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DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL of the Health Branch Department of Health and Welfare ANNUAL REPORT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1956

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIVISION OF
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
of the Health Branch
Department of Health and Welfare
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year 1954
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1955  Victoria, B.C., May 11th, 1955.
To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report on Tuberculosis in the
Province of British Columbia for the year 1954.
ERIC MARTIN,
Minister of Health and Welfare. Department of Health and Welfare, Public Health Branch,
Victoria, B.C., May 11th, 1955.
The Honourable E. C. Martin,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to December
31st, 1954.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT, M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health.
Department of Health and Welfare, Public Health Branch,
Division of Tuberculosis Control,
2647 Willow Street,
Vancouver 9, B.C., May 11th, 1955.
G. F. Amyot, Esq., M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to December
31st, 1954.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. KINCADE, M.D.,
Director, Division of Tuberculosis Control. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Letter of Transmittal.	
Letter of Transmittal-	
List of Tables	
List of Charts	
Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control-
Report of the Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Control.
(a)  Introduction	
(b) Sanatorium Accommodation_.
(c) National Health Grants	
(d) Recalcitrant Patients __
(e)   Control of Tuberculosis
Statistical Section	
(a)  Clinics	
(ft) New Cases Examined by Clinics_
(c) General Summaries	
(d) Institutions	
(e) B.C.G. Vaccinations	
(/) Known Cases of Tuberculosis-
(g) Notifications of Tuberculosis-
(/.)  Tuberculosis Mortality	
Page
. 3
. 4
. 7
. 10
. 11
_ 13
_ 13
_ 15
_ 16
_ 17
. 18
. 19
. 21
. 27
. 36
. 40
. 54
_ 55
_ 62
. 77  INDEX
LIST OF TABLES
Clinics
Page
Table   1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent at Each Centre
and Number of Persons Examined by Mobile Unit, 1954  22
Table   2.—Persons Examined at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1954  25
Table   3.—Treatment and Tests at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1954  26
Table   4.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1954  27
Table 5,
Table 6,
Table 7.
Table 8,
New Cases Examined by Clinics
-New Examinations and Re-examinations in the Units Operated by This
Division during Years 1950 to 1954 (Excluding Indians)  29
-New Diagnoses Other than Negative in Persons Examined by Diagnostic
Clinics, by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age-group, 1954 (Excluding Indians) 30
-New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Examined by Clinics, by Infection
and Condition, 1954 (Excluding Indians)  32
-Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Survey Clinics, and
General Hospital Units, 1945-54  33
Table 9,
Table 10,
Table 11,
Table 12,
•--    Table 13,
Table 14,
Table 15,
General Summaries
-X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1954.
-Laboratory Report, 1954.
-Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics, 1945-54.
...... 36
.  37
  38
-Dental Report, 1954  38
-Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report, 1954  39
Institutions—Summaries
-Institutions—General Summaries, 1954  40
-Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) Given by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1945—54  41
Institutions—Admissions
Table 16.—Total Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions in each
Age-group, 1950-54  41
Table 17.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1954  43
Table 18.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1954  45
Table 19.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1954  45
Table 20.—Total Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1954  46
Table 21.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1950-54  46
Table 22.—First Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1954  46
Table 23.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1950-54  46
Table 24.—Readmissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1954  48
Table 25.—Readmissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1950-54  48
Table 26.—Review Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1954  48
Table 27.—Review Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1950-54-  48 d 8 department of health and welfare
Institutions—Discharges
Page
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1950-54  49
Table 29.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length
of Stay, 1954  51
Table 30.—Discharges from Institutions of First Admissions, by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length of Stay, 1954  52
Table 31.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Home
Condition, 1954  52
Table 32.—Discharges from Institutions on Medical Advice, by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Home Condition, 1954  53
Table 33.—Discharges from Institutions against Medical Advice, by Sex and Home
Condition, 1954  53
B.C.G. Vaccinations
Table 34.—B.C.G. Vaccinations Completed according to Group Listed, 1954  54
Table 35.—B.C.G. Vaccinations Completed according to Age-group, 1954  54
Known Cases of Tuberculosis
Table 36.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1950-54  55
Table 37.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of
British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1950-54 55
Table 38.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1950-54  55
Table 39.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District of
Residence and Sex, 1954 (Excluding Indians)  56
Table 40.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District of
Residence and Sex, 1954 (Indians Only)  57
Table 41.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in British
Columbia by Age-group and Sex, 1954 (Excluding Indians) _______._58
Table 42.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition, and Age-
group, 1954 (Excluding Indians)  60
Table 43.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition, and Age-
group, 1954 (Indians Only)  61
Table 44.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis among
the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian
Population, and the Indian Population, 1945-54  62
Notifications of Tuberculosis
Table 45.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1950-54  62
Table 46.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1950-54  63
Table 47.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, 1950-54  63
Table 48.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases by Statistical Area, by Place
of Residence, British Columbia, 1954  63
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, 1954 (Excluding Indians)  64
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District of Residence and Sex, 1954 (Indians Only)  66 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954 D 9
Page
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1945-54  67
Table 52.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition, and Age-
group, 1954 (Excluding Indians)  69
Table 53.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition, and Age-
group, 1954 (Indians Only)  70
Table 54.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group, Sex, and
Diagnosis, 1954 (Excluding Indians)  71
Table 55.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group, Sex, and
Diagnosis, 1954 (Indians Only)  72
Table 56.—Tuberculosis Notifications by Age-group and Sex for British Columbia,
S 1940-54, Rates per 100,000 Population (Excluding Indians)  74
Table 57.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis in British
Columbia, 1950-54  77
Tuberculosis Mortality
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1950-54  77
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Other-
than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area,
1950-54  78
Table 60.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Indian
Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1950-54  78
Table 61.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1954 (Excluding Indians)  79
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1954 (Indians Only)  80
Table 63.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-group, 1954  81
Table 64.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1945-54  82
Table 65.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia
by Age-group, 1950-54  84
Table 66.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by Age-group, 1950-54  84
Table 67.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by
Age-group, 1950-54  84
Table 68.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-group, 1950-54  85
Table 69.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-group, 1950-54  86
Table 70.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by Length
of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1954  88 D  10
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 1.-
Chart 2,
Chart 3,
Chart 4,
Chart 5.
Chart 6,
LIST OF CHARTS
-Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control.
Page
.   11
Chart   7.
Chart   8
Chart   9
Chart 10
Chart 11
Chart 12
Chart 13
Chart 14
Chart 15
Chart 16
Chart 17
-New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics, 1945-54
(Excluding Indians)  28
-New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics, 1945-54
(Excluding Indians)  29
-X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary
Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals,
1945-54  34
-X-ray Examinations Made by Institutions, Diagnostic and Treatment
Clinics, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and
General Hospitals, 1945-54  35
-Percentage Distribution of Admissions to Institutions by Age-group,
1950-54  42
-Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1954  44
-First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution),
1950-54  47
-Percentage Distribution of Discharges from Institutions according to Condition on Discharge, 1945-54  50
-Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in British
Columbia by Age-group and Sex, 1954 (Excluding Indians)  59
-Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1945-54  68
-Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1954  73
-Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group and Sex,
1940-54, Rates per 100,000 Population (Excluding Indians)  75
-Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1945-54  83
-Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-group, 1950-54  85
-Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Population of British Columbia by Age-group, 1950-54  86
-Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population and the
Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1954  87 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 11
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TRAVELLING
DIAGNOSTIC CLINICS
Interior
Coast
Island
Kootenay
Fraser Valley
__J  Report of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, 1954
Dr. G. F. Kincade, Director
INTRODUCTION
This is the Nineteenth Report of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, and it
covers the calendar year January 1st to December 31st, 1954.
The Report is divided into six major sections of statistical tables showing the general summaries of the clinics of the Division, institutional admission and discharge summaries, B.C.G. summaries, tables on known cases and new cases of tuberculosis, and
tuberculosis mortality.
Certain amendments have been made to existing tables with a view to improving
their usefulness. Brief narrative comments have been made as a guide to the more
important features of these statistics, and graphs have been included with some of the
tables to assist the reader in following time trends.
Since the inception of tuberculosis-control programmes, our energies have been
directed mainly toward two objectives—the finding of cases and their treatment. Over
the years our attention has been chiefly focused on the saving of lives as reflected
through mortality rates. This was natural when, at the outset of this campaign, tuberculosis was the leading cause of death. Treatment was paramount because it was
realized that, through treatment, lives could be saved and in bringing the disease under
control through treatment the spread of tuberculosis to the rest of the population would
be controlled. Case-finding was a necessary adjunct to successful treatment, because
early diagnosis gave more hope of successful treatment.
That we have been successful in the treatment of tuberculosis is now very evident,
and with the advent of antimicrobials and the advances in chest surgery we are now
able to cure tuberculosis. This is reflected in the falling death rates, which have
declined precipitously since 1946, when streptomycin was first introduced. Although
we do not as yet have the perfect antimicrobial, the present agents used in combination
are proving most effective. How successful we have been is evident from the following
table, which shows the reduction in deaths from tuberculosis in hospitals and other
institutions:—
Deaths from
Tuberculosis by
Place of Death, 1945-54
Place of Death
19541
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
1948
1947
1946
1945
36
45
15
42
44
17
45
96
16
23
76
83
20
33
96
80
25
41
88
143
26
45
81
143
27
49
108
189
24
53
127
175
21
63
105
Sanatoria   	
164
27
72  |       16
60
103
119    I    180
212     I     242
302
300
374
386
356
Preliminary figures only (excludes Indians).
Includes 1 death in a private clinic.
Admissions to Tuberculosis Institutions, 1945-53
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
1948
1947
1946
1945
557
985
56.5
566
989
57.2
541
926
58.4
526
928
56.7
547
973
56.2
486
814
59.7
546
898
60.8
534
851
62.7
611
889
68.7
13 D  14
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Between 1945 and 1953, although the total admissions to sanatoria increased from
889 to 985, the deaths in that group reached their peak in 1947 with 189 deaths, but
in 1954 there were only 45 deaths.
Besides the saving of lives, the results of treatment have had other beneficial effects
in that many patients are now treated following discharge from sanatorium for prolonged periods of time and are rendered non-infectious. This has markedly reduced the
infection in the community and greatly lessened the hazard of tuberculosis to the population at large.
There were 123 deaths from tuberculosis during 1954, for a rate of 9.7 per
100,000. This includes Indians and is a preliminary figure only. This is a drop from
17.9 in 1952 and 57.4 in 1946. During the past three years the mortality has been
falling by about one-third each year. Of 123 deaths in 1954, 88 were in males and
35 in females, and the rates were 13.6 and 5.6 respectively, showing that the male
mortality rate is over twice as high as the female. Moreover, out of 88 male deaths
64 were in men over 50 years old and represent 72.7 per cent of the total male deaths.
On the other end of the scale, only three deaths from tuberculosis in 1954 were
recorded in the other than Indians under 20 years—two in the 1-4 age-group and one
in the 10-19 age-group. Formerly, tuberculosis was a leading cause of death in late
adolescence.
During 1953 an analysis of the length of treatment of discharged cases following
first admission showed that of 546 cases discharged 39 (7.1 per cent) were treated
under one month, 76 (13.9 per cent) were treated one to four months, 137 (25.0 per
cent) were treated four to eight months, and 114 (20.8 per cent) were treated eight to
twelve months.
Therefore, 366 or 66.8 per cent of new cases were treated in sanatorium under one
year and 46 per cent of new cases were treated less than eight months.
The improving situation has also led to a lessened demand on the treatment-beds,
as will be shown later, with the result that where previously it was necessary to discharge patients from sanatorium earlier than we would have desired, it is now possible
to treat them as long as necessary in sanatorium.
The tremendous improvement in mortality from tuberculosis has not been paralleled by a similar decline in the morbidity rate. However, there has been a marked
improvement in this situation in recent years, with fewer cases found in spite of
increasing effort.
The success of case-finding is in direct ratio to the energy expended in the intelligent application of certain accepted principles in the epidemiology of tuberculosis.
Although with the introduction of the miniature X-ray film it became possible, theoretically, to examine the total population, selectivity has been exercised in concentrating on
certain groups where from experience it was known tuberculosis could be expected to
exist. Special emphasis has always been placed on examination of contacts of known
cases, of certain groups of workers whose occupation showed a high incidence of tuberculosis, of certain social groups, and of those suffering from lesions associated with
tuberculosis.    Selection is also on the basis of age and economic status.
The following table will clearly demonstrate the reduction in morbidity:—
New Cases of Tuberculosis by Year of Notification, 1947-54
1954
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
1948
1947
661
181
482
182
621
208
699
185
694
185
998
246
	
855
163
	
929
Quiescent  	
Activity undetermined    —
224
	
Total	
842
1,450
664
1,501
829
1,383
804
1,688
879
1,699
1,242
2,202
1,018
2,108
1,153
Total tuberculous 	
2,616 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954 D  15
The peak of new cases discovered was in 1947, when 2,616 new cases were found
in 180,000 persons examined. In 1954, 1,450 new cases were found in 332,996 persons examined. This was an increase of 701 persons examined in 1954 and an
increase of approximately 52,000 persons examined over two years ago. During this
period between 1947 and 1954 the number of new cases that could be classified as
active decreased from 1,153 to 842. Therefore, it can be shown that in spite of
increased searching, morbidity from tuberculosis in British Columbia is showing a
marked reduction.
It is becoming increasingly difficult and more costly to find new tuberculosis cases
as the situation improves. On the basis of 40 cents for each miniature X-ray, it will be
seen that the direct cost of detecting an active case of tuberculosis is about $700.
However, the indirect costs would add considerably to this figure. At what point the
yield of new cases makes it impractical to continue case-finding by this method is not
yet apparent, but it is generally agreed that this point is not yet reached. The saving
through early detection, with removal of infection in the community, is undoubtedly
greater than the costs of later treatment and the spread of infection. It is obviously
better to find an active case at the cost of $1,000 than to treat several that might
develop from this source at an estimated cost of $15,000 per case.
SANATORIUM ACCOMMODATION
There has been a marked change in the picture as regards sanatorium accommodation and, indeed, a much-lessened demand on the beds. This has undoubtedly been
brought about by two factors—the modern treatment of tuberculosis and the decreased
number of new cases found.
In the first ten months of this year there were 790 applications for admission to
sanatorium, compared to 799 for the first ten months of 1953 and 804 in 1952, actually
very little change. However, discharges showed a marked increase, with 840 discharges
in the first ten months of 1953 and 929 in the first ten months of 1954. At the time of
the opening of Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital there were approximately 200 patients
awaiting admission to our institutions. At this time last year the waiting-list had been
eliminated, except for elective cases. It became apparent that the Division was in a
position to close certain unsatisfactory sanatorium beds, and plans were laid for the
evacuation of Jericho Beach Hospital.   This took place at the end of October.
At the present time it has been possible to abandon all the temporary accommodation which was once occupied, namely, St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital, the temporary
addition at Willow Chest Centre, and Jericho Beach Hospital. The opening of Pearson
Tuberculosis Hospital provided 264 beds, but simultaneously we closed 164 beds in the
Vancouver area, hence there was a net gain of 100 beds. With the closing of Jericho
Beach Hospital, having a capacity of 91 beds, one might say that Pearson Hospital
represents a replacement of the temporary accommodation that was being operated in
Vancouver. However, in the meantime, with the renovation at Tranquille Sanatorium,
approximately 60 extra beds became available at that institution this spring. With a
complement of 833 beds, there are available 70 more beds than before the opening of
Pearson Hospital.
A census of the sanatorium patients has again been made as of October 31st this
year, and this emphasizes the fact that the problem of tuberculosis in the older person
is increasing.
Out of 719 patients in sanatorium, 284 were aged 50 years or over; that is, 39.5
per cent, which is an increase over 32.3 per cent in 1952 and 35.1 per cent in 1953.
The ratio of males to females in the total sanatorium population has not changed and
remains at 2-1, but males to females over 50 years are in the ratio of 8.5-1. In 1953,
26.6 per cent of the admissions were for persons over 50 years.    On the other hand, D  16
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
this group represents 39.5 per cent of the total population of the sanatoria. Of the
male sanatorium population, 52.9 per cent are over 50 years of age, an increase from
45.6 per cent in 1952 and 48.2 per cent in 1953. Of the 262 admissions of persons
over 50 years of age, only 38 were females, there being six times as many males as
females admitted in the older age-groups. Females over 50 years of age represent 12.5
per cent of female population, and this is an increase from 8.6 per cent in 1952.
Age Distribution
in Sanatorium,
October 3]
st, 1954
Males
Females
Grand
Total
Age-group
Total
Pearson
Willow
Victoria
Tranquille
Total
Pearson
Willow
Victoria
Tranquille
0- 4 ...  	
5- 9 	
	
1
1
1
10-14- - -	
1
1
3
2
1
4
15-19   ■  '	
13
5
3
5
20
8
3
2
7
33
20-24 __ 	
30
11
5
5
9
33
9
7
3
14
63
25-29....- -    .
37
12
3
4
18
47
16
9
6
16
84
30-39. _.	
66
21
14
5
26
75
30
12
9
24
141
40-49-..- 	
79
30
11
7
31
30
10
4
16
109
50-59 	
96
33
8
6
49
17
7
6
4
113
60-69 	
95
39
6
7
43
8
3
1
1
3
103
70-79- .— —	
48
15
4
12
17
3
2
1
51
15
8
1
1
5
2
2
17
Totals—— 	
480
174
55
47    |    204
1
239
85
41
25
88
719
The increase of the older age-groups in sanatorium is due to several factors, as
follows:—
(1) Increased emphasis on case-finding in this age-group has uncovered many
cases.
(2) Advances in medical and surgical treatment have made it possible to offer
hope to these people through active therapy.
(3) Availability of beds has made it possible to admit and retain this group
of people, where formerly it was necessary to give priority to the younger
and more-treatable patients.
However, there is an increasing concentration of older persons in our institutions
for whom little can be done either in the matter of curing their disease or in vocational
rehabilitation. They must be cared for, and because many have no adequate domicile,
they must be retained so that they will not become spreaders of disease, which would
occur if allowed to return to inadequate surroundings.
It was shown earlier that the problem of tuberculosis is shifting from the younger
to the older age-groups: 60.1 per cent of deaths are in persons 50 years and over and
39.5 per cent of those under treatment in sanatorium are over 50 years of age. This has
considerable economic significance. Obviously fewer young people are developing
tuberculosis and fewer are dying of it. It used to be that the disease affected persons in
their most productive years, and meant a great loss to the country through loss of
production. Incapacitation of the bread-winner while the children still needed support
and longer periods of disability than under modern therapy placed many families on social
assistance. As the disease shifts to the older age-groups, while it does create problems
in chronic care, it is alleviating many of the problems connected with the disease in the
younger groups and should prove less of a burden on the economic structure of the
country.
NATIONAL HEALTH GRANTS
The amount available in the Tuberculosis Control Grant for the present fiscal
year is slightly higher than last year at $351,213. At the present time $.313,632 has been
assigned to various projects, practically all of which have been approved. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954 D 17
' In 1953-54, 94.7 per cent of the grant was approved for expenditure in the amount
of $329,317. Because of the fact that some of the equipment was not delivered and
other accounts were not submitted before the cut-off date, this was only utilized to the
extent of $275,714, which was 79.3 per cent utilization. However, this was an increase
from 65 per cent utilization in the previous year.
In this the seventh year of National health grants, a continuing pattern in their use
becomes apparent. About 85 per cent of the money is committed to continuing projects
and is distributed as follows:—
(1) Provision of antimicrobials, $70,500.
(2) X-ray survey programme, $120,000. This provides for payment of hospital admission X-rays, both large and small, together with the operating
costs of all the miniature equipment outside of our institutions and clinics.
(3) Rehabilitation, $26,756.
(4) Provision of staff, $87,293. There are twenty-nine positions provided,
twenty-four of these being in the Division.
Over the years a great deal of this money has been spent on the installation of
photoroentgen X-ray equipment for admission X-ray purposes, but this need has been
largely met, and at the present time only one or two units a year are being added.
Similarly, much money has been spent on equipment for the institutions and the clinics
of the Division, but this need seems to have been largely met, because in the present year
the total for new equipment in this grant amounts to only $29,150. In fact, the total for
completely new projects is only $1,000 more than this figure.
It will be seen that the Tuberculosis Control Grant plays an important part in
case-finding, treatment, and rehabilitation. In actual expenditure, vocational rehabilitation represents less than 10 per cent of the total grant, but it has enabled us to build
up an effective service, and the total project is supported by these funds. It was possible
to reach our objective of having three rehabilitation officers—one in each of our major
sanatoria with the necessary clerical assistance—earlier this year, but this staff has now
been reduced to two rehabilitation officers through the resignation of our Director to
assume duties in a broader field. It is hoped that when a suitable candidate becomes
available, we shall again have a complete staff in this department.
It has also been possible through National health grants to provide most of the
antimicrobials that are used both for in-patient and out-patient care, and, of course, this
is the most important single factor in the control and treatment of tuberculosis at the
present time. Besides this, most of the staff provided, and much of the equipment is
directed toward, the treatment of the patient.
National health grants have also made the admission X-ray programme possible
and, besides having provided the equipment, continue to pay the costs of the operation.
In 1953, 78,740 miniature X-rays were taken on patients admitted to hospital. In the
smaller hospitals using their own equipment, an additional 11,251 X-rays were taken
on large films. In those hospitals where photoroentgen equipment has been installed,
27,120 out-patients were also examined. In these hospitals there has been an increase
in coverage of about 10 per cent in 1954, and approximately 65 per cent of hospital
admissions are now X-rayed. All told, in 1954 there were 105,860 miniature films taken
and 24,511 large films taken in these hospital surveys.
RECALCITRANT PATIENTS
For many years there have been regulations providing for the forcible admission of
infectious cases of tuberculosis to institution if they are proving a public health menace
and refusing treatment. During the time there was a bed shortage for cases seeking
voluntary admission it was not thought advisable to use these powers provided to control
recalcitrants.   However, with the improving bed situation during the past year, action D  18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
has been taken for such cases, and they have been forcibly committed to institutions—
three of these to Tranquille Sanatorium and one to Shaughnessy Chest Unit. For the
most part, these patients have been co-operative, but one case proved difficult from
a point of view of security and management. Moreover, several prisoners from Oakalla
under sentence were transferred to Tranquille for treatment against their wishes, and
again the problem of management proved very difficult.
If the regulations for forcible admission to institution are applied more broadly, it
becomes apparent that the problem of security and care for these patients will become
increasingly difficult, and if we are to continue this programme and large numbers of
persons are committed, we must be prepared to provide special accommodation and,
indeed, to employ special types of staff whose training would be somewhat similar to that
provided at Essondale or Oakalla.
In the past these cases have been sent to Tranquille because barred rooms are
available there. However, these are very limited in number, and as this programme
expands it will be necessary to provide this type of accommodation in all units where
special security measures must be enforced. It would appear that eventually the bulk
of these cases would be amongst the chronic offenders, such as drug addicts and alcoholics,
where little co-operation from the patients while in institution can be expected. Moreover, with the need to provide special security accommodation and close supervision of
these patients, it would appear that the cost of looking after this type of patient would
be greater than the cost for ordinary patients.
CONTROL OF TUBERCULOSIS
The control of tuberculosis in this Province is a co-ordinated effort and involves
Federal, Provincial, and municipal authorities. The Federal authorities are charged with
the responsibility for the control of tuberculosis amongst Indians and have also assumed
the responsibility for the treatment of war veterans. One is happy to relate that the
closest co-operation exists among these groups. Our programmes of control and treatment
are similar, and our exchange of services and information leaves little to be desired.
Within the Provincial authority the closest co-operation between the Division and local
health services must be maintained to produce the highest degree of integration of these
services. While the units of the Division are responsible for the patients while under
treatment and for their follow-up examinations when these patients are outside of institutions, their supervision rests with the local health organization. To deal intelligently
with these patients and to advise them on the basis of the findings of the tuberculosis
clinics, it is therefore essential that the field-workers be kept fully informed and in
possession of all the essential information that is pertinent to the case. This becomes
even more important when such large numbers of patients are continuing treatment in
their homes with antimicrobials after discharge from sanatoria.
Although it is realized that vast amounts of information are constantly being sent
out to the health units and that close liaison is maintained through co-ordinating nurses,
there are sometimes oversights and misunderstandings that are annoying and should be
avoided if at all possible. Of course, the exchange of information is a two-way street,
and only if all of us keep this total picture in mind and realize how many workers are
involved in the complete rehabilitation of a patient can the maximum co-ordination of
our efforts be achieved. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
for the Year January 1st to
December 31st, 1954  TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
CLINICS
Map of British Columbia Showing Statistical Publication Areas
d 21
m
a
b
a
—i
e
b'.
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i
i
i
\.g
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cV":
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/ a <
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U-»\r/s-'_rJ
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vb
Province of British Columbia—
Population, 1,266,000.
Area, 366,255 square miles.
Travelling clinics—
Kootenay Clinic (Nelson)—Statistical Areas 1 and 2.
Interior Clinic (Kamloops)—Statistical Areas 3, 6, 8, 10c, lOd.
Coast Clinic (Vancouver)—Statistical Areas 4 (excluding Fraser Valley), 7, 9c, 9d, 9e.
Island Clinic (Victoria)—Statistical Area 5.
Fraser Valley Clinic (New Westminster)—Statistical Area 4 (excluding Lytton and Lillooet).
Mobile clinics.
Stationary clinics—
Victoria.
Vancouver.
New Westminster.
Tranquille. D 22                                 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent at Each
Centre and Number of Persons Examined by Mobile Unit, 1954
Travelling Diagnostic Clinics
Interior
Centre Visited                                                    Days                          Centre Visited                                                    Days
Allenby (mine only)        2              Oliver       6'/i
Armstrong  .    .      ...   ..       .                    2              Penticton     ..                                      8
Ashcroft ...        1               Prince George        8
Burns Lake         2               Princeton          4
Copper Mountain (mine only) ...        3               Quesnel           9
Dawson Creek
Enderby 	
Fort St. John ..
Hedley (mine only)
Kamloops 	
Kelowna 	
Lillooet 	
Merritt 	
McBride	
31/2
2
2
2
6
15
1
1
1
Revelstoke ...
Salmon Arm
Summerland
Vanderhoof .
Vernon 	
Williams Lake
Total (25 centres)
3
4
2
3V_
9
4
104V.
Coast
Centre Visited
Hazelton 	
Marpole (Provincial Infirmary) 	
Ocean Falls	
Powell River	
Prince Rupert     23
Smithers       4
Days
3
3
2
9
Centre Visited Days
Squamish   6
Terrace (including six days at Home for
Aged)   13
Total (8 centres)
Centre Visited
Abbotsford 	
Allco (Infirmary)
Agassiz
Fraser Valley
Days
2
2
2
Centre Visited
Hope
Total (5 centres)
63
Days
2
22
Chilliwack       14
Island
Centre Visited
Campbell River ...
Chemainus 	
Courtenay	
Duncan 	
Ladysmith 	
Lake Cowichan ...
Days                          Centre Visited Days
12 Nanaimo  36
8 Port Alberni  15
18 Qualicum  3
18 Victoria (Mount St. Mary)   3
Total (10 centres)   129
Kootenay
Centre Visited
Castlegar	
Cranbrook 	
Creston 	
Fernie 	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood 	
Invermere 	
Kaslo 	
Kimberley 	
Days
7
9
6
5
1
7
1
1
2
6
Centre Visited
Michel 	
Nakusp 	
Days
8
4
Nelson      50
New Denver
Rossland 	
Salmo	
Trail 	
Total (18 centres)
7
6
5
20
145 TUBE
Table 1.—Clinics Held
Centre and Number of
Centre Visited
Arras 	
RCULOSIS CO
in British C
Persons Exai
Mobile Si
In
Days        X-rays
1              81
1 126
2 435
1             121
1              91
1              79
1            167
1              72
1              87
.    1             129
3 815
.    1             105
.    1            286
.    1              48
1              53
1             131
1              63
1 82
2 506
1              48
1            310
1             189
1             105
1 197
Frase
Days        X-rays
2 318
.    1             140
.    5         1,538
1             100
1              97
4 1,682
1             131
1             102
4            873
.    1             158
h
Days       X-rays
1            182
1/2          48
1/2         154
.    *              71
.    *              70
*              19
1/2          77
1/2          63
1             141
1             128
1/2         123
1/2          36
1           483
1           376
Holberg, and Jeun
VTROL REPORT,  1954
dlumbia, Showing Time Spent at Ei
/iined by Mobile Unit, 1954—Contin
rRVEY Clinic
'erior
Centre Visited                                   Days
Okanaean Centre          1
D 23
^CH
ued
X-rays
72
133
1,418
678
130
184
133
122
698
1,800
183
993
76
102
356
168
346
400
1,511
623
294
Okanagan Falls	
...     1
Burns Lake -       -       . - .. 	
Oliver	
Osoyoos 	
Oyama
3
2
1
Cawston	
Cecil Lake	
Clayhurst	
East Kelowna          .
.     1
Penny 	
Pouce Coupe	
1
...    1
Farmington
Princeton   	
...    3
Fort St. James	
Fort St. John
Quesnel	
Rose Prairie 	
5
.__    1
Fraser Lake       .  ..     .
Rutland	
Sunset Prairie	
..    2
...    1
Giscome
Grassy Plains
Tupper       . .
...    1
Groundbirch 	
Hedley 	
Hudson Hope    .. .... .   .
Vanderhoof 	
Wells                         	
2
1
Westbank	
West Quesnel   	
West Summerland 	
1
2
...    4
Kaleden 	
Keremeos
Little Prairie
Williams Lake  _.
...    3
McBride  .      .. 	
Winfield 	
Totals (45 centres)
r Valley
Centre Visited
New Westminster (industry)
North Bend	
2
67
Days
3
...    1
100 Mile House	
Montney           ...
14,746
X-rays
747
141
222
100
70
521
931
Naramata   . .	
Centre Visited
Agassiz
Boston Bar
Cloverdale
Port Mann _ - .   ...
...    1
Crescent     . 	
Stave Lake	
Sunnyside                  	
Surrey 	
White Rock	
1
1
...    2
...    6
Dewdney      .. .   	
Fraser Mills (industry)
Harrison Hot Springs	
Totals (16 centres)
land
Centre Visited
Port McNeill	
36
Days
...     1
Hope       .... 	
7,871
X-rays
184
72
76
36
21
349
90
47
10
256
53
24
New Westminster (B.C.E.R.) .....
Centre Visited
Alert Bay   . .   ..   ...    	
Beaver Cove .. .   ...	
Quatsino 	
Redonda Bay   	
1/2
1/2
Blubber Bay
Coal Harbour  ..   	
Refuge Cove	
1/2
Holberg   	
Shoal Bay  	
1
Jeune Landing  	
Sointula 	
....       1
Englewood   	
Hornby Island     .   . 	
Squirrel Cove   .... 	
1/2
Stuart Island	
1/2
Kelsey Bay  	
Lasqueti 	
Mansons Landing      .
Sullivan Bay	
Vananda 	
1
...      Vi
1/2
1
Whaletown 	
Winter Harbour	
Mahatta 	
Port Alice
Total (26 centres)
- Landing.
171/2
Port Hardy ,	
3,189
* One day spent at Coal Harbour D 24
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent at Each
Centre and Number of Persons Examined by Mobile Unit, 1954—Continued
Mobile Survey Clinic—Continued
Centre Visited
Beaverdell 	
Canal Flats	
Castlegar 	
Edgewater 	
Emerald Mine ._-.
Fruitvale 	
Field 	
Days
Golden  	
Grand Forks     3
Greenwood 	
Invermere 	
Kaslo 	
Kinnaird 	
Michel	
Midway	
Kootenay
X-rays
148
118
802
91
111
180
153
220
1,209
336
262
228
252
129
193
Centre Visited
Montrose 	
Nakusp 	
Natal	
Needles 	
New Denver	
Riondel 	
Rock Creek	
Salmo 	
Slocan City	
Days
South Slocan 	
Spillimacheen 	
Trail (industry)    12
Total (27 centres)   43
X-rays
74
535
412
176
318
195
176
342
161
154
96
4,012
11,083
Coast
Centre Visited Days X-rays
Aero Camp   Vi 71
Bella Bella ..... 1 57
Britannia Beach  1 245
Butedale   1 111
Houston   1 130
Masset   2 245
Moresby Camp   Vi 43
Mount Sheer       1 126
Namu   1 149
New Hazelton   1 64
Port Clements   1 59
Port Edward  1 104
Prince Rupert (industry)   4 492
Centre Visited
Queen Charlotte City
Sandspit 	
Smithers	
Squamish 	
Stewart 	
Telkwa 	
Terrace 	
Usk 	
Watson Island
Woodfibre 	
ays
X-rays
1
151
1
79
3
598
2V_
761
1
329
1
112
3
736
1
46
1
322
m
522
Total (23 centres)   32
5,552 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 25
It should be noted that a concerted effort is being made in the older age-group where
the majority of diagnostic examinations have taken place.
Table 2.—Persons Examined at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1954
Item
Stationary
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
New
Westminster
Travelling
Coast
Kootenay
Interior
Island
Fraser
Valley
Total
Total cases X-rayed	
Type of case—
New	
Re-examination 	
Known   TB.   cases   reexamined	
Other re-examinations..
Reason for examination—
Referred from survey	
Symptoms 	
Routine check 	
Age-groups examined—
0- 4 years ._... M.
F.
5- 9    „     M.
F,
10-14    „     M.
F.
15-19    „     M.
F.
20-24    „      M.
F
25-29    „      M.
F.
30-39    „     M.
F.
40-49    „     M.
F.
50-59    „     M.
F.
60-69    „     M.
F.
70 years and over M.
F.
Racial origin—
White	
Ind ian	
Breed 	
Chinese	
Japanese	
Other	
Usual occupations—
Clerks 	
Fishermen 	
Hospital-workers	
Housewives	
Labourers—
Common	
Skilled	
Loggers	
Miners—
Coal	
Hard-rock	
Nurses—
Graduate	
Student	
Teachers  	
Other professional 	
Students—
Normal	
University.	
Other	
Other and unspecified	
17,910
3,212
14,698
8,766
5,932
950
2,179
14,781
133
158
350
307
267
245
190
254
335
526
678
1,106
1,589
2,360
1,754
1,596
1,707
857
1,632
728
831
307
16,994
37
11
695
141
32
2,072
112
277
5,030
2,862
921
202
26
294
263
78
175
360
20
143
1,329
3,746
1,588
248
1,340
325
1,015
4
114
1,470
19
19
12
31
21
94
64
144
98
135
149
260
148
129
102
72
56
18
1,559
3
26
628
177
96
83
7
157
15
49
58
205
5,269
1,368
3,901
2,058
1,843
390
970
3,909
136
136
145
120
66
48
75
72
110
184
152
264
399
671
458
423
360
296
509
198
330
117
4,942
46
3
274
2
2
563
9
72
1,558
461
287
18
3
2
24
57
139
19
23
351
1,595
2,715
573
2,142
1,635
507
111
464
2,140
144
127
127
133
21
16
25
32
54
79
120
215
291
214
220
191
82
156
45
2,660
3
11
32
3
6
74
28
27
735
417
212
40
49
16
12
67
204
796
130
1,601
390
1,211
20
82
1,629
16
12
36
39
40
33
15
38
35
33
39
74
124
118
84
110
32
282
48
417
18
1,669
1
3
45
86
16
71
285
137
58
11
3
12
164
882
2,305
632
1,673
834
839
202
304
1,799
12
53
36
69
61
44
45
59
68
76
126
152
217
257
251
208
116
174
72
151
46
2,140
38
1
14
112
82
"40
728
181
95
15
57
69
37
1
36
18
2
277
667
2,822
790
2,032
1,110
922
132
3
2,687
39
26
63
91
69
77
67
102
44
103
78
173
251
358
258
257
191
133
176
98
119
49
2,709
4
18
20
70
1
145
17
962
186
351
35
10
25
2
57
48
394
590
2,614
418
2,196
1,125
1,071
80
338
2,196
28
31
65
59
43
35
52
51
40
110
68
161
234
312
275
273
179
131
206
134
39
2,504
81
9
20
56
16
16
997
145
249
104
28
1
25
2
23
43
236
672
428
89
339
208
131
89
339
10
15
10
9
3
11
9
16
2
20
31
43
24
39
44
16
32
15
58
9
420
3
2
2
1
10
1
26
126
27
19
9
3
1
3
11
2
41
148
37,382
7,460
29,922
16,451
13,471
1,889
4,543
30,950
533
536
861
825
584
527
492
699
750
1,272
1,270
2,179
3,108
4,636
3,506
3,272
3,148
1,741
3,258
1,347
2,202
632
35,597
132
49
1,166
372
66
3,200
182
1,174
10,598
4,512
2,275
441
121
395
652
124
381
747
47
178
3,054
9,301 D 26
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The trend away from collapse therapy is noted by the fact that following a 35-percent reduction in pneumothorax refills in 1953 there was a reduction of approximately
66 per cent in 1954. This has greatly lessened the work in the pneumothorax clinics
and indicates that cases previously initiated are now completing their treatment and very
few new pneumothorax cases are being added to the lists. However, this trend is not
apparent in the pneumoperitoneum refills.
Table 3.—Treatment and Tests at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics,
1954
Stationary
Travelling
Item
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
New
Westminster
Coast
Kootenay
Interior
Island
Fraser
Valley
Total
Pneumothorax—
Initial  	
Refill	
1,582
2,472
237
350
15
4,910
5,189
167
17
33
189
350
58
43
7
103
3
188
2,072
307
212
43
1
545
1,323
	
15
5
12
29
200
-—
2,129
Pneumoperitoneum—
Initial ■	
Refill	
2,749
244
541
20
Fluoroscopes_ 	
Tuberculin tests given6	
5,861
9,134 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
Table 4.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1954
D 27
Clinics
Mobile
Stationary
Metropolitan
Health
Unit,
Courtenay
General
Hospitals
Willow
Chest
Centre
Victoria
New
Westminster
Provincial
Metropolitan
Total
28,972
43
7
16
3
5
8
16
10
6
9,576
5
1
3
2
1
9,808
32
21
4
8
9
8
4
1
42,441
28
20
7
6
53,243
43
35,845
54
2
24
6
6
3
9
17
14
2
1
9
7
1
1,464
1
105,860
134
6
79
11
20
20
28
35
15
5
9
6
10
6
287,210
New tuberculosis cases	
Primary 	
340
16
26
7
8
1
10
15
13
1
1
2
2
189
40
54
24
Inactive —	
7
6
4
1
1
1
71
98
Active  	
61
15
10
Inactive  —
6
4
1
1
12
9
1
2
6
1
1
2
2
36
45
21
57
28,650
108
3
2
2
1
2
2
12
31
23
2
	
1
3
5
446
9
284
21
16
61
186
121
10
9
47
55
27
7
3
8
9
5
117
313
391
485
102,801
1,173
1
1
2
61
36
4
2
7
23
12
4
1
3
4
12
4
1
3
4
1
39
47
28
57
35,409
150
5
Non-pulmonary  	
1
1
2
9
77
70
2
43
2
10
31
21
1
668
	
11
	
56
2
430
25
	
1
5
50
18
3
1
1
22
	
86
Inactive	
297
173
	
18
10
4
11
3
1
5
15
4
1
60
	
85
48
25
4
	
	
1
1
17
68
129
97
41,813
212
1
2
13
1
2
3
16
7
Suspect 	
Pleurisy 	
1
15
1
15
9,449
90
6
8
13
9,723
26
26
42
25
16
52,922
99
244
541
595
6
1,443
7
746
Negative-               	
Other     .                	
282,211
1,865
Note.—The above figures do not include 626 survey films taken at Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital for which no
breakdown of findings is available. D 28
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 2.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics,
1945-54
(Excluding Indians)
No. of Cases
(in OOO'sJ
TOTAL
/
/
****
^
^^
/
/
RE-EXAM
NATIONS
-    —
/
f
/
/
/
/
/
>
/
	
•m,                NEW
T-  ^   ^
EXAMINATIONS
\
\
\
s
/
/
>'   /
/
/
/
\
\
>-'"
	
/
1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 29
Chart 3.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics,
1945-54
(Excluding Indians)
No. of Coses
(in OOO'sl
TOTAL
EXAMINATIONS
-
r^x-
-.-£=
^ ^
re-examination:
"*-».«.	
NEW EXAMINATIONS
■—  .
_
NEW CASES EXAMINED BY CLINICS
A definite trend is noted in the new examinations carried out by the travelling
clinics, where since 1950 there has been a reduction in new examinations of almost
50 per cent. This is an indication of the availability of miniature X-ray services
throughout the travelling-clinic areas which now are used as a screening method and
only selected cases are given a diagnostic examination. This trend was evident earlier
in the stationary clinics.
Table 5.—New Examinations and Re-examinations in the Units Operated
by This Division During 1950 to 1954
(Excluding Indians)
Total
Examinations
Stationary Clinics
Travelling Clinics
Mobile1
Year
New
Examinations
Re-
examinations
New
Examinations
Reexaminations
Survey
Clinics
1950- --	
1951.  — -.
1952     _    	
132,195
119,099
99,836
127,757
128,805
35,816
26,110
21,603
25,159
25,173
47,269
55,481
59,205
56,928
51,291
3,897
3,116
3,170
2,462
2,059
9,463
7,958
8,204
7.698
7.841
35,750
26,434
7,654
1953 	
1954  	
35,510
42,441
1 Excludes mobile unit operated by Vancouver Metropolitan Health Committee (see Table 8). D 30
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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r- r-      ri ih
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m Tt       oo rn
vovo       O ■*
i r-      qo r-
rJ <-i      m t—
vc vo      r- cn
Os t~-      ts
tH  ^fr —  —
l en      rt rn
Tt rt       ca rn
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so CA        ■* (N
os r~      vo r-
w «H w CN
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m rt      en rt
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CA CA        rf Tt SO rf Tr* CA CO Tt O CA
rt CA CA rn rf in rf CA
rt en      ca Tt
%&,   gn; g»; gn; «gp; ;§& s*   S* S^ S^ s* TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1954
D 31
CO   VO             *-t   Tf
rn t-h        m t-h
Ov  Tt
VO O
N00
tF>-
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CC    Tf
o
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cn r~>       so rn
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Tt     j        r- en
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Tt    P-
CS
vC CS        tJ- cm
vO vO
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CS    -H
cs
cs
m
vC »-       rn Tt
ON  O
as
CO
tn rt      Tt
en SO
Tt    CS
Os
vO
CO CS
Q
en
O   Tt
cs
CA      j            !     !
vo
Tt
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Tt
j    ;      cs Tt
VC Os
CS
vO «-.
s
ten      xtt.
Tt    T-t
•n tr-
cs
i-   -
r~ t-h
CO
in
UlH
Ci
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cs
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cs
i      i         H
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in
i-      ;   j
co m
cs
t-i m
Tt
Tt   CS
vO
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m
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CS   Tt
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CO
cs
m rt      r~ rt
cs r-
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Tt    CS
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cs
CS      !
cs
rt     |         CS      !
CS CS
Tt  rH
Tt
IT)
CO     1        rN     i
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cs r*
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CS CO
CS    T-H
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80 yrs. and over M.
F.
rU
0
H
91
"rt
O
■d
c
0 d 3:
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
During 1954 there were 717 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed by clinics,
as compared with 709 in 1953. Among these, 412 or approximately 57 per cent had
minimal tuberculosis; 199 or approximately 28 per cent were moderately advanced.
This indicates an increase in minimal cases discovered and a decrease in the far advanced
cases discovered, with 20 less far advanced cases.
In 1953, 47.5 per cent of new cases were classified as active, whereas in 1954
51 per cent of new cases diagnosed were active.
Table 7.—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Examined by Clinics,
by Infection and Condition, 1954
(Excluding Indians)
Stationary
Travelling
Infection and Condition
Pearson
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
New
Westminster
Coast
Kootenay
Interior
Island
Total
3
3
1
1
4
30
4
23
3
185
52
15
65
53
129
11
7
95
16
37
1
33
3
63
27
216
75
5
2
2
1
3
1
1
1
3
3
2
1
1
40
4
10
20
6
19
3
12
4
6
1
4
1
4
14
36
12
5
1
4
61
33
4
15
9
14
5
1
7
1
3
1
2
38
7
28
10
5
5
27
7
2
7
11
12
1
10
1
7
7
8
2
29
12
2
2
16
3
5
8
4
2
2
3
9
10
2
2
36
11
5
11
9
8
3
1
2
2
1
.._..
14
6
16
11
5
3
2
39
4
12
16
7
10
3
5
2
1
1
4
15
25
11
50
Arrested	
Active   	
5
39
6
412
Inactive —	
Arrested-  	
116
50
143
103
Moderately advanced -	
199
21
Arrested  —
16
134
Activity undetermined	
28
56
Inactive  -	
Arrested —	
Active     -  	
3
49
4
Total pulmonary—
Inactive  	
Arrested	
137
74
365
141
Totals   	
4
381
8
66
83
51
22
47
55
717
Source: Case Examination, Form TB. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 33
Table 8.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Survey Clinics, and
General Hospital Units, 1945-54.
Institutions
Stationary
Travelling
Mobile
Stationary
Metropolitan
General
Hospital
Units
Year
Diagnostic
Survey
Diagnostic
Survey
Provincial
Metropolitan
Total
1945	
3,858
6,667
5,196
6,111
6,432
6,412
6,361
7,106
8,395
9,297
11,075
16,781
20,986
24,144
27,695
28,500
29,192
27,450
29,001
27,482
28,850
45,810
44,196
57,428
56,374
54,585
52,399
53,380
53,089
48,982
12,613
11,289
12,996
13,399
13,508
13,360
11.074
13,374
10,160
9,900
764
763
1,063
91
89,799i
99,103i
155,6741
127,0811
140,7221
80,686i
26,434
7,654
35,510
42,441
57,509
58,579
65,207
53,243
24,355
32,182
35,879
35,845
45,210
71,410
80,795
95,054
105,860
146,939
1946	
1947	
1948. -	
1949..	
1950	
180,413
240,111
228,254
244,731
228,753
1951	
278,734
1952	
281,319
1953..-	
332,295
1954	
332,996
1 No breakdown available for mobile units prior to 1951.
Source: X-ray Ledger TB. 73 and Clinic Ledgers TB. 71 and TB. 41.
'
 - •■	
■
; ■ D 34
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 4.—X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals,
1945-54.
No. of Examinations
(in 000's)
*
TOTAL     ^
.MOBILE UNITS
y
*+
•»• ^^^^
~~ ^ _^
s
STATIONARY
CUNICS*       \
y
«»      ..
\, «•*
•
■* **
*
#_'
_•* ^_
/
/
TRAVELLIr-
. CilNICS
^<!:<s^s.
——'
1
1945 1946 '947 1948 1949 1950
1952 1953
"Include* Jtotionary melropoliton from 1951. Chart 5.—X-ray Examinations Made by Institutions, Diagnostic and Treatment
Clinics, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals, 1945-54.
No. of Exom!nations
(in 000's)
TOTAL    ^^
.
\
/
/
\
>
^
S
*
*
\
/
*
1
\    MOBILE
\
JNITS
,    ^"'
-""
\
>
b*.- ^^m —
>.^'
1/
/
T                 »^
^^
STATIONARY
SURVEY*
r\
/
y
y
- «■ ""
DIAGNC
STIC AND treat*
ENT CLINICS
	
"""--.
.»*
INSTITUT
ONS
—'	
'Includes "stationary metropolitan". D 36
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
GENERAL SUMMARIES
There is a marked increase in the number of planographs, from 1,306 in 1953 to
1,608 in 1954, indicating the need for investigation due to our present-day methods of
treatment.
Table 9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1954
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
New
Westminster
Jericho
Beach
Pearson
Total
X-rays taken   	
Chest X-rays—
Flat-
In-patient 	
Out-patient 	
V.D. Division _	
Stereoscopic—
In-patient 	
Out-patient 	
Planograph—
In-patient 	
Out-patient	
Other chest—
In-patient.. _ ___	
Out-patient 	
Gastro-intestinal—
In-patient _
Out-patient	
Bones and joints—
In-patient	
Out-patient— _ 	
V.D. Division	
Other-
In-patient- — 	
Out-patient	
Fluoroscope—
In-patient - 	
Out-patient 	
V.D. Division	
Electrocardiogram—
In-patient    	
Out-patient  	
V.D. Division 	
Indian Department examinations _
Lipiodol injection—
In-patient	
Out-patient — 	
23,242
1,731
17,580
522
335
467
559
1,704
31
6
113
61
6
76
17
438
4,910
173
216
11
165
85
20
18
1,462
2,003
1,606
253
6
428
28
48
41
20
5
355
201
7,056
485
5,321
14
1
79
75
261
703
43
36
12
6
29
180
2,715
2,697
481
303
126
14
30
1
559
225
2,734
1,461
173
456
5
322
1
30
249
9
20
2,230
26
40,690
5,983
27,503
536
14
9
1,127
555
1,600
2,451
75
10
468
147
6
130
28
3,277
5,850
173
354
11
165
91
36
19
Source: X-ray Ledger TB. 73. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1954
Table 10.—Laboratory Report, 1954
D 37
Willow
Chest
Centre
Sputum tests—
Routine—
In-patient	
Out-patient _.
Concentrated—
In-patient	
Out-patient 	
Stomach washings—
In-patient	
Out-patient 	
Guinea-pig inoculation-
In-patient 	
Out-patient	
Blood tests—
Sedimentations—
In-patient	
Out-patient 	
V.D. Division	
Haemoglobin—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division	
Red-blood count—
In-patient   _
Out-patient 	
V.D. Division.	
White-blood count—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division	
Differential—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division	
Blood chemistry	
Other special blood tests
Kahn—
In-patient	
Out-patient..	
Urinalysis—
Routine—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Quantitative—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Smear .	
Cultures—
Sputum—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Others-
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Other tests.	
3,600
1,680
105
739
489
17,092
2
1,509
365
2
354
73
2
394
392
91
2
578
1,723
276
27
,143
553
207
52
608
2,020
80
55
121
Tranquille
2,728
144
239
24
525
66
1,121
181
177
502
33
528    |
33
540
39
189
939
381
144
1,902
119
10
652
433
86
965
47
1,724
Victoria
New
Westminster
Jericho
Beach
671
462
17
41
233
11
253
2
249
2
211
2
207
2
90
79
544
1
26
14
633
1,793
35
11
35
48
2,000
625
262
10
46
10
25
42
Pearson
2,537
12
35
78
1
19
10
247
11
225
15
989
96
780
280
355
67
444
36
444
36
224
65
298
110
1,401
147
810
9
73
222
Kootenay
30
260
Total
3,833
3,612
4,870
144
586
897
527
67
3,094
19,650
2
3,476
834
2
1,485
175
2
1,619
159
2
1,618
168
2
1,159
2,807
1,109
291
5,237
831
243
794
2,484
3,908
1,153
113
2,103
Source: Daily Laboratory Ledger TB. 72. d 38 department of health and welfare
Table 11.—Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics, 1945-54
Total
Institutions
Clinics
<_
_
Year
c
o
o
4>
Su
'3
c
rt
'3
c
a
_
3
.rt
rt
SS
a
c_
O
rt
o^
a
CA
o
2™
O
o
H
£o
i_
H
PL,
>
O
H
5-e
H
0J
>
o
H
_.*
d
t_>
H
o
>
1945 	
285
274
9
2
127
117
9
1
158
157
1
1946 	
353
452
334
366
3
72
	
16
14
174
297
160
211
3
72
11
14
179
155
174
155
	
5
1947   	
1948.....	
700
415
258
	
27
552
273
252
27
148
142
6
1949  	
683
437
210
	
36
554
308
210
36
129
129
1950
652
721
485
539
146
145
	
21
37
486
513
319
332
146
145
21
36
166
208
166
207
1951 	
1
1952  ... _
738
545
154
39
553
360
154
39
185
185
1953      	
796
674
519
470
151
110
75
77
51
17
602
430
333
233
150
110
75
77
44
10
194
244
186
237
1
7
1954
7
Source: Institutional Ledger TB. 70 and Clinic Ledger TB. 71.
Table 12.—Dental Report, 1954
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
Jericho
Beach
Pearson
Total
Patient-visits—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Examinations—
In-patient —	
Out-patient	
Consultations—
In-patient.
Out-patient-
Fillings, including cement bases—
In-patient..
Out-patient:
Prophylactic treatment-
In-patient —	
Out-patient.
Surgical removal, impacted teeth—
In-patient   	
Out-patient  _	
Denture fittings—
In-patient   	
Out-patient _  	
Extractions—
In-patient _  	
Out-patient  	
X-rays	
Other	
462
358
90
113
90
20
184
305
29
7
3
1
182
103
130
79
1,056
33
2,099
256
147
639
343
861
1,380
2^685
10
488
34
250
19
42
3
148
23
65
1
52
4
162
6
326
30
652
127
122
1,230
4,401
392
22
250
868
132
17
125
421
23
33
419
1,423
328
5
78
520
	
8
1
10
66
5
97
644
1,946
	
	
109
1
471
2,308
109
33
2,763
7,189
5
64
239
Source: Ledger TB. 74. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 39
Table 13.—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report, 1954
Willow Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
Pearson
Total
Patient-visits—
In-patient	
Out-patient.	
Eye—
Examinations-
In-patient	
Out-patient-
Prescriptions—
In-patient	
Out-patient-
Refractions—
In-patient-	
Out-patient-
Other treatments—
In-patient _	
Out-patient	
Consultations—
In-patient 	
Out-patient-
Ear, nose, and throat—
Examinations—
In-patient	
Out-patient 	
Treatments—
In-patient ...
Out-patient—	
Consultations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Surgical procedures.—.
80
34
60
2
37
1
36
1
25
34
25
17
180
58
6
60
216
156
95
138
14
71
28
5
" 5
501
34
325
2
190
1
180
1
19
163
34
36
5
23
Source: Ledger TB. 75. D 40
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
INSTITUTIONS—SUMMARIES
This report would indicate that pneumothorax now plays a very small part in the
treatment of tuberculosis and has almost been abandoned in our institutions. Last year
a marked drop was recorded in pneumothoraces initiated to 39. In 1954 only 2 initial
pneumothoraces have been given. There is also noted a reduction of almost 50 per cent
in the number of pneumoperitoneums being initiated, there being 40 initiated in 1954.
The marked reduction in total patient-days in the institutions of the Division is due
to the fact that there were many empty beds at Tranquille Sanatorium during the summer,
and then in the fall, as a result of lessened demands for beds, Jericho Beach Hospital
was closed.
Table 14.—Institutions—General Summaries, 1954
Item
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
Jericho
Beach
Pearson
Total
35,418
209
210
1
36
5
247
62
104,962
354
364
25,741
136
144
21,322
30
76
18
2
179
17
92,493
286
296
1
91
26
1,941
279,936
1,015
1,090
2
Treatments—
Pneumothoraces—
Refill         	
94
7
233
80
15
14
11
254
Pneumoperitoneum—
Initial - -	
Refill                                                         	
40
2,614
170
30
21
2
4
30
Stage 1            	
47
2
4
1
10
68
4
Stage 2	
8
1
- ~
1
2
1
2
Extra-pleural pneumothorax	
1
2
1
Phrenic"—
2
Resection—
Segmental .-	
52
45
64
5
233
70
706
123
106
11
17
7
12
1
110
72
23
168
5
4
69
52
76
Pneumonectomy  	
Thoracoscopy —  	
Bronchoscopy "	
Bronchospirometry  -	
6
77
2
135
33
3
11
430
144
864
9
333
114
Autopsies - - ,.	
	
26
Source:   Clinic Ledgers TB. 71 and TB. 41 and Institutional Ledger TB. 70;  Admission Form TB. 78 and Discharge
Form TB. 79. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1954
D 41
Table 15.—Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) Given by
Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1945-54
Total
Initial
Refill
Year
Total
Initial
Institutions
Stationary
Clinics
Traveling
Clinics
Total
Refill
Institutions
Stationary
Clinics
Traveling
Clinics
1945 	
17,121
21,883
21,919
21,788
22,393
327
413
354
339
334
286
207
125
39
2
325
397
350
336
328
279
201
119
39
2
1
5
1
2
5
7
6
6
1
11
3
1
1
16,794
21,470
21,565
21,449
22,059
20,853
20,044
15,244
8,306
2,383
9,678
12,347
12,698
12,745
11,066
9,174
6,769
5,031
1,983
254
6,892
8,799
8,616
8,617
10,873
11,649
13,247
10,160
6,281
2,114
224
1946..	
1947	
1948	
1949 	
324
251
87
120
1950. 	
1951  ..
21,139
20,251
15,369
8,345
2,385
30
28
1952  	
1953.	
1954    	
53
42
15
Source: Clinic Ledgers TB. 71 and TB. 41 and Institutional Ledger TB. 70.
Table 16.-
INSTITUTIONS—ADMISSIONS
-Total Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions
in Each Age-group, 1950-54
-	
50
IS
1951
1952
1953
1954
Age-group
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
5
0.9
5.9
22.1
24.8
18.0
12.7
9.6
6.0
3
42
196
243
231
115
94
53
8
0.3
4.3
19.9
24.7
23.4
11.7
9.5
5.4
0.8
1
0- 9 years  	
18
1.9
0.6
9
9
45
210
225
190
153
112
67
4
0.9
10-19    „        	
61
312
6.6
33.7
42
262
241
4.5
28.2
26.0
58
219
245
4.4
20-29    „	
20.7
30-39    „      	
224
131
87
70
25
24.1
14.1
9.4
7.5
2.7
22.2
40-49    „   .	
151
109
82
36
16.3
11.7
178
126
18.7
50-59
15 1
60-69    „	
8.8
3.9
95
59
11.0
6.6
Not stated 	
0.4
Totals   _
928
100.0
928
100.0
989
100.0
985
100.0
1,015
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. __  42
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
in
I
o
>/.
a.
Oh
5
O
P.
O
W
O
<
M
co
Z
o
H
.-
H
P
o.
Z
t-H
o
H
no
Z
o
S
Q
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B.
O
z
o
H
D
m
3
H
«
z
w
o
i_:
w
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H
P.
U TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 43
It will be noted that in 1954 there were 1,015 admissions to institutions, as against
985 in 1953, in spite of the fact that during the year, particularly in the summer
months, there was a considerable number of vacant beds. This is probably explained
by the fact that many cases were brought in for short-term purposes of assessment and
review.
The number of pleurisy and effusion cases admitted in 1954 was 20, which is
double the number in the previous year.
Table 17.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1954
Age-group
Diagnosis
_j _
o-o
rt'n
■Slig
HO-ffl
OJ..
3 >._
P.sg(fcj
_ i-oj
% 3™
3,23
HC. O
OQ
H
■a
70 years and over.,—	
Not stated 	
Totals	
Grand totals.
0- 4 years	
    M.
F.
5- 9 „
       M.
F.
10-14 „ 	
 M.
F.
15-19 „ 	
 - M.
F.
20-24 „ 	
 _ M.
F.
25-29 „  	
 - M.
F.
30-39 „ 	
 _ . M.
F.
40-49 „ 	
  M.
F.
50-59 „
_  M.
F.
60 69 ,,  -
 M.
F.
F.
_M.
F.
..M.
F.
6
11
16
15
14
37
26
46
33
16
27
7
21
2
10
4
4    j     154
8     j     139
12    |    293
16
15
27
26
50
45
50
28
60
13
35
6
23
3
268
146
414
11
11
27
18
36
13
38
2
41
2
22
4
180
59
239
12
20
24
13
37
39
43
111
114
127
63
131
22
101
11
642
373
1,015
39
82
128
225
190
153
112
67
1,015
1,015
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. d 44 department of health and welfare
Chart 7.—Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1954
Age
Group
10-19 yrs.
20-29 yrs.
30-39 yrs.
40-49 yrs.
50-59 yrs.
60-69 yrs.
70 yrs and
over
20 40 60 80 100 120
160 180
I   M
I    FAR ADV
MODERATELY ADVANCED
MINIMAL
MODERATELY ADVANCED
FAR ADVANCED
MODERATELY ADVANCED
FAR ADVANCED
MODERATELY ADVANCED
FAR ADVANCED
MODERATELY ADVANCED
FAR ADVANCED
MODERATELY ADVANCED
I
FAR ADVANCED
MODERATELY ADVANCED
FAR ADVANCED
20 40
60 80 100
No. of Admissions
140 160 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954 D 45
Table 18.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1954
Diagnosis
Total
by Sex
Racial Origin
Primary
Minimal
Moderately
Advanced
Far
Advanced
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
with
Effusion
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
without
Effusion
Other
Diagnoses
Grand
Total
White   - M.
3
135
230
155
10
22
555
F.
4
122
131
46
8
8
319
874
Chinese  M.
1
16
24
19
2
1
63
F.
7
2
1
1
11
74
Japanese  M.
F.
1
3
2
1
1
4
4
8
Hindu M.
1
3
2
6
F.
1
1
	
	
2
8
Half-breed and Indian M.
1
9
3
1
14
F.
4
6
11
12
4
37
51
Totals M.
4
154
268
180
12
24
642
F.
8
139
146
59
8
.._
13
373
1,015
Grand totals
12
293
414
239
20
37
1,015
1,015
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 19.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1954
Diagnosis
Total
by Sex
Type of Case
Primary
Minimal
Moderately
Advanced
Far
Advanced
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
with
Effusion
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
without
Effusion
Other
Diagnoses
Grand
Total
First admission  M.
1
121
146
98
12
20
398
F.
2
101
73
16
7
13
212
610
1
31
31
110
56
79
38
1
	
3
223
F.
127
350
Review .  ~ M.
3
1
10
1
15
F.
4
5
14
2
......
25
40
Continuation   of   treat
ment      M.
	
1
2
3
	
6
F.
1
2
3
3
._....
9
15
Totals  M.
4
154
268
180
12      |
24
642
F.
8
139
146
59
8      1
13
373
1,015
Grand totals	
12
1
293
414
239
20      |
37
1,015      |
1
1,015
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. D 46 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 20.—Total Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis. 1954
Total
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
Jericho Beach
Pearson
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary	
Minimal	
Moderately advanced.
12
293
414
239
20
37
1.2
28.9
40.8
23.5
2.0
3.6
9
53
93
44
10
4.3
25.3
44.5
21.1
4.8
101
127
91
18
17
28.5
35.9
25.7
5.1
4.8
1
48
59
27
1
0.7
35.3
43.4
19.9
0.7
1
12
14
1
2
3.3
40.0
46.7
3.3
6.7
2
90
123
63
1
7
0.7
31.5
43.0
22.0
Tuberculous pleurisy..
Other diagnosis	
0.4
2.4
Totals	
1,015
100.0
209
100.0
354
100.0
136
100.0
30
100.0
286
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 21.—Total Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1950-54
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
23
264
410
219
3
9
2.5
28.4
44.2
23.6
0.3
1.0
1
19    |       2.0
288    1      31.1
50
324
383
209
7
16
5.1
32.8
38.7
21.1
0.7
1.6
4
303
393
262
10
13
0.4
12
1.2
30.8
39.9
26.6
1.0
1.3
293
414
239
20
37
28.9
Moderately advanced	
Far advanced 	
402
209
4
6
43.3
22.5
0.5
0.6
40.8
23.5
2.0
Other diagnosis	
3.6
Totals	
928
100.0
928
100.0
989
100.0
985
100.0
1,015
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 22.—First Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis. 1954
Total
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
Jericho Beach
Pearson
Diagnosis
Num
Per
Num
Per
Num
Per
Num
Per
Num
Per
Num
Per
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
ber
Cent
Primary	
3
0.5
1
1.6
1
1.2
1
0.5
Minimal.	
222
36.4
21
35.0
89
35.4
40
46.0
	
72
35.4
Moderately advanced-
219
35.9
19
31.7
78
31.1
33
37.8
2
22.2
87
42.9
Far advanced	
114
18.7
12
20.0
50
19.9
12
13.8
4
44.5
36
17.7
Tuberculous pleurisy _
19
3.1
	
	
18
7.2
	
	
1
11.1
	
	
33
5.4
7
11.7
16
6.4
1
1.2
2
22.2
7
3.5
Totals	
610    | 100.0
1
60
100.0
251
100.0
87
100.0
9    | 100.0
1
203
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 23.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1950-54
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary —  .
Minimal-  —
Moderately advanced    	
3
199
208
107
3
6
0.6
37.8
39.6
20.3
0.6
1.1
11
203
214
106
3
4
2.0
37.5
39.6
19.6
0.6
0.7
35
236
188
91
4
12
6.2
41.7
33.2
16.1
0.7
2.1
2
217
195
129
5
9
0.4
39.0
35.0
23.1
0.9
1.6
3
222
219
114
19
33
0.5
36.4
35.9
18.7
Tuberculous pleurisy
Other diagnosis	
3.1
5.4
526
100.0
541
100.0
566
100.0
557
100.0
610
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 47
Chart 8.—First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis
(Percentage Distribution), 1950-54
MODERATELY
ADVANCED
^w
^^ n^
/
.+
-"—""
N
>
*,
^
y
>
—
v^
/
""■
—
**N.
/
\
^» — ■
rAlNlrA^
>
FAR ADVANCED
y
X
/
^"^
x
X
/
-
*
X
X
/
_ —  —   —
■ D 48 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 24.—Readmissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1954
Total
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
Jericho Beach
Pearson
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary 	
Minimal..	
Moderately advanced-
1
62
166
117
1
3
0.3
17.7
47.4
33.4
0.3
0.9
26
51
29
2
24.1
47.2
26.9
1.8
11
45
40
1
11.3
46.4
41.2
1.1
8
25
13
17.4
54.3
28.3
1
10
10
4.8
47.6
47.6
1
16
35
25
1
1.3
20.5
44.8
32.1
Tuberculous pleurisy-
Other diagnosis	
1.3
Totals	
350
100.0
108
100.0
97
100.0
46
100.0
21
100.0
78
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 25.—Readmissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1950-54
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
2
39
161
99
1
0.6
12.9
53.3
32.8
0.4
2
65
148
97
1
0.6
20.8
47.3
31.0
0.3
8
74
174
112
1
3
2.1
19.9
46.8
30.1
0.3
0.8
67
141
107
21.2
44.8
34.0
1
62
166
117
1
3
0.3
17.7
Moderately advanced	
47.4
33.4
Tuberculous pleurisy	
0.3
0.9
Totals	
302
100.0
313
100.0
372
100.0
315    |    100.0
1
350
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 26.—Review Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1954
Total
Willow
Tranquille
Victoria
Jericho Beach
Pearson
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
7
6
24
2
1
17.5
15.0
60.0
5.0
2.5
7
6
21
1
1
19.4
16.7
58.3
2.8
2.8
2
100.0
1
1
50.0
50.0
	
	
Moderately advanced-
	
Tuberculous pleurisy...
Other diagnosis—	
	
—    1   	
     I   	
	
Totals	
40
100.0
36
100.0
2
100.0
2
100.0
     1     -----
1
	
	
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 27.—Review Admissions by Diagnosis
(Percentage Distribution), 1950-54
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954 .
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
18
26
41
13
2
18.0
26.0
41.0
13.0
2.0
6
20
40
6
2
8.1
27.0
54.1
8.1
2.7
3
14
19
6
7.2
33.3
45.2
14.3
1
15
48
11
5
3
1.2
18.1
57.8
13.3
6.0
3.6
7
6
24
2
1
17.5
Minimal      —    —	
Moderately advanced 	
15.0
60.0
5.0
Tuberculous pleurisy—	
Other diagnosis.	
2.5
Totals	
100
100.0
74
100.0
42    |    100.0
1
83
100.0    |      40
!
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1954
INSTITUTIONS—DISCHARGES
D 49
There were 1,090 discharges, and it is interesting to note that the low percentage
of deaths in sanatorium is being maintained, and almost one-third of these deaths were
due to underlying conditions other than tuberculosis.
There is a further increase in the number of arrested cases being discharged from
institutions, and this has almost doubled in the last five years.
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1950-54
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
Condition
Number
Per
. Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Inactive 	
Arrested. _	
158
510
118
99
18
17.5
56.4
13.1
11.0
2.0
166
517
121
102
36
17.6
54.9
12.9
10.8
3.8
41
191
382
139
113
24
4.5
21.4
42.8
15.6
13.0
2.7
20
274
508
153
54
17
1.9
26.7
49.5
14.9
5.3
1.7
31
353
492
115
67
32
2.8
32.4
45.1
10.6
Dead1	
6.2
Other diagnosis   . „
2.9
Totals
903
100.0
942
100.0
890
100.0
1,026
100.0
1,090
100.0
1 Includes 22 deaths occurring in tuberculosis institutions in which the underlying cause of death was other than
tuberculosis.
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79.
 .-
. D 50
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 9.—Percentage Distribution of Discharges from Institutions
according to condition on discharge, 1945-54
1
"»*.
--*
ACTIVE
1
MPROVED
•-1
/
/
/
t
\
\
y
\
\
/
/
/
\
\
/
/
/
V
\
\
\
f
\
\
/
r7
/
/
/
/
/
ot^***"
/
/
X
/
/
/
**v
	
	
/
_>
* Mi
N.
/
/
ACTIVE UN
..PROVED
•
+
+
*
+
\
\
\
X
\
\
1
- — -
•_—— -
^ OTHER DMGN
OS'S
--''
*«lr
^^ INACTIVE
t945        1946 1947        1948 1949 1950        1951 1952        1953        195* TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 51
Table 29.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex,
and Length of Stay, 1954
Length of Stay
in Institution
Total
by Sex
Grand
Total
Condition on Discharge
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7
Months
8-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3-5
Years
OverS
Years
Inactive    	
M
8
3
4
2
3
3
1
1
5
:_
....
22
9
F.
31
Arrested   	
M
10
14
18
15
22
40
31
36
71
53
18
10
8
2
4
1
182
171
F.
353
Active improved 	
M
14
10
52
39
113
51
76
34
55
19
7
5
11
5
1
333
159
F.
492
Active unimproved
M.
F.
30
21
22
14
6
1
3
6
4
2
1
1
1
1
2
67
48
115
Non-pulmonary 	
M
1
1
2
1
::
1
4
F.
5
Non-tuberculous
_M.
F.
5
1
7
1
_..
12
2
14
Undiagnosed  _
M.
F.
4
1
5
1
1
i
10
3
13
Dead1     	
M
15
3
6
3
8
3
16
1
4
1
3
2
2
57
10
F.
M.
F.
67
Totals
86
54
115
77
152
97
114
77
152
75
30
17
23
5
12
4
684
406
1,090
140
192
249
191
227
47
28
16
1,090
1,090
1 Includes 22 deaths occurring in tuberculosis institutions in which the underlying cause of death was other than
tuberculosis.
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79. D 52
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 30.—Discharges from Institutions of First Admissions, by Condition
on Discharge, Sex and Length of Stay, 1954
Length of Stay in Institution
Total
by Sex
Grand
Total
Condition on Discharge
Under 1
Month
1-3
Months
4-7
Months
8-11
Months
lYear
2 Years
3-5
Years
Over 5
Years
Inactive  M.
F.
-
1
1
1
3
1
1
3
8
3
11
Arrested    M.
F.
1
1
6
6
10
18
23
23
57
42
12
9
7
3
119
99
218
Active improved  M.
F.
4
1
26
25
74
35
56
25
41
14
4
3
5
5
215
103
318
Active unimproved       M.
F.
11
5
11
4
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
2
28
15
43
Non-pulmonary    _ M.
F.
1
1
2
1
-_.
1
4
5
Non-tuberculous    M.
F.
4
1
7
1
-
11
2
13
Undiagnosed  M.
F.
3
1
5
1
1
-
8
3
11
Dead   M.
F.
9
1
3
1
6
1
8
3
1
1
1
2
33
5
38
Totals   M.
F.
32
12
60
41
94
57
82
50
112
57
19
14
13
1
11
2
423
234
657
Grand totals
44
101
151      |    132
1
169
33
14
13
657
657
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79.
It is noted that approximately 95 per cent of the cases were discharged to satisfactory home conditions, as against 77 per cent in the previous year.
Table 31.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge,
Sex, and Home Condition, 1954
Condition on Discharge
Total
by Sex
Home Condition
■_
u
•a
u
>
o
6 J
t>°3
•_
_
g
<
_
>
_
C
5.
_S
c
o
cE
s
o
3
o
°-s
Z3
0.
•is
£ a
P a
Grand
Total
Satisfactory — — "     -
M.
F.
 M.
310
151
23
8
53
45
13
2
1
1
176
170
6
1
22
8
1
1
4
11
2
1
9
3
1
582
383
44
12
1
1
57
10
965
F.
 M.
56
Discharged dead1 	
F.
M.
F.
 M.
2
67
Totals 	
333
159
67
48
182
171
22
9
1
4
12
2
10
3
684
406
F.
1,090
Grand totals 	
492
115
353
31
5
14
13
1,090
1,090
1 Includes 22 deaths occurring in tuberculosis institutions in which the underlying cause of death was other than
tuberculosis. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 53
Table 32.—Discharges from Institutions on Medical Advice, by Condition
on Discharge, Sex, and Home Condition, 1954
Condition on Discharge
Total
by Sex
Home Condition
•o
_
+3 0.
Il
•a
_
>
o
•> &
.£-
o'c
■a
V
_
<
a
>
_
cd
C
cd
C
O
_.-
3
O
3
o
r   t-
G s
o*
Z2
M
T_   _
5l
Grand
Total
 M.
261
120
3
1
26
20
1
170
160
1
21
7
1
3
10
2
1
7
3
496
315
6
1
F.
  M.
811
F.
7
F.
 M.
264
121
27
20
171
160
21
7
1
3
11
2
7
3
502
316
F.
818
385
47
331
28
4
13
10
818
818
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79.
It is noted that in 1954 there were  195 discharges against medical advice, as
compared with 249 in 1953.
Table 33.—Discharges from Institutions against Medical Advice,
by Sex and Home Condition, 1954
Condition on Discharge
Total
by Sex
Home Condition
_
g o
-
>
o
_,
.as
t. 5
<0
t3
_
<
_
c
cd
n
o
eg
013
Za
i.
3
O
3
o
c o
za
.2-a
So
Grand
Total
 - M.
48
28
20
7
24
23
12
2
1
1
6
10
5
1
1
1
1
i
2
1
82
62
38
.11
1
1
F.
 M.
144
F.
 M.
49
F.
... M.
2
68
35
37
26
11
11
1
1
1
i
3
121
74
F.
195
103
63
22
2
1
i
3
195
195
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79. D 54
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
•      B.C.G. VACCINATIONS
There has been an increase in the recorded vaccinations from 625 to 1,013. It is
noted that there was a percentage of 95.3 successful vaccinations, against 82.7 per cent
in 1953.
Table 34.—B.C.G. Vaccinations Completed according to Group Listed, 1954
Post B.C.G.
Tuberculin Test Positive
Post B.C.G.
Tuberculin Test Negative
Number of Cases
Number of Cases
_
Positive by
u
_
Complications
Negative by
_
u
Group Vaccinated
cd
O
Type of Test
cd
U
cd
o
Type of Test
cd
O
Cd
U
o
o
__.=
c -
a> >
u o
•a
fffl
S.1
bo
O
<~ _
-
3
z
c.
O
DC
Si
11
Zo,
§1
►J3
cd -
WO
o
o
bo
Is?
zz
b. 60
_  U
B.Z
Student-nurses  -	
418
269
132
401
95.9
1
16
17
4.1
Graduate nurses.	
3
1
1
2
66.7
_.
1
1
33.3
Hospital employees	
89
14
36
35
85
95.5
	
	
___
1
3
4
4.5
Contacts	
432
7
350
61
418
96.7
	
	
11
3
14
3.3
Others1  	
71
......
39
20
59
83.1
6
6
12
16.9
Totals 	
1,013
21
695
249
965
95.3
—
	
19
29
48
4.7
1 Includes 1 school-child and other vaccinated.
Note.—All scratch method of vaccination.
Source: Tuberculin Testing Reports, Form TB. 77.
Table 35.—B.C.G. Vaccinations Completed according to Age-group, 1954
cd
U
i—i
o
u
cu
.->
£
3
z
Post B.C.G. Tuberculin Test Positive
Post B.C.G.
Tuberculin Test Negative
Group Vaccinated
Number of Cases
Positive by
Type of Test
_
cd
o
o
JD.Z
il
Za,
Ba
y
cd
O
O
C -
OS
- o
Complications
Number of Cases
Negative by
Type of Test
D_
u
cs
u
o
si
is?
zz
o
c.
cd
o
s
o
CN
o
!
13 ^
-1
T3
•u ...
£.•§
cd C
«o
, "3
el
s
o
CN
tie
o
.0
o
_! w
g>
US
u cm
aZ
246
113
50
396
109
34
39
8
5
13
5
1
4
4
2
4
1
217
87
34
242
60
20
21
3
3
8
20
18
13
134
34
8
13
4
2
3
242
105
48
380
98
30
38
8
5
11
98.4
92.9
96.0
96.0
90.0
88.2
97.4
100.0
100.0
84.6
.._..
i
	
._-.
3
7
1
2
5
1
1
1
1
14
6
3
1
2
4
8
2
16
11
4
1
2
1.6
5-9    „	
7.1
10-14   „      	
4.0
15-19    „      	
4.0
20-24    „   .                        	
10.0
25-29    „    - 	
11.8
30-39    „    	
40-49    „   -- -                   	
2.6
15.4
Totals..	
1,013
1    21
i
695
249
965
| 95.3
I
—
	
19
29
48
4.7
Note.—All scratch method of vaccination.
Source: Tuberculin Testing Reports, Form TB. 77. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
KNOWN CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS
D 55
Table 36.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of
British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1950-54
Area
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
315
807
913
10,377
2,742
930
430
854
974
153
972
336
821
889
10,371
2,768
949
472
942
1,001
160
.....
316
776
862
10,543
2,822
938
458
996
1,045
171
301
698
869
10,776
2,942
1,014
469
1,159
1,157
205
295
675
896
11,096
2,974
1,077
Area 7  —
Area 8   —   	
487
1,257
1,235
Area 10                                                  	
214
Totals       	
19,482
18,709
18,927
19,590
20,206
Table 37.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1950-54
Area
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
Area 1   	
Area 2    —	
264
802
827
9,887
2,183
583
190
335
374
77
915
275
816
789
9,872
2,167
548
200
355
304
78
258
770
754
10,058
2,181
511
192
359
331
83
247
690
751
10,311
2,277
511
190
390
348
92
237
667
767
10,615
2,265
559
Area 7         —
Area 8     	
204
404
342
Area 10                        —	
91
Totals	
16,438
15.404
15,497
15,807
16,151
Table 38.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of
British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1950-54
Area
1950
1951
1952
1953
19541
51
5
86
450
559
346
240
519
601
76
57
61
6
100
499
601
401
271
587
697
82
58
6
108
485
641
427
266
637
714
88
54
8
118
465
665
503
279
769
809
113
Area 5 —  	
Area 6  	
Area 7  _._
709
518
283
853
893
123
Area 10                             	
Totals	
2,990
3,305
3,430
3,783
4,055
1 Includes 122 Indians of white status. D 55
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 39.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and
School District of Residence and Sex, 1954
(Excluding Indians)
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
Metropolitan    Health    Committee,
School District No. 1   	
49
32
40
35
89
67
Vancouver—Continued
School District No. 41....	
335
317
School District No. 2	
652
30
12
19
5
49
17
School District No. 44 	
219
76
179
62
398
School District No. 4	
School District No. 45—	
138
School District No. 5	
26
5
31
9
57
14
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 40 	
School District No. 431	
306
250
254
228
School District No. 18	
560
Selkirk, Nelson—
478
7
97
35
14
7
91
31
13
14
188
66
27
North Fraser, Mission—
School District No. 42 	
School District No. 75  _
62
54
11
49
43
8
School District No. 7 	
111
97
School District No. in     	
School District No. 76	
19
West Kootenay, Trail—
Upper Island, Courtenay—
29
23
52
61
138
School District No. 11 	
97
109
206
School District No. 71- 	
67
70
137
School District No. 12— -	
26
7
18
11
44
18
School District No. 72	
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
44
44
88
School District No. 13	
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 50 	
5
14
19
School District No. 14 —	
36
30
66
School District No. 51. _	
9
4
13
School District No. 15-	
72
56
128
School District No. 52— -	
128
90
218
School District No. If.      	
5
2
7
School District No. 53 - —
54
39
93
School District No. 17	
18
19
37
School District No. 54	
16
20
36
School District No. 23	
113
117
230
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 77 -	
25
22
47
School District No. 59	
32
33
65
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 60— _
6
15
21
School District No. 19 	
27
22
49
Victoria-EsquimaU Union Board of
School District No. 20	
49
32
81
Health-
School District No. 21     	
9
9
18
School District No. 61 (part)2	
399
335
734
School District No. 22 	
76
79
155
Saanich and South Vancouver Is
School District No. 78..- ,;
17
6
23
land—
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 61 (part)3	
194
134
328
School District No. 24	
188
170
358
School District No. 62 	
34
27
61
School District No. 25 -—
5
2
7
School District No. 63 	
30
25
55
School District No. 26	
3
6
9
School District No. 64 	
27
11
38
School District No. 29.....	
23
10
33
Central    Vancouver    Island,    Na
School District No. 30  	
15
17
32
naimo-—
School District No. 31  	
15
9
24
School District No. 65 	
39
61
100
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 66 	
25
33
58
School District No. 27..-	
School District No. 28 —
23
49
School District No. 67	
33
47
80
40
89
School District No. 68	
111
75
186
School District No. 55	
16
14
30
School District No. 69	
24
12
36
School District No. 56	
19
17
36
School District No. 70  .   .
66
72
138
School District No. 57	
60
52
112
School District No. 79 	
J
4
7
School District No. 58	
10
4
14
School   districts   not   covered   by
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack—
health units—
School District No. 32 	
15
24
39
School District No. 46 	
64
37
101
School District No. 33	
111
123
234
School District No. 48 	
16
25
41
School District No. 34-	
60
51
111
School District No. 49— -	
34
23
57
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 61 (part)4	
82
47
129
School District No. 35.	
87
50
137
School District No. 73 	
26
33
59
School District No. 36	
205
198
403
School District No. 74	
15
6
21
School District No. 37	
30
34
64
School District No. 80	
10
4
14
Metropolitan    Health    Committee,
Vancouver—
Unorganized  	
31
28
.59
93
83
176
Totals  	
8,811
7,340
16,151
School District No. 39 	
3,857
2,997
6,854
1 Includes 182 males and 143 females at Mental Health Services, Essondale.
2 Includes Victoria and Esquimalt.
8 Excludes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
* Includes Oak Bay only. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 57
Table 40.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and
School District of Residence and Sex, 1954
(Indians Only1)
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
Metropolitan    Health    Committee,
School District No. 1 _ 	
2
1
3
Vancouver—Continued
School District No. 2  -
16
10
26
School District No. 41 - 	
2
2
School District No. 3
School District No. 44	
School District No. 45— _	
34
39
4
73
9
9
18
4
School District No. 5_ 	
4
3
7
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
4
7
11
School District No. 40
6
6
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 43	
1
5
6
School District No. 7 	
1
1
School District No. 42	
3
8
11
School District No. 8
School District No. 75  	
School District No. 76	
Upper Island, Courtenay—
4
43
5
33
9
School District No. 10   -
76
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 9
School District No. 47 	
School District No. 71	
School District No. 72 	
7
3
19
18
5
24
25
School District No. 11
8
School District No. 12
43
School District No. 13   ..
5
5
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 50. 	
65
60
125
School District No. 14 	
2
5
7
School District No. 51 	
110
111
221
School District No. 15.	
13
7
20
School District No. 52. 	
115
134
249
School District No. 16	
9
8
17
School District No. 53.
179
200
379
School District No. 17  	
1
2
3
School District No. 54.   .
1
5
6
School District No. 23.....  ■
12
8
20
School District No. 77
School District No. 59
6
4
10
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. CO.
45
33
78
School District No. 19 __	
1
1
2
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of
Schnnl District No. 20. 	
22
12
34
Health-
School District No. 21
1
1
School District No. 61 (part)2
Saanich and South Vancouver Is
3
3
6
School District No. 22 	
14
11
25
School District No. 78    	
17
14
31
land—
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 61 (part)3
11
15
26
School District No. 24 	
36
6
37
4
73
10
School District No. 62.
5
16
3
16
8
School District No. 25	
School District No. 63.
32
School District No. 26
1
1
1
2
3
School District No. 29. _	
36
42
78
School District No. 30...-
47
47
94
naimo—
School District No. 31—    	
40
33
73
School District No. 65.
51
58
109
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 66.
2
3
5
School District No. 27	
68
75
143
School District No. 67. . -
26
15
41
School District No. 28 	
13
11
24
School District No. 68
19
15
34
School District No. 55
36
42
78
School District No. 69.
2
4
6
School District No. 56.....
87
85
172
School District No. 70
36
25
61
School District No. 57
11
15
26
School District No. 79
18
31
49
School District No. 58	
School   districts   not   covered   by
health units—
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack—
School District No. 32—
26
23
49
School District No. 46.   -
19
15
34
School District No. 33—   .
41
29
70
School District No. 48.
44
49
93
School District No. 34.— „	
3
7
10
School District No. 49.
71
81
152
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 61 (part)4
School District No. 35.  	
4
5
9
School District No. 73.
78
87
165
School District No. 36	
14
12
26
School District No. 74
13
16
29
School District No. 37 	
4
2
6
School District No. 80.   .
23
25
48
Metropolitan    Health    Committee,
296
302
598
School District No. 38 __	
1
2
3
Totals	
1,999
2,056
4,055
School District No. 39	
20
29
49
1 These figures include 122 Indians of white status.
2 Includes Victoria and Esquimalt.
3 Excludes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
4 Includes Oak Bay only. D 58
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 41.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis
in British Columbia by Age-group and Sex, 1954
(Excluding Indians)
Age-group
Population
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79     80-and
Years      Over
Total
Total	
43.5
45.4
41.5
181.0
179.9
182.1
324.4
337.9
310.3
398.8
340.5
460.2
1
761.8 I 1.360.3
2,036.8
1,874.4
2,185.9
2,187.0
2,140.3
2,236.6
2,120.1
2,588.8
1,604.7
1,947.1
2,537.2
1,266.1
!
1,814.8 j 1,823.8
2,413.3 | 2,470.1
1,087.0 | 1,138.8
1
1,308.0
Male	
Female	
675.3
847.8
1,122.6
1,585.4
1,399.4
1,212.9 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 59
Chart 10.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis
in British Columbia by Age-group and Sex, 1954
(Excluding Indians)
3000    2500   2000    1500    1000    500     0
0     500    1000    1500    2000   2500    3000
3000   2500   2000    1500    1000    500     0
0     500    1000    1500    2000   2500   3000 D 60
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 42.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition,
and Age-group, 1954
(Excluding Indians)
Age-group
Diagnosis
cd
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Primary  	
50
6
19
185
58
71
7
7
22
6
14
3
1
1
179
72
59
7
13
15
1
12
25
4
11
2
2
1
1
4
8
2
96
37
33
8
6
2
3
7
85
20
36
9
5
8
3
4
32
2
7
3
2
10
3
5
13
1
2
6
4
1
1
54
14
27
1
3
4
1
4
253
87
95
16
7
22
9
17
121
18
54
14
4
20
6
5
30
3
3
6
3
13
2
2
1
43       43
9        9
23       10
2
2         1
9      21
658J2.159
283(1,072
233    745
431     87
23 [     84
38 j     67
26      58
12|     46
1
285    977
621   296
1231   397
251     83
11
2
3
2
4
1,967
1,057
613
78
63
56
55
45
871
294
356
55
59
66
25
16
338
63
121
48
47
41
9
7
2
2
3
1,387
724
460
36
39
37
36
55
667
173
274
56
5
2
1
2
1,161
627
379
23
37
29
33
33
555
128
233
48
3
1
1
II
168
68
66
6
2
7
9
10
90
16
42
6
10
8
6
2
27
4
8
1
6
3
5
3
1
1
4
1
1
2
61
29
20
2
2
3
1
4
25
4
6
2
2
9
1
1
15
2
1
3
1
3
5
2
1
1
107
36
27
7
6
16
2
13
680
213
249
25
Active unimproved — 	
2
18
4
1
1
1
1
710
375
234
27
18
20
19
17
340
76
145
26
21
47
13
12
119
12
41
16
22
24
1
3
18
4
11
34
65
16
Not stated 	
78
8,638
4,348
2,893
329
282
1
289
Activity undetermined 	
250
247
Moderately advanced —	
2
3,973
1,069
1,640
318
Arrested     	
1
Active unimproved 	
21
38
12
4
90
76
75
31
19
773
561     33
284
Active (not stated). 	
1
2
1
1
2
4
6
2
4
1
1
66
28
14
244
42
80
32
27
47
7
9
19
2
9
1
1
1
5
2,324
943
825
125
123
151
71
86
79
22
12
168
20
47
28
27
39
4
3
22
5
14
421
147
94
2
1,327
81     56
35 j     97
17|     35
111     38
211
435
1
186
186
Active (not stated)	
Activity undetermined  	
1
15
1
3
35
4
226
28
8
9
17
1
7
2
55
I
4|      12
101
14
Arrested      ;•*
3
6
1
1
51
1
Active unimproved 	
Active (not stated) __ ' '
190
59
72
7
8
23
7
14
219
77
72
9
17
18
2
24
227
60
79
20
13
26
20
1
1
460
122
179
37
17
60
16
29
	
1
1
1
1,911
782
674
99
98
149
60
49
7
1
3
2
55
7
20
1.080
4        7
2
1,190
468
432
69
61
92
33
35
1
288
89
116
13
19
18
15
18
23
3 464
3,204
1,417
1,100
181
171
165
14,719
Inactive      	
362|1,433
41711.255
5,855
5,268
85
207
700
859
3
19
5
1
57
793
911    177
1,005
39|     94|     89
29j     98|     81
442
Not stated	
497
Sub-totals— —	
55
190
219
227
460
l,080|3,464[3,204|2,324jl,911
1,190
288
107(14,719
Other                -  	
5
1
4
18
72
3
...._._
72
4
68
104
21
2
81
1         1
138|   347|   265
18      35      17
2        4|       7
118[   308|   241
159
12
4
123
4
2
57
32
	
1
40   1.432
115
1
56
32
40
22
Non-pulmonary 	
1431   117
1,295
Totals  -	
60
208
291
299
564
1,218|3,811|3,469
1         1
2,483
2,034
1,247
320
147
16,151
1 Includes 36 cases of far advanced tuberculosis with silicosis. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 61
Table 43.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition,
and Age-group, 1954
(Indians Only1)
Age-group
Diagnosis
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76
1
27
388
184
160
18
11
14
1
28
8
11
1
7
1
16
6
1
307
65
149
19
6
62
3
3
5
2
3
6
1
3
2
290
153
112
9
6
8
2
91
25
42
7
2
11
4
70
12
31
7
1
18
1
33
1
15
2
9
5
1
2
176
110
54
5
4
2
1
158
76
41
16
7
13
3
2
128
23
60
13
6
20
5
1
57
3
19
11
10
14
3
54      21
35]     12
16        7
1|	
6
4
1
3
3
	
1
	
3
1,325
567
	
1
2
529
52
1
45
2
1
28
 |       1
.1	
1|       1
I
196    223
1101   131
133
6
1
170
120
40
3
1
3
2
1
101
36
36
10
5
10
4
31
5
8
5
6
6
1
125
75
39
4
2
4
1
71
26
25
7
3
6
3
1
28
4
4
5
5
9
1
78
48
22
4
4
54
17
18
1
4
11
3
15
2
2
2
2
7
31
23
8
15
11
2
7
4
2
10
1,127
631
58
9
3
6
7
3
122
28
46
12
12
17
6
48
3
17
11
68
6
4
7
4
3
151
52
66
9
11
10
3
63
3
15
13
335
50
33
12
11
2
3
5
i
1
13
2
7
2
1
1
6
:    1
2
1
1
	
17
56
26
12
Moderately advanced 	
767
209
306
64
48
9
110
26
4
Far advanced  	
1
14
1
4
2
2
5
10
1
3
1
5
9
315
23
2
3
1
2
1
2
3
1
89
56
Active unimproved 	
1
7|     16
101      14
62
79
7
4
2
	
2
2
2
1
1
460
199
156
28
31
32
9
5
11
	
1
	
34
13
9
4
4
2
1
1
12
5
4
1
1
1
	
1
2
522
212
174
45
27
50
8
6
2
422
176
137
33
22
33
14
7
308
165
85
18
12
19
7
2
227
108
68
16
8
17
7
3
	
74
35
22
5
4
7
1
147
67
42
7
6
22
3
446
193
181
22
13
35
1
2
330
66
154
19
8
73
5
5
2
486
191
200
25
18
42
4
6
Totals, all foregoing types	
77
1
27
3,545
1,431
1,259
1
46
2
155
62
37
Not stated — —	
. 1        1
Sub-totals
771   446]   330|   486
522
4221   460
3081   2271   147
74
34
12
3,545
Other            -	
1
13|     59
. 1       8
1        3
12|     48
29
3
1
25
105
18
13
74
104
33
4
67
1
77 j     67
15        9
71       6
551     52
26
4
1
21
20
3
2
15
6
6
2
1
1
1
1
Pleurisy with effusion 	
Pleurisy without effusion	
95
38
1
1|
377
Totals      -                      	
901   505
359
591
626
499!   527
334
247
153
76
35
131
1
4,055
1
i Includes 162 Indians of white status. D 62
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 44.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-
Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1945-54.
Total
Other than Indians
Indians
Year
Known
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Known
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Known
Cases1
Deaths2
Ratio
1945	
1946	
1947 	
1948  	
1949.        '
1950 	
1951          .    ..     	
1952	
1953   	
1954. 	
13,116
14,069
15,408
16,812
18,483
19,428
18,709
18,927
19,590
20,206
525
576
536
442
406
313
292
214
146
123
25.0
24.4
28.7
38.0
45.5
62.1
64.1
88.0
134.2
164.3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
11,212
12,254
13,430
14,528
15,738
16,438
15,404
15,497
15,807
16,151
363
369
362
286
295
239
212
179
122
103
30.9:1
33.2:1
37.1:1
50.8:1
53.3:1
68.8:1
72.7:1
86.1:1
129.6:1
156.8:1
1,904
1,815
1,978
2,284
2,745
2,990
3,305
3,430
3,783
4,055
162
207
174
156
111
74
80
35
24
20
11.8:1
8.8:1
11.4:1
14.6:1
24.7:1
40.4:1
41.3:1
98.0:1
157.6:1
202.8:1
1 These figures include: 1947, 141 Indians of white status; 1948, 84 Indians of white status; 1949, 93 Indians of
white status; 1950, 160 Indians of white status; 1951, 127 Indians of white status; 1952, 159 Indians of white status;
1953, 125 Indians of white status;   1954, 122 Indians of white status.
2 These figures include deaths of: 1947, 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 8 Indians
of white status; 1950, 4 Indians of white status; 1951, 10 Indians of white status; 1952, 3 Indians of white status;
1953, 3 Indians of white status;   1954, 3 Indians of white status.
NOTIFICATIONS OF TUBERCULOSIS
In 1954 there was a slight reduction in the total number of new cases discovered,
from 1,501 to 1,450.
Table 45.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population
of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1950-54
Area
1950
1951
1952
1953
19541
Area 1  	
Area 2                	
27
71
83
889
259
69
41
88
120
34
3
15
48
94
80
852
198
71
56
133
121
17
5
13
27
44
53
748
178
72
27
113
92
11
2
15
11
30
48
742
170
76
34
166
155
43
3
23
13
21
52
760
209
63
Area 7     — -	
25
139
Area 9     	
Area 10                     - 	
131
22
Unorganized   	
14
Totals    	
1,699
1,688
1,382
1,501
1.4502
1 Includes 72 dead cases.
2 Includes 1 Indian, residence not stated.
Source:  Case Examination, Form TB. 1. r
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 63
A very definite trend is shown in the reduction of the incidence of new cases in
Areas 1 and 2 of the Province, which includes the East and West Kootenays. The same
applies to a lesser degree in Area 3, but in most areas there has been very little change.
Table 46.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian
Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1950-54
Area
1950
1951
1952
1953
19541
Area 1  	
27
71
64
853
144
27
18
35
54
15
3
15
38
94
67
816
151
29
19
58
36
6
5
13
20
43
44
730
134
28
15
39
29
1
2
15
10
27
40
720
136
29
12
37
40
18
3
22
7
21
Area 3                                   	
38
740
169
27
16
49
41
Area 10   .      	
10
Unorganized 	
Ex-Province	
13
Totals  •	
1,326
1,332
1,100
1,094
1,131
1 Includes 64 dead cases.
Source:  Case Examination, Form TB. 1.
Table 47.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population
of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1950-54
Area
1950
1951
1952
1953
19541
Area 1   — ...	
Area 2       ...
Area 3 , 	
19
36
115
42
23
53
66
19
10
13
36
47
42
37
75
85
11
7
1
9
18
44
44
12
74
63
10
1
3
8
22
34
47
22
129
115
25
1
6
14
20
Area 5    	
40
36
Area 7 	
9
90
90
Area 10
12
1
Totals   	
373
356
282
407
319_
1 Includes 8 dead cases.
2 Includes 1 Indian, residence not stated.
Includes 22 Indians of white status.
Source:  Case Examination, Form TB. 1.
In both Areas 8 and 9 the incidence per 1,000 of 3.2 and 5.8 respectively is high,
although this is influenced greatly by the incidence amongst the Indians of 15.3 and
16.2 respectively. However, in spite of this, in the other-than-lndian population in Area
9 the incidence is 2.4 per 1,000 and is the highest of any area in the Province.
Table 48.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases by Statistical Area,
by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1954
Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Total.. 	
0.4
0.2
13.0
0.3
0.3
0.6
0.5
1.2
1.1
1.1
5.4
0.9
0.7
6.5
1.4
0.7
7.1
1.3
0.9
3.8
3.2
1.3
15.3
5.8
2.4
16.3
1.4
0.7
15.4
1.1
0.9
10 2 D 64
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1954
(Excluding Indians)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Dead
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
School District No. 1                    	
1
2
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
6
4
1
4
2
1
1
3
1
6
1
2
1
2
10
2
2
11
1
4
5
14
2
8
256
35
14
5
24
16
4
8
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
4
5
2
1
2
1
2
8
1
1
2
1
3
2
1
5
1
2
5
6
3
20
3
7
180
13
13
3
9
10
2
4
2
2
~~3
2
5
3
i
3
1
2
1
10
9
1
6
1
4
2
1
5
1
14
2
3
3
2
1
13
4
3
16
1
3
9
6
8
34
5
15
436
48
27
8
33
26
6
12
1
1
1
1
1
1
29
1
2
6
1
6
1
4
School District No. 2 ._ —	
	
School District No. 5  	
School District No. 18 	
Selkirk, Nelson—
School District No. 6  ;	
	
School District No. 8  	
School District No. 10  	
West Kootenay, Trail—
School District No. 9    	
School District No. 11    - ..,,	
1
1
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14  -	
School District No. 15  -	
School District No. 16  _     	
School District No. 23    —
School District No. 77   - -	
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19   -	
School District No. 20  — -	
School District No. 21          	
	
School District No. 22    	
School District No. 78  	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24 —   __. -	
School District No. 25-   '	
School District No. 29    - -
School District No. 30 — —	
School District No. 31-_     -
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 27   	
School District No. 28.	
1
1
School District No. 56-   .   	
	
School District No. 58  - 	
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack—
	
School District No. 33   	
	
Boundary, Cloverdale—
1
Metropolitan Health Committee, Vancouver—
School District No. 38- - 	
35
2
2
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 40 	
School District No. 431    	
North Fraser, Mission—
School District No. 42           	
10
1
School District No. 75 	
School District No. 76	
1 Includes 5 males and 4 females reported alive and 3 males and 3 females reported dead from Mental Health
Services, Essondale. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 65
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1954—Continued
(Excluding Indians)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Dead
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47 _ -   	
5
3
8
1
1
School District No. 71  	
9
7
16
School District No. 72  	
3
4
7
1
1
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50 	
1
1
—
School District No. 51 	
1
1
2
School District No. 52 __ -	
11
14
25
3
3
School District No. 53 -	
4
4
8
School District No. 54 	
2
3
5
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59  	
3
4
7
>      1
1
School District No. 60 	
2
2
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of Health—
School District No. 61 (part)2 	
30
22
52
2
2
Saanich and South Vancouver Island—
School District No. 61 (part)3	
6
4
10
School District No. 62 	
3
2
5
School District No. 63 	
1
1
2
	
School District No. 64  - -
2
2
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
4
5
5
12
4
3
4
3
8
8
9
15
School District No. 66  	
School District No. 67 -	
School District No. 68   	
School District No. 69.  -	
School District No. 70 	
8
4
12
School District No. 79  	
1
2
3
School districts not covered by health units—
School District No. 46	
4
2
6
School District No. 48	
3
2
5
School District No. 49 	
4
1
5
School District No. 61 (part) <-.	
5
2
7
School District No. 73  .....
4
4
8
1
1
School District No. 74 	
2
2
School District No. 80 	
2
2
Unorganized.	
3
4
7
Ex-Province 	
12
1
13
624
443
1,067
52
12
64
2 Includes Victoria and   Esquimalt only.
3 Excludes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
4 Includes Oak Bay only. D 66
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1954
(Indians Only1)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Dead
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay, Cranbrook—
1
3
1
1
1
5
4
1
4
5
5
2
19
1
2
2
3
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
3
5
3
4
3
4
8
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
!
1
1
4
1
3
1
2
7
1
5
4
9
3
9
8
6
27
2
4
4
3
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
School District No. 5  - r—
Selkirk, Nelson—
West Kootenay, Trail—
South Okanagan, Kelowna—
School District No. 14. • 	
School District No. 15	
	
School District No. 17 , 	
School District No. 23  	
	
North Okanagan, Vernon—
School District No. 19    -	
School District No. 20	
School District No. 21 - •	
School District No. 22                     	
1
School District No. 78  	
South Central, Kamloops—
School District No. 24-  	
School District No. 25 	
School District No. 26   	
School District No. 29  -	
School District No. 30   	
School District No. 31	
1
Cariboo, Prince George—
School District No. 27	
School District No. 28  _    1	
School District No. 55	
	
School District No. 56    	
School District No. 57 _ 	
School District No. 58	
1
Upper Fraser Valley, Chilliwack—
School District No. 32 -	
School District No. 33   	
School District No. 34   	
Boundary, Cloverdale—
School District No. 35— -	
School District No. 36    	
School District No. 37   	
Metropolitan Health Committee, Vancouver—
School District No. 38   -
School District No. 39	
School District No. 41  	
	
School District No. 44   .   	
School District No. 45. - 	
	
Simon Fraser, New Westminster—
School District No. 40 	
School District No. 43	
North Fraser, Mission—
School District No. 42     	
School District No. 75...      	
	
School District No. 76 —  	
These figures include 22 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 67
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
of Residence and Sex, 1954—Continued
(Indians Only1)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Dead
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Upper Island, Courtenay—
School District No. 47 	
School District No. 71 _
School District No. 72                                 	
2
5
5
8
14
2
1
1
6
2
1
1
2.
A
9
37
1
6
6
12
14
1
5
3
4
3
1
4
4
32
1
1
3
11
11
20
28
1
7
1
3
1
10
"i
i
3
1
3
8
13
69
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Skeena, Prince Rupert—
School District No. 50  	
School District No. 51    -	
School District No. 52. - 	
School District No. 53  , --	
School District No. 54   	
Peace River, Dawson Creek—
School District No. 59                                 —	
2
1
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of Health—
School District No. 61 (part)2
Saanich and South Vancouver Island—
School District No. 61 (part)3              	
School District No. 62.   '	
School District No. 63   -
'   School District No. 64  	
Central Vancouver Island, Nanaimo—
School District No. 65 -	
1
School District No. 66  	
School District No. 67  	
School District No. 68  	
School District No. 69- _ 	
School District No. 70   	
School District No. 79                       	
1
School districts not covered by health units—
School District No. 46 - 	
School District No. 48 	
School District No. 49    -
School District No. 61 (part)4	
School District No. 73  	
School District No. 74-	
School District No. 80              	
Unorganized.  	
Totals
162
149
311
3
5
8
1 These figures include 22 Indians of white status.
2 Includes Victoria and Esquimalt only.
3 Excludes Victoria, Esquimalt, and Oak Bay.
4 Includes Oak Bay only.
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1945-54
Racial Origin
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
Total	
White       	
2,079
1,519
417
111
32
2,373
1,973
256
120
24
2,616
1,864
645
81
26
2,108
1,448
553
88
19
2,202
1,525
578
78
21
1,699
1,220
373
86
20
1,688
1,209
356
100
23
1,383
999
282
85
17
1,501
926
407
140
28
1,450
1,040
319
Chinese	
Japanese	
80
11
1 Includes notifications of: 1947, 21 Indians of white status; 1948, 27 Indians of white status; 1949, 34 Indians of
white status; 1950, 10 Indians of white status; 1951, 21 Indians of white status; 1952, 26 Indians of white status; 1953,
25 Indians of white status;   1954, 22 Indians of white status. D 68
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 11.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1945-54
4000
TOTAL
WHITE
100
/
"*• ^^     INDIA
N
/
**"•
—    mmmmm
N
/
/
N
\
/
/
X
—-^
\
/
y
\
1
f
^«»
y
^ „_-.
*
/
*
\
100
X
CHINESE
*> -
>*■-_.
/
\
\
^^---,-*
^ ** -^
__——
^^^
^*^
N
V
JAPANESE
Si
S-
_.--'
^
•
•
•
\
10
>,
•
\
\
\
\
\
1945 1946 1947 194S 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 69
The epidemiological trends are indicated in the fact that in the Indian group, out of
319 new cases diagnosed, 121 were classified as primary, while in the white population
only 58 out of 1,131 new cases were so classified.
It is noted that out of a total of 1,131 new cases of tuberculosis diagnosed 148 were
non-pulmonary, the vast majority of these being tuberculosis of the genito-urinary system,
with 42 cases, and of the lymphatic system, with 37 cases. Only 7 cases of meningitis
were reported in the other-than-Indian population.
Table 52.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition,
and Age-group, 1954
(Excluding Indians)
Age-group
Diagnosis
VI
H
ci
<&
-t
o
H
W
o
><
on
1
«_
V
>*
o
H
_
ON
7
l-l
U
o
cs
H
-I
_
GN
C.
tN
H
-3
0J
ON
2
o
m
w_
ci
u
Os
rt
<D
rt
H
rt
<u
;*
ON
o
u
><
ON
NO
O
NO
J.
6
C
O
QO
T3
Si
c.
Si
o
Z
o
H
19
1
17
1
25
2
19
4
1
8
1
7
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
70
15
8
28
19
25
3
20
2
7
1
6
1
1
15
12
55
21
105
23
10
41
	
1
___
48
18
5
15
9
1
36
5
2
24
4
1
19
15
1
3
4
1
3
23
7
55
15
8
—
1
58
1
5
Active       -
47
6
Dead                                   -	
 1	
16
1
2
11
2
10
1
8
1
3
42
9
5
20
8
25
1
1
21
2
5
89
22
13
30
70
22
9
21
18
34
1
26
7
18
17
1
7
1
6
22
11
64
25
7
35
17
5
8
4
1
22
3
13
5
1
8
9
3
489
127
1
5
1
2
5
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
1
3
1
2
2
58
181
	
1
311    24
118
Dead     	
65
9
8
42
6
1?
35
8
1
22
4
17
5
260
Inactive  _ .  	
Arrested      -     _   _ 	
28
18
180
32
Dead _	
2
1
1
91
1
1
 1	
..—   —.
Arrested    	
3
5
1
1
10
6
47
11
2
7
2'
1
4
1
10
1
4
1
5
3
14
2
2
5
2
1
1
4
72
Activity undetermined :.	
5
Dead                   	
10
42
2
1
2] _
l|-.„.
11      3
1
32]    31
201    15
921    62
401    29
21      3
5
2
Dead 	
1
17
2
2
20
4
1
1
8
1
4
24
3
14
20
5
26
9
19
5
1
2
9
2
9
1
7
1
1
32
Totals, all foregoing types—
157
Arrested. 	
86
486
162
Dead      __.	
49
Sub-totals  	
201    26
10
32|    74
103
186[ 140[ 129
108
79
23|    10
940
Other               	
7|      4
1!	
9
1
8
13
2
11
23
12
11
10
4
6
41
12
28
1
29
5
24
20
2
17
1
13
3
9
1
12
1
5
5
191
Tuberculous pleurisy _   	
43
Dead, tuberculous pleurisy  .
........
4
3
7
4
1
4
4
1
133
3|	
15
Totals  ,	
271     30
19
451     97
113
227
169
149
121
91
28
15
1,131
1 Four cases of far advanced tuberculosis with silicosis reported. D 70
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 53.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Condition,
and Age-group, 1954
(Indians Only1)
Age-group
Diagnosis
L.
a
u
>*
rt
I
.3
u
><
ON
1
Ul
it
ca
U
>H
Tf
7
o
n
it
c.
p>
Os
m
c-l
O
-3
U
On
ri
1
1
©
m
-0
03
OJ
->
ON
3
■3-
_
><
ON
2
O
H
c.
-
>•
On
NO
1
o
NC
c.
_
ON
<±
r-
6
C3
.3
O
CO
u
55
o
Z
.3
o
H
Primary	
Inactive       —
Arrested	
41
4
36
1
54
1
14
37
1
1
19
3
4
12
4
1
2
I
5
5
5
1
2
2
12
1
1
8
2
9
9
2
2
	
1
1
6
5
1
8
8
4
4
—
—
8
3
2
2
1
5
9
5
1
3
6
—
1
1
121
6
1
1
	
24
88
2
1
Minimal    	
13
6
2
1
4
9
8
1
2
2
n
2
3
4
2
5
4
1
7
6
1
5
2
3
4
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
	
71
21
13
4
1
1
2
1
1
1
	
25
	
11
1
1
3
2
1
1
59
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
5
1
3
2
1
5
45
6
1
1
1
	
26
. .   1
1
1
1
1
22
Activity undetermined    	
Dead  	
4
	
	
6
2
11
2
3
14
3
5
2
3
3
5
3
1
5
1
10
1
1
4
37
1
1
14
40
2
1
3
5
19
1
2
3
21
2
1
17
1
	
	
Dead                  	
Totals, all foregoing types—
Inactive      _
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
29
42
180
5!      3 L_
--I       1|       1
19
Dead              	
7
Sub-totals  	
42|    581    2S
28
19
24]    231    11|    15
18
6
4|      1
277
Other—  	
5
4
1
4
1
3
4
4
6
4
2
6
3
3
8|      5
3
3
1
1
42
1
2
13
Dead, tuberculous pleurisy	
5
5
28
1
Totals	
47
62
32
34
25
32
28
14
15
18
6
5
1
319
1 Includes 22 Indians of white status.
2 No cases of far advanced tuberculosis with silicosis reported. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 71
Table 54.—Notification of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1954
(Excluding Indians)
Ag
e-group
Diagnosis on Notification
._
CA
On ^
■* _
A -
ON   ■»
_
On £
oj
ON   2
^ -
Si.
N.   ."
On  £
=>._
..."
On  £
.—.   _
8>
On g
._
c i_
c.  _
go
■a
_
o _
2.55
.3
o
H
Pulmonary—
 M.
10
9
10
15
4
4
2
1
1
1
	
1
29
F.
29
M.
F.
1
1
8
8
17
25
28
42
48!    56
52
18
35
12
26
8
2
5
1
1
571    33
211
 M.
2
8
13
12
13
12
321    28
33|      7
26
8
25
10
18
3
5
2
1
164
F.
94
M.
1
2
1
2
3
5
2
6|    10
51      2
14
2
13
1
5
2
9
F.
M
	
1
—„.l	
1
1
1
1          .
F.
M
1
1
1
1
I
II      1
 I
_-_.-„..
5
5
T.
1
- .   1         !
Dead >  	
M.
	
1
1
2
1
I
7|      .
- -I      2
1
161      8
31      1
"    1
F.
 M.
9
Total pulmonary 	
11
9
20
10
16
26
4
6
10
14
18
32
34
40
74
461    881    961  1011    82
571    981    441    281    26
1031  1861  1401  129]  108
651    171      7
141      61      3
79|    231    10
575
F.
T.
... M.
p
365
940
Tuberculous pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion	
7 i
1
1
1
6
6
1         1         1
21      51      21      1
21      71      31       1
3
1         1         1
1. 1. I     27
——--  1     21
-_! ...J..._..!...--
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion
M.
F.
1         1         1
- 1 — 1 ._... 1	
— 1—1- 1	
Dead1   .      .. .
M.
......
	
	
1         1         1
—-1- 1—-1-	
-1    -1—-1	
1 1 1
F.
.   M.
F
T.
M.
F.
Total tuberculous pleurisy ..
"~i
l
 -1      11      1
 -1 1       1
 1       11      2
6
6
12
21      51      21      1
21      71      31      1
41    121      51      2
3
3
1I--I         1     22
-   I — I 1     21
1!   -1   —1     43
Non-pulmonary—
Meninges  	
	
1
.-_. 1.	
21.......
2
1        1        1
_L_L i   i
 i    ii     i	
1        1        1
11        1        I       .
-.1—1—1       5
Intestines and peritoneum  	
-   M.
F.
    1  _ _
- ,.,!.	
" 2
i   ii -i.'i
i     i     i
1
-H--H .!   ,
Vertebral  column  	
M.
ii i
1!..._..
.... i .... i     i 	
.-i   ii   ii.—
1         1
 1   I         I       2
F.
 1- 1- 1       3
Tuberculoma
M.
___L_
 1	
.— 1     l
I    ii    ii....
 i -i i.	
i
1-      1        1       2
F.
 1- |__l       1
Boines and joints 	
--M.
11      2
— 1      1
11     1
. 1-	
1       11       31......
1      21      21      1
11  1        1     10
F.
— I--I..--.I       6
Skin  	
M.
F.
 1	
 I	
-..-1	
1      1
1
..--1 i   ii
..   ..1      41      11
1
1
— !.—-1...-I       3
— !._— 1 1       6
Lymphatic system 	
M.
F.
1
1
1
11      3
.1      1
2
2
 1      1
21      2
4!      1
31      4
2
1
_  1 — 1. 1      15
31      11      11     22
Genito-urinary system   _
M.
—-
11      2
 1	
1
11      6
41      8
21      1
2
1
21         I      21     29
F.
3
6
. 1. L 1      13
Miliary  	
M.
 1	
---1 1 1	
 _!     !     |
F.
11-	
__
1        1
—! 1—i
M
	
 1	
1
. I-.-.I.	
-1   !   1
F.
Other non-pulmonary ..
M.
- 1      1
-.-- -1	
2
ll 1      1
lj-.__.l-...
-_!   !   !   3
F.
 1        3
Deadi	
. „M.
2
1
-     -1	
- 1	
 1      11      1
    1 1	
4
3
1
lj      17
F.
1      1
_ |       3
Total  non-pulmonary	
M.
F
T.
M.
F.
T.
41      21
2|      2
61      4
41      8
41      3
81    11
4
7
11
1|      91    141    11|      8
51    201    101      7!      2
6|    29|    24]    181    10
81      31      3|     7»
31      21      21     60
HI      5|      51   148
Total notifications   	
151    12
121    18
271    30!
91    23
101    22
191    45
44
53
97
491  1021  1121 1131    93
641 1251    57!    361    28
1131 2271  1691  14Q1  121
741    201    101   676
17!      81      51   455
911    281    1511.131
1 Dead on notification.
Source:  Case Examination, Form TB. 1. D 72
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 55.—Notification of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1954
(Indians Only1)
Age-group
Diagnosis on Notification
* _
2_
5>-
On 2
"7 C.
-><
■* 2
-N.
..."
ON  2
7 i
..."
on 2
On 2
^ 2
..."
on «
On 2
■_
C i_
_)  OJ
So
u
O rt
zz
73
o
Pulmonary—
.   -M.
24
17
24
29
9
10
4
1
_
	
1
62
F.
58
_.M.
	
1
7
5
7
3
3
5
8
5
6
3
7
3
5
6
3
1
i
i
33
F.
37
Moderately advanced  	
M.
F.
2
1
2
3
5
4
4
4
4
5
2
3
2
1
5
5
1
4
l
35
23
„ „M.
__
1
2
2
2
1
1
6
2
1
2
l
—
9
F.
13
 M.
	
	
	
—
F.
	
Type not stated 	
 M.
F.
.M.
	
1
_
	
"   1
1
1
1
..
3
F.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
1
4
Total pulmonary —	
241    261    12
181    321    16
421    581    28
16
12
28
9
10
19
101      7
141    16
241    23
61    10
51      5
111    15
14
-
18
5
1
6
21       1
21.	
41      1
142
135
277
Tuberculous pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion 	
1
1
1
1
7
31	
1
i .. z
	
1         1
111       7
- 1       4
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion _
M.
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1
1
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1
1
.
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 M.
 |	
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1
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3
3
1
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11
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2
4
2
1
1
"    "l
5
13
Non-pulmonary—
Meninges    	
1
1
1
1
1
2
._. M.
---
__
	
11	
:::::
__
F.
1
M.
F.
	
	
	
	
	
1
1
1
i
2
1
Tuberculoma   	
M.
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—1—
Bones and joints    	
M.
F.
	
1
1
11-	
1
2
Skin   	
M.
F.
--
	
—
	
Lymphatic system 	
M.
F.
M.
F.
2
7
1
7
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
8
6
Genito urinary system _ —
I
—1—
1
_„-M.
1
j
F
. M.
-    1
1
I
—
1
Other non-pulmonary 	
F.
M.
F.
	
1
1
■       | -      1
1
1
_   M.
1
 1- -
	
F.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
1
Total non-pulmonary	
2!      1
31      2
5|      3
31      1
11      1
41      2
2
1
3
31      31—. 1 1	
2!      21      21- 1.	
51      51      21— -1	
	
15
14
29
Total notifications 	
261    281    151    19
211    341    171    15
47|    621    321    34
12
13
25
161    101      61    101    V
161    181      81      5|      4
32!    281    141    151    18
51      31      1!   165
11      21        1   154
61      51      l!   319
1 Includes notification of 22 Indians of white status.
2 Dead on notification.
Source:  Case Examination, Form TB. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 73
Chart 12.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia
by Diagnosis, 1954
EXCLUDING INDIANS
PUtMONARY NOT STATED
1-0%
DEAD NON-PULMONARY
1.2%
INDIANS
/                    PRIMARY
/                            37.6%
DEAD
NON-PULMONARY	
•3%
/               MINIMAL
\>5>v A
\                     21.9%
MODERATELY            \/
\      / A>
ADVANCED               /
\    /     «? *     /
18.2%             / D 74
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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0
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Tf         ON
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OO TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 75
Chart 13.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group
and Sex, 1940-54, Rates per 100,000 Population
(Excluding Indians)
Rale
400
1
i
i
1
1
1
M.
*__r*^^^
LE
EMAIE
1
I
1
Rate
400
1
i
1
1
1
1
1
MALE
'ft
FEMALE // NJ.
_/SJ---y   \s_»
«fr ™
1
1
*%Z3
1940     41       42       43       44       45       46      47       48       49       50       51       52       53     19 54 1940     41       42       43       44       45       46       47       48       49       50       51       52       53      19 54
Rate
400
10-14 yrs.
1
1
FEMALE
MALE
1   ,
i
t
_  i
\
N
\
'" "      *
1
1
*<IS'
1
Rate
400
15-19 yrs.
1
i
i
FEMALE
1                /
\
i
Vi  » '
\ *
'
MALE
i
1
i
i
i
1940  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  43  49  50  51   52  53  1954        1940 41   42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51   52  53 1954
Rate
20-29 yes.
1
)
^"female
/   /
/    /
■_-— s
y'
1 \
i    %
X
\
^k    f
1
-
,/MlE
V
-**"""
100
0
1
i
, i
i
1
t
'
1940  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53 1954
i
1940    41       42      43      44     45      46      47      48     49      50       51      52      53     1954 D 76
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 13.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-group
and Sex, 1940-54, Rates per 100,000 Population—Continued
(Excluding Indians)
40-49 yrs.
50-59 yrs.
1940      41       43       43       44       45       4.       47      48       49      50       51        52       53     1954 1940     41        42       43       44       45      46       47       48      4?      50       51       52        53    1954
60-69 yrs. Ra'-
70-79 yrs.
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
MALE /
t
1
.
1
%
t
.
>
%
/
%
/
/
N
1  .
*
1
..y
1
1
».
/     -
'           \
\
1
— -'*'
300
1
1
1
1
I
1
1
%
%
100
1
t
\          ^W
*
>>/
*   FEMA
1
mm"<T
\
s
,''>«
*  '
, T ,
1
<
1940     41       42       43       44      45      46       47       48      49      50       5>        52       53    1954 1940     41       42      43       44      45       46       47       48       49      50       51       52      53     1954
-
1940     41       42       43       44      45       46       47       48      49       50       51       52       53    ^954 1940    41        42
43      44      45     46      47     48      49      50      51      52      53     1924 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 77
Table 57.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from
Tuberculosis in British Columbia, 1950-54
Total
Other than Indians
Indians
Year
New
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
New
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
New
Cases1
Deaths2
Ratio
1950.  	
1,699
1,688
1,383
1,501
1,450
313
292
215
146
123
5.4
1
1,326    |      239
1,332    j      212
1,101    |      180
1,094           122
1.131     1      103
5.5:1
6.3:1
6.1:1
9.0:1
11.0:1
373
356
282
407
319
74
80
35
24
20
5.0:1
1951	
1952...	
5.8
6.4
10.3
11.8
1
1
1
1
4.5:1
8.1:1
1953  	
1954	
17.0:1
16.0:1
3 Includes notifications of; 1950, 4 Indians of white status; 1951, 10 Indians of white status; 1952, 26 Indians
of white status;   1953, 25 Indians of white status;   1954, 22 Indians of white status.
2 Includes deaths of: 1950, 4 Indians of white status; 1951, 10 Indians of white status; 1952, 3 Indians of white
status;   1953, 3 Indians of white status;   1954, 3 Indians of white status.
TUBERCULOSIS MORTALITY
The death rate for the total population has dropped from 11.5 to 9.6. The area of
lowest death rate in the Province is that of the West Kootenay. The area showing the
highest death rate, 30.9, is Area 9 with 7 deaths. When Indians are excluded (see
Table 59), this rate is reduced to 5.8 and drops it below the average death rate, which
is 8.2 excluding Indians.
The Indian rate is the highest in the Province in this area—109 per 100,000.
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbi
- BY
Statistical Area, 1950-54
Total Population
Area
1
Area
2
' Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality—
1950             -                  	
1.
4     |    11
4            9
3      j    11
2     |      6
2            3   .
13
10
8
4
6
162
144
129
86
72
44
42
27
18
11
18
13
10
9
8
4
10
2
1
2
1
1
33      1     18
6
10
1
2
2
3131
1951 - 	
1952: 	
1953 -	
1954—    	
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1950 —	
1951 	
1952      	
1953	
1954 _
28
15
13
8
22
5
7
292
214
146
1212
16.2 |    19.9
14.5 |    15.0
10.6 |    17.8
6.9 |      9.7
6.7   1       4.6
17.5
12.9
10.0
4.9
7.1
24.3
22.2
19.3
12.5
10.2
22.8
19.5
12.2
8.2
4.7
46.5
31.1
23.3
20.0
17.6
26.6
54.8
10.7
4.6
10.1
99.3
69.5
36.3
30.6
18.3
80.3
105.6
37.4
22.7
30.9
44.3
69.5
6.8
13.0
12.9
27.5
25.1
17.9
11.9
9 6
1 Excludes death of 1 ex-Province resident.
2 Excludes deaths of 2 ex-Province residents.
Preliminary figures for 1954. D 78
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area,
1950-54.
Other-than-Indian Population
Area
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality—
1950	
1951...          .                       --
3
3
3
2
2
12.4
11.0
10.7
7.0
6.8
11
9
11
6
3
20.0
15.0
17.8
9.5
4.6
12
8
7
4
5
16.4
10.5
8.9
4.9
6.0
160
135
125
86
70
24.1
20.9
18.8
12.6
10.0
32
33
20
15
9
17.0
15.8
9.3
6.8
4.0
5
8
6
2
3
14.6
21.5
15.7
5.1
7.4
1
5
1
2
7.6
31.7
5.9
11.4
9
5
5
3
4
31.8
14.3
14.0
8.2
10.6
5
8
2
2
1
30.7
50.8
12.2
12.0
5.8
1
1
1
2
7.8
7.2
7.0
13.6
3291
215
1952  	
179
1953	
122
1954.   ..                          	
1012
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—■
1950	
1951	
1952 	
1953    ..    .                         	
21.5
18.9
15.3
10.2
1954   -                              	
8.2
1 Excludes death of 1 ex-Province resident.
2 Excludes deaths of 2 ex-Province residents.
Preliminary figures for 1954.
Table 60.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1950-54
Indian Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality—
19501 _ .
19511	
1
1
245.1
228.3
	
3
2
1
1
244.3
175.0
93.9
88.7
2
9
4
2
54.0
302.2
114.4
53.9
12
9
7
3
2
228.4
157.4
120.6
50.1
32.4
13
5
4
7
5
286.7
105.9
83.3
141.5
98.1
3
5
2
155.0
216.5
90.6
24
23
10
10
4
484.8
428.6
180.6
175.2
68.1
13
14
6
3
6
212.5
278.6
115.6
56.1
109.0
3
9
1
1
380.7
1267.6
136.4
132.6
74
77
19521 	
19531                                 	
35
24
19541     	
20
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1950	
1951    .                                	
255.2
270.4
1952.. ..                          	
119.1
1953 -	
1954	
79.2
64.1
i Includes deaths of:   1950, 4 Indians of white status;   1951, 7 Indians of white status;   1952, 3 Indians of white
status;   1953, 3 Indians of white status;   1954, 3 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 79
Table 61.
-Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1954
(Excluding Indians)
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
9
1
2
1
1
1
1
44
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
2
12
2
Z
14
5
56
6
1
1
1
Area 4b—Continued
Vancouver 	
Unorganized _
35
2
10
1
1
45
2
8
Saanich —
3
3
Unorganized   	
Area 5f  	
2
Area 2b 	
1
1      |      _
1      1        1
1               1
1
Rossland _ 	
2
Unorganized	
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Area 3b— -
Area 7b     -   — 	
1
Unorganized 	
1
1
Westview- 	
1
2
Unorganized  — ...
Area 8d -
2
2
1
Unorganized  — -
Area 9d - -
Unorganized    - -	
Area lOd	
1
New Westminster. 	
Port Coquitlam	
Surrey- 	
1
1
2
2
Ex-Province  	
2
North Vancouver District
77
26
103 D 80
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1954
(Indians only1)
Place of Residence
Male      Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
1
1
....
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
Area 4a _ - ,
Area 8f. 	
Area 8g	
Area 9b  -	
Unorganized-     ..	
Unorganized-          - 	
2
1
2               2
2
Area 9d  _.	
3
2
2
1
11
9
20
1 Includes deaths of 3 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 81
As in 1953, the present figures record only three deaths in the other-than-Indian
group under the age of 25. Two of these are in the 1-4 age-group and one in the 10-14
age-group. Even including Indians, there were only 3 deaths from meningitis. There
were only four Indian deaths under 25 years of age.
Table 63.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-group, 1954
Excluding Indians
Indians Only1
1 Includes 3 Indians of white status.
Source:   Death Registrations, 1954.
Diagnosis
Age-group
o
of!
HP.-?
a
si
TB. of
Intestines
and
Peritoneum
OJ §
CQ  _ O
H>U
•a
§
_
o SS
HO.S
_
rt
twi_: c
°. =2
TB. of
Genitourinary
System
.. v- C
° _ rt
~ -= M
m ^ v.
HOO
cut.--:
rt
O
H
Under 1 year     .
1- 4 years 	
5- 9    „    	
1
1
5
11
17
21
19
14
6
i
i
—
	
 4
.1
1
1
2
2
10-14    „	
1
15-19    „    ....    -	
20-24   „    	
25-29    „        	
5
30-39    „      -	
13
40-49    „    	
17
50-59    „    	
23
60-69    „
20
70-79    „    	
15
80 years and over	
7
Totals	
95
2
1
2
3
103
Under 1 year. 	
1- 4 years -
5-9    „    	
1
1
1
1
2
3
2
2
6
1
	
	
	
1
1
1
10-14   „    	
-     1    	
15-19    „    	
20-24    „    .    	
1
25-29    „     	
1
30-39    „   .    —	
2
40-49    „   -    	
     |    ....
     1    ----
—-    |    	
3
50-59    „    	
2
60-69    „     	
2
70-79    „     	
6
80 years and over	
Totals -
19
1
	
     |    .	
1
	
     1    -     1        20
1                1 D 82                                   DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 64.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals, 1945-54.
Year
Total Province
Indians
Excluding Indians
1                      1
Num-                        |    Rate
Num
Rate
Num
Rate
ber of    Population 1      per
ber of
Population
per
ber of
Population
per
Deaths                           100,000
Deaths
100,000
Deaths
100,000
1945    - 	
525
949.000            55.3
1                 !
173    j       25,758    |    671.6
1                      [
352           923.242            38.1
1946  	
576
1,003,000
57.4
207    1       26.400    1    784.1
369
976,600
37.8
1947 	
536
1,044,000
51.3
1741
27,000
644.4
362
1,017,000
35.6
1948  - 	
442
1,082,000
40.9
1561
28,000
557.1
286    I  1,054,000
27.1
1949 - 	
406
1,114,000
36.4
11U
28,500
389.5
295
1.085,000
27.2
1950           -   -
313
1,138,000
27.5
741
29,000
255.2
239
1,109,000
21.6
1951 	
292
1,165,210
25.1
771
28,478
270.4
215
1,136,732
18.9
1952 	
214
1,198,000
17.9
35i
29,400
120.7
179
1,168,600
15.3
1953  -
146
1,230,000
11.9
241
30,300
79.2
122
1,199,700
10.2
1954               	
123
1,266,000
9.7
201
31,200
64.1
103
1,234,800
8.3
Year
Chinese
Japanese
Excluding Indians and
Orientals
Num
Rate
Num
Rate
Num
Rate
ber of
Population
per
ber of
Population
per
ber of
Population
per
-
Deaths
100,000
Deaths
100,000
Deaths
100,000
1945 	
40
15,848
252.4
16
14,695
108.9
296
892.699           33.2
1946  	
44
15,600
282.1
13
7,000
185.7
312
954,000
32.7
1947..	
40
15,400
359.7
12
7,000
171.4
310
994,600
31.2
1948 .	
33
15,200
217.1
8
7,000
114.3
245
1,031,800
23.8
1949  	
22
14,900
147.7
5
7,500
66.7
268
1,063,100
25.2
1950     -
24
15,000
160.0
6
8,000
75.0
209
1,086,000
19.2
1951 	
31
15,933
194.6
4
7,169
55.8
180
1,113,630
16.2
1952 	
23
15,900
144.7
2
7,400
27.0
154
1,145,400
13.4
1953 	
17
15,800
107.6
2
7,450
26.8
103
1,176,450
8.8
1954 	
9
15,750
57.1
2
7,500
26.7
92
1,211,550
7.6
1 Includes deaths of:    1947, 9 Indians of white status;   1948, 12 Indians of white status;   1949, 8 Indians of white
status;   1950, 4 Indians of white status;   1951, 7 Indians of white status;   1952, 3 Indians of white status;   1953, 3 Indians
of white status;   1954, 3 Indians of white status.
Note.—" Indian deaths " includes all deaths of persons of Indian racial origin, whether they were Indians under the
meaning of the " Indian Act " or not, except in 1945 to 1946.
Source:   Mortality-
-Annual
Reports of V
tal Statist
cs, 1945
to 1953, inch
isive (1954 figures preliminary only).
\ TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 83
Chart 14.—Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals, 1945-54.
1000
CHINESE        -
y
\
V
,-.'*
*
\
\
\
\
INDIANS
4
/
/
/
••>- _.
V   JAPANESE
\
\
\
\
\
s
\
_.. rr
*<•
N, \
IN
\    N
.
\
\
\
\
\
m
^
S\
1
0*
\
X
\
>
TOTAL
\
\
EXCLUDING INDI
.NS AND
\
\
s
s
m   ^*
EXCLUDiNG^^
^      1NDIAN5
■*.-.
\
^^^™
■■™• ~~
N.     N
\ V
______
v^
v;>
7
N
I945 1946 1947 1948 1949 )950 195! 1952
1953        1954 D 84
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
In males, out of a total of 88 deaths 64 occurred in people 50 years of age and over.
This is approximately 75 per cent of the male deaths.
Table 65.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of
British Columbia by Age-group, 1950-54
Age-group
Year
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Total
1950  _	
10
11
6
4
2
6
4
2
2
2
1
1
5
7
8
1
....
8
8
3
1
8
6
3
4
2
17
19
16
6
3
21
21
12
11
16
30
29
28
16
24
49
58
39
27
17
28
25
27
25
17
5
3
4
5
6
189
1951  	
193
1952	
149
1953	
100 .
1954.   -	
88
Preliminary figures for 1954.
Source:   Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1950 to 1953.
Table 66.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of
British Columbia by Age-group, 1950-54
Age-group
Year
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Total
1950	
13
6
2
6
11
14
21
23
11
13
1
3
124
1951	
8
1
4
11
12
8
22
11
4
4
11
3
99
1952.. 	
1
3
2
2
4
10
15
10
5
7
3
3
65
1953  	
7
1
1
2
3
8
6
6
1
7
4
46
1954	
2
1
1
4
12
4
1
5
4
1
35
Preliminary figures for 1954.
Source:   Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1950 to 1953.
Table 67.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of
British Columbia by Age-group, 1950-54
Age-group
Year
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Total
1950 - 	
23
14
4
11
19
22
38
44
41
62
29
8
313
1951	
19
5
6
18
20
14
41
32
33
62
36
6
292
1952 -	
7
5
3
10
7
13
31
22
33
46
30
7
214
1953 —-  	
11
1
1
1
3
7
14
17
22
28
31
8
146
1954 	
4
1
1
1
6
15
20
25
22
21
7
123
Preliminary figures for 1954.
Source:   Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1950 to 1953. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 85
_■
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z
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o
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tt,
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w
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h
j
<
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B_
O
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5
o
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H
a.
P
H
w
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<
00
VO
w
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cq
<!
H
r. r— r. Ov *_>
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90
II
4«
0 « h r>' Tf
ov r- t- \o '*
tJ- \c r~- m i
cD m ca so ca
Os so Os tr- en
cc 00 CA tt rt
06 \6 tr^ so ci
en os en a •
0\ H « H .
o\ o sq Tt i
■**■ m' ~s6 en -
>
F
O *H (S en  **
*n m m m m
Os Os Qs OS Os D 86
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Vs
I
O
vs
as
a.
P
o
a.
O
i
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a
<
P
_j
o
U
ffi
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ffi
cn
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pa
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<
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a.
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rt
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tt,
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w
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><
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rt
o
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ca
p
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w
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W
rt
u.
H
Cl
1
o
ON
VO
oO
On «
21
■a-r1
8;*
i_J
Tf Tf (N««
in in O oo m
ri m O x h
Tf  Tf  Tf  Tf  Tt
CAtptr-ent>
Tf ci o en r.
Tt rn  in —< CJ
od co Tf ri o
CA t Tt
sq Tf rj Tt Tt
in \6 Tt oo in
r.^«3 N--
t> o tD oo r-
Os m ca en a
(N oo Tf in rn
co t^ rn so CA
%&
Os Os Os Os Os TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1954
D 87
Chart 17.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population and
the Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1954
EXCLUDING INDIANS
INDIANS ONLY D 88
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 70.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by
Length of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1954
Length of Residence
in British Columbia
Place of Death
1-5
Months
6-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3
Years
4
Years
5
Years
OverS
Years
Not
Stated
Total
Hospitals and other institutions
Tuberculosis institutions1—	
1
1
	
1
1
1
2
1
31
40
11
6
1
1
1
4
36
45
15
Home   	
Other                   	
6
1
Totals  	
1
1
2
3
1
89
6
103
1 Excludes 22 deaths occurring in tuberculosis institutions in which the underlying cause of death was other than
tuberculosis.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid. Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1955
210-655-6054

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