The collection also includes
type specimens purchased from distributers. Other valued specimens or groups of
specimens have been donated or loaned to the museum.
PUBLICATIONS
Annual Reports of the Minister of Mines, bulletins, and other publications of the
Department, with prices charged for them, are listed on pages 183 to 186.
Publications may be obtained from the offices of the Department in Victoria and
elsewhere in the Province. They are also available for reference use in the Department's
library (Mineralogical Branch) at Victoria, in the joint office in Vancouver, and in the
offices of the Inspectors of Mines in Nelson and Prince Rupert, as well as in public
libraries listed on page 189.
MAPS SHOWING MINERAL CLAIMS, PLACER CLAIMS, AND
PLACER-MINING LEASES
From the details supplied by the locators, the approximate positions of mineral claims
held by record and of placer-mining leases are shown on maps that may be inspected in
the Central Records Offices of the Department of Mines in Victoria and in Vancouver.
Copies of these maps may be obtained on request. The boundaries of surveyed claims
and leases are shown on the reference maps and other maps of the British Columbia
Department of Lands and Forests.
JOINT OFFICES OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF MINES
AND THE DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND TECHNICAL SURVEYS,
CANADA.
The Provincial Department's Inspector and Resident Engineer, the Gold Commissioner and Mining Recorder for the Vancouver Mining Division, and the officers of the
Federal Geological Survey occupy one suite of offices. All official information relating
to mining is now available to the public in the one suite of offices in Vancouver.
The services offered to the public include technical information on mining, the identification of mineral specimens, distribution of Federal and Provincial mining publications,
a reference library, a display of rocks and minerals, and a central records office.  Topographic Mapping and Air Photography
Topographic mapping and air photography continue to be carried on by the Surveys
and Mapping Branch of the British Columbia Department of Lands and Forests and by
the Canadian Government Departments of Mines and Technical Surveys and of National
Defence.
In addition, the Legal Surveys Division of the British Columbia Surveys and Mapping Branch makes various types of cadastral surveys which, in the 1955 season, consisted
of approximately 26,000 acres of Crown lands surveyed in the Peace River District for
settlement purposes; 72 miles of control and right-of-way survey along highways in their
final location, these covering part of the Cariboo Highway between Lac la Hache and
Williams Lake, the Southern Trans-Provincial Highway from Cranbrook to Wardner, and
part of the highway on the Sechelt Peninsula; and various lots for alienation and reserve
varying in size from half an acre to 640 acres and totalling 335 parcels. During the year
this Division replaced, by permanent monuments, 284 old lot corners.
Interim maps based on air photographs and existing ground control are compiled
by the Air Division of the British Columbia Surveys and Mapping Branch. On a scale
of 2 inches to 1 mile, they include planimetric and cadastral information and also show
the centres of vertical air photographs used, but do not show contours. During 1955
some 43,000 square miles were covered with this type of map, with a further 40,000
square miles in hand at the end of the year. As a result, with the exception of Queen
Charlotte Islands and the area adjacent to Mount Waddington, the entire south half of
the Province is either mapped in this manner or is in the process of being mapped where
adequate maps are not already available.
During 1955 the Topographic Division of the British Columbia Surveys and Mapping Branch completed its project of obtaining ground control in the northeastern part
of the Province for the purpose of providing horizontal control to enable the co-ordinating
of permits located under the "Petroleum and Natural Gas Act, 1954." This season's
work covered 8,000 square miles, utilizing sixty-two tower stations. Five ties were made
to the 60th parallel. The key reference point of the petroleum and natural-gas permits
in the western section—namely, the old Hudson's Bay Company post at Nelson Forks—
was also fixed.
The Canadian Government Departments of Mines and Technical Surveys and of
National Defence, working in close co-operation together during 1955 in the Province,
completed the field work for nineteen half-sheets of the 1:50,000 topographic series and
one and three-quarter sheets of the 1:250,000 topographic series.
Already an integral part of current mapping, increased use is being made of air
photographs as recorded in loans by the Air-photo Library in Victoria. During 1955
some 26,000 square miles of new photography of various scales involving nearly 17,500
photographs was added to the said library. The total of all air photographs, Federal and
Provincial, now on hand in the Air-photo Library in Victoria is 415,285.
In the Annual Report of the Deputy Minister of Lands for 1955, coverage by air
photographs and by topographic and interim maps is indicated on a series of base maps.
Further information concerning these or the corresponding Federal mapping may be
obtained from the Director, Surveys and Mapping Branch of the Department of Lands
and Forests.
A 67  Department of Mines and Technical Surveys
The Canadian Government Department of Mines and Technical Surveys, created by
an Act of Parliament introduced in November, 1949, took over most of the branches and
functions related to mining of the former Department of Mines and Resources. The
Mines Branch, Geological Survey of Canada, and Surveys and Mapping Branch are the
three branches of the Department of the most direct interest to the mining industry. Brief
reference to the work of the Surveys and Mapping Branch in British Columbia is made
in the preceding note headed " Topographic Mapping and Air Photography." A note on
the Geological Survey of Canada follows this paragraph and is followed by a note on the
Mines Branch.
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF CANADA
By an arrangement made at the time the Province of British Columbia entered Confederation, geological investigations and mapping in the Province are carried on by the
Geological Survey of Canada. Several geological parties are in the field each year. Many
excellent reports and maps covering areas of British Columbia have been issued by the
Geological Survey of Canada, and they have made available a great amount of information
that has been of much benefit to the mining and prospecting activities in British Columbia.
A branch office of the Geological Survey of Canada is maintained in Vancouver.
Maps and reports on British Columbia can be obtained there. J. E. Armstrong is in
charge of this office, having relieved W. E. Cockfield in September, 1955. Dr. Cockfield,
in charge of the Vancouver office since 1929, died on January 4th, 1956.
Field Work by the Geological Survey of Canada in British Columbia, 1955
J. D. Aitken completed the geological mapping of the Atlin map-area (104n).
S. Duffell completed the geological mapping of the Terrace may-area (103i, E. V2).
J. E. Armstrong completed the geological mapping of the Tertiary, Pleistocene, and
Recent sedimentary deposits of the Canadian portion of the Lower Fraser Valley (Flood
to Gulf of Georgia).
J. A. Roddick completed the geological mapping of the Coquitlam 4-mile map-area
(92g, E. V2).
H. W. Little continued the geological mapping of the Kettle River map-area (82e,
e. y2).
J. E. Reesor continued the geological mapping of the Lardeau map-area (82k,
E. V2).
W. E. Cockfield undertook various geological investigations logically handled from
the British Columbia office of the Geological Survey.
H. W. Tipper continued the geological mapping of the Anahim Lake map-area
(93c,W. Vi).
W. L. Fry continued a detailed study of the Tertiary paleobotany and stratigraphy
of southwestern and south central British Columbia, paying particular attention to the
Princeton and Coalmont areas.
E. C. Halstead completed a groundwater survey of Matsqui and Sumas.
E. Hall continued to assist the Engineering and Water Resources Branch, Department of Northern Affairs and National Resources, by examining drill cuttings and cores
at prospective dam-sites on the Columbia River, and by other geological means.
H. Frebold commenced a detailed study of the Jurassic fauna and stratigraphy of
southern British Columbia, examining sections in the Harrison Lake, Lillooet, and
Ashcroft areas.
A 69 .
A 70 REPORT OF THE MINISTER OF MINES,  1955
G. B. Leech completed most of the geological mapping of the Canal Flats map-area
(82 J/4).
E. J. W. Irish commenced the geological mapping of the Charlie Lake map-area
(94a).
B. A. Latour investigated the coal reserves of the Crowsnest Basin.
R. B. Rowe examined various niobium (columbium) deposits in British Columbia.
Publications of the Geological Survey
The following reports relating to British Columbia published by the Geological
Survey were received by the British Columbia Department of Mines during 1955:—
National Advisory Committee on Research in the Geological Sciences, Fifth
Annual Report, 1954-55.
Paper 54-9:   Atlin, British Columbia, by J. D. Aitken.
Paper 54-11:  Nechako River, British Columbia, H. W. Tipper.
Special reports—Misc. G-50:   A List of Recently Published General Reports
and Maps of Canada.
Bulletin 29:  Wall-rock Alteration at Certain Lead-Zinc Replacement Deposits
in Limestone, Salmo Map Area, British Columbia, by L. H. Green.
Map 900a:  Canada, Principal Mineral Areas.
MINES BRANCH
The Mines Branch has branches dealing with mineral resources, mineral dressing and
process metallurgy, physical metallurgy, radioactivity, and fuels and explosives. Publications of the Mines Branch pertaining to British Columbia received in 1955 included
tabular pamphlets dealing with coal mines, gold mines, stone quarries, petroleum refineries, and milling plants in Canada, and the reports listed below: —
Mines Branch No. 844:   The Canadian Mineral Industry, 1952.
Mines Branch No. 850: Analysis Directory of Canadian Coals, Second Edition,
1953, Supplement No. 1-1955, by E. Swartzman and T. E. Tibbetts.
Memorandum Series 129:   Durability of Aggregates in Concrete Mixes (Final
Report), by R. H. Picher.
Memorandum Series 130:   Nickel in Canada with a Survey of World Conditions, by W. R. McClelland.
Technical Paper No. 11:  Refining Antimony by Electrodeposition and by Distillation, by R. R. Rogers and R. A. Campbell.
Technical Paper No.   12:    The Constitution of Bone China,  Part III, by
P. D. S. St. Pierre.
Technical Paper No. 13:   Development of the Port Radium Leaching Process
for Recovery of Uranium, Radioactivity Division.
Technical Paper No. 14:   Measurement of Thorium in Ores by the Thorium
Emanation Method, by J. B. Zimmerman and J. A. F. Bouvier.
Information Circular No. M.R. 13:   A Survey of the Iron Ore Industry in
Canada during 1954 (with special emphasis on production, development,
and exploration), by W. Keith Buck.
Information Circular No. M.R. 14: A Survey of Developments in the Titanium
Industry during 1954, by W. Keith Buck.
Information Circular No. M.R. 15:   A Survey of the Petroleum Industry in
Canada during 1954, by R. B. Toombs.
Information Circular No. M.R. 16:  A Survey of the Natural Gas Industry in
Canada during 1954, by R. B. Toombs.
Topical reports, Radioactivity Division, No. TR-126-55:   Data on Portable
Counters Available in Canada, by G. G. Eichholz. DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND TECHNICAL SURVEYS
A 71
The Mineral Dressing and Process Metallurgy Division investigates the milling of
ores and industrial minerals from many deposits and also tests clays and other ceramic
materials. The British Columbia Department of Mines has received the following report
on work performed by the Mineral Dressing and Process Metallurgy Division, in 1955,
on British Columbia ores: —
Investigation
No.
Title
MD3104. Concentration Tests on a Sample of Lead-Barite Ore from Giant
Mascot Mines Ltd., Spillimacheen, British Columbia. 

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