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Railway Department PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT Year Ended December 31st 1953 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1954

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 Railway Department
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
Year Ended December 31st
1953
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1954  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to present herewith the Annual Report of the operations and
activities of the Railway Department for the year ended December 31st, 1953.
W. R. T. CHETWYND,
Minister of Railways.
Victoria, B.C., February 12th, 1954. Victoria, B.C., December 31st, 1953.
The Honourable W. R. T. Chetwynd,
Minister of Railways, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Thirty-sixth Annual Report of the Railway
Department, covering the year 1953, together with Appendices.
Your obedient servant,
J. S. BROADBENT,
Assistant Deputy Minister. Report of the Railway Department
FOREWORD
It is a recognized rule in human evolution that civilization progresses in accordance
with improvements in overland transportation. It was a little over a century ago that the
first pioneer coal-miners landed in a wilderness at a place on Vancouver Island known
to-day as Nanaimo. Coal had been discovered, and, as a new age in transportation was
dawning, coal was needed to fuel the ships and supply power for the new railways and
cities which were creating a new civilization in the Golden West of North America.
In those early days the only land transportation in British Columbia was by horse
and wagon, but, as it was necessary to move the coal from inland mines to tide-water,
small steam-locomotives were imported from England and little railways sprang up
around Nanaimo and Wellington on Vancouver Island. These were the first railways in
British Columbia. In 1883 Robert Dunsmuir, by a special Act, incorporated the Wellington Colliery Railway, and in the same year an Act was passed to authorize the building
of the Island Railway from Nanaimo to Victoria. This railway, which was to become
the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway, was under construction before the Canadian Pacific
Railway was completed into Vancouver in 1886.
From that time onward, as the railways progressed, civilization followed the newly
opened avenues of potential growth; however, in the early 1920's civilization progressed
to a point where the railways and methods of railroading lagged behind the demands of
civilization, and man, of necessity, invented improved methods of transportation to carry
his civilization to greater heights.
Transportation on air-inflated rubber tires became the public demand, and the air-
inflated rubber tire was the key to success of the motor-car. In turn the motor-car was
improved and reduced in price so that by 1925 the working class owned 90 per cent of
all the motor-cars in the United States and Canada. Soon the roads became inadequate
as the motor-car demanded better roads. As roads were improved, better motor-cars
were built to run upon them until, where in 1914 the speed-limit on some roads was 8 to
15 miles per hour, the speed of traffic increased by 1930 up to 60 and 70 miles per hour.
In fact, transportation on rubber tires progressed to the point that during the early thirties
the railway companies woke up to find the new methods were seriously affecting the
business of their railways. They introduced diesels and better equipment, but the motorcar and its big brothers, the truck and bus, were firmly entrenched, in fact so much so
that by 1950 some of the logging companies were using rubber-tired logging-trucks.
Private roads were being built into the wilderness for the transport of logs and raw
materials.
The new type of motor-trucks could negotiate heavier grades, and improved braking
systems were required. Air-brakes were applied to these 60-ton vehicles in order to
control them safely. Motor-trucks hauling logs and other material moved on to public
roads hauling the heavy commodities which formerly were hauled on the railways.
In the cities the public demand for transportation on rubber tires reached the point
where street-railways were taken up, and in the place of street-cars rubber-tired trolleybuses operated on the streets by power from overhead trolley-wires. These vehicles were
not required to carry licence-plates of any kind either under the " Motor-vehicle Act" or
the Public Utilities Commission. They were and still are operated under the Street Rail-
waymen's Union, although a Class A chauffeur's licence is required to drive them. JI 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A new era of transportation had come into being. Newly accepted standards
became commonplace. Logging and construction companies now flew their personnel
into the camps by aeroplane. Some companies procured helicopters for the construction
of transmission-lines, hauling loads of 2,000 pounds over glaciers and mountain ranges.
Aerial tramways were constructed to inaccessible places. When oil was discovered on the
Prairies, pipe-lines were constructed to transport oil to the Great Lakes and also to the
Pacific Seaboard in British Columbia.
Thirty years before, a railroad traffic man was considered to be a transportation
expert, but not so in the new order of things: the railroad still had its place hauling long
cross-country hauls and also hauling heavy commodities where railway already existed;
the aeroplane had its place where fast transportation was required or where no road of
any kind existed or was possible; the truck and bus running on public and private roads
and on city streets had also their place in the new order of things, as well as did local and
transcontinental pipe-lines in transporting crude oil and natural gas.
To-day the four major types of land transportation operate competitively with each
other, and each must recognize the other as a necessary part of our present-day economy.
On a National basis all four types of transportation are controlled by the Board of
Transport Commissioners, but in British Columbia transportation solely within the
Province operating under Provincial jurisdiction is controlled by the Provincial Railway
Department.
About twenty years ago the Federal Government recognized new types of transportation other than railways and the name of " Board of Railway Commissioners," and all
types of transportation other than that under Provincial jurisdiction were controlled by
the Federal Board of Transport.
The Railway Department recognized new methods of transportation which were to
be assisted rather than hindered. Logging companies, which had always had the Department's assistance on technical matters, called the Department in to help them in their
trucking and other transportation problems. As a result, improved braking systems were
developed for logging-trucks, improved underground hoisting safety devices were recommended on the Alcan project, and improved safety devices were used on aerial tramways.
Truck-drivers on private roads were examined and certified, and this service is now being
extended to the public roads, in which respect public lectures and training courses are
being conducted by the Department in the hope of increasing public safety.
In view of the trend of the times regarding new methods of transportation in addition
to railways, the time is at hand when the name of the Department could be changed to
the " Department of Transport," which would be in keeping with changes already made
along the same line by the Federal Government.
THE HISTORY OF A RAILWAY
(Compiled by R. E. Swanson, Chief Inspector)
The Railway Department in British Columbia came into existence in 1911 to take
care of existing railways and also to administer the railway expansion and railway-
building programme that was booming during the years prior to World War I, which
event ended the great railway speculative booms that had flared up in the West ever since
the building of the first transcontinental railway. Some of the railways incorporated in
those years are still operating and serving the present-day economy of the country, but
many of them were fantastic schemes which never materialized. The history and statistics
of those early railways and schemes to build industrial empires are preserved in the files
of the Railway Department; but what about some of the earlier railways in existence
before such records were kept? It is, therefore, the intention of this short article to preserve the history and statistics of one of the early narrow-gauge railways which ushered RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1953
JJ 7
in wide gauge on Vancouver Island before the transcontinental railways reached the
shores of the Pacific.
Historical records show that sometime during the year 1869 Robert Dunsmuir, who
was a Scottish mining engineer for the Vancouver Coal Company, which operated the
Nanaimo coal mines, discovered the Wellington coal-seam 5 miles north of Nanaimo on
Vancouver Island. It is said, while on a hunting-trip, Dunsmuir discovered the seam
quite by accident where a windfall had exposed the seam, and he and his partner, W.
Diggle, immediately set to work to acquire the property and develop it under the name of
Dunsmuir, Diggle & Company, which was in 1883 changed to R. Dunsmuir & Sons and
later changed to Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited.
The first shipments of coal from the Wellington seam were transported to Departure
Bay by horse and cart, but as production increased a tramway employing wooden rails
was constructed from Wellington to Departure Bay and mules supplied the motive power.
In time the wooden rails were replaced with iron rails imported from England, and Dunsmuir obtained a small " dinky " or construction locomotive to replace the mules.
By 1883 the Wellington seam had developed to such proportions that five shafts
were in operation, working three shifts, and the original railway became inadequate. That
year the Wellington Colliery Railway was incorporated by an Act of the Legislature. The
railway was reconstructed and rerouted, with 30-foot cuts and fills to hold the required
grade and curvature. The gauge of the track was 3 feet, and the weight of rail was 42
pounds per yard. Larger wharves were constructed at Departure Bay, with new marshalling yards at Wellington and at No. 4 mine on the bluffs. New shops were built at
Wellington.
No. 3 mine was located 2 miles south-west of Wellington in a valley. This became
the original South Wellington (now forgotten) and was famous in its day for its Chinatown. As it was in a valley beneath No. 4 bluff, a long trestle was constructed and a
hoist was employed to haul the South Wellington coal up to the No. 4 marshalling yards
on the bluff, from where the cars of coal were hauled on the new railway to Departure
Bay, from which point R. Dunsmuir & Sons transhipped it to San Francisco in a fleet of
fast sailing-vessels owned by the company.
The Wellington seam appeared unlimited, and when the coal seam was further discovered on the Westwood Estate, 3 miles east of Wellington, Dunsmuir tried but was
unable to obtain the coal rights on his own terms, and consequently the Westwood
interests negotiated with Mr. R. D. Chandlier, of San Francisco, who bought the West-
wood coal rights and formed the East Wellington Colliery. Dunsmuir now had two
competitors—the Nanaimo interests and the new Chandlier interests—but this state of
affairs he determined would be taken care of in due course.
The East Wellington Colliery Railway was constructed to run from new wharves on
the south side of Departure Bay (where the Black Ball Ferry dock now stands) 5 miles
out to the Westwood property, which was, in effect, the back door of the Dunsmuir
domain. This railway was well constructed, was 3-foot gauge with 42-pound rail, and
had two 20-ton saddle-tank engines called the "Premier" and the "Columbia." The
first trip was made on July 28th, 1883, and coal was thereafter railroaded from the two
new mines at East Wellington to Departure Bay and thence by sailing-ships to San
Francisco. A large sawmill was also built at East Wellington and served by the new
railway.
Dunsmuir watched this new " empire " thrive at his back door for seven years, then
one day he found Chandlier had trespassed and mined Dunsmuir coal over his boundary.
After the lawsuit Dunsmuir possessed the Chandlier interests and took over the railway,
which he connected up with his own Wellington Colliery Railway, changing the names of
the locomotives in honour of the names of the Dunsmuir sailing-ships. JJ 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
From a railway point of view, 1883 was an important year: legislation was passed in
Victoria authorizing the building of the Island Railway from Nanaimo to Victoria, which
project was one of the conditions of Confederation. Dunsmuir, in company with his
associates in San Francisco, built the railway which was to become the present Esquimalt
and Nanaimo Railway. In return for building the railway, the Dunsmuir interests
acquired what is known to-day as the E. & N. land grant. In addition, the Dunsmuir
interests continued to own and operate the railway until it was sold to the Canadian
Pacific Railway in 1905.
The Dunsmuir " empire " continued to expand, for, during the early nineties, coal
was discovered near Comox Lake on Vancouver Island, and the new coal town was called
Cumberland. Another Wellington Colliery Railway was built from Union Bay to Cumberland, and this railway was standard gauge, the same as Dunsmuir's Esquimalt and
Nanaimo Railway. Regular passenger service was inaugurated between Union Bay and
Cumberland.
When the Cumberland development was well under way, the Dunsmuir geologists
turned their attention to the Wellington seam. It seemed to them, geologically speaking,
mountain-building had cut off the Wellington coal seam but its extension should be farther
to the south-west. The main coal-seam was finally discovered to be 8 miles south-west of
Nanaimo, and development got under way. The town was named Extension, and an
extension of the narrow-gauge Wellington Colliery Railway from Departure Bay was
planned to go 12 miles out to Extension. The right-of-way was graded, but permission
could not be obtained to cross the Vancouver Coal Company's property, as in those days
there was no Railway Act under which to obtain expropriation of property. Dunsmuir
swore his vengeance on the Nanaimo interests and, foreseeing the original Wellington
seam nearly worked out, decided to construct a new railway south to Oyster Bay.
The new town he called Ladysmith, in honour of the Boer War town in South Africa.
Thus another new Wellington Colliery Railway was constructed, but the old original was
still operating from Wellington to Departure Bay.
The new operations at Ladysmith and Cumberland were modern, and the virgin
coal-seams were lucrative; whereas Old Wellington was becoming obsolete and costly to
operate. There were many strikes due to poor mining conditions, and when a strike took
place in Wellington in 1899, Dunsmuir shut the mines down and moved the town of
Wellington to Ladysmith, so that where in 1898 Wellington had a population of 5,000
people, in 1901 there were only 100.
The little railway was abandoned in 1899, and the locomotives and rails taken to
Extension. To-day timber grows on the old grades over which millions of tons of Wellington coal had been hauled, and the original locomotive, " Wellington," has been erected
in a park in Nanaimo as a monument to the coal age which ended in December, 1953,
when the successors to the Dunsmuir interests mined the last coal in the area of Nanaimo,
Wellington, and Ladysmith.
The Canadian Pacific Railway acquired the Collieries' property in Nanaimo, and
to-day Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway diesel trains rumble along where three-quarters
of a century ago the little Wellington Colliery Railway gave birth to its wide-gauge
brother; thus out of past accomplishment is born the progress of the future. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1953
JJ 9 JJ  10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Last coal to be hoisted in the Nanaimo-Wellington district in November, 1953.
Note narrow-gauge track.
' The Splendour that was Greece and the Glory that was Rome "—ruins of old
coal mines in Nanaimo where the last coal was mined in 1953. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1953
JJ  11
INSPECTION REPORTS
Development and expansion in industry and construction in British Columbia during
the year 1953 kept all means of transport exceptionally busy. Railways, aerial tramways,
motor-trucks, and other means of transportation connected with the activities of the
Department were therefore operating to full capacity. Business on the common-carrier
railways is reported to have been increased over previous years, and in the timber industry, while there has been a trend to the hauling of logs and lumber by motor-truck, the
logging-railways have been kept operating to full capacity, with motor-trucks in many
instances feeding the railways to transport the raw materials to tide-water.
On the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, where traffic has increased enormously,
regular inspections were carried out on track, rolling-stock, and operation. In order to
cope with increased traffic, the company procured three additional diesel-electric locomotives during the year. These locomotives are 1,600 horse-power, 240,000 pounds on
drivers, with a starting tractive effort of 60,000 pounds. They have conventional four-
wheel trucks, with the total weight of the locomotive on the drivers. Previously the
company had procured similar locomotives with six-wheel trucks and only two-thirds of
the total weight on drivers, and consequenly these locomotives hauled only two-thirds
the possible tonnage at low speed. The specifications for the new locomotives were
prepared by the Department, and it is understood the company will convert its original
diesels to the conventional wheel arrangement of the new locomotives.
While it can be reported maintenance on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway is being
well taken care of by the personnel of the company, it must be pointed out that much of
the steel rail on this railway is now over forty years old and in certain sections is quite
badly worn. In 1951-52 the worn rail on the Squamish subdivision was replaced with
several miles of new 85-pound rail, and a programme was inaugurated whereby 50 miles
of worn rail would be replaced with new 85-pound rail each year; however, the 50 miles
allocated for 1953 did not arrive in time, and it will be laid during 1954. Actually 100
miles should be replaced during 1954. With regard to public safety, the urgency of the
rail-renewal programme cannot be too strongly recommended by the Department, for
when rail wear progresses beyond a certain point, public safety will be impaired. Studies
on rail wear by competent authorities indicate that while diesel locomotives are not as
hard on track as steam power is, rail wear in increased in many instances by the use of
diesel power until speeds and superelevation of track are adjusted to the new conditions
and track-oilers are installed on bad curves. Flange wear on wheels is one of the main
contributing factors to rail wear and vice versa; therefore it is recommended that the
company obtain adequate modern mechanical facilities so that flange and wheel wear can
be taken care of in the company shops, as the present machinery is entirely inadequate.
A separate report on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway is included under another heading.
While passenger traffic on District 3 of the British Columbia Electric Railway from
New Westminster to Chilliwack has been discontinued, freight traffic has increased, and
a regular freight transfer service is operating between Huntingdon and New Westminster.
Overhead trolley-wires have been taken down from Kennedy to Chilliwack, and consequently this portion of the railway is now dieselized. Inspection of District 3 tracks and
facilities was made during 1953, and it can be reported the track is in quite good condition. Certain rail-renewal has been done with heavier section of rail, and the Vedder
River Bridge has been strengthened and repaired. Regular inspections were also made
of the automatic crossing signals at Scott Road and King George Highway. Inspections
were also made of crossings on District 1 and accidents investigated. New industrial
spurs were inspected on District 1.
On the logging-railways there has been a trend to truck-logging, and consequently
some of the operations have curtailed their rail-hauls to main-line hauls feeding the
railway with trucks; others have found it more convenient to truck all the way and JJ  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
abandon short rail lines. In this regard the Department has been called upon to recommend changes to truck air-brakes so the vehicles can be properly controlled. This phase
of the work, inaugurated in 1952, has been carried forward during 1953, so that several
of the operations now use an improved braking system developed by the Department. In
addition, the Department has been requested to train and examine the drivers of these
air-equipped logging-vehicles, and, during 1953, 117 truck-drivers were examined and
certified.
Inasmuch as the Department had availed itself with special knowledge and facilities
regarding heavy logging and lumber transport vehicles, the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police on Vancouver Island made application to the Department for a Department
Inspector to examine air-equipped vehicles involved in accidents on public highways
and later appear as an expert witness on behalf of the Crown regarding the equipment
involved. This request was complied with, and, as a result, the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police has now requested the Department extend its truck-driver training course to drivers
of vehicles on public highways and later examine the drivers as to their proficiency.
On the mining-railways, regular inspections were made. With the closing of the
No. 8 mine at Cumberland, 10 miles of trackage was abandoned, and the haulage from
the new Tsable River mine is being handled by motor-truck feeding the rail facilities at
Union Bay. At Nanaimo the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited has turned its
trackage over to the Canadian Pacific Railway. At Fernie the Morrissey, Fernie and
Michel Railway has continued to operate at full capacity; regular inspections were made
on the main-line railway and the small narrow-gauge locomotives serving the mines and
coke-ovens. The underground air-locomotives were hydrostatically tested, and copies
filed with the Department of Mines. Inspections were made at Britannia Mining and
Smelting Company, where electric locomotives are used. Inspections were also made at
the Kimberley mine and at Trail on the haulage and industrial railways of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company.
Hoisting equipment, aerial tramways, and locomotives were inspected at Kemano
and Kitimat. The safety brake on the aerial tramway at Kemano, designed last year by
the Department, has continued to function satisfactorily during the year. Exceptionally
large hoists were employed underground for the lining of the underground penstocks.
These hoists and cables were inspected. At this operation eighty-six hoistmen were
certified by the Department. Safety lectures employing films and slides were also conducted in the interests of safety with regard to motor-trucks and tractors.
The common-carrier aerial tramways and ski lifts were inspected several times
during the year, and annual certificates to operate were reissued. No accidents were
reported on the three aerial tramways adjacent to Vancouver, but one accident (not
serious) was reported at the Red Mountain Ski Club, where a passenger did not disembark at the proper time and place.
Trackages were inspected and locomotives tested at the shipyards, pulp-mills, steel-
mills, and other industrial plants. At Columbia Cellulose Company the engineer was
examined and certified. At the new Elk Falls paper-mill the barge-slip was inspected
and the steam-locomotive tested. At Prince Rupert dry-dock the locomotive crane was
tested. The diesel-electric locomotive, trackage, and barge-slip at the powder-works of
the Canadian Industries Limited were inspected, and operating personnel instructed and
examined. While making inspection at the Powell River Company plant, assistance was
given to the company in noise measurement where noise was impairing the efficiency of
workmen in various parts of the plant. Measurements were made of the noise level, and
recommendations submitted to the company in the interests of safety and well-being of
the workmen involved.
Five hundred and thirty-three inspections were made of fire-protective appliances
on locomotives of the Canadian National Railways, Canadian Pacific Railway, and the RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1953
JJ   13
Great Northern Railway. These inspections were made by Department Inspectors under
the authority of the Board of Transport Commissioners, with copies of reports submitted
to the Forest Service. Forty-three similar inspections were made of logging and industrial
locomotives.
Public safety and safety with regard to employees has always been a prime function
of the Department, and during 1953 our safety programme has been diversified to extend
to a wider range of application. As previously mentioned, our safety lectures have been
extended to the trucking industry on construction projects, private roads, and public
roads. Safety lectures were given at four terminals on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway,
and a safety programme inaugurated so that subdivisions on that railway can compete
with each other for a Pacific Great Eastern Railway safety trophy put up by the Department. The safety trophy on mining-railways was again won by the Morrissey, Fernie and
Michel Railway in 1953. The Department's safety trophy for logging-railways was
awarded to the Englewood Division of the Canadian Forest Products Limited. It is felt
safety trophies have increased the competitive spirit of all concerned, and during the
coming year it is the sincere resolution of the Department to further the application of
safety practices in every field of its endeavours.
On the Pacific Great Eastern Railway it can be reported generally that from
Squamish to Quesnel the condition of the track is much improved over previous years;
130,000 railroad-ties were replaced during 1953. Bridges which required renewal and
repairs from last year's inspection have been completed, with several new bridges, some
of creosoted-timber construction, replacing existing bridges, while other bridges have
been replaced by line diversions and fills. Several new culverts have been installed to
take care of run-off, and at Mile 288 a run-off flume was completed at a washout-site.
Tunnels are in order, portal timbers and linings being maintained during the year.
A number of industrial spurs to serve timber-producers have been installed during the
year.   Switches and clearances were found to be in order.
During 1953, 6 miles of track was lifted and reballasted and, in addition, 9 miles of
track was resurfaced by floating gangs, with the usual maintenance carried out by regular
section gangs from Squamish to Quesnel. The programme of replacing eight bridges on
Pavilion Hill was carried forward during the year, with four bridges remaining for 1954.
Chemical weed-control was not carried out in 1953 but should be done in 1954, as, over
many sections, weeds are in evidence, and consequently tie-renewals will be increased if
weed-control is not kept up in 1954.
Section gangs are not yet established at Prince George. Buildings to accommodate
crews are under construction, so that regular crews can be put on in 1954. Way-stations
are under construction on the extension, with seven completed. Water-supply at Prince
George terminal is under construction and will be completed in January, 1954.
The rail-renewal programme was halted during 1953, as rail on order did not arrive
in time; however, during 1954, 50 miles of 70-pound rail will be replaced with 85-pound
rail. In this respect the company engineers recommend, in consideration of the rail wear
on Pavilion Hill, that 32 miles of steel be changed between Miles 122.7 and 154.5 and
18 miles of 60- and 70-pound rail on Alta Lake Hill between Miles 36 and 54 be changed
with 85-pound rail.
It must be borne in mind that on many sections the 60- and 70-pound rail is badly
worn, in fact close to approaching the danger point; consequently, the rail-renewal programme must be continued, and 50 miles of new 85-pound rail will be required for 1955
so that the rail along Anderson and Seton Lakes can be changed. The importance of
the rail-renewal programme cannot be minimized, as public safety will be impaired as
rail wear progresses. Recent studies indicate that track-oilers installed on bad curves
tend to eliminate rail wear and at the same time cut down on flange wear on locomotives
and cars. JJ 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
It can be reported that terminal and mechanical facilities are much improved at
Squamish, Lillooet, and Williams Lake, with such facilities not yet completed at Prince
George. Adequate mechanical facilities to take care of locomotive wheel and flange
wear recommended in 1952 are still lacking at Squamish.
In view of the improvements and increased maintenance over the past five years, it
can be reported the railway is safe for operation, provided maintenance as recommended
is carried forward.
Following is a report of the inspection work performed during the year 1953:—
Hydrostatic tests applied to boilers  130
Internal and external inspections of boilers     17
Internal-combustion locomotives inspected and certified     14
Internal-combustion locomotive cranes inspected and certified _      8
Air-locomotives hydrostatically tested     18
Power rail-cars inspected and certified     46
Air-receivers tested and inspected       5
Diesel-electric locomotives inspected and certified     24
Electric locomotives inspected on narrow-gauge electric railways    15
Electric locomotives inspected on Alcan project     12
Locomotives inspected other than hydrostatic tests     74
Number of cars inspected on industrial railways  621
Number of cars inspected on common-carrier railways     94
Miles of underground trackage inspected at Alcan project     16
Miles of track inspected  759
Aerial tramways inspected in British Columbia       5
Aerial-tramway inspections conducted     17
Locomotive engineers examined and certified _;       3
Conductors examined and certified       4
Power-car operators examined and certified     13
Locomotive-crane engineers examined and certified       7
Train-dispatchers examined and certified       1
Internal-combustion locomotive engineers examined and certified         1
Engineers examined and certificates issued, Pacific Great Eastern Railway        3
Electric-locomotive operators examined and certified, Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada Ltd     14
Motormen and underground hoistmen examined and certified,
Morrison-Knudsen Co. of Canada Ltd     86
Logging-truck operators examined and certified  117
B.C. Electric Railway street and interurban cars inspected       6
B.C. Electric Railway diesel and electric locomotives inspected
and certified     17
Accidents on B.C. Electric Railway       4
Fatal accidents on B.C. Electric Railway       2
Accidents investigated on logging and industrial railways      4
Fatal accidents on logging-railways       1
Fatal accidents on aerial tramways       1
Accidents on logging-truck roads investigated       1
Accidents on Pacific Great Eastern Railway       6
Fatal accidents on Pacific Great Eastern Railway       1
Kemano project hoist designs approved       1
New diesel-electric locomotives imported       3 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1953 JJ 15
Rail-car designed and constructed under Department supervision        1
Reservoirs constructed under Department supervision '.       4
Safety lectures conducted by the Department       8
Truck air-brake lectures conducted by the Department     21
Inspections made of fire-protective appliances on Pacific Great
Eastern Railway and industrial railways     43
Inspections made of fire-protective appliances on locomotives
of C.P.R., C.N.R., and G.N.R. for Board of Transport
Commissioners  533
LIST OF APPENDICES
A list of Executive Council certificates issued is given in Appendix A.
Accidents on railways are shown in Appendix B.
Industrial railways operating during the year are shown in Appendix C.
A list of locomotive cranes in industrial plants inspected by the Department is shown
in Appendix D.
A summary of the mileage of all railways operating in the Province is shown in
Appendix E. JJ  16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDICES
APPENDIX A
Certificates Issued under the Provisions of the " Railway Act "
Certificate No.
Granting leave to the B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. to issue general mortgage
bonds and approving of the sale of same  811
Approving standard freight tariff on the line of the B.C. Electric Railway Co.
Ltd. ...  812
Approving standard freight tariff on the line of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.   813
Granting Minister of Public Works leave to construct highway crossing over
tracks of Canadian Collieries Ltd. Railway at Lake Trail Road  814
Ordering Elk River Timber Co. Ltd. to construct farm crossing over its line of
railway at Homewood Road, Sayward District  815
Granting B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. leave to construct a spur track across
Dow Road, Municipality of Burnaby  817
Granting Minister of Public Works leave to construct highway crossing over
tracks of Pacific Great Eastern Railway at Pemberton  818
Approving application of Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co. to operate its line
of railway from Quesnel to Prince George for passenger traffic  819
Amending Certificate No. 793, section (c), governing speed tape recorders  820
Amending Rules and Regulations, Rule 121, Part III, Locomotives  821
Approving application of Aluminum Company of Canada for exemption from
standard clearances   822
Granting the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co. leave to construct a level
crossing across the Cariboo Highway at Prince George, P.G.E. Mileage
428.8   823
Granting the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co. leave to construct a spur track
across the highway at Squamish  824
Granting the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co. leave to construct a level
crossing across the Cariboo Highway, P.G.E. Mileage 279.7  825
Granting The Corporation of the District of Burnaby leave to construct a level
crossing over tracks of B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. at Rumble Street,
District of Burnaby  826
Granting Minister of Lands and Forests leave to construct a highway crossing
over tracks of Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co. at Mile 377.7  827
Granting Minister of Lands and Forests leave to construct a highway crossing
over tracks of Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co. at Mile 406.5  828
Granting The Corporation of the District of North Vancouver leave to construct a level crossing over tracks of Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co. at
Philip Avenue, District of North Vancouver  829
Approving construction and operation of Aluminum Company of Canada Ltd. 318 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1953
JJ 17
APPENDIX B
Accidents Reported, 1953
On Railway
B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd.— Killed
Passengers      ~-
Employees ._.    __.
Other persons       2
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.—
Passengers 	
Employees 	
Other persons .       1
Industrial railways—
Employees        2
Other persons '.	
Locomotive cranes—Employees      	
Aerial tramways (industrial)        1
Injured
29
1
15
Totals
52
Level Crossings
Unprotected Crossing
Protected Crossing
Killed
Injured
Number
of
Accidents
Killed
Injured
Number
of
Accidents
Under jurisdiction of the Provincial Government—
1
6
2
3
1
Totals	
1
**
3
1
Under jurisdiction ot the Board of Transport Commissioners for Canada—
4
1
8
16
16
29
....
1
1
Totals	
5
24
45
....        |        ....        |         2
Total number of accidents in British Columbia—      .
5
25
53
—
3
3 JJ 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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JJ  19
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APPENDIX D
List of Cranes and Other Auxiliary Motive Power in Industrial Plants
Inspected by Railway Department
Alaska Pine & Cellulose Ltd. .                                  Crane No. D.R. 304.
s
Alberta Lumber Co. Ltd.      ....                                Crane No. 42998 B.C.
Anderson Bros. Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 11905 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 302.
Arrowhead Wood Preservers Ltd Crane No. D.R. 293.
Crane No. D.R. 322.
Crane No. 22633 B.C.
Associated Foundry Ltd.„                         _„                         Crane No. D.R. 305.
Baxter, J. H., & Co. Ltd Internal-combustion Crane No. 1.
B.C. Cement Co. Ltd              Crane No. 21439 B.C.
B.C. Forest Products (Sawmill)                 Crane No. D.R. 320.
Burrard Dry Dock Co. Ltd Crane No. 50514 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 292.
Gas Locomotive Crane No. 4.
Capital Iron & Metals Ltd                                   Crane No. D.R. 295.
Crane No. 44386 B.C.
Columbia Cellulose Co. Ltd.     Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada Ltd.—
Kimberley Electric Locomotives Nos. 1, 2, 3.
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd Crane No. 44129 B.C.
Crane No. 44317 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 347.
Crane No. 44013 B.C.
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd. (Granville St. Bridge project)... Gas Locomotive No. 1.
Dominion Tar & Chemical Co. Ltd Crane No. 44441 B.C.
Gas Switcher No. I.
Crane No. D.R. 283.
Gas Locomotive Crane No. 6.
Esquimalt Dry Dock Crane No. 22582 B.C.
Portable Boiler D.R. No. 314.
Hillcrest Lumber Co. Ltd. (Sawmill) Crane No. 40049 B.C.
Crane No. 44315 B.C.
Crane No. 41298 B.C.
Jamieson Construction Co. Ltd.                 ... ... .  .         Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
King, M. B., Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 12430 B.C.
Lions Gate Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 12370 B.C.
Lumby Timber Co. Ltd.      ...          ...       Crane No. D.R. 343.
Mayo Lumber Co. Ltd.                           Crane No. D.R. 321.
MacMillan & Bloedel Ltd.—
Sawmill                                               Crane No. 44666 B.C.
Pulp-mill                      _  Gas Internal-combustion Locomotive No. 50.
Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
Northern Construction Co. Ltd.                  Crane No. 43505 B.C.
Osborn Bay Wharf Co. Ltd.            .   ...     Crane No. 21526 B.C.
Prince Rupert Drydock & Shipyard       .    Crane No. D.R. 290.
Sigalet & Co. Ltd.                                         Crane No. 21089 B.C.
Sooke Lake Lumber Co. Ltd.                   Crane No. 22632 B.C.
Timber Preservers Ltd.                                Crane No. 43807 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 288.
Timberland Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 12368 B.C.
Vancouver Steel Co. Ltd.                             Crane No. D.R. 316.
Crane No. D.R. 342.
Victoria Machinery Depot Ltd.     Crane No. D.R. 291.
Western Bridge & Steel Fabricators Ltd.     Crane No. D.R. 308.
Crane No. D.R. 309. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1953
JJ  21
APPENDIX E
Mileage of All Railways Operating in the Province
Mainland
Island
Total
Main
Line
Sidings
Main
Line
Sidings
Main
Line
Sidings
Under jurisdiction of the Board of Transport Commissioners for Canada—
1,858.31
1,302.34
140.77
33.04
527.06
364.63
38.52
21.72
197.81
90.17
46.51
21.53
2,056.12
1,392.51
140.77
33.04
573.57
386.13
38.52
21.72
3,334.46
951.90
287.98
68.04
3,622.44
1,019.94
Under jurisdiction of the Provincial Government—
430.80
104.96
32.28
7.00
38.17
61.20
20.27
18.39
15.00
34.92
430.80
104.96
337.38
7.00
46.42
61.20
B.C. Electric Railway            	
20.27
Industrial railways—
305.10
54.97
73.36
15.00
Narrow gauge   	
8.25
1.75
36.67
Totals  	
613.21
149.78
313.35
56.72
926.56
206.50
3,947.67
1,101.68
601.33
124.76
4,549.00
1,226.44
Total mileage of all railways in British Columbia, 5,775.44.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1954
210-254-7751   

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