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Civil Service Commission REPORT FROM JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 31ST 1955 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1956

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Civil Service Commission
REPORT
FROM JANUARY 1st TO DECEMBER 31st
1955
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1956  To His Honour Frank Mackenzie Ross, C.M.G., M.C.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Report of the Civil Service Commission,
Province of British Columbia, from January 1st to December 31st, 1955.
WESLEY D. BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
Victoria, B.C., January 1956. The Honourable Wesley D. Black,
Provincial Secretary,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—In conformity with the provisions of section 7 of the " Civil Service Act"
(chapter 51, "Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948"), I have the honour to
submit herewith the Report of the proceedings and work of the Civil Service Commission
from January 1st to December 31st, 1955.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. M. MORRISON,
Chairman, Civil Service Commission.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1956. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Chairman: Hugh M. Morrison. Member: J. V. Fisher.
Administrative Assistant:  A. Partridge.
PERSONNEL STAFF
Victoria
Chief Personnel Officer: R. L. W. Ritchie.
Classification Officer: A. G. Richardson.
Personnel Officer: Miss J. Meryl Campbell.
Personnel Officer: D. J. Slader.
Vancouver
Personnel Officer:  S. B. Williscroft.
Essondale
Personnel Officer: G. L. Tomalty.
Clerical Staff
Miss W. E. Brown. Mrs. R. M. Frankling.
Mrs. S. M. Burns. Mrs. T. V. M. Hole.
Miss E. L. Christie. Miss M. E. Jackson.
Miss P. D. Clarke. Mrs. G. Knott.
Miss D. Claydon. Miss J. McCuaig.
Miss M. M. DeWar. Mrs. A. M. Robertson.
Miss M. Dixon. Mrs. P. Russell.
Miss V. E. Fell. Mrs. C. M. Vance.
Vancouver Office
Mrs. M. M. Young. Miss D. H. Thomson.
Essondale Office
Mrs. M. Booth.  CONTENTS
Report of the Civil Service Commission-
Report of the Chief Personnel Officer	
Report of the Classification Officer	
Report of the Personnel Officer, Vancouver
Report of the Personnel Officer, Essondale..
Appendix—Statistics
Page
9
19
21
23
24
25  Report of the Civil Service Commission
Pursuant to Section 7 of the " Civil Service Act," from
January 1st to December 31st, 1955
In conjunction with the record-breaking economic activity of the Province during
1955, the personnel management agency of the Government of British Columbia—that
is, the Civil Service Commission—experienced a busy and invigorating year. In addition,
the year 1955 marked the completion of the first decade of the Government's personnel
administration based upon a consistent and centralized policy, derived from the " Civil
Service Act " of 1945 and its amendments.
The Legislative Assembly, in its wisdom, was pleased to base the Act of 1945 upon
principles recommended in the Report of the Civil Service Committee on Reorganization—virtually, a committee, like the famous British Northcote-Trevelyan Committee—
an inquiry by Civil Servants into the Civil Service.* The record of the Government's
personnel management of its own staffs since that date (as revealed in the published
Annual Reports of this Commission) has proven, in the opinion of your Commissioners,
the wisdom and soundness of that Committee's report and the Legislature's positive
implementation of its recommendations. Indeed, the Commission ventures the opinion
that this almost unknown report ranks in its own sphere of public personnel administration as significant as the Northcote-Trevelyan report ranks in the British sphere.
The Civil Service Commission begs to report primarily for the year 1955 in this
Annual Report. However, in view of the importance of the decade completed (1945-
55), it will make reference to improvements made in management of the Civil Service
since 1945.
SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF THE CIVIL SERVICE
The expanding activities of Government were reflected in a return to the upward
trend of Civil Service enrolment. On December 31st, 1954, the total number of probationary and permanent Civil Servants enrolled was 7,945 (see Appendix, Table 3,
Annual Report, 1954); the corresponding number at December 31st, 1955, was 8,138
(see Appendix, Table 3), an increase of 193. The gross total (including temporary
employees) at the end of 1954 was 8,523; the corresponding number at the end of 1955
was 8,893 (see Appendix, Tables 3 and 4), an increase of 370. This increase was largely
due to expanded services in Government institutions, such as the opening of the new West
Lawn Building at Essondale and the Brannen Lake School for Boys.
AMENDMENTS TO THE "CIVIL SERVICE ACT" AND REGULATIONS
Important amendments were made to the " Civil Service Act." One amendment
was the elimination of all age-limits upon entry into the Civil Service. Authority is now
delegated to the Civil Service Commission to determine age-limits as " best meet the
needs of the public service at the time of the competition." This amendment resulted
in the removal of the younger age-limit for females as against a five-year older limit
for males, and it also removed all artificial and unsound handicaps toward the securing
of the best available talent and experience for the Service.
Another amendment was the granting of authority to the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council to defer, in the public interest, the compulsory retirement of any employee for
a period of up to five years. In addition, the compulsory retirement age of 65 years was
made to apply to females as well as to males, thus removing unequal treatment between
*" The Organization of the Permanent Civil Service, together with a Letter from the Rev. B. Jowell " (Nov., 1853).
9 CC  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
the sexes in this regard. Previously, the compulsory retirement age for females was 60
years. This amendment, in addition to effecting equality of treatment between the sexes,
permits the Government to retain in the Civil Service trained and physically competent
personnel beyond the compulsory retiring age, when in the public interest.
The third and final amendment was provision for a greater refinement in the calculating of service which could be credited toward determining the amount of retiring
allowance, and also the complete separation of the payment of the retiring allowance from
any connection with the superannuation scheme. The Commission now arranges for
the payment of these allowances to employees on the non-Civil Service staffs, such as the
Game Commission and gaols.
During the year, revisions were made by Orders in Council to the regulations, as
follows:—
(1) In line with revisions by the Federal Government to its regulations governing leave of absence for enlistment in the armed forces, similar revisions
were approved by Order in Council No. 1678/55.
(2) The regulations in respect to overtime services were consolidated and
amended by Order in Council No. 2903/55, so that full straight-time payment, only where necessary and approved, is made to all eligible classifications. The general policy is to authorize overtime only in exceptional
and emergency circumstances, and then only on a " compensatory time
off " basis. Payments are approved only when it is proved to the satisfaction of the Civil Service Commission that compensatory time off is
impractical and not feasible.
(3) Leave regulations were amended by Order in Council No. 174/55 to
permit the granting of special leave to employees as delegates attending
meetings of service associations related to Her Majesty's Forces.
(4) The regulations governing vacation and sick-leave were amended by Order
in Council No. 282/55, granting the Commission power to credit employees, upon re-entry into the Service, with former vacation and sick-leave
credits prior to the full reinstatement of their Superannuation Fund
accounts.
(5) The regulations governing the granting of vacation and sick-leave to part-
time nurses of the Divisions of Tuberculosis Control and Venereal Disease
Control were amended by Order in Council No. 1452/55 to conform to
the five-day work-week.
(6) The Commission advised and assisted in the formulating of the regulations
as amended by Order in Council No. 1038/55, governing the granting
of vacation and sick-leave to the non-Civil Service staffs of the Departments of Highways and Public Works.
ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGES
In keeping with the objectives of the general checking of administrative procedures
and organization of staffs carried on throughout the Service, commented on further in this
Report, the Commission, with the assistance of the survey team allotted to its own office,
was able to effect some simplification of methods, thus keeping staff requirements to the
minimum. The work entailed in the issuance of notices of appointment has been considerably lessened in that formerly a notice was issued upon probationary appointment
and another upon permanent appointment. Now only one notice is issued on appointment, permanent status being established upon the approval of a satisfactory efficiency
rating report. The elimination of the additional notice form, with its numerous copies,
not only constituted a saving in expensive stationery, but has eliminated procedures in
the various departments.   For instance, under the dual notice system the Comptroller- CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
CC  11
General's office was forced to replace the probationary notice with the permanent one,
a procedure which caused a good deal of extra work involved in the complexities of the
centralized mechanical paying system.
Upon the recommendation of the Civil Service Commission, the system of calling
for " open " resignation and certain " marital status " forms from married non-self-
supporting female employees was discontinued. Aside from the psychological benefits
involved in this decision, there were, in addition, savings in time and effort formerly
involved in the collection and filing of these forms.
Another saving effected, though a minor one, was in the decision of the Executive
Council to call for tenders in renewing the blanket bond, which covers all Government
employees.   The lowest bid was accepted, at a saving over the cost of the previous bond.
APPOINTMENTS AND RECRUITMENT RATE
During the year 2,626 appointments were made (see Appendix, Table 2), as compared with 2,120 appointments made during 1954, an increase of 506.
The number of separations reported is 2,807 (see Appendix, Table 9), an increase
of 278 over the previous year. In the same period 867 permanent appointments were
granted. This figure includes probationary appointments carried over from some of the
1,149 probationary employees appointed in 1954. Of the new appointments processed in
1955, 1,264 were probationary and 1,030 were casual. As the total enrolment (probationary-casual-permanent) as at December 31st, 1955, was 8,893, the recruitment rate
for 1955 was 25.8 per cent, and increase of 6.1 per cent over 1954. The economic
activity in the Province was reflected in the increased recruitment rate.
Year
1947
Recruitment Rate
 37.0
Year
1952	
1953	
Recruitment Rate
 24.5
1948    	
 31.7
 19.5
1949
23.6
1954	
.     19.7
1950	
 18.5
 22.4
1955	
 25.8
1951	
SEPARATIONS
The Chief Personnel Officer's analysis of the reasons for the separation of permanently appointed personnel from the Service may be found in his report, specifically
on page 20. The decline in the percentage dismissed for unsatisfactory service, noted in
the 1954 Annual Report, has been maintained, the percentage for 1955 being 4 per cent
as it was for 1954. It will be noted, however, that percentage of those who left the Service
to accept other employment rose in 1955 by 6 over that of former years. This would
appear to indicate that the holding power of the Civil Service decreased during the year.
Evidence that permanent appointment is not automatically obtained, or that once
secured it cannot be withdrawn, is found in the fact that 52 employees were dismissed
during the year and 59 had their probationary periods extended. In addition, 4 suffered
suspensions without dismissals.
The following tabulation shows the extent of this disciplinary trend during the past
three years:—
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
Number of Civil Servants whose probationary periods were extended 	
Number of Civil Servants who were suspended from duty but not dismissed.
43
12
66
68
8
53
49
11
64
61
10
54
59
4 CC  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
GENERAL ELIGIBILITY EXAMINATIONS
General assembled stenographic, clerical, and draughting examinations for the establishment of eligibility lists in the junior classifications were held from time to time as
necessity dictated in Victoria, in addition to constant smaller and individual examinations.
In Vancouver and at Essondale it once more was found impossible to maintain eligibility
lists for a reasonable period of time. Hence, applicants were examined constantly at both
Commission offices in Vancouver and the Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale.
Nevertheless, as the Personnel Officer at Essondale reports (page 24), he was able to
conduct a qualifying examination for applicants wishing to compete for Charge and Assistant Charge Psychiatric Nursing positions. Interior points in the Province were served
through the never-failing courteous assistance of the Department of Finance Government
Agents, who, when necessary, conducted the examinations and served as excellent liaison
officers for the Commission in filling junior grade and clerical positions in the various
departmental branch offices.
At the Victoria centre the total number of applicants examined in the junior written
examinations amounted to 641. Of this number, 410 or 66 per cent qualified. In the
Vancouver centre 442 were examined, of which 305 or 69 per cent qualified. At the
Essondale centre 139 candidates wrote examinations, of which 96 or 69 per cent qualified.
The records of these centres during the past few years are as follows:—
Percentage of Qualifications on General Eligibility Examinations
for Initial Entrance to Junior Level Grades
Centre
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
Victoria.— 	
Per Cent
71
O)
(2)
Per Cent
67
88
(-)
Per Cent
64
72
(2)
Per Cent
66
84
(2)
Per Cent
61
89
(2)
Per Cent
66
69
69
1 No record.
2 No centre.
It is interesting to note the significant decrease in the percentage which qualified in
the Vancouver centre, and also to note that in the adjacent newly opened Essondale
centre the percentage is the same.
COMPETITIONS FOR PROMOTION
All vacancies are given a wide publicity, both within and without the Service, but
preference is given to the in-Service applicant when the qualifications are judged equivalent to applications from without the Service. In this respect emphatic weighting is given
to an in-Service applicant's knowledge and experience within the Service together with
his record of work performance. This is a just policy and helps to maintain morale within
the Service, and also is attractive to young people who wish to stay in the Service and
make the Civil Service a career. On the other hand, care must be exercised to guard
against in-Service breeding. As a result, all vacancies advertised within the Service are
simultaneously advertised in the newspapers, inviting public competition. According to
the report of the Chief Personnel Officer, of 784 advertised and filled by open competition, 373 or 47 per cent were filled from within the Service, and 318 or 41 per cent were
filled by appointment from outside the Service. A good proportion of the appointments
from outside the Service include junior level positions, not offering promotional opportunities to those within the Service.
A good share of the work of the Commission's Personnel Officer at Essondale deals
with the conducting of promotional competitions through written examinations and the CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT CC 13
convening of promotional interview panels, the members of which are the pertinent
Mental Health Services officials. During 1955 it is reported that 619 appointments were
made, of which 144 were filled by 110 promotional competitions. In connection with
these appointments or promotions, 21 written examinations were held, at which there
were 139 candidates (see report of Essondale Personnel Officer, page 24). A qualifying
examination for consideration toward placement on eligibility lists for promotion to
Charge and Assistant Charge Psychiatric Nurses was also held toward the end of the
year.   There were 261 applicants, of which 238 wrote the examination.
IN-SERVICE TRAINING
The usual training courses, conducted by the various departments and referred to
in previous Annual Reports of this Commission and various departmental reports, were
continued throughout the year. In addition to these formal departmental courses, some
departments conduct annual or biennial conferences of their key personnel.
During the latter part of the year the Commission was in touch with the University
of British Columbia, exploring the practicability of establishing in co-operation with the
University a formalized system of administrative management training.
Supervised training courses under the direction of Miss J. M. Campbell, of the Commission's staff, were continued on a reduced scale in 1955. The reduced programme
was regrettably accepted because of Civil Service staff survey commitments described
later (page 16) in this Report. Nevertheless, 108 key personnel were able to take advantage of these courses, and the departments concerned expressed their appreciation.
Since the inauguration of these courses in 1950, more than 1,300 supervisors have
been enrolled, as follows:— XT   .     ._
Number of Supervisors
Year Enrolled
1950  101
1951  132
1952  317
1953  287
1954  405
1955  108
Total  1,350
THE VANCOUVER OFFICE
In respect to recruitment the Personnel Officer in the Vancouver office reports
referral of 712 applicants for appointment to the various Civil Service establishments in
and around Vancouver. Because of the opening of the Essondale office, this is a smaller
number than in previous years.
In recent years the number of such referrals was as follows:—
Year Number of Referrals Year Number of Referrals
1950   495     1953	
1951   640     1954  1,099
1952   952     1955   712*
1 Does not include Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
In addition to recruitment, this office assists the Classification Division in respect to
position classification investigations; twenty-six such studies were conducted. The Personnel Officer has, in addition to his regular duties, been of noteworthy assistance in
guiding the staff survey of the Provincial Mental Health Services in co-operation with
the Commission's Personnel Officer at Essondale, the Departmental Personnel Officer,
and the Administrative Assistant to the Director of Mental Health Services. CC  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE ESSONDALE OFFICE
The year 1955 was the first full calendar year for this office. Its establishment is
justified by the more expeditious and improved personnel management rendered the
Mental Health Services, which in number constitutes a large proportion of the Civil
Service, and the greater part of this proportion is congregated in the Essondale area.
The Personnel Officer is making good progress in refining and systematizing recruiting techniques. In addition, he was able to carry out twenty-three investigations for the
Classification Officer, and also conducted and co-operated in a good number of important
organizational studies. He is also serving, under the chairmanship of the Personnel
Officer at Vancouver, on the staff survey team reporting on the general organization of
the Mental Health Services.
CLASSIFICATION AND SALARY PLAN
The regular work of the Classification Division is tabulated in the Appendix, Tables
18 and 20. The total number of official classification reviews amounted to 659. This
may be compared to 678 in 1954, 728 in 1953, 818 in 1952, 980 in 1951, and 708 in
1950. In addition, special assignments involving investigations and reports on various
conditions of service, such as hours of work and prevailing wage and salary studies, are
continually being conducted by this Division.
During the year 77 new positions were classified into the classification schedules
and 73 were deleted (see Appendix, Table 20). The wide variety of the types of
occupation represented in the Civil Service is indicated by the Classification Officer's
statement that there " are at present 851 classifications listed in the schedules."
DEPARTMENTAL ESTABLISHMENTS
The Division continued its check on departmental permanent establishments by
reviewing all requests for the establishment of new positions and the filling of replacements. During the year 269 new positions were added to the permanent Civil Service
and 34 were deleted. Hence the number of permanent positions was increased by 235
during the year. The Classification Officer estimates that a saving of $45,000 was
effected because of classification reviews, and $50,000 because of staff establishment
checks.
At the beginning of the year the Honourable the Premier indicated that a check of
the organization and utilization of personnel should be made during 1955 throughout
the Civil Service, and that this check should be undertaken by departments and the Civil
Service Commission, with the latter body submitting final reports to the Executive
Council.
The Classification Officer was assigned to supervise directly the check. Through
the whole-hearted co-operation of the various departments a staff of thirty-five to forty
key employees was marshalled and divided into teams. Each team was composed of
representatives of the department or unit being checked and representatives from other
departments or from the Civil Service Commission. The teams were as follows (first
named is Chairman):—
Department of Finance—
G. S. Bryson, Assistant Deputy Minister of Finance.
C. Davies, Inspector of Government Agencies.
A. G. Richardson, Classification Officer, Civil Service Commission.
Departments of Public Works and Highways—
A. G. Richardson, Classification Officer, Civil Service Commission.
J. Moore, Departmental Comptroller, Public Works and Highways.
H. C. Davies, Administrative Assistant, Public Works and Highways
(Personnel). CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT CC  15
Health Branch—
Institutions—
P. M. Nerland, Personnel Officer, Health Branch.
Miss E. Wyness, Supervisor of Welfare, Social Welfare Branch.
Remainder—
A. H. Cameron, Director of Administration, Health Branch.
G. C. Page, Chief Clerk, Vital Statistics Division.
H. G. Moore, Chief Clerk, Motor-vehicle Branch.
Social Welfare Branch—
R. L. W. Ritchie, Chief Personnel Officer, Civil Service Commission.
E. R. Rickinson, Departmental Comptroller, Department of Health and
Welfare.
Forest Service—
W. J. Williams, Personnel Officer, Forest Service.
A. F. Taylor, Auditor, Department of Finance.
A. Cooper, Forester—Grade 1, Forest Service.
Lands Service—
Miss M. J. Campbell, Personnel Officer, Civil Service Commission.
J. H. Palmer, Personnel Assistant, Lands Service.
R. Torrance, Assistant Superintendent of Lands.
Department of the Provincial Secretary—
Mental Health Services—
S. B. Williscroft, Personnel Officer, Civil Service Commission.
G. L. Tomalty, Personnel Officer, Civil Service Commission.
C. B. Watson, Administrative Essistant, Mental Health Services.
J. Dowling, Administrative Assistant, Mental Health Services.
Remainder of Department—
W. H. Forrest, Assistant Deputy Minister and Assistant Superannuation Commissioner.
J. F. Lister, Senior Clerk—Grade 1, Department of the Provincial
Secretary.
Miss M. J. Campbell, Personnel Officer, Civil Service Commission.
Department of the Attorney-General—
R. A. Hadfield, Deputy Superintendent of Motor-vehicles.
E. T. Cantell, Solicitor—Grade 1, Department of the Attorney-General.
H. W. Mellish, Secretary, Public Utilities Commission.
Department of Agriculture—
D. J. Slader, Personnel Officer, Civil Service Commission.
N. L. Camsusa, Administrative Assistant, Department of Agriculture.
Department of Education—
C. B. Conway, Director of Tests, Standards, and Research, Department of
Education.
D. J. Slader, Personnel Officer, Civil Service Commission.
G. W. Graham, Director of Administration, Department of Education.
Departments of Labour, Municipal Affairs, Railways, and Fisheries, and Hospital Insurance—
J. D. Baird, Superintendent and Deputy Inspector of Municipalities.
G. A. Little, Administrative Assistant, Department of Labour.
B. W. Dysart, Chief Administrative Officer, Department of Labour.
L. F. Detwiller, Assistant Commissioner, Hospital Insurance Service.
Department of Mines, Department of Trade and Industry, and Public Utilities
Commission—
G. D. Bishop, Research Supervisor, Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
R. A. Hadfield, Deputy Superintendent of Motor-vehicles.
P. J. Mulcahy, Chief Gold Commissioner. CC 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The teams, departments, and Commission were instructed to pursue their work in a
positive and critical frame of mind, and to consider:—
(a) Effectiveness of the organization in rendering the service for which it was
constituted, including clearness of lines of authority and degree of delegation of power.
(b) The duties and need of all duties of each employee.
(c) Printed forms, their necessity and adaptability.
(d) Mechanics of work-flows, etc.
The work by these teams was continued actively throughout the year. With the
exception of a few large departments or branches, all teams had initially reported by the
end of the year. The response and co-operation received from all concerned, including
team members and departmental officials, has been very gratifying, and much good work
has been achieved. Many recommendations are reported to have been implemented
during the investigations. Matters involving general policy are referred to the Executive
Council.
At the end of the year the check was still in progress, as evidenced by the following
summary:—
Number of survey teams  14
Number of reports received from survey teams  22
Number of reports referred for departmental consideration  22
Number of reports officially considered by the Civil Service Commission   12
Number of reports forwarded by the Civil Service Commission to
the Executive Council     8
Aside from the actual economic savings effected and the improved efficiency in
operation, the educational value of such a Service-wide check is very important, as it
results in efficiency and cost consciousness, which is highly desirable in such big business
or service as the Government is to-day.
SICK AND SPECIAL LEAVE
During the year October 1st, 1954, to September 30th, 1955, a total of 48,690 days'
sick-leave were granted—41,31 U/i days with pay and 7,378 Vi days without pay (see
Appendix, Table 5). This is an average of 5.5 days, a decrease of 1.1 days from the
average for the previous twelve-month period of 6.6 days. Sick-leave granted under
the Workmen's Compensation Board and Department of Veterans' Affairs sections of
the sick-leave regulations is not included in these totals. For purposes of comparison, the
average number of days' sick-leave per employee during recent years has been as
follows:—
ear Ended
Sept. 30
1950      	
Average per
Employee
 5.3
Year Ended
Sept. 30
1953	
Average per
Employee
    6.4
1951
 6.2
1954	
    6.6
1952	
 6.0
1955	
 5.5
Calculated on a daily-rate basis, the average salary during the year October 1st,
1954, to September 30th, 1955, was $12.15, which means that the cost of sick-leave
granted with pay in the twelve-month period was $501,935. Most of the sick-leave,
however, was of short duration, no payment for relief assistance being required.
Reference is made elsewhere in this Report to revision of the regulations relative
to the enlistment of Provincial Government employees in the forces of the Crown. Seventeen employees are on leave of absence serving with units of the armed forces under the
provisions of these regulations. During the year, forty-eight employees were granted
special leave for the purpose of training with Reserve units of Her Majesty's Forces or to CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT CC  17
take further qualifying courses.   Two employees are serving with the Military Component,
Canadian Delegations, Indo-China, and one is serving with a United Nations Organization.
Special leave of absence for further training and study was granted to fifty employees,
in some cases with assistance from Federal health grant funds.
The Employees' Health Service in Victoria, operated by the Department of Health
and Welfare under the administration of the Director of Environmental Management,
completed its first calendar year. In the words of the Director, the objective of this
Service " is designed to meet the needs of the employee whether in sickness or in health
by the showing of information on the fundamental principles of healthful living," such
as " health counselling, circulation of relevant literature, recognition of early symptoms
with referral of the employee to the family doctor, and consultation with departmental
officers and employees."
During the year advisory and emergency medical services were extended to some
2,500 employees in the Victoria area. This would appear to be proof enough of the
need of this service.
GRIEVANCES
For the fourth consecutive year it is with pleasure that the Commission is able to
report that no formal grievance was heard. In the opinion of the Commission, this is
a result of sound employee-employer relations, founded on responsible employee associations' reactions and receptive employer reactions, all channelled through sound personnel
administration.
A DECADE OF PROGRESS IN PUBLIC PERSONNEL
ADMINISTRATION
As stated at the beginning of this report, it is fitting that the Civil Service Commission should underline the gains made during the last ten years, as these gains are in the
interest of the Province as well as in the interest of the public servant.
The Public Service of British Columbia has an interesting history, and can claim
many competent and interesting characters who assisted in the building of the foundations
of this Provincial society, which is British Columbia.
Nevertheless, and with due acknowledgments of the pioneers of the past, it may be
safely asserted that the past ten-year period has seen greater changes take place than any
former ten-year span. The report of the Civil Service Committee on reorganization, as
stated earlier, was accepted, and the " Civil Service Act" was revised.
The main features established were the establishment of a strict merit system of
appointment and promotion, the classification upon an equitable basis of aU positions
within the Service, and the creation of salary ranges in respect to most positions with
provision for annual salary increases over spans of seven or nine years (later reduced to
four or five years), subject, of course, to the submission of a satisfactory efficiency report.
Never before had definite salary-increase dates been set.
Other changes, either granted then or granted later in the decade, included:—
(1) Systematizing of vacation- and sick-leave regulations.
(2) The provision of grievance procedures, wherein the employee may seek
redress through regulated channels right to the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council if necessary.
(3) Provision for living expenses, when necessary, upon the transfer of an
employee.
(4) Provision of special living allowances in northern areas.
(5) A regulated promotional policy providing for wider advertisement of
vacancy and open competition.
(6) Provision for the recognition of overtime under regulated conditions when
necessary. CC  18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(7) Application of unemployment insurance to employees under certain status.
(8) Continuous salary adjustments of various scopes, keeping Service salary
in line with fair wages in business and industry.
(9) The five-day week.
(10) Retiring allowances in accordance with length of service.
(11) In-Service training programmes.
(12) A system of payment for substituting in certain trades and sundry positions
of higher classification.
(13) A service bonus (up to a salary ceiling of $250 per month) of $5 per
month for each five years of service in which no increase was available
(with a minimum service requirement for the first bonus of ten years).
(14) Provision of a health centre in Victoria.
(15) Various and vital improvements in the Civil Service superannuation plan.
These steps constitute the foundations for a sound public service, and your Commission is of the opinion that the wisdom shown by your Government and former
Governments exhibited in this respect is being justified by the returns of the good service
being rendered the people and the Province by the Public Service, particularly in this
period of great expansion.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
In closing this report the Commission wishes to express its appreciation of the
co-operation given in its work by the various departments of Government and by the
Federal and various Provincial Civil Service Commissions. It also wishes to express
to you, Sir, as Provincial Secretary, its keen appreciation of your assistance and wise
guidance.
To each member of its technical and clerical staffs, it wishes to express its appreciation for the never-failing efficient and loyal support.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.
H. M. Morrison, Chairman.
J. V. Fisher, Member. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
CC 19
REPORT OF THE CHIEF PERSONNEL OFFICER
R. L. W. Ritchie, B.A.
The progress made by the Civil Service Commission in the past decade is particularly
evident in the sphere of recruitment, promotion, and training. Prior to 1945, recruitment
and selection were conducted to a limited extent by the former Commission, but a considerable amount was done by departments, with little reference to uniform standards or
methods; candidates were frequently confused as to which agency or department they
should address applications; there were no formal examinations at that time nor a promotional policy; and promotions were at times haphazard and arbitrary. Little or no
public advertising was done, and there was no centralized in-Service training.
In contrast with the above, ten years subsequent to the "Civil Service Act, 1945,"
the Civil Service Commission now is the central recruiting and selection agency for the
Government Service. Procedures and methods have been developed to fill positions
expeditiously with the best-qualified applicants available, recognizing the needs of Government and the public in general, the departments concerned, and the individual applicants;
vacancies are publicly advertised and selection recommended by examining panels under
Civil Service authority. Assembled and unassembled examinations are carefully planned
and administered; a promotional policy has been developed in conjunction with the
employees' association. In-Service training in areas of interest to all the Service has been
instituted, and advice and assistance are offered to departments undertaking more specialized training problems. In addition, forms, records, and other like media have been
reviewed, improved, and stream-lined.
An indication of the growing services provided by the Personnel Branch is illustrated
in the following table:—
Year
Total Initial
Appointment
Number of
Persons Taking
Written
Examinations
Number of
Competitions
Advertised
Number of
Positions
Filled by
Promotion
Number of
Employees
Given Supervisory Training
1946..
1947..
1948.
1949.
1950.
1951..
1952.
1953..
1954..
l,884i
2,863
2,908
2,107
1,715
2,130
2,468
2,056
2,120
(-•)
308
933
1,279
929
1,087
1,346
1,029
(2)
(-)
103
153
203
269
396
430
543
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
(2)
206
280
315
371
101
132
317
287
405
Estimated.
2 No record.
This, of course, does not reflect the many interviews, personal counselling, advice,
and assistance to departments and the public on personnel matters, which constitute a
large part of the day-to-day activities of the Personnel Branch.
1. RECRUITMENT
The following table shows the nature and number of competitions in 1955:-
Number Per Cent
Number of positions filled by open competition
(includes 63 carried over from 1954)  784 100
Filled by promotion within Service  373 47
Filled by appointment outside Service  3181 41
Unfilled or pending or cancelled     93 12
beginning level " positions, such as junior clerical, stenographic, and like positions not offering
inriiHatps
1 This includes all 	
promotional opportunities for in-Service candidates CC 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Of in-Service promotions, forty-four or 12 per cent were made by transfer from one
department to another, as compared with 14 per cent in 1954.
2. EXAMINATIONS
Written examinations for eligibility lists in Victoria were held as follows:—
Classification
Number
Examined
Number
Qualified
Per Cent
Qualified
221
84
152
49
77
41
5
12
105
66
107
31
58
34
3
6
47
78
70
63
75
83
60
50
Totals     ..                  	
641
410
66
3. TRAINING
Supervisory training courses were administered in 1955 under the direction of Miss
J. M. Campbell, as follows:— Number
Attending
The Woodlands School (including Public Works Department
staff)   45
Department of Trade and Industry, Victoria  26
Department of Labour, Victoria and Vancouver  37
Total   108
4. STAFF TURNOVER
The following is an analysis of staff separations recorded for the past four years:—
Reason for Separation
Per Cent
1952
1953
1954
1955
14
17
14
7
19
10
19
9
17
12
8
18
7
29
8
18
12
8
19
4
1
30
9
19
13
111 health             	
7
25
4
Enlisted in Her Majesty's Forces 	
Miscellaneous or unknown     	
1
22
Totals                              .  ~                   	
100
100
100
100
The principal significant change is in the number who leave to accept other
employment, which has risen by 6 per cent over former years. This suggests that
employment in the Civil Service is less relatively attractive.
GENERAL
During the year all Personnel Officers were engaged as chairmen and members of
survey teams for the Civil Service staff survey, in addition to normal duties. This has
meant that less time was available for supervisory training and other personnel functions. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT CC 21
REPORT OF THE CLASSIFICATION OFFICER
A. G. Richardson, M.A.
CLASSIFICATION AND JOB EVALUATION
The Classification Division has operated more or less as a separate division of the
Civil Service Commission since 1949. Since then there have been a number of significant changes in classification and job-evaluation procedures. The classification system
has been totally revised from a more or less departmental system to a Service-wide
system of groups, classes, and grades. Point-rating evaluation schemes have been developed for clerical, some technical and engineering, and related positions. The pay plan
has been modified toward a standard salary range and uniform steps.
Since 1949 there have been two major staff surveys covering all departments of
Government. The second was started in March, 1955, with the Classification Officer
as co-ordinator, and has not as yet been completed. In addition, there have been approximately 35 independent office surveys in the period, as well as over 400 surveys of
prevailing salaries in outside organizations.
Within this period the amount of money administered on an average by each Government employee has increased by approximately 24 per cent. It is estimated that
savings resulting from staff surveys and classification studies within the period are well
over $1,000,000.
The classification reviews conducted by the division in 1955 are shown in the
Appendix, Table 18.   The total is approximately the same as last year.
In conjunction with classification studies, a number of salary surveys were conducted
during the year, as follows:—
(1) Clerical and related positions.
(2) Psychiatrists and Physicians.
(3) Road Labourers and Equipment Operators.
(4) Agriculturists.
(5) Ward Assistants and Nurses' Aides.
(6) Orderlies.
(7) Cooks and Culinary Workers.
(8) Gardeners.
(9) Barbers and Hairdressers.
(10) Assessors.
(11) Audit Accountants.
(12) District Superintendents in Highways Department.
(13) Mechanical Superintendents.
(14) Tradesmen.
(15) Laundry-workers.
(16) Seamstresses.
(17) Analysts.
(18) Bacteriologists.
(19) Librarians.
(20) Blacksmiths.
(21) Launch Captains and Engineers.
(22) Postal Clerks.
(23) Dental Assistants.
(24) Dieticians.
(25) Draughtsmen.
(26) Electroencephalograph Technicians.
(27) Hospital Housekeepers.
(28) Teachers. CC 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Occupational Therapists.
Photographers.
Psychologists.
Research Assistants.
Right-of-way Agents.
Scalers.
Bridge-tenders.
X-ray Technicians.
Deputy Ministers.
Museum positions.
Bus-drivers.
Public Health Educators.
Business-machine Mechanics.
Physiotherapists.
Ninety-seven position specifications were written or revised during the year and a
number of miscellaneous reports prepared, as follows:—
Organization, Department of Highways.
Reports on Civil Service establishments.
Standards of work for Building Service Workers.
General information on employment and economic conditions.
Organization, Occupational Therapy Division at Essondale.
Organization, Dietary Department at Essondale.
Article on classification for employees' publication.
Salaries, Workmen's Compensation Board.
Comparison of employees to expenditures.
Administrative procedures in wage and salary determination.
Organization and classification, Department of Municipal Affairs.
Minister of Highways' office.
Statistical and research procedures.
Controlling establishments.
During the year the classification schedules were revised, apart from routine changes
in title, by the addition of seventy-seven positions and the deletion of seventy-three others.
The schedules, therefore, list four more catgories than last year. There are at present 851
classifications listed in the schedules.
(29
(30
(31
(32
(33
(34
(35
(36
(37
(38
(39
(40
(41
(42
(1
(2
(3
(4
(5
(6
(7
(8
(9
(10
(11
(12
(13
(14
ESTABLISHMENTS
The Division continued to maintain a check on departmental permanent establishments by reviewing all new positions and replacements. Table 20 of the Appendix
indicates the number of these reviews by department. It indicates that there were 269
new positions added during the year and 34 positions deleted. The number of permanent
employees increased 235 during the year. All these changes were submitted to the
Executive Council by means of draft orders.
FINANCIAL ASPECTS
The approximate savings on classification reviews during the year amounted to
$45,000 and on establishment reviews amounted to $50,000, a total of approximately
$95,000. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT CC 23
REPORT OF PERSONNEL OFFICER, VANCOUVER
S. B. WlLLISCROFT, B.COMM.
The main activities engaging this office during 1955 were the recruitment and placement of personnel, the conduct of staff and organizational surveys, the investigation of
grievances, the assessment of positions for classification purposes, and the provision of
advice to local Government officials and to the public on matters relating to personnel
practices and employment opportunities.
During 1955 it was necessary to maintain a high level of activity in recruiting personnel to fill a wide variety of clerical, technical, and professional positions, and a total
of 712 candidates, selected through competition, were referred to supervisory officials of
institutions and offices. This number is 387 less than was recruited by this office during
1954. However, unlike the 1954 total, the present one does not include any placements
in the Mental Health Services institutions, as these are now made through the Civil Service
Commission office operating for that service. For summary showing the distribution of
these appointments by position classification see Table 16 of Appendix.
As in previous years, all candidates for clerical and stenographic positions during
1955 were subjected to qualifying examinations, and while it was possible to fill the
majority of vacancies as they occurred, a decided shortage of qualified applicants was
apparent. This shortage is due to an intense local competition existing for trained clerks
and stenographers, and it is anticipated that the present high rate of staff turnover in these
classifications will continue during the current year. The following table provides a summary of the examinations given during 1955:— Passed Failed
Junior Clerk      49 9
Clerk—Grade 1      78 23
Clerk-Typist     81 11
Stenographer—Grades 1 and 2     80 13
Clerk-Stenographer      14 	
Secretarial Stenographer       3 	
Totals  305 137
Grand total, 442.
During the past year this office continued to provide assistance in recruiting personnel
to many departments of Government who do not employ Civil Servants, and appreciation
for such co-operation has been expressed by supervisory officials of the Lions Gate Bridge,
the Gaol Service, the University Endowment Lands, and the Borstal School.
During 1955 this office assisted the Classification Officer by conducting twenty-six
studies relative to position classifications and organizational requirements and continued
checking the duties of positions becoming vacant to determine if changes in classification
were warranted before a new appointment was made.
In February of last year your Personnel Officer was appointed chairman of a panel
comprising four members, which was instructed to make a complete organizational and
staff survey of the Provincial Mental Health Services. I am pleased to be able to report
that by the end of 1955 considerable progress has been made in the survey, and recommendations made by the panel are being implemented in several departments of the
Mental Health Services, and it is anticipated that they will be reflected by increased
efficiency and economy of operation. The conduct of this survey has necessitated your
Personnel Officer spending a considerable amount of time away from this office and his
clerical assistants assuming much of the responsibility for maintaining office efficiency,
and I wish to report that they have given loyal co-operation.
The in-service training courses carried out on the Mainland during 1955 have continued to be received with enthusiam by supervisory officials. I think it is gratifying to
note that the number of staff grievances appears to be decreasing as more supervisors
become aware of their staff responsibilities through the courses. CC 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF PERSONNEL OFFICER, ESSONDALE
G. L. Tomalty, B.A., M.P.A.
The purpose of the Essondale office is to provide greater service to the Mental Health
Services of British Columbia, to the Essondale division of the Department of Public
Works, and at the same time to provide the necessary administrative control of personnel
in regard to recruitment, promotions, classifications, and supervisory training.
RECRUITMENT
During 1955 recruiting was active and 619 appointments were made (see Appendix,
Table 17).   Of this number, 144 positions were rilled by 110 promotional competitions.
COMPETITIONS AND EXAMINATIONS
Where possible, written qualifying examinations were included in the selection process of said competitions. Twenty-one examinations were held, in which 139 applicants
participated, exclusive of the recent promotional eligibility examination for Psychiatric
Charge Nurse and Assistant Charge Nurse positions.
Total number of competitions  HO1
Total number applied  861
Total number of interviews  469
Examinations given     21
Number tested  139
Number passed     96
Number of appointments made  144
1 Includes local postings.
With the number of Psychiatric Nurse supervising positions occurring throughout
the Service, it became apparent that a promotional eligibility list should be devised whereby vacancies could be filled from this list in an effective and time-saving manner, still
upholding sound personnel promotional policy.
A qualifying examination was given for applicants wishing to compete for Charge
and Assistant Charge Psychiatric Nursing positions throughout the Service. There were
261 applicants, of which 238 wrote the examination. This qualifying examination plus
other factors will be used to determine the promotional eligibility list from which Charge
and Assistant Charge Psychiatric Nursing position vacancies will be filled.
The examination will be held annually, allowing new applicants and those who were
not successful an opportunity to be placed on the list. The promotional eligibility list
will be finalized and put into effect shortly.
In July of this year this office took over the recruitment of physicians for the Mental
Health Services, working closely with the Director of the Mental Health Services.
In 1955 twenty-three investigations were carried out concerning the classification of
personnel on requests by the Classiffication Officer, along with numerous reports on
organizational requirements.
In June, 1955, the staff of this office was increased to two, with the appointment of
Mrs. M. Booth to assist the Personnel Officer. With the continual demands of the Civil
Service function at Essondale, arrangements have been concluded for an additional staff
member, loaned to this office on a three-quarter-time basis, from the Mental Health
Services personnel office.
On November 3rd, 1955, new quarters were provided, which are adjacent to the
personnel and pay office of the Mental Health Services in the Crease Clinic. The arrangement is quite satisfactory and lends itself to a more efficient use of the staff in this office.
Very little supervisory training has been given in 1955 on a scheduled basis to staff
in the Mental Health Services.   This programme will be extended next year. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
CC 25
APPENDIX
STATISTICS
Table 1.—Enrolments in the Civil Service from 1933 to December 3 1st, 1955
(Enrolments for 1955 exclude 755 casual employees.)
(Enrolments for 1954 exclude 578 casual employees.)
Year Enrolment
1933-34  1,424
1934-35  1,484
1935-36  1,541
1936-37  1,607
1937-38  1,718
1938-39  1,889
1939-40  1,941
1940-41  1,951
1941-42  1,851
1942-43  1,822
1943-44  2,018
Year
1944-45	
Apr. 1, 1945, to Dec. 31
Enrolment
   2,159
1946 4,664
1947  5,425
1948  6,417
1949  7,345
1950  7,694
1951.
1952.
1953.
1954.
1955.
7,994
8,543
8,543
7,945
8,138
Table 2.—Appointments Made by the Civil Service Commission
from 1933 to December 3 1st, 1955
Year
Probationary
Casual
Permanent
Total
1933-34                   	
1,230
984
1,191
1,417
1,193
1,149
1,264
170
248
258
279
297
328
342
356
352
474
491
547
2,058
2,048
2,0411
507
441
600
673
473
533
1,030
98
85
78
104
185
133
146
121
88
173
184
155
1,245
815
867
370
290
339
378
390
438
332
268
1934-35   	
1935 36    ..                              	
333
336
1936-37    . 	
383
1937-38 	
482
1938-39    .
461
1939 40                                                               	
488
1940-41                     _	
477
1941 42                                                                   	
440
1942-43      	
647
1943 44                     _                   	
675
1944-45                   _
702
April 1st, 1945, to December 31st, 1946           	
3,303
1947         . 	
2,863
1948   .	
1949     	
1950     	
1951                                           .	
2,908
2,107
1,715
2,130
2,468
2,056
1952  	
1953
1954 ' ....	
2,120
1955   _-  ....	
2,6262
1 Included in the number are 1,062 appointments of a probationary nature.
2 Included in this total are 818 employees who terminated their service before December 31st, 1955. CC 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 3.—Number of Civil Servants Enrolled in Departments of Government as at
December 31st, 1955, according to Nature of Appointment and Sex
Department
Permanent
Probationary
Total
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Premier's Office	
Agriculture 	
96
270
146
373
4
316
44
239
53
12
985
24
386
6
34
429
90
154
548
1
37
176
165
207
1
606
30
34
20
4
837
30
88
2
23
30
84
272
117
1
133
446
311
580
5
922
74
273
73
16
1,822
54
474
8
57
459
174
426
665
9
28
19
33
26
1
25
1
122
1
14
9
23
6
20
31
9
48
48
56
174
8
8
2
1
251
6
30
9
6
17
74
50
18
76
67
89
200
9
33
2
2
373
7
44
18
29
23
94
81
105
298
165
406
4
342
45
264
53
13
1,107
25
400
6
43
452
96
174
579
1
46
224
213
263
1
780
38
42
22
5
1,088
36
118
2
32
36
101
346
167
1
151
522
378
Finance  .— -
Fisheries   .
Health..  -
Labour	
669
5
1,122
83
306
75
18
2,195
Public Utilities „ 	
Highways.... 	
61
518
8
75
Public Works __	
488
197
Welfare        	
520
746
Totals 	
4,209
2,764
6,973
368
797
1,165
4,577
3,561
8,138
Table 4.—Number of Casual Employees Enrolled in Departments of Government
as at December 31st, 1955, according to Sex
Department
Male
Female
Total
6
7
15
26
2
61
9
1
102
28
1
32
6
21
40
1
2
44
32
29
125
5
2
66
14
1
5
13
11
48
1
8
51
47
Finance    - - -
55
2
186
14
3
168
42
2
37
19
Welfare                                  —           -    -	
32
88
Totals -	
357
398
755 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
CC 27
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 6.—Number of Civil Servants Appointed to Departments of Government from Ianu-
ary 1st to December 31st, 1955, Still on Staff at the End of the Year, according to
Nature op Appointment and Sex.
Department
Permanent
Probationary
Total
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Male    !
Female
Total
6
15
7
16
8
42
39
48
148
8
4
2
1
195
4
26
8
6
17
70
42
13
61
56
77
5
23
18
32
6
11
6
13
5
19
17
29
14
53
45
61
19
4
1
3
76
Education —
63
93
Health                        	
5
52
4
1
57
4
3
1
20
18
168
8
22
2
2
295
5
35
25
20
1
1
138
1
9
200
12
5
2
1
271
5
28
225
12
2
1
25
3
1
100
1
9
2
38
86
1
2
124
1
2
409
Public Utilities           . 	
6
37
Railways    	
19
3
13
19
6
31
4
9
18
6
17
17
17
24
23
87
59
9
37
9
30
17
8
6
20
88
46
17
43
3
18
4
29
118
63
Totals   	
89
207
296
286
668
954
375
865
1,240
Table 7.—Number of Casual Employees Appointed to Departments of Government from
Ianuary 1st to December 31st, 1955, Still on Staff at the End of the Year, according
to Sex.
Department
Male
Female
Total
5
5
13
22
2
41
7
1
89
12
20
3
19
18
1
27
27
25
96
|         5
54
10
1
4
9
10
32
1
5
32
40
47
2
Health  	
137
12
1
143
Public Utilities	
22
1
24
12
Welfare                                          .	
29
50
Totals        -          	
257
301
558 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
CC 29
Table 8.—Number of Civil Servants Granted Permanent Appointment during
and Still on Staff at the End of the Year
(These figures include probationary appointments carried over from previous year.)
1955
Department
Male
Female
Total
Agriculture 	
Attorney-General..
Education	
Finance	
Health	
Labour	
Lands 	
Mines	
Provincial Secretary-
Public Utilities	
Highways-
Trade and Industry-
Public Works 	
Hospital Insurance-
Welfare 	
Forests	
Totals..
3
13
14
19
25
1
12
2
96
9
2
26
6
22
44
25
26
37
127
9
4
1
222
4
13
3
3
11
56
24
573
11
38
40
56
152
10
16
3
318
4
22
5
29
17
78
68
867
Table 9.—Number of Separations in 1955 according to Department of Government
Department
Superannuated
Resigned
Died
Dismissed
Finished
Transferred
O.S.
Cancelled
Enlisted
Transferred
to Cas.
Transferred
to CS.
from
Cas.
Total
Premier's Office..	
1
4
2
6
2
5
13
1
11
3
1
7
31
102
80
151
1
538
18
91
2
1
588
15
101
15
36
30
128
108
1
5
1
4
1
1
1
3
1
1
15
1
21
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
12
9
11
60
5
2
40
1
6
11
3
10
2
2
1
5
4
13
1
5
2
2
5
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
"5
3
1
5
2
1
2
1
4
16
16
26
121
1
9
2
88
18
~12
15
41
17
1
34
142
Education. _ .,., ~   -
110
200
1
Health  .,     	
765
19
Lands	
Mines 	
121
7
1
Public Utilities	
19
145
Welfare  	
185
146
Totals
56
2,037
14
52
173
40
6
10
38
381
2,807 CC 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 10.—Number of Civil Servants and Casual Employees Appointed to Departments of
Government from Ianuary 1st to December 3 1st, 1955, according to Certain Age Intervals, as at December 31st, 1955.
Interval
Appointed during 1955
Male
Female
Total
93
465
558
164
425
589
140
206
346
119
179
298
128
175
303
89
111
200
66
72
138
42
44
86
28
32
60
10
12
22
14
14
6
6
12
899
1,727
2,626
Under 21 years
21 to 25 years...
26 to 30
31 to 35
36 to 40
41 to 45
46 to 50
51 to 55
56 to 60
61 to 64
65 years and over..
Not stated 	
Totals......
Terminated!	
551
I
818
1 Included here are 818 employees who terminated their service before December 31st, 1955.
Table 11.—Civil Service and Casual Employees Enrolment according to Certain
Age Intervals, as at December 31st, 1955
Interval
Under 21 years..
21 to 25 years	
26 to 30
31 to 35
36 to 40
41 to 45
46 to 50
51 to 55
56 to 60
61 to 64
65 years and over..
Not stated—	
Totals	
Civil Service and Casual Employees
Male
97
352
601
788
740
731
519
472
355
244
22
13
4,934
Female
535
797'
539
511
530
480
264
131
122
20
30
3,959
Total
632
1,149
1,140
1,299
1,270
1,211
783
603
477
264
22
43
8,893 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
Table 12.—Salary Statistics
(Median salary, $239 per month; average salary, $261 per month.)
CC 31
Number
Basic                                                                                                              of
Monthly Salary                                                                                              Employees
$50-$ 100 ...                   9
Percentage
of
Employees
00.10120
101-
150       752
08.45608
151-
200                                                                                     1,496
16.82221
201-
250                    2,704
30.40593
251-
300          -            1,731
19.46475
301-
350 ..                    908
10.21027
351-
400              .                                    631
07.09546
401-
450        ....     ._                              182
02.04655
451-
500        _   ..                                              152
01.70920
501-
550                                                           101
01.13572
551-
600                                  119
01.33813
601-
650                                                       33
00.37107
651-
700         38
00.42730
701-
750        .....                      20
00.22489
751-
800                9
00.10120
830
                        8
00.08995
Totals   8,893
Table 13.—Basic Monthly Salary Commitment according to
Groups, as at December 31st, 1955
Number of
Group                                                                                      Employees
Administrative (AD)         86
Clerical (CL)     2,741
99.99991
Classification
Total Amount of
Basic Salary
Involved
$38,744
564,709
Manual (ML)        1,297
289,337
Executive (EX)    ...       18
13,866
Professional (PR)             1,629
599,437
Technical (TE)   3,122
812,978
Totals    8,893
$2,319,071
Table 14.—Number of Male Veterans Appointed during the Period
January 1st, 1955, to December 31st, 1955
Veterans ....      343
Total males appointed       632
Percentage of veterans   54.24
Table 15.—Total Number of Male Veterans in Provincial Civil Service
Veterans 	
Total male employees .
Percentage of veterans
3,259
4,934
66.05 CC 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 16.—Distribution of Appointments by Position Classification
Initiated and Tabulated in the Vancouver Office
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25
26.
27.
28
29
30.
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
Audit Accountant
Bacteriologist
Building Service Worker
Carpenter ...
1
... 15
... 62
...      2
Clerk—Grade 1 _.      70
Clerk—Grade 2     28
Clerk, Intermediate—Grade 1      16
... 3
... 30
... 4
... 14
... 4
... 63
... 2
...      6
1
... 1
... 4
...    13
1
... 2
... 1
...      4
1
Clerk, Intermediate—Grade 2
Clerk, Junior—Grade A	
Clerk, Senior—Grade 1 	
Clerk-Stenographer 	
Clerk-Stenographer, Senior __.
Clerk-Typist
Clerical Assistant-Student
Cooks 	
Court Reporter	
Deck-hand 	
Dietician 	
Draughtsman 	
Draughtsman, Electrical
Draughtsman, Senior Electrical
Driver 	
Drivers' Examiner
Electrician 	
. Engineer, Stationary     23
Epidemiology-worker
Fireman
Fire-fighter
Forest Protection Officer—Grade 1
Gardener 	
Hairdresser	
Hospital Tutor	
Housekeeper 	
Inspector, Boilers	
Inspector, Dairy Barn ...
Inspector, Electrical 	
Inspector, Fire Marshal
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
Inspector, Milk Board
1
Instructor, Recreational   3
Kitchen Helper (Male)   12
Laboratory Technician  10
Laundress   10
Maid   13
Mate-Purser   3
Nurse's Aide   34
Nurse, Head	
Nurse, R.N.	
Occupational Therapist
Oiler 	
4
31
2
Operator, Elevator   1
Operator, Machines  2
Operator, Switchboard  6
Orderly   30
Outfit-maker and Glassware-cleaner
Painter  j	
Pharmacist 	
Rehabilitation Officer	
Right-of-way Agent	
Seamstress 	
Supervisor, Technical
Teacher 	
Waitress  	
Ward Assistant
Watchman 	
X-ray Assistant
Secretarial Stenographer—Grade 1 ...
Shipwright   2
Social Worker—Grade 1   11
Social Worker—Grade 5   1
Stenographer   52
Stockman   2
Supervisor, Jericho Hill School  8
  1
  1
  11
  39
  6
  2
X-ray Technician  1 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
CC 33
Table 17.
—Distribution of Appointments by Position Classification
Initiated and Tabulated in the Essondale Office
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
Bacteriologist—Grade 1   2
Bacteriologist—Grade 2   2
  1
  2
Baker—Grade 2 	
Barber—Grade 1 	
Building Service Worker—Grade 1       8
Building Service Worker—Grade 4       1
Cemetery Caretaker	
Clerk—Grade 1 	
Clerk—Grade 2	
Clerk, Intermediate—Grade 1
Clerk, Junior	
Clerk, Senior—Grade 1 ..
Clerk-Stenographer
1
......      6
......      3
.       1
.       6
1
.       1
Clerk-Stenographer, Senior ...             1
Clerk-Typist      12
Cook—Grade 1      15
Cook—Grade 2        4
Cook—Grade 3         2
Co-ordinator of Voluntary Workers       1
Dairyman        4
1
.       2
1
.       3
......      5
Engineer, Stationary—Grade 2     18
Engineer, Stationary—Grade 3        2
Engineer, Stationary—Grade 4       4
Engineer, Stationary, Chief       1
Dairyman, Head 	
Dental Assistant 	
Dental Officer—Grade 1
Dietician 	
Driver 	
Fire-fighter
Foreman of Works—Grade 2
Gardener—Grade 1 	
Gardener—Grade 2 ...	
Hairdresser 	
Herdsman 	
1
1
2
1
2
2
Housekeeper (Home Supervisor)      14
Industrial Therapist        2
6
4
1
39
1
4
6
7
1
Instructor, Handicrafts
Instructor of Nurses—Grade 1 __„
Instructor, Recreational 	
Kitchen Helper (Male) 	
Laboratory Technician—Grade 2
Laundress—Grade 1 	
Laundress—Grade 2 	
Laundry Helper—Grade 1	
Laundryman—Grade 2	
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
90.
Mechanical Maintenance Foreman
Meat-cutter	
Meat-cutter, Assistant Chief	
Meat-cutter, Chief	
1
6
1
1
Meat-cutter's Helper       1
Nurse, Psychiatric (Male)      12
Nurse, Psychiatric (Female)      89
Nurse, Psychiatric, Assistant Charge
(Male)       17
Nurse, Psychiatric, Assistant Charge
(Female)      21
Nurse, Psychiatric, Charge (Male)        8
Nurse, Psychiatric, Charge (Female).__      4
Nurse, Psychiatric, Chief       1
Nurse, Psychiatric, Chief (Nights)        1
Nurse, Psychiatric, Chief—Grade 1        1
Nurse, Psychiatric, Deputy Chief (Male)      2
Nurse, Psychiatric, Dining-room (Male)      1
Nurse, Head     11
Occupational Therapist—Grade 1       5
Operator, Switchboard       6
Physiotherapist        2
Psychiatric Aide (Male)    136
Psychiatric Aide (Female)   238
Psychologist—Grade 1       1
Psychologist—Grade 3        2
Psychologist—Grade 4 ......       1
Painter        2
Plasterer and Tile-setter       1
Resident Physician—Grade 2 ..       5
School-teacher        4
Seamstress        1
Social Worker ..       1
Secretarial Stenographer—Grade 1        3
Stenographer—Grade 1 ___.—.., ..    19
Stenographer—Grade 2      17
Stenographer, Senior       1
Staff Nurse—Grade 1 ... 14
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
Stockman, Cattle _■	
Stockman, Stores—Grade 2 	
Stockman, Stores—Grade 3	
Stockman, Swine	
Superintendent of Nurses—Grade 1 .
Supervisor, Home for Aged, Vernon
Supervisor, Regional Recreational
X-ray Technician __	 CC 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 18.—Classification Reviews by Department in 1955 with Comparative
Figures for 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, and 1954
•a > a
*<-i
II
O oo.
-   _  CD
Is*-
a §■§ °
D       O C
OmW
Q o
n
.2-j__,
s rt 3 oc
<-<tn _iU
°».o
•Sa-S-S
«»E»
M u_
—i,0        (0
■a|cE
£li§
"_fSO
S73 e 2
'>J_rYl  OJ
«_3
oc.
Agriculture	
Attorney-General..
Education —	
Finance —	
Fisheries —	
Health.... 	
Welfare.
Hospital Insurance-
Highways. —-
Labour 	
Lands 	
Forests 	
Mines .
Municipal Affairs —
Provincial Secretary
Public Utilities	
Railways 	
Public Works ..
Trade and Industry	
Totals, 1955..
Totals, 1954..
Totals, 1953..
Totals, 1952..
Totals, 1951..
Totals, 1950..
9
47
26
78
27
19
5
46
10
15
47
4
6
81
5
35
19
479
513
480
505
585
474
17
49
80
55
61
32
1
6
4
17
3
17
10
4
1
1
5
17
2
18
94
87
130
143
296
174
36
12
19
97
14
10
10
7
7
5
20
6
21
9
11
7
3
11
11
55
32
100
35
44
17
55
12
18
53
4
6
109
7
61
19
659
678
728
818
980
708
Table 19.—Number of Employees by Length of Service in Five-year Steps,
as at December 31st, 1955
Interval
Male
Female
Total
632
1,644
1,456
353
265
112
82
26
6
4
1
353
1,176
1,866
531
159
68
28
26
8
2
1
94
1,808
3,510
1,987
512
6 to 10                                                     —   .
11 to 15    „                                - -	
16 t" ?n
333
21 to Ts
140
?fi to 10
108
31 to 35    „  	
34
.6 to 40    „
8
41 to 45    „                            	
5
46 to 50     „
1
447
4,934
3,959
8 893 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
CC 35
Table 20.—Additions to and Deletions from Establishments
Department of Agriculture
Additions—
1 Home Economist.
1 Poultry Inspector.
Department of the Attorney-General
Additions—
7 Court Reporters—Grade 1.
5 Clerks—Grade 1.
4 Clerks—Grade 2.
1 Senior Clerk—Grade 1.
1 Legal Stenographer.
1 Clerk-Stenographer.
2 Clerk-Typists.
2 Inspectors, Fire Marshal's Office.
1 Assistant Registrar of Companies.
1 Official Committee.
Department of Education
Additions—
1 Co-ordinator of Services.
1 Recreational Consultant—Grade 1.
1 Teacher—Grade 7.
4 Inspectors of Schools.
4 Stenographers—Grade 1.
1 Clerk-Stenographer.
1 Clerk-Typist.
Deletions—
2 Clerks—Grade 1.
Department of Finance
Additions—
1 Clerk—Grade 1.
3 Clerk-Typists.
1 Junior Clerk.
1 Clerk-Stenographer.
4 Equalization Valuators.
1 Assessor—Grade 3.
1 Intermediate Clerk—Grade 1.
1 Research Assistant—Grade 2.
1 Apprentice Typewriter Mechanic.
1 Key-punch Operator—Grade 1.
1 Key-punch Operator—Grade 2.
1 Audit Accountant—Grade 1.
1 Research Supervisor—Grade 1.
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 1.
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 3.
1 Supervisor of Assessors.
1 Postal Clerk—Grade 1.
Department of Lands and Forests
Additions—
1 Forester-in-training.
1 Assistant Forester—Grade 5.
1 Assistant Forester—Grade 2.
1 Assistant Forester—Grade 1.
1 Launch Engineer.
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 1.
1 Stockman—Grade 4.
1 Ranger—Grade 2.
1 Inspector of Licensed Scalers.
1 Assistant Superintendent of Scalers.
4 Scaling Supervisors.
1 Draughtsman—Grade 1.
1 Technical Survey Assistant—Grade 2.
Deletions—
1 Chief Clerk.
Department of Labour
Additions—
1 Stenographer—Grade 1.
1 Stenographer—Grade 2.
Department of Mines
Additions—
1 Clerk-Stenographer.
1 Junior Draughtsman.
Deletions—
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 3.
Department of the Provincial Secretary
Additions—
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 4.
3 Building Service Workers—Grade 1.
1 X-ray Technician—Grade 2.
1 Truck-driver.
1 Meat-cutter.
5 Laundry Helpers—Grade 1.
1 Laundress—Grade 2.
3 Laundresses—Grade 1.
1 Psychiatric Nurse.
2 Psychiatric Charge Nurses.
12 Assistant Charge Psychiatric Nurses.
3 Superintendents of Nurses—Grade 1.
4 Head Nurses.
1 Dietician—Grade 1.
1 Cook—Grade 3.
1 Cook—Grade 2.
1 Cook—Grade 1.
6 Kitchen Helpers.
3 Occupational Therapists—Grade 1.
1 Intermediate Clerk—Grade 2.
1 Stockman—Grade 2.
1 Stockman—Grade 3.
1 Recreational Instructe ,
13 Psychiatric Aides—Gr, ide 2.
1 Physiotherapist.
1 Dairy Herd Supervisor.
Deletions—
1 Clerk-Typist.
2 Housekeepers (Home Supervisors).
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 1.
1 Chief Clerk.
1 Stockman—Grade 3.
1 Stockman—Grade 5.
2 Kitchen Helpers.
1 Cook—Grade 1.
Public Utilities Commission
Additions—
1 Inspector of Cemeteries.
Department of Trade and Industry
Additions—■
1 Tabulating-machine Operator—Grade 1.
1 Tabulating-machine Operator—Grade 2.
1 Clerk-Typist.
1 Intermediate Clerk—Grade 2. CC 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Health and Welfare
Additions—
1 Intermediate Clerk—Grade 1.
1 Clerk-Stenographer.
1 Senior Clerk—Grade 1.
1 Junior Clerk—Grade A.
1 Secretarial Stenographer—Grade 1.
1 Clerk—Grade 2.
7 Clerks—Grade 1.
2 Stenographers—Grade 2.
1 Social Worker—Grade 1.
3 Social Workers—Grade 2.
1 Social Worker—Grade 4.
3 Supervisors of Welfare—Grade 1.
1 Supervisor of Welfare—Grade 3.
4 Orderlies.
10 Nurses' Aides.
9 Staff Nurses—Grade 1.
1 Staff Nurse—Grade 2.
1 Head Nurse.
5 Ward Assistants.
2 House Matrons.
3 Public Health Nurses—Grade 1.
1 Superintendent of Nurses—Grade 2.
1 Hospital Housekeeper—Grade 1.
1 Cook—Grade 1.
2 Cooks—Grade 2.
1 Cook—Grade 3.
4 Kitchen Helpers.
4 Kitchen Maids.
8 Building Service Workers—Grade 1.
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 2.
1 X-ray Technician—Grade 2.
1 Bacteriologist—Grade 1.
1 Bacteriologist—Grade 5.
1 Physician Specialist.
1 Resident Physician—Grade 2.
1 Occupational Therapist—Grade 1.
1 Dietician—Grade 2.
2 Cottage Parents.
1 Stockman—Grade 4.
1 Seamstress.
1 Driver.
1 Barber—Grade 1.
Deletions—
1 Gardener—Grade 1.
1 Supervisor of Public Health Nurses.
Department of Public Works
Additions—
1 Chief Stationary Engineer.
8 Stationary Engineers—Grade 2.
1 Right-of-way Agent—Grade 1.
1 Electrical Inspector—Grade 1.
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 1.
1 Gardener—Grade 2.
1 Stenographer—Grade 2.
Deletions—
1 Building Service Worker—Grade 1.
1 Junior Clerk—Grade A.
1 Mechanic—Grade 3.
1 Road Maintenance Foreman—Grade 2.
1 Driver (Pattullo Bridge).
1 Deck-hand.
Department of Highways
Additions—
1 Mechanical Supervisor—Grade 2.
1 Ferry Captain—Grade 3.
Deletions—
1 Truck-driver—Grade 3.
1 Truck-driver—Grade 2.
1 Road Maintenance Foreman—Grade 3.
1 Road Maintenance Foreman—Grade 2.
1 Resident Engineer—Grade 1.
2 Reaction Ferry Operators.
1 Stockman—Grade 4.
1 Utility Operator.
1 Power-grader Operator—Grade 2.
2 Mechanics—Grade 5.
Department of Municipal Affairs
Additions—
1 Town Planner.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1956
260-256-8966

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