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Mental Health Services PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1954

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
Mental Health Services
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31st
1953
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1953  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the Director of
Provincial Mental Health Services for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1953.
W. D.  BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
November 24th, 1953.  The Honourable W. D. Black,
Provincial Secretary,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report of the Provincial Mental
Health Services for the twelve months ended March 31st, 1953, being the Eighty-first
Annual Report.
The early history and development of our mental hospitals were being lost in
obscurity. As a matter of public interest, and after considerable research, Dr. Gee,
Director of Mental Health Services, has outlined in his report the history and development
of these Services during the past 100 years.
One of the progressive events of the year under review was the enactment of the
" Schools for Mental Defectives Act." This Act provides for the direct admission to
The Woodlands School of mental defectives, who hitherto were committed to the mental
hospitals pursuant to the provisions of the " Mental Hospitals Act."
Again, I have the pleasant task of commending to you the high devotion to duty
and to the cause of our patients on the part of the staff of the Mental Health Services in
all branches.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
R. A. PENNINGTON,
Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Deputy Provincial Secretary's Office,
November 20th, 1953.  TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART I.—MEDICAL
Officers and Staff, List of	
Report—Director of Mental Health Services
Report of Crease Clinic—Dr. Davidson
Page
11
15
33
34
35
40
Reports of Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale—
Report by Dr. Caunt	
Treatment Services—Dr. McNair	
Department of Occupational Therapy—
(a) Women's Division—Mrs. Draper	
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Herring  41
Department of Recreational Therapy—Mr. Brown  42
Audio-Visual Department—Mr. Walker  44
Library Report—Miss Ruzicka  46
Department of Physical Medicine—Dr. McNair_ __. 47
___      48
  49
  49
  49
  51
  52
  55
  56
  58
Dental Department—Dr. lohnsen	
Optical Report—Mr. Woodbridge	
Beauty-parlour Report—Mrs. Townsend.
Department of Dietetics—Miss Pelling	
Department of Neurology—Dr. Fister	
Laboratory Report—Dr. Nicolson	
Department of Radiology—Dr. Jackson-
Department of Psychology—Miss ElarL_.
Department of Social Service—Miss Carroll	
Department of Nursing Service—
(a) Women's Division—Miss Pullan     65
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Creber     67
Department of Nursing Education—Miss Smith     69
Department of Rehabilitation—
(a) Women's Division—Dr. McNair     70
(b)  Men's Division—Mr. Addison
Reports of The Woodlands School—
Report by Dr. Sauriol	
Educational Department—Mrs. Rhodes..
70
73
78
Department of Occupational Therapy—
(a) Girls' Division—Mrs. Jones  79
(b) Boys' Division—Mr. Mercer  80
Department of Recreational Therapy—Mr. Lynes  81
Department of Dentistry—Dr. MacCrostie  83
Department of Dietetics—Miss Paterson  83
Laboratory Report—Dr. Nicolson  84
Department of Radiology—Mr. Barteluk  84
Beauty-parlour Report—Mrs. DeCoene	
Department of Nursing Service—
(a) Women's Division—Miss Sanders.
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Elliot	
Department of Nursing Education—
(a) Women's Division—Miss Pullan
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Nash	
85
85
86
87
87 T 8
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Reports of The Woodlands School—Continued page
Department of Psychology—Miss Cohen     88
Department of Social Service—Miss Carroll     89
Reports of Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz—
Report by Dr. d'Easum  94
Department of Occupational Therapy—Mr. Helander  95
Report of Shoe and Tailor Shops—Mr. Campbell  96
Department of Recreational Therapy—Mr. Lowndes  96
Dental Report—Dr. Dempsey  97
Department of Nursing Service—Mr. McLeod  97
Department of Nursing Education—Mr. Lowndes  99
Reports of Geriatrics Division—
Report by Dr. Bryson  100
Tables on Movement of Population  103
Reports of Child Guidance Clinics—Dr. Byrne  106
(a) Social Service to Child Guidance Clinics—Mr. Ricketts  112
(b) Psychology Department—Miss Munro  115
Report of Research Division—Dr. Gibson  118
Medical Statistical Tables, Mental Hospitals—
1. Movement of Population  121
2. Summary of Operations since Inception  123
3. Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths  124
4. Districts from Which Patients Were Admitted  125
5. Number of Attacks at Time of Admission  126
6. Reported Duration of Attack Prior to Admission  126
7. Reported Cause of Attack in Patients Admitted  127
8. Probation, Number Discharged on  127
9. Discharges, Alleged Duration of Illness Prior to Admission in Those
Discharged  127
10. Deaths, Cause of, and Length of Time in Hospital  128
11. Psychoses of First Admissions ■  131
12. Psychoses of Readmissions  133
13. Age-groups of First Admissions by Psychoses   135
14. Age-groups of Readmissions by Psychoses   136
15. Economic Status of First Admissions by Psychoses  137
16. Use of Alcohol of First Admissions by Psychoses  138
17. Conjugal Conditions of First Admissions by Psychoses   139
18. Conjugal Conditions of Readmissions by Psychoses  140
19. Education of First Admissions by Psychoses  141
20. Nativity of First Admissions by Age-groups  142
21. Country of Birth of First Admissions  142
22. Citizenship of First Admissions   143
23. Religion of First Admissions   143
24. Age-groups of First Admissions  143
25. Age-groups of Readmissions  144
26. Previous Occupations of First Admissions  144
27. Method of Commitment of First Admissions  145
28. Method of Commitment of Readmissions  145
29. Rural-Urban Status of First Admissions by Psychoses  145
30. Age-groups of Discharged Patients by Psychoses  146
31. Duration of Last Hospital Residence of Discharged Patients by Psychoses 147 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Medical
32.
33.
34.
Medical
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
T 9
Page
148
148
149
Statistical Tables, Mental Hospitals—Continued
Conditions of Patients on Discharge by Psychoses	
Age-groups of Patients Who Died	
Age-groups of Patients at Time of Death by Psychoses	
Statistical Tables, Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine—
Movement of Population   151
Summary of Operations since Inception  151
Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths  152
Districts from Which Patients Were Admitted  153
Number of Attacks at Time of Admission   154
Alleged Duration of Attack Prior to Admission   154
Alleged Cause of Attack in Patients Admitted  154
Number Discharged and Results  155
Reported  Duration   of  Mental  Illness   Prior  to  Admission  in   Those
Discharged :  155
Deaths, Cause of, and Length of Time in Hospital  155
Psychoses of First Admissions   156
Psychoses of Readmissions   157
Age-groups of First Admissions by Psychoses   159
Age-groups of Readmissions by Psychoses  160
Economic Status of First Admissions by Psychoses  161
Use of Alcohol of First Admissions by Psychoses  162
Conjugal Conditions of First Admissions by Psychoses  163
Conjugal Conditions of Readmissions by Psychoses  164
Education of First Admissions by Psychoses  165
Nativity of First Admissions by Age-groups  165
Country of Birth of First Admissions  166
Citizenship of First Admissions  166
Religion of First Admissions   167
Age-groups of First Admissions  167
Age-groups of Readmissions  168
Previous Occupations of First Admissions  169
Method of Commitment of First Admissions  170
Method of Commitment of Readmissions  170
Rural-Urban Status of First Admissions by Psychoses  170
Age-groups of First Admissions by Psychoses  171
Duration of Last Hospital Residence of Discharged Patients by Psychoses 172
Condition of Patients on Discharge by Psychoses  173
Age-groups of Patients Who Died  173
Age-groups of Patients at Time of Death by Psychoses  174
PART II.—FINANCIAL
Report—Business Manager  175
Expense Statement, Preventive Services  179
Expense Statement, Headquarters  179
Financial Tables—
Mental Hospitals—
A. Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost for Past Ten
Years  180
B. Yearly Gross Expenditure, Analysis of, for the Past Ten Years  181
C. Summary of Gross and Net per Capita Cost in All Hospitals  182
D. Expense Statement, New Westminster  183 T 10 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Financial Tables—Continued
Mental Hospitals—Continued page
E. Expense Statement, Essondale  183
F. Expense Statement, Saanich  184
Revenue, Table of, for Past Ten Years  185
Expenditures under Federal Health Grants  186
Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine—Summary of Costs, per Capita, and
Population  187
Homes for the Aged—
Port Coquitlam—
Summary of Costs, per Capita, and Population  188
Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost since Inception 188
Vernon—
Summary of Costs, per Capita, and Population  189
Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost since Inception 189
Terrace—
Summary of Costs, per Capita, and Population  190
Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost since Inception 190
Summary of Gross and Net per Capita Cost in All Three Institutions  191
PART III.—COLONY FARM
General Financial Report—Business Manager  193
Profit and Loss Account  193
Dairy and Herds Department—Profit and Loss Account  194
Work-horse Department—Profit and Loss Account  194
Hog Department—Profit and Loss Account  195
Cannery—Profit and Loss Account  196
Orchard and Truck-garden—Profit and Loss Account  196
Field Crops and Pasturage—Profit and Loss Account  197
Tractors—Profit and Loss Account  197
Trucks—Profit and Loss Account  197
Maintenance and Administration, General  198
Miscellaneous Statements, Inventories, etc.-—■
Produce Supplied to Essondale  198
Produce Supplied to New Westminster  199
Accounts Receivable  199
Remittances to Treasury  199
Summary of Equipment Inventories  199
Orchard and Truck-garden Inventory _-_  199 OFFICERS AND STAFF
Hon. W. D. Black, Provincial Secretary.
R. A. Pennington, O.B.E., F.C.I.S., Deputy Provincial Secretary.
A. M. Gee, M.D., CM., Director of Mental Health Services.
A. E. Davidson, B.A., M.D., CM., Deputy Director of Mental Health Services.
T. G. Caunt, M.D., Medical Superintendent.
Frederick A. Matheson, Business Manager.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL AND CREASE CLINIC
OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE, ESSONDALE
B.A.,  M.D.,  CM.,  Clinical
Director of Radiology.
M.D., Director of Labo-
Assistant
F. E. McNair,
Director.
J. M. Iackson, M.D.,
G. A. Nicolson, B.A.,
ratories.
W. P. Fister, M.D., M.R.C.P.(Edin.), F.R.C.P.
(Can.), Director of Neurology.
W.  E.  Powles,  B.A.,  M.D.,  CM,
Clinical Director.
C. E. Derkson, M.D., CM.
R. H. Lawler, M.D.
N. L. Richardson, M.D., CM.
G. H. Stephenson, M.D.
E. E. Leyland, B.S., M.B.(Eng.).
R. D. Nixon, B.A., M.D., CM.
A. Yakushavich, B.A., M.D., CM.
A. P. Gould, M.D., CM.
E. S. Gurushantappa, M.B., B.S. (India).
T. P. Millar, B.A., M.D., CM.
P. DeKoven, M.D.
K. G. Phin, B.A., M.D., CM.
I. Kenning, B.Sc, M.D., CM.
J. Walsh, M.B., B.Ch.(Ireland), D.P.M.
T. Dobreva, M.D.(Prague).
R. Halliday, M.B., B.Ch.(Ireland), D.P.M.
J. W. Hill, M.D.
F. G. Tucker, M.B., B.S.(Eng.).
H. O. Iohnsen, D.D.S.
C. B. Watson, M.A., Administrative Assistant.
Miss A. J.  Elart,  B.A., Psychological Clinic
Assistant.
J.  W.  Borthwick,  B.A., Psychological Clinic
Assistant.
W. R. Brown, Director of Recreation.
K. Woolcock, Pharmacist.
G. H. Walker, Audio-Visual Department.
W. Creber, Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
Miss E. M. Pullan, R.N., B.A.Sc, Director of
Nursing.
Miss  O.  J.  Smith,  B.A.,  R.N.,  Instructor of
Nursing.
Miss A. K. Carroll, B.A., M.S.W., Supervisor,
Psychiatric Social Service.
Miss H. V. R. Pelling, Chief Dietitian.
Mrs.  K.  Draper,  B.A.,  O.T.Reg., Supervisor,
Occupational Therapy  (Women's Division).
R. Herring, Supervisor, Occupational Therapy
(Men's Division).
D. Addison, Rehabilitation Officer (Men's Division).
Mrs. I. H. Wedge, Branch Secretary.
Miss A. D. Dingle, Senior Stenographer.
Consultant Staff:
F. A. Turnbull, B.A., M.D., F.R.CS.(Can.), Neurosurgery.
Iames W. Wilson, M.D., CM., F.R.CS.(Can.), M.S.(Minn.), General Surgery.
George T. Wilson, B.A., M.D., CM., F.R.C.S.(Can.), General Surgery.
Business:
I. F. Anderson, Assistant Business Manager.
L. Fox, Paymaster.
G. A. Grieve, Cost Accountant.
Rev. Iohn F. O'Neil, Protestant.
W.  Gueho,  Cashier.
R. Boulter, Steward.
Miss A. Mikita, Business Stenographer.
Chaplains:
Rev. Father J. P. Kane, Roman Catholic.
Trades:
W.  R. Meadows, B.E.(CE.,), Superintendent
of Public Works.
T. Lamb, Foreman of Works.
I. Wright, Chief Engineer.
W. R. Parks, Gardener Foreman.
T. Harrison, Electrician.
G. Matthews, Plumber.
Colony Farm:
W. B. Richardson, B.Sc.  (Agriculture), Superintendent.
J. C. Purse, Head Tailor.
D. Anderson, Laundryman.
A. L. Blair, Barber.
W. A. Wardle, Chief Cook.
J. C. Merrick, Baker.
H. Young, Chief Painter.
11 T 12
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL, NEW WESTMINSTER
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., CM., F.A.P.A.,
F.A.A.M.D., Medical Superintendent.
C. E. Benwell, M.B., Deputy Medical Superintendent.
R. D. S. Herrick, M.D., D.P.H., D.P.M.
A. Gallinger, M.D., CM.
M. C. Muckhart, M.B.(Glasgow).
H. MacCrostie, D.D.S.
Miss V. M. Sanders, R.N., Superintendent of
Nurses.
Miss A. M. Paterson, B.H.E., Dietitian.
Miss   M.   C.   Hardy,   Supervisor,   Psychiatric
Social Work.
P. Barteluk, X-ray Technician.
Mrs. A. I. Rhodes, School Principal.
H. Mercer, Industrial Arts Instructor.
J. Lynes, Recreational Instructor.
Mrs. M. E. Iones, Occupational Therapist.
J. Elliot, Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
R. Nash, Instructor, Male Psychiatric Nursing.
Miss C.  Cohen, B.A., Psychological Clinic
Assistant.
J. B. Woodward, B.A., Psychological Clinic
Assistant (on active service).
Mrs. M. G. Macgowan, Clerk-Stenographer.
W. O. Booth, Deputy Business Manager.
Rev. P. C. McCrae, Protestant.
C. M. Doyle, Foreman of Works.
C. Hauck, Chief Engineer.
W. Mercer, Carpenter Foreman.
C. Stapleton, Head Gardener.
L. S. Davies, Assistant Foreman.
G. Coulson, Laundry Manager.
P. Brian, Plasterer and Tile-setter.
Business:
A. Fraser, Steward.
Chaplains:
Rev. Father D. J. McIntosh, Roman Catholic.
Trades:
H. W. Brownjohn, Plumber.
R. T. Ballard, Shoemaker.
L. Arnold, Barber.
Mrs. S. DeCoene, Hairdresser.
J. Fraser, Head Painter.
W. Jenkins, Head Cook.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ
L. G. C. d'Easum, M.D., Medical Superintendent.
A. C. C. Loat, Deputy Business Manager. P. McLeod, Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
HOMES FOR THE AGED
B. F. Bryson, B.A., M.D., CM., Medical Superintendent.
A. G. MacKinnon, M.D., CM., Medical Super- W. E. Skillicorn, Supervisor, Terrace,
intendent, Vernon.
CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
U. P. Byrne, M.D., D.P.H., D.I.H., Director.
G. M. Kirkpatrick, M.D. Miss M. Munro, M.A., Supervising Psycholo-
L. I. M. Coleman, B.Sc, M.D., CM. gist.
W. L. Valens, M.D., CM. D. B. Ricketts, B.A., M.S.W., Supervisor, Psy-
Mrs. M. Harvey, R.N., B.A.Sc, Public Health chiatric Social Service.
Nurse.
RESEARCH DIVISION
W. C. Gibson, B.A., M.Sc, M.D., CM., D.Phil.(Oxon.), Director. > o o-g
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13 T 14
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Dr. E. J. Ryan. REPORT OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
For the Twelve Months Ended March 31st, 1953
PART I.—MEDICAL
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
R. A. Pennington, Esq., O.B.E., F.C.I.S.,
Deputy Provincial Secretary,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In compliance with the " Mental Hospitals Act," the Eighty-first Annual
Report of the British Columbia Mental Health Services is submitted herewith.
HISTORICAL
The earliest record of a mentally ill person in British Columbia dates back to the
year 1850. At this time a young Scotch immigrant became mentally ill soon after his
arrival in the country. As no facilities were available for treatment, the difficulty was
solved by sending him home on a sailing-vessel. It is reported that during the voyage
home the patient made a good recovery.
During the years 1858 and 1859 there was a great influx of people to the gold-fields
in the Cariboo. Victoria, which at that time was a Hudson's Bay Company post, was the
chief outfitting depot and point of departure for the Interior. It was the chief port of
call for ships coming from San Francisco. Many of the new-comers broke down under
the strains and hardships, and had to be returned to California. Following this sequence
of events, arrangements were made whereby mental patients from this area were cared
for by the mental hospital in California. This generous arrangement on the part of the
American authorities was not allowed to continue for long, and in the early sixties it
became necessary to house mental patients in the Victoria Gaol. The gaol of those days
was a hewn-log structure containing twelve cells; this was replaced some years later by
a brick administrative building two stories in height. This site was the same as is now
occupied by the Law Courts on Bastion Street. As the gaol cells overflowed with patients,
the milder cases were transferred to the Royal Hospital. The Royal Hospital was
originally a " pest house," and so was located outside the city on an Indian reserve across
the harbour. Both the gaol and the Royal Hospital admitted only men, and a real
problem presented itself with the appearance of the first female patient. The problem
was met by taking over the Royal Hospital and converting it into the first " Provincial
asylum." Thus, on October 12th, 1872, the Mental Health Services of this Province
had their humble beginning in a converted " pest house " in Victoria. The management
of this new institution was placed under the Provincial Secretary's Department, where the
Mental Health Services have remained since inception. Records show that on the
opening-day seven patients were admitted. Seven staff members were appointed to
operate the " hospital."
All matters pertaining to the mentally ill had, up to that time, been carried out
without benefit of any special legislation. In 1873 an Act was passed known as the
" Insane Asylums Act."
15 T 16 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
In 1877, with a patient population of 37, it was decided that this site could no longer
expand to meet the demands, and a decision was reached to move the institution to New
Westminster and locate on a Government reserve. The site chosen is that presently
occupied by The Woodlands School, the branch of the Mental Health Services caring for
the mentally defective group.
The first building was erected in the fiscal year 1877-78 at a cost of $24,000. The
transfer of 38 patients was effected during the month of May, 1878. The first annual
report was published in 1882. It shows that the number of patients had increased to 49,
and that overcrowding was becoming intolerable. In 1884 an additional wing was added
at a cost of $26,000, providing now for a total bed capacity of 70. Further construction
was delayed until 1889, at which time a central administration building was erected and
an additional wing added, bringing the capacity to 165 patients. In 1896 it is reported
that the wards were "full to overflowing," there being 171 patients in residence. One
new building was completed in 1898 to accommodate 55 men, and in 1900 a second
building was completed to accommodate a similar number of women.
In 1897 the " Hospitals for the Insane Act " superseded the " Insane Asylums Act "
of 1873, and the institution became officially known as the Public Hospital for the Insane.
Thus, at the close of the century, the hospital had grown until it possessed ten wards and
one cottage, with a capacity of 310 patients. Up to this date $155,000 had been spent
on construction.
During 1904 the Government secured 1,000 acres at the junction of the Coquitlam
and Fraser Rivers for future expansion. On July 10th, 1904, a start was made in the
work of clearing land and erecting temporary buildings. Eighteen patients, supervised
by two staff members, made an initial start on what later was to become the Essondale
site of future developments. Clearing and dyking of the land continued over the next
few years, and in 1909 construction was commenced on the first patient unit. The site
was named in honour of Dr. Henry Esson Young, who at that time was Provincial
Secretary. The first unit was opened at Essondale on April 1st, 1913. This building,
now known as the West Lawn Building, was originally constructed to house 480 patients.
At the present time 1,031 patients are in residence. At the end of that year a total of
919 patients were under care, 683 of whom were men and 236 were women. The
admissions for the year were 380; of these, 276 were men and 104 were women.
No additional construction was undertaken for some years, and in 1919 further
expansion became necessary. A Provincial gaol at Colquitz was taken over by the
Provincial Secretary and converted for the use of a group of mental patients who had
been convicted of crimes. The building was occupied on March 25th, 1919, when 9
such patients were transferred from the New Westminster unit. Though entirely unsuitable for the care of mental patients, this building still functions as a unit of the Mental
Health Services.
The year 1924 saw a pronounced step forward in the treatment and care of the
mentally ill of the Province with the opening of the second building in the Essondale
area. On November 1st, 1924, the Acute Building, or Centre Lawn Building as it is
now known, was opened as a receiving centre, and all future admissions were received
here, while the admitting service at the New Westminster unit was discontinued. The
original capacity of this building was 300 patients, and at the present time it accommodates 489. During this year the institution rapidly began to assume its proper role as
a treatment centre, rightly deserving the name " mental hospital." It was in 1924 that
the first registered nurse made her appearance as Superintendent of the Nursing Department. Great stimulus was given to the development of organized departments of
occupational therapy.
In 1926 the first specific therapy for a mental illness was undertaken, with the
introduction of intravenous tryparsamide combined with therapeutic malaria for the DIRECTOR'S REPORT
T 17
treatment of general paresis and cerebro-spinal syphilis. At this time syphilis was
responsible for 6 to 8 per cent of admissions. Subsequent treatment has reduced the
incidence of syphilis as a causative factor of mental illness to the vanishing-point.
Overcrowding again became very apparent, and in the year 1930 the third large
building was opened at Essondale. This building was occupied on October 2nd of that
year, and was known as the Female Building, and later renamed East Lawn Building.
Again a large group of patients were moved from the New Westminster Hospital, and
a better classification of patients was made possible. The building had at the time of
construction a rated capacity of 675 patients. The building now houses 1,469 patients.
During the same year occupational therapy, as such, received considerable impetus with
the appointment of the first trained occupational therapist. Further stimulus to the
programme came in 1930 with the appointment of the first social service worker to the
staff and subsequent organization of a social service department. During 1932 first
concrete efforts toward prevention were developed with the opening on July 15th of the
first unit of the Child Guidance Clinic in Vancouver. On September 12th, 1934, a second
unit was opened in Victoria.
Coincident with these developments of a more active treatment programme was the
organization of the nurses' training-school, and subsequent first graduation exercises in
1932. It was at this time that the decision was made to convert the old parent institution
in New Westminster to the care of the feeble-minded. A start on remodelling the
structure was made in 1930. Complete remodelling of both the interior and exterior
was completed by 1945.
The population of the hospital continued to rise, and on December 4th, 1934, a new
unit was opened at Essondale to house the veteran patients. This building subsequently
became the west wing of the completed Crease Clinic. At that time there were in
residence 3,080 patients.
Due to economic depression and war no new construction was undertaken during
the twelve-year period from 1934 to 1946. During this long interval the hospital
population rose to 4,151 patients, with resulting overcrowding. The situation became
so desperate that immediate space had to be made available.
In 1935 the " Provincial Home for the Aged Act " was passed and certain cottages
were made available at the adjacent Boys' Industrial School for the use of aged mental
patients. The first of these buildings was occupied on May 14th, 1936. Five units in
all were taken over from the school—three for patient occupancy, one as a kitchen unit,
and one as a nurses' home and administration unit. These buildings formed the nucleus
for future developments of the Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam. A new 100-bed
unit was specially constructed for the care of the aged and was occupied on June 27th,
1946, while another unit, also to accommodate 100 patients, was occupied on June
11th, 1947.
The pressure upon the Mental Hospital continued, and the problem of overcrowding
remained acute. In addition, increased numbers of senile patients were being presented
for admission. In order to provide some measure of relief, both to the community and
the Mental Hospital, the Government purchased from the War Assets Corporation the
Vernon Military Hospital. This structure was given a very thorough renovation and was
equipped to function as a Home for the Aged. The building was ready for occupation
in the late spring of 1948, but the disastrous floods of that year delayed matters. Finally,
on July 4th this new unit was officially opened, and on July 7th the first patients, 137 in
number, arrived by special train from Essondale. Later in the year the number in residence was raised to 200, and since then the accommodation has increased to 239. The
patients sent to Vernon were specially selected ambulant senile persons for whom the
special facilities of the Mental Hospital and Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam, were
not essential. T 18 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
While the new Home for the Aged unit at Vernon provided some relief from the
problem presented by the ever-increasing demands for accommodation for the senile, the
facilities were soon taxed to capacity. Therefore, in 1949 plans were made to convert
the Terrace Military Hospital for use as a Home for the Aged. By the fall of 1950 the
hospital had been renovated and converted to its special use, and on October 3rd a group
of 153 elderly male patients was moved to Terrace by special train. The next year
another group of elderly men was sent to the Terrace Home for the Aged, thus utilizing
it to its total capacity of 300.
The need for accommodation for the senile has continued to grow, and the most
recent beds added to the Geriatric Division are those in the third 100-bed unit at the Port
Coquitlam Home for the Aged. These were occupied in 1952. The total accommodation for the psychotic senile in the Provincial Homes for the Aged on March 31st, 1953,
was 1,036, or 88.9 beds per 100,000 of the general population of the Province.
With the end of the war in 1945, great efforts were made to improve the mental-
health facilities of the Province, and these efforts were sustained by an upsurge of public
criticism over the unsatisfactory conditions found to exist in some American mental
hospitals. While conditions in the British Columbia hospitals never approached the state
complained of by the press, nevertheless there was scope for improvement following the
inevitable neglect and understaffing of the war years.
An early start was made to provide a high-quality residential training centre for the
mentally subnormal in the mental hospital at New Westminster. In 1945 a modern
school building incorporating an auditorium-gymnasium was opened and the staff of
teaching specialists was increased to five. At the same time the programme of vocational
training in the domestic and manual arts was reorganized under specialist instructors,
while the socialization of these subnormal children received considerable impetus by the
appointment of a recreational therapist.
As a result of all this educational activity and emphasis, it soon became apparent
that this institution could not be truly considered a mental hospital, and accordingly in
1950 the Government granted permission to redesignate the New Westminster institution
The Woodlands School.
The need to provide more accommodation for the mentally defective became very
urgent, and a further building programme was begun. The first of a series of four
specially designed reinforced-concrete buildings was opened in February, 1950. The
remaining three were opened in 1952, and this new construction raised the capacity of
The Woodlands School to 1,182 patients.
While the new buildings provided more space for patients, they also permitted an
expansion of the various service departments. Thus modern dental and X-ray suites
were provided and equipped. A clinical laboratory and dispensary were set up. Provision was made for an admission suite in order that patients might be admitted direct to
The Woodlands School without the necessity of being committed to the Provincial Mental
Hospital, Essondale.
The final step in developing The Woodlands School as the specialized unit of the
Mental Health Services for the care and training of the mentally defective was taken by
the Spring Session of the 1953 Legislature, when the "Schools for Mental Defectives
Act" was passed.
Undoubtedly the most significant development in the Provincial Mental Health Services in recent times has been the provision of an active treatment centre for the attack
upon mental illness in its early phases. This centre is situated at Essondale, adjacent
to the Provincial Mental Hospital, and is known as the Crease Clinic of Psychological
Medicine. The contract for this building was let in 1946, and the Clinic was officially
opened on November 16th, 1949. The Clinic is a four-story modern structure consisting
of three elements:  (1) The West Wing, housing the men's wards (formerly known as the DIRECTOR'S REPORT
T  19
Veterans' Block and opened in 1934); (2) the East Wing, housing the women's wards;
and (3) the Central Wing, incorporating the administrative headquarters of the Mental
Health Services and the specialized medical departments for investigation, diagnosis, and
teaching.   Accommodation for 312 patients is provided in this unit.
In order that the active treatment centre might serve the group of mentally ill for
whom its facilities were especially designed, it was considered desirable that patients
should have access to it as freely as possible. Accordingly, the " Clinics of Psychological
Medicine Act" was passed by the Legislature in 1948. This Act makes provision for
admission upon the voluntary application of the patient, or by the medical certification of
two physicians upon the application of a relative or other interested responsible person.
There is, thus, no legal committal with consequent loss of civil rights. Furthermore, the
Act does not permit a person to remain in the Crease Clinic for longer than four months.
The first patients were received in the Clinic building on April 3rd, 1950, and until
December, 1950, this unit served as the admitting centre for the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale. The " Clinics of Psychological Medicine Act " was proclaimed effective
on January 1st, 1951, and on that date the first patients to receive active intensive therapy
under its provisions were admitted.
The Provincial Mental Hospital experienced many very serious problems in the early
post-war years, including the overcrowded conditions and the lack of staff. The latter
situation was not improved without a sustained recruiting programme, aided by the introduction of the eight-hour day in 1947 and a considerable improvement in the salary
schedule for nursing personnel.
With reference to the overcrowding, the situation has not been so happy. The pressure was relieved from time to time by means of the new beds provided in the Homes for
the Aged and The Woodlands School. However, the vacancies created when patients
were moved to these units were immediately filled, and the reduced state of overcrowding
was only of short duration. To-day the overcrowding in the wards of the continued-
treatment buildings, with consequent excessive demand upon the utility services, constitutes a major problem.
As noted, the veterans were for some years housed in the West Wing of the Crease
Clinic, and in order that this new unit might function, alternative accommodation had to
be provided. This was accomplished by erecting a new 295-bed reinforced-concrete
structure of modern design situated on Colony Farm.
At the present time the North Lawn Building is under construction, and it is anticipated that it will be ready for occupation in 1955. It is a 230-bed hospital unit for the
care and treatment of mental patients suffering from tuberculosis, with a limited accommodation for patients with other infectious diseases.
Needless to say, the increased bed accommodation provided in the Mental Health
Services since the end of the war has necessitated an expansion of many of the service
facilities in the hospital plants.
New nurses' homes have been constructed at Essondale and New Westminster,
adding about 150 staff beds to each unit. The bakeshop at Essondale has been enlarged
and equipped throughout with modern machinery. The boiler capacity in the hospital
power plants has been increased to serve the new buildings.
A four-story combined stores and laundry building is now in the final stages of construction at Essondale. The latest laundry and dry-cleaning equipment is being installed.
In the stores section there is ample cold-storage space for perishables, and a modern
butcher-shop is provided.
At Colony Farm the best of modern dairy equipment has been installed including
a homogenizer.
The most recent major development in the Mental Health Services has been the
establishment of a Research Division.   This unit has been organized on the campus of T 20 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
the University of British Columbia, and it is operated upon a co-operative basis with the
Faculty of Medicine.
Our major research emphasis at this time lies in the field of neurophysiology, where
efforts are being made to develop a non-empirical basis for therapy. We are also carrying
on studies of the relationship between brain-wave patterns, as recorded by the E.E.G., and
personality with a view to obtaining a better understanding of psychopathic personalities.
PROGRESS
Historically, the first mental-health need to be met in British Columbia was the protection of society from the aggressive behaviour of the dangerously psychotic. It has
been recounted above how the gaol and, later, the pest house were employed for this
purpose. One can speculate upon the fate of the benign, confused mental patients who
wandered away from the settlements and were not seen again.
Certainly their plight was not long in being recognized, for, with the establishment
of the first Provincial Asylum in 1872, it is evident that the second mental-health need of
the Province received recognition in that society made provision for the custodial care of
those who by reason of their symptoms were dangerous to themselves. The full details
of the early developments will not be reviewed here. It is sufficient to state that the first
fifty years—ending with World War I—saw a steady progress to more humane care in
the essentials of food, shelter, and clothing; the introduction and development of programmes of occupation and recreation in place of segregation and restraint and, finally,
an increasing interest by the medical profession in the needs of the mentally ill.
Perhaps the most important advance of the twenties was the transition to a " hospital " point of view. This transition was facilitated by the appointment of young
well-trained physicians who, with the encouragement of the administration, introduced,
expanded, and modernized the various medical services, such as the laboratories, the
radiology department, and the surgeries.
To provide the higher level of medical and psychiatric care envisaged by the medical
staff, it was necessary to introduce and develop a modern nursing service. The first
registered nurse was appointed in 1924, and not long after the Training School for Nurses
(now the School of Psychiatric Nursing) was established. It would be difficult to overestimate the improvement in patient care made possible by the provision of a competently
trained nursing staff.
Other major developments in this period were the appointment of the first trained
occupational therapist in 1930, and the appointment of the first social worker in the same
year. The services commenced by these pioneer employees have expanded greatly, until
to-day each is making a major contribution to the treatment programme.
Physical treatment in psychiatry gained in popularity following the successful
employment of fever therapy in general paralysis of the insane. This treatment, combined with intravenous tryparsamide, was introduced to the British Columbia mental
hospitals in 1926.
An exceedingly important advance in the treatment of schizophrenia was the introduction of insulin coma therapy in 1937. This mode of therapy, while it requires a high
proportion of staff to patients, is very successful in arresting the progress of the schizophrenic process. Thus the course of the illness is shortened, and many patients are able
to be restored to the family and community as functioning personalities. Formerly a vast
number of schizophrenics never recovered, but remained hospital residents for twenty or
more years, gradually becoming more and more deteriorated and withdrawn from reality.
In 1939 metrazol convulsive therapy was first utilized, to be superseded by electroconvulsive therapy in 1942. Experience has shown that the latter is the preferable treatment. With endogenous depressions, electro-convulsive therapy is now regarded as
specific.   This is a safe and rapid form of treatment, and its use has remarkably shortened DIRECTOR'S REPORT T 21
the duration of depressions, with a consequent extinction of psychic suffering and reduction in the period of hospitalization. While this type of treatment necessitates the provision of larger numbers of trained medical and nursing personnel, it is justified by the high
discharge rate of patients receiving this type of therapy. Formerly the period of hospitalization for treatment of depression extended from a year to eighteen months, with
concurrent risk of suicide. To-day such cases are relieved of their acute symptoms,
stabilized and rehabilitated in four months or less.
Lobotomy was first employed in our hospital in 1945, when a group of disturbed
patients of long standing was selected for the treatment. The results were encouraging,
and we have since evolved criteria for the selection of patients who respond well to this
neurosurgical procedure. In highly selected cases that have proved intractible to other
therapeutic approaches, lobotomy has been the means of securing a relief from disturbing
and disabling symptoms, with consequent healthier adjustment to the life of a hospital
resident, while in other cases, after a period of intensive re-education, it has been possible
to discharge some patients to their homes and gainful employment.
At the conclusion of World War II profound changes occurred in the Mental Health
Services. Many who had gained experience in neuro-psychiatric installations of the armed
services returned to the staff or joined for the first time. They brought with them an
attitude of optimism with respect to therapy in mental conditions, and their enthusiasm
was supported by the administration. Thus was commenced a programme of " total
push," which has utilized every therapeutic modality available for the cure of the mentally
afflicted.
The Clinical Psychology Department, which was first established in 1937, grew
rapidly and, by means of the provision of internships, attracted young graduates from the
universities.
The post-war years witnessed a great increase in interest in mental-health problems
by the universities, with the result that greatly improved courses of instruction were made
available to the students in medicine, nursing, social work, and clinical psychology. We
were fortunate in being able to attract numerous recent graduates in all these specialized
fields to our institutions and clinics.
The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons (Canada) established standards to be
met by those physicians who intended to specialize in psychiatry, and we were able to add
to our staff young residents in training who, while they came to us for experience, brought
with them enthusiasm for the newer methods being developed in university centres.
A particularly significant contribution by this group has been a great increase in psychotherapy, both individual and group, and the spread of therapeutic attitudes to all patient-
care staff.
There was also an increased awareness of the importance of organic factors in the
etiology of mental illness, and this trend is reflected in the development of a Department
of Neurology at Essondale in 1947. The neurologist was granted a year of postgraduate
study at the Montreal Neurological Institute, and modern diagnostic apparatus was
installed in the Crease Clinic. Included in this apparatus were an eight-channel electroencephalograph and eight-channel electrocorticograph, a wave-frequency analyser, and
complete facilities for pneumoencephalography.
Noteworthy among the ancillary services is the Department of Recreational Therapy.
This service was formally set up in 1945, and very rapidly made a significant contribution
to the welfare of the patients, and its varied programme of activities has provided for the
interests of all. The opening of Pennington Hall, the Recreational Therapy Centre, may
be regarded as the culmination of the phenomenal growth of this necessary adjunct to the
practice of psychiatry.
The Audio-Visual Department was reorganized and its scope extended in 1947.
This department has provided a programme of movies and wired music, and has thereby
assisted the patients to maintain and develop community interests.   The Audio-Visual T 22 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Department is also housed in Pennington Hall, where, for the first time, they have the
advantages of an adequate auditorium.
It was found that by proceeding with an active " total push " programme there was
developed simultaneously a need for several complementary services. Great reliance was
placed upon the Social Service Department, and, as a result, there was a rapid growth both
in numbers and in the quality of the professional training. Thus the Social workers were
able to provide improved services to the patients and their relatives by means of their
special skills in casework.
The need for rehabilitation services for patients about to be discharged became more
and more evident, and in 1947 the Mental Health Services took over the operation of The
Vista in Vancouver as a rehabilitation centre for women. The needs of men on discharge
were met by the provision of a Rehabilitation Officer, who assisted those in need of
employment to become re-established.
ORGANIZATION
There have been no major changes in the over-all organization of the Services during
the past year. Much has, however, been accomplished toward the delineation of the
three major groups of patients coming under our care—the psychotic, the mental defective, and the senile. Up to the present time the mental-health legislation of this Province
has not differentiated between mental illness and mental deficiency, so that both mentally
ill and mentally defective patients have been accepted by the Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale.
In order that the special needs of the mentally defective person might be met, patients
of this type have been transferred to the New Westminster unit of the Mental Hospital
as accommodation became available. Over the past fifteen years the New Westminster
unit has been remodelled and expanded to prepare it for its special function as a residential
hospital-school for the care and training of the mentally defective child and young adult,
and in 1950 it was officially renamed The Woodlands School.
On March 27th, 1953, the Legislative Assembly of the Province assented to an
Act relating to mental defectives, cited as the " School for Mental Defectives Act."
This new Act will become effective on October 1st, 1953. After that date all mentally
defective patients will be admitted directly to The Woodlands School. The regulations
respecting the admission of patients made pursuant to the Act place admissions in the
discretion of the Medical Superintendent. Plans for further construction are presently
on the draughting-boards, and it is hoped that, in the not too distant future, restrictions
on admissions may be removed.
Similarly, plans are being evolved for further construction in the Geriatric Division
at Port Coquitlam. With the completion of this new admitting unit, it is hoped that
admissions may be made directly to the aged section without prior admission to the
Mental Hospital at Essondale. When this has been accomplished, we will be able to
better segregate these three groups and render more efficient service. In addition, our
statistical tables will become more meaningful. To this end, the Division of Vital Statistics will take over the compilation of our statistical tables, effective April 1st, 1953.
It is with sincere regret that I record the death of Dr. E. J. Ryan, our Senior Medical
Superintendent. The late Dr. Ryan joined the staff on February 26th, 1917. He became
Assistant Medical Superintendent at the New Westminster unit in 1921 and was transferred to Essondale in 1930. Dr. Ryan was made Medical Superintendent in 1935 and
was accorded the title Senior Medical Superintendent in 1950. He contributed much to
the development of the service during a professional lifetime.
The loss of Dr. Ryan from the senior staff necessitated some organizational changes,
resulting in the appointment of Dr. A. E. Davidson as Deputy Director of Mental Health
Services, Dr. T. G. Caunt as Medical Superintendent of the Mental Hospital at Esson- DIRECTOR'S REPORT
T 23
dale and the Crease Clinic, Dr. B. F. Bryson as Medical Superintendent of the Homes
for the Aged, and Dr. F. E. McNair as Clinical Director in the Essondale area. In order
to strengthen the treatment supervision, Dr. W. E. Powles was designated as Assistant
Clinical Director.
We are still experiencing difficulty in obtaining trained psychiatrists, but this condition will improve as more of our physicians complete their training period. The policy
of furthering assistance toward the training of professional personnel is paying good
dividends in the development of a stable professional staff.
The Nursing Panel set up some years ago greatly facilitates matters with reference
to promotions, appointments, and discipline.   The Panel is chaired by Dr. Davidson.
There has been a great turnover in medical residents, although no difficulty is being
experienced in obtaining a sufficient number of replacements. Last year it was found
advantageous to remove the appointment of resident physicians from Civil Service, due
to the fact that the majority of physicians came to us for one or two years' experience as
part of their training programme. The requirements for training in the specialty of
psychiatry are laid down by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons (Canada).
The College advises that no physician proceeding to certification should receive all of
his training in any one centre. It is therefore conceivable that we will continue to have
a great interchange of junior physicians. Due to the sudden resignation of Professor
W. D. Ross from the chair of psychiatry at the University, I regret that a definite training
programme has not been worked out for our residents in training. It is hoped that such
a training programme may ultimately come under the supervision of the Medical School
of the University of British Columbia.
The religious aspects of our treatment programme have been strengthened by the
half-time appointment of Rev. F. J. O'Neil to the staff. It is hoped that in the coming
year arrangements may be completed for Mr. O'Neil's full-time appointment.
On May 27th a course of instruction in civil defence was initiated. Thirty-two staff
members enrolled in this first course. A good deal of attention has been given to matters
relating to the protection of the hospital and also the organization of our hospital staff
as a possible reception centre in the event of a major catastrophe. The basic No. 2
course in civil defence was started in February. Courses were held in the fire-hall under
the capable leadership of Fire Chief A. P. Lowry. The course was opened by an address
from Air Vice-Marshal Heakes.   Over 100 staff members have now completed courses.
ADMISSIONS AND SEPARATIONS
Table I.—Showing Patients in Residence, April 1st, 1952, and
March 31st, 1953, by Institutions
Institution
In Residence, Apr. 1, 1952
Men
Women      Total
In Residence, Mar.
31, 1953
Men
Women
Total
111
132
243
1,764
1,655
3,419
287
	
287
628
457
1,085
150
320
470
107
127
234
290
290
3,337
2,691
6,028
Increase (+)
or
Decrease (—)
Crease Clinic	
Mental Hospital, Essondale..
Mental Hospital, Colquitz	
The Woodlands School	
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam..
Home for the Aged, Vernon	
Home for the Aged, Terrace	
Totals	
100
115
215
1,843
1,641
3,484
286
	
286
439
369
808
158
260
418
106
128
234
293
293
2,513    |    5,738
I
+28
-65
— 1
+277
+52
-3
+290
Table I shows at a glance the number of patients in residence in each of the institutions at the beginning and at the end of the fiscal year 1952-53. The degree in which we
have been successful in bringing about a better reclassification of patients is evident.   It T 24
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
should be noted that, in spite of a heavy admission load to the Mental Hospital, we have
been able to relieve the desperate overcrowding in the Essondale unit by 65 patients.
This has been accomplished by the opening of new construction at The Woodlands School,
accounting for the increase of 277 patients in that area. The in-residence population of
the Crease Clinic shows little in the way of fluctuation, inasmuch as the maximum period
of residence is set by Statute at four months. Only on one occasion has the maximum
accommodation been taxed, and that only on the men's wing.
Table II.—Mental Health Services, April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Men
Women
Total
Intake
Psychotic and neurotic.
Non-psychotic 	
Senile  	
Mentally defective..
Returned from probation _
Returned from escape	
Totals	
Separations
Discharged in full to community-
Discharged on probation	
Discharged on escape	
Deaths   - 	
Totals..
849
168
140
113
33
5
923
39
101
111
35
1
1,772
207
241
224
68
6
1,308
1,210
2,518
746
183
20
247
708
178
9
137
1,196
1,032
1,454
361
29
384
2,228
Intake  	
Separations 	
Net increase..
Summary
2,518
2,228
290
Table II indicates the total admissions and separations, in broad diagnostic groups, in
all institutions.
Table III gives a comparative analysis of admissions over the past eight years.
Table III.
—Mental Health Services
Year
Total
Admissions
Admissions
over
65 Years
Admissions
under
15 Years
Voluntary
Admissions
Population
Increase
Index of
Increase
1945-46
834
880
v        1,111
1,260
1,415
1,811
2,175
2,512
206
207
225
270
230
262
306
357
49
52
69
63
72
148
97
179
33
40
91
165
297
504
637
768
147
140
316
354
306
235
285
290
17.62
1946-47 	
1947-48
15.91
28.44
1948-49   --	
1949-50	
1950-51          _ _	
28.09
21.62
12.98
1951 52       - -	
13.05
1952 53         - 	
11.54
In reviewing these tables, one notes again that there is a heavy rise in the admission
rate. However, in spite of it, the separations have kept pace and the increase of population per 100 admissions continues to fall. Reference to Table IV below shows that over
one-half of the admissions to the Mental Health Services occurred in the Crease Clinic,
where the return of the patient to the community is rapid. The continued rise in the
admission rate merely indicates that a greater service is being provided to the public and
that the public is accepting the available facilities more readily. It does not mean that
there is any alarming increase in the incidence of mental illness. The increase in population is due, for the most part, to the increasing admission of the mentally defective and
senile groups; 465 admissions fell into these two groups. DIRECTOR'S REPORT
T 25
An interesting investigation into the life expectancy of patients admitted to the Home
for the Aged reveals that the average male patient lives 15.1 months after admission,
whereas the average female patient lives 28.42 months after admission. This is reflected
in the death rate shown in Table II.
I would draw your attention to the favourable increase in voluntary admissions, as
set forth in Table III. This is probably the best single indication of an improving type of
service; 768 patients, or 30 per cent of the total admissions, were by voluntary admission;
534 of these were to the Crease Clinic and 234 were to the Mental Hospital.
Table IV.—Admissions and Separations, Crease Clinic, April 1st,
1952, to March 31st, 1953
Men
Women
Total
Intake
Psychotic and neurotic.
Non-psychotic	
Totals..
Separations
Discharged in full to community	
Discharged in full to Mental Hospital _
Deaths	
Totals-
509
20
687
5
518
675
1,196
25
529
692
1,221
431
72
15
612
57
6
1,043
129
21
1,193
Intake	
Separations..
Summary
Net increase..
1,221
1,193
28
Table IV shows the intake and separations taking place in the Crease Clinic during
the twelve months under review. It will be noted than an increase in the admission rate
has occurred; 963 patients were admitted the previous year in comparison to 1,221 in
the current year. This is to be anticipated as facilities improve and as the public becomes
educated to the acceptance of early treatment.
In studying this table it must be remembered that all patients are discharged at the
end of the four-month treatment period, by Statute. Discharge may be to the community
or to the Mental Hospital by commitment. A total of 1,172 patients was separated,
exclusive of deaths. Of this number, 89 per cent were returned to the community and
only 11 per cent discharged to the Mental Hospital for a further and more prolonged
treatment period.
A recent effort was made to determine the sustained improvement, or recovery, of
those patients discharged from the Clinic to the community. The first twelve-month
period of operation of the Clinic was taken, and the discharges for that period were surveyed. It was found that one year after discharge 85.1 per cent of the group were still in
the community, 9 per cent had returned to the Clinic for a further short treatment period,
and 5.1 per cent had been admitted to the Mental Hospital.
GENERAL COMMENTS
Fortunately, we have been free this year from any major outbreak of infectious
diseases in the Essondale area. This is largely due to the active immunization programme
that is constantly being carried out in both the patient and staff populations. The
problem of the infectious diseases of childhood is still a major one in The Woodlands
School.   Generally speaking, the health of the entire patient group has been satisfactory.
Mental Health Week was observed throughout Canada during the week May 5th to
10th. A good deal of prominence was given to mental-health activities through the press
and radio.   The week's programme culminated with open house being held on May 9th
I T 26 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
at The Woodslands School and the Crease Clinic. At the former institution, one of the
new residential units was on display, as well as school and classroom activities. Seven
hundred guests availed themselves of the opportunity to see these facilities. The attendance at the Crease Clinic during the afternoon and evening was estimated at 2,500.
Many worth-while exhibits were arranged throughout the building, and the staff was well
organized to supervise and conduct the guests. In addition to the Crease Clinic, the
facilities of Pennington Hall were demonstrated. The event was a great success, and it
was considered that much was accomplished in public education and the promotion of
good public relations.
The twenty-first graduation exercises in psychiatric nursing were held in the auditorium of the New Westminster Junior High School on May 8th. A capacity audience
greeted the graduating class. The Deputy Provincial Secretary acted as chairman. The
address to the graduating class was delivered by the Right Rev. Godfrey P. Gower, Bishop
of New Westminster. One hundred and fifty-one graduates received diplomas in psychiatric nursing, and nine registered nurses received diplomas in postgraduate psychiatric
nursing.
The Canadian Mental Health Association held a dinner meeting in Vancouver on
June 13th, at which meeting the British Columbia Division of the association was inaugurated. A board of directors and a scientific and advisory council were named. Dr.
J. D. M. Griffin, the medical director of the parent association, addressed the group.
It is hoped that a strong Provincial body will be developed and that much will be accomplished to further public education along the lines of mental-health activities.
The fifth annual sports day was held at Essondale on August 28th. This annual
feature of the recreational department concludes the summer outdoor activities, and is
an event of great interest to the patient population. A full day of sports was held on
the lower lawns. Hot-dogs, ice-cream, lemonade, and cookies were served from an
outdoor food-bar. Some 1,500 patients spent the day on the lawns. The Vancouver
Firemen's Band provided music for the occasion. We were pleased to have with us on
that day our Minister, the Honourable W. D. Black, and the Deputy Minister, Mr. R. A.
Pennington.
A good deal of attention has been focused throughout the year on the problem of
drug addiction. Meetings were held in Vancouver, sponsored by the Community Chest
and Council. Federal and Provincial representatives were present from the Departments
of Health and Welfare, the Provincial Secretary's Department, as well as law-enforcement
representation. Subsequent meetings have been held throughout the year, and it has
been proposed that a research project be undertaken covering those cases of drug addiction currently in Oakalla Prison Farm in an endeavour to determine the psychological
components of these individuals, their background, and other related problems. Financial assistance is to be sought from Federal Mental Health Grants. The investigation
and research are to be under the aegis of the University of British Columbia.
I am pleased to report that we have been able to make the first step toward direct
admission of mentally defective patients to The Woodlands School. Effective December
1st, 1952, arrangements were completed for the direct admission of children under 6
years of age. It is hoped that this will be enlarged to include all mentally defective
patients in the not too distant future.
The surgical suite has been opened for use. The suite was utilized for a short time
for minor surgery. As the staff became acquainted with working facilities, general surgery
was introduced. It is planned to add neurosurgery and orthopaedic surgery at a later
date. The suite of rooms on West 2 Ward has been set up as an isolated unit for the
post-operative care of surgical cases.
Distinguished out-of-Province visitors included Professor McDonald Critchley, Dean
of Medicine at the Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London, England; Dr. C. A.
Roberts, Director of the Division of Mental Health, Department of National Health and DIRECTOR'S REPORT T 27
Welfare, Ottawa; Dr. Samuel Laycock, Professor of Psychology, University of Saskatchewan; Dr. Daniel Blain, Medical Director, American Psychiatric Association, Washington, D.C.; the Honourable McKinnon Phillips, Minister of Health and Welfare, Province
of Ontario; Dr. R. G. Montgomery, Director of Mental Health Services, Province of
Ontario; and Mr. H. Cotman, Chief Auditor, Department of Health and Welfare, Ontario.
During the year the Crease Clinic has been host to meetings of many organizations
interested in the mental-health programme. We have been pleased to entertain the following groups: The Fraser Valley Firemen's Association, the Greater Vancouver Dietetics Association, the Neuro-psychiatric Section of the Vancouver Medical Association,
the Mathewson Road Ratepayers' Association, British Columbia X-ray Technicians'
Association, the British Columbia School Trustees' Association, and the British Columbia
Society of Laboratory Technicians.
Three new 100-bed units at The Woodlands School were occupied during the year.
This gives us much needed space in this area, and has enabled the admission of many
small children from the waiting-list, as well as provided for transferral of mentally defective children from the Essondale Mental Hospital.
Tenders have been called for the construction of a new building at Essondale. This
building, to be known as the North Lawn Building, is designed as an infectious unit and
will house chiefly those men and women suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis. In
addition, there is a unit for infectious cases other than tuberculosis. The building has
an estimated capacity of 224.
The service of the Child Guidance Clinic has been expanded with the establishment
of a full-time operating unit at Victoria. This was made possible by securing the services
of Dr. W. L. Valens as psychiatrist in charge. This unit gives service to the Vancouver
Island area.
MENTAL HEALTH GRANT
The Government of Canada, through the Department of National Health and
Welfare, again made available a sum of money to be used in improving the Mental
Health Services in this Province. This grant is known as the Mental Health Grant and
this was the fifth year that it has been made available to British Columbia. The patterns
of administration and utilization of the grant this year closely follow those established
in previous years. We have continued to receive the helpful understanding and cooperation of the Department of National Health and Welfare in the examination and
approval of our project submissions. In 1952-53 the total expenditure was $357,339,
some $10,000 more than in 1951-52. Reference to the major areas of expenditure is
made in the succeeding paragraphs.
Professional Training
Miss Margaret Stewart completed one year of postgraduate study in psychiatric
social work at McGill University in July, 1952.
Dr. G. H. Stephenson commenced one year of postgraduate study in psychiatry at
the University of Toronto in September, 1952.
Dr. N. L. Richardson commenced one year of postgraduate study in psychiatry at
McGill University in January, 1953.
Dr. A. E. Davidson and Mr. F. A. Matheson attended the Fourth Annual Mental
Hospitals Institute at Columbia, Ohio, in October.
Mrs. J. C. Morton, of the Psychology Department of the Crease Clinic, attended
Dr. Bruno Klopfer's ten-day workshop on the Rorschach method at Asilomar, Calif.,
in August.
Dr. MacDonald Critchley, of the Institute of Neurology, Queen Square, London,
England, conferred with our Neurologist and with our Research Director, and also presented a clinic on Huntington's chorea to the assembled medical staff. The visit of Dr.
Critchley was made possible by an honorarium provided by the Mental Health Grant. T 28 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1952-53
Grants to the Department of Psychology and to the School of Social Work at the
University of British Columbia were continued in 1952-53 but were again reduced in
accordance with the established plan. The purpose of these grants is to aid in the provision of graduate instruction in clinical psychology and psychiatric social work in order
that trained personnel in these fields may be available for the Mental Health Services.
Two teachers from the public-school system completed the course in mental hygiene
for teachers at the University of Toronto and returned to the Province in July. With
the reopening of the schools in September, these teachers were appointed Mental Health
Co-ordinators—one in North Vancouver and the other in Kelowna. Eight teachers in
the school system have now completed the course at the University of Toronto, and,
as a result of their work, we are able to detect a greater sensitivity to the mental-health
needs of the school-child.
Equipment and Supplies
Occupational-therapy equipment and supplies were again authorized for the Crease
Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale and for The Woodlands School at
New Westminster. Our recreational-therapy programme has also benefited from supplies made available by the grant.
Specialized laboratory equipment has been provided for our clinical laboratories
and for the Research Colony at the University. The Research Colony was also provided
with special facilities for the housing of the laboratory animals.
For the first time it was possible to obtain a Mental Health Grant for our Geriatric
Division, the necessary authority for the purchase of some equipment for the Home for
the Aged at Vernon being granted.
Community Mental-health Programmes
As in previous years, the mental-hygiene programmes of the health departments
of Vancouver and Victoria have received support through the provision of staff and
travelling expenses.
The Greater Vancouver Metropolitan Health Committee mental-health programme
was aided by the provision of a bursary to permit a male social worker to take postgraduate studies in New York.
The psychiatric services of the Vancouver General Hospital were again assisted by
the provision of a grant to pay the salaries of a psychiatric social worker and an occupational therapist.
St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver was given a grant to purchase an electroencephalograph.
The Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria was given a grant to obtain electro-convulsive
therapy apparatus.
Staff Increases
The consultants in neurosurgery and general surgery were again supported by the
Mental Health Grant, and a consultant in orthopaedic surgery was added.
Continued support for our Rehabilitation Department was forthcoming, and the
detailed report upon this service is printed elsewhere in this Report.
The large projects to provide salaries for physicians, psychologists, laboratory technicians, occupational therapists, dietitians, and psychiatric nurses have been continued in
1952-53, and the provision of this personnel has done a great deal to make possible the
active treatment programme.
COUNCIL OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSES
The annual meeting of the Council was held at Essondale on April 15th, 1952, and
at this meeting the Chairman of the Council was empowered to authorize the Registrar to DIRECTOR'S REPORT T 29
issue licences to psychiatric nurses with credentials from a school of psychiatric nursing
approved by the Council. This delegation of power by the Council alleviated the need
for frequent meetings to the extent that there was only one other meeting in the year.
There was only one change in the composition of the Council this year: Dr. A. L.
Swanson resigned upon moving to Toronto, and the Hospital Council appointed Dr. B. F.
Bryson, Medical Superintendent, Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam, to replace him.
No licences were cancelled or suspended in the year under review, but in one
instance the Council declined to authorize the issuance of a licence.
At the conclusion of the year there were 668 licensed psychiatric nurses in the
Province, an increase of 312 over 1951-52.
STAFF CHANGES
We have maintained the policy of " in-service training " residencies for our junior
physicians. Physicians come to us now for a period of twelve or twenty-four months,
during which time they remain on temporary appointment. As a consequence, there are
many changes occurring each spring. We have been fortunate to secure the services of
several physicians who are completing their period of training and who look forward to
joining our permanent staff. In the meantime we are continuing to send a small select
group of physicians who are on the permanent staff to outside university centres for
educational purposes.
The following physicians received appointments during the year: Dr. W. L. Valens,
Dr. E. S. Gurushantappa, Dr. C. E. Cobb, Dr. T. B. Millar, Dr. P. DeKoven, Dr. R. J.
Hanna, Dr. M. C. Muckart, Dr. P. G. Phin, Dr. A. Gallinger, Dr. T. Dobreva, Dr. R.
Holliday, Dr. J. Walsh, and Dr. J. W. Hill.
The following resignations were received: Dr. A. J. E. Rowe, Dr. W. R. Laidlaw,
Dr. I. Kent, Dr. S. W. Jackson, Dr. M. Bryant, Dr. A. L. Swanson, Dr. C. E. Cobb, Dr.
A. K. Hancock, and Dr. K. G. Phin.
Dr. L. I. M. Coleman returned to the staff following a two-year course of study in
various English centres.
Dr. P. M. McLean, specialist in orthopaedics, was appointed to the visiting staff.
Dr. C. R. Young resigned from the dental staff, and Dr. G. D. Campbell was
appointed to fill the vacancy.   We have developed a very high-class dental service for the
patient population in the Essondale area.   The staff is now composed of two full-time
dentists, a dental mechanic, and two dental assistants.
The present year saw the retirement of many employees who had been with the
service for long periods of time.   The following were superannuated:—
Essondale area: Mr. William Cross, Deputy Chief Psychiatric Nurse; Mr. J. H.
Wilson, Chief Engineer; Mr. W. H. J. Moore, male nurse; Mr. R. P.
Fogg, male nurse; Mr. H. J. Clark, male nurse; Mr. H. McAllister, male
nurse; Mr. D. Paterson, garden foreman; Mr. C. E. Bess, farm employee;
Mr. W. Headridge, storekeeper; and Mr. R. T. Hall, Director, Male
Occupational Therapy Department.
The Woodlands School:   Mr. H. A. Myton, male nurse, and Mr. A. Waller,
male nurse.
Mental Hospital, Colquitz:  Mr. J. M. Arnold, male nurse, and Mr. J. F. Stamford, stores clerk.
It is with regret that I report the death of two employees in the service—Dr. E. J.
Ryan, recorded elsewhere in this Report, and Mr. H. J. Mullin, male nurse, The Woodlands School.
FUTURE POLICY
There is no change in the general over-all statement of our future policy. It continues to be directed toward two aims:— T 30 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1952-53
(1) To further increase early active treatment facilities in order to prevent
patients from entering into the long-treatment mental-hospital area:
(2) To further alleviate the present overcrowded conditions that exist in our
mental-hospital buildings.
The overcrowded conditions presently existing in all of our buildings were brought
about by the complete lack of expansion during the depression and subsequent war years.
During the period between 1934 and 1946 no construction took place and no new beds
were acquired. It was not until 1948 that any definite programme of expansion was
undertaken. The Mental Health Services have constructed or acquired the following
beds since 1948:—
Essondale— Beds
Veterans' unit  295
Crease Clinic  167
462
The Woodlands School—
Cedar Cottage  177
Pine Cottage  160
Beech Cottage  120
Willow Cottage  120
Homes for the Aged—
Port Coquitlam  100
Vernon  239
Terrace  300
577
639
•      Total  1,678
During the past year the Government has given great impetus to the expansion of
services to meet our needs. The North Lawn Building at Essondale is under construction. It will be available for occupancy early in 1955. It is to be utilized as an infectious
building, and will provide adequate facilities for the modern treatment of those mental
patients suffering from pulmonary tuberculosis as well as other infectious maladies.
At the present time, plans are well under way for a 300-bed unit at The Woodlands
School. This building is being planned to care for the crib cases as well as a group of
sick and infirm older mental defectives.
At the Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam, it is planned to build a 300-bed admitting and sick-and-infirm unit.   These architectural plans are in the preliminary stage.
Plans are nearing completion for the new Child Guidance Clinic and Day Hospital
Centre.
In addition, plans are going forward for a new Recreational Therapy Centre for
The Woodlands School and a Nurses' Home and Training Centre for the Essondale area.
It is hoped that these plans will all be finalized and ready to tender for construction
by early summer of 1954.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
It seems fitting to close a report of this nature with some expression of appreciation
to the many individuals and organizations who have helped us to develop a better service.
In the not too remote past, mental hospitals were operated in a complete state of isolation
and seclusion from community life. Such isolation has had its origin in the minds of
mental-hospital administrators, and an apparent rejection and complete lack of understanding of such programmes on the part of the general public. It has been further
fostered by the remote geographic location of such institutions.   However, I am glad to DIRECTOR'S REPORT T 31
report that year by year we are drawing closer to the communities of people whom we
serve. The natural city growth is enveloping our institution, and modern means of travel
have depreciated distances. In addition, the staff members of hospitals are no longer
living within the institutional setting to the extent of former years, but now commute
from adjacent cities. This in itself brings us in closer contact with the community. We
look forward to the day when mental illness and mental hospitals will be accepted by the
people in just the same manner that physical illness and general hospitals are accepted
to-day.
In spite of this general apathy, the public has in recent years shown great interest
in the subject of mental health and particularly child development. A new phase in the
development of public education began with the formation of the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Mental Health Association in June, 1952. This Provincial division
has as its general objectives: To lessen the heavy toll of mental and emotional disorder,
and to foster activity to raise the standard and knowledge of mental-health principles
throughout the general population.
The Mental Health Services have gained a great ally by the formation of this
organization, and I commend it to you with my whole-hearted support.
I would like to express my appreciation of the various veterans' organizations and
the Women's Auxiliaries of the Canadian Legion. They have done much to add to the
comforts of our veteran patients by personal visits and by the presentation of many gifts.
A good number of concerts have been made available by organizations too numerous
to mention. I would refer you to the report of the Recreational Department for details
of the work carried out in this important treatment field. I would, however, like to
mention the Vancouver Firemen's Band, who have over the years played for our annual
sports day.
Special mention should be made of the splendid co-operation existing between this
department and other departments of the Government. Our work brings us into close
association with the Departments of Health and Welfare, Public Works, the Attorney-
General, and Finance, the Civil Service Commissioner, and others.
I would like again this year to express my appreciation of the co-operation which
this office receives from the British Columbia Government Employees' Association, the
British Columbia Psychiatric Nurses' Association, and other organizations within our
service.
I would commend to you the superintendents and directors of the various divisions
of the Mental Health Services, and refer you to their individual reports. I am pleased
to report a very high degree of co-operative effort from all departments. As the services
have grown, we have endeavoured to decentralize administration as much as possible,
with the result that added responsibilities have been delegated.
I would like, Sir, through you to convey my gratitude to the Honourable W. D.
Black, who has championed our cause in an aggressive and effective manner. On his
appointment to office, he readily assumed his obligations and rapidly familiarized himself
with our problems by frequent personal visits to our institutions. We look forward to
great improvement and expansion of our services to the public.
To you, Mr. Pennington, I convey the gratitude of the entire staff for the splendid
leadership which you have given over the years. Your personal knowledge and close
contact with all our own problems has enabled you to interpret our needs to legislative
bodies. The improvements which have taken place in our services during recent years
are in large part attributable to your endeavours.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. M. Gee, M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services. T 32
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Graduation ceremonies, April 30th, 1953. REPORT OF THE CREASE CLINIC
T 33
REPORT OF THE CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL
MEDICINE
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I submit herewith the annual report of the activities of the Crease Clinic of
Psychological Medicine for the fiscal year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
During the past year the facilities of the Crease Clinic have been used to capacity
during the greater part of this period. The following table gives a summary of the movement of population during the fiscal year:—
Men
Women
Total
In residence, April 1st, 1952	
New admissions during the year_.
Discharged during the year	
In residence, March 31st,1953	
100
529
518
111
115
215
692
1,221
675
1,193
132
243
With our total bed capacity being 302, we have had as many as 277 patients domiciled in the Clinic at one time. There is need to keep a number of beds in readiness for
admissions at all times as our peak of admissions in one day has been sixteen, and it is
common to admit as many as eight in a day.
It is satisfying to note the number of patients who have come for psychiatric treatment voluntarily. During the year we have had 211 men and 323 women, making a total
of 534, voluntary admissions. This is approximately 45 per cent of our total admissions
who are seeking psychiatric help on a voluntary basis. It is also pleasing to note the
large number of patients who come to the Crease Clinic as their first psychiatric referral
without previous treatment.
Regarding our discharges, it has been possible during the past year to return a vast
majority of our discharged patients back to the community. It has only been necessary
to commit 129 of our discharged patients to the Provincial Mental Hospital.
The operating-room in the Crease Clinic and the surgical ward of 8 beds were
opened for general surgery on February 14th, 1953. Patients are received here from the
Crease Clinic, the Mental Hospital, The Woodlands School, and the Homes for the Aged
for various forms of surgery. To date, we have operated on twenty cases. It is to be
expected that this service will be extended greatly in the coming year, and the surgical
specialties of orthopaedic surgery and neurosurgery should be added.
We have been able to put in operation an open ward for women during this past year.
This ward functions in the same manner as the men's open ward, and creates a very
beneficial and pyschological effect on those who are able to be cared for in this way.
Our educational programme has continued to be quite active. The lecture and
conference rooms are in daily use for the educational programme of our staff, for university students, and for visiting organizations. Our own medical staff has continued to
hold weekly evening seminars during the fall, winter, and spring terms.
A great deal of interest in the Crease Clinic has been shown by many lay groups
requesting permission to inspect our facilities. This culminated in the holding of Open
House Day on May 9th, 1952, during Mental Health Week. It is estimated that approximately 2,500 persons visited during the day and observed the facilities of our Clinic.
This is certainly one of the best ways to acquaint the general public with some of the
problems of mental health.
Respectfully submitted.
A. E. Davidson, M.D.,
Deputy Director of Mental Health Services.
3 T 34 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
REPORTS  OF PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL,  ESSONDALE
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—I submit herewith the annual report of the Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale for the fiscal year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
Examination of Table No. 1 of the Mental Hospital statistical tables during this
period is the chief source of the statistics used in this particular report.
In residence on April 1st, 1952, there were 1,843 men patients and 1,641 women
patients; 110 patients were on probation; and 3 patients were carried on escape, thus
making a total of 3,597 patients on our books. During the year 1,332 patients were
admitted, making a total under treatment at the Mental Hospital at Essondale for the
year of 4,929 patients. Of the number admitted, 1,024 were by ordinary admission; 41
were by urgency committal; 180 men and 54 women, making a total of 234 patients,
were voluntary admissions; 10 were admissions from the Yukon; 1 admission was by
warrant; and 22 admissions were by Order in Council. The total admissions were thus
794 men and 538 women, making a grand total of 1,332 patients.
The separations during the fiscal year were very satisfactory. There were 704 men
and 489 women separated from the Mental Hospital at Essondale during this period,
making a grand total of 1,193 patients. In residence on March 31st, 1953, there were
1,979 men and 1,757 women, making a grand total of 3,736 patients in residence at the
end of the fiscal year.
There are several points of interest in this report. First, the gross admissions which
reveal the ever-present need for continued care of large numbers of patients. The
majority of the 234 patients who were voluntary admissions were alcoholics. During
this fiscal year it was found expedient to reserve a limit of 25 male beds for the use of
this type of case. These 25 beds are occupied almost constantly by this particular type.
There has been no reservation made regarding women alcoholics. Our total admissions
were 1,332 patients, and our total separations, including deaths, were 1,193 patients.
Fifteen patients were discharged from the Mental Hospital at Essondale to be admitted
to the Crease Clinic, and we received for committal from the Crease Clinic a total of
127 patients during the year. The percentage of patients recovered and improved, as
compared to admissions, was 21.09 per cent. The percentage of deaths to the number
under treatment was 3.14 per cent. The percentage of discharges to admissions (exclusive of deaths) was 77.93 per cent. The daily average population was 3,440.35. We
cared for an average of approximately 100 Federal charges; this number constantly
changed, but averaged 8 patients from the British Columbia penitentiary, 30 patients
from the Yukon, and 62 patients from the Department of Indian Affairs. This number
was exclusive of the large group of Federal cases which come under the Department of
Veterans' Affairs.
There have been many great changes within this division of the Provincial Mental
Health Services. The greatest of these, I feel, was our loss in the death of Dr. E. J. Ryan,
Senior Medical Superintendent, on July 2nd, 1952. Dr. Ryan had spent the greater part
of his fife working in this service, and took a large share in its development and growth.
He had an extremely full knowledge of the workings and activities of all departments,
patients, and staff.   The Mental Health Services have suffered a great loss in his death.
Mr. William Headridge, Chief Stores Steward, after a great many years of service,
was retired, and the vacancy caused by his retirement was filled by Mr. A. Boulter. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
T 35
Mr. William Cross, Deputy Chief Psychiatric Male Nurse, who had been with us for
many years, retired on superannuation. Mr. R. T. Hall, Supervisor of Industrial Therapy,
Trades and Occupational Therapy, Men's Division, retired, and his position was filled
by the appointment of Mr. R. Herring. Dr. A. L. Swanson, Deputy Medical Superintendent, resigned during the year. These men all filled important positions in the Mental
Health Services and contributed much to the high standard of service provided.
The general health of the patients has been satisfactory during the year. There
have been no severe infections of an epidemic nature. There have been minor infections
of a respiratory type which have been localized in extent.
An additional service in the care of our patients was the opening of the operating-
room on February 18th, 1953, in the Crease Clinic. Considerable elective surgery and
emergency surgery has been performed. This surgery has been done by our consultant
surgical specialists. At a later date it is anticipated that our neurosurgery will also be
performed here.
The active treatment of patients is being stressed, and the case-load this year has
been a very heavy one. The various forms of physical therapy are still used quite extensively and will be dealt with in detail in the Clinical Director's report.
There remains considerable overcrowding in both the men's and the women's divisions, as has been noted in previous Reports. It is anticipated that the new building for
tubercular patients will assist in this regard.
A total of 282 patients was transferred to The Woodlands School in New Westminster during the year. This was made possible by the opening there of new buildings.
A milestone this year was the direct admission to The Woodlands School of all those
patients under the age of 6 years. This procedure commenced on December 1st, 1952.
It is hoped that in the foreseeable future it will be possible to admit all mentally defective
patients directly to The Woodlands School. This, together with the separation of approximately 350 mentally defective patients from the Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale,
would relieve the pressure here considerably. In addition, the separation of 500 patients
at Essondale who are 65 years of age and the admission of the aged directly to the Home
for the Aged would further relieve the pressure on this overtaxed division of the Provincial Mental Health Services.
I wish at this time to gratefully acknowledge all those individuals and departments
who are in any way concerned with the care and treatment of patients or maintenance
of facilities, and to express my appreciation of their co-operation in this work.
This report covers some of the more important points in this division of the Provincial Mental Health Services following my appointment as Medical Superintendent of the
Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale and the Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine
on October 1st, 1952.
Respectfully submitted. _ ^ •_ _, _
r T. G. Caunt, M.D.,
Medical Superintendent.
TREATMENT SERVICES
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the Treatment Services in the Mental Health
Services, Essondale.
Both in the Crease Clinic and the Provincial Mental Hospital, during the week
following admission, a medical investigation and psychiatric assessment of each patient's T 36 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
condition are undertaken by his attending doctor with the aid of the nursing, psychology,
and social-service personnel. Consultation with our visiting surgeons is also undertaken
where indicated. Ward rounds are held each week in both hospitals, both for men and
women patients, to discuss the admissions of the week before and plan the treatment
programme. These conferences are attended by the medical staff, and also by representatives of the nursing, occupational-therapy, and social-service departments.
In the broadest terms, our treatment is aimed to improve the patient's ability to
live with himself and others. Many approaches to treatment are outlined in these pages,
and these reports contain the smaller detail of much creative work provided, and diver-
sional activity organized, so that people who are mentally and emotionally disturbed
may find themselves once again. A newer emphasis in hospital psychiatry is on relationship therapy, which is another way of saying that understanding and acceptance
carried through to the patient from all levels of staff must go along with more specific
measures employed. Listed below are the number of physical treatments, or somato-
therapies, as they are now called, given in the course of a year. This is tangible evidence
of the efforts we have put forth to help our patients regain their health. An effort has
been made to determine what the results have been for each procedure. It is very hard
to assess results in these terms, as some patients have received, in addition, considerable
psychotherapy, and the hours devoted to this treatment are not recorded statistically.
More time could be spent profitably in psychotherapy if we had the staff to do it. The
place of somatotherapy, then, is to relieve the symptoms of distress and restore the
patient's initiative in working toward his recovery so that he can give up the isolation
of his illness and participate socially once again.
We have endeavoured to foster new approaches in treatment in the clinic which
can be carried over to the Mental Hospital, both in its admitting department and the
continued-treatment services. We have endeavoured to provide our patients with a
more relaxed hospital atmosphere in which individuality can be preserved. The appointment of a musical therapist and a padre broadens the scope of the approaches we can
make to patients.
In the Clinic, two wards are now functioning as open wards, in which reliance is
placed on morale instead of on scrutiny. Use of seclusion rooms on other wards is less
frequent. Other evidences of this trend have been the institution of periodic ward meetings and the provision of a polling-booth for those able to exercise their franchise on
election-day. Group psychotherapy is achieving a place of increasing importance. Two
groups have been meeting in the Clinic twice weekly under medical direction and with
the competent assistance of our psychologists.   This service will shortly be doubled.
In the Mental Hospital there have been three groups meeting for psychotherapy;
namely, on the women's rehabilitation ward, on the women's lobotomy ward, and in the
men's alcoholic clime. A most significant achievement was recorded during the year in
the Mental Hospital, when on August 14th, 1952, the use of physical restraint was abolished. This step was the culmination of at least two years' intensive work in this direction. We have now embarked on a much more comprehensive task, which we call our
reactivation programme, in which we are endeavouring to improve the social standard of
living of the patients who are domiciled therein. This programme is already under way
on the top floor of the East Lawn Building with the active and enthusiastic teamwork of
the nursing, occupational-therapy, recreational-therapy, and medical staff making it possible. A ward programme for the adult mental defectives has been started by the ward
staff, and this area is one in which musical therapy has been employed to advantage.
A small reactivation programme has been commenced in the West Lawn Building, and
will be expanded in the coming year. An effort has been made to deal conscientiously
with the large number of men patients presenting themselves for treatment for alcoholism.
Certain changes in the Provincial Statute have been asked for and have been made
whereby we might deal more satisfactorily with those patients whose motivation to be REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
T 37
helped is strong. It is to be hoped that before long this department of treatment will be
lifted out of the Mental Hospital setting altogether. The facilities for treatment in the
Centre Lawn Building, or the Admitting Building to the Mental Hospital, are keeping
step with the Clinic, with the exception that no provision has yet been made for insulin
coma therapy. The deficiency is to be made up during the coming year. Both to lend
encouragement to our reactivation programme and to speed rehabilitation, we have
commenced ward rounds in the East Lawn Building by going to one ward each week in
rotation. We are grateful to the psychiatric social workers for the support they have
given this venture.
Of course, rehabilitation services must expand to keep pace with the increased
number of patients coming for treatment. Much of the burden of rehabilitation planning falls upon the social workers. We have noted a lessened problem of discrimination
in job placements. Sometimes special placements are necessary, and in this regard we
have had the full co-operation of the National Employment Service. The women's
rehabilitation home, The Vista, has accommodated almost twice the number of patients
that it did last year, and there is a clear need for a rehabilitation home for men, as indicated in the report of the Rehabilitation Officer.
The various forms of physical therapy are still actively used, and the following tables
are of interest.
(a) Coma Insulin
All patients receiving coma insulin are at present being treated in the Clinic. These
facilities are actively used in the treatment of the many schizophrenic disorders.
Record of Coma Insulin Treatment from April 1st, 1952, to April 1st, 1953
FEMALES
0
l-H    Vi
u —
.0 ci
|s
u
t-
Si
>
O
o
Si
Pi
Si
>
o
a
|
T3
Si
>
O
a,
I
s
5a
u
S3
-c
Vi
a
ii
BS.S
•a
V
3
2    °
Manic Depressive
1
1
i
1
1
—
i
Schizophrenia
14
10
23
53
3
21
24
1
4
3
2
12
8
18
39
17
20
2
2
3
10
4
2
14
10
21
49
3
21
24
1
1
..__ 1 ......
______ 1 ______
2    1    	
4   j   ...._.
......   |   ......
______   |   ......
______   |   __
______   |   ______
2
2
2
1
Latent     	
1
148
11
114
23
142
6
8
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
	
_
Epilepsy with psychosis - -  	
Alcoholic psychosis   	
Anxiety reaction     	
Totals    	
4
3
1
4    1    —    1         I    	
153
11
118
24
147
6
....__
8
L_ T 38
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Record of Coma Insulin Treatment from April 1st, 1952, to April 1st, 1953—Continued
MALES
§1
2.H.
I
ii
Bo
tax
Manic 	
Depressed.	
Other	
Totals.
Manic Depressive
Simple	
Hebephrenic.
Catatonic	
Paranoid	
Schizophrenia
Acute schizophrenic reaction.
Latent	
Schizo-affective psychosis __.
Unspecified	
Totals	
Paranoid state 	
Pathological personality..
Epilepsy with psychosis .„
Alcoholic psychosis-
Neurotic depressive reaction.
Anxiety reaction.
Obsessive compulsive neurosis,
Psychoneurotic disorders	
Hysterical reaction	
Totals	
Grand totals .
161
1 I
1   1 I
1 I
15
6
16
72
9
23
13
10
4
4
11
8
47
3
6
1
18
1
11
17
107 |
5
2
1
17
4
1
30
13
6
15
70
23
13
1
1
1
2
1
	
148 |   5 [   1 |
113
12
(b) Convulsive Shock Therapy
This form of therapy is actively used both in the Clinic and in the Mental Hospital.
In the Clinic it is chiefly used for the relief of disturbances of mood, either elation or
depression, with gratifying results.
Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine
RESULTS
Number of
Patients
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
65
227
62
23
4
5
10
13
2
28
161
44
4
Schizophrenia	
Miscellaneous	
49
11
Totals        _ _
354
32
25
233
64
DISPOSAL
Discharged
Discharged
Later
Discharge
Pending
Transferred
to Insulin
Transferred
to E.N.T.
Transferred
to Mental
Hospital
Died Later
56
81
53
3
6
1
115
2
6
2
21
3
2
Schizophrenia	
Miscellaneous	
1
190
9
1
115
10
26
3 REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
T 39
Provincial Mental Hospital
results
Number of
Patients
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
32
232
48
7
3
8
7
2
18
131
30
6
Schizophrenia 	
87
13
312
10
17
179
106
DISPOSAL
Discharged
Discharged
Later
Discharge
Pending
Transferred
to Insulin
Transferred
to
Lobotomy
Transferred
to E.N.T.
Remaining
in Mental
Hospital
Died Later
Manic depressive ....
Schizophrenia
Miscellaneous	
12
34
14
9
5
1
3
10
—
4
1
10
1
14
162
26
1
2
Totals
60
17
4
10
4
12
202
3
(c) Electronarcosis
This form of therapy continues to give beneficial results in a limited number of
patients. Frequently patients who have failed to respond to other forms of therapy will
have favourable results with electronarcosis.
Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine
results
Number of
Patients
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
9
30
20
2
1
7
12
15
2
Schizophrenia __ _	
15
5
Totals   	
59
2
1
34
22
DISPOSAL
Discharged
Discharged
Later
Discharge
Pending
Transferred
to Insulin
Transferred
to E.N.T.
Remaining
in Clinic
Died Later
Manic depressive	
Schizophrenia 	
Miscellaneous 	
6
12
15
2
2
4
3
1
13
1
Totals 	
33
8
3
15
Provincial Mental Hospital
RESULTS
Number of
Patients
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
Manic depressive	
Schizophrenia  _	
Miscellaneous	
2
15
1
1
—
1
13
1
2
Totals   	
18
1
15
2 T 40
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Provincial Mental Hospital—Continued
DISPOSAL
Discharged
Discharged
Later
Discharge
Pending
Transferred
to Insulin
Transferred
to
Lobotomy
Remaining
in Hospital
Died Later
Manic depressive ,	
Schizophrenia 	
Miscellaneous	
2
9
1
2
4
	
12
2
4
(d) Lobotomy
The majority of patients treated by this method have been those who have presented
disturbing and troublesome problems of adjustment in hospital.
RESULTS
Number of
Patients
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
18
2
....
10
1
3
1
5
Miscellaneous  	
Totals.  	
20
—
11
4
5
DISPOSAL
Discharged
Transferred to
Coma Insulin
Transferred
to E.C.T.
Remaining
in Hospital
8             1
2
8
Miscellaneous  _ _	
1
2
Totals.. _	
  	
8
2
10
F. E. McNair, M.D.,
Clinical Director.
DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Women's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale,B.C.
Sir,—This year the staff of the Women's Occupational Therapy Department was
increased by six members—four occupational therapists, an industrial therapist, and
a stenographer-instructor, so that we now number twenty-four and supervise activities
in four occupational-therapy workshops and six industrial departments. The fact that
we have a larger staff and have had only three resignations during the year has enabled
us to expand our programme in the following ways:—
The workshop at the Home for the Aged was reopened in May with a full-time
therapist in charge. Patients are visited twice a week on the wards, and
the workshop is opened to patients each afternoon.
In August the ward programme in the East Lawn Building was reorganized so
that daily visits are made to all wards except two. This programme has
been most beneficial to those patients unable to attend the workshop, and REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE T 41
constructive work has replaced destructive activities.   Mention should be
made of the cooking class held for a very deteriorated group of patients.
Having a stenographer has relieved the staff of stenographic work and has
facilitated the keeping of records and supplies.   Instruction has also been
given to patients interested in shorthand and typing.
The average number of patients registered for treatment during the year was 763, as
compared to 473 last year.   The number of treatments given during the year was 151,506.
The number of patients admitted for treatment was 1,848, and the number discharged,
discontinued, or transferred was 1,329.
Miss Stella Hincks, our assistant supervisor, resigned in April and was replaced by
Miss Marie LeBlanc, who has been a member of our staff since 1947.
A period of three months' clinical training was provided for two University of
Toronto students and two students from the College of Puget Sound, Tacoma, Wash.
Lectures were given to the affiliate and student nurses, and the former spent one week of
observation in the departments. We have also had visiting therapists from Vancouver
and Salem, Ore.
Exhibits of handicrafts were presented at the Fraser Valley Art Show, New Westminster; at the Women's Institute, Port Coquitlam; and at the Parent-Teacher Association, Port Coquitlam.
Proceeds from the annual Christmas sale amounted to $1,243.75. This money
becomes part of the Patients' Comfort Fund and in the past has gone toward the purchase
of the organ at Pennington Hall. This department assisted also at Christmas with
decorations, packed 4,273 bags of candy for patients, made 150 toys for The Woodlands
School, and designed the hospital Christmas card.
Included in the personnel of this department is a school-teacher who teaches English
to non-English speaking patients and supervises extension courses.
We wish to thank you, the medical staff, the nursing staff, and all others who have
given so freely of their time and counsel during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
Kathleen Draper,
Director, Occupational Therapy Department
( Women's Division).
Men's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the annual report of the Trades Training and
Occupational Therapy Department (Men's Division) for the fiscal year April 1st, 1952,
to March 31st, 1953.
(a) Trades Training.—From February to the end of April, 1953, the patient
population was increased from 65 to 104 patients; in the same period, 17 patients were
discharged.
The Tailor-shop shows a continual turnover of patients. A large percentage of
patients discharged from the Tailor-shop have benefited from their training, and have
proved their interest and ability while in this department.
The Mattress-shop is doing an excellent work in rehabilitating patients from the
lower-level brackets to the higher trade levels in the training programme.
The Cabinet-shop features a new department for the repair of hardwood chairs and
small furnishings. It also serves as a training area for the Cabinet-shop. The latter is
to be congratulated on the fine workmanship turned out for the operating-room. T 42 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
The Upholstery-shop, Shoe-shop, and Machine-shop show a profit for the year, with
a good patient turnover.
The Metal-shop deserves mention for its fine workmanship in the manufacture of
stainless-steel kitchenware.
The Printing-shop was moved from the Centre Lawn Building up to the Trades
Training Building in February, and is proving an asset to the training programme.
(b) Occupational Therapy.—Crease Clinic: A staff of two occupational therapists
and one handicraft instructor supervise the treatment programme in the Crease Clinic.
The total number of patients treated was 1,292. The total number discharged was 291,
and 38 patients were transferred to the Mental Hospital. Mixed wood occupied 609
patients; weaving, 246 patients; pottery, 228 patients; and the remainder were employed
at miscellaneous crafts.
Veterans' Building: One occupational therapist supervised the treatment programme,
which comprised a total of 18,750 treatment-hours. The patients in this unit are to be
commended for their untiring efforts in toy-manufacture. These toys are donated to the
various veterans' organizations for Christmas distribution. Deserving mention is the
scale contour map of the Hospital grounds and buildings. The lengthy project took nearly
a year to complete. The finished model was installed in a mahogany case, built by the
Trades and Training Department, and now adorns a central position in the rotunda of the
Crease Clinic.
Centre Lawn Building, D 5: The activities in this unit have been increased, a greater
variety of crafts are in use, and the patient population and interest have also grown. One
therapist is in charge. The average number of patients treated daily is 27. Visits are
made to D 2 hospital ward, and a treatment programme has been started. The gardening
and landscaping project, supervised by Mr. A. B. Finnie and assisted by the therapist
from Centre Lawn, is showing outstanding results as a diversion for the occupational-
therapy patients and serves as an outlet for those not interested in shopwork.
Mr. R. T. Hall, who was retired on superannuation in January, 1953, leaves us with
memories and standing monuments of this department's services to the Hospital during
his years as Supervisor of Trades Training and Occupational Therapy.
I wish to express my sincere thanks for the co-operation given by the Trades Training
and Occupational Therapy Department staff during the past months of adjustment.
The staff of the Trades Training and Occupational Therapy Department wish to
thank you, Dr. Gee, the medical staff, the nursing staff, and Public Works Department
for their counsel and co-operation during the past year.
Respectfully submitted.
R. Herring,
Supervisor of Trades Training and Occupational
Therapy (Men's Division).
DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL THERAPY
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the following report showing programme and
attendance figures of the activities promoted by this department during the fiscal year
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
T 43
Patients' Recreation
Physical-education and gymnastic classes
Badminton classes	
Bowling      392
Dances 	
Visiting band concerts	
Visiting choir and concert groups	
Concerts  presented  to  individual  wards  by
patients' glee club and gymnastic group.._
Variety parties and social gatherings	
Swimming 	
Softball League activities	
Reactivation programmes 	
Fifth annual sports and field day	
Staff recreation      279
Number of
Programmes
Total
Attendance
97
2,021
61
454
392
6,857
81
13,996
6
3,810
4
2,413
17
1,649
27
1,651
72
1,987
50
8,000
54
1,280
1
1,200
279
3,818
Totals  1,141
49,136
Following are special, or progressive, inaugurated events to our programme during
the year, and additional remarks:—
1. In September, 1952, a musical therapist ,was appointed. During the ensuing
months, the musical therapist, in conjunction with the Recreational Therapy Department,
held a total of 83 periods of activity. These included the formation of a Hospital glee
club, Protestant Church choir, individual ward music-appreciation hours, and community
sing-songs, which provided musical entertainment to 6,744 patients.
2. Reactivation Classes.—During the month of October, 1952, a new type of activity
was started with small groups from both the men's and women's refractory wards, with
highly encouraging and beneficial results. More attention is being given to this type of
activity weekly.
3. During the past fall indoor season, specific emphasis was placed on all types of
gymnastic work, both elementary and advanced, also with encouraging and beneficial
results. This has proven so satisfactory that plans now call for a regular annual display
at the end of the fall season, which will be very similar to our annual field and sports day
which is held at the end of the summer season.
4. The newly formed Inter-building Softball League was a complete success for both
players and spectators. This Softball League will also be a regularly scheduled annual
activity.
5. The physical-education and gymnastic classes listed above consisted of calisthenics, both elementary and advanced, and indoor games of every type and too numerous
to mention.
6. The concerts listed above were organized by the musical therapist and the
Recreational Therapy Department, and were presented mainly on wards with patients
who would not ordinarily get out to the auditorium activities.
7. Staff recreation was carried out mainly in the late evening hours, and their
activities consisted of badminton, bowling, dancing, gymnastics, picnics, and swimming.
8. Variety party and social gatherings listed above consisted of bingo groups,
cribbage, checker, chess, and bridge tournaments, and other types of social activities not
scheduled under the regular recreational programme.
9. Activities not supervised by the Recreational Therapy Department, but carried
out in the new Pennington Hall auditorium:—
(a) April 3rd, 1952:  Hospital student-body dance.
(b) June 17th, 1952:   Devotional service of Vancouver Diocesan Anglican
Church clergy. T 44
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
(c) October 23rd, 1952:   Hospital graduate nurses'reunion.
(d) December 17th, 1952:   Red Cross blood donor clinic.
(e) December 20th, 1952: Provincial Employees' Association kiddies' Christmas party.
(/)  February 20th, 1953:  Credit Union annual meeting.
(g)  March 26th, 1953: Alumna; nurses'fashion show.
Once again I would like to express my thanks and appreciation for the assistance
and co-operation given this department by so many of the staff personnel and allied
departments in the promotion of our various recreational activities.
Respectfully submitted. „, „   „
v • W. R. Brown,
Director of Recreational Therapy.
Sixth annual sports day, August, 1953.
AUDIO-VISUAL DEPARTMENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith is a summary of the basic functions of this department for
the fiscal year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
On May 19th, 1952, the first 35-mm. movies were shown in Pennington Hall, and
later in the year the stage curtains were installed. Many comments have been received
in regard to the fine quality of the equipment and its performance. A number of first-run
pictures have been shown, much to the delight of the patients.
Owing to quarantine restrictions, recreational movies, both 16-mm. and 35-mm.,
were curtailed somewhat, reducing the number of shows by sixty-seven over last year. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
T 45
At the same time the total attendance, despite this reduction, increased from 94,315 to
94,666. This is largely due to the facilities of Pennington Hall. It would appear that
if more transportation were provided, the total attendance to movies would be over the
100,000 mark.
On February 24th, 1953, owing to overcrowding at The Woodlands School, a third
showing of 35-mm. movies became necessary.
The educational film library now contains 147 films, and an average of five of these
are shipped out each week, necessitating the use of a Kardex system, with a number of
printed forms, to keep track of the details in connection with the lending library. Fifty-
one more educational films were presented over last year, which almost balances the
number of recreational shows not given.
As I mentioned in last year's report, the weekly average of movies shown could not
be exceeded without an increase in staff or a deterioration in other phases of the department. The increasing demands placed upon this department, with a limited staff, have
not been without some sacrifice, and the vast amount of technical and maintenance work
required in itself, and in service to others, is not being carried out.
Photography and all its branches, such as copy work, slides, etc., continues to be of
value in many ways, and the report below gives this pertinent data.
Recorded music has been relayed, whenever time has permitted, through the sound
system on channel three to the Crease Clinic and the Veterans' Building at Colony Farm,
throughout the year, and also the lawns in the summer-time.
Gradually some fine long-playing records are being secured for the record library
which will be used in connection with the four-channel sound system, and it is unfortunate
that the West Lawn, the Centre Lawn, and East Lawn Buildings are as yet not part of
this system. Some of the more musical types of concerts given on the stage of Pennington
Hall have been broadcast on an experimental basis. The padre also makes use of this
equipment during his evening broadcasts.
Owing to current requirements absorbing nearly all available time, much equipment
is still installed on a temporary basis, and the results of its performance often are of the
same nature. A great deal of time and engineering are still required before all equipment
is put into place and functioning smoothly.
Recreational Motion Pictures
Number of
Shows
35-mm. presentations at Essondale  135
35-mm. presentations at The Woodlands School..    85
16-mm. presentations at Essondale, Home for the
Aged (Port Coquitlam), and Colony Farm 420
Total
Attendance
40,968
17,063
36,635
Totals  640 94,666
16-mm. Films Shipped to Other Institutions
Mental Home, Colquitz  95
The Woodlands School  96
Home for the Aged, Vernon  46
Provincial Home, Kamloops  46
Girls' Industrial School ,  43
Boys' Industrial School  49
Allco Infirmary, Haney  49
The 16-mm. projection equipment was loaned out 183 times. T 46 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Educational Motion Pictures
Number of Total
Shows Attendance
16-mm. presentations at Essondale  213 10,988
16-mm. films loaned  231 7,514
Photography
4x5 negative exposed, black and white  250
4x5 negatives exposed, colour  45
8x10 prints produced  490
5x7 prints produced  24
314x4 colour transparencies produced  40
3%x4 black and white transparencies produced  49
2x2 slides produced 1  17
16-mm. motion-picture film exposed, black and white, and
colour (feet) 300
Records and Recordings
Domestic records loaned  677
Hours of music played ;  280
Minutes of recorded material for clinical and miscellaneous
purposes  391
G. H. Walker,
Director, Audio-Visual Department.
LIBRARY REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—Attached herewith is a report of the medical and patients' libraries for the
fiscal year ended March 31st, 1953. Mrs. H. M. Fraser, Librarian, resigned in February,
and to date the position has not been filled.
Weekly book service to the wards continues, also to the Home for the Aged,
Veterans' Building, and The Vista in Vancouver. Many donations of magazines were
received, and these were distributed to the wards. The Library co-operated with the
National Research Council of Ottawa in the compilation of a union fist of scientific
periodicals in Canadian libraries. When the project is completed, our Library will be
listed with the symbol " BEC." A portion of the Federal Mental Health Grant was again
made available to the medical library for the purchase of basic works in medicine and
Psychiatry- Patients' Library
Book collection  4,276
News books added  300
Donations  124
4,700
Book losses  58
Book discards  91
—       149
4,551
Current magazine subscriptions  10
Number of books circulated  15,757 REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
T 47
Medical Library
Book collection  1,639
New books added      202
Book losses
Journals (medical and psychiatric)  70
Journals (technical, other departments)  45
Journals (bound volumes)	
Pamphlets 	
Books borrowed on inter-library loan
Books lent on inter-library loan	
Number of books circulated	
Respectfully submitted.
1,841
18
1,823
115
154
536
38
5
883
(Miss) A. Ruzicka.
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of the treatments given in the Physiotherapy Department of the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953:—
Male
Female
Total
220
869
236
45
965
139
695
148
287
5
64
189
1,323
57
66
88
506
835
207
550
1,684
1,184
1,731
73
34
726
1,704
443
595
2,649
1,223
2,426
221
321
5
15
62
2,284
63
820
79
Wax bath  	
251
3,607
120
886
88
5,396
543
10,048
598
15,344
1,141
Respectfully submitted.
F. E. McNair, B.A., M.D., CM.,
Clinical Director. T 48 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
DENTAL DEPARTMENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the annual report of this department for the fiscal
year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
The past year has seen the Dental Clinic brought up to full working capacity.
An additional dental nurse and a dental mechanic have been added to the staff, and
have both proved themselves very capable.
New equipment in the laboratory has made it possible to handle all types of
mechanical work quickly and efficiently, and no work has been sent out to city laboratories since our dental mechanic had his equipment installed. This required a considerable amount of rewiring. Besides our own work, we also take care of the mechanical
work for The Woodlands School.
In the operating-rooms new equipment and new lights over the chairs have made
for better working conditions. These lights were part of the original equipment, but as
the ceiling fixtures were designed for ceilings under 10 feet, they were not mounted when
the other equipment was installed. With the co-operation of the two electricians, 4-foot
extensions have been added, and the lamps mounted on these extensions so that they
now hang 8 feet above the floor and thus give excellent light for working at the chairs.
A new system of requisition for dental work, signed by the patient's doctor, has
worked out very well and enables the nurse to plan appointments more efficiently.
Examination of patients at the Home for the Aged has been completed, saving
a good deal of transportation of these old people to and from the Dental Clinic. We
now have lists of these patients on whom dental work is required.
Examination of patients on Wards H 1 and H 5 has also been carried out, and
lists of patients requiring dental work under general anaesthesia made out, also lists of
patients whose dental work it is believed possible to handle in the Dental Clinic with
local anaesthesia.
New dentures made in our laboratory are all marked with the patient's number and
are easily identified, but a number of old dentures are lost and cannot be traced back to
their owners when found. The dental mechanic has now worked out a satisfactory
method for marking these dentures, and all dentures on Ward H 2 are now marked.
This work will continue as time permits.
The following is a summary of the work done during the year:—
Examinations   1,999
Extractions     1,759
Fillings   1,134
Prophylaxis  _'      296
Treatments        189
X-rays         470
General-anaesthetic cases         63
Dentures made       226
Dentures repaired       175
Dentures relined        39
Bridges repaired         16
Bridges made   1
Gold inlays   7
Crowns    1
Respectfully submitted.
H. O. Johnsen, D.D.S. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE T 49
OPTICAL REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the optical work done at the Provincial Mental
Hospital and the Crease Clinic for the fiscal year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st,
1953:—
Refractions    348
Major repairs   243
Minor repairs and adjustments  100
Respectfully submitted.
H. H. Woodbridge,
Optometrist.
BEAUTY-PARLOUR REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—Following is the report of the above department for the fiscal year April 1st,
1952, to March 31st, 1953, covering the Mental Hospital and the Crease Clinic:—
Shampoos    6,572
Finger-waves     6,466
Marcels         44
Permanents   1,006
Hair-cuts   7,148
Manicures   1,684
Scalp treatments         17
Shaves     1,926
Oil treatments  2,344
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) M. Townsend.
DEPARTMENT OF DIETETICS
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is a report on the work done in the Department of Dietetics
during the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1953.
The department was sorry to lose Mrs. M. W. Spencer, Acting Chief Dietitian, in
July, who is now devoting her full time to housekeeping, and Mrs. G. Kitos, who moved
to the United States with her husband, but welcomed the addition of Miss C. L.
Neighbor, who transferred from The Woodlands School, Miss E. J. Jones, Mrs. E. E. J.
Garside, and Miss R. L. Neal as dietitians.
Throughout the year the department strove to improve the quality and variety of
the meals served to the patients. Fresh fruit was served while in season, also garden
vegetables and salads throughout the year. The surplus beans and cauliflower were
frozen, and served when other green vegetables were not available. T 50 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Toward the end of the summer thirty-six insecticide vapourizers were installed in
all kitchens and dining-rooms. Considerable time was spent in investigating these
thermal generators, but we were well rewarded when the flies and cockroaches were
brought under control.
The plastic sectional trays introduced after the war have been replaced by plates
in the Crease Clinic and on some wards in the East Lawn, but this programme cannot
be completed until the new dish-washer is installed in this building. The tables in the
Lawn Buildings have been re-covered with arborite, which is a vast improvement and
has considerably brightened the dining-rooms.
The kitchens in the Home for the Aged and Centre Lawn Buildings have been
completely renovated and electrified, and are proving more economical and sanitary.
During the coming year we hope to complete the programme for converting the
kitchens from coal to electricity with the renovation of the West Lawn kitchen. The
establishment of the central butcher-shop will enable us to control the consumption of
meat and enable the kitchens to serve a greater variety of meat dishes; the new diet
kitchen will give better facilities for serving and controlling more accurate diets in the
East Lawn Building.
The two cooks and seventeen patients in the scullery have done excellent work preparing all the vegetables for the kitchens throughout the year under very adverse conditions; it is hoped that the scullery will soon be moved to a more suitable building and
equipped with adequate facilities for continuing this very monotonous and thankless job..
Files have been made up of all large equipment in the kitchens and dining-rooms;
these will facilitate fuller use of the equipment in planning new kitchens and eliminate
much of the wastage arising out of the previous system. Departmental information files
have also been enlarged and brought up to date.
The Hospital diet manual is being completely revised and rewritten, and will be
ready for publication in 1953, when it will be used throughout the Hospital and at The
Woodlands School, and used as a text-book for the nurses-in-training.
A standard recipe book has been compiled and will be used in all kitchens.
Monthly stock-taking of expendable commodities was introduced this year, as was
a simplified costing system, which enable the dietitians to improve the menus without
increasing the expenditure per diem.
Training programmes have been extensive this year and have embraced four different
groups.
Miss Jones has given a series of lectures in nutrition and diet therapy to all classes
of student nurses, and Miss A. Paterson has given lectures on feeding of infants and old
people.
The cooks' training programme has remained as a one-year course, with eight
students this year. Of the six graduates from the 1951—52 course, one was transferred
to Colquitz immediately as a Grade 1 cook; one promoted in September, four in February, and one in March. Mr. Quayle, Grade 3 Cook, left in January to reside in the
United States, and the total number of promotions during the year was thirteen.
A short course of training was given to the kitchen helpers employed this year; it
consisted of instruction and films on sanitation, food service and dish-washing, given by
the dietitians, and a lecture on the effect of good food and service for psychiatric
patients, which was given by Dr. McNair.
The fourth programme was in showing a coloured film on the correct methods of
dish-washing to the patient-workers, who seemed to enjoy the show and were suitably
impressed with the lesson it contained.
The year ended with the following staff in the Department of Dietetics: 1 Chief
Dietitian, 5 dietitians, 3 Grade 5 cooks, 2 Grade 4 cooks, 8 Grade 3 cooks, 16 Grade
2 cooks, 14 Grade 1 cooks, 27 kitchen helpers, 16 dining-room stewards, and 107
patient-workers.
_ REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE T 51
I would like to take this opportunity of thanking the heads and staff of all departments for their co-operation throughout this year, for without it the progress of the
Department of Dietetics would have been greatly retarded.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Heather V. R. Pelling,
Chief Dietitian.
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit a report of the activities of the Department of Neurology for
the fiscal year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
The demand for neurological consultation and investigation has shown an increase
over the previous year. This is mirrored by the number of electroencephalograms, which
has risen from 642 in 1952 to 1,079 in 1953. There has been also a further increase in
the number of pneumoencephalograms performed, which totalled 237 in 1953, compared
with 221 in 1952.
Twenty-five patients were referred to the neurosurgical service of the Vancouver
General Hospital for further assessment and treatment. The majority of these suffered
from space-occupying lesions, either of neoplastic or vascular origin. They have undergone surgical treatment. One case of focal epilepsy was treated with ablation of the
epileptogenic region. One case of depressed skull fracture was surgically dealt with.
The rest were seen by the neurosurgeon for various other diagnostic studies, such as
ventriculograms and angiograms, which were necessary for their final evaluation.
The survey of all resident patients with a history of seizures, which was begun in
1952, has been completed.
In conjunction with Dr. Kennard, a preliminary study of the electroencephalographic
relationship to mental illness was carried out, and 100 selected cases with the clinical
diagnosis of schizophrenia and psychopathy were examined.
Repeated lectures on neurological subjects and techniques were given to both the
medical and nursing staff. For six weeks in April and May, 1953, the Neurologist was
engaged as demonstrator in neuroanatomy at the Faculty of Medicine of the University
of British Columbia.
Clinical demonstrations were given to first-year medical students and to students of
applied psychology.
Respectfully submitted.
W. P. Fister, M.D.,
Director of Neurology. T 52 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
LABORATORY REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the laboratories at
Essondale from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953:—
Blood—
Kahn, negative  2,732
Kahn, positive  63
Kahn, quantitative  39
Red-blood count and haemoglobin  3,321
Haemoglobin  598
Haematocrit   1
js          White-blood count and differential  3,476
Arneth count  1
Eosinophile count  7
Thorn test  2
Sedimentation rate  1,165
Grouping  3
Cross-matching   2
Sternal marrow  3
Bleeding time  39
Coagulation time   36
Prothrombin activity  29
Platelet count  13
Reticulocyte count  26
Fragility  .  1
Culture  9
Widal   13
Agglutination for B. abortus  9
Paul Bunnell  16
Glucose  361
Glucose tolerance curve ..  11
Amylase   2
Non-protein nitrogen  139
Urea nitrogen  14
Uric acid  6
Creatinine   11
Carbon monoxide  1
C02 combining power  4
Cholesterol  80
Barbiturate  4
Bromide   29
Chloride   9
Sodium :  5
Potassium  5
Iron  2
Calcium  14
Phosphorus   10
Alkaline phosphatase  24
Acid phosphatase  9
Icterus index  29 REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE T 53
Blood—Continued
Van den Bergh  47
Total protein  16
Albumin-globulin ratio ,  13
Hanger flocculation  23
Albumin  2
Bromsulphalein excretion  3
Congo red test  1
Ascorbic acid  1
Thymol turbidity   11
Cerebrospinal fluid—
Kahn, negative  243
Kahn, positive  15
Kahn, quantitative  16
Colloidal gold curve  249
Cell count  512
Total protein  736
Glucose   4
Chloride   6
Ultra-violet absorption spectrum  223
Urine—
Routine   8,344
Acetone  1,091
Quantitative sugar  251
Benzidene  717
Bromide   2,325
Chloride  1
Calcium  3
Phosphate  1
Amino nitrogen  47
Copper  51
Quantitative albumin  197
Bence Jones protein  3
Two-hourly   14
Friedman  64
Pregtest   11
Bile  23
Urobilinogen   21
Phenylpyruvic acid  82
Phenolsulfonphthalein  1
Barbiturates   2
Urea  1
17-ketosteroid   9
TB. (24-hour specimen)  5
pH  2
Smears—
Miscellaneous  1,163
G.C.   55
TB  25
Vincent's organisms  12
Trichomonas   8
Diphtheria  2
Fungus   1 T 54 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Sputum—
TB  457
24-hour specimen for TB  4
72-hour specimen for TB  3
Cultures—
Miscellaneous  606
Antibiotic sensitivity  56
Diphtheria  3
Typhoid   1,221
Dysentery  1,884
TB  17
Fungus   1
Water  10
Milk   4
Gastric contents—
Analysis   8
Occult blood  4
TB  52
Faeces—
Parasites  127
Occult blood  71
Bile   1
TB  18
B.M.R  141
E.C.G -  228
Surgicals  25
Autopsies   116
Animal autopsies  47
Sections  6,092
Agglutination for typhoid  3
Agglutination for dysentery  86
Pleural fluid routine  1
Semen examination  2
Injections—
Typhoid vaccine  641
Diphtheria toxoid  159
Pollen antigen  27
Skin tests—
Tuberculin   744
Brucellergen  2
Schick   225
Smallpox vaccinations  150
Total _.  42,262
Respectfully submitted.
G. A. Nicolson, M.D.,
Pathologist. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE T 55
DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following report is the work performed in the Department of Radiology
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953:—
Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine
Number of films taken  4,030
Number of patients X-rayed  1,995
Patients Films
Chests   1,272 1,292
Extremities           62 205
Spines        380 596
Skulls       110 232
Pneumoencephalograms         102 1,240
Barium meals         21 257
Barium enemas           5 58
Ribs          5 8
Abdomens          12 16
Gall-bladders           6 40
Pelvis           6 18
Intravenous pyelograms          5 36
Sinuses           1 4
Shoulders           1 2
Jaws             5 17
Barium swallows  '. _..         2 9
Totals  1,995 4,030
Provincial Mental Hospital
Number of films taken  13,191
Number of patients X-rayed     9,147
Patients Films
Chests   7,879 7,950
Extremities        513 1,501
Spines       178 435
Skulls       177 382
Pneumoencephalograms         116 1,407
Barium enemas        31 345
Barium meals        40 548
Intravenous pyelograms        21 135
Ribs         17 36
Pelvis         58 128
Abdomens          58 136
Jaws           14 43
Gall-bladders         19 116
Sinuses         10 35
Noses          7 18
Shoulders           4 8
Barium swallows          3 23
Mastoids           3 9
Totals  9,147 13,191 •
Respectfully submitted. j M ^^ M D
Director of Radiology. T 56 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of work performed for the fiscal year ended March 31st,
1953, at the Provincial Mental Hospital and the Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine.
During the year the Department of Psychology continued in its chief capacity of providing psychological evaluations of those patients referred by the medical staff. Participation in various phases of the educational programme of the Mental Health Services was
also continued. A new field of activity, group therapy, was commenced, and the
evaluation of nursing applicants was discontinued.
Miss M. E. Davidson and Mr. J. T. Hamilton, both formerly of Shaughnessy
Hospital, joined our staff in August and September respectively. Miss F. J. Darroch
completed an internship in psychology and returned to the University of Toronto for
postgraduate training. Miss B. J. Leslie began a year's internship which will be completed in the forthcoming fiscal year. Mrs. J. C. Morton attended the Rorschach
Workshop at Pacific Grove, Calif., under the direction of Dr. Bruno Klopfer, the
leading authority on the use of the Rorschach method of personality diagnosis.
The department examined a considerably greater number of patients than in
previous years. This was made possible by a larger staff. A relatively wider use of
projective techniques was employed as a consequence of an increase in the level of
training of the staff. Projective techniques are time-consuming, but their worth in
providing valuable clues to the personalities of the patients warrants their use.
The quick turnover of patients at the Crease Clinic and the need for their rapid
evaluation has increased the number of referrals to the department. The institution of
referral cards has provided a useful and efficient means of keeping a check on those
patients who are to be seen. Attendance at ward rounds offers a means of selecting
those cases in which psychological examinations would be of most value and in determining the cases to be given the highest priority.
Four hundred and twenty-seven patients were examined and reported on during the
year. A total of 1,325 tests was administered. Abstracts of psychological examinations
made elsewhere totalled eighteen. The weekly clinical conferences were attended, and
the Psychologist's findings were presented. During the first three months of the year
one qf our members provided psychological services at The Woodlands School on a one-
day-a-week basis.
The following is a tabulation of the tests administered in the Crease Clinic and
Provincial Mental Hospital:—
Arthur Point Scale   7
Bender Gestalt        42
Benjamin Proverbs        29
California Test of Personality   2
Children's Apperception Test  3
Draw-a-Person        92
Differential Aptitude   3
General Clerical   4
Goldstein Scheerer        31
Goodenough Intelligence  7
House-Tree-Person   1
Incomplete Sentences         30
Kent Emergency Scales   3
Kent-Rosanoff Word Association  1
Kuder Preference Record        12 REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE .           T 57
Lee-Thorpe Occupational Interest  22
Lowenfeld Mosaic   8
Make-a-Picture Story   15
Mechanical Comprehension   1
Meier Art Judgment  3
Mill Hill Vocabulary   2
Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory  22
Nebraska Test for Deaf Children  1
Otis Arithmetic Test  1
Otis Self-administering  5
Picture Concepts  1
Porteus Mazes   99
Practical Judgment   2
Primary Business Interests  3
Progressive Matrices   9
Rorschach Method of Personality Diagnosis   230
Rosenzweig   1
Shipley-Hartford   122
Stanford-Binet Forms L and M  35
Symonds Picture Story   12
Szondi   21
Thematic Apperception Test  106
Wechsler-Bellevue Forms I and II  302
Wechsler Memory Scale Forms I and II  20
Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children  12
Wide Range Achievement  3
Total  1,325
The administration of a battery of psychological tests to new student nurses and
aides was discontinued in November. Two hundred and twelve were examined from
April to November.   The following is a tabulation of the tests administered:—
Army Alpha   200
California Test of Personality  _._.._ 200
Kuder Preference Record  200
Thurstone Test of Mental Alertness      12
Psychologists took part in various aspects of the educational programme of the
Mental Health Services. One intern completed and another commenced a year's practicum in clinical psychology. Fifty-six hours of lectures in basic psychology were delivered
to psychiatric nurses-in-training. Examinations, totalling 489, were set and marked.
Members of the department participated in seminars with members of the medical staff
and presented eight papers. Teaching clinics for University of British Columbia students
in abnormal psychology were attended by a staff member, who contributed the psychologist's view-point on the mentally ill. Members of the staff participated in two round-
table discussions concerning the Mental Health Services. Four showings of the film
" Breakdown " to Parent-Teacher Association groups were introduced and discussed by
staff members.
A new duty which has been found to be very rewarding is that of group therapy.
In conjunction with the medical staff, members of the department have been working
with groups of patients who discuss their problems and increase their skills of interpersonal relationships. Both acutely ill patients and patients who have had lobotomies
make up these groups. Eighty-two sessions of approximately one and one-half hours
each were completed during the year. T 58 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
It is felt that during this year the Department of Psychology has increased considerably in its contribution to the hospital team. The high number of admissions, to the
Crease Clinic especially, has made a great demand on our staff. It is important in an
intensive treatment centre that the psychological study should be made shortly after
admission. It is undesirable that treatment should be delayed while the Psychologist
completes his investigations, but, on the other hand, once certain treatments begin, the
findings tend to be distorted. At the present time there is usually a lag between the
time of referral and the time examinations begin because of the large number of
referrals. An increased staff to cope with this load would be desirable for the future.
Respectfully submitted.
Alice Elart,
J. W. Borthwick,
Psychological Clinic Assistants.
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENTS, PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL,
HOMES FOR THE AGED, AND CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL
MEDICINE.
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The report of the Social Service Departments for the past fiscal year is here
presented and considered under three sections:—
I. Changes in the organizational structure and administrative responsibilities
in social services.
II. Review of social services to patients over the past fiscal year.
III.  Social-service trends as seen in realtion to the service needs of patients
and their families.
The social-work job all the world over is concerned with helping people to make
conscious adjustments and adaptations to their life situations, individually, through group
experience, and by the provision of social-welfare resources in the community.
Functions and processes, such as teaching, supervision, administration, and research,
have evolved. The basic principles and methods contained in these functions are in
process of continuous restatement and refinement to the end that social work make as
effective a contribution in the service of people and in the service of the health and welfare
agencies as possible.
The social-work job in the psychiatric hospitals and clinics is generically the same
as the aforedefined but with these additional skills and responsibilities: A knowledge of
the content of the problems dealt with in psychiatric hospitals and clinics; an ability to
use the social-work skill in a collaborative working relationship with the many other
professional disciplines in the psychiatric setting—all of which are also concerned with
the specific problem as presented by the individual patient. In short, the essence of the
social-work job in the psychiatric hospital and clinic setting is the effective incorporation
of its skills and body of knowledge into hospital and clinic practice.
Over the past fiscal year, in their work in the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease
Clinic, the social workers have been purposefully studying how best to incorporate social
work into the purpose and services of each setting; how best to dovetail social-work
effort to achieve therapeutic unification to the end that patients are better served. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
T 59
I. Changes in the Organizational Structure and Administrative Responsibilities of the Social Services, Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic
In May, 1952, a decision was made whereby the existing social-service staff at the
Provincial Mental Hospital was divided into two separate Social Service Departments—
one located in the East Lawn (Women's Section) and Centre Lawn (Admission Section);
the second department located in the Crease Clinic on Wards East 2, East 4, Centre 4,
and West 4.
II. Review of Social Services to Patients over Past Fiscal Year
1. Social Service Department, Provincial Mental Hospital
There are two sections to this department—one concerned with admission (intake
and reception services around the admission of patients), brief case-work services to
patients and families, as well as selection and referral of patients and families to longer-
term case-work services given by the second section, the Continued Case Work Services
Section.
The present social-service staff at Provincial Mental Hospital consists of one social
worker in the Admission Section (this worker is supervised by a case-work supervisor
having responsibility for all the social services given at the time of admission both in the
Hospital and the Clinic), six social workers in the Continued Case Work Services Section
in the Provincial Mental Hospital, and one case-work supervisor over this section.
(a) Work of the Admission Section, Social Service Department, Provincial Mental
Hospital, April, 1952, to March, 1953.—Social services during the admission period are
directed to assisting in the interpretation of hospital services and programme to patients
and families. This will often entail helping the family to deal with problems arising out
of the admission of the patient. Help will also be given to the relative and patient, with
their feelings of uncertainty and worry arising out of the fact that hospitalization has to
be considered. The whole focus during this period is in establishing a relationship with
the family which encourages them and helps them to see the hospital and the patient's
need for treatment or a period of care in a positive non-rejecting way. With the growth
of this feeling, the family can play its part in the patient's treatment programme and
finally be ready to receive the patient on discharge from hospital and help him in his
adjustment to family and community life.
During reception into Hospital the patient himself is helped to accept his need for
hospital care. Attempts are made to relieve the patient, if at all possible, of the fears
and threats embodied for him in the security setting of the mental hospital. At this time
the social worker, along with the other disciplines, explains hospital routines and procedures and helps the patient to understand that the social worker serves as a link between
him, his family and community. It is important that family life and community ties be
maintained. The admission and reception of the patient sets the whole tone of his
response to treatment. During the admission period the social worker begins the social
study of the patient, his interpersonal and interfamilial relationships, his experiences,
and his ways of feeling, thinking, and responding to these experiences.
REPORT OF ADMISSION SECTION, PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL,
APRIL, 1952, TO MARCH,
1953
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Total
Total   admissions,   Provincial   Mental
Hospital 	
Referrals for social-history study	
Interviews   with   patients   at   time   of
admission- _	
Interviews with psychiatrists at time of
86
32
7
11
15
11
4
105
41
11
9
20
29
6
101
37
18
15
24
18
10
133
51
20
9
18
11
4
112
46
17
6
21
30
4
102
40
23
7
17
34
8
147
61
42
13
37
33
8
101
57
31
18
25
37
12
107
34
21
21
14
42
10
116
48
14
16
23
15
12
101
40
12
8
20
17
10
121
37
38
91
1,332
524
254
Brief  social  services  to  relatives  and
27  |     261
11   1     ins
Ward rounds following admission clinics
on admission	
12
100 T 60 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
This table records the year's activity of the social worker on admissions in the
Provincial Mental Hospital.   In review, the table shows that an average of 111 patients
are admitted monthly to the Provincial Mental Hospital; some 39 per cent (524) of all
patients admitted yearly are being extended social services at the point of their reception
into hospital.   The social worker on admissions is active with the following patients: —
(i)  The Young Psychotic.—This is the largest group to which social services
are being extended at the point of the patient's reception.   These patients
and their families are in great need of long-term case-work services.
A large number of the patients in the young psychotic group are transfers
from the Crease Clinic at the point where the four-month treatment has
lapsed with relatively little change in the pattern of the patient's illness.
To this transferred young psychotic group the social worker in the Admis-
mission Section serves as a liaison between the Crease Clinic Continued
Case Work Services worker and the Provincial Mental Hospital Social
Service Department.   This transferred group of patients needs the understanding and supportive help of the social worker, for the very fact that
they have failed to respond to treatment at the Clinic is distressing and
disturbing to them.   Often this transfer is felt to be rejection of the patient,
(ii)  The Older Group of Mentally III.—Included in this group are a large
number of readmissions, which patients come to the Admission Section
for an interim evaluative study.    The social worker assesses again the
family situation, discusses the patient's prognosis with the psychiatrist,
thus determining what the extent of Continued Case Work Services is
likely to be, and then, through conference, transfers the patient to this
section,
(iii)  The Mentally Retarded Patient over the Age of 6 Years.—To this group
brief case-work services are given by the social worker on admissions to
the patient's family at the time of reception.   Parents of these patients
require much help with their sorrow and interpretation around why their
child must be committed to a mental hospital before entering The Woodlands School,
(iv)  The Alcoholic Patient.—The psychiatrist treating this group of patients
often requests the social worker on admissions to undertake a social
diagnostic study so that he may assess whether the patient is suitable or
ready for the extensive treatment programme in the alcoholic clinic.
The table further shows that 261 families were given brief case-work services, that
354 interviews were held with patients at the time of reception, and that the collaborative
function of social worker at the time of admission was furthered through 156 interviews
with the psychiatrists and attendance at 100 clinics and ward rounds.   In the ward round,
presided over by the clinical director, the individual and social dynamics which go to
make up the patient, his illness, and his total response to life are studied.    It is here
that the social worker on admissions makes her contribution out of her study of the
family-patient-community interrelationship.   Here, too, the social worker gains in understanding of psychodynamics and patient-care needs in hospital.
(b) Work of the Continued Case Work Services Section, Social Service Department,
Provincial Mental Hospital, April, 1952, to March, 1953.—In this section, case-work
services are brought to the patient during his treatment period, along with correlative
family therapy. Another service is that of pre-convalescent planning, as well as the
service of convalescent care. This latter involves after-care social services to the patient
on extended visit (probation), besides case-work services of an after-care nature to the
voluntary patient discharged in full of hospital care.
Dr. Alan A. Lieberman, of Elgin State Hospital, Elgin, 111., has recognized that
" the social worker's contribution to therapy in work with the mentally ill will be pri- REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
T 61
marily in his understanding of human relations, and he will strengthen the healthy
aspects of the patient's personality in order to enhance adjustment to reality problems."
Throughout the treatment period the social worker is concerned with all aspects of
the patient's relationship with medical and nursing staffs, with other patients, family,
friends, and community.
REPORT OF CONTINUED CASE WORK SERVICE SECTION, SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT,
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, APRIL, 1952, TO MARCH, 1953
Treatment
Pre-conva-
lescence
Convalescence
Total
1,116
1,327
1,341
525
138
42
474
270
636
258
60
27
867
471
375
57
9
15
2,457
2,068
2,352
840
Conferences with community agencies     	
207
84
4,489
1,725
1,794
8,008
Total number of patients referred   	
607
Total number of ward rounds and clinics —._ _	
108
This table records the total number of patients (607) referred during the past fiscal
year to the Continued Case Work Service Section of the Social Service Department,
Provincial Mental Hospital.
During the treatment period of hospital care, the social worker's contact with the
patient on the ward is directed toward building a supportive, understanding relationship
through which the patient is helped to hold to whatever reality functioning he may possess.
Interest in wife, husband, children, and parents, etc., is maintained, besides which the
patient is helped to work through those problems of which he is aware and about which
he expresses concern.
During the treatment period 607 patients and families received case-work services
involving 4,489 interviews. Some 24.8 per cent of these were directly with the patient.
Some 29.5 per cent of all interviews were extended to retaining the interest of the family
and friends in the patient. This is accomplished by familiarizing the family with the
nature of the illness, its treatment, hospital routines; by helping the relative with his own
feeling about mental illness and the mentally ill patient. In this way is the family helped
to see what it can do in becoming a part of the treatment programme and rehabilitation
planning. Some 29.8 per cent of all interviews were directly concerned in conferences
with the psychiatrist; 14.7 per cent with nursing, occupational therapy, etc.; and 0.93 per
cent with community agencies. The latter interviews show the extent of the social
workers' collaborative working relationship with the other professions during the treatment period.
As the patient approaches the termination of treatment, a review of the content and
meaning of the patient's living experiences before hospitalization and during hospital care
is undertaken by the treatment team in hospital. At this time some attempt is made to
pool together and arrive at some social rehabilitation programme for the patient. During
the past fiscal year 1,725 interviews were extended in case-work services to patients during
the period of pre-convalescence. Of these, 27.4 per cent of all interviews were directly
with patients; 15 per cent with family; 36.8 per cent with psychiatry; 18.4 per cent with
nursing, occupational therapy, etc.; and 1.5 per cent with community agencies.
Convalescent care is the re-establishment of the patient in the community. During
this period the patients on probation remain the responsibility of the Hospital. The social
worker assists in the discharge of this responsibility by supervising the patients and by
making available for the use of the patients all the resources in the community helpful to
their readjustment.   The family is helped to understand the patient.    The patients are T 62 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
helped to regain economic security by helping them to locate work and by encouraging the
interest and acceptance of the employer group. Besides the latter committed patient
group, social workers also bring similar convalescent services to the voluntary patient
discharged in full of hospital care. During the past fiscal year 768 patients were referred
for convalescent services. Some 1,794 interviews were directed to helping these patients.
Some very significant developments have taken place during the past year in the
Continued Case Work Services Section of the Social Service Department, Provincial
Mental Hospital. In spite of the large number of referrals and staff shortages, two social
workers began to work full time on two wards. The appointment of social workers at
ward level is the only soundly efficient operative level for social work in the large Provincial mental hospital. Working at this level, the social worker works closely with
nursing, psychiatry, psychology, and occupational therapy in a " total push " relationship.
This relationship brings added skills and vitality to the understanding of the patients, to
treatment, and to socialization through dynamically oriented ward living. The social
worker's responsibility on the ward has been directed toward establishing a case-work
relationship focused on helping the patient to move in a meaningful way to ward activities,
such as occupational and industrial therapy; to be a liaison person between the hospital
and the patient's relatives; to bring to the other professions working on the ward pertinent
information regarding family relationships; and to secure and bring into play rehabilitative
resources for the patients.
2. Social Service Department, Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine
There are two sections to this department—one concerned with admission (intake
and reception services at the time of the admission of the patient), brief case-work services
to patients and their families, as well as selection and referral of patients and families to
longer-term case-work services given by the second section, the Continued Case Work
Services Section.
The present social-service staff at the Crease Clinic is made up of two social workers
in the Admission Section (these workers are supervised by the case-work supervisor in
charge of all admission services at the Provincial Mental Hospital as well as Crease Clinic),
five social workers in the Continued Case Work Services Section in the Crease Clinic, and
one case-work supervisor has responsibility for the supervision and co-ordination of the
work of this section.
The Social Service Department of the Crease Clinic has had 1,100 patients referred
for service over the past fiscal year.
(a) Work of the Admission Section, Social Service Department, Crease Clinic,
April, 1952, to March, 1953.—The work of this section in the Crease Clinic began in
the summer of 1951, and by June, 1952, it was felt that the service was accepted by all
other professions and functioning well as a service. During the eight-month period to
June, 1952, the Admission Section (then consisting of one worker) received referrals on
175 patients at the time of their reception into the Clinic out of a total of 766 admitted.
In the next four months to October, 1952, these referrals increased to a total of 33 per
cent (518 patients per year) of all patients admitted. As there was one admission worker
at this time, the need was seen for increased staff, with a view to covering 50 per cent (800
patients per year) of all patients admitted. In January, 1953, this section was increased
to two workers. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
REPORT OF ADMISSION SECTION, CREASE CLINIC, APRIL, 1952, TO MARCH, 1953
T 63
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Total
107
21
13
25
15
14
12
120
25
25
27
18
19
8
119
32
23
32
21
10
8
83
21
33
26
28
17
4
86
29
21
22
19
11
4
92
23
22
24
23
12
8
94
26
24
28
20
15
12
89
17
20
29
12
14
12
88
81
51
103
9
54
8
129
121
36
101
7
47
8
108
99
32
89
11
23
8
106
78
24
85
16
82
12
1,221
573
Interviews with patients at time of
admission.  	
Interviews  with psychiatrists and
324
591
199
Brief services to patients and relatives
Ward  rounds  following  admission
clinics on admission 	
318
104
This table records the year's work of the two social workers on admissions. Some
1,221 patients were admitted to the Clinic, and, of these, 573 patients (46.9 per cent)
were extended social services at the time of their reception into the Clinic. Some 318 of
the 573 patients and families were carried in the Admission Section and received casework services of an enabling and supportive nature over a brief period. Some 324
patients of the 573 patients seen by Admission Section were helped individually at the
time of their reception into hospital.
The table further indicates that 562 conference interviews were undertaken by the
Admission Section with the psychiatrists and nurses, to the furtherance of a collaborative
working relationship, in the light of the best service possible for the patient.
(b) Work of the Continued Case Work Services Section, Social Service Department,
Crease Clinic, April, 1952, to March, 1953.—Case-work services are brought to the
patient in the Crease Clinic and his family throughout the period of treatment in hospital,
as well as in planning discharge (pre-convalescent service) and after discharge (convalescent service).
REPORT OF CONTINUED CASE WORK SERVICE SECTION, SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT,
CREASE CLINIC, APRIL, 1952, TO MARCH, 1953
Pre-conva-
lescence
Convalescence
Total
Interviews with patient	
Interviews with family	
Conferences with psychiatry	
Conferences with nursing —
Conferences with other disciplines 	
Conferences with other agencies 	
Total number of interviews	
Total number of patients referred	
Total number of ward rounds and clinics
1,590
1,385
1,635
272
48
225
948
368
795
236
40
336
768
681
699
18
368
3,306
2,434
3,129
508
106
929
5,155
2,723     2,534
10,412
1,100
101
This table shows that 1,100 patients were active with the Continued Case Work
Section of the Social Service Department of the Crease Clinic. Some 5,155 interviews
(49.5 per cent of all interviews) were extended to the patient and his family during the
period of hospital care. Some 2,723 interviews (26.15 per cent of all interviews) were
extended to the patient and his family in planning for discharge, while 2,534 interviews
(24.4 per cent of all interviews) were given to patients and families following the patient's
discharge in full of the Clinic's service.
It is in the aforementioned post-discharge service that we see the social workers
operating in an area of service which is an increasing need of patients, that is, an outpatient clinic facility of the Crease Clinic. Over the next fiscal year the demand for the
service is bound to increase.
The Vista rehabilitation centre has continued to make an outstanding contribution
in the rehabilitation of women patients without resources in family or friends, or whose T 64 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
families are unable to give the supportive help necessary in their rehabilitation. During
the past fiscal year the Social Service Departments of the Provincial Mental Hospital and
Crease Clinic have conferred with the supervisor at The Vista on 201 occasions and made
286 visits to patients in residence at The Vista. The success of The Vista is such that
the possibilities of increasing this type of rehabilitation facility should receive purposeful
thought and study as to ways and means.
(c) Report of Participation in Education and Training of Social Service Departments, Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic.—One of the first responsibilities of
social workers in education is to their own profession—social work. For the past three
fiscal years, under Federal Mental Health Grants, twenty-eight social-work students have
had their field-work placement in the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic.
Although direct responsibility for the supervision of the students was with the School of
Social Work training supervisor, plans for introduction and orientation to the Social
Service Departments of Hospital, Clinic, and community agencies were evolved with the
participation of the department. The introduction of the students to interdepartmental
co-operation between the Social Service Departments and other departments of the Hospital and Clinic, and policies relating thereto, as well as intercommunity agencies'
policies, was the responsibility of the Social Service Departments. The Social Service
Departments have attempted to help the students feel the basic underlying philosophy of
the service by working closely with them and sharing through staff meetings and special
studies. The contribution of the training supervisor and the students to the growth of the
social services in Hospital and Clinic has been rich and valuable. Fourteen planning
sessions around the training project were held during the fiscal year.
The Social Service Departments have a second responsibility in education and training, which is directed to staff development and training. This is achieved through two
media—social-work supervision and participation in staff meetings. During the past
fiscal year forty staff meetings were held, and the contribution of the social workers in the
organization, administration, refinement of social-work skills and services has been of the
highest order.
(d) Report of Administrative Procedures, Social Service Departments, Provincial
Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic, April, 1952, to March, 1953:—
Admission Sections—
Supervisory conferences     96
Case-assignment conferences      48
Policy conferences with doctors     42
Social-worker staff conferences re assignment of cases  144
Interpretation-to-public sessions     56
Administrative reports prepared     38
Interdepartmental administrative meetings     36
Supervision of social workers (hours)  216
Ward rounds  101
Staff meetings     37
Teaching clinics     24
Orientation professional groups     12
Continued Case Work Services Sections—
Supervisory activities—
(a) Supervision of case-workers (hours)  577
(b) Conferences with clinical director on policy matters—    72
(c) Conferences with individual psychiatrists  204
(d) Conferences with community agencies re individual
patients      66
Ward rounds     96 REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE T 65
Staff meetings  40
Medical climes  12
Educational activities—
(a) Social-work education—
(i) Clinical presentations  4
(ii) Supervision of students (hours) 24
(b) Nursing education—
(i)  Interpretation to psychiatric nurses (hours) 16
(ii)  Interpretation to postgraduate nurses (hours) 12
(iii)  Interpretation to affiliate nurses (hours) 9
(c) Orientations—
(i)  Social workers (hours) 16
(ii) Psychiatric fellows (hours) 5
(d) Ward-round conferences, Mental Hospital and Crease
Clinic   208
Clinical conferences  21
III. Social-service Trends in Relation to Patients' Needs
Over the past fiscal year there has been an 11.7-per-cent increase in the number
of patients referred to the Social Service Departments. During the 1951-52 fiscal year
2,100 patients were referred, whereas during the past fiscal year 2,475 patients were
served by social workers. This past fiscal year has seen a 61.1-per-cent increase in
case-work service interviews to patients in the Hospital and Clinic. In the fiscal year
1951-52, 13,221 service interviews were extended to patients. During the past fiscal
year 21,298 interviews were given in the service of patients.
Another very noticeable trend is that of the increasing number of patients referred
to Social Service from the long-term patient group. Some 267 patients from this group
were referred during the past fiscal year for social case-work services, focused on helping
the patient to use more purposefully and effectively the treatment services of the Hospital.
This is a most progressive step in the use of all available professional services in the
mobilization of patients on long-term treatment wards—a mobilization directed to patient
study, treatment, and rehabilitation.
(Miss) Alice K. Carroll, B.A., M.S.W.,
Provincial Supervisor of Psychiatric Social Work.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICE
Women's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Presented herewith is the report of the Department of Nursing Service (Women's Division) for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1953.
The nursing staff has improved this past year. It has been increased by 91 personnel.
Some of the increase was due to fewer resignations, but mainly through improved recruitment.   The year ended with the following personnel:— T 66 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Registered nurses  35
Psychiatric graduate nurses  114
Psychiatric nurses-in-training  139
Psychiatric aides  187
Postgraduate students  2
Student psychiatric nurses  105
Home housekeepers  24
Nurses' Counsellor  1
Total   607
During the year there were 281 resignations, 12 transfers to other departments, and
397 new appointments.
The attrition rate has continued to be high, but resignations had decreased by 15
as compared with the previous year.   The reasons for resignation are as follows:—
Marriage   38
Illness   24
Illness in the family  16
Unsuited to psychiatric nursing  13
To take student Psychiatric Nursing Course  14
To take another position  21
To take General Nursing Courses  12
To gain further experience  12
To return to school  8
To resume household duties  22
Completion of postgraduate course  4
To reside in another Province  11
To travel  2
Transportation difficulties  1
Temporary staff  65
Services terminated  18
The increase in the staff was required to open new units of the hospital. During
the year, Cottages 8 and 9 of the Home for the Aged were opened. The third ward of
the three women's wards of the Crease Clinic was opened. This is an open ward where
patients are assisted in their rehabilitation. The patients are given considerable freedom
but also more responsibility. We were also able to open the operating-room after many
delays. The first operation was performed on February 9th, 1953. The surgical ward
located in the corridor of West 2 Ward was opened March 3rd, 1953. This provides
facilities enabling the staff to give the very best post-surgical nursing care.
The School of Psychiatric Nursing has had an extremely busy year. The volume
of students who have received the Psychiatric Nursing Course has been in excess of last
year. The instructors are to be commended for their management of the situation. This
past year we were able to extend the affiliation programme to include the Schools of
Nursing of the Royal Inland Hospital and the Royal Jubilee Hospital. The Schools of
Nursing of the University of British Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, and the
Royal Columbian Hospital continued to send some of their students.
Graduation exercises were held for the third time in the New Westminster Junior
High School. A total of 150 students graduated from the three units at Essondale, The
Woodlands School, and Colquitz.
Nursing education has been broadened to include psychiatric aide and the graduate
groups. Prior to October 1st, psychiatric aides were not given any instruction. This
being unsatisfactory, arrangements were made to give each group of psychiatric aides a REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE T 67
course of instruction during the first week of employment. The adjustment and the
quality of work has been greatly improved. A programme of lectures and demonstrations was arranged for the graduate nurses. This programme was primarily arranged
for the charge nurses from both the women's and men's divisions. Assistant charge
nurses and graduates were invited to attend.
There has been considerable minor illness among the staff. Many have been treated
in the Nurses' Infirmary. We have been fortunate indeed to have had the services of
Dr. Yakushavich and Dr. Dobreva.
An active programme of immunization for tuberculosis has been in operation
through the use of B.C.G. vaccine. All students, graduates, and aides are vaccinated.
We hope that the incidence of tuberculosis will be reduced by this programme. During
the year three student nurses were ill with tuberculosis and two were ill with pleurisy
with effusion.
Mrs. E. Gibson was appointed as Nurses' Counsellor. She comes to us with wide
experience in nursing and counselling. We are fortunate indeed in securing the services
of Mrs. Gibson, as the need for a counsellor among the student group was very great.
Activities and social events are being organized and are proving very successful.
There have been several changes in the senior staff of this department. Miss M.
Thieman transferred to the Home for the Aged, Vernon, to take the position of Superintendent of Nurses, which was vacated by Miss C. E. Clark. Miss F. Logan, R.N.,
transferred to the Pearson Hospital. Miss J. Shand, R.N., resigned her position as
instructor to take a position in the United States.
During the past year we have seen some stabilization of our staff, which is encouraging. However, we still have too few who are able to take positions which require
special training in teaching and supervision. In order that we may have sufficient staff
with these qualifications, I would suggest that a plan be laid to encourage our senior
psychiatric nurses to augment their present training by additional training at a general
hospital and then allowed the advantage of a course in teaching and supervision at a
university school of nursing.
The interest, patience, and tolerance which have been shown by the senior ward
staff has been most encouraging. Their problems have been many, and they are to be
commended for the efficient way in which they have given care and treatment to our
patients. We also appreciate the assistance which has been given so generously by all
departments.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Edith M. Pullan, R.N.,
Director of Nursing.
Men's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—On April 1st, 1952, the total male nursing staff, including student-nurses,
psychiatric aides, and utility staff, was 376. In the following twelve months there were
thirty-one resignations, four superannuations, five transfers to other departments, and two
dismissals—forty-two in all. During this period forty-six student-nurses and twenty-eight
psychiatric aides were added to the staff. Also during this time sixty-eight completed
their third school term, graduating as male psychiatric nurses.   One of this group resigned.
Fifty completed their second term; of these, four resigned. Two also took their
third term. Thirteen student male nurses commenced classes as of April, 1953. The
standing, therefore, at March 31st, 1953, was as follows:— T 68
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Male psychiatric nurses _
Psychiatric aides
Second-year male nurses (regular staff) _
Second-year student-nurses	
First-year student-nurses	
New students	
260
75
29
18
13
13
Total
408
These were distributed as follows:—
Psychiatric
Nurses and
Second
Year
Aides
Students
Total
58
170
35
1
3
15
7
4
48
12
1
10
7
15
3
13
6
69
Essondale.       . .
233
50
1
ni	
4
25
7
13
6
Totals	
289
75
44
408
Since our last report for the Male Nursing Department, our new surgical ward has
been opened, as of March 3rd, 1953. This ward is operated with a complete staff of
registered nurses and male and female psychiatric nurses. There are four male psychiatric nurses regularly attached to this ward. The number of patients who have been
treated here to March 31st is fourteen.
The Crease Clinic recreational and occupational departments contribute a great deal
to the improvement and recovery of patients. Our records shown an ever-increasing
number of patients discharged, creating interest in the public in general and influencing
many to voluntarily apply for admittance. On the psychiatric nurses and aides depend
largely the care and improvement of the patient, and at this time I wish to commend the
nursing staff for its good work. We can look back with a great deal of pride to the night
of April 30th, when the largest graduation class ever held for our psychiatric nurses from
Essondale received diplomas, and the great interest of the public was gratifyingly demonstrated by the very large audience.
I would like to take this opportunity to thank all those who have given of their
valuable time to bring the very fine and much appreciated lectures on a variety of subjects
for the benefit of charge and assistant charge nurses, as well as general-duty staff. In this
regard our special thanks go to Miss Street, instructor in the School of Nursing at the
University of British Columbia.
To all the doctors, nurses, clinical staff, and heads of departments who have helped
in no small measure the nursing staff, we are extremely thankful.
Respectfully submitted.
W. Creber,
Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE T 69
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I wish to submit the following report.
The activities of the School of Psychiatric Nursing have increased during the past
year due to several factors. It was necessary to include greater numbers of three-year
students in each class in order to complete the course within the prescribed time. The
number of students enrolled in the two-year course has steadily increased, a fact which
may be attributed to visits made to the schools throughout the Province by Mrs. Lundahl
two years ago, and to the better integration of classroom teaching and ward experience,
which has produced an improved course.
Following are the numbers of students who received instruction:—
Three-year students—
Essondale—
Women  290
Men     95
Woodlands School—
Women     96
Men     56
Total  537
Two-year students—
Women  147
Men     5 6
Total  203
Affiliate students—
Vancouver General Hospital  32
Royal Columbian Hospital  15
Royal Jubilee Hospital  4
Royal Inland Hospital „  4
University of British Columbia (degree course)  3
Total     5 8
Postgraduate students        9
In May and June, 1952, thirteen Public Health Nursing students came from the
University of British Columbia in groups of two and three to observe the activities of
the various departments of the Mental Health Services.
The selection of students, the planning of their rotation through the different departments to obtain a balanced experience and at the same time contribute the necessary
service, and the arrangements for affiliation with The Woodlands School are responsibilities which have been assumed by the Department of Nursing Education.
The instructors have also contributed to the programmes arranged for charge nurses
and their assistants. By increased contact with those in charge of wards and other departments, we are endeavouring to better understand their needs and so interpret them to the
student-nurses.
To our Students' Counsellor and all staff of the Medical, Nursing, Psychology,
Dietary, Physiotherapy, Audio-Visual, Occupational Therapy, and Recreational Therapy
Departments who have so graciously assisted us in achieving our aims, we offer our sincere
thanks.
Respectfully submitted. ...    . _
r ' (Miss) Orma J. Smith,
Senior Instructor. T 70 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITATION
Women's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The increased services now available at The Vista have been used to much
better advantage during the past year. The active participation of the psychiatric social
workers in assisting with job placements has shortened the stay of individual patients in
The Vista. The new supervisor, Mrs. Rees, and her assistant have worked capably and
industriously in the rehabilitation of the patients in their care and toward a general
improvement of the establishment.
We are now using an introductory letter with which to acquaint the patients proceeding to The Vista with an understanding of its operation. Our present undertaking
is to allow patients to stay for two or three weeks, with an extension of this allotment
available to those patients without funds who have taken employment. However, the
patient is then asked to secure private accommodation as soon as she has received a
pay-cheque.
A number of the patients discharged via The Vista come back for periodic visits
or out-patient interviews after they have moved, and this is considered evidence of the
good relationship they enjoy with the rehabilitation division and not an indication of
continued dependency.
There have been few times during the year that the 7-bed accommodation has not
all been filled. Reference to the following table would show that we have nearly doubled
the number of patients admitted to The Vista from last year, and that fifty-four patients
have been rehabilitated through this agency, forty-five coming from the Clinic and thirteen from the Mental Hospital. The majority of these patients have been placed in
employment.
Total number admitted to The Vista from the Crease Clinic  45
Total number admitted to The Vista from the Provincial Mental
Hospital   13
Number returned to the Crease Clinic     3
Number returned to the Provincial Mental Hospital     1
Rehabilitated to the community     6
Rehabilitated to own home
Rehabilitated to job and lodging  39
Total rehabilitated   54
Respectfully submitted.
F. E. McNair, M.D.,
Clinical Director.
Men's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I take pleasure in submitting the annual report of the Men's Division of the
Rehabilitation Department for the fiscal year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953,
together with a statistical summary of the cases assisted.
There has been a substantial increase in the number of patients placed in employment and assisted in their rehabilitation plans in spite of it having been a rather difficult REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE T 71
year as far as general employment was concerned. There are a number of reasons for
this: One is the increased acceptance by the general public and employers in particular
of the recovered mental patient. The intensive treatment programme of the Crease
Clinic of Psychological Medicine and its gratifying results have done much to educate the
public of the hopefulness of psychiatric treatment. Another reason is the general impetus
in all fields of rehabilitation of handicapped persons. This again is a good medium of
education and liaison, and continually brings to the attention of the employer the potential man-power that is usefully available. A third reason is that the department is
becoming better known as time goes on. In this the careful selection of patients is
important. Successful and continued placement depends on receiving a good report
from the employer, thus building up his trust in psychiatric treatment and the placement
techniques of the Rehabilitation Department.
There is still a great deal of work required in a liaison and interpretive sense, but
the ex-mental patient is increasingly being accepted for his employ ability assets.
There are still many needs to round out a first-class rehabilitation job, and the
following are suggested for your perusal:—
(1) An in-town rehibilitation centre:—
(a) To eliminate loss of time in transporting patients by ones and
twos to Vancouver and back to the hospital:
(b) To relieve overcrowding in convalescent wards:
(c) To facilitate interviews with prospective employers.
(2) Increased staff. The job of the Rehabilitation Officer is becoming increasingly more in demand. With the increase in discharges, particularly from
the Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine, the number of interviews,
not only with patients and staff, but with employers, agencies, and families, plus the increased transportation of patients to and from centres of
employment, is more than one person can do efficiently.
(3) More adequate funds available for rehabilitation of patients:—
(a) The question of initial maintenance is a very serious one. At
the point of discharge, the patient needs not only considerable reassurance, but material assistance until he receives his first pay-cheque.
(b) Many patients would benefit psychologically by retraining or
brush-up courses. Possibly the proposed Schedule R may produce an
answer to this.
In conclusion, the general trend in this Province tends to move toward the establishment of secondary industries, not only to utilize the products of primary industries, but
to cope with the ever-increasing problem of unemployment caused by the influx of
workers and new citizens to the West. In this I see increased hopes of a greater variety
of occupations as well as more suitable types of work for the ex-patient. Our department, as a pilot project in the field of rehabilitation, should be looking to the future and
to the welfare of the increasing number of patients that are ready for resocialization and
re-employment.
In submitting this report I again want to thank all members of the Hospital staff
for their co-operation and teamwork during the past year, and to express appreciation
for the acceptance, assistance, and interest of outside agencies, business concerns, and
industry. T 72
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Summary of Referrals
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Schizophrenia  _ -„
Manic depressive  	
Alcoholic psychosis -
11
2
1
4
1
2
2
1
1
12
2
1
1
1
1
1
8
1
2
1
1
15
2
4
1
1
8
2
1
4
12
2
1
1
1
1
11
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
4
1
10
3
1
5
1
16
1
7
1
12
4
1
2
1
123
11
3
28
Idiopathic epilepsy with psychosis, ,..
Idiopathic epilepsy without psychosis	
Epilepsy with mental deficiency 	
3
4
5
14
12
12
Involutional melancholia 	
G.P.I	
1
6
Brain tumour with psychosis 	
Mental defective -  	
1
2
Psychosis with somatic symptoms	
Behaviour problem 	
1
	
1
1
1
1
1
4
26
1
19
2
13
3
23
1
15
1
18
4
21
1
16
2
11
1
21
	
......
26
3
...
21
230
Resumed treatment 	
11
8
Total active rehabilitation cases _
25
17
10
22
14
14
20
14
10
21
23
21
211
17
8
140
9
8
136
3
7
88
12
10
114
11
3
102
10
4
79
10
9
107
6
8
102
7
3
77
13
8
109
8
15
122
15
6
117
122
Cases assisted by referral and casework.
Total interviews (doctors, staff, patients,
employers, etc.)  _ 	
89
1,293
Respectfully submitted.
J. D. Addison,
Rehabilitation Officer. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
T 73
REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL,
NEW WESTMINSTER
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—It is with pleasure that I submit the report of The Woodlands School, New
Westminster, for the fiscal year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953. The reports of
the various departments are included.
This residential training-school for the mentally retarded had, on April 1st, 1952,
a patient-pupil population of 439 males and 369 females, totalling 808. In addition, we
had 6 males and 3 females on probation, totalling 9, making a grand total of 817. On
March 31st, 1953, we had an actual total in our hospital-school of 628 males and 457
females, totalling 1,085, and, in addition, 7 males and 5 females on probation, totalling
12.   This made a grand total on our hospital-school register of 1,097.
s   all
Pine, Beech, and Willow Cottages at The Woodlands School.
Effective December 1st, 1952, children under 6 years of age were admitted directly
to The Woodlands School under the " Mental Hospital Act" instead of to Essondale as
heretofore. Children under 6 years of age are on a waiting-list basis and are admitted
when accepted by the Medical Superintendent here. The waiting-list, previously at Essondale, was turned over to the Medical Superintendent at The Woodlands School for
December 1st, 1952. The new Act relating to Mental Defectives went through the last
Legislature, but with the transfers of the mentally retarded from Essondale and the direct
admissions of those under 6 years of age, our accommodation for new admissions or T 74 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
transfers will soon become nil. At the time of writing there are no beds vacant for female
patients.
From December 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953, there were forty-one admissions
directly to The Woodlands School under 6 years of age.
We propose to have admission facilities on the third floor of our present administration building when admissions take place directly to The Woodlands School, for the
admission procedure only. As the social-service staff increase, office space is being used
on the third floor (back corridor).
Throughout the year there were many telephone calls for information concerning our
school. Many of the parents who telephoned were interested in the admission of their
child to The Woodlands School and not to Essondale. There were many requests for
admission of babies under 12 months of age—some in cases of Mongoloids. Telephone
calls were received one day or a few days after the birth of the child.
The usual visiting and interviews took place at The Woodlands School. Relatives of
prospective pupil admissions visited the School and Social Service Department and the
Medical Superintendent for information and orientation. Some parents of pupils who
are admitted at Essondale and have not previously seen The Woodlands School wish to
visit here before they themselves return home.
In April Dr. Pauline Gould gave lectures and clinical demonstrations to Psychiatric
Nursing students of the third year from April 7th to 27th.
Dr. Herrick lectured to the third-year Psychiatric Nursing students on mental
deficiency from March 4th to 18th, inclusive, giving approximately twelve hours of lectures
and a final clinical demonstration. The month before, February, Dr. Gould, at Essondale, gave another group a similar course.
A visit orientation and clinical demonstration with visit to the School and one or
two cottages was given to various groups, as in previous years, throughout the year. The
Medical Superintendent welcomed the groups and taking part was our usual clinical
team—Social Service Department, Psychologist, and school-teachers. The cottage ward
nurses have always helped in this orientation. Dr. Gould took charge of the clinics until
September, when she transferred to Essondale, and Dr. Herrick carried on. The groups
consisted of University of British Columbia Social Service students; postgraduate psychiatric nurses; Vancouver kindergarten teachers; public health nurses from Abbotsford
district; affiliate students at Essondale; social-service workers from the vicinity of New
Westminster, Burnaby, Vancouver, Port Moody, etc.; teachers from Bellingham Summer
School (Western Washington College) who were taking the course on Exceptional
Children; medical students who were at Essondale for the summer; five teachers from the
Greater Victoria School Board (for special study of four days); Dr. Whitbread, Medical
Health Officer at Chilliwack, and a nurse and welfare worker, plus six parents of retarded
children who are at home; the Cerebral Palsy staff from the Western Rehabilitation
Centre in Vancouver, plus eight occupational therapists and some students from the
University of Toronto, here at the moment at Essondale; eighteen school principals,
School Inspector, and some other teachers; students from the University of British
Columbia School of Nursing; second-year students from St. Paul's School of Nursing
(Pediatric Division); teachers from the Deaf and the Blind School, Vancouver; and
forty students from the Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
We have continued to give some small groups an intensive orientation course of three
days or more. Many individual persons who were interested in the mentally retarded also
had an opportunity to visit and receive an orientation to our School.
During the fiscal year we have had staff clinics at the School one afternoon a week,
as in the past.
The monthly conferences were held in the Medical Superintendent's office as usual.
Those present were the school-teacher's department, two representatives each from the REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL T 75
male and female psychiatric nursing staff, as well as the Superintendent of Nurses, Chief
Male Psychiatric Nurse, Foreman of Works, and our Deputy Business Manager.
Dr. C. A. Roberts, Director of the Federal Mental Health Services, visited in June.
Dr. Daniel Blaine, Medical Director of the American Psychiatric Association, visited
The Woodlands School on Monday, September 8th.
Miss M. Craig, mental health co-ordinator and school-teacher, was here one day in
September.
Dr. Margaret Muckart, physician, came on duty July 7th.
Dr. Angela Gallinger, physician, came on duty August 1st.
Dr. H. MacCrostie, dental surgeon, came on duty July 15th as full-time dentist,
replacing Dr. Mathisen, who was previously part-time dentist. It was obvious for some
time that a full-time dentist was absolutely necessary in order to carry out the required
care in an expanding patient-pupil population. Dr. Mathisen, who had been doing good
work in his part-time duties, could not be expected to do all the work a full-time dentist
could accomplish.
Miss D. Martyn, dental assistant, came on duty July 15th.
Mrs. J. DeCoene, hairdresser, came on duty July 2nd, and established a beauty-
parlour department here.
Miss C. Cohen came on duty July 8th as full-time psychologist. She has been doing
excellent work here and has been carrying on in the clinical team. She has not been
hampered by doing a battery of tests alone, but has been encouraged to carry on as
clinician.
Miss Herchmer, our Assistant Superintendent of Nurses, requested a transfer to the
Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital in Vancouver, September 1st, to be in closer proximity
to her home.   Mrs. K. McKinnon was promoted to this vacancy.
On October 1st, 1952, Miss A. Paterson came on duty as dietitian. Miss Neighbor
had previously been transferred to Essondale.
Mrs. Lind, assistant bacteriologist, came on duty November 1st, and later Miss B.
Seymour, bacteriologist, took charge of our new laboratory in Pine Cottage. At the end
of the fiscal year it was working to the best advantage. Previous to our new laboratory
being opened, all the work was done by the laboratory at Essondale. Some special tests
will still continue to be done there.
On December 8th, Miss Mcintosh, social worker, came to work, being transferred
from Essondale.
I regret to report that Mr. H. Mullins, psychiatric nurse, died suddently at his home
on December 23rd, 1952.   Mr. Mullins had been with us since April 3rd, 1941.
Mrs. P. Smith, school principal, resigned in October; she was replaced by Mrs. A. I. •
Rhodes.
Miss Glover, speech therapist, who had been coming to The Woodlands School one
day a week from the Child Guidance Clinic, returned to England.
In the latter part of April, 1952, the roads to the three new cottages were completed.
On Friday, May 9th, there was " open house " at The Woodlands School for the
first time in its history. This was held in Mental Health Week and was in conjunction
with the Crease Clinic " open house " day. Beech Cottage, which was unoccupied, was
open for inspection, and equipment and furniture were in place. It is estimated that a
total of 700 visitors took advantage of the day to visit the School.
In the latter part of May, 1952, Beech Cottage and Pine Cottage, new buildings, were
opened and occupied with transfers of patients from Essondale.
On December 9th Willow Cottage, the last of the three new cottages, was opened
and occupied. Later, fifty-eight male patients sleeping in two dormitories over the store
were transferred to Willow Cottage, forty-two of whom, by January 5th, 1953, were
sleeping in two dormitories on the ground floor of this cottage, and no patients were now T 76 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
sleeping over the store but were attached to the V.T.B. Building for meals, dayroom,
and bathroom facilities. The dormitory facilities for these forty-two patients who are
working during the day seem quite satisfactory.
The female occupational therapy was returned in the autumn of 1952 to the established department over the stores. A few years ago this department had to vacate to
make room for a dormitory for female patients. However, these patients were earlier
transferred to one of the new cottages.
On January 4th, 1953, the new Nurses' Home No. 3 was opened and has accommodation for 100 nurses.
The grounds around the new units were seeded and landscaping has been done.
School classes are now being held in Beech and Pine Cottages, in addition to the
usual classes in Cedar Cottage. The classrooms on the ground floor of these cottages
are very satisfactory and provide the extra classrooms over and above those in the school
building. More classrooms were required, due to our increased population during the
fiscal year.
New equipment has been installed in the kitchen. The new boiler was put into use
to heat the new buildings and in the new Nurses' Home, and has worked very satisfactorily.
On December 1st, 1952, the bakery, with the electrical ovens, was abolished, and
wrapped and sliced bread is now being delivered from Essondale. After necessary
alterations, the bakeshop will be used as a dayroom for forty-two V.T.B. patients instead
of the present dayroom close to their dining-room. Mr. Copp, the baker, was transferred
to Essondale.
The airing-court and playground were taken up by the new buildings. There is
now the problem of giving adequate outdoor recreation. There is no space except near
the school building, which is not practical. There should be a playground large enough
to accommodate at least 600. The recreational instructor recommends an outdoor
swimming-pool in the area of a building that would serve as a recreation-auditorium hall.
The annual gymnasium display took place in April, and was an outstanding success.
The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Army, Navy, and Air Force gave a concert in our
auditorium for the girls on October 9th, and for the boys on October 16th. On December
15th, 1952, the Fraternal Order of Eagles gave an excellent performance for the benefit
of our patients.
Owing to the increase in population, an additional picture show (35 mm.) is being
given each week.
On March 16th an amateur hour took place in the auditorium. Participants were
the pupils of various ages. It was one of their first efforts, and the Psychiatric Nurses'
Chapter of The Woodlands School sponsored the idea. The Recreational Therapy
Department co-operated in this event, and the entertainment was most successful.
The annual picnic took place on July 29th to Second Beach, Vancouver; ninety-
seven of the patient-pupils were able to attend. The chapter of the Psychiatric Nurses'
Association co-operated with the management through Mr. Lynes, recreational instructor,
and a most enjoyable afternoon was spent. Three buses supplied transportation, and a
picnic supper was held.
The usual parties were held on special occasions. The mixed dances took place
once a week. The usual Christmas and New Year's Eve dances were held, and on
Christmas Day Santa Claus visited all the wards.
Graduation exercises of the Mental Health Services of this Province took place in
the Junior High School Auditorium, New Westminster, at which graduates from The
Woodlands School received their diplomas.
During the year we have suffered the usual childhood diseases amongst our patient-
pupil population.   Due to the considerable overcrowding, it was at times most difficult REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL T 77
to control the situation. It is proposed that in the new building which is contemplated
there should be an infectious section with suitable equipment.
In January we had one case of Shiga dysentery which cleared up quickly. There
were no other cases. However, we had some dysentery which, on examination of the
fasces by the laboratory, showed, culturally and serologically, Shigella sonnei. Some
of the wards of the cottages were temporarily quarantined and later reopened. At the
end of the fiscal year there was very little dysentery clinically. Many of the positive
reports from the laboratory were from patients who did not have any clinical dysentery.
In March, 1953, The Woodlands School was able to provide suitable accommodation for post-operative care for some of our major operations performed at the Crease
Clinic.
In the latter part of April the new equipment in the Shoe-shop was put into operation and the old shoe department was vacated.
There is great need for increased bed accommodation to fulfil the public demand
for admission. It is hoped that the proposed new building will soon be erected. The
three new buildings completed during this present fiscal year are now almost filled to
capacity. It is not possible to accommodate all the requests made for admission of
children under 6 years of age, and despite the acceptance of some from the waiting-list,
this list is again increasing rapidly. It is to be remembered that our patient-pupil population is of various ages, from infants to adults. They are intellectually retarded in
varying degrees of intelligence. Our citizens in British Columbia are becoming aware
that there are many causes for mental retardation, and are more anxious than heretofore
to have their child placed in a residential school if conditions warrant. It should be
noted that in our population at The Woodlands School there are a number of mentally
retarded who also have cerebral palsy and are handicapped in varying degrees.
In our hospital-school we give nursing and medical care, education and training,
with socialization stressed, so that our children can be happy, contented, and know how
to get along with others. Our ultimate aim is to return back to the community those
who are able to carry on in the tasks given them by their employers in the community,
and make satisfactory adjustment to their environment and to those with whom they
come in contact. Our Social Service Department is doing an excellent service on a
pre-admission and admission basis. Its work continues on during hospitalization and
in making plans for rehabilitation. The latter project entails a great deal of time and good
public relationship. The prospective employer requires to have some knowledge regarding the limitations and feelings of the intellectually retarded, and this form of education is
the responsibility of the Rehabilitation Officer from the Social Service Department. If this
can be accomplished, then it is considered that our discharge rate will materially increase.
With the opening of new units, our population has grown, and, with the proposed
arrangements for direct admission, it will be necessary to further augment our social-
service staff.
As in time past, I would again recommend a rehabilitation centre in a large community where our boys and girls who are returning to the community could have a place
for intermediate guidance and direction. We should seek board-out care in proper
homes, and funds should continue to be available for this purpose. We now have a
" Schools for Mental Defectives Act," but at the present time all mental defectives are not
being admitted directly to The Woodlands School.
Before closing, I would like to thank you for your understanding and support of our
objectives in aiming toward a high standard of care and training of our intellectually
retarded.
Through you I would like to extend to the Provincial Secretary and his Deputy
Minister my appreciation of their co-operation in all circumstances pertaining to this
branch of the Mental Health Services.
Respectfully submitted. L E  Sauri0L; m d
Medical Superintendent. T 78 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the annual report of the Educational Department for the
fiscal year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
The school enrolment has shown a marked increase during the past year. This
increase has been largely due to the opening of the three new cottages.
With the appointment of our ninth academic teacher in September, it was possible
to organize several new classes. Many of our new pupils were accommodated in these
classes. The need for a tenth teacher is now being keenly felt as our patient-pupil
population continues to increase.
During the past year three teachers resigned from the staff. Mrs. Kines left us in
July. Mrs. Smith, school principal, resigned in October, and Mrs. Roberts' resignation
was submitted in March.
We were fortunate in having Mrs. Siddall rejoin our staff in September, after having
spent the past year teaching in Ontario. Under Mrs. Siddall's direction, lipreading classes
were organized.
Mrs. MacKinnon was also appointed to our staff in September. She took charge of
the morning ward classes and the afternoon pre-school classes in Pine Cottage.
In January Mrs. Brankley was transferred to our staff from the Girl's Industrial
School.
Mrs. Roberts was granted a leave of absence to attend the Summer School of
Education in Victoria from July 2nd to August 7th. During her absence her classes were
taken over by Mrs. Walsh, who was employed for the months of July and August.
We are now using the classrooms in Cedar, Pine, and Beech Cottages.
On April 1st, 1952, Miss H. Lenihan, a psychiatric aide, joined the school staff.
It is her responsibility to bring the girls to school and to return them to the various wards
after their classes.   She also cleans the classrooms in Pine and Cedar Cottages.
The sixth annual gymnastic display was held in April, under Mr. Lynes' direction.
The school building and Beech Cottage classrooms were open for inspection on
" open house " day, May 9th. Each teacher arranged displays of various types of
academic work, handwork, and teaching equipment. The Occupational Therapy Department had a display of work in the school gymnasium, along with a display of recreational
equipment.
Staff holidays began on June 16th and ended on September 28th. Each teacher
had the regulation two weeks' holiday.
The increased enrolment made it necessary to hold four picnics to accommodate
all the school-children. Approximately seventy children attended each of the two junior
picnics. About sixty attended the intermediate and senior picnics. The senior group
had its picnic at Queens Park, where they enjoyed a baseball game, followed by
refreshments.
Painting of the classrooms, halls, and gymnasium was completed during the summer.
Pastel shades were used throughout the building.
Three Hallowe'en parties and a masquerade dance were held in the school gymnasium the last week in October.   Approximately 400 pupils attended the four affairs.
Because of the increased enrolment and other added duties, the work at the school
became too great for one male psychiatric aide. Consequently, in October, Mr. G.
Ewles was appointed to assist Mr. S. Smithman with this work.
In December the annual Christmas concert was presented. There were three performances held for the patient-pupils at The Woodlands School, and one for relatives
of the school-children and other invited guests.    We were fortunate in having fine REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL T 79
weather, and had a capacity crowd on visitors' day.    Three parties and a Christmas
dance were also held during the festive season.
Preparations were made to hold the usual three Valentine parties and one special
dance. The first junior party was held, but we were forced to cancel the others because
of the prevalence of dysentery within the School.
We are extremely grateful for the ready co-operation received from all departments
during the past year.
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) A. I. Rhodes,
School Principal.
DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Girls' Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the annual report of the Department of Occupational
Therapy for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1953.
This past year has been a year that will lay a new foundation for the many changes
to take place in this department in the future years.
Up until September of last year the Occupational Therapy Department shared a room
with the Linen and Clothing Department. With the opening of the new buildings, we
were able to get back our original workroom above the stores. This room was being
used for a girls' dormitory to relieve overcrowding on the wards.
This year there are thirty girls receiving benefit from occupational-therapy training,
an increase of ten since last year. It is hoped that by this time next year we will have
doubled our attendance record. The present expansion programme has been interrupted
while waiting for an order to be filled for more chairs and tables.
There is only one therapist in charge of this entire department. There is a great
need for a larger staff. If the staff were increased, it would be possible to establish
a more concrete therapeutic-ward programme. There is a large number of patients that
cannot attend the therapy classes because of physical disabilities, spasticity, or who are
bedridden because of illness, both among the male as well as the female patient-pupils.
An endeavour is being made to reach approximately twenty of these cases, but there are
many more who cannot possibly be helped until such time as the staff situation is relieved.
At " open house," held in the school gymnasium on May 9th last year, we had
a display of work done by the girls of this department.
Again this year we decorated the tables in the cafeteria at Christmas time. We also
made Christmas decorations, which were sold to the staff.
We did not have our annual sale of work this year owing to the confusion of moving
and the reorganization of the department.
Two new experiments were tried this year. The first of these was elementary
drawing and painting, which was most successful. One of the girls progressed sufficiently
far that she was able to create a design for a hooked rug. When the rug was made up,
she found the results very gratifying. Another girl drew a border of flowers. She then
transferred it on to material, and thus made a delightful runner. This is only a small
beginning of something that I hope will grow into an entirely new field for the mentally
retarded. T 80 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
The second project was gardening, conducted on a small scale in window-boxes,
and confined to flowers. This spring permission was received to plant a full-sized garden
plot outside the O.T. Building. This project was chosen to see how the mentally retarded
would react to a group project. I cannot at present tell you what the eventual results of
these two projects will be, but it will be most interesting to note at some later date what
has been accomplished.
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) Elizabeth M. Jones,
Occupational Therapist.
Boys' Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I hereby submit a report covering the above department for the period from
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
New equipment added to the shop consisted of a variety of hand-tools and accessories to the existing equipment. One power-carver was supplied. Repairs were nil, and
replacements due to wear were of a very minor nature. All tools were maintained in
excellent working-order. Much credit is due to the boys for their care and appreciation
of good tools during a whole year of consistent and practical use.
Expendable supplies have been used judiciously. Strict supervision has kept
quantities used within reasonable limits. Some new kinds of lumber and finishing
materials have been introduced to stimulate interest. The resulting projects have shown
continued improvement in accuracy and finish. The boys have shown a marked appreciation of shop methods and their own skills. Where feasible, many projects have been
executed for other departments within the School.
Discipline in the shop continues to be very good, satisfying to the boys and the
instructor. Safety first has been stressed continuously, resulting in a complete absence
of accidents or injuries.   Harmony and industry have resulted.
The shop has had many visitors during the year from the public, from the doctors
and staff. Doctors and nurses have given encouragement and co-operation unstintingly.
Mutual assistance between the departments of the whole School has been excellent.
The work in this department is being seriously hampered by lack of space. All
stock, tools, benches, and projects are confined to the one room. As projects increase
in size and numbers, the working area is reduced in proportion. Ventilation is quite
inadequate both from health and work angles.   Lighting, too, leaves much to be desired.
The tangible results of the year's work have been excellent, showing marked
improvement over the preceding period. The boys have become more proficient in their
work, more useful to themselves and the School at large, happier and more contented
in this environment.
Respectfully submitted.
Harold Mercer,
Industrial Arts Instructor. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
T 81
DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL THERAPY
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit my annual report from April 1st, 1952, to March
31st, 1953.
With our increased population our recreation classes have increased in attendance,
and it has been necessary to limit our evening classes for lack of floor space in our
gymnasium. Our classes should be increased at least 30 per cent to allow all our
resident members participation in our recreation programme. In planning for the future,
for a recreation-auditorium building we should consider an outdoor swimming-pool in
the area of the recreation-auditorium building which would eliminate the need of dressing-
rooms, toilet and shower facilities. We should plan for a playground and playing area
large enough to accommodate 600. At present we are sending our boys and girls out to
small areas around our cottages that have no conveniences and have no playground
equipment or playing area.
Last summer over ninety boys and girls were taken by bus to Second Beach for
a picnic. Before lunch a softball game was played, and later in the afternoon we went
in for a swim and wound up the day with pop and ice-cream.   ..,
A group was taken to the exhibition in September to see the exhibits and the Shrine
Circus.
We again staged our New Year's dance, with the trimmings of noise-makers, hats,
streamers, and everything that goes to make a New Year's party a success. A new
undertaking was an amateur hour, which proved so successful that further series are
planned.
The sixth annual display of recreation and physical education climaxed the winter
activities. Four displays were staged—two for resident members and two for the general
public. The Woodlands School, in its training programme, can look forward to a full
programme in recreational therapy. Our members, though mentally retarded, are, in the
majority, physically fit and capable of enjoying our varied programme. During the week
there is a 35-mm. show and a 16-mm. show; the men and ladies have two gym. nights
a week and a dance; the juniors and tiny tots have four periods a week. Special events
are held during the year in keeping with holidays and special days as Hallowe'en and
St. Valentine's Day.
In the recreational-therapy programme we have found that our boys and girls have
become well socialized, are physically in good condition, and, most important, we have
a happy and contented population.
Respectfully submitted.
J. A. Lynes,
Chief Instructor of Recreation. T 82
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53 REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL T 83
DEPARTMENT OF DENTISTRY
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the report of the Dental Department for the year ended March
31st, 1953, at The Woodlands School.
This clinic was opened on a full-time basis on July 15th, 1952, with the services of
Dr. H. MacCrostie, D.D.C., and a capable dental assistant. Prior to this the necessary
dental treatment was performed by Dr. Mathison on Wednesday afternoons only.
There is a well-equipped two-chair office, with the addition of two Panovision
operating lights installed in November, 1952.
Summary
Number of visits to patients  2,209
Examinations   2,209
Extractions    994
Fillings  557
Scaling   629
Prophylaxes   383
Miscellaneous treatments   342
Full dentures  21
Partial dentures  11
Repair and refine dentures  9
Respectfully submitted.
H. MacCrostie, L.D.S., D.D.S., D.D.C.,
Dental Officer.
DEPARTMENT OF DIETETICS
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the annual report of the Dietary Department for the fiscal
year ended March 31st, 1953.
With the completion and subsequent opening of the three new units, extra work was
involved for those in the kitchen. Our staff was increased accordingly. Mr. W. Jenkins
was promoted to Grade 4 cook, while one Grade 3 cook and one kitchen helper were
added to the staff.
Our bakeshop equipment was moved to Essondale and was amalgamated into the
large central bakeshop there. Mr. V. Copp, baker, was transferred to Essondale also.
The bread, which is sliced and wrapped, is now delivered to us daily from Essondale
and distributed to the wards. The baking of cakes and cookies, which was formerly
done by the bakeshop, was taken over by the kitchen staff.
The problem of flies in the summer is still a serious one, and we are looking forward
to have " deflyer " machines in use in the near future.
Several pieces of large equipment have been installed in the past year, including
a potato-peeler, a three-decker electric oven, a French fryer, and a griddle. With these
in operation, a greater variety of food can be prepared.
As in the past, lectures in nutrition were given by the dietitian to first- and third-
year students at Essondale, as well as to the psychiatric aides at The Woodlands School. T 84 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Approximately 1,000,000 meals were served to the patients during the year and
46,466 to the staff.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Audrey M. Paterson,
Dietitian.
LABORATORY REPORT
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—On November 1st, 1952, a clinical laboratory, fully equipped and staffed by
two technicians, was opened, in facilities provided in Pine Cottage.
The work undertaken so far has been mainly organizational, and actual laboratory
procedures carried out have dealt mainly with the outbreak of dysentery prevalent in the
hospital during the past six months.
Laboratory procedures carried out during the period from November 1st, 1952, to
March 31st, 1953, were as follows:—
Red-blood counts     68
White-blood counts     85
Haemoglobin estimations       2
Sedimentation rates     49
Routine urinalyses       4
Benzidine tests       2
Faeces examinations for typhoid and dysentery  519
Total  729
Respectfully submitted.
G. A. Nicolson, M.D.,
Director of Laboratories.
DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the annual report of the Department of Radiology for
the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1953.
In the past year we have added a large mobile X-ray unit to the department, which
was opened three years ago. This was made necessary because our infant population
has doubled during the past year, and that transportation was no longer available to the
X-ray Department. Now this mobile unit is moved to each children's ward, and everyone
is X-rayed without too much difficulty. This unit is also used to radiograph any patient
who cannot be transferred to the department by stretcher.
During the past year three new wings were opened. The pupil-patient population
and staff have increased to such an extent that 60 per cent more work is being done now
compared to last year. All radiographic and clerical work, except for the reading and
filing of the films, is done here by one operator. It is hoped that when the proposed
new 300-bed unit is opened, an assistant will be added to the department. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL T 85
The following work was accomplished during the last fiscal year:—
Chests   3,534
Extremities        116
Shoulders         26
Spines          48
Ribs         12
Skulls         16
Abdomens         10
Teeth         27
Number of exposures  4,255
Number of films  3,980
Respectfully submitted.
Peter C. Barteluk, R.T.,
Radiological Technician.
BEAUTY-PARLOUR REPORT
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit my report, covering the period from July, 1952, to
March 31st, 1953.
Shampoos       425
Finger-waves  1,019
Permanents       142
Hair-cuts   _.  1,075
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) Jacqueline DeCoene,
Hairdresser.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICE
Women's Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the report of the Women's Division of the Department of
Nursing Service for the fiscal year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953. The year ended
with the following personnel: Registered nurses, 4; psychiatric nurses, 54; psychiatric
nurses in training, 36; student psychiatric nurses, 16; psychiatric aides, 91; and home
supervisors, 12.
New appointments for the year were 151, with 89 resignations for the following
reasons: 111 health, general training, household duties, unsuited to the work, and to be
married.
There have been a few changes within the senior staff of our department. Miss
Elizabeth Herchmer, R.N., transferred to the Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital in September
from her position of Assistant Superintendent of Nurses. She had been with this
Department since 1946. T 86 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Mrs. K. McKinnon, R.N., who held the position of head nurse in Cedar Cottage,
was appointed Assistant Superintendent of Nurses in September, 1952.
Miss D. Curie, R.N., completed her postgraduate course at Essondale and was
appointed head nurse in Pine Cottage, which was opened in May, 1952.
Mrs. M. Mowat, R.N., was appointed head nurse of Cedar Cottage in November,
1952.
Nurses' Home No. 3 was opened in January and has filled a great need for comfortable accommodation for the students.
Our psychiatric aides are now being given one week in the classroom prior to going
on the wards, and we hope to be able to complete instruction for those already on staff
in the near future.
Our recreational activities have been enjoyed by all able to attend, and we have been
able to increase the number of patients with parole privileges.
The Social Service Department has been very active all year and has rendered
valuable assistance in the interpretation of the patients' needs to the relatives and the
adjustment of the patient to the School.
To all those who have helped through a busy and active year, we are very grateful.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) V. M. Sanders, R.N.,
Superintendent of Nurses.
Men's Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit this annual report of the Men's Division of the Department of Nursing Service for the fiscal year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
We have increased our male staff this past year, a necessity brought about by the
occupation of Beech and Willow Cottages, which have a combined capacity of 240
pupils. A large percentage of our new staff being psychiatric aides, it has been necessary
to redistribute our psychiatric nurses to give trained coverage to all wards. The nurses
have done exceedingly well both in keeping up the standard of nursing care and in training
the increased number of new staff.
Psychiatric Nurses Albert Waller and Herbert Myton left on retirement; Harold
Mullins passed away unexpectedly in December during his twelfth year of service.
I am pleased to note Mr. Hugo Lind has been able to return for duty after a lengthy
illness that entailed several operations.
Our psychiatric students, twenty-four in number, who will graduate in April, 1953,
will complete the accelerated nursing course put into effect in the fall of 1951. In
future we will draw our psychiatric nurses as graduates from the School of Nursing,
Provincial Mental Health Services, being operated at Essondale. Student-nurses will
rotate through The Woodlands School for three months' training in the care of mentally
retarded children.
Social activities with staff assistance have become a daily occurrence. Dances,
concerts, amateur programmes, a visit to the exhibition and Shriners' Circus, playground
periods, moving pictures, gymnasium activities, and seasonal parties were included in
this programme. Our increased population is being rapidly absorbed in all activities,
and we now find the gymnasium at the School and the old auditorium are far too small.
Our airing-court and sports field were taken up by the new buildings; this has created
a problem that should be remedied at an early date. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL T 87
Nurses and students have enjoyed weekly attendance at the School's staff clinics,
with monthly representation on the departmental staff meetings, as well as our own senior
staff meetings, which are on a monthly schedule.
We appreciated having our older wards equipped with additional closet space and
lockers, which have made it much easier for our staff in caring for pupils' clothing and
toys. Two of the older wards have been completely redecorated, with replacement of
worn floor coverings where needed.
In the past year I feel the pupils in our care have received a high standard of ward
instruction and nursing care, with a genuine endeavour by our staff to fill the needs of this
large family of growing boys.
To all who have so ably assisted with our many problems, we extend our sincere
thanks.
Respectfully submitted.
J. N. Elliot,
Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION
Women's Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—The report of the Women's Division of the Department of Nursing Education
for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1953, is respectfully submitted herewith.
Under the centralized system of nursing education, the students have received their
courses of lectures at the school of Psychiatric Nursing at Essondale. The students have
received the benefit of uniformity of instruction as well as opportunities to be in closer
contact with actual practice of psychiatric nursing procedures.
Many students have been given the opportunity to accelerate their progress through
the school. Twenty-eight students graduated this year. Fourteen students took the first-
and second-year term of classes in one year.
Next year the remaining students who are employed as psychiatric nurses-in-training
will graduate if they are successful in the academic programme.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Edith M. Pullan, R.N.,
Director of Nursing.
Men's Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the report on the Men's Division of the Department of
Nursing Education for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1953.
During the past year, lectures have been presented on the block system of classes in
the School of Psychiatric Nursing at Essondale. This system has enabled The Woodlands School students to gain a better understanding of psychiatric nursing.
The majority of lectures were given at Essondale; the rest, on the treatment and
care of the mental deficients, were given at The Woodlands School. T 88 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
This year twenty-four students completed the course in psychiatric nursing. This
group will be the last graduating class from The Woodlands School, due to a change in
the training-school policy.
Student-nurses from the School of Psychiatric Nursing spend three months on the
wards, rotating from ward to ward, which enables them to further their knowledge in
the treatment and care of the mentally deficient children.
A course of training for psychiatric aides in psychiatric nursing and nursing arts is
in progress, and they are finding it very helpful to them.
To all those doctors, nurses, and heads of departments who have helped greatly with
the educational programme, we are extremely grateful.
Respectfully submitted.
Ronald F. Nash,
Instructor of Male Nurses.
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C
Sir,—Following is a report of work performed for the fiscal year ended March 31st,
1953, at The Woodland School.
Mr. J. B. Woodward, Psychological Clinic Assistant, commenced a leave of absence
in February, 1952, when he joined the Canadian Army. In March, 1952, two members
of the Essondale staff made weekly visits to provide for the more pressing cases. This
service was continued until July, 1952, when Miss C. Cohen joined the staff as Psychological Clinic Assistant.
The Department of Psychology has, first of all, provided psychological evaluation
of pupil-patients. Referrals have been accepted from the medical staff, the Social Service
Department, the school, and the nursing staff. Intelligence tests, manual dexterity tests,
personality tests, educational tests—all the available techniques have been utilized.
Projective techniques such as the Thematic Apperception Test have also been used on an
exploratory basis. In assessing the pupil-patient the prime considerations have been,
first, the programme of training—that is, whether academic or occupational—second, the
possible need for therapy, and, finally, the question of rehabilitation. This department
and the Social Service Department have worked together closely on all these problems,
particularly the latter one. All academic prospects have been screened through and
graded by this department. Several of the adult patients have been seen in regular
weekly interview, and several of the children have been seen in play interview. Some of
these patients have been referred to the Occupational Therapy Department, and many
others have been worked with in conjunction with the Occupational Therapy Department.
Some assistance has been given to the Occupational Therapy Department in its reorganization and expansion programme.
Twenty-eight Wednesday afternoon staff clinics have been attended to present
psychological findings. A short talk has been given at each of nine visitors' clinics. This
department has been present at 177 daily staff conferences throughout the year. An
orientation clinic was given to members of the medical staff and the Social Service
Department. A number of patients have been examined prior to their admission by
psychologists of the Child Guidance Clinic. Forty-four abstracts of their findings were
made, to be placed on the clinical files.
One hundred and eleven patients were examined by this department during the year.
A total number of 508 tests were administered. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL T 89
The following is a tabulation of the tests administered:—
Test Number
Arthur Point Scale  3
Bennet Hand Tool Dexterity  2
Bender Gestalt  79
Crawford Small Parts Dexterity  15
California Test of Personality  9
Goodenough Draw-a-Man  63
Kent E.G.Y.   72
Kuder Preference Record  1
Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory  2
Minnesota Rate of Manipulation  7
Progressive Achievement Tests  7
Progressive Matrices  13
Porteus Maze Test  97
Stanford-Binet Form L  62
Thematic Apperception Test  14
Vineland Social Maturity Scale  2
Wechsler-Bellevue Intelligence Scale Form I  26
Wechsler-Bellevue Intelligence Scale Form II  13
Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children  6
Weigl-Goldstein-Scheerer Color Form Sorting Test  15
Total  508
Respectfully submitted.
C. Cohen,
Psychological Clinic Assistant.
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICE
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—The report of the Social Service Department of The Woodlands School for
the past fiscal year is herewith submitted for consideration. The report is concerned
largely with:—
I. A review of social services to pupil-patients, with some interpretation
regarding the relationship of these services to the function of social
workers in a school for the education and training of the mentally retarded.
II. A review of the beginning of social services directed to the rehabilitation
of the mentally retarded, together with some interpretation as to immediate
basic resources needed to develop a minimal rehabilitation programme.
I. Review of Social Services to Pupil-patients, April 1st, 1952,
to March 31st, 1953
The important contribution of social workers in a programme geared to the understanding, education, training, and rehabilitation of the mentally retarded is that of
forming a fink between the institutional School, the pupil-patient, his family and community. This link is forged by purposeful helping and interpretation undertaken by the
social workers.   Such help and interpretation is directed toward the development, mainte- T 90 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
nance, and furtherance of the responsibility of family and community in the provision of
services geared to the continuing social adjustment of the mentally retarded both within
the School and community.
Social workers begin to help the family at the point when the use of the School is
being considered for one of its members, as well as helping the family with problems
which often arise at the time of admission, discharge, or rehabilitation of the pupil-patient.
During the pupil-patient's education and training period, social workers help him
to cope with any problem he may face in his relationships within the institutional School.
This help may be given to pupils individually by a case-worker or by a group-worker to
groups of pupils. During this period also, social workers help some parents who have
deep feelings about their child's mental retardation. Through this help many parents can
be freed to become active with the School throughout the pupil-patient's training period
and ultimately free to assume their responsibility in his rehabilitation.
1. Analysis of Social Services of an Interpretative Pre-admission Nature Rendered
to Families and Community, April, 1952, to March, 1953.—Over the past fiscal year
132 families inquired about the services of The Woodlands School for the use of a
mentally retarded member. All 132 families were interviewed by social workers. Of this
number, 60 families were referred to Social Welfare Branch field services or other agencies
either for help with a family-living problem which was recognized as the problem basic
to the family's acceptance and adjustment to the mental retardation of its member, or
referred for help with a serious marital problem which was seen as the source of the
family's unhappiness.
Referral of a family to another agency for service must be done in a way that is both
supporting and mobilizing to the family as well as informative and helpful to the agency
whose service is being requested. To this end, the social workers engaged in 252 referral
services to parents and agencies.
Social services were brought directly within the department to 72 families seeking
information about the School programme. Some 264 interviews of a helping nature
were given to this group, together with 180 consultative conferences with the School's
psychiatrists in the interest of this group of families.
The social workers in the School recognize that they have a real responsibility to
help parents and relatives as they consider placement in the School for a mentally retarded
member. The aforementioned 444 pre-admission interviews were directed to this end.
Part of the help given by the social workers at this time is directed toward a careful
screening of the applications so that needless commitments not in the interests of the
family and child are prevented.
When the application has been screened, help must be given parents to enable them
to prepare their mentally retarded child for the separation from the home and from the
familiar family ways of doing and living. At The Woodlands School such help to parents
is partly extended through a carefully planned and purposefully directed orientation to
the School, which permits the observation of the School programme and through a helpful
supportive relationship which grows up between the parents and the social worker. The
latter affords the parents an opportunity to recognize or work through to a degree the
feelings of disappointment, often shame, rejection, and guilt which exist around having
a mentally retarded child and become ascendent when the parents seek institutional care
for him. During the past fiscal year 80 parents were oriented to the School and its
programme during this pre-admission period. In summary, during the fiscal year social
workers have given 444 helping interviews to 80 parents prior to the admission of
the child.
2. Analysis of Social Services at the Time of the Pupil-patient's Admission and
Reception to the Provincial Mental Hospital and The Woodlands School, April, 1952,
to March, 1953.—The procedure for the admission of the mentally retarded in operation REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL T 91
in the Mental Health Services is that of committal to the Provincial Mental Hospital under
the " Mental Hospitals Act," with the mentally retarded person remaining in Hospital
until a bed becomes available in The Woodlands School. This procedure has distressed
many parents, and because of this the social workers have felt a real responsibility for
supporting and helping parents and relatives both prior to and during the admission of
the mentally retarded family member.
During the month of January, 1953, The Woodlands School began to admit the
child under 6 directly to the School. At this time also, an additional social worker was
appointed to the staff of The Woodlands School, bringing the number employed to three.
The social workers at The Woodlands School, assisted by the Provincial Mental
Hospital social worker on admissions, have taken responsibility for the reception into the
Hospital of 175 mentally retarded persons. Parents of mentally retarded children have
had 234 helping interviews extended to them at the time of the admission and reception
of their mentally retarded family member. Some 223 consultative interviews with other
disciplines and agencies have been undertaken in the interests of parents and pupil-patients
at the time of reception. One hundred and nine studies of the child, the degree of retardation, his family relationships and experiences have been completed.
From January to March, 1953, some 30 children under the age of 6, their parents
and relatives were helped by social workers at the time of admission to the School.
Some 103 helping interviews were given to parents. In summary, during the past fiscal
year the social workers helped receive into Hospital and School 205 pupil-patients, and
gave to pupils and parents some 560 helping interviews at this time. In all, 1,004
helping-interviews involving patience and skill have been directed to meeting parents'
feelings about their defective child and about the decision they were reaching to commit.
The goal of social work at the time of admission is to help parents to work with the School
staff throughout the pupil's education and training, and to see the School as a rehabilitation process for their child. Only as a last resort do we want the School seen by parents
as an institution for the permanent custodial care of their child. Another social-work
goal at this time is to assess through study the rehabilitation potential in the child.
3. Analysis of Case-work Services to Pupil-patients in Residence at The Woodlands
School, April, 1952, to March, 1953.—The patient and skilful meeting of parents'
feelings about their defective child, helping them to work with the School staff throughout
the pupil's education and training period, is a step-by-step treatment programme undertaken through a team approach by doctors, nurses, teachers, psychologists, and occupational, industrial, and recreational therapists, and dietitian and social workers.
Briefly, during the fiscal year 251 pupils in residence were referred to the Social
Service Department. Some 1,244 helping interviews were extended to these pupils.
The social workers, together with other disciplines, participated in 242 clinical study
sessions which were directed to the understanding and formulation of training and
rehabilitation goals for pupils in residence. Inter-co-operative conferences with other
agencies directed to planning for specific pupils in residence numbered 24. During the
education period when the mentally retarded child is in residence, social services are
directed toward keeping the interest of the parents and studying and developing the
child's rehabilitative potential.
4. Responsibility Assumed by Social Service Department in Education and Training,
April, 1952, to March, 1953.—The first responsibility of social workers in education and
training of personnel is toward their own profession—social work. The social workers
at The Woodlands School during the fiscal year participated in a teaching clinic for sixty
first-year social-work students of the School of Social Work, University of British
Columbia. Three second-year social-work students were oriented for a three-day period.
A number of in-service-trained workers attended a specially arranged teaching clinic.
Five groups of public health nurses, postgraduate nurses, and nursing affiliates were
oriented to the School programme, as well as to the part played by social services in
a school for the education and training of the mentally retarded. T 92 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
A group of thirty-five teachers and another group of thirty kindergarten teachers
spent time studying education in this setting and the part social service plays related to
education.
Four representatives of rehabilitation and social-work agencies spent time in the
Social Service Department, and three service clubs visited to study the School programme.
II. A Review of the Beginning of Social Services Directed to the Rehabilitation
of the Mentally Retarded, Together with Some Interpretation as to
Immediate Basic Resources Needed to Develop a Minimal Rehabilitation
Programme.
During the year five pupils were rehabilitated—four into working convalescent care
and one into family convalescent care. Of the four for whom working convalescent care
was planned, two returned to the School before the expiration of the six-month probationary period. The reason for return was due to a temporary breakdown in the pupil's
adjustment to the demands of the job. In the case of one long-institutionalized pupil, the
job selected was beyond his emotional integration to cope with. In the case of the other
pupil, the employer's demands exceeded his comprehension. Lack of praise on the job
also made him unsure of himself and his ability. The latter pupil had also been in the
institution for long years.
Much work is demanded of the social workers in preparing the pupils for placement
in working convalescent care. The pupil must be studied and assessed. Social work
shares a responsibility with other disciplines in study and assessment of pupils for whom
rehabilitation is being planned.
In preparation for rehabilitation of the five pupils, 205 interviews of a preparatory,
supervisory, and supportive nature were given. Employment and financial assistance
agencies were conferred with on 33 occasions. In this preparatory period the psychiatrists
were consulted on 165 occasions, psychology on 86, occupational therapy on 19, recreation and industrial on 45, education on 81, and 15 study clinics were attended by the
social workers.
Study and selection of the working home, too, involves careful work on the part of
the social workers. Some 45 visits to assess working homes were undertaken by social
workers.   Contacts with other agencies in assessment of these homes numbered 21.
Some 68 follow-up visits were paid to pupils and employers over the period of
placement.
One 40-year-old woman who had been deserted by both parents on placement in an
orphanage was committed to The Woodlands School about twenty-five years ago. While
in the School her progress had been remarkable from the medical, psychological, and
sociological aspects. When first admitted to the School at the age of 15, she was
described as imbecile, given to hysterical attacks and fainting. Pre-rehabilitation study
after her education and training period revealed her to be of dull-normal intelligence.
In April, 1952, she approached the Social Service Department, and after numerous
interviews with the pupil and contact with a distant relative a programme for her eventual
rehabilitation was initiated. There was, however, some doubt in the psychiatrists' minds
as to this pupil's ability to adjust to the outside community, having regard to her long
residence in the School, which had not presented her with an opportunity for competition
with individuals her own age. Social Service, however, proceeded with the rehabilitation
process, working closely with the pupil, and initiated a programme geared to helping her
face the world with new confidence and reassurance. The result was a finely integrated
personality, assured signs of emotional and social maturity, and, most important of all,
the pupil's desire to return to community.
After four months the National Employment Service was contacted, and after careful
selection by the Employment Service and the School social worker a job on a chicken- REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL T 93
farm was investigated and selected with the co-operation of the pupil and other School
staff. The employer was given a complete picture of the pupil's emotional level, and it
was explained that she would need constant and close supervision, and that she would
need to be trained by simplified methods in order to learn. A visit to the working home
was planned for the pupil, and a starting wage of $50 monthly offered.
Since placement, an intensive follow-up programme has been carried out. Employer
and employee were both seen from time to time, and on each occasion highly satisfactory
reports were received. The pupil's enthusiasm and improvement in both appearance
and behaviour was such that when the six months' probationary period was about to
expire, the employers agreed very readily to an extension of probation as everything was
working out well. The pupil has been given increasing responsibilities and has proved
reliable in every respect to date.
A review of the foregoing case-history of the rehabilitation of a pupil indicates the
long, detailed, and skilled work involved.
To ensure the development of this programme, certain basic resources must be
forthcoming from the Mental Health Services: Increase of social-work staff; availability
of rehabilitation funds within the Mental Health Services; extension of The Woodlands
School as a midway home for the pupils' use over the early placement period; the gearing
of the School to the early assessment of the rehabilitative potential of the pupils; the
continuing study of the pupil, directed to formulation and reformulation of education and
training goals in the light of this potential. Early consideration must be given to the
establishment of a midway home at a distance from the institutional School. Following
these resource developments within the School and Mental Health Services, it will be
necessary to develop the understanding, support, and service of community in the field
of rehabilitation of the mentally retarded.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Alice K. Carroll, B.A.,M.S.W.,
Provincial Supervisor, Psychiatric Social Work. T 94 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
REPORTS OF PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ
Dr. A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the Medical Superintendent for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1953.
It was with sincere regret that we learned early in the year of the passing of Dr.
E. J. Ryan, Senior Medical Superintendent. His visits to this institution were always
looked forward to, and I have missed his kindly advice and guidance.
The work of the various branches and departments of this hospital has gone forward
smoothly, if routinely, during the year, and there has been no outstanding event to report.
However, the departments have been active, and the fine co-operation from and between
the department heads is still in evidence.
Our patient-count at the beginning of the year was 286 and at the end of the year
was 287. During the year twelve patients were transferred to this institution from the
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale. One patient recovered sufficiently to be returned
to the British Columbia Penitentiary, and one patient was discharged on probation to
himself. There was one elopement during the year, the patient being returned after an
absence of only four hours by members of the nursing staff. Ten deaths occurred among
the patient population, the cause of death in the majority of cases being chronic heart-
disease.   One patient returned from probation.
We continue to have about 60 per cent of the patients usefully employed.
Dr. G. Hall continues to care for the physical health of the patients. Dr. A. Beattie,
of the Saanich and South Vancouver Island Health Unit, arranged for the mobile unit
of the Division of Tuberculosis Control to visit the institution on March 17th, 1953, and
all the patients and the majority of the staff were chest-plated. The tuberculosis clinic
in Victoria has continued to be most co-operative in rechecking suspicious cases at
regular intervals. There are only two cases isolated at the present time because of
tuberculosis.
Dr. W. Dempsey, of Victoria, has replaced Dr. T. W. James as part-time dentist,
the latter having resigned. The visits of the dentist have been increased from once to
twice monthly, and new equipment has been installed, thereby improving the dental
services to the patients.
The recreational and occupational facilities continue to be used to the limit both
afternoons and evenings. A good standard of moving pictures has been shown to the
patients twice weekly, and again this year we have been fortunate in having a number
of fine concerts, some being organized and put on by the patients themselves, assisted
by members of the nursing staff.
It is regretted that the training-school here is to be discontinued as of May 1st,
1953. It is noted, however, that the instructor is to be retained, and it is hoped that by
lectures to the psychiatric aides and postgraduate lectures to the psychiatric nurses, the
high level of interest reached by the nursing staff in its work will be maintained.
A number of the staff left our employ during the year for various reasons and were
replaced by new men (see Chief Psychiatric Nurse's report). Mr. J. F. Stamford, stores
steward, having reached the age of retirement, left our employ in January, 1953, and was
succeeded by Mr. P. Tempest.
Attached herewith are detailed reports from the heads of the various departments.
I wish again to express my appreciation for the assistance and support during the
past year from yourself, the members of your staff who have visited here in a consulting
capacity, and to the staff members of this institution.
Respectfully submitted. T    _,   -,    _, _, „ _
v J L. G. C. d Easum, M.B.,
Medical Superintendent. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ T 95
DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitt, B.C.
Sir,—Following is the annual report on the Occupational Therapy and Maintenance
Department for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1953.
The usual crafts and hobbies have been carried on as in the preceding year and
included cabinetmaking, wood-turning, furniture-building, inlay, built-up woodwork,
picture-framing, art metal, copper repousse, and tooling. Carving and moulding of
plastics and all the different aspects of leatherwork, wood-carving, weaving, and metal-
turning were also done.
An electric oven was constructed in the shop during the past year. An electric
element and a three-heat switch were purchased; the rest of materials used were from
salvaged sheet iron and angle iron, making the initial cost of this oven very small. It is
used to heat plastics and has proved to be very satisfactory.
The repair of all buildings was done by our department, also all painting and
decorating, as well as all window-washing and general cleaning.
One of the major accomplishments of the shop during the past year was the conversion of the room doors in the Lower East Ward from the old lever system to individual
locks for each door. We devised a method of installing locks for a maximum of
efficiency with a minimum of expense. These locks should prove more satisfactory than
the West Ward locks, which were installed some years ago, in that they will need very
little upkeep. The initial cost of installation, too, was very much less. I feel that we
saved the institution considerable expense on this project.
Patients help to do new construction and concrete-form work and thus learn the
proper procedure and methods of building, which will be an aid toward rehabilitation.
We find, however, that the majority of patients in the shop prefer to do hobbies and
crafts, and take great pride in making difficult and intricate projects. As usually a lot
of thought and time must be expended in making these things, we feel that one of the
main objects in an occupational-therapy shop is accomplished as the patient forgets his
own troubles in concentrating and doing this intricate work.
As there has been mention made of a new boiler-room, I would like to make a suggestion for your consideration regarding the old boiler-room and engineer's present office.
After the old boilers are removed, I would suggest that we remodel and convert that
space into an occupational-therapy shop. I am sure that if it were equipped with some
tools and small machines, it would prove a very valuable addition to our department
in benefiting patients that we have not the space for now, or who are not fit to come out
to our present shop.
In closing, I would like to express my thanks and appreciation for your assistance
and counsel during the past year, and also the staff for their co-operation.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Helander,
Instructor of Trades and Maintenance. T 96 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
SHOE AND TAILOR SHOPS
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—During the past year in the Shoe-shop there has been a great increase in
repair work, such as half-soling, heels, and patching. More work in the rebuilding of
boots has been started. For those patients who have destructive tendencies, we now
make boots with cloth tops, old soles, new insoles, and rubber heels cut with heel dies
from old rubber boots.   They are comfortable, look well, and are more economical.
A considerable portion of our time in the Tailor-shop has been spent on repair work,
especially on canvas articles. Repair slips show a total of 6,093 pieces repaired and
returned to the wards.
During the year there was an average of seven patients employed in the Shoe and
Tailor Shops.
Respectfully submitted.
G. Campbell,
Foreman.
DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL THERAPY
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C. i
Sir,—Recreational activities were very well attended during the past year, starting
with the tennis-courts in front of the main building, which were placed in operation in
April. During April and May a combination of indoor and outdoor activity was
occasioned by the changeable weather conditions.
In June softball was attempted in the new airing-court, using bats made by our
Occupational Therapy Department. It was so successful that more equipment was
secured and a backstop made, and every Thursday evening until fall the diamond was
put to good use. Patient interest was excellent. Evenly matched teams were chosen by
the more active patients, and on several occasions we had patients umpiring the games.
A tennis-court was also installed in the new recreation centre, and equipment was made
available and put to use almost daily.
In addition, the original tennis-courts were in constant use both afternoons and
evenings, and golf, lawn-bowls, and croquet were participated in by a considerable
number of patients. Patients outside in recreational activities are governed by the number
of staff available to supervise and participate.
The ward staff encourages these activities whenever possible, with softball and tennis
in the summer and volleyball in the main dining-room during the winter being the major
attractions.
Each Thursday evening during the year some form of organized recreational activity
takes place—outdoors in summer and inside in winter. Indoors we have a bingo game
each month, and usually a special bingo party around Christmas time, when we give each
one attending a gift of home cooking or candies, etc., donated by the staff. Other
Thursday evenings, card games, chess, etc., have been enjoyed by patients from all wards
in the Top East Ward, which has proved ideal for such endeavours. Ice-cream is usually
served and is obviously enjoyed.
Any time which the classroom schedule allows is spent in recreation. Walking-
parties, table-tennis, lawn-tennis, golf, lawn-bowls, volleyball, card games (including
canasta, which is very enthusiastically played at the present time), chess, and checkers REPORTS OF MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ T 97
provide a variety of activities which can be conveniently fitted into ward routine as the
time and opportunities present. The number of patients engaged varies considerably—
from one to fifty-six—at any one time. Fifty-six is the greatest number to attend a bingo
game (average around fifty), up to thirty-five at card games, twenty-five at softball, and
smaller groups kicking a football and playing catch, etc.
The number of patients who participate and the interest they show in recreation are
conclusive proof of the value of the programme; yet, we still have a fairly large group
whose working activities occupy much of their time, and the older age-group whose
interest is mostly passive. Although these latter groups see the twice-weekly moving
pictures and several concerts yearly, I believe they would greatly appreciate the opportunity of being taken for a drive on some of the scenic routes and to local places of
interest; using institutional machines, the cost should not be too great.
During the regular operator's absence on holidays, etc., I ran the movie projector
for approximately 20 per cent of the scheduled shows.
Respectfully submitted.
J. Lowndes.
DENTAL REPORT
Dr. L.G.C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—I should like to submit herewith a report of my work as visiting dentist at the
Colquitz Provincial Mental Home.
During the period from October 31st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953, the following has
been done: Examinations, 40; extractions, 74; prophylaxes, 5; restorations, 15; relining
of dentures, 4; repairs of dentures, 7; and new dentures, 5. In addition to the actual
treatments listed above, some effort has been made toward the establishing of a dental
unit at the Hospital.
Prior to accepting the position as visiting dentist, some patients were treated in my
office. Six extractions and three restorations were done between June 24th, 1952, and
October 1st, 1952.
At all times I have been assisted by members of the Hospital staff. The capable
manner in which they performed their duties has been most gratifying to me.
Respectfully submitted.
W. G. Dempsey.
NURSING SERVICES
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—There was no change in the accommodation available for resident patients at
this institution since the report submitted last year.
With the exception of one patient assigned for outside work on the farm at 5 a.m.,
six for kitchen work at 5.30 a.m., and six to assist in the dining-rooms at 6 a.m., the
remainder of the patients did not arise until 7 a.m.
During the year we had a daily average of 35 patients with full ground privileges,
5 patients with supervised lawn privileges, and 3 patients with full poolroom privileges,
with a daily average of approximately 105 engaged in some form of useful occupation
in the various departments, together with 70 engaged in ward routine activities.    The
7 T 98 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
daily average of patients confined to their rooms was 13.48—4.86 physically ill and 8.62
mentally disturbed.
The recreation-courts were in use daily during the year when weather permitted—
in the summer from 1 to 4 p.m. and 6.30 to 8.30 p.m. During the winter, active patients
with supervision were allowed out in the afternoons for exercise, using the sidewalks.
Two picture shows of Australia were screened by Mr. and Mrs. I. Day, of Victoria.
Five concerts sponsored by service clubs and organizations and one concert arranged
by the patients and staff augmented the entertainment programme during the winter
months.
The programme of entertainment and recreation activities every day of the week
was made possible by the enthusiasm and active participation of the nursing staff.
The radio continued to provide enjoyable entertainment for the patients. The
individual receiving set in the recreation-room on the grounds was replaced by a speaker
and an additional speaker placed in the recreation-court. Several patients have private
radios which they were permitted to use.
Patients with musical instruments were encouraged to practise, and the piano was
available for those able to play.
The Red Cross Society and the Britannia Branch of the Canadian Legion with the
Women's Auxiliary to the Britannia Branch provided comforts for ex-service patients
monthly.   Other organizations supplied comforts at times.
The Salvation Army held service in the morning of the first and third Sunday of
each month. They were accompanied by their band on seven occasions and the songsters
three times. They also distributed Christmas packages to each patient. The Church of
England minister held service in the afternoons on the second and fourth Sunday of each
month. Roman Catholic patients were visited and mass was held by the priest each
month.
The Travelling Library, Public Library Commission, Victoria, continued to look
after our reading requirements and changed the library twice during the year. Popular
magazines were provided by organizations and individuals. The Victoria Daily Times
provided cross-Canada daily newspapers each Friday.
Time lost through sick-leave and other causes by the staff amounted to 478 working-
days. This included the dietary department and stores, where relief was provided from
the nursing staff to keep these departments operating efficiently. Consequently, it was
necessary to employ an additional psychiatric aide as temporary help on January 24th,
1953.
During the year eleven members of the nursing staff left the service for the following reasons: Resigned for other employment, 4; resigned due to ill health, 3; left the
service on reaching the age of 65, 1; granted leave of absence to join the Royal Canadian
Navy, subsequently resigned, 1; resigned on account of housing difficulties, 1; promoted
to Grade 4 stockman from psychiatric nurse, 1.
Members of the staff were detailed to special duty at St. Joseph's Hospital, Victoria,
for 104 eight-hour shifts.
Several members of the staff attended a course on instruction in Civil Defence.
Mr. K. A. Thompson, psychiatric nurse, qualified as a special instructor in basic general
training, Parts 1 and 2, upon completion of Course No. 12 at Victoria.
The co-operation between the different departments was excellent, and the staff are
to be commended for the manner in which they performed their duties.
Respectfully submitted.
P. T. McLeod,
Chief Psychiatric Nurse. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ
T 99
TRAINING-SCHOOL
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,-—The following is the report of the training-school activities during the year
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
Number of students attending classes, April 1st, 1952, 15; resignations during year,
2; number of students attending classes, March 31st, 1953, 13.
In May, 1952, fourteen students from previous terms graduated at the ceremonies
in New Westminster and received their certificates as psychiatric nurses. Though the
time on the Mainland was short, the students were very appreciative of the arrangements
made, and the glimpse they did obtain of Essondale made them realize what values could
be derived if the opportunity for closer contact were made possible.
Classes were held on a continuous basis throughout the year, and the total number
of hours devoted to classroom instruction was 366. No failures were recorded, and no
students were required to rewrite any examinations.
With the concentration of lectures during this period, all students should be ready
for graduation in April, 1953. This, I believe, will complete the three-year training
programme here, when all eligible to graduate will have done so.
I believe that the value of the training-school here is demonstrated continuously in
the care accorded the patients in the phases of hospitalization which this institution
provides. Though actual bedside nursing opportunities are few, whenever occasion
demands, the staff is responsive and takes a keen interest in whatever problems are
presented. Interest has been maintained as in the past, and the attitude and marks of
the students have been very gratifying. Rapport is good, and co-operation has been
excellent from all departments in connection with the training-school activities.
Respectfully submitted.
J. Lowndes,
Instructor. T 100 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
REPORTS OF THE GERIATRIC DIVISION, PORT COQUITLAM,
VERNON, AND TERRACE
REPORT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I hereby submit the seventeenth annual report of the Geriatric Division of the
Provincial Mental Health Services, with attached tables, for the fiscal year April 1st,
1952, to March 31st, 1953.
On November 1st, 1952, Dr. T. G. Caunt left the Division consequent to his
appointment as Medical Superintendent of the Provincial Mental Hospital and the Crease
Clinic at Essondale, and Dr. B. F. Bryson commenced duty as Superintendent of the
Homes for the Aged the same date. On behalf of the nursing and clinical staffs and
members of all departments of our three units, I would like to express our appreciation
to Dr. Caunt for the many years of interest and effort he devoted to the welfare of the
patients of this Division.
The three units of this Division have continued to function smoothly and efficiently
during the past year and have been running practically to capacity at all times.
There has been no decrease in the demand for the type of service offered by this
Division of the Mental Health Services, but rather, especially on the women's side, there
has been a considerable increase in the number of applications received. A total of 294
applications for admission were received during the year. Inquiries from various sources
relative to the proposed committal of men and women over 70 years of age to this
Division totalled 404 during the year. These inquiries took the form of office interviews,
telephone calls, and letters, and much time was spent in explaining to anxious relatives
and others our frequent inability to accept patients because of lack of accommodation.
It is still impossible to keep pace with the applications for the admission of aged women,
whereas male vacancies have been more frequent, and the rate of admission of aged men
has maintained a minimal number on the waiting-list. The demand for this type of
service will likely increase in the years to come. Throughout the year every opportunity
has been taken to encourage efforts for the care of the aged at the community level or in
the home, and wherever a patient's condition has improved sufficiently, relatives have
been encouraged to make arrangements for their care outside the Hospital. It is felt that
efforts in this way will help conserve the available bed space for those persons most in
need of our type of care.
As will be noted in Table No. 1, there were 557 men and 388 women, a total of
945 patients, in the three Homes on March 31st, 1952. During the year the total in
residence increased to 994, as of March 31st, 1953. This increase is primarily due to
the opening of H.A. 9, which provided additional accommodation of 49 beds for women.
Tables Nos. 2, 3, and 4 will show that a total of 257 patients, 126 men and 131 women,
were admitted to the three Homes during the year. During the same period 294 applications for admission were received, leaving a total of 37 patients who needed care but
could not be accommodated, thus increasing thereby the existing waiting-list. All
applications from Vernon and Terrace districts were handled promptly by direct admission
to those units. Accumulated vacancies in these two units also allowed for a relief of
pressure on the Port Coquitlam unit. On October 6th, 1952, 12 men were transferred
to Terrace by train. This move was organized by Dr. T. G. Caunt, and Dr. A. G.
MacKinnon supervised the patients en route.   The trip was uneventful, and all patients REPORTS OF THE GERIATRIC DIVISION T 101
were taken to the Terrace Home safely. On March 3rd, 1953, 25 patients were taken
to the Vernon Home by train, under the supervision of Dr. Bryson. This group consisted
of 12 men and 11 women transferred from the Port Coquitlam unit, with 2 women
admitted from the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale. This transfer was also carried
out smoothly and without incident.
There was a total of 180 deaths during the year in the three units—119 men and
61 women. This continued discrepancy in the death rates for men and women accounts,
in large part, for the lack of accommodation for the many applications for admission of
women to this Division. Discharges for the year totalled 28 — 17 men and 11 women.
It is felt that the discharge rate could be increased if the services of a social worker were
obtained to work with the patients and their families.
The general health of the patients has remained good throughout the year, and there
have been no epidemic infections or serious medical problems. During the year 11
patients were referred for surgical consultation from the Port Coquitlam Home, 2 of
whom required emergency surgery, which was carried out at the surgical unit of the
Crease Clinic. Several others benefited physically by elective surgical procedures.
Orthopaedic care was required for 12 women and 3 men, most of whom suffered fractured
hips as a result of unavoidable accidental falls, and have received nursing care in the
infirmaries at Essondale.
The nursing and ward services at the Port Coquitlam unit have continued to function
smoothly, and many comments have been received concerning the kindly attention given
to patients by the nursing staff. The weekly church services have been greatly appreciated
by many patients, and the frequent ward movies, the monthly bingo parties, the occupational therapy, and other activities continue to bring pleasure and stimulation to the
daily routine of the patients. The lack of radio facilities in Wards H.A. 8 and H.A. 9
is regretted, as the daily radio programmes do much to preserve contact and interest in
life outside the Hospital, as well as providing musical pleasure. Ward H.A. 9 was
opened for patients' occupation on September 9th, 1952, and has been occupied to
capacity since. On November 18th Miss Unger was assigned to the Port Coquitlam unit
as the night nursing supervisor. This increased supervision has been reflected in better
nursing care and service to our patients.
All other departments continue to function satisfactorily, and their co-operation
has contributed much to the welfare of the patients. A number of Public Works
improvements have been completed or are under way, such as the installation of outdoor
lights, renovations in the H.A. kitchen, and grading and seeding of the lawn west of
H.A. 8. A number of projects, however, remain to be done, and I would like to stress
particularly the need for completion of the new road through the Home for the Aged
property, the complete painting inside and out of all buildings, provision of radio
facilities in Wards H.A. 8 and H.A. 9, outdoor urinals, and screened housing for garbage-
cans at the rear of each cottage.
During the year several notable visitors were received at the Port Coquitlam unit.
On September 8th, 1952, Dr. Daniel Blain, medical director of the American Psychiatric
Association, visited and inspected the various buildings. He was able to give us several
useful ideas from his varied experience and visits to similar institutions elsewhere. He
was quite favourably impressed with the service provided here. On October 2nd, 1952,
we were fortunate in having the Honourable W. D. Black, Provincial Secretary, and
Mr. Pennington, Deputy Provincial Secretary, visit the Home at Port Coquitlam. They
were both favourably impressed with the services provided here and showed much interest
in conversing with our aged residents. On December 3rd, 1952, Mr. Gunnar Sjobeck,
public assistance councillor of the Royal Board of Sweden, inspected our facilities and
showed much interest in the new buildings. He was quite complimentary in his remarks
concerning the facilities here, and at his request he was provided with information
concerning the problem of the care of the aged in this Province. T 102 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Dr. A. G. MacKinnon reports a satisfactory year at the Home for the Aged, Vernon,
where the general health of the patients has been quite satisfactory. They have had no
major medical problems, and the various departments have functioned at a satisfactory
level of efficiency.
The close relationship of this Home to the Vernon General Hospital has facilitated
the necessary surgical care of our patients, and the co-operation of the local surgeons
has been excellent.
I visited the Vernon unit in March, 1953, and was impressed with the excellent
condition of the buildings and equipment and the care which is being provided for our
patients there.
This Home has been able to care for all the aged men and women requiring our type
of care in this area of the Province.
In May, 1952, Miss Elizabeth Clark, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses at Vernon, left
our service to join the staff of the Kelowna General Hospital. Miss Clark was a most
active and willing worker and did a great deal for the nursing staff at Vernon. She was
well liked by all, and it was with regret that we saw her leave. This position was filled
in October, 1952, by the arrival of Miss Thiemann, R.N., from the nursing staff at
Essondale, who has carried out her duties as Superintendent of Nurses with efficiency and
dispatch. Miss Thiemann and Dr. MacKinnon have been actively engaged throughout
the year in carrying out an instructional and educational programme for the nursing staff.
Such a programme not only creates interest and enthusiasm on the part of the staff, but
is reflected in better care for our patients, and should be encouraged whenever possible.
Mr. W. E. Skillicorn, Supervisor of our Home for the Aged at Terrace, reports all
departments functioning satisfactorily.
The general health of his patients has continued to be very good, and there have
been no epidemic infections during the year. Only two patients required surgical
attention and two patients had the misfortune to suffer fractured hips.
During the year Dr. Weare left Terrace for a practice of his own at Smithers, B.C.
For a time Dr. Hicks was assisted by Dr. H. Leighton, but at the present time is without
an assistant. He continues to supervise the medical care of our patients at Terrace
regularly and satisfactorily.
The religious needs of the patients have been well cared for by regular Protestant
and Catholic services, which are held on alternate Sundays.
The efforts of the staff to provide suitable entertainment for their patients continues
to be hampered by the lack of radio or recorded entertainment. It is hoped that provision will soon be made for either radios for the dayrooms or, better still, the wiring
of the Hospital for combined record-playing equipment and radio reception. One
weekly picture show continues to be the most popular form of entertainment.
The problem of maintaining adequate staff coverage at the Terrace Home remains
a prominent one. During the winter months adequate staff was available, but with the
coming of summer vacations the problem of holiday relief is a pressing one. This Home
has never operated with a full complement of nursing staff. The chief factors leading to
this situation appear to be the acuteness of the local nursing situation and the availability
of higher-paying jobs in the community.
The increased efficiency of this unit has been facilitated by the completion of many
projects during the past year; namely, the completion of renewing concrete piers and
posts under three of the apartment buildings; repairs made to the laundry sewage-
disposal system; erection of a suitable fence to separate the institutional buildings from
the residential area; completion of the airing-court; overhauling of the plumbing and
sewage system under the Hospital kitchen; redecoration of wards and corridors; renewing of the substructure and flooring under Dormitories 2 and 3; housing of the fire
equipment; the new garbage-room to the rear of the kitchen; and the purchase of a new
Farmall Cub tractor. REPORTS OF THE GERIATRIC DIVISION
T 103
In concluding this annual report of the Geriatric Division of the Mental Health
Services, I wish to gratefully acknowledge and commend the co-operation and assistance
rendered by all members of the staffs in the Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and Terrace Homes
for the Aged. Especially do I wish to express appreciation to yourself and Dr. Caunt
for advice and assistance offered to me since taking over this position as Superintendent
of the Homes for the Aged.
Respectfully submitted.
B. F. Bryson, M.D.,
Superintendent, Homes for the Aged.
TABLES ON MOVEMENT OF POPULATION
Table No. 1.—Movement of Patient Population, Provincial Homes for the
Aged, Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and Terrace, April 1st, 1952, to March
31st, 1953.
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
158
106
293
260
128
418
234
293
557
126
388
131
In residence, Vernon, March 31st, 1952  	
In residence, Terrace ,March 31st, 1952.—  	
945
257
Total under treatment, 1952-53 __ 	
683
519
1,202
150
107
290
320
127
470
234
290
Total in residence, Port Coquitlam, March 31st, 1953	
Total in residence, Vernon, March 31st, 1953 __	
Total in residence, Terrace, March 31st, 1953 	
547
447
Grand total in residence, Port Coquitlam, Vernon, Terrace, March 31st, 1953     	
994
Table No. 2.—Movement of Patient Population, Home for the Aged,
Port Coquitlam, April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
In residence, Port Coquitlam, March 31st, 1952 	
158
97
2
260
124
1
418
221
3
257
107
385
65
642
Separations, 1952-53—
12
12
12
71
9
11
45
21
23
12
116
172
150
' 320
470 T 104
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 3.—Movement of Patient Population, Home for the Aged,
Vernon, April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
In residence, Vernon, March 31st, 1952  	
Admissions, Vernon _ 	
Admissions from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale_...
Transferred from Port Coquitlam 	
106
25
12
128
5
2
11
234
30
2
23
143
36
146
19
289
Separations, 1952-53—
4
30
2
2
16
1
6
46
3
55
107
127
234
Table No. 4.—Movement of Patient Population, Home for the Aged,
Terrace, April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
In residence, Terrace, March 31st, 1952   	
Admissions, Terrace  _	
Transferred from Port Coquitlam 	
293
4
12
	
293
4
12
309
19
309
Separations, 1952-53—
18
1
18
1
Discharges 	
19
290
290 REPORTS OF THE GERIATRIC DIVISION
T 105
Variety gymnastic display in Pennington Hall.
Patients' Christmas dance in Pennington Hall. T 106 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
REPORT OF DIRECTOR
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith are consolidated summaries of the work done in the Provincial Child Guidance Clinics from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
Table No. 1 is a summary of the general activities of the Clinics. Once again there
has been a significant increase in the number of clinics held throughout the Province.
This increase has been most marked in the Victoria area and was brought about by the
appointment of Dr. W. L. Valens as psychiatrist and Mr. Paul Laeser as psychological
clinic assistant, both on a full-time basis. This permits a continuous but limited service
on Vancouver Island. In the Vancouver area, clinics are held on regular schedule at
the Children's Hospital, the Health Centre for Children at the Vancouver General Hospital, and the Western Society for Physical Rehabilitation. Clinics were held for the
first time at Smithers, Williams Lake, and at the Isolation Department Hospital attached
to the Vancouver General Hospital. These will be continued as required. During the
year it was possible to develop the pre-clinic conference as a regular feature of the functioning clinic team. The attendance at the Clinic of a psychiatrist-in-training from the
Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic service has been mutually beneficial.
Table No. 2 shows a definite increase in the total number of cases seen, particularly
new cases. There has been an increase in the number of children seen, particularly
males, with a decrease in the number of adults, again most noticeable in the male sex.
The latter has resulted from the establishment by the Department of the Attorney-General
of their own screening team for the Borstal and Young Offenders' Unit. The professional members of this team were recruited from the staff of the Vancouver Child Guidance Clinic.
Table No. 3 again confirms a distinct trend which was noted in last year's report.
While the total number of cases examined for social agencies is almost identical with
the previous year, the relative proportion of these cases continues to decline. This
development is discussed in greater detail in the report of the Social Service Department.
The increase in cases referred by medical and health agencies, private physicians, parents,
and relatives shows a growing awareness of the value of the Clinic's services.
Table No. 4 shows the problems and disorders presented by new cases given a
complete examination.   It shows the reason for the original referral to the Clinic.
Table No. 5, an analysis of age-groups and intelligence shows that the majority of
cases seen by the Clinic are pre-adolescents of at least average intelligence. It is a
justifiable inference that the majority should respond to suitable treatment.
The interesting developments in the Psychology Department are covered in the
report and accompanying Table No. 7, by Miss Munro; those in the Social Work Department are covered by the report of Mr. Ricketts with its accompanying Table No. 6.
These reports are drawn to your particular attention.
One of the basic objectives of the Clinic is to bring the potential skills of each Clinic
worker to an optimal realization. Policies that are supportive of effective service to the
patient are emphasized. Every endeavour is being made to maintain high standards of
practice and opportunities for the professional growth of each Clinic member. The high
standards that have been maintained have brought about the acceptance and approval of
the Clinic by other agencies and by the community at large. REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
T 107
Another basic objective of the Clinic is its contribution to the total mental-health
needs of the Province through its activities in various communities. In addition to its
mediative and co-ordinative role in furthering the concept of integrative community
activity in behalf of the health and welfare of the individual, the Clinic staff has concentrated on an educational programme. Various members of the staff from all departments
have attended meetings with all types of groups where there are mental-health overtones.
This has meant working with these groups in an active, practical, and constructive manner
in an endeavour to further mental-health education. The establishment of the British
Columbia Division of the Canadian Mental Health Association should give impetus to
this programme and further diffuse its benefits.
The staff of the Vancouver Clinic has been stimulated and encouraged by the opportunity to study the plans of the proposed centre to include Child Guidance Clinic, Adult
Out-patient and Day Ward. The need for such a centre is well established, as is that for
an observation and treatment centre for pre-adolescents suffering from emotional disturbances of such severity that their treatment in their own or foster homes is not possible.
In Victoria it is recommended that the establishment of the Vancouver Island team be
filled, and the present quarters be renovated to provide adequate and suitable accommodation for the staff.
Table No. 1.—Summary of Clinics' Activity, April 1st, 1952,
to March 31st, 1953
Mainland Travelling Clinics
Vancouver
Island Clinics
Number of clinics held..
Physicals	
Urinalyses	
Playroom observations	
Agency case conferences	
Consulting case conferences.
Private case conferences	
Psychiatric interviews  —
Pre-clinic conferences	
299
675
212
87
624
304
151
1,595
135
43
1523
27
13
13
27
18
10
21
15
12
20
17
491
1,053
405
110
919
338
252
2,375
135 T 108
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 2.—Number, Sex, and Status of All Cases Examined at Child
Guidance Clinics, April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
u
Si
>
a
o
o
>
Mainland Travelling Clinics
Vancouver
Island Clinics
£
Vi
0
X
X
<
M
o
cd
J
O
£
"ra
T>
u
SJ
>
O
0
M
O
O
Jd
c
es
U
d
0
u
V.
0
41
«
0
c
o
Q
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u
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■0
c
eo
0
60
o.
o
o
1
_:
c
c
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1
c
o
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c
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ci
u
a.
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5
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tt,
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rt
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u
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u
n
3
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o
£
§
Z
'C
o
>
Vi
O
H
New cases	
595
4
1
2
1
4
18
12
1
5
6
1
2
3
24
4
4
4
7
2
2
3
7
9
1
6
2
9
12
3
6
3
12
1
1
1
1
2
5
3
1
1
2
1
1
7
8
6
2
8
7
1
4
2
2
2
9
9
1
4
4
3
1
2
12
10
4
1
5
1
~1
11
6
1
3
2
2
2
8
8
1
3
2
2
10
7
6
1
1
1
8
4
1
2
1
4
3
1
2
1
1
4
24
1
17
1
5
3
1
2
13
1
8
4
10
1
4
5
10
6
2
2
2
2
12
9
6
3
2
2
11
13
5
5
1
3
1
18
4
4
4
20
3
10
7
5
5
25
119
2
73
4
40
19
929
Males—
Adults    	
85
306
42
162
136
102
Children-	
Females—
Adults   .„
509
55
263
Repeat cases	
203
Males—
Adults  	
17
73
8
38
1
10
8
138
24
108
Females—
Adults 	
9
62
27 23
731
1,132 REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
T 109
Table No. 3.—Sources of All Cases Referred to Child Guidance Clinics,
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Agency or Source
Number
of Cases
Total
Percentage
of
Distribution
1. Social agencies _
Children's Aid Society	
Social Welfare Branch	
Catholic Children's Aid Society-
Child and Family Welfare	
Family and Children's Service.	
Family Welfare Bureau...
City Social Service Department	
Young Women's Christian Association-
Loyal Protestant Home	
2. Institutions—New Haven..
3. Medical and health agencies..
Public health nurses	
Children's Hospital-
Vancouver General Hospital, Social Service Department-
Saanich Health Unit   _ 	
Simon Fraser Health Unit	
Crease Clinic 	
Western Rehabilitation Centre-
Health Centre for Children...	
4. Schools..
Public-
School Board-
Teachers	
Other-
Boys' Industrial School-
Girls' Industrial School	
School for the Deaf and the Blind-
School Counsellor  	
5. Juvenile Court..
Provincial Probation Officer-
Young Offenders' Unit	
6. Adult Court—Borstal..
7. Private physicians	
8. Parents, relatives, self, friends..
9. Other—Speech therapist 	
Totals	
194
219
31
1
16
15
10
1
1
130
32
1
1
1
1
31
12
6
34
77
29
7
3
57
1
35
70
115
1
1,132
488
43.11
209
18.46
156
13.78
35
70
115
1
3.09
6.18
10.17
0.09
1,132
100.00 T 110
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 4.—Problems and Disorders Presented by the New Cases Given
Full Examination by Child Guidance Clinics, April 1st, 1952, to March
31st, 1953.
1. Primary behaviour disorders—
(a) Habit disorders—
Nail-biting _
Thumb-sucking_
Enuresis	
Masturbation ___
Tantrums	
Soiling _
Feeding difficulties _
Other 	
(b) Personality disorders-
Seclusive states..—
Depressed states ...
Day-dreaming.
Excessive introspection _
Feelings of inadequacy—
Sensitiveness 	
Phantasy 	
Aggressiveness	
Negativism	
Other 	
(c)   Neurotic disorders—
Tics and habit spasms .
Sleep-walking	
Stammering.__	
Overactivity	
Fears  	
Nervousness _
Nightmares —
Anxiety.—.	
Other 	
(d) Conduct disorders—
Truancy _.
Fighting and quarreling.
Untruthfulness 	
Stealing _
Destruction of property-
Use of alcohol  -	
Cruelty	
Disobedience	
Setting fires	
Sex offences.  	
Vagrancy.
Running away	
Staying out late	
Breaking and entering _
Assault  	
Other 	
2. Psychotic and prepsychotic-
Manic depressive 	
Schizophrenia _
With juvenile general paresis .
With epidemic encephalitis	
Undifferentiated	
Other  	
3. Psychoneurosis and neurosis-
Hysterical type _
Psychasthenic type .
Anxiety type	
Other-
Children
M.
4. Convulsive disorders—
Epilepsy 	
Other	
5. Psychopathic personality 	
6. Educational disability—
(a) Associated with dull-normal or border-line intelligence.
(b) Special mental disability—
Writing	
Reading.
Arithemtic.
Other__
(c)   Social adjustment.
2
24
3
21
4
5
2
6
2
21
2
4
8
4
2
16
3
6
47
3
13
4
2
1
3
19
3
3
2
12
2
18
2
3
9
4
12
2
1
13
Adults
M.
24
3
1
14
4
1
12
2
2
Total
2
5
36
7
33
6
7
5
8
3
27
2
5
9
6
4
5
9
11
2
2
10
27
3
10
87
3
5
16
4
22
4
8
1
34
7
10
10
2
18
3
32
J REPORTS of child GUIDANCE CLINICS
T 111
Table No. 4.—Problems and Disorders Presented by the New Cases Given
Full Examination by Child Guidance Clinics, April 1st, 1952, to March
31st, 1953—Continued.
Children
Adults
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
7. Behaviour disorder associated with somatic disorder—
3
3
11
4
14
2
2
1
1
1
1
36
5
10
23
6
10
18
55
4
1
8
5
1
7
1
4
—
2
17
5
14
6
2
12
55
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
31
1
1
1
6
2
1
4
3
8. Mental deficiencies—
(a) Familial  	
(b) Mongolism _	
21
9
1
23
2
3
1
(i)   With other organic disorders  	
(j)   Undifferentiated _ _  	
(k) Other  _„    	
5
1
3
54
10. No ascertained mental deviation—
10
26
31
8
10
(/) Social problems—
(1) Placement	
(2) Adoption ___   _	
30
110
6
2
(5) Other  	
(g) Unascertained _	
4
(0   Sight problem_   	
2
3
12. Borstal 	
31
Totals  _	
519
257
97
56
929 T 112
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 5.—Chart Comparing Ages with Intelligence Quotients of All
New Cases Seen at Child Guidance Clinics from April 1st, 1952, to March
31st, 1953.
Males
Females
0-19 	
20-49       	
9
9
1
1
2
_
22
50-69 ____ _	
5
16
5
7
33
70-79   	
3
8
9
1
1
	
22
80-89           _.                   -.
7
19
26
16
2
16
15
18
7
2
22
23
10
7
1
5
11
14
10
1
1
1
1
	
52
90-99   —	
68
100-109               	
69
110-129                  	
41
130-139   	
5
140+ - -    	
4
1
5
Totals 	
91
91
79
49
3
2
2
317
Respectfully submitted.
Ultan P. Byrne, M.D., D.P.H., D.I.H.,
Director, Child Guidance Clinics.
Intelligence Quotient
Age in Years
1-4
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40+
Total
0-19               .  	
7
9
6
19
20
42
33
2
1
5
37
16
23
41
50
31
2
2
5
17
12
34
31
34
23
1
1
6
8
14
23
27
16
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
4
20-49  —	
19
50-69  _	
70
70-79     	
80-89   	
90-99  	
100-109  	
110-129          	
42
92
116
155
107
130-139
140+ -
Totals   	
6
5
139
207
157
98
11
612
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT
U. P. Byrne, Esq., M.D., D.P.H., D.I.H.,
Director, Child Guidance Clinics,
455 West Thirteenth Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Sir,—During the 1952-53 year the work of the Social Service Department has
continued to develop along the lines experienced in recent years. The demand from the
community for increased direct service to children and parents has continued, and much
of the staff thinking and energy has been directed to services in this area.
Social-work responsibilities in the Child Guidance Clinic include participation in
diagnostic and consultative services to health and welfare agencies and institutions,
various teaching and educational duties, and services to parents and children seeking
direct help from the Clinic. They also involve work in various joint staff projects and
committees, interpretation and co-ordination with other agencies, and planning and
arranging of services as in Travelling Clinics. Several surveys and research activities have
also been undertaken, including a follow-up study of the effectiveness of Travelling Clinic
services which is just under way. REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS T 113
There has been some decrease in services to other agencies except for the Travelling
Clinic, which has continued to take the full time of one staff member of this department.
In the educational area, social workers have continued to contribute to various professional and community groups and projects. We have also participated in teaching and
orientation of student-nurses and social workers. On several occasions we have been
called upon to teach in-service training class for the Provincial Social Welfare Branch,
and one of our workers has given time to teaching part of a course in research at the
University of British Columbia School of Social Work. We have also introduced a
number of visitors from other countries to social services here. The Federal mental-health
project for students training in conjunction with the University School of Social Work
has continued for the second year, with eight students in the campus unit. Lack of space
made location outside of the Clinic necessary, and while this is not desirable it has worked
out quite satisfactorily.
It is expected that the Mental Health Services will gain four master's degree students
from this project after completion of their training. When those coming to the Child
Guidance Clinics have joined the staff, eleven of our sixteen social workers will be people
trained in these student projects of the Mental Health Services.
Direct services to families have again shown a tendency to increase in relation to
other services. The social workers take considerable responsibility in intake. They
obtain information, explore the problem with parents and children, help them toward
good use of Clinic services or referral to a more satisfactory source of help, and they
assess the problem in terms of social and parent-child relationships. A beginning was
made this year in establishment of a social-work intake section, and it is hoped that this
approach can be broadened as a means of giving earlier and more helpful service. The
Social Service Department has also taken part in inaugurating the use of pre-Clinic team
conferences as a part of intake procedure. This is seen as an aid to making early decisions
which will facilitate and focus our services.
From their continuing case-work help following intake, the social workers contribute
to diagnosis and treatment planning. They also carry a responsibility in most continuing
cases for case-work services to parents and children. They have responsibility for integrating and co-ordinating their work with that of other team members and also for bringing
to the client the community resources which they can use.
The following statistics give some indication of the services given, and they indicate
the continued trend toward more direct and intensive services. In the Vancouver Clinic
there were 344 applications for " direct" help which were handled by the Social Service
Department. The case-count indicates only those cases which were incorporated in caseloads for continued services. The over-all intake was up from the previous year by about
44 per cent (Victoria, 170 per cent, and Vancouver, 15 per cent), and cases carried over
to the next fiscal year were up about 31 per cent (Victoria, 61 per cent, and Vancouver,
24 per cent). Total cases carried increased about 26 per cent (Victoria, 74 per cent,
and Vancouver, 15 per cent), and direct interviews with clients showed an increase of
44 per cent (216 per cent in Victoria, and 29 per cent in Vancouver). The steady
increase in numbers has been evident for some years and would seem to reflect increased
public awareness, resulting from the Clinic's growth in ability to give needed services.
The latter part of this fiscal year has particularly seen a considerable increase in applications, with the result that present facilities and staff are taxed and there is usually a waiting
period for appointments.
One feature of the statistics is the outstanding growth in services at the Victoria
Child Guidance Clinic. This is, of course, a result of the establishment of a full team
there. It was possible to add a second social worker last summer to meet the demands
on the new team, and a third worker is needed in the near future.
While these statistics are focused mainly on case-work services, some indication of
other aspects of social services is given by a total of 1,105 cases from other agencies, T 114 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
including Travelling Clinics. In addition to the quantitative aspects of these statistics,
there are several figures which, at least, suggest a qualitative interpretation. The number
of case-work interviews has again increased more rapidly than case-count; there is a
considerable increase in inter-professional conferring and there is an increaase in supervisory consultation within the department. These are aspects of professional practice
which can be expected to reflect in better services to the individual.
At the beginning of the fiscal year there was an unusual turnover of staff in this
department, resulting in many vacancies. Replacements were made by the end of the
summer, and the case-work staff was at that time almost completely new. This, of course,
caused some dislocation, but the new staff made it possible to avoid too much disruption
of services, and they have taken a real interest in their work and in various staff projects.
The members of the staff who left last year were well-trained social workers whose child-
guidance experience contributed to their qualification for the jobs to which they moved.
Higher compensation and the opportunity for advancement were factors in most of these
moves. One of our supervisors moved into administration of a large medical social-
service department and another into the development of a child-placement agency. One
took a position in another Province, and other workers moved to family, children, and
correctional fields in this area.
As our own services have expanded, the gaps in community resources have become
more and more obvious. We are often called upon to give services to severely disturbed
children who are in real need of care and treatment in an institutional setting. Over and
over again we are seeing the need for a residential centre for these children, who cannot
respond to help in a normal home or foster-home setting.
There are excellent developments in the correctional field, but we are still finding that
services are hampered by gaps in this area.
In many cases where there is a necessity for temporary removal from home during
treatment, adequate facilities are lacking. Our workers also find a continuing need for
psychiatric out-patient facilities, and we are sometimes in the position of giving child-
guidance services where adult out-patient help is greatly needed by the parents. It is
hoped that some of these gaps can be filled in the near future.
The Social Service Department is pleased at the prospect of a new clinic building.
Efficiency and adequacy of service have been seriously handicapped by present space
and facilities, and it is hoped and expected that the new quarters will provide the essentials
for better service. REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
T 115
Table No. 6.—Social Services of Provincial Child Guidance Clinics,
April 1st, 1952, to March 3 1st, 1953
Case-work Services
Vancouver
Victoria
1952-53
Totals
1951-52
Totals
Cases brought forward from previous fiscal year-
New cases  	
Reopened during year	
Reopened from previous year.
Total intake	
Total cases carried. 	
Cases closed during fiscal year	
Cases carried over to next fiscal year-
Number of applications for service.
Total casework interviews with and regarding clients _
Conferences attended in agency diagnostic service	
Conferences attended on cases carried by Clinic	
Consultations with team members	
Periods of supervision _ _ __.
Travelling Clinics (total days)..
Cases given service in Travelling Clinics _
157
36
231
8
17
256
405
210
195
344
7,860
687
700
367
757
701/2
320
129
2
12
143
177
117
58
1,555
47
89
63
34
17
51
193
360
10
29
399
582
329
253
9,415
734
789
430
791
87 V2
371
200
230
24
23
277
453
267
193
6,100
1,017
397
359
677
80
275
Respectfully submitted.
Donald B. Ricketts,
Supervisor, Social Service Department.
PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT
U. P. Byrne, Esq., M.D., D.P.H., D.I.H.,
Director, Child Guidance Clinics,
455 West Thirteenth Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith is a tabulated summary of the work of the Psychology
Department of the Provincial Child Guidance Clinics from April 1st, 1952, to March
31st, 1953.
A comparison of this table with that of last year shows trends which reflect, but
do not explain, some important changes. One of these is the decrease in the number of
tests administered for Borstal screening purposes at Oakalla. This was due to the appointment in July, 1952, of Mr. R. V. McAllister, of our staff, to establish the first full-time
position as psychologist at Oakalla. Another change is indicated in the increase in the
amount of work done in Victoria. In January, 1953, Mr. Paul Laeser was transferred
to Victoria to become the first full-time psychologist on the Vancouver Island Clinic team.
Until that time the work had been done periodically by psychologists from Vancouver,
who still assist Mr. Laeser on Up-Island Clinics. The increase in the volume of work
since the Vancouver Island Clinic has been established on a full-time basis indicates that
another full-time psychologist is now necessary.
The increase in time devoted to play interviews shows that we have made some
progress in the extension of our service in this area. However, in view of the need to
meet the demands for diagnostic service, its chief value at present is that it provides
experience for our staff in the use of play techniques. During this year eleven children
were seen for periods varying from six months to one year. In addition, three children
were seen over lengthy periods for reading tuition, three were seen for extensive observation, and four others for interviews concerned with vocational planning. T 116 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1952-53
In addition to the staff changes already mentioned, Miss Mavis Plenderleith resigned
in September to continue postgraduate studies at the University of California, Berkeley,
and Miss Mona Hopkins and Miss Susan James joined the staff as psychological interns.
Our contribution to the educational programme continues, with an increase in the
number of talks to interested groups and in the orientation of other professional persons.
This year, for the first time, three groups of students from postgraduate courses in Clinical
Psychology at the University of British Columbia spent a day at the Clinic observing
psychologists in action. This brief orientation is suggestive of the contribution which
we may be able to make in the future through co-operating with the University in its
clinical training programme.
The development over the past year has been gratifying, not only in the general
extension of our services, but in the quality of the work which a more experienced staff
has been able to contribute.
Respectfully submitted.
Marjory Munro, M.A.,
Psychologist. REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
T 117
IEJC-X
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t; o <u o T 118 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1952-53
REPORT OF RESEARCH DIVISION
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the annual report of the U.B.C.-Crease Clinic
Research Unit for the fiscal year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
The two main research problems reported in our last annual statement continue to
occupy the laboratory: (a) The physiological and anatomical basis of lobotomy; (b) the
electroencephalogram in abnormal personality. Because of delay in obtaining suitable
personnel, the second of these has been carried on to only a limited extent. This problem
will shortly be rectified.
Dr. Kennard has succeeded in producing some very interesting results in cats and
monkeys with frontal, temporal, and other removals. The catatonia ensuing in cats
following cingulate gyrectomies has been remarkable, and coloured moving pictures of
such animals have already been taken. Mr. Roy Griffiths, B.A., a research fellow working for his Master of Science degree in this department, has continued his very interesting
work on the effect of removal of brain tissue upon already established conditioned reflexes.
On the study dealing with electroencephalographic differences in abnormal personalities, a trial run has been made of approximately 100 patients at the Crease Clinic
on whom Dr. Fister, Director of the Neurological Department, has made the E.E.G.
recordings. These have been grouped with approximately 1,000 other records which
Dr. Kennard has from previous clinical work on behaviour disordered children, long-
term criminals, sexual psychopaths, and other inmates of gaols or mental hospitals. It is
obvious that the correlation of E.E.G. and clinical psychological findings which we
propose to carry on during the next twelve months will be of great importance in
prognostic work.
Dr. Gibson's work has been continued on establishing methods for the tracing of
interrupted fibre pathways in the human brain following lobotomy operations. A silver
staining method has been worked out which has given excellent results in a normal control
brain and two lobotomized brains. This work was reported during March, 1953, for the
North Pacific Society of Neurology and Psychiatry meeting in Portland, Ore. It is hoped
that sufficient personnel may be attached to the laboratory in the next year to make this
method well worth while. The Surgeon-General of the U.S. Army has given us access
to a large collection of lobotomized brains, and he has recently sent four to us for
anatomical study.
The work which was commenced over a year ago by Dr. John Harvey on the problems of cerebral vessels has been discontinued in this laboratory and will be carried on
in the Department of Anatomy of the University, in which department Dr. Harvey has
been made a professor.
During the year Dr. Kennard travelled to the meetings of the American Neurological
Association and of the American E.E.G. Society, held conjointly at Atlantic City. She
presented a paper on " The E.E.G. and Psychopathology " in a symposium on this
subject. Dr. Gibson attended the meetings of the American Neurological Association
and those of the American Society of Neuropathology, held jointly at Atlantic City.
VISITORS
Visitors to the laboratory have included Dean Macdonald Critchley, of the Institute
of Neurology, London, England; Sir Philip Livingston, D.M.S. (Air) (retired), of the
R.A.F.; Professor Stuart Morson, of the Department of Neurosurgery, University of
Sydney, Australia; Dr. Thomas Greenaway, of the Department of Medicine, University
of Sydney; Maj.-Gen. George E. Armstrong, Surgeon-General of the U.S. Army;  Pro- REPORT OF RESEARCH DIVISION T 119
fessor Robert Dow, University of Oregon; and Professor Robert Ray, University of
Washington Medical School, Seattle, Wash. During the year, also, Dr. Jenkins, of the
Department of National Health and Welfare, inspected the monkey cages provided for
out of Ottawa grants, in company with representatives of the Treasury Board and Dr.
Horowitz, of Ottawa. They appeared well pleased with the accommodation provided
for the monkeys, cats, and other laboratory animals, and seemed satisfied that their money
had been wisely spent.
EQUIPMENT
Apart from cages to house the monkey colony and our cats, the only large addition
of apparatus has been photographic enlarging equipment, which has made the greatest
difference to the work of the laboratory for publication.
BUDGET
The budget for the year consisted of Ottawa grants-in-aid to the amount of
$32,182.64, together with an operating and apparatus account from the Mental Health
Services of British Columbia and a small appropriation from the University to the
Department of Neurological Research for items of equipment, repairs to apparatus, and
special services, not otherwise provided for.
PUBLICATIONS
Publications from the laboratory have included six during the year 1952-53 by
Dr. Margaret Kennard. Dr. Gibson gave a paper on "Human Cerebral Synapses,"
presented for us at the First International Congress of Neuropathologists at Rome, about
to appear in " Science " in the United States. Dr. Kennard and Dr. Gibson have spoken
widely on subjects of neurological interest and of the physiological basis of mental
disease.
DISPLAYS
Displays of work being carried on at the laboratory have been made at the annual
" open house " at the Provincial Mental Hospital and at the International Congress of
Neuropathology at Rome in September, 1952.
COMMITTEES
Dr. Kennard and Dr. Gibson have been asked to serve on the University Committee
on Narcotic Addiction and on the Medical Board of the Cerebral Palsy Association.
PUBLIC RELATIONS
Relations with the University have remained very cordial throughout the year, and it
is a matter of great regret to the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine that additional space
for this laboratory has not yet been provided. However, as soon as estimates permit, the
conversion of two large classrooms in the medical-hut quadrangle is proposed. For limitation of space, it has been necessary to cut down drastically on the number of people
who can assist with the work, including many voluntary student workers, among whom
mention must be made of Miss Anne Worth, who did an excellent piece of work in the
summer of 1952 under Dr. Kennard's direction.
NEEDS
The needs of the laboratory continue to be adequate space and a relief from the
ever-present danger of fire. Further, a Grass eight-channel electroencephalograph is
urgently required, together with a stroboscope and conditioning movie projector for T 120 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
research on E.E.G. in psychopathology, which must eventually include a number of non-
hospitalized cases. The need for the maintenance of continuity in the work of the
laboratory is evident to all who have had experience in scientific institutions. The delays
associated with Ottawa grants have made it very difficult to acquire the personnel required
to begin at the first of each fiscal year.
CONCLUSION
Mention must be made in closing of the active co-operation of the many departments
of the University of British Columbia upon which we have called for help and advice
during the past year. The care afforded our animals by the Department of Animal
Nutrition is second to none on this continent. The Department of Physics, its workshops,
and in particular Professor Arthur Crooker, of the Department of Optics, have rendered
us assistance on many occasions. Finally, the library of the University has been our
mainstay, and we have had excellent co-operation from all its branches.
W. C. Gibson, M.D.,
Director of Research. STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS T 121
MENTAL HOSPITALS STATISTICAL TABLES
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Mental Hospitals—Essondale,
Colquitz, and The Woodlands School, New Westminster—from April 1st,
1952, to March 31st, 1953.
Movement of Population
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
1,843
439
286
44
7
2
2
1
1,641
369
66
2
1
3,484
808
286
110
9
2
3
1
2,624
794
2,079
538
In residence, The Woodlands School, New Westminster, March
31st, 1952___   _
On probation, carried forward from 1951-52, Essondale.—	
On probation, carried forward from 1951-52, The Woodlands
On probation, carried forward from 1951-52, Colquitz 	
On escape, carried forward from 1951-52, Essondale-   	
On escape,  carried forward from 1951-52, The Woodlands
On escape, carried forward from 1951-52, Colquitz 	
4,703
Admitted during the year 1952-53—
559
28
180
7
1
19
465
13
54
3
3
1,024
41
234
10
1
22
1,332
Total under treatment, Essondale, The Woodlands School,
New   Westminster,   and   Colquitz,   April   1st,   1952,   to
March 31st, 1953- _    - 	
Discharged during the period of April 1st, 1952, to March
31st, 1953—
(a) Essondale—■
23
134
167
209
2
71
4
94
29
105
170
46
1
76
1
61
52
239
337
255
3
147
5
155
3,418
739
2,617
505
6,035
Not insane -	
Died               _	
704
489
1,193
(b) New Westminster—
1
4
7
9
1
6
9
1
5
13
18
Died    	
21
16
37
(c) Colquitz—■
1
2
1
10
1
2
1
10
Died         	
14
14
Total discharged from Essondale, The Woodlands School, New
1,244
Total in residence, Essondale, The Woodlands School, New
2,679
2,112
4,791 T 122
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Mental Hospitals—Essondale,
Colquitz, and The Woodlands School, New Westminster—from April 1st,
1952, to March 31st, 1953—Continued.
Movement of Population
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
Essondale—
Total on books, March 31st, 1952 _ 	
Admitted during 1952-53                               	
1,889
776
2
1,708
515
16
3,597
1,291
18
2,667
903
2,239
584
Received from New Westminster, The Woodlands School-
4,906
Discharged during 1952-53-     	
704
187
12
489
95
1,193
282
12
1,487
446
205
371
118
817
313
1,764
1,655
3,419
New Westminster, The Woodlands School—
Total on books, March 31st, 1952    •	
651
23
489
32
1,140
21
2
16
16
37
18
55
289
12
289
12
Total in residence, The Woodlands School, New Westminster,
March 31st, 1953 ,	
628
457
1,085
Colquitz—■
Total on books, March 31st, 1952  —	
301
14
301
Discharged during 1952-53	
14
14
14
Total in residence, Colquitz, March 31st, 1953	
287
287
Total in residence, Essondale, March 31st, 1953 	
Total in residence, The Woodlands School, New Westminster,
March 31st, 1953 _ _
Total in residence, Colquitz, March 31st, 1953 	
1,764
628
287
1,655
457
3,419
1,085
287
Grand total in residence, Essondale, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, and Colquitz, March 31st, 1953	
2,679
2,112
4,791
Percentage of patients recovered and improved to admissions-
Percentage of discharges to admissions (.deaths excluded)	
Percentage of deaths to number under treatment- 	
Daily average population  	
..22 (21.99)
67.64
3.03
___ 4,674.37 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
T 123
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Mental
Hospitals since Inception
Year
Discharges
O si
0) V
« o ca
•"•n_.e
3
z.
ill
«__
M ^ S_h
I III
iill
OS'S x
*xi o>
P ea  B 5!
H.QZH
1872	
1873	
1874	
1875	
1876 	
1877  	
1878	
1879 	
1880 	
1881 	
1882 _
1883	
1884—	
1885	
1886 	
1887	
1888 ___.
1889 	
1890 	
1891	
1892	
1893	
1894 ______
1895 	
1896 	
1897 -
1898 	
1899 	
1900 	
1901	
1902 	
1903	
1904 	
1905   _
1906	
1907	
1908 	
1909.—	
1910	
1911 	
1912	
1913 	
1914 	
1915 	
1916	
1917 	
1918	
Jan. 1, 1919, to
March 31, 1920
1920-1921	
1921-1922	
1922-1923	
1923-1924	
1924-1925	
1925-1926	
1926-1927.	
1927-1928	
1928-1929	
1929-1930 —
1930-1931	
1931-1932	
1932-1933	
1933-1934	
1934-1935	
1935-1936	
18
15
12
29
22
14
16
18
17
13
7
8
10
20
27
36
26
41
52
49
52
44
80
62
64
74
81
101
113
115
121
139
115
123
150
221
230
232
280
332
375
380
402
332
353
371
375
574
489
478
438
447
461
475
494
542
543
602
632
562
635
610
653
679
1
10
4
3
11
4
7
4
5
5
3
4
2
5
10
15
12
14
17
19
17
14
13
29
23
20
27
31
38
40
30
38
46
43
361
48
681
732
84
67 *
741
904
58
83
732
88
75
116
88
96
91
842
63
57=
76*
75*
92s
118i
701
58 «
444
613
711
631
6
5
6
5
6
4
10
18
19
11
25
8
13
32
27
20
31
37
26
33
43
43
56
77
82
114
128
146
126
91
96
78
95
221
173
178
167
121
242
240
171
252
294
311
235
299
323
309
349
304
1
5
3
10
5
3
5
5
2
3
2
5
6
5
3
4
12
20
13
14
19
20
9
14
19
21
29
25
25
26
26
27
28
39
57
40
41
60
76
67
74
89
80
106
132
132
122
114
133
163
138
142
161
147
181
223
191
181
195
200
321
291
16
14
19
32
35
38
36
41
48
48
49
49
51
61
66
77
82
100
117
123
135
133
162
164
171
203
221
234
258
284
311
349
321
348
388
461
507
536
595
690
752
919
1,027
1,090
1,205
1,301
1,347
1,458
1,566
1,649
1,697
1,784
1,884
1,995
2,125
2,269
2,347
2,411
2,550
2,676
2,824
2,960
3,080
3,180
5
13
3
3
5
7
2
10
5
11
5
18
17
6
12
29
2
7
32
18
13
24
26
27
38
27
43
73
46
29
48
105
62
167
108
63
115
96
46
111
108
83
48
87
100
111
130
144
78
64
139
126
148
136
I 120
I 100
28
18
31
26
48
54
49
54
54
58
61
55
57
59
71
88
102
103
123
152
166
175
179
213
224
228
246
285
327
356
377
413
466
480
505
552
666
765
816
896
1,034
1,065
1,264
1,364
1,437
1,527
1,650
1,753
2,025
2,043
2,137
2,180
2,234
2,327
2,434
2,565
2,743
2,914
3,063
3,148
3,214
3,390
3,530
3,721
3,838
5.55
66.66
33.33
10.34
50.00
28.57
43.75
22.22
29.41
38.46
42.85
50.00
20.00
25.00
37.03
41.66
46.15
34.15
32.69
38.77
32.69
31.81
16.25
46.77
35.93
27.03
33.33
30.69
33.63
34.78
24.79
27.34
40.00
33.33
23.03
21.30
28.30
31.00
30.00
19.57
18.90
22.63
14.43
25.00
20.68
23.72
20.00
20.20
14.17
20.08
20.77
18.56
13.66
12.00
15.38
13.28
16.76
19.10
10.60
10.32
6.92
10.00
10.87
9.27
5.55
80.00
33.33
26.89
63.63
78.57
62.50
27.77
29.41
61.54
57.14
62.50
60.00
25.00
59.25
55.55
69.23
46.34
44.23
46.94
51.92
72.72
40.00
64.51
75.00
37.83
49.38
62.37
57.52
52.17
50.41
53.96
62.61
61.78
52.06
41.20
53.90
64.60
59.28
54.42
53.80
62.10
45.77
52.41
47.87
44.74
45.33
58.71
72.60
57.32
59.36
64.20
66.16
62.53
50.00
60.33
71.07
71.26
64.24
63.52
58.42
60.65
64.32
54.05
5.55
16.12
11.53
20.83
9.35
6.12
16.16
14.81
8.62
8.19
3.63
5.26
3.33
6.94
6.81
4.80
2.87
3.25
7.64
11.69
6.95
7.60
8.92
8.92
3.94
5.69
6.66
6.42
8.14
6.63
6.06
5.57
5.42
5.34
5.04
5.08
7.44
6.40
4.57
5.83
7.02
5.30
5.43
6.19
5.24
6.42
7.47
6.51
5.97
5.33
6.10
7.25
5.93
5.83
6.27
5.36
6.21
7.28
6.06
5.63
5.75
5.66
5.94
7.58
1 Three not insane.
6 Five not insane.
2 One not insane.
s Two not insane.
1 Four not insane.
5 Six not insane. T 124
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 2-
-Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Mental
Hospitals since Inception—Continued
c/_
a
o
'vi
Vi
•a
<
Discharges
0
[fl
3
a.
Year
•a
Si
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o
u
si
p.
■a
0
u
0
>
0
VI
£
el
u
0
erf 0 c3
Z"Sw
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0
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„       co
rt'C-2
C > co
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c § to"2
8-Sll
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O n
ew.c w
a 3     a
c||l
^^ e_ t_
OhOZH
1936-1937 —
1937-1938 	
1938-1939	
1939-1940	
1940-1941	
1941-1942	
793
834
827
869
864
834
803
840
822
834
880
1,111
1,260
1,415
78s
74
72 3
111'
107 e
718
91°
87
9610
117»
9710
124"
13712
195
300
330
345
455
410
400
443
423
377
352
496
560
748
787
268
207
208
230
254
255
260
309
300
240
238
240
209
202
3,301
3,487
3,612
3,710
3,836
3,902
3,925
3,960
4,019
4,110
4,151
4,269
4,355
4,602
121
186
125
98
126
66
23
35
59
91
41
118
86
247
—
4,067
4,255
4,471
4,713
4,781
4,843
4,919
4,965
4,960
5,014
5,174
5,447
5,758
5,999
9.96
8.87
8.71
11.39
12.38
8.51
11.32
10.36
10.46
14.02
11.02
11.34
10.87
13.78
63.60
67.30
78.72
88.50
79.97
56.46
66.50
61.66
58.39
57.43
68.18
63.64
76.59
69.40
6.59
4.86
4.65
4.88
5.31
6.54
1942-1943. 	
1943-1944—	
1944-1945	
1945-1946            ..   ..
5.31
6.02
6.04
5.84
1946-1947 - .
1947-1948.. .."	
1948-1949	
1949-1950	
4.59
4.40
3.63
3.37
r/J
e
.2
'in
CO
1
Discharges
Q
u
3*8
So
erf 0 S3
•MS
S
H
O
a
eq
es
p
U
u
Q
1-1
B
f
3
*■*
0 0
Oca
■0
p
ss
08;
—   fll P- M
loG.1
8-§21
fl<PL<a<;
u
■a
S2   1
llli
B__'9q
4>__
Is
oSg
Mo P
ssa
«.__.\_
0 s< u
si S a
Year
•a
u
u
0
>
0
0
u
«
•a
u
>
0
u
a
E
•0
0
>
0
u
a
S
1
QQ
M
■^.  CO
1950-51    -
1951-52.                	
1,499
1,217
1,332
169
138
53
421
301
240
414
438
350
284
252
258
223
188
183
4,538
4,578
4.791
40
213
64
4,815
6,020
6.035
39.35
36.07
21.99
67.04
92.77
67.64
3.53
3.12
1952-53
3.03
3 Two not insane.
10 Seven not insane,
psychosis.
" Five not insane. 7 Twelve not insane.
11 Three not insane;   196 without psychosis.
8 Ten not insane.
12 Two not insane;
8 Eight not insane,
seventy-eight without
Table No. 3.—Showing the Total Number of Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths
in the Mental Hospitals from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Months
Admissions
Discharges
Deaths
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
1952
April	
58
69
57
88
74
66
85
59
61
58
58
61
28
36
44
45
38
36
62
42
46
58
43
60
86
105
101
133
112
102
147
101
107
116
101
121
58
31
30
41
48
52
58
38
29
57
52
47
31
22
25
18
27
46
25
25
38
26
29
40
89
53
55
59
75
98
83
63
67
83
81
87
8
18
8
10
7
7
8
7
13
12
7
8
4
9
5
5
3
5
2
5
6
9
9
8
12
27
June  __	
July             	
13
15
August 	
September 	
10
12
10
November 	
December  	
1953
January	
February „	
March	
12
19
21
16
16
Totals  	
794
538
1,332
541
352
893
113
70
183 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
T 125
Table No. 4.—Showing What Districts Contributed Patients
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Abbotsford  _	
6
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
18
1
1
8
8
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
6
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
9
1
1
1
13
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
23
1
2
1
1
1
2
11
1
1
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
—
1
1
1
3
1
4
4
5
9
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
41
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
19
9
1
1
4
1
3
1
1
4
2
1
3
1
3
2
1
1
6
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
12
1
5
1
1
17
7
1
119
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
4
1
1
6
5
63
1
12
2
14
3
3
1
1
3
1
4
6
1
4
1
7
12
2
2
2
2
1
1
4
3
2
1
1
1
2
103
3
2
1
2
2
1
2
2
3
1
2
1
5
5
1
39
18
3
1
1
1
7
1
3
3
1
1
3
1
6
4
1
4
3
2
1
5
1
i
222
Kimberley   	
Kinnaird
Alberni _ -
3
1
4
3
4
1
1
Lang Bay 	
Black Creek	
Langford.	
Langley 	
3
Brocklehurst	
Lantzville  	
Loos	
1
1
Bull River
Lulu Island __	
3
Burnaby-	
Lumby 	
Lynnmour 	
Lytton    	
Mabel Lake  	
2
1
1
1
2
1
Maillardville	
Maple Bay.. -	
Chase  '
1
4
Matsqui— -	
2
Merritt  -	
Cobble Hill	
4
Colquitz - _.
1
Comox  .
2
Coquitlam 	
6
Monte Lake  —
Montreal, Que  	
Courtenay-	
1
1
11
10
New Hazelton —
1
New Westminster	
102
1
Dawson, Y.T.
North Vancouver	
30
Notch Hill 	
2
Delta
Oakalla Prison Farm	
17
Oak Bay 	
4
3
2
1
Oyster Bay _ 	
1
10
1
Ponoka, Alta -
1
Falkland
9
1
Field	
Port Kells 	
1
1
7
2
13
16
2
Fort St. John
6
2
5
1
3
1
9
3
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
Glade	
Hope-
Hot Spring Cove    _
Saturna Island	
Kamloops
Kelowna	
Sechelt
Kemano ',.,	
Shutty Bench
Carried forward	
119
103
222
331
247
578 T 126
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 4.—Showing What Districts Contributed Patients
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953—Continued
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
331
2
4
1
1
1
1
8
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
371
247
3
1
3
3
3
1
1
2
6
208
578
5
5
1
1
3
1
4
11
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
9
579
730
1
2
41
1
1
1
3
1
3
4
3
1
1
1
478
1
4
40
1
2
4
3
1
2
2
1,208
Vanderhoof 	
1
Vernon  	
6
81
Wardner	
Webster's Corners	
1
1
3
Steward	
Wells	
3
1
Telkwa
4
Whitehorse	
White Rock __	
6
Tofino
5
Toronto, Ont.
Yale   	
Trail 	
Yarrow	
1
Totals  -	
Carried forward	
730      |
478
1,208
794
538
1,332
Table No. 5.—Showing the Number of Attacks in Those Admitted
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Number of Attacks
Male
Female
Total
320
73
18
3
1
2
1
1
1
25
317
32
224
76
21
6
2
2
27
163
17
544
149
Third                                       - 	
39
9
Fifth   -	
3
Sixth-   .  	
4
Eighth
Tenth
1
52
49
Totals                          _              	
794
538
1,332
Table No. 6.—Showing the Reported Duration of Mental Illness Prior to
Admission in Those Admitted from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Duration of Attack
Male
Female
Total
Unc
45
91
29
27
26
15
2
2
4
317
230
6
39
72
14
25
15
29
4
4
163
169
4
84
163
'
6      „                                                                                    .                  	
43
'
12       ,                                                                                	
52
'
41
'
5    „     	
44
*
10    „                              -    —  	
6
15    ,                                                             	
6
r 15    „                              .. .. -                - -	
4
Wit
Unl
Life
480
399
10
Totals                                 -	
794
538
1,332 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
T  127
Table No. 7.—Showing the Reported Cause of Attack in Those Admitted
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Alleged Cause
Male
Female
Total
33
59
6
1
2
1
2
258
1
7
11
1
1
1
90
1
1
1
317
5
17
1
4
235
1
6
1
4
100
1
163
38
76
7
1
2
1
6
493
1
1
13
1
15
1
1
1
190
1
1
1
1
480
794
538
1,332
Table No. 8.—Showing the Number Discharged on Probation and Results
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Results
Male
Female
Total
Discharged recovered-
Discharged improved-
Discharged unimproved-
Discharged without psychosis-
Totals _  	
24
135
171
211
541
Disposition of discharged—
Discharged to Homes for the Aged-
Discharged to Crease Clinic..
Total discharges to community..
Totals	
97
10
434
541
Returned to hospital from probation	
On probation and still out at end of year__
29
105
171
47
352
126
4
222
352
25
82
53
240
342
258
893
223
14
656
893
50
162
Table No. 9.—Showing Reported Duration of Mental Illness Prior to Admission in Those Discharged from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Alleged Duration
Male
Female
Total
32
51
16
11
18
36
27
6
17
235
92
27
54
21
12
25
24
10
3
27
62
87
59
105
37
„      „    3      „       _ 	
23
„      „    6      „       -	
43
„      „ 12      „      _   _	
60
37
„    3    „    — -             	
9
44
297
179
541
352
893 T 128
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953,
in the Mental Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz
Sex
Age
Time in Hospital
Certified Cause
Years
Months
Days
M.
23
3
1
10
Haemoptysis; bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; catatonic schizophrenia.
F.
66
4
4
Bronchopneumonia; myocardial degeneration; arteriosclerotic heart-disease.
F.
77
.	
10
13
Bronchopneumonia; myocardial degeneration; arteriosclerotic heart-disease.
M.
59
12
6
28
Terminal bronchopneumonia; bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; paranoid
schizophrenia.
M.
70
2
1
1
Bronchopneumonia; hypertensive heart-disease; nephrosclerosis; encepha-
Iitis-Schilder's type-with-psychosis.
F.
1
2
Acute intestinal obstruction; intussusception.
M.
56
11
Pneumonia; hypertensive cardiovascular disease; arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
71
2
6
15
Coronary thrombosis; arteriosclerosis; adhesive pericarditis; cirrhosis of
the liver.
M.
64
	
	
8
Spontaneous subarachnoid cerebral haemorrhage; cerebral sclerosis; generalized arteriosclerosis; chronic pyelonephritis.
F.
78
1
2
26
Bronchopneumonia; chronic arteriosclerosis.
M.
66
1
1
17
Acute pulmonary oedema; chronic myocardial degeneration; pre-senile
dementia.
M.
66
26
Bronchopneumonia; chronic peptic ulcer; arteriosclerotic dementia.
F.
77
32
2
7
Bronchopneumonia; senile dementia.
F.
68
2
9
5
Bronchopneumonia; chronic arteriosclerotic heart-disease; arteriosclerotic
dementia.
M.
66
1
8
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral arteriosclerosis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
F.
67
is
11
5
Nephrosclerosis; amyloid disease; uremia; paranoid schizophrenia.
M.
71
1
15
Pulmonary tuberculosis; senile dementia.
M.
69
	
5
20
Coronary occlusion; chronic myocarditis; chronic pyelonephritis; pre-senile
dementia.
M.
51
22
1
8
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; paranoid schizophrenia.
F.
91
6
7
Bronchopneumonia; hydrocephalus; congenital heart-disease; idiot.
M.
50
29
12
Peritonitis following resection of volvulus of sigmoid colon; mental deficiency with psychosis.
M.
91
9
Bronchopneumonia; senile dementia.
F.
66
7
28
Chronic myocarditis; arteriosclerosis.
M.
51
17
8
5
Toxemia and cachexia; carcinoma-of the stomach with abdominal metastasis; general paresis of the insane.
M.
62
	
	
28
Chronic myocarditis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
60
1
4
24
Bronchopneumonia; arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
65
4
5
Lobar pneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis; pre-senile dementia.
F.
52
16
8
18
Status epilepticus; epilepsy; hydrocephalic idiot.
M.
66
19
7
25
Massive pulmonary embolus; thrombophlebitis of the lower leg; paranoid
schizophrenia.
M.
36
8
7
8
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis with cavitation; mental deficiency with
psychosis.
M.
52
8
7
21
Cerebral embolism; alcoholic psychosis.
M.
67
5
2
3
Bronchopneumonia; arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
71
4
22
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; paranoid schizophrenia.
F.
56
3
6
Bronchopneumonia; Huntington's chorea.
F.
39
6
~10
2
Cerebral anoxia; sodium pentothal anaesthesia; Mongolian idiocy.
M.
64
5
11
22
Cerebral thrombosis; general paresis of the insane.
M.
65
2
9
Lobar pneumonia; chronic bilateral subdural haematoma; pre-senile dementia.
M.
62
	
	
19
Bronchopneumnia; meningioma of the brain; generalized arteriosclerosis;
psychosis due to brain tumour.
F.
59
3
29
Bronchopneumonia; cerebrovascular accident.
F.
58
3
10
21
Bronchopneumonia; simple schizophrenia.
M.
21
1
18
Bronchopneumonia; congenital cardiac defect; Mongolism.
M.
72
~4
1
22
Pulmonary cedema; diabetes mellitus; chronic pyelonephritis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
70
2
9
24
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
F.
68
2
7
7
Bronchopneumonia; chronic myocardial degeneration; arteriosclerotic
dementia.
M.
72
15
11
2
Carcinoma prostate; paranoid schizophrenia.
M.
67
3
15
Bronchopneumonia; arteriosclerotic dementia.
F.
45
	
7
	
Bronchopneumonia; torula meningitis.
M.
7
5
8
26
Bronchopneumonia; inanition of idiocy; idiocy.
F.
41
	
	
7
Bronchopneumonia; Mongolian idiot.
M.
66
12
4
6
Bronchopneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis; psychosis due to Huntington's chorea.
M.
75
	
	
8
Coronary thrombosis; congestive heart failure; senile psychosis.
F.
2
.	
1
2
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral agenesis; cerebellar agenesis.
M.
78
1
4
Diabetes mellitus; arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
39
	
9
18
Brachial artery occlusion with gangrene of left forearm; luetic cardiovascular disease; general paresis of the insane.
F.
62
24
10
	
Auricular fibrillation; myocardial degeneration; paranoid schizophrenia.
1 Months. STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
T 129
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953,
in the Mental Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz—
Continued.
Sex
Age
Time in Hospital
Certified Cause
|
|
Years
Months
Days
M.
67
5
1
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral thrombosis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
F.
45
3
9
13
Bronchopneumonia; toxic psychosis.
F.
51
6
Intussusception of the jejunum; bronchopneumonia; congenital heart-
disease; cerebral agenesis; idiot.
M.
42
. 4
7
29
Coronary thrombosis; arteriosclerosis; paranoid schizophrenia.
F.
44
8
10
20
Bronchopneumonia; asthma; mental deficiency.
M.
1
1
20
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral atrophy; idiocy.
M.
62
2
2
Cardiac decompensation; hypertensive cardiovascular heart-disease; psychosis associated with organic disease.
M.
39
13
23
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; catatonic schizophrenia.
M.
40
15
1
24
Pulmonary tuberculosis; catatonic schizophrenia.
F.
64
4
6
4
Bronchopneumonia; chronic myocardial degeneration; arteriosclerotic confusion.
M.
24
15
1
18
Acute intestinal obstruction; volvulus; Mongolian idiot.
M.
55
7
25
Pulmonary oedema due to cachexia; carcinoma of stomach with generalized
abdominal metastasis; pre-senile psychosis.
M.
72
19
2
	
Pulmonary tuberculosis; involutional melancholia.
F.
55
10
4
Bronchopneumonia; hypertensive cardiovascular disease; arteriosclerotic
confusion.
M.
58
3
13
Myocardial infarction; coronary thrombosis; generalized arteriosclerosis;
cerebral atrophy of undetermined origin.
M.
19
13
3
	
Bronchopneumonia; aortic stenosis (congenital); Mongolian idiot.
F.
64
2
8
20
Acute intestinal obstruction; volvulus of terminal ileum; old operative
adhesions; pre-senile dementia; chronic arteriosclerotic cardiovascular
disease; latent syphilis.
F.
60
2
2
16
Bronchopneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
65
23
6
4
Congestive heart failure; myocardial infarction; arteriosclerotic heart-
disease; paranoid schizophrenia.
M.
65
34
7
23
Cerebral vascular accident; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
M.
58
30
10
26
Cancer of lung; paranoid schizophrenia.
M.
63
27
2
20
Myocardial infarction; coronary occlusion; paranoidal schizophrenia.
F.
58
2
11
12
Bronchopneumonia; chronic hypertensive cariovascular disease; chronic
mixed schizophrenia.
M.
49
	
	
19
Secondary carcinoma of the brain; primary unknown; psychosis with
somatic disease.
M.
69
	
2
30
Chronic myocarditis; arteriosclerotic heart-disease; organic psychosis due
to cerebral arteriosclerosis.
M.
10
8
1
' 29
Staphlococcic meningitis; staphlococcic pyelonephritis; hydrocephalic idiocy.
M.
63
	
6
22
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral vascular haemorrhage; hypertensive cardiovascular disease; arteriosclerotic dementia.
F.
68
1
1
7
Coronary occlusion; arteriosclerotic heart-disease; generalized arteriosclerosis; bilateral subdural haematoma.
F.
63
3
9
26
Bilateral lobar pneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
69
5
9
17
Mesenteric artery thrombosis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
F.
66
11
25
Bronchopneumonia; cerebrovascular accident; hypertension; arteriosclerotic
dementia.
F.
73
	
3
3
Auricular fibrillation; arteriosclerosis; hypertensive psychosis; Paget's disease;   gangrene of left leg;   fracture of left femur:   amputation of left leg.
M.
30
24
11
8
Septicaemia; acute nasal pharyngitis; multiple abscesses of lungs; mental
deficiency with epilepsy.
M.
77
7
5
19
Bronchopneumonia; cardiac decompensation due to arteriosclerotic hypertensive cardiovascular disease;   paranoid schizophrenia.
M.
61
22
18
Acute pulmonary oedema; hypertensive heart-disease; generalized arteriosclerosis;   general paresis of the insane.
M.
70
4
4
2
Bronchopneumonia; gangrene of right leg; pulmonary tuberculosis; bilateral syphilitic aortitis; general paresis of the insane; generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
64
8
25
Cerebral haemorrhage; arteriosclerotic hypertensive cardiovascular disease;
arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
83
	
8
Bronchopneumonia due to uremia;   senile dementia.
M.
71
9
8
14
Bronchopneumonia;  chronic rheumatoid arthritis;  paranoidal schizophrenia.
M.
61
2
16
Pulmonary oedema; hypertensive cardiovascular disease; residual haemi-
plegia;  arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
63
3
10
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral haemorrhage; hypertensive cardiovascular
disease;  arteriosclerotic dementia.
F.
65
22
3
17
Carcinomatosis; carcinoma of pancreas; ulcer of stomach (benign) with
massive haemorrhage.
M.
69
	
19
Uremia; chronic glomerular nephritis; psychosis due to uremia; arteriosclerotic heart-disease.
F.
70
	
17
Bronchopneumonia;   cardiac infarction;  hypertensive heart-disease.
l Months.
9 T 130
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1952-53
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953,
in the Mental Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz—
Continued.
Time in Hospital
Certified Cause
Sex
Age
Years
Months
Days
F.
28
3
10
20
Pulmonary tuberculosis;   simple schizophrenia.
f.
76
8
4
Bronchopneumonia;  hemiplegia.
F.
28
1
7
25
Pulmonary tuberculosis;   manic depressive psychosis.
F.
52
8
6
11
Carcinoma of liver;   carcinoma of stomach;   paranoid schizophrenia.
M.
66
1
7
11
Mitral stenosis;   cerebral arteriosclerosis.
M.
77
16
6
11
Carcinoma of the stomach; paranoid schizophrenia.
M.
64
2
12
Cerebral oedema;  status epilepticus;   generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
74
19
5
14
Myocardial degeneration;  paranoid schizophrenia.
M.
55
1
24
Bronchopneumonia; hypertensive cardiovascular disease; arteriosclerotic
dementia.
F.
81
1
7
Asphyxia;   sodium penathol anaesthesia;  mental deficiency.
M.
71
	
6
Asphyxia due to hanging;   paranoid schizophrenia.
M.
69
7
27
Bronchogenic carcinoma;   arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
67
5
1
23
Subarachnoid haemorrhage;   cerebral sclerosis;   pre-senile psychosis.
F.
65
7
9
11
Uremia; bilateral pyelonephritis; carcinoma of cervix; mental deficiency
with psychosis.
M.
62
10
16
Bronchopneumonia;   cerebral arteriosclerosis and hypertension.
M.
49
1
2
27
Subarachnoid haemorrhage;   general paresis;   chronic pyelonephritis.
F.
33
1
2
1
Acute myocarditis; bronchopneumonia; cretinism; mental deficiency
(imbecile).
F.
51
2
1
18
Intracerebral haemorrhage; chronic hypertensive heart-disease; arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
10
6
1
7
Bronchopneumonia;   congenital deformity of chest;  cerebral palsy;  idiot.
M.
17
5
1
6
Pulmonary tuberculosis; congenital malformation of the heart; congenital
mental deficiency.
F.
70
26
11
26
Septicaemia;   bronchopneumonia;   empyema of gall-bladder;   schizophrenia.
M.
52
8
Cerebral oedema;   subdural haematoma;   psychosis due to tumour.
M.
46
19
8
11
Haemorrhage from oesophageal ulcer;   schizophrenia.
M.
68
7
10
Toxaemia; gangrene of leg; arteriosclerosis; confusional psychosis due to
heart failure.
M.
17
8
4
8
Bronchial pneumonia;   mental deficiency with epilepsy.
F.
20
6
7
1
Bronchopneumonia;   lung abscess;   idiocy.
M.
60
33
8
9
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis with cavitation;   simple schizophrenia.
M.
53
10
2
Congestive heart failure;  schizophrenia.
M.
72
37
8
27
Congestive heart failure; hypertensive heart failure; pulmonary tuberculosis
(healed).
F.
26
22
3
26
Bronchopneumonia;   mental deficiency (moron).
M.
55
3
7
1
Myocarditis;   general cardiovascular degeneration;   arteriosclerotic dementia.
F.
85
	
3
7
Diabetic coma due to diabetes mellitus; hypertensive heart-disease; nephrosclerosis.
M.
68
	
5
23
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
65
	
	
26
Bronchopneumonia;   cirrhosis of the liver;   chronic pyelonephritis.
F.
20
1
11
15
Pulmonary tuberculosis;  schizophrenia (imbecile).
M.
80
	
2
Coronary thrombosis;   senile dementia.
M.
62
3
25
Cerebral oedema;   colloid cyst of third ventricle of the brain.
F.
68
1
8
17
Congestive heart failure; coronary occlusion and fatty infiltration of heart;
diabetes mellitus;   generalized arteriosclerosis;  manic exhaustion.
F.
64
	
—
14
Terminal bronchopneumonia; carcinoma of urinary bladder with metastases
to regional lymph nodes and left lung.
M.
66
2
4
Bronchopneumonia;   cardiovascular degeneration;   cerebral arteriosclerosis.
M.
72
2
11
21
Terminal bronchopneumonia;  generalized arteriosclerosis.
F.
10
2
2
14
Bronchopneumonia;  exhaustion of idiocy;  spastic paralysis.
M.
25
3
1
20
Tuberculous enteritis; bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; mental deficiency
with epilepsy.
M.
61
1
3
25
Pulmonary embolism;   arteriosclerotic heart-disease;  pre-senile dementia.
M.
68
	
5
30
Pulmonary oedema;   hypertensive heart-disease;   nephrosclerosis.
F.
62
21
4
20
Pulmonary oedema; chronic myocardial degeneration; diabetes mellitus;
paranoid schizophrenia.
F.
8
6
6
9
Bronchopneumonia; exhaustion of idiocy; spastic cerebral palsy and convulsions.
F.
73
5
3
10
Bronchopneumonia;   generalized arteriosclerosis;  cerebral atrophy.
F.
80
2
2
28
Bronchopneumonia;   myocardial infarction.
M.
64
11
14
Pulmonary oedema; congestion due to coronary thrombosis; arteriosclerotic
heart-disease;  psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis.
M.
72
9
4
14
Terminal bronchopneumonia;   encephalomalacia;   cerebral arteriosclerosis.
M.
70
37
11
26
Coronary thrombosis;  paranoid schizophrenia.
M.
3
1
7
17
Bronchopneumonia and gastroenteritis; exhaustion of idiocy; congenital
spastic paralysis.
M.
70
30
10
11
Phthisis pulmonalis;  paranoid schizophrenia.
1 Months. STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
T 131
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953,
in the Mental Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz—
Continued.
Sex
Age
Time in Hospital
Years I Months I Days
Certified Cause
M.
M.
F.
F.
F.
M.
F.
F.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
F.
F.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
65
1
7
53
1
5
56
3
20
1
4
1
50
11
18
83
5
2
29
65
	
3
22
54
4
11
11
73
3
6
20
93
	
	
21
51
6
2
8
47
4
10
23
57
25
9
25
77
1
9
82
1
1
12
57
13
11
22
55
20
15
61
5
17
45
4
10
4
64
24
21
19
2
6
67
4
22
77
29
5
2
38
4
9
15
84
7
10
16
69
8
60
10
10
26
65
4
8
17
78
10
10
23
63
11
20
Terminal bronchopneumonia; arteriosclerotic heart-disease; generalized
arteriosclerosis.
Pulmonary congestion and oedema; hypertensive heart-disease and generalized arteriosclerosis.
General paresis.
Bronchopneumonia;   exhaustion of idiocy.
Cardiac and respiratory arrest due to nitrous oxide therapy;  schizophrenia.
Congestive heart failure,   auricular fibrillation;   myocardial degeneration.
Meningitis (staphylococcal); chronic pyelonephritis; prostatectomy; generalized arteriosclerosis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis;  simple schizophrenia;  fractured left hip.
Bronchopneumonia; paraplegia.
Bronchopneumonia;   hypertensive heart-disease.
Terminal bronchopneumonia;   cerebral thrombosis;   organic dementia.
Pulmonary tuberculosis;  paranoid schizophrenia.
Carcinoma sigmoid;  paranoid schizophrenia.
Bronchopneumonia;   congestive failure.
Pulmonary embolism; thrombophlebitis to left iliac and femoral veins;
general arteriosclerosis.
Bronchopneumonia; encephalomalacia; cerebral thrombosis; generalized
arteriosclerosis.
Bronchopneumonia;   cerebral atrophy.
Cerebral oedema; secondary carcinoma of brain; turban tumour of the
scalp with additional metastasis to lymph nodes and lungs.
Cerebral haemorrhage;   hypertensive heart-disease.
Congestive heart-failure;   auricular fibrillation;   organic psychosis.
Epilepsy;   epileptic idiot;  hemiplegia birth injury.
Bronchopneumonia;  hypertensive heart-disease;  organic dementia.
Coronary thrombosis;   manic depressive.
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia with massive infiltration of lungs, liver, and
spleen; schizophrenia.
Terminal bronchopneumonia;   senile dementia.
Bronchopneumonia; congestive heart failure; auricular fibrillation; cerebral
haemorrhage.
Terminal bronchopneumonia.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; generalized arteriosclerosis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
Bronchopneumonia;  chronic myocarditis;  senile dementia.
Terminal bronchopneumonia;   brain tumour;   brain tumour with psychosis.
Table No. 11.—Showing Psychoses of First Admissions from April 1st,
1952, to March 31st, 1953
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Schizophrenic disorders, totals..
(a) Simple type__
(6) Hebephrenic type..
(c) Catatonic type	
(d) Paranoid type	
(e) Others-
Manic depressive reaction, totals-
(a) Manic and circular	
(b) Depressive— 	
(c) Other-.
135
16
4
14
77
24
6
3
3
Involutional melancholia 	
Paranoia and paranoid states .
Senile psychosis-
Pre-senile psychosis	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis	
5
2
89
3
56
23
100
14
6
9
50
21
5
1
4
3
6
93
6
17
3
235
30
10
23
127
45
11
4
7
8
8
182
9
73
26 T 132
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 11.—Showing Psychoses of First Admissions from April 1st,
1952, to March 31st, 1953—Continued
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology, totals_
(a) Resulting from brain tumour..
(b) Resulting from epilepsy and other convulsive disorders  	
(c) Psychosis secondary or due to infective or parasitic diseases 	
(d) Psychosis due to allergic, endocrine, metabolic, and nutritional diseases..
(e) Psychosis due to diseases of circulatory system...
(/) Psychosis due to diseases of nervous system and sense organs__
(g) Psychosis due to drugs and other exogenous poisons	
(ft) Psychosis due to accidents and violence	
(i) Psychosis due to other conditions_   	
Other and unspecified psychoses, totals__
(a) Psychosis with psychopathic personality-
(b) Psychosis with mental deficiency	
(c) Other unspecified  	
Psychoneurosis, totals  	
(a) Anxiety reaction	
(b) Hysterical reaction-
(c) Phobic reaction.-
(d) Obsessive-compulsive reaction..
(e) Neurotic-depressive reaction-
(/) Psychoneurosis with somatic symtoms—circulatory system_
(g) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—digestive system....
(h) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—other systems -
(i) Psychoneurosis—other types  	
Syphilis and its sequelae, totals  _   	
(a) Congenital syphilis _ 	
(b) Tabes dorsalis..
(c) General paralysis of insane—
(d) Other syphilis of central nervous system-
Undiagnosed psychosis _ 	
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality, totals__
(a) Schizoid personality __
(6) Paranoid personality	
(c) Cyclothymic personality-,
(d) Inadequate personality	
(e) Anti-social personality	
(/) Asocial personality	
(^) Sexual deviation.—
(7.) Other and unspecified-
Immature personality, totals	
(a) Emotional instability—
(6) Passive dependency	
(c) Aggressiveness-
(d) Enuresis characterizing immature personality	
(e) Other symptomatic habits except speech impediments-
(/) Other and unspecified-—  	
Alcoholism  - 	
(a) Acute —
(b) Chronic
(c) Unspecified-
Drug addiction.
Primary behaviour disorders—
Mental deficiency, totals	
(a) Idiocy-
(&) Imbecility..
(c) Moron	
(d) Border-line..
(e) Mongolism-
(/) Mental deficiency with epilepsy.-
(g) Other and unspecified types..
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders.-
Epilepsy..
(a) Petit mal_
(b) Grand mal-
(c) Status epilepticus-
(d) Other and unspecified-
Neurological disease without psychosis	
Observation without need for further medical care—mental-
Head injury of other and unspecified nature	
Undiagnosed-
Senility without psychosis..
Totals	
23
6
4
1
14
6
1
10
96
96
2
1
111
21
23
24
5
19
6
13
1
1
591
19
19
103
30
24
7
1
22
4
15
3
2
385
32
6
4
6
6
3
7
2
1
1
21
7
2
10
1
1
15
~~2
13
115
115
2
1
214
51
47
31
6
41
10
28
3
6
1
 1_
976 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
T 133
Table No. 12.—Showing Psychoses of Readmissions from April 1st,
1952, to March 31st, 1953
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Schizophrenic disorders, totals-
(a) Simple type__
(b) Hebephrenic type..
(c) Catatonic type—	
(d) Paranoid type	
(e) Others-
Manic-depressive reaction, totals..
(a) Manic and circular	
(b) Depressive 	
(c) Other	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis-
Pre-senile psychosis	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology, totals .
(a) Resulting from brain tumour..
(6) Resulting from epilepsy and other convulsive disorders-
(c) Psychosis secondary or due to infective or parasitic diseases..
(d) Psychosis due to allergic, endocrine, metabolic, and nutritional diseases..
(e) Psychosis due to diseases of the circulatory system...
(/) Psychosis due to diseases of nervous system and sense organs..
(g) Psychosis due to drugs and other exogenous poisons 	
(h) Psychosis due to accidents and violence   	
(i) Psychosis due to other conditions   	
Other and unspecified psychoses, totals-
(o) Psychosis with psychopathic personality ~
(6) Psychosis with mental deficiency. 	
(e) Other unspecified— 	
Psychoneurosis, totals..
(a) Anxiety reaction	
(6) Hysterical reaction _
(c) Phobic reaction-
(d) Obsessive-compulsive reaction..
(e) Neurotic-depressive reaction_.
(/) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—circulatory system..
(g) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—digestive system	
(h) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—other systems	
(i) Psychoneurosis—other types   	
Syphilis and its sequelae, totals_   	
(a ) Congenital syphilis—   	
(6) Tabes dorsalis...
(c) General paralysis of insane _
(d) Other syphilis of central nervous system..
Undiagnosed psychosis  	
Without psychosis, totals..
Pathological personality, totals__
(a) Schizoid personality	
(b) Paranoid personality ...
(c) Cyclothymic personality__
(d) Inadequate personality....
(e) Anti-social personality—.
(/) Asocial personality-	
(g) Sexual deviation-
(/0 Other and unspecified-
Immature personality, totals	
(a) Emotional instability—
(b) Passive dependency	
(c) Aggressiveness	
(d) Enuresis characterizing immature personality-
(e) Other symptomatic habits except speech impedimentS-
(/) Other and unspecified    	
Alcoholism—     	
(a) Acute__
(6) Chronic..
(c) Unspecified..
Drug addiction-
Primary behaviour orders.
Mental deficiency, totals—
(a) Idiocy-
(&) Imbecility	
(c) Moron	
(d) Border-line._
(e) Mongolism..
(/) Mental deficiency with epilepsy..
(g) Other and unspecified types	
56
12
2
7
21
14
16
9
7
2
3
1
3
10
4
11
2
1
1
5
94
5
2
76
76
11
1
2
5
70
17
8
6
27
12
19
11
8
2
2
6
1
4
2
6
1
3
32
6
15
15
126
29
10
13
48
26
35
20
15
4
5
7
1
7
12
10
1
5
4
2
2
18
6
2
2
5
126
11
2
91
Tl
18
3
3
7
1
3
1 T 134
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 12.—Showing Psychoses of Readmissions from April 1st,
1952, to March 31st, 1953—Continued
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders..
Epilepsy-
(a) Petit mal-
(6) Grand mal _
(c) Status epilepticus-
(d) Other and unspecified-
Neurological disease without psychosis	
Observation without need for further medical care—mental-
Head injury of other and unspecified nature	
Totals 	
203
153
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136 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
T 137
Table No. 15.—Showing Economic Status of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Psychosis
Total
Dependent
Marginal
Comfortable
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.,
F.
T.
135
6
5
2
89
3
56
23
23
1
14
11
6
1
96
2
1
111
4
I
1
100
5
3
6
93
6
17
3
9
1
7
4
2
1
19
103
3
2
1
235
11
8
8
182
9
73
26
32
1
1
21
15
8
2
115
2
1
214
3
6
1
1
1
17
3
1
74
2
22
5
2
3
2
1
5
1
97
1
15
1
"74
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1
2
102
1
32
1
3
1
148
2
28
5
5
4
2
1
7
1
199
1
1
118
6
2
1
15
1
34
18
21
1
11
9
5
.1
91
2
14
4
1
85
4
3
6
19
6
11
3
6
1
6
4
2
1
17
1
2
2
1
203
10
5
7
34
7
45
21
27
1
1
17
13
7
2
108
2
15
2
6
1
1
—
Alcoholic psychosis  	
—
Psychosis with psychopathic personality—	
—
Psychoneurosis 	
Undiagnosed psychosis-   .„ 	
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality  	
Alcoholism    — -
....-
Other  and  unspecified  character,  behaviour,
Neurological disease without psychosis	
Observation without need for further medical
care—mental-   	
Head injury of other and unspecified nature	
Totals    	
591
385
976
236
205
441
355
180
535
— T 138
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 16.—Showing Use of Alcohol in First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Psychosis
Total
M.      F.       T.
Abstinent
M.      F.       T
Temperate
M.
Intemperate
M.
Schizophrenic disorders.	
Manic-depressive reaction-
Involutional melancholia-
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis	
Pre-senile psychosis..
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology-
Psychosis with psychopathic personality—
Psychosis with mental deficiency	
Other and unspecified psychosis 	
Psychoneurosis.-
Syphilis and its sequela?..
Undiagnosed psychosis—
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality-
Immature personality	
Alcoholism	
Drug addiction .
Primary behaviour disorders..
Mental deficiency-
Other  and unspecified character, behaviour,
and intelligence disorders	
Epilepsy-
Neurological disease without psychosis 	
Observation without need for further medical
care—mental	
Head injury of other and unspecified nature _
Senility without psychosis	
Undiagnosed  	
135
6
5
2
89
3
56
23
23
Totals-
591
100
5
3
6
93
6
17
3
9
1
111
103
4
3
2
1
1
1
385
235
11
182
9
73
26
32
1
1
21
15
2
115
2
1
214
3
6
1
1
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976
1
1
103
264
102
3
1
1
303
118
8
5
6
137
5
38
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1
1
9
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1
205
3
2
1
567
27
1
1
1
9
2
3
104
2
3
2
33
3
25
161
50
211
10
1
10
1
23
3
13
1
12
1
10
26
4
115
1
166
32
198 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
T 139
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H T 142
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 20.—Showing the Nativity of First Admissions by Age-groups
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Age-group
Total
M.  I   F.   I   T.
I I
Canadian
Born
M.
F.
T.
British
Born
M.
F.   I   T.
Foreign
Born
M.
F.
T.
Unknown
M.
Under 15 years-
15-19 years..
20-24   „    -	
25-29    „     	
30-34   „    	
35-39    „   	
40-44   „    	
45-49    „   	
50-54   „ -	
55-59    „    	
60-64    „    	
65-69    „    	
70 years and over-
Totals	
85
84
20
7
28
18
40
23
44
25
40
28
40
19
41
22
34
18
24
11
47
24
44
22
104
84
591
385
169
27
46
63
69
68
59
63
52
35
71
66
188
80
17
25
34
34
33
25
19
19
9
13
13
37
84
6
17
19
21
20
12
11
7
3
10
4
29
164
23
42
53
55
53
37
30
26
12
23
17
66
2
3
4
3
2
3
9
10
38
976
243 ] 601
111
75
1
2
1
9
5
12
11
7
8
24
32
74
5
3
1
5
2
4
7
14
10
10
18
9
30
186
66
3
2
8
4
9
10
22
19
15
23
17
47
184
Table No. 21.—Showing Country of Birth of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Country
Arabia	
Austria-	
Australia-
Belgium	
China	
Czechoslovakia-
Denmark	
England	
Finland 	
France	
Germany ..
Greece _	
Hungary-
India	
Ireland-	
Italy-
Japan 	
Lithuania	
New Zealand _
Norway	
Poland	
Roumania	
Russia	
Scotland-
Sweden—
Switzerland—
South Africa-
Ukraine	
United States-
Unknown	
Wales	
Yugoslavia	
Canada—■
Alberta-
British Columbia-
Manitoba	
New Brunswick-
Newfoundland	
Nova Scotia	
Ontario 	
Prince Edward Island..
Quebec-
Saskatchewan	
Yukon Territory-
Totals	
Male
1
6
3
2
10
2
1
59
7
2
4
3
1
13
1
1
2
5
13
1
3
32
1
27
26
4
3
24
154
34
9
1
14
58
2
17
33
3
591
Female
51
1
1
1
2
1
1
8
1
1
3
2
1
5
16
8
1
1
18
14
16
127
21
5
3
5
32
6
19
1
385
Total
1
6
7
4
11
3
1
110
8
3
5
1
5
2
1
21
1
1
3
1
8
15
2
8
48
16
2
1
1
45
40
4
7
40
281
55
14
4
19
90
2
23
52
4
976
J STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
T 143
Table No. 22.—Showing the Citizenship of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Citizenship
Male
Female
Total
Canadian by birth-
British born who have resided in Canada five years or more-
British born who have resided in Canada less than five years..
Alien born (naturalized)..
Alien born who have resided in Canada five years or more (not naturalized)
Alien born who have resided in Canada less than five years   	
Unknown   	
Totals-
346
103
2
123
5
6
6
591
234
580
71
174
2
4
69
192
4
9
2
8
3
9
385
976
Table No. 23.—Showing the Religion of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Religion
Male
Female
Total
129
1
2
15
1
3
2
6
4
2
2
1
30
2
5
1
2
16
7
1
43
103
120
2
72
19
81
11
4
1
6
1
2
1
1
1
21
3
4
7
3
2
22
79
59
1
3
4
60
8
210
1
2
26
Buddhist - __
1
4
4
8
7
6
3
3
2
51
5
9
1
2
23
10
3
65
182
179
1
5
4
132
27
Totals  	
591
385
976
Table No. 24.—Showing Age-groups of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1952, to March 3 1st, 1953
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
85
20
28
40
44
40
40
41
34
24
47
44
104
84
7
18
23
25
28
19
22
18
11
24
22
84
169
27
20-24   „                                           	
46
25-29   „ - -     -
63
30-34   „                                  	
69
35-39    „ -   -  	
68
40-44   „               .  -.   - 	
59
45^49    „           ..         - -  	
63
50-54    „         	
52
55-59   „     - -
35
60-64   „                        - - - 	
71
65 69    „                                         .   -	
66
188
Totals                -     -	
591
385
976 T 144
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1952-53
Table No. 25.—Showing Age-groups of Readmissions
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
2
2
8
20
29
30
31
26
18
6
16
12
3
2
2
9
9
29
26
18
10
7
14
8
11
8
4
4
20-24   „                       	
17
25-29   „   — 	
29
30-34   „     _ _	
58
35 39    „       -          _	
56
40   ..    „        -           — - — -	
49
45-49    „    .   -   _ —	
36
50-54   „          -
25
55 59   „                                                           -	
20
60-64    „   .   .        	
24
6S 60    .,
23
11
Totals      —     -   	
203
153
356
Table No. 26.—Showing the Previous Occupations of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Occupation
Male
Female
Total
Occupation
Male
Female
Total
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
11
1
1
1
1
2
8
1
3
1
4
19
1
7
1
2
1
2
3
1
147
1
24
2
1
2
1
5
3
3
1
5
1
120
1
1
1
4
3
3
8
121
9
1
1
1
128
4
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
11
1
1
5
1
2
11
1
3
3
1
4
19
1
7
1
2
1
2
8
121
3
1
156
1
1
24
2
1
2
1
5
4
4
1
5
1
248
4
401
1
1
5
42
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
61
11
1
1
7
1
2
1
3
1
2
1
1
4
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
6
9
4
1
1
1
1
286
38
33
2
3
1
9
1
2
3
6
1
687
Actress    	
Advertiser   	
Office-worker —  	
1
1
Painter-   	
Pensioner	
5
80
1
Beautician ...._   —	
Pianist  _ _
1
1
Bricklayer  —	
Butcher—	
Carpenter  	
Plumber 	
Porter	
Poultryman -	
1
1
1
2
Railwayman	
Reporter-	
Retired 	
3
Clerk 	
1
94
11
Cook                            	
2
1
Decorator  - -
Domestic.	
Driller   	
Sawyer.—	
Seaman	
Seamstress  	
Secretary ..__	
1
7
3
1
3
Shipwright—	
Smelterman 	
Steam engineer	
Steel-worker	
Stenographer— 	
Steward ___                .,
Storekeeper	
Student	
Surveyor.—	
1
Fisherman  	
Foreman.—  	
Forestry- 	
3
1
2
9
Gardener 	
Housekeeper— _ __._
Housewife   	
1
2
4
1
1
1
Taxi-driver.   	
2
2
Logger 	
Longshoreman 	
Machine operator	
Marine engineer 	
Telephone operator.	
Tiemaker    	
Trapper    .„•   ;
Truck-driver	
2
1
1
6
12
Waiter 	
4
6
Min e op e rator 	
Miner   	
Moulder  	
None  	
Warehouseman.	
Watchmaker	
Watchman	
Winchman  	
Totals	
591
385
976
401
286
687 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
T 145
Table No. 27.—Showing the Method of Commitment of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Method of Commitment
Male
Female
Total
459
94
2
12
18
6
349
23
1
10
2
808
117
2
Otherwise—
13
Urgency  — 	
28
8
Totals	
591
385
976
Table No. 28.—Showing the Method of Commitment of Readmissions
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Method of Commitment
Male
Female
Total
98
91
8
5
1
115
31
2
4
1
213
122
Otherwise—
10
Urgency    	
9
2
Totals —  	
203
153
356
Table No. 29.—Showing Rural-Urban Status of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Psychosis
Total
Rural
Urban
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
135
6
5
2
89
3
56
23
23
1
14
11
6
1
96
2
1
111
4
1
1
100
5
3
6
93
15
17
3
9
1
7
4
2
1
19
103
3
2
1
235
11
8
8
182
9
73
26
32
1
1
21
15
8
2
115
2
214
61
2
1
1
33
2
27
5
8
6
4
3
1
17
47
2
46
3
2
4
24
1
7
1
5
1
1
1
4
44
1
107
5
3
5
57
3
34
6
13
5
4
1
21
91
2
1
74
4
4
1
56
1
29
18
15
1
8
7
—
3
79
2
1
64
2
1
1
54
2
1
2
69
5
10
2
4
1
6
3
—
1
1
15
59
3
2
128
6
5
125
20
Without Psychosis
4
2
1
123
Other  and  unspecified  character,  behaviour,  and  intelligence
Observation without need for further medical care—mental	
	
Totals   _	
591
385
976
220
145
365
371
240
611
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MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 32.—Showing Conditions of Patients on Discharge by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Pyschosis
Total
Recovered
Improved
Unimproved
Without
Psychosis and
Unclassified
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.     F.
T.
Schizophrenic disorders	
104
21
4
8
78
1
22
15
14
3
4
1
28
3
12
189
23
9
2
134
20
7
4
91
1
17
4
4
7
1
7
32
15
4
4
238
41
11
12
169
2
39
19
18
3
4
1
35
4
19
221
38
4
13
2
4
2
2
8
1
5
19
7
1
1
1
—
23
9
1
2
9
1
6
71
18
3
4
1
5
5
5
2
2
17
72
9
6
2
2
1
2
3
2
5
1
143
27
9
6
3
1
7
8
7
2
2
22
1
29
1
1
2
77
1
17
2
8
1
2
1
6
3
23
43
4
2
89
15
2
—.
1
15
72
5
1
4
166
1
32
2
10
1
2
1
7
3
38
12 |     7
189 |   32
1     4
9 |     4
2|„
	
Senile psychosis- 	
	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology
Psychosis with psychopathic personality..
	
Without Psychosis
19
?,?,1
Primary childhood behaviour disorders-
	
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders	
Epilepsy	
Neurological disease without psychosis—
Observation without need for further
4
13
7.
Totals	
541
352
893
22
29
51
133
105
238
174
171
345
212 |   47
759
Table No. 33.—Showing Age-groups of Patients who Died
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
Under li
15-19 ye
20-24
6
3
2
1
1
3
2
4
7
10
21
28
25
9
3
3
1
2
1
3
6
6
8
11
17
15
3
5
25 29
4
30-34
2
35 39
5
40-44
'
3
45-49
7
50-54
13
55 59
16
60-64
29
65 69
39
70 years
42
Totals                                   -           -   -	
113
70
183 ON
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L T 150
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Sixth annual sports day. STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
CREASE CLINIC STATISTICAL TABLES
T 151
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operation of the Crease Clinic from
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Movement of Population
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
100
318
211
115
369
323
215
687
534
100
529
115
692
215
Admitted during the year 1952-53—
1,221
55
271
95
82
15
41
456
106
66
6
96
727
201
148
21
Total number under treatment, April 1st. 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Discharged during the year April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953—
629
518
807
675
1,436
Unimproved _ ' 	
Died         „                         	
1,193
Total in residence, Crease Clinic, March 31st, 1953  	
111
132
243
Daily average population -   - 	
Percentage of discharges on admissions (not including deaths)..
Percentage of patients recovered and improved to admissions	
Percentage of deaths on whole number under treatment 	
230.77
94.35
67.39
1.46
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operation of the Crease Clinic
since Its Inception
a
o
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1
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<
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Patients Recovered
and Improved to
Admissions
Percentage of
Discharges to
Admissions
(Deaths Excluded)
Year
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Percentage of
Deaths to
Whole Numbe
under Treatme
January, February,
and March, 1951.
1951-52 	
264
963
1,221
26
158
96
38
496
727
23
155
201
7
97
148
12
21
170
215
243
45
28
264
1,133
1,436
24.24
67.91
67.39
35.61
94.19
94.35
1.06
1952-53..__._ _	
1.46 T 152
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1952-53
Table No. 3.—Showing the Total Number of Admissions, Discharges, and
Deaths from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Month
Admissions
Discharges
Deaths
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
1952
49
48
51
36
33
39
38
39
48
63
42
43
58
72
68
47
53
53
56
50
40
66
66
63
107
120
119
83
86
92
94
89
88
129
108
106
40
41
46
54
50
43
30
25
26
48
41
59
43
69
65
60
53
48
50
51
62
39
66
63
83
110
111
114
103
91
80
76
88
87
107
122
1
1
2
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
May    	
1
2
July                                               - —  .
1
August— — —  	
September  	
October 	
November   	
December   —
1953
January 	
1
2
5
2
2
2
Totals    	
529
692
1,221
503
669
1,172
15
6
21 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
T 153
Table No. 4.—Showing What Districts Contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
6
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
12
2
2
1
4
6
3
1
4
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
3
1
4
1
1
1
6
6
3
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
3
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
21
1
1
T_
6
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
2
1
1
1
5
3
3
1
2
1
1
5
18
1
1
1
4
1
1
3
8
3
2
1
1
1
4
1
1
11
1
1
10
1
4
3
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
33
3
2
2
4
24
9
1
1
1
8
4
1
2
3
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
6
2
4
1
1
1
1
6
1
4
1
7
4
1
6
2
1
2
11
24
3
4
2
1
5
2
3
1
3
10
5
2
4
13
2
1
Brought forward
134
5
20
1
16
__
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
8
2
6
1
1
2
1
2
17
11
1
......
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
4
1
1
1
196
4
34
2
1
3
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
179
6
46
1
1
19
1
3
1
2
2
6
1
5
4
3
2
4
7
7
1
1
2
2
4
1
3
5
1
1
3
1
1
1
6
2
2
1
5
1
274
1
1
5
38
1
1
1
11
1
6
1
1
1
4
1
313
11
66
Aldergrove 	
North Bend . ~	
1
1
1
35
Oak Bay	
1
5
Beaver Falls 	
Bella Coola
Okanagan Centre	
1
1
Okanagan Mission	
Oliver  	
Osoyoos	
Parksville	
Peachland	
Peardonville-	
Penticton	
Pitt Meadows	
2
Bradner 	
Bralorne  _	
Burnaby 	
1
3
1
3
Canyon	
Chase 	
Chemainus  	
1
12
2
13
2
Cobble Hill	
Port Coquitlam.. 	
10
1
4
Courtenay	
4
1
6
24
18
1
Cumberland 	
Qualicum	
1
1
Dawson, Y.T	
2
3
Quilchena	
1
Drewry 	
1
Duncan  	
6
1
Endako 	
1
1
Esquimalt- 	
4
7
1
Flood 	
1
Fort St. John	
2
1
5
1
1
Sinclair Mills	
Smithers	
1
1
Haney 	
1
Hazelton.- „
1
1
Hope 	
10
4
1
Kaslo _
6
Terrace	
Tofino  	
Trail
Kelowna 	
1
5
Kimberley  	
1
1
1
Ladner 	
470
Lake Cowichan 	
1
1
Lang Bay 	
9
Victoria   	
Webster's Corners	
Wellington.—	
2
Lumby 	
1
West Summerland	
2
14
Maillardville 	
Masset 	
2
Matsqui 	
2
Whalley-	
1
Midway 	
1
Milner 	
Milne's Landing	
Mission  	
White Rock	
Whonnock	
8
2
1
Montney—	
1
Mount Lehman   	
1
Namu 	
Nanaimo  —	
Yahk   	
1
4
Naramata- _ 	
1
Needles _  	
1
Carried forward-	
134
179
313
Totals..	
529
692
1,221 T 154 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1952-53
Table No. 5.—Showing the Number of Attacks in Those Admitted
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Number of Attacks
Male
Female
Total
First                                                                            	
172
142
27
5
1
2
1
1
10
87
81
229
-247
47
10
4
1
2
12
58
82
401
389
Third            -	
74
Fourth           	
15
Fifth	
5
Sixth _
3
1
Fiohth
2
Ninth	
1
22
145
163
Totals
529
692
1,221
Table No. 6.—Showing the Reported Duration of Mental Illness Prior to
Admission in Those Admitted from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Duration of Attack
Male
Female
Total
68
139
17
11
25
10
5
1
1
87
165
80
204
55
19
33
9
8
1
58
225
148
343
„      6      „               	
72
„    12      „ _    .
30
58
5      „                                 -          	
19
„    10      „         --               	
13
„    15      „                                 .
2
Over 15      „        	
1
145
390
Totals             	
529
692
1,221
Table No. 7.—Showing the Reported Cause of Attack in Those Admitted
from April 1st, 1952, to March 3 1st, 1953
Alleged Cause
Male
Female
Total
24
7
7
1
394
1
2
1
1
2
2
87
3
12
3
603
4
4
1
3
1
58
27
19
10
1
997
4
5
3
1
1
5
3
145
529
692
1,221 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
T 155
Table No. 8.—Showing the Number Discharged and Results
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Results
Male
Female
Total
Discharged recovered 	
Discharged improved  	
Discharged unimproved _	
Without psychosis 	
Total discharges 	
Discharged to Mental Hospital—	
Discharged to Home for the Aged _
Total discharged to community.
55
271
95
82
503
41
456
106
66
669
57
96
727
201
148
1,172
129
1,043
Table No. 9.—Showing Reported Duration of Mental Illness Prior to Admission in Those Discharged from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Alleged Duration
Male
Female
Total
Less th
43
77
48
20
18
22
11
6
19
82
157
53
79
76
40
63
40
17
17
11
66
207
96
156
•
124
3                                                     	
60
6      „ —-
81
, 12      „ _.
62
28
3      ,,                                              _     -
23
30
V
T
148
364
Totals                    -	
503
669
1,172
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953,
in the Crease Clinic, Essondale, B.C.
Age
Time in Hospital
Certified Cause
Years
Months
Days
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
50
24
50
50
69
37
31
62
68
25
60
70
29
49
20
51
52
38
51
38
57
1
1
3
3
2
2
3
1
1
9
13
4
20
30
3
16
13
14
6
9
8
13
9
21
13
3
7
3
15
Gastro-intestinal haemorrhage; ulcerative carcinoma of stomach with metastasis to liver and adrenal glands;   epilepsy with psychosis.
Multiple fractures and compound fracture of the skull with laceration of the
brain;   trauma;   psychosis resulting from brain tumour.
Carcinoma of the brain; bronchogenic carcinoma; arteriosclerotic dementia.
Cerebral ha.morrhage; intracranial hypertension; cerebral neoplasm; phy-
chosis with cerebral neoplasm.
Bronchopneumonia; glioblastoma multiforme of right temporal lobe; psychosis associated with brain tumour.
Acute cardiac failure; chronic toxic myocarditis; chronic anoxaemia; pulmonary tuberculosis with thoracoplasty.
Asphyxia due to drowning in Coquitlam River while mentally unbalanced;
simple schizophrenia.
Asphyxia due to drowning (suicide);   reactive depression.
Thrombophlebitis;  pulmonary embolism;   manic depressive (manic).
Glioblastoma; psychosis resulting from brain tumour of the left temporal
lobe.
Cerebral thrombosis; hypertensive arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease;
auricular fibrillation;   arteriosclerotic dementia.
Left ventricular failure;   coronary pulmonale;   emphysema.
Cerebral oedema;   coma insulin-therapy reaction;   paranoid schizophrenia.
Subarachnoid haemorrhage;   ruptured aneurism;   mixed schizophrenia.
Asphyxia due to hanging;   acute schizophrenic reaction.
Secondary metastasis in the brain;   cancer of sigmoid colon.
Cerebral haemorrhage due to astrocytoma right cerebral hemisphere.
Pulmonary embolism; thrombophlebitis of femoral and iliac veins; right
middle lobectomy;   catatonic schizophrenia.
Coronary occlusion;   arteriosclerosis;   cerebral arteriosclerosis.
Pulmonary oedema; cerebral oedema; brain tumour; organic psychosis due
to brain tumour.
Chronic pyelonephritis with toxaemia; chronic dilation of the bladder; pernicious anaemia with sub-acute combined degeneration. T 156
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 11.—Showing Psychoses of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Schizophrenic disorders, totals..
(a) Simple type..
(6) Hebephrenic type~
(c) Catatonic type	
(d) Paranoid type	
(e) Others-
Manic-depressive reaction, totals..
(a) Manic and circular	
(b) Depressive— 	
(c) Other-
Involutional melancholia-
Paranoia and paranoid states„
Senile psychosis	
Pre-senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology, totals..
(a) Resulting from brain tumour_
(b) Resulting from epilepsy and other convulsive disorders	
(c) Psychosis secondary or due to infective or parasitic diseases	
(d) Psychosis due to allergic, endocrine, metabolic, and nutritional diseases-
{ei Psychosis due to diseases of circulatory system..
(/) Psychosis due to diseases of nervous system and sense organs..
ig) Psychosis due to drugs and other exogenous poisons	
(ft) Psychosis due to accidents and violence— 	
(i) Psychosis due to other conditions	
Other and unspecified psychoses, totals—
(a) Psychosis with psychopathic personality..
ib) Psychosis with mental deficiency	
(c) Other unspecified	
Psychoneurosis, totals..
(a) Anxiety reaction	
(ft) Hysterical reaction..
(c) Phobic reaction..
(d) Obsessive-compulsive reaction..
(e) Neurotic-depressive reaction..
(/) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—circulatory system..
(g) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—digestive system	
(ft) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—other systems	
(i) Psychoneurosis—other types	
Syphilis and its sequelae, totals  __ 	
(a) Congenital syphilis. —  	
(6) Tabes dorsalis-
(c) General paralysis of insane..
(d) Other syphilis of central nervous system-
Undiagnosed — 	
Pathological personality, totals-
Without Psychosis
(a) Schizoid personality-
(b) Paranoid personality	
(c ) Cyclothymic personality__
(d) Inadequate personality—
(e) Anti-social personality-—
(/ ) Asocial personality	
(g) Sexual deviation.-
(ft) Other and unspecified-
Immature personality, totals—
(a) Emotional instability—
(b) Passive dependency—
ic) Aggressiveness-	
(d) Enuresis characterizing immature personality..
(e) Other symptomatic habits except speech impediments „
(/) Other and unspecified	
Alcoholism, totals	
(a) Acute	
(b ) Chronic  	
ic) Unspecified	
Drug addiction-
Primary childhood behaviour disorders _
203
27
4
16
108
48
25
11
14
10
6
2
2
7
15
15
6
2
1
1
4
1
6
5
1
108
55
6
3
31
20
4
2
2
4
3
5
5
2
2
249
49
7
30
101
62
45
26
19
24
8
2
3
13
2
15
3
6
1
181
78
14
1
4
46
1
13
24
1
15
1
1
5
5
1
1
1
7
4
1
1
452
76
11
46
209
110
70
37
33
34
14
4
5
20
17
30
9
1
1
4
4
2
6
5
1
289
133
20
1
7
77
3
16
32
3
35
5
2
1
7
9
4
6
1
12
6
3
1
1
13 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
T 157
Table No. 11.—Showing Psychoses of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953—Continued
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Mental deficiency, totals..
(a) Idiocy-
(b) Imbecility	
(c ) Moron  	
id) Border-line  	
(e ) Mongolism	
(/) Mental deficiency with epilepsy..
(g) Other and unspecified types..
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders-
Epilepsy, totals-
fa) Petit mal-
(6) Grand mal	
(c) Status epilepticus	
(d) Other and unspecified-
Neurological disease without psychosis-
Observation without need for further medical care—mental__
Head injury of other and unspecified nature 	
Undiagnosed  	
Totals.
12
7
481
2
10
2
4
4
6
2
1
596
4
28
3
9
16
13
7
4
1,077
Table No. 12.—Showing Psychoses of Readmissions from
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Schizophrenic disorders, totals..
(a) Simple type-
(6) Hebephrenic type _
ic) Catatonic type	
(d) Paranoid type	
ie) Others-
Manic-depressive reaction, totals..
(a) Manic and circular	
(6) Depressive	
ic) Others-
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis-
Pre-senile psychosis	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology, totals-
(a) Resulting from brain tumour—
(6) Resulting from epilepsy and other convulsive disorders-
ic) Psychosis secondary or due to infective or parasitic diseases..
(d) Psychosis due to allergic, endocrine, metabolic, and nutritional diseases-
(e) Psychosis due to diseases of circulatory system..
(/) Psychosis due to diseases of nervous system and sense organs-
ig) Psychosis due to drugs and other exogenous poisons 	
(ft) Psychosis due to accidents and violence— 	
(i) Psychosis due to other conditions 	
Other and unspecified psychosis, totals  -  	
(a) Psychosis with psychopathic personality-
(b) Psychosis with mental deficiency	
(c) Other unspecified	
Psychoneurosis, totals..
(a) Anxiety reaction	
(b) Hysterical reaction  	
(c) Phobic reaction 	
W) Obsessive-compulsive reaction..
(e) Neurotic-depressive reaction-
(/) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—circulatory system__
(g) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—digestive system	
(ft) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—other systems	
ii) Psychoneurosis—other types  —	
17
4
1
2
6
4
4
13
8
3
1
1
42
6
1
6
20
9
16
32
18
3
1
7
59
10
2
8
26
13
20
8
12
5
2
45
26
3
1
10
1
4 T 158
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1952-53
Table No. 12.—Showing Psychoses of Readmissions from
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953—Continued
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Syphilis and its sequelae, totals..
fa) Congenital syphilis	
fa) Tabes dorsalis	
fa) General paralysis of insane _
(d) Other syphilis of central nervous system..
Undiagnosed    	
Pathological personality, totals..
fa) Schizoid personality-
fa) Paranoid personality-
Without Psychosis
(c) Cyclothymic personality„
(d) Inadequate personality—..
(e) Anti-social personality-	
(/) Asocial personality	
fa) Sexual deviation...
(ft) Other and unspecified _
Immature personality, totals	
(a) Emotional instability....
(ft) Passive dependency	
(c) Aggressiveness	
(d) Enuresis characterizing immature personality..
(e) Other symptomatic habits except speech impediments_
(/) Other and unspecified 	
Alcoholism, totals-	
(a) Acute    	
(ft) Chronic-
(c) Unspecified _
Drug addiction-
Primary childhood behaviour disorders-
Mental deficiency, totals	
(a) Idiocy-
fa) Imbecility	
fa) Moron	
id) Border-line-
fa) Mongolism __
(/) Mental deficiency with epilepsy-
fa) Other and unspecified types-
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders .
Epilepsy, totals	
(a) Petit mal..
(b) Grand mal-
(c) Status epilepticus..
(d) Other and unspecified-
Neurological disease without psychosis	
Observation without need for further medical care—mental-
Head injury of other and unspecified nature   	
Totals __
96
144 ON
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160 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
T 161
Table No. 15.—Showing Economic Status of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Psychosis
Total
Dependent
Marginal
Comfortable
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
203
249
452
13
15
28
190
234
424
25
45
70
1
1
2
23
44
67
1
1
10
24
34
1
1
8
22
30
2
1
3
6
8
14
6
8
14
2
2
4
2
2
4
2
3
5
2
3
5
7
13
20
2
2
3
13
16
2
2
15
2
17
15
2
17
15
15
30
1
1
15
14
29
	
5
5
1
1
4
4
1
1
1
1
108
181
289
4
2
6
102
178
280
2
1
3
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
20
15
35
1
1
2
19
14
33
5
7
12
1
1
5
6
11
6
2
8
6
2
8
1
1
1
1
8
5
13
6
3
9
2
2
4
5
3
8
3
1
4
2
2
4
	
2
2
4
1
1
2
1
1
2
18
10
28
7
2
9
11
8
19
7
6
13
1
1
6
6
12
5
2
7
1
1
2
4
1
5
	
3
1
4
1
1
2
1
3
481
596
1,077
42
30
72
431
564
995
8
2
10
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reaction 	
Involution al melancholia  	
Paranoia and paranoid states	
S enil e p sychosis _   	
Pre-senile psychosis	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis	
Alcoholic psychosis 	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology	
Psychosis with psychopathic personality	
Psychosis with mental deficiency. _ 	
Other unspecified psychosis	
Psychoneurosis  	
Syphilis and its sequelae	
Undiagnosed psychosis	
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality	
Immature personality  _	
Alcoholism   	
Drug addiction 	
Primary behaviour disorders	
Mental deficiency	
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
and intelligence disorders	
Epilepsy -— 	
Neurological disease without psychosis	
Observation without need for further medical care—mental 	
Head injury of other and unspecified nature -
Undiagnosed (not psychotic)-— 	
Totals  	 T 162
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 16.—Showing Use of Alcohol of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Psychosis
Total
Abstinent
Temperate
Intemperate
M.
F
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Schizophrenic disorders   _	
203
25
10
6
2
2
7
15
15
5
1
108
2
20
5
6
1
8
5
2
18
7
5
3
249
45
24
8
2
3
13
2
15
181
1
15
7
2
" 5
3
2
10
6
2
1
452
70
34
14
4
5
20
17
30
5
1
289
3
35
12
8
1
13
8
4
28
13
7
4
102
11
7
4
1
4
6
3
53
11
1
7
4
1
16
5
5
2
203
40
24
7
2
3
13
12
150
12
3
4
3
2
9
6
~2
305
51
31
11
2
4
17
18
3
203
23
4
11
7
3
25
11
~ 7
2
80
11
3
1
2
1
3
6
2
43
2
7
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
43
5
1
2
24
2
4
1
1
1
123
16
3
2
2
1
3
8
2
67
2
9
6
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
21
3
1
15
3
1
12
2
2
6
1
1
3
2
1
7
1
1
2
24
3
Involutional melancholia	
1
Pre-senile psychosis   —
	
17
Psychosis with other demonstrable etiology	
Psychosis with psychopathic personality	
4
Other and unspecified psychosis 	
Psychoneurosis  	
Syphilis and its sequelae __	
1
19
1
Without Psychosis
3
2
8
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
1
1
Observation without need for further medi-
Head injury of other and unspecified nature
Totals	
481
596
1,077
243
495
738
170
84
254
68
17
85 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
T  163
Table No. 17.—Showing Conjugal Conditions of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Psychosis
Total
I
M.|F.
T.
Single
M.IF. IT.
I I
Married
M.  F.   T
Widowed
I      I
M.IF.   T.
Divorced
M.IF. |T.
I I
Separated
I
M.  F. I T.
Schizophrenic disorders ___	
Manic-depressive reaction-- 	
Involutional melancholia  	
Paranoia and paranoid states	
Senile psychosis  	
Pre-senile psychosis   	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis—	
Alcoholic psychosis —  	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology	
Psychosis with psychopathic personality	
Psychosis with mental deficiency 	
Other and unspecified psychosis	
Psychoneurosis  	
Syphilis and its sequelae. _	
Undiagnosed psychosis	
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality _	
Immature personality _ „	
Alcoholism.— - 	
Drug addiction—  	
Primary behaviour disorders —	
Mental deficiency 	
Other and unspecified character, behaviour.
and intelligence disorders  	
Epilepsy      —
Neurological disease without psychosis	
Observation without need for further medical care—mental   	
Head injury of other and unspecified nature __
Undiagnosed (not psychotic) _	
Totals	
203
25
10
6
2
2
7| 13
15 2
15   15
481
452
70
34
14
4
5
20
17
30
5
1
289
3
596
1,077
245
19
111
62
356
187
385
572   11
13
51
62
11
13
10
24
27
12
36
25
4
63 T 164
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 18.—Showing Conjugal Conditions of Readmissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Total
Single
Married
Widowed
Divorced
Separated
1      I
M. 1 F. 1 T.
1      1
1
M.IF.
T.
1      1
M. I F. 1 T.
1
1      1
M. 1 F. 1 T.
1      1
1
M.IF.
1
T.
1
M.IF.
1
T.
17
4
5
1
1
13
1
3
1
2
1
42   59
10
1
1
1
4
1
2
10
1
3
1
2
20
2
1
1
7
2
4
1      1
6   31   37
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
	
1
	
—
16
1
32
2
2
1
20
5
2
1
45
3
5
1
1
2
3
3
1
7
1
12
1
28
15
3
2
35
1
	
	
	
Senile psychosis —  	
	
1
	
—
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology	
	
1
1
1
1
Syphilis and its sequelae _ 	
Without Psychosis
1
2
2
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and
Observation without need for further medical
care—mental  —   	
Head injury of other and unspecified nature	
 .
Totals 	
48
96
144
22
17
39
21
72
93
3
6
9
— 1    1
1
2
?, STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
T 165
Table No. 19.—Showing Education of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1952, to March 3 1st, 1953
Psychosis
Total
Illiterate
Reads and
Writes
Common
School
High
School
University
M.
F.
T.
M.
1
F. IT.
1
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.I F.
1
T.
M.
F.
T.
203
25
10
6
2
2
7
15
15
5
1
108
2
20
5
6
1
8
5
2
18
7
5
3
249
45
24
8
2
3
13
2
15
181
1
15
7
2
5
3
2
10
6
2
1
452
70
34
14
4
5
20
17
30
5
1
289
3
35
12
8
1
13
8
4
28
13
7
4
2
2
16
1
15
4
1
31
5
1
133
17
6
4
2
1
3
8
9
5
1
61
1
14
2
3
5
2
1
9
5
5
2
136
27
13
1
3
8
9
108
9
3
2
3
2
1
8
3
1
269
44
19
4
3
4
11
8
18
5
1
169
1
23
5
5
8
4
2
17
8
6
2
42
4
3
2
1
2
1
3
28
1
4
3
2
2
3
2
81
10
8
8
1
2
4
55
4
4
1
1
1
1
123
14
11
10
1
1
4
1
7
83
1
8
7
2
2
1
1
3
3
1
12
3
1
15
4
1
77
7
	
1
1
7
1
5
2
7
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
10
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
7
3
17
1
1
1
3
1
1
5
1
1
1
10
2
2
8
1
3
Alcoholic psychosis - 	
1
2
2
1
2
2
2
1
Psychosis with mental deficiency 	
Other and unspecified psychosis —  	
18
Without Psychosis
3
1
1
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
1
Observation without need for further medical
care—mental  — 	
Head injury of other and unspecified nature
1
Totals      	
481
596
1,077
6
4
10
41
40
81
299
337
636
103
181
284
32
34
66
Table No. 20.—Showing the Nativity of First Admissions by Age-groups
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Age-group
Total
Canadian Born
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
14
2
16
14
2
16
28
22
50
25
22
47
55
41
96
41
38
79
61
73
134
49
55
104
68
97
165
55
79
134
60
83
143
50
64
114
55
88
143
31
60
91
35
62
97
17
28
45
33
43
76
19
16
35
21
34
55
6
12
18
27
28
55
8
8
16
18
20
38
5
4
9
6
3
9
1
1
2
481
596
1,077
321
389
710
British Born
M.
Foreign Born
M.
Unknown
M.
Under 15 years
15-19 years	
20-24    „    	
25-29    „    --	
30-34    „    	
35-39    „    	
40-44    „    	
45-49    „    	
50-54    „     	
55-59    „	
60-64    „    ___	
65-69    „    __	
70 years and over
Totals.-.
1
6
2
6
3
6
3
6
4 I
8 I
10 I
5 I
60 | 103
1
7
10
16
14
19
20
19
12
21
18
6
10
7
7
18
15
8
11
11
3
163
100
2
10
20
15
15
33
32
22
25
18
11
1
104
204 T 166
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 21.—Showing the Country of Birth of First Admissions by
Age-group from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Country
Male
Female
Total
1
1
6
3
3
3
44
1
2
1
5
6
1
2
3
4
9
13
1
6
15
1
5
1
1
19
3
3
27
139
29
3
1
8
35
1
13
62
2
4
1
1
1
1
4
56
2
3
2
1
1
1
8
2
1
1
1
12
2
20
34
1
3
3
31
5
4
64
142
49
3
8
39
1
11
70
1
1
3
10
1
Brazil       	
1
1
3
4
7
100
3
5
1
Holland _.                  	
7
7
1
2
10
Italy -   —	
5
1
4
1
10
Poland            	
25
3
26
49
1
1
8
1
4
50
8
7
Canada—■
91
281
78
6
1
16
Ontario 	
74
2
24
132
1
Totals   	
481
596
1,077
Table No. 22.—Showing the Citizenship of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Citizenship
Male
Female
Total
Canadian by birth—   -
British born who have resided in Canada five years or more—
British born who have resided in Canada less than five years..
Alien born (naturalized)-
Alien born who have resided in Canada five years or more (not naturalized)..
Alien born who have resided in Canada less than five years 	
Unknown.-   	
Totals -
321
52
8
50
22
28
481
389
93
10
62
23
19
596
710
145
18
112
45
47
1,077 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
T 167
Table No. 23.—Showing the Religion of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Religion
Male
Female
Total
1
101
2
19
5
1
2
5
5
11
4
38
6
2
1
1
4
10
24
76
2
92
2
1
66
132
1
15
2
3
5
5
1
3
40
19
3
9
1
42
123
-----
94
1
1
5
1
89
1
1
Anglican   _     	
233
3
34
Christian Science   - — -	
7
1
2
8
10
16
5
3
78
25
2
1
1
7
19
1
66
199
2
186
1
1
7
Sikh	
1
1
155
1
Totals                                                                                              	
481
596
1,077
Table No. 24.—Showing Age-groups of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1952, to March 3 1st, 1953
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
Under 15 years .	
15-19 years	
20-24   „     -	
25-29    „    	
30-34   „ -	
35-39    „   	
4(M4    „    	
45^*9    „     ___	
50-54   „    ____ __.
55-59    „    	
60-64    „     ___	
65-69    „    	
70 years and over-
Totals	
14
2
16
28
22
50
54
41
95
62
72
134
68
97
165
60
83
143
55
89
144
35
62
97
34
43
77
20
34
54
27
28
55
18
20
38
6
3
9
481
596
1,077 T 168
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No. 25.—Showing Age-groups of Readmissions from April 1st,
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
Under 1
15-19 ye
20-24   ,
1
3
4
6
11
2
5
3
1
4
4
4
3
3
16
15
22
8
12
4
8
3
2
1
6
7
25-29    ,
22
30-34   ,
26
35-39    ,
24
40-44    ,
13
45-49    ,
15
50-54   ,
5
55-59    ,
12
60-64   ,
7
65-69    ,
6
Totals— -	
48
96
144 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
T 169
Table No. 26.—Showing the Previous Occupations of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Occupation
Male
Female
Total
Occupation
Male
Female
Total
5
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
11
1
7
1
9
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
8
30
3
1
8
2
1
1
3
1
4
1
119
2
34
4
1
2
1
9
1
1
10
1
1
1
2
4
id
1
27
1
1
1
1
13
424
2
1
2
6
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
3
11
4
1
7
1
19
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
28
2
1
2
8
30
1
3
1
8
1
2
1
1
3
1
13
424
1
4
1
121
2
1
34
4
1
2
1
9
1
1
12
309
13
5
1
1
1
1
3
1
4
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
15
1
13
11
1
4
1
4
1
2
1
2
1
2
3
31
2
3
2
1
1
13
1
1
3
3
6
1
1
1
493
5
13
5
1
1
1
3
2
2
2
14
2
22
8
4
6
11
1
802
Aide 	
Miner  —
None	
Nurse 	
Nurse's aide	
Oiler	
Optometrist  __ 	
Orchardist- 	
Painter—  	
Paymaster	
Pensioner.-	
13
Artist  _ -	
10
14
5
1
Banker 	
Barber 	
1
1
3
1
4
1
1
1
Cashier 	
Chef 	
Plumber  _ ___	
2
1
2
Clergyman  _ 	
Clerk	
Preacher	
Printer  _ _.._
1
2
1
1
Retired—   __
18
1
13
13
1
2
2
4
Electrician  	
Service-station attendant
1
4
Farmer 	
Shipper ._ -
Smelterman	
1
2
1
2
Stenographer  ___	
14
1
Foreman _ _.
Forester  	
Steward _	
Storekeeper 	
Student    -
Tailor  	
2
5
53
Gardener— — _
2
11
2
Telephone operator	
4
1
1
13
Typist  -	
6
1
1
3
Waitress	
11
3
Mailman  _.. -
Welder  —
6
1
1
1
1
Totals-	
481
596
1,077
309
493
802 T 170
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1952-53
Table No 27.—Showing the Method of Commitment of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Method of Commitment
Male
Female
Total
290
191
324
272
614
463
Totals	
481
596
1,077
Table No. 28.—Showing the Method of Commitment of Readmissions
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Method of Commitment
Male
Female
Total
28
20
45
51
73
71
Totals
48
96
144
Table No. 29.—Showing Rural-Urban Status of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Psychosis
Total
Rural
Urban
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
203
25
10
6
2
2
7
15
15
5
1
108
2
20
5
6
1
8
5
2
18
7
5
3
249
45
24
8
2
3
13
2
15
181
1
15
7
2
5
3
2
10
6
2
1
452
70
34
14
4
5
20
17
30
5
1
289
3
35
12
8
1
13
8
4
28
13
~~7
4
39
6
2
4
2
4
2
28
2
2
—
1
2
1
8
3
1
50
11
\
1
1
4
8
34
2
—-
2
2
2
--
1
	
89
17
6
3
1
1
8
2
12
	
62
2
4
1
4
1
10
5
1
1
164
19
9
4
2
2
3
13
11
3
1
80
2
18
3
6
1
7
3
1
10
4
5
2
199
34
19
7
1
2
9
2
7
147
1
15
5
2
5
1
2
8
4
1
1
363
53
Involutional melancholia -	
28
11
Senile psychosis _ 	
3
4
12
15
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology	
Psychosis with psychopathic personality	
18
3
1
227
3
Without Psychosis
33
8
8
Drug addiction __ __ -
Primary behaviour disorders 	
1
12
4
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
3
18
Neurological disease without psychosis	
Observation without need for further medical care—mental    	
Head injury of other and unspecified nature—.
8
6
3
Totals  	
481
596
1,077
108
124
232
373
472
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171 T 172
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1952-53
Table No. 31. — Showing Duration of Last Hospital Residence of Discharged
Patients by Psychoses from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Total
Less than
1 Month
Less than
2 Months
Less than
3 Months
Less than
4 Months
4 Months
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Schizophrenic disorders  .
220
26
16
6
1
8
12
12
3
110
4
21
8
6
1
7
3
2
17
12
2
5
1
283
55
16
11
1
3
8
1
12
1
1
210
1
29
5
2
6
2
12
8
1
1
503
81
32
17
2
3
16
13
24
1
4
320
5
50
13
8
1
13
3
4
29
20
2
6
2
11
1
2
1
8
31
7
3
3
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
30
6
4
1
1
3
5
42
7
3
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
41
7
6
1
1
1
3
8
5
73
14
6
5
1
3
2
3
6
2
2
2
23
10
5
2
3
2
8
1
32
2
9
4
3
1
2
1
9
3
47
17
4
2
5
1
5
83
8
1
1
1
5
3
70
27
9
61
5
3
84
19
5
3
1
1
1
1
1
41
1
8
1
6
2
145
24
8
5
1
1
2
2
4
1
1
65
2
10
1
4
8
3
83
9
4
2
2
89
8
1
3
1
172
17
5
5
1
2
42
1
2
33
5
2
2
75
6
4
4     2
8      2
?,
1
1
Alcoholic psychosis- -  	
3
13
1
115
2
17
5
3
2
2
2
14
6
2
3
24
1
2
1
3
2
1
1
1
2
2
7
1
1
1
1
2
1
8
2
1
i
Psychosis with psychopathic personality..	
7
Psychoneurosis 	
Syphilis and its sequelae 	
16
2
36
4
52
6
15
1
Without Psychosis
3
1
Alcoholism  	
2
2
2
1
1
3
2
3
1
1
1
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
and intelligence disorders 	
7
?
Observation without need for further medical
Head injury of other and unspecified nature
3
3
	
Totals                          	
503
669
1,172
80
112
192
123
183
306
112
175
287
126
145
271
62
54
116 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
T  173
Table No. 32.—Showing Conditions of Patients on Discharge by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Psychosis
Total
Recovered
Improved
Unimproved
Without
Psychosis and
Unclassified
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Schizophrenic disorders	
220
26
16
6
1
8
12
12
3
110
4
21
8
283
55
16
11
1
3
8
1
12
1
1
210
1
29
5
503
81
32
17
2
3
16
15
24
1
4
320
5
50
13
8
1
13
3
4
29
20
. 2
6
2
25
6
4
1
7
1
11
13
10
3
1
1
13
38
16
7
1
7
1
1
1
24
147
17
9
4
5
5
4
2
76
2
....
208
39
12
6
1
7
1
8
1
173
355
56
21
10
1
12
6
12
3
249
2
48
3
3
2
1
2
8
23
2
3
-
62
6
1
5
1
2
1
3
24
1
I
—
110
9
4
7
2
2
3
11
47
3
3
21
8
6
1
7
2
17
12
2
5
1
29
5
2
6
2
12
8
1
1
—
Pre-senile psychosis 	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis
—
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology
Psychosis with psychopathic personality
....
Psychoneurosis _ _ _
Undiagnosed psychosis 	
Without Psychosis
50
13
6  1    2
8
1
7
3
2
17
12
2
5
1
6
2
12
8
1
1
1
Primary childhood behaviour disorders
13
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
4
29
Neurological disease without psychosis
Observation without need for further medi-
20
2
Head injury of other and unspecified nature
6
2
Total s _   	
503  |669
1
1,172
55
41
96
271
456
727
95
106
201
82
66
148
Table No. 33.—Showing Age-groups of Patients Who Died
from April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
1
2
1 -
2
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
20 24    „                                 - —  	
2
25 29    ,                                                                                              	
2
30-34    ,,                                                                                           	
2
35 39    ,                                                                   	
2
40-44    „                                                                            	
45 49    „                                      - -  	
1
50 54    „                                                                                - -	
5
55 59    „                                                	
1
60-64   ,                                                                                                	
3
65 69    .,                 -  	
2
1
15
6
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