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DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1952 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1954

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 PROVINCE   OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1952
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1954  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to transmit herewith the Annual Report of the Department of
Municipal Affairs for the year ended December 31st, 1952.
W. D. BLACK,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Victoria, B.C., December 23rd, 1953.  Report of the Department of Municipal Affairs
Victoria, B.C., December 22nd, 1953.
The Honourable W. D. Black,
Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of this Department for the
year ended December 31st, 1952. Continuing the policy established last year, there
is included in this Report the individual reports of the separate branches of the
Department.
The total assessed value of land and improvements for cities, districts, villages,
and Vancouver for 1952 increased over the previous year. The increase was smaller
both absolutely and relatively than for 1951, except in the case of Vancouver and the
villages. Taxable values and values actually taxed also showed increases over the
previous year. The values actually taxed in 1952 continue to bear approximately the
same ratio to the total assessed values as existed in the two previous years. Figures are
shown in the following tables.
Total Assessed Value
of Land and
[mprovements
1951
1952
Increase
$328,463,342
352,124,109
43,174,027
$348,992,827
371,943,030
53,126,953
$20,529,485
19,818,921
9,952,926
$723,761,478
557,937,134
$774,062,810
608,304,366
$50,301,332
50,367,232
$1,281,698,612
$1,382,367,176
$100,668,564
Values Taxable
1951
1952
Increase
$249,341,133
284,292,026
36,616,533
$265,576,391
303,605,583
43,818,551
$16,235,258
19,313,557
Villages _ _   	
7,202,018
Totals                         	
$570,249,692
461,975,094
$613,000,525
503,004,011
$42,750,833
41,028,917
$1,032,224,786
$1,116,004,536
$83,779,750
Values Actually Taxed
1951
1952
Increase
Cities                                      	
$148,859,181
186,696,891
23,251,705
$160,283,727
200,294,606
28,319,093
$11,424,546
13,597,715
5,067,388
Villages  -	
$358,807,777
300,020,487
$388,897,426
324,030,086
$30,089,649
24,009,599
$658,828,264
$712,927,512
$54,099,248
During the year approximately $7,000,000 in new debentures were approved.
This is $1,500,000 less than in the year 1951. In spite of this, the total debenture
debt outstanding for cities, districts, and villages only increased from $66,500,000 to N 6
BRITISH COLUMBIA
$68,800,000.   The amount and purpose for which the new debentures were approved
are set out below:—
Purpose
Cities
Districts
Villages
Total
Civic projects 	
Hospitals- — 	
Local improvements	
Property purchase-	
Protection to persons and property
Public works equipment 	
Roads and streets	
Schools	
Sewers  	
Waterworks	
Totals-- 	
$370,000.00
241,000.00
177,110.68
40,000.00
38,000.00
46,000.00
150,000.00
430,950.00
300,000.00
335,000.00
$2,128,060.68
$25,000.00
80,000.00
199,273.87
41,500.00
300,000.00
1,138,400.00
1,778,000.00
977,000.00
1,000.00
20,000.00
308,500.00
$4,539,173.87
$336,500.00
$395,000.00
321,000.00
376,384.55
48,000.00
79,500.00
46,000.00
450,000.00
1,569,350.00
2,098,000.00
1,620,500.00
$7,003,734.55
Total debenture debt is summarized as follows:
Issued, Sold, and
Outstanding
Unissued and
Unsold
Total
$39,605,949
23,214,096
1,813,355
$3,031,432
1,035,337
149,200
$42,637,381
24,249,433
1,962,555
Totals   	
$64,633,400
101,004,873
$4,215,969
$68,849,369
101,004,873
$165,638,273
$4,215,969
$169,854,242
This Department has been advised by the Department of Finance of the Federal
Government that all semi-annual payments have been made in respect of the project for
which loans were obtained under the provisions of the " Municipal Improvements Assistance Act, 1938." The following table shows the outstanding amounts as at January
1st, 1953:—
Loans Made under the Provisions of " The Municipal Improvements Assistance
Act, 1938," Guaranteed by the Province of British Columbia, as at January
1st, 1953.
Municipality
Loan No.      Amount Advanced     Balance Outstanding
Greater Vancouver Water District.
City of Vancouver 	
District of Saanich_ 	
City of Nanaimo	
City of Prince George ... —	
City of Grand Forks 	
District of Summerland __ _	
City of Trail 	
City of Port Alberni	
City of Alberni 	
City of Prince Rupert _
Westview Light, Power, and Waterworks District
District of Coquitlam    —
District of Pentictoni   	
District of Surrey   	
Annable-Warfield Waterworks District 	
Connaught Heights Waterworks District	
District of West Vancouver __	
Grandview Waterworks District  	
City of Salmon Arm   	
City of Armstrong — 	
Totals    	
1
2
21
22
31
32
33
54
56
57
59
60
67
68
69
81
84
85
89
94
95
$750,000.00
390,000.00
39,224.15
200,000.00
18,750.00
11,000.00
140,192.50
130,000.00
66,000.00
10,000.00
40,000.00
40,000.00
8,400.00
41,000.00
12,500.00
44,000.00
39,200.00
100,000.00
8,000.00
15,000.00
11,491.05
$2,114,757.70
$406,482.61
164,684.70
16,563.12
59,687.94
4,888.21
78,770.07
51,484.63
27,869.72
26,167.10
7,522.46
2,490.50
16,237.47
2,807.05
19,722.61
25,643.75
60,107.00
3,378.12
9.812.65
2,995.77
$987,315.48
1 Changed from district to city status, April 30th, 1948.
Amortized payments due December 31st, 1952, and January 1st, 1953, made by all municipalities. report of department of municipal affairs
N 7
All money by-laws before being approved for submission to the electors were
carefully examined as to the necessity, the estimated cost, the financial ability of the
municipality to repay the loan, and the relation of the life of the works to the maturity
date of the debentures. Care was also taken to see that the debt burden resulting from
combining the existing and proposed debt-repayment schedules was not unduly excessive
for any particular year.
At the end of the year under review, reserve funds amounted to $4,291,090, being
an increase over the previous year of $1,444,661.
Toward the close of the year the Inspector of Municipalities, as the result of
complaints lodged by a Ratepayers' Association, recommended the holding of a public
inquiry into the conduct of certain business of the City of North Vancouver. Such an
inquiry was held without disclosing any personal wrong-doing and without any punitive
action being necessary. However, the Commissioner commented adversely upon some
of the procedures which had been followed.
The Municipal Officers' Conference was held in June, 1952. This is the thirteenth
year that this Conference has been sponsored by the Minister of Municipal Affairs.
It provides an excellent opportunity for the discussion of administrative problems and
also for municipal officials to take up local matters with the various departments of
Government.
During the year 1952 the following communities were incorporated as village
municipalities: Ashcroft, Fort St. James, Fruitvale, Sidney, Telkwa, Ucluelet, Warfield,
and Zeballos. Extensions of boundaries were granted to three cities and three villages.
Minor changes were made in the boundaries of Fernie and Victoria, but in the case of
the City of Nanaimo the area was more than doubled and the population increased by
nearly 50 per cent. The Village of Squamish likewise had its area more than doubled,
while Campbell River and Tofino enjoyed a moderate increase in size.
Amendments were made to the " Municipal Act" and " Village Municipalities Act"
through the "Taxation Act" covering the basis for assessments of pipe-lines.
The changing conditions brought about by the growth of urban centres in district
municipalities which were formerly predominantly rural has presented problems to certain
Councils which they seem unable or disinclined to deal with. In my opinion, some of
the special problems of these urban communities could be handled under existing powers.
However, if this is not done and the present conditions become more aggravated, other
and possibly less welcome statutory remedies seem inevitable.
The year 1952 was unique in the history of the Department in that there were three
different Ministers of the Crown in charge of the Department in that year—the Honourable
R. C. MacDonald, the Honourable A. D. Turnbull, and the Honourable W. D. Black.
After a lapse of nearly seven years the position of Supervisor was filled by the
appointment of J. E. Brown, M.A. (U.B.C.), M.B.A.  (Chicago).
The active co-operation of the various elected and appointed officials of the
municipality has, during the year, materially assisted the efforts of the Department.
B. C. BRACEWELL,
Deputy Minister. N 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE  SUPERVISOR OF MUNICIPALITIES
Victoria, B.C., December 18th, 1953.
B. C. Bracewell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—This is the second year for which municipal statistics have been published
separately from the Departmental Report. The only major change in the former has
been the inclusion of a table showing sewer, water-main, road, and street mileage for
each municipality as at the end of the year.
Toward the close of the year some work was done toward the setting-up of standardized assessment and collectors' rolls and accounting records. The Department is indebted
to the Institute of Chartered Accountants for its generous assistance in this work.
Pressure of other duties has unfortunately prevented the completion of this task.
The staff continued to be fully occupied dealing with the regular flow of business.
A comparison of the following with the corresponding summary for 1951 will show
that this continued unabated.   During 1952:—
(1) Ninety-five visits were made to municipalities. The number of individual
municipalities visited is less than this figure, since a few received more
than one visit.
(2) One hundred and fifty-eight Orders in Council were prepared and
approved.
(3) Forty-eight certificates of approval for municipal loan by-laws were
issued.
(4) Thirty-nine debenture issues were certified by the Inspector of Municipalities, while 7,376 debentures with coupons attached were examined,
checked, sealed, and certified.
(5) Two hundred and ninety-six village by-laws were examined and filed.
In the latter part of the year the Department was honoured by being asked to
supervise a training programme in municipal administration for a nominee from Israel
under a United Nations Fellowship. It is of more than passing interest to note that
this was the only fellowship currently offered in municipal administration in North
America. Around the middle of November, Zvi Freund arrived in Victoria to begin
a thirteen-week study of our methods. The major part of the programme consisted of
visits to municipalities to obtain direct experience in the application of the statutory
provisions. Selected municipalities on Vancouver Island and on the Lower Mainland
co-operated whole-heartedly in the programme. Reports are that Mr. Freund was greatly
impressed by the friendly manner in which he was received by the various municipal
officials and by the efforts made to assist him in gaining an insight into our methods of
conducting municipal business. It is understood he found one or two aspects of our
procedures which could be readily applied in his own country to advantage.
Last year reference was made to the debt position of the municipalities of this Province. In a review of municipal finances, municipal revenues are probably second to debt
in importance, from the view-point of the investor, administrator, or student. For that
reason a brief report on these revenues is appended this year. To conform to the latest
classification of accounts, the statistics on revenues have been adjusted throughout the
earlier years to exclude Provincial grants for schools, miscellaneous school revenues,
proceeds from the sale of tax-sale lands, interdepartmental credits and receipts from the
Better Housing Programme. In addition, only the excess of receipts over disbursements
in the case of utilities is treated as revenue. There is no suggestion that the statistical data
for such a long period are strictly comparable, but it is extremely doubtful that the conclusions are in any way vitiated by whatever discrepancies there may be in the statistics. report of department of municipal affairs N 9
The major source of revenue for the municipalities has been, and still is, the property tax, which in this Province means chiefly real property. This tax is computed on
the basis of 100 per cent of the assessed land values, together with some fraction of the
assessed value of the improvements on the land as distinct from the land itself. The
percentage of improvements subject to taxation varies from municipality to municipality
and is determined by each Council, provided the percentage is kept below the statutory
limit, which is 75 per cent. In addition, the municipalities may levy a poll, road, dog,
and business tax. The first three of these have been in force for many years but have
never been productive of large amounts. Of late years there has been a growing tendency
to discontinue the use of these three taxes. The business tax, however, is new to this
Province, having been placed in the Statutes in 1947. To date only two cities have
adopted this tax, which in their cases provides from 8 to 10 per cent of their total tax
revenue. Other sources of revenue are Provincial grants, profits from utilities, licence
fees and permits, fines, and sundry other miscellaneous items. Comparing the present
with thirty-five years ago, the only significant changes in the source of revenues have
been the Government grants, utility profits, and the business tax.
In one important respect, however, there has been a decided change in the application of the property tax. In the earlier years this tax was in many cases confined to
land only, as distinct from the improvements placed on the land. Over the years there
has been a gradual shift toward the taxation of improvements, which has taken place
by three distinct routes.
First, there has been a decided shift toward not only taxing improvements, but also
to taxing a greater percentage of the assessed value of these improvements. That is
fairly clearly demonstrated in Table 1. Secondly, improvements in 1952 made up roughly
three-quarters of the total assessed value of land and improvements, compared with about
one-third in the case of cities and one-quarter for districts in 1918. This change in the
relative importance of the two components is in part accounted for by the large amount
of construction which has taken place over the years. It seems safe to assume, however,
that at least two other factors also contributed to this change—the highly inflated land
values of the period immediately preceding World War I and the tendency to almost
ignore improvement values, particularly in those municipalities where they were not being
taxed. Thirdly, there has been the tendency to widen the definition of improvements by
the inclusion of items which might not normally be classed as real property.
It is interesting to trace the trend of municipal revenues during the years since 1917,
which latter is the first year for which Departmental statistics are reported. This is
shown graphically in Chart 1, where it can be observed that revenues advanced rapidly
up to the years 1920 and 1921, and thereafter remained relatively constant until the close
of World War II, when they again increased at a very rapid rate. At least a part of this
change can be attributed to a growth in population and to changes in the level of prices.
By reference to Table 2 it will be seen that after correcting for both population and price
there has been, between 1921 and 1951, an increase of 34 per cent in revenues in the
case of the cities, 14 per cent for Vancouver, and 18 per cent for the districts. Subject
to the inherent limitations of the data, this is the extent to which to-day's citizens are
paying for increased or better community services compared to those of thirty years ago.
There has always been considerable criticism of municipal taxation on the grounds
that it is not responsive to changes in the income of the taxpayers. Chart 2 lends considerable support to this contention. It will be observed that the relationship between
total revenue, less Provincial grants, in all municipalities and total personal income for
all citizens of British Columbia does not remain constant. Even correcting for the change
in the proportion of the population residing within municipal boundaries, which has gone
from 71 per cent of the total in 1921 to 78 per cent in 1951, would not materially alter
this relationship.   For example, in the interval from 1929 to 1940 income fell off very N  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
sharply while municipal revenues continued to be maintained at a fairly uniform level,
and it was not until 1940 that the relative position between revenue and income which
had prevailed in 1929 was regained. However, since 1940 income has advanced very
much more rapidly than locally collected municipal revenues. In the meantime, of course,
both the Province and the Federal Government have increased their " take," so that in
the over-all picture the taxpayer is devoting a larger fraction of his income to government
now than in the immediate pre-war era.
A second criticism, which is partly related to the first, is to the effect that investments in real property do not keep pace with income. Chart 2 is an attempt to examine
this complaint. The results are, of course, only a partial answer, but tend to support
the contrary view, particularly for the long period. Investment in residential property
in Canada is compared with national income for Canada. It is at once evident that, over
the cycle, income swings more widely than the value of investments in residential property, but the relationship between the two which existed in the years 1926 to 1929 has
been fairly well re-established in the post-war years 1945 to 1948. No figures on investment in commercial and industrial property are readily available, but such as exist suggest
that the trend of investments in these fields is not dissimilar to that for residential property.
The relative importance of the major sources of revenue for all the cities excluding
Vancouver, for Vancouver, and for the districts is shown in Charts 3, 4, and 5 respectively, and for selected years is given in Tables 2 and 3. The cities are characterized by
being able to obtain fair amounts of revenue from alternative sources, and thus to keep
the direct taxation at a relatively low level. Between 1919 and 1945 total revenues of
the cities advanced from approximately $5,400,000 to $8,200,000. Tax revenues, however, in the same period amounted to approximately $5,000,000 in 1919, thereafter
declining to a low of $4,000,000, and did not again reach $5,000,000 until 1945. Provincial grants, other than school grants, have been a variable element in municipal
revenues throughout this period. The first of such grants was introduced initially in
1921. By 1929 these grants had come to represent over 9 per cent of the revenues of the
cities. Thereafter, these were sharply reduced, so that by 1934 they were less than 3 per
cent. Starting in 1935, social-assistance grants were made to the municipalities, and in
1947 a share of the social security and municipal aid tax was added, so that currently
Provincial grants are roughly 21 per cent of revenue.
The cities have had one source of revenue which to a large extent has been unique
to them—the profits from municipally owned utilities. Over the years this has varied
from 3 to upward of 10 per cent of their revenues. Some cities, of course, make no profit
on utilities, but a few receive as high as 30 per cent of their total revenue from this source.
Vancouver differs from the average of the other cities by obtaining a smaller share
of its revenues from licences, permits, utilities, etc. For this reason, the fraction which
must be raised from taxation is considerably greater. The districts collect a smaller
amount relatively of revenue than is generally true of the cities or Vancouver. Unlike the
cities, the districts have not obtained any significant amount of revenue from utilities.
The amount of revenue collected by the various municipalities varies quite widely.
Table 4 gives an approximate idea of this range. Generally, the amount of revenue collected is the resultant of the interplay between the cost of providing a certain level of
desired services and the willingness of the taxpayer to be taxed. In part this tendency to
collect (or spend) is related to size (see Chart 6)—the larger the community, the greater
the per capita revenues required—although obviously size is not the only factor.
The general conclusions are:—
(1) That the municipalities now depend upon local taxation to a much smaller
extent than was the case thirty-five years ago. At that time roughly 90
per cent of their revenues came from taxation. To-day it is approximately
60 per cent or less. report of department of municipal affairs
N 11
(2) That municipalities are collecting and spending more, both relatively and
absolutely, than ever before.
(3) That, in spite of this increased spending, the revenues, in terms of relative
burden, are well below those collected in 1929, and, in fact, could currently be increased by roughly 65 per cent before being as onerous as they
were at that time.
J. E. Brown,
Supervisor of Municipalities. N  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 1.—Number of Cities and Districts by Percentage of Assessed Value
of Improvements Taxed for the Years 1921 and 1951 Respectively
Percentage
0
10
15
20
25
30
33J
35
40
45
50
55
60
65
70
75
Number of cities—
1921 i	
12
14
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
17
18
10
10
2
1
3
3
1
1
1951..      	
2
Number of districts—
1921	
1951 	
f,
Table 2.—Per Capita Municipal Revenues by Major Sources for the
Years 1917, 1921, 1931, 1941, and 1951 Respectively
(In dollars.)
1 Does not include Provincial grants for schools.
2 Excess of receipts over disbursements.
3 This column represents relative change in adjusted per capita revenue.
Year
Municipal Taxation
Provincial
Grants1
Utilities2
Licences,
Fines, and
Other
Revenue
Total
Revenue
Total Revenue
Corrected for
For
Schools
Total
Changes in
Prices
All cities except Vancouver—
1917	
1921	
1931      	
$
6.42
11.55
13.35
9.35
19.80
7.05
12.03
12.95
11.95
21.10
4.55
8.27
9.62
5.75
18.15
$
27.85
37.60
31.80
28.20
43.15
30.80
46.60
44.80
38.40
54.00
24.80
27.60
21.80
16.20
34.20
5.60
5.81
11.14
$
.57
3.29
3.05
20.45
.52
2.79
4.35
19.60
.51
3.12
2.23
15.50
3.78
.99
11.13
$
.56
1.47
3.67
8.60
.31
.93
.76
.17
1.20
$
4.00
7.82
9.39
8.03
15.80
2.35
6.03
4.91
5.54
10.97
3.00
6.24
6.83
1.27
6.54
4.04
2.08
8.43
$
31.85
46.55
45.95
42.95
88.00
33.15
53.15
52.50
48.60
85.50
27.80
34.35
31.75
19.70
57.00
13.42
9.05
31.90
$       (3)
57.60    100
67.75    117
1941	
1951	
61.95    107
77.50    134
Vancouver—
1917 _ -
1921      	
65.75    100
1931 .- -
77.35    117
1941 '■
69.75    106
1951  	
All districts—
1917 _ _ .
75.25    114
1921      	
42.45    100
1931 _
46.75    110
1941..	
1951	
All villages—
1931 _	
28.25      67
50.20    118
19.80    100
1941- 	
13.10     66
1951.	
28.10    142 REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
N  13
Table 3.—Percentage Distribution of Municipal Revenues by Major Sources
for the Years 1917, 1921, 1931, 1941, and 1951 Respectively
Year
Municipal Taxation
For
Schools
Total
Provincial
Grants1
Utilities2
Licences,
Fines, and
Other
Revenue
Total
Revenue
All cities except Vancouver-
1917.  	
1921   _ 	
1931  _..
1941 	
195L_ 	
Vancouver—
1917	
1921	
1931 _	
1941- _
1951.  __.
All districts—
1917	
1921  ______
1931 	
1941 	
1951	
All villages—
1931.  	
1941	
1951-  	
Per Cent
20.15
24.80
29.10
21.80
22.50
21.30
22.75
24.62
24.60
24.70
16.35
24.10
30.30
29.20
31.85
Per Cent
87.40
80.75
69.25
65.60
49.00
93.00
87.75
85.45
79.10
63.20
89.25
80.40
68.60
82.20
60.00
41.65
64.25
34.90
Per Cent
1.22
7.16
7.10
23.25
.99
5.32
8.95
22.95
1.48
9.82
11.32
27.20
28.20
10.93
34.90
Per Cent
1.20
3.20
8.55
9.77
.64
1.09
1.33
1.88
3.76
Per Cent
12.60
16.83
20.39
18.75
17.98
7.00
11.26
9.23
11.31
12.76
10.75
18.12
21.58
6.48
11.47
30.15
22.94
26.44
| PerCent
| 100
100
I 100
| 100
I        100
I
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
1 Does not include Provincial grants for schools.
2 Excess of receipts over disbursements.
Table 4.—Distribution of per Capita Revenues for Cities and Districts
for the Year 1951
Per Capita Revenues Cities
$20 to $29.99	
$30 to $39.99     1
$40 to $49.99     3
$50 to $59.99     4
$60 to $69.99     8
$70 to $79.99
$80 to $89.99
$90 to $99.99
$100 and over
7
4
5
3
Districts
l
l
4
10
6
2
2 N  14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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TOTAL REVENUE   FOR   VANCOUVER   IN  MILLIONS   OF  DOLLARS
TOTAL REVENUE   FOR  ALL CITIES   EXCEPT     VANCOUVER
IN  MILLIONS    OF   DOLLARS      (
TOTAL   REVENUE    FOR   ALL   DISTRICTS   IN  MILLIONS   OF   DOLLARS
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3   n   N   3 A 3   H REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
N 15
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LEGEND
INVESTMENT   IN RESIDENTIAL  PROPERTY   IN  CANADA,   I.N   BILLIONS    OF    DOL
NET   NATIONAL   INCOME     FOR   CANADA    IN     BILLIONS    OF    DOLLARS
TOTAL     PERSONAL    INCOME     FOR     BRITISH    COLUMBIA    IN   HUNDREDS
OF    MILLIONS    OF   DOLLAR
TOTAL.    REVENUE    LESS   PROVINCIAL    GRANTS    IN   TENS     OF    MILLIONS
.RATIO    CHART)                                                                                                          OF    DOLLARS
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
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SONVSnOHX     NI     NOIXViridOd N 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF DIRECTOR, REGIONAL PLANNING DIVISION
Victoria, B.C., December 18th, 1953.
B. C. Bracewell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—During the year ended December 31st, 1952, the addition of Quesnel District
Regulated Area and Golden Regulated Area brought to ten the number of areas in which
building construction, zoning, and subdivision regulations are administered by this Division of the Department. These regulations have the same effect on the parts of unorganized territory to which they apply as local by-laws dealing with the same matters have in
municipalities. Changes in local conditions in a regulated area have to be taken note of
and the necessary amendments made to the regulations in force in that area so as to
maintain their suitability, therefore a few amendments of this nature were made during
the year.
Amendments to boundary definitions also had to be made because of municipal
developments. Part of the North Saanich Regulated Area became the incorporated Village of Sidney and part of the Nanaimo District Regulated Area became absorbed into
the City of Nanaimo. These developments afforded illustrations of the benefits of controlling and directing growth of a developing district until it reaches village or municipal
status. When time for incorporation is reached, the fact is seen that what might have
been a liability is instead an asset in so far as general standards are concerned.
The drafting and application of the regulations also continued to be based on sound
practical considerations. For example, almost all building requirements put in force in
the regulated areas meet the minimum safety requirements recommended by the National
Research Council of Canada. The very few exceptions are those dictated by British
Columbia conditions.
It should be recorded that Port Edward and North Squamish Light District are
regulated areas but are administered on a special basis.
At the request of the Lands Branch of the Department of Lands and Forests, the
matter of a suitable layout of parts of the University Endowment Lands was investigated.
Interviews were held with the various officials and citizen representatives concerned, and
a report and sketch drawings were prepared indicating the considerations that should
govern and the lines that should be followed in the development of a subdivision design
suited to the land being dealt with.
In addition, also by request, a design was prepared showing the disposition of developments about an area to be known as " Church Place " in the above-noted lands. The
carrying-out of this plan has already commenced.
Other designs were developed for the subdivision of areas to be included in the
extended boundaries of municipalities whenever such help was requested. Individual
draft zoning by-laws and plans were prepared for application in four municipalities,
including villages, at the request of the Councils concerned, and various zoning by-laws
that had been prepared independently by some other villages were scrutinized and suggestions given for revision when necessary.
A number of meetings was held with officials of the Department of Public Works,
which resulted in the production of the first draft of a Bill eventually to be advanced
as the " Controlled Access Highways Act." Close relations were maintained with other
departments and the nature of the work of the Division often made it possible to help
other offices by the contribution of information regarding actual facts or the direction of
present trends.
At the same time, acknowledgement must be made of the fact that excellent cooperation has been received from other departments at all times. Special mention must
be made of the ready help available at the Department of Lands and Forests and the REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS
N 21
Department of the Attorney-General, and particularly the Department of Public Works,
which has worked closely with this Division in securing orderly subdivision and associated
developments in regulated areas.
The work of compiling an atlas of maps of incorporated municipalities and villages
was continued, and good progress was made. More than half the required maps were
processed or prepared.
A research study was conducted in the North Saanich Regulated Area to establish
the continued suitability of the standards used in classifying and apportioning land-use
areas as industrial, commercial, or residential.
As previously reported, the Division is represented on the Advisory Council to the
Community and Regional Planning Course of the University of British Columbia and
also in the Research Committee on Planning Legislation.
The amount of building construction authorized by building permits in regulated
areas in 1952 is shown in the table hereunder:—
Year
Regulated Area Establishe
Kelowna District  1947
Vernon District  1947
Connaught Heights   1948
Total for Year
Ended Dec. 31, 1952
View Royal  1948
North Saanich  1948
Prince George District  1949
Nanaimo District  1949
Kamloops District  1950
Golden   1952
Quesnel   1952
$184,020
97,436
19,376
143,455
214,755
1,148,365
677,478
246,100
101,387
117,120
$2,949,492
In these figures are included the costs of 399 residences for which permits were
issued during the year, as shown below.
New Housing Accommodation Provided in Regulated Areas
Regulated Area
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
Total
129
15
167
51
18
7
17
116
29
6
20
58
8
170
43
28
3
25
39
46
152
24
15
4
20
26
75
120
24
11
9
5
16
25
189
81
35
8
20
490
147
36
88
165
318
523
59
8
20
Totals _ .      —	
144
260
407
336
308
399
1,854
The foregoing figures differ very slightly from previous reports for the following
reasons. Wherever an existing building has been converted to a residence, it has now
been included in the above tabulation, since it represents additional housing accommodation, although it is not entirely new construction. Similarly, houses that have been
moved into a regulated area have been left out of the total, as they have already existed
as housing accommodation in some other part of the Province.
J. H. Doughty-Davies,
Director, Regional Planning Division, N 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF SUPERVISOR, ESTATES BRANCH
Victoria, B.C., December 18th, 1953.
B. C. Bracewell, Esq.,
Deputy Minister of Municipal Affairs.
Sir,—By and with your title of Inspector of Municipalities, acting for the Attorney-
General as statutory committee under the " Lunacy Act," the administration of the estates
of patients at the Provincial Mental Hospitals has continued during the past year, and
in increased volume.
A brief outline of the history of this Branch was given in the Annual Report for
1951.
It will bear repetition that this Branch of the Department has enjoyed co-operation
and assistance from many sources. The information and assistance so provided has
afforded a most valuable means of protection and guidance in the exercise of our duty.
We are particularly dependent upon the Attorney-General and the officials of his Department for direction and advice with regard to the legal aspects of all major decisions, as
well as in the execution of documents.
All estate matters are dealt with confidentially. Because of the circumstances, the
handling of the individual estates is ever a matter of some delicacy. In years gone by
there was an all too prevalent feeling among relatives of patients that the Government
was taking or seizing the property of the patient. I am happy to report that this feeling
seems to be lessening, and that it is being replaced by a fuller appreciation of the fact
that it is the duty of the appointed official to administer the patient's affairs as a trust in
the best interests of the patient.
As of the end of 1952, cash and securities and other assets belonging to these patients
totalled around $1,950,000, compared with $1,750,000 at the end of 1951, with some
3,000 current files.
The total moneys received to the credit of the patients for the year under review
amounted to some $831,700. This sum was derived from revenue earned on the assets,
including interest on the cash balances held on our books and on investments, and from
pensions, disability payments, legacies, cash realized from the sale of real and personal
property, and other sources. The increase over the figure ($372,000) for the previous
year was occasioned largely by " The Old Age Security Act" pensions from the beginning of 1952 and the " Old-age Assistance Act " payments.
During the same period some $683,500 was paid out on behalf of patients. This
money, in part, was used (including the major part of Old Age Security and Old-age
Assistance amounts) toward maintenance charges and extra comforts for patients at the
institutions. Certain sums were expended on behalf of dependents of patients. Other
expenditures were chiefly for estate maintenance, represented by a variety of items, and
for the closing-out of balances to patients upon their discharge from the hospital.
A very heavy volume of correspondence is involved, as will be realized from the
foregoing information.   In addition, it was necessary to have many interviews.
Expressions of appreciation have continued to be received from patients after they
have left the hospital for the manner in which their affairs were handled.
E. C. Wilderspin,
Supervisor, Estates Branch.
victoria, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1954
910-1253-6976  

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