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Civil Service Commission REPORT FROM JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 31ST 1953 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1954

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Civil Service Commission
REPORT
FROM JANUARY 1st TO DECEMBER 3 1st
1953
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1954  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Report of the Civil Service Commission,
Province of British Columbia, from January 1st to December 31st, 1953.
WESLEY D. BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1954. The Honourable Wesley D. Black,
Provincial Secretary,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—In conformity with the provisions of section 7 of the "Civil Service Act"
(chapter 51, "Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948"), I have the honour to
submit herewith the Report of the proceedings and work of the Civil Service Commission
from January 1st to December 31st, 1953.
I have the honour to be,
Six,
Your obedient servant,
H. M. MORRISON,
Chairman, Civil Service Commission.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1954. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Chairman: Hugh M. Morrison. Member: J. V. Fisher.
Administrative Assistant: A. Partridge.
PERSONNEL STAFF
Chief Personnel Officer: R. L. W. Ritchie.
Classification Officer: A. G. Richardson.
Personnel Officer, Vancouver: S. B. Williscroft.
Personnel Officer: J. Meryl Campbell.
Personnel Assistant: D. J. Slader.
CLERICAL STAFF
Miss M. Ddcon.
Mrs. G. Knott.
Miss J. McCuaig.
Miss E. Wood.
Miss P. G. Dyson.
Miss D. Claydon.
Miss J. Olafson.
Mrs. J. Newton.
Mrs. G. Brule.
Mrs. P. Peterson.
Miss D. Thorpe.
Mrs. C. A. Evans.
Miss E. L. Christie.
Miss W. E. Brown.
Miss M. M. Dewar.
Miss J. Zaluski.
Vancouver Office
Mrs. M. M. Young. Miss D. H. Thomson.  CONTENTS
Report of the Civil Service Commission.
Report of the Chief Personnel Officer..—
Report of the Classification Officer	
Report of the Personnel Officer, Vancouver.	
Appendix A.—Order in Council—Regulations re Five-day week-
Appendix B.—Order in Council—Regulations re Sick-leave	
Appendix C.—Order in Council—Regulations re Unemployment Insurance-
Appendix D.—Statistics	
Paob
.    9
. 16
. 18
. 20
. 21
. 21
. 23
. 24  Report of the Civil Service Commission
Pursuant to Section 7 of the "Civil Service Act," from
January 1st to December 31st, 1953
The Civil Service Commission, being the agency for personnel administration of the
great majority of the Government's employees, continued its duties in both its direct
and indirect phases. These duties are direct, particularly, in selection, including initial
appointment and promotion of personnel, always, of course, in co-operation with the
departments of Government concerned. They are indirect in various other formal and
informal advisory functions to the Executive Council, and to the various Government
departments in connection with problems of personnel management.
Recruitment, involving initial and promotional appointments, in addition to in-service
training work, needed the constant attention of the Selection Division. The Classification
Division's work was slightly heavier than in 1952. Position classification and organizational studies, salary reviews of prevailing rates for similar occupations outside the
Service, and various auxiliary duties required and received continued attention.
The Commission, at its meetings, reviewed numerous reports for final consideration
and disposal, and representatives from various employee groups and departmental
officials were heard on matters concerning a wide field of employment conditions, salaries,
training, and position classification.
SIZE AND COMPOSITION OF THE CIVIL SERVICE
For the first time in more than a decade, enrolment in the Civil Service showed no
increase. This is attributable mainly to Government control over establishments, with
the result that the number on Civil Service rolls was exactly the same—namely, 8,543—
on December 31st, 1953, as on December 31st, 1952.
The flattening of the curve, as compiled from Table 1, Appendix D, is herewith
graphically shown:—
Enrolment in the Civil Service, Years 1947 to 1953, Inclusive
1
1       1
r
1
1
9000
8500
	
E  8000
—
N
7500
R
—
0 7000
.
—
L
65OO
M
—
—
E 6000
/
N
5500
T
—
—
5000
r 1
1   1
1
1
Ii
1.947
1948
1949
1950     1951
1952
1953
YEARS II 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT II 11
An analysis giving type of appointment and enrolment in each department of Government is given in Table III, Appendix D. Roughly 82 per cent of British Columbia
Civil Servants hold permanent appointments, 11 per cent are probationers, and 7 per
cent are engaged in work of a temporary nature.
In respect to age the British Columbia Civil Service appears fairly well balanced
{see Table VIII, Appendix D, for tabulation of age intervals). An approximate comparison with the Civil Service of the United Kingdom is given on page 10 in diagrammatic
form. The statistics used in compilation of the diagrams are those as reported for British
Columbia in effect on December 15th, 1952, and for Great Britain as at January 1st,
1953. The former figures are in the 1952 Annual Report of this Commission (Table IX,
Appendix C), and the latter are to be found in the Whitley Bulletin, Volume XXIII,
No. 10 (London). A strict comparison between the two systems is impossible, because
there is a slight difference in the chosen age intervals. Notwithstanding this point, a very
good approximation is possible.
The diagrams indicate that the British Columbia Civil Servant is on the average
younger than the British Civil Servant. One important reason for this could well be the
rapid expansion of the British Columbia Civil Service during the past few years. It is
interesting to note the quite regular step pattern toward the retirement age in the British
Columbia Civil Service in comparison to the steep " falls " in the Great Britain pattern.
The patterns do suggest, however, that the holding powers, particularly in respect to
females, may be greater in the United Kingdom Service than in the British Columbia
Service. In the British Columbia Service itself, it is quite evident, as could be expected,
that the turnover of staff is far greater among female employees than among male employees. In other words, more men are making careers of public service than women.
In spite of the large number of married women in the Service, family and other demands
eventually enforce themselves.
Table XVI, Appendix D, by showing length of service, indicates the point made
that males stay with the Service longer than females do. The recent expansion is shown
in the high proportion in both sexes who have served ten years or less; namely, 3,506
males and 3,520 females. These figures indicate the number of males who have served
more than ten years lies somewhere between 794 and 1,192, and that the number of
females who have served more than ten years is between 237 and 325. Only 359 males
and 122 females are in the eleven- to fifteen-year interval. The real pioneers of the
Service are to be found in the 103 men and 28 women who have served more than
twenty-five years.   The Civil Service is roughly 55 per cent male and 45 per cent female.
Truth of the assertion that the Civil Service is no longer restricted on an occupational basis to administrators and clerks is reflected in Table XI, Appendix D. The
range of occupations is almost as widespread as the industrial life of the Province.
A total of 1,269 employees, or 15 per cent of the entire Service, are engaged in unskilled
or semi-skilled occupations, such as janitors, watchmen, hospital-cleaners, and ward
assistants; 2,804 employees, or 32 per cent, are engaged in such skilled occupations as
carpenters, electricians, plumbers, steam engineers, and technicians of various kinds;
2,881 employees, or 34 per cent, form the great clerical backbone of the Service in the
form of such occupations as stenographers, typists, clerks, and business-machine operators. The remaining 1,586 employees, or 19 per cent, belong to the administrative and
professional classes. Almost every profession is represented in this group, including,
to name but a few, medical doctor, dentist, nurse, social worker, teacher, economist,
statistician, and accountant. The above analysis is graphically illustrated in the following diagram:— II 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Figure Illustrating Broad Occupational Composition of the
British Columbia Civil Service in 1953
AMENDMENTS TO REGULATIONS
The most important amendment to regulations for the year was Order in Council
No. 1760 (see Appendix A), granting permission to departments, "where practical,"
to institute a five-day working-week, effective August 1st. The five-day week came into
effect throughout the Service for office personnel, or mostly those who were working a
36%-hour week, approximately about 50 per cent of the Service.
Because of the institution of the five-day week, amendments became necessary to
the sick-leave regulations. As a result, Order in Council No. 2340 (see Appendix B)
amended these regulations so as to establish a common basis for calculating sick-leave
for personnel on both the five-day and other types of work-week. Thus cumulative
sick-leave was made to apply on a weekly basis rather than on a daily basis.
Order in Council No. 2406, approved November 5th, 1953, amended the regulations governing the application of the " Unemployment Insurance Act " to the Provincial
Government employees by exempting from the Act (see Appendix C) certain types of
part-time employees, and also superannuated employees, temporarily re-employed, but
subject to individual representation, to be covered.
RECRUITMENT AND PERSONNEL SERVICES
Appointments and Recruitment Rate
During the year, 2,056 new (that is, probationary and temporary) and confirmed
permanent appointments (that is, employees who have successfully completed proba- CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
II 13
tionary periods in 1952) were made to the Civil Service (see Table II, Appendix D).
This is a figure which is 412 smaller than the similar figure for 1952.
The number of separations reported is 2,187 (see Table VII, Appendix D). In the
same period, 1,071 gained permanent appointment to the Service (see Table VI,
Appendix D). This latter figure includes probationary appointments carried over from
some of the 1,054 probationary employees appointed in 1952. Of the 2,056 new
appointments, 1,193 were probationary and 473 were temporary (see Table II, Appendix
D). Thus, by adding the number of probationary appointments (1,193) and the number
of temporary appointments (473), it is possible to arrive at the number of actually new
appointments made during the year, which was 1,193 plus 473 equals 1,666, being 19.5
per cent of the total enrolment of 8,543 as at December 31st, 1953. This 19.5-per-cent
recruitment rate for 1953 is lower than in 1952; it is almost a return to the 1950 rate.
It would appear that the Service is securing a greater degree of stability.
Year
1947	
Recruitment Rate                 Year
  37.0                1951	
Recruitment Rate
  22.4
1948
31.7                1952
  24.5
1949
  23.6                1953	
.._:  18.5
Separations
  19.5
1950	
There were 2,187 separations from the Civil Service during the year. An analysis
according to departments and cause is given in Table VII, Appendix D. Sixty-six Civil
Servants were superannuated, and in accordance with section 69 of the " Civil Service
Act " a total of $30,594 was made in retiring-leave payments to 46 employees. Resignations amounted to 1,857; deaths in the Service, 23; dismissals, 64; and completion
of temporary appointments, 166. The Chief Personnel Officer's analysis of the reasons
for staff turnover (see page 17) indicates no divergence from normal trends.
Evidence that permanent appointment is not automatically obtained, or that once
secured it cannot be withdrawn, is found in the fact that 64 employees were dismissed
during the year and 49 had their probationary periods extended. In addition, 11 suffered
suspensions without dismissals.
The following tabulation shows the extent of this disciplinary trend during the past
three years:—
1951
1952
1953
Number of Civil Servants whose probationary periods were extended 	
Number of Civil Servants who were suspended from duty but not dismissed__
Number of Civil Servants who were dismissed 	
43
12
66
53
49
11
64
GENERAL ELIGIBILITY EXAMINATIONS
General assembled stenographic, clerical, and junior draughting examinations for
the establishment of eligibility lists in the junior classifications were held five times during
the year in Victoria, in addition to constant smaller and individual examinations in the
Commission's office. In Vancouver it again was found impossible to maintain lists for
a reasonable period of time. Hence, applicants were examined constantly in the Commission's Vancouver office. Interior points were served through the never-failing courteous assistance of Government Agents, who, when necessary, conducted examinations.
The Chief Personnel Officer, in his report, states that in the Victoria centre the
total number of applicants who were examined in these junior written examinations II 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
amounted to 897.    Of this number, 592 or 66 per cent qualified.    In the Vancouver
area 449 persons were examined, of which 378 or 84.2 per cent qualified.
The records in both these offices during the past few years are as follows:—
Per Cent of Qualifications on General Eligibility Examinations
Office
1950
1951
1952
1953
Per Cent
71
Per Cent
67
88
Per Cent
64
72
Per Cent
66
84
1 No record.
One of the reasons given to explain why the Vancouver qualification percentages are
higher than the Victoria percentages is that in the Victoria centre many candidates who
have failed the general assembled examinations reappear for a re-examination (and often
a second failure) some time later in the year. This apparently does not happen so much
in Vancouver, as to date there have been no general assembled examinations, and, in
addition, the competition for workers in Vancouver is keener than in Victoria.
.     PROMOTIONAL POLICY
The system of promotion as described in last year's Report was continued. This
system maintains good morale within employee ranks. A policy which would eliminate
the needless posting of vacancies is having the consideration of the Commission.
During the year, 430 vacant positions were advertised. Of those filled, 90 per cent
were filled by in-Service appointments (82 per cent in 1952) and 10 per cent of those
filled were from outside the Service.
IN-SERVICE TRAINING
The usual training courses, conducted by the various departments and referred to
in previous Annual Reports of this Commission, were continued throughout the year.
In addition to formal departmental courses, some departments conduct annual or biennial conferences of their key field personnel.
Supervisory training courses were continued, and 287 personnel of supervisory
capacity stationed in Victoria, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and Prince George benefited
from these courses. It is a well-established fact that one of the best ways to communicate sound principles of supervision is through a small conference group gathered for an
intensive but brief period of time on the job. At these conferences, problems which the
supervisor feels most keenly are discussed and their solutions reasoned out.
THE VANCOUVER OFFICE
The report from the Vancouver office shows that there were effected through that
office 868 appointments, only 84 less than in 1952, when the new Pearson Tuberculosis
Hospital was opened. During the past few years the number of appointments effected
through the office were as follows:—
1950   495 1952   952
1951   640 1953   868
Assistance in classifications was given; five general surveys were accomplished;
and advice and assistance were rendered to the Cancer Clinic and to the Community
Chest. During the year this office was moved to commodious quarters in the old Workmen's Compensation Building. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
II 15
CLASSIFICATION AND SALARY PLAN
The work of the Classification Division is tabulated in Table XV, Appendix D.
The total number of official classification reviews amounted to 717. This may be compared to 811 in 1952, 977 in 1951, 697 in 1950, and 874 in 1949. The Commission
is of the opinion that this Division should soon embark on a programme of systematic
classification audits, so as to enhance equity throughout the Service.
DEPARTMENTAL ESTABLISHMENTS
During the year, 273 new positions were classified into the Service and 61 were
deleted (see Table XVII, Appendix D). It is estimated that savings effected through
classification and organization studies exceeded $65,000.
SICK AND SPECIAL LEAVE
During the period October 1st, 1951, to September 30th, 1952, a total of 54,594Vi
days of sick-leave were granted, 43,767 with pay and 10,827Vi without pay, an average
of 6.4 days per Civil Servant enrolled, as to September 30th (see Table IV, Appendix D).
This is an increase over the average for the previous twelve-month period, which was
6.0 days. These figures do not include sick-leave granted under the Workmen's Compensation Board and Department of Veterans' Affairs, some 287 cases.
Although the amount of sick-leave granted in this Service is, upon the whole, not
excessive when compared to other services, it is rather startling to calculate the financial
value of the leave granted with pay in a year. The average salary, calculated upon
a daily basis, is $10.73 (as on December 31st, 1953). Such being the case, the value
of sick-leave granted with pay last year approximates $469,620, being 43,767 multiplied
by $10.73. This figure, however, should not be taken too seriously, as most of the
sick-leave is of short duration, needing no payment for relief assistance.
Forty-three employees are on leave of absence serving with units of Her Majesty's
Forces, under the provisions of Orders in Council Nos. 2223/50 and 2857/50, and
during the year forty-nine employees were granted leave for the purpose of training with
Reserve units of Her Majesty's Forces or to take officers' training courses. One employee is serving with the United Nations Organization in the Far East.
Thirty-eight employees were granted special leave for further training and study,
some with the assistance of Federal health grants.
GRIEVANCES
For the second consecutive year, no formal grievance was heard by the Commission.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
During the year the centres of Lillooet, Clinton, Williams Lake, Quesnel, Prince
George, Vanderhoof, Burns Lake, Smithers, Terrace, Prince Rupert, Dawson Creek,
and Pouce Coupe received official visits.
In June this Province and this Commission were honoured by the holding of the
Annual Conference of the Western Region of the Civil Service Assembly of the United
States and Canada in Victoria. Delegates represented public service agencies ranging
from Alaska to California and from Hawaii to Colorado.
The Commission wishes to express its appreciation of the co-operation given in its
work by the various departments of Government, and by the Federal and Provincial Civil
Service Commissions. It also desires to express, to each member of its technical and
clerical staffs, appreciation for the never-failing efficient and loyal support.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.
H. M. Morrison, Chairman.
J. V. Fisher, Member. II 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CHIEF PERSONNEL OFFICER, R. L. W. RITCHIE, B.A.
1. Recruitment
In accordance with policy, the majority of positions above " beginning levels " are
filled by internal competition and promotion, as indicated in the following table:—
Number Per Cent
Positions posted in 1953  430
Positions filled by in-Service appointments  315                 90
Positions filled by outside appointments  35                10
Positions posted but not yet filled  80
Discussions have been held with the British Columbia Government Employees'
Association toward improvement of the posting policy in expediting appointments. These
discussions have proved productive, and certain amendments to the posting policy are
now before the Civil Service Commission for study.
2. Examinations
The number of persons who were examined and who qualified in the Victoria area
were as follows:—
Classification
Number
Number
Examined
Qualified
215
133
237
182
215
121
63
31
94
68
40
30
20
18
13
9
897
592
Per Cent
Qualified
Junior Clerks	
Clerks—Grade 1~
TypistS-
Stenographers—Grade 1
Stenographers—Grade 2-
Junior Draughtsmen	
Draughtsmen—Grade 1___
Draughtsmen—Grade 2 __.
Totals  -
62
77
56
44
72
75
90
69
~66
3. Training
The training of supervisors is continuing successfully in all departments under the
direction of Miss J. M. Campbell of this division. The following number of supervisors
attended these sessions:—
Department and Location Number Attending
  46
  48
  95
  18
  14
All departments, Prince George	
All departments, Prince Rupert	
B.C. Hospital Insurance Service, Victoria
Health, Victoria	
Lands, Victoria	
Public Utilities, Vancouver     21
Forest Service, Victoria     31
Motor-vehicle Branch, Vancouver     14
Total
287
The possibility of developing the training of draughtsmen in the Service by the use
of correspondence courses is being explored.
4. Staff Turnover
The following is an analysis of staff separations recorded during the past two years
(complete records are not available prior to 1951):— CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
II 17
Reason for Separation
To further education  	
1952
(Per Cent)
14
1953
(Per Cent)
9
Marital status
17
17
Moved from job locality
___-___.. „    14
12
Til health
          7
8
To accept other employment	
Services unsatisfactory, dismissed, etc	
Miscellaneous reasons or unknown	
Totals	
     19
     10
     19
  100
18
7
29
100
No special comment is required, as the reasons for turnover have not changed
significantly over previous years.
5. General
During the year the Chief Personnel Officer visited Government offices and institutions at Lillooet, Clinton, Williams Lake, Quesnel, Prince George, Vanderhoof, Burns
Lake, Smithers, Terrace, Prince Rupert, Dawson Creek, and Pouce Coupe. Employment
and living conditions were appraised, and the personal contact with staff and officials
at these points has aided in the understanding of mutual problems.
The Personnel Division continues to assist all departments in problems of personnel
administration, supervision, interpretation of policy, etc. Close liaison is maintained
with rehabilitation officers of the Department of Veterans' Affairs, the National Employment Service, and the Workmen's Compensation Board, whose continued co-operation
is acknowledged. II 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE CLASSIFICATION OFFICER,
A. G. RICHARDSON, M.A.
Classification and Job Evaluation
The Classification Division has continued throughout 1953 the work of evaluating
and classifying a large variety of positions throughout all departments of the Civil Service.
Table XV, Appendix D, indicates the distribution by department and the type of these
reviews which have formed the bulk of the work of the Division. All reviews, with few
exceptions, resulted from representations made by either the particular department or
the individual employee. The number of these requests is such to prevent a systematic
audit of classification of positions throughout all departments. In one case only was
an audit carried out of all positions in a branch, in the Industrial Conciliation and
Arbitration Branch of the Department of Labour. This was performed in conjunction
with a survey on establishment and work procedures.
It is felt that the inability to carry out systematic audits throughout all departments
is a disadvantage both to the employee and the employer, and that, if this were possible,
a greater degree of accuracy in classifying positions would result. At the present time
this Division deals only with the numerous requests for salary and classification studies.
It is unable to discover classifications which are too high or too low by a systematic
audit. The requests from departments or employees in most cases recommend increases
in classification and salary. Very few are received in which decreases are recommended.
Naturally, nothing is said where salaries are high, and there are probably instances
where nothing is said where salaries are low. A systematic audit would bring both
circumstances to light and would avoid the present tendency of listening only to those
employees who complain.
During the year the Classification Schedules were revised, apart from routine
changes in title, by the addition of thirty-three positions and the deletion of forty others.
The continual striving to reduce the number of positions in the Classification Schedules
has consequently met with little success during 1953, there being only seven fewer
positions listed than in the previous year.
Also during the year the system of job evaluation used to classify clerical positions
was revised by regrouping and reducing the number of factors considered in evaluating
positions. The revised system was circulated to all Deputy Ministers as well as to
officials of the Employees' Association, and their helpful remarks have contributed in no
small measure to the final result. This system utilizes eight factors instead of the present
nine and has not yet been placed in operation.
A number of miscellaneous reports were also completed during the year as follows:—
Effect of the Five-day Week.
Salaries of University Students.
Classification of Positions in Official Administrator's Office, Vancouver.
Salaries of Pages.
***Salaries of Registered Nurses.
*Salaries of Public Health Nurses.
**Salaries of Tradesmen.
**Salaries of Psychiatric Nurses.
*Salaries of Psychologists.
* Salaries of X-ray Technicians.
*Salaries of Electrical Inspectors.
Salaries of Teachers.
Classification of Positions in the Cancer Institute.
Report on Staff of Community Programmes Branch.
Report on Staff of General Administration Section of Department of Education. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
II 19
Report on Departmental Comptroller's Office, Department of Education.
Medical Establishment, Division of Tuberculosis Control.
Report on Probation Officers' Salaries.
**Salaries of Ferry Crews.
The requests for salary reviews of specific groups of employees were received from
a committee of the group of employees concerned, as noted by one asterisk, the British
Columbia Government Employees' Association, as noted by two asterisks; or an organized group outside the Provincial Government, as noted by three asterisks.
Establishments
The Division exercised some check over the establishments of departments. This
was maintained by reviewing all requests for additional staff and, in some cases, requests
for replacements. Table XVII, Appendix D, indicates the number of such reviews by
department. Two hundred and seventy-three positions were added to establishments as
a result of these reviews and sixty-one deleted.
The reviews of establishments are time-consuming, and in many instances there was
not sufficient time or staff to make a detailed study. It is felt that reviews of organizations and methods should be a continuing process, particularly of positions in the
lower levels. Provision of a staff to carry out this work would apparently save a considerable amount of money in the long run. The limited nature of the reviews during
the past year resulted in a saving of approximately $20,000.
Financial Aspects
The actual amount of money saved in wage and salary administration is not a true
indication of the worth of the system. There are many intangibles, such as the effect on
the morale of employees, which are difficult to measure in dollars and cents. However,
for what it is worth, the amount of increases in salaries requested during 1953 was
reduced by approximately $45,000. This amount, plus the amount saved on establishment reviews, totals approximately $65,000. II 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE PERSONNEL OFFICER, VANCOUVER,
S. B. WILLISCROFT, B.A.
As in previous years, the work of this office was concerned with the recruitment
and placement of personnel, the assessment of positions for classification purposes, the
conduct of staff and organizational surveys, the investigation of grievances, and the
maintenance of liaison with local Government officials on matters relating to staff.
Recruitment and placement activities continued actively during 1953 and resulted
in 868 appointments. This number is eighty-four less than was made in 1953, when
the Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital was staffed. However, it should be noted that
recruiting during the current period concerned a wider variety of professional and technical positions and consequently presented greater problems in selection than were
encountered previously. A summary is attached that shows the distribution of these
appointments by position classification.
During 1953 this office provided assistance to the Classification Officer by investigating fifty-three positions. In addition, five general surveys were conducted concerning
office organizations and grievances, and assistance on staff problems was rendered to
such organizations as the Cancer Clinic and Community Chest as it was requested.
Appointments involving the Civil Service promotional policy contributed much to
the activity of the office during 1953, as approximately 213 competitions were finalized
here. In addition, your Personnel Officer attended eighteen meetings of the Promotional Panel constituted in the Mental Health Services to handle promotions at the Mental
Hospitals of Essondale and The Woodlands School, involving some forty-eight positions.
During July of 1953 the location of this office was moved and now enjoys more
spacious quarters, allowing for more efficient service to the public and facilitates the
conduct of the examinations that form the basis for the selection of clerical and stenographic staff.   A summary of these examinations is as follows:—
Passed Failed
Junior Clerk  48 10
Clerk—Grade 1   74 9
Clerk-Typist  104 29
Stenographer—Grades 1 and 2  133 23
Clerk-Stenographer   16
Secretarial Stenographer  3
378 71
Total, 449.
It has been noted recently that the services of this office have been requested by
a greatly increasing number of new-comers to the Province, among whom are a large
proportion of recent immigrants, and while little concrete assistance can be rendered,
a real effort has been made to provide them with an introduction to employment possibilities in the Province as a general service.
In general, your Personnel Officer can report that the in-service training programme
carried on locally for the past few years appears to be giving results in a concrete manner
because there were very few staff problems encountered in 1953, and these concerned
offices which have not yet been covered by the programme. It is suggested that the
programme be continued and intensified, if possible, to give such continued good results. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT II 21
APPENDICES
APPENDIX A.—ORDER IN COUNCIL—REGULATIONS RE FIVE-DAY WEEK
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
The undersigned has the honour to report that a study has been made relative to the application
to Provincial Government employees of a five-day working-week (Mondays to Fridays):
And that it is considered that where practical the said five-day working-week be instituted
commencing August 1st, 1953:
The undersigned therefore has the honour to recommend that where, in the opinion of the
Minister of the department concerned, it is considered practical to apply such five-day working-week
to his department, or to any portion of his department, the following shall apply, effective August
1st, 1953:—
(1) That the hours of work of employees presently employed on a five-and-one-half-day
working-week of thirty-six and three-quarter hours shall be from 8.30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
(Mondays to Fridays), with one hour and ten minutes as luncheon period:
(2) That the number of hours of work for employees presently working on a forty-four-hour
week basis shall remain the same, but may be distributed on a five-day working-week
basis at the discretion of the Minister of the department concerned, and where the
five-day working-week is to apply and an employee works more than eight hours in any
one working-day in order to achieve a forty-four-hour working-week, such excess hours
shall not be considered as overtime:
(3) That, unless authorized by the Minister of the department concerned, the five-day
working-week shall not apply to the staffs (including clerical employees) of any
Provincial Government institution, such as hospitals, schools, and gaols, wherein treatment, custodial care, or education is afforded to patients or inmates:
(4) That where, by law, Government offices, other than those referred to in clause (3), are
required to remain open on Saturday mornings, the departments concerned will arrange
that the employees so employed be allowed equivalent time off, such compensatory
time off not to be considered as overtime; provided, however, that no Government
office shall remain closed on any other working-day.
Dated this 24th day of July, a.d. 1953.
W. D. BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
Approved this 24th day of July, a.d. 1953.
W. A. C. BENNETT,
Presiding Member of the Executive Council.
APPENDIX B.—ORDER IN COUNCIL—REGULATIONS RE SICK-LEAVE
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
The undersigned has the honour to report that, by Order in Council No. 2879, approved
December 30th, 1949, as amended by Order in Council No. 69, approved January 16th, 1950, and
further amended by Order in Council No. 2478, approved October 23rd, 1951, regulations were made
pursuant to the " Civil Service Act " governing the manner in which sick-leave may be granted to
Provincial Government employees:
And to recommend that the said Orders in Council Nos. 2879/1949, 69/50, and 2478/51 be
rescinded:
And to report that the Civil Service Commission, constituted under the " Civil Service Act," now
recommends the instituting of regulations in terms of the resolution attached hereto:
And to recommend that, pursuant to section 60 of the " Civil Service Act," the regulations as set
out in the said resolution be approved.
Dated this 21st day of October, a.d. 1953.
W. D. BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
Approved this 21st day of October, a.d. 1953.
W. A. C. BENNETT,
Presiding Member of the Executive Council. II 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Resolution Passed by the Civil Service Commission Pursuant to Section 60
of the " Civil Service Act " on the 1st Day of October, 1953
Resolved, That the regulations attached hereto governing the granting of sick-leave to Provincial
Government employees be made by the Civil Service Commission pursuant to the provisions of
section 60 of the " Civil Service Act."
Regulations in Respect of Sick-leave Made by the Civil Service Commission Pursuant
to the Provisions of Section 60 of the " Civil Service Act"
1. During the first working-year of service, sick-leave with pay may be granted to a total of six
working-days; provided, however, that during the first six months of service, the six working-days'
sick-leave shall not be granted at a greater rate than one working-day for each completed month of
service.
2. Further sick-leave with pay may be granted on the following basis: During the second
working-year and thereafter for each succeeding working-year of service, non-cumulative sick-leave
with pay may be granted to a total of six working-days each working-year, and cumulative sick-leave
at the rate of two weeks for each working-year of service; provided, however, that the maximum
amount of cumulative sick-leave which may accumulate shall not exceed twenty-six weeks.
3. Subject to section 4, sick-leave credits shall be computed from the date from which the
employee has been continuously employed on a full-time basis; provided, however, that all periods
of sick-leave which have been taken subsequent to January 1st, 1935, shall be deducted from the
accumulated sick-leave credit of each employee concerned.
4. Where an employee who has resigned from the Service returns, and his superannuation account
is reinstated, he shall be credited with his former service when computing sick-leave credits, such
credits to be subject to deductions for sick-leave granted during such previous service.
5. Where an employee was granted leave of absence to join the Forces of the Crown, the period
of such absence may be included when computing sick-leave credits.
6. Where sick-leave is necessary, it shall be granted up to the accumulated amounts which the
employee has to his credit, after which, if additional leave is necessary, it shall be without pay, but
once the employee returns to the Service, if he already has exhausted his sick-leave credit, he shall
begin to accumulate further credit at the rate of two weeks for each succeeding working-year of
service to a maximum of twenty-six weeks. If the employee should return to service not having
exhausted his accumulated sick-leave credit, he shall again accumulate sick-leave at the rate of two
weeks per working-year, in accordance with section 2, and, in addition, shall carry forward the
unexpended portion of his sick-leave credit remaining after his return to duty.
7. Except with the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, the maximum amount of
sick-leave which may be granted under these regulations is fifty-two weeks.
8. Where an illness can be attributed directly to exceptional circumstances surrounding the duties
and conditions of employment of an individual employee, and where the sick-leave credit of such
employee has been expended, the Commission, notwithstanding the provisions of sections 1, 2, and 6,
may recommend to the Lieutenant-Governor in Council the granting of additional sick-leave with pay.
9. Sick-leave may be granted only on the production of satisfactory evidence of the inability of
the employee to perform his duties, in the form of a written declaration from the employee in cases
where the absence has not exceeded three working-days and by way of a certificate from a qualified
medical practitioner where the absence has exceeded three working-days, such certificate to be
submitted within seven days of beginning of absence.
10. Where an employee whose position is of a permanent nature (excluding probationary
appointees) makes application on account of illness sustained or injury accidentally received in the
performance of his duties and not caused by negligence on the part of the employee, such application
being properly supported by a certificate of a qualified medical practitioner, sick-leave may be granted
to a total of twenty-six weeks, and, except on the recommendation of the Commission, no deduction
from accumulated sick-leave credit shall be made for such sick-leave; provided, however, that such
employee shall not be entitled to or receive salary in the amount of any award granted to, or on behalf
of, the employee by the Workmen's Compensation Board. Sick-leave in addition to that granted under
this section shall be charged to the accumulated sick-leave credit of the individual concerned, and any
recommendation for further sick-leave with pay under this section must receive the approval of the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council.
11. (a) Where an employee whose position is of a permanent nature (excluding probationary
appointees) who has served with the Forces of the Crown in any war is granted sick-leave for the
purpose of attending a medical board or receiving diagnosis or treatment for a non-pensionable
disability in a military or other authorized hospital, such sick-leave may be granted in accordance
with sections 1, 2, and 6 of these regulations.
(b) Where an employee who has served with the Forces of the Crown in any war is granted
sick-leave for the purpose of attending a medical board or receiving diagnosis or treatment for a
pensionable disability in a military hospital or other authorized hospital, sick-leave may be granted
to a total of twenty-six weeks on the following basis:— CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
II 23
(i) Where the employee is required to attend a medical or other board and is not carried
on treatment strength in a military hospital or other authorized hospital, the sick-leave
may be granted as follows:—
If the employee is in receipt of remuneration from the Provincial Government at
a rate of $7.50 per working-day or less, the sick-leave shall be granted without pay.
If the employee is in receipt of remuneration from the Provincial Government
exceeding $7.50 per working-day, he shall be entitled only to that portion of his
remuneration which exceeds $7.50 per working-day.
(ii) Where the employee is carried on treatment strength in a military hospital or other
authorized hospital, he may be granted the sick-leave with full pay; provided, however,
that all pay and allowances received in excess of his permanent disability pension and
allowances shall be credited to the particular vote concerned,
(iii) No deduction from accumulated sick-leave credit shall be made for the sick-leave
granted under this section,
(iv)  Sick-leave  in  addition to that granted under this  section  shall  be charged to the
accumulated sick-leave credit of the individual concerned,
(v) In the case of an employee holding a probationary or temporary appointment, sick-leave
may be granted in accordance with section 1, but subject to the requirements relative
to remuneration and pay and allowances as provided under subclauses (i) and (ii) of
this clause.
12. Notwithstanding the provisions of any other regulation governing sick-leave, where an
employee has a history of tuberculosis prior to entry into the Service, and has a recurrence of the
disease, he shall not be eligible for sick-leave with pay beyond that which he has accumulated under
sections 2 and 6 of these regulations, nor beyond that to which he may be entitled under section 11.
13. Where an employee is absent on account of illness, the office concerned must be immediately
informed, with a proper explanation of the cause of the absence.
14. Absences occasioned by illness are subject to the final approval of the Civil Service
Commission.
15. All sick-leave must be recorded by the authorized recording official on the appropriate
sick-leave record card of the employee.
16. Where Saturday forms part of the normal working-week of an employee, such day, for
sick-leave purposes, shall be considered a full working-day.
17. Where a statutory holiday occurs within the normal working-week of an employee on
sick-leave, such statutory holiday shall not be a debit against his sick-leave.
APPENDIX C—ORDER IN COUNCIL—UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
The undersigned has the honour to report that by Order in Council No. 1848, dated August 20th,
1949, regulations were approved governing the application of the Unemployment Insurance Act to
Provincial Government employees:
And that the said regulations provided for the exemption from Unemployment Insurance coverage
of certain classes of Provincial Government employees engaged in excepted employment.
The undersigned now has the honour to recommend that the said Order in Council No. 1848/49
be amended by adding two clauses exempting from Unemployment Insurance coverage two further
classes of employees considered for the purpose of the aforesaid regulations to be employees engaged
in excepted employment, as follows:—
(d) Employees engaged on a part-time basis, such as cleaners, janitors, or like employees,
in any Government-owned premises or premises used for Government purposes.
(e) Former Provincial Government employees in receipt of a Superannuation Allowance
who are re-employed by the Provincial Government; provided, however, that any such
personnel so re-employed shall have the privilege of making representations to the
Department concerned to be included for Unemployment Insurance coverage.
Dated this 4th day of November, a.d. 1953.
W. D. BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
Approved this 4th day of November, a.d. 1953.
W. A. C. BENNETT,
Presiding Member of the Executive Council. II 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDIX D.—STATISTICS
Table I.—Enrolments in the Civil Service from 1933 to December 3 1st, 1953
Year Enrolment
1933-3 4  1,424
1934-35  1,484
1935-36  1,541
1936-37  1,607
1937-38  1,718
1938-39  1,889
1939-40  1,941
1940-41  1,951
1941-42  1,851
1942-43  1,822
Enrolment
.__ 2,018
__ 2,159
Year
1943-44_____	
1944-45	
Apr. 1, 1945, to Dec. 31, 1946 4,664
1947  5,425
1948  6,417
1949  7,345
1950  7,694
1951  7,994
1952  8,543
1953  8,543
Table II.—Appointments to the Civil Service from 1933 to December 31st, 1953
Year
Probationary
Temporary
Permanent
Total
1933-34                             	
1,230
984
1,191
1,417
1,193
170
248
258
279
297
328
342
356
352
474
491
547
2,058
2,048
2,041i
507
441
600
673
473
98
85
78
104
185
133
146
121
88
173
184
155
1,245
815
867
370
290
339
378
390
268
1934-35  _     _      	
1935-36   _     _ _ _ _
333
336
1936-37   -_                                                    _ -     _     -
383
1937-38    _ _         __
482
1938-39                 	
461
1939-40   -- _	
488
1940-41
477
1941-42           .....                         	
440
1942-43 	
647
1943-44                        „            	
675
1Q44-45
702
April 1st, 1945, to December 31st, 1946                   	
3,303
1947 _	
2,863
1948
2,908
1949
2,107
1,715
2,130
1950      	
1951	
1952.    	
2,468
1Q53
2.0562
1 Included in this number are 1,062 appointments of a probationary nature.
2 Included in this total are 557 Civil Servants who terminated their service before December 31st, 1953.
Table III.—Number of Civil Servants Enrolled in Departments of Government as at
December 31st, 1953, According to Nature of Appointment and Sex
Department
Permanent
Probationary
Temporary
Total
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
98
256
139
362
4
641
45
786
51
18
953
26
845
6
30
2
46
171
167
195
1
1,076
30
156
21
7
714
27
129
2
29
2
144
427
306
557
5
1,717
75
942
72
25
1,667
53
974
8
59
5
15
9
24
67
1
58
2
1
90
3
26
5
5
40
37
55
1
220
7
44
1
3
217
8
13
5
10
55
46
79
1
287
8
102
3
4
307
11
39
10
1
2
5
73
12
2
28
10
1
10
8
11
307
1
13
~54
1
9
1
11
10
16
380
1
25
__
82
1
19
103
272
150
391
4
781
46
856
53
21
1,071
29
881
6
35
2
52
221
212
261
2
1,603
38
213
22
10
985
36
151
2
34
2
Agriculture	
155
493
362
652
6
Health and Welfare	
2,384
84
1,069
75
31
Provincial Secretary 	
Public Utilities Commission..—
2,056
65
1 032
8
69
Totals       	
4,260
2,773
7,033
306
656
962
133
415
548
4,699
3,844
8,543 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
II 25
Table IV.-
-Sick-leave Granted from October 1st, 1952, to September 30th, 1953,
According to Departments of Government
Department
Number of
Civil Servants as at
Sept. 30, 1953
Days' Sick-
leave with
Pay
Average
Days per
Employee
Days' Sick-
leave without Pay
Average
Days per
Employee
3
151
486
357
653
5
1,280
583
86
1,057
74
29
2,054
65
1,059
9
66
521
32
339
2,295
1,36214
3,056
7
6.022V2
5,104i/2
3811/2
2,929%
1911/2
1841/4
13,3601/z
53 Wz
4,877
24
365%
2,703
10.7
2.2
4.7
3.8
4.7
1.4
4.7
8.8
4.4
2.8
2.6
6.4
6.5
8.2
4.6
2.7
5.5
5.2
~ 6
4951/2
554
381
2,8441/2
1,655%
27H
227
22
3,361%
25%
9501/2
10%
2661/2
Agriculture —  	
1~0
Education  	
Finance...   - ..
Fisheries     	
Health                 	
1.6
0.6
2.2
2.8
0.3
0.2
0.8
1.6
Public Utilities Commission	
Public Works             	
0.4
0.9
Railways    _.  	
0.2
Welfare       	
0.5
8,538
43,767
10,8271/2
Over-all sick-leave averages covering all Civil Servants:   With pay, 5.1 days;   without pay, 1.3 days;   total, 6.4 days.
Table V.—Number of Civil Servants Appointed to Departments of Government from January 1st to December 31st, 1953, Still on Staff at the End of the Year, According to
Nature of Appointment and Sex.
Department
Permanent
Probationary
Temporary
Total
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Premier's Office 	
Agriculture	
4
6
3
6
38
2
21
47
1
16
1
2
21
9
11
86
2
13
1
68
16
4
6
27
12
17
124
4
34
1
115
1
32
5
5
12
8
23
58
1
37
2
1
82
3
19
5
5
39
37
50
1
210
7
42
1
3
208
7
13
5
10
51
45
73
1
268
8
79
3
4
290
10
32
10
1
2
3
24
5
1
19
7
4
6
9
127
1
6
14
8
5
8
12
151
1
11
1
33
15
9
19
13
32
120
3
63
2
2
148
4
42
6
7
64
52
70
1
423
10
61
2
3
290
7
37
9
16
83
65
Finance.—	
102
1
543
Labour 	
Lands and Forests.— 	
Mines 	
13
124
4
Provincial Secretary      	
Public Utilities Commission
438
11
79
Railways ..    	
15
Totals— —
145
233
378
256
628
884
62
175
237
463
1,036
l,499i
1 Not including 557 Civil Servants who were appointed during 1953 but terminated their service before December
31st, 1953.
Number of veterans included in this report, 250. II 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VI.—Number of Civil Servants Granted Permanent Appointment during 1953
and Still on Staff at the End of the Year
(These figures include probationary appointments carried over from the previous year.)
Department
Male
Female
Total
Premier's Office..
Agriculture..
Attorney-General-
Education	
Finance	
Fisheries	
Health and Welfare..
Labour	
Lands and Forests-
Mines	
Municipal Affairs	
Provincial Secretary	
Public Utilities Commission-
Public Works	
Railways-
Trade and Industry-
Totals	
11
17
15
27
89
4
97
126
3
65
1
2
457
6
39
29
40
227
4
47
5
183
1
25
614
17
36
44
67
316
8
144
5
309
4
90
1
10
1,071
Table VII.—Number of Separations in 1953 According to Department of Government
Department
Superannuated
Resigned
Deceased
Dismissed
Completed
Temporary
Appointment
Cancelled!
Total
Premier's Office.	
Agriculture	
Attorney-General-
Education	
Finance	
Fisheries	
Health and Welfare -
Labour 	
Lands and Forests..
Mines 	
Municipal Affairs	
Provincial Secretary	
Public Utilities Commission-
Public Works... 	
Railways-
Trade and Industry-
Totals	
4
4
2
6
11
13
15
11
1
11
88
69
125
1
719
19
135
6
7
534
23
98
1
20
4
2
26
3
27
2
66
1,857
23
64
2
7
8
76
1
6
1
42
2
16
2
3
166
11
1
15
98
80
142
1
839
21
159
7
7
622
23
144
3
23
2,187
i Did not report for work.
Table VIII.—Number of Civil Servants Appointed to Departments of Government from January 1st to December 31st, 1953, According to Certain Age Intervals, as at December
3 1st, 1953.
Interval
Male
Female
TotaU
Under 21 years	
21 to 25 years	
26 to 30   „   	
31 to 35    „    	
36 to 40   „   	
41 to 45    „   	
46 to 50    „   	
51 to 55    „    	
56 to 60   „   	
61 to 64   „   	
65 years and over..
Not stated 	
Totals..
81
482
563
112
375
487
113
210
323
90
163
233
73
113
186
66
32
118
29
26
53
25
15
40
14
7
21
5
2
7
	
3
"I
608
1,448
2,056
1 Note.—Included in this total are 557 Civil Servants who terminated their service before December 31st, 1953. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
II 27
Table IX.—Civil Service Enrolment According to Certain Age Intervals,
as at December 31st, 1953
Interval
Male
Total
Under 21 years..
21 to 25 years.—
26 to 30
31 to 35
36 to 40
41 to 45
46 to 50
51 to 55
56 to 60
61 to 64
65 years and over..
Not stated	
106
372
663
754
735
591
498
406
337
231
Totals..
4,699
653
880
566
512
504
335
178
130
82
3,844
759
1,252
1,229
1,266
1,239
926
676
536
419
231
"To
8,543
Table X.—Salary Statistics
(Median salary, $225 per month.)
200..
250.
300.
350.
400
Basic
Monthly Salary
$50-$ 100 —
101- 150	
151-
201-
251-
301-
351-
401- 450.
451- 500.
501- 550.
551- 600.
601- 650.
651- 700.
701- 750..
751- 800.
830	
Number
Percentage
of
of
Employees
Employees
13
0.15
827
9.67
2,045
23.94
2,590
30.31
1,371
16.05
684
8.01
483
5.65
150
1.76
138
1.62
56
0.66
103
1.21
22
0.26
25
0.29
21
0.25
8
0.09
7
0.08
Totals..
8,543
100.00
Table XI.—Basic Monthly Salary Commitment According to Classification
Groups, as at December 3 1st, 1953
Group
Administrative (AD)
Clerical  (CL)  	
Executive (EX) 	
Manual (ML) 	
Professional (PR)
Technical (TE) 	
Miscellaneous 	
Number of
Employees
86
... 2,881
16
- 1,269
- 1,484
.__ 2,804
3
Totals-
8,543
Total Amount of
Basic Salary
Involved
$37,543
579,214
12,480
278,474
514,958
683,984
1,076
$2,107,729
Table XII.—Number of Male Veterans Appointed during the Period
January 1st, 1953, to December 31st, 1953
Veterans    250
Total males appointed   463
Percentage of veterans   53.9
Table XIII.—Total Number of Male Veterans in Provincial Civil Service
Veterans 	
Total male employees .
Percentage of veterans
2,826
4,699
60.1 II 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIV.—Distribution of Appointments by Position Classification
Initiated and Tabulated in the Vancouver Office
1. Apprentice Upholsterer  1
2. Audit Accountant—Grade 1  6
3. Bacteriologist    5
4. Bacteriologist, Assistant  9
5. Baker   2
6. Barber  2
7. Captain, Ferry  1
8. Cleaner   36
9. Clerk, Chief  2
10. Clerk—Grade 1   53
:        11. Clerk—Grade 2  17
12. Clerk, Intermediate—Grade 1   8
13. Clerk, Intermediate—Grade 2  5
14. Clerk, Junior  35
15. Clerk, Senior—Grade 1   8
16. Clerk-Stenographer   10
17. Clerk-Stenographer, Senior ...  2
18. Clerk-Typist  - "J;:  73
19. Cook . — .I'.'  28
20. Deck-hand   10
21. Dental Officer—Grade 2   1
22. Dietitian  ,  12
23. Draughtsman   4
24. Draughtsman, Senior, Electrical  1
25. Driver   3
26. Dye-mixer   1
27. Engineer, Ferry   2
28. Engineer, Stationary  14
29. Engineer, Stationary, Chief  2
30. Examiner, Motor Carrier  1
31. Examiner of Titles, Senior  1
32. Fireman   1
33. Foreman, Farm   1
34. Gardener  .  6
35. Hairdresser  1
36. Helper, Heating Plant  1
37. Helper, Kitchen, Male  14
38. Housekeeper .: .  13
39. Housekeeper (Home Supervisor)   3
40. House Matron — : .  4
41. Inspector, Electrical __: .  2
42. Inspector, Factories  1
43. Inspector, Labour  2
44. Inspector, Licence Scalers   1
45. Inspector, Motor Carriers _„. 1
46. Inspector, Social Services Tax Branch  3
47. Instructor, Girls' Industrial School :  4
48. Instructor, Handicrafts   2
49. Instructor, Industrial Arts   1
50. Instructor, Staff Nursing  1
51. Janitor   3 0
52. Laboratory Assistant  10
53. Labourer  2
54. Laundress  —  2
55. Laundry Helper, Male  5
56. Laundry Supervisor  1
57. Librarian   1
58. Maid -  25
59. Mate-Purser   1
60. Milker ■. — : ;  8
61. Nurse's Aide  39
62. Nurse, Dental .  1 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
II 29
Table XIV.—Distribution of Appointments by Position Classification
Initiated and Tabulated in the Vancouver Office—Continued
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
80.
81.
82.
83.
84.
85.
86.
87.
88.
89.
90.
91.
92.
93.
94.
95.
96.
97.
98.
99.
100.
101.
102.
103.
104.
105.
106.
107.
108.
109.
Nurse, Head	
Nurse, Matron 	
Nurse, Psychiatric, Male 	
Nurse, Public Health	
Nurse, R.N.	
Nurse, Special Services 	
Nurse, Superintendent	
Nurse, Assistant Supervisor
Occupational Therapist	
Oiler 	
Operator, Machines .....
Operator, P.B.X. ..
Orderly
Outfit-maker and Glassware-blower
Painter 	
Pharmacist	
Physician  :	
Physiotherapist 	
Power-mower Operator	
Psychiatric Aide ._
Psychologist
Psychological Clinic Assistant
Psychological Intern  .	
Purser 	
Ranger
Research Assistant
Seamstress 	
Scaler, Senior	
Secretarial Stenographer
Social Worker—Grade 1
Social Worker—Grade 2
Social Worker—Grade 3
Speech Therapist	
Stenographer
Stenographer, Legal
Stenographer, Senior
Stockman 	
School for the Deaf and the Blind
Supervisor, School for the Deaf and the Blind .
Supervisor, The Woodlands School	
Teacher 	
Teamster	
Vice-Principal,
Waitress 	
Ward Assistant _.„
Watchman 	
X-ray Assistant _
X-ray Technician
9
1
3
1
8
2
9
1
5
2
10
18
22
2
1
4
1
4
1
1
2
2
1
4
2
1
5
1
5
4
1
1
1
88
1
1
5
8
1
15
1
1
9
47
9
4
2
Total
868 II 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XV.-
-Classification Reviews by Department in 1953 with Comparative
Figures for 1949, 1950, 1951, and 1952
8
o
"in
•d > c
D ca.
in
a
o
'55
'>
4>
*M
||.2
151
0 ca.
$S
all
■8*1
«'£ O
w O _
Upward Revisions
of Positions,
Including Several
Employees
Downward Revisions
of Positions,
Including Several
Employees
Reviews of Positions,
Including Several
Employees, Resulting in No Change
o
H
3
54
25
45
1
44
36
40
14
22
70
6
40
4
72
3
1
2
5
4
14
5
4
2
1
4
1
~33
1
~4
2
9
16
4
~9
18
5
1
11
1
40
1
12
i
2
2
15
1
1
4
2
5
65
50
53
1
67
59
49
Health    -                               	
Welfare*               	
22
24
85
s
115
6
Public Works  ,                	
103
3
2
Totals, 1953              	
480
505
585
474
540
80
55
61
32
31
130
143
296
174
248
19
97
14
10
22
1
6
1
1
5
7
5
20
6
28
717
Totals, 1952                  	
811
Totals, 1951                 .    -
977
697
Totals, 1949               ~     -    -
874
1 Includes positions in Accounting Office, Departments of Health and Welfare and Provincial Secretary.
2 Includes positions in Queen's Printer.
Table XVI.—Number of Employees by Length of Service in Five-year Steps,
as at December 31st, 1953
Interval
Male
Female
Total
462
2,049
995
359
221
111
64
27
5
4
3
398
1,041
2,032
447
122
62
25
20
6
2
88
1,503
4,081
6 to 10   „                                 - - -	
1,442
11 to 15                                              	
481
16 to 20    ,
283
21 to 25                                        	
136
26 to 30    ,                                - 	
84
31 to 35    „                                 ■■	
33
36 to 40
7
41 to 45                                                                                       	
4
46 to 50    ,                                               -	
3
486
4,698
3,845
8,543 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
II 31
Table XVII.—Additions to and Deletions from Establishments
(Asterisk shows deletions.)
Department of Agriculture
Agriculturist—Grade 2	
Inspector, Cow-testing Associations
Inspector, Veterinary	
intermediate Clerk—Grade 1      1
No. of
Positions
.....    4
_    1
....    1
Department of Attorney-General
Clerk—Grade 2	
*Clerk—Grade 2	
Clerk, Intermediate—Grade 2	
Clerk, Senior—Grade 1 	
Court Reporter—Grade 1	
Registrar, Court, Deputy—Grade 1
Stenographer, Legal	
Department of Education
Librarian—Grade 1	
*Housekeeper (Home Supervisor) .	
*Nurse's Aide	
Teacher—Grade 2	
Department of Finance
Audit Accountant—Grade 1  10
Audit Accountant—Grade 5  1
Appraiser (Timber Land)—Grade 1  1
Clerk—Grade 2  2
Clerk, Intermediate—Grade 2  1
* Engineer, Stationary—Grade 2  1
Forest Assistant—Grade 2  2
Forest Assistant—Grade 3 	
Inspector, Social Services Tax-
*Janitor, Assistant.
-Grade 1.
*Janitor-Engineer—Grade 2
Janitor-Engineer—Grade 2
Janitor-Engineer—Grade 1      2
Stenographer—Grade 1      2
Stockman—Grade 2     1
Department of Fisheries
Laboratory Assistant	
1
Public Health Branch
Bacteriologist, Assistant  1
Cleaner  1
*Cleaner  2
Cook—Grade 1   1
Director of Health Unit  1
*Helper, Kitchen, Male  7
*Maid, Kitchen  6
Maid, Kitchen  9
Nurse's Aide  8
*Nurse's Aide  3
Nurse, Staff—Grade 1   12
*Nurse, Staff—Grade 1  6
Nurse, Staff—Grade 2  1
*Nurse, Staff—Grade 2  1
Nurse, Public Health—Grade 1  1
Nurse, Public Health—Grade 2 .. 1
*Orderly	
* Occupational Therapist—Grade 1
Physiotherapist
No. of
Positions
_    4
._.    2
Stenographer—Grade 1 	
*Stenographer—Grade 2 (half time)
Stenographer—Grade 2	
Teacher—Grade 2	
Ward Assistant	
*Ward Assistant	
Forest Service
Captain, Launch
Clerk—Grade 1 .
Clerk—Grade 2 .
Clerk-Typist
  1
  3
  4
  2
  8
  1
  1
Engineer-in-training   3
Forester, Assistant—Grade 1   2
Forester, Assistant—Grade 2  2
Forest Assistant—Grade 3    2
Draughtsman, Junior—Grade A
Draughtsman—Grade 1	
Draughtsman—Grade 2	
Forester-in-training 	
Forest Assistant—Grade 2 (Technical) ...
Inspector of Licensed Scalers	
Janitor (half time) 	
* Janitor (half time) 	
Janitor	
Operator, Tabulating-machines, Senior—
Grade 1 	
10
1
1
1
1
2
1
Ranger, Forest—Grade 1  7
Ranger, Forest—Grade 2  4
Ranger, Forest, Supervisor  3
Stenographer—Grade 1   1
Stenographer—Grade 2  2
Department of Labour
Clerk, Intermediate—Grade 2  1
Lands Service
*Chemist, Chief, Coal, Petroleum and Natural Gas Control	
*Clerk, Junior	
*Clerk—Grade 1	
Clerk-Stenographer 	
*Clerk, Intermediate—Grade 1 	
*Clerk, Senior—Grade 1 	
*Comptroller, Coal, Assistant	
Comptroller, Petroleum and Natural Gas,
Assistant     1
Draughtsman, Junior—Grade A     1
Draughtsman—Grade 1     2
Draughtsman—Grade 2 .
Draughtsman, Senior
*Engineer, Petroleum, District	
♦Engineer, Petroleum, and Chief Sample
Examiner 	
Inspector, Land—Grade 1	 II 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XVII.—Additions to and Deletions from Establishments-
(Asterisk shows deletions.)
-Continued
Lands Service—Continued
Instrument-maker	
Photographic Technician	
Radio Technician	
Survey Assistant, Technical—Grade 1
Survey Assistant, Technical—Grade 3
*Survey Assistant, Technical—Grade 3
♦Stenographer—Grade 2
No. of
Positions
♦Stenographer, Secretarial—Grade 1 	
Surveyor, Topographic—Grade 3     2
Department of Mines
Analyst, Senior—Grade 2	
Clerk, Intermediate—Grade 1	
Clerk, Senior—Grade 1 	
Engineer, Mineral—Grade 1	
Engineer, Mineral—Grade 2	
Engineer, Petroleum, District	
Engineer, Petroleum, Senior	
Geologist, Assistant	
Stenographer—Grade 2	
Department of Municipal Affairs
Draughtsman, Junior—Grade A     1
Department of Provincial Secretary
Bacteriologist, Assistant	
♦Branch Secretary	
Chaplain	
Clerk-Typist
  2
  1
  1
  1
♦Clerk-Stenographer, Senior  1
Clerk, Senior—Grade 1 -. 1
Driver  1
Hairdresser   1
Hospital Housekeeper—Grade 2  1
Instructor, Handicrafts   1
Instructor of Nurses—Grade 1   2
Nurse, Head   3
Nurse, Psychiatric, Charge  1
Nurse, Psychiatric, Assistant Charge   2
Nurse, Psychiatric  5
Occupational Therapist, Specialized Assistant, Carpenter .  1
Physiotherapist   2
Psychiatric Aide, Female  19
Seamstress—Grade 1   2
No. of
Positions
Seamstress—Grade 2  1
Stenographer—Grade 1   2
Teacher—Grade 2   1
X-ray Technician—Grade 1   1
Superintendent of Nurses—Grade 1   3
Department of Public Works
Blue-printer's Assistant—Grade 2  1
Clerk, Junior  1
... 1
_. 1
.. 1
_ 1
_ 1
.. 1
- 1
_ 1
.. 1
_ 1
Deck-hand	
♦Engineer, District, Public Works	
Engineer, Divisional, Public Works .
Engineer, Ferry—Grade 2 (Diesel)
Engineer, Maintenance	
Engineer, Resident—Grade 1	
♦Foreman, Road—Grade 3 ...
Helper, Heating Plant
Inspector, Electrical—Grade 1 	
♦Janitor	
♦Mechanic—Grade 3  1
Oiler   1
Operator, Rowboat Ferry  1
Purser (Ladner-Woodward Ferry)   3
Right-of-way and Claims Agent, Assistant 1
Switchboard Operator—Grade 2  3
Supervisor, Mechanical—Grade 1   6
Supervisor, Mechanical—Grade 2  3
Department of Trade and Industry
Clerk, Junior  1
Operator, Tabulating-machine—Grade 2... 1
Stenographer—Grade 1   1
Social Welfare Branch
Clerk-Typist  2
Occupational Therapist—Grade 1   1
Social Worker—Grade 1   1
Social Worker—Grade 2  8
Social Worker—Grade 3   1
Social Worker—Grade 5   2
Social Worker—Grade 5  (Treatment Director, Girls' Industrial School)   1
Stenographer—Grade 2     1
♦Teacher—Grade 2 (Assistant Superintendent, Girls' Industrial School)      1
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1954
310-254-7770

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