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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Eighty-fourth Annual Report 1954-55 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1956

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 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Eighty-fourth Annual Report
1954-55
By the Superintendent of Education
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1956  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Eighty-fourth Annual Report of the Public Schools
of the Province.
RAY GILLIS WILLISTON,
Minister of Education.
January, 1956.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, 1955
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Ray Gillis Williston, B.A.
Deputy Minister and
Superintendent of Education:
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed., LL.D.
Assistant Deputy
Minister of Education:
J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Paed.
Chief Inspector of Schools:
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.)
Municipal Inspectors, Assistant Municipal Inspectors, and
Superintendents of Schools:
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Burnaby.
Iohn Gough, M.A., Greater Victoria.
J. V. Grant, B.A., B.Ed., Vancouver.
R. C. Grant, B.A., Assistant, Burnaby.
William Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
W.  E. Lucas,  B.A.,  B.Paed., Assistant, North
Vancouver.
D. B. Mackenzie, B.A., M.A., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
R.   F.   Sharp,   B.A.,   D.Paed.,   Superintendent,
Vancouver.
Inspectors of Schools in
H. D. Abbott, M.A., Creston.
K. F. Alexander, B.Sc, B.Ed., Burns Lake.
N. A. Allen, B.A., Nelson.
I. N. Burnett, M.A., B.Ed., Vancouver.
C. L. Campbell, M.A., Nanaimo.
T. G. Carter, M.C., Vancouver.
D. G.  Chamberlain,   B.A.,   B.Ed.,   Williams
Lake.
Ioseph Chell, M.A., Mission.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Grand Forks.
E. J. Dunn, B.A., M.A., Cranbrook.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Alberni.
S. I. Graham, B.A., Trail.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Abbotsford.
B. H. Harford, B.A., B.Ed., Castlegar.
H. S. Hurn, B.A., Campbell River.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Paed., Penticton.
F. L. Irwin, B.A., Dawson Creek.
1. H. R. Ieffery, B.A., Chilliwack.
R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster.
H. B. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., Assistant Superintendent, Vancouver.
Deputy  Superintendent,
M.M.,   B.A.,   Assistant,
0. J. Thomas,  B.A
Vancouver.
A.   Turnbull,   M.C
Greater Victoria.
F. M. Wallace, B.A., M.A., Vancouver.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Surrey.
School Districts:
H. P. Iohns, Ph.D., Victoria.
G. E. Iohnson, B.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
A. D. W. Iones, B.A., Kitimat.
1. G Kirk, B.A., M.A., Kimberley.
I. I. McKenzie, B.A., Duncan.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Victoria.
Earl Marriott, B.A., Kamloops.
A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
W. I. Mouat, B.A., Salmon Arm.
G. H. Nelson, B.A., B.Ed., Fort St. Iohn.
F. I. Orme, B.A., B.Paed., Quesnel.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., New Westminster.
C. E. Ritchie, B.A., Prince Rupert.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Langley.
R. B. Stibbs, B.A., Coquitlam.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., M.B.A., Powell River.
A. S. Towell, M.A., Vernon.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS
Vancouver:
F. C. Boyes, B.A., M.A., Acting-Principal.
E. B. Broome, B.A., M.A., B.Ed., Vice-Principal.
W. H. Auld, B.A., Ed.M.
Mrs. T. G. Birkett, B.Ed., M.A.
R. V. Boughton, B.Sc, M.Sc, Ph.D.
L. E. Brown, B.P.E., M.A.
Miss M. E. Cottingham, B.A., M.A.
D. C. Gibbard, B.A.(Music), M.A.(Music).
R. A. Hanslow.
F. C. Hardwick, B.A., M.A.
Miss A. I. Kilgour, B.Ed., M.A.
Miss K. L. Meredith, B.A.
Miss M. E. Maynard, B.A., H.E.Spec.
I.   A.   S.   MacDonald,   Diploma,   Vancouver
School of Art.
I. McGechaen, B.A., M.A.
Miss M. S. O'Connell, B.A.
P. G. Penner, B.A., B.Ed.
Miss S. Shopland, B.A., Lib.Sc.(Librarian).
L. H. Slind, B.Sc, B.Mus., D.Ed.
D. C. Smith, B.A., B.Ed., D.Ed.
C. W. Truax, B.A., B.Ed., D.F.C. EE 6
PUBLIC
SCHOOLS REPORT
Model School:
1954-55
Miss Z.
M.
Manning.
Mrs. J.
P. Webber.
Victoria:
H. C. Gilliland, M.A., Acting-Principal. N. A. Swainson, M.A., B.Ed.
G. A. Brand, B.A. R. V. Maclean, B.A., M.Ed.
H. E. Farquhar, M.A. F. L. Martens, B.Ed., M.Sc.(N.P.E.).
A. W. Johns, B.A. Miss J. B. Fleming, B.A.
Miss W. A. Copeland. Miss M. C. Bray, B.P.E.
Mrs. K. M. Christie, B.A. Mrs. H. M. Gilmour.
A. E. Loft, B.A. Miss G. Tuckey, B.A., B.S.W., Librarian.
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Co-ordinator of Services: W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.
Co-ordinator of Teacher Education: F. H. Johnson, M.A., D.Paed.
Comptroller: S. E. Espley.
Chief Clerk: M. J. Davis.
Director of Administration: G. W. Graham, B.A.
Supervisor of Planning and Construction: J. H. Wilson.
Director of Adult and Vocational Education: H. A. Jones.
Inspector of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A.
Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Assistant Registrars: J. R. Hind, B.A., B.Paed., and P. E. Wilkinson, B.A.
Director of Home Economics: Miss Bertha Rogers, B.Sc.(H.Ec), M.A.
Inspectors of Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S., and Miss D. De Jong, B.Sc(H.Ec).
Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance: H. P. Johns, M.A., Ph.D.
Director of Community Programmes: L. J. Wallace, B.A., M.Ed.
Director of Visual Education:  J. R. Pollack, B.A.Sc.
Director of School Radio Broadcasts: P. I. Kitley, M.A.
Director of Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed.
Director of High School Correspondence: Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: A. H. Plows.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch: P. G. Barr.
Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind: C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D.
Assistant Director of Curriculum: J. R. Meredith, B.A. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Report of the Superintendent of Education	
Report of the Assistant Deputy Minister of Education	
Report of the Chief Inspector of Schools	
Report of the Division of Teacher Education	
Summer School of Education
Provincial Normal Schools—
Vancouver	
Page
  11
  28
  34
  37
  41
  46
Victoria  48
Report of the Director of Technical, Vocational, and Adult Education  51
Report of the Director of Community Programmes Branch  54
Report of the Director of Home Economics  58
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver  60
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)	
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)	
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)	
School Districts No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver).
School District No. 36 (Surrey)	
67
70
71
73
75
Reports of District Inspectors     76
Report of the Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind (Jericho Hill
School)  114
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools-
High School and Vocational Courses	
Elementary School Correspondence	
116
120
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  122
Report of the Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance  126
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts  127
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  129
Report of the Director of Visual Education  131
Report of the Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act "____ 132
Statistical Returns  133
Information re Examination Papers  170 EE 8 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  11
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  12
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils according to Different Classes of Schools  12
Teachers' Certificates  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  13
Cost per Pupil, on Various Bases, for the School-year 1954-55    14
Number of School Districts  15
Number of Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District __ 15
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  16
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District   . 17
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District   17
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  18
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  18
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District   _ 19
Number of District Supervisors, Relieving Teachers, Visiting Teachers  20
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils  20
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each Type
of School  22
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  22
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  23
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1954-55 by Provincial Government  24
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1954-55 by School District  25
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various
School Districts  135 The Honourable Ray Gillis Williston, B.A., Minister
of Education.  Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1954-55
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., January, 1956.
To the Honourable Ray Gillis Williston,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Eighty-fourth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1955.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from 210,174
to 223,840, and the average daily attendance increased from 191,061 to 204,239. The
percentage of the regular attendance was 87.34.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Large
Municipal
Large Rural
Rural
Total
5,612
12,317
6,258
8,408
17,479
9,181
606
3,049
820
71,493
413
7,084
185
193
244
79
334
192
1,771
14,618
37,073
15,683
1,765
8,870
162
18,284
2,450
496
2,711
45,834
12,749
F.lempntnry-.Tnnio. high schools
3,885
137,382
Totals
73,228
111,036
36,578
2,998
223,840
In addition to the number given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High School Correspondence classes, regular students  (exclusive of the 3,766 officially registered in
high, superior, or elementary schools) 	
In the Elementary School Correspondence classes, regular
students	
Under section 13 (g) of the " Public Schools Act," pupils
receiving instruction	
1,853
1,463
34
3,350
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme
Night-schools 	
Vancouver School of Art	
Vancouver Vocational Institute	
High School Correspondence (adults only)	
Elementary School Correspondence (adults only)
Carried forward	
8651
2,280
103
2,011
3,816
309
9,384
1 Does not include apprentice training, now operated by the Department of Labour.
11 EE  12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
Brought forward
  9,384
Adult education—Continued
Recreational and Physical Education Classes  104,2192
Summer School of Education (1954 session)   1,799
Normal School, Vancouver  550
Normal School, Victoria  251
Industrial and vocational teachers-in-training  192
Victoria College   3373
University of British Columbia  5,9144
122,646
2 This figure is a total course enrolment, rather than a total of the adults in this category.
3 This figure does not include an enrolment of 739 in the special evening classes.
* This figure does not include the following enrolments:    1954 summer session,  1,161;    1954-55  extra sessional
classes, 242;   correspondence courses, 471.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade for
the school-year 1954-55:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
1,016
14,328
14,116
12,274
10,817
10,587
10,363
10,238
8,962
7,716
6,033
4,523
3,518
517
889
12,799
12,903
11,663
9,875
9,879
9,936
9,431
8,727
7,684
6,393
4,847
3,506
300
1,905
Grade T
27,127
Grpde TT
27,019
Gr ad.   TTI
23,937
Grade TV
20,692
Grade V     ■ '     ...
20,466
Grade VT
20,299
Grade VTT
19,669
Grade VIII           _
17,689
Grade IX   ~ -	
15,400
Grade X	
12,426
Grade XI                       _       ....     — 	
9,370
Grade XII                          	
7,024
Grade XTTT
817
Totals
115,008
108,832
223,840
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number of
pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per teacher
are shown in the following table:—
Number of Teachers
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
Type of School
Grade
Teacher
Special
Instructor
Total
511
1,248
503
101
473
120
4,315
64
145
364
144
45
8
144
656
1,612
647
101
518
128
4,459
64
14,618
37,073
15,683
2,450
12,749
3,885
137,382
6.53
16.56
7.01
1.09
5.69
1.74
61.38
28.61
29 71
31 18
Superior schools..	
Elementary-senior high schools .
Elementary-junior high schools _
Elementary schools	
24.26
26.95
32.38
31.86
Totals	
7,335
850
8,185
223,840
100.00
30 52 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
EE 13
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number
with or without university degrees:—
Type of School
Number of Teachers
With
Degrees
Without
Degrees
Senior high schools _
Junior-senior high schools-
Junior high schools	
Superior schools..
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools..
Elementary schools	
Unclassified	
546
1,201
479
17
200
44
374
30
110
411
168
84
318
84
4,085
34
Totals..
2,891
5,294
656
1,612
647
101
518
128
4,459
64
8,185
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR
PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and
also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of
School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877-78..
1882-83...
1887-88..
1892-93 .
1897-98.
1902-03..
1907-08..
1912-13..
1913-14..
1917-18..
1922-23..
1927-28..
1928-29-
1929-30..
1930-31-
1931-32-
1932-33-
1933-34..
1934-35..
1935-36..
1936-37..
1937-38..
1938-39-
1939-40..
1940-41..
1941-42..
1942-43-
1943-44-
1944-45-
1945-46..
1946-47..
1947-48..
1948-49..
1949-50-
1950-51-
1951-52-
1952-53..
1953-54..
1954-55..
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
597
859
246
118
,668
,784
,854
,948
,959
,912
,873
942
956
.025
,092
,194
,220
,248
,224
,055
162
354
512
,833
,116
,496
,873
,272
598
,105
574
185
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
100
104
104
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
195,290
210,174
223,840
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
176,138
191,061
204,239
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
90.19
90.91
91.24
60.
113,
174.
290
473
544
1,663
1,885,
1,653.
3,176,
3,532,
3,765
3,743
3,834
4,015
2,849
2,611
2,835,
2,972.
3,277
3,524
3,630
3,585
3,963
4,028
3,924
4,244
5,022
5,765
9,398
12,468
17,363
22,809
25,830
26,885
26,555.
24,060
34,279.
,411.141
.758.751
.679.361
,775.43
,255.26
,802.29
,671.60
,003.34
654.11
796.60
686.283
518.953
,920.69s
,317.083
,727.193
,074.373
,972.023
937.803
040.743
385.043
660.23 3
962.69 3
670.783
.769.003
848.243
397.88s
,243.533
,898.823
,534.593
.205.503
473.463
653.183
,430.943
631.23s
,076.883
,980.43 3
,080.24s
233.15s
302.273
$215
425
604
1,220
4,658
4,634
3,519,
7,630.
9,261,
11,149
10,008
10,061
9,719
8,941
8,213
8,458
8,775
9,593
10,193
10,640
10,521
10,982
11,120
11,502
12,231
13,683
14,818
20,176
25,768
35,538
47,726
54,195
57,881
58,401
70,791
80,823
056.22s
555.10
357.86
509.85
894.97
877.56
014.61
009.543
094.983
996.273
255.663
387.993
333.813
497.343
369.043
156.003
353.78s
562.643
367.08s
,740.47s
684.923
364.49s
,801.94s
291.353
029.35s
538.18s
,625.813
,930.53s
,392.09s
079.883
,750.37 s
.133.953
,559.48s
121.153
844.25 s
263.71s
1 The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
2 This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
3 This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University. EE 14 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE
SCHOOL-YEAR 1954-55
Grand total cost of education  $80,823,263.71
Deduct—
Capital expenditures  $18,115,968.25
Debt charges on school district debt       6,070,866.72
     24,186,834.97
$56,636,428.74
Miscellaneous refunds of expenditure  505,936.38
Net total operating costs  $56,130,592.36
Less—
Grant re salaries and enrolment, Victoria College $18,204.25
Special grant to Victoria College  30,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia  2,877,251.00
Normal School, Vancouver  165,057.84
Normal School, Victoria  132,276.28
Correspondence schools—
High   239,051.26
Elementary  75,573.89
Night-schools   28,160.59
Adult education  543,606.65
Special grants under section 13 (g) of Act  5,500.00
$4,104,681.76
Miscellaneous refunds of expenditure  354,389.06
       3,750,292.70
Net operating cost for total enrolment of 223,840 pupils  $52,380,299.66
Net operating cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  234.01
Net operating cost per school-day (188 days) on total enrolment  1.24
Net operating cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of
204,239  256.47
Net operating cost per school-day (188 days) on average daily attendance   1.36
Grand total cost to Provincial Government  $34,279,302.27
Less—
Capital—debenture debt retirement   $3,066,185.16
Miscellaneous refunds of expenditure         505,936.38
Non-public-school expenditure __    4,459,070.82
       8,031,192.36
Net operating cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of
223,840 pupils for year     26,248,109.91
Net operating cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total
enrolment  117.26
Net operating cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day
(188 days) on total enrolment  .62
Net operating cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on
average daily attendance of 204,239  128.52 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
EE 15
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE
SCHOOL-YEAR 1954-55—Continued
Net operating cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day
(188 days) on average daily attendance	
Net operating cost per capita for year on population of 1,305,000 (1955
estimate)	
Net operating cost per capita per school-day (188 days) on population
of 1,305,000	
Net operating cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on
population of 1,305,000	
Net operating cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day
(188 days) on population of 1,305,000	
1 Computed on the net operating cost of $52,380,299.66
2 Computed on the net operating cost to the Provincial Government of $26,248,109.91.
$0.68
40.141
.211
20.112
.ll2
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1954-55:—
Municipal school districts       7
Large municipal school districts     37
Large rural school districts     37
Rural school districts (unattached)     23
Total number of districts  104
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 14,618; of this
number, 7,206 were boys and 7,412 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1954-55 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
5
2
2
1
1
4
1
12
4
21
7
15
16
31
20
9
116
31
52
29
13
61
22
16
4
33
10
22
22
43
25
12
159
40
67
34
18
97
33
21
392
81
11. Trail                                                  	
696
176
515
476
1,027
503
34. Abbotsford	
36. Surrey   	
291
3,697
902
1,614
781
463
1,976
642
1        i          13
386
Totals                                        _
26         1         472
656
14,618 EE 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 37,073; of
this number, 18,669 were boys and 18,404 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1954-55 in each
district are shown in the following:—
District Number and Name
Numbe]
School
of
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
5.
7.
8.
9.
11.
12.
14.
15.
16.
20.
21.
23.
24.
27.
28.
32.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
42.
43.
46.
47.
52.
53.
54.
55.
57.
59.
61.
62.
63.
65.
66.
67.
70.
71.
75.
76.
77.
Fernie -	
Cranbrook..
Kimberley.-
Creston	
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton  	
Keremeos	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Williams Lake~
Quesnel.
Fraser Canyon..
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver...	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
Sechelt 	
Powell River	
Prince Rupert-
Terrace  	
Smithers	
Burns Lake  	
Prince George	
Peace River South-
Greater Victoria—
Sooke	
Saanich 	
Cowichan 	
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith	
Alberni	
Courtenay	
Mission.— 	
Agassiz..
Summerland	
Unattached Districts..
Totals..
7
20
21
20
9
12
19
18
15
22
37
8
18
11
20
36
10
17
11
31
58
15
24
306
30
37
11
26
22
10
6
4
32
22
14
18
24
29
15
12
38
7
24
6
12
60
1,172
I	
27
32.
28
11
12
26
24
18
28
45
11
25
14
29
47
15
24
14
43
78
19
32
443
37
53
12
36
31
13
8
4
41
33
23
23
34
39
22
20
49
10
35
10
17
 9_
1,612
177
644
729
581
236
269
539
508
385
566
1,081
227
515
323
598
1,189
287
547
289
957
1,924
379
860
10,747
1,052
1,262
294
753
707
284
172
92
937
639
445
511
664
879
433
388
1,194
213
840
197
376
184
37,073 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
EE 17
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 15,683; of this
number, 8,031 were boys and 7,652 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1954-55 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
4
1
15
24
24
22
24
26
21
77
40
45
26
23
74
26
24
33
32
29
30
35
30
110
50
62
34
28
114
36
471
11. Trail                                           	
710
771
700
33. Chilliwack                      	
734
34. Abbotsford.. 	
786
692
2,674
1,385
1,644
934
716
2,642
68. Nanaimo	
824
20
467
647
15,683
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 2,450; of this number,
1,267 were boys and 1,183 were girls. The number of schools, number of divisions,
number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1954-55 in each district are
shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
4.
5.
6.
7.
13.
19.
20.
22.
26.
27.
28.
29.
46.
48.
51.
54.
55.
56.
62.
64.
72.
81.
Windermere_
Creston	
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson	
Kettle Valley-
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm—
Vernon	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel 	
Lillooet	
Sechelt	
Howe Sound.	
Portland Canal-
Smithers 	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Sooke 	
Saltspring..
Campbell River-
Fort Nelson	
Unattached districts-
Totals	
30
3
4
5
3
9
3
4
3
3
9
3
3
6
2
3
6
2
10
3
2
8
4
3
~m~
3
4
5
3
9
3
4
3
3
9
3
3
6
2
3
6
2
10
3
2
8
4
3
95
112
111
87
212
50
98
64
58
243
81
43
181
30
66
180
42
251
49
54
181
108
54
2,450 EE  18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was 12,749;
of this number, 6,536 were boys and 6,213 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1954-55 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
4.
6.
10.
13.
17.
18.
20.
22.
24.
25.
26.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
39.
47.
48.
49.
50.
53.
54.
56.
58.
60.
64.
69.
71.
72.
73.
74.
78.
79.
80.
Fernie	
Windermere	
Kootenay Lake-
Arrow Lakes—
Kettle Valley.	
Princeton	
Golden	
Salmon Arm..
Vernon __
Kamloops	
Barriere— _
Birch Island—
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
Ashcroft	
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon—
Vancouver	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Terrace	
Smithers  —
Vanderhoof	
McBride 	
Peace River North..
Saltspring	
Qualicum  —
Courtenay..
Campbell River-
Alert Bay—	
Quatsino. 	
Enderby..
Ucluelet-Tofino-.
Kitimat	
Totals-
52
26
13
8
6
9
18
15
12
13
7
6
7
6
22
26
14
4
18
4
21
21
8
7
6
13
10
10
10
16
11
22
19
11
6
7
16
448
30
13
9
6
10
22
15
12
16
7
6
7
7
26
30
15
4
23
4
25
26
6
13
12
15
13
21
12
29
21
11
11
9
16
769
375
239
141
247
654
413
332
442
170
159
174
155
580
738
453
116
544
75
538
646
185
215
166
395
280
240
323
397
363
697
433
256
229
186
424
518
12,749
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was 3,885;
of this number, 1,966 were boys and 1,919 girls. The number of schools, number of
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1954-55 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
33    rhiHiwRc!.
1       |         11
3        |          73
1        |          15
1        |          12
1        |            1
12
85
17
13
1
355
2,738
460
312
20
Totals
7         1         112
128
3,885 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
EE 19
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 137,382; of this
number, 71,333 were boys and 66,049 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1954-55 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
Fernie	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere..
Creston	
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson	
. Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail	
Grand Forks..	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton 	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Vernon..	
Kelowna  	
Kamloops	
Barriere 	
. Birch Island.  	
Williams Lake 	
Quesnel	
. Lillooet—	
Ashcroft	
Merritt  	
8. Slocan..
9,
10,
11.
12.
13.
14,
15,
16,
17,
18.
19,
20,
21,
22
23.
24,
25.
26,
27
28
29,
30.
31.
32.
33,
34.
35.
36.
37.
38,
39.
40.
41.
42.
43,
44.
45.
46.
47.
48,
49.
50.
51,
52,
53.
54,
55,
56,
57
58
59
60
61
62
63,
64
65,
Fraser Canyon..
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond—
Vancouver-
New Westminster..
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge 	
Coquitlam..
North Vancouver..
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River-
Howe Sound-
Ocean Falls.—
Queen Charlotte-
Portland Canal-
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers 	
Burns Lake	
.. Vanderhoof.—	
Prince George—
McBride  —
. Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria—
Sooke 	
Saanich —
Saltspring	
Cowichan	
6
5
7
6
7
3
11
10
12
4
12
2
4
3
5
5
5
2
5
8
1
7
17
28
5
6
22
19
5
5
3
7
13
22
18
33
9
9
50
6
20
12
12
11
6
11
12
7
7
2
1
7
9
5
11
3
37
9
30
21
29
9
12
3
17
16
30
34
7
30
3
48
23
34
12
104
17
5
30
41
14
11
2
22
31
12
45
77
81
5
6
36
41
5
5
4
21
74
74
65
184
34
93
1,006
75
194
49
72
145
58
24
49
11
11
3
1
38
26
14
24
4
85
12
64
34
281
33
39
3
44
16
32
35
7
34
3
51
23
34
12
113
17
5
32
42
14
11
2
22
33
12
47
78
83
5
6
36
41
5
5
4
21
75
77
66
185
34
94
1,151
79
201
49
74
155
62
24
50
11
11
3
1
39
27
14
25
4
88
12
66
35.
289
33
42
3
45
412
1,063
1,128
155
877
57
1,612
553
937
342
3,034
538
90
1,011
1,492
389
276
22
765
978
397
1,642
2,627
2,385
87
88
897
1,184
78
74
65
632
2,710
2,444
2,166
6,652
1,101
3,184
32,254
2,951
7,039
1,702
2,761
5,495
2,164
674
1,416
234
220
76
10
1,280
786
390
678
81
2,447
236
1,717
747
10,687
982
1,205
46
1,390 EE 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
66. Lake Cowichan .
67. Ladysmith 	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay .
72. Campbell River..
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz	
77. Summerland	
78. Enderby-
79. Ucluelet-Tofino..
81. Fort Nelson	
Unattached districts-
Totals  	
6
5
18
6
8
14
15
7
7
15
4
1
7
1
2
21
847
26
17
78
12
61
56
31
7
8
39
12
14
16
2
5
57
4,216
27
17
81
12
64
56
31
7
8
40
12
14
18
2
5
60
4,459
818
531
2,494
287
2,141
1,834
744
100
107
1,289
381
524
384
43
129
1,764
137,382
DISTRICT SUPERVISORS, RELIEVING TEACHERS, AND
VISITING TEACHERS
District Number and Name
39.
41.
43.
59.
61.
Vancouver	
Burnaby	
Coquitlam_
Peace River South-
Greater Victoria-
Number of
Teachers
____ 31
____ 4
____ 1
.___ 2
___. 26
Totals.
64
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools showing number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
Fernie. 	
Cranbrook—
Kimberley	
Windermere..
Crestcn — __.
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson	
Slocan 	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail- 	
Grand Forks...
Kettle Valley-
Southern Okanagan.
Penticton 	
Keremeos 	
Princeton	
Golden  	
Revelstoke 	
Salmon Arm 	
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
9
6
8
9
9
5
15
13
13
7
15
3
8
4
6
6
6
5
7
12
2
49
50
55
23
54
16
87
35
53
22
167
32
23
52
78
22
29
17
32
65
23
54
59
67
23
66
17
105
35
60
22
203
35
24
60
87
25
33
17
35
74
26
1,358
1,707
1,857
625
1,570
407
2,798
822
1,476
564
4,948
923
549
1,577
2,573
616
930
435
991
1,923
720 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
EE 21
District Number and Name
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
80.
81.
Vernon	
Kelowna ....
KamloopS-
Barriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
Ashcroft	
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon..
Chiiliwack -	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey...	
Delta 	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam..
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound —.
Ocean Falls ..„	
Queen Charlotte..
Portiand Canal	
Prince Rupert..	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof 	
Prince George	
McBride 	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Saltspring	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo.. 	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay 	
Campbell River-
Alert Bay	
Quatsino	
Mission	
Agassiz	
Summerland	
Enderby..
Ucluelet-Tofino..
Kitimat	
Fort Nelson	
Unattached districts-
Totals	
11
100
21
135
30
124
6
11
8
16
26
55
22
67
8
30
8
31
4
18
9
36
16
140
25
120
19
96
38
251
10
49
11
138
63
1,523
9
146
27
364
13
79
14
109
13
200
8
94
13
41
14
79
10
34
9
32
4
11
2
4
8
60
11
43
8
32
13
30
7
27
38
117
10
22
31
86
22
44
38
430
12
54
15
63
5
15
18
73
7
41
7
44
20
126
8
40
9
99
17
87
18
61
11
26
9
19
16
63
5
18
2
26
8
22
2
9
1
16
3
9
24
69
1,042
6,988
120
158
137
11
16
60
75
34
35
19
39
160
137
109
275
53
156
1,917
169
419
86
128
223
108
42
90
38
37
11
4
70
48
34
31
27
129
24
101
50
549
59
76
18
84
49
54
150
46
113
99
68
28
19
75
22
31
29
11
16
9
73
8,185
3,434
4,401
3,744
246
320
1,427
1,967
701
812
518
1,037
4,826
3,733
3,123
8,867
1,480
4,736
49,916
5,238
13,035
2,754
4,023
7,210
3,343
1,149
2,244
802
866
261
76
1,987
1,285
908
812
727
3,384
516
2,356
987
15,750
1,542
1,869
423
2,269
1,251
1,379
3,960
996
3,335
2,796
1,622
533
363
2,129
578
900
613
229
424
237
2,022
223,840 EE 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of teachers
employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance in each type
of school for the school-year 1954-55:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Average
Daily
Attendance
Total
Boys
Girls
26
60
20
30
52
7
847
656
1,612
647
101
518
128
4,459
64
14,618
37,073
15,683
2,450
12,749
3,885
137,382
7,206
18,669
8,031
1,267
6,536
1,966
71,333
7,412
18,404
7,652
1,183
6,213
1,919
66,049
12,927.03
33,472.47
14,486.12
Superior schools
2,184.05
11,403.93
3,550.73
126,214.39
Totals	
1,042
8,185
223,840
115,008
108,832
204,238.72
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars only)
paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals,
and special instructors. Part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers earning less than $1,100 are
excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Number of
Teachers
High
Salary
Low
Salary
Average
Salary
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools-
Junior high schools	
Superior schools..
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools..
Elementary schools	
486
1,196
484
101
453
114
4,224
$6,990
7,090
6,990
5,250
6,590
6,624
7,090
$1,474
1,290
1,020
1,040
1,235
2,035
1,000
$4,890
4,249
4,201
3,050
3,643
3,408
3,275
Supervising Principals
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools-
Junior high schools..
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools..
Elementary schools	
$8,140
8,665
7,757
7,690
7,697
7,490
$7,063
6,765
7,053
6,358
6,667
6,314
Special Instructors
145
364
144
45
8
144
64
$6,586
6,345
5,820
5,350
3,956
7,100
12,368
$1,164
1,215
1,747
1,016
2,840
1,096
4,280
$4,529
4,381
4,117
3,620
3,333
3,590
5,384 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
EE 23
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, excluding part-time teachers,
teachers attached to the Bureau of Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and
teachers earning less than $1,100 per annum:—
Salary Range
$1,900-$ 1,999	
2,000- 2,099	
2,100- 2,199	
2,200- 2,299	
2,300- 2,399	
2,400- 2,499  . 256
2,500- 2,599  266
Number of
Teachers
__ 21
_. 91
__ 151
__ 157
__ 280
2,600-
2,700-
2,800-
2,900-
3,000-
3,100-
3,200-
3,300-
3,400-
3,500-
3,600-
2,699  270
2,799  220
2,899  251
2,999  285
  259
  245
  233
  251
  201
  216
  187
  253
3,800- 3,899  361
3,099_
3,199.
3,299_
3,399
3,499.
3,599.
3,699
3,700- 3,799.
3,900-
4,000-
4,100-
4,200-
4,300-
4,400- 4,499.
4,500- 4,599.
4,600- 4,699  122
3,999  254
4,099  259
4,199  236
4,299  222
4,399  313
  156
  121
Salary Range
$4,700-$4,799_
Number of
Teachers
... 85
4,800- 4,899  102
4,900- 4,999  189
5,000- 5,099  117
5,100- 5,199  166
5,200- 5,299  131
5,300- 5,399  113
5,400- 5,499  59
5,500- 5,599  97
5,600- 5,699  102
5,700- 5,799  85
5,800- 5,899  49
5,900- 5,999  155
6,000- 6,099  142
6,100- 6,199  20
6,200- 6,299  30
6,300- 6,399  28
6,400- 6,499  28
6,500- 6,599  23
6,600- 6,699  21
6,700- 6,799  14
6,800- 6,899  10
6,900- 6,999  10
7,000- 7,099  26
7,100- 7,199  10
7,200- 7,299  10
7,300- 7,399  15
7,400 and over  35 EE 24 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1954-55
Minister's office  $ 16,621.00
General administration  55,252.15
Curriculum Branch _.  83,230.28
Adult Education Branch  99,392.16
High Correspondence School  239,051.26
Elementary Correspondence School  75,573.89
Inspection of Schools and School Services  551,725.99
School for the Deaf and the Blind  279,544.91
Teacher-training and Summer Schools  70,015.25
Teacher Registration and Examinations  126,786.50
Vancouver Normal School  165,057.84
Victoria Normal School  132,276.28
Accounting Branch  49,543.87
Federal-Provincial Training Programmes—
Urban Occupational Training  33,944.66
Rural Occupational Training  16,864.14
Student-aid Bursaries   71,248.50
Vocational Training—Re-establishment  47,166.99
Vocational Training—Rehabilitation  2,282.96
Vocational Schools' Assistance  224,207.77
Vocational Correspondence Courses   5,391.76
Courses for new Canadians  15,341.36
Community programmes grants  27,766.35
Grants toward cost of education  26,684,132.33
Special grant under section 13 (g) of Act  5,500.00
Teachers' Pensions Fund 6%   1,895,312.21
Night-school grants  28,160.59
Education of soldiers' dependent children  15,029.10
Free text-books, maps, etc. (Text-book Branch)  338,720.83
University of British Columbia—
General grant  $2,800,001.00
University Endowment Lands  72,250.00
Dental consultant grant  5,000.00
  2,877,251.00
Special grant to Victoria College  30,000.00
Incidentals and contingencies  16,910.34
Total expenditure by Government  $34,279,302.27
Amount expended by districts (including debt and capital charges)     46,543,961.44
Grand total expenditure  $80,823,263.71 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT EE 25
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1954-55
District Number and Name
Total
Expenditure1
Government
Grants
District
Expenditure
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook
3. Kimberley.
4,
5.
6.
7,
Windermere..
Creston	
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson 	
Slocan	
Castlegar...	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail 	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley-
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos 	
Princeton	
Golden 	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm._
Armstrong-Spallumcheen..
Vernon   	
Kelowna  	
Kamloops	
Barrlere   	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake  	
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
South Cariboo	
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon .
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey 	
Delta 	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster.
Burnaby ...	
Maple Ridge...	
Coquitlam...
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt  	
Powell River	
Howe Sound—	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte.—
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prmce George	
McBride 	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Saltspring—	
Cowichan	
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay-
Campbell River-
Alert Bay	
$811,882
385,153
487,415
136,966
467,438
143,246
673,706.
237,499
825,845
151,290
1,765,682,
220,457
140,194
446,084
605,141
172,139,
204,849,
204,319,
268,784,
458,577.
229,189,
742,104.
905,417.
1,320,883,
76,391.
131,080.
445,850.
526,139,
339,351,
236,455.
158,095.
277,789.
1,126,049.
1,103,727.
651,822.
1,735,948.
395,114.
1,298,821.
20,372,370.
2,128,749.
4,226,986.
582,905.
884,600.
2,121,041.
1,157,197.
316,507.
922,831.
301,607.
405,214.
98,603.
28,232.
478,370.
361,174.
250,796.
229,809.
619,848
958,938
194,655
849,033
536,659
4,686,823
541,205
464,171
128,960
560,328
396,052.
423,860
1,626,922
603,387
712,983.
691,117
602,891
437,444,
26
,12
oo
54
60
18
57
.05
03
85
.67
,50
.66
68
.53
,32
,45
,75
,04
,32
,91
.43
79
08
41
48
40
,97
,00
,86
.80
.23
.57
.64
.19
.73
.33
,07
.82
.85
43
,34
.88
.10
,28
93
44
62
14
85
.56
89
06
39
11
90
62
24
,43
15
51
56
41
42
88
66
96
14
99
26
60
40
53
$310,941.74
236,348.01
208,387.57
110,634.34
332,170.20
66,120.54
364,315.64
134,252.33
249,140.12
107,954.64
425,091.31
• 144,775.86
88,286.48
290,038.02
277,273.15
125,471.25
152,360.52
97,055.43
133,452.99
282,748.91
78,997.00
443,381.27
510,640.45
534,354.81
56,819.46
89,350.32
323,844.06
405,569.86
93,933.37
146,566.70
72,346.74
173,401.78
523,038.53
514,099.02
371,637.75
753,668.17
125,156.35
460,397.08
5,239,292.94
439,903.82
1,150,914.45
326,549.04
404,593.42
568,000.11
216,345.25
184,405.15
288,858.89
155,232.64
111,341.79
60,556.84
16,856.56
85,715.75
276,729.30
201,033.01
168,421.55
180,494.22
441,821.24
143,115.02
511.509.52
310,543.20
1,351,059.59
296,360.63
243,123.59
92,723.93
304,326.80
187,644.24
189,882.64
442,691.88
248,927.57
336,484.18
463,031.63
304,790.56
109,110.75
$500,
148,
279
26
135
77
309
103
576,
43
1,340,
75,
51,
156
327
46,
52,
107.
135.
175,
150,
298.
394,
786,
19,
41.
122,
120,
245,
89.
85,
104,
603.
589,
280,
982,
269.
838,
15,133.
1,688,
3,076,
256,
480,
1,553,
940,
132,
633,
146
293
38,
11,
392,
84,
49,
61
439,
517,
51
337,
226,
3,335
244
221,
36,:
256,
208,
233.
1,184,:
354,
376,
228,i
298,
328
940.52
,805.11
,027.43
,332.20
268.40
125.64
,390.93
,246.72
,704.91
336.21
,591.36
,681.64
,908.18
,046.66
,868.38
,668.07
488.93
,264.32
,331.05
,828.41
,192.91
723.16
,777.34
528.27
571.95
730.16
,006.34
,570.lt
,417.63
,889.16
,749.06
,387.45
,011.04
,628.62
,184.44
,280.56
.957.98
,423.99
,077.88
,846.03
071.98
356.30
,007.46
,040.99
852.03
,102.78
,972.55
374.98
872.35
047.01
376.00
655.14
444.76
763.38
387.56
354.68
117.38
540.22
523.91
115.95
,763.92
844.93
047.82
236.49
002.08
408.42
978.32
230.26
460.42
499.08
085.97
100.84
333.78
Includes debt and capital charges. EE 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1954-55
—Continued
District Number and Name
Total
Expenditure1
Government
Grants
District
Expenditure
74. QuatsinO-
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz..
77. Summerland-
78. Enderby	
79. Ucluelet-Toflno..
80. Kitimat	
81. FortNelson..
Anahim-
Bamfield-
Belmont Park„
Butedale	
Camp Mile 163..
Camp Mile 456-
Chezacut 	
Comox Airport..
Esperanza	
Kyuquot	
Lower Post	
Muchalat	
McDame Creek-
Sarita River	
Sydney Inlet	
Tahsis River	
Tatlayoko-
Telegraph Creek..
Tofino Airport	
Tulsequah— „
University Hill	
Zeballos 	
Totals-
Unattached
$242,097.39
518,823.79
166,898.27
187,798.39
203,081.19
105,220.37
650,884.08
64,539.02
19,455.65
5,630.58
17,698,53
75,552.30
5,391.29
4,805.45
5,631.44
3,788.69
20,769.36
4,140.54
5,825.46
5,564.63
30,365.10
4,037.46
16,352.71
3,322.29
32,603.74
19,902.50
20,853.10
5,588.63
4,688.41
577,962.99
12,366.94
$32,947.81
225,004.97
94,817.03
85,655.60
109,446.45
68,167.62
19,488.50
60,345.18
18,833.50
4,099.58
16,455.38
59,347.34
675.00
4,728.98
5,484.98
3,457.50
18,980.78
2,972.10
5,361.72
5,420.96
29,236.50
3,527.60
12,705.50
3,138.34
24,743.30
19,658.24
18,850.52
5,535.12
275.00
69,941.04
11,155.60
$73,450,832.65  | $26,906,871.21
$209,149.58
293,818.82
72,081.24
102,142.79
93,634.74
37,052.75
631,395.58
4,193.84
622.15
1,531.00
1,243.15
16,204.96
4,716.29
76.47
146.46
331.19
1,788.58
1,168.44
463.74
143.67
1,128.60
509.86
3,647.21
183.95
7,860.44
244.26
2,002.58
53.51
4,413.41
508,021.95
1,211.34
$46,543,961.44
1 Includes debt and capital charges.
EXAMINATION SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS, 1955
University Entrance
The fifteen General Proficiency Scholarships, each of $175, awarded by the
University of British Columbia, with the accompanying fifteen scholarships, each of $225,
generously granted by the Chris Spencer Foundation, were won by the following:—
Place
Name
School
Per Cent
1st in B.C.
2nd in B.C.
Area 1
Area 2
Area 3
Area 4
Area 5
Area 6
Area 7
Area 8
Area 9
Area 10
Area 11
Area 12
Area 13
Arthur John Stewart Smith..
Tovie Leon Rome	
Olga Rumen..
Alvin Edward Neumeyer..
Lorna Kay Reeve	
Ronald Kennedy Jones	
Deana J. Clancy	
Riho Hans Martinson	
Robert Eiji Horita  __
William Harold Charles Holt-
f Margaret Mores ..
| John Henry Dressier.	
Gordon Fullerton Gibson .
Roderick Kerns Calverley..
Sarah Granville Eliot—	
Valerie Anne Squance	
Victoria High School-
King Edward High School..
Fernie Elementary-Senior High School.	
Similkameen Junior-Senior High School-
Kelowna High School	
Kamloops High School-
Delta Junior-Senior High School-
Vancouver Technical High School-
King George High School	
Magee High School..
T. J. Trapp Technical High School-
Burnaby South High School-
West Vancouver Senior High School	
South Peace Junior-Senior High School-
Oak Bay High School  _ 	
Royal Oak High School 	
93.4
92.3
86.0
86.0
89.0
85.3
83.3
87.6
89.3
89.3
84.5
82.4
87.4
83.3
89.6
87.2 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
EE 27
The Governor-General's Silver Medal for the highest standing in the University
Entrance examinations was won by Arthur John Stewart Smith. The Governor-General's
Bronze Medal for the second highest standing in the University Entrance examinations
was won by Tovie Leon Rome.
SENIOR MATRICULATION
The six Royal Institution Scholarships, each of $200, awarded by the University
of British Columbia for general proficiency, were won by the following:—
Name
School
Per Cent
90.4
89.3
89.0
88.1
86.0
85.9
Bock Wing Yip  	
Catherine Elizabeth Ann Millward..
Lorna Maria Ryder	
Ronald Soligo..
Martha Michiko Watanabe..
Hillary Joan Lee 	
King Edward High School	
Nanaimo Senior High School-
J. Lloyd Crowe High School	
J. Lloyd Crowe High School	
Kamloops High School	
J. Lloyd Crowe High School —
GENERAL REVIEW
Considerable progress has been made in all branches of Departmental work during
the year.    Reports of the branches appear in the following pages.
Retirements
During the school-year the Department lost the valued services of Mr. Harry A.
Jones, Director of Technical, Vocational, and Adult Education, who retired after fifteen
years' service.
Two other valued members of the Department also severed their connections on the
occasion of marriage—Miss D. De Jong, Inspector of Home Economics, and Mrs. D. M.
Haffenden, of the Victoria Normal School staff.
Appointments
The following appointments have been made during the year:—
To be Director of Technical and Vocational Education:  Mr. J. S. White.
To be Inspectors of Schools:   Miss J. Irvine (Home Economics); Mr. K. F.
Alexander, Burns Lake;  Mr. N. A. Allen, Nelson;   Mr. B. H. Harford,
Castlegar;   Mr. G. H. Nelson, Fort St. John;   and Mr. C. E. Ritchie,
Prince Rupert. EE 28 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
REPORT OF J. F. K. ENGLISH, M.A., B.P/ED., ASSISTANT
DEPUTY MINISTER OF EDUCATION
A.  Division of Curriculum
There is a growing emphasis on and a greater concern for individual needs to-day
than ever before. The greatly increased enrolments in the high schools create a wide
diversity of interests and abilities. The curriculum must provide new offerings, not
only to meet these special abilities, but to alleviate special disabilities. In other words,
more and more curriculum is being considered on an individual basis with special reference to individual pupils. Furthermore, the complexities of modern life and their
impact upon the pupil have brought about the need for new subject areas that will teach
all pupils how to care for their individual and group needs. For instance, modern traffic
flow and crowded school buses on crowded streets suggest greater emphasis on safety
education; the necessity for the conservation of our natural resources is another example,
while driver education would appear to merit a place as an extra-curricular activity.
The greater amount of free time now available to most people, resulting in more opportunities for leisure, creates a greater demand for music, art, dramatics, and literature,
all of which, to be really effective, must be considered on an individual pupil basis.
While certain basic elements or essentials will find a place in the schools of every
age, it is the task of educational thinkers and curriculum planners to revise and to adjust
the curriculum to meet these evolving needs, as well as to keep pace with man's ever-
increasing knowledge in a wide variety of fields. It is obvious that the sum total of
human knowledge has increased enormously within the last generation and even within
our time.   There are areas of learning now that were entirely unknown a few years ago.
No public institution in a democracy can long remain oblivious to these changing
conditions and to current public opinion. The comments and discussion that have
recently been accorded public education both in this country and elsewhere are indicative of a genuine interest and have resulted in what appears to have been a general " taking
stock of the work of the public schools." There appears to be a better understanding
of what is expected from our schools, as well as a greater appreciation of what they are
actually doing and the problems and difficulties with which they must contend.
During the past year considerable attention was given by the Department of Education in examining the aims and functions of public-school education. The following
statement was prepared in co-operation with the Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board
and is authorized as the official statement of aims of education in the schools of British
Columbia. It is of significance as an expression, not only of what schools are expected
to do, but also of the limited responsibilities which schools can assume if they are to do
their work thoroughly and effectively.
"Aims of Education in British Columbia
" The people of this Province have established schools for the primary purposes of
developing the character of our young people, training them to be good citizens, and
teaching them the fundamental skills of learning necessary for further education and
adult life.
" The school, however, is not the only agency responsible for the education of
children. Worthy influence of the home, the church, and the community must also be
considered, since these are a vital part of the child's environment. The school must add
to and strengthen the influence of these agencies, but it should not attempt to take their CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES EE 29
place.   The home, the church, the community, and the school should work together to
provide strong and worthy guidance for our children.
" The education given in the school, unlike other forms of education, can be readily
planned and directed. For this reason, it is possible for the school to bring together all
those educational forces that will contribute to the best development of the child. The
school should support influences that are good and oppose those which are harmful.
Above all, it should do its own special task so well that it earns the confidence and respect
of the people of the Province.
"A good school programme develops children in two ways—as individual persons
and as citizens. Since this development begins long before the child comes to school, the
programme must build upon a foundation already well defined. It should be so planned
that it helps the child to become an individual who has confidence in himself because of
what he is and what he knows. At the same time it should guide him into becoming
a person who is respected and trusted by his fellow-man. A school programme which
neglects the child in either of these respects fails to fulfil its responsibilities.
"In order that these general aims may be achieved, certain objectives must be
established for those areas of learning in which the school is best qualified to serve.
If these defined objectives are attained to a desirable degree, the school can make its
special contribution to the complete education of every child. They may be summarized
as follows:—
" To ensure that all pupils master the fundamental skills of learning to the limit
of their abilities.
" To help all pupils to develop healthy minds and bodies.
" To help pupils become familiar with that which is great and valuable in
history, science, and the arts.
" To guide pupils in the development of such qualities of character and citizenship as good personal habits, willingness to work with others, honesty,
obedience, and self-control.
" To co-operate with parents in guiding the growth and development of their
children.
"To teach each pupil to do his best work by maintaining high standards of
performance in all phases of the school programme.
" To instil in all pupils respect for high standards of work and an appreciation
for the efforts of others.
" To develop in all pupils an understanding of the responsibilities and privileges
of life in a democracy.
" To encourage self-discipline in pupils by requiring acceptable standards of
performance and behaviour in all phases of the school programme.
"To teach pupils some common manual skills as a means of helping them
become practical and useful citizens.
" To give pupils some guidance in the choice of a career and some opportunity
to begin preparation for occupational life.
" To seek out and develop pupils' special talents and potentialities, and to assist
them in developing their strengths and overcoming or adjusting to handicaps or weaknesses."
During the period under review, the work of curriculum development has been
concerned with the following aspects:—
(a) Revision of Present Courses.—During the year, curriculum development was
undertaken in the following subjects:—
(1) English.—A revision of the English programme for Grades VII, VIII,
and IX was completed, with the preparation of a new course for Grade IX.
(2) Social Studies.—A reorganization of the Social Studies programme for
Grades I to VI was undertaken. Course revision and a study of text-books EE 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
was undertaken for Social Studies 20 to incorporate further study of
modern world history for all senior high-school pupils.
(3) Mathematics.—A revised course was prepared for Grade VII beginning
the revision of Mathematics for Grades VII, VIII, and IX.
(4) Science.—A revision of the Science programme for Grades I to VI is being
completed, and a study of text-books was made.
(5) Chemistry.—A revision of the Chemistry course for Grade XIII was
begun, and a study of suitable texts was made.
(6) Language.—A revision of the Language programme for Grades I to VI
was begun, and a study of suitable text-books for this programme was
undertaken.
(7) Classics.—Two courses in Greek were prepared, and accompanying textbooks were selected. These courses, which will probably be offered only
in selected schools, are designed to increase interest in and study of
classics.
(8) Industrial Arts.—A preparation of a new series of courses in Industrial
Mechanics was undertaken. These will be designed to teach students the
fundamental principles of industrial mechanics and their practical application to the industries of the community.
(9) Music.—Work on the revision of the Music programme for senior high
schools was begun.
(b) Selection of New Text-books.—After a careful evaluation of all appropriate
text-books available, the following were recommended for adoption as prescribed textbooks for the subjects indicated:—
English—
Our Heritage, English 10.
Using Our Language, English 10.
Social Studies—
Canadian Social Studies Atlas, Social Studies 33.
Mathematics—
Mathematics for Canadians, Mathematics 7.
Plane Geometry, Mathematics 30.
First Course in Algebra, Mathematics 30.
Science—
Science in Action, Book 1, Science 10.
Greek—
Xenephon Anabasis Selections, Greek 91 and 92.
Music—
World Music Horizons, Music 8.
It may be noted in connection with the foregoing that all but two of the above books
were written or edited by Canadian or British authors. In the selection of these books,
particular attention was given to the accuracy and value of their content as well as to the
style and organization of the writing. Text-books are changed only when an appraisal
indicates conclusively that present texts are inadequate or out of date and that better
books are available to replace them.
Provincial Curriculum Advisory Board
This Board, which began to function in September, 1954, acts in an advisory capacity
to the Honourable the Minister of Education. It is composed of well-known and highly
respected persons in business, industry, agriculture, labour, the teaching profession, and
other important groups in the Province. During its first year the Board has given careful
study and has rendered valuable advice on a number of curriculum problems. Some time
was spent in assessing the total curriculum picture and appraising the aims of education CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES EE 31
in this Province.   The official statement of the aims of education, previously referred to,
was prepared with the advice and assistance of this Board.
Other topics that received the attention of the Board included driver education,
vocational education, the feasibility of extending the alcohol education programme to the
elementary-school grades, as well as pupil report cards. During the year the Board
visited the Vocational Institute in Vancouver, and on another occasion were guests of the
board of directors of the Pacific National Exhibition, when an opportunity was provided
for viewing the displays in the British Columbia Building.
The Professional Committee on Curriculum Development
In the spring of 1955 a Professional Committee was organized to meet at the call of
the Chair to advise from time to time on technical aspects of the curriculum. Membership
includes principals and teachers of wide experience, as well as specialists in the fields of
Commercial Education, Home Economics, Industrial Arts, and Technical Education.
The work of the Committee is largely concerned with the administrative aspects of curriculum development and of policies affecting changes in courses, time allotments, textbooks, and other problems which concern curriculum in action. It is expected that in
time the Committee may be enlarged to include representatives from the College of
Education, primary and intermediate teachers, and the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation.
Experimental Courses
To be highly effective, the curriculum must make provision for meeting new needs
as they arise. This provision is made in the form of experimental courses. Such courses
are planned and tried out in selected schools for a period and afterwards revised in the
light of experience and ultimately become a new course or programme for all schools
of the Province. In some cases the courses are designed to meet needs and conditions
of a local district; for example, coal-mining at Fernie. Another experimental course
which appears to be proceeding satisfactorily is the one in Forest Industries being
developed at Port Alberni. An experiment in conservation is also being conducted at the
Mission Junior-Senior High School. It is anticipated that commencing in September,
1955, some experimental work will be done with courses in Greek designed to encourage
greater interest in the classics.
The Division of Curriculum encourages experimentation and local adaptation of
courses within reasonable limits, but these innovations should be approved and authorized
by the Department of Education. The Department desires to be kept informed at all
times, not only because it is the responsible agent for the total educational programme,
but also for the reason that much useful information may be relayed to other areas in the
Province contemplating similar projects.
Acknowledgments
The advice and assistance contributed voluntarily by many groups and individuals
throughout the Province is gratefully acknowledged. Over 116 teachers, members of the
University staff, and others were active on various official Departmental committees.
A wealth of suggestions and advice were received from these and other sources. The
genuine interest and co-operation shown by the Teachers' Federation, School Trustees'
Association, and the Parent-Teacher Federation augurs well for the soundness of the
development now being undertaken.
Close working relationship is maintained with the office of the Chief Inspector, the
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research, and the Registrar. The Text-book Branch
likewise keeps in close contact with this Division. The co-operation of all these Departmental branches is acknowledged and appreciated. EE 32 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
May I also pay a tribute to the Assistant Director of Curriculum, Mr. J. R. Meredith,
for his keen insight and whole-hearted co-operation at all times, and to the staff who have
worked so conscientiously throughout the year.
B.  General Educational Services
Certain other phases of education come within the scope of the office of Assistant
Deputy Minister. In some cases, detailed reports appear elsewhere as noted, but a
passing reference is made to the more important of these activities as follows:—
Jericho Hill School
Jericho Hill School, formerly known as the School for the Deaf and the Blind,
located in the 4100 block, Fourth Avenue West, Vancouver.
Although the report of the Superintendent describes adequately the work of the
School, it may be said that important matters of policy are referred to an Advisory Committee, at present composed of Inspectors Gray and Burnett, the president of the Blind
Department of the Parent-Teacher Association, the president of the Deaf Department of
the Parent-Teacher Association, Superintendent Dr. C. E. MacDonald, and the Assistant
Deputy Minister of Education. Monthly meetings are held, at which time the Superintendent reports on the condition of the School and any other matters affecting the welfare
of the children. (Note.—A detailed account by the Superintendent of Jericho Hill
School appears elsewhere in this Report.)
Provincial Junior Red Cross
As Chairman of the Provincial Junior Red Cross Committee, it is a pleasure to
state that this organization continues to be very active at the elementary-school level,
and is becoming progressively so at the secondary. Statistics as to enrolment are as
follows: Grades I to VIII, 110,248; Grades IX to XIII, 24,828—an over-all increase
in membership of 15,280 pupils for the year. The Chairman is also a member of the
Health Centre for Children, Vancouver General Hospital.
The Provincial Junior Red Cross Committee has been enlarged to include a Provincial Inspector of Schools, as well as a number of teachers in various parts of the
Province who act as corresponding members. Besides these, the Provincial Normal
School, the Department of Health and Welfare, and the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation are effectively represented. The detailed annual report of Junior Red Cross
activities may be found in the Thirty-sixth Annual Report, 1954, Canadian Red Cross
Society, British Columbia Division.
Educational Conferences
A secondary-school principals' conference of ten days' duration was held in July,
1954, under the direction of this Division. Some seventy-five principals from all points
of the Province participated, and several members of the staff of the Department of
Education also took part as consultants. The purpose of the conference was mainly to
discuss and, if possible, arrive at possible solutions to some of the current problems in
mass secondary education. A report of the conference was subsequently prepared and
distributed to those taking part.
A Departmental conference in which all Inspectors of Schools and Departmental
heads took part was called in December, 1954. A daily lecture by Dean Neville Scarfe,
Faculty of Education, University of Manitoba, highlighted the conference. In addition,
there were special panels and discussion topics on the agenda.   Each of these fields of CURRICULUM AND GENERAL EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
EE 33
interest was developed and presented by one or more members of the staff. The conference was concluded by a dinner, to which former members of the Department of
Education were invited.
Public Education Information Committee
In January, 1955, a committee, now bearing the title of "Public Education Information Committee," was set up. Membership in this body includes representatives of the
British Columbia Teachers' Federation, British Columbia School Trustees' Association,
British Columbia Parent-Teacher Federation, and the Department of Education. It was
thought that such a committee could serve a very useful purpose by co-ordinating the
work of these educational bodies in providing pertinent information to the public about
the educational system of the Province. In order to assist in planning an effective programme, certain persons have been invited to work with this new committee, namely:
Mr. Eric Ramsden, Vancouver Daily Province; Mr. Charles Bayley, Vancouver school
system; Mrs. Rosemary Cruit, British Columbia Teachers' Federation; and Mr. P. J.
Kitley, Director of British Columbia School Broadcasts, Department of Education. The
co-operation of the organizations and the individuals mentioned is gratefully acknowledged.
■ EE 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), CHIEF INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
In submitting my first report as Chief Inspector of Schools, I should like to pay
tribute to my two predecessors in this office, Dr. H. B. King and Dr. H. L. Campbell, who
contributed so much to the educational advancement of this Province. Both were responsible for major and important changes in methods of instruction, although both had duties
extending far beyond the problems of inspection of schools. Since June, 1947, the position of Chief Inspector was permitted to remain vacant, although its duties were discharged
by the Assistant Superintendent of Education. When it was again filled on July 1st, 1954,
the duties of the office were restated as follows: " To assist in co-ordinating the inspection
and supervision of elementary and secondary instruction throughout the Province; to
assist in the supervision of special education for the blind, deaf, and otherwise physically
and mentally handicapped; to inspect and supervise the Provincial School for the Deaf
and the Blind; to conduct experimental studies in education; to report and advise on any
matters concerned with instruction in the elementary and secondary schools; and generally
to perform such other duties as may be assigned to him by the Superintendent of Education " (section 7 (3) of the " Public Schools Act").
One of my first duties on taking office was to conduct a short orientation course at
Victoria to acquaint newly appointed Inspectors of Schools with some of the details of
their duties and with the operation of other divisions of the Department. This was done
through the co-operation of branch heads and divisional directors.
All Inspectors of Schools outside of Vancouver report through this office. During
the month of September introductory visits are made to most teachers for the purpose of
assisting them with problems incidental to the reopening of schools. During the past
school-year the forty Inspectors outside of Vancouver were responsible for the general
supervision of the work of 6,262 teachers. Among these are a number of Home Economics
and Industrial Arts teachers who, because of the technical nature of their work, receive
reports from Inspectors of the Divisions of Home Economics and of Technical and Vocational Education. To the remainder, 11,864 visits (exclusive of those made in September)
were paid, and 3,074 formal reports were issued by Municipal and Provincial Inspectors
of Schools.
Such statistical information fails to give any true or complete picture of the complex
nature of the work of an Inspector. As the field representative of the Superintendent and
Department, and as technical adviser to his School Boards, he has a twofold responsibility, outlined in the " Public Schools Act."
The following resume of an Inspector's activities during one school-year in a typical
inspectorate may serve as an illustration, although even it is an incomplete portrayal:—
School and Classroom Visits.—Reports on all schools and on a proportion of
the teachers, including all those on probationary appointment and those
with interim or temporary certificates;  regular visits for discussion with
principals; visits to all teachers, with particular attention to those requiring
assistance; checking on instructional equipment and on laboratory work;
investigation of special problems in instruction and in organization of
schools.
Evaluation.—Discussion of high-school examination results with principals,
teachers, and Boards; co-ordination and supervision of testing programmes
within the inspectorate, with the aim of improving instructional methods; INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS AND SCHOOL SERVICES EE 35
initiation and encouragement of follow-up programmes within schools;
assistance in administration of Departmental survey tests.
In-service Training.—Arrangements for in-service training courses for credit;
assistance with local curriculum revision committees; attendance at staff
meetings; attendance at principals' meetings; assistance with study groups;
assistance in programmes of teachers' conventions; various addresses to
professional and lay groups. In this connection, the following is a list of
in-service training activities reported from thirty of the Province's inspectorates: Regular meetings of principals, 24 inspectorates; co-operative
testing programmes, 14; institutes and conferences, 13; courses for certificate credit, 9; Inspectors' bulletins, 6; teacher inter-visitation, 5; workshops and study groups, 5; miscellaneous types, 9.
School Board Duties.—Attendance and reports at Board meetings; assistance
in building programmes; assistance in preparation of estimates; help to
Board secretary-treasurers; advice to Boards and Board committees on
all matters concerned with instruction and teachers; school attendance
area and representatives' meetings.
Other Duties.—Investigations for Department and Board; attendance at professional conferences; preparation of own reports; checking of annual
reports; checking of school requisitions for instructional supplies.
In the month of December a Departmental conference for all Inspectors and other
officials was held at Victoria, under the chairmanship of the Assistant Deputy Minister.
Matters of general policy were discussed under the leadership of the various participants.
A notable feature was the series of stimulating addresses on educational philosophy by
Dean Scarfe, of the College of Education of the University of Manitoba.
In addition to the routine duties of this office, the following activities may be
significant:—
(1) Visits were paid to inspectorates in the Okanagan, Kootenays, Peace River,
and some other centres. In most cases it was possible to meet not only
with the Inspector, but with the principals and School Boards and to visit
schools in operation. In some cases it was also possible to meet and talk
with groups of teachers. I was impressed with the professional alertness
of the teachers of this Province and the enthusiasm with which they undertook to study teaching problems.
(2) Throughout the year a Chief Inspector's circular, containing suggestions
from many sources for the improvement of instruction, was issued to
Inspectors and to schools concerned with the material discussed.
(3) A study was made of organization, as reported by secondary schools, and
suggestions made as to improving efficiency in specific cases.
(4) The Accrediting Booklet was revised in accordance with present curricula
and philosophy, and sent out to schools in preparation for the fall term.
Inspector McLellan did a great deal of the work of revisions for the
Accrediting Committee.
(5) A survey was made of supervisory staffs within school districts. Preparation of recommendations to the Council of Public Instruction as to teacher
consultants and the supervisory duties of principals followed.
(6) A survey was made of the present status of the education of handicapped
children in British Columbia in preparation for further study of this
problem. An immediate result was the recognition for grant purposes of
teachers of special classes in the public schools under the amendments
to the " Public Schools Act." EE 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
(7) Some time was spent in the inspection of Jericho Hill School (the Provincial School for the Deaf and the Blind), especially in relation to
instruction.
(8) A survey was made of present practices in this Province of teaching fast-
learning and gifted children. The results of this survey may lead to
suggestions to schools in this respect at a later date.
(9) Two special investigations of specific local problems were carried out at
the request of the Minister to assist School Boards.
(10) A close liaison was maintained with other branches of the Department
through attendance at formal and informal committee meetings dealing
with such matters as budgeting and finance, curriculum, examinations,
survey-testing, and teacher-training.    In addition, information on new
and significant developments within local districts was furnished on a
revised monthly report form by Inspectors and transmitted to other branch
heads.
The improvement of instruction is a slow and steady process, fundamentally dependent on the work of the teacher in the classroom.   The Division of Curriculum evolves
the courses of study; it is the function of this branch to give leadership in the teaching of
them by studying the best practices evolved by our schools and making them familiar to
other schools, while at the same time encouraging controlled experiments to evolve still
better practices. DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION EE 37
DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
REPORT OF F. HENRY JOHNSON, M.A., D.P/ed.,
CO-ORDINATOR OF TEACHER EDUCATION
Reorganization of Teacher Education
Beginning in the summer of 1954 a study was made of the possibility of reorganizing
the present programme of teacher-training, with a view to improving the education of new
teachers academically and professionally. A Departmental committee consisting of the
Deputy Minister, Assistant Deputy Minister, Chief Inspector, and the Co-ordinator of
Teacher Education met with a committee from the University of British Columbia
consisting of Dean Andrew, Dean Chant, Dean Gage, and the Registrar, Mr. C. B. Wood,
to consider the possibility of integrating all teacher education with the University. As
a result of these meetings, a general plan for the reorganization of teacher education was
developed and given legislative sanction during the session of 1955 through amendments
to the "British Columbia University Act," the "Public Schools Act" and the "Victoria
College Act."
The new system will come into operation in September, 1956, when all teacher
education, elementary and secondary, will be given under the authority of a new College
of Education of the University of British Columbia, and will carry credit toward degrees
in education. The new College of Education will rank as a faculty within the University,
but will differ from other faculties in having its own board, to be known as the " Joint
Board of the College of Education." Its membership will be the Chancellor, the President of the University, the Dean of the College of Education or their nominees, a representative of the Senate, the Deputy Minister of Education, the Assistant Deputy Minister,
Chief Inspector of Schools, the Co-ordinator of Teacher Education or their nominees, the
principal of Victoria College or his nominee, a representative of the British Columbia
School Trustees Association, and two representatives from the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation.
The Joint Board is empowered to make recommendations to the Board of Governors,
the Senate, and the President of the University, and the Minister of Education regarding
the curriculum, staff appointments, budgetary provisions, and capital expenditures of the
College of Education.
In Victoria the training of elementary teachers will be continued through a department of education of Victoria College.
Meetings of the Joint Board have been held and plans approved for offering,
beginning in September, 1956, the following programmes:—
A. For the Basic Education of Elementary Teachers.—(1) A two-year intramural programme for high-school graduates with University Entrance.
At the conclusion of this two-year period successful candidates would have
completed the course requirements for the Elementary Basic certificate and
have earned two years' credit toward a degree in education.
(2) A one-year programme of teacher-training for those entering
with Grade XIII or first year of university. To enter this programme, such
students must have a C+ or second-class average in either Grade XII or
Grade XIII (first year of university). Successful completion of this year
will constitute the course requirements for the Elementary Basic certificate
as well as the second year of credit toward a degree in education.
(3) Because of the present demand for teachers and the necessity
of a transitional period in progressing to a higher standard of teacher EE 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
education and certification, it is recognized as necessary for the present
to retain an emergency one-year course for those students who have only
University Entrance standing.   Students who elect this course must have
a C+ or second-class average in Grade XII.   On satisfactory completion
of this year of training, these graduates would receive a certificate valid
for four years, during which time they must complete by summer sessions
or intramurally the remaining courses of the two-year basic programme
for elementary-teacher training.
Both one-year programmes referred to in paragraphs (2) and (3) above are planned
to extend beyond the usual dates of the university year.    Students electing these programmes would spend two weeks prior to the opening of the College of Education in
directed observation and study in a public school.    (If they have been active members of
a Future Teachers Club during their high-school course, this observation period would
not be required.)    Immediately following the close of the regular academic term in the
College of Education, all one-year students would be required to take a post-sessional
course of six weeks' duration, terminating about the end of June.
All of the above courses would be offered both at the College of Education, University
of British Columbia, and at Victoria College.
B. For the Education of Secondary-school Teachers. — There will be three
programmes offered:—
(1) A five-year programme of Arts and Science courses combined
with professional courses in education, including observation and practice
teaching. Successful completion will fulfil course requirements for a
Secondary Basic certificate and a degree in education.
(2) An elementary teacher, with two years' credit toward the education degree, may, intramurally or by summer sessions, complete a further
three years of training for the Secondary Basic certificate and a degree in
education.
(3) The graduate with a Bachelor of Arts or other degree from a
faculty other than education may, by taking a special one-year teacher-
training programme in the College of Education, qualify for the Secondary
Basic certificate.
C. For the Further Professional Education of Elementary Teachers.—Elementary teachers desiring to advance their knowledge and professional training
beyond the minimum two years required for the Elementary Basic certification, and yet not desiring to become secondary-school teachers, will be
offered a programme of further academic and professional study leading
to a four-year degree in elementary education.
D. For Teachers Proceeding to Graduate Studies.—The College of Education
will also offer a programme of graduate courses leading to the Master of
Education degree.
Recognition for Degree Credit of Past Teacher Education
Teacher-training taken prior to September, 1956, will be recognized and evaluated
toward the education degree on the following basis:—
(1) For Senior Matriculation or the equivalent of Senior Matriculation as
recognized for the Elementary Basic certificate, one year in Education.
(2) For Normal School, one year in Education.
(3) For a combination of (1) and (2), two years in Education.
(4) For two years of Arts or better plus Normal School, two years in Education plus such additional credits to be evaluated according to the new
curriculum of the College of Education.   Every student, however, will be DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION EE 39
required to take a minimum of 15 units in attendance at the University
for the education degrees.
Curriculum Planning
A curriculum committee of the Joint Board was appointed under the chairmanship
of the Co-ordinator of Teacher Education, and gratifying progress was made during the
summer of 1955 on the new curricula in teacher education.
Measures Which Have Been Taken to Promote Recruitment of Teachers
1. Financial Assistance.—In July, 1954, the Government established a Teacher
Training Loan Fund, initially of $100,000, from which interest-free loans repayable in
four years could be granted to worthy students in need of assistance. Individual loans
are approved where necessary up to a maximum of $900. Sixty-two students in the
Normal Schools and the University's School of Education were aided by these teacher-
training loans in the first year, 1954-55. In the current year there has been a great
increase in requests for these loans, and such assistance has been granted to 102 students.
Financial assistance continues to be granted in smaller amounts under the Dominion-
Provincial Student Aid Fund. In 1954-55, 119 student-teachers were granted bursary
loans.   About the same number are being assisted from the Fund this year.
It is encouraging to report also that an increasing number of organizations are now
offering scholarships to students entering training for teaching.
2. Future Teachers Clubs in High Schools.—During the past year the Department
of Education initiated a recruitment policy in the high schools whereby each high-school
principal was requested if possible to form a Future Teachers Club and to select one of his
outstanding teachers as a sponsor. A Handbook for Future Teachers Clubs was prepared
by the Co-ordinator of Teacher Education and distributed to all clubs. This outlines the
objectives of the clubs and offers suggestions regarding the organization, programmes,
available films and reference books, financial help for teacher-training, the teacher-
training programme, certification, salaries, the qualities desirable in teachers, and the
advantages of teaching as a profession. Through the co-operation of the Inspectors,
periods of observation and in many cases a little practice teaching were arranged in
near-by elementary schools for members of the Future Teachers Clubs. These were very
popular with the members.
The response of high-school principals, staff, and students to the Future Teachers
Club programme was most encouraging. Eighty-seven clubs were organized, with a membership of approximately 1,600. Even the small rural high schools had clubs of five to
ten members. It is too early to report the effect of this membership on registration in the
teacher-training colleges, as it has been our policy to encourage these students, if at all
possible, to proceed from high school to university or senior matriculation before enrolling
for teacher-training.
3. Teacher Recruitment among University Students.—During the past year the
Co-ordinator of Teacher Education visited the University of British Columbia and Victoria College, speaking to numerous classes and student groups from freshmen to seniors
on teaching as a profession and the training requirements, stressing particularly the increasing need for secondary-school teachers.
4. Recruitment of Teachers in the United Kingdom.—During the summer of 1954
the Department of Education sent Mr. C. G. Brown, the retiring Inspector of Schools for
Burnaby, to the United Kingdom to interview numerous British teachers interested in
coming to this Province to settle and teach. In the spring of 1955 he was followed by
Inspector William Gray, who interviewed these and others and completed arrangements
between them and our School Boards so that the teachers might be brought out to Canada
under assisted immigration and go directly to their school districts.    Under this system EE 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
twenty-two elementary and forty-three secondary teachers from the United Kingdom were
engaged for the school-year 1955-56.
Since the spring of 1954, when a positive teacher-recruitment policy was initiated in
the Province, results have so far been very gratifying. Normal School enrolments have
almost doubled, from 510 in September, 1953, to 970 in September, 1955. Enrolment
at the University of British Columbia School of Education for training secondary teachers
who are university graduates has increased slightly to 130 in September, 1955. DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
EE 41
Summer School of Education
In 1955 the location of the Summer School of Education was changed from Victoria
High School to the campus of Victoria College and Normal School, with additional accommodation in the adjoining new Lansdowne Junior High School. The move seems to have
been a popular one with the teachers attending. In addition to the increased accommodation which necessitated the change, our students were able to enjoy the very attractive
buildings and grounds.
Enrolment reached an all-time high of 2,017, an increase of 218 over that of last
year. A faculty of seventy-one were employed, most of whom were outstanding teachers,
principals, professors, or Inspectors from our own Province. Ten guest lecturers from
other Provinces and, in one case, from the United States were employed.
The Industrial Arts Section of the Summer School of Education met in Vancouver
at the Vancouver Technical School, while the Commercial Section was held, as in past
years, in the School of Commerce on the campus of the University.
For the success of this session we would like to acknowledge with gratitude the very
fine co-operation we received from the School Boards of Victoria and Vancouver, the
University of British Columbia, Victoria College, and the Victoria Normal School. For
the loan of hundreds of volumes to supplement our own library, our thanks are due also
to the librarians of the Normal Schools, Victoria College, the University, the Public
Library Commission, the Vancouver Teachers Library, and the Victoria Public Library.
Courses and Enrolment (Summer Session Only)
Figures for the numbers of courses offered, numbers of instructors, and total enrolment for the past five years are shown in the table below:—
Courses
Instructors
Enrolment
Victoria Section, 1955	
Vancouver Section—
79
26
6
59
8
4
1,866
104
47
Totals for 1955	
Totals .fir 1954
111
102
104
100
88
71
68
66
61
56
2,017
1,799
1,711
1,608
1,465
Totals for 1953	
Totals for 1952	
Totals for t«i
Courses Offered
Victoria Section
Enrolment
Philosophy, Psychology, Methods, and Administration of Education:
1. Principles and Techniques of Elementary Education  173
11. Principles of Visual Education  56
The Curriculum: Its Objectives and Procedures  9
14.
32.
50.
52.
Intermediate Demonstration and Laboratory Class (Grades
V and VI)	
43
Techniques of Classroom Management  189
Organization and Administration of the British Columbia
School System
63. Introduction to Educational Supervision	
80A. Historical Foundations of Canadian Education — European Background	
8 0B. Historical Foundations of Canadian Education—Canadian and American Background	
236
14
41
36 EE 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
Philosophy, Psychology, Methods, and Administration of Education
 Continued Enrolment
100. Principles and Techniques of Secondary Education     74
104X. Seminar in Educational Leadership for Elementary School
Principals and Vice-Principals     36
115. Psychology of Adolescence     83
126. Adjusting School Work to Individual Differences  105
128. Remedial Education  104
132. Tests and Measurements     62
150. Growth and Development of Children  131
156. Disciplinary Problems in the School  135
159. Mental Hygiene  168
Kindergarten-Primary Education:
440A. School Music—Kindergarten-Primary   153
584. Art Education for the Kindergarten-Primary Grades     83
590. Principles and Practices of Primary Education  114
591. Primary Observation and Laboratory  107
592. Social Studies and Science in the Primary Grades  192
593. Reading in the Kindergarten-Primary Grades  225
596. Language and Literature in the Kindergarten-Primary
Grades  156
597. Arithmetic in the Kindergarten-Primary Grades  230
Intermediate Grades Education:
200. Language Arts in the Intermediate Grades  107
202. Remedial Reading  116
212. Creative Writing     25
261. Arithmetic in the Intermediate Grades  107
301. Social Studies in the Intermediate Grades  121
357. Art Education in the Elementary School     63
440B. School Music in the Intermediate Grades     91
Secondary Grades Education:
210. Oral French  30
262. Junior High School Mathematics  24
279. History of Science  21
346. Modern Canada   55
425A. Canadian Literature:   Part I — A Survey of Canadian
Poetry in English  56
425B. Canadian Literature:  Part II—Contemporary Canadian
Prose  45
441. Music Education in the Secondary School  12
Art:
356. Twentieth-century Art  51
363. Weaving  25
366. Ceramics  29
371. Picture-making  59
382. Design I  38
389. Photography  27
392. Design II  23
397. Drawing and Painting III  24
400. Art Criticism II  16 DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION EE 43
Music: Enrolment
446. Choral Music and Conducting II  16
447. Advanced Music Literature and History  22
448B. Instrumental Ensemble—Woodwinds  29
457. Instrumental Music I  45
466. Instrumentation  15
469. Summer School Chorus  156
Library Service:
409. Orientation to School Library Work  23
411. Functions of the School Library  23
412A. Children's Literature—History   39
412B. Children's Literature—Current   55
414. Book Selection  31
Guidance and Counselling:
190X. Counsellors' Conference  29
191. The Individual Inventory in Guidance  30
192. The Use and Interpretation of Tests in Guidance  33
Physical Education:
P.E. 102. Gymnastics for the Secondary School  18
P.E 108. Softball  69
P.E. 120. Badminton  42
P.E. 150. Track and Field  73
P.E. 162. Secondary School Physical Education Curriculum  35
P.E. 163. Organization and Administration of Physical Education  70
P.E. 165. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education  22
P.E. 170. Introduction to Physiology for Physical Education
Teachers  19
Home Economics:
650A. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  25
650B. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  49
650C. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  23
651.     Problems in Home Economics Education  31
Grade XIII (Senior Matriculation):
213. Grade XIII English (English 100 and 101)  212
313. Grade XIII World History (History 101)  108
316. Grade XIII Canadian History (History 102)  139
Miscellaneous:
349. Night-school Directors' Conference, July 11th to 15th  25
Vancouver Section
Commercial Education:
623. Typewriting (Teaching Methods)  30
626. Book-keeping Practice  15
630. Commercial Arithmetic           8
631. Business Machines  28
633. Office Routine, Business Forms, and Secretarial Practice— 20
634. Workshop—Business and Personal Finance  24 EE 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
Industrial Arts: Enrolment
14. The Curriculum: Its Objectives and Procedures  24
220. Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Junior High
School  18
224. Freehand Sketching Applied to the Industrial Arts  19
225. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  5
227. Elementary Woodwork  11
228. Elementary Wood-turning   7
229A. Farm Mechanics (Woodwork)  6
229B. Farm Mechanics (Electricity)  15
229C. Farm Mechanics (Metalwork)  6
231. Elementary Electrical Theory     15
232. Elementary Electrical Shopwork     15
234. Art Metalwork  3
235. Elementary Sheet-metal Work  3
236. Elementary Machine-shop Work  16
238. Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Senior High
School  15
242. Freehand Sketching  14
241. Practical Geometry  10
243. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  2
245. Advanced Woodwork (Benchwork)     15
246. Advanced Wood-turning     12
247. Practice in the Use of Woodworking Machinery: Care and
Maintenance  10
248A. Farm Mechanics (Metalwork)  18
248B. Farm Mechanics (Woodwork)  10
249. Advanced Sheet-metal Work  22
250. Advanced Machine-shop Work  15
251. Welding, Arc and Oxy-acetylene  26
Student Courses1
Totals in 1955  6,083
Totals in 1954  5,456
Totals in 1953  5,150
Totals in 1952  5,776
Totals in 1951  4,104
1 These figures are totals of all course enrolments.
Registration
Table I.—Teaching Experience of Those Registered
13 or more years  341                Less than 1 year      215
10 to 12 years  110                Unreported        53
7 to 9 years  158                                                    	
4 to 6 years  285                               Total  2,017
1 to 3 years  855
Table II.—Type of School in Which Teachers Taught in 1954—55
More than 10 rooms 889                1 room      107
7 to 10 rooms  297 Unreported, or did not
4 to 6 rooms  207                    teach this year      335
3 rooms  73                                                    	
2 rooms      109 Total  2,017 DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION EE 45
Table III.—Grades Taught by the Teachers Enrolled
Grade XIII  11 Grade IV  365
Grade XII  199 Grade III  441
Grade XI  221 Grade II  421
Grade X  242 Grade I  373
Grade IX  309 Kindergarten        2
Grade VIII  368 Special Classes     13
Grade VII  371 Unreported, or did not
Grade VI  273                    teach this year  373
Grade V  317
Table IV.—Advanced Certificates Sought
Primary   346 Physical Education  81
Intermediate  204 Counsellor  39
Art   84 S.A. (Instructor)  86
Commercial  48 Handicapped   3
Music  75 Not specified  21
Library  41	
Home Economics  78                               Total  1,218
Industrial Arts  112
Student Activity Society
Auditing dates do not permit the inclusion here of the 1955 accounts. The following
statement is of the accounts of the preceding or 1954 session, as audited by Ismay,
Boiston, Dunn & Company, chartered accountants.
Receipts
Activity fees paid by students (less refunds)  $4,992.00
Additional income (receipts from dances and concerts)___       797.60
Total  $5,789.60
Disbursements
Fees and expenses of artists, lecturers, etc  $2,716.59
Social affairs, dances, picnics, entertainment        820.89
Equipment and supplies     1,076.83
Service charges and incidentals        823.71
Total  $5,438.02
Excess of receipts over disbursements      $351.58
Funds on hand, December 31st, 1954  $3,739.07
Fall and Winter In-service Courses
During the fall-to-spring session there was an increase in the number of courses
offered in various urban centres for the in-service training of teachers. This year forty-
nine courses were offered, compared with thirty-one in 1954. Classes were formed in the
following thirteen centres: Abbotsford, Burnaby, Chilliwack, Kamloops, Langley, Mission, Nanaimo, New Westminster, Penticton, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria, and Trail. EE 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
Provincial Normal School, Vancouver
REPORT OF F. C. BOYES, M.A., PRINCIPAL
The fifty-fourth session of the Provincial Normal School, Vancouver, B.C., commenced on September 13th, 1954, and closed on June 17th, 1955. Enrolment and results
are indicated in the following table:—■
Men
Women
Total
193
180
357
332
550
512
The total enrolment, as shown above, does not include some twenty applicants who
left before medicals were completed and fees collected. It shows, however, an increase
of approximately 60 per cent over last year's total in both men and women students.
This presents a striking contrast to the figures for the previous year.
The following twenty-four students were awarded distinction standing: Marilyn
Irvine Abernethy, Gordon Gerald Frank Adams, Nesta Mary Ashworth, Margaret Louise
Beck, Mrs. Esther Viola Colton, Eileen Muriel Daniel, Leslie Keith Deane, Michael
Edward Downing, Joyce Lorraine Dubeau, Charlotte Elizabeth Faulkner, Susie Erna
Friesen, Wilfred Thomas Gutteridge, Barbara Elizabeth Johnson, Neil Kerr, Robert
Edward Alexander McLauchlan, Margaret Elinor Miller, Margaret Elizabeth Louisa
Newell, Mrs. Nadia Olafson, Violet Rezansoff, Hans Eberhard Tonne, Yvonne Grace
Tupper, Lorna Vale, Richard Frederick Wagner, Margaret Marie Wells. The Max
Cameron Award, presented by the British Columbia Teachers' Federation, was divided
this year between two students—Miss Charlotte Elizabeth Faulkner and Mr. Neil Kerr.
The presentation was made at the annual banquet by Mr. Charles Ovans, executive
secretary of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation.
The usual range in academic standing was maintained. The following percentage
figures are revealing: University Entrance only, 34 per cent; University Entrance plus,
18 per cent; Senior Matriculation, 19 per cent; First Year of University standing, 13
per cent; Second and Third Year of University standing, 7 per cent; university degrees,
9 per cent. It should be noted that among the latter group there were three students with
Master of Arts degrees from Canadian and British universities. There was also one
student with a Ph.D in Economics and a Ph.D in Law from Yugoslavia.
It is disappointing to have to report that the number of students with bare minimum
requirements had increased by some 7 per cent. While it is true that, as a result of
examinations written in June or in August, the number of those with full Senior Matriculation standing or better may reach 55 per cent of the total, it is regrettable that so many
have attended without first securing their Senior Matriculation standing. From discussions held with many of this group, the reason for this lay in the uncertain future of
teacher-training and the possibility of a two-year course being instituted this year. Plans
now under way for reorganizing teacher-training should remove this uncertainty and
enable counsellors and students to plot a reasonably safe course toward a diploma.
While there can be no doubt but that the possibility of a two-year course was a great
factor in increasing our enrolment, there were several other causes which were important
and interesting. The publicity given to the profession and the increased expenditures in
both buildings and salaries caused many men and women in other jobs and professions
to enter the training-school. Many of these people had good academic backgrounds, and
their mature outlook and wide experience should prove of real value in the classroom.
Then, too, the new loan policy made it possible for people to take the course who would
otherwise have been unable to do so. These factors, together with the Future Teacher
Clubs, should ensure a record enrolment for 1955-56. DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION EE 47
The past year was a difficult one for staff and students alike. We were forced to
accommodate, in a plant designed for 250 students, some 550. The women's classes
averaged fifty-eight students; the men's classes, fifty students. All facilities were strained
to the utmost. Staff and students accepted the crowded conditions with equanimity, and
the year was a happy and successful venture. Provision has been made for increased
accommodation and staff for the coming year, so we may find the load a bit lighter.
With smaller classes, we can give so much more individual attention, which we find so
essential in this work.
Practice-teaching plans required a great deal of time owing to the numbers. The
two model schools found the fall participation work very heavy. Instead of sending no
more than four persons to one teacher, we were forced to send six or seven. While fairly
large numbers work well in the case of observation, they are a real handicap were participation is concerned. We came to the conclusion that we would be forced to cut down on
the number of periods which could be given to this work and decrease the number of
students sent to each teacher. This will be a loss to the students, but, unless another large
model school could be used, it is our only alternative.
Principals and staffs of these two schools gave us every support during the fall
period. Once more thay presented demonstration lessons which were inspirations to our
students. They were always prepared to do remedial work with our weaker members, to
help us diagnose those cases where more help was needed, and to encourage all students
in planning and presenting lessons. No words of mine could adequately convey to them
the sincere thanks of both our students and the members of our staff.
We are all sorry that Mr. Meadows will not be with us next year. He retired in June
of this year and we shall miss him. He was a powerful figure in the Vancouver school
system, and we were fortunate in having him associated so closely with the work of
teacher-training for many years.   Our thanks go to him for his most valuable assistance.
Once more the schools of Vancouver and New Westminster were opened to us for
the first practicum. Dr. Sharp and Mr. O. J. Thomas carried on the pattern set by Mr.
MacCorkindale, that of doing everything possible to assist in teacher-training. Mr.
Shields, in his usual kindly fashion, offered the services of his principals and staff for the
same purpose. We owe these men and the men and women of their staffs a real vote of
thanks, and it is hereby tendered most sincerely.
For the second practicum we found that schools throughout the Province were
opened to us, and we took advantage of the offers wherever possible. We used many
schools in North and West Vancouver, Burnaby, and the Fraser Valley.
Teachers in many parts of the Province volunteered to assist, and many of these were
used. We would like to thank the Inspectors, principals, and teachers for their active
interest in our work. They did much to make the students' work pleasant and profitable.
Their criticisms and comments were carefully made and were of real value to us in our
final assessment.
Because of our numbers it became necessary to employ six additional workers for
supervision. We were fortunate to secure the services of the following: Mr. H. B. Fitch,
Miss Margaret Gray, Mrs. A. James, Mr. Angus Macdonald, Mr. H. H. MacKenzie, and
Mr. William Plaxton. These men and women had had a great deal of experience in
teaching and in judging teachers. They took their work very seriously and earned our
sincere thanks for a job well done.
During the year we were fortunate in having several talks from people engaged in
educational work or in the fields allied with education. Among the speakers were:
Dr. F. H. Johnson, Mr. Harry Evans, Mr. Morrison, Mr. Gordon Selman, Dr. W. G.
Black, Mrs. A. H. Young, Mr. Charles Ovans, Mr. Peter Barr, and Dr. Clemons.
We also had talks by Mr. S. D. Meadows, principal of the Simon Fraser School, and
Mr. William Franklin, principal of the model school, on " What a principal may expect
from a beginning teacher."   Since both men were known and admired by the students, EE 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
these talks were exceedingly well received. We would like to have all who took the
time to prepare and deliver these talks know that we sincerely appreciate the time and
effort thus devoted to our work.
I must again refer to the work done in our rural classrooms by Miss Manning,
Mrs. Webber, and Miss Helen Grier. Our students have a grand opportunity to see
experts handle a multi-class situation with non-selected pupils, and many of them are
privileged to try their hand at the work. This must be of great assistance to them when
they face a similar situation themselves. Our thanks to these three women is deep and
sincere.
The Metropolitan Health Committee had a real task this year in examining our
record class. It took longer than usual, but the work was well done. Conferences
between Dr. Wilhts, Dr. Gundry, Miss Parrett, and members of the staff were most
interesting and valuable. By pooling our knowledge we are able to arrive at the best
way in which to handle most of our problems. All of us would be pleased to see a
psychiatric clinic set up to decide on some of the more disturbed cases. We sincerely
appreciate the work done by the Metropolitan Health Committee on our behalf.
There were two staff changes during the year. Dr. Grantham was again borrowed
by UNESCO, this time taking a position in Jordan. His place was taken once more by
Mr. Norval Brown, whom the Vancouver School Board kindly loaned to us. His work
was of high calibre and we were delighted to have him with us again. Miss Jean Kilgour
asked for leave of absence as from January 1st, 1955, in order to complete her work
for a Ph.D. degree at the University of Washington. This was granted by the Department of Education, and the Vancouver School Board came to our assistance once more.
Miss Sheila O'Connell was loaned to us for the balance of the year. She had been in
the primary department of both the Simon Fraser and model schools. Since Miss
O'Connell was acquainted with all members of this staff and with many of the students,
she was able to take over with a minimum of loss of time. Her work was most satisfactory.
Once more I would like to say a real " thank you " to members of the staff of the
Department of Education and of the Department of Public Works. Because of unusual
circumstances, I was forced to ask for many unusual services. My requests uniformly
met with some favourable action, and the rough spots were smoothed out as quickly as
possible.   I am pleased to acknowledge my debt to these officials.
Provincial Normal School, Victoria
REPORT OF HENRY C. GILLILAND, M.A., PRINCIPAL
The forty-first session of the Provincial Normal School at Victoria commenced on
September 13th, 1954, and closed on June 17th, 1955. Enrolment and results are shown
in the following table:—
Men
Women
Total
91
85
160
146
251
231
Honour Standing and Awards
The following students graduated with honours: Barbara J. Arnold, Winfield; Joyce
A. Butler, Victoria; Helen B. Dewar, Victoria; Leslie K. Field, Victoria; Calvin D.
Hoffman, Vernon; Joanne E. Hunter, Salmon Arm; Margaret E. Little, Victoria; Ralph DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION EE 49
E. Morton, Duncan; Joan V. Turner, Victoria; Elaine F. Thomas, Victoria; and Mar-
lene J. Vance, Victoria.
The Denton Memorial Award for all-round achievement and leadership was won by
Deanna Marion Boychuk, of Canoe. This award is the gift of the Normal School class
of 1943-44.
The Maxwell Cameron Memorial Award, given by the British Columbia Teachers'
Federation for high scholarship and success in teaching, was won by Margaret Elizabeth
Little, of Victoria.
I am happy to record that scholarships and bursaries are now being made available
by various organizations to assist worthy students in obtaining their teacher-training.
Our sincere thanks go to the following organizations: Major John Hebden Gillespie
Chapter, Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire, Victoria—annual scholarship of $100
for student entering on teacher-training at this centre; Comox District Teachers' Association, Courtenay—annual scholarship of $100 for a student entering on teacher-training
at this centre; and radio station CJIB, Vernon—scholarship of $100 for a student with
top academic standing.
Record of these scholarships and bursaries was entered in this office. I believe that
others may have been awarded by Parent-Teacher Associations, teachers' associations,
and service clubs. I express our sincere appreciation of these awards and invite their
registration in this office. It is my hope that the practice of granting of scholarships to
able students to assist them in teacher-training will be widely extended.
Our kind thanks are also extended to principals and counsellors of the. high schools
and to the sponsors of Future Teachers Clubs for their splendid work in directing the
attention of students of high ability to the great service they can give to this Province by
entering the teaching profession.
Work of the Staff
I express my appreciation and grateful thanks to Mr. George Brand, B.A., and to
Mr. Hugh Farquhar, M.A., for their efficient help in administrative duties, and to Mrs.
Marjorie Hoey for her loyal and skilful work as registrar. My warmest thanks go to all
members of the staff for their steadfast support in our important work.
In this session we welcomed three new members to our faculty. Alfred E. Loft,
B.A., came from Rossland High School, and Neil A. Swainson, M.A., B.Ed., from Victoria High School. Professor William H. Gaddes, M.A., Ph.D., of Victoria College, acted
as our special lecturer in psychology, his competent assistance being a happy symbol of
the cordial relations existing between the two institutions occupying these buildings.
At the end of the year we lost the services of Miss Dorothy Daniels, B.A., who
resigned on her marriage. During the period of her work she has built up an enviable
record for this school by the efficiency of her instruction in all matters relating to health
and physical education.
Observation and Practice-teaching
Observation and practice-teaching formed a central part of our programme. As has
been usual during the past decade, these activities were spread throughout the year. In
the initial period of general observation during the early part of the school-year, four
student-teachers were placed once a week in each classroom for one half-day's observation of children and teaching methods.
For their first practice-teaching, the student-teachers went in pairs to the Greater
Victoria classrooms. The first part of this experience was an orientation period of four
days during late October and early November, when the student-teachers observed and
taught occasional lessons. This orientation period was followed by two weeks of practice-
teaching. EE 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
In like manner, four days of observation and occasional teaching during January
and early February were followed by two weeks of practice-teaching in the latter part of
February—again in the schools of Greater Victoria. Grateful thanks are offered for
assistance given by Municipal Inspectors John Gough and Alex. Turnbull, by Primary
Supervisor Miss Marion James, and by the principals and teachers of School District No.
61 (Greater Victoria). Their kindly and skilful guidance of the work of the young
teachers is an essential element in the success of our training programme.
During the period following Easter, each student-teacher returned to his own part
of the Province, where he took charge of a class for a month. Student-teachers and
faculty alike wish to express their kindest thanks to the many School Inspectors, principals, and teachers who so ably co-operated with our faculty in the supervision of this
final month of practice-teaching.
Special Lectures
During the year a series of special lectures by leaders from various fields in education brought information about these phases of their work to the student-teachers. We
extend our cordial thanks to Dr. F. H. Johnson, Co-ordinator of Teacher Education,
for his clear presentation of the pattern of teacher certification and of opportunities offered
by the Summer School of Education; to Mr. P. G. Barr, officer in charge of the Textbook Branch, for his explanation of the teacher's function in the care of text-books;
to Mr. Stan Evans, assistant general secretary of the British Columbia Teachers' Federation; and to.Mr. Harold O'Donnell, president of the Greater Victoria Teachers' Association, for their organization of a workshop which assembled many leaders of the
profession to discuss with the student-teachers how to solve some of the problems that
face young teachers; to Dr. C. B. Conway, Director of Tests, Standards, and Research,
for his exposition of some aspects of measurement; to Mr. Denis Brown, Director of
Visual Education for Greater Victoria, for his discussion of Junior Red Cross; to
Mr. W. E. Whatmough, principal of Rhodes Elementary School in Vancouver, for his
discussion of the work of the B.C.T.F. Medical Services Association; and to Mr. Philip
J. Kitley, Directory of School Radio Broadcasts, for his demonstrations of the use of
radio as an assistance to better teaching.
Health Services
Our kind thanks are offered to Dr. C. E. Mahaffy, M.D., M.P.H., who was in charge
of our health services. The work consisted of medical examinations and consultations,
nursing inspections, chest X-rays, immunizations against communicable diseases, and
lectures on special subjects. Miss Helen McAleese, public health nurse, Saanich Health
Unit, gave valued weekly service to our students in health services and consultations.
Dr. R. M. Lane, Director of the Chest Clinic, gave lectures on " Tuberculosis
Services " and " Venereal Diseases." The whole field of school health services was
dealt with in a panel arranged by Mr. D. K. MacDonald, public health educator, who
acted as chairman. Other members of the panel were Dr. A. N. Beattie (speaking as
a school medical officer), Miss Helen MacAleese, P.H.N, (public health nurse),
Mrs. M. Wiley (elementary-school teacher), and Mr. E. S. Gropp (sanitary inspector).
We extend to the Provincial Department of Health our sincere appreciation for the
excellent health services which they have provided for us year after year.
Services of the Department of Public Works
The members of the Public Works Department render us a steadfast flow of friendly
services. We extend our thanks to Mr. Percy Mackereth, Superintendent of Works, and
through him to all who have so competently served us. On behalf of faculty and students
alike, may I pay tribute to Mr. Henry Hill, Chief Gardener, for the joy he brings to us
by his devoted service in maintaining our grounds at their high level of beauty. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION EE 51
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF H. A.  JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL,
VOCATIONAL, AND ADULT EDUCATION
Industrial Arts
(Report prepared by T. A. Quayle and C. J. Strong, M.A.,
Inspectors of Technical Classes.)
In line with the increasing school population, twenty-six additional Industrial Arts
teachers were required for the school-year 1954-55. As our teacher-training class
graduated only twelve men, it was fortunate that the Summer School training programme
was able to cover the deficiency to a large extent.
Consideration should be given to the need for increased facilities for training
Industrial Arts teachers. During the year new centres were opened in two additional
school districts, namely, Terrace and Alert Bay. There are now sixty-three school
districts in which Industrial Arts is established.
Industrial Arts facilities were improved during the year by the completion of several
new schools and additions to established centres. Two new junior high schools were
opened in Victoria. Junior high additions were added to Vancouver Technical School
and John Oliver Junior-Senior High School in Vancouver and to the junior high school
in Nelson. A new metal-shop was opened at Castlegar. One-man general shops were
completed and opened at Alert Bay, Salmo, Sparwood, Terrace, and University Hill.
The new senior high school in Maple Ridge was opened and, in addition to high-school
classes, is offering instruction to junior high classes pending construction of the new
junior high school.
All Industrial Arts courses revised and reprinted in July, 1954, were used in our
schools during the past school-year. It was the opinion of Industrial Arts men that this
revision is the most complete and satisfactory made to date.
The total number of individual junior, junior-senior, and senior high school shops
in the Province is 276. The total number of Industrial Arts teachers is 301. The total
number of pupils participating is as follows: Junior high schools, 14,692; senior high
schools, 7,146; total, 21,838.
Vocational Education
The following report covers two groups of classes which are administered by the
Department of Education: (1) Those that are conducted in co-operation with the Federal Government, that is, classes operated under the Dominion-Provincial Vocational
Training Agreement and under the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement; and
(2) those that are the direct responsibility of the Province, which are the classes conducted at the night-schools.
Classes Conducted in Co-operation with the Federal Government
During the fiscal year 1954-55 the following schedules and sub-schedules of the
Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement were in operation:—
Schedule O, Sub-schedule C—Urban Occupational Training.—Training was given
to young men and women, who had not previously been employed, in automotive
mechanics, diesel mechanics, and power sewing. The total cost of this training was
shared equally between the Provincial and Federal Governments. The number trained
was:   Men, 28; women, 37; total, 65.
Schedule O, Sub-schedule E—Rural Occupational Training.—Training under this
sub-schedule was given in a variety of subjects to young men and women from the rural EE 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
areas of the Province at an eight weeks' course at the University of British Columbia.
The enrolment was:   Men, 47;  women, 18; total, 65.
Schedule O, Sub-schedule H—Student Aid.—Assistance was granted in the form
of 60 per cent bursary and 40 per cent loan to students proceeding with their education
beyond the secondary-school level.   Number of awards granted were 627.
Schedule R—Training of Disabled Persons.—Training was given to both men and
women, to fit them for gainful employment, in the following subjects: Book-keeping,
typing, beauty culture, draughting, shoe-repairing, radio, and plumbing. The number
trained was 16.
Schedule M—Training of Unemployed Workers.—Training was given to unemployed men and women, in order that they might become gainfully employed, in hair-
dressing, book-keeping, typing, chef-training, welding, diesel mechanics, and automotive
mechanics.   The number trained was:  Men, 41; women, 20; total, 61.
Schedule K-2—Training of Defence Workers.—Training in the new techniques of
welding was given to experienced shipyard welders in Victoria. The number trained
was 31.
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.—Under this agreement, courses are
offered in the secondary schools of this Province in three areas of training—(a) Commercial, (b) Agriculture, and (c) Industrial—in day and night schools, for which extra
grants are paid to the local School Boards. The cost is shared equally between the
Department of Education and the Department of Labour, Ottawa. The enrolment for
the past fiscal year was as follows:—
Day-school—
Commercial  3,499
Agriculture      183
Industrial  2,396
  6,078
Night-school—
Commercial  2,058
Industrial  5,388
  7,446
Teacher-training classes for Industrial Arts teachers are also held under this Agreement, and during the past year ninety-six men were given training.
Night-schools
Classes in night-schools, which are operated by the local School Boards, continue
to increase because of public demand. Fifty-five school districts offered classes during
the past year, the enrolment being as follows: In vocational classes, 7,446; in non-
vocational classes, 14,834; total, 22,280.
Training of Industrial Arts and Vocational Teachers
Enrolment in courses for Industrial Arts and vocational teachers was as follows:
Part-time courses, 78; full-time courses, 18; Summer School, 96; total, 192.
High School Correspondence
(Report prepared by Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L., Director.)
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the school-
year 1954-55 was 9,435. Of this number, 23.1 per cent or 2,180 were between the
ages of 18 and 20 and 40.5 per cent or 3,826 were 21 years or over. Thus 63.6 per
cent of our students can be classified as adults. This is an increase of 2.7 per cent over
the figures of 1953-54. There was an increase of 278 students in the number of students
over 21 years and an increase of 611 in the number of students between the ages of 18
and 20 years. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION EE 53
There were adult students among those registered for every course offered by this
department, as indicated in my report of High School and Vocational Courses.
The following is a classification of the occupations of students 18 years of age and
over who gave information as to their employment:—
Apprentices   77
Army, Navy, Air Force  51
Civil Servants  39
Police   17
Domestic workers  70
Farming and ranching  91
Firemen, engineers  345
Forestry  65
Housewives   143
Lumbering   152
Merchants   32
Mining  30
Office-workers   499
Professional—
Teachers  305
Nurses   138
Miscellaneous  45
Railroad ._  30
Skilled labour  477
Unskilled labour  271
Miscellaneous  5 8
Total   2,935
Elementary Correspondence School
(Report prepared by Arthur H. Plows, Director.)
In the school-year 1954-55 the enrolment in the adult class of the Elementary
Correspondence School was 309 students. The enrolment figures for the year are as
follows:—
September      76 February   221
October   130 March   248
November  159 April  279
December  172 May  302
January  197 June   309
During the year, 6,150 papers of adult students were corrected. EE 54 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
ADULT EDUCATION
REPORT OF LAWRENCE J. WALLACE, B.A., M.Ed., DIRECTOR
OF COMMUNITY PROGRAMMES BRANCH
The most effective and best programmes of recreation are those which the local
citizens of the community plan and administer. It is the function of the Community
Programmes Branch to help persons help themselves in the development of community
programmes through a variety of valuable recreational services.
The manner in which the Community Programmes Branch and its services to the
communities have been accepted throughout the Province is most gratifying. The encouragement and the assistance which the communities received have, in many cases,
led to systematic study and planning of recreational activities and facilities for all persons of all ages in the community.
The following Regional Consultants represent the Community Programmes Branch
and operate in the areas and from the headquarters as indicated below. The Consultants
have done an outstanding work for recreation and communities throughout the Province.
They disseminate information and act in an advisory capacity to any community group
wishing assistance in recreation programming and planning.
Consultant
Region
Headquarters
Mr A. C. Batcheler          - -	
New Westminster and district (Howe Sound)	
Fraser Valley    	
Central British Columbia    __	
Okanagan        	
Mr T. Ruben
Kamloops.
Mr A W. Thiessen                  ■
Mr K K Maltman                             - -
Northern British Columbia  	
Mrs. Hilda Keatley retired on June 30th, 1955, after many years of service to the
Department of Education. The Branch also has on its staff Mr. Joseph Lewis, Director
of Recreation for Blind Citizens, who has done such an outstanding and inspirational
work in his chosen field.
Recreation Commissions and others interested in recreation made extensive use of
publications and films listed in the Branch's Catalogue of Recreation Resource Material.
This library, specializing in all phases of recreation, contains a great number of books,
booklets, and instructional manuals which are not usually available within the limited
resources of the community. An extensive selection of films and filmstrips is also available. There is a constant revision which provides for the addition of new books and
films.
The importance of the place of the leader in recreation has been increasingly emphasized. The need for discovering and training leaders for community recreation programmes has been stressed, and Recreation Commissions throughout the Province have
given more consideration to this matter. The Branch makes provision for a programme
of leadership training in order that suitable persons may be given the opportunity to
have courses which will assist them in becoming proficient instructors and organizers of
local activities.
Regional recreation conferences were organized during the year in eight large areas
and were attended by the Director, Consultants, and representatives of the Recreation
Commissions in the area concerned. A total of 219 delegates, representing seventy-one
British Columbia communities, attended these conferences.
Recreation leadership will not be effective unless high standards of training are
established and made available. With this in mind, the First Provincial Recreation
Leadership School was held at the Victoria Normal School from July 19th to 29th, 1954.
Fifty-one voluntary leaders nominated by thirty-five Recreation  Commissions took ADULT EDUCATION EE 55
advantage of the training offered by this School. It is expected that the number attending the 1955 School will be doubled. The enthusiasm and accomplishment of these
community leaders left little to be desired, and the effect of their work quickly became
apparent throughout the Province. The following courses were offered at the 1954
School: Recreation Objectives and Philosophy, Recreation Organization, Square and
Old-time Dancing, Puppetry, Leathercraft, Block Printing, Physical Activities, Recreation Games, and a workshop in Recreation Problems.
In addition to the regional recreation conferences and the Provincial Recreation
Leadership School, forty-one leadership training clinics were held throughout the Province during the year. Among the activities studied at these clinics by 1,224 delegates
representing 154 communities were: Square Dancing, Gymnastics, Playground Leadership, Baseball Coaching, Ski-ing, Drama, Copper Tooling, Public Relations, Basketball
Coaching, Track and Field, and Recreational Activities.
The former School and Community Drama Branch is now an integral part of the
Community Programmes Branch. The drama adviser for the Branch is Miss Anne
Adamson, who has done an outstanding work for so many years in the Department of
Education. During the past year thirty drama festivals were held, of which ten were
for school groups, fourteen for adults, and six for students and adults.
District adult festival winners advanced to region or zone festivals, and the winners
of these took part in the British Columbia Drama Festival at Kamloops, June 9th to
11th, 1955. Groups participating were Yellow Point, North Vancouver, White Rock,
Vernon, Dawson Creek, Trail, and Fernie. " The Shewing Up of Blanco Posnet" was
the winning play, directed by Mr. Franklin Johnson with the White Rock Players' Club.
North Vancouver, Yellow Point, and Trail were runners-up. Miss Betty Mitchell, drama
director at Western Canada High School, Calgary, and winner of many Dominion Drama
Festival awards, was the adjudicator. In conjunction with the festival a workshop was
held.
The annual meeting of the British Columbia Drama Association was held on June
11th at Kamloops, and the following were elected to the office of honorary president:
Honourable R. G. Williston, Dr. H. L. Campbell, and Mr. H. S. Hum. Mr. Ross A.
Lort, of Vancouver, was returned as president. The executive and members of the
British Columbia Drama Association praised the Department of Education for its interest
and assistance.
Twelve drama scholarships were awarded to outstanding students and drama leaders
throughout the Province. Most of the scholarship winners attended the University of
British Columbia Summer School of the Theatre while the others studied at the Banff
School of Fine Arts.
Drama clinics and workshops were held in many centres throughout the year. The
Branch is most fortunate in enjoying the co-operative relationships existing between it
and the Extension Department of the University.
Many hundreds of plays and publications dealing with the technical aspects of the
theatre are contained in the drama library, which is in constant use the year around.
As a companion to the Community Programmes Branch's Catalogue of Recreation
Resource Material, a catalogue of drama material will be completed and distributed
within the next few months.
The Department is most fortunate in having a good number of well-qualified and
enthusiastic persons who give of their leisure to adjudicate festivals and stimulate the
theatre in the communities. Miss Anne Mossman, director of the Yellow Point Drama
Club, instructed the Community Drama Organization course at the Provincial Recreation
Leadership School. Plays from the Greater Victoria Schools Drama Festival and from
the Vancouver Island Adult Drama Festival were presented to two large and appreciative
Summer School audiences.
The Dominion Drama Festival, British Columbia region, has been held in Vancouver for the past several years. The local committee receives assistance in many ways
from the Community Programmes Branch. EE 56                                     PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
The number of recreational courses operated in co-
operation with the Community
Programmes Branch and through the regularly organized
night-schools
was increased and
included:   Archery, Art, Badminton, Band, Basketball,
Ballet,
Bridge, Choral, Craft
and Design, Drama, Folk Dancing,
Golf, Women's Keep
Fit,
Gymnastics, Leatherwork,
Scottish Country Dancing, Volleyball, and Leadership.
The following is a summary of
night-school recreational
courses:-
1953-54
1954-55
Number of school districts	
19
28
Number of centres
32
73
2,866
nal grants-in
46
98
3,381
-aid on behalf of
Number of courses
Number enrolled
The Community Programmes
Branch makes nomi
local Recreation Commissions
to assist them in their work
and in
their maintaining
a proper staff.   These grants are always supplementary to the communities' efforts.   The
Recreation Commissions, with the Regional Consultant, plan
, or
ganize, and co-ordinate
recreation activities in the community.
The following 118 communities have appointed or elected Recreation Commissions
since the organization of the Community Programmes Branch
—
1. Alert Bay.
41.
Houston.*
80.
Port Moody.*
2. Alexandria.*
42.
Invermere.*
81.
Pouce Coupe.*
3. Argenta.*
43.
loco.*
82.
Prince George, t
4. Armstrong.*
44.
lordan River.*
83.
Prince Rupert, t
5. Barnston Island.
45.
Kaleden.*
84.
Procter.*
6. Blue River.*
46.
Kamloops.t
85.
Quadra Island.*
7. Bonnington-Corra Linn.*
47.
Kaslo.*
86.
Quesnel.*
8. Bouchie Lake.*
48.
Kelowna.*
87.
Richmond, t
9. Britannia Beach.t
49.
Kimberley.t
88.
Riondel.*
10. Burnaby.*
50.
Laidlaw.
89.
Roberts Creek.*
11. Campbell River, t
51.
Langley.*
90.
Roe Lake.*
12. Canyon.*
52.
Lister.*
91.
Salmo.*
13. Cedar.*
53.
Lone Butte.*
92.
Salmon Arm.*
14. Central Saanich.*
54.
Lumby.*
93.
Sayward.*
15. Chase.*
55.
Lytton.*
94.
Sidney.*
16. Christina Lake.*
56.
Mara.*
95.
Slocan City.*
17. Copper Mountain.*
57.
Marysville.*
96.
Smithers. *
18. Coquitlam.*
58.
Michel-Natal.*
97.
Soda Creek.*
19. Courtenay.t
59.
Midway.*
98.
Sooke.*
20. Cranbrook.t
60.
Mission City.*
99.
South Hazelton.*
21. Crawford Bay.*
61.
Mount Sheer, t
100.
Squamish.*
Summerland.*
Surrey.*
22. Crescent Valley.*
62.
Nakusp.*
101.
23. Creston.t
63.
Nanaimo. t
102.
24. Cultus Lake.*
64.
Nanoose Bay.*
103.
Tarrys and district.*
25. Decker Lake.*
65.
Nelson.t
104.
Tatla Lake.*
26. Delta.*
66.
North Bend.*
105.
Tatlayoko Lake.*
27. Dewdney.*
67.
North Cowichan.t
106.
Telkwa.
28. Enderby.*
68.
North Kamloops.*
107.
Terrace, t
29. Fraser Lake.*
69.
North Vancouver.t
108.
Trail-Tadanac.t
30. Fruitvale.*
70.
Okanagan Centre.*
109.
Ucluelet.
31. Gabriola Island.*
71.
Oliver.
110.
Vancouver.t
32. Gibsons.*
72.
Osoyoos.*
111.
Vernon.*
33. Glenmore.*
73.
Palling.*
112.
Westbank.
34. Grand Forks.*
74.
Parksville.*
113.
West Vancouver.*
35. Great Central Lake.*
75.
Peachland.
114.
Winfield.*
36. Greenwood.*
76.
Penticton.t
115.
Woodfibre.*
37. Grindrod.*
77.
Popkum.*
116.
Wynndel.*
38. Groundbirch.*
78.
Port Coquitlam.*
117.
Ymir.*
39. Harrison Hot Springs.*
79.
Port Mellon.*
118.
Zeballos.*
40. Hazelton.*
enses.
* Receiving a grant for recreation exp
t Receiving a grant tor full-time director or
directors of recreation. ADULT EDUCATION
EE 57
Some 4,047 persons have benefited through their participation in twenty-five special
recreation projects. Recreation Commissions or School Boards in conjunction with
School Inspectors or Regional Consultants have recommended these projects which
included playgrounds, swimming, and basketball programmes. These projects have, in
all cases, proved to be of inestimable value to the community.
Under the auspices of the Community Programmes Branch, the Orthodox Doukhobor Choir from Grand Forks made an educational concert tour to sixteen communities
during the two weeks from February 14th to 24th, 1955. This was a goodwill tour of
Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island centres with the object of portraying something
of the cultural contribution brought to Canada by the Orthodox Doukhobor people.
The Branch handled arrangements for this project in co-operation with schools and local
Recreation Commissions. Spokesman for the choir group was Mr. John Verigin, of
Grand Forks. An estimated 15,880 persons attended the twenty-four concerts which
comprised the schedule. In addition, two recordings, one of thirty minutes by radio
station CBU, Vancouver, and another of fifteen minutes by CJVI, Victoria, were both
later broadcast over their respective stations.
The Community Programmes Branch co-operated with the Red Cross Society, the
St. John Ambulance Association, and other interested groups in the sponsoring of Water
Safety Week, held during the third week of May. Schools and communities were supplied with information pertaining to this important and increasingly necessary matter.
Cities, municipalities, villages, and rural areas are becoming aware of the value of
planning and organizing for recreation. Where this is accepted, the work is embracing
many people and many organizations. In several instances, recreation surveys have
been undertaken and Recreation Commission constitutions studied and written. Several
communities have advertised for full-time recreation directors to guide the important
work of recreational leadership, administration, and programming. Such men are
employed to guide and to serve the leisure interests of the people so that these interests
will be more richly satisfying and recreation will serve the community in a forceful way.
A community will be just as stimulating and alive or just as dull and depressing as
its citizens care to make it. The functions of the Community Programmes Branch are
not to dictate, but to advise and to co-operate. The Branch is working for the advancement of recreation, through local Recreation Commissions which are organized by the
communities in co-operation with the Regional Consultants. The best programmes of
recreation and adult education grow out of the initiative and planning of local citizens
and develop under local leaders. The services of the Community Programmes Branch
are available at all times to all communities to assist in this important development.
■ EE 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, B.Sc. (H.Ec), M.A., DIRECTOR
Total number of students taking Home Economics:—
Elementary schools      2,145
Junior high schools  17,386
  19,531
In Grade VII     7,870
In Grade VIII     7,931
In Grade IX ___    3,730
19,531
Jericho Hill School  33
Senior high schools     8,567
High-school boys  56
Technical students      5
Private schools         550
Indian schools  85
        635
In elementary grades  (Grades VII and
VIII)  307
In high school (senior grades)  328
635
Correspondence courses taken under supervision of teacher
who is not qualified to teach senior Home Economics
courses         138
28,904
(Included in the above figures are 1,339 students who took Homemaking 91, which
is the final course for the Home Economics Major.)
There are 131 Home Economics centres in public schools throughout the Province,
9 in private schools, and 2 in Indian schools. This shows an increase of 12 centres over
the 1953-54 total.
One-room centres 	
Two-room centres	
Three-room centres	
Four-room centres 	
Five-room centres	
Six-room centres	
Seven-room centres
Centres
Rooms
72
72
46
92
15
45
1
4
5
25
1
6
2
14
142 258
During the 1954-55 session, new Home Economics centres were opened at Alert
Bay, Enderby, Salmo, Terrace, and Ucluelet.
The Home Economics centre at Haney was reopened this year, the former building
having been destroyed by fire in 1953.    Home Economics classes were conducted at HOME ECONOMICS
EE 59
Grand Forks again this year, after having been discontinued during the 1953-54 session
owing to the teacher shortage.
New school buildings with Home Economics centres were opened at:—
Armstrong:   Armstrong Junior-Senior High School.
Fernie:   Fernie Elementary-Senior High School.
Michel-Natal:   Sparwood Junior-Senior High School.
Nelson:   Nelson Junior High School.
Vancouver:   University Hill Junior-Senior High School.
Victoria:  Central Junior High School and Lansdowne Junior High School.
The Home Economics centre at Smithers was renovated and extended.
Additional Home Economics rooms were opened at the following centres:—
Burnaby:   McPherson Park Junior High School.
Courtenay:   Courtenay Junior-Senior High School.
New Westminster:  New Westminster Junior High School.
North Vancouver:   North Star Elementary School.
Penticton:   Penticton Junior-Senior High School.
Prince George:   Prince George Junior-Senior High School.
Saanich:   Royal Oak Junior-Senior High School.
Salmon Arm:   Salmon Arm Junior-Senior High School.
There are 256 teachers of Home Economics on the staffs of the schools in the
Province, showing an increase of 28 over the total for last year.
During the 1955 session of the Provincial Summer School of Education, ninety-four
teachers attended Home Economics courses. Of this number, fifty-two were teachers
working toward Elementary Home Economics certification. Forty-two Home Economics
graduates attended the Home Economics classes, two of whom were taking refresher
courses; twenty-six were taking their first summer session toward teacher-training, while
fourteen were taking their second year toward teacher-training. An additional number
of Home Economics graduates took the third summer session of teacher-training at the
Provincial Summer School of Education in Victoria or at the University of British
Columbia in Vancouver.
Courses in Home Economics offered at the Summer School of Education during
the 1955 session were:—
650a. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics.
650b. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics (two classes).
650c. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics.
651.    Problems in Home Economics.
The instructors for the above courses were, respectively, Miss Bertha Rogers,
B.Sc.(H.Ec), M.A.;   Mrs.  Kathleen Boone,  B.Sc.(H.Ec);   Mrs.  Elva P.  Hanson,
B.Sc.(H.Ec); Miss K. Jean Campbell, B.Sc.(H.Ec), M.A.; and Mrs. Irene V. Green,
B.Sc.
Miss Daisy De Jong resigned her position as Inspector of Home Economics during
July, on the occasion of her marriage.
Miss Jean Roberta Irvine, B.Sc.(H.Ec), Manitoba, was appointed to succeed Miss
De Jong. After graduation, Miss Irvine spent three years in dietetics in Alberta and
Manitoba, following which she entered the teaching profession in British Columbia.
Miss Irvine has taught Home Economics in junior-senior high schools at Prince Rupert
and Chilliwack, and latterly in Victoria at Victoria High School and Lansdowne Junior
High School. EE 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39   (VANCOUVER)
REPORT OF R. F. SHARP, B.A., D.P/ed., SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
During the past school-year a number of important developments took place within .
the Vancouver school system as a result of studies and projects undertaken by our Board
of School Trustees with the co-operation and assistance of the Department of Education.
These changes included:—
(1) The appointment of an Inspector of Elementary Schools, who commenced
his duties in September, 1954; two teacher-consultants for the primary
grades and two for the intermediate grades, whose appointments were
effective February, 1955; and an Inspector of Secondary Schools, who
will start his duties September, 1955.
(2) The formulation of a promotion policy for the appointment of elementary-
school principals and the establishment of the position of senior assistant
in the elementary school to give secondary-school teachers the opportunity
to qualify for an elementary principalship.
(3) The elevation of the Bureau of Measurements to the status of a full
department, named the Department of Research and Special Services,
because of additional responsibilities assigned to it during the past two
years.
(4) A survey of mental-health services completed by a special committee of
the Board and officials which, with the assistance of the Department of
Education, has resulted in the inauguration of an in-service training programme for mental-health co-ordinators, to begin this coming September.
(5) The amendment of the administrative code to include the Metropolitan
Health Service, thus clarifying the relationship of this organization to the
Vancouver School Board and its administrative system.
(6) The elimination of swing shifts during the year through accurate planning
of the building programme, and the preparation of a tentative building
programme to provide accommodation for the future needs illustrated in
the following table:—
Enrolment in Vancouver Schools, 1954 to 1960
Year Enrolment Year Enrolment
1954  49,724 1958  57,681
1955  52,003 1959  59,444
1956  53,918 1960  60,746
1957  55,813
Before proceeding with an outline of the activities of the six administrative departments of the Vancouver school system, I would like to refer briefly to changes made in
our senior administrative positions. Mr. D. B. MacKenzie and Mr. H. B. Smith assumed
in September their new duties as Assistant Superintendents, in charge, respectively, of
elementary and secondary education. Already their long teaching and administrative
experience has proved valuable to our school system. Mr. Owen J. Thomas retired in
June after forty-four years with the Vancouver School Board. His outstanding contribution to education was recognized by the British Columbia Teachers' Federation,
which presented him with the Ferguson Memorial Award, and by the Vancouver
Elementary and Secondary Teachers' Associations, each of which has established annual
scholarships in his name. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER) EE 61
Department of Elementary Education
Under the broad heading of " Constructive Supervision," much progress was made
during the year in providing assistance to teachers, especially to appointees who had
graduated recently from the training institutions, and to married women returning to
teaching after some years.
On September 1st, 1954, Mr. J. V. Grant was appointed Inspector of Schools, with
the approval of the Department of Education, to assist in the inspection of our 1,144
elementary-school teachers who were teaching 32,651 pupils.
The two teacher-consultants for the primary grades and the two for the intermediate
grades were appointed in February for a two-year term to assist teachers in the organization, preparation, and presentation of their classroom work. During the past five
months they visited almost 400 classrooms, as well as arranged for many of the new
teachers to observe some of our outstanding teachers. This innovation, which is one
of peer relationship rather than one of inspection, has been so very well received that
it represents a major advancement.
The supervisors of Music, Art, Primary, Physical Education, Industrial Arts, Home
Economics, and special classes continued to give valuable service to the teachers in the
classrooms. Emphasis this year was placed on in-service training courses and group
conferences, to permit as many teachers as possible to obtain assistance and guidance.
The supervisors and the teacher-consultants also assisted at numerous teacher conventions and conferences throughout the Province.
Our principals made a very worth-while contribution toward the improvement of
instruction and supervision. They participated with our officials in committees which
examined teaching techniques and standards of achievement in the basic subjects. As
a result, mastery tests in arithmetic were developed for each grade from II to VI and
given to all pupils in June. A survey was made of the supplementary-reader situation,
and, as a result of its study, quotas have been set for each classroom according to the
needs of the grade. Suitable books were chosen and techniques outlined for their use.
Another committee made an exhaustive study into the most suitable maps and globes
for the intermediate classrooms and established quotas.
Our school libraries continued to be an important aspect of instruction. The
library pool collection now totals 24,677 volumes. Over 6,900 books were added to
the permanent school libraries.    Circulation for the year was 237,058.
During the year our schools received splendid assistance from the Vancouver Police
and Fire Departments in carrying on the ever-important safety programme. The police,
the Vancouver Central Lions Club, and the Board of School Trustees co-operated in the
operation of fifty schoolboy patrols, which, under teacher sponsors, included 1,500 boys
and gave safe crossing to some 20,000 pupils each day.
Department of Secondary Education
One of the most significant developments in our secondary-school organization was
the conversion of the Vancouver Technical into a composite junior-senior high with
a technical bias. As a result, the Technical School now offers a complete range of
academic, commercial, and technical courses to pupils in a specific school area, and at
the same time makes available advanced technical training to any secondary-school
student in the city.
This expansion at the Technical School, the additions to John Oliver and to Britannia which will become a junior-senior high in September, the commencement of construction of Sir Winston Churchill, the completion of working plans for Killarney, and
the start on the plans for the new Gordon Park Secondary School, all underline the tremendous building programme necessary to meet the rapidly rising enrolment in Vancouver's secondary schools.   The unrelenting pressure of this growth may be gathered EE 62
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
from the following table, covering the enrolments in Grades VII to XII from 1954 to
1961:—
Enrolment in Vancouver Secondary Schools, 1954 to 1961
Year • Enrolment
1954  18,323
1955  19,528
1956  20,565
1957  21,292
Year
1958.
Enrolment
  22,785
1959  24,622
1960  25,670
1961  26,685
Substantial progress was made during the year in our educational programme. We
were able to offer students a wide range of academic and vocational subjects. Our principals and teachers devoted much attention to the improvement of instruction, and our
in-service training programme was extended particularly in the fields of Music, Art, Home
Economics, Industrial Arts, Physical Education, and Counselling.
Plans were formulated, in co-operation with the Department of Education and the
Department of Health and Welfare, for the in-service training of experienced counsellors
as mental-health co-ordinators. A new course in Industrial Mechanics was developed
and will be introduced this coming term at John Oliver Secondary School. Committees
of principals and teachers worked on matters pertaining to supplementary text-books,
standardization of equipment and supplies, awarding of scholarships, science supplies,
heads of departments, and pupil visits to the British Columbia Building at the Pacific
National Exhibition. New library procedures governing the ordering, processing, and
distribution of books to the secondary schools were introduced. The integration of our
special classes for slow learners with the regular secondary-school organization was
further improved. For the first time in Vancouver, by arrangement with the principal
of Jericho Hill School, one blind pupil was enrolled in one of our regular classes, an
experiment which proved very satisfactory.
To assist us in our efforts to maintain and improve instruction and pupil achievement,
the Board of School Trustees appointed Mr. F. M. Wallace, principal of John Oliver
Secondary School, with the approval of the Department of Education, to the position of
Inspector of Secondary Schools, effective September, 1955.
Department of Adult Education
The comprehensive programme of adult education carried on by the Board of School
Trustees continued to show marked growth. Daytime classes were held at the Vancouver
Vocational Institute, the Vancouver School of Art, and the Radio Electronics Centre.
Evening classes were held at twenty-seven centres. In addition, some part-time instruction was offered during mornings and late afternoons as a supplement to the evening
programme.
A. Day Classes for Adults
At the Vancouver Vocational Institute, twenty-one divisions provided pre-employment and up-grading instruction relating to trade and service occupations. Enrolments
for the year increased over previous years, as did the number of students completing
courses successfully and the number obtaining employment on recommendation from the
Institute.   The following table indicates this growth for the past five years.
Enrolment at the Vancouver Vocational Institute, 1950
to 1954
Detail
1950-51
1951-52
1952-53
1953-54
1954-55
1,347
649
432
1,524
751
399
1,682
930
523
1,851
1,031
420
2,011
1,319
Number of students completing pre-employment
and upgrading courses successfully....	 SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER) EE 63
In many divisions the number of registrations differed widely from those of the
previous year, with the greatest numerical gain in the Stationary Engineering Division and
the greatest decline in Navigation. The increase in total enrolment mainly resulted from
a greater intake of indentured apprentices directed to the Institute by the Apprenticeship
Branch of the Department of Labour for special courses of four weeks' duration, as well
as from the introduction of a Hair-styling course for beauty-parlour employees.
At the Vancouver School of Art, 103 students enrolled for full-time studies and
115 for part-time studies. Sixteen students graduated, after completing the four-year
programme. Reports from the School show that employment opportunities for graduating students were good, that teachers and students achieved success in national art
competitions, and that additional scholarships were received from business firms and from
individuals.
At the Radio Electronics Centre, sixty students were in training, an increase of
sixteen over the previous year. Of these, twenty-one either gained their second-class
Department of Transport communication certificates or completed their studies for the
qualifying examinations. Of vital importance to the Centre was the installation of much
new equipment prescribed by the 1952 International Communications Convention for
use in all examinations leading to international certification on and after April 1st, 1955.
B. Evening School Programme
A total of 296 courses in 188 subject fields were offered. An all-time high enrolment
of 17,793 was reached and 570 classes operated.
A number of new courses were introduced, the most prominent of which were Technician and Sub-engineering Training, Gas Fitting, and Downhill Welding. The Technician course was planned for young men wishing training on a higher technical level as
preparatory work to enrolment for professional engineering subjects. The Gas Fitting
course served more than 400 plumbers and pipe-fitters who wished to qualify for Provincial certification covering installation and maintenance of gas appliances. The Downhill Welding course instructed experienced welders in special techniques required in pipeline welding. The Unemployment Insurance Commission and the Provincial Department
of Education paid the full cost of operating this course to make training available to
unemployed welders. Even greater numbers, from the employed ranks, were enrolled
through the efforts of the British Columbia Welding Society. A small training project
in actual pipe-line welding was also carried on during May with these two Government
agencies as joint sponsors.
The following table gives an analysis of the courses offered, the enrolments, and the
teaching staff required. The 1953-54 registration totals are inserted to reveal the growth
in the evening programme. Surprisingly, more men than women attended evening classes.
Largest numbers of registrations were recorded at King Edward High School with 4,443,
Vancouver Vocational Institute with 3,230, Vancouver Technical School with 1,681, and
Kitsilano High School with 1,514. EE 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
Analysis of Enrolment in Vancouver Evening Class Programme, 1954-55
Classification of Courses
Number
of
Subjects
Number
of
Classes
Subject Registrations
Instruc
Male
Female
Total
1953-54
Total
tors
Academic   	
38
55
14
20
18
29
2
5
7
.__..
86
173
55
27
82
59
36
14
38
2,016
4,430
600
245
113
554
991
205
356
1,619
196
1,118
512
2,260
766
455
335
1,022
3,635
4,626
1,718
757
2,373
1,320
1,446
540
1,378
3,460
3,689
1,467
560
2,073
1,473
1,029
419
1,216
62
149
37
Teacher-training, Including kindergarten-
19
Homemaking          	
41
38
English and citizenship for the foreign-born	
31
7
26
9
Totals  -    .
188
570
9,510
8,283
17,793
15,386
419
Department of Research and Special Services
The scope and variety of duties assigned to this Department have increased considerably in recent years. The following few statements indicate the valuable contribution
this Department made during the past year to the Vancouver school system.
Almost 24,000 individual and group intelligence and achievement tests were administered under the regular standardized testing programme. Special survey achievement
tests in arithmetic were developed and given to each grade from II to VI. Two additional
Bryant reading tests were constructed. Aptitude and achievement tests issued by the
Department of Education were given in English 30 and 31, Mathematics 10, Social Studies
10 and 20, English 40 and 41.
More than 23,000 personal record cards were handled, 5,000 choice-of-course cards
processed, and applications for 850 transfers across school boundaries considered.
Extensive enrolment surveys were made, the results analysed, and a revised building
schedule, based on the latest available information, established. .
The educational programme for children in special classes, in the Vancouver General
Hospital, Preventorium, Children's Hospital, Rehabilitation Centre, and Detention Home,
as well as for children confined to home for lengthy periods, was assisted by this
Department.
Province- and Canada-wide salary data were obtained and summarized. This material proved invaluable to the Board in salary negotiations with its ten bargaining employee
groups. Here it should be noted that, for the first time in Vancouver, a two-year agreement
was reached with the school administrators and with the two other teacher associations.
Various publications were produced including a new endeavour, "Among Ourselves,"
designed to stimulate interest in the work of the Board and of the teachers' professional
organizations. The Department also arranged orientation sessions in the administration
building for teacher appointees and for newly appointed principals.
Department of Construction and Maintenance
The Department of Construction and Maintenance is responsible for janitorial services, the general maintenance of buildings and equipment now valued at approximately
$50,000,000, and for the planning and supervision of new school construction. Every
effort has been made to maintain schools and equipment in good repair. In addition,
coal furnaces were replaced with oil-burning equipment in five schools and lighting was
brought up to approved standards in eleven schools under the Board's rewiring
programme. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER)
EE 65
The following list of new schools completed during the year, those under construction, and others in the planning stage indicates the progress made in the architectural
division of this Department:—
New construction completed:—
Douglas Primary Annex (new):  Eight classrooms, one special classroom, one
activity-room.
Fleming Primary Annex (new):  Eight classrooms, one special classroom, one
activity-room.
Franklin Elementary:  One lunchroom.
Lloyd George Elementary: Six classrooms, one gymnasium-auditorium.
McBride Elementary:   One gymnasium-auditorium and alterations to heating
system.
Osier Elementary:  Eight classrooms, one lunchroom.
Portable classrooms:  Twenty-six classrooms.
Queen Mary Elementary:   One gymnasium-auditorium, one lunchroom, two
special classrooms.
Lord Roberts Elementary:  One gymnasium-auditorium and alterations to heating system.
Trafalgar Primary Annex (new): Eight classrooms, one special classroom, one
activity-room.
John Oliver Secondary:   Eighteen classrooms, four special classrooms, four
shops, one auditorium, one cafeteria, five home-economics rooms.
Britannia Secondary:   One classroom, four special classrooms, one shop, one
double gymnasium, one cafeteria, three home-economics rooms, extensive
alteration work.
Vancouver Technical:  Sixteen classrooms, ten special classrooms, one double
gymnasium, extensive alteration work.
New construction under way:—
Brock Elementary: Additions and alterations.
Edith Cavell Elementary:  Alterations.
Sir Wilfred Grenfell Elementary:  Addition.
Kerrisdale Elementary: Alterations.
Laurier Elementary: Addition.
Livingstone Elementary: Addition.
Quilchena Elementary:  Addition.
Sexsmith Elementary: Addition and alterations.
Southlands Elementary: Addition.
Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith: New.
Sir Winston Churchill Secondary:  New.
Plans on draughting-boards:—
Edith Cavell Elementary: Addition.
Capt. James Cook Elementary (formerly Carleton No. 2): Addition.
Hastings Primary Annex: New.
Kerrisdale Elementary: Addition.
Dr. R. E. McKechnie Elementary: New.
Queen Elizabeth Elementary: Addition.
Elementary school in the vicinity of Thirty-seventh Avenue and Willow Street:
New.
Killarney Secondary:  New.
Department of Business Administration
Under the direction of the secretary-treasurer, the Department of Business Administration was of valuable assistance to all branches of our administrative organization.
Changes were made in this Department which benefited, directly or indirectly, our educational system. EE 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
Because of the large number of maintenance and capital projects carried on simultaneously, the provision of up-to-date cost information for department heads and the
establishment of budgetary control was found to be essential. A careful survey indicated
that a manually operated costing system would be much more expensive than the use
of punched-card accounting. Consequently a fully equipped punched-card section was
installed in the Accounting Division. This change has resulted in increased efficiency
and operational savings. For example, the data accumulated from time-sheets for costing
also provided the basic information for payroll purposes. Thus the punched cards serve
a dual purpose—costing and the preparation of the labour payroll. This change also
made it possible to dispense with a rental service under which the city, for the past twenty
years, had prepared the teachers' payroll and the accounts payable distribution on punched
cards.   This function is now performed in our Accounting Division.
The amendments made to the "Public Schools Act" in 1955 vitally affected our
accounting procedures. With the introduction of an Operating Expense Budget and a
Capital Expense Budget, the freedom of action formerly possible under the wide definition
of " Ordinary Expenses " no longer exists. Funds from the Operating Expense Budget
are not now available for expenditures provided for under the definition of " Capital
Expenses." The provisions of section 23 of the Act, requiring approval of the Superintendent of Education for all capital expenditures, whether eligible for Government
sharing of the costs or not, demands a careful analysis of all projects before authorization
in order to segregate any reconstruction or improvements which may result from the
work in order that prior appropriation of the estimated cost may be made against the
Capital Budget.
In all large school systems, standardization of equipment and supplies is essential to
efficient operation. In co-operation with educational officials and principals, the Department of Business Administration made considerable progress in this direction. A standardized scale of supplies for teaching most of the subjects in the curriculum was completed.
Lists of standard equipment for each teaching unit in the elementary schools were prepared, and similar lists for the secondary schools are in the course of preparation. A scale
of equipment considered essential to permit the most effective use of visual aids in our
schools was drawn up, and each school will be brought up to this standard as soon as
finances permit. Under the auspices of the Art Supervisor, an Art Manual for teachers
was prepared and reproduced in the mimeograph section of this Department. This publication was so well received, not only in Vancouver, but throughout the Province, that
a large number of requests for copies have been made. Copies have been supplied to
other school districts at cost, and this will be continued as long as a supply is available.
The rapidly increasing school enrolment, outlined earlier in this report, also placed
an additional burden on this Department as funds must be available to meet the cost of
the heavy capital expenditures required if swing shifts are to be avoided. The secretary-
treasurer's department has worked very closely with the educational officials and the
architectural staff in the development of the building programme to ensure that, as far as
possible, no project would be delayed because of lack of funds.
Conclusion
In this report, I have attempted to outline the growth and development of the
Vancouver school system during the past year. The progress achieved has been made
possible through the untiring efforts of the Board of School Trustees and the co-operation
of the Department of Education. Much has been accomplished, but many problems still
remain to be solved.
I would be remiss, in concluding this report, if I did not comment on the excellent
and willing assistance given me by all the department heads in the Vancouver school
system. They worked so effectively as a team that the task of co-ordinating their activities
has been a pleasant one. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
EE 67
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)
REPORT OF JOHN GOUGH, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS,
AND ALEX. TURNBULL, M.C., M.M., B.A., ASSISTANT MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS.
The opening of two new junior high schools in 1954 made this an eventful year for
the Greater Victoria School District. On September 7th, 802 pupils comprising twenty-
two divisions assembled in the new Central Junior High School. Shortly after, on
September 16th, the Lansdowne Junior High School commenced to operate with eleven
divisions of students in Grade VII and VIII.
The accelerated rise in number of children attending the thirty-eight schools in this
district over the past four years is indicated by the following figures:—
Number of Pupils
1951
1952
1953
1954
8,838
1,171
2,114
9,338
1,466
2,211
10,014
1,766
2,175
10,238
2,588
2,394
Totals           	
12,123
13,015
13,955
15,220
When schools opened for the 1954-55 school-year, the following number of teachers
were employed:—
Men
Women
Total
73
62
84
226
50
46
299
112
130
Totals	
219
322
541
Because ratepayers had refused to give majority support to the second school building by-law in the previous December, it was found necessary, in September, to introduce
the shift system at Cloverdale, Doncaster, McKenzie Avenue, Oaklands, and View Royal
Elementary Schools, an arrangement which affected approximately 400 children.
When the voters were asked in December, 1954, to authorize the Board to borrow
$3,129,000 under a school loan by-law referendum, the majority gave approval. Thus
the Board was able to proceed with a building programme which, when completed, will
include a large junior high school in the Tillicum-McKenzie Avenue-Colquitz area;
elementary schools at Glanford, Gordon Head, Macaulay, and Marigold; additions to
Doncaster, George Jay, Margaret Jenkins, Oaklands, Strawberry Vale, View Royal, and
Willows Elementary Schools; additions to Esquimalt and Mount View High Schools and
to the F. T. Fairey Vocational-Technical Unit; the development of small schools at Lake
Hill, Hampton Park, and Richmond Road by assembling portable units; and the erection
of maintenance-shops.
With the view to co-ordinating administration of the schools within the system,
principals and supervisors have met with the Inspectors month by month throughout the
year to discuss matters of general interest, particularly with reference to the improvement
of instruction. The Handbook of Administrative Policies, made available to principals,
teachers, and supervisors in September, proved to be a ready reference on procedures
established over the past few years. EE 68
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
The testing programme conducted by Miss A. Verna Turner served to relate pupil
achievement to pupil ability; it aided in evaluating the effectiveness of instructional
methods and materials; further, it provided test results which formed a common basis for
considering promotions from elementary schools to the junior high schools. During the
year, standardized tests were administered to all pupils in Grades IV to VI in Reading,
Spelling, and Grammar, and to all pupils in Grade VIII in Reading, Spelling, Grammar,
and Mathematics; in addition, scholastic aptitude surveys were undertaken in Grades IV,
VI, VIII, XI, and XIII. By way of assisting the Department of Education, survey tests
were administered in scholastic aptitude, Social Studies, English, and Mathematics.
In order to meet the needs of approximately ninety boys and thirty girls who were
classified as very slow learners, six special classes were operated—four at George Jay
School and two at South Park School. A seventh class was estabhshed at North Ward
School to teach English to twenty-five new Canadians of school age.
In addition to supervising classroom instruction at the kindergarten and primary
level, Miss Marian D. James directed the Teaching Aids Department, which looked after
the selection and purchase of books, the loaning of 23,000 supplementary readers during
the year, the issuing of phonograph records, and the distribution of practical arts supplies.
The continuing expansion of the Department of Audio-Visual Aids, under Mr. Denis
W. Brown, is revealed by this table, summarizing requests by teachers for various
teaching aids:—
1952-53
1953-54
1954-55
Filmstrips— —  	
 ...loans
584
117
17,342
2,688
169
15,466
3,159
School journeys	
   trips
212
17,274
Numerous educational motion pictures loaned by the Provincial Division of Visual
Education and over 100 films owned by the Board were put to effective use. The school
system is indebted to the Provincial Museum and other agencies which made exhibits and
models available, and also to the I.O.D.E. and the National Film Board for donations of
films and filmstrips.
To assist teachers with little experience in teaching Physical Education, Mr. George
Grant, supervisor, conducted in-service training courses at four centres. The expanding
interest in teaching folk dancing and rhythm activities was reflected in the way many
groups of pupils participated in the folk-dancing classes of the Greater Victoria Music
Festival. As in former years, the Board provided funds for a course of eight lessons in
swimming for pupils in Grade V; the larger majority of those participating in the swim
programme in the Crystal Garden pool earned test awards.
Student participation in school athletics was encouraged by means of several leagues;
extensive student participation was noticeable in the intramural activities sponsored by
the secondary schools. Because of the existence of four junior high schools, it was
possible to organize an inter-junior high swim meet, a badminton tournament, and track
meet for the first time.
The committee in charge of Strathcona Trust awards for physical training nominated
Cloverdale School recipient of the elementary award and named Mount View High School
and the S. J. Willis Junior High School as co-winners of the secondary award.
Under the guidance of Mr. H. J. Bigsby, supervisor of Music, the elementary and
secondary schools achieved a high standard in choral and instrumental work; this was
demonstrated by choirs, ensembles, and bands which represented their schools in the
local music festival as well as in various school activities.
School bands now number seven, with a total membership of 575 pupils. The schools
pipe band has a membership of fifty. Trips made by several of the bands to the Mainland
to attend the British Columbia Schools' Band Conference in New Westminster or to play REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS EE 69
in other cities helped to promote interest in the instrumental programme. For 160 pupils
learning to play string instruments, seven groups were in operation.
Through the Mental Health Department, the Board assisted many children in need
of special guidance, among them maladjusted children, others with behaviour problems,
and several with unsatisfactory attendance. Approximately 300 cases of such children
were referred to Mr. H. P. Mickelson, who maintained close liaison with various social
agencies, particularly the Family and Children's Service and the Provincial Child Guidance
Clinic. About 100 pupils with speech difficulties received help from Miss Marie C.
Crickmay, speech therapist.
The gradual reorganization of all schools to enable them to function as elementary,
junior high, and senior high schools was carried a step further in September, 1954, with
the opening of the Lansdowne Junior High School. One effect of this was to convert the
Victoria High School into a unit teaching pupils in Grades X, XI, and XII only. However, that school suffered little change in enrolment in view of the growing numbers at the
senior high-school level, a trend common to the other senior high schools in the area.
To assist parents in understanding the junior high-school system, the Public Relations
Committee of the Board authorized the publication of an illustrated booklet describing
the four schools now in operation.
Academic work at the secondary level was maintained at a satisfactory standard of
achievement; distinction came to the school district in consequence of high standings
obtained by several students who wrote University Entrance examinations.
Evening classes, directed by Mr. John S. White, opened in October with a record
enrolment of 1,848 adults at Victoria High School, at F. T. Fairey Vocational-Technical
Unit, and at Central, S. J. Willis, and Oak Bay Junior High Schools. Sixty-six instructors
offered a total of eighty-four courses in (a) apprenticeship training, (b) vocational and
trade extension, (c) leisure-time handicrafts, and (d) in French 92, Social Studies 30,
and Chemistry 91 for Matriculation standing.
Additional facilities for teaching Industrial Arts and Home Economics became available in the fall with the opening of the Lansdowne Junior High School; this made possible
the closure of the old manual-training centre at South Park School and the allocation of
Mount Douglas High School students taking these courses to this junior high school,
about a mile away.
In September, Victoria College embarked on another successful year under Dr. W. H.
Hickman, principal, with an increased enrolment of forty-seven students over the previous
year. A total of 387 students were in attendance—248 in the first year and 89 in the
second year.
To supplement the emphasis by students on academic achievement, the Students'
Council sponsored a number of clubs. " The Young Elizabeth," produced in the new
Union Room as theatre-in-the-round, was an especially rewarding experience for the fifty
students connected with the production of this historical play.
Under the direction of Mr. Robert T. Wallace, the Evening Division extended the
services of the College to the community by offering a number of courses which were
well attended.
During the year a great deal of thought was given by Victoria College Council and
the staff to the new "Victoria College Act" which, in September, 1956, will incorporate
teacher-training into the programme of the College. This change will terminate the
agreement whereby the College has been administered effectively for over fifty years by
the local School Board.
It was with considerable disappointment that the School Board learned from Trustee
Austin I. Curtis in December, 1954, that he would not seek re-election to a position which
he had discharged so conscientiously and continuously over the past fourteen years.
The end of the school-year brought the retirement of the following teachers, who axe
to be commended for their long and outstanding service in Greater Victoria:  Olga Bossi, EE 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
thirty-three years; Beth T. Ramsay, forty-two years; Percy C. Routley, thirty years;
H. L. Smith, forty-one years; and Leila B. Maxwell, who retired voluntarily after thirty
years.
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)
Report of Roy S. Shields, B.A., Municipal Inspector of Schools
The citizens of New Westminster are justly proud of the school system of New
Westminster and of the Board of School Trustees—business men and women of ability,
enthusiasm, and foresight who give of their time freely and without remuneration that
the youth of this city shall have every educational opportunity to become worthy citizens
of a great commonwealth. Trustees are Mr. Cecil Watson, Chairman of the Board;
Mr. B. M. Bowell, Chairman of Finance; Mr. A. W. E. Mercer, Chairman of the
Management Committee; Dr. L. Lesk, Chairman of the Health and Supply Committee;
Mr. W. L. Linn, Chairman of Buildings and Grounds; Mrs. H. Culter, Chairman of
Public Relations; and Mr. T. K. Fisher, Chairman of Labour Relations.
Our schools are doing splendid work; of the many services which are purchased by
taxes, there is none from which society and the individual citizen receive more benefit
than from public education. The cost of education appears to be negligible as compared
with the values received because of the resultant productivity of the individuals who
receive an education, exceeding the cost many times over.
This September the Board of School Trustees will open a senior composite vocational high school at a cost of $1,500,000, called the Lester Pearson Senior High School,
one of the finest schools in the Province, with an expected enrolment of over 1,000 pupils.
Situated on spacious school-grounds of 30 acres, it completes the secondary-school
building programme.   Mr. Ian Douglas is principal and Mr. George Ford is vice-principal.
The building of this school is a milestone in the educational life of this community
in that it marks the closing of two smaller senior high schools—the Duke of Connaught
High School, built in 1911, and the T. J. Trapp Technical High School, opened in 1920.
The interschool rivalry in both academic and athletic fields will be missed, but we know
that greater opportunities will present themselves in the new school.
Other building plans are under advisement—a School Board office to be built
between the senior and junior high schools, a four-room primary school to meet the
needs of the McBride School area, the renovation of the T. J .Trapp Technical High
School as an elementary school (John Robson), and additional rooms on the junior high
school.
Many extra-curricular activities were carried on throughout the year, such as May
Day, International Peace Arch Day, etc., and with it the standard of classroom work
showed steady improvement. Miss Margaret Mores, a student of T. J. Trapp Technical
High School, was successful in winning the University of British Columbia scholarship
of $400 for University Entrance (District Nos. 40 and 41), plus the University of British
Columbia Alumna, scholarship of $250, plus the Kiwanis scholarship of $200. To Miss
Mores we offer our heartiest congratulations.
It is with regret we lose the services, through retirement, of Miss Clara Maxwell,
Miss Florence Eickhoff, Mr. George Johnson, and Mr. Frank Morris, with services totalling almost 150 years in the interests of the youth of this city. Able and scholarly
teachers, their work will long be remembered.
Night-school, under the principalship of Mr. Frank Morris, had its most successful
year to date. Although superannuated from the regular teaching staff, Mr. Morris has
been appointed Director of Night School Classes for next year. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
EE 71
Several appointments of interest have been made within our school system. Mr.
W. O. Hudson and Mr. W. D. Clarke have been made supervising principals and Mr.
Fred Turner has been made Director of Music for the Secondary Schools.
Careful attention has been paid this past year to the development of a testing programme and the establishment of individual pupil record under the chairmanship of Mr.
Arthur Sweet. A more comprehensive programme has been planned for this coming
year.
Once more, appreciation is expressed for assistance given so freely and harmoniously
by teachers, principals, School Board members and personnel, P.-T. A. groups, service
clubs, and the Department of Education.
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)
REPORT OF C. J. FREDERICKSON, B.A., AND R. C. GRANT, B.A.,
MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS OF SCHOOLS
In 1952 a very careful survey and analysis of Burnaby's school population was made
with a view to projecting enrolments to 1960. At that time it was anticipated that, in the
latter year, the enrolment would be 17,800 pupils. The growth has, however, considerably outstripped the calculations, and the construction afforded by the $4,500,000 by-law
of 1953 has proved to be inadequate.
The following brief table gives an outline of the problems faced by School District
No. 41:—
Date
Population
Houses
Births
Entering
Grade I
September
Enrolment
1945                                   	
36,500
48,000
61,000
70,000
75,000
92,000
514
1,453
1,767
3,173
1.4821
748
1,096
1,735
2,039
1.1271
714
902
1,348
1,667
1.9502
2,7252
5,953
1948                                                    	
7,124
10,034
1952                     	
1954 	
1955 	
1960   -  	
12,600
14.4552
22,7752
1 Half-year.
2 Estimate.
While the by-law did not provide sufficient funds for new construction for the increasing needs, it did allow the School Board to proceed with the complete renovation and
modernization of a number of schools built in the 1920's and the demolition of several
buildings which were long outmoded and uneconomic to maintain. This phase of the
programme should be completed by the end of 1955.
In-service Programme
Under the direction of Dr. C. C. Watson, Director of the In-service Programme, Miss
J. Bailey, intermediate supervisor, and Miss K. Collins, primary supervisor, an extensive
in-service programme was conducted during the year. Since all supervision is considered
a part of the in-service programme, the full extent of the professional development cannot
be adequately recorded, but it is estimated that at least forty-eight various activities, of
which five were courses for credit, were conducted. It is estimated that there were 9,777
teacher-hours of participation for the 410 teachers on the staff. These figures do not
include the time spent by those teachers who attended extra-sessional classes at the
University, night classes in other districts, or pursued private study. Of particular interest
was the course in School Office Practice conducted for and by the principals and vice- EE 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
principals. Participation in planning and in the actual development of the courses has
been the key-note of the in-service programme. The whole-hearted co-operation extended
by the teachers and principals is sincerely acknowledged.
Testing
A fairly extensive testing programme was carried out under the direction of Mr. H. J.
McPherson. The Stanford Achievement, Form J, was administered to Grades II, IV, VI,
and VII and Scholastic Aptitude Tests to Grades I, III, and VII. Results were tabulated
and evaluated in order that the supervisory staff might determine where remedial measures
should be taken to improve instruction. The testing programme revealed that, in general,
the achievement in basic skills was satisfactory, but it also revealed that much remains to
be done for those pupils at either end of the distribution—the very slow and the very
bright.
Mr. McPherson also administered individual tests in those cases where teachers and
principals made referrals. As a trained social worker, he also acted as a liaison official
with the Social Welfare and Juvenile Court.
Mental Hygiene
During the year an extensive educational campaign on behalf of mental hygiene was
was conducted by Mr. J. Findlay. Emphasis was placed on the place of an understanding
of mental health in the classroom. Mr. Findlay will act on a full-time basis for the
ensuing year.
Music
While Burnaby does not have a Director of Music and there are no immediate plans
to appoint one, music has not been neglected. As far as possible, teachers with a knowledge of music have been appointed, and the importance of music as an integral part of
the programme has been stressed. As a recognition of the fact that interest in choral
music diminishes sharply in the adolescent years but that the child's interest in music
itself does not, bands were organized in several schools. The growth in a matter of five
or six months has been phenomenal. In that short period of time over 150 students have
enrolled in various school bands and have made remarkable progress. A tribute is due
to the teachers who, despite inexperience, tackled this project with great enthusiasm and
success, and to the many parents who assisted in the financing of the organizations.
If there has been a tendency on the part of some educationists to look upon the
development of the school band with askance because of a certain possible flamboyancy
which might occur, it must be recognized that choral music alone is an inadequate means
of expression.
Library
The organization and development of pool libraries has been most encouraging.
Under the direction of the primary and intermediate supervisors, the district was zoned
to form four school pools. Books were exchanged within each pool three times during
the year.
A most promising teachers' professional library has been started, toward which both
teachers and the Board contribute.
The burden of organizing and conducting library enterprises is, however, too much
for the supervisors, and it is planned to have a full-time librarian for the ensuing year.
Health
A close relationship exists between the administrators, teachers, and the staff of the
Metropolitan Health Board.    The services rendered by Dr. W. Sunderland, Medical REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
EE 73
Director; Miss M. Ross, Director of the Nursing Service; and Dr. A. Menzies, psychiatrist, are greatly appreciated by the schools and by the public.
Regular liaison meetings are held between the administrators and the officials of the
health service.
NlGHT-SCHOOLS
Under the direction of Mr. F. H. Pratt, the night-schools show continued growth.
Two schools are conducted—one in the Burnaby South High School and one in the
Burnaby North High School. Where necessary, certain courses are conducted in other
schools. The close of the year showed an enrolment of 697 students in thirty-three
courses.
Retirements
The end of the school-year 1953-54 saw the retirement of Mr. C. G. Brown,
Municipal Inspector; Miss M. Gray, principal of Rosser Avenue Elementary School;
and Miss H. Russell, teacher at Gilmore Avenue Elementary School.
Mr. Brown came to Burnaby in 1917 and was, until 1936, principal of the Burnaby
South High School. In that year he was appointed Provincial Inspector and, shortly
after, Municipal Inspector. His leaving was the occasion of a public gathering of his
former students and associates, who acclaimed his many years of devoted service, his
outstanding ability and great popularity.
Miss Gray and Miss Russell were appointed in 1911 and retired after forty-three
years of outstanding service.
June of the current year marked the retirement of Miss R. I. Leavens, who served
Burnaby faithfully since her appointment in 1914.
School Board
This report cannot be concluded without a tribute to the School Board and its
officials. The Board has spared no effort to recoup the physical losses due to many years
of enforced neglect and has endeavoured in every way possible to place Burnaby in the
forefront as British Columbia's second largest municipal organization. Its policies have
resulted in the harmonious relationships that presently exist between itself, the Municipal
Council, and the teaching staff. These policies could not have been executed, however,
without the able assistance of its secretary-treasurer, Mr. A. C. Durkin, and his capable
and well-trained staff.
School Districts No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)
REPORT OF WILLIAM GRAY, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS,
AND W. E. LUCAS, B.A., B.Pjed., ASSISTANT MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS.
The steady growth and development of the North Shore is indicated in the following
table:—
Year
Number of
Pupils
Number of
Schools
Number of
Teachers
District No. 44 (North Vancouver)
1952                           .                                ...           .   .   .
5,597
6,319
7,041
2,482
2,894
3,235
13
13
13
7
8
8
174
1953      — _      	
196
1954  	
224
District No. 45 (West Vancouver)
1952                .                                .   .
83
1953
96
1954	
110
Totals, 1954
10.276           I                 21
334 ee 74 public schools report, 1954-55
North Vancouver
To meet the increase in school population in September, the North Vancouver School
Board provided twenty-one additional classrooms, as follows: A six-room addition to
the Highlands Elementary School, a six-room addition to the North Star Elementary
School, a two-room addition to the Keith Lynn Elementary School, a two-room addition
to the Burrard View Elementary School, two portable classrooms for the senior high
school, two portable classrooms for the Norgate Elementary School, and one portable
classroom for the Lynn Valley Elementary School. This increase in accommodation was
not adequate to meet the needs of the Highlands and Forest Hills subdivisions, in which
unusual growth occurred. As a result, the School Board was forced to employ the shift
system in the Highlands Elementary School.
In December, 1954, the ratepayers approved a referendum by-law authorizing the
North Vancouver School Board to sell debentures for an amount of $830,000. This will
provide funds for four new elementary schools, namely, Canyon Heights (twelve rooms),
Queensbury (six rooms), Mountain Highway (eight rooms), and Seymour Heights
(six rooms). The new Hamilton Junior High School will be ready for occupancy in
September, 1955.
West Vancouver
In September, 1954, four new classrooms were opened in the Cedardale Elementary
School and four in the Ridgeview Elementary School. In addition, an activity-room was
completed for the Hollyburn Elementary School. In December, ratepayers of the school
district approved a referendum by-law empowering the Board to sell debentures totalling
$686,675. This sum provides for an addition of two rooms and an activity-room to the
Gleneagles Elementary School, a new four-room primary school at Irwin Park, and
a twenty-two-room addition to the West Vancouver Senior High School.
General
Standardized tests in Reading, Vocabulary, Spelling, Language, and Arithmetic were
administered to all pupils in Grades III to IX inclusive. Surveys of scholastic aptitude
were carried out in Grades III, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, and XL The testing programme
revealed that pupil achievement was very satisfactory. Successful night-school programmes were conducted in both North Vancouver and West Vancouver.
The class for handicapped children was continued at Queen Mary Elementary
School in North Vancouver, and it is proposed to organize two classes for these pupils
in September, 1955. An opportunity class was conducted at Pauline Johnson School,
and another was instituted in West Vancouver at the Ridgeview Elementary School.
Pupils from the surrounding schools were enrolled in the latter class for approximately
three months. Under the guidance of a skilled and understanding teacher, the pupils
were given the needed special help and then returned to regular classes. The experiment
proved a success in the opinion of parents and teachers. It will be continued next term.
Impressive graduation exercises were held in both the North Vancouver and West Vancouver Senior High Schools. Many valuable local scholarships have been established in
both schools, these being awarded annually to deserving students.
In June of this year, Gordon Gibson, a student of West Vancouver Senior High
School, brought distinction to himself and to the school by winning one of the General
Proficiency scholarships awarded by the University of British Columbia to successful
students in the University Entrance examinations.
Miss Caroline Perry retired on superannuation at the close of the school-year. She
is to be commended for her many years of loyal and efficient service with the North
Vancouver School Board.
Appreciation is again expressed for the support received during the year from both
School Boards and from officials of the Department of Education. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS EE 75
School District No. 36 (Surrey)
REPORT OF K. B. WOODWARD, B.A., B.P/ed., MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
There were no major developments in School District No. 36 (Surrey) during the
past year. The implementation of the by-law passed in June, 1954, was begun, but only
two classrooms were completed and in use when the year ended. They were part of a
prefabricated unit containing two classrooms and an activity-room which was built as an
annex to Bridgeview School and opened after Easter. At present there are four four-
roomed schools and two of six rooms under construction. It is hoped to have these
classrooms available in September.
The peak enrolment for the year was 8,744, which showed a slower rate of increase
than for some years. This was a pleasing development because we ended the year with
100 classes on shift and eleven basement classrooms, some of which are quite unfit for use.
There were in operation during the year thirty-three elementary schools, four junior-
senior high schools enrolling Grades VIII to XII, and one senior high school. Two of
the junior-senior high schools enrolled Grade XIII. All of the Grade VII pupils were
enrolled in the elementary schools, as were seven of the Grade VIII classes. The Grade
VIII classes were transported to the high schools for Home Economics and Industrial
Arts, but because of the limited facilities it was impossible to do this for the Grade VII
classes. There were five one-roomed schools in operation, four enrolled primary grades,
and the one on Barnston Island enrolled Grades I to VII. The two two-roomed schools
enrolled primary grades only.
During the year Miss Erma Stephenson again looked after the primary grades very
capably. Mr. John Niedzielski did very good work with the intermediate grades. These
two people were largely instrumental in raising the general standard of the work in our
elementary schools.   The results as measured by tests in June, were very satisfactory.
This spring, Lome Hrynkiw, a Grade XI student at North Surrey, placed first in
British Columbia in the mathematical contest sponsored by the Mathematical Society of
America. Also, Georgina Tucker, a Grade XII student of Semiahmoo High School, was
first in the Province for the Job Study Contest carried out by the B.C. Products and
Industrial Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade.
The Strathcona Trust shield went to Queen Elizabeth High School after a close
contest.
We appreciate greatly the help given by the Boundary Health Unit under the direction of Dr. Kennedy and his able and co-operative staff.
In closing I would like once again to thank the staff of the Surrey School District,
the School Board, and the officials of the Department of Education for their help and
co-operation during the past year. EE 76 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
School Districts No. 53 (Terrace), No. 54 (Smithers),
and No. 55 (Burns Lake)
REPORT OF H. D. ABBOTT, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 53 (Terrace)
Enrolments are increasing rapidly in this area, especially in the Village of Terrace.
The new Skeena Junior-Senior High School has just completed its first year in operation
and is offering a much broader curriculum, made possible through additional facilities.
The former Terrace Senior High School building has been completely rebuilt inside and
will serve as a primary school. It will relieve the elementary school and will keep the
youngest students nearer home. With the closing of the mines at Skeena Crossing, the
school building there was moved to Cedarvale. A new school has commenced operation
in the Upper Kispiox Valley. An additional classroom is under construction at South
Hazelton.
School District No. 54 (Smithers)
An extensive building programme was successfully completed this year, and all
new buildings and additions were officially opened by the Honourable R. G. Williston,
Minister of Education. Additional projects now under way include construction of
a bus garage and renovation of the old school building in Telkwa, and provision of an
additional classroom and teacherage in Houston.
School District No. 55 (Burns Lake)
A large building programme, providing additions and replacements in many parts
of the district, will be commenced this summer. The superior school at Topley will
revert to elementary status, while the school at Grassy Plains will become a superior
school. The latter change was made necessary through the fact that numbers of
secondary-school pupils were separated from Burns Lake Junior-Senior High School
by Francois Lake.
General
For the first time a fall teachers' convention was held at Terrace. This is to become
an annual affair, and will benefit teachers too far west to journey to the convention at
Prince George. Continued difficulty was experienced in securing the services of teachers
fully qualified for such fields as Physical Education, Home Economics, Music, Art, and
Primary. Intensive studies of the transportation systems were carried out by School
Boards, and some reduction in cost should result. There has been extensive use of
standardized testing materials in the schools, and a continued emphasis upon fundamentals. Mr. F. J. Orme has assisted in the inspection of schools, with resulting benefit
to those concerned. A wonderful spirit of co-operation and zeal has been evidenced by
all groups concerned with education in these districts. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
School Districts No. 38 (Richmond), No. 73 (Alert Bay), and
Unattached School District (University Hill)
EE 77
REPORT OF J. N. BURNETT, M.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School Organization
Schools
Teachers
District
High
Jr.-Sr.
High
Jr.
High
Elem.-
High
Elem.
Graded
Elem.
Ungraded
High
and Jr.
High
Elem.
and
Sup.
Special
No. 38 (Richmond)
No. 73 (Alert Bay)          ..   ..
-
1
1
1
4
9
1
7
62
9
9
95
18
9
1
Unattached (University Hill)	
	
Totals	
2
1
4
10
7
80
122
1
Totals: Schools, 24; teachers, 203.
School District No. 38 (Richmond)
During the year it was still necessary to resort to double-shift classes in order to
provide classrooms for all children. Three new elementary schools—Tait, Blundell,
and Cook—were organized, but no buildings for these were available so that they were
housed during the term in existing schools. Because of this, two double-shift classes
were conducted at Bridgeport Elementary School, six at Garden City Elementary School,
and six at R. M. Grauer Elementary School. One class from R. M. Grauer was also
transported daily to the Lord Byng Elementary School, where the small lunchroom was
pressed into service.
The substantial renovation work carried out on the old Cambie Junior High School
during the summer and fall necessitated its closing from September until December.
During this period the Cambie Junior High School and the Richmond Junior-Senior
High School used the latter school on a double-shift basis.
The implementation of the five-year school building programme sanctioned by the
referendum by-law last year was actively pursued by the Board. Two six-room elementary schools—Cook and Blundell—will be completed some time in the summer of 1955.
The Steveston Junior High School, begun in April, will be brought into service in September, 1956. Contracts have also been let for the following projects, with completion
expected during the fall of 1955:—
(a) Two-room elementary school for Tait subdivision.
(Z.)  Two-room elementary school for Thompson subdivision.
(c) Two-room addition to Siddaway Elementary School.
(d) One-room addition to and partial renovation of East Richmond Elementary School.
(e) Four-room elementary school for Mort subdivision.
(/) New School Board administration building on the Civic Administration
Centre site.
The class of new Canadians at the Lord Byng Elementary School was again carried
on during the year and continued its very useful function of introducing our new settlers
from foreign lands into our Canadian.schools. Owing to the acute accommodation situation, no classes for the mentally handicapped could be inaugurated, but it is planned
to begin a junior class for this type of student in 1955-56.
The School Board and Municipal Council held several joint meetings to discuss
mutual and related problems. The two most pressing of these were the need for the
adoption of zoning regulations to ensure adequate and necessary school-sites for the EE 78 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
foreseeable future and the planning of a combined Civic Administration Centre.    Good
progress toward solution was achieved in both these urgent matters.
The dental health services sponsored by the Board to provide preventive dental
treatment for pre-school and Grade I children continued under the capable direction of
Dr. Marion B. Deverell. In all, 289 pre-school pupils were examined together with 577
Grade I beginners.   The number of students receiving dental treatment totalled 698.
School District No. 73 (Alert Bay)
After experiencing many years of planning difficulties, the new Alert Bay Elementary-Senior High School was completed in September and officially opened by the Honourable the Minister of Education in April. With its modern classrooms, auditorium-
gymnasium, and Home Economics and Industrial Arts rooms, this school will provide
excellent educational facilities for this area. In Grades VII to XII the school enrols
100 Indian pupils, and it is of interest to record that in the first year under this arrangement only the most harmonious relations were experienced and expected problems were
conspicuous by their absence.
The need for further accommodation at Sointula was met by the addition of two
classrooms and a teachers' room to the Malcolm Island School. In September, 1955,
there will be five rooms in operation in this elementary-senior high school.
Teacher housing has been greatly improved by the construction of two duplex
teacherages at Alert Bay and one at Sointula. These comfortable structures should prove
a positive factor in the obtaining and holding of teachers in these areas.
For the moment the educational needs of all attendance areas appear to be well
satisfied. The Beaver Cove-Nimpkish logging-railway now under construction will,
however, when completed, cause a rearrangement of the schools in the Telegraph Cove-
Beaver Cove-Englewood areas. The Board has already given thought to this matter,
and a consolidated school is now under consideration as a solution.
University Hill School (Unattached)
The new junior-senior high school was completed in November and officially opened
by the Honourable the Minister of Education in January. This is an excellent structure
and provides educational accommodation and equipment in keeping with the complexion
and needs of this very desirable residential area.
A new three-room elementary school with playroom has been completed adjacent
to the old structure. This will be opened for classes in September and should obviate
the need to use basement classrooms. In addition, it is planned to renovate the existing
old school during the summer, and when this is completed the University Hill area will
have excellent modern school buildings.
School Districts No. 50 (Queen Charlotte) and No. 68 (Nanaimo)
REPORT OF C. L. CAMPBELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
In the two districts which make up this inspectorate there were employed 161
teachers, an increase of ten over last year.
School District No. 50 (Queen Charlotte)
The four communities where schools operate in this district are widely separated,
and communication between them is expensive and inconvenient, so that trustees find
it difficult to meet as often as is desirable. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS EE 79
The elementary divisions were staffed without too much difficulty and on the whole
did good work. It was found impossible to secure qualified high-school teachers for
Grades IX to XI, and although commendable efforts were made by teachers with temporary secondary certificates, results were in most cases far from satisfactory. High-
school correspondence courses were used, but it is difficult to convince pupils and parents that these are desirable and necessary in the small one- and two-roomed high school
if a comprehensive programme is to be offered.
School District No. 68 (Nanaimo)
While this district has required about twelve additional teachers each year to take
care of a steady growth in school population, it has been fortunate in having a relatively
small turnover in staff and in securing ample applications to fill all vacancies for regular
classroom teachers. Considerable difficulty has been experienced, however, in procuring specialist teachers in Home Economics, Commerce, Music, etc.
Results of Departmental examinations were good and indicate that, in the senior
high school, standards have been maintained and the counselling has been effective.
The junior high school, in spite of overcrowding and poor physical set-up, has had
a very successful year. With the opening of a new school in September, 1955, a great
improvement in accommodation should be experienced, and the following year it is
hoped the remainder of the junior high-school pupils will be housed in a second new
school.
The three supervising principals of elementary schools have been most successful
in organizing and supervising the schools under their care and in keeping, as far as possible, all schools up to a high standard of achievement. With the increase in school
population and addition of several new schools, it is felt that the supervisory load is
becoming a little too heavy. When the present building programme is completed in
1956, it is anticipated that several additional principals will be required.
School Districts No. 37 (Delta), No. 47 (Powell River),
and No. 74 (Quatsino)
REPORT OF T. G. CARTER, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Delta
During the year the ten schools of the district were staffed by fifty-three teachers.
The total enrolment was 1,464.
The new Heath School of two classrooms was opened in September, and two additional rooms were constructed at Sunbury.
The first stage in the development of the huge industrial estate on Annacis Island
is to be completed in July, and the construction of factories and the accompanying facilities is to commence immediately. It is expected that a sharp increase in school population will follow in the wake of this project.
A referendum to provide a new junior-senior high school in North Delta, five new
elementary schools, additions to four other schools, and a new School Board administration office is to be submitted to the ratepayers in September.
Powell River
There were fourteen schools in operation, with a staff of ninety teachers and an
enrolment of 2,237.
New schools at Edgehill and Grief Point and an addition to the school at Wildwood
were under construction.   These will be ready for use in September. EE 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
A very adequate new School Board administration office was occupied in January.
With the purchase of a duplex house at Vananda, all outlying schools are now provided with comfortably equipped teacherages.
The very efficient maintenance department continues to improve the school facilities
throughout.
Special classes for retarded pupils were again in operation at Henderson Elementary School and Brooks High School.
All the School Board members are to be especially commended for their progressive attitude and for their unswerving loyalty in the interests of the children of this
district.
QUATSINO
In the nine schools of this district there were nineteen teachers and 353 pupils.
The official opening in September of the new R. H. Richmond Elementary-Senior
High School at Port Alice and the new Robert Scott Elementary-Senior High School at
Port Hardy was an event of outstanding significance in the educational progress of the
district. The Honourable R. G. Williston, Minister of Education, and Mr. H. L. Campbell, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education, participated in the opening
ceremonies. These two schools provide very modern accommodation, and they will
continue to represent a memorial to the progressive and untiring efforts of the members
of the School Board.
A new one-room school was opened at Mahatta River and a second division was
added to the San Josef School. An activity-room was constructed at Jeune Landing.
Well-equipped new teacherages were provided at Coal Harbour and Port Hardy, thus
ensuring that good living accommodation is available at all schools where boarding
facilities do not exist.
General
The parent-teacher organizations of my inspectorate have continued to take an
active interest in the schools.   School dental services are provided in each district.
I wish to express my appreciation to all my School Boards, their secretary-treasurers,
and to all the principals and staffs of my various schools for the generous co-operation
extended to me throughout the year.
School Districts No. 42 (Maple Ridge) and No. 75 (Mission)
REPORT OF J. CHELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
In this school-year 160 teachers were employed for the 4,800 pupils enrolled. The
report of five years ago records 131 teachers for 3,800 pupils. The increase is mainly
in District No. 42 (Maple Ridge), where at present there is a staff of eighty-five for
2,700 pupils as against sixty-eight teachers for 2,100 pupils five years ago. Already
a travel pattern has been set in the American States to the south, " free-ways " as they
call them, and as this trend establishes itself here this area, just 30 miles from Vancouver,
is in line for great and rapid expansion.
On October 7th, 1954, the new Maple Ridge Junior-Senior High School was officially
opened by the Honourable Lyle Wicks, Minister of Labour, and Mr. J. F. K. English,
Assistant Deputy Minister of Education. The former had been a student and the latter
a principal of the MacLean Building, which was once the high school but now serves
as auxiliary classrooms and School Board office.
November 26th, 1954, was the occasion of the first Future Teachers' Conference.
It was sponsored by the Mission group and drew representatives from a wide area. The
affair was a great success and should be continued. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS EE 81
The principal, staff, and students of Maple Ridge High School staged several extracurricular programmes to acquaint the public with the new school. These events were
well received, over 1,200 people attending " open house."
Two in-service courses were given and appreciated.
The culmination of an activity known as Mission School Forest should be recorded.
A committee was representation from many interested groups has set aside an area within
the municipal forest for school use. Classes will go there to observe species, growth,
and particularly study methods of conservation.
On May 17th, 1955, the first unit of a new Websters Corners School, School District
No. 42 (Maple Ridge), was opened. The unit has two classrooms, administrative centre,
and activity-room, and is connected to an adjoining two classrooms.
In June, 1955, trustees and high-school staff gathered in Mission High School to
Honour Mr. H. L. Manzer on his retirement. He has served the district as teacher,
vice-principal, and principal through many years of loyal service.
It is with regret that the sudden passing on February, 1955, of Miss H. Howse is
recorded. Miss Howse was a teacher in the richest sense of the word. Her little one-
room school at McConnell Creek was a joy to visit.
In preparation for the work of the new school-year, School District No. 42 (Maple
Ridge) has provided for a relieving teacher. This appointment will be a great help to
principals as their duties increase in this expanding district. In School District No. 75
(Mission) provision has been made for the appointment of a teacher-consultant to begin
in September. The appointment will bring help to beginning teachers and exchange
ideas with the more experienced teachers in smaller schools.
Shortly after the close of school, Mr. K. F. Alexander, principal of Mission Junior-
Senior High School, received an appointment to the staff of Inspectors. The Board
appointed Mr. J. A. Thomas, of Castlegar, to succeed him.
Again, my thanks to teachers, trustees, secretary-treasurers, and health-unit officials
for the help so generously given me in this past year.
School Districts No. 12 (Grand Forks), No. 13 (Kettle Valley),
and No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
REPORT OF C. E. CLAY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The past year has been another one of steady progress. Throughout the year
special attention was given in all schools to the fundamentals in arithmetic. Regular
tests were administered throughout the entire inspectorate to Grades VII to XII. All
other subjects received full attention.
A most successful workshop on remedial reading was held at Osoyoos on Friday
evening, November 5th, and all day Saturday, November 6th, under Mr. J. Sutherland,
of Magee High School, Vancouver. Some forty teachers from different grades participated, and all were very pleased with the benefits and the help they received.
In School District No. 12 (Grand Forks) the schools were fully staffed and all
teachers were certificated. The standard of work maintained is high, and good progress
is being made by all pupils. For the past several years the high school has done very
well with its drama programme, and this year one of the members, Lawrence Fofonoff,
was awarded a drama scholarship at Summer School.
In School District No. 13 (Kettle Valley) one school at Westbridge was closed due
to lack of proper accommodation, both for the pupils and for a teacher. Pupils from
this school were transported to Kettle Valley and Midway.    By transporting these pupils EE 82 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
the Grade IX and X pupils in the area were given the opportunity of attending the
Midway Superior School rather than having to leave home to enrol in these grades. This
district has shown considerable growth and more accommodation is required at Kettle
Valley and Midway, while at Greenwood an additional eighty-seven pupils who formerly
attended Sacred Heart Convent increased the numbers at the elementary-high school
there to such an extent that it was necessary to open two temporary classrooms in an old
building. A by-law has been prepared and will be submitted to the ratepayers in August
to provide the necessary extra accommodations throughout the district.
In School District No. 14 a by-law was carried providing for the construction of
a gymnasium, Industrial Arts shop, Home Economics laboratory, and four classrooms
at Osoyoos, to make the school there an elementary-junior high, thus avoiding the need
to transport the Grade IX pupils to Oliver for the regular classes and the Grades VII
and VIII pupils to the same place for Home Economics and Industrial Arts. The contract for this has been let, and it is hoped that the building will be completed by school
opening in September. All schools in this area were fully staffed, and here, too, good
progress has been made.
Mr. C. E. Ritchie, principal of the Southern Okanagan Junior-Senior High School
for many years, has been appointed to the inspectoral staff. Both he and his wife have
been held in very high esteem in this district, and they will both be greatly missed.
However, he will bring to his new field the same high standards and principles that he
held in his former position.
The introduction of the new finance formula has met with the approval of all the
Boards.
Conferences with the public health authorities and the principals have been held in
all districts, and once again I would like to express my appreciation to the members of
the Department of Health and Welfare, to the secretaries, and to the School Board
members for their co-operation throughout the year.
School Districts No. 69 (Qualicum), No. 70 (Alberni), No. 79 (Ucluelet-Tofino),
and Unattached School Districts at Bamfield, Esperanza, Kyuquot, Muchalat,
R.C.A.F. Station (Tofino), Sarita River, Sydney Inlet, Tahsis River, and
Zeballos.
REPORT OF H. C. FERGUSON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
It is with a sense of deep gratification that one looks back over the 1954-55 school-
year because of the very considerable achievements that have been made in the fields
of school accommodation and of educational progress.
School District No. 69 (Qualicum)
The energies of this Board were largely directed toward the completion of the
building programme authorized by the ratepayers during the previous year. The new
classroom at Nanoose was completed and occupied early in the term. Work progressed
well on the addition to the Qualicum Beach Junior-Senior High School, and this accommodation was made available during the spring term. Simultaneously, numerous smaller
jobs were completed. The additionardassroom at French Creek was available for school
opening. Contracts were let for the addition at Parksville Junior High School and for
the new one-room schools at Bowser and Home Lake. By the end of the school-year,
work was well advanced on these buildings. With the completion of this programme
this district should be able to handle normal school enrolments for some time to come.
A word of commendation should be said to the members of this Board for their foresight REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS EE 83
and untiring efforts to provide the best possible educational facilities within the limits of
their budget.
School District No. 70 (Alberni)
The most important project carried out by this Board was the finalization of preliminary steps in the preparation of its by-law and the successful passing of this new
million-dollar building programme late in the spring term. Increased industrial expansion in the Albernis is attracting many new settlers, and the need for additional classrooms is becoming very urgent. The architectural firm of Carter & Nairne has been
charged with the responsibility of preparing the detailed plans and specifications for the
major building projects. By the end of the school-year the plans for at least one school
were well advanced. The Board plans to concentrate on the completion of elementary
classrooms in the hope that it may forestall the need for a shift system in these schools.
Since the number of elementary classrooms called for in the budget is based on the needs
of the forseeable future, it is likely that some of this accommodation will be made available to the Grades VII and VIII classes until the new junior high school can be completed. The maintenance crew in this district does a very commendable job, and to it
has been entrusted the completion of minor items in the building programme. The
work of preparing and presenting a building by-law in a district of this size is a major
undertaking. The Board members deserve considerable credit for the time and energy
they devoted to the project and for the fine response of the ratepayers.
School District No. 79 (Ucluelet-Tofino)
This year has been devoted to a consolidation of recent gains. For the most part
the Board has concerned itself with maintenance projects, teacher accommodation, and
ground improvements. School enrolment in this district has shown a steady increase in
the past few years, and it will not be long before more elementary classrooms and increased
shop accommodation will have to be provided. The Board members are to be commended for their interest in school affairs and for the considerable improvement they
have made in both school accommodation and facilities.
Unattached School Districts
For the most part these isolated areas were singularly fortunate in obtaining or
maintaining fully qualified and experienced staff. School population at Kyuquot showed
a considerable increase. A new school dock was built at this point and a covered play
area is to be provided during the summer. Enrolment at Zeballos fell off rather sharply.
Sufficient pupils were in attendance to warrant a staff of two teachers, and the work of
the school progressed smoothly and efficiently during the year. At Esperanza a serious
situation of overcrowding during the fall term resulted from enrolling pupils from outside areas. This situation was quickly righted, and good work was done for the remaining part of the school-year. Increasing enrolment at Tahsis River made it necessary to
provide funds for an additional classroom. Through the continued co-operation of the
Tahsis Company, plans and specifications were prepared. At term's end, work was
ready to start on the installation of a new heating plant and the construction of the additional room. The one-room school at Muchalat was removed to Gold River early in
the new year. School work was interrupted for approximately six weeks during this
period. Through the work of pupils, parents, and teacher the effect of the loss of school
time was reduced to a minimum. At Sydney Inlet the one-room school continued to
give good service under its able teacher. For the first time a school was operated for
Grades I to VI at the R.C.A.F. station (Tofino). This was a welcome move as it
enabled the younger children to attend their own local school instead of having to be
transported 14 miles to Ucluelet. Pupils in Grades VII to XII from this school district
continued to go to the Ucluelet Elementary-Senior High School.    Increased enrolment EE 84 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
at Sarita River made it necessary to give consideration to the construction of a new
two-room building. Early in the new term, plans were well under way for this additional
accommodation. Through the co-operation of the MacMillan & Bloedel Company the
recreation hall at Kildonan was moved to Sarita River and by the term's end a good
start had been made in converting this building to the needed school accommodation.
At Bamfield the three-room superior school continues to serve its community well.
In all these more or less isolated areas the work of local Boards of School Trustees,
official trustees, and competent staff is having a very beneficial effect on each community.
The ready co-operation and friendly understanding of the residents minimize the effects
of isolation and assist greatly in making possible a good educational programme for their
children.
General
The 183 teachers staffing the schools of this inspectorate gave a very good account
of themselves during the year. Some excellent work was done at almost every grade
level and in nearly every subject-matter filed. The year was characterized by a minimum of problems arising from poor community-teacher-pupil relationships. Principals
and teachers did a good job of keeping the public informed of the work of the schools.
The many parent-teacher organizations worked harmoniously and efficiently in school
and community. The co-operation and help of representatives of the Department of
Health and Welfare did much to advance the work of the schools.
During the year regular principals' meetings were held. Monthly bulletins were
prepared and sent to all schools. A district-wide testing programme to supplement that
given by the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research was completed. Two meetings
of grade teachers in each grade from one to six were held during the spring term. These
meetings took the form of workshops on specific problems or subject-matter content and
combined professional advancement with a social evening. The attendance at all meetings was almost 100 per cent in spite of the considerable distances some teachers had to
travel. All schools were visited as frequently as possible during the year. In the spring
terms, reports were written on a good percentage of learning situations. The work of
inspection was completed with visits to the Indian day-schools at Ucluelet, Ahousat,
Nootka, and Kyuquot. Although the working and living conditions for teachers in these
schools equals and frequently surpasses those in neighbouring Provincial schools, much
of the effectiveness of these educational institutions is lost because of the lack of continuity of good instruction.
In May it was my privilege to attend the C. E. A. Kellogg, University of Alberta,
Short Course. This experience was most worth while, and I feel deeply indebted to the
Department for the opportunity of participating in this in-service training.
In conclusion I wish to express to the officials of the Department of Education at
Victoria, to the Boards of School Trustees and their secretary-treasurers, principals and
teaching staffs my sincere thanks for the fine co-operation received throughout the year.
School Districts No. 32 (Fraser Canyon) and No. 34 (Abbotsford)
REPORT OF WILLIAM H. GRANT, B.S.A., B.Ed.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Educational affairs in this inspectorate have progressed very smoothly during this
school-year. Both districts were favoured with good staffs of teachers, and this, combined with good attendance of pupils, has resulted in satisfactory educational progress.
In both districts, Boards of School Trustees have been able to carry through their REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS EE 85
planned programmes of maintenance, repairs, new buildings, transportation, and management without undue delay and disappointment. In addition, both teachers and
trustees have had a good measure of success in working with each other, and with those
of other districts in co-ordination of efforts to improve conditions and to advance the
cause of education generally.
School District No. 32 (Fraser Canyon)
Because of dissatisfaction over the method of electing trustees, the people of Hope
have agitated for some years to have it brought into line with that used in organized
areas. Amendments to the "Public Schools Act" in 1954 and subsequent regulations
by the Department of Education made this possible for the annual election of trustees and
representatives for that year, and resulted in keener interest both with regard to the
number of candidates for office and the number of electors participating. While this
resulted in evident satisfaction to the Hope people, there were some misgivings on the
part of trustees from the rural districts. However, these have disappeared and satisfaction with the arrangement now seems general.
School enrolments have increased again this year, rising from 957 in June, 1954,
to 1,115 in June, 1955, or 16.5 per cent, due largely to increase in lumbering and highway activities. The increase in the Hope Junior-Senior High School was 12.6 per cent,
thus pushing a greater number of elementary pupils out and necessitating the renting of
another temporary classroom, in addition to the three already in use, and the utilization
of undesirable space within the main building. To overcome this condition, the Board
has completed the planning of an eight-room elementary school with activity-room, and
it is anticipated, with the continued expansion of the secondary school, that it will
eventually occupy all the space in the present building. Further accommodation for
elementary pupils is planned for the Silver Creek area, where a fine site has been obtained.
There has been a marked increase in school enrolment at Yale, requiring the abandonment of present unsuitable buildings and the erection of a new two-room building for the
coming school-year. At Boston Bar enrolment has almost exceeded the capacity of the
present building, and it may be necessary to use the old school building during the coming
year. At other centres the enrolment has increased but remains within the capacity of
the existing accommodation.
There is gradual improvement in the general physical conditions of all school buildings. This is due to the policy of the Board in bringing buildings up to and maintaining
them at a good standard. The execution of that policy has been materially assisted by
the work of the Upper Fraser Valley Health Unit and by improvement in the janitorial
service.
The district has been satisfactorily served by the school transportation service.
While the Canyon route of the Hope schools is rather a long one, requiring an early
morning start for pupils on the end of the run, all pupils have been delivered to school
in time for morning exercises. Due to the removal from the district of some pupils,
the Chaumox route had to be abandoned this year and private arrangements made for
the transportation of the balance of the pupils. The Boston Bar route has been a boon
to pupils along the Trans-Canada Highway and has brought a measure of satisfaction to
those Boston Bar parents who have hitherto been dissatisfied with having their children
cross the aerial ferry to North Bend.
The following tabulation indicates the certificate classification of teachers engaged
during the year: E-T, 1; E-C, 11; E-B, 15; S-T, 1; S-B, 8; S-A, 2; total, 38. Sickness and other causes necessitated several changes during the year, but the Board was
fortunate in securing suitable replacements. A complete testing programme was carried
out in May, using the Metropolitan and California General Achievement Tests, and the
B.C. English Usage Test.    Results of these tests were most gratifying as they indicated EE 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
not only good growth during the year, but an increase of standards above those of the
previous year.
School District No. 34 (Abbotsford)
Net increase in enrolment in the public schools of this district amounted to fifty-one
pupils, with a peak enrolment of 3,715 in October. The senior high-school enrolment
increased by thirty-eight pupils, or 9.2 per cent. Several factors operated in reducing
enrolments from what was expected. Farm-income reduction in a number of instances
caused removal of people from the district, and a greater number of pupils attended
private schools due to increased accommodation in those schools.
The outstanding feature in accommodation provision this year has been the planning
and building of a new senior high school, which will be ready for occupancy in September.
Five years ago there were forty temporary classrooms in use in the district. With the
completion of this building and the conversion of the Philip Sheffield to an elementary
building, the Board will have eliminated the last of the temporary classrooms besides
having taken care of the increased enrolment. They are to be congratulated for a
tremendous task well done.
The policy of the Board of having all maintenance work done by its own crew,
coupled with placing the responsibility for proper care of buildings on the shoulders of
principals and senior teachers, has resulted in school buildings being kept to a high
physical standard at a reasonable maintenance cost.
By its policy of placing elementary schools strategically about the district, combined
with putting the fleet of buses under the authority of a supervisor, the Board has been
able to give efficient transportation without increasing the number of buses in its fleet
over the past five years, and with an actual reduction in costs.
An analysis of certification of teachers shows the following numbers in the various
categories: E-C, 11; E-B, 65; E-A, 5; S-T, 1; S-C, 7; S-B, 40; S-A, 7; total, 136.
Seventy-six per cent of the secondary-school staffs have their basic certificates or better,
while 79 per cent of elementary staffs have the basic certificate or better.
All elementary-school and junior high-school pupils in the district were tested in
the first two weeks of May, using the Metropolitan General Achievement Tests for
Grades I to VI and the California General Achievement Tests for Grades VII to IX.
Analysis of results showed a significant upward deviation from the test norms, a distinct
improvement of standard from the previous year, and a very satisfactory year's growth.
In addition, all Grade X pupils received the British Columbia English Usage Test, which
has proved valuable as a classification measure.
In both school districts successful night-schools were operated during the year under
the management of night-school directors appointed by the Boards. These offered a wide
variety of courses, including a number under the Community Programmes Branch, and
were generally well patronized.
Thanks for the generous co-operation of the Director of the Upper Fraser Valley
Health Unit and his staff, the Social Welfare Branch, the Boards of School Trustees and
their secretary-treasurers are again gratefully extended this year. To the teaching staffs
of both districts I wish to express my high appreciation for their constant and conscientious assistance in improving instruction in these districts. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS EE 87
School Districts No. 33 (Chilliwack) and No. 76 (Agassiz)
REPORT OF S. J. GRAHAM, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
During the school-year 1954-55, 5,230 pupils were enrolled in the two school
districts comprising this inspectorate, with a staff of 183 teachers employed. In addition, for inspection purposes, there were four teachers employed for the Sapper Apprentice School at Camp Chilliwack and five teachers employed by the Federal Government
in Indian day-schools, making a total of 192 teachers in the inspectorate.
The calibre of the teaching staff continued at a high level, and this has been reflected
in an excellent level of achievement throughout the school systems.
Particularly gratifying has been the continued improvement in the Agassiz schools
under the direction of the senior principal, Mr. W. S. Duncan. An indication of the
effectiveness of the work being carried on in Agassiz was the doubling in size of the
Grade XII class this year.
The schools in District No. 33 (Chilliwack) enjoyed another excellent year. A noteworthy feature of the schools organization was the very fine group of young Normal
School graduates who came into the district in September. The effectiveness of the work
done by these young people is a credit to our Normal Schools and to the high schools of
the Province from which they graduated.
Recognition of the leadership shown in the Chilliwack Senior High School was
given by the Department of Education by the appointment of Mr. B. H. Harford, principal of the school, to the staff of School Inspectors, and the request for a leave of absence
for Mr. P. G. Penner, senior English teacher, to join the staff of the Vancouver Normal
School.
The end of the school-year marked the retirement of Mr. W. E. Chidlow as secretary-treasurer of School District No. 33. Mr. Chidlow has served the Chilliwack schools
for twenty-three years, and his contribution to the development of the schools in this
area is much appreciated by everyone.
Mention has been made in past reports on this inspectorate of the work done along
academic lines in the Sapper Apprentice School at Camp Chilliwack. The first group
of students was graduated in February of this year. The occasion was marked by a
full-dress parade witnessed by many citizens of the community. The young men graduating from this school are a credit to the staff of civilian teachers as well as to the Army
instructors.
School Districts No. 15 (Penticton), No. 16 (Keremeos),
and No. 17  (Princeton)
REPORT OF E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.P/ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The continuing growth in these districts was reflected in the increase to 146 teachers
during this past year. A school referendum was passed with excellent public support
in Penticton, and the construction of a new eight-classroom school is being completed
for use in September. The Penticton School Board has also purchased property in the
southern portion of the city for a future elementary school. These are effective steps in
reducing the centralization and in bringing the elementary classrooms nearer the homes.
Both the Princeton and Keremeos Boards have added classrooms during the year.
The Princeton addition provided two excellent rooms for Science and Art. The Keremeos
Board has added two classrooms to the Cawston Elementary School.
It is with regret that the closing of the Nickel Plate Mine School is reported. The
mine has been in operation almost continuously for fifty years, and for more than twenty EE 88 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
of these years it has been operated by the Kelowna Exploration Company. During
these years the company has set a standard for co-operation with school authorities that
will be difficult to exceed. The closing of this property will be a serious loss to the
district in every way.
The in-service training programme in this district was very successful this year.
A curriculum committee of elementary teachers with Mr. David Tully as chairman made
recommendations on the selection of a language text for the intermediate grades. Miss
Grace d'Aoust organized a popular review class in French for those teachers who intended
to proceed to second year of university French. Course No. 52, History and Development of Education in British Columbia, was given as an afternoon class for Summer
School credit. Twenty-one teachers with representation from each district attended the
classes. The periodic meetings of elementary principals have brought together the
varied experiences from different-sized schools and some uniformity in administrative
practices within the district. It has been pleasing to observe the growth of professional
interest in in-service training both among the teachers as well as among the administrators.
A co-operative type of testing programme was emphasized during the year. Monthly
Arithmetic Drill Tests were given at the Grade VIII level. These were administered and
marked by the teachers, and this office prepared monthly class, school, and district norms.
A monthly Grade V paragraph assignment was given all the classes under standard
conditions. These were marked in this office and a monthly report was sent to all teachers.
Some very marked improvements followed the year-long effort. At the Grade VI level
all pupils were examined by the two forms of the British Columbia Fundamentals Tests
at a six-month interval. These were given at the request of the Grade VI teachers and
were teacher administered and marked. Class, school, and district norms were computed
in this office. The schools, by mutual consent, gave the California Battery Achievement
Test at the Grades V and VI levels and submitted their scores for compilation into district
norms. A Spelling Test was given to all Grade IX pupils and the Chief Inspector's
Grammar Test was given at the Grades VII and VIII levels. An attempt was made to
provide the results speedily on all tests, and excellent co-operation was experienced from
the teachers.
The winner for District No. 2 University Entrance Scholarship for this year is Alvin
Edward Neumeyer, from the Similkameen Junior-Senior High School. It is pleasing to
see a smaller high school preparing candidates so well.
The administrative affairs of these school districts have functioned well during this
past year. The resignation of Mr. James Metzler as secretary-treasurer of the Princeton
Board was a severe loss to that district. The establishment of an executive committee
to save time and labours of the Penticton Board members and to carry out the policy of
the Board appears to be working well. Teacher-Board relations and, indeed, the whole
public relations of the school organizations have been good in this area.
School personnel and the public have been deeply saddened by the tragic passing
of Mrs. Irene Burtch. Mrs. Burtch has been not only an able trustee for Penticton, but
also a strong supporter and worker for all activities of young people. She has been an
inspiration for many and will long be missed.
Once again I wish to express my gratitude for the many kindnesses and courtesies
that have come my way from the teachers, the School Boards, and the secretary-treasurers.
I consider myself especially fortunate in these districts, where such support and encouragement are provided. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS EE 89
School Districts No. 59 (Peace River South), No. 60 (Peace River North), No. 81
(Fort Nelson), and Unattached School Districts at Atlin, Camp Mile 163,
Camp Mile 456, Cassiar, Lower Post, Fort Nelson Airport, and Telegraph
Creek.
REPORT OF FLOYD L. IRWIN, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate, which includes the extreme north and the north-east corner of
the Province, continues to show a steady growth in population. It is staffed by 169
teachers in a total of sixty-three schools.
The supervision of this area was shared by Inspector of Schools Frank Orme, who
spent a total of thirteen weeks in the district, and whose able assistance was very much
appreciated.
School District No. 59 (Peace River South)
In Dawson Creek a second elementary school of ten divisions was organized and
operated in temporary quarters. The new school, the Grandview Elementary, is under
construction and will be occupied in September. Progress on a new junior high school
is being made, and it is expected construction may commence this fall.
The building of new homes is going on at a rapid pace. Industrial and Government
building projects and road-building are attracting many families to the area. The resultant increase in school enrolment is being adequately provided by the school district.
School District No. 60 (Peace River North)
The new North Peace Junior-Senior High School was occupied in September, 1954,
and provided ample accommodation for all departments of the school. It was formally
opened on November 24th by Mr. G. W. Graham, Director of Administration, who
represented the Deputy Minister and Superintendent, Dr. H. L. Campbell.
The continuing shortage of properly qualified teachers made it necessary to employ
eight inadequately certified teachers.
Better schools were provided for the Murdale and Rose Prairie areas.
School District No. 81 (Fort Nelson)
This new school district was created this spring and will include the schools at
Camp Mile 300, Fort Nelson (River), Mile 295, and the R.C.A.F. station. This consolidation will soon permit the establishment of adequate secondary educational facilities.
The growing importance of this centre on the Alaska Highway as a gateway to the north
and north-east of the Province and for its own potential natural resources point to rapid
development. The establishment of a School Board will enable the district more easily
to keep pace in school development.
Unattached Schools (Alaska Highway)
These schools continued in normal operation. A new two-room school and double
teacherage are planned for Cassiar, and it is expected they will be occupied during next
school term.
General
A rather extensive general testing programme was conducted throughout the year,
which emphasized arithmetic fundamentals and general subjects at the Grade VII level.
It is gratifying to note the general rise in mastery of arithmetic fundamentals throughout
the area.
In conclusion I wish to express my appreciation for the co-operation extended to
me by School Boards, secretary-treasurers, official trustees, area representatives, principals, and teachers. EE 90 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
School Districts No. 1 (Fernie), No. 2 (Cranbrook), No. 3 (Kimberley),
No. 4 (Windermere), and No. 18 (Golden)
REPORT OF I. H. R. JEFFERY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The inspectorate temporarily comprises two former inspectorates with centres at
Cranbrook and Kimberley. The included school districts are the two large rural school
districts of No. 4 (Windermere) and No. 18 (Golden) with the large municipal school
districts of No. 1 (Fernie), No. 2 (Cranbrook), and No. 3 (Kimberley).
Mr. Eric J. Dunn was assigned to the enlarged inspectorate for the year as Assisting
Inspector of Schools. I wish to commend Mr. Dunn for his diligence, excellent cooperation, and effective help during the past year.
The problems of school-population increase and school-building need have continued to present themselves in each of the five school districts.
In May the Honourable the Minister of Education, Mr. R. G. Williston, accompanied by Chief Inspector F. P. Levirs, officially opened two new school structures in
Fernie School District—Sparwood Junior-Senior High School and the addition to Fernie
Elementary-Senior High School. Attention was soon directed to secondary-education
facility needs in the southern section of the district.
In Cranbrook School District a successful April referendum will permit the building
of a seven teaching-unit wing to the Mount Baker Junior-Senior High School. Unfortunate delay might necessitate the use of shift classes next school-year. Plans are being
made for elementary-school accommodation requirements at Cranbrook and Yahk.
In Kimberley School District a successful December referendum will permit the
building of additions to Marysville Elementary School and Blarchmont Elementary
School and the erection of a new senior high school.
In Windermere a November school-construction referendum was defeated by a
small margin. Plans are under way for a second referendum under a revised plan that
involves a change from secondary-school centralization to decentralization at Edgewater,
Invermere, and Canal Flats. Consideration will be given to needed accommodation at
Radium, Windermere, Edgewater, Invermere, and Canal Flats.
In October the Assistant Deputy Minister, Mr. J. F. K. English, officially opened
two school structures in Golden School District—the Columbia Valley Elementary-
Senior High School at Parson and the Golden Junior-Senior High School addition. The
Board commenced plans for a three-room addition for Golden Elementary-Senior High
School and a one-room addition at Columbia Valley Elementary-Senior High School.
The grade extension at Field this year to include Grades XI and XII in a purchased
adjoining building has completed the provision of secondary-school education centres
for all populated parts of the school district.
The testing programme conducted by the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research
was supplemented by a minimum district standardized programme as a teaching aid.
University Entrance and terminal-course mid-year examinations were again successfully
planned and administered by the East Kootenay principals and their teachers in excellent
co-operation with the Inspectors.
Four valuable East Kootenay Administrative Council meetings were held in superior
co-operation and participation with the Inspectors.
In all five school districts, School Boards give generously of their time and effort
in a constant educational development for adults as well as regular school pupils. The
principals and teachers are to be commended for their improving qualifications and professional calibre. The reasonably small turnover of teachers indicates a good educational climate. The whole-hearted guidance of the Department personnel at Victoria is
appreciated. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS EE 91
School Districts No. 63 (Saanich) and No. 64 (Saltspring)
REPORT OF HAROLD P. JOHNS, Ph.D., INSPECTOR
During the  school-year  1954-55  a number  of developments  of some interest
occurred in School District No. 63 (Saanich).   These can be summarized as follows: —
(1) A " terminal class " was established for the district to serve students of
secondary-school age with learning difficulties. An " opportunity class,"
begun the previous year and serving the elementary grades, was continued.
(2) A professional testing committee for the district was organized and met
frequently throughout the year. Composed of experienced teachers from
elementary and secondary schools, it was charged with developing a
co-ordinated testing programme for the entire district. It made a distinct
contribution to the educational progress in the district.
(3) A similar committee dealing with audio-visual teaching aids was set up
late in the term. It, too, gives promise of becoming an important asset
to the district.
(4) In many respects the most unusual development, in that it involved every
elementary-school principal and teacher, was the self-survey of Educational Supplies and Equipment. The degree of co-operation and enthusiasm exhibited by the staff in a programme that took much of their
personal time and continued throughout the entire school-year is deserving
of high commendation. The value of the survey as an in-service training
device was considerable.
(5) Regular meetings of principals were held. These were fruitful in the
number of practical suggestions which they furnished.
(6) Faced with the problem of added school requirements, the Board of School
Trustees took the unique step of inviting the Capital Region Planning
Board to make a thorough survey of the district and its needs from a professional town-planning point of view. The report of Mr. Brahm Wiseman, the Planning Board's director, was received in June.
In School District No. 64 (Saltspring) good academic progress was noted.    The
major change in this area was the establishment of Galiano School as a superior school.
School Districts No. 56 (Vanderhoof), No. 57 (Prince George),
and No. 58 (McBride)
REPORT OF G. E. JOHNSON, B.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment, staff, and schools as at June 30th, 1955, were as follows:—
District
Number of
Pupils
Number of
Schools
Number of
Teachers
No. 56 (Vanderhoof)	
727
3,385
516
7
37
10
130
No. 58 (McBride)      	
24
Totals                                    	
4,628
54
Staffing of the schools continued to be a problem in this inspectorate. It was particularly difficult to find adequately qualified teachers at the secondary level. As the
table below indicates, only about one-half of the high-school teachers had secondary EE 92
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
qualifications. This is an alarming situation and is having its effect on the standard of
work accomplished in the secondary schools. Certification of teaching staff was as
follows:—
Teacher Certification
S-A
S-B
s-c
S-T
E-A
E-B
E-C
E-T
Total
Secondary      .          	
6
20
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
12
81
6
31
3
12
53
128
Totals-
6
21
2
4
3       1       93
37
15
181
School District No. 56 (Vanderhoof)
The school-year just completed was marked by the opening of a new classroom at
Fraser Lake, a two-room school at Fort St. James, and a junior-senior high-school plant
at Vanderhoof. In June the two last-named schools were officially opened by the
Honourable R. G. Williston, Minister of Education.
In addition to the above, new teacherages were completed and occupied at Mapes,
Fraser Lake, Fort Fraser, and Fort St. James.
A high-school dormitory at Vanderhoof was completed during the year and will
commence operation in September, 1955.
A new Board office administration building is included in the plans of the district
and should be ready for occupancy in the fall of 1955.
This has been a busy building year for the relatively small school district and good
progress has been made.
School District No. 57 (Prince George)
This school district continues to expand at a very rapid rate. Shortage of classroom
space was felt particularly in the City of Prince George, where continued use had to be
made of a shift system in order to accommodate all pupils. New schools are presently
under construction as a result of ratepayers' approval in December, 1954, to million-
dollar building programme. All indications are that it will be necessary to seek early
approval for another large expenditure for school buildings.
The rapid growth of the school district is reflected in the following table:—
School units..
Classrooms—
Pupils	
Teachers	
June,
June 19,
1946
1955
24
37
44
118
1,177
3,385
50
130
Per Cent
54
168
188
160
The dormitory in Prince George continues to serve the needs of pupils from outlying
districts. That the dormitory is proving its worth is evidenced in the better average
achievement made by the dormitory students as compared to the averages for the school
as a whole.
The shortage of qualified teachers in nearly all subject fields is severely handicapping
the secondary school in this area. Despite this, a fairly wide offering of courses has
been made available. Next year, plans call for the introduction of a course in Forestry
to suit the particular needs of this part of the Province.
Commencing in September, 1955, the secondary school wiU be divided into separate
junior and senior high schools. This should ease the administrative and supervisory
problems faced by the school principals. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
EE 93
To assist the teachers in the elementary and rural schools, a teacher-consultant has
been engaged for the school-year commencing September, 1955.
School District No. 58 (McBride)
School District No. 58 faces the same problems as the other districts. A referendum
to provide a new dormitory in McBride and a four-room addition to the McBride Junior-
Senior High School received approval in March. Construction will commence during
the summer of 1955.
A new school will likely be established in September, 1955, at Lucerne in the
Canadian Rockies, 20 miles west of Jasper, Alta.
It has not been possible to secure fully qualified teachers for the more isolated areas
in this district. In order to make teaching conditions more attractive, the Board has
constructed very good teacherages at Dome Creek, Dunster, and Valemount.
General
Rural schools in the area continued to be served with reference material and recreational reading through the Prince George Branch of the Public Library Commission.
With the expanding school population there is an ever-increasing need for more books,
and the resources of the Commission have been taxed to the utmost.
A regular testing programme was carried out in each district. Good progress was
shown in most schools in the handling of arithmetic fundamentals.
A very worth-while conference of Inspectors and principals from this and surrounding areas was held during the year at Peace River. It is planned to make these
meetings yearly events.
Mr. F. Orme, newly appointed Inspector of Schools, gave valuable assistance in this
area during a part of the school-year.
School Districts No. 49 (Ocean Falls), No. 51 (Portland Canal), No. 52 (Prince
Rupert), No. 80 (Kitimat), Unattached School Districts of Butedale and
Tulsequah, Kemano, and Indian Day-schools of the Skeena and Bella Coola
Agencies.
REPORT OF A. D. JONES, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 49 (Ocean Falls)
This is a far-flung district considerably in excess of 9,000 square miles. Its northern border converges upon Tweedsmuir Park and its eastern and southern boundaries
are firmly entrenched in the Pacific Coastal Range along the fiords of Dean Channel and
Smith Inlet in the south. The greatest concentration of schools outside of Ocean Falls
is located in the Bella Coola Valley on the North Bentinck Arm. Bella Coola Elementary School is located in the centre of the Bella Coola Townsite. This school is new
and well appointed, having five classrooms with an activity-room and modern accommodation for five teachers. Two classrooms and the activity-room were added during
the current year.
Sir Alexander Mackenzie Elementary-High School is situated 12 miles farther up
the valley (east) at Hagensborg. The school is large and attractive, but accommodation
is becoming overcrowded and additional classrooms with boys' and girls' shower-rooms
are now in process of planning.
Firvale School is positioned 28 miles east of Hagensborg. This is a one-room school
with a small teacherage attached.   During the year the Board officially opened a new EE 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
one-room school at the head of South Bentinck Arm. The School Board has given much
time and planning to improve educational facilities within the Bella Coola Valley comprising Ocean Falls East
Ocean Falls West lies on the fringe of the Pacific Ocean. Bella Bella is a one-room
school located on Denny Island directly opposite the large Indian day-school at New
Bella Bella.   The one-room Shearwater School is a close neighbour.
Namu School, with two rooms, enrols pupils from Grades I to X. It is ideally
situated on a high prominence looking directly on to Fitzhugh Sound.
Avalon School, under the patronage of the Board, lies in the far south in Takush
Harbour on Smith Inlet.
The parent area at Ocean Falls is served by Charleson School. This is an elementary-high school with a staff of twenty-two teachers and an enrolment in excess of 500
pupils. Excellent kindergarten facilities and tutelage are provided. A new elementary-
school replacement has required a major building programme and will provide a completely modern school in the coming year.
School District No. 51 (Portland Canal)
This district operates a three-room superior school at Stewart and an ungraded
school at Torbrit Mines on Alice Arm. Increased logging operations in the Stewart
area caused a noticeable gain in the school's enrolment. The Board completed substantial improvements to the school plant during the year. Plans for the coming year include
the erection of suitable teacherages.
School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)
The enrolment at Booth Memorial Junior-Senior High School increased as forecast,
passing the 700 mark. Classroom accommodation in this school is now taxed to capacity. The Board embarked on its third major building programme of recent years.
Foundations for the replacement of the Borden Street School were laid on Roosevelt
Park site. With the completion of this building, Prince Rupert and district will be served
by four attractive and well-planned elementary schools. The Board continued its sound
policy of maintenance and improvement of its facilities. Additional area was obtained
to augment Conrad School's restricted playground space and to serve this rapidly expanding residential section. Increased locker accommodation was installed in the high school.
A maintenance foreman was appointed, and the Board gave its thoughtful attention to
administration details affecting educative policy within its schools.
School District No. 80 (Kitimat)
Tremendous growth was the main feature of the Kitimat Elementary-High School
throughout the year, the number enrolled increasing from 132 in June, 1954, to 411 in
June, 1955. Fortunately the Board had estimated correctly the growth which would
take place and had made adequate provision in terms of teachers and facilities. Accordingly a sound education programme was maintained, though the year did not pass without several moments of near-crisis. The teaching staff was of high calibre, and it appeared that the Board, by virtue of its circumstances and of its policy, was favourably
< placed at that stage in the expansion of Kitimat to implement one of its primary objectives, namely, to recruit and retain a competent teaching staff which would give quality
and continuity to education in its schools.
Throughout the year the principal problem occupying the attention of the Board
was one of expansion in future years. This problem was simplified by the fact that development in the residential townsite would take place in accordance with a master plan,
which integrated subdivision and building with all other aspects of suburban life. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS EE 95
As the school-year drew to a close, the Board had substantially completed recruitment of teachers for a threefold expansion of its teaching staff for the ensuing school-
year, and had a fourteen-room elementary school approaching completion, an eight-
room elementary school and ten temporary portable units in the early stages of construction, the first part of a large high-school approaching completion on the architects'
drawing-boards, and other schools in the early planning stages.
Ungraded schools were in session at Butedale and at Tulsequah on Taku Inlet,
north of Juneau. At Kemano a two-room private school provided educational facilities
for the children of Alcan employees.
The Indian day-schools connected with this inspectorate extend north along the
Nass River into the Pacific archipelago, and are established at eastern reaches of the
Douglas Channel and North Bentinck Arm. This Department received the complete
co-operation of the Indian Agencies and its several Federal supervisors.
School Districts No. 24 (Kamloops), No. 25 (Barriere), No. 26 (Birch Island),
No. 29 (Lillooet), No. 30 (South Cariboo), and No. 31 (Merritt)
REPORT OF E. MARRIOTT, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Staff changes during the summer of 1954 resulted in the transfer of Mr. F. A.
McLellan, Inspector of Schools for School Districts No. 25 (Barriere), No. 26 (Birch
Island), No. 29 (Lillooet), and No. 30 (South Cariboo) for the past six years, to an
inspectorate on Vancouver Island. The four districts were combined with School Districts No. 24 (Kamloops) and No. 31 (Merritt) temporarily into one inspectorate.
Mr. D. G. Chamberlain, former principal of the Rossland Junior-Senior High School,
was assigned to assist me with this enlarged area. The inspectorate covered forty-two
one-room schools, six Indian day-schools, four large graded elementary schools, nine
elementary-high schools, and one large junior-senior high school of forty-five teachers.
The six school districts included in the inspectorate varied considerably in pupil
enrolment and the number of teachers employed. Nevertheless, there were many problems in common in that all school districts were faced with the need for additional accommodation, with increasing demands for transportation, and with the problem of securing
qualified teacher replacements.
The Boards of School Trustees proved most sincere and untiring in their efforts in
providing good facilities and in maintaining a high standard of educational service for
their respective areas. The secretary-treasurers, the principals, and the 256 teachers
which formed the total teaching staff of the districts, gave conscientious and commendable service in their respective positions.
While the turnover in teaching staff was large, the School Board personnel and
administrative staff remained reasonably stable. A few changes are of note. The past
year saw the resignation of Mr. G. Slater, Chairman and Board member for twenty-five
years in the Kamloops District. Two secretary-treasurers, after many years of service
with their districts, resigned during the past year—Mr. H. G. Hooper, of Merritt, and
Mrs. E. Schwarz, of Ashcroft. School District No. 24 suffered a loss in the passing of
Joseph Dilworth, principal of the North Kamloops School, at the age of sixty-four, after
thirty-four years' service in the teaching profession.
School District No. 24 (Kamloops)
This district employed 137 teachers for thirty schools and an enrolment of 3,703
students.    The school-enrolment growth continued to exceed provision of new class- EE 96 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
rooms, resulting in utilization of temporary accommodation, over-large classes, and
classes on shift. Several new schools, providing eighteen elementary classrooms, were
commenced during the past year, and the completion of these was anticipated by September, 1955. Relief to the present overcrowding at the secondary level is anticipated
on completion of the new North Kamloops Junior-Senior High School.
School District No. 25 (Barriere)
A pattern of gradual but constant enrolment growth continues in this district. A new
division was added to the district's consolidated elementary-high school, entailing the
construction of a one-classroom addition.
A noticeable improvement in the ability to procure satisfactory teachers to staff the
elementary schools was evidenced.
School District No. 26 (Birch Island)
Increase in enrolment during the past year necessitated a further building by-law,
which was approved by the ratepayers in June, 1955. Plans are progressing rapidly for
the building of a new four-room elementary school at Clearwater, a new two-room school
at Birch Island, and improved teacherage accommodation in several rural centres.
School District No. 29 (Lillooet)
The school-year 1954-55 was marked by continuation of the steady growth and
development of the past years. The completion of the six-room elementary school and
modern rural school at Devine helped the overcrowding at those points.
The work on the two-room addition of the high school and alterations and additions to the elementary school at Bralorne will nearly complete the building programme.
Plans for a teacherage at Bralorne and Devine are under way.
The purchase of a School Board office building has helped administration, and
plans are under way for a board-room addition and public health office.
The visit of the Honourable R. G. Williston to officially open our new schools was
made in May and marked a " high spot " for the year.
School District No. 30 (Cariboo South)
Enrolment increases at Lytton, Ashcroft, and Clinton have presented a problem
in all three centres during the past year. Plans are proceeding for the provision of additional accommodation which will provide better special-room facilities for the secondary
level and much-needed gymnasiums for these growing centres.
School District No. 31 (Merritt)
The successful passing in October, 1954, of the first school by-law since the formation
of the larger school district in 1946 has permitted the Board to proceed with the construction of a new modern junior-senior high school for the centre of Merritt. Completion of this school in the fall of 1955 will provide shops, gymnasium, library, and
other special facilities necessary for a broadened secondary programme equal to other
towns of a comparable size.
General
Educationally the area maintained a satisfactory standard. Increasing demands on
the principals' time did not prevent several successful meetings of the principals, vice-
principals, and counsellors of the larger schools during the past year. Their interest
and concern with the many problems of the improvement of instruction, together with
a changing attitude of the teachers toward positive group action in raising educational
standards, indicate a praiseworthy trend toward a growing professional status of our
teaching body.
_> REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS EE 97
My appreciation to the members of the various Boards of Trustees, the secretary-
treasurers, the principals, and the teachers for their continued friendly co-operation is
gratefully acknowledged.
Acknowledgment must also be made to Mr. D. G. Chamberlain, Inspector of
Schools, for his very able assistance in all phases of the administrative and inspectorial
responsibilities of this inspectorate during the past year.
School Districts No. 23 (Kelowna) and No. 77 (Summerland)
REPORT OF A. S. MATHESON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
In this inspectorate the school-year 1954-55 included little of the spectacular. It
has been, however, a year of normal progress and of consistent hard work on the part
of all those engaged in teaching and in directing the educational programmes of the 5,301
pupils enrolled in the public schools of the two districts under review.
Staffing with fully qualified teachers continued to be difficult in some departments
of the secondary schools. However, all positions were filled before the reopening in
September. Of the 188 teachers employed, ninety-two teach in elementary schools and
ninety-six in secondary schools. All of those in the elementary schools and eighty of
the ninety-six in secondary schools are fully qualified for the positions they hold. The
remaining sixteen teachers in secondary-school positions hold elementary-school certificates and either partial training as specialists or are proceeding, by Summer School
work, to university degrees. The major subjects taught by those not fully qualified for
secondary-school positions are: Physical Education, 6; Industrial Arts, 2; Home Economics, 2; Music, 1; Art, 1; and general subjects at the junior high-school level, 4.
In view of the apparent adequacy of supply, possibly the approaching oversupply, of
teachers at the elementary-school level, it has occurred to me that if some special inducement in the form of financial assistance for advanced training were made available to
experienced and superior elementary teachers, the needed recruits for secondary-school
work might be secured.
The counselling of teachers and the supervision of classroom work have included
continued emphasis on the fundamental skills at all levels and inspectorate-wide testing
at appropriate intervals. Both the principals and teachers have cheerfully co-operated
in this phase of the work, and definite improvement has been achieved. However, in
general, more systematic attention should be given to the diagnosis of individual pupil
weaknesses in day-to-day teaching and to the necessary reteaching and frequency of
appropriate drill.
For the past two years I have reported on our inspectorate-wide effort to implement
a three-track programme in the primary grades so that the very bright and mature pupil
can complete the prescribed work of these grades in two years, while the slow-learning
or immature pupil can be taken over the work at a slower pace and achieve reasonable
mastery in four years without the experience of non-promotion at any point. We are
satisfied that the plan is producing good results. In June of this year fifty-four pupils
who entered Grade I in September, 1952, completed, with top-quarter standing, the
work of Grade IV after having proceeded through the work of the primary grades in
two years.   As far as is now apparent, no undesirable concomitant has developed.
The following data on the individual districts are worthy of record.
School District No. 23 (Kelowna)
As compared with last year, there was an increase in enrolment of 140, giving a
total net enrolment of 4,401—1,774 in the secondary schools and 2,627 in the elementary EE 98 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
schools. The teaching staff of 157 included seventy-eight in the elementary schools and
seventy-nine in the secondary schools. In addition, Mr. Joseph Billyeald continued his
work as mental-health co-ordinator, and during his three years' experience in this field
has abundantly proved the worth of this office.
After a period of five years in which no new classroom was provided, plans were
completed for the erection of a two-teacher school on the V.L.A. development known
as Lakeview Heights, the replacement of the old, unserviceable four-classroom elementary
school at Westbank, four-classroom additions to the junior high school at Kelowna and
the George Pringle Junior-Senior High School at Westbank, the modernization of the
one-teacher Black Mountain Elementary School, the expansion of the Home Economics
accommodation at the Rutland Junior-Senior High School, and the Industrial Arts accommodation at the George Pringle Junior-Senior High School. All these projects have been
proceeded with and, with the exception of the George Pringle addition, will be ready for
use in September.
At this time it is fitting to express my appreciation of the long and faithful services
of Mr. F. T. Marriage and Mr. A. H. Hooper. Both retired on superannuation in June.
Mr. Marriage served in the Kelowna schools for twenty-nine years, and for the last nineteen was principal of the large elementary school. His ability, devotion to his work and
the welfare of the community, his kindliness and high qualities of character have won
for him an enviable place in the respect and esteem of all with whom, and for whom,
he worked.
For eighteen consecutive years Mr. Hooper served as principal of the Mission Creek
Elementary School. His faithfulness and sincerity have assured to him an enduring place
in the respect and esteem of both his pupils and the community.
School District No. 77 (Summerland)
Full consolidation has been in effect in this district for many years; all the pupils
are gathered into the MacDonald Elementary School and the junior-senior high school
at West Summerland. With an increase for the year of forty-five pupils, the net enrolment stands at 900—524 in the elementary grades and 376 in the secondary grades. The
teaching staff numbers thirty-one—fourteen in the elementary and sixteen in the secondary and one relieving teacher to provide the principals with time for supervision and
administration.
In my 1954 report I noted the need for additional classroom space in both schools.
While no building was carried out during the school-year, plans are being made to proceed with both projects in 1956.
To members of the School Boards, principals, teachers, secretary-treasurers and
their office staffs, the public health nurses and doctors, and all others who have wholeheartedly co-operated in our great task, 1 wish to express my sincere appreciation. As
the Summerland District is being removed from my inspectorate, I wish to say a special
" thank you " to the trustees and secretary-treasurer of that district for unfailing courtesy
and consideration extended to me. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS EE 99
School Districts No. 6 (Kootenay Lake), No. 7 (Nelson), No. 8 (Slocan),
and No. 11 (Trail)
report of j. j. Mckenzie, b.a., inspector of schools
For the school-year 1954-55 this inspectorate was enlarged to include School District No. 11 (Trail). This was a temporary measure for this year only. To cope with
the inspection of the increased number of teachers in all districts, two newly appointed
Inspectors of Schools, Mr. H. S. Hum, with headquarters in Nelson, and Mr. J. G. Kirk,
with headquarters in Trail, assisted with this work. As a result, more teachers were
inspected than had been possible formerly. Some difficulty was encountered in an
attempt to keep the administration of the districts and the supervision of instruction
reasonably separate. However, on the whole, the system worked satisfactorily, and the
School Boards concerned appeared well satisfied.
All schools in all districts were fully staffed during the year, although in some
instances it was necessary to use elementary teachers in secondary-school positions.
A number of meetings of the principals and vice-principals of the six school districts comprising the West Kootenay were held at various centres. This group, which
is known as the West Kootenay Administrators' Association, discussed problems relating
to the administration of schools of the area, as well as the topics of supervision, district
testing programmes, time-tables, and office procedures. The administrators of this region
are professionally minded and work together in an effort to solve some of the problems
in education which are ever-present.
Two curriculum revision committees operated in the inspectorate during the year.
A committee for the revision of junior high school Mathematics, under the chairmanship
of Mr. R. Hanna, of Trail, completed its assignment about the middle of the year, and
a committee working on the revision of Social Studies for the elementary school, under
the Chairmanship of Mr. B. B. Crawford, of Nelson, completed its assignment by the
end of the school-year. The committees spent many hours in deliberation, and it is
hoped that the results will prove satisfactory to the Department and the Central Curriculum Revision Committee.
School District No. 6 (Kootenay Lake)
Little change has taken place in this school district since the last Annual Report.
There has been no appreciable increase in school population in the district as a whole,
but a small increase in the Riondel area may necessitate one additional room next year.
During the summer vacation the Jewett School at Meadow Creek will be replaced with
a new building. The position of secretary-treasurer has changed twice during the past
year, thus causing some interruptions in this office. However, the attentiveness of the
Board Chairman to school matters helped greatly to keep the work up to date.
School District No. 7 (Nelson)
This school district continues to enjoy a steady increase in pupil enrolment. However, the incompletion of the new senior high school by September offers a much-
overcrowded situation in the existing facilities, which were taxed to the limit during the
past year. Such a condition works a hardship on both teachers and pupils. It is hoped
that the new building will be ready for occupancy by January, 1956. An increase in
enrolment in the Harold Lakes area will require one additional classroom. With the
increase in the price of base metals it is quite possible that some of the mines in this
Kootenay area may reopen during the coming year. However, this would not require
any additional construction immediately. The school population of the City of Nelson
is increasing steadily, particularly at the secondary level. Both secondary schools should
be able to take care of this increase for a few years. EE 100 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
School District No. 8 (Slocan)
School District No. 8 (Slocan) was in the unfortunate position of having a by-law
defeated twice during the past year. The by-law was to provide activity-rooms at Mount
Sentinel Junior-Senior High School and W. E. Graham Junior-Senior High School, plus
additional stage and dressing-room facilities at New Denver. Such a programme would
have completed the physical facilities in this district for many years to come. The
school population in this area remains reasonably stable. Two rural schools (Vallican
and Sandon) were closed due to insufficient enrolment, but Vallican will have to be
reopened this September.
Of special interest in this district has been the establishment of special classes for
Sons of Freedom children. This was brought about as a result of Government policy
enforcing the attendance of these children. Because of the refusal of parents to send
their children to school, many of them were prosecuted under the " Public Schools Act "
and the " Protection of Children Act." The children were placed in the New Denver
Sanatorium under the care of the Welfare Department. Classrooms were set up and
teachers hired to teach the children. It is worthy of note that these children have entered
into the spirit of school life in a normal fashion and have made good progress for the
length of time they have been at school. A continued programme, although compulsory,
should do much toward increasing the literacy of these children.
During the month of July this district suffered the loss of its Board Chairman, Mr.
E. E. Marshall, of South Slocan. Mr. Marshall, who had been Chairman of the Board
for many years, was the greatest single influence in the furtherance of education in this
district. It was largely through his efforts that progress was made in providing good
school accommodation throughout the valley. He will be greatly missed by both pupils
and parents.
School District No. 11 (Trail)
During the year six classrooms, an activity-room, and a draughting-room were added
to the Fruitvale Elementary-Junior High School. This was necessary to take care of
the increased school population of this part of the district. Two rooms were also added
at Montrose and four rooms at Sunningdale. The Central School was fully renovated
and an activity-room added. At present the old part of Cook Avenue School in Ross-
land is being dismantled to make way for five new classrooms. An increase in school
population in the Glenmerry district may bring about the construction of a two- or three-
room school in this region. At present the students attend the Laura J. Morrish School
in East Trail.
Although the school population for the district showed a slight drop from that of
June, 1954, this was due to drop-outs from the secondary schools. An increase is contemplated for September, which would place the total attendance over the 5,000 mark.
Columbia Gardens Rural School was closed during the year, and the pupils transported to Fruitvale.
This district provided a good night-school programme, offering to 280 students
twenty-one courses. Two teacher in-service courses were also held, as well as an apprentice training programme. During the early part of the school term a half-day primary
teachers' institute was held under the direction of Miss Doris Sutherland, primary teacher-
consultant. Miss Sutherland is to be commended for the capable manner in which she
gave assistance to the primary teachers throughout this area. It is gratifying to note
that the Board appointed her to a second term as teacher-consultant.
The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company, which has always taken a keen
interest in education in the Kootenays, provided an excellent public relations programme
this year. Through its Educational Advisory Committee, under the chairmanship of
Dr. C. H. Wright, all teachers of the district were given a tour of the plant, followed by
a banquet and hockey game.   The administrators of West Kootenay were entertained at REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
EE 101
a luncheon meeting with the Advisory Committee. It is the policy of this company to
give what assistance it can, particularly in the field of science, to teachers of the area.
Good progress has been made in this programme. I sincerely hope that the programmes
launched during the past two years will be continued in the future.
In concluding this report I should like to thank my colleagues, Mr. Hum and Mr.
Kirk, for their assistance during the past year. My thanks also go to the principals, the
secretary-treasurers, and trustees for the fine spirit of co-operation displayed during my
stay in the Kootenays. As I am about to leave the area for a new inspectorate, I can
say that I am doing so with a goodly measure of regret. I sincerely hope that my successor enjoys his work in this area as much as I have during my five years.
School District No. 62  (Sooke)
REPORT OF F. A. McLELLAN, M.A., B.P/ED.
During 1954 the Belmont and Milnes Landing Junior-Senior High Schools were
completed, together with a one-room addition at Happy Valley Elementary School and
a three-room addition at Langford Elementary School.
School population continues to increase owing to development chiefly in the eastern
end of the district; it is anticipated that this increase will continue owing to the opening-up
of new subdivisions as a result of the completion of the new Island Highway from Victoria
to Goldstream. As the chief point of impact of this increase will be the Langford area,
it is planned to add three more classrooms together with an administration unit to the
Langford Elementary School in 1955. In order to effect this construction, funds have
been diverted from the proposed addition to the Belmont Junior-Senior High School, and
this in turn necessitated modification of the present old Belmont School to accommodate
an increase of approximately sixty pupils in September, 1955.
In 1955 the system of relief teachers was innovated at the larger elementary schools;
this allows the principals of these schools to devote some time during the week to supervisory duties.
Departmental policy has forced the abandonment of the pay-as-you-go policy of
the School Board in the construction of new classrooms, and the Board will have to
revert to financing new construction by issuing debentures. It is proposed to submit
a referendum to the ratepayers late in 1955 to provide for required additions to the
schools in the district.
School Districts No. 27 (Williams Lake) and No. 28 (Quesnel), Unattached
School Districts at Chezacut, Tatlayoko, and Anahim, and Indian Day-schools
REPORT OF W. J. MOUAT, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
Enrolment
Total
April, 1951-
April, 1954-
April, 1955..
770
1,155
1,370 EE 102
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
The Board of this district has had to provide for an increasing school population for
a number of years. This year has seen very crowded conditions in Williams Lake Village,
Lac la Hache, 100 Mile House, and Lone Butte schools, due mainly to a widespread
development of the lumbering industry.
The Board met the problems involved by using temporary accommodation last year.
At present it has under construction a six-room addition to the Williams Lake High
School and new rooms at Lone Butte and 100 Mile House. In other areas it is reconditioning abandoned schools and other temporary accommodation to meet the situations
that are arising.
To provide for the future, the Board is preparing a referendum. This referendum
has required a good deal of work and thought as it is extremely difficult to plan for the
needs of such a large district where new lumbering enterprises are developing constantly.
Some of these have established cutting cycles that ensure a degree of permanency and
others are of short duration.
Despite the many problems it has had to surmount, the Board has reason to be
proud of the services it is offering to this district. This year the Board operated a high-
school dormitory with sixty-nine students, a good central high school, several superior
schools, an adequate school transportation system, good elementary schools, and other
services. The Board has been able to do this because of the energy, enthusiasm, and
clear thinking displayed by its Board members and the excellent co-operation of its office
staff, maintenance department, teaching staff, and others.
School District No. 28 (Quesnel)
Enrolment
Grades 1 to VI
Grades VII to XII
Total
June 1950                            	
623
897
1,172
1,293
239
398
544
628
862
June, 1952                                    —	
1,295
1,716
1,921
June, 1954                          	
During the last two years this Board completed thirty new classrooms. This last
year the Board found it necessary to convert an activity-room to two classroms and to
continue the use of basement and other substandard rooms. The Board had to transport
rural elementary pupils to its overcrowded central schools.
In September the Board will have to rent additional accommodation and transport
even more elementary pupils. However, it is about to call tenders for an elementary-
school addition which will give considerable relief.
The Board has given much careful consideration to the future educational requirements of this district. It intends to present a referendum designed to take care of them
for the near future. Although it has tried to anticipate the needs of the entire area, it
is well aware that probable industrial developments may render its plans inadequate for
even the near future.
Quesnel District is to be congratulated on having completed an excellent administration building. This building provides offices, a maintenance-shop, and a bus repair
depot.
Although its schools are crowded and are likely to be so for some time, this Board
has good right to take pride in the excellent educational opportunities it is providing for
the district. This includes a good central high school, good elementary schools, an
efficient maintenance programme, and a very well operated system of district-owned
buses. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS EE 103
The district owes much to the Board members, whose wisdom and enthusiasm have
made it possible to keep pace with its fast growth, and to Board officials and teachers
for their loyal and active co-operation.
Unattached School Districts at Chezacut, Tatlayoko, and Anahim Lake
The Chezacut School Board continued to give valuable service to its district by
operating a good rural school.
The Inspector of Schools is official trustee at Anahim and Tatlayoko. In each of
these districts, modern rural schools with teacherages were opened during the year.
Indian Day-schools
The day-schools at Upper Dean River (Anahim Lake) and Anahim Village near
Alexis Creek continued to do valuable work. At Sugar Cane, near Williams Lake, an
excellent one-room school and teacherage opened in January. Another combined school
and teacherage was opened in the Nazko Valley to give a much-needed service.
Throughout the inspectorate, excellent co-operation has been given to the schools
by the public health authorities, Social Welfare Branch, Department of Community
Programmes, and others too numerous to acknowledge. I wish to express my appreciation to all.
School Districts No. 43 (Coquitlam) and No. 46 (Sechelt)
REPORT OF C. T. RENDLE, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 43 (Coquitlam)
During the past year the Board of School Trustees and others involved in education
have been particularly concerned with the second major building programme within the
past five years. A referendum, to the amount of $1,217,000, for sites, schools, and
equipment was passed in June, 1954. With the completion of this phase of the programme, nineteen elementary classrooms, six activity-rooms, and nineteen secondary
teaching units will be provided. At the secondary level the first unit of a junior high
school in the Municipality of Coquitlam will be established. Additions to the Viscount
Alexander School permit the establishment of a junior high school in Port Coquitlam.
The addition to this school will make it possible to convert this building to a junior-senior
high school in the immediate future. With one exception all elementary schools of four
rooms or more will have activity-rooms.
The accommodation provided by this programme was considered to be approximately one-half of the district's requirement, to 1960. However, the school district
presently shows unprecedented expansion in industry and housing developments. Future
requirements over the next five years will exceed the classroom accommodation
anticipated.
Present and future transportation requirements will be reduced by the construction
of new schools.
A teacher was placed in charge of night-school classes in September. Classes were
held in Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, and Port Moody. Instruction was given in both
vocational and recreational courses.
The primary teachers, under the guidance of Miss Andrew, primary consultant, held
regular meetings.   Their major topic for the year was a study of primary number work.
The principals made a thorough survey of the slow learners and handicapped
children. As a result of their work, both principals and teachers were rewarded with
a better understanding and appreciation of the problems involved. It is expected that
two special classes will be established in the near future. EE 104 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
Mr. Rickard, senior Industrial Arts instructor at the Como Junior-Senior High
School, is to be congratulated upon his appointment by the Department of Education as
instructor for the training of Industrial Arts teachers. Mr. Rickard has made a valuable
contribution to the development of vocational training in School District No. 43
(Coquitlam).
School District No. 46 (Sechelt)
A normal year has been experienced in most respects. Continued growth in the area
necessitates additional accommodation. A thorough survey of requirements was made,
and preliminary steps have been completed. Delays made it impossible to hold the
referendum in June. However, the programme is ready for presentation in September of
this year. The programme will provide additional accommodation at both the secondary
and elementary levels.
General
The Boards of School Trustees in both districts have displayed a keen interest in the
quality of instruction, a desire to obtain and retain a competent teaching staff. By use
of relieving or substitute teachers, the principals have been encouraged to assist with the
instructional programme. Essential equipment, supplies, and library requirements are
given commendable consideration by the Boards.
Maintenance of buildings is good. Beautification and improvement of grounds
should be mentioned. Excellent playing-fields have been provided for each of the large
secondary schools.
As in the past, a standardized testing programme has been carried out in each district.
The local programme has been supplemented by tests from the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research.
Interest in the schools by Parent-Teacher Associations, local Teacher Associations,
and others is reflected in the increased number of local scholarships, contributions to
libraries, and other aspects of the educational programme. Their contributions in the
cause of education are acknowledged and appreciated.
An increasingly large number of teachers are availing themselves of the opportunity
to improve certification through winter and summer sessions.
In severing my associations with School Districts No. 43 (Coquitlam) and No. 46
(Sechelt), I wish to express my sincere appreciation to the Boards of School Trustees,
area representatives, secretary-treasurers, principals, and teachers for their able assistance,
co-operation, and loyalty at all times.
School Districts No. 5 (Creston), No. 9 (Castlegar), and
No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
REPORT OF DENIS C. SMITH, B.A., B.Ed., D.Ed., INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
During the school-year 1954-55, 147 teachers were employed in this inspectorate
for an enrolment of approximately 3,570 pupils. This constitutes an increase of thirteen
teachers over the past school-year. The area of greatest increase in school population
continued to be School District No. 9 (Castlegar). Mr. H. Hum was assigned to this
inspectorate to assist in the inspection of schools and rendered valuable assistance.
School District No. 5 (Creston)
The School Board of this district employed sixty-five teachers for an enrolment of
some 1,620 pupils.   This year Grade XIII was not taught due to a lack of the necessary REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS EE 105
«
minimal enrolment.   The kindergarten facilities are being expanded for 1955-56.   The
staffs of both elementary and secondary schools made major contributions in educational
research on problems of both a practical and immediate nature.
Construction of a new administrative building has been undertaken and should be
completed in the fall term.
School District No. 9 (Castlegar)
This district employed sixty teachers for an approximate enrolment of 1,400 pupils.
A bus service was instituted to Renata in the fall with the opening of a road to Deer Park.
New schools were opened as follows: Valley Vista, two rooms; Robson, one room; and
Tarrys, two rooms. Glade School was closed in April and the pupils transported to
Tarrys School. An activity-room has been completed for Kinnaird Elementary School
and was officially opened last fall. A new classroom and activity-room was opened at
Stanley Humphries High School, and the new wing to the high school is being completed
for a possible September opening. All elementary units are expansible with a view to
accommodating increased enrolments should industrial expansion continue.
A principal was appointed by the Board to the newly created principalship of Robson,
Brilliant, Tarrys, and Ootischenia. Appreciation should be expressed to the Consolidated
Mining and Smelting Company, which provided the teachers of Castlegar District with
a tour through the plant and later a banquet, at which time Deans Chant and Gage
addressed the assembled teachers.
School District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
The enrolment of 585 required twenty-two teachers to staff the schools in the Arrow
Lakes, an increase of two teachers over the preceding school-year.
A double-glazing programme is being completed for all schools, and the Board plans
to stucco the schools, experimenting first with Burton School.
A teacher institute for both pre-service and in-service training was held in September
at Nakusp, and the Board on this occasion gave a banquet to welcome the teaching staff
for the year.
A building programme has been authorized by the Department, which calls for a new
junior-senior high school at Nakusp, teacherages in each attendance area, and an addition
to the Edgewood School to make it into an elementary-high with an addition of two classrooms plus an activity-room. The plans are now in the hands of an architect. Purchase
of a new school bus has been approved.
In all districts a local testing programme has been continued, supplemented by tests
from the Bureau of Tests, Standards, and Research.
The system of a co-operative exchange of locally developed tests, unit outlines, and
summaries of research findings on the slow learner, the gifted child, and remedial problems have been enthusiastically undertaken and developed by the teaching staffs, who
deserve considerable commendation for their willingness to undertake this additional load.
The problem of the education of Doukhobor children has been studied by the local
Inspector, working with the Co-ordinating Committee on Doukhobor Education. The
situation to date shows comparative improvement.
At the time of writing this report the Department of Education has deemed it
advisable to split this inspectorate, with Mr. Barrie Harford appointed to Districts No. 9
(Castlegar) and No. 10 (Arrow Lakes) and Mr. Harley Abbott appointed to inspect
District No. 5 (Creston). Both these gentlemen are well qualified to give competent
advice and assistance to the School Boards concerned in the discharge of their necessary
duties. EE 106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
Once again I take pleasure in paying tribute to the teachers and School Board members in this inspectorate for the prevailing harmony in this district. I know they will both
extend to my successors the same co-operation that I have enjoyed in the past two years.
School Districts No. 35 (Langley) and No. 48 (Howe Sound)
REPORT OF H. D. STAFFORD, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 35 (Langley)
Because of inadequate school facilities, educational progress at the secondary level
in this school district will in all probability suffer a lag for a few years.
A referendum providing for new school construction, submitted by the Board of
School Trustees in June, 1954, was defeated by the ratepayers. The referendum was
more emphatically rejected when submitted a second time in December, 1954.
It is anticipated in excess of 1,300 pupils will be in attendance at the secondary school
in September, 1955. As the school was originally designed for some 750 pupils, the
immediate result of such overcrowding will be a shortening of the school-day, reduction
in the offerings of optional courses in some grades, and fewer co-curricular activities.
Most secondary students go to school on buses, which are also used to convey elementary pupils. The conveyance system will be severely taxed, as it is planned that the
secondary school will operate on three shifts, as follows: (1) 7.54 a.m. to 12.27 p.m.,
(2) 8.38 a.m. to 2.40 p.m., and (3) 12.35 p.m. to 5.08 p.m.
The elementary schools in School District No. 35 are for the most part situated in
centres of population, so that many of the pupils should be able to walk to school.
During the past year the primary teachers organized monthly meetings to study
problems peculiar to their needs. Considerable professional gain resulted from the well-
attended meetings, where the different points of view brought forward by the special guest
speakers were freely discussed.
The regular monthly meetings of the elementary-school principals were concerned
with matters of school administration and a study of methods for the improvement of
instruction.
During the past year the level of instruction in both elementary and secondary schools
has been satisfactory. In the secondary school there has been an increase in the number
of teachers holding less than the minimum required certification.
School District No. 48 (Howe Sound)
A review of growth of School District No. 48 since its formation in 1946 is summarized in the following table:  1946 1955
Number of teachers     17 38
Number of schools       7 10
Number of pupils—
Grades I to VI  239 520
Grades VII to XII  121 274
  360          794
Three school buses are in operation in the Squamish-Britannia area, while one bus
serves the Pemberton Meadows-Pemberton District.
An excellent fully equipped secondary school is located in Squamish, and there is
a three-teacher secondary school at Woodfibre. A superior school has been established
at Pemberton. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
EE 107
The school buildings are well maintained and equipped. The care given to the
school buildings and grounds is developing community pride in the schools. The trustees
have developed a fine relationship with the teaching staff and the general public.
In this district it has been necessary for the first time to employ an untrained staff
member. Should further such appointments be necessary, I trust that future temporary
teachers will do as fine a piece of work as was done by the temporary teacher employed
during 1954-55.
The people of the district have seen the expenditure of large sums of money for the
extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, for highway construction, for flood-
control in the Pemberton area, and for the extension of private industries. In all parts
of the district this has meant an increase in population. School authorities are making
plans for the construction of teacherages, additional classrooms, and new schools.
With a change in the distribution of population in this school district, it was found
necessary to change the method of selecting school trustees. A combined representative
and elective method is now in effect.
School Attendance Area
Method of Selection
Representative
Trustee
Board of
School
Trustees
2
2
2
2
1
)  1 trustee
Britannia Mines   __ 	
Appointed   	
Elected  _____ 	
Elected     _	
Elected  	
Elected	
Elected             	
Elected  	
Elected  _____	
Board of School Trustees for 1955: Mr. J. H. Otterbine (Chairman), Mr. A. T.
Smith, Mrs. M. L. Fougberg, Mr. N. H. Bailey, Mr. G. M. Behrner. Secretary-treasurer,
Mr. F. D. Ross.
General
Attention is directed to the worth-while contribution to effective schooling that has
been made by the School Medical Health Officers and by the public health nurses. Their
good work, ready assistance, and co-operation have been appreciated by parents and the
school authorities in School Districts No. 35 (Langley) and No. 48 (Howe Sound).
School Districts No. 20 (Salmon Arm) and No. 19 (Revelstoke)
REPORT OF R. B. STIBBS, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School Statistics, 1948 and 1955
Year
Pupils
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Grades I
to VI
Grades VII
to XIII
Total
Schools
1Q48
School District No. 20
854
1,223
488
660
1,342
1,883
53
74
31
1955    .                              .                             	
12
369
172
541
21
School District No. 19
1948
455
619
301
348
756
967
29
36
8
1955. .
7
164
47
211
7 EE 108 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
The information shown in the accompanying tables indicates that there has been
a steady but not heavy increase in the number of pupils and teachers in the past few years.
This is more evident in School District No. 20 (Salmon Arm), where the holding power
of the secondary school is much more apparent. It is interesting to note that the number
of schools in School District No. 20 have been considerably reduced due to consolidation.
School District No. 20 (Salmon Arm)
In September, 1954, it was found necessary to place eight classes on shift and utilize
basement and lunchroom areas to accommodate the increased population. Referendums
were placed before the ratepayers on three occasions during the school-year before
meeting with approval. The successful plan made provision for a number of decentralized
elementary schools throughout the municipality. When the buildings are completed,
possibly late in 1955, there will be a total of seventeen schools in operation, with
additions to Canoe, Carlin, Eagle River, North Shuswap, Salmon Arm Secondary, and
Silver Creek.
The past several years, regardless of the problem the area has faced in school finance,
has shown steady improvement in the standard of education. Despite the fact that a
number of classes were accommodated in unsuitable areas, the pupils did exceedingly
good work in general over the school-year. I am quite pleased with the result of the
Remedial Reading class which was in operation in the Salmon Arm Elementary School.
A number of the teachers show an active interest in improving their qualifications
and standards through attendance at Summer Schools. It is particularly gratifying to note
the happier relationships which are becoming more apparent amongst the component
parts of the district. Transportation is used to considerable extent, with sixteen buses
operating. However, the new building plan should be able to offer considerable relief
in this regard.
School District No. 19 (Revelstoke)
The residents of this area have always been kindly disposed toward the work the
schools are doing. This was shown in a concrete way when the ratepayers approved
enthusiastically a referendum to build an eight-room elementary school. This structure
was well on its way to completion before the end of the school term. It will be noted that
the increase in pupils falls largely on the elementary-school grades. Plans are well under
way to change the status of the secondary school to a junior-senior high school. This
might make for a more effective educational plant. As the Grades VII and VIII pupils
proceed through the high-school grades, a definite increase could easily come about.
During the year four classes were on shift in the elementary school. Despite this fact the-
standards of achievement reached by the pupils in these grades was most commendable.
Teacher turnover in the high school was quite high, and unfortunately it was not possible
to obtain replacements that met the necessary requirements. This area has a very fine
School Board, and the work done by the trustees is reflected in the very fine schools that
exist throughout the area.
General
During the year several successful conferences were held with all principals, vice-
principals, and counsellors of the inspectorate. Generally speaking, these gatherings
served a most useful purpose. Through the principals, stress was placed upon the teaching of the fundamentals, good work habits, and the careful keeping of note-books.
Perhaps the best meeting was the one attended by the Registrar, Mr. H. M. Evans, when
many problems pertaining to his department were clarified. A one-day convention was
planned by the Salmon Arm Teachers' Association, to which were invited teachers from
neighbouring areas. The success of the conference was assured through the attendance
of the Honourable R. G. Williston, Minister of Education; the Chief Inspector of Schools,
Mr. F. P. Levirs; and the teaching consultants Miss G. M. Etter and Miss J. M. Greer, REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
EE 109
who were allowed to attend through the courtesy of the Vancouver Superintendent of
Schools.
With the co-operation of a number of other Inspectors, tests on the Grade VII level
in a number of subjects which were set by successful practising teachers were given
throughout this area. The results were used largely to assist teachers in establishing
good standards at this particular level.
In conclusion, before I leave this area, I wish to pay sincere tribute to the many
school trustees, secretary-treasurers, principals, and teachers I have worked with during
my stay here for their splendid co-operation and invaluable help. It has been a pleasure
working with them for the improvement of education in the respective districts.
School Districts No. 71 (Courtenay) and No. 72 (Campbell River)
and Comox Airport Rural School District
REPORT OF C. I. TAYLOR, B.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 71 (Courtenay)
For the past several years this district has shown a steady growth of from 150 to 200
pupils per year. In 1954-55 there were 2,734 pupils enrolled and a staff of ninety-nine
teachers.
On December 18th, 1954, the School Board submitted a referendum for $616,000
for the construction of elementary schools in Cumberland, Comox, and Courtenay and
additions to high schools in Cumberland and Tsolum. Construction started on these new
schools in June. The secondary-school population has shown a marked increase in the
past few years.   A separate junior high school for Courtenay will be necessary by 1957.
The reconditioning programme for the older schools developed by the Board has
now been completed. All schools in the district have been modernized. The maintenance
of the schools is well kept up. Grounds have come in for a good deal of attention during
this year and marked improvements have been effected.
The construction of 100 housing units for R.C.A.F. personnel in the Village of
Comox will create a problem for school accommodation in 1955-56.
School District No. 72 (Campbell River)
The growth in this district has been very rapid. Five years ago there were 829
pupils in the schools, and in 1954-55, 1,619 were enrolled and a staff of sixty-eight
teachers was employed.
Willow Point Elementary School, serving the southern part of the district, was
occupied in September. The Honourable R. G. Williston officially opened this school,
Campbellton Elementary, and Sayward Superior on October 6th and 7th. Squirrel
Cove was not opened in September, the few pupils being transferred to Mansons Landing.
Rock Bay attendance dropped and that school had to be closed at Easter. In June, Port
Neville and Refuge Cove Schools were closed. The trend has been to the larger centres—
Campbell River, Quadra, and Sayward. Lack of steady employment and changes in
logging and fishing operations have caused this drop in enrolment in the outside schools.
The additions to the paper-mill at Duncan Bay and the construction of a dam by the
British Columbia Power Commission at Upper Campbell Lake will further develop this
district. The Board is, at present, building an eight-room addition to the high-school
wing of the Campbell River Elementary-Senior High School. It will not be long before
this school will be entirely occupied by Grades VII to XII pupils and another elementary EE 110 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
school will be needed in Campbell River.   Sayward shows steady growth; the five-room
superior school has an extra room under construction this June.
Comox Airport Rural School District
This unattached school district, established in 1952, provides school accommodation
for the children of R.C.A.F. personnel living in married quarters on Department of
National Defence property. A new Grades I to VI elementary school was opened in
September with six divisions and 204 pupils. By June, 1955, the enrolment had increased
to 240. A seventh division will be needed for next year. Additions to the present building are necessary. The excellent co-operation of the R.C.A.F. officials and the efficiency
of the staff have made this elementary school a model one in every way. The junior and
senior high-school pupils attend District No. 71 schools.
In-service Training
The in-service training programme organized in these districts for 1954-55 included:
A teachers' institute, Campbell River; teachers' meetings at the four division levels—■
primary, intermediate, junior high, and senior high in both districts; a reading institute,
conducted by Mr. John Sutherland, of Vancouver, on low-level reading problems;
administrative meetings for principals.
Testing Programme
A co-operative exchange testing programme was organized for all Grades X and XII
subjects and given to the students in the four high schools. Grade VII pupils in both
districts throughout were tested in five subjects in March. A complete programme of
standardized tests was used with Grades III, VI, and VIII in the larger schools and with
all grades in the smaller schools.
General
Future Teachers Clubs were organized in the four high schools. These clubs
operated very successfully and are probably responsible for twenty-one students from this
district planning to attend teacher-training next year. Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited
offered two scholarships of $2,000, one for each district, for teacher-training at the
University of British Columbia. These scholarships were most gratefully accepted by the
Boards and local committees set up to administer them.
Mr. J. C. Tonks, for thirteen years principal of Cumberland Junior-Senior High
School, retired in June.   The district loses the services of a fine teacher.
A drama festival, a music festival, and an art display again were features of the
year's work.
In conclusion, may I once more pay tribute to the teachers, the Board members, and
the secretary-treasurers of these three districts. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
School Districts No. 65 (Cowichan), No. 66 (Lake Cowichan),
and No. 67  (Ladysmith)
EE 111
REPORT OF B. THORSTEINSSON, B.A., B.Ed., M.B.A., INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate, with offices located in Duncan, embraces the following school
districts:  No. 65 (Cowichan), No. 66 (Lake Cowichan), and No. 67 (Ladysmith).
The enrolment and staffs in these school districts, as of June, 1955, are as follows:—
District
Pupils
Schools
Teachers
Elementary
Secondary
Elementary
Secondary
Total
District No. 65 (Cowichan) 	
District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan) .
District No. 67 (Ladysmith)	
1,379
842
833
818
432
539
18
7
8
45
27
26
39
22
28
84
49
54
Totals  	
3,054
1,789
33
98
89
187
School District No. 65 (Cowichan)
The most pressing problem in this area during the year has been the planning for
future school accommodation. A referendum put last April failed to gain the support
of the ratepayers, and arrangements are now being made to present a revised plan.
The night-school classes, which have proved so worth while since their introduction
four years ago, operated successfully again this year.
It is a pleasant relief to report that staffing in the elementary schools is becoming
much less of a problem as each year passes. This year, with only one exception, all
rural schools of two rooms or more have at least one male teacher on the staff.
Academic progress has been notably good. Results as measured by standardized
tests administered to all pupils at the close of the year show more than normal progress.
Such tests have been given regularly in this area for some time, and the teachers have
been encouraged to use them as on-going evaluating instruments from year to year.
During the year the rural teachers met regularly in professional groups. At these
meetings, problems of common concern were carefully discussed. In the Fairbridge and
Duncan Elementary Schools, the principals co-operated in research experiments which
involved all members of the staffs. A similar undertaking was embarked upon in the
high school.   The results of these efforts have been recorded, compiled, and bound.
School District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)
Much-needed secondary-school accommodation was added in this district by an
addition to the present high school. The added facilities included an administrative
section, shower and dressing rooms, and four additional classrooms.
During the year the high-school staff, under the leadership of the principal, organized
regular bi-monthly meetings with parents. These were well attended and enthusiastically
carried on. Various topics of interest were raised and discussed. An informal check of
the reactions of some parents indicated the popularity and value of these meetings. It is
planned to carry on with this activity during the coming year.
As usual, the Lake Cowichan schools were well represented in the local district
music festival and, as in past years, the participants did exceedingly well.
Attention should be drawn to the development in the elementary schools of study
groups among the teachers. These groups were later re-formed into smaller research
groups and a number of interesting studies resulted. Many of these studies were recorded
and bound. EE 112 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
The Board of School Trustees in this district has, as usual, worked very well during
the year in carrying through its many and varied tasks. It would be hard to find a more
earnest or more competent Board, and to its members the community owes a debt of
gratitude.
School District No. 67 (Ladysmith)
As a result of the passage of the referendum presented to the ratepayers in June,
1954, the Board of School Trustees has been busy during the year in renovating old and
providing new accommodation in the district. A new ten-room elementary school is well
under way in Ladysmith. Its construction required the removal of the old elementary
annex building. During the construction period the elementary school was placed on a
two-shift system. This system was so well organized that very little inconvenience or loss
resulted.
In order to accommodate the teacher in the one-room school on Thetis Island, a
teacherage was built there. Other improvements placed this small school in excellent
condition. All other schools in the area received the careful attention of the Board and,
as a result, the district will, next term, be very well served with school facilities.
School progress has been notably good during the school-year. The teaching staff
has proved most diligent and capable, and the results, as measured by standardized tests,
has been, as usual, very good indeed.
A word of commendation should be offered to the members of the Board of School
Trustees, who have continued untiringly to lend their every effort in improving the
schools.   In this they have been notably successful.
School Districts No. 21  (Armstrong-Spallumcheen), No. 22 (Vernon),
and No. 78 (Enderby)
REPORT OF A. S. TO WELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 21 (Armstrong-Spallumcheen)
To this highly consolidated district, which operates only two schools, the September,
1954, reopening brought a real educational transformation. Accommodation difficulties,
which had been increasing year by year, reached a climax in 1953-54. The senior high-
school building had been condemned and demolished, and its classes were housed in the
Council Chamber of the City Hall, a former teacherage, the Recreation Hall, and various
other improvised quarters scattered over a number of buildings. The eight-grade elementary school was badly overcrowded, and was also using improvised accommodation.
The new school-year opened with the elementary school reduced to six grades, thus
eliminating the overcrowding. Grades VII and VIII, comprising four divisions, were
transferred to a brand-new and well-equipped junior-senior high school, a fourteen-room
building.
Results have been most gratifying, and there has been a marked improvement in tone
and morale of staffs and students of both schools. For the first time in several years it
can now be said that Armstrong-Spallumcheen has a good school system.
School District No. 22 (Vernon)
The year saw a further step in the policy of decentralizing the Vernon City elementary-school facilities. The very large Central Elementary School, located in the heart of
the city, is gradually being supplemented by a series of primary schools located around
the city's outskirts, and the second of these, a four-room building, was put into operation
during the year. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
EE 113
Besides this, a fourth room was added at Coldstream School, and construction was
well under way on a new eight-room elementary school and a four-room addition to the
high school, both at Lumby. Accommodation at Cherryville Superior School was also
increased by a two-room addition.
As this is written, a referendum by-law is being prepared which will provide the
third of the series of peripheral primary schools in Vemon, extensive additions to the
Vernon Junior High and Senior High Schools, and a gymnasium-auditorium at Lumby.
If, as is hoped, these are ready for occupancy a year hence, the district will be in excellent
shape as far as school facilities are concerned, and should have no further problems for
a few years.
School District No. 78 (Enderby)
Here again, the September, 1954, reopening saw a real transformation, comparable
to that described in respect of Armstrong-Spallumcheen. During the previous year
thirteen divisions, Grades I to XII, had been crowded into what was nominally an eight-
room building. Every available nook and cranny was crammed with pupils ranging in
size and age from mere toddlers to young men and women.
With the new school-year a new six-room elementary school and an auditorium-
gymnasium were put into operation, while the old building became a junior-senior high
school, with facilities for Home Economics and Industrial Arts built into space vacated
by the elementary-grade pupils. Here, too, the changes have very greatly improved the
learning situation.
At the same time three new and modern rural school buildings were put into service.
In this part of the district it may be worth noting that four of the six one-room rural
schools have now grown to two rooms each, thus providing more adequate grading.
Further, five of them now have electric lighting, and it is expected that the sixth will have
it within the next year.
General
Throughout the inspectorate the learning situation is now very satisfactory. In the
larger schools able principals have given fine leadership to competent staffs and smoothly
operating schools, thus leaving the Inspector free to devote much of his available time to
the smaller schools. The number of special classes operating is unchanged from that
reported last year.
One more I gratefully acknowledge the fine work and friendly co-operation of
trustees, teachers and other employees, Departmental officials, and indeed all who have
had to do in any way with educational affairs in my districts. EE 114
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
JERICHO HILL SCHOOL
(Formerly School for the Deaf and the Blind)
REPORT OF C. E. MACDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., SUPERINTENDENT
Attendance
Our enrolment of 167 students for the past term has been the highest in the history
of the school. Of this number, seven were enrolled from the Province of Alberta as
extra-provincial pupils. In addition, ten pre-school deaf children received part-time
instruction at the school and six others received home training through our correspondence
course for parents. Four out-of-town partial-sighted students were given room and board
whilst attending a special class at Kitsilano High School. Seventy-five pre-school blind
children received home training, in co-operation with the Canadian National Institute
for the Blind.
Following is a summary of the enrolment for the 1954-55 school-year:—
Day Pupils
Residents
Total
42
15
96
14
138
29
Totals                   	
57
110
167
Health
During the term, fifty children attended the clinic at the Health Centre for Children
for routine examinations. Three were refracted for glasses and twelve were fitted with
suitable hearing aids. All our children received dental examinations and any necessary
treatments at the Metropolitan Health Services dental clinic operating in this School.
General Remarks
With approval of the Department of Education, the name of the School was changed
from School for the Deaf and the Blind to Jericho Hill School.
A very successful two-day workshop-conference on blind children was held at the
Canadian National Institute for the Blind with Dr. Berthold Lowenfeld, Superintendent
of the California State School for the Blind, as chief consultant and adviser. A large
number of parents of blind children from infants to high-school age attended the conference sessions and participated in the group discussions. Appropriate resource people
from the fields of mental health, social welfare, education, and public health were also
participants.
Before the end of the term, plans were completed for a new dormitory-school unit
for blind students and part of a new recreational centre.
The following appointments were made during the term to complete the organizational plans: Mr. Gordon Carson, vice-principal of the Blind Department; Mr. Peter
Freemantle, vice-principal of the Deaf Department; and Mr. Lyle Armitage, business
manager.
Three intermediate deaf classes were operated in city schools—Lord Kitchener,
Model, and Dawson—whereas two had been in operation heretofore.
Valuable assistance and support have been given to the School over the past term
by P.-T.A. organizations, both of the Blind Department and of the Deaf Department.
Both organizations celebrated their first anniversary during the year.
Special emphasis has been given auditory training in the primary and intermediate
divisions of the Deaf Department, utilizing newly installed equipment and techniques. IERICHO HILL SCHOOL
EE 115
The dining-hall was redecorated and fluorescent lights installed before the beginning
of the term. Movable partitions were installed to effect separation of the blind and deaf
children within the dining-room.
In accordance with a directive from the Government, work schedules were revised
to place the staff on a forty-hour work-week.
I wish to conclude this report by expressing my thanks to all the staff for their loyal
support and to the Advisory Committee, Metropolitan Health Services, and the Child
Guidance Clinic for their valuable guidance and co-operation. Their assistance has
contributed in a large measure to the successful accomplishments of the past year.
. EE 116 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
High School and Vocational Courses
REPORT OF EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. es L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the year
1954-55 was 9,435.   This figure shows an increase of 1,026 over 1953-54.
Correspondence courses were taken by students in the following classifications:—
Students registered in school— Per cent
1. School-age students registered in high and superior schools. (Throughout this report the term
" school-age " refers to students under 18 years
of age.)   2,567
2. School - age students registered in elementary
schools       203
Total number of school-age students  2,770
3. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years registered in
their local schools      986
4. Students of 21 years or over registered in their
local schools        10
Total number of students registered in their
local schools taking one or more correspondence courses  3,766        40.0
Students not registered in schools—
1. School-age students unable to attend school because of physical disability       110
2. School-age students gainfully employed      140
3. School-age students studying courses at home because of the distance factor      225
4. School-age students in institutions—Girls' Industrial School, Boys' Industrial School, Oakalla
Prison Farm, British Columbia Penitentiary        76
5. School-age students not registered in schools for
other reasons      108
6. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years not registered in
their local schools  1,194
Total number of students under 21 years
not registered in their local schools
and obtaining their education by correspondence   1,853        19.7
7. Adult students (21 years and over)  3,816        40.3
Totals  9,435      100.0 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS EE 117
The students enrolled may be classified as to age in the following three groups:—
Per Cent
1. Pupils under 18 years of age  3,429        36.4
2. Pupils 18, 19, and 20 years  2,180        23.1
3. Pupils of 21 years of age and over  3,826        40.5
Totals  9,435 100.0
Some of these students took a full year's work in six high-school courses. Others
registered for only one or two courses. The number of students who enrolled in each of
the high-school subjects during the year was as follows:—
English Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  1,337
English Grammar and Composition 10, 20, 30, 40  1,454
English 91  113
English 99  3 7
Social Studies 10, 20, 30  1,068
History 91  104
Science 10, 20  591
Mathematics 10, 20, 30, 91  2,493
Latin 10, 20, 91, 92  319
Spanish 10, 20, 91, 92  175
French 10, 20, 91, 92  590
Health and Personal Development 10, 20, 30  584
Agriculture 10, 38, 39  227
Geography 91  131
Homemaking 10, 20, 30, 91  618
Art 10, 20  308
Record-keeping 11  530
Business Fundamentals 24  161
Book-keeping 34, 91, 95  506
Mathematics 12  65
Shorthand 21, 31  233
Typewriting 10, 20  906
Secretarial Practice 92, 93  16
English 93 (Business English)  97
English 32 (Journalism)  27
Biology 91  13 3
Chemistry 91  140
Physics 91  103
Bible Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  42
Mechanical Drawing 10, 20  322
Sheet-metal Work 20  1
Metal-mining  14
Auto Mechanics 91, 92  277
Diesel Engineering 91  72
Electricity 20  185
Radio and Wireless 30  106
Elementary Geology 29  68
Forestry 30  136
Art 3 9  3 2
Frame-house Construction 20  58
Home Furnishing 23  43
Extramural Music 11, 21  21
Total  14,443 EE 118 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
This figure is, of course, larger than the figure given for the number of students
enrolled, since the majority of the students were registered for more than one course.
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Senior Matriculation courses
was as follows:—
English Literature 100  180
English Composition 101  176
Mathematics 101  157
Mathematics 100  55
French 120  34
French 110  67
Latin 120  9
Latin 110  18
Spanish 110  2
Agriculture 100  11
History 101  95
History 102  85
Chemistry 101  40
Physics 101  36
German 90  156
Total  1,121
The number of students who enrolled in each of the non-credit courses may also be
classified in the following table:—
Steam Engineering, 4th, 3rd, 2nd Class  490
House Painting and Decorating  14
Aviation 1  9
Industrial Mathematics  42
Practical Design  38
Glove-making  6
Air Navigation I, II  14
Mathematics for Steam Engineering, 2nd Class  38
Accountancy for Credit Unions  14
Spherical Trigonometry  7
English 19  545
Dressmaking  24
Total  1,241
Students in rural elementary schools and superior schools, hospitals, and inmates of
public institutions were not required to pay fees. Students of small high schools were
required to pay an annual fee of $3. Other students paying fees were those who have the
privilege of attending a high school having six or more teachers, employed students of 16
years or over, students enrolled for Senior Matriculation courses, and students living
outside this Province.
Most students paid their own fees. However, in the case of 878 students the fees
were paid by their School Boards. CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS EE 119
The following is a classification of students who were exempted from tuition fees:—
1. Hospital cases   231
2. British Columbia Penitentiary  113
3. Oakalla Prison     74
4. Girls' Industrial Home     12
5. Boys' Industrial Home     39
6. New Haven     56
7. On relief or equivalent       8
8. Disabled students at home     18
9. Students needed at home     25
Total  576
All students were asked to indicate their chosen vocations.   The following summary
shows the choices of those who gave this information:—
Professional—
Teachers  907
Nurses  619
Medicine  155
Science  39
Law  40
Art  68
Theology   44
Pharmacy  36
Miscellaneous  144
Commercial  80
Skilled labour (mechanics, technicians, steam engineers, etc.) 409
Police  49
Aviation  68
Her Majesty's Forces  85
Civil Service  8
Agriculture and farming  126
Forestry  124
Mining  12
Journalism  67
Diesel and steam engineering  736
Radio  86
Miscellaneous  74
Not given  4,659
Total  9,435
Completion of Courses
A total of 123,320 papers were marked during the year, which is an increase of
13,149 over the number of papers marked in the preceding year. We have five-, ten-,
twelve-, eighteen-, and twenty-paper courses.
Instructional Staff
An inside staff of four course-writers and an outside staff of sixty-eight instructors
were employed during the year. EE 120
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 3,411 students with material from our course
in English I for New Canadians, 811 students were supplied with material from the
English II for New Canadians, and 545 students took the course in English II (English
19) by correspondence. Classes in English were held in sixty-three night-school centres,
and material was supplied for other classes and individuals in 109 small isolated places
throughout the Province.
New Courses
Biology 91, French 120, History 102, Homemaking 10, Latin 120, Mathematics 20,
Physics 101, English Literature 10, and English Grammar and Composition 10 were the
new courses offered during the year. •
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ARTHUR H. PLOWS, DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1954-55 there were 1,463 pupils enrolled in the Elementary
Correspondence School. Of these, 1,355 were enrolled at Victoria and the remaining
108 were enrolled at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District. The tabulation below
shows the enrolment by month and grade for each locality.
Enrolled at Victoria
Grade
1
Grade
II
Grade
III
Grade
IV
Grade
V
Grade
VI
Grade
VII
Grade
VIII
Total
September.	
October 	
November	
142
188
206
211
238
240
248
253
258
253
103
132
153
157
167
174
195
201
210
217
108
127
139
146
154
159
168
170
175
173
78
100
114
122
129
142
144
149
154
165
84
102
115
123
128
132
141
144
151
151
70
86
97
96
106
116
119
123
126
124
61
79
95
104
108
117
124
128
135
144
58
81
93
96
107
113
117
125
126
128
704
895
1,012
1,055
1,137
1,193
1 256
January	
February  .
1,293
1,335
1,355
May 	
Enrolled at Pouce Coupe (Peace River Branch)
September-
October	
November-
December—
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
4
15
18
20
22
23
25
26
25
25
12
14
14
20
20
20
20
21
21
6
9
9
10
11
12
13
14
14
14
12
14
14
14
16
17
18
18
18
17
8
9
9
9
10
10
44
69
82
85
96
99
103
106
107
108
The number of papers marked in the two centres was as follows: Victoria, 139,850;
Pouce Coupe, 12,126—a total of 151,976.
The staff in Victoria consisted of the Director, thirteen full-time instructors, one
part-time instructor, and an office staff of five members; in Pouce Coupe, one full-time
instructor in charge and one full-time assistant.
The services of five qualified outside markers were used during the year, marking
excess papers on a piece-work basis in their own homes. CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS EE 121
During the year new courses were produced in Literature and Language for Grade
VIII, Writing for Grade V, and the final portions of Arithmetic for Grade III. All these
were devised, written, and illustrated by staff instructors.
In addition to the numbers shown above, adult students enrolled for courses from
Grades I to VIII as follows:—
September     76 February  221
October   130 March  248
November  159 April  279
December  172 May  302
January  197 June  309
A total of 6,150 papers were marked in the adult section during the year. EE 122 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE
As the school population grows, so does the work of the Text-book Branch, and it
would almost seem as if our accommodation grows smaller.
In spite of the difficulties which arise from cramped quarters, the staff has completed
another big year and our clients have been satisfied. The Text-book Rental Plan continues to operate successfully, but an appeal is made again to principals and teachers to
insist on all free or Rental Plan books being properly covered and cared for. Additional
paper covers are available on request at the Text-book Branch.
The Text-book Branch supplied the required free text-books and the various forms,
etc., to schools and School Boards as and when required. Curriculum and other bulletins were distributed to schools, and orders for books from the various dealers throughout the Province were processed and completed in a satisfactory manner.
To purchase and distribute the free supplies to public and private schools and to
correspondence students during the school-year 1954—55 required an expenditure of
$338,720.83; 4,415 free requisitions were received and filled.
Combined orders, free and saleable, reached the large total of 18,243, and from
these orders the sum of $632,923.02 was collected.
A total of 2,416 Rental Plan requisitions was received, checked, and completed,
and $334,978.07 in rental fees and remittances for lost and damaged books was collected.
During the school-year $3,676.82 was refunded to pupils who left the school system
prior to March 31st.
To properly carry out all of the detail involved in the above requires the complete
assistance and co-operation of a loyal and efficient staff and school officials, particularly
secretary-treasurers. For this assistance and co-operation, I am proud to officially
record my thanks.
The accompanying financial statements, presented in the form required by the Audit
Branch, include the sixth covering the Text-book Rental Plan.
Stock
The stock on hand in our warehouse, $407,277.40, is valued at publisher's price
plus incoming freight. The rental stock in the various schools, $455,172.67, is valued
on the same basis, less depreciation, and no allowance is made for the costs involved in
moving the stock from the text-book warehouse to the several schools.
Sales
The sales to dealers, etc., amounted to $745,100.05, less discount of $139,065.71,
and our revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year is $27,827.94, after deducting
salaries, wages, and other overhead.
Rentals
We received $328,156.61 in rental fees, etc., from the various schools, an increase
of 7.7 per cent over 1953-54. In the Rental Plan it will be noted that our expenditure
over revenue for the year amounted to $123,042.35. This is less than was estimated
for the subsidized plan. TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 3 1st, 1955
Sales
EE 123
Revenue—
Sales _.
Less discount
Net sales 	
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31st, 1954  $341,687.78
Purchases for year (cost, freight, and
duty)      598,154.67
$745,100.05
139,065.71
$606,034.34
Inventory, March 31st, 1955
Cost of sales	
Gross profit	
$939,842.45
407,277.40
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages	
Packing and general expenses
Freight and delivery	
Sundry expenses 	
$33,142.26
4,218.50
7,362.67
917.92
Excess of revenue over expenditure for the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1955	
532,565.05
$73,469.29
45,641.35
$27,827.94 EE 124 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
Text-book Rental Plan Operations
Rental fees collected  $328,156.61
Opening rental inventory, March 31st, 1954  $380,125.03
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, duty, and S.S. tax)    483,264.03
$863,389.06
1954-55
Depreciation1
Inventory, March 31st, 1953  $342,395.20
Less three years' depreciation at 33VS per cent
per annum      342,395.20 $114,131.74
Inventory, March 31st, 1954  $398,989.93
Less two years' depreciation
at 33V_. per cent per
annum      265,993.28    132,996.64
$132,996.65
Inventory, March 31st, 1955  $483,264.03
Less one year's depreciation
at 33^ per cent per
annum      161,088.01    161,088.01
$322,176.02
Closing rental inventory at March 31st, 1955     455,172.67
Total depreciation for year 1954-55     $408,216.39 $408,216.39
Add expenses—
Salaries and wages  $31,211.62
Packing and general expenses  3,972.80
Freight and delivery  6,933.72
Sundry expenses   864.43
       42,982.57
451,198.96
Excess expenditure over revenue for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1955  $123,042.35
1 See footnote to balance-sheet. Imprest Account—
Cash on hand
Cash in bank _
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1955
Assets
EE 125
Inventory—
Stock on hand	
Consigned text-books __.
Less depreciation1
Accounts receivable	
Outstanding publishers' credit notes
$100.00
750.00
$863,389.06
408,216.39
$850.00
407,277.40
455,172.67
18,495.01
1,510.20
$883,305.28
1 Third year depreciation on 1952-53 inventory ...
Second year depreciation on 1953-54 inventory
First year depreciation on 1954-55 inventory ....
$114,131.74
132,996.64
161,088.01
$408,216.39
Liabilities
Customers' credit balances carried as back orders __
Treasury advances for petty cash, Imprest Account
Advances from Consolidated Revenue Fund	
$372.99
850.00
882,082.29
$883,305.28 EE 126 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE
REPORT OF HAROLD P. JOHNS, PH.D., DIRECTOR
School counsellors of British Columbia again in 1954-55 evidenced a continuing
interest in their profession by the manner in which they sought specialized training.
During the winter months thirty-one counsellors of the Greater Vancouver area completed Course 190X, Counsellors' Conference, while the same course attracted an enrolment of twenty-nine at the Summer School of Education in Victoria in July. Two other
courses offered at the Summer School—No. 191, The Use of Tests in Counselling, and
No. 192, The Individual Inventory in Guidance—had enrolments of thirty and thirty-
three respectively. Unlike the two Counsellors' Conferences, which were open only to
experienced counsellors, a large proportion of those registered in Courses 191 and 192
were counsellors beginning their training. At a time when so many School Boards are
seeking to employ trained school counsellors, it is encouraging to see the profession
attracting these numbers of recruits. However, there is considerable evidence that
increased emphasis will have to be placed on a counsellor-training programme if the
requirements of the schools are to be met.
During the school-year, all secondary schools were supplied with vocational-
guidance monographs for their Occupational Information files covering twenty-one different occupations. In addition, 257 new monographs were listed and classified as a
service to schools of the Province.
Again in 1954-55 the Vancouver Board of Trade and the Pacific National Exhibition jointly sponsored the Annual Job Study Competition as a means of stimulating
interest in vocational guidance.   Winners of the bursary awards were as follows:—
(1) Grand award (winning job study submitted by a student of Grades X to
XII dealing with a single vocation): Georgina Tucker, Grade XII,
Semiahmoo High School, White Rock.   Subject, " Industrial Chemistry."
(2) Second award (senior high schools): Anne Dawson, Grade X, Gladstone Junior-Senior High School, Vancouver.   Subject, " The Secretary."
(3) First award (junior high school, dealing with an industry): Louise Trem-
blay, Grade IX, Brooks Junior-Senior High School, Prince Rupert. Subject, " Communications Jobs for Women."
It is encouraging to note the increase in vocational-guidance activity in the schools
as reflected by the number of entries submitted during the ten years that the Job Study
Competition has been conducted. The table below gives the number of studies voluntarily submitted each year:—
Number of Number of
Year Studies Year Studies
1954-55 19,251 1949-50    9,381
1953-54 15,376 1948-49 12,321
1952-53 10,901 1947-48    9,919
1951-52 11,125 1946-47    8,257
1950-51 10,078 1945-46    5,500
This Division is deeply appreciative of the efforts of both the Vancouver Board of
Trade and the Pacific National Exhibition in active support of vocational guidance in
the schools of British Columbia. On this occasion, which marks the completion of ten
years of close association with these public-spirited bodies, a formal word of acknowledgment would appear to be in order. DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
EE 127
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., DIRECTOR OF
SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
Programme Organization
School broadcasts are scheduled as far as possible so as to provide an even distribution of material by grade and subject throughout the year, and to ensure that material is
available at the most suitable time of year. In view of the fact that the time-table must
take account of an appreciable number of broadcasts shared with other Provinces, it will
be seen that this is no easy task. During the year, 148 half-hours of broadcasts were
presented. On a time basis, 20 per cent of the programmes originated in one of the other
three Western Provinces and another 20 per cent in Toronto, as national school broadcasts. A total of twenty-two half-hours of broadcasts were originated in British Columbia
for use in other Provinces.
By grade level, approximately 25 per cent of the year's programmes were suitable
for the primary grades, 42 per cent for intermediate grades, 18 per cent for junior high-
school grades, and 15 per cent for senior high-school grades. This distribution seems
appropriate, since less variety of material is possible in primary grades and school time
limitations impose heavier listening restrictions in senior grades.
The trend to shorter programmes is evident from the following comparison:—
1944-45 1954-55
Programme Length Percentage Percentage
10 minutes  15 12
15 minutes  28 44
20 minutes  15 12
30 minutes  42 32
100
100
School Response
During the year, school broadcasts were heard in British Columbia over CBU and
thirty-one repeater transmitters, as well as over nine other stations associated with the
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Pacific network.
The following is compiled from reports received from most schools. It is significant,
however, that returns fell below 75 per cent in twenty school districts. This may be taken
to indicate that there are still a large number of schools beyond the reach of transmitters.
Figures indicate almost exactly the same listening pattern as last year: 44 per cent
of pupils attending, 45 per cent of classrooms in session, 54 per cent of the schools of the
Province.
The most popular programmes were once again the music and the art broadcasts.
The music programme with the highest rating, had a listening audience of over 30 per cent
of the classrooms in session. The art broadcasts were heard by 11 per cent of the classrooms in session. Next in popularity were " Health Highways," " Australia at Work,"
and " Voices of the Wild," a nature science series.
A large number of teachers once more undertook detailed day-to-day evaluating of
programmes. There is a growing tendency for teacher evaluating committees to be set
up in the larger schools. This is a most useful project, and the sincere thanks of the
Division go to all those who co-operated in it this year.
Teacher Training and Assistance
The amount of standard printed material going out to schools showed an increase
of 7 per cent.   Guide pamphlets were issued for two special series as well as for the main EE 128 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
broadcasts, and supplementary music and map material was also distributed. As in
former years, the Division also undertook to distribute copies of the C.B.C. school radio
handbook " Young Canada Listens," 4,000 copies being sent out.
The programme of school visiting was continued, and included approximately sixty
schools outside the metropolitan area. The purpose of such visits is to confer with
teachers on the use of broadcasts and to discuss listening difficulties with them. It is
manifestly impossible to visit more than a sampling of schools in any one year.
Each of the three teacher-training centres was kind enough to make time available
for demonstration and discussion of the use of school broadcasts. A total of seventeen
hour-periods was devoted to this. Miss Margaret Musselman, Assistant Director of
School Broadcasts, held discussions and gave demonstrations at a variety of the classes
attending the 1954 Summer School of Education in Victoria.
Parent Information
The year was notable for the inauguration of a series of health broadcasts in which
parents actually participated through a broadcast discussion at the close of each broadcast.
Addresses on school broadcasts were given to a number of parent-teacher organizations.
Television
In November of 1954 the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation presented an experimental series of school telecasts in which some twenty schools of the Province participated.
Evaluation summaries were compiled by this Division. The results for Canada have
been published in the C.B.C. report " Television in the Classroom." DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH EE 129
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P/ed., DIRECTOR
The test standardization programme carried out by the Division in 1954-55 was
a very extensive one. Language and Literature were tested in both Grade XII English
courses (English 40 and 41), and two forms of a test in Social Studies 20, one in Social
Studies 10, and three parts of a test in Mathematics for Grade IX were administered on
a Province-wide basis. In addition, the British Columbia edition of the Dominion Group
Test of Learning Capacity was readministered to half the Grade XI enrolment and a
beginning was made in obtaining standards in Physical Education for Grade X boys.
Most of the tests were given late in the school-year and marking had to be carried on
simultaneously with the scaling of Matriculation examinations. Therefore, the load of
counting, shipping, marking, checking, typing, and tabulating was much too heavy to be
carried by the three regular staff members and the Director. The mimeographing of
survey materials, issued in quantities too small to justify printing, alone consumed 14,500
sheets. The number of tests and scores is given in the accompanying table. As a result,
several temporary employees had to be engaged, and, at its peak, the total staff reached
seventeen. Several days of typing also were contributed by employees in the Chief
Inspector's office.
Course or Subject
Pupils
Tested
Tests
Marked
Sub-tests
Scores
Obtained
English Literature 40-
English Language 40._
English 41 (Language and Literature)..
Social Studies 20 (A and B)	
Social Studies 10 	
Mathematical Fundamentals, IX.
Dominion Group Test of Learning Capacity, B, XI.
Physical Education, X 	
Totals	
4,718
1,278
10,508
13,602
13,628
3,856
5,900
4,712
4,718
1,278
10,508
13,602
40,734
3,856
14,136
18,872
8,946
10,508
13,602
95,096
3,856
29.5001
53,490
79,408
29
194,516
1 Age, height, and weight norms also were obtained.
The scales used for the University Entrance and Senior Matriculation examinations
in 1955 were the ones that were established in 1954. They are based on differences in
the ability of students taking different courses. The same scales, with minor modifications, will be used again next year. Methods used to establish University Entrance and
Senior Matriculation standards in British Columbia are believed to be unique, and a grant
of $500 has been received from the Research Council of the Canadian Education Association to conduct further research along this line. It is expected that the results of this
investigation will be reported in "Canadian Education" early in 1956.
Consideration is being given to the problem of retardation of male pupils, although
it must be admitted that no solution is in sight. Apparently there is much more retardation
among boys than among girls in Grade I, and the difference becomes greater rather than
less in subsequent years. It may be caused by the greater homogeneity found in the
scholastic aptitude of girls, to their ability to adjust to the new social environment established by the teacher, to earlier language development, or to greater suitability of the
curriculum.   The relationships are shown in the accompanying graph. EE 130 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
Sex Differences in Retardation in British Columbia Schools
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Large quantities of tests are distributed to British Columbia schools each year in
addition to the ones that are used in standardization or terminal course surveys. Many
of them are tests that have been standardized commercially, some are commercial tests
modified for use in British Columbia, and others are ones that have been produced entirely
within the Division. During 1954 over half a million copies of tests of this type were
sold. School enrolment is now 160 per cent of what it was when the Division was first
established, but the purchase of tests by School Boards has increased to 340 per cent of
its former level. That indicates that the use of standardized tests by teachers has more
than doubled during the past eight years. Over 200 tests with accessory materials are
available through the Division, and the preparation of a catalogue describing them is in
itself a major project. A new one was produced in 1955 for distribution in September.
Other leaflets and booklets have been distributed to Inspectors and principals from time
to time, and two of these produced during the past year dealing with Diagnosis in Reading and the Construction of Tests are expected to have a wide circulation.
Two of the members of the staff of the Division, Miss Ellen Brown and Mrs. Olga
Bowes, completed courses in Tests and Measurements with outstanding success during
the past year. Both also constructed preliminary forms of English tests, and Miss Brown's
Social Studies 20 test is now completely standardized. Mr. F. Martens, of the Provincial
Normal School, Victoria, selected the Physical Education tests, and very able assistance
was obtained outside the Division in making up preliminary forms of tests in Social Studies
10 and English 41.
It is becoming evident that enrolment forecasts made as recently as two years ago
are again proving to be too low. Net immigration from other Provinces of approximately
3,500 school-age children is expected this year, and the British Columbia birth rate
continues to rise. It is probable that the number of births in British Columbia will exceed
40,000 by 1970 and 70,000 by 1985. Obviously the levelhng-off of enrolment expected
about 1965-70 is now nowhere in sight, and we can look forward toward continuous
expansion, teacher shortages, and lack of accommodation for pupils for at least a generation and a half. DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
EE  131
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Circulation Report, September 1st, 1954, to August 31st, 1955
District Number and Name
Motion Pictures
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Filmstrips
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
5. Creston	
6. Kootenay Lake ._
7. Nelson ...
8. Slocan	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail— 	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. South Okanagan.	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos  	
17. Princeton  	
18. Golden    	
19. Revelstoke 	
20. Salmon Arm	
21. Armstrong	
22. Vernon  	
23. Kelowna...	
24. Kamloops	
25. Barriere	
26. Birch Island	
27. Williams Lake	
28. Quesnel 	
29. Lillooet _	
30. South Cariboo	
31. Merritt 	
32. Fraser Canyon	
33. Chilliwack  	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley 	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond   	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster....
41. Burnaby 	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam- 	
44. North Vancouver....
45. West Vancouver—
46. Sechelt    	
47. Powell River 	
48. Howe Sound 	
49. Ocean Falls	
50. Queen Charlotte.	
51. Portland Canal	
52. Prince Rupert	
53. Terrace ...
54. Smithers  	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Vanderhoof	
57. Prince George	
58. McBride	
59. Peace River South-
60. Peace River North-
61. Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich 	
64. Saltspring	
65. Cowichan	
526
163
151
314
63
842
352
379
257
544
366
215
155
110
482
84
227
403
533
155
393
897
614
115
26
18
109
88
147
176
392
184
665
535
842
545
955
3,466
658
1,942
1,129
1,478
486
186
559
267
272
615
25
359
171
112
127
139
282
55
411
111
5,167
253
360
174
277
268
86
103
169
34
371
179
158
135
296
163
84
62
77
236
42
153
192
238
61
213
469
374
77
14
9
52
50
61
78
198
133
367
260
459
245
409
2,236
435
941
512
690
358
148
266
133
147
357
22
150
83
41
54
52
114
24
192
55
2,988
144
130
81
141
271
48
23
8
103
252
140
4
43
194
100
111
17
65
60
85
215
231
79
217
163
280
1
11
20
30
169
324
98
351
564
541
197
630
574
11
795
943
1,446
53
151
341
262
138
107
310
9
229
42
2
51
98
3
261
41
10
135
439
56
953
217
30
18
6
75
202
119
2
38
139
71
69
15
57
45
69
169
169
54
159
100
225
1
10
18
28
137
237
90
290
364
388
168
418
467
6
589
597
987
51
120
201
191
102
90
223
8
162
36
2
19
73
1
187
34
8
97
294
36
694 EE 132 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1954-55
Circulation Report, September 1st, 1954, to August 31st, 1955—Continued
Motion Pictures
Filmstrips
District Number and Name
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
78
110
295
301
825
156
708
179
230
1,246
59
538
220
147
763
745
49
69
148
141
464
83
353
79
128
920
21
291
117
37
514
662
159
107
233
239 .
164
392
115
118
640
66
47
21
48
292
353
98
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum  .    '  	
70. Alberni        	
71. Courtenay .  —   	
82
165
179
139
283
73. Alert Bay.              	
96
74. Quatsino       	
80
517
76. Agassiz             	
41
39
78. Enderby          .   „ .
15
79. Ucluelet-Tofino     	
SO    Kifimat
16
215
Miscellaneous                 .    .	
232
Totals   .                                         	
38,703
21,145
16,099
11,669
This Division supplied visual aids to 556 schools during this term.
On the shelves of the library were 2,184 motion pictures, 3,982 filmstrips, 704
picture sets, and 61 dioramas.
Loan service of stereographs to rural schools has met with favourable response.
There are now 753 sterographs in the library.
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT
REPORT OF MRS. FREDA KINSMAN, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1954-55 a total of 205 applications were considered by the
Commission. Of these, twenty-five were turned down, the chief reason being that family
income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes; namely, $100
for a family of two, plus $40 for each additional dependent.
One hundred and eighty applications were approved for grants, eighty-seven receiving assistance for the first time, forty-nine for the second year, thirty-one for the third
year, and thirteen for the fourth year. Students were distributed by grades as follows:
Grade IX, 54; Grade X, 50; Grade XI, 36; Grade XII, 40. During the year twelve
students dropped out and grants were discontinued. Of the Grade XII students, ten
completed the General Programme, fourteen completed the University Entrance Programme, and ten students wrote Government examinations on subjects in which they had
not secured sufficient credits for complete pass. Fifty per cent of the subjects written
gained a pass mark.
The grant per pupil was $85.80 for the year, payable as follows: September, $50;
December, $25; March, $10.80.   STATISTICAL RETURNS
EE 135
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E
C_ EE  170
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1954-55
EXAMINATION PAPERS
Copies of examination papers for University Entrance and
Senior Matriculation, prepared by the Department of Education
for candidates who sat for examination in 1955, may be obtained,
in booklet form only, from the Officer in Charge, Text-book
Branch, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C., at the following
prices:—
University Entrance Examination Booklet, June and
August, 1955.     Price, 84 cents, postage prepaid.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, June and
August, 1955.    Price, 53 cents, postage prepaid.
Prices for the examination booklets for previous years still
available are as follows:—
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1947.    Price
63 cents.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1948.    Price
63 cents.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1949. Price.
63 cents.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1950. Price
74 cents.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1951. Price
79 cents.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1952. Price,
95 cents.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1953. Price.
$1.05.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1954. Price
$1.05.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1947. Price
42 cents.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1948. Price
42 cents.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1949. Price
53 cents.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1950. Price
63 cents.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1951. Price
68 cents.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1952. Price
53 cents.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1953. Price
53 cents.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1954. Price,
53 cents.
Note.—The above prices include the 5-per-cent social services
tax.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1956
3,060-356-9565

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