Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

Department of Trade and Industry REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1953 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1954

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0348774.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0348774.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0348774-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0348774-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0348774-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0348774-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0348774-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0348774-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0348774-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0348774.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Trade
and Industry
REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1953
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1954  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the year ended December 31st, 1953.
RALPH CHETWYND,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Office of the Minister,
Department of Trade and Industry,
Victoria, British Columbia. Honourable Ralph Chetwynd,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the year ended December 31st, 1953.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
EDWIN G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
For the Year Ended December 31st, 1953
In reviewing the economic growth of British Columbia, it is apparent that 1953
was a year of consolidation and expansion. Consolidation of the gains resulting from
the spectacular developments of the post-war years and expansion in many directions
to meet increasing demands for goods and services.
Aside from such outstanding achievements as the completion of the oil pipe-line
and the establishment of the usual quota of new industries, possibly the most remarkable
feature was the expansion plans carried out in the pulp, paper, and plywood industries,
in oil-refining, in hydro-power development, in mining by-products such as chemical
fertilizers, in the brewing industry, in the metal trades, and in the distribution and servicing industries.
Of particular interest and pointing up expansion in the accommodation field are
surveys undertaken this year by outside interests for increased hotel facilities in the
Lower Mainland area. In addition, mercantile banking facilities by other than Canadian banks have entered the commercial life of the Province. This expansion proves
conclusively the continuing faith of investors in the future of this Province.
Another notable feature was the increasing number of Eastern Canadian manufacturers who set up distribution and servicing depots in British Columbia. Inevitably,
many of these firms will establish branch factories as demand develops, thus adding to
the range of products which contribute to the ever-growing value of manufacturing production. In this field, statistics show that British Columbia's contribution to the Canadian economy is consistent and important.
Throughout the year, interest in new industrial development continued at an encouraging level. There was evidence of easing in United Kingdom restrictions on transfer
of investment funds for new commercial enterprises. Several new and interesting items
of production made their appearance and interest in the possibilities of others was
apparent. Inability to transfer working capital is a deterrent to many European firms
wishing to establish.
As in past years, the industrial and commercial advantages of British Columbia were
pointed up by attractive advertisements in widely circulated national media.
Domestic trade, both retail and wholesale, compared favourably with, and in some
lines exceeded, the volume attained in the previous year. In external trade the trend
was toward increased imports and decreased exports. The trend to higher import totals
may be attributed to the competitive position enjoyed by many foreign countries, coupled with a determined effort on the part of all concerned to bring about a more equitable
trade balance. In exports there has been no slackening in the desire to buy B.C. products, but currency difficulties continue to present a difficult situation. In export as well
as in import trade, tariff revisions under review are of vital importance.
Tourist trade or the visitor industry has had a record year from the point of view
of automobiles entering through customs ports. This valuable industry has been conserved and expanded by a consistent programme of advertising in all practical fields.
Development of regional areas has been maintained by field service and special
surveys in several instances. A healthy indication is the steady population growth in
most communities throughout the Province.
The activities of the various divisions of the Department are outlined in the following pages of this Report. LL 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
NEW INDUSTRIES AND PRODUCTS
Of particular interest among new manufacturing industries during the year under
review is the planning for a steel pipe and tube mill to produce black and galvanized pipe
in sizes from one-half inch to 4 inches in diameter and rigid electrical conduit in sizes
up to 2V2 inches. This mill will produce pipe from imported steel strip and will be
located in the Greater Vancouver area.
Paper bags in specialty shapes and sizes came into production in a new factory,
financed and managed by Dutch capital. Plastic pipe, which has a great many uses in
industry and agriculture, is now being produced in British Columbia. Other new industries produce insulating-glass, aluminium-foil insulation, tungsten carbide, drill-bits,
mattress coil springs, men's clothing, prefabricated steel buildings, sawmill machinery,
propellors, cardboard containers, and television sets and equipment.
The oil pipe-line from Alberta has been a great stimulus to the whole industry,
resulting in a new refinery at Kamloops, expansion of refineries on Burrard Inlet, and a
tank-farm in Burnaby. An early and favourable decision on a natural-gas pipe-line
would create endless opportunities in the petro-chemical field and in many other fields
of industry and commerce.
The hardy perennial hope for a steel industry received encouragement during the
year with no less than four groups expressing interest. Smelting of other types of ore,
not presently processed in British Columbia, looms as a possibility for the northern section of the Province, and surveys are now under way.
The Department has co-operated in the continuing plans for development of Annacis
Island as an industrial estate. This project, financed and promoted by the Duke of
Westminster Estates, is expected to make a very worth-while contribution to industrial
expansion in British Columbia.
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT
Interdepartmental Industrial Advisory Committee
This Committee meets at the call of the Chair to consider industrial problems which
affect various departments of the Government service.
The following is the personnel of this Committee:—
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry (Chairman).
J. V. Fisher, Deputy Minister of Finance (Vice-Chairman).
E. S. Jones, Deputy Minister, Public Works Department.
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
C. Hopper, Deputy Minister of Lands.
R. Bowering, Public Health Engineer, Public Health Branch.
Dr. C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests.
W. H. Robertson, Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
T. L. Sturgess, Administrative Assistant, Department of Trade and Industry.
G. T. Hatcher, Director, Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of
Trade and Industry.
Dr. H. Sargent, Chief, Mineralogical Branch, Department of Mines.
G. Alexander, Deputy Minister of Fisheries.
H. L. Campbell, Deputy Minister of Education.
British Columbia Research Council
Under the chairmanship of the Minister of Trade and Industry, the Research Council
held monthly meetings, at which were considered many scientific problems of vital interest
to the Province. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 7
Industrial advancement is contingent upon scientific research, and it is very gratifying to the directors of the Council that industry is taking advantage of the services
which the Council provides.
The Council was organized in order to perform the following functions:—
(1) To co-ordinate the work of existing and prospective research units within
the Province of British Columbia:
(2) To initiate and undertake research work in any field of particular interest
to the Province; to apply the results of research toward the development
of new products, the improvement of industrial processes, and the establishment of new industries based on the resources of the Province:
(3) To assist in the development of the technical status of the industries in
the Province of British Columbia through a fuller utilization of scientific
methods and industrial research:
(4) To provide fellowships, scholarships, bursaries, and rewards and pecuniary and other aids, in order to facilitate and encourage original scientific
and industrial research:
(5) To provide for the publication of the results of the research work and to
enter into such arrangements as may be necessary with regard to patents
arising out of the work done by or for the Council.
The board of management consists of the following personnel:—
Chairman—Hon. Ralph Chetwynd, Minister of Railways, Trade and Industry,
and Fisheries of the Province of British Columbia.
Provincial Government—
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
W. H. Robertson, Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
Federal Government—
Dr. R. E. Foerster, Principal Biologist, Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries
Research Board of Canada, Nanaimo, B.C.
K. G. Fensom, Superintendent, Forest Products Laboratory, University of
British Columbia, Vancouver 8, B.C.
University of British Columbia—
Dr. W. A. Clemens, Department of Zoology.
Professor A. H. Finlay, Department of Civil Engineering.
Dr. D. G. Laird, Department of Agronomy.
Industry—
James S. Eckman, chairman, Greater Vancouver Metropolitan Industrial
Development Commission, 521 Marine Building, Vancouver, B.C.
M. M. O'Brien, Bralorne Mines Limited, 555 Burrard Street, Vancouver,
B.C.
Paul Walrod, general manager, B.C. Fruit Processors Limited, 1165 Ethel
Street, Kelowna, B.C.
Aird Flavelle, president, Flavelle Cedar Limited, Port Moody, B.C.
C. E. Webb, 6162 Churchill Street, Vancouver, B.C.
R. V. Robinson, manager, British Columbia Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, 355 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.
To provide improved facilities required by the great demand for services, the Council
started construction of an addition to its new building.   The addition will be ready for
occupancy by midsummer, and it will provide much more efficient handling of the
majority of the Council's activities and, in addition, a safe home for a large part of the
valuable laboratory equipment acquired in the years since the Council's formation. LL 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
With the new buildings and equipment and the ever-increasing background of
experience of the staff, the Council is a growing asset to the Province and one in which
industry can well place its confidence.
Industrial Advertising
The Department continued to advertise the opportunities for new industrial enterprise in the Province. This advertising stressed the natural resources of the Province
and their relation to secondary production.
The advertisements were placed in the following selected publications in Canada
and the United States: Fortune, Newsweek, U.S. News and World Report, Nation's
Business, Dun's Review, Business Week, Time (Canadian), Canadian Business, Industrial Canada, Saturday Night, Financial Post, Financial Times, Monetary Times, Maclean's, Western Business and Industry, Steel, and Canada Review (England).
The results of this campaign have been most gratifying, and from the inquiries
received, it is evident that much attention has been drawn to the advantages of British
Columbia.
Co-operative Contacts
The Department has consistently co-operated with the British Columbia Boards of
Trade, Chambers of Commerce, the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and the Greater Vancouver Metropolitan Industrial Development
Commission, and the assistance which these organizations have so willingly and cheerfully provided is appreciated.
Industrial Research
The Department continues to act as a clearing-house for application of research
results and assists in acquiring industry with facilities offered by the Council.
Interprovincial Co-operation
The Deputy Minister represents the Province of British Columbia on the Provincial
Government's Trade and Industry Council. This organization works very closely with
the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce, the banks, railways, and other interested trade-promotion groups in an effort to further the industrial life of Canada in general and the respective Provinces in particular.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE REPRESENTATIVE IN THE UNITED
KINGDOM, BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE, LONDON
The year 1953 was by far the best year since the establishment of the Industrial and
Trade Office at British Columbia House. British merchants, manufacturers, and industrialists are fully alive to the situation and wish to participate in the industrial growth of
Western Canada to an extent that would have been thought visionary during the years
1947 to 1950, when the dollar and materials shortage was so acute.
During 1953 the Bank of England and the Treasury relaxed the stringent regulations which had held back British investment in Canada since the end of the war. Large
amounts have been authorized for transfer into the dollar area by British industrialists
and manufacturers. This change in the British outlook is most gratifying, as it has been
the constant aim of this office to direct United Kingdom enterprise to British Columbia.
Undoubtedly the acquisition by the Westminster interests of Annacis Island and
their stated intention to build an industrial estate has done much to focus British interests
toward our Province. Many inquiries were received throughout the year at British
Columbia House regarding this project, and when factory space is ready to be offered on
long-term leases, it will start a steady flow of British industry, some large but certainly
many of a secondary nature, to our Province. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 9
One significant move of 1953 was the establishment of John Laing & Son (Canada)
Limited in Vancouver. The Industrial and Trade Representative at British Columbia
House worked very closely with the directors of John Laing & Son Limited and Mr.
Wallace Haughan in making preparations for the establishment of this new company.
As has already been announced in the press, this company is undertaking the initial
work on Annacis Island.
During 1953 the following businesses became established, or received permission
from the United Kingdom Treasury for such a move: John Laing & Son (Canada)
Limited, construction; Leslie Pringle Limited, leather merchants; Kalamazoo Limited,
book-keeping systems; Industrial Trading Company (B.C.) Limited, machinery sales;
Marley Tile Company Limited, floor tiles; F. L. Smidth & Company Limited, cement
plant; Tillstrom & Twigg, travel agents; Watson Plant Hire Company Limited, construction equipment; R. L. Welsh Limited, machine-shop; and Austin Motor Company,
service depot.
The most significant development during 1953 as far as trade between these Islands
and our Province was concerned was the abolition of timber-control and the changeover to private-enterprise buying for lumber, plywood, shingles, and other forest products.
It is expected that in the next few months the Ministry of Food will be wound up
completely and the buying of foodstuffs will also revert to private enterprise. The Ministry of Food was approached in the latter part of 1953 by the Fisheries Association of
British Columbia, when it was pointed out the serious situation which faced the industry
unless orders from the United Kingdom were forthcoming. The fishing interests in
British Columbia made a very wise and far-reaching decision in sending over a mission
headed by Mr. K. F. Fraser in an endeavour to find sources of supply for all types of
commodities used by the fishing industry and which were now being purchased elsewhere,
the theory being that if orders could be diverted to the United Kingdom, purchases thus
increased would improve the dollar situation. Mr. Fraser's mission was most successful
and created a most favourable impression, both in Government circles and throughout
industry. The pattern thus developed by the fishing industry could very well be followed
by other industries in British Columbia if all participating firms work in concert.
Despite numerous approaches, the Ministry of Food has not placed orders for
apples. This situation is being watched very carefully, and it is hoped that some solution will be found.
During 1953 the trade between Britain and the Province received considerable
impetus, mainly because suitable publicity was given to the large-scale buying of United
Kingdom products by British Columbia Government departments and firms, hitherto
not fully realized by the United Kingdom authorities. Such transactions include the
British Columbia Government's purchase of steel rails for the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway extension, the British Columbia Electric Company's purchase of rails and cables,
steel for the new Granville Street bridge in Vancouver, electrical and other equipment
for Kitimat-Kemano, etc.
Agencies for United Kingdom Goods
This office at British Columbia House got into touch with ninety-four British
manufacturers who wished to sell their goods or services in Western Canada. These
were sent to Victoria and published in the Trade and Industry Bulletin. From these
inquiries many successful agencies are secured for wholesalers, retailers, and agency
houses in the Province.
Many business-men from the Province called at British Columbia House and were
put into touch with British firms. This is a service that the office can give to visitors
from the Province. Because of the many contacts that can be made, much time is saved
for the visitor. LL 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Liaison, Trade Fairs
A constant liaison was maintained throughout the year with Canada House, the
Provincial Houses, Canadian banks, and other organizations throughout the United
Kingdom. The general up-swing in British interests in Canada has made co-operation
between the various Canadian Houses in London even more essential.
Emigrants continue to call at this office for advice on how best to become established
in business and professional life. This activity takes up a considerable time of each
week, the average number of such inquirers for 1953 being eight per week.
Many firms send out sales representatives or survey groups to British Columbia.
Letters of introduction were supplied in twenty-four instances to company representatives
and to many individuals emigrating from the United Kingdom.
The Industrial and Trade Representative in London attended exhibitions and trade
fairs which had a bearing on British Columbia trade requirements. These exhibitions
included housing and furniture, textiles, agricultural machinery, business machinery,
machine tools, motor-cars, moving and handling machinery, diesel engines, etc. The
British Industries Fair, both at London and Birmingham, was well attended by British
Columbia visitors, and free admission cards and special introductions to various exhibitors
were arranged at short notice. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 11
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE OFFICE
The prime objectives of this office are the promotion of new industrial and commercial enterprises throughout the Province, assistance to established businesses whenever
required, and the promotion of domestic and export trade.
This work is carried out in co-operation with other Provincial Government departments, Federal Government departments, Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce, the
British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, industrial commissions, departments of other Provincial Governments, and foreign trade representatives
in Canada and overseas.
DEFENCE PRODUCTION PROGRAMME
Throughout the year, liaison was maintained with the Department of Defence
Production through the office of the Western Representative, Department of Trade and
Commerce, and other agencies concerned. Information was made available to British
Columbia producers on type and quantity of goods required for defence purposes and in
procurement of necessary raw materials.
At the close of the year it was possible for Ottawa to announce termination of the
activities of the Materials Division, Department of Defence Production, due to continuing
improvement in the supply of strategic materials. Similarly, the activities of the Small
Industries Division were consolidated. This latter Division, through field offices throughout Canada, has given valuable assistance to smaller manufacturers seeking defence
business.
EXPORT SURVEYS
A main function of the office continues to be assistance to industry groups and
individual firms in connection with export problems.
CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
Committee Organization
The Department is represented on the committee in charge of all British Columbia
arrangements for the Canadian International Trade Fair. This includes survey and
action for exhibitor, buyer, and visitor participation, and for special phases of publicity
and public relations connected with the fair. Reference is made elsewhere in this Report
to the Department of Trade and Industry's Departmental exhibit.
Plans for 1954 were well under way at the close of the year.
The Department of Trade and Industry has already agreed to active participation,
and the appointment of a Trade Fair field representative working with the local committee
ensures a cross-section survey of exhibitor and buyer prospects in the Province.
The Department, through the committee, has received the active co-operation of
trade groups, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and Boards of Trade.
Department Exhibit
For the fourth year the Department of Trade and Industry entered an exhibit at the
Trade Fair held at Toronto, June 1st to 12th, 1953. The exhibit is a pictorial and
statistical presentation of this Province's industries and progress. It commanded marked
attention and compared favourably with other Provincial exhibits. Hundreds of inquiries
were received for information on all aspects of our economy. Many inquiries concerned
settlement, travel, and employment, while many valuable contacts were made for branch-
plant, office, or warehouse establishment. Sources of supply for British Columbia
products were provided in many cases.
Twenty-seven countries were represented with exhibits. Exhibit space used was
the greatest on record. LL 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
The British Columbia Industrial Design Committee includes representation from
the Department of Trade and Industry, Department of Education, University of British
Columbia, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver Board of Trade, Vancouver
School of Art, British Columbia Research Council, and the Federal Department of Trade
and Commerce.
The Committee has co-operated with the National Industrial Design Committee
in local planning. It has assisted in publicity and public relations, to encourage appreciation of industrial design and its importance as a factor in production and marketing of
British Columbia products.
The Committee has assisted in building up reference libraries on industrial design.
It has assisted in local planning for National design competitions sponsored by industry.
Direct financial assistance was secured from the National Gallery, Ottawa, with
smaller contributions from British Columbia sources.
HANDICRAFT PRODUCTION
A revised edition of the Directory of Handicraft Producers and Products was
published in 1953. As in 1952, this Directory listed producers in British Columbia
known to be interested in finding a market and in a position to supply reasonable demands.
Distribution of the Directory was made to retail and wholesale firms as a guide for any
handicraft items they might wish to purchase. Additional distribution was made in
Eastern Canada and the United States.
Contact was maintained by correspondence with Eastern Canadian Provinces, some
of which have extensive educational programmes for handicraft development.
UNITED KINGDOM SURVEYS
The work of the Industrial and Trade Representative at British Columbia House
is covered in the general section of this Annual Report.
The Department at Victoria has cleared the Representative's work under headings
of Branch-plant Establishment, Investment Surveys, Special Industrial Surveys, Agency
Inquiries, Itineraries, and Introductions.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN      •
This Bulletin, listing trade inquiries, licence manufacture opportunities, and news of
general commercial interest, has been published for the past four years. It has been the
means of establishing contact between foreign firms and British Columbia importers and
manufacturers. Many of the trade inquiries reach us through our Industrial and Trade
Representative at British Columbia House, London, while the majority of licence manufacture opportunities are supplied by the Industrial Development Division, Department
of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa. Foreign trade representatives in Canada also use the
Bulletin to clear their trade inquiries.
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT
The policy of contacting firms known to be interested in, or considered to be suitable
for, branch-plant establishment has been continued, and a great deal of information has
been supplied. In addition, many European and United States firms have sought advice
on procedure and possibilities of establishing in British Columbia.
PUBLIC RELATIONS AND COMMITTEE WORK CO-OPERATION
The Department has continued the effective basis of co-operation with foreign
consulates and with the Trade Commissioners of Commonwealth countries. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 13
The office has been responsible for itinerary and other arrangements for business
visitors from Eastern Canada and overseas, and visiting trade missions and special
industrial-survey parties. It has worked in direct co-operation with the Foreign Trade
Service Office in Vancouver for the arrangements in British Columbia for visiting Trade
Commissioners and officials from Ottawa.
The office is represented on the Greater Vancouver Metropolitan Industrial Development Commission and on several standing committees of the Vancouver Board of Trade
and the Victoria Chamber of Commerce. The Department has continued financial
assistance to the Transportation Bureau of the Board of Trade to help it serve the smaller
Boards of Trade in other parts of the Province in a constructive programme of tariff and
freight rates and services information.
REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT
During the year the promotion of industrial and commercial development in regional
areas was carried out by means of special area surveys, assistance to local groups by field
representatives of the Department, and by the collection of economic data in preparation
for the 1954 edition of the Regional Industrial Index.
This Index has proved valuable in providing a factual background for sound
industrial planning on a regional basis. LL 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics during 1953, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is, as its name
implies, a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is to
provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into economic
questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and compile economic
statistics of interest to the Province.
In order to carry out these objectives, the Bureau is divided into the following
divisions: Economic research, trade and transportation, market research, statistical,
and mechanical tabulating. To ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured
to follow the policy of building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who
could be relied upon to perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also
been the policy to make the services of the technical personnel continuously available to
all other departments of the Government.
Since other Governmental agencies are also concerned with the collection of statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication has
been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, Provincial Secretary, and Health and Welfare. During 1953 the essential statistical services performed
for the other Provincial departments, as well as for the Department of Trade and
Industry, were maintained. Before proceeding with a description of the services performed by the various divisions during the year, a brief review of business activity in
British Columbia is presented.
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Preliminary statistical returns for 1953 indicate that business activity continued the
upward trend of recent years. The basic industries will probably show a slight decrease
over 1952, which had shown a decrease over 1951; again, however, the manufacturing
and construction industries will show sizeable increases over 1952 figures. Retail prices,
as indicated by the Consumer Price Index, decreased during 1953, the first time a
decrease has been recorded since 1939. Retail sales continued to increase at a moderate
pace and allowing for the increase in population and decrease in price level; per capita
sales showed a slight increase over 1952.
Incomplete returns indicate the net value of production of primary and secondary
industries amounted to some $1,315,000,000 in 1952, compared with $1,259,000,000
in 1951 and $971,879,000 in 1950. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 15
ECONOMIC      INDICATORS     IN     BRITISH     COLUMBIA
EMPLOYMENT
BANK DEBITS
^
160
S
n
a 120
z
□
5    60
0
1939 1941        1943 1945       1947 1949      1951        1953
YEARS
0
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
1939  1941
1943   1945   1947   1949  1951
YEARS
RETAIL TRADE
INTERNAL TRADE
/
1200
3 1000
5
g   800
h
o
m   600
z
0
J   400
s
200
0
1939       1941 1943 1945       1947
YEARS
1949       1951        1953
FREIGHT LOADED
SALES OF LIFE INSURANCE
CONSUMPTION OF ELECTRICAL POWER
= 4.5 ^
i. — ^	
O 3.0  iZi	
m	
o
1939        1941 1943 1945       1947 1949      1951       1953
YEARS
160
1.20
80
40
0
tn
<
_l
(A
Z
0
-1
-1
s
/
/
/
<S
1939       1941 1943 1945       1947 1949      1951        1953
YEARS
1953 Figures Subject to Revision LL 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ECONOMIC     INDICATORS     IN     BRITISH     COLUMBIA
CONSUMER PRICES
19
9 =
[00
PRICES
(INDEX NOS.)
250
225
200
WHOLESALE PRICES
1935-1939 =
100
1939        1941 1943 1945 1947 1949 1951 1953 1939        1941 1943 1945 1947 1949 1951 1953
CONSTRUCTION
(in Millions of Dollars)
500
450
300
250
200
150
100
50
VALUE
OF
CONTRACTS AWARDED
VALUE
OF
BUILDING PERMITS
450
400
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
0
\
\
\
\
\
\
/
1
1939        1941 1943 1945 1947 1949 1951 1953 1939        1941 1943 1945 1947 1949 1951 1953
YEARS YEARS
1953 Figures Subject to Revision DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 17
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1951 and 1952,
with Preliminary Estimates for 1953
Unit or
Base
Period
1953
Preliminary
Estimates^
1952
Mining—1
Total value of production....
Gold production _...
Silver production __	
Copper production 	
Lead production... 	
Zinc production 	
Coal production — 	
Forestry—
Total value of production2..
Timber scaled* „	
Lumber production5 	
Paper production2. 	
Fisheries—3
Total value of production...
Pack of canned salmon	
Agriculture—4
Total value of production ...
Apples—
Total shipments	
Domestic shipments .....
Export shipments	
External trade—5
Export of canned salmon ...
Export of planks and boards, Douglas fir..
Export of red-cedar shingles  	
Internal trade—
Total retail sales5 	
Department stores	
Motor-vehicle dealers .
Gasoline consumed0 _
Railway freight loaded in British Columbia5 	
Consumption of electric power5 	
Sales of life insurance5...   _ 	
Construction—5
Contracts awarded ._. _ —  	
Building permits issued..... 	
Finance—Bank debits5    	
Tourist trade—Automobile entries on sixty-day permits5.
Employment—5
All employment    	
Manufacturing.
Iron and steel products-
Lumber products 	
Pulp and paper	
Mining  	
Logging. _	
Construction	
Communication..
Transportation....
Services	
Trade 	
MB.M.
MB.M.
Tons
$
Cases
Boxes
Boxes
Boxes
Cwt.
Mft.
Sq.
000$
000$
000$
Gallons
Tons
000 kwh.
000$
000$
000$
000$
Number
1949 = 100
1949 = 100
1949=100
1949 = 100
1949 = 100
1949 = 100
1949 = 100
1949=100
1949=100
1949=100
1949 = 100
1949 = 100
149,000,000
9,320,000
7,225,000
13,950,000
39,150,000
37,950,000
9,100,000
512,288,656
5,291,587
3,807,262
65,455,000
1,821,269
139,000,000
Salaries and wages7-
499,473
1,272,106
2,052,877
1,225,000
163,486
253,988
210,072,483
11,845,595
4,897,335
176,899
163,477
149,231
11,786,823
283,837
108.4
107.9
113.0
108.3
123.1
104.3
92.5
127.4
139.1
112.3
98.6
102.8
1,000,000,000
170,851,914
9,109,994
7,315,088
13,054,893
45,936,692
59,189,656
9,272,224
496,506,550
4,937,965
3,696,629
521,609
56,635,000
1,293,435
141,402,677
4,740,716
2,758,950
1,981,766
292,185
1,151,485
2,093,767
1,194,900
156,300
240,300
191,531,678
11,888,688
4,457,298
159,826
166,273
94,264
11,111,011
262,550
106.7
105.4
114.1
98.8
116.4
121.9
95.8
114.2
114.8
104.6
95.7
102.9
979,364,603
175,659,591
10,345,858
7,768,118
11,980,155
50,316,015
66,448,242
10,233,353
504,807,930
4,696,347
3,723,877
484,581
83,813,000
1,955,475
144,380,443
3,884,213
1,986,455
1,897,758
321,796
1,281,467
2,563,585
1,099,000
140,600
210,900
172,742,019
11,600,237
4,186,972
135,971
381,548
87,344
9,945,579
247,801
106.1
110.3
115.6
112.9
107.5
107.6
122.2
93.3
127.8
110.1
96,6
102.2
831,884,887
1 British Columbia Department of Mines.
2 British Columbia Department of Lands and Forests, Forest Service.
3 British Columbia Department of Fisheries.
1 British Columbia Department of Agriculture.
5 Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
6 British Columbia Department of Finance.
* Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Labour Division.
8 Subject to revision. LL 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
CO
IT)
CN
o
I-
o
CM
Os
CO
<
UJ
>-
U
CQ
LL
O
z
o
r-
U
Q
O
or
a.
_i
<
3
y
o±
<
$
 ■--,,.llf„<„>  ••*-■■*■■  """■■■.
I        i      „    ».   _     i
 ' v. _.__l
t » i
_       *~r-r.-. v.    ~--|
<
savnoa dOSNomiw DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 19
A    1
O
^
I        It
1 If!
#
!?
CO
m
Os
t! 1
1 >?
$
1  V ^ >f
*|l
a
o
o
..   •
$|
'
r-
o
CN
.1;
m
O
t>
CO
CC
<
....       ;%ol:
n
N"
^S.
- ~-*tg™..
>
X^J.,^
™}*,.3g:'._
(J
a.
CQ
'%,
\
o
LL
o
,..,3?*N
o
t^
z
o
-   <
LU
>
LO
ro
y|..lp
1-
u
Q
O
CC
a.
ro
ro
—'?; sk/p.,*!. ^
CO
UJ
ro
CC
LU
I
CO
LL
/"■'ft
■ftft   .
\
LL
o
r--
J*
f
r>
Z>
/
\ •■ j)
.:'
; i i
in
<
>
\
\
■■■■:..■:,.:::■
.ft:*:.
\
J        3^
|
1
Sj
#
ro
CN
\
1    !!
CN
O
"
H^*
o
o
o
Ox
o
03
£
O
•o
c
ir
c
c
c
c
>              c
•i
3                   O
suvnoa dosNomiw LL 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ro
m
CN
O
r-
o
CN
Os
CO
cc
<
LU
U
CQ
LL
o
z
o
h-
u
Q
O
CC
0_
>
cc
h-
CO
cu
CC
O
<
>
syvnoa dosNomiw DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 21
oo
in
On
o
o
CN
Os
CO
CC
<
LU
>-
u
cci
Z
o
r-
u
Q
O
cc
a.
<3
Z
Z
5
2
<K        1
V           1
$                \
\        !
i'"'...        X 1
r   :"1cft  j   J
gg**4i<«U;
y
ft            ft                 1                      ":*63*iT
"") ' '/■"'      1               t ^%       1
j                               1     \k     '
*■%:   1   .■                   \j
\J '".-.:'.
■"V
■          1                     |
fc"
£ <
savnoa dosNomiw LL 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
oo
m
CN
O
r-
o
CN
Os
CO
CC
<
LU
>-
u
CQ
z
o
I-
u
ID
o
o
cc
CL
O
z
CC
=>
h-
u
<
LL
Z
<
<
>
oo
CO
o
CC
o
•—
o
■"•
Os
—-
o
"""i
h-
i
o
]
■
m
ro
<*
o
"*3fe.
\
1
1*
4
os
'X
^—
Os
CO
Os
 j !
t      ~
/
r-»
\
Os
J
ro
■ i  i  i
~—
ro
00
——
" • ■
ro
'I "11
~—■  1 ■■■■■   1 L-
1.1         |         |
4 :'■'-!■■     1      1
1
r>
...   j,...  |
_._J_
Os
LI
CN
O
^"7
in
CN
O
ro
CN
O
CN
O
savnoa josNomiw DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY LL 23
ECONOMIC RESEARCH DIVISION
During the past year this Division has continued to provide economic counsel to the
Government. This is done on a general basis through the medium of a weekly report
sent to the Premier's Office and to the Minister of each Department. The report contains
a review of current economic events which are considered to be of particular significance
to the Province. The report also contains charts chosen to illustrate trends in our
economy. A section of statistical information is also included, to provide an up-to-date
summary of current business conditions in the Province.
In addition to providing general economic data, as described above, the Division
has also been requested to prepare reports on special subjects by many branches of the
Government. Technical assistance of this nature has been given to the following
branches: Attorney-General's Department, Department of Labour, Department of
Finance, the Hospital Insurance Commission, and the Civil Service Commission.
This Division receives hundreds of requests during the year from private individuals,
corporations, trade-unions, newspapers and business publications, and Boards of Trade.
In some cases such inquiries call for the provision of statistical information readily
available from our files and library. In other cases they require lengthy tabulations and
a considerable amount of research. The helpful co-operation of the staff of the Provincial
Library and other departments of the Government is worthy of mention in this regard.
One of the aims of the Division is to keep government and industry informed on
current business conditions in the Province. This is accomplished, in part, through the
distribution of a publication entitled " The Monthly Bulletin," which contains a written
summary of changes in the economy as shown by the latest available statistical indicators.
It also contains a detailed statistical review which supplements the text. Another feature
of the Bulletin is a monthly report on the external trade passing through our customs ports.
Special Surveys
Wage-rate Surveys
At the request of the Civil Service Commission the annual study of wage rates and
working conditions in the metropolitan areas of Vancouver and Victoria was prepared.
The questionnaire was sent to all large firms in these areas, and asked for their policy in
respect to days and hours worked per week, vacation policy, sick-leave policy, and wage
rates for selected occupations. The response of the firms was very good, and useful
information was provided both to the Civil Service Commission and to this Division from
the survey. Considerable demand for the report was also shown by non-governmental
bodies, and a mimeographed summary was prepared for distribution to the co-operating
establishments and other interested organizations.
Many reports showing occupational wages were prepared for the Department of
Labour during the past year. The information was compiled from sources such as the
wage-rate study referred to above, collective-bargaining agreements, and statistical returns
from industrial firms which are filed with this Bureau.
The clerical-salary survey of the Vancouver Board of Trade was again tabulated and
analysed by this Division. The results of the survey were published in a comprehensiive
report showing salary ranges and average salaries for thirty-three office occupations within
the Vancouver area. The publication also includes a section outlining the policies of the
participating firms with respect to working conditions.
Assistance was also given to the Vancouver Board of Trade in preparing two small
surveys. One of these dealt with wage rates and working conditions of warehouse and
shipping-room employees in the Vancouver area, while the other was a survey dealing
with reimbursing of salesmen for automobile expenses. LL 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Trade-union Statistics
As in previous years, a directory of trade-union organizations was compiled by this
Division for the Labour Relations Board. Reported labour-organization membership
in British Columbia (including non-trade-union membership of less than 1,000 members)
totalled 174,894 members at December 31st, 1952, compared with 170,036 members at
December 31st, 1951, an increase of 2.86 per cent. Organized-labour membership was
48.93 per cent of the paid working force in non-agricultural occupations in British
Columbia as at December 31st, 1952.
A study of union membership by industrial categories showed the following
distributions: — Per Cent
Wood and wood products  20.90
Public service  17.95
Construction   11.38
Foods .     8.08
Mining and quarrying     7.11
Other transportation     7.04
Steam-railway transportation     6.45
Metals      6.15
Personal service      5.48
Light, heat, and power     2.97
Communications     2.41
Printing and publishing     1.42
Clothing and footwear     0.55
All others .     2.11
TRANSPORTATION AND TRADE DIVISION
Transportation and Freight Rates Section
The year 1953 has been important in the transportation and freight-rates field.
On January 1st, 1953, a general increase of 9 per cent was permitted by the Board of
Transport Commissioners, and on March 16th a further 7 per cent was granted. This
latter increase was appealed, without success, to the Governor-General in Council on
May 1st, 1953. Effective November 15th, however, the Board ordered, as a part of the
equalization process, a 5-per-cent reduction on class rates in Western Canada and
permitted a 10-per-cent increase in the East. This action was substituted for the implementation of a single class-rate scale for all of Canada, originally ordered to come into
effect on January 1st, 1954, but now delayed by one year. It is estimated that the
5-per-cent reduction will save British Columbia class-rate shippers and receivers over
half a million dollars annually.
Depending on the rate scale selected, the complete equalization of class rates should
relieve British Columbia traffic of an annual burden of between one and a half to two
and a half million dollars.
For the past few years the Royal Commission on Transportation and the Board's
equalization proceedings have required a great deal of the Bureau's attention, and it
would appear that this function will be increasingly important when the equalization of
commodity rates begins; this will be after a basic class-rate scale and a new classification
has been decided upon. Eighty per cent of British Columbia's traffic moves on commodity
rates; therefore, every attention will be directed toward obtaining just and reasonable
rates for this important sector of the traffic. Other problems which require study, such
as the reinstatement of the subsidy on long-haul lumber shipments and certain needed
revisions to the Federal "Railway Act," indicate considerable future activity for this
Division of the Bureau. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 25
With the increased use of agreed charges by the railways, it is necessary to maintain
a complete file of these tariffs to see that the interests of British Columbia industry are
looked after. This file, along with the Bureau's regular tariff library, is available to
anyone interested.
In co-operation with the Provincial counsel, the Bureau also prepared British
Columbia's successful case for the removal of the mountain differential on passenger
rates. Instead of AV2 cents per mile, travellers in British Columbia now pay the same
basic 4-cent rate as anywhere else in Canada.
Interdepartmentally, the technical assistance of the Bureau in the field of transportation economics has been considerable. This is especially true of the assistance given
to the Department of Finance in preparing for Federal-Provincial negotiations. Similarly,
assistance has been given to the Railway Department and the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway in rate matters. Reciprocally, much valuable help and advice has been received
from these Departments in other fields.
Finally, the efforts of the Bureau are co-ordinated with the needs of practical traffic
managers in commerce and industry through the Assistant Director, who acts as secretary
and conducts research for the Advisory Committee on Freight Rates.
External Trade Section
The agreement between this Bureau and the External Trade Branch, Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, consummated in the fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under
this agreement the Bureau receives monthly a duplicate set of punch-cards showing in
detail the importation and exportation of every commodity normally listed in the
Federal trade reports which has been recorded at customs ports located in this Province.
While these records do not distinguish the exported merchandise originating in British
Columbia nor the imports destined for consumption in this Province from the other
goods passing through these customs ports, the records do provide the basis for a very
comprehensive annual report on the foreign trade of British Columbia.
Preliminary statements showing the external trade through British Columbia customs
ports covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over are now published annually. Until June, 1950, detailed monthly statements were also published.
For reasons of economy, this publication has been combined in an abbreviated form
with the Bureau's Monthly Bulletin.
The discontinuance of fairly detailed monthly published external-trade figures has
resulted in increased requests for import and export information, which has been
supplied to all inquirers.
Tables 2 and 3 give a brief insight into British Columbia's foreign trade for the
eleven-year period 1942 to 1952. The peak year for exports was 1951, there being
a slight drop in 1952. Imports have tripled since 1945, and exports are more than
two and a half times as great. Preliminary figures for the first six months of 1953 indicate a slight decrease in the value of exports and a small increase in the value of imports. LL 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
•S
s
s
cj
»1
0
cj
a
s
o
Cj
oo 0
fc. .a
a J
Ci.s_
s *>
5
■s"?
g, 5
s ^>
g rX
S
S
o
CJ
5,
■«
^
fl
no
r-^-'*fn,*occsiosaooo
cno^oocAtn'rt-mentn
e-
o
Ttf mt ooaOO\nO
oo
<N
tn
o«--'0\'stOfsirsio\,t
00
C^ONfiVlTtri^'itM
OS
1-tsoOcoi-it-C'jWiaosO
P;
Tt\D\0«riO^-t-vC'-H«n
oo"
r^  C
ca vt r-t cn
fN
«■
ccoosoioooio^tosoor-
00
HoofvfmioNmao
t-
cncNsoinvsor-cNsou-i
in
»n>nossO'-HOsoo»rsr^'^-
cn"
tn
H(SmriHo\hrs-n»
o\
a\
r*,tvDr-i»rt\cto\M
00
M
oovoo\rs-ovirNasor-
oo
«n           THv-*c3\cNm'-'fs|
eg-
cn
co^ctHnHVOcnOO
Csl
OTfrrOOTf'srOcsirsO
so
"nWstCswsfrHcsinm
OS
o
-*
tn
■st
Q\
mmcNCsiONOcNTrmos
cn
r-l (n *t ■>* so t— oomoovi
so
Ui                   i-l           sO  rH  l^s           —<
■**
w-
CN
&9-
OrtSOfNv-ir-WiSOcnvi
O
o\"*Tt-'sOo\sowiooo\r-
CASOCAt>cnCAOOOsi-4SD
as
tHrHM00r0'tfs|O'Hfs|
»n
rj-
ooo\rNOs<nr-csirtoor-
o\
OV)X""M»t^Oif)\0
StJ
r-oocncnso'rj-cNOsvowi
00
CO                      rt            V1H-*             l-H
o
«■
(N
t«-
ro*o ti oo ^u, ^ o »n w
fN
WXTstO0TT»«Ttl^r^
00
OscoOaofN'-"tN,rf-w,oo
cn
■*
■rtcnsosoyitr^-tnasmos
0\
Cmninr-fsiVKslM-s
-*
00«o'stncn-iO\CJ\«0\
fN
m            i-h       m      M-
OS
«■
(fl-
HQOQOICfrimTt>OiCh
fN
r— 0\ x-i oo co-o r-i ih N tj-
S
00©OSV"sOSO0I>00SOm
t—
rtl^QOVlTtVO^'rtJ-'rJ-SO
so
Tf
Tf oo^DooOMfihom
Os
ooosr-«r>ot—'*r*i-rtos
00
7-1
Os"
vs te
rnSDso\ocosOsO>n
en           i-i      in      tn      r-t
00
v>
tfi-
cnOsfN^OOcnOri-v-iO
CN
osincn-rtoscntr-i-<soos
i
mavooo-stvocnor-cn
yp
aocno\vocNvor-oor-Ui
so
■*
^nOTfxifiOnOao
CT\
cN'^-'-irNOr-osos"*os
t--cnmQ0T*xt'H-fN'stOs
en
cN                    cn      ca
CN
v±
vt
H«MnOMO\mO\in
s
cn cn cA in •** <r-< r- © Os cn
rsi'rtMrn'srvimmcoio
CN
to
Ifl    H    Cl    -H    rt    O    rH    IO    m    m
00
Tfr
voQrhr-ooosmrj-ovO
oooov-)Om©r^sO*n
CN
O
o\
HOrtionOst\ono\
OO
CN                               CN         rn         (N
O
«fr
Cfl-
h 00 m O rt Tt ff) CA O M
tn
OsOsaoTrmrtrtmsoso
Tf
aosoo^i/^""*- so t-^cn rt ra
so
|
so ^ in of rn* r-* o" oo ^f so"
HOOrtlfirf MNHO00
00
so
Os
cnoocortcnO\som**-Tj-
r^
OSrtrtVOCNfN^C-moO
00
rt                           tN        rt        cn
V*
«■
•rtcGcnasososi—^sotn
oJsosoOsOt-incofNr-
SO
Os
sosoi-'oofNso"i*r^oo»*
SO
m
tr
oo" so oo so rt r-^ oo"
tt"
r> m
■*
fnoofNvorsirtOfN'^-Tt'
00
Os
«nr-rtaoO\t--in»nOOs
°\
1-1
W-lrtfNOSrtOOsO^-cnfN
so"
rt                         (S       th       rn
«■
«■
© so so in r— os m as *p *o
mmrs|rtOo\sOr-Oos
r-
m
fOSOVsOsCNCNWiCNSOCN
SO
cs
TTOOSDOSDWi-rtsOOOOO
oo"
^
i^-Hr-OsOsocNoosoin
CN
as
■^■CNr-^-OOrtfOOvOvO
fN
fSCNrtr^rtrnfrifnrNoo
IS
rt                      rN       rt       w^
00
«■
w-
1
(0
01
3
M
o
&
a.
§2
•■  o
w  3
n
§
0
i
o
E
E
o
O
•5
o
Ih
a
3
(L»
00
t
s
T
C
0
t
1
C
3   O   c
1 at
c s
rt  cd "C
3
X
1
V
« TD   3   u
ous metals
allic miner
Is and allie
leous prod
Totals, all
>
•o
ll
p
at
0
0
t*H
It
1 rfg.fi
8-85*
c
I
nimals
ibres, tt
'ood, w
on and
on-ferr
on-met
tiemica
iscellai
<
<
ft
^
\~
Z
Zs*
2 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 27
Table 4.—Twelve Leading Exports of British Columbia, 1952
Rank Commodity
1. Planks and boards, Douglas fir
2. Planks and boards, hemlock	
3. Lead in pigs, refined lead	
4. Newsprint
Value
($000,000)
.         99.7
  44.0
  41.6
  40.3
5. Zinc spelter    28.0
6. Planks and boards, cedar  22.5
7. Shingles, red cedar  19.8
8. Pulp sulphite, dissolving  12.7
9. Wood-pulp, sulphite kraft  10.0
10. Copper, fine in ore     9.8
11. Nitrogen fertilizer     9.6
12. Beef and veal, fresh     8.9
The above table indicates the importance of our lumber, pulp and paper, mine and
smelter products, and live stock.
British Columbia products, exported through all Canadian ports, went to over 100
countries in 1952; however, two of these—the United States and the United Kingdom—
bought 80 per cent of these exports. Since the end of the war the United States has
taken an increasing proportion of our total exports until 1950, when it reached 79 per
cent. By 1952, however, this had dropped to 59 per cent. The United Kingdom,
which took 8 per cent of British Columbia's exports in 1950, took 27.2 per cent in 1952.
Ten countries took over 96 per cent of all our exports. These leading customers are
set out as follows:—
Table 5.—The Ten leading Countries to which British Columbia Products
Were Exported in 1952
Rank Country Value
1. United States   $286,971,658
2. United Kingdom     132,887,679
3. Japan        17,729,108
4. Australia
5. Hawaii 	
6. Union of South Africa
7. Belgium	
8. Italy 	
9. New Zealand	
10. France	
8,418,061
5,667,471
4,285,010
3,863,603
2,715,971
2,447,323
1,729,961
All other countries       21,837,994
Percentage
of Total
58.7
27.2
3.6
1.7
1.2
.9
.8
.6
.5
.4
4.4
Total, all countries   $488,553,839 100.0
A continental breakdown of British Columbia exports shows North and Central
America and the West Indies bought 59.5 per cent, Europe 29.9 per cent, Oceania 3.5
per cent, Asia 5.1 per cent, Africa 1.3 per cent, and South America 0.7 per cent. LL 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 6.—The Eleven Leading Imports from Foreign Countries
for Consumption in British Columbia, 1952
Value
Rank Commodity ($000,000)
1. Crude petroleum for refining  18.9
2. Ores of metals, n.o.p.   15.7
3. Coffee, green   14.0
4. Pipe, wrought, over 10Vi inches  11.8
5. Sugar, raw, imported direct  10.3
6. Gasoline, under .8236 specific gravity  8.6
7. Heavy fuel-oils, Nos. 4, 5, and 6  6.1
8. Angles, beams  5.8
9. Automobiles, passenger (under $1,200)  5.4
10. Clothing, tourist      5.4
11. Logging machinery and parts     5.3
The presence of three petroleum products among our eleven leading imports shows
that California oil-producers can still compete effectively in the British Columbia market.
This situation may be altered now that the pipe-line from Alberta has been completed.
Although British Columbia imported from eighty-six countries in 1951, three-
quarters originated in the United Kingdom and the United States. United Kingdom
imports dropped from $39,000,000 in 1951 to $32,000,000 in 1952, while imports from
the United States rose from $201,000,000 to $220,000,000 in 1952. The top ten
countries listed below provided over 90 per cent of all imports.
Table 7.—Ten Leading Countries from Which British Columbia Imported Products
in 1952, for British Columbia Consumption
Percentage
Rank Country Value of Total
1. United States  .  $220,187,043 67.0
2. United Kingdom   31,612,975 9.6
3. Peru   7,566,846 2.3
4. Brazil   6,943,800 2.1
5. Fiji   6,473,877 2.0
6. Japan   6,067,094 1.8
7. Belgium  5,604,970 1.7
8. Philippines   4,592,408 1.4
9. Colombia   4,013,312 1.2
10. India   3,236,575 1.0
All other countries       32,499,907 9.9
Total, all countries  $328,798,807 100.0
A breakdown of our imports by continents reveals that in 1952 North America
supplied us with 70 per cent, Europe 13.1 per cent, South America 7.6 per cent, Asia
5.9 per cent, Oceania 3 per cent, and Africa less than 1 per cent.
The gap between our total imports and exports narrowed slightly in 1952 compared
with 1951, in that imports were 61.9 per cent of exports but in 1952 were 67.3 per cent.
The balance is still closer than in 1939, when the ratio was around 50 per cent.
STATISTICAL DIVISION
This Division is responsible for the collection, compilation, analyses, interpretation,
and publication of statistical information. Also, it is the duty of this Division to assist
other departments in the compilation of statistical information and to establish uniform
statistical methods throughout the service. In addition, it co-operates with other statistical bureaux in the elimination of duplication and answers inquiries relating to statistical
data.    Following is a brief outline of the statistics compiled in this Division. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 29
Co-operative Statistical Agreements
The co-operative statistical agreements with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and
other Federal offices increased during 1953. The fields of co-operation and the dates
of the original agreements are as follows: (1) Mining Statistics, 1926; (2) External-
trade Statistics, 1938; (3) Cost-of-food Statistics, 1939; (4) Provincial Government
Payroll Statistics, 1949; (5) Forecast of Capital and Repair and Maintenance Expenditures for Provincial, Municipal, and Other Local Authorities, 1950; (6) Census of
Construction Statistics—Building Permits, 1951. In addition, copies of Dominion
Bureau of Statistics annual Census of Industry forms and monthly reports on Production, Shipments, and Stocks on Hand in British Columbia Sawmills have been received
since 1948. Commencing in 1953 the Dominion Bureau of Statistics agreed to supply
this office with duplicates of their Operations in the Woods forms. In return, the
Bureau assists the Dominion Bureau of Statistics by checking mailing-lists, estimating
production of delinquent firms, and other services.
Conferences between the Provincial and Federal statistical bureaux are now held
annually. As a consequence, it is expected that within the next few years there will be
considerable progress toward the elimination of duplication in this field.
Prices Section
The year 1953 was a year of relatively stable prices. The Consumer Price Index
(Tables 8 and 9) showed a tendency to decline slightly during the first half of the year
and turned upwards the last half. The Consumer Price Index for December 1st, 1953,
stood at 115.8, the same as for December, 1952.
Wholesale prices (Table 12) also showed little variation from month to month
over the year, although, of course, individual items were subject to wider price changes.
Consumer Price Index—Description
In October, 1952, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics began publication of the
Consumer Price Index, which is the successor to the old Cost-of-living Index.
The new index remains, in character and general purposes, the same as the old
Cost-of-living Index. However, the goods and services selected for purposes of computing the new index conform with post-war expenditure patterns and should reflect
more realistically current changes in living costs due to prices.
In order to determine the items and proportions to be used in the new base budget,
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics conducted a survey of family expenditure covering
some 3,600 urban Canadian families. The survey covered the year ended August 31st,
1948. It was decided that the central core of family types whose expenditure patterns
were similar enough for their changes in living costs resulting from price change to be
adequately represented by one index could be defined as those families (a) living in
twenty-seven Canadian cities with over 30,000 population, (b) ranging in size from two
adults to two adults with four children, and (c) with annual incomes during the survey
year ranging from $1,650 to $4,050.
Detailed information on expenditures was submitted by 1,517 families with these
attributes.
The year 1949 is the base period of the new Consumer Price Index. This index will
measure the percentage change in prices between 1949 and, for example, January, 1952,
rather than between January, 1952, and 1935-39, as in the case of the old Cost-of-living
Index. Calculations of the percentage change between any two points in time will yield
exactly the same result regardless of the base period used.
Publication of the old Cost-of-living Index ceased after September 1st, 1953. Each
month the Bureau of Economics and Statistics releases the latest Consumer Price Index
figures to a mailing-list of some 180 individuals and organizations. LL 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
British Columbia Cost of Food
During the year this Bureau continued to calculate its quarterly Cost-of-food Index
covering British Columbia centres. Information regarding comparative food costs in the
various centres is available upon request.
Year
1913
1914
1915
1916.
1917
1918-
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929
1930
1931
1932
1933-
Table 8.—Canadian C<
(Base,
Index
  49.2
  49.6
50.3
msume
1949=
r Price Index, 1913-53
= 100.!)
Year
1934	
Index
59.6
1935	
1936	
59.9
61.1
  54.2
1937	
1938	
1939	
63.0
  63.7
72.0
63.7
63.2
  78.8
  90.5
  80.9
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
65.7
69.6
72.9
  74.9
74.2
  75.2
  74.0
  74.6
  75.9
74.6
75.0
1946 ..........
77.5
1947	
1948	
1949	
. 84.8
.   74.6
. 97.0
75.0
. 100.0
  75.8
75.3
1950	
1951	
1952	
1953	
102.9
. 113.7
  67.9
  61.7
  58.8
116.5
115.5
1 The Consumer Price Index prior to January, 1949, is the Cost-of-living Index, inclusive of all tobacco taxes, linked
to the Consumer Price Index, 1949=100. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 31
Table 9.—Total and Main Components of the Canadian Consumer Price Index,
by Years, 1949-53, and by Months, 1952-53
(1949=100.)
Date
Total
Food
Shelter
Clothing
Household
Operation
Other
Commodities and
Services
1949	
1950— 	
1951	
1952 (average)..
January..
February..
March	
April	
May	
June..	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November	
December	
1953 (average)..
January_
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
100.0
102.9
113.7
116.5
118.2
117.6
116.9
116.8
115.9
116.0
116.1
116.0
116.1
116.0
116.1
115.8
115.5
115.7
115.5
114.8
114.6
114.4
114.9
115.4
115.7
116.2
116.7
116.2
115.8
100.0
102.6
117.0
116.8
122.4
120.8
117.6
117.2
115.5
115.7
116.0
115.7
115.8
115.1
115.7
114.1
112.6
113.5
112.7
111.6
110.9
110.1
111.4
112.7
112.8
114.0
115.5
113.4
112.1
100.0
106.2
114.4
120.2
118.3
118.3
119.1
119.4
119.6
120.4
120.6
120.6
121.2
121.5
121.4
122.2
123.6
122.3
122.5
122.5
122.7
122.9
123.6
123.9
124.1
124.2
124.5
125.0
125.2
100.0
99.7
109.8
111.8
114.9
113.5
112.9
112.5
112.3
111.8
111.7
111.6
110.9
109.9
109.8
109.7
110.1
109.7
109.6
109.7
109.7
110.1
110.1
110.3
110.4
110.4
110.3
110.3
110.2
100.0
102.4
113.1
116.2
116.4
116.3
116.9
116.8
116.2
115.9
115.9
115.8
116.0
116.2
115.9
116.1
117.0
116.5
116.6
116.7
116.9
116.6
116.6
117.0
117.2
117.4
117.5
117.4
117.4
100.0
103.1
111.5
116.0
115.5
115.8
116.4
116.6
115.6
115.7
115.6
115.8
115.8
116.4
116.6
116.6
115.8
116.7
116.7
115.2
115.0
115.1
115.1
115.2
115.8
115.9
116.0
116.3
116.3 LL 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 10.—Dominion Bureau of Statistics Index Numbers of the Cost of Living in
Canada, by Years, 1913-52, and by Months, 1952-53
Adjusted
to Base
100 for
August,
1939
On Base of Average Prices 1935-39=
100
Date
Total
Food
Rent
Light
and
Fuel
Clothing
Home
Furnishings and
Services
Miscellaneous
1913    -      	
79.1
79.4
81.0
87.6
103.7
117.4
129.0
149.3
131.5
120.3
120.7
118.6
119.6
120.8
118.9
119.5
120.7
119.8
108.2
98.2
93.7
94.8
95.4
97.3
100.4
101.4
100.7
104.8
110.8
116.1
117.5
79.7
80.0
81.6
88.3
104.5
118.3
130.0
150.5
132.5
121.3
121.7
119.5
120.6
121.8
119.9
120.5
121.7
120.8
109.1
99.0
94.4
95.6
96.2
98.1
101.2
102.2
101.5
105.6
111.7
117.0
118.4
118.9
119.5
123.6
135.5
155.0
160.8
166.5
184.5
187.5
191.5
190.8
189.1
188.7
186.7
187.3
188.0
187.6
186.5
185.0
184.8
184.2
184.4
184.9
184.2
183.9
183.6
184.8
186.0
186.4
186.3
88.3
91.9
92.7
103.3
133.3
152.8
163.3
188.1
143.9
121.9
122.8
120.9
126.3
133.3
130.8
131.5
134.7
131.5
103.1
85.7
84.9
92.7
94.6
97.8
103.2
103.8
100.6
105.6
116.1
127.2
130.7
131.3
133.0
140.4
159.6
195.5
203.0
211.0
241.1
237.4
250.0
248.1
241.7
240.2
235.3
237.0
239.5
238.0
234.2
229.3
229.0
226.1
226.2
227.4
225.7
223.5
222.8
225.7
229.2
229.5
228.6
74.3
72.1
69.9
70.6
75.8
80.2
87.6
100.2
109.2
113.7
116.6
117.4
117.4
115.9
114.5
117.3
119.7
122.7
119.4
109.7
98.6
93.2
94.0
96.1
99.7
103.1
103.8
105.3
109.4
111.3
111.5
111.9
112.1
112.7
116.7
120.7
123.0
132.9
140.0
147.4
144.8
144.8
146.3
146.3
146.3
147.9
147.9
147.9
148.9
148.9
148.9
149.9
150.2
150.5
150.7
150.9
151.0
152.5
152.9
153.3
153.4
76.9
75.4
73.8
75.4
83.8
92.2
100.7
119.9
127.6
122.2
122.2
119.2
116.8
116.8
114.4
113.2
112.6
111.8
110.0
106.8
102.5
102.1
100.9
101.5
98.9
97.7
101.2
107.1
110.3
112.8
112.9
110.6
107.0
107.4
115.9
124.8
131.2
138.3
147.1
151.1
151.2
151.3
152.5
152.5
150.6
149.8
149.8
150.1
150.3
150.9
151.1
152.7
153.9
154.3
154.4
155.5
153.2
152.6
153.5
153.6
153.9
88.0
88.9
96.8
110.8
130.3
152.3
175.1
213.1
123.4
147.0
145.1
141.7
141.3
139.1
135.6
135.5
134.8
130.6
114.3
100.6
93.3
97.1
97.6
99.3
101.4
100.9
100.7
109.2
116.1
120.0
120.5
121.5
122.1
126.3
143.9
174.4
183.1
182.3
203.1
209.4
215.3
213.0
211.2
210.4
210.1
209.3
209.1
208.6
207.7
206.7
205.5
205.4
205.3
205.2
205.5
205.5
206.3
206.4
206.5
206.7
207.0
70.3
1914  	
70.3
1915— 	
70.9
74.5
1917	
81.5
91.4
1919	
101.2
1920 	
1921 	
110.3
112.5
1922   	
112.5
111.7
1924       	
109.6
1925       	
107.5
106.1
.    105.1
104.8
105.0
105.4
1931 ...    -   '
103.3
1932	
100.4
1933      	
98.2
1934 	
97.8
1935 ;. 	
95.4
97.2
101.5
102.4
101.4
107.2
113.8
117.9
118.0
118.4
119.0
124.5
141.6
162.6
167.5
169.2
194.4
197.8
201.1
200.1
200.8
200.5
198.2
197.2
196.7
196.0
195.8
195.9
195.5
195.3
196.0
196.1
196.3
196.8
196.2
196.2
196.0
159.9
196.0
98.7
99.1
100.1
1938   	
101.2
101.4
102.3
1941 — -	
1942  	
105.1
107.1
108.0
1944  	
1945...  	
1946 - -	
1947 	
118.0
118.6
122.6
134.4
153.8
159.6
165.2
183.1
186.0
190.0
189.3
187.6
187.2
185.2
185.8
186.5
186.1
185.0
183.5
183.3
182.7
182.9
183.4
182.7
182.4
182.1
182.3
184.5
184.9
184.8
108.9
109.4
112.6
117.0
1948  	
1949       	
123.4
128.8
132.6
141.3
147.6
145.7
146.5
March   —
146.9
147.9
147.4
147.4
147.4
147.8
147.8
148.5
148.8
December 	
1953—
January 	
February	
March  -	
April    . 	
May     —
June  	
July 	
148.8
148.9
149.0
147.9
148.7
149.0
149.0
149.2
150.0
September1 	
150.2
1 Cost-of-living Index discontinued beyond September 1st. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 33
Table 11a.—Index Numbers of the Cost-of-living at Vancouver, B.C., by Years,
1940-52, and by Months in 1953
(Base: August, 1939=100.)
Date
Home Fur
Total
Food
Rent
Fuel and
Light
Clothing
nishings
and
Services
Miscellaneous
103.7
105.9
99.6
108.8
108.8
104.3
100.4
109.1
117.0
99.8
109.5
114.8
109.5
103.4
114.2
128.8
100.6
111.5
119.2
112.9
105.2
117.3
134.8
102.0
111.3
121.6
114.1
107.8
117.9
133.5
103.4
114.2
123.6
115.7
108.7
119.2
136.0
104.8
114.2
125.5
115.7
108.8
123.0
142.2
106.2
116.1
128.9
122.1
111.1
134.9
161.9
109.4
128.6
146.6
137.0
115.8
155.6
198.7
112.1
135.1
182.5
157.4
126.2
162.0
208.7
113.9
139.5
192.7
161.3
131.3
167.8
218.2
122.7
141.0
191.0
163.7
135.8
185.2
245.9
128.9
158.3
213.1
187.3
143.7
190.3
244.9
134.6
175.8
221.9
194.5
151.2
188.2
236.8
136.9
176.9
217.1
195.1
152.9
187.5
234.6
137.2
176.9
216.5
195.1
152.9
187.1
233.5
138.0
177.3
216.2
195.4
152.0
187.2
232.4
138.2
177.7
216.2
195.4
153.5
187.5
232.6
138.4
177.7
217.1
195.0
154.1
187.6
233.0
139.0
174.3
217.2
194.8
154.1
188.8
236.5
140.0
174.3
217.2
194.8
154.1
188.0
233.5
140.0
174.3
217.2
195.3
154.3
188.2
233.9
140.1
174.3
217.4
195.0
154.4
1940-
1941..
1942..
1943..
1944..
1945-
1946-
1947..
1948-
1949 	
1950 —
1951 L_
1952__ .....
1953—
January	
February—
March—.—
April	
May-
June	
July —
August	
September1-
1 Cost-of-living Index discontinued beyond September 1st.
Table 1 1b.—Consumer Price Indexes, Vancouver, B.C.
(1949=100.)
Date
Total
Food
Shelter
Clothing
Household
Operation
Other
Commodities and
Services
1949..
1950-
1951..
1952-
1953 (average)..
January..	
February.	
March	
April	
May.-
June..
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December...
100.0
103.6
114.3
117.4
116.1
116.2
115.7
115.5
115.6
115.7
115.8
116.5
116.0
116.2
116.7
116.5
116.3
I
100.0
104.5
117.8
117.3
112.1
113.4
112.4
111.8
111.3
111.4
111.6
113.3
111.8
112.0
112.7
112.6
111.3
100.0
107.7
113.2
118.2
122.1
120.2
120.5
121.2
121.3
121.5
122.0
122.9
122.9
123.0
123.2
123.2
123.5
100.0
99.1
110.6
115.1
112.5
112.6
112.3
112.1
112.1
112.6
112.7
112.7
112.7
112.8
112.6
112.6
112.7
100.0
101.4
115.3
122.2
122.7
122.7
122.7
123.0
123.1
122.9
122.1
122.1
122.3
122.1
123.2
123.3
123.4
100.0
103.3
109.4
115.1
117.0
116.4
116.4
115.7
116.8
117.3
117.3
117.3
117.4
117.5
117.5
117.4
117.4
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics, "Prices and Price Indexes.'
-
"   . ■
■■
,. .
:."■::■■.:
.!:-..        ft   '.ft LL 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 12.-
-Principal Wholesale Price Indexes, Canada
(Base: 1935-39=100.)
Date
General
Wholesale
Price
Index
Raw and
Partly
Manufactured
Fully and
Chiefly
Manufactured
Industrial
Materials
Canadian Farm Products
Field
Animal
Total
1913            	
83.4
203.2
130.3
124.6
87.4
102.0
99.2
108.0
116.4
123.0
127.9
130.6
132.1
138.9
163.3
193.4
198.3
211.2
240.2
226.0
220.7
221.5
221.1
221.9
219.5
220.0
85.1
194.7
129.1
126.1
79.3
99.4
94.9
103.1
114.4
123.0
131.1
134.4
136.2
140.1
164.3
196.3
197.1
212.8
237.9
218.7
207.0
209.4
208.0
209.8
205.6
206.4
207.2
207.2
210.1
207.1
205.9
203.3
204.4
86.2
208.2
133.0
123.7
93.3
103.5
101.9
109.9
118.8
123.7
126.9
129.1
129.8
138.0
162.4
192.4
199.2
211.0
242.4
230.7
228.8
229.0
228.8
229.2
227.8
228.2
230.2
229.3
229.7
229.8
228.8
228.0
227.6
144.3
132.8
78.3
95.8
99.0
113.3
125.2
135.1
140.0
143.1
143.2
148.6
187.0
222.7
218.0
244.6
296.1
252.6
232.3
240.2
238.4
237.5
232.9
234.2
234.0
231.7
231.4
228.8
227.0
225.8
225.8
158.5
137.2
69.3
100.9
83.7
85.4
88.9
109.7
129.0
144.5
162.5
177.9
184.1
200.6
191.9
191.9
200.4
223.0
175.1
186.4
196.6
191.9
187.6
185.2
184.5
187.7
157.2
154.0
151.7
151.7
151.9
130.2
144.4
69.2
104.8
101.5
106.7
124.4
144.6
161.8
166.1
170.2
181.2
200.2
263.7
265.4
281.4
336.9
277.5
1920 	
1926	
144.4
1929.	
140.8
1933  	
1938	
1939.	
1940                      	
69.3
102.9
92.6
96.1
1941  	
1942	
106.6
127.1
1943             -   	
145.4
1944.	
1945      _                          -
155.3
166.4
1946      _                     	
179.5
1947                                	
192.2
1948	
232.1
1949             	
228.7
1950   ...
236.7
1951 	
268.6
1952            	
250.2
263.8             219.5
January.  	
266.4
263.1
264.3
255.8
263.2
268.7
265.3
269.9
263.7
265.3
258.0
261.6
226.4
229.6
228.1
221.7
224.2
June	
July
221.5
221.0
222.2
221.2
220.4
218.7
219.0
226.6
226.5
August 	
September 	
October  '. -	
November	
213.6
208.9
208.5
204.9
206.8
Source:  Dominion Bureau of Statistics, "Prices and Price Indexes."
Tourist Trade Section
The volume of tourist travel to British Columbia from the United States in 1952
increased slightly over 1951. Over the same period the number of Canadian tourists
returning from the United States through British Columbia ports increased considerably.
Tables 13 and 14 give figures for tourist travel between British Columbia and the
United States. Chart 1 gives a breakdown of automobiles visiting Canada from the
United States by State of origin, with the number visiting British Columbia and the
Yukon indicated in red.
Expenditures of United States travellers in Canada during 1952 showed a slight
decrease over 1951. However, British Columbia continued to receive an increased share
of the total—from 13.5 per cent in 1950 to 15.3 per cent in 1951 to 15.5 per cent in
1952. Interprovincial tourist travel is not measured by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, but it is undoubtedly important and adds considerably to the total of tourist
expenditures in British Columbia.
Year
United States
Travel Expenditures
in Canada
Year
United States
Travel Expenditures
in Canada
1941  $107,000,000
1942   79,000,000
1943   87,000,000
1944  116,600,000
1945  163,300,000
1946  216,100,000
1947  $241,100,000
1948  267,400,000
1949  267,100,000
1950  259,700,000
1951  258,000,000
1952  257,000,000!
i Subject to revision. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY LL 35
Preliminary figures for British Columbia for 1953, based on the first months, indicate that United States tourists have increased in number over 1952. Rail and bus
traffic have decreased, but all other methods of travel have increased more than enough
to compensate. LL 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
<a
& 2
f *
2   S
a. p
>> ts
*   o
-S3   ^o
*§L-9
O
s
S   43
3j  —
C
o
IS
° 9
-o   o
S   u
U   |
jg  a
•a   *>
o
d
tq  «
o
i i
O
6
o
■ .
tn
so -rf tn tn ^ so a>
>-< CO tN 00 t~ >n VO
cn co t^ © ** r^ ©
rt CS               i-i
on
o\fNrtr>No\x
O^HinNNN
l-H    CN                          I"""
inOOhTf tNWO
a.
inhto»ff>h
^H   (N                          ^
N t M f- h « O
m
r- vo on oo r- © -*
on
(N
o\
«-i o cn r- oo on vo
Os
O  ^t  00  i-H  Tf  Os  t>
o\ y-i       m en en cA
•tt ca as r- oo tn vo
00
rNMChoomo
Ov
On rt t- ^ CN t^ *n
OO Os       if en tn CA
l-H                      l-H
vo \o ID 0> ti CO (S
tn i-h r- -h vo as CA
ON
r~~ tn so Os ca oo ca
r- O      it Tt m tN
\om*cyowo w
r— o\ m I— en so i-h
Os
o\ oo m vd r- on vo
Vi  t>          Wi  ON  Tf  rH
l-H                           «H
cn ^ oo t- on © ^
o o on oo ■* ^a- o
Os
i-h r> *n o vo *-h tN
tJ- o       vo T~~ en ri
c- o c~ -^t tn so as
i-h tN vo oo m m o
Os
tn tn      vo r- tN
Tf tN ^t tN co o O
Os
M»TfHHHlO
Nn       r- tn ca
ca i* r^ vo on i* i-h
Os
vo tn tn vo vo co •**
en tn       tn I— *-h
w
4)
O
T3
C
rt
■C
0
8
Cfl
rt
CJ
H-
Pi
i
0
«
/-v N
H
Ih
ti
,0
6
s
Q
u
MM s~
o
a
>.
H
U   Ih
»f   ft  t]
I   u ~
,23 S
•3 g *
,r of travel
er of trave
r of travel
number of
rt
H
vehicles) —
(1) Non-permit
(2) Traveller's
(3) Commercia
ail traffic (numbt
Dat traffic (numb
us traffic (numbe
eroplane traffic (
3
o
E
o
a
<
Ph mm<
HH
i—
>—
£
>
o
«'U
•—
d
9
k
h
B
.D
0
ti
>
rt
H
O
s
si
El
■le o
> 2 S
hi     "   01
CO   fc.
O  3  3
3 m B
.K, o o
•s-S
".•si
rt « ..
■Sua
t; « s
ww §
(J
^6
«
(!)
0
(1)
»i
>
!U
C3
a.
tH
^,
hs
O
Pv
u
►Q
aj
T3
41
s
IC
3
<o
C
"cS
«
-a
R
-Q
5=
O
3
■—a
O
O
1
•S3    a)
05   R
0
u
S
(I)
M
»a
<5)
-t->
o
w
m
(^
-«
>x
SJ
a
s
o
to
CO
(1)
-^
ja
**
o
K
R
**
o
tV)
+j
S"
4
O
a
*~
Ks
43
S3
a
3
C
a
s
i)
CN
+^
m
C3
c
T)
a
d
■n
a
ff
o
t-(
O
03
o
w
En
o
c
y=
m
e
u
^
ta
<D
«
43
O
'.
F
^J-
o
~-1
^-»
s
-a
<
«
h
Nrt'Oft
tr-
cn
ON Tj- *-c VO VO VO tN
t- ** On 00 t» O C-
«n
tn tn tN vc
i-h in co r-
CN t-
tN
OMHH
£7\
innooott^H
VO "* tN ON tN 00 (N
r^ciovowH^
»n
Os
vn O (N 00 tN r» r-t
m i-h
©
v-i -«t tn t— in On in
I* vo m i-h i-h vo ©
ON
<N
on t~- en tN i-h © **
ON
l^oovotN>t"n
ON
oo on r^ i-h vo m m
r> t- *h ^ cs on »-«
tN
00
m m oo m vo r- oo
ON
on t-^ oo co © t~ <S
■^ co i-h tN tN r- i-i
tN
vo «n rs i-h © tn tN
ON
i-h ov «n i-h vo i-t tN
tN
vo i-h o vo co vo <n
VO
CO Tt ON ■* Tf On vo
On
© en i-h tj- Tj vo
tN
tn
in h Tt vo vc 3 o\
ON
On oo tN co r- tn en
i-h oo r- On -h- On vo
i-h cn tN Tt- tN tN en
i-h m vo w m oo oo
o\
\D ih O "H C- CA i-*
tj- i-h y-i tn l-H tN
tn
r^ cs tN ■* r- oo m
Tf
Tf  tN  ON  VO  ON  CO  *H-
ON
Tf 0O r- On rt tN i-h
tn -*t oo on i> r- vo
VO ^j- _ „  fv) \c ^,
ON
fN  ©  ©  ©  ON  ^  rt
t.
4-1
O
•d
c
rt
o
CO       '•
E
o
0 o
5  3
u
rt
Ih
H
0
u
a
o
M
U
£
a g
C   ih   r/
ti ti t
>1 >l >
t-
a
1
t
c
i
t-
■i.
~
>
a
t-
c
U
x >
ti
H
O
tH
V
^)
CJ
1
ti
3
o
e
o
s
vehicles)—•
(1) Length of sta
(2) Length of sta
ail traffic (number
Dat traffic (numbe
js traffic (number
eroplane traffic (n
<:
«««■<
HH
aa>>
*m
H
s
o
wi
0
d
y
ti
b
a
Xi
o
s
rt
H
0
&
c
BB
ti
s
^cn
rt
3
s
3
JJ
a
a
o
o
B
* J
wg DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 37 LL 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Forest Section
The primary and secondary forest industries of British Columbia comprise the most
important industrial group in the Province. In recent years this industrial group has
accounted for 40 per cent of the net value of production, as opposed to 30 per cent in
the pre-war year of 1938. During this period the primary industries of forestry and
fishing have been able to maintain their relative .positions in relation to the Provincial
total net value of production, whereas the other primary industries of agriculture, mining,
electric power, and trapping decreased in relative importance by approximately one-half.
At the same time the secondary industries of construction and manufacturing increased
greatly in importance. A great deal of this increase in manufacturing took place in the
wood- and paper-products industries. To-day the primary and secondary forest industries give direct employment to some 60,000 people and pay out better than $175,000,000
in salaries and wages.
The Province of British Columbia is truly fortunate to possess ideal conditions of
climate and soil which are admirably suited to the growth of large softwood trees.
Recent estimates, based on new surveys and revised standards of utilization and accessibility, show more standing timber available to-day than was previously estimated. As
of December 31st, 1952, the Forest Service reported some 116 billion cubic feet (approximately 667 billion board-feet) of standing timber.
The traditional conversion enterprise for British Columbia timber has been saw-
milling. The sawmilling industry in the Province has grown tremendously since its inception a hundred years ago, so that to-day it is the most important single industry in British
Columbia and produces half the total Canadian production of sawn lumber. However,
our changing economy has forced us to recover more from our timber than sawmilling
alone can give. This need for better utilization of our forest resource has caused the
merging and integration of the larger units in our forest industries. At the same time the
Provincial Government realized that integrated utilization is unlikely to succeed under
short-term forms of tenure. It was with this realization in mind that the Government
introduced the forest management licence, a long-term form of tenure. This co-operation
of industry and Government should result in stability in our forest industries and the
continuance of this industry at its relatively high position of importance in the Province. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY LL 39
Table 15.—Value of Production in the Forest Industries of British Columbia
Industry
1938
1950
1951
1952
(Preliminary)
Gross Value
NetValue
Gross Value
NetValue
Gross Value
NetValue
Gross Value
Logging	
$42,894,803
$33,636,883
$170,759,943 $133,898,784
$214,051,202
$166,343,551
$210,300,000
Furniture	
Sash, door, and planing mills
Sawmills	
Veneers and plywoods	
Boxes and baskets, wood
$2,183,934
4,181,381
46,986,133
O)
2,088,182
87,389
(3)
211,734
670,719
(3)
(3)
(3)
117,987
$1,215,809
2,028,105
19,575,124
O)
1,009,623
59,331
(3)
96,668
313,314
(s)
(*)
(»)
41,187
$13,502,308
34,070,701
293,022,294
30,047,542
2,684,420
722,267
337,777
606,630
8,137,973
(3)
(»)
(3)
(3)
$6,695,137
11,485,054
148,286,160
16,094,945
1,131,150
300,509
174,993
258,396
2,584,078
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
$14,310,215
41,331,453
347,147,390
43,202,315
2,150,361
820,116
421,202
654,756
11,938,080
(3)
(3)
(3)
(3)
$7,415,149
13,811,839
167,001,838
24,806,298
1,116,187
345,712
219,307
278,957
4,523,713
(3)
(3)
(8)
(3)
$14,800,000
43,500,000
316,723,587
42,176,834
(2)
(2)
Woodenware	
(2)
(2)
Miscellaneous wood products (N.E.S.) 	
Bee-keepers'   and  poultry-
(2)
(3)
(3)
(3)
Cooperage— :	
(3)
Totals, wood products.
$58,036,069
$24,996,965
$383,899,507|$187,392,993
$462,793,788
$219,875,798
$440,000,000
$1,125,979
12,004,843
562,267
2,476,821
$539,815
7,495,177
287,250
700,442
$10,263,180
86,886,870
3,583,204
9,353,881
$3,765,897
54,234,983
1,842,335
3,214,189
$11,653,032
141,503,427
3,474,016
10,608,685
$4,343,437
90,824,327
1,626,429
3,465,150
$12,153,840
125,290,032
(2)
Miscellaneous paper products	
(2)
Totals, paper products
$16,169,910
$9,022,684
$110,087,135| $63,057,404
$167,239,160
$100,259,343|$151,500,000
Totals, forest industries
$117,100,782| $67,656,532
$664,746,585|$384,349,181
$844,084,150
$486,478,6921 $801,800,000
Net   value   of  production
(totals, all Industries)	
—
$228,572,747
$973,109,773
$1,212,253,561
	
1 Included in sawmills.
2 Not available at publication date.
3 Less than three firms reporting; however, their values are included in the totals.
Source: Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa.
Mining Section
This Section collects and compiles mining-production statistics, with the exception
of coal, and same are made available to the Provincial Department of Mines, the Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, and to the Bureau of Economics and Statistics. The information,
when collected, is made available for general use in a form which preserves the confidential aspects of individual company's or operator's returns when it is requested.
Mining Statistics in detail will be found in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines.
Many special compilations dealing with data not readily available were provided to other
departments and outside agencies. Contact is maintained at all times with officials of
the Department of Mines, consulting with and providing much data for special bulletins
issued by that Department. This Section also maintains up-to-date records on mining
statistics, copies of which are kept in the Central Records Branch of the Department of
Mines. These records represent years of research and compilation by the Mining Section,
and are considered to be an integral part of a most comprehensive departmental source
of information on the production from every British Columbia mine reported to have
shipped ore for treatment at a smelter or refinery.
The Section continues to provide the mineral-production value on a census division
basis, and Table 16 shows the production for the years 1948, 1949, 1950, 1951, and
1952 on the several regions involved. In order to provide a handy reference, the essential mineral-production statistics, as originally published in the Department of Mines
Annual Report, are given in Table 17. The 1952 Report of the Minister of Mines makes
available to the public comprehensive statistics of mineral production for 100 consecutive years.   The total gross value of mineral products to the end of 1952 is slightly more LL 40
BRITISH COLUMBIA
than three billion dollars. The value of all mineral products in 1952 was $170,851,914,
some $4,800,000 less than 1951. In 1952 iron ore, having a value of $5,474,924, was
mined on Vancouver Island and Texada Island, most of which was exported to Japan.
Production of tungsten was begun late in 1951, none being shipped that year, but in
1952 the value of tungsten concentrates shipped was $4,565,024. Of the by-product
metals, antimony had a value of $1,028,025, an increase of about $405,378, and bismuth
and cadmium both showed reductions, as did the quantity of tin.
Silver, lead, and zinc were produced in greater quantity in 1952 than in 1951, the
approximate increase being for silver 7 per cent, for lead 4 per cent, and for zinc 11 per
cent of the 1951 output. However, the lower prices gave a reduced value to the 1952
production of each of these metals, and the sum of the three values in 1952 was
$112,441,436, compared with $124,532,375 in 1951.
Although silver, lead, and zinc were produced in large quantities in 1952, silver-
lead-zinc mining in British Columbia experienced a serious setback. The sharp fall in
prices and the discount on United States funds affected all producers, and restricted
acceptance of concentrates at the Trail smelter affected those shipping to that smelter.
Since 1936 the entire copper output of British Columbia has been exported for
smelting, refining, and marketing.
The number employed in all branches of the mining industry of British Columbia
in 1952 was 18,257. Major expenditures by the industry include salaries and wages,
$62,256,631; fuel and electricity, $10,131,272; process supplies, $27,024,500; freight
and treatment of ores and concentrates of metals, $30,444,575; Federal taxes, $19,202,-
325; Provincial taxes, $1,824,221; municipal and other taxes, $1,135,952; levies for
workmen's compensation, silicosis, and unemployment insurance, $2,075,491. These
items amount to $154,094,967.   Dividends paid in 1952 amount to $32,603,956. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 41
0^r^rtvoovDrnr^corJONrtcooOTr©co«ncntNvo©infNrnoin(NvoooTrvDcn-rt,fNooN©rt
©CNi-Hrtw^ir)W^in-^tnONVO>nrtcor^'nininON^rSfnrtON©Ovo^*n©cNCNWi(NtNONOO^HVo
cNinr-ONr-©cNinovtN int-i-i** ^^^^^°°ln'^l'^c>vovoi> c~-tNvort rt vcm cn (ncg^cno^
in oCoo'r^ rf oo'cs in r^ u^ oo'on vo co »n vo'vo'on'© i*
cocNONrtONrtooOcNrtfnvovovorti-Hir)00coinr^^o\rtrntn©oO'^ooinvo(Ncnt--voin©oooN
«ninini^^©t^oovovo©vovor^fnvoovooON©©votncnoNCNvooo^i-ico'^©rJtNONONCNinin
«■
©©©Ovoomu
i-H ON rt © vo
votNt-ir©
CNrt^cNVOxr
r-'vo'oToN'vo'
m©oor—r-
i-HCO^vo^ONrn
vo"^f inr-in
fNCOOi-
«n vovpc
t-ONOW
-vo^co
o'in©
t t-r-
0
irMwmrt
invor-r-tN
ONinON tNvo
OVOr-ifrtONCOrtO,
oovorNaNinrtr-rnOvrt
r^mvor-©oo©ONVoco
i-T© rt'©'m' r> oo'© o r»"
moooocNCNrtTr-rt/C--vo
in©int-in
©r^mr-^in
ONTtmoNON
tfrr+i-<       rt
(N ** oo co <<    _
vortincnvor-votNVOin©cN©rtr—
•ninMNo^c^MOr^vo^Ort^oo^inrt^©
rico © nd'c^© i-T m'rt'r-vo'cn'on m©
CNvoONm-^-rNtNrttNN-Tfr-fNVOOO
rn i-h m in CN m rt on oo m     ocnocS
f/*
rt rt(NCN
Omoo©r-OMncooocncovo
•cj-coTrmittvocNcnvO'-H—ifN
r-^r-^rt ceoaor-inoortt-rn
rn cn On oo'rtNo'in cn" rf rti--©"
cn oo rt rt r-O rt i-h     TftN"n
VDrt        IriOOrt TfON©
On© OcnVO
rtr-r-rtco
coc^ovcs©
TfoocfT©"
Wirt t—©CO
•—VOCOVD^t
rr on i-h oo rn
t—cnoN r- vo
vo'vo'cNOv'vo'
©CN tN 00 ON
ONCOcn tN tN
S
<*l
K
o
-o
s
•2
o
1
.s
•S
-S
s
»5
a
s
cscN©csininvovot-cnt^vorNrtvo
tNtNOOO^tVOrtOOinrtCNCNrt^H-rt,
Ov tn V *-( eN ©©„ co^ en i-h co CS cN t> ^
rn cn'oo'cN vo inco"cn'rtt--t--On rtoTvo
©rtrtt^rnONt—inr-mmr-rtmi-H
cn cn i-h i-i cn cn ■* m m m     csr-oooo
«* w-T-T-J'-J'
ON'Tl-ooOrt moNtNinrt mvoooNOvomoo cncoov rtoortmt-
i-h vo oo tNcs vo^r ©vo tN i-h or-mm r-m voce r->n rtcnrtcort
OAt*^^cfl^MO^Wr4SOOvO\>D07tt^Oviinr«.fNj rn vo^vovc^
i-h © -hoVov o'in ©'oCvo'vo'rn i-h © cAtn >-■ oCon rn ©vo in r^ m
ON i-h on tT m m m on tj-m o vo r-oo oo tj-c4 oo vo O On i-h on
cNm-rt    i-tntmvo iH(Si-iiHrHrt cn
0m©rt\0
cn t—OvcNrt
r-ommvo
r-rnvococs
l>C~;cnfNrt
00©'rt"t-"ri
C-CAtnOsSD
oovom t-m
rt'cNcn'cnin
69-
©mo-tvo
in in rt rn i-h
mr—ONtNrt
«■ Ti
CA co m © is©-"*- m vo ©©mmi-TN
vOcnoovomr-©r—rj-inoomoMnON
inONCN©©inr-ON r-*tNac t^,cn r-^cN
cn m cn" i-h vo oo on m© rn on © <n r-^rt
«■ vo tN CO rt© rt tN fN rN rt
tt i-^cN cn ©
©
m
m
rt
vo"
On
MMOSmmitrtitijTf 00
rtvortTt^-©r-inmrtrn
tt voinrt oo rt © t-^ON oo r-
i-i O rt r~ >n r> in vo" rt oo r>
rtrt irirt tNOOrt
cNcnmcnm
t-r-moNVO
©Ocni-H m
r>©_r-_rnvo_
vo"oo"rt"©"vo*
rtCOr-VOrt
inin mi-" t-h
oovortm r-
ininoomrt
r}-vooo_incN
m"©cn"rt rn
©r-i-nNm
cn© cNON^tn
rtininrtrt"
va
in r> o\
rt©cn
cncNO\
tinvooN©ONr>rnco,^-vot-'HrONinoor-
ininr-mi-Hcnrtcnr-r-vooNCNinOvco
ON_ON^r> cn© rt co rt_ ©^cn in CN oo^inrtvo
tNcn rn oo oo'inr> rt r^    rt' vort" ovvn
©enr-oo cN     rHOMnco
lOr-rtvovommrtONoo
lONrnvorrt—OONOtNOv
'. © i-Ti-H co tN i-h cn tN r-^o^
i'ONrNCNr-©rtrt©r^vo
i vo^o^ON^in ON^cn i-h cn cn vo^
j cn cn rlrN rt'rf in'»n'inin
rnONrt t-rt
i-h moo»n cn
ovtninooas
tNcn'r-^i-HTt
cnt-Ocnt--
rtONt
r-owocNrt
ONVoovr-oi
• ' rt ON,rt ON_
coinrt'vo'oN
00 rf votNin
rt menrt ©
r-^oCoo'oCcn
O
mm-*
r-tNvo
cAi-xtn
Ovo©©r-rtON©cN©ONrtmrtrtvOrtmmONr^rtt-oocN
cnrtinrttN©ONCN(Nr^cNrtrtvoinincsr-ONONONONVom©
rt cn © r- ss>v\ rt *o cj N^fjifi'fir' ''O cn cn cn on^ oo cn vo © co
oCoCrt co'"n ^" O rt© t-^r— on in vo i-h rt in m" rt'en tN ON'oo'vo'rr*
oinrtmvo,*vot>c-r-ONCNCNfNvortr-or-rtoooNrtONVo
rtcninmm rt     rtmrtmm i-h cn cn r> -rt oo m oo
m'm'cn'rtrt i-T rfincn
VpONrtONrt
©o©m©
CNm r-r^m
rtrt'rt"r>m
mco©Ovvo
Ov©moort
inONVOCOrfr
envocovor-
•rt/_rt©_rf CN
"o'cNi—"©'rf
rtfNmaNTt
cNmrtr-cn
(N<
-enmrt
-rttNinmr^
incNmrtts
cNmomrt
m'rt'vo'rt'o
tNmoooNON
0\0\<rtVOO
r~oo"©inm
3mrtintN00OrtrtO0\V0inrtrt00V0rt0NV0r--0Ni-Hini-Hrtrn
nOinvon-rt©rtvortmtNrt(NtNvor-incoON--HCOoooovooocN
"lovW^'f tNotiOo^rt rt m t-< rn © m *■* »-t m O vo On moo© r-©
-f r-' Vo'i-T©" oo' rt rf OM> no' ©' rt © CO oo'rr" On rt On' m' © ©' rf" rt" vc'rn
rtrtoNinmOrrmtNONoomcN©"*
©mvocortr-vommvommrtmc
m CNrtrt©vor- l>t- rt m Ci*-" ^C .. --,,.-.-,-,-,-■• • -   ■ ; -   - -      „   -   -, -     -.
cncNm"    rt"©"ov'rs'vo"rt'vo'rtrtm"r-'vo"rt*o"oo'rt'rtc>r^vo'©'rt©'TC
rncNCN oor^mo^ONCN©mvovor-oovortt>i^mvomvor-vooomc>cNOcNrtr-o\rti-^i-H
«■ tNrtrt^©\000l>00rtO\rtOjl©»n tNrOrt OOrtCNrtCN
CN CN CN CN ri
in"r--inr--r^
rtrtNOOort
-rtCOVOtNm
m cn © m vo
C^tnc£cS<^
mr-r-mrt
tMrtrt'rtirt
oo (ninrt in
oomvot-oo
i—m mm tN
m'riov©m
miH-otN en
mm mm m
©'rt'oN©'©"
r^inmm
mi-H r-c-
«-rtcncN
©VOVOrtrtm^Hrt©lnr--©rti-HOv©rtCTsOO©rnONt— ONrt
ONrnoort^totNr—O-rtrNtnt—>nmoo©i-Hvoo>ntN'rti—'oo
© ^ cn o^'o rt rt vo mmrNvqr-Ovt—Ovomrfrt^irtmni-H
rt o vo r- © vo rt co ©vo'coon oo'rt oo'vo oCo'winriinV'vo'ri
rt oo i-< m On© On m m m rn mcAsososo On tN©cNmr-r- co©
r-von cn^mr—rt rti-n rtmenvoort cNt-cNOO r-om
i-h ^HrirtCO CNm'vo'rt" m
mm-rt rt co
rrtsn-ccoo
VO^rtC^inrt
00*rt ri ON rt
rtt-OOrttN
CNCNCNCSm
r~—io*om
mONt-rtON
ootN'rtinr*
t—r-vomri
on cN«ncort
vomvomrt
(Nrtrtrt-lX1
(NO«ONincN
HVOOOOOON
Hrtinmrr
H'rt'o'rf©"
5rtrtr-rt
JVO-ttNOO
r-o\covo©
ONtNcocnin
rt-oovovom
! CN rt CS © rt 00 ON
! rt VO 00 ON VO VD r~
I rt m rt m rt tn rf
i riri© oo'rt fN
ooi-h w\ r-©
co^on vo © m
mtNcnm'tN
n ON_rt m i-h on m ©i-h r-^© oo rt ©
jC © rt moo" © oo" co'r- r-oo" vo"r~ t>
nrj-rtmmmmrtm
000NOrtrN000N©rtrJ000NOrtCN000N©rtr^00aN©»-«r4000NOrtCN000N©rtCN000N©i-HC-l
rtrtmmmrtrtmmmrtrtmmmrtrtmmmrtrtmmmrtrtmmmrtrtmmmrtrtmmin
CJiOnOnC^OvO\OnOnOnonOsOnOn(^OnC^^OnO\OnC^OnOnOnOn^OvOnOnOnOnOnOnOnOnO\OnOnOnOn
rt rtovr-m
ONOCOrn-H
rr^o^vo^rtON
oo'cNvo'rt'm
COrt cNmvo
mm©rnm
ririmrtri
00ON©rtfN
rt rtm mm
OsOsOsasOs
rt oomcNm
©mmm r-
r^ONTto^c-;
rt"r-rvo"rt"ri
rtOvONCNtN
m © i-h m vo
COON©rt(N
rt rtmmm
On Os On ON On
0
u LL 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 17.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1951 and 1952
Description
1951
Quantity        j Value
1952
Quantity
Principal Metals
Gold-
Placer, crude oz.
Lode, fine  oz.
Silver       oz.
Copper -i  _Jb.
Lead    lb.
Zinc    _lb.
Totals..
Miscellaneous Metals
Antimony
Bismuth _..
Cadmium
Indium  	
Iron ore ._
Platinum ...
Tin 	
-lb.
..lb.
.lb.
Tungsten (WO3)
Totals	
..lb.
Industrial Minerals
Asbestos	
B arite   	
Diatomite «. 	
Flux (quartz, limestone) ~
Granules (slate and rock)
Gypsum and products 	
Mica 	
Sulphur   ~
—tons
—tons
—tons
...tons
...tons
 lb.
Totals..
Structural Materials
Brick-
Common  .No.
Face, paving, sewer  No.
Firebrick, blocks  	
Clays  - - - - - —tons
Structural tile, hollow blocks  _	
Drain-tile, sewer-pipe, flue-linings  	
Pottery—glazed or unglazed   	
Other clay products    	
Cement    -	
Rubble, riprap, crushed rock  	
 -tons
Totals  __	
Fuel
Coal                      _    ■	
Total value    ,..	
23,691
261,274
8,215,884
43,249,658
273,456,604
333,910,764
1,310,836
191,471
1,164,933
582
113,535
22
346,718
1,248
8
144,235
5,727
124,729
606,000
194,874
1,353,000
3,127,888
241,723
972,178
4,837
$717,911
9,627,947
7,768,118
11,980,155
50,316,015
66,448,242
17,554
251,393
8,796,720
42,005,512
284,949,396
372,871,717
$146,858,388
$622,647
451,872
3,122,021
1,368
790,000
2,085
495,807
2,333,239
142,246
726,172
404
900,481
2
212,113
1,434,640
$5,485,800
$16,244
223
292,100
73,767
263,072
7,462
1,840,992
848
12
55,588
1,610
91,112
314,000
182,627
$2,493,840
$41,820
153,575
380,742
60,255
171,481
410,206
4,695
10,393
3,311,439
1,251,327
1,145,072
3,355,693
309,350
830,815
2,566,540
321,710
739,504
122,308
I $10,606,048
1,574,362
$10,233,353
1,426,496
I $175,677,429
$494,756
8,615,238
7,315,088
13,054,893
45,936,692
59,189,656
$134,606,323
$1,028,025
312,941
1,561,270
889
5,474,924
176
250,293
4,565,024
$13,193,542
$23,000
13,408
240
141,478
21,026
235,453
3,001
1,745,258
$2,182,864
$28,248
121,254
435,681
51,797
60,273
468,110
6,536
11,296
3,603,273
1,552,772
982,792
3,839,965
434,964
$11,596,961
),272,224
$170,851,914
Labour Section
Constituting a regular annual project of main importance for the Labour Section,
the collection and compilation of labour statistics was again completed for the Provincial
Department of Labour, a summarization of the 1952 survey being published under heading of Statistics of Trades and Industries in the Annual Report of the Department of
Labour for that year.
The rapid growth of industrial development throughout the Province places increasing emphasis on labour and its problems, and the need for labour information, facts, and
figures of interest and concern to both employer and employee. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 43
As a means to deal constructively with the growing number of inquiries concerning
industrial payrolls, employment, occupational wage rates, hours of work, and similar
matters, the Labour Section provides a constant source of information through the medium
of annual surveys. Under a co-operative agreement in effect for some years between the
Department of Labour and the Department of Trade and Industry, information thus
obtained is made jointly available to both Departments.
Supplementary projects completed during the year included regional breakdowns
of industrial employment and payroll information, the current edition of a list of industrial firms in size groups, an industrial index of reporting firms, and routine statistical
analyses of Provincial labour data in response to periodic inquiries from outside interests,
business and banking institutions, Boards of Trade, and other Governmental departments.
Presentation of the accompanying census map, Chart 2, and Table 18 is again used
as a means of comparing the industrial growth and development in the various regional
areas of the Province. Totals within the table represent industrial payrolls (only)
originating in the various numbered census divisions indicated on the map, the comparative annual variation in the figures for each area pointing up the extent of industrial
expansion occurring in that section.
Although the reported totals are restricted to an industrial coverage, and are therefore representative of only a portion of the entire Provincial summary, as a sensitive
indicator in measuring the labour concentration within the census districts they serve to
highlight progressive changes from year to year.
Table 18.—British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas for
the Comparative Years 1949 to 1952
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1949
1950
1951
1952
No. 1	
No. 2 	
No. 3              	
$14,196,272
25,465,483
17,162,800
268,168,929
69,824,047
6,709,107
13,991,506
7,109,097
7,793,375
2,586,330
1.156.849
$14,730,880
28,152,569
17,986,918
276,660,854
87,321,304
7,793,958
17,053,224
11,492,745
9,749,718
1,352,763
2.139.119
$16,925,795
33,803,674
21,563,865
326,844,763
106,834,119
10,905,394
22,065,843
18,808,909
19,560,533
2,140,056
2.291.684
$27,425,293
40,455,349
20,422,805
No. 4     	
No. 5	
358,233,779
109,412,278
No. 6  	
11,015,136
No. 7	
20,160,757
No. 8 	
20,771,777
No. 9	
No. 10.	
32,163,701
2,266,598
4.703.401
Totals	
$434,163,795     I  $474,434,052
$581,744,635     I S647.030.874
-
:
,
'
■■■■'-
... ft:.. ■
M<- LL 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Chart 2.—Census Divisions
CENSUS
DIVISION
MARKET RESEARCH DIVISION
This Division is responsible for market research studies, industrial and location
surveys, the collection of market statistics and statistics relating to new industries, new
plants, and additions to existing plants.
This Division, in co-operation with the University of British Columbia marketing
classes, completed a survey of the vacation travel habits of Greater Victoria and Vancouver residents. This survey covered the following topics relating to Greater Victoria and
Vancouver tourist habits: Expenditures, destinations, length of stay, average size of
party, method of travel, type of lodging used.
Considerable progress was made in the preparation and revision of the Regional
Industrial Index of British Columbia which will be released in 1954.
A companion publication to the British Columbia Trade Index, released in 1952,
Wholesale Directory was in the final stages of preparation and will be released early in
1954.
Several area studies of a confidential nature were undertaken to determine the
economic potentialities of specific regions. It is planned to make several market and
industrial-area studies during 1954.
This Division assisted in the preparation of material for the Federal-Provincial
Conference held in December.
In addition, many miscellaneous requests, principally relating to regional statistics
and marketing, were answered. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 45
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION
During the year 1953 the Mechanical Tabulation Division continued to operate as
a service bureau for those departments of the Government which do not operate a
punched-card installation. Departments and branches taking advantage of this service
are listed below, showing the value of work done for each at cost for the twelve-month
period ended October 31st, 1953. No charge was made to the departments for this
service, except the Liquor Control Board, which agreed to pay a fixed monthly rate.
Department of Agriculture—Herd Improvement Branch $ 1,05 6.68
Department of the Attorney-General—
Motor-vehicle Branch   $6,049.88
Liquor Control Board  27,111.60
     33,161.48
Department of Education—Annual Statistical Report...      1,124.98
Department of Finance—Furniture inventory  628.94
Department of Health and Welfare—
Accounting Division   $1,678.92
Medical Services Division  14,025.22
Hospital Insurance Service     1,236.76
     17,940.90
Department of Labour—Annual Statistical Report       3,493.04
Department of Lands and Forests—
Geographic Division      $468.40
Water Rights Branch        746.18
Forest Surveys Division     4,196.98
Forest Management Branch     2,140.98
       7,552.54
Department of the Provincial Secretary—
Civil Service Commission  $4,735.54
Queen's Printer  12,822.20
     17,557.74
Department of Trade and Industry—
Bureau of Economics and Statistics  $5,846.94
Mechanical Tabulation Division     8,221.12
     14,068.06
Total
$96,584.36
There was a considerable amount of development work undertaken during the year.
For the Department of Lands and Forests, the following new jobs were started:—
Water Rights Branch:   Water Rights Rental Billing.
Forest Surveys Division:   (a) Aerial Reconnaissance Survey; (b) D.B.H. Tally
Records; (c) Volume of Trees Survey.
Forest Management Division: Lumber Recovery Survey.
For the Water Rights Branch we were required to punch and verify 45,000 cards
which will form a permanent billing file for some 15,000 rental accounts. From this file
the 1954 bills were automatically prepared, together with a numeric listing and an alphabetic cross-index of accounts. As accounts are paid, cards will be pulled and transferred
to a " paid-up file " so that statements can be prepared showing paid or unpaid accounts
as required. This job was developed in close co-operation with the Comptroller-General's
office.
In the early part of the year we were asked to make a special tabulation of Aerial
Reconnaissance Survey records for the Forest Surveys Division. This survey was designed
to produce an estimate of the lumber acreage and volume throughout the Province.
4 LL 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
To attain this, cards were punched for each status and timber class in each of the 9,000
compartments, and additional cards were punched to show a distribution of mature
timber by species and others for a distribution of age-classes for immature timber.
Predetermined acreage volumes and species percentages were punched into the cards, and
by using the multiplying punch the area was multiplied by the average volume to obtain
total volume figures. In the same way the volume by species was determined by
multiplying species percentage by total volume. A similar operation was used to
determine area by age-groups.
In December the punching of some 75,000 cards was started for a special survey
based on the diameter of trees at breast height. In this survey, diameters are recorded
in one-tenth inches, and is designed to group the results in 2-inch-diameter classes. This
survey is due for completion early in January of the new year.
In December another large-scale job was started for the Forest Surveys Division,
when we undertook to punch some 250,000 cards for its Volume of Trees Survey. This
job, which is scheduled for completion in April, will involve a considerable amount of
multiplier time, as we will be required to calculate the total volume for each tree by
squaring both the bottom and top diameters, which will be added together and multiplied
by the length and a predetermined factor. By doing this operation mechanically, it is
obvious that a tremendous amount of time will be saved.
Another interesting job was the Lumber Recovery Survey for the Forest Management Division. In this case we punched from the scaling records for individual mills
and calculated by means of the multiplying punch the estimated lumber recovery in
1-inch, 2-inch, and dimensional groups. These were used by Forest Service officials to
compare with the actual recovery records to determine the operating efficiency of the
mills concerned.
The Forest Inventory job, which has been in operation for about seventeen years,
was revised and considerable detail eliminated, which has made it possible to record the
vital information on three instead of eight cards, as previously used. Tabulations for
this survey are printed directly on to Duplimat masters by the alphabetic printer, which
makes it possible to run thirty-five copies of each tabulation.
In the Department of Agriculture we punched individual milking records for the
Ayrshire and Guernsey breeds and calculated average production records, by sire, daughters, and daughter-dam pairs. While this was not a large-volume job, the number of
calculations that had to be performed made it a worth-while tabulating operation.
One of the biggest expansions was undertaken for the Liquor Control Board in the
latter part of the year, when the punched-card system in use in the Esquimalt store on
an experimental basis was instigated in the Pender Street store in Vancouver. The
system was put into effect December 1 st and successfully withstood the heavy Christmas
and New Year rush, during which some 312,000 cards had to be handled for this store
alone.
A survey was also started but has yet to be completed on a plan to combine cost-
of-drug statements with those of the Medical Services Division of Vancouver for Social
Assistance cases.
Preliminary talks were held with officials of the Department of Public Works concerning a plan to tabulate its traffic records, which it is understood would involve 35,000
cards in the initial tabulation.
A survey was made for the Queen's Printer and a system using pre-punched mark
sensed cards was recommended for their job-time records; this has, however, not yet
been put into operation.
A discussion was held with an official of the Poultry Branch on the possibility of
tabulating turkey-breeding records.
To meet the diversity of the work handled, the Division is equipped with a complete
set of tabulating equipment, including alphabetic tabulators, sorters, reproducing gang r
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 47
summary punches, end-printing document punches, alphabetic interpreters, a collator,
and a multiplying punch, as well as alphabetic punches and verifiers.
The staff is composed of a senior supervisor, assistant supervisor, three senior
machine operators, seven machine operators, a senior key-punch operator, three verifier
operators, four key-punch operators, a senior clerk-stenographer, and three clerks. In
addition, two members of the Liquor Control Board staff are attached to the Division
to maintain liaison between the two departments.
During the year there was an exodus of machine operators to the United States,
which noticeably affected our senior positions, and we experienced considerable difficulty
in holding or replacing trained personnel.
The Chief Supervisor was honoured by being selected for a one-year assignment
with the United Nations to install a punched-card system for the Burmese Government;
however, the staff situation prevented granting of the necessary leave.
PUBLICATIONS
Monthly Bulletin.—This publication has been continued and expanded. Special
articles have been included at various times throughout the year covering topics of current interest. Included are statistical summaries of business indicators relating to British
Columbia's economy.
External Trade.—Monthly statistics covering external trade are contained in the
monthly bulletin. A statement of external trade through British Columbia customs
ports and covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over is published annually.
British Columbia Trade Index.—There are a few copies remaining of this publication, released in November, 1952. The Wholesale Index is now being revised and
will be published during 1954.
British Columbia Industrial Index.—This publication is being revised and will be
released during 1954.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.—This publication was first issued in 1948;
the seventh edition will be released early in 1954. This publication provides general and
historical facts and statistics relating to British Columbia under the following headings:
Population, Education, Government and Finance, Judiciary, Banking, Transportation,
Communication, Retail Trade, Agriculture, Fisheries, Forestry, Mining, Manufacturing,
Water Power, Tourists, and Economic Activity.
Summary of Business Activity in British Columbia.—This publication is a companion of the monthly bulletin and provides a compact source of annual statistics relative
to the economy of the Province.
A Survey of the 1952 Vacation Travel Habits of Greater Victoria and Vancouver
Residents.—This survey was done in co-operation with the marketing classes of the
University of British Columbia and covers such items as expenditure, mode of travel,
type of lodging used, destination, and average size of party as they relate to Greater
Victoria and Vancouver residents.
Establishing a Business in British Columbia.—The above is a new brochure published by this Bureau and gives to prospective investors information relating to the
establishment of a business in British Columbia, such as government regulations, facilities
and services, etc.
Statistical Record of the Lumber Industry in British Columbia.—An historical summary of statistics relating to the forest industry of British Columbia.
List of Industrial Firms in British Columbia by Number of Employees.—An alphabetic listing of firms segregated by size groups according to employment.
Current Publications.—In addition to Departmental publications, other studies were
completed but not released for general consumption and covered such topics as tourist
expenditures, wage rates and working conditions in Vancouver and Victoria, and industrial expansion by census divisions. LL 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT
TRAVEL BUREAU
GENERAL
The year 1953 proved an unparalleled tourist year for British Columbia. Month
after month the number of travellers' vehicle permits issued at the Provincial border
eclipsed the record-breaking figures of the year before.
Percentage-wise, visitors coming by automobile through the customs ports were up
over 8.1, more than 850,000 United States visitors crossing the line, compared with
approximately 787,000 in 1952. Interprovincial and domestic holiday traffic appeared
to be proportionately heavy, and a final estimate should show the Provincial cash register
recording close to $70,000,000 on the Visitor Industry Account.
Including those who arrived by public carrier or entered the Province via the
Alberta boundary, British Columbia played host to over 1,700,000 visitors.
That British Columbia's " visitor " figures hold up so well in face of increased
competition for the tourist dollar is something we may congratulate ourselves upon.
Last year there was a general trend toward more expenditures authorized for tourist
promotion. Florida alone doubled the State advertising appropriation, as did Montana
and Vermont. Southern California, Hawaii, the West Indies, Mexico, Britain—all
tourist-conscious countries and communities—stepped up their promotions, but perhaps
part of British Columbia's success in more than holding its own may be found in the
results of a questionnaire survey made by the Canadian Government Travel Bureau:
" The advice of friends was the greatest influence in persuading people to come to
Canada.   This accounted for 37.5 per cent, advertising 23.6 per cent, etc."
From this we take it that those who visit us return home satisfied; that we have
given good accommodation, good food, courtesy, and that our scenery, highways, and
amenities have measured up to our promises. While British Columbia's tourist promotions have been sustained and every encouragement must be given the prospective visitor
both on Provincial and local levels, it is obvious that the wider public recognition and
appreciation of the tourist industry is also having a beneficial effect.
Other factors contributing to the steady increase in the tourist industry of British
Columbia are the improved highways, the superior accommodation in all price brackets,
and the effects of the Game Branch programme, which has resulted in the balance of
nature in wildlife being largely maintained in spite of the heavy harvest taken annually
by anglers and sportsmen.
We were fortunate last year in that there was no adverse publicity on floods, fires,
or other catastrophic events, real or otherwise, to discourage travel, but the resort areas
were affected by seasonal weather conditions, which made for some early fluctuations in
the occupancy graph.
We found this year that a larger percentage of the inquiries received were for the
less expensive type of vacation, and that the parks and camp-sites were extremely well
patronized. (In the East Kootenay National Park alone there were 120,283 visitors in
the period April 1st to July 31st, an increase of 24,242.) While there was little indication that the British Columbian was making fewer trips to points south of the border,
there was every indication that the British Columbia family was taking more advantage
of those facilities afforded by the Province for the enjoyment of the outdoors.
Our own observations coincide with those of the Canadian Government Travel
Bureau, in that the average length of stay appears to be shorter. According to the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, the average length of visit dropped from 5.28 days in
1948 to 4.62 in 1952. Our thought on this, however, is that the decline in average stay
is not due to the lesser number remaining a week or more in British Columbia, but to DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 49
the greater number of those from our large Washington market who, having normally
a five-day week, can take advantage of this and of the longer week-ends over statutory
holidays to take brief excursions into Canada.
ADVERTISING
The advertising investment in 1953 followed a slightly different pattern from previous years. Some space was taken in national magazines with a high travel interest—
Highway Traveller, Holiday, National Geographic, Sunset, Time—and space was also
taken in the Travel Agent, a trade publication. These advertisements are supported
throughout the West by newspaper space in all major centres through the eleven Western
States, with schedule emphasis in California, Oregon, and Washington. The copy theme
was an invitation to " Enjoy a Coronation Year Vacation in British Columbia."
A promotional innovation for British Columbia was the use of television. An investment of approximately $10,000 was made in specially prepared one-minute telecasts
over two stations in Seattle, two in Los Angeles, three in San Francisco, and one in
Spokane. These television spots were made in April and May, reaching an audience
conservatively estimated at five million.
The five painted bulletins, which have proven so effective in past years, were
repainted with the Coronation Year invitation. In the vicinity of Seattle, Portland,
Tacoma, Grant's Pass, and Spokane, traffic count past these bulletins was in the vicinity
of eleven million. 'if
With a view to (1) encouraging British Columbians to spend their own vacations
in British Columbia and (2) stemming the flow of Canadian dollars in the pockets of
British Columbians to the United States, the Department again engaged in a programme
of spot announcements over eighteen British Columbia radio stations. These announcements were given at effective times through June, July, and August, and were given
generous support by radio-station management generally, and by sponsors of commercial
programmes. While it is extremely difficult to key this type of advertising, from the
reaction and comments of resort operators through the country the Department is convinced that the campaign was effective and gave a good rate on the dollar investment.
The theme " Know British Columbia Better " was also carried through large numbers
of general advertisements which appeared in various newspapers and miscellaneous
publications in the Province through the season.
Interprovincial traffic was encouraged through the use of Canadian national magazines and newspapers with wide distribution, and the winter traffic was stimulated by
a special campaign through the Prairie Provinces and Eastern Canada which, from the
point of view of inquiries received, more than justified the modest investment. This
campaign again had the effect of stimulating a large number of settlement inquiries,
particularly from Easterners who are retired or approaching retirement.
While the basic tourist advertising campaigns are prepared and placed through an
agency, the Bureau staff prepared 190 general advertisements, including special editions,
issued orders for 2,420 advertisements for other departments, and checked all advertising
invoices for every branch of Government service.
INQUIRIES
All told during 1953 the Bureau staff handled 23,517 inquiries by mail. During the
height of the season—April, May, and June—more than half the inquiries were attributed
to the current advertising campaign. The Bureau was again fortunate in having a staff
of young ladies, all of whom are qualified by their training in the Bureau, to handle this
volume expeditiously. With very few exceptions, inquiries are given response within
twenty-four hours of receipt. Many letters expressing appreciation of services and
information given were received by the Bureau. LL 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Green-garbed Girls Boost Evergreen Province
Visitors to this evergreen Province now find that official travel information
comes garbed in appropriate fashion. Five travel counsellors, who believe in doing
their job in the right style, are wearing smart forest-green blazers as they dispense
information at the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau on Superior Street
in Victoria. Civil Servants can also be colourful, the girls decided, when they
voluntarily purchased their identical outfits. Grey flannel skirts and white blouses
complete the costumes. Pictured above, all ready to give a good impression of their
service as well as travel information, the Travel Bureau " girls-in-green " are, left to
right: Joan Young, Lois Moir, Pat Hamilton, Yvonne Christopher, and Pat I'Anson.
Staff writer Harry Harrod completes the picture. (These girls have handled up to
800 inquiries through the mail in a single day.)
FIELD WORK
Of the Bureau's promotional activities, the personal-contact trips play a most
important part. In the months of March and April such a trip was made through the
eight Western States. Washington, Oregon, and California, in particular, were given
special attention, as the volume of traffic from these three States is heavier by comparison
than that from other States. The larger populated areas on the West Coast continue to
function as focal points for publicity and are the principal distributing centres for
promotional material, their value as such being indicated by the increased travel inquiries
and calls for greater quantities of tourist literature from these places.
A few cities of approximately 25,000 population which had not had complete
coverage on previous contact trips were visited, and the response was excellent. These
smaller urban areas, in which much of our summer traffic has its source, could be given
more attention to good advantage should more time be allotted to this phase of tourist
promotion.
A trip of shorter duration was made in June to the customs ports and major cities
of the Border States and through the Province of Alberta. This publicity work, which
continued throughout the summer within British Columbia, was included in part of the
duties of the Assistant Commissioner. All travel in connection with the field work was
done by automobile. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 51
This type of promotion is designed mainly to offer assistance and guidance to travel
counsellors in planning vacation trips for their clients, to promote British Columbia's
attractions in areas recognized as already supplying considerable travel volume, to
stimulate traffic from other districts with tourist-traffic potential, and to establish
appropriate and effective advertising outlets. Such a coverage requires calls on the
major travel agents, transportation companies, automobile clubs, Chambers of Commerce,
oil companies, newspaper and magazine editorial and advertising departments, radio
and television stations.
Talks and film showings were given to service clubs and other organizations, and
tourist promotional literature was distributed in considerable quantity. A number of
new literature-distribution outlets were opened in communities not heretofore included.
The Canadian Consulates in Seattle, San Francisco, and Los Angeles provide
invaluable assistance in promoting British Columbia, and every effort was made to see
that their literature and film requirements were adequately met. LL 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
1
ES61
7961
ISM
0561
61-61
B*6I
E56I
ZS6I
IS6t
0S61
B*6t
ES61
;s6i
IS61
0561
61-61
Si-61
E56I
ZS6I
1561
0S6I
6*61
8*61
ES6I
ZS6I
IS6I
0561
6*61
81-61
ES61
IS6I
6*61
8*61
€561
ZS6I
1561
0561
6*61
8*61
ES6T
ZS6I
IS6I
0S6I
COMPARATIVE MONTHLY FLUCTUATIONS
IN TRAVELLERS' VEHICLE PERMITS
ISSUED AT BRITISH COLUMBIA  BORDER
POINTS OVER THE PERIOD 1948-1953.
6*6 T
Bf-61
^■iBMHBM
ES6I
ZS6I
IS6I
0S6I
6*61
8*61
ES6I
ZS61
IS6I
0561
6*61
8*61
ES6I
■ «■«£»
156!
0561
6*61
81-61
€561
Z56I
IS61
0S6I
6*61
-J—
.
 ! I 1 I 1 1 1 1 »^^^^^^»
8*61
(saNvsnoHx ni) aanssi sxmaad aioiH3A DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 53
PUBLICITY
The Bureau continued to exploit the possibilities of free publicity in a wide range
of periodicals, including general magazines, week-end and daily newspapers, trade
journals, business publications, and house organs.
Articles dealing with the tourist attractions of the Province were supplied to The
Edmonton Journal, Spokane Spokesman-Review, Hawaii Advertiser, Ca et La, World
Travel, Canadian Geographical Journal, Travel Magazine, the National Automobile
Association publication, Pacific Travel Handbook, The Rudder, and Sicks' Enterpriser,
while source material for the writing of stories and articles was supplied to editors and
writers of Fortnight, Sunset, Authenticated News Service, The Union Signal, The
Edmonton Journal, New York Journal of Commerce, Spokane Daily Chronicle, and
Moncton Times and Transcript.
Bureau services were also aimed at encouraging interest in the Province as a land
of industrial opportunity. To this end, articles were written for Western Buyers' Market,
The Financial Post, The Monetary Times, The Railway Review, The Canadian Mixer,
The Jewish Post, Williams Lake Tribune, Cariboo Observer, Modern Transport, Imperial
Review, Canadian Industrial Index, and the programmes of the B.C. Products Fair and
the Pacific National Exhibition.
Factual material for editorial use was forwarded on request to Encyclopedia of
Canada, Southam newspapers, Quick Canadian Facts, Seattle Times, Year, and the Bank
of Montreal's Canada Today.
LITERATURE
Of the twenty-eight pieces of promotional literature in active circulation last year,
over half a million folders and booklets were distributed. All the material was distributed on personal request, except at entry ports, where limited amounts of folders are
kept in racks accessible to visitors as they cross the border. Otherwise, the folders
are handled by the Bureau and by auto clubs, travel agencies, and other directional
bureaux where inquiry is made. Every effort is made to ensure that the folders are used
effectively and with a minimum of waste, each piece of literature being designed to support
a definite sales objective, meet a particular need or requirement, or support a definite
objective in a specific market. Requests for literature from the United States, other
Canadian points, and travel interests within the Province were unprecedented. The
Department continued with the publication of the road reports, for which it now has
a mailing-list of approximately 1,000 auto clubs, oil companies, radio stations, newspapers, travel bureaux, etc. This is produced with the co-operation of the Department
of Public Works and the Queen's Printer, who provides a twenty-four-hour production
service.
British Columbia's highway map appeared in a new form, and the map design now
follows the general pattern adopted by the oil companies, to which the public has become
accustomed. This has proven a very popular and basic piece of literature. The next
publication in order of its importance and acceptance is the Auto Courts and Resorts
folder which, in 1954, will list hotels and camp-sites as well as resorts and motels. The
demand has been such that the print order on the 1954 edition is 100,000.
Interest in the British Columbia route to Alaska dictated the production of a folder,
"The Great North Road through British Columbia," which replaced the John Hart
Highway folder. Another new folder, " Fascinating Facts about British Columbia," was
designed to answer the thousands of general inquiries, at a low cost.
In addition to the general and regional folders, the Bureau was also able, as in
previous years, to assist in the development of convention traffic through the insertion
or overprint of messages in standard literature. The Bureau also assisted a number of
regional promotions by printing and contributing folders covering special events and LL 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
regional attractions in Chilliwack, Revelstoke, Dawson Creek, Mission, Nelson, Creston,
White Rock, and Kelowna. The British Empire Games were also subject of a special
promotional folder.
During the year the Department was charged with the continued production of the
Provincial Parks folder and the Roadside Campsites folder, previously published by the
Forest Service. These are popular and informative folders which, in 1954, will also
include the National parks in British Columbia.
During the year the Department produced a series of twelve very attractive posters,
18 by 23 inches, which have proven most acceptable, and which are being used very
widely for display purposes across Canada and through the United States. These posters,
in one colour, are fine examples of lithographic art, and have been subject of a great deal
of favourable comment.
A new folder under production will feature the Vancouver-Howe Sound-Sechelt-
Powell River area, which is being further developed tourist-wise by the new highway-
ferry finks.
In co-operation with the Province of Alberta, the Bureau also produced a map
folder covering Alberta and British Columbia for the particular benefit of through
travellers and in the interests of development of interprovincial traffic.
CO-OPERATIVE ACTIVITIES
The British Columbia Government Travel Bureau appreciates and acknowledges
other and great factors contributing to the development of the tourist industry of British
Columbia. Its officers also appreciate the splendid spirit of co-operation which pervades
the industry generally. The exchanges between the Bureau and the Automobile Club of
Southern California, the National automobile clubs, and the State automobile associations of California, Oregon, and Washington have all reflected a genuine interest in the
visitor to the Pacific Northwest, regardless of his destination or place of origin.
By these organizations, as by the oil company travel bureaux without exception,
British Columbia highways, facilities, attractions, and amenities have been treated most
truthfully. To their officers and staff the Bureau is much indebted for a comparatively
trouble-free year in that all of them have gone to great lengths to assure factual information for their clients and patrons.
The British Columbia Automobile Association also co-operated very closely with
the Bureau.
During the year, community and regional travel bureaux throughout British Columbia became more firmly established and rendered exceptional service to the traveller.
The activities of these organizations reflect a growing community appreciation of the
tourist industry, which is expressed in many ways. Information centres at Kamloops,
Nanaimo, Hope, Vernon, New Westminster, Chilliwack, Trail, Kimberley, Kelowna,
Revelstoke, Nelson, Cranbrook, Courtenay, and a score of other centres rendered useful
and effective service to many thousands of visitors and, in co-operating with the Bureau,
enabled it to round out a comprehensive programme of promotion and service.
The Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau and the Vancouver Tourist Association,
as through many preceding years, rendered a tourist service extending far beyond their
immediate local and regional concerns.
The co-operation at all times of the Canadian Customs and Immigration Officers
at border points was greatly appreciated by the Bureau. These busy officers took time,
as opportunity offered, to give factual information as requested and to handle such
literature as the Bureau was able to afford the ports of entry. It is felt that the co-operative and helpful attitude on the part of the Canadian border officials has contributed in
no small way to the development of the tourist industry in British Columbia.
The Bureau also appreciatively acknowledges the co-operation of the United States
Immigration Officers stationed in Victoria and the Canadian Superintendents of Immi- r
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 55
gration and Customs, all of whom have co-operated very generously on matters pertaining
to their respective fields.
In another section of this report, mention has been made of the liaison between the
Bureau and the Auto Courts and Resorts Association. The officers of the association
have given considerable time to matters concerning the industry as a whole, and both the
Provincial and regional associations have extended much assistance to the Bureau.
As in the past, every courtesy and consideration has been extended to the Bureau
by the officers of the Evergreen Playground Association, in which British Columbia
maintains token membership.
Particularly friendly gestures have been made by the officers of the San Francisco
Sport Show, where, notwithstanding that the Bureau has not taken space for a number of
years, the Province is given programme advertising without cost and extended many
courtesies.
British Columbia's interest in the Canada-wide promotion of the Canadian Government Travel Bureau has been well protected, and the directors and staff of the Ottawa
Bureau have been very ready at all times to discuss the many problems affecting tourist
traffic. An exchange of literature and information provides the Bureau with material
on immigration, customs, and extra-provincial matters, while British Columbia's literature is made available to the Canadian offices in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, and
San Francisco.
The Canadian Consuls-General and their staffs in San Francisco, Los Angeles, and
Seattle at all times placed the resources and facilities of their offices at the disposal of
the Bureau, which facilities were frequently taken advantage of. These offices were
particularly helpful to the Assistant Commissioner on his spring tour.
Number of Auto Courts Star-rated and Ungraded
1953
1952
1951
1948
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
334
249
160
124
147
33
25
16
12
14
311
30
261
231
166
147
24
23
17
15
70
158
112
141
151
11
249
25
25
166               16
130              13
165               16
17
23
179               18
24
1,014»
288
100
1,021             100
218
984               100
212      1      	
632               100
Totals            	
1,302
55
1,239
82
1,196
84
l
Permits 	
        1       -----
1,357
	
1.321      1      	
1.280       1
1 Total accommodation star-rated in 1953 is less than year previous, as there was a considerable number of premises
of low grade being improved at the time of inspection and they were placed in the ungraded category pending reinspec-
tion for up-grading in 1954.
The following grades were raised in 1953:—
Three grades raised from three to four stars.
One grade raised from two to four stars.
Seven grades raised from two to three stars.
Two grades raised from one to three stars.
One grade raised from no star to three stars.
Three grades raised from one to two stars.
The following grades were lowered in 1953:—
One grade lowered from four to three stars.
One grade lowered from three to two stars. LL 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Auto courts initially graded in 1953 were as follows:—
Four stars   27
Three stars i     5
Two stars     2
One star      3
No star     2
Total  - 39
Auto courts that ceased operating in 1952 numbered 40, and in 1953 also
numbered 40.
New licences issued in 1953, 103, and cancelled (health O.K.), 3.
"TOURIST ACCOMMODATION REGULATION ACT"
The figures in the accompanying tabulation cover the Bureau's physical activities
under the " Tourist Accommodation Regulation Act." These figures indicate that there
was a still further improvement in British Columbia's high standard of accommodation
in 1953. This year, however, the inspection work had to be carried out entirely by the
Assistant Commissioner in addition to his other field work, and the percentage of
reinspections was low. All operators who asked for a regrading were given one, but
with the staff limitations it was impossible to provide the satisfactory minimum of one
call each year on each establishment.
The star-rating system is very much appreciated by the public and by the Auto
Courts and Resorts Association, but the fact that general standards in British Columbia
have so greatly improved since the regulations were first enforced now calls for some
revision of the grading formula, particularly in respect to the width of the four-star
bracket. The Auto Courts and Resorts Association has had a committee studying this
problem for some time, and the officers of the Bureau have also given the problem
considerable study. No new formula has yet been adopted, but it would now appear
desirable to permit operators with more than one type of accommodation to advertise
the star range of their premises.
Sanitarians attached to the health units through the Province have assisted the
Bureau by furnishing reports on various establishments, and the interest of the Public
Health Branch has very largely supplemented the field work of the Assistant Commissioner.
Officers of the Travel Bureau had frequent opportunities and occasion during the
year to co-operate with, and in many ways assist, operators of tourist accommodation,
individually and through their association. The resources of the Bureau in respect to
data concerned with the economics and management have been fully taken advantage of.
The liaison between the Bureau and the Auto Courts and Resorts Association has been
a very pleasant one. The Commissioner and Assistant Commissioner at various times
attended regular meetings of the association and also attended the annual convention, at
which time the Bureau's very active interest in the tourist industry was demonstrated.
SETTLEMENT
During 1953 the Bureau continued in the receipt of a large volume of inquiries from
people who desired to settle in the Province. There was a large number of inquiries
from farmers in the United States who wished to establish here. There was also a
considerable volume from new Canadians in the Prairies and Ontario particularly who,
for one reason or another, wished to migrate farther west. There was a considerable
volume of inquiries from Canadian artisans and trades people in Eastern Canada who
were also attracted by the advantages of living in British Columbia. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
LL 57
As in previous years, the Province also held an attraction for people with respiratory
problems and other health-seekers. A few inquiries from professional people in the
United States, South Africa, Australia, and Eastern Canada were also received each
month.
The Bureau largely confines its interests to the furnishing of facts and figures and
the direction of prospective new-comers to the proper authorities, but the information
and advice with which official material has been supplemented by the Department is often
appreciatively acknowledged.
Acknowledgment should be given here of the full co-operation offered by the
Department of Agriculture and the Department of Lands and Forests in Victoria, the
offices of the Department of Citizenship and Immigration of Victoria and Vancouver,
the offices of the National Employment Service in both places, and the Agent-General for
British Columbia and the Canadian Department of Labour in London, England.
TOURIST COUNCIL
The fourteenth annual meeting of the Tourist Council was held in Vancouver on
April 20th, with the Deputy Minister in the chair. The regional problems as well as
Provincial matters were fully discussed, and the 1953 advertising programme was approved
as submitted by the agency.
At this meeting it was resolved that the policy of gathering interprovincial tourist
statistics be continued; that the Government of the Province of British Columbia be asked
to provide the necessary funds for the establishment of reception centres at the border;
that the Department of Trade and Industry continue its efforts with the Federal Government to the end that Canadian Travel Bureau offices be opened in Los Angeles and
San Francisco; and that every step be taken to sizeably increase the present amount of
funds for the operation of the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau.
Action on the foregoing resolutions was initiated by the Deputy Minister, who has
also furthered the Tourist Council's interests in having historic sites properly marked, at
the Federal-Provincial Tourist Conference and at the Canadian Tourist Association
Convention.
HISTORIC SITES
The interests of the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau in the marking of
historic sites was expressed through the presentation of several bronze plaques, which
were installed by local authorities.
CANADIAN TOURIST ASSOCIATION
In October the Province was host to the Canadian Tourist Association for its
twenty-first convention and nineteenth annual meeting, in Vancouver and Victoria.
The convention was attended by 140 official delegates from the ten Canadian Provinces,
representing all public tourist interests and the chief transportation and catering interests.
Major discussions revolved around the travel trends, extension of Canada's vacation
season, the standardization of highway signs, preservation of historic sites, and conservation.    Stimulation of interprovincial traffic was also given full discussion.
The Canadian Tourist Association, in which the Department holds a membership,
is concerned with the promotion, research, and educational work in such fields as
conservation, improvement of services to travellers and vacationists, encouragement of
a distinctively Canadian approach to the development of cultural and other attractions,
continuous study of travel and vacation trends, and the development of public recognition
of the visitor industry as an important factor in national, regional, and community
prosperity.
As a past president of the Canadian Tourist Association, the Deputy Minister was
able to contribute considerably to the discussions and the movement. LL 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PHOTOGRAPHIC BRANCH
Activities of the Photographic Branch are summarized as follows:—
Motion-picture Shows.—To various organizations in Victoria and environs, 64;
preview shows in the Branch theatre, 31.
Motion-picture Circulation.—Total audiences: British Columbia, 63,380; other
Provinces, 35,630; United States, 452,000; United Kingdom, 112,230; grand total,
668,220.
Still Photographs.—During the year, photographs were sent complimentary to
writers, publishers, and advertising agents, as follows: British Columbia, 3,273; other
Provinces, 1,011; United States, 684; foreign, 410; total, 5,378.
Darkroom Production.—Total number of negatives processed, 4,291; total number
of prints, 13,612.
Still Photography.—During the year the Photographic Branch accepted and completed still assignments for the following departments: British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service, Provincial Archives, British Columbia Natural Resources Conference,
Travel Bureau, Health Education, Public Works, Queen's Printer, Lands and Forests,
Legislature, Fisheries (Industrial), Thunderbird Park reconstruction, Agriculture, Canadian Good Roads Association Convention, Canadian Travel Association Convention.
Still Assignments.—Four photographers were in the field during the months from
May to October, photographing various districts of the Province, covering new highways
(construction, etc.), industrial and scenic attractions.
The Branch also prepared 110 16- by 20-inch enlargements for display at the
Canadian Good Roads Association Convention.
Motion Pictures.—Motion pictures were taken of progress at Thunderbird Park
from the start of carving totem-poles to the erection of the Kwakiutl house and resulting
potlatch ceremonies. Further progress movies will be taken under the supervision of
Mr. Wilson Duff, British Columbia Anthropologist.
Motion pictures were made of the 1953 Kelowna Regatta, the final operations of
coal-mining at the Bright mine, Cedar, and the last use made of the mine railway operation at Nanaimo, for historical records. Further material to be filmed when weather
permits.
Also filmed were the opening ceremonies of the new section of the Vernon-Falkland
Highway and the opening of the Savona-Kamloops Highway.
Motion-picture footage was taken of the pack-train tour of Cathedral Lakes area,
east of Manning Park, in co-operation with the British Columbia Automobile Association.
Completed Films.—Editing was completed on "Johnny's Heritage" (industrial)
and "Land of Tomorrow" (Peace River Block), and six prints of these colour-sound
productions were released for general distribution, as also was a 400-foot short titled
" Beautiful British Columbia."
Three films are in the final stage of editing—" Quality Plus " (certified seed-potato
production in British Columbia), "Lady of the Lake" (Kelowna Regatta), and "Northward Bound " (British Columbia section of Alaska Highway from Dawson Creek to
Lower Post)—and are scheduled for release prior to March 31st, 1954.
Television.—A short television film was prepared by the Branch from stock material.
Twenty 16-mm. colour-sound subjects were supplied to and televised by KXLF-TV
in Butte, Mont., and KXLF-TV in Spokane, Wash. The films are sent direct to the television station in Butte, which, after televising them, forwards them to its Spokane station,
which, in turn, televises the same programme. Each station estimates audiences upwards
of 25,000 per showing.
victoria, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1954
860-254-7887  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0348774/manifest

Comment

Related Items