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Department of Trade and Industry REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1955 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1956

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Trade
and Industry
REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1955
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1956  To His Honour Frank M. Ross, C.M.G., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the year ended December 31st, 1955.
RALPH CHETWYND,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Office of the Minister,
Department of Trade and Industry,
Victoria, British Columbia. The Honourable Ralph Chetwynd,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the year ended December 31st, 1955.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
THOMAS L. STURGESS,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
For the Year Ended December 31st, 1955
The Departmental activities detailed in this Report took place in a year that was
outstanding from the view-point of economic progress within the Province. This statement is borne out by statistics indicating increases in almost every direction, including
such important indicators as construction, retail sales, personal income, and industrial
employment. Construction activity in British Columbia was at a high level during 1955.
The total value of construction put in place during the year is estimated at $521,000,000,
up 15.5 per cent over the value of $451,000,000 reported during the previous year. The
largest single item in British Columbia construction is residential building; it is estimated that in 1955 it accounted for 46 per cent of the value of building construction
and for approximately one-quarter of the total value of all construction. Residential
building starts during the year were running 70 per cent above 1954 and completions
at 43 per cent above the previous year.
The number of companies incorporated during 1955 was 2,290, compared with
1,869 for 1954. Business activity has been greatly stimulated by a continuation of the
expansion programme designed to further develop our forestry wealth, greater intensity
in the exploration for mineral and oil resources, heavy outlays on manufacturing-plant
expansions, and additions to marketing and service facilities. The gross value of manufacturing is estimated at $1,600,000,000, an all-time high. Contributing largely to this
increase were wood and paper products, foods, and beverages, backed up by an increasing
variety of other manufactures. A Trade Index, soon to be published by the Department,
will list many more companies and products than the 1952 edition.
Departmental files indicate that 1955 was marked by a record number of inquiries
from many countries for information leading to industrial and commercial establishment.
In addition, many individuals and groups were assisted in first-hand surveys. Certainly
British Columbia's reputation as a storehouse of natural resources, including an ever-
increasing supply of hydro-electric power plus oil and natural gas, is gaining increasing
international favour. A programme of advertising the economic advantages of British
Columbia in business publications in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States
was undertaken, with the result that many requests for information were received and
dealt with.
The external trade of the Province shows satisfactory increases in exports and
imports, with very little change in the actual direction of our exports or in the proportion
between our sales and purchases. Market conditions for our leading exports have been
good during 1955, with both domestic and foreign demand showing little sign of slackening. As was the case in 1954, the gains in foreign trade have been largely in the sale of
primary-resource commodities—lumber, pulp, non-ferrous metals. At the same time,
active internal conditions, with a high level of spending both for consumer and capital
goods, has pushed the value of goods imported into British Columbia to record levels.
As in past years, the Department continued the policy of assisting British Columbia
importers and exporters to locate products and markets.
Research and statistical staff of the Department rendered valuable assistance in the
preparation of the British Columbia Government submission to the Royal Commission
on Canada's Economic Prospects. Throughout the year this staff rendered an economic
research, data collection and tabulation service for business and industry and many
government departments in addition to the preparation of periodic reports.
The tourist industry enjoyed a record year, judged not only by the increased number
of visitors using the Province's vacation facilities, but by the increased estimated volume W 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of expenditure. Good roads and good accommodation, including camp-sites, have contributed to this favourable situation. The publicity efforts of the Department were continued and expanded whenever possible. Newspaper, magazine, and radio were used
as media for an advertising campaign, with good results.
The activities of the divisions of the Department of Trade and Industry for the
calendar year 1955 are described in the following pages of this Report. Included also
is the report of the Department's Industrial and Trade Representative at British Columbia
House, London.
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT
Regional Development
During the year under review the field representatives located at Nelson and Victoria
continued to work closely with industrial establishments, research groups, Chambers of
Commerce, and other agencies interested in the industrial expansion of British Columbia.
The regions covered by the fieldmen from their regional offices are as follows:
Regions 1 and 2 (East and West Kootenays), Region 3 (Okanagan), and Region 6
(Kamloops and South Central British Columbia) covered by the Nelson office; Region 4
(Lower Mainland), Region 5 (Vancouver Island and Gulf Islands), and Region 7
(Central Mainland Coast) covered by the Victoria office.
Numerous area and regional surveys were undertaken, and assistance was given to
several industrial development groups in preparing composite industrial maps.
The close liaison between the field offices and the British Columbia Research Council
continued, resulting in the channelling of technical inquiries to that organization. The
field representatives also assisted in arrangements for plant visits by members of the
Council.
The continued co-operation received from Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce,
and municipal officials was greatly appreciated by the Department.
British Columbia Research Council
Under the chairmanship of the Minister of Trade and Industry, the Research Council
held regular meetings during the year, at which were considered many scientific problems
of vital interest to the Province.
The Council was organized to perform the following functions:—■
(1) To co-ordinate the work of existing and prospective research units within
the Province of British Columbia:
(2) To initiate and undertake research work in any field of particular interest
to the Province; to apply the results of research toward the development
of new products, the improvement of industrial processes, and the establishment of new industries based on the resources of the Province:
(3) To assist in the development of the technical status of the industries in
the Province of British Columbia through a fuller utilization of scientific
methods and industrial research:
(4) To provide fellowships, scholarships, bursaries and rewards, and pecuniary
and other aids to facilitate and encourage original scientific and industrial
research:
(5) To provide for the publication of the results of the research work and to
enter into such arrangements as may be necessary with regard to patents
arising out of the work done by or for the Council.
To help achieve these objectives, the Council provides extensive research laboratories
and an experienced scientific and technical staff. It is gratifying to report that industry
has continued to make ever-increasing use of the Council's services.    A notable trend DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY W 7
is shown by the fact that individual industries or companies are requesting larger, more
comprehensive research studies than in previous years. While short-term trouble-shooting
problems are still important, industry is devoting more attention to larger-scale improvements in processes and products.
To meet the growing demand on the Council's services, construction was begun
on a new wing for the laboratories, increasing the floor area by nearly one-half to a total
of more than 28,000 square feet. Because of the imminent introduction of natural gas
to large areas of the Province, and the resulting large demand for gas-burning equipment,
the Council has been appointed the testing laboratory for the Province, under the " Gas
Act." The ground floor of the new wing will be almost entirely devoted to this work.
The upper floors will provide new laboratories for the Division of Applied Biology,
whose work on food and agricultural products, forest seeding, the reduction of marine-
borer damage, and related subjects is crowding existing space. Other new facilities
include new temperature- and humidity-controlled rooms and a larger technical library.
The board of management consists of the following:—
Chairman—Honourable Ralph Chetwynd, Minister of Railways, Trade and
Industry, and Fisheries of the Province of British Columbia.
Provincial Government—■
T. L. Sturgess, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
Wm. MacGillivray, Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
Federal Government—
A. W. H. Needier, Director, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries Research
Board of Canada, Nanaimo, B.C.
K. G. Fensom, Superintendent, Forest Products Laboratory, University
of British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
University of British Columbia—■
Ian McTaggart-Cowan, Department of Zoology.
A. H. Finlay, Department of Civil Engineering.
C. A. Rowles, Department of Agronomy.
Industry—
J. K. Clarke, Assistant to the Manager, Buckerfield's Limited, foot of
Rogers Street, Vancouver 6, B.C.
P. E. Cooper, a Director, Crown Zellerbach Canada Limited, P.O. Box
879, Vancouver 4, B.C.
James S. Eckman, Chairman, Greater Vancouver Metropolitan Industrial
Development Commission,  1123  Marine Building, Vancouver  1,
B.C.
Aird Flavelle, Timber Consultant, Flavelle Cedar Limited, Division of
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited, Port Moody, B.C.
S. J. Hammitt, President, Western Canada Steel Limited, Granville Island,
Vancouver 1, B.C.
M. M. O'Brien, Vice-President and General Manager, Bralorne Mines
Limited, 555 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
R. V. Robinson, Manager, British Columbia Division of Canadian Manufacturers' Association, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
Paul Walrod, General Manager, B.C. Fruit Processors Limited and B.C.
Tree Fruits Limited, Kelowna, B.C.
C. E. Webb, Consulting Engineer, 6162 Churchill Street, Vancouver 13,
B.C. W 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE REPRESENTATIVE IN THE UNITED KINGDOM,
BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON
General Business Conditions
During 1955 the trading position in Britain improved considerably, but exports to
the dollar countries decreased. This decrease was a direct result of the flourishing home
market in Great Britain, and steps have now been taken by the British Government to
rectify the situation.
United Kingdom-British Columbia Trade
The United Kingdom is an important market for British Columbia products. Since
the war we have sold a yearly average of $190,000,000 and have purchased from United
Kingdom sources an average of $35,000,000. The balance of trade is therefore very
much in British Columbia's favour, but if the figures are examined, it will be seen that
British Columbians, per capita, purchase seven times as much United Kingdom goods
as do the British of British Columbia goods.
The Province stands high in the minds of the British people as Britain's best customer
in Canada. This was forcibly demonstrated when it was announced by this office that
during the month of October alone special purchases in the United Kingdom by the
British Columbia Government and by British Columbia firms amounted to $25,840,000.
Visits from the Province of Government officials, organized buying missions, prominent industrialists, and traders help to create a fund of goodwill throughout the British
Isles. British Columbia, therefore, has the best name of all the Canadian Provinces for
actively encouraging two-way trade. Typical of this was the speech of Mr. Eric Johnson,
M.P. for the Blackley Division of Manchester, during the Budget debate, when he spoke
at some length on why Britain should increase her purchases from our Province. Another
member, Mr. William Shepherd, of Cheshire, in a House of Commons debate, said:
" The present state of trade between Canada and the United Kingdom must give us all
cause for concern. ... In this connection British Columbia has set a high standard.
If the same effort were made by all Provinces in Canada, it might go a long way toward
putting our trade on a more satisfactory basis and avoid that cut in imports from the
dollar area which I fear must be made before very long unless there is a material improvement in the present position."
During 1955 the sale of British Columbia products in the United Kingdom increased,
with forest products well in the lead. During the year, lumber shows a small increase
over 1954, approximating an amount of $51,000,000. The sale of railway-ties dropped
slightly to $1,900,000.
British Columbia plywood shows the most spectacular increase. Total sales in 1953
were approximately $80,000; in 1954, $900,000; and in 1955 deliveries reached a total
value of $2,799,006.
Canned salmon and apples from the Province are now available to British distributers
on individual specific licence, and the demand for both commodities is steadily increasing.
One disturbing element in the situation, however, is the amount of Japanese and Russian
salmon presently entering the United Kingdom.
United Kingdom Investment in British Columbia
As sterling became more easily convertible due to the improved dollar position,
British investment in the Province increased. Figures for the total investment for 1955
are not available, but typical of this trend was the acquisition by Great Universal Stores,
of London, of a department store in Vancouver, at a price approximating $1,000,000.
It is now apparent to United Kingdom firms who wish to sell their goods on a continuing basis that they must establish sales offices, warehouses, or service depots.   This DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY W 9
point was continually stressed throughout the year through the medium of the press and
trade journals and at meetings with business groups and Chambers of Commerce.
The scope for professional services from Britain is another facet of investment.
Typical of this trend was the establishment in New Westminster of the Canadian British
Engineering Consultants and also Ewbank & Partners Limited, of London, in their
association with Crippen, Wright Engineering Limited, of Vancouver. During 1955
three professional firms made surveys of British Columbia, and announcements of their
plans are expected shortly.
Vancouver Board of Trade Buyers' Mission
Fifty-four members of the Vancouver Board of Trade were in the British Isles
from April 11th to 23 rd on a trade mission concerned primarily with purchasing from
British sources on behalf of their various companies. This mission was under the leadership of Mr. Howard N. Walters, president of the Vancouver Board of Trade. Accompanying the delegation was the Minister of Trade and Industry, the Honourable W. R. T.
Chetwynd.
Arrangements were made by British Columbia House for the reception and entertainment of this mission during the first five days of their stay in London. These arrangements were made in co-operation with the High Commissioner at Canada House, the
Minister of State at the Board of Trade, the Lord Mayor of London, the Dollar Exports
Council, the Scottish Council, the Grosvenor Estates, as well as many others in governmental and business circles in Great Britain who have ties with our Province.
The Industrial and Trade Office at British Columbia House maintained throughout
this visit a complete secretarial service and report centre for all members of the mission.
Contacts were made with British business houses, and visits to factories and showrooms
arranged.
This mission was most successful, as it brought forcibly to the attention of the
British Government and industrialists the possibilities of trade with British Columbia,
and, further, orders totalling $20,000,000 were placed or arranged whilst the mission was
in the United Kingdom.
Visit of the Minister of Trade and Industry
The Honourable W. R. T. Chetwynd remained in the United Kingdom after the
Board of Trade mission had returned to British Columbia, during which time he had
consultations with Ministers of those Government departments concerned with the
granting of licences for the purchase of canned salmon, apples, metals, and other British
Columbia products.
The announcement made during his stay that the Pacific Great Eastern Railway was
purchasing a further large tonnage of rails served to underline the importance and reality
of two-way trade. Mr. Chetwynd delivered several speeches to large gatherings of British
business-men, notably the Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Great Britain and the
Federation of British Industries. He also spoke at a press conference at British Columbia House. The Minister visited several industrial centres in the Midlands before his
return to Canada.
Contacts with Other European Countries
The two European countries most interested in trade with British Columbia are the
Netherlands and the West German Federal Republic. Both German and Dutch enterprise have already had their impact on the industrial life of the Province with the establishment of such companies as the Canadian Western Pipe Mills Limited, The Pitt Polder
Limited, and the Mercantile Bank of Canada. W 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
The position in the Netherlands is that there are vast reserves of capital (mainly
withdrawn from the former Netherlands East Indies) now ready for investment in other
countries. Further, the productivity of the Netherlands has increased enormously over
pre-war standards and the Dutch are looking for export markets.
In Western Germany they are mainly concerned with export markets, but many of
the exporters feel that in order to enter the Canadian market it is necessary that branch
plants be established. This is felt to be a fairly short-term policy because of the special
position of a divided Germany, whereas the financial and industrial position in the Netherlands will be a continuing problem.
Trade between British Columbian ports and other European countries continues to
show a favourable balance in our favour.
The Industrial and Trade Representative in London, during 1955, made trips to
Germany and the Netherlands and arranged for two West German and four Dutch companies to visit the Province and survey the situation for investment and branch-plant
(or servicing-depot) establishment. Continual contact is also kept with the trade
attaches at appropriate embassies in the United Kingdom.
Trade and Industry Service
In May of 1955 a new method was instituted for handling inquiries from the
Province, from the United Kingdom, and from European countries. This was given
considerable publicity through the media of Government departments, Chambers of
Commerce, and Canadian commercial counsellors in Europe, under the title of " British
Columbia Trade and Industry Service." Since its initiation the following number of
cases have been dealt with:—
From United
Kingdom
From European
Countries
From British
Columbia
46
26
4
8
3
2
7
2
1
8
4
12
Commodities and machinery requiring special service	
g
T"tfi|«
96
15
20
The above figures do not include those inquiries from British Columbia which come
to this office through the medium of the United Kingdom Trade Commissioner in British
Columbia, but now that it has been initiated it is hoped that more of our business-men
will avail themselves of this service. Full details can be obtained from the Deputy
Minister at Victoria.
Notices of tenders are now received from Government departments and from some
municipal and civic offices in British Columbia for installations and machinery required.
Appropriate United Kingdom and Continental firms have been informed that specifications and tender documents are available at British Columbia House.
The General Functions of the Office
The year 1955 was a record one for British Columbian visitors, 2,518 being the
number recorded by the reception desk. A proportion of these were business-men wishing
to be put in touch with ministries, trade associations, and firms in the United Kingdom.
Through these contacts many agency representations for British and Continental goods
were secured. Inquiries by prospective emigrants from all parts of the British Isles
increased. These inquiries include tradesmen, shopkeepers, mechanics, salesmen, scientists, engineers, and business executives, almost all able to move to British Columbia
J DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 11
capital from the normal £1,000 allowance, but much larger amounts in many cases.
There were also twelve young men interviewed who wished to enrol for either Commerce
or Forestry degrees and put in touch with the Registrar at the University of British
Columbia.
All inquiries from British firms who wish representation in Western Canada are
carefully considered and, if deemed suitable, forwarded to Victoria for inclusion in the
Trade and Industry Bulletin. W 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
This office is responsible for the promotion of new industrial and commercial enterprises throughout the Province. Special attention is provided to industries seeking new
plant locations, with specific information being furnished on planned industrial sites
zoned for exclusive industrial uses. Assistance is also given to established businesses
when required, and promotion of the domestic and export trade is practised.
This work is carried out in co-operation with other Provincial Government departments, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce, the
British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, industrial commissions, railway industrial agents, and foreign trade representatives in Canada and
overseas.
During the year this office arranged itineraries and tours of British Columbia for
manufacturers, business-men, groups of Assistant Trade Commissioners, and for delegations from Pakistan working under the Colombo rehabilitation plan.
NEW INDUSTRIES AND PRODUCTS
The numerous new industries established or under way during the year under review
contributed substantially to British Columbia's unprecedented economic expansion.
While much of the industrial activity centred on huge capital investments for construction
of pulp and paper plants, many other types of industries also commenced operation for
the first time in British Columbia. Among these was the $7,000,000 steel pipe and tube
mill at Port Moody that commenced production of black and galvanized pipe in sizes
from one-half inch to four inches. The potential of this mill is more than 60,000 tons
annually, and much of the production will find a ready market in the natural-gas field.
Construction also began on an $11,000,000 chemical plant in North Vancouver which
will produce chlorine and caustic soda to serve the rapidly growing pulp, oil-refining,
plywood, and chemical manufacturing industries. Approximately 100 will be employed
in this plant upon its completion early in 1957. Preparations are also under way for the
construction of a $5,000,000 chemical plant in North Vancouver to produce sodium
chlorate, and a $1,000,000 plant is being erected at Marpole to manufacture a chemical
from hemlock-bark.   This chemical is used as an additive in rock-drilling lubricants.
The new $1,000,000 corrugated-paper box company, reported as under way in 1954
at New Westminster, commenced operation, with an annual capacity of 150,000,000
square feet. Construction of a $4,000,000 paper specialties and box plant was also well
under way on Lulu Island.   This plant will employ 400 when completed.
Many smaller enterprises were also established during the year, and although they
involved lesser capital investments, they contributed substantially to rounding out the
economy of our Province.
Among some of these were a new chain-saw plant in Burnaby, a new aluminium-
fabricating plant in Vancouver capable of cold-rolling 150 lineal feet per minute, an
aircraft-maintenance depot at Patricia Bay Airport in Saanich, and a new plant in South
Westminster to manufacture a volcanic aggregate for use in plaster and concrete mixes.
Several large chippers and log-barkers were installed in mills throughout the Province,
and large dry-kilns were constructed in the Interior at Cranbrook, Lumby, and Nelson.
One of the greatest boons to expansion of new industries and manufacturing of new
products was the announcement during the year that a multi-million-dollar natural-gas
pipe-line is to be built from the Peace River to Vancouver. This will mean the availability
of cheap fuel for Interior points of British Columbia, which in turn will allow a greater
diversification of industry. With the advent of natural gas and oil at tide-water, it appears
certain that the Lower Mainland will attract new petrochemical industries, and expansion
of existing industries can also be expected through this cheap and adaptable fuel. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY W 13
With an adequate supply of natural gas, together with our increasing hydro-power
potential, British Columbia can be assured of a continued stimulus for further industrial
development.
Branch-plant Inquiries
The volume of inquiries through this office continued to increase during 1955.
While some of this increase resulted from the natural economic growth of our Province,
a great number of inquiries were directed to this branch due to the numerous letters sent
to selected industrial contacts throughout the year. The vigorous advertising campaign
conducted by the Department and our participation at the Canadian International Trade
Fair at Toronto were also responsible for contributing to this growth. Inquiries came
from Eastern Canada, the United States, England, and Europe. Among eastern firms
contemplating establishing a plant in British Columbia were inquiries on the possibilities
of manufacturing industrial heating equipment, manufacturing of plumbing fixtures, manufacturing of dowel pins, taper pins, etc. Several United States firms requested data for
possible plant expansion. Some of the reports and surveys submitted to these firms
furnished information on the manufacturing possibilities of wire springs, men's apparel,
metal-working machinery, and paper-board partitions for paper boxes. Detailed surveys
were also made for English firms, including one regarding branch-plant establishment for
manufacturing electric motors and another on the opportunities to manufacture metal
shelving for storage systems. In addition to servicing inquiries, an aggressive programme
of contacting firms considered to be suitable for branch-plant establishment was continued.
CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR EXHIBIT
For the sixth consecutive year, British Columbia was represented by an exhibit at
the Canadian International Trade Fair held at the Canadian National Exhibition grounds
in Toronto from May 30th to June 10th. The exhibit occupied 240 square feet and was
located in an excellent spot in the west annex of the Exhibition grounds. Basically the
exhibit was similar to last year's, with certain improvements and additions which added
to its attractiveness. The exhibit depicted pictorially and statistically the Province's
industrial progress.
Twenty-eight countries exhibited and occupied more than 195,000 square feet of
exhibiting space. Business visitors were recorded from more than sixty countries. There
were a greater number of business-men from British Columbia this year, most of whom
made a point of visiting the Department's exhibit. Dr. Ludwig Erhard, Minister of
Economic Affairs for West Germany, officially opened the fair and afterwards paid a
special visit to the British Columbia exhibit. He expressed keen interest in the
Province's industrial development.
There was an increase this year in the number of branch-plant inquiries, with several
firms indicating an interest in establishing plants in British Columbia. Among these
were a boot-manufacturer, a manufacturer of fire-fighting equipment, and a manufacturer
of fibre-glass boats and automatically operated garage doors. Other business inquiries
requested data on importing of British Columbia canned and frozen fish to Europe, data
on the cost of importing Christmas trees to Eastern Canada and the United States, and
numerous requests to act as agents for British Columbia products in other Provinces of
Canada. Considerable interest was also displayed in freight-rate costs in shipping goods
from British Columbia to eastern points.
More than 6,000 pieces of the Department's industrial and commercial literature,
in addition to 1,500 pieces of Boards of Trade pamphlets, were distributed. Our new
brochure, " Invitation to Industry," proved most popular and was well received, Two
members of the Department's staff were in charge of the exhibit. W 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
COMPOSITE INDUSTRIAL MAP OF LOWER MAINLAND
Several changes were made in the revised edition of this map, which was published
early in 1955. The map now indicates the industrial areas occupied by heavy and light
industries, the areas zoned for heavy and light industries, and also potential areas suitable
for heavy and light industries but at present not zoned. The map covers an area from
Vancouver to Port Coquitlam City and includes thirteen municipalities. The requests
for copies of this map from business-men and manufacturers have been most gratifying.
CLOSING-DAY PAMPHLET
This pamphlet was revised during the year, and numerous requests for copies have
been received. The pamphlet lists the closing-days for retail and wholesale establishments for more than 100 city, village, and district municipalities. It also lists the closing-
days for the majority of the larger unincorporated communities.
HANDICRAFT DIRECTORY
The sixth directory of handicraft products and producers in British Columbia was
published in 1955. The directory provides a listing for the benefit of shops and other
outlets interested in buying and selling handicraft items. Distribution of the directory
was made to retail and wholesale firms, resorts, and other outlets. Several producers
notified the Department of sales made through the medium of this brochure. The
usual contact was maintained with Eastern Canadian Provinces interested in handicraft
development.
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
The British Columbia Industrial Design Committee includes representation from
the Department of Trade and Industry, Department of Education, University of British
Columbia, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver School of Art, British
Columbia Research Council, and the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce.
The Committee has co-operated with the National Industrial Design Committee in
local planning. It has assisted in publicity and public relations, to encourage appreciation
of industrial design and its importance as a factor in production and marketing of
British Columbia products.
The Committee has assisted in building up reference libraries on industrial design.
It has assisted in local planning for National design competitions sponsored by industry.
Direct financial assistance was secured from the National Gallery, Ottawa, with
smaller contributions from British Columbia sources.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN
This Bulletin, listing trade inquiries, licence manufacture opportunities, and news
of general commercial interest, has been published for the past six years. It has been
the means of establishing contact between foreign firms and British Columbia importers
and manufacturers. Many of the trade inquiries reach us through our Industrial and
Trade Representative at British Columbia House, London, while the majority of licence
manufacture opportunities are supplied by the Industrial Development Division, Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa. Foreign trade representatives in Canada also
use the Bulletin to clear their trade inquiries.
PUBLIC RELATIONS AND COMMITTEE WORK CO-OPERATION
The Department has continued the effective basis of co-operation with foreign
consulates and with the Trade Commissioners of Commonwealth countries. W 15
H
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
MEANS
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LOOK
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FOR THE GREAT
^INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT^
OF THE CENTURY
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REASON:
The world's greatest source of softwood pulp for chemicols and wonder
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facilities. ■ ■■
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| Add'e« ■■ 	
The   Government   of   the   Province   of
BRITISH
COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE & INDUSTRY
VICTORIA,  B.C.,
The office has been responsible for itinerary and
other arrangements for business visitors from Eastern
Canada and overseas, and visiting trade missions and
special industrial-survey parties. It has worked in
direct co-operation with the Foreign Trade Service
Office in Vancouver for the arrangements in British
Columbia for visiting Trade Commissioners and officials from Ottawa.
The office is represented on the Greater Vancouver Metropolitan Industrial Development Commission and on several standing committees of the
Vancouver Board of Trade and the Victoria Chamber of Commerce.
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENTS' TRADE
AND INDUSTRY COUNCIL
This organization is composed of representatives from the ten Provincial industrial and trade promotion departments. Associated with the Provincial
representatives in this co-ordinated effort to develop
industry and encourage trade are other agencies,
including the Federal Department of Trade and
Commerce, the banks, transportation companies,
and other interested industrial and trade promotion
groups.
This Council meets once each year, and in 1955
Quebec was the host Province. All Provinces and
associated agencies were represented.
INDUSTRIAL ADVERTISING
After a lapse of one year, a programme of
industrial advertising was undertaken in the latter
months of 1955, and some of the insertions will carry
over to the early months of 1956. An illustration of
one of the advertisements is shown in this Report,
and it will be seen that the theme is a presentation
of some of British Columbia's leading resources and
a reiteration of the slogan that " British Columbia
means business." Among media used were Time
Magazine (both United States and Canadian editions), Fortune, Newsweek, U.S. News and World
Report, The Economist (London, Eng.), Wall Street
Journal, and Financial Post. Many coupons were
returned requesting further information, and all inquiries were listed for follow-up.
HON.  RALPH CHfTWYND
MINISTER
T. L. STURGESS
DEPUTY  MINISTER W 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics during 1955, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is, as its name
implies, a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is to
provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into economic
questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and compile economic
statistics of interest to the Province.
In order to carry out these objectives, the Bureau is divided into the following
divisions: Economic Research, Trade and Transportation, Market Research, Statistical,
and Mechanical Tabulation. To ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavored
to follow the policy of building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who can
be relied upon to perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been the
policy to make the services of the technical personnel continuously available to all other
departments of the Government.
Since other Governmental agencies are also concerned with the collection of
statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication
has been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, Provincial Secretary, and Health and Welfare. During 1955 the essential statistical services
performed for the other Provincial departments, as well as for the Department of Trade
and Industry, were maintained. Before proceeding with a description of the services
performed by the various divisions during the year, a brief review of business activity in
British Columbia is presented.
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Preliminary economic indicators suggest that business activity in British Columbia
continued its upward trend and reached an all-time high during 1955. The primary
industries, with the exception of the fisheries industry, held their own or showed increases.
The highlights of activity took place in the construction and manufacturing industries.
Wages increased moderately, prices only slightly, and as a result real wages showed
an increase. The increase in real wages and willingness to spend were in evidence, as
retail sales showed a good increase. When adjusted for price and population increases,
the per capita retail sales were the highest in British Columbia's history.
Incomplete returns indicate the net value of production of primary and secondary
industries amounted to some $1,312,000,000 in 1954, compared with $1,319,827,000
in 1953 and $1,239,009,000 in 1952. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 17
EMPLOYMENT
3      60
1949   •   100 |
1939       1941       1943      1945       1947        1949       1951        1953
YEARS
1400
RET
AIL TRADE
/
/
1200
t/i
/
<
P 1000
J
0
o
/
2    600
/
2
0
3
BANK DEBITS
y
0
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
/
0
939   1941  1943   1945  1947  1949   1951  1953  1955
YEARS
1939 I 1941  1943   1945   1947  1949  1951   1953  1955
YEARS
6.0
4.5
3.0
1.5
19
CONSUMPTION OF ELECTRICAL POWER
/
a
£
W
0
is
0
J
3
39
19
41
19
43
19
•15
19
47
19
49
19
31
19
>3
19
15.0
FREIGHT LOADED
i
12.0
/
y
s
/
s
9.0
7.5
6.0
3.0
1.5
0
1939        1941       1943
194319471949
YEARS
1951       1953      1955
SALES OF LIFE INSURANCE
<
160
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j
C)
u
b
1?.0
7
O
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2
1
/
Z
/
___^z^
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2_
.—^
1939        1941       1943       1945       1947      1949       1951 1953       1955
YEARS
1955 Figures Subject to Revision W  18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CONSUMER   PRICES
WHOLESALE   PRICES
1 1949  =   100 1
1941 1943 1945 1947
YEARS
1949 1951 1953 1955 19 39 1941 1943
| 1935-1939  ^   100 |
1945 1947
YEARS
1949 1951 1953 1955
AVERAGE  WEEKLY  WACES
220
200
180
160
tfl
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BUILDING
PERMITS
2
60
40
20
1939 1941 1943
1945 1947
YEARS
949 1951 1953 1955 1939 1941 1943 1945
1947
YEARS
1949 1951 1951 1955
1955 Figures Subject to Revision DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 19
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1953 and 1954,
with Preliminary Estimates for 1955
Unit or
Base
Period
1955
Preliminary
Estimates
1954
1953
Mining—
Total value of production..
Gold production..
Silver production	
Copper production..
Lead production	
Zinc production..
Coal production—	
Forestry—
Total value of production..
Timber scaled __
Lumber production	
Paper production	
Fisheries—
Total value of production-
Pack of canned salmon	
Agriculture—
Total value of production..
Apples—
Total shipments	
Domestic shipments	
Export shipments	
External trade—
Export of canned salmon-
Export of planks and boards, Douglas fir..
Export of red-cedar shingles  _	
Internal trade—
Total retail sales  -	
Department stores	
Motor-vehicle dealers..
Gasoline consumed —
Railway freight loaded in British Columbia..
Consumption of electric power 	
Sales of life insurance 	
Construction—
New residential units completed 	
Building permits issued-	
Finance—Bank debits .
Tourist trade—Automobile entries on sixty-day permit.
Employment—
All employment 	
Manufacturing-
Iron and steel products -
Lumber products	
Pulp and paper..	
Mining.. 	
Logging—	
Construction-
Communication..
Transportation	
Services	
Trade 	
Salaries and wages.—
Mb.m.
M b.m.
Tons
Cases
$
Boxes
Boxes
Boxes
Cwt.
Mft.
Sq.
000$
000$
000$
Gallons
Tons
000 kwh.
000$
Units
000$
000$
Number
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949 = 100
1949=100
1949 = 100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
178,000,000
8,425,000
7,300,000
17,250,000
44,750,000
51,000,000
9,500,000
610,000,000
6,480,000
5,270,000
63,000,000
1,406,230
131,000,000
2,326,505
455,920
1,784,910
2,470,903
1,378,681
189,302
304,637
246.764,000
14,000,000
5,895,295
234,122
14,034
235,000
12,812,854
283,469
111.3
118.3
120.8
124.2
141.3
94.9
97.8
105.1
144.2
110.8
111.2
107.8
1,290,000,000
153,377,315
9,042,246
8,153,108
14,599,693
45,482,505
34,805,755
9,154,544
528,022,783
5,567,423
4,481,279
647,117
69,400,000
1,743,406
129,177,288
4,245,808
2,263,438
1,982,370
702,261
1,537,160
2,285,907
1,249,499
173,960
273,079
220,679,669
12,359,945
5,209,683
198,311
9,158
164,840
11,956,325
278,376
106.2
109.2
107.2
112.5
137.2
92.5
91.3
106.9
145.7
110.6
102.4
103.0
1,200,000,000
152,731,181
9,130,524
7,017,709
14,869,544
39,338,655
40,388,346
9,630,777
512,288,656
5,291,587
4,045,724
597,936
66,259,600
1,826,588
129,537,055
4,395,772
2,630,492
1,765,280
499,473
1,272,106
2,052,877
1,228,231
156,391
252,245
210,072,484
11,845,595
4,897,335
176,899
7,503
149,231
11,786,823
283,837
108.4
107.9
113.1
108.3
123.1
104.3
92.5
127.4
139.2
112.3
98.6
102.7
1,066,979,019 O
VALUE OF AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION OF B.C., YEARS  1920 TO  1955
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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ECONOMIC RESEARCH DIVISION
One of the major functions of this Division is to provide economic counsel to the
Government. On a general basis this is done through the medium of a weekly report
sent to the Premier's Office and to the Minister of each Department. The report contains
a review of economic events which are considered to be of particular significance to the
Province. The report also contains charts chosen to illustrate trends in our economy.
A section of statistical information is also included, which provides an up-to-date summary
of business indicators.
In addition to providing general economic data, as described above, the Economic
Research Division has also been requested to prepare reports on special subjects by many
branches of the Government. Technical assistance of this nature has been given in the
past year to the following branches: Department of Labour, Department of Finance,
the Hospital Insurance Commission, and the Civil Service Commission.
This Division provides government and industry with various publications designed
to keep them informed on current business conditions within the Provincial economy.
Three widely distributed publications of this nature are the Monthly Bulletin of Business
Activity, the Quarterly Bulletin of Economic Conditions in British Columbia, and the
Annual Summary of Business Activity. The monthly publication contains a brief description of current changes in monthly business indicators, such as production, trade, and
employment. Statistical tables and charts, including a table showing the imports and
exports through British Columbia customs ports, supplement the text of each issue. The
quarterly publication is a commentary on changes in economic conditions for each quarter
of the year. The annual publication is a record of the past year's performance. In
addition to providing a description of recent progress in business and industrial endeavour,
it contains numerous charts and historical series illustrating business growth.
A great number of requests for information dealing with the Provincial economy have
been received during the past year from private individuals, corporations, trade-unions,
newspapers, business publications, and Boards of Trade. In some cases such inquiries
call for the provision of statistical information readily available from our files and library.
In other cases they require lengthy tabulations and a considerable amount of research.
The helpful co-operation of the staff of the Provincial Library and other departments
of the Government is worthy of mention in this regard.
Seasonal Unemployment
In the spring of this year the Bureau assigned part of its research staff to a study of
seasonal unemployment in British Columbia. While seasonal unemployment is a recurring problem in certain of our major industries (such as logging and construction), it was
abnormally high in the winter and spring months of 1953-54.
The survey was based on a study of available statistical information complemented
by interviews with senior officials in those industries most severely affected by seasonal
contractions, trade-union officials, and other interested organizations. Reports were
prepared for the Government incorporating the suggestions received from these sources
and recommending possible action which might be taken in an effort to reduce seasonal
unemployment.
Wage-rate Surveys
At the request of the Civil Service Commission, the annual study of wage rates in
the metropolitan areas of Vancouver and Victoria was again prepared. A questionnaire
was sent to all large firms in these areas asking for the going wage rates in selected
occupations, as at the last pay period in April, 1955.
As a result of the survey, the Civil Service Commission was provided with comparative wage rates paid by private firms and by the Provincial Government. Considerable demand for the information collected was also shown by other Government branches. W 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A mimeographed summary of the survey was prepared for distribution to the co-operating
establishments and to other interested organizations.
The clerical salary survey of the Vancouver Board of Trade was again tabulated and
analysed by this Division. The results of the survey were published in a comprehensive
report showing salary ranges and average salaries for thirty-three office occupations
within the Vancouver area. The publication also includes a section outlining the policies
of the participating firms with respect to working conditions.
Trade-union Statistics
Each year a survey of trade-union locals operating in British Columbia is conducted
for the Labour Relations Board. Data collected from each local include the following:
Names and addresses of officers, affiliation, membership, and jurisdiction of the local
organization. A directory of trade-union locals operating in British Columbia is compiled
from the returns and is published in the Provincial Department of Labour's Annual
Report.
Reported labour-organization membership in British Columbia (including non-
trade-union membership of less than 1,000 members) totalled 186,951 members at
January 1st, 1955, compared to 178,533 members at January 1st, 1954, an increase of
4.71 per cent.
Expressed as a percentage of paid workers, organized-labour membership this year
reached 53.21 per cent.
A comparison of the 1955 industrial distribution of trade-union membership with
the corresponding distribution for 1954 is as follows:—
Jan. 1, 1954     Jan. 1, 1955
(Per Cent)      (Per Cent)
Wood and wood products  20.44 20.18
Public service  17.65 20.96
Construction   12.58 9.97
Other transportation   9.20 8.60
Foods   7.14 8.32
Railway transportation  6.80 7.09
Metals   7.16 7.09
Mining and quarrying  5.64 5.16
Personal service  4.15 4.36
Light, heat, and power_  2.94 3.22
Communication  2.36 2.46
Printing and publishing  1.56 1.53
Clothing and footwear.  .58 .59
All others  1.80 .47
100.00 100.00
As indicated last year, the survey of organized labour in British Columbia is now
carried out jointly with the Federal Department of Labour. Advantages of combining
surveys of this type are elimination of duplication, increased coverage, and less forms for
industry to complete.
TRANSPORTATION AND TRADE DIVISION
Transportation Section
The past year has placed heavy demands on the transportation section of the Bureau
of Economics and Statistics, with much consideration given to the preparation of briefs
for the Royal Commission on Coastal Trade and the Royal Commission on Canada's
Economic Prospects in addition to the normal duties.   Equalization of railway mileage DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY W 27
class rates has been virtually completed, but there now remains the task of equalizing the
commodity mileage scales. While this is primarily a problem for individual industries,
assistance will be offered to any British Columbia firm requiring the research services
of the Bureau.
In addition to the above, considerable assistance has been given to and received from
the Department of Railways and the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. Close co-operation
has also been maintained with the Department of Finance on Federal-Provincial and
other fiscal problems pertaining to transportation. The Department of Agriculture and
the Bureau of Economics and Statistics are, at the time of writing, jointly engaged in the
preparation of a brief protesting the unreasonableness of the spread between export grain
rates and those paid on feed by British Columbia farmers.
During the past year several assignments have had to be put aside due to the pressure
of work; these include (a) suggested revisions to the rates section of the British Columbia
" Railway Act," (b) studies on the effect of changes in commodity rates which may result
from equalization, (c) further research into the practicability of applying the " cost of
service " principle to rate-making, and (d) a further economic survey of the area to be
served by the Pacific Great Eastern Railway extension north of Prince George.
External Trade Section
The agreement between this Bureau and the External Trade Branch, Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, consumated in the fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under this
agreement the Bureau receives monthly a duplicate set of punch-cards showing in detail
the importation and exportation of every commodity normally listed in the Federal trade
reports which has been recorded at customs ports located in this Province. While these
records do not distinguish the exported merchandise originating in British Columbia nor
the imports destined for consumption in this Province from the other goods passing
through these customs ports, the records do provide the basis for a very comprehensive
annual report on the foreign trade of British Columbia.
Preliminary statements showing the external trade through British Columbia customs
ports covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over are now published annually. Until June, 1950, detailed monthly statements were also published. For
reasons of economy, this publication has been combined in an abbreviated form with the
Bureau's monthly bulletin.
The discontinuance of fairly detailed monthly published external trade figures has
resulted in increased requests for import and export information, which has been supplied
to all inquirers.
Tables 2 and 3 give a brief insight into British Columbia's foreign trade for the
eleven-year period 1944 to 1954. The value of exports in 1954 was 10 per cent higher
than in 1953, the highest previous year on record. The value of imports in 1954 declined
by 6 per cent from 1953 values.
Preliminary data for the first seven months of 1955 indicate that both exports and
imports will exceed 1953 and 1954 values. W 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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ZZuS DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY W 29
Table 4.—Twelve Leading Exports of British Columbia, 1954
Value
Rank Commodity ($000,000)
1. Planks and boards, Douglas fir  114.7
2. Newsprint paper   54.9
3. Planks and boards, hemlock  54.3
4. Planks and boards, spruce  43.8
5. Planks and boards, cedar  34.0
6. Lead in pigs, refined lead  25.8
7. Shingles, red cedar  24.0
8. Zinc spelter  22.0
9. Copper, fine in ore  13.7
10. Fertilizers, phosphate  :     11.5
11. Salmon, sockeye (canned)      10.4
12. Nitrogen fertilizer        9.8
The products of the forests and mines of British Columbia dominated the exports
in 1954, as they have done in previous years. Six of the twelve leading products exported
were lumber and paper products, with mining and fishery products accounting for the
balance.
British Columbia's products were sold in almost every area of the world during
1954, reaching markets in over 100 countries. The United Sates and the United Kingdom were again the most important purchasers of British Columbia's products, taking
84 per cent of the total value of goods exported. While the value of exports to the United
States was higher for 1954 than in 1953, its value expressed as a percentage of the total
exports was smaller than in 1953, dropping from 71.8 per cent to 66.8 per cent. In 1954
the United Kingdom purchased 17.6 per cent of the total exports, compared to 13.5 per
cent in 1953. Increased exports of canned salmon, lumber, and pulp brought about
this increase. The ten leading countries took over 94 per cent of our exports in 1954.
These countries were as follows:—
Table 5.—The Ten Leading Countries to Which British Columbia
Products Were Exported in 1954
Percentage
Rank Country Value of Total
1. United States  $407,161,267 66.8
2. United Kingdom   106,624,631 17.6
3. Japan   21,372,629 3.4
4. Australia   12,720,735 2.1
5. Union of South Africa  8,187,355 1.3
6. Belgium  4,503,961 .8
7. Netherlands   1  4,287,164 .7
8. New Zealand  3,566,549 .7
9. Hawaii  2,924,354 .5
10. Rhodesia Nyasaland  2,324,611 .4
All other countries       35,402,342 5.7
Totals  $609,075,598 100.0
Exports of British Columbia products by continental area show that North and
Central America and the West Indies purchased 67.9 per cent of our products, while
Europe imported 20.5 per cent, Asia 5.3 per cent, Oceania (South Pacific areas such as
Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, etc.) 3.3 per cent, Africa 2.2 per cent, and South
America less than 1 per cent. W 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 6.—The Twelve Leading Imports from Foreign Countries
for Consumption in British Columbia, 1954
Value
Rank Commodity ($000,000)
1. Coffee, green  17.8
2. Tourist purchases, duty free  13.2
3. All machinery, n.o.p., and parts  9.1
4. Sugar, raw, for refineries  6.6
5. Crude petroleum for refining  6.5
6. Tractors, internal combustion  5.4
7. Heavy fuel-oils, Nos. 4, 5, and 6  5.1
8. Automobiles, passenger, new (under $1,200)   4.8
9. Casing, gas, water, or oil-well -.  4.5
10. Manufactures of iron and steel, n.o.p.  4.3
11. Tea, black  3.6
12. Copra, not prepared  3.6
The leading commodities imported in 1954 were, as in previous years, manufactured
iron and steel products, agricultural products from the tropics, and petroleum products.
Crude petroleum dropped from first place in 1953 to fifth in 1954 because of completion
of the oil pipe-line from Alberta. The total value of imports in 1954 was lower than
the 1953 value by 6 per cent due to a reduction in the purchase of petroleum products
and manufactured iron and steel goods.
British Columbia's purchases from foreign countries originated in over ninety
countries in 1954. The United States and the United Kingdom supplied almost 80 per
cent of these imports. Imports from the United States decreased to $207,000,000 in 1954
from $246,000,000 in 1953. This decrease resulted from a reduction in the value of
petroleum products and manufactured iron and steel products imported from the United
States. The United Kingdom supplied 13.6 per cent of the total value of goods imported
in 1954, compared to 11.9 per cent in 1953. The ten countries listed below supplied
over 90 per cent of all imports in 1954.
Table 7.—Ten Leading Countries from Which British Columbia Imported
Products in 1954, for British Columbia Consumption
Percentage
Rank Country Value of Total
1. United States  $206,872,401 63.8
2. United Kingdom  44,057,790 13.6
3. Japan   8,697,075 2.7
4. Brazil   6,496,772 2.0
5. Colombia   6,034,206 1.9
6. Fiji  :  5,797,250 1.8
7. Germany, West  4,967,776 1.5
8. India   3,488,441 1.1
9. Philippines   3,442,712 1.0
10. Jamaica   3,100,468 .9
All other countries     30,979,213 9.7
Totals  $323,934,104 100.0
Of the imports into British Columbia, Europe supplied 18.2 per cent, North and
Central America and the West Indies 67.0 per cent, South America 4.6 per cent, Asia
6.5 per cent, Oceania (includes Hawaii, Australia, and New Zealand) 2.9 per cent, and
Africa less than 1 per cent. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 31
The gap between our total imports and exports in 1954 was considerably greater
than in 1953, as the total value of imports was only 53 per cent of the value of exports,
compared to 62.5 per cent of the exports in 1953.
STATISTICAL DIVISION
This Division is responsible for the collection, compilation, analyses, interpretation,
and publication of statistical information. Also it is the duty of this Division to assist
other departments in the compilation of statistical information and to establish uniform
statistical methods throughout the service. In addition, it co-operates with other statistical bureaux in the elimination of duplication, and answers inquiries relating to statistical
data.   Following is a brief outline of the statistics compiled in this Division.
Co-operative Statistical Agreements
The co-operative statistical agreements with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and
other Federal offices increased during 1955. The fields of co-operation and dates of the
original agreements are as follows: (1) Mining Statistics, 1926; (2) External Trade
Statistics, 1938; (3) Cost of Food Statistics, 1939; (4) Provincial Government Payroll
Statistics, 1949; (5) Forecast of Capital and Repair and Maintenance Expenditures for
Provincial, Municipal, and Other Local Authorities, 1950; (6) Census of Construction
Statistics—Building Permits, 1951; (7) Census of Industry Statistics, 1954; (8) Nature
of Business Statistics, 1955; (9) Trade-union Statistics, 1955. In addition, copies of
Dominion Bureau of Statistics monthly reports on production, shipments, and stocks on
hand in British Columbia sawmills have been received since 1948. Commencing in
1953 the Dominion Bureau of Statistics agreed to supply this office with duplicates of
their Operations in the Woods forms. In return, the Bureau assists the Dominion Bureau
of Statistics by checking mailing-lists, estimating production of delinquent forms, and
other services.
Conferences between the Provincial and Federal statistical bureaux are now held
annually. As a consequence, it is anticipated that continued" progress toward the
elimination of duplication in this field will be made.
Conferences are now held periodically with the Federal Department of Labour, and
the elimination of duplication is under way, especially in the fields of trade-union statistics
and working-conditions statistics. The co-operative agreements have resulted in savings
to both Governments, to union secretaries, and to private industry.
Prices Section
Prices during 1955 have been comparatively stable. Retail prices in 1955 as
reflected in the consumer price index were slightly higher than 1954 prices, with some
variations during the year due to seasonal effects on food, clothing, and fuel prices.
Wholesale prices averaged slightly higher in 1955 than in 1954.
Consumer Price Index—Description
In October, 1952, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics began publication of the
Consumer Price Index, which is the successor to the old Cost-of-living Index.
The new index remains, in character and general purposes, the same as the old
Cost-of-living Index. However, the goods and services selected for purposes of computing the new index conform with post-war expenditure patterns and should reflect more
realistically current changes in living costs due to prices.
In order to determine the items and proportions to be used in the new base budget,
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics conducted a survey of family expenditure covering W 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
some 3,600 urban Canadian families. The survey covered the year ended August 31st,
1948. It was decided that the central core of family types whose expenditure patterns
were enough for their changes in living costs resulting from price changes to be adequately
represented by one index could be defined as those families (a) living in twenty-seven
Canadian cities with over 30,000 population, (b) ranging in size from two adults to two
adults with four children, and (c) with annual incomes during the survey year ranging
from $1,650 to $4,050.
Detailed information on expenditures was submitted by 1,517 families with these
attributes.
The year 1949 is the base period of the new Consumer Price Index. This Index
measures the percentage change in prices between 1949 and, for example, January, 1952,
rather than between January, 1952, and 1935-39, as in the case of the old Cost-of-living
Index. Calculations of the percentage change between any two points in time will yield
exactly the same result regardless of the base period used.
Publication of the old Cost-of-living Index ceased after September 1st, 1953. Each
month the Bureau of Economics and Statistics releases the latest Consumer Price Index
figures to a mailing-list of some 180 individuals and organizations.
British Columbia Cost of Food
During the year this Bureau continued to calculate its quarterly Cost-of-food Index
covering selected British Columbia centres. Information regarding comparative food
costs in the various centres is available upon request.
Table 8.—Canadian Consumer Price Index, 1913—55
(Base: 1949=100.!)
Year
Index
Year
Index
1913	
  49.2
1935	
59.9
1914
  49.6
1936	
1937	
61.1
1915	
  50.3
63.0
1916	
  54.2
1938	
63.7
1917
.   63.7
1939	
1940	
63.2
1918	
  72.0
65.7
1919	
  78.8
1941	
69.6
1920	
  90.5
1942	
72.9
1921	
  80.9
1943	
74.2
1922_	
  74.9
1944	
1945	
1946	
. 74.6
1923
  75.2
75.0
1924	
  74.0
77.5
1925
  74.6
1947	
1948	
84.8
1926	
  75.9
97.0
1927
  74.6
1949	
100.0
1928	
  75.0
1950	
102.9
1929	
  75.8
1951	
113.7
1930	
  75.3
1952	
116.5
1931	
  67.9
1953	
115.5
1932
  61.7
1954	
1955	
116.2
1933	
  58.8
. 116.4
1934
  59.6
1 The Consumer Price Index prior to January,
linked to the Consumer Price Index, 1949=100.
1949, is the Cost-of-living Index, inclusive of all tobacco taxes, DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 33
Table 9.—Total and Main Components of the Canadian Consumer Price Index,
by Years, 1939-53, and by Months, 1954-55
(1949=100.)
Date
Total
Food
Shelter
Clothing
Household
Operation
Other
Commodities and
Services
1939	
1940 	
1941	
1942 	
1943 	
1944	
1945	
1946— 	
1947	
1948 	
1949  ...
1950	
1951	
1952	
1953 _.....
1954 (average).
January...
February-
March	
April.	
May	
June	
July...	
August.
September..
October	
November	
December	
1955 (average)..
January-
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July-
August	
September-
October.	
November-
December—
63.2
65.7
69.6
72.9
74.2
74.6
75.0
77.5
84.8
97.0
100.0
102.9
113.7
116.5
115.5
116.2
115.7
115.7
115.5
115.6
115.5
116.1
116.2
117.0
116.8
116.8
116.8
116.6
116.4
116.4
116.3
116.0
116.1
116.4
115.9
116.0
116.4
116.8
116.9
116.9
116.9
50.2
52.6
57.9
63.4
65.2
65.6
66.3
70.0
79.5
97.5
100.0
102.6
117.0
116.8
112.6
111.4
111.6
111.7
110.7
110.4
110.2
112.0
112.1
114.4
113.8
113.8
113.4
112.6
112.1
112.1
111.5
110.7
111.0
112.3
110.0
111.5
112.4
113.7
113.5
113.0
112.4
84.6
86.6
89.2
90.7
90.9
91.2
91.4
91.8
95.1
98.3
100.0
106.2
114.4
120.2
123.6
126.5
125.4
125.4
125.6
125.6
125.8
126.4
126.6
127.0
127.2
127.4
127.9
128.2
129.5
128.4
128.5
128.6
128.7
128.8
129.2
129.6
129.8
130.0
130.2
130.6
131.0
54.9
59.9
63.6
65.8
66.1
66.6
66.9
69.2
78.9
95.6
100.0
99.7
109.8
111.8
110.1
109.4
110.1
110.0
109.8
109.9
109.9
109.7
109.6
109.6
109.5
108.4
108.2
108.1
108.0
108.1
108.1
108.0
107.9
107.9
107.8
107.8
107.8
107.8
107.8
107.9
108.5
66.5
70.3
73.8
76.0
76.1
75.7
74.9
77.2
86.2
96.8
100.0
102.4
113.1
116.2
117.0
117.4
117.5
117.5
117.6
118.1
117.3
117.1
117.2
117.2
117.2
117.3
117.2
117.1
116.4
117.1
117.1
117.0
116.9
116.4
116.1
115.8
115.8
115.9
116.1
116.5
116.6
77.2
77.9
80.0
82.0
84.8
86.1
86.4
88.7
91.6
96.5
100.0
103.1
111.5
116.0
115.8
117.4
116.4
116.5
116.6
117.2
117.5
117.5
117.6
117.7
117.6
117.9
118.2
118.2
118.1
118.2
118.2
118.3
118.2
118.3
117.8
117.7
118.0
117.9
118.1
118.3
118.3 W 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 10.—Consumer Price Indexes, Vancouver, B.C.
(1949=100.)
Date
Total
Food
Shelter
Clothing
Household
Operation
Other
Commodities and
Services
1949	
1950 	
1951 	
1952 	
1953	
1954	
1955 (average)..
January	
February-
March	
April—,—
May	
June	
July-
August	
September-
October.	
November-
December—
100
103.
114.
117.
116.
117
117.
118.
118.
117.
117.
117.
116.
116.
116.
118.
118.
118.
120.
100.0
104.5
117.8
117.3
112.1
111.7
111.6
111.8
111.6
110.0
109.4
109.5
108.6
109.3
110.1
113.5
114.8
114.7
115.9
100.0
107.7
113.2
118.2
122.1
124.9
127.0
126.1
126.1
126.1
126.1
126.6
127.3
127.4
127.4
127.6
127.6
127.8
128.0
100.0
99.1
110.6
115.1
112.5
112.9
112.4
112.6
112.6
112.5
112.5
112.2
112.2
112.2
112.2
112.3
112.5
112.6
112.8
I
100.0
101.4
115.3
122.2
122.7
125.2
125.1
125.4
125.4
125.6
125.8
125.8
124.9
122.5
122.5
123.7
123.9
124.2
131.0
100.0
103.3
109.4
115.1
117.0
119.2
120.5
122.4
122.4
122.6
120.6
120.4
119.8
119.6
119.6
119.6
119.6
119.6
119.6
Source:  Dominion Bureau of Statistics, " Prices and Price Indexes.'
Table 11.-
-Principal Wholesale Price Indexes, Canada
(Base:  1935-39=100.)
Date
General
Wholesale
Price
Index
Raw and
Partly
Manufactured
Fully and
Chiefly
Manufactured
Industrial
Materials
Canadian Farm Products
Field
Animal
Total
1913    _
83.4
203.2
130.3
124.6
87.4
102.0
99.2
108.0
116.4
123.0
127.9
130.6
132.1
138.9
163.3
193.4
198.3
211.2
240.2
226.0
220.7
217.0
218.9
215.7
217.4
217.4
218.5
217.8
218.7
218.4
219.6
220.9
220.0
220.7
221.4
85.1
194.7
129.1
126.1
79.3
99.4
94.9
103.1
114.4
123.0
131.1
134.4
136.2
140.1
164.3
196.3
197.1
212.8
237.9
218.7
207.0
204.8
209.7
205.0
207.6
206.2
210.4
209.5
210.3
210.1
210.7
212.2
210.8
211.3
212.4
86.2
208.2
133.0
123.7
93.3
103.5
101.9
109.9
118.8
123.7
126.9
129.1
129.8
138.0
162.4
192.4
199.2
211.0
242.4
230.7
228.8
224.2
224.5
222.1
223.2
224.1
223.5
223.1
224.1
223.7
225.3
226.4
225.7
226.5
226.6
144.3
132.8
78.3
95.8
99.0
113.3
125.2
135.1
140.0
143.1
143.2
148.6
187.0
222.7
218.0
244.6
296.1
252.6
232.3
223.5
226.0
225.9
229.0
229.9
233.1
233.2
236.2
237.1
240.6
241.4
240.7
240.8
244.2
158.5
137.2
69.3
100.9
83.7
85.4
88.9
109.7
129.0
144.5
162.5
177.9
184.1
200.6
191.9
191.9
200.4
223.0
175.1
162.1
165.6
165.6
167.6
166.1
186.8
183.2
174.3
170.0
159.0
153.9
151.7
153.2
155.2
130.2
144.4
69.2
104.8
101.5
106.7
124.4
144.6
161.8
166.1
170.2
181.2
200.2
263.7
265.4
281.4
336.9
277.5
263.8
256.2
245.1
248.4
245.8
241.3
238.7
243.4
250.0
249.5
250.6
251.6
241.9
240.5
239.0
1920  	
1926   - -	
144.4
1929     -    -    —	
140.8
1933                           - -
69.3
1938     _- .
102.9
1Q3Q
92.6
1940      	
96.1
1941    -         -
106.6
1942      -	
127.1
1943 — -   .-	
145.4
1944
155.3
1945    - — -   	
166.4
1946     	
179.5
1947     	
192.2
1948                            	
232.1
1949    	
228.7
1950
236.7
1951                        -	
268.6
1952                           	
250.2
1051
219.5
1954                            -          .
209.2
205.3
207.0
206.7
203.7
212.7
213.3
212.2
July	
209.8
204.8
202.7
196.8
196.9
197.1
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics, "Prices and Price Indexes.' DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 35
Tourist Trade Section
The volume of tourist travel between British Columbia and the United States
decreased slightly in 1954 over 1953, both in the number of tourists entering the Province
and in the number of British Columbia residents entering the United States. This
decrease in volume was offset by an increase in the Province's share of the total expenditures by United States visitors to Canada. These expenditures were $280,700,000;
British Columbia's share of total expenditures—16.2 per cent in 1954, 14.6 per cent
in 1953, 15.5 per cent in 1952, and 15.3 per cent in 1951. A table showing United
States travel expenditures for the years 1943 to 1954 is given below.
Tables 12 and 13 give a breakdown of tourist travel between British Columbia and
the United States for the years 1944 to 1955. The 1955 figures are subject to revision.
Preliminary estimates indicate that travel volume in 1955 is slightly greater than 1954.
Chart 1 gives a breakdown of automobiles visiting Canada from the United States
by State of origin, with the number visiting British Columbia and the Yukon shown in
red. In 1954, automobiles originating in California, Oregon, and Washington comprised
85 per cent of the total number of cars visiting British Columbia from the United States.
The average length of stay of cars from the above States was 5.66 days and expenditures
averaged $14.74 per car per day.
Interprovincial tourist-travel figures are not compiled by the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, but this travel is undoubtedly important and adds considerably to the total of
tourist expenditures in British Columbia.
Year
United States
Travel Expenditures
in Canada
1943  $87,000,000
1944  116,600,000
1945  163,300,000
1946  216,100,000
1947  241,100,000
1948  267,400,000
Year
United States
Travel Expenditures
in Canada
1949  $267,100,000
1950  259,700,000
1951  258,000,000
1952  257,000,000
1953  282,200,000
1954  280,700,000 W 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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W 37
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O W 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Forest Section
The primary and secondary forest industries of British Columbia comprise the most
important industrial group in the Province. In recent years this industrial group has
accounted for approximately 40 per cent of the net value of production, and in 1954
provided employment for some 61,100 people, who received some $219,000,000 in
salaries and wages.
During 1954 the primary industry of logging cut an all-time high of 5,567,423 M
board-feet, valued at $209,600,000. Operations in the Coast region accounted for
3,997,981 M board-feet, with Douglas fir the leading species at 1,462,333 M board-feet
and hemlock next with 1,234,065 M board-feet. At the same time, Interior regions cut
1,569,442 M board-feet, with Douglas fir again the leading species at 665,528 M board-
feet and spruce next at 468,762 M board-feet. The forest cut in 1955 of 6,480,000 M
board-feet is a substantial increase over the 1954 cut.
The traditional conversion enterprise for British Columbia timber has been saw-
milling. This industry has grown tremendously since its inception a hundred years ago,
so that to-day it is the most important single industry in the Province and produces
55 per cent of the total Canadian output of sawn lumber. During 1954 sawmills in
British Columbia produced an all-time high of 4,481,279 M board-feet of lumber, valued
at $340,200,000. Mills in the Coast region produced 2,705,539 M board-feet of sawn
lumber, valued at $238,200,000, while those in the Interior produced 1,775,740 M board-
feet, valued at $102,000,000.
The pulp and paper mills of the Province during 1954 used 1,179,896 cords of
pulpwood, valued at $28,255,655, as well as 565,290 cords of waste wood (for example,
sawmill and veneer-mill chips, slabs, edgings, etc.), valued at $9,247,377. From this
material these mills produced 1,277,082 tons of pulp, valued at $99,629,620. Over half
of the pulp produced was used in the Province to make 683,384 tons of paper, valued
at $79,499,580.
During 1955 the Forest Section prepared a third publication dealing with the forest
industries of the Province entitled " Statistical Record of the Pulp and Paper Industry in
British Columbia." The first publication in this series, " Statistical Record of the Lumber
Industry in British Columbia," released originally in 1953, was revised and published
again in 1955. Our forest research assistant was the first witness called before Chief
Justice Sloan's present Royal Commission on Forestry which began its hearings in
February, 1955. In addition to information contained in the above publications, our
forest research assistant also presented evidence from the publication " Statistical Record
of the Logging Industry and Summary of the Forest Industries in British Columbia."
During the year the Forest Section prepared the information on forestry contained
in the Government's brief to the Royal Commission on Canada's Economic Prospects. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 39
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ZJ W 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mining Section
The metals, industrial minerals, fuels, and structural materials produced by the
mineral industry of British Columbia in 1954 had a combined value of $153,377,315,
compared with $152,628,683 in 1953.
Most of the copper produced went to the Tacoma smelter, mainly in the form of
concentrates, together with some dross shipped from the lead smelter at Trail for recovery
of the copper content. Lead and zinc refined at Trail were shipped to other Provinces
of Canada, to Europe, including the British Isles, and to the United States. Additional
quantities of lead and zinc were shipped to United States smelters in the form of
concentrates.
The value of principal metals produced—gold, silver, copper, lead, and zinc—is
$112,083,307, with lead valued at $45,482,505, zinc at $34,805,755, copper at
$14,599,693, silver at $8,153,108, and lode and placer gold at $9,042,246.
Miscellaneous metals in 1954 had a value of $11,866,409, compared with
$15,588,840 in 1953; the decreased output of iron ore was the main cause of the lower
value.
Industrial minerals had a total value of $5,877,881 in 1954, compared with
$3,211,748 in 1953, increases being noted in asbestos and sulphur.
The structural-materials group had a value of $14,395,174, compared with
$13,555,038 in 1953. The output of coal for 1954 was valued at $9,154,544, compared
with $9,528,279 in 1953.
The products of the industry are mainly basic commodities that secondary industry
manufactures into products of much greater unit value. In so far as the manufacturing
is done in British Columbia, the increase over the value of the basic commodity makes
a further contribution to the economy of the Province. An example is the industrial
mineral sulphur, to which the value assigned is $2,308,422. Some of the sulphur is used
in the production of wood-pulp, and some is sold for use in the manufacture of sulphuric
acid, but most of the sulphur is used in plants at Trail and Kimberley in the production
of fertilizer that has a market value several times that assigned to sulphur.
The selling prices for most of the metal produced are in United States funds, and the
United States dollar was at a discount in Canadian funds throughout 1954. United States
prices for copper, lead, and zinc rose moderately during 1954, and the price of silver
was constant. The greater discount of 2.6 per cent in 1954, compared with 1.6 per cent
in 1953, resulted in somewhat lower average prices for silver, copper, and zinc in Canada,
but the price for lead was somewhat higher than in 1953.
Production of refined metal in British Columbia was increased by the production of
aluminium, begun at Kitimat in August, 1954. The aluminium is derived from ore mined
in lamaica and does not enter into British Columbia production figures.
The average number employed in 1954 was 14,128, and salaries and wages amounted
to $48,702,746. Other major expenditures included: Fuel and electricity, $7,128,669;
process supplies, $19,654,724; Federal taxes, $13,692,190; Provincial taxes, $2,443,691;
municipal and other taxes, $1,537,067; levies for workmen's compensation (including
silicosis), unemployment insurance, and other items, $1,647,642. Dividends amounted
to $25,368,262, and the lode-mining industry spent $29,135,673 on freight and treatment
charges on ores and concentrates. Expenditure in exploration for petroleum and natural
gas in 1954 was $4,266,998. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 41
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".2 W 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 16.—British Columbia Mines Production, 1953 and 1954
Description
1953
1954
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Principal Metals
Gold-
14,245
253,553
8,376,953
49,021,013
296,559,781
378,345,159
$403,230
8,727,294
7,017,709
14,869,544
39,338,655
40,388,346
8,684
258,388
9,825,153
50,150,087
332,474,456
334,124,560
$238,967
Lode	
Silver    	
Copper   -	
Lead — 	
Zinc  -	
.  fine „
  lb.
8,803,279
8,153,108
14,599,693
45,482,505
34,805,755
Totals
$110,744,778
$112,083,307
 lb.
Miscellaneous Metals
Antimony  	
Bismuth   	
1,551,043
71,298
787,158
6,752
991,248
$570,474
157,569
1,550,701
14,922
6,763,105
1,302,333
225,351
680,734
477
535,746
4
587,528
2,206,443
$382,104
493,519
1,123,211
Indium	
Iron ore  	
   oz.
 tons
    oz.
1,281
3,733,891
408
Tin 	
Tungsten (WO3)	
 lb.
1,092,228
2,168,977
581,746
5,950,323
280,437
5,851,558
Totals                                     - -
$15,588,840
$11,866,409
Industrial Minerals
$988,716
52,845
110,698
59,321
387,655
11,338
11,120
1,590,055
$2,920,751
  tons
3,560
37,358
4,620
172,665
604,000
1,112
151,954
5,056
39,897
4,541
175,480
284,000
115,337
Flux (quartz, limestone)    „
Granules (slate and rock) —    „
40,804
65,507
421,734
Mica    — - - -—
 lb.
  tons
5,326
Sulphur	
219,999
2,308,422
Totals
$3,211,748
$5,877,881
 No.
Structural Materials
Brick—
Common	
Face, paving, sewer 	
1,382,883
4,307,894
$51,381
226,459
426,783
31,990
123,469
627,097
30,012
19,267
5,071,260
1,357,958
1,122,516
4,388,594
78,252
1,289,911
5,651,262
$35,550
316,676
372,528
Clays      	
.   „ tons
5,226
6,609
36,425
122,903
753,297
31,081
32,697
4,935,298
   tons
338,005
770,415
317,976
920,707
1,555,002
1,253,856
4,850,469
Stone	
  tons
2,611
3,055
99,392
$13,555,038
$14,395,174
 tons
Fuel
Coal 	
1,384,138
$9,528,279
1,308,284
$9,154,544
$152,628,683
$153,377,315
Labour Section
The close interdepartmental relationship which exists between the Department of
Labour and the Department of Trade and Industry in the matter of the collection and
summarization of annual labour statistics has again proved most effective during the
past year.
Industrial and business surveys were again conducted on a joint co-operative basis,
the factual information resulting from the statistical inquiries being immediately available
for use by either Department.
The annual compilations and statistical review of industrial labour information were
completed by the Labour Section of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics and prepared DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 43
for publication under the heading of " Statistics of Trades and Industries " in the Annual
Report of the Department of Labour for 1954.
While completion of the above Annual Report material constitutes the primary
work of this Section, many additional projects were completed during the year, including
the preparation of regional segregations of industrial employment and payroll information,
the current edition of a list of industrial firms arranged in size groups by employment, an
alphabetical index of firms reporting in the survey listed by industrial classifications and
geographical location, and various analyses of occupational wage-rate information in
response to inquiries from industry, business, and other Governmental departments.
Provincial regional statistics have grown in importance with the years, and the
extent of comparative progress and development within the ten census areas may be
observed in the following table (Table 17), which gives the payroll totals by area, based
on reports from industrial firms only, over the past four years.
The census map (Chart 2) outlining the regional areas accompanies the table, and
while the figures represent only an industrial coverage, they serve to show the degree of
labour concentration in the various sectors from year to year.
Table 17.—British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas
for the Comparative Years 1951 to 1954
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1951
1952
1953
1954
No. 1                                       -  -
$16,925,795
33,803,674
21,563,865
326,844,763
106,834,119
10,905,394
22,065,843
18,808,909
19,560,533
2,140,056
2,291,684
$27,425,293
40,455,349
20,422,805
358,233,779
109,412,278
11,015,136
20,160,757
20,771,777
32,163,701
2,266,598
4,703,401
$19,495,380
42,633,966
20,361,133
370,901,521
111,953,368
15,781,535
21,111,044
18,367,655
44,702,234
3,304,619
4,501,909
$17,125,372
No 2                                                                                - ...
32,519,954
No. 3                                       	
20,790,437
No. 4	
389,154,398
No 5                                                     --                  	
117,023,841
No. 6                                       -	
12,487,726
No. 7                            -    -
22,351,967
No. 8                               -
18,012,903
No o
23,458,261
No. 10                                 	
3,387,399
5,224,932
Totals                              	
$581,744,635
$647,030,874
$673,114,364
$661,537,190 W 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Chart 2.—Census Divisions
CENSUS
DIVISION
MARKET RESEARCH DIVISION
In addition to the usual functions of market and trade studies for business and
government, this office (1) represented the Department at the International Trade Fair
and Marketing Conference at Seattle, (2) was closely associated with the University of
British Columbia and industry on problems affecting market research, (3) loaned personnel to the Department of Finance for special research, (4) assisted in the preparation
of material for the Gordon Commission, and (5) prepared industrial and related maps
and commentary for resource atlas.
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION
This Division was established to handle mechanical tabulation work for the Bureau
and act as service centre for departments of the Government requiring the facilities of
punched-card equipment. No charge is normally made to the departments for this
service; however, accurate job costs are maintained and are listed below to show the
value of work done for each department and branch for the twelve-month period ended
October 31st, 1955. Similar figures for two previous periods are included for comparative purposes. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 45
Department and Branch
1952-53
1953-54
1954-55
Department of Agriculture
$1,056.65
$685.20
$1,010.26
Department of the Attorney-General
$6,049.88
27,111.60
$5,423.86
33,784.56
$5,165.46
38,295.26
$33,161.48
$39,208.42
$43,460.72
Department of Education
$1,124.98
$1,626.06
1,358.68
$1,388.84
714.80
$1,124.98
$2,984.74
$2,103.64
Department of Finance
$628.94
Department of Health and Welfare
$1,678.92
14,025.22
1,236.76
$1,890.94
14,493.50
6,986.86
$1,967.88
12,557.36
17,867.14
Totals 	
$16,940.90
$23,371.30
$32,392.38
Department of Labour
$3,493.04
$2,627.24
$3,621.80
Department of Lands and Forests
$468.40
746.18
4,196.98
2,140.98
$288.88
5,064.96
12,880.46
971.02
$7,235.38
31,130.98
1,220.12
$7,552.54
$19,205.32
$39,586.48
Department of the Provincial Secretary
$4,735.54
12,822.20
$4,929.00
11,741.00
$6,918.86
Queen's Printer 	
11,701.68
Totals   	
$17,557.74
$16,670.00
$18,620.54
Department of Highways
$647.77
Department of Trade and Industry
Bureau of Economics and Statistics 	
$5,846.94
8,221.12
$6,747.36
5,673.94
$9,741.20
5,108.30
549.00
Totals	
$14,068.06
$12,421.30
$15,398.50
$95,584.33
$117,821.29
$156,194.32
To meet the diversified demands of the various departments, a complete set of
punched-card equipment is rented, which includes alphabetic printers, sorters, reproducing gang summary punches, end printing document punches, an alphabetic interpreter,
collator, and multiplying punch, as well as alphabetic punches and verifiers. Here again
the job cost records are used to ensure that maximum utilization is obtained from the
equipment.
To operate the equipment efficiently, a well-trained staff has to be maintained, and
at present it consists of a senior supervisor, assistant supervisor, four senior machine
operators, eight machine operators, a senior key-punch operator, twelve key-punch
operators, a senior clerk-stenographer, and three clerks. In addition, three members of
the Liquor Control Board staff are attached to the Division to maintain liaison and perform necessary clerical functions.
As in previous years, a considerable amount of work was done in the development
of new applications and revision of current jobs. Time was also spent in reorganizing the
staff to create evenly balanced sections to handle the work of the various departments!
At present we have four major sections, each headed up by a senior machine operator:— W 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(a) Liquor Control Board Records Section.
(b) Forest Service Records Section.
(c) Health and Welfare Records Section.
(d) General Statistical Section.
The Liquor Control Section works with the Liquor Control Board staff and is responsible for the mechanical preparation of all statements and reports under the following
major headings:—
(a) Payroll Cheques and Associated Statements.
(b) Warehouse Inventory and Stock Status Reports.
(c) Warehouse Reconciliation to Brewery Accounts.
(d) Vendor's Inventory and Stock Status Reports.
(e) Vendor's Reconciliation of Goods Received.
(/)   Vendor's Trading Account.
(g)  Preparation of Purchase Journal.
(h)  Invoiced Beer Reports.
(i)  Licensee Beer Reports.
(/)   Statement of Licensee Sales.
Although we were advised last year that the Vendor's Inventory Control Records
established in the Esquimalt and Pender Street Stores as an experiment would be discontinued, the work has been maintained during the year.
The Forest Service Records Section was established during the year to handle the
increased work for this department. It is mainly concerned with the preparation of the
following work as used for forest inventory purposes:—
(a) Volume of Trees, Part I—Gross Volume.
(b) Volume of Trees, Part II—Decay Analysis.
(c) Volume of Trees, Part III—Standing Tally.
(d) Working Plan Special Survey.
In addition to the above, tabulations were made for the Forest Management Division
on lumber recovery by mills throughout the Province and figures for an annual report of
lumber cut from the Scaling and Royalty files punched in the Vancouver District office.
The Health and Welfare Section was also created during the year to handle the
work of the Health and Welfare Department. The major jobs being handled in this
Section are:—■
(a) Hospital Insurance Admission-Discharge Records, Annual Report.
(b) Cost of Drugs to Social Welfare Cases, Quarterly Reports.
(c) Social Welfare Register of Cases by Category.
The General Statistical Section is actually divided into two groups, one being responsible for daily, weekly, and monthly reports, and the other for annual reports. The work
of this section covers the following jobs:—
Department of Agriculture—Herd Improvement.
Department of the Attorney-General—Motor-vehicle Accident Reports.
Department of Education—Annual Statistical Report of Schools.
Department of Labour—Annual Statistical Report.
Department of Lands—
Maintenance of B.C. Gazetteer.
Water Rights Billing and Accounting.
Department of the Provincial Secretary—
Civil Service Personnel Statistics.
Queen's Printer Job Costs.
Department of Highways—Traffic Surveys.
Department of Trade and Industry—
Trade Statistics.
Trade Index.
Miscellaneous Surveys. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 47
The Water Rights billing job was completely revised during the year so that a transfer
poster ledger card may be used. It is felt that this change will greatly simplify the clerical
procedure of the job.
Several changes have been incorporated in the Motor-vehicle Accident Reports and
complete quarterly and annual tabulations will be made for the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics for comparison with other Provinces.
A request has been received from the Department of Agriculture asking that we
survey their Dairy Herd Improvement records, with an expansion of work in mind.
Several special surveys were tabulated for the British Columbia Government Travel
Bureau during the year for the first time, and it is anticipated that this work will increase
now that its value has been established.
The expansion and renovation of our office quarters has relieved the overcrowded
conditions and permitted a much more efficient layout of equipment.
The development of electronic data-processing equipment is being watched, as it is
felt the use of such equipment is the logical next step in an establishment such as this.
There are now approximately a dozen firms manufacturing electronic computers, all with
different types of input, storage facilities, and output methods. In view of this and the
fact that this is a comparatively new field, and much of the equipment becomes obsolete
shortly after it is on the market, it is felt that we would be most unwise to take any definite
steps at this time; however, it is strongly recommended that the Government set up a
committee to collect and study data on the various types of equipment so that the final
decision can be made on carefully assessed facts.
PUBLICATIONS
Monthly Bulletin of Business Activity.—This publication has been continued and
expanded. Special articles of current interest have been included at various times throughout the year. Included are statistical summaries of business indicators relating to British
Columbia's economy.
Quarterly Bulletin of Economic Conditions in British Columbia.—This publication
is a new release, and in textual form outlines the current economic picture in British
Columbia.
Summary of Business Activity in British Columbia.—This publication is a companion of the two above-mentioned publications and, in fact, takes the place of the fourth-
quarter Quarterly Bulletin. It summarizes the current year's economic picture and
presents historical series relating to business activity in the Province.
External Trade.—Summary of monthly statistics covering external trade are contained in the aforementioned Monthly Bulletin. A statement of external trade through
British Columbia customs ports and covering commodities with an aggregate value of
$50,000 and over is published annually.
British Columbia Trade Index.—This publication lists the products manufactured by
British Columbia industries. A new issue will be released early in 1956.
British Columbia Regional Industrial Index.—The latest issue of this publication
is 1954 and contains statistics on a wide range of subjects covering all areas of the
Province.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.—The ninth edition of this publication will be
released in 1956. This publication provides graphic, general, and historical facts and
statistics relating to British Columbia under the following headings: Population, Education, Government and Finance, Judiciary, Banking, Transportation, Communication,
Retail Trade, Agriculture, Fisheries, Mining, Forestry, Manufacturing, Water Power,
Tourist and Economic Activity.
Establishing a Business in British Columbia.—This brochure, now being revised,
gives to prospective investors information relating to the establishment of a business in
British Columbia. W 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
List of Industrial Firms in British Columbia by Number of Employees.—This publication provides an alphabetic listing of industrial firms segregated by size groups according
to employment.
Regional Statistics of British Columbia.—Summary of census statistics by regional
areas. At the end of 1955 the following area studies were complete: West Kootenay,
East Kootenay, Okanagan, Lower Mainland, and Vancouver Island.
Statistical Record of the Pulp and Paper Industry in British Columbia.—An historical summary of statistics relating to the pulp and paper industries of British Columbia.
Current Publications.—A directory of publications released by the Department of
Trade and Industry.
In addition to Departmental publications, many confidential reports were prepared
for other Government departments. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY W 49
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT
TRAVEL BUREAU
GENERAL
The value of the tourist industry in British Columbia for 1955 is estimated at
$90,000,000. At the end of the 1955 tourist season, admission on travellers' vehicle
permits through British Columbia ports reflected the national improvement of more than
3 per cent above the figures of 1954. To the end of October, 1955, visitor vehicle entries
for a twelve-month period totalled 286,895, compared with 280,156 for the previous
same twelve-month period.
The foregoing figures show a comparatively healthy condition, but a survey of the
accommodations and a study of actual business conditions during the season indicate an
improvement in British Columbia's tourist industry far beyond that shown by the T.V.P.
index. There was every indication that inter- and intra-provincial tourist traffic exceeded
all previous records.
CONTRIBUTING FACTORS
There was an unprecedented patronage of camp-sites and more inquiries than ever
for information on camping and camping facilities. Observation of the camp-site patronage and also of the patronage of the dude ranches, which catered in 1955 chiefly to the
family trade, indicated that families of ex-service men had positively influenced this trend,
although the high standards of Provincial camp-sites themselves had undoubtedly fostered
and encouraged the usage. Over the season, however, increased camp-site patronage did
not adversely affect the over-all tourist accommodation business, but showed, rather, that
more people were seeking long and short vacations in the natural surroundings provided.
New and improved rail and air services stimulated the visitor industry considerably,
the new transcontinental trains and the advertising and publicity attendant upon them
adding particularly to the impetus. There was a marked up-swing in the number of
organized tours to and through the Province, and bus traffic also showed improvement
over the record of the previous year.
Interprovincial traffic was adversely affected by reports on the condition of the road
through the Kicking Horse Pass, the block at Three Valley, and the surface between Yahk
and Kingsgate, but notwithstanding these handicaps, stopping-places in the Windermere
Valley and the Revelstoke areas report a good season, and the adverse reports on the
Banff-Windermere Highway through the National park had no serious effect on traffic
to and through Radium. It is felt that the adverse reports on these sections of the highway, which automobile clubs and other travel directors felt bound to pass on to their
members, were more than offset by publicity on our general highway programme and the
steady and rapid improvements being made all over the system.
Another contributing factor to the growth of the visitor industry has been the improvement in accommodations. The urban areas have benefited from the development
of new drive-in hotels, and in the past two years entirely new standards have been established in British Columbia. At the present time, guest-beds are fairly evenly divided
between the hotels and the motels, resorts, and other types of accommodation.
ACCOMMODATIONS
In the past six years, auto courts, motels, and resorts catering to the tourist in British
Columbia have increased by 388, from 1,057 to 1,445. During the same period the
number of hotels decreased from 618 to 545, a drop of 73, but this mortality, as reported
by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, is not necessarily among hotels catering to the
tourist trade. In all, British Columbia now has some 1,990 establishments catering to
the visitor, with 28,840 rental units containing an estimated 57,920 guest-beds. r
W 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
On the basis that 22 per cent of the tourist dollar is spent on accommodation, it is
further estimated that the direct gross revenue for British Columbia hotels on account of
accommodation alone was, in 1955, over $9,000,000, and that the other types of accommodation grossed approximately the same amount. The restaurant business grossed
$18,000,000 from the visitors.
Through the co-operation of operators of tourist accommodation in a survey it was
learned that of the tourists who patronize our hotels, motels, and resorts, 34 per cent
come from the United States and other foreign countries, 19 per cent are from other parts
of Canada, and 47 per cent live in British Columbia.
Of total expenditures made by visitors from outside the Province, 22 per cent were
made by visitors from Washington, 8 per cent by those from Oregon, and 34 per cent by
those from California, or a total of 64 per cent by people of the three Pacific Coast States.
During the tourist season, Albertans accounted for 6 per cent of the outside visitor
expenditure, and Ontario contributed 7 per cent. The latter figures are drawn from a
questionnaire returned by over 2,000 visitors.
THE MARKET
It is seen from the foregoing that the Western States continue to be British Columbia's largest outside market. Population-wise, this market continues to expand as has
the ratio of automobiles per capita. A Curtis Publishing Company survey of the travel
market in 1954 shows, among other things, that 33.3 per cent of United States families
have incomes of $5,000 or more, that United States families spent about $10,500,000,000
for recreational travel in 1954, and that 12.8 per cent of United States families with
incomes of $5,000 or more live in the Pacific Coast States. On this premise, it is fair to
estimate that the people of Oregon, Washington, and California spent $1,340,000,000 on
rcreational travel in 1954. Of the $5,000-and-up income families in the three Western
States, 1,229,000 or 66 per cent took vacation trips away from home in 1954 (Curtis).
Recognizing the three Western States as British Columbia's prime foreign market
and accepting the foregoing figures as being correct, the question arises as to whether the
traffic could not be improved. Certainly the return on British Columbia's tourist promotion expenditures is high, particularly in face of the competition from every State in the
Union and every free country in the world.
In 1955, advertising in the United States was confined largely to newspaper and
magazine advertising in the three Pacific Coast States. This was an attempt to reach as
many as possible of the type of patrons who would be interested in the vacation amenities
and accommodations offered by the Province. It was kept in mind that the average
United States family expenditure for vacation travel is $396, that the average automobile-
tourist family covers little more than 1,000 miles on its vacation, and that a large percentage of potential visitors to this Province would have to spend more than the average
in money and mileage in order to get here.
TRENDS
If the record number of mail inquiries (33,653) is any criterion, then in 1955 the
advertising accent was in the right place. Travel trends change with practically every
season, however, and each year's advertising must be adjusted to whatever changes are
apparent. The Travel Bureau, for instance, is now studying the traffic situation with a
view to anticipating the effect of 10,000,000 additional automobiles on the United States
highways over the next five years. Will this increase or decrease the average vacation
mileage, and will British Columbia's potential market expand or contract with greater
congestion along the route? Will the traffic arteries keep ahead of the flood of new
vehicles?   These and other problems are vital considerations, and are written into this DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 51
report with a view to giving some appreciation of the factors and close study behind the
promotional programme.
ADVERTISING
The first advertising impact of the 1955 season was gained through a page in Holiday
magazine, run in full colour and in co-operation with the States of Washington and
Oregon. This advertisement appeared in January, and coupon returns totalled 3,700
before the season was over. This and Highway Traveller were the only United States
magazines with national circulation used by the Bureau. Sunset, National Motorist,
Westways, and Fortnight were used on the Pacific Coast to support the newspaper advertising, and of the 33,653 inquiries received by the Bureau, 2,500 were keyed to advertisements. All dailies were used, with a general invitation to visit " British Columbia, the
Colour-camera Country."
Five large bulletin-boards, with a traffic count of over 11,000,000, were repainted
with a repeat of the invitation. These boards are strategically located and have been
maintained for several years in the vicinity of Seattle, Portland, Tacoma, Grants Pass,
and Spokane.
With a view to encouraging British Columbians to spend their own vacations in the
Province, radio was again used, and it was also used in conjunction with Canadian
national magazines and newspapers to encourage more interprovincial traffic. Inquiry
response was good, and a large number of settlement inquiries also resulted.
General advertisements were kept to a minimum, in order that the budget could be
devoted in its entirety to promotion. Separate advertising agencies handled radio, newspaper, and magazine advertising.
The Bureau continued to handle the placing and checking of advertising for other
branches of Government service.
PUBLICITY
Acknowledgment is given to a large number of magazines, newspapers, radio
stations, television stations, and trade journals which afforded opportunities to place
promotional material without cost to the Bureau. The publicity supplementary to
scheduled advertising campaigns added materially to the over-all promotion of British
Columbia's tourist interests. A steady flow of articles and captioned photographs was
maintained with a high rate of acceptance, requests for material coming in with almost
every mail.
This year, for the first time, the Bureau distributed a series of twelve two- and three-
column mats to all daily and weekly newspapers in the Province. These mats featured
historic, scenic, and vacation attractions of various parts of the Province, and they received a 100-per-cent acceptance. In the interest of further developing intraprovincial
tourist traffic, it is hoped to enlarge this programme in 1956.
A similar service was tried in the United States. In this case the Bureau used a
commercial mat-distributing service, an investment of $300 bringing a return of 182
clippings from newspapers all over the United States. This service may also be enlarged
upon in 1956.
LITERATURE
Over 800,000 pieces of literature were distributed by the Bureau in 1955, the
demand far outstripping the estimates. Several of the basic folders appeared under new
cover and design, most noteworthy being the Vancouver Island and Vancouver-Sunshine
Coast folders, which set a new standard.
Maps also underwent a drastic revision. A continuing problem with maps had been
to secure one which had public acceptance, carried full detail and information, folded
conveniently, and covered desired areas. One of the major objections to our maps had
been the fold, no machinery being available to provide an accordion fold west of Toronto. W 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Rights to a map with universal acceptance became available in British Columbia early
last year, and this was incorporated into a book-fold which proved fairly satisfactory.
However, by adjustments within his own plant, the Queen's Printer was able to run an
accordion fold, with the result that this useful format later became available to the Bureau
for the first time.
The joint Alberta-British Columbia map was run with the new fold, and all maps
printed in 1956 will use it.
"Alluring British Columbia " met a very wide public acceptance, and its demand and
use was such as to warrant another 50,000 edition, reduced in size to 6 by 9 inches.
This publication is a "prestige" piece, which proved very effective as a supplement to
convention solicitation.
A need was felt for a publication which would give the traveller some historic and
scenic reference points, and to that end the Bureau produced a series of small folders,
" Historic Notes Along the Way." These notes were prepared on all trunk highways, with
the hope that they would form a base upon which a more comprehensive " picturesque-
historic-highways " folder could be built. The " Historic Notes " have been sent to Chambers of Commerce and others concerned for distribution, with request for additions and
amendments.
The Bureau is interested in the production of forty publications of various kinds,
each designed to serve a particular interest or meet a specific demand in a given market.
Distribution is carefully controlled to ensure effective use without waste. All are designed
as selling pieces. New productions included a four-page folder in colour designed for use
as a convention invitation.
The effectiveness of the Bureau literature is reflected in 2,000 responses to a visitor
questionnaire. " Descriptive literature " was a close third to " friends and relations " and
" previous visits " in answer to the question, " What first gave you the idea of vacationing
in British Columbia? " The alternate routes and circular tours suggested by much of the
literature have had a great effect on the length of stay and the mileage driven within the
Province.
TOURIST INFORMATION CENTRE, PORT OF DOUGLAS
After several years of planning, a Tourist Information Centre was opened at the
Douglas port of entry. Construction was started during August of 1954. By the early
part of 1955 the building was ready for occupancy.
The building is strategically located some 1,000 yards from the Canadian customs,
and is set on the grassy boulevard bordering the King George VI Highway. The grounds
immediately surrounding the building are well landscaped and maintained by the British
Columbia Forest Service in conjunction with the Peace Arch Park. A rustic sign in
advance of the building, handsomely bordered by miniature evergreens, advises the
travelling public of the service available to them. The lofty presence of the Red Ensign
beside the building adds to the feeling that the traveller is entering a different land.
Adequate parking facilities are provided by a black-topped area capable of accommodating over forty cars at one time.
The building, 24 by 32 feet, although of modern design, is finished in rustic architecture, with varnished siding and cedar shingles lending to the warmth and hospitality
provided by the staff. The rustic trend is carried within the building by the cedar-siding
decor on the face of the spacious counter and the dividing-wall between the main lobby
and the public washrooms. The two large plate-glass windows in the wall facing the
highway, and the two side walls, which are almost entirely glass, add a bright and cheery
feeling to the atmosphere.
The plastic-topped counter provides ample working space for the staff to display the
various maps and folders that are called for, and to enable them to mark out proposed
routes and scenic return journeys.   Display racks within reach of the travelling public DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 53
carry area and group folders, as well as transportation schedules and literature provided
by the various Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce throughout the Province.
All Government travel publications are displayed behind the counter, and are distributed by the staff in answer to the varied questions that are put forth.
Accurate statistics are kept, tabulating the number of cars that stop, their points of
origin, and the number of people that they contain. The number of trailers that are
brought in to British Columbia at this port is also recorded.  The number of days that
each party expects to spend within the Province is also tabulated. Separate tallies are
made of those visitors with no advance plans, and those pre-routed through auto clubs or
other travel bureaux.
One important item recorded is the number of miles the traveller expects to cover
during his stay in British Columbia. By describing and pointing out alternate return
routes, it is possible for the staff to add considerably to this mileage, which is recorded as
"estimated increased mileage." It is possible for the estimated increased mileage to
reach 5 per cent of the total mileage planned.
During this first summer's operation, the Centre was kept open for twelve hours a
day, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., seven days a week. It has been decided to keep the building
open throughout the winter months for regular office hours, including both Saturday and
Sunday. W 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A staff of three was capable of maintaining a high degree of service for the first
season's operation, but as the service becomes known, a larger staff may be necessary
during the months of June, July, and August.
Numerous inquiries are made regarding the areas where good hunting and fishing
are available. The Game Commission supplies the Centre with weekly fishing bulletins
compiled from reports supplied by the various District Game Wardens. Hunters and
fishermen are also advised where they can procure non-resident licences.
The popularity of the British Columbia Forest Service camp-sites is reflected by the
number of requests for literature giving descriptions and locations of these well-used
recreational havens.
U.S. Army signals are relayed to the Centre from the Travel Bureau, giving weekly
reports of the conditions of the Alaska Highway, and the Department of Highways provides information regarding conditions of Provincial roads, which is released in printed
form by the Government Travel Bureau and made available to the travelling public.
A visitors' register is maintained, in which visitors from all of the forty-eight States
have set their names. Many visitors have registered from as far away as England, Germany, South Africa, Hawaii, and Dutch Guiana. Notes of appreciation of the services
provided by the Centre have also been set down in the visitors' register.
Local residents have made use of the Centre in obtaining bus and ferry schedules,
rail and air-line information, and many have been helped in planning summer vacations
within the boundaries of the Province.
During the first tourist season, to October 1st, the Reception Centre was host to
9,212 cars, containing 25,903 persons who planned on spending 45,677 days in British
Columbia.   Extra mileage encouraged by the staff was estimated at 597,480.
" TOURIST ACCOMMODATION REGULATION ACT "
The Travel Bureau is concerned with filling over 2,000,000 guest-beds every month,
and while the Province boasts magnificent scenery, good fishing, and all resort and recreational attractions, it early came to the realization that British Columbia's tourist
industry would never be any better than its accommodations. That was why, in 1945,
the Regulations Governing Tourist Accommodation and Trailers were brought down,
and why the star rating of tourist accommodation was later instituted. In the year following the establishing of the star rating system, the accommodation directory showed
the rating of each establishment. It was the listing of these star ratings which caused
this folder to become one of the most potent and widely referred to travel directories in
North America.
Star rating enjoyed several years of stability and recognition from 1949 to 1953.
Physical and economic conditions surrounding the travel industry remained much the
same. While a continued improvement in the existing accommodation was apparent,
the nature of building and operating did not change and the stars became recognized as
reliable symbols. In 1953 and 1954, however, a new look became evident in the tourist
field; popular demand and completion began to be met by new standards, recognized
both in new accommodations and in the renovation of existing property. The standards
appreciated so rapidly as to render the current star rating formula obsolete.
In January last, representatives of the four Western Provinces met for the purpose
of creating a uniform grading system which could be applied throughout British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. At that meeting a formula was designed to
meet modern requirements, and the Provinces agreed to experiment with this during the
next season. The objective was to eliminate any defects from the proposed chart and
meet again in September with a view to arriving at an agreement on a unified formula.
On September 11th and 12th last the interprovincial committee met again, and during
the two-day conference the policy of grading tourist accommodation was reviewed, its
effect on the industry and the operators carefully considered, and the star rating formula DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 55
discussed in minute detail. The weight of experience of the grading officers from the
travel bureaux and the health and licensing departments of the four Western Provinces,
concentrated on this document, resulted in the unanimous adoption of a new formula,
which will be used in 1956 for publication of results in 1957. During the past year, star
rating of tourist accommodation was conducted under the old system, with the results
as tabulated herewith.
Number of Auto Courts Graded and Ungraded
Rating
1955
1954
1949
Number       Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
456
271
187
130
178
37
22
15
11
15
395
255
175
123
166
35
23
16
11
15
168
185
134
138
132
22
24
18
18
18
Total graded   —
1,222
223
100
1,114
226
100
757
100
1,445
....
1,340
....
The following grades were raised in 1955:—
Twenty-two raised from three to four stars.
One raised from two to four stars.
Nine raised from two to three stars.
One raised from one to three stars.
Three raised from no star to three stars.
Fourteen raised from one to two stars.
Seven raised from no star to one star.
The following grades were lowered in 1955:—
Six lowered from four to three stars.
Six lowered from three to two stars.
One lowered from three to one star.
Four lowered from two to one star.
Four lowered from one to no star.
Auto courts initially graded in 1955 were as follows:—
Four stars   3 6
Three stars  18
Two stars     7
One star     7
No star  14
Total  82
New listings in 1955 amounted to ninety-seven.
Fifty auto courts ceased operating in 1954 and twenty-eight in 1955.
SETTLEMENT
Again in 1955, settlement inquiries were received in considerable volume, a large
number being inspired by the press coverage of British Columbia's great industrial
developments, actual and proposed. A large number of people who had failed to establish themselves in Ontario and other Provinces, to which they had originally migrated,
hoped to find a home in British Columbia; there were also a large number of retired
Canadians seeking a happy place in which to spend declining years. A heavy mail was
also received from prospective agricultural settlers. In disposing of these inquiries, the
Bureau acknowledges the assistance of the Department of Agriculture, Department of W 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Citizenship and Immigration, and other authoritative sources of factual information and
advice. The National Employment Service in Vancouver and Victoria helped the Bureau
on many occasions, and the Agent-General for British Columbia and the Canadian
Department of Labour in London, England, were important references.
The Bureau does not solicit immigration, but the expanding economy of the Province naturally invites inquiry. Such inquiries as are funnelled to the Travel Bureau are
given the information and references most suitable and helpful, but any finalizing is left
to the Canadian or Provincial department most directly concerned.
Appreciative acknowledgment has been received from many countries.
TOURIST COUNCIL
The sixteenth annual meeting of the Tourist Council was held in Vancouver on
October 20th and 21st, with the Deputy Minister in the chair. Operations of the Government Travel Bureau over the past year were reported upon and reviewed by the
Council. Regional reports were given by members, and discussions led to several resolutions and recommendations for the help and guidance of the Bureau and the general
welfare of the visitor industry.
FIELD WORK
The travel promotion programme through personal contact with travel information
offices followed a different pattern in 1955.
A new full-time travel promotion service in the United States was established in
April of this year under the joint sponsorship of the Provinces of British Columbia and
Alberta. Both Provincial travel bureaux long recognized the value of promotion through
personal contact and the need for increased activity in this direction. A travel trade
representative is now located in the United States, headquartered in San Francisco, Calif.
With him rests the responsibility for carrying on the contact work for the two Provinces
in the eleven Western States. No office is maintained, but greatly appreciated assistance
received from the staff of the Canadian Consulate-General in San Francisco has been
most helpful when needed.
Benefits from this increased service have been acknowledged by many travel information agencies, and their excellent co-operation throughout the entire area has been
most encouraging.
An important approach to this contact work is the maintaining of close liaison with
automobile club headquarters, with follow-up visits to their branch offices, in addition
to keeping in close touch with travel agents, transportation companies, and the travel
promotion departments of major oil companies. Of considerable significance is the work
with travel and outdoor editors of newspapers and magazines, which is closely associated
to the demand for planning tours and arranging appointments for writers seeking subject
material for magazine articles. The commercial motion-picture field has been helped in
a similar manner. Speaking to groups and the showing of films plays an important part
in this type of promotion. The Government travel films have had an acceptance by the
television stations that is very gratifying.
The Pacific Northwest Travel Association operated a booth at the Los Angeles
Sport and Travel Show, and the travel trade representative assisted in the staffing of
this display. This form of travel promotion works well in some areas, and future participation in selected shows with one display for the two Provinces, as is planned, should
prove profitable. Experiments with placing small displays at large conventions worked
well this year, and it is hoped that this approach can be continued in the future.
Four senior travel counsellors of major automobile clubs in the West Coast States
travelled 3,500 miles on a conducted automobile tour of Alberta and British Columbia
as guests of the Provincial travel bureaux. The group expressed hearty enthusiasm over
the many tourist attractions, and each now feels in a much improved position to direct DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 57
travel into the Provinces. The combined memberships of the clubs represented approximately 900,000, and each member received a report on the tour through his club
periodical.
Through the avenues opened up by these personal contacts, it is expected that the
publicity and dissemination of travel information, including large quantities of tourist
literature, will provide a valued aid to planning British Columbia and Alberta vacations.
EXHIBITIONS
The Bureau did not take space in any of the sport shows in 1955, but in April Mr.
Peers represented this Province and Alberta at the Pacific Northwest Travel Association
booth in the Los Angeles Sport Show. At the same time Mr. Walter Fuller, of Alberta,
represented both Provinces at the Minneapolis Sport Show, at and en route to which he
distributed a quantity of pertinent literature.
The Canadian National Exhibition at Toronto offered rental space in the Avenue
of Provinces during the period of the exhibition, and all other Provinces being represented, the Bureau staffed a booth, distributing literature and furnishing information to
many thousands. The Avenue of Provinces was not enclosed and the conditions not
all that could be desired, but development of the national theme in an enclosed area is
now being promoted by the exhibition authorities, and any future participation would
be on a more suitable basis. Meanwhile, from the report of Miss P. Hamilton, who had
charge of the booth for the Travel Bureau, it is felt that, notwithstanding the lateness of
the exhibition, considerable traffic can be encouraged and general publicity for the Province accented by such participation.
CO-OPERATIVE ACTIVITIES
Under this heading must come a little more than mere acknowledgment of cooperation. Elsewhere in this report, mention has been made of the joint Alberta-British
Columbia sponsorship of a travel officer with headquarters in San Francisco, and also
of the joint production of a map-folder and the co-operation, with Saskatchewan and W 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Manitoba, in connection with establishment of a star rating formula. While these expressions were dictated by mutual interest, the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau
appreciatively acknowledges an interest on the part of the Deputy Minister of Economic
Affairs for Alberta and the Director and staff of the Alberta Government Travel Bureau
far beyond what is ordinarily called for.
Mention should also be made here of the staff meetings, the second of which was
held at Banff in September, at which the travel counsellors, fieldmen, and other officers
of the Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia travel bureaux discussed mutual
problems in the interest of betterment of service and advancement of knowledge of the
tourist industry.   These exchanges have proven very beneficial to all concerned.
The Province has also been served most generously by the automobile club of
Southern California, the national automobile club, and the state automobile associations
of California, Oregon, and Washington.
Without exception, the oil companies' travel bureaux have co-operated very closely,
particularly in respect of dissemination of road reports. The regional and community
travel bureaux at Kamloops, Nanaimo, Hope, Vernon, New Westminster, Chilliwack,
Trail, Kimberley, Kelowna, Revelstoke, Nelson, Cranbrook, Courtenay, and a score of
other centres, in co-operating with the Bureau, enabled it to round out a comprehensive
programme of promotion and service. The Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau and
the Vancouver Tourist Association gave a tourist service extending beyond their immediate interests and were in turn furnished folders and promotional material for distribution. A special credit should be given the British Columbia Automobile Association for
a fine spirit of co-operation, and also the British Columbia Hotels Association and Auto
Courts and Resorts Association of British Columbia.
The co-operation at all times of the Canadian Customs and Immigration Officers at
border points is greatly appreciated by the Bureau, as it is by the visitors. Without
exception, visitors to the Province have been courteously received, a fact which has been
very frequently commented on.
Particularly friendly liaison has been maintained between the Bureau and the Canadian Government Travel Bureau in Ottawa, its offices in New York and Chicago, and
the Canadian Consulates in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle. At all times the
resources and facilities of these offices have been placed at the disposal of the Bureau
and the travel representative, and frequently taken advantage of.
The Bureau also acknowledges that its promotional task would be much more difficult without the full co-operation of the press and radio interests.
SURVEYS
During the year the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau conducted two
surveys with a view to securing more and up-to-date data on the patterns of tourist traffic
within the Province, the nature of the traffic, and other statistics which might assist in
planning promotions.
One questionnaire was distributed to visitors by travel bureaux, Chambers of Commerce, hotels, motels, etc., in all parts of the Province. Fifteen thousand forms were
distributed, and the returns approximating 2,000. Response to selected questions was
tabulated at the end of the season, some findings being incorporated into other sections
of this report.
An interest in securing reliable statistics on the visitor industry was expressed by
Professor E. D. McPhee, of the Faculty of Commerce, University of British Columbia,
who called a meeting to discuss the problem. In June he met with Dr. N. H. Engle,
Director of the Bureau of Business Research, University of Washington; Dr. J. A.
Guthrie, Director of the Bureau of Economics and Business Research, State College of
Washington; Professor S. Oberg, of the University of British Columbia; Deputy Minister
T. L. Sturgess; James Hughes, Executive Vice-President of the Vancouver Tourist Asso- DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY W 59
ciation; George I. Warren, of the Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau; and Ernest
Evans, Commissioner of the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau. A meeting
of the Canadian members of the committee was called by the Deputy Minister a month
later, when it was agreed that Mr. Sturgess would discuss the problem at the Federal-
Provincial Conference, and that the committee would analyse the results of the surveys
currently being conducted. The University authorities offered to co-operate in outlining
and conducting further surveys in another year if necessary.
At the end of the season all operators of tourist accommodation were contacted,
and response to questionnaires gave an exceptionally large and comprehensive sample
upon which to base a study.
The following are a few preliminary tabulations of interest, submitted without
comment.
How the Tourist Dollar Was Spent
Retail and department stores.
Food and restaurants	
Accommodation	
Transportation
Entertainment and recreation	
Roadside purchases, refreshments and souvenirs.
19511
250
19552
190
220
220
170
220
190
200
90
90
80
80
1 Dominion Bureau of Statistics figures.
2 British Columbia Government Travel Bureau figures.
Hotel Survey, 1955
Tourist guests were composed of—
British Columbians  55.5%
Other Canadians  22.3%
United States visitors  22.2%
100.0%
Percentage of overnight trade  53%
Average number in party     2
Average length of stay (days)     2
Guests who made reservations  20%
Percentage of repeat business  26%
Motel and Resort Survey, 1955
Guests were composed of—
British Columbians   47%
Other Canadians   19%
United States visitors  34%
100%
Percentage of overnight trade  55%
Percentage of repeat trade  36%
In some areas the demand for housekeeping ran as high as 80 per cent and in others
as low as 40 per cent. The over-all average for British Columbia, etc., was 70 per cent.
The average length of stay for all types of accommodation was four days, while the
average number of persons in each party was 3.5. These figures include resorts and other
stopping-places where bookings often run to fourteen days and parties of five and six are
not uncommon. W 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
British Columbia scenery is still the greatest attraction to visitors. In answer to the
query " What desirable factors prompted your visit? " 1,458 replied scenery; 786, rest
and relaxation; 490, climate; 356, visited friends and relations; 315, fishing; and 327,
shopping.   Other factors were out of the running.
The value of scenery to British Columbia is also reflected in the fact that of the people
stopping at the Douglas Reception Centre, over 65 per cent carried a camera.
The majority of visitors to British Columbia found our accommodations good (ratio,
4 to 1 against fair), our prices moderate, our restroom facilities only fair. Half of the
visitor's "shopping" money was spent on souvenirs and chinaware; clothing and woollens came next on the list; jewellery was fifth on the list of specified purchases; linens
next; and sports equipment last.
HISTORIC SITES
Three historic sites were marked by plaques furnished by the Bureau in 1955, two
being unveiled on the occasion of the opening of the road through to Bella Coola. One
of these plaques marks the spot where caterpillar tractors, working from the east and the
west, met at a point a few miles west of Anahim. The other plaque marks the spot where
Alexander Mackenzie reached tide-water.
A plaque commemorating the first high school in British Columbia was unveiled on
the grounds of the new junior high school on Fort Street, Victoria.
Whenever opportunity has offered, the Commissioner has encouraged local historic
societies in their work and projects and emphasized on all possible occasions the value of
local historic references. In this respect it is encouraging to note the increased amount of
historic reference in regional and community folders.
Inquiries and correspondence received by the Bureau also reflects a greater interest
in historic references on the part of the visitor.
REPRESENTATION
During the year the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau was represented
at conventions of the Canadian Tourist Association, Okanagan-Cariboo Trail Association,
British Columbia Hotels Association, British Columbia Auto Courts and Resorts Association, and at several regional meetings of the latter. The Bureau was also officially
represented at the May meeting of the Pacific Northwest Trade Association and at the
annual meetings of the Vancouver and Victoria tourist associations. Membership was
maintained in the National Association of Travel Organizations. At the Federal-Provincial Tourist Conference, the Bureau was represented by the Deputy Minister.
At all of these gatherings the various aspects of the tourist industry were discussed,
the Bureau's contribution being to the general advancement of the industry on the various
levels concerned and the improvement of British Columbia's tourist economy in particular.
PHOTOGRAPHIC BRANCH
Still Assignments
Photographers in the field covered the Chilcotin District from Williams Lake to Bella
Coola.   This was the first time that our photographers had worked in that area.
Many new photographs were obtained of the Cariboo District, and a side trip was
made to the Bowron Lake chain of lakes for new coverage.
Another still photographic trip covered the area adjacent to Highway No. 3 from
Hope to Crowsnest Pass, thence north in the Kootenay-Columbia Valley to Kootenay and
Yoho Parks. From there new photographs were taken along the Trans-Canada Highway
to Kamloops and the Fraser Canyon. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
W 61
New photographs were also obtained from a trip through the Lower Fraser Valley,
and continued on to the Okanagan where the Kelowna Regatta was covered.
Other photographs were taken of Vancouver Island and the Sechelt Peninsula.
Motion Pictures
Photography was completed on the new industrial film, sequel to "Johnny's Heritage " and to be entitled " Forward."
New material was obtained covering the Chilcotin and Cariboo Districts with a view
to replacing the " Romantic Cariboo," now badly outdated. This new film will have
sequences showing the Williams Lake Stampede and also game photography in the
Bowron Lakes area.
A film showing the Provincial polio services was completed for the Department of
Health and Welfare, entitled " Road Home." The film shows the services provided from
the admission to hospital to the final rehabilitation of the patient.
Remarks
The continued widespread use of our photographs by newspapers and magazines is
gratifying. Almost twice as many were sent out this year for this purpose as compared to
last year.   The resulting publicity value is very great.
Particular attention has been paid to producing photographs slanted to meet the
requirements of the Departmental publicity campaigns in connection with the tourist
industry, as set by the Commissioner.
A print from our files this year won the Latimer trophy, one of the highest awards in
Canada to professional photography. It also won the Ansco award for outstanding excellence in its class.
Many of the films in the motion-picture library are becoming worn and outdated.
Despite this, the demand for films is still increasing. A system of grading the condition
of films has been installed so that we are able to judge which prints are suitable for television and other major shows.
Added to the film library this year were ten prints of a thirty-minute film, " British
Columbia, Canada's Evergreen Playground," which were made available through the
courtesy of the Standard Oil Company of Canada.
The National Film Board distribution office in Chicago continues to give good results
in releasing and placing our films in the United States. Their co-operation is greatly
appreciated, and it is hoped that we will be able to make still greater use of their service
in the future.
A list showing production and distribution follows.
Motion-picture Shows
To various organizations in Victoria and environs  20
Preview shows in the Branch theatre  33
Motion-picture Circulation
Total audience in British Columbia  72,855
Total audience in other Provinces  1,449,960
Total audience in United States  104,611
Total audience in England  107,203
Total audience  1,734,629 W 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Still Photos
During the year, photographs were sent complimentary to writers, publishers, and
advertising agents as follows:—
British Columbia   3,833
Other Provinces    1,188
United States    1,010
Foreign      731
Total  6,762
Darkroom Production
Total number of negatives processed     4,940
Total number of prints  15,343
Still Photography
During the year the Photographic Branch accepted and completed still assignments
for the following departments: Agriculture, British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service,
British Columbia Power Commission, British Columbia Resources Conference, Health
and Welfare, Lands, Lands and Forests, Mines, Provincial Archives, Provincial Museum,
Provincial Secretary, Public Works, and Queen's Printer.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1956
860-156-8716  

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