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Provincial Game Commission REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1952 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1954]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Provincial Game Commission
REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1952
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1953  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game
Commission for the year ended December 31st, 1952.
R. W. BONNER,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., July, 1953. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., July 1st, 1953.
Honourable R. W. Bonner, Q.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended
December 31st, 1952.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
JAMES G. CUNNINGHAM,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
Game Commissioners. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Reports— Page
Game Commission     7
Officer Commanding "A" Division   11
Officer Commanding "B" Division  14
Officer Commanding "C" Division  18
Officer Commanding " D " Division  24
Summary of Reports of Game Wardens in " E " Division  28
Report of Fisheries Management Division—Chief Fisheries Biologist Dr. P. A.
Larkin  30
Report of Game Management Division—Chief Game Biologist Dr. J. Hatter  38
Report of Predator-control Branch—Supervisor of Predator-control G. A. West 43
Statistical Reports-—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-52, Inclusive  46
Summary of Total Revenue Derived from Sale of Various Licences, Collections,
etc., during Year 1952  47
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences  48
Revenue—Sale of Deer, Moose-Elk, Goat, and Pheasant (Game) Tags  49
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences  50
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Outfitters' Licences  51
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Anglers' Licences  52
Revenue—Sale  of Fur-traders',  Taxidermists',  and  Tanners'  Licences  and
Royalty on Fur  53
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-52, Inclusive...  54
Comparative  Statement  Showing Pelts  of Fur-bearing  Animals  on  Which
Royalty Has Been Collected, 1921-52, Inclusive  55
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on Which Royalty Was
Collected during Year 1952  56
List of Confiscated Fur, 1952, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur_
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1952, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Firearms  57
Bounties Paid, 1952  59
Comparative Statement of Bounties Paid from 1922 to 1952, Inclusive  60
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees Paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1952  60
Prosecutions, 1952  61
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1952  63
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1952  64
Statement—Returns from Holders of Special (Trapping) Firearms Licences,
Season 1951-52  76
Statement—Game-bird Liberations, 1952  77
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1952  78
Statement—Miscellaneous Receipts  78
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1952  79
Personnel of Game Commission as at December 31st, 1952  88  Report of the Provincial Game Commission, 1952
The year under review, in so far as revenue is concerned, has been a successful one
in spite of considerable loss of revenue from the non-resident trade through the outbreak
amongst cattle of foot-and-mouth disease in a small portion of the Province of Saskatchewan which resulted in an embargo on the importation of the meat of most species of
big game into the United States.
The total revenue derived from the sale of non-resident angling and game licences
and trophy fees for the calendar year 1952 amounted to $212,699, as against $363,809
for the previous year, showing a loss of $151,110. There was an over-all increase in
revenue derived under the " Game Act" from the all-time high for 1951 of approximately
$10,719.05 in spite of the reduction in the number of non-resident hunters. The revenue
derived from resident hunters and fishermen showed an increase of $143,058 over the
previous year. The total revenue of the Department amounted to $941,439.70, as
against $930,720.65 for the previous year. The increased revenue from the resident
trade resulted from the increased cost of various resident licences and game-tags recommended by the organized sportsmen at the Provincial Game Convention in 1951.
Particulars covering sale of hunting and angling licences are set out hereunder:—
Licences
Kind of Licence Issued Revenue
Non-resident angling licences  27,641 $165,620.00
Non-resident firearms licences  1,172 26,714.00
Resident angling licences  87,457 146,931.00
Resident firearms licences  80,403 397,630.00
Totals.
  196,673        $736,895,00
Other miscellaneous revenue, such as the sale of game-tags, trophy fees, sale of fur-
traders' and guides' licences, fur royalties, etc., amounted to $203,877.70.
The decrease in non-resident trophy-fee payments was approximately $93,290, or
a total of $20,365 in 1952 as against $113,655 in 1951. It is anticipated that this picture
will be changed during the fall of 1953, provided that there will be no further outbreaks
of foot-and-mouth disease in Canada.
Considerable progress has been made in scientific studies of wildlife during the year.
Several major investigations in regard to game birds, big game, and sport-fishery problems
were conducted. These investigations included studies on pheasants, liberations of
chukar partridge, study of California bighorn sheep in the Churn Creek area, a continuation of the moose survey throughout the Cariboo District, and in respect to deer on
Vancouver Island.
As a result of the moose investigations and a strong recommendation from our game
biologists, a short open season of six days on cow moose in certain areas was allowed.
This action, however, brought strong protests and criticism from some quarters. This
criticism was to be expected as the opening of a season on the female species of any
member of the deer family was a departure from past policies. Your Game Commission's policy in the past has been toward protection of the females of any member of the
deer family unless it was necessary to reduce the herd or stand of game in any particular
area for cause such as over-population and damage to agricultural interests. However,
a more thorough knowledge of the situation brought about through scientific investigations, and in co-operation with the sportsmen and guides who are now becoming aware
of the need of maintaining a proper balance of game in keeping with the available food-
supply, has to some extent lessened the criticism. At the present time the guides in the
areas that were provided with a cow-moose season are co-operating very fully with our
game biologists, with the object in view of the safe management of game in those areas. K 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Pollution of some of our lakes and streams by mining and other interests, as well as
an ever-increasing number of applications for water rights in some of our more accessible
and popular fishing areas, continues to be a major problem; so much so that we have
found it necessary to employ one permanent biologist with a part-time assistant to carry
out necessary investigations. This important assignment is under the direction of Fishery
Biologist R. McMynn. The total number of new applications for water use handled by
this branch for the year was 906.
The operation of all fish-hatcheries and all phases of the fish-cultural operations has
been placed under the very able supervision of Dr. Peter A. Larkin. It is expected that
this co-ordination of fishery operations will greatly improve the efficiency of the Branch.
A change in the supervision of our Predatory-animal Control Branch has taken
place since our last Report. The former Supervisor of Predator-control, W. Winston
Mair, has been appointed to the position of Chief of the Canadian Wildlife Service at
Ottawa. His work with this Commission has been taken over by Game Biologist G. A.
West, a graduate of the University of British Columbia. The work of this Branch has
increased considerably during the past year. Systematic poisoning of predatory animals,
principally wolves and coyotes throughout the interior and northern sections of the
Province, has been most successful. In fact, we anticipate recommendations in the very
near future from certain Farmers' Institutes and branches of the cattle industry to modify
our activities in areas where the control of predators has been so successful. This is the
goal that the Department is attempting to reach. It is expected that the recommendations
may be for cancellation of bounty payments during the winter months, when we are most
actively engaged in poisoning operations.
During the past winter some 800 predatory-animal poison-stations were in operation, the majority of which were highly successful. It is anticipated that this programme
will be stepped up in the more remote areas of the Province next fall. The poisoning
programme, or our activities of predatory-animal control in the northern sections of the
Province where there are a large number of registered trap-lines held in the names of
Indians, was fully appreciated by the Department of Indian Affairs; so much so that
financial assistance was received, enabling the chartering of aircraft to assist in our activities in the vicinity of these Indian trap-lines.
The cougar situation throughout the Province and more particularly on Vancouver
Island has been the cause of considerable concern and expense to the Department. The
fact that we have had three instances of attacks by cougar on residents of the Island in
recent years, one of which resulted in the death of a child, has resulted in many more
complaints than usual. Many of these complaints have originated on the west coast of
Vancouver Island, where transportation facilities are difficult and necessitate considerable
use of aircraft. Many of the complaints, however, have turned out to be baseless, but
failure to investigate one complaint that may result in an attack on some human would
leave us open to much criticism, and consequently all must be investigated. The control
of cougar necessitates the use of highly trained and valuable dogs, and the casualties
among these dogs have been very high.
The game-checking station at Cache Creek was again in operation during the fall
hunting season. The results obtained through this operation have been very valuable
from a game-management standpoint, as well as a source of information to all parties
passing through the station to the hunting-grounds.
The total amount of game checked through Cache Creek was down considerably
from the previous year owing to the drop in non-resident hunters, and further through
the abnormally fine open fall. The game did not come down to their usual fall haunts
until long after the close of all game seasons. In fact, some of the usual game wintering-
grounds were little used this past winter.
The following is a summary of results from the Cache Creek Checking-station:— REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952 K
Game Killed by Resident and Non-resident Hunters Checked through Cache Creek
Species of Game
Resident
Hunters
Non-resident
Hunters
Totals
54
8
694
11
11
3
4
32
28
4
552
38
65
19
697
4
1,235
10
5
6,582
425
123
10,293
4,613
106
1,267
Mountain-goat _ _ 	
Mountain-sheep  __   _	
38
9
7,i34
463
123
727
5,807
11,020
Fish                               	
10,420
106
24,148
7,217
31,365
41
$535.00
9
$90.00
50
$625.00
$2,610.00
A total of 12,200 hunters passed through Cache Creek, of which 11,606 were
residents of the Province and 594 non-residents.
Checking-stations such as Cache Creek not only supply us with much desired
information, but are very popular from the standpoint of cattle interests; so much so
that we are in receipt of resolutions from those same interests for the establishing of
checks on the Hope-Princeton Highway and the vicinity of Elko in the East Kootenay.
While checking-stations at these points would be beneficial to all concerned, the operation costs would be great, and our finances will not permit these operations at this time.
The popularity of the area of the Province lying north of Cache Creek through its
variety of game draws more and more coastal sportsmen into that district, and tremendous improvements on the roads leading into all sections of the Central and Northern
Interior have played no small part in drawing the sportsmen into these areas from all
parts of the Province and the United States.
The Sixth Annual Provincial Game Convention was held at Vernon this year on the
occasion of that city's diamond jubilee. This Convention proved to be the most successful
one held so far, and the success was due to the excellent arrangements and co-operation
of the Vernon and District Fish and Game Protective Association. The Convention was
well attended. It was the first time that this meeting has been held in the Interior, but
the success of the meeting indicates the desirability of holding the Annual Provincial
Game Convention in different large centres each year.
UPLAND GAME BIRDS
The 1952 season on pheasants showed an upward trend in population of birds both
on the Coast and in the Interior, especially in the vicinity of North Okanagan and that
portion of the Okanagan Valley south of Okanagan Falls. Partridge and quail are also
becoming very numerous in the southern part of the Okanagan in the vicinity of Oliver
and Osoyoos.
During the year, plantings of chukar partridge were made in the Interior in the
vicinity of Vaseaux Lake, Tranquille, and Ashcroft, the total of which amounted to 668
birds. The introduction of this species of game bird has been successful in the State
of Washington, and care is being taken to carry on our liberations in the same type of
habitat that proved most successful in the State mentioned.
The peak on the cycle on grouse appears to have been reached, and populations
are on the downward trend, although there were fair numbers of birds in most areas.
Prairie-chicken and sharp-tailed grouse and blue grouse were numerous, but the ruffed
and Franklin's grouse were found in reduced numbers. K 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS
The past season was a very poor one for the hunting of migratory birds, at least
in so far as the hunter was concerned. Birds were plentiful along the coast, but climatic
conditions were favourable to the birds and not conducive to good duck-hunting.
Actually, the good duck-hunting days did not amount to more than seven or eight. The
same conditions prevailed in the Interior. We were finally favoured with a seventy-day
season on ducks in certain areas, but this concession was not granted until considerable
correspondence had taken place with the Canadian Wildlife Service at Ottawa, and only
after it was learned that the Pacific Flyway States had been granted a seventy-day season.
BIG GAME
The fall hunting season of 1952 generally was disappointing. Exceptionally mild
weather prevailed over the whole of the Province until well after the close of all hunting
seasons, with the result that big-game animals did not reach their usual wintering-grounds
or popular hunting areas until well after the end of the year. The harvest of all big game
was exceptionally light, in spite of the fact that a heavier take of deer was anticipated.
Populations of deer are definitely on the increase, and it may be necessary to provide an
open season on the females of the species in some areas in order to prevent damage to
agricultural interests.
The population of moose in the Cariboo-Lillooet areas has decreased, particularly
in areas west of the Fraser River, owing to depletion of proper and suitable food through
over-browsing, and it is doubtful if we will ever see the populations of moose back to
the numbers we had in the late 1940's. The short six-day experimental open season on
cow moose that was allowed at the end of November in certain parts of the Cariboo,
LiUooet, and Kamloops Electoral Districts, recommended by our game biologists, caused
a great amount of criticism, especially in view of the apparent decrease in moose populations. But owing to the exceptionally mild late season, lack of non-resident hunters,
and the shortness of the season, only 351 cow moose were checked through Cache Creek.
This number naturally did not include the local kill, which would probably reach another
450 animals, making an estimated total of 800 cows harvested. The harvesting of this
number would not materially affect the over-all population of moose in the areas open
to hunting.
Moose are steadily spreading south of the Thompson River, and in some sections
are in fair numbers. A scientific survey of this new population and new area is
anticipated, and it is just possible that additional moose-hunting territory will be available
in the very near future. It is not expected that this new area will ever produce large
populations as in the Cariboo District, owing to lack of the quantity of browse suitable
for moose;  hence the advisability of controlling populations before they become too
aige' GAME-LAWS ENFORCEMENT
Enforcement of the " Game Act," the Migratory Birds Regulation, and the Special
Fishery Regulations for the Province of British Columbia is still a very important phase
of proper game management. With increasing populations and better roads leading into
more remote hunting and fishing areas, the problem of enforcement and protection of this
natural resource increases.
The total number of prosecutions for the year under the aforementioned Acts and
regulations amounts to 1,504, with a total of $25,755 in fines.    The following is a
summary of the prosecutions under the various Acts and regulations:—
" Game Act ":   1,244 prosecutions and $22,184 in fines.
Special Fishery Regulations:   178 prosecutions and $1,886 in fines.
"Migratory Birds Convention Act" and Regulations:   82 prosecutions and
$1,685 in fines.
A more detailed analysis of prosecutions will be found later on in this Report. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
GAME-FISH CULTURE
K 11
The year 1952 saw important changes and improvements in our Fish-cultural Branch.
Dr. Peter A. Larkin, Chief Fisheries Biologist, has taken over all phases of trout-hatchery
management along with other scientific responsibilities. This means that such work
as collection of trout-eggs, restocking programmes, temporary and permanent trout-
hatcheries, lake and stream investigations and improvement work, pollutions, etc., now
come under Dr. Larkin's supervision. It is felt that this arrangement will result in
improved efficiency and economy in operations.
HUNTING ACCIDENTS
Later on in this Report will be found a detailed statement of hunting accidents for the
year, which shows that there were twenty-seven accidents, seven of which resulted in
death. Of the total accidents, five covered cases of being mistaken for a deer or moose,
three of which died; five caused by taking loaded firearms from a boat or automobile,
one of which died; and eight were self-inflicted, two of which died. The number of
hunting accidents remains fairly consistent from year to year. In every instance where
careless handling of firearms has been the cause of an accident, the licence held by the
person responsible has either been cancelled or suspended.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
We have taken every opportunity to attend conventions and meetings of such
organizations as the Cattlemen, Farmers' Institutes, Game Associations and Zone
Organizations, Guides' and Trappers' Associations, as well as a great number of service
clubs and schools, where our educational films have been shown at every opportunity.
Your Commission fully appreciates the excellent co-operation received from these organizations as well as the personnel of all the Provincial and Federal governmental departments with whom we come in contact in our game-management work.
"A" DIVISION (VANCOUVER ISLAND, THE GULF ISLANDS, AND THE
MAINLAND COAST FROM TOBA INLET NORTH TO CAPE CAUTION,
INCLUDING THE ISLANDS ADJACENT TO THE EAST COAST OF VANCOUVER ISLAND NORTH OF CAMPBELL RIVER).
By G. C. Stevenson, Officer Commanding
I have the honour to submit my annual report covering game and fish conditions
in "A" Division for the year ended December 31st, 1952.
Big Game
Wapiti (Elk).—This animal, though indigenous to Vancouver Island, shows little
sign of increasing in any appreciable numbers. In those parts where elk are found, they
appear to concentrate year after year in the same locality, and there is very little evidence
of them extending their habitat. It is my opinion that elk were never very plentiful on
Vancouver Island, and though their range may have been somewhat wider before
extensive human settlement, I doubt their numbers being ever great. When the biological
survey being conducted by the Game Commission is completed, a better understanding
of the situation may result.
Deer.—There was a marked improvement in the deer population during the past
year due in large measure to a moderate winter. In certain areas on Vancouver Island,
such as Mohan Lake and Camp 5 in the Sayward District, these animals could be said
to be plentiful. In the more settled districts where heavy hunting pressure is exerted,
the deer have become almost nocturnal in their habits, and this would account for the K 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
poor hunting success.   Hunters encounter much evidence of deer, but not the animals
themselves.
Certain of the Gulf Islands show good deer populations, especially Saltspring Island,
where hunting proved exceptionally good during the past season.
Many parts of South Vancouver Island that once contained large stands of deer are
now practically devoid of these animals. This situation is difficult to account for, as food
conditions have had ample time to recover from any over-browsing. In this connection
I refer to large areas such as McGee Swamp, Highland District, Malahat, and Leechtown.
Owing to heavy hunting pressure in confined areas, deer are becoming more and
more wary each year, and hunters should expect greater difficulty in bagging their game.
Black or Brown Bear.—These animals are plentiful, but the brown variety is seldom
encountered. A few of them are to be seen at the headwaters of the Adams and Salmon
Rivers.
Grizzly Bear.—These animals are not found on Vancouver Island, but on the upper
reaches of Bute, Toba, and Knight Inlets they are fairly plentiful.
Fur-bearing Animals
Beaver are increasing all over Vancouver Island, and control measures have had to
be adopted in several areas in order to protect property. Racoon have become a menace
to poultry-farmers owing to their increasing numbers. Mink and marten are plentiful,
and in some places muskrat are increasing. Squirrel and weasel are found in moderate
numbers, but they are not plentiful.
Upland Game Birds
Blue Grouse.—These birds continue to maintain a heavy population on Vancouver
Island and some of the adjacent islands of the gulf group. The harvest of these birds
during the past hunting season was slightly in excess of the preceding year. There is
difficulty in telling when these birds commence leaving their breeding-grounds and
disperse elsewhere. Usually when the birds are ready for harvest, fire conditions prevent
the opening of the season, and by the time the fire-hazard is passed, the birds have
commenced to leave. A full harvest is not possible under these conditions, but the
situation is unavoidable unless weather conditions should be favourable at the time.
Willow Grouse.-—This species is showing definite signs of an increase and should
continue to do so, as the controlled bag is proving very effective. Very limited numbers
were taken by hunters, and all indications point to an increase in these birds.
California Quail.—These birds fluctuate in numbers from year to year and hunting
has very little bearing on the population, as few are ever shot. The incidence of large
fields of yellow broom has a marked bearing on their survival through the winter, as heavy
snow takes a severe toll of their numbers unless they have the shelter of the broom. There
are fair numbers of these birds on the southern portion of the Island.
Pheasants.—The pheasant population on Vancouver Island requires considerable
study, especially where restocking with farm-raised birds is concerned. The basic stock
remains sound, and in areas where hunting is prohibited these birds multiply considerably,
but where their numbers are reduced by hunting, and restocking is adopted, the difference
does not appear to be filled adequately. I would suggest that pheasant-farmers be required
to feed their birds a hard-grain diet for at least two weeks prior to submitting them for
acceptance by the Department. In this way, birds would survive more easily in stubble
fields, where their diet would be mostly whole grain and seeds.
Liberations of young pheasants were made in the Saanich, Duncan, Cowichan,
Nanaimo, Alberni, Comox, and Courtenay areas. Farmer-hunting relationship during
the past season was very amicable. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
K 13
Migratory Game Birds
Ducks and Geese.—These birds have been plentiful in this district during the past
year, but the hunter's scope is greatly restricted through various causes prevailing in the
southern portion of Vancouver Island. These restrictions are mostly due to sanctuaries,
municipal by-laws, and private property. The west coast provides exceptionally good
duck and goose shooting, but accessibility is restricted to the few. A general survey in
this Division indicates migratory waterfowl are plentiful, and various sanctuaries show
large populations.
Predator-control
There were 268 cougars and 6 wolves destroyed in this Division during the past
year. So far no appreciable increase in cougar-kills has been noticed under the current
bonus-bounty system, but it may require a little time for hunters to train additional dogs,
etc., in order to produce results. In the meantime the bonus system seems to be an
effective answer to the clamour for higher cougar bounties.
Many calls from remote settlements for help in destroying cougars kept Departmental
hunters continually on the move, as the safety of the public cannot be ignored. This
form of predator destruction—apart from the expense involved—interferes greatly with
planned control in selected areas.
Timber-wolves cannot be said to be numerous, but small pockets of these animals
are encountered in widely spread parts of Vancouver Island. Many exaggerated reports
of their numbers are quoted from time to time, but few are trapped or shot. The six
wolves presented for bounty during the past year practically all came from the Nanaimo
and Cowichan areas.
Game Protection
There were 165 informations laid under the " Game Act " and Fisheries Regulations
for various infractions; 164 convictions were obtained. An improvement in late shooting
of migratory game birds was noted.
Game Propagation
The question of game propagation is receiving considerable study by Departmental
biologists. Before an effective formula for propagation (this especially applies to upland
game birds) can be carried out, the question of supply and quality, together with survival
rate, requires considerable research. Added to this is the attitude of Agricultural Associations to the liberation of birds on their lands. It is more and more necessary for Gun
Clubs and Game Associations to educate their members so that a harmonious understanding can be achieved between farmers and hunters.
Game Reserves
Strathcona Park, Shaw Creek, Bald Mountain, Elk Lake, Elk Falls, China Creek,
and Miracle Beach are very effective reserves, with one or two of lesser extent that are
really Class "A" parks covered under section 11 (2) of the " Game Act." The Shaw
Creek reserve contains a considerable stand of elk.
Fur Trade
Much of the fur shipped from this Division is the product of fur-farms, but a good
volume of wild fur is taken by trappers who ship direct to the Mainland.
Trap-lines
Registration of trap-lines and the measures adopted to control beaver are outstanding features of game management in this Province. A perusal of fur records will
show a consistent supply of fur which shows no sign of diminishing.   Very few of the K 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
public realize the infinite amount of work and care that goes into the maintenance of a
smoothly working trap-fine registration system where detail in geographic problems and
a very close check on catches has to be maintained at all times.
Registration of Guides
Guiding in this Division—with a few exceptions—is mostly confined to fishing in
the Campbell River and Comox regions.
Special Patrols
No special patrols were carried out during the past year. Many of the west coast
patrols, though carried out in remote sectors, were routine in nature and could not be
classified as special.
Hunting Accidents
There were eight hunting accidents in this Division during the past year, four of
which were fatal. In all cases the evidence shows carelessness and a disregard to the
ordinary precautions necessary in handling firearms and hunting with companions. For
detailed information covering the accidents, see report " Hunting and Fishing Accidents,
1952."
Game-fish Culture
Successful liberations of Kamloops and cut-throat fingerlings were made throughout
this Division during the spring and fall. Cut-throat fingerlings released were of an
exceptionally good size. In all, about 192,300 were planted in lakes and streams, with
several thousand retained for experimental purposes.
Summary and General Remarks
The hunting success experienced by sportsmen during the past season showed a
higher ratio than the previous year, and checking-stations were able to establish definite
figures showing increased bags of deer and grouse. Very dry weather at the opening
of the hunting season invariably has the effect of lessening the take of deer at the
commencement, but hunters are usually successful at a later date. It must be remembered,
as stated previously in this report, that deer on Vancouver Island are becoming more
and more cautious each year as hunting pressure grows, and the halcyon days when a
hunter could bag his old limit of three deer on the first day are gone.
Blue-grouse shooting was uniformly good, and ducks and geese were numerous
even though fine weather kept them from the fields until almost the close of the season.
Fishing has been good throughout the Island and is proving one of the major lures to
tourists.
Good co-operation is maintained among the various Game Associations in this
Division, and all problems have been settled amicably. The Royal Canadian Mounted
Police in this Division have been most co-operative and, when requested, have at all
times provided personnel to carry out checks on roads and boats for transportation.
I wish to take this opportunity of expressing my gratitude to them. To the Game
Wardens, predator-hunters, and personnel of the Puntledge Park Trout Hatchery, I wish
to extend my sincere thanks for the able way in which they have carried out their duties
to the Commission during the past year.
"B" DIVISION (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS)
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding
I beg to submit herewith my annual report for the year ending December 31st, 1952. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
K 15
Big Game
Moose.—The stand of moose in the East Kootenay, while not heavy, appears to be
stabilized, with a slow penetration to outside areas. The main stand is in the Rocky
Mountain section, but they are in good numbers on the southern slope of the Selkirks
and are occasionally in the East Kootenay. An open season in the Cranbrook district
resulted in the taking of a few mature bulls.
Wapiti (Elk).—These animals are well distributed in the East Kootenay, and a short
open season was allowed in the Creston district. A fair band of elk is now present at the
top end of Kootenay Lake from a planting a few years ago, and a short open season
should soon be considered there. The elk situation near Princeton and Penticton is
being closely studied by the biological staff.
Caribou.—These animals are thinly distributed in the Selkirk Mountains adjacent
to the Arrow and Kootenay Lakes. The short open season seems satisfactory, although
only a handful of caribou are bagged, due to their high ranging habits. Caribou-hunting
in the Kootenays is a vigorous sport.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are well distributed throughout the district and
plentiful in the East and West Kootenays. The noticeable decline in the number of
mountain-goat recorded previously still continues to be puzzling. Cougars, coyotes,
eagles, and disease are all suspected, although our recent severe winters are probably
the main adverse factor.   However, the situation is not yet too alarming.
Mountain-sheep (Bighorn).—These animals are again in fair numbers after the
epidemic several years ago, and it is hoped that they will continue their present satisfactory
rate of increase.
Mule Deer.—It is pleasing to report that the present winter, 1952-53, has been
unusually mild and that all deer have wintered very well. Examination of deer-kills—
predatory or on the highways—during the months of February and March indicated that
deer were in as good shape as in the hunting season—an unusual and gratifying condition.
It is hoped that this favourable situation may partly compensate for our losses in the
harsh winters we have had so recently.
White-tailed Deer.—The above remarks also apply.
Grizzly Bear.—These animals are well distributed but not plentiful. It may be
a matter of regret that grizzly bear seem to be on the way out in this section of the
Province where they can be so readily hunted in the spring. Already there is a current
feeling among the sportsmen that the elimination of spring hunting might be a prudent
conservation measure.
Black and Brown Bear.—These animals are well distributed and are plentiful.
Fur-bearing Animals
The prevailing low price of fur still continues to discourage trappers, although very
few of them have given up their registered trap-lines. It is to be hoped that the price of
fur will appreciate, as the increasing number of beavers as well as lynx and bobcats are
causing us some concern. Game Wardens have been energetic in live-trapping beaver
whose dams are flooding highways or railways and moving them to more suitable sites.
The prevalence of deer-kills by both bobcats and lynx has been rather surprising
this past winter or two. The trappers formerly kept these animals under control when
the prices were better, but now these predatory wild cats are too numerous and too active.
Upland Game Birds
Blue Grouse.—These birds were well distributed and very plentiful during the past
season in the Boundary, Similkameen, and West Kootenay; also fair numbers in the
East Kootenay. K 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—These birds are well distributed and presumably on the
same cyclical uptrend as the willow grouse.
Franklin's Grouse.—These birds are well distributed and presumably on the same
cyclical uptrend as the willow grouse.
Sharp-tailed Grouse.—Several successive open seasons in the Columbia district do
not seem to have changed their numbers, and they now appear to be well established and
extending their range to portions of the East Kootenay, where they were quite plentiful
half a century ago.
Ptarmigan.—These are alpine birds and are hunted very little. Most hunters regard
them as a curio, and due to their trusting nature there is little inducement to bag them.
Pheasants.—The pheasant situation appears more encouraging than for some years,
and there is every prospect of improved shooting for the future. While we have as yet
no satisfactory explanation for the universal decline of pheasants a few years ago, it does
seem as if this phase or cycle is now over and the good shooting of ten years ago may
return.
European Partridge.—These birds are present but not numerous in the Creston,
Grand Forks, and Penticton-Oliver districts.
Quail.—These birds are fairly numerous in the Penticton-Oliver-Summerland areas.
Canada Geese.—These birds wintered in good numbers in the Creston district.
Practically all waters were open throughout the winter, and the usual concentrations were
not apparent.   It was not necessary to feed any migratory game birds as we usually do.
Ducks.—The main nesting areas for ducks are in the Windermere and Golden
districts along the Columbia River sloughs and in the vicinity of Creston and Osoyoos.
Many ducks stayed all winter due to mild weather.
Coots.—These birds are plentiful everywhere in this Division, but they are not
hunted.
Wilson's Snipe.—These birds are migratory and present for only a few days each fall.
Swans.—Occasional.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds
Predators destroyed by game personnel during the calendar year totalled 83 cougars,
13 bobcats, 11 bear, 28 ownerless dogs, and 71 wild house-cats. It is difficult to estimate
the total number of coyotes destroyed by means of poison baits, but a conservative
estimate would indicate a large number of them were eliminated and there is a definite
shortage where we have used poison. Several instances of this kind attest the efficiency
of carefully placed poison baits for coyote-control.
The above summary is not intended to conflict with the detailed report of the
Supervisor of Predator-control, but is merely to emphasize the active interest taken in the
predator campaign by the entire field staff of this Division.
Game Protection
There were 173 prosecutions for infractions of the " Game Act," the Special Fisheries
Regulations for British Columbia, and the " Migratory Birds Convention Act," which
resulted in 169 convictions and 4 dismissals.
Game Propagation
No pheasant-stockings were made during the year, although a planting of chukar
partridge was made in the Oliver district.
Game Reserves
The Elk River Reserve, comprising the upper watershed of the Elk and Bull Rivers,
and also the White River, is the most important one, as it is situated in the heart of the REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
K 17
big-game country. Game-bird sanctuaries at Nelson and Vaseaux Lake, south of Penticton, are also beneficial, and their establishment continues to meet with general approval.
Deer sanctuaries at Elko and on the Kettle River are located on winter yarding-grounds
and serve as a haven should unusual conditions occur during the open season when deer
might be too easily taken.
Fur Trade
Most of the fur in this Division is handled by local resident fur-traders or sent to
traders in Vancouver.   Very little fur is exported locally from the Province by trappers.
Registration of Trap-lines
Although fur prices continue to be very low, the value of trap-lines is such that very
few of them become vacant. Most trappers are confident that the price of furs will
improve ultimately.
Registration of Guides
The embargo against the export of meat last year practically eliminated the nonresident hunting in this Division. The odd party was taken out, but in general the guides
had their slackest hunting season since the early war years.
Special Patrols
We have no special patrols other than routine ones made during the year on horseback, on foot, and with row-boats in the course of general duties. During the winter
many trips on foot by personnel hunting cougars have resulted in prosecutions for illegal
hunting and are productive of much reliable information about the winter game situation.
Hunting Accidents
There were three hunting accidents in this Division during the year, one of which
was fatal. For detailed information covering the accidents, see report " Hunting and
Fishing Accidents, 1952."
Summary and General Remarks
For the first time in several years it is pleasing to be able to summarize game
conditions for the past year without striking a sour note. The closing winter months of
1952 were average; that is, the snow was not unduly deep nor was the weather unduly
cold and all game got off to a good start in the spring. The summer was warm and fairly
dry and merged so unobstrusively into the winter that the hunting season was over before
winter had even started. The bag of all wild game was light, and much fear was expressed
that our game animals were gone. This was a mistake, of course; they were simply not
concentrated on the lower levels as they usually are in the late fall months.
We were favoured with the sort of winter that occurs three or four times in a century.
The last similar winter was in 1925-26, although, if anything, this past winter was even
milder. We had no snow to mention and no cold weather. The deer were on much of
their summer range all winter, and their usual concentration on the winter feeding-grounds
was missing, although in some customary places they did bunch up enough so that we
could get a reasonable estimate of their stand. It is worth recording that deer were in as
good condition during the months of January and February as they normally are in the
hunting season. This means that our winter carry-over will be very high, the fawns will
have a good start in life, and there is every reason to believe that next season's hunting
should be good.
The usual cordial co-operation was received from the organized sportsmen during
the year, and the assistance from both the Department of Public Works and the Forest
Service in many instances is gratefully acknowledged. K 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Fishery Supervisor C. H. (Jimmy) Robinson, who is retiring March 31st, 1953, has
completed fifteen years' service with the Game Department in addition to nineteen years
previously with the Federal Department of Fisheries. It is an understatement to say that
Mr. Robinson will be missed both in " B " and " C" Game Divisions. His careful
attention to detail, his first-hand knowledge of all field problems, and his remarkable
co-operation with the organized sportsmen's groups will leave a considerable gap in our
Interior set-up. This is a day of new things, but Jimmy Robinson has done somewhat
more than his share in maintaining the efficiency and prestige of our sport-fish programme
in the Central and Southern Interior areas of British Columbia.
" C " DIVISION (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO,
CHILCOTIN, AND SQUAMISH DISTRICTS)
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in
" C " Game Division during the year ended December 31st, 1952.
Big Game
Moose.—The present open winter of 1952-53, with very little snow up to March
15th, 1953, was responsible for the unprecedented lack of big-game movement from
the higher elevations to the more impoverished food-supply at lower levels. The rainfall
record in the Kamloops district alone was 50 per cent below normal. The Thompson
River gauge for the watershed at Kamloops has reached at the moment of writing,
March 15th, 1953, a record low.
Hunters everywhere were keenly disappointed at the lack of good hunting at lower
elevations, and the question was repeatedly asked, " Where are the moose? " The
answer so commonly heard was that big game still remained either far back or higher
up on the more inaccessible slopes. Some reports from hunters living in regions
described as more remote revealed the fact that moose, even in those regions, were
extremely scarce or non-existent.
The simple fundamentals of scarce food-supply, or even lack of the required nutrient
for big-game sustenance, were due to conditions entirely out of human control. These
conditions are just as cyclic as the rising sun, except that the memory of longer cyclic
changes are non-existent in the public mind. The original causes of much of our meteorological phenomena on which big game has to depend for its sustenance is still very
obscure to the world of science. Biologists have told us that we are faced with a
diminishing food-supply for moose due to overcrowding ranges. A problem as simple
as this could be intelligently handled by any farmer having live stock. The logical conclusion would be to reduce the herd to conform with the food-supply available. We have
to contend with the ups and downs of the growth cycle, with its years of abundance and
scarcity plus its nutrient content or lack of it. It is indeed possible for animals to starve
on full bellies at the end of several dry and dull years. The entire problem of game
management and its biotic relationship is to a large extent beyond the understanding of
the layman. One cannot judge the quality of a regional food-supply by one range alone.
Scientific examination has been made by the small staff of biologists whom we have at
present to prove that there is sufficient evidence, relatively speaking, of a lack of nutrients
and quantity of winter moose-feed, and, based on the amount of scientific information
we have at hand, we are due for a jolt unless sensible action is taken. The alternative
of sensible action is to take the advice of the hunter who hunts on the range for several
days a year or even the trapper or guide (and there are hundreds) who try to judge the
over-all picture from what happens on his trap-line or guiding area. Reasonable consideration for the other fellow's view-point is a basic fundamental of democracy, but in REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 19
the final analysis the preservation and conservation of wildlife resources must rest with
the recommendations of the biologist and the co-operation of the sportsmen and wildlife
enthusiasts. Old customs die hard. There is considerable room for education along
more scientific lines. In a report published in the Canadian Journal of Research, October, 1950, by Professor Ian McTaggart Cowan and associates, they quote one authority
" setting a higher protein level for a satisfactory diet," and state " feeding of domestic
livestock a 12% protein diet is considered the minimum for a maintenance ration."
On this basis, and according to Professor Cowan's findings, all the browse growth consumed by moose during the winter would be rated as deficient. Whether moose can
live on a lower-quality nutrient is a subject for further research.
The year just past was a disastrous one for the Province. Foot-and-mouth disease
in Saskatchewan barred the export of domestic cattle and game. In one sense it was
a blessing in disguise in so far as exploitation of big-game resources was concerned.
Our American friends who had planned a trip to this Province to hunt but did not come
because of the embargo were not disappointed when they learned of the poor returns
obtained by our resident hunters. The non-resident hunters who did come to this
Province in 1952 practically ignored the taking of moose and deer because of the
embargo. Only thirty-two moose were taken by non-resident hunters during the open
season in the Cariboo and Chilcotin areas.
In the Merritt district the movement of moose proceeded slowly southward; a few
were seen around the Mud and Alleyene Lakes areas. Reports from Clinton mention
the poor food-supply and the prediction of another winter kill of moose. A few moose
have been reported in the Bolean Lake country in the Falkland district near Vernon.
Other reports from various Detachments, especially Kamloops, drew attention to the
failing food-supply. The new growth of palatable willow around Kamloops is spindly
and sparse; practically all the shoots are less than 8 inches long and less than one-quarter
of an inch in diameter, which is truly indicative of the dry year. As a moose consumes
60 pounds of willow and other growth per day, one can only conclude that a wider
browsing and diminishing of the year's growth will follow. Areas to the south of the
Thompson River in the Kamloops and Merritt districts should be watched, and an open
season on moose should not be delayed any longer than is necessary. This applies also
to the north-west portion of the Salmon Arm Electoral District, where favourable reports
of moose penetration are continually being received. The kill of moose in Wells Gray
Park was also disappointing. Guides reported a poor season. A survey by aircraft this
winter will reveal to some extent how we stand in comparison with previous years.
Tick infestation is reported in the area north of Quesnel River and east of the
Fraser. A good calf-crop was reported last spring from the Quesnel Detachment. Three
or four moose wintered near the airport at Quesnel, making the landing of aeroplanes
hazardous. I wish to endorse the recommendation coming from the Quesnel Detachment that opening the season on both sexes at the same time tends to make the hunters
careless. Hunters reported that bullets struck perilously close to them because of this
fact. This precaution of opening the season on only one sex at a time was an opinion
expressed and followed around 1932.   Twenty years later it seems to have been forgotten.
What has been said of moose and its food-supply applies to a large extent to other
browsing ungulates.
Deer.—The kill for the year past was extremely disappointing. In some areas in
the Kamloops district the carcasses of deer were examined, and many were inclined to
be suffering from malnutrition. The records of the frozen-food locker plant at Kamloops showed a 75-per-cent reduction in deer storage over that of the previous year.
Caribou.—One comment from the Quesnel Detachment is worth mentioning in
connection with this species. Trappers report that caribou have, as a rule, a fair calf-crop
in spring, but in the fall no calf tracks are seen.   Whether this is due to predators or K 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
some other cause is difficult to determine.   The situation calls for a winter study similar
to that being carried out by L. Sugden on mountain-sheep in the Churn Creek basin.
Mountain-sheep.—The seven days' open season on mountain-sheep at Squilax
netted a total of five big-horn rams. For the first few days this area was hunted heavily,
but due to the hot weather the results were disappointing. There are approximately 100
animals in this area.    In the Shorts Creek district near Vernon very few sheep were seen.
Ewes were observed along the lake-shore all summer, which is a most unusual
occurrence. Deterioration of food-supply, coupled with a very dry season and encroachment of forest-growth on sheep ranges, is one reason for no increase. In the Churn
Creek basin there is no appreciable increase in numbers of mountain-sheep. This statement is characteristic of nearly all mountain-sheep areas. The Squam Bay area should
remain closed for the protection of the very small band established there. In the LiUooet
district a very small kill of mountain-sheep was reported.
Mountain-goat.—There are limited numbers around the Bowron Lake Game
Reserve, but their numbers are not increasing. In the LiUooet district a slight increase
is noted in the Cayoose and Texas Creeks areas.
Very few goats were taken from the Mount Robson district. A total of twenty-eight
goats was taken by non-resident hunters through the Cache Creek Checking-station
during the open season.
Fur-bearing Animals
A report from the Quesnel Detachment states that 108 beaver were taken. This is
no indication of the potential catch, since the price factor plays a very large part in
trappers' activities. Prices are not good at present, and there is little incentive to trap.
From an area (Quesnel Detachment) of 7,000 square miles, only 34 fisher were taken.
Also trapped were 82 marten and 131 mink. Squirrels took top place, with a total of
8,078 pelts. Indian trap-lines produced some fur, but we have no record of the total
catch.    Private-property trappers were also fairly active.
A most unusual sight in the Quesnel Detachment is to see lynx run across the roads
in broad daylight. The low price for this variety of fur is partly responsible for the
increase plus the upward trend of the snowshoe rabbit. One cannot compel trappers
to spend much of their time on a trap-line under the present poor prices. The actual
catch, even in higher-priced years, is far below the productive potential.
Upland Game Birds
After the disastrous disappearance of pheasants nearly two years ago, there is
evidence of a decidedly strong come-back in numbers everywhere. Sportsmen with
good hunting-dogs had little trouble getting their limit, although conditions were not up
to the standard of former years. Vernon, as usual, retained its top position with a high
pheasant population. Several counts taken in small fields in the Vernon area showed
a relatively higher percentage of pheasants than was seen in any other Detachment.
In the Quesnel Detachment, willow and Franklin's grouse were numerous, but not
as plentiful as in the previous year. The survival rate for 1953 will be an interesting
feature in view of the expected cyclic decline. There are, no doubt, regional boundaries
involved here.
The numbers of blue grouse taken in all Detachments are considerably less than
those of other species. The fact that they take to the higher ranges as the season opens
and that limited numbers of hunters follow them gives no indication of their increase or
decrease.
Willow and Franklin's grouse are, in so far as the kill is concerned, more truly
indicative of the upward and downward trends, since they are largely birds of the roadside.   The Cariboo and Chilcotin, which are described geologically as the " great interior REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 21
plateau," may be, to some extent, outside the category of " higher ranges." Willow and
Franklin's grouse were still very much in evidence, particularly willow, with a relative
decrease in Franklin's. Sharp-tailed grouse are not native to the hills of this Province,
but thrive better on the grain-fields and cattle ranges. Their numbers are very limited.
The 11,606 resident hunters visiting the Cariboo took 6,582 ducks, 425 geese, and
10,293 grouse.
Migratory Game Birds
The hunting of waterfowl was in line with other species of game. Spring migration
was a normal occurrence, showing neither increase nor decrease. The mild weather
kept the ducks on higher ranges, and no influx to lower waters took place until very late
in the season. The hunting was poor everywhere. Migration in fall was long delayed
and of a desultory nature. There is no such phenomenon as migration of clockwork
precision in fall. In the north, advancing winter plays a part, with adult birds leading
the way south.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds
For detailed information covering vermin killed by the Game Wardens in this Division, please refer to the " Statement of Vermin Destroyed by Game Wardens."
In a check-up of bounties paid on predators during the year 1952 in this Division,
it was observed that more bounties were paid in areas where poisoning operations were
carried out. It is possible that pelts may have been picked up by hunters on ranges
where poison was used.
Game Protection
There were 442 prosecutions and convictions recorded in this Division during the
year. With an astonishing increase in construction of logging-roads, the 300-per-cent
increase in hunters carried their hunting activities farther afield. There is little use
trying to cover such a vast network of roads with the present totally inadequate staff
of Wardens. Prevention of violations when dealing with slower traffic was the order
of the day many years ago under the then existing road system, but with the enormous
development of our timber resources to which greater access has been provided, one
could not begin to cover all the roads in the manner followed before the war. While
enforcement of our game laws and regulations is a very necessary part of our duty, the
integration of our work with the biological study of our game resources should take
more prominence.
Through the road blocks carried out by the Game Wardens, statistical information
useful to the biologists was obtained. At the Cache Creek Checking-station the kill and
other valuable information were also recorded. Unfortunately, the decrease in nonresident hunters left a gap in our yearly statistics. Assistance of a limited nature, where
possible, was rendered to fishery and game biologists and predatory-animal hunters.
Game Propagation
There were 308 chukar partridges and 1,392 pheasants liberated throughout this
Division during the year. The Department of Indian Affairs, under the supervision of
Fur Supervisor Robin Kendall, was given permission to take nuisance beavers for
liberation on Indian trap-lines.
Game Reserves
Other than the Bowron Lake sanctuary, from which we take approximately fifteen
beavers per year, no programme of development has been contemplated. There are
areas in the Division in which no hunting has been allowed for years. It would indeed
be interesting to know the results of a survey of the game resources within their boundaries and to assess their real value to our Province.    Since conditions, as far as we know, K 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
are static, little information of material value can be supplied. The Thompson River
sanctuary immediately opposite the City of Kamloops is a bright spot as a waterfowl
sanctuary.
Fur Trade
This business is in a comparative state of depression. Agents in the Interior invariably pass all furs into Coastal outlets.   There is little to report under this heading.
Registration of Trap-lines
After a long period of effort to get individual Indian trap-lines registered, a great
deal of progress has been made, particularly in the Quesnel Detachment. Arrangements
were made with Robin Kendall, Fur Supervisor for the Department of Indian Affairs, to
set things in motion and have the Indians and Agents and the local Game Wardens meet
for the purpose of drawing a map of trap-line boundaries, many of which date back to
the old tribal days. Previously, nearly all Indian trappers were confined to large blocks
of territory where Indians agreed among themselves to respect each other's trapping
rights. While this, in a measure, was satisfactory to the Indians, it did not provide us
with a check system as to where many Indians were obtaining their pelts. To obtain
a closer check, it was decided to change from the large tribal block to the individual
trap-line, much the same as that of the white trapper. This work was ably carried out
in detail by Game Warden H. J. Lorance, of the Quesnel Detachment, aided by Mr. Kendall and others. The Williams Lake and Vernon Detachments and Canim Lake Reserve
have been completed. The Alexis Creek Detachment Indian blocks will be on the
agenda for action shortly.
Special Patrols
A special patrol was made by Game Warden H. J. Lorance, accompanied by
R.C.M.P. Constable George Hackin, who was engaged on police duty, and Robin Kendall, Fur Supervisor for the Department of Indian Affairs, to the Nazko-Kluskus Frontier
Cattle Company area to draw up individual Indian trap-lines boundaries based largely
on old historical family records. The patrol was made by car to Nazko, pack and saddle
horse to the area occupied by the Frontier Cattle Company, and return to Nazko, thence
by car to Quesnel. This patrol was undertaken from May 28th to June 12th, 1952.
Mileage covered on the patrol was:  By car, 175 miles, and by horse, 230 miles.
Hunting Accidents
Four hunting accidents occurred in this Division during the hunting season. For
detailed information covering the accidents, please refer to statement " Hunting and
Fishing Accidents, 1952."
Registration of Guides
The system of individual guiding areas, a great many of which overlapped, was
abolished in this Division. There was no guarantee of individual hunting rights of a
permanent nature. To prevent any suggestion of monopoly, each Detachment having
moose and other big-game animals within its boundaries was divided into blocks of
from 300 to 500 square miles each. This meant that most of the guides operating within
the new boundaries were neighbours well known to each other. In carrying out the
scheme, greater harmony among guides prevailed, and, by mutual understanding, guides
invariably confined their hunting activities to their favourite hunting-grounds in an area
where greater elbow room was provided. The scheme met with the approval of the
guides, and I feel sure that when our American friends return after the foot-and-mouth
disease embargo is lifted, they will appreciate the greater freedom of hunting movement
over the newly formed areas of increased size. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
K 23
Summary
The past year, without a shadow of a doubt, from a hunter's point of view, was the
poorest in the history of the Game Branch. Foot-and-mouth disease, now happily
eliminated, was a destructive factor due to the embargo placed on the importation of
big game into the United States. Greater stress should be placed on the importance
of encouraging Prairie sportsmen to come to British Columbia to maintain the cropping
of big-game ranges already overstocked. These deplorable results, both for big game
and waterfowl, apart from the embargo, were due to conditions entirely out of human
control. Scientific game management avails little if weather conditions are against any
suggestion of normal movement of big game or waterfowl. The elements cannot be
controlled, nor can the ups and downs or cyclic increases and decreases be switched to
suit our purpose. We are the recipients of what nature hands out to us, but much can
be learned from a scientific understanding of natural phenomena and knowing what to
expect, and when to expect it, and how to deal with the effect of its occurrence. The
suggestion, after limited scientific investigation, that moose-food during winter is deficient
in protein content, relatively speaking, is worth further investigation. The question to
be answered is whether moose can thrive on a low winter protein diet. Over-browsing
is prevalent, except in areas of unpalatable swamp willow and other growth of a similar
nature.
Our pheasant population has not fully recovered from its phenomenal overnight
disappearance of two years ago. There are, however, signs everywhere of a strong
come-back. The expected cyclic decrease of grouse has not yet become fully apparent.
After the past hunting season, large numbers were still left, although a decrease is
reported in some sections. Investigation of cause and effect in relation to a multiplicity
of varying conditions both in the flora and fauna of British Columbia is impossible to
attain with the limited staff of biologists we have at present. There seems to be little
realization and appreciation of the enormity of the task simply because the hunter with
a gun does not understand the problems arising out of adverse conditions beyond human
control.
The wolf during the past three or four years has, relatively speaking, almost
disappeared. The wolf is not here to accomplish the leveling-off of a surplus of moose
unable to obtain full nourishment or quantity from its wintering-grounds. Our biologists
and observing Game Wardens have drawn our attention to conditions affecting the
food-supply and the effect in the form of annual die-offs. The brutal fact is that hunters
do not like to hear the news. The whole of our natural resources must be scientifically
and adequately managed from a biological and administrative view-point. We have a
duty to perform for the benefit of future generations, and that duty should be carried out
fearlessly. It is poor game management to increase certain species of big game to the
point where they have to be winter-fed. We have been warned in the past by American
authorities to keep our game resources as natural as possible. One hunter at a Game
Association meeting summed up his knowledge of game management problems when
he said, " What do I know about game conditions in this Province as compared to
biologists who are spending six days a week studying game and its welfare? " Human
judgment is not always infallible in the face of fluctuating conditions.
The revised guiding system of group areas to replace the individual guiding areas
formerly established furnishes greater security for the guide and his family. It has been
very well received by the guides generally. American hunters will welcome the greater
elbow room afforded during their annual hunt, which many look forward to as the
finest vacation ever.
In the fur-bearing world, prices were at a very low ebb. Trappers sought other
employment of a more lucrative nature. This may be all to the good. I do not think
that we have even remotely approached the fur potential. The forthcoming appearance
of television is something for the biologist and the Game Warden to pleasantly contem- K 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
plate.   Its educational value is enormous.   Visual education for the younger generation
toward a better understanding of our wildlife resources has indeed a bright future.
To the Forest Service Parks Branch officials at Kamloops, and to officers of the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police, officials of the Water Rights Branch, and Wardens of
the Division, my thanks are gratefully extended for the very valuable assistance rendered
and duty performed during the year. In conclusion and after completing thirty-three
years with the Game Department, I would like to pay my respects to officials of the
various Government departments in the Interior and especially in the Kamloops district
for the splendid support and courtesy extended over the years. It is a record to which
I look back with many happy memories of services rendered by Government officials in
their effort to serve the public of British Columbia to the best of their ability.
" D " DIVISION (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, PRINCE RUPERT, FORT
GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS)
By W. A. H. Gill, Officer Commanding
I beg to submit herewith my annual report covering game conditions in " D "
Division for the year ended December 31st, 1952.
Big-game Animals
Moose.—These animals are plentiful throughout the Division, except along the
coast and in the Fort Nelson area. In the spring of 1952 there was still 2 feet of snow
with a heavy crust, which condition made moose easy prey for wolves and coyotes. This
condition lasted for two weeks and was so severe that the moose were hardly able to
move around enough to obtain sufficient food.
Moose ticks were scarce in 1952, but it was noticed that a great number of moose
taken during the hunting season had tapeworms. As tapeworms are not dangerous to
human beings when the meat is cooked, and since they apparently do not destroy the
moose, they are not considered too great a menace.
In 1952 a great number of moose were taken by the local sportmen during the
first two weeks of the season. After this, however, due to the mild fall, the moose
moved back to the higher levels and few were taken.
A considerable number of poison baits were set out in order to destroy wolves in
the more heavily populated moose wintering-grounds, with splendid results.
Deer.—These animals are still fairly scarce, except in the Queen Charlotte Islands,
where a continuous open season has been in effect for the past several years.
Increases in the deer population have been noted in the Burns Lake and Prince
George areas. I might say that, while setting out poison for predators, particular
attention has been paid to the deer wintering-grounds.
Caribou.—These animals are slowly decreasing in numbers, but they may still be
found in fairly large numbers in the Cold Fish Lake area and in the area between Fort
St. John and Fort Nelson.
Black and Brown Bear.—These are not nearly as plentiful as in past years, and it
is felt that the bear population has been sufficiently reduced by our Predator-control
Branch to where they are no longer a major menace to domestic stock and game.
Grizzly Bear.—These big-game animals are plentiful and could stand to be hunted
much more heavily than they are at present.
Mountain-sheep.—Mountain-sheep are still found in large numbers north of the
56th parallel, but the white sheep (Ovis dahl) are scarce.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are plentiful wherever the terrain is suitable. In
this Division, few are taken by the sportsmen.
Wapiti (Elk).—Elk are very scarce in this Division; a few bands are reported in
the Wapiti River, Moberly Lake, Germansen Lake, and Tete Jaune areas.   We hope to REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 25
be able to release some elk in the Butcher Flats area west of Bednesti Lake in the Fort
George District.
Fur-bearing Animals
Marten.—These splendid fur-bearers are steadily increasing, and no doubt this is
greatly due to the low prices being paid by fur-traders.
Beaver.—These animals are plentiful, and old-time white trappers report that as
far back as they can remember beaver are far more numerous now than at any time in
the past.
Due to the Indian practice of taking as many beaver as possible at each colony,
some of the Indian trap-lines are still understocked. However, I feel that this practice is
being gradually overcome through the efforts of Robin Kendall, Fur Supervisor for the
Department of Indian Affairs.
Fox.—Due to the fact that there is no market for fox-pelts, trappers have stopped
trapping these fur-bearers, and consequently they are becoming plentiful.
Mink.—An increase has been noted in the mink population, but due to the pelts
of these animals being in good demand, the trappers are taking more than in past years.
Fisher.—These animals are steadily increasing, but because of the uncertain fur
market, they are not being trapped to a great extent.
Lynx.—Lynx are very plentiful; this, no doubt, is due to the abundance of rabbits,
and due to the fact that they are not being heavily trapped because of low fur prices.
All other fur-bearers are holding their own. However, it is believed that squirrels
are decreasing slightly in some areas. They are still being heavily trapped, as prices are
fairly good.
Upland Game Birds
Pheasants.—The Smithers Rod and Gun Club was supplied with twenty adult
pheasants. These birds were kept in pens, and the eggs obtained from them were hatched.
Toward fall, some of the birds were released. Out of the twenty birds received from the
Game Commission, one was dead on arrival and three were badly injured. Fourteen of
the original birds are still alive, and ten birds raised by this active club appear to be
quite healthy. The club still has two pens of pheasants which are being kept for breeders
for the spring of 1953. They plan to incubate all eggs obtained and to release the birds
in the fall.
Some of the pheasants released in the Vanderhoof and Dawson Creek areas are still
alive, but no increase has been noted.
Willow Grouse.—A slight decrease in willow grouse in certain areas was noticed.
However, it would appear that they are still plentiful and a good season for 1953 can be
expected.
Blue Grouse.—These birds are scarce in this Division and are seldom seen.
Franklin's Grouse.—Franklin's grouse (fool hens) are still scarce and have shown
no increase since 1949.
Prairie-chicken (Sharp-tailed Grouse).—Prairie-chicken are plentiful in all the
farming districts in this Division. As many as 100 birds have been flushed in one flock.
I believe a longer season should be put into effect in order to spread these birds out and
decrease their numbers before some disease destroys them.
Migratory Game Birds
Ducks and Geese.—Very poor duck-hunting was experienced in most areas in this
Division. Because of a mild fall the birds did not arrive as early as usual. When the
migration started, the birds passed right on through owing to a sudden storm and the
lateness of the season.
Local ducks and geese showed a slight increase. K 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Destruction of Vermin
Timber-wolves and Coyotes.—An extensive coyote and wolf poisoning programme
has been carried out in and around the farming areas. Horses have been obtained in all
farming communities, and 1,080 poison stations have been set out.
Considerable work has been undertaken in putting out poison stations in localities
where heavy concentrations of wolves are known to be destroying game animals. All
this work and the results obtained are reported to the Supervisor of Predator-control,
G. A. West, and, therefore, I would refer you to his report on the subject.
I wish to thank all farmers and loggers who donated the twenty-nine horses used in
our poisoning operations, and also others who so generously assisted us in this worth-while
effort.
Cougars.—These predators are increasing slightly, but not in sufficient numbers to
warrant the employment of predatory-animal hunters or keeping trained dogs in this
Division to hunt cougars.
Magpies.—Magpies are steadily increasing and are being hunted more extensively
by game personnel.
Eagles.—Numerous reports have been received from trappers in connection with
eagles killing muskrats.   These birds seem to be increasing.
Game Protection
As stated in previous Annual Reports, a Department-owned aircraft is definitely
needed. With the ever-increasing use of aircraft by sportsmen in this vast Division, it is
impossible to check them when they are permitted to land on lakes which are hundreds
of miles inland and which are impossible to reach by road or by any other means of
transportation at our disposal. Such aircraft could be used almost continuously in this
Division alone.
A considerable increase in population in this Division has occurred. Many permanent residents have moved into the district, as well as a number of transients, the majority
of whom are employed by the Aluminum Company of Canada or by the Columbia
Cellulose Company plant at Prince Rupert. The opening of the John Hart Highway
has also been responsible to some degree for the increase. As a result of this great influx
in population, a large increase in the number of prosecutions has occurred. Two hundred
and fifty-two convictions were obtained during the period from January 1st to December
31st, 1952.
A new Detachment has been opened at Terrace. This was necessary because of the
great increase in population in that area. This increase is caused mainly through the
Columbia Cellulose Company logging operations and the construction of the highway
and railway from Terrace to Kitimat.
Because of the unexpected development in the Atlin district, it is felt that a Game
Detachment will be necessary there in the near future.
Game Propagation
Pheasants.—Twenty adult pheasants were donated to the Bulkley Valley Rod and
Gun Club at Smithers. These birds were placed in suitable pens pending favourable
weather, and as the birds were still laying, a number of eggs were gathered and hatched,
with the result that ten additional birds were raised. In December of this year, fourteen
of the original birds were still alive and all of the ten young birds survived.
The Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun Club still has two pens of these birds in captivity
and will hatch all eggs obtained, and any young birds raised will be liberated in the fall
in the Smithers area.
Elk.—It is hoped that the request submitted by the Prince George Rod and Gun
Club for the liberation of elk at Butcher Flats will be given favourable consideration. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952 K 27
Beaver.—Beaver liberated in this Division have all become well established in
suitable areas. All trappers who obtained beaver from the Department for propagation
purposes are very pleased with the results.
Game Reserves
There are only three small game reserves in this Division. These are located around
towns and are more for the protection of the public than for game.
The Nechako Bird Sanctuary at Vanderhoof has resulted in providing far better field
shooting for local sportsmen. Now that the Aluminum Company of Canada has shut off
the flow of water in the Nechako River with the Kenney Dam, it is not known whether
or not this sanctuary will be inhabited by migratory birds as in the past unless considerable
work is done on the river-bed in order to hold back sufficient water for the protection
of ducks and geese resting on this sanctuary.
It is hoped that a migratory game-bird sanctuary will be established at Buckhorn
Lake (Buckthorn Lake) in the vicinity of Prince George for the purpose of making
a resting-place for ducks and geese and thereby providing better sport for the local
residents.
Fur Trade
Due to the low price being paid for raw furs, trappers have not been as actively
trapping their lines as in the past.
Registration of Trap-lines
Very few complaints are received. However, because of the newer maps being
brought out from time to time, a great deal of work is involved in changing registrations
and relocating the trapper's registered areas in conformity with the new maps.
Game Warden J. A. McCabe, of Fort Nelson, has completed registering almost all
the outstanding registrations in the Fort Nelson area. He is greatly handicapped in this
work because most of his Detachment can be reached only by dog team. Many patrols
have to be made, and many trappers must be interviewed before a trap-line registration
can be completed.
Registration of Guides
This system is working very satisfactorily. Complaints are no longer received from
guides or visiting sportsmen, as was the case in the past when guides were not restricted
to certain areas.
Special Patrols
•.
Five special patrols were made in 1952. Game Wardens J. A. McCabe and B.
Villeneuve made a special patrol to Hay Lakes, Alberta, in February, 1952. The patrol
lasted for thirty-one days, and a distance of 720 miles was covered by dog team and
133 miles by car. This patrol was undertaken for the purpose of checking Alberta Indian
trappers who are trapping in British Columbia and to observe the beaver population.
Extremely severe weather was encountered on this patrol, and the hardships endured by
these Game Wardens have shown them to be a credit to the Department.
In June, 1952, a special patrol was made by aircraft to Hay Lakes, Alberta, in
company with Game Wardens J. A. McCabe and B. Villeneuve, and Fur Supervisor for
Indian Affairs Branch, R. Kendall, and myself for the purpose of holding a joint meeting
with the Indian Affairs Branch and the Alberta and British Columbia Game Branch
representatives in order to clear up points of dispute regarding Alberta Indians trapping
in British Columbia and to make recommendations for better fur conservation.
In June, 1952, Game Wardens McCabe and Villeneuve made a special patrol by
river-boat to Fort Liard, Northwest Territories, in order to check fur-buyers' books and K 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
interview enforcement officers for the Northwest Territories.    A distance of 400 miles
was travelled by boat.
Two patrols were made to Haynes, Alaska, during the months of September and
October by Game Wardens J. Stewart, of Lower Post, and J. A. McCabe, of Fort Nelson.
These special patrols were made for the purpose of checking hunters. On these patrols
4,722 miles were covered by car.
Hunting Accidents
There were two hunting accidents in this Division during the year, one of which
was fatal. For detailed information covering the accidents, see report " Hunting and
Fishing Accidents, 1952."
Game-fish Culture
Coarse-fish traps in Beaverly and St. George Creeks, one of which flows into and
the other out of West Lake, were operated continuously during the coarse-fish run.
A trap was also operated in Cluculz Creek at the outlet of Cluculz Lake. Fish tox
was used in Beaverly, St. George, Cluculz, Norman, Deep, and Sucker Creeks. Samples
of fish were weighed at each operation, and it is estimated that approximately 34 tons of
coarse fish were destroyed in all.   Less than 100 trout were destroyed in these operations.
Several lake surveys were carried out in this Division by the Scientific Branch, who,
no doubt, will be submitting a detailed report on their findings and also on the number
of fry and eggs planted.
I wish to thank the Bulkley Valley and Prince George Rod and Gun Clubs for their
splendid work in connection with fish-culture.
Summary and General Remarks on Game and Fish
I feel that the game and fish in this Division are in a satisfactory condition. However,
I would like to stress the need for more suitable equipment for the use of Game Wardens
and predator-hunters in combating the timber-wolves and for carrying out checking in
remote areas we are unable to reach at present.
I wish to thank all Game Wardens and office staff for their splendid co-operation.
SUMMARY OF REPORTS SUBMITTED BY GAME WARDENS IN " E" DIVISION (MAINLAND COAST NORTH TO TOBA INLET AND LOWER
MAINLAND AS FAR INLAND AS NORTH BEND).
Big Game
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—Fairly numerous throughout the whole Division.
Elk (Wapiti).—The herd of wapiti in the McNab Creek area, Howe Sound, appears
to have reached its peak in numbers because of lack of suitable browse.
Black or Brown Bear.—Notwithstanding a continuous open hunting season being
in effect on these animals, very few have been taken, and reports of damage have been
increasing.
Grizzly Bear.—At the heads of Loughborough Inlet, Phillips Arm, Frederick Arm,
Bute and Toba Inlets, grizzly bear are fairly plentiful. As access to these regions is
somewhat difficult, they are not hunted to any great extent.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are in fair numbers at the headwaters of Coquitlam, Alouette, Stave, Davis, Harrison, and Chehalis Lakes, as well as in sections of the
Chilliwack district.
Fur-bearing Animals
Due to the downward trend in the fur market, fur-bearers have not been as heavily
trapped as in the past, and consequently a general increase has been noted in all fur- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952 K 29
bearing animals, especially racoon and beaver. However, in the Alert Bay Game
Detachment, due to a lengthy strike of fishermen, trapping was carried on more extensively than in the past.
Upland Game Birds
Grouse (Blue and Willow or Ruffed).—In this Division blue grouse in most sections
are not plentiful, but willow or ruffed grouse seem to be increasing slightly in some
portions.
California Quail and Hungarian Partridge.—These birds are found only in a few
sections of the Lower Mainland, where they are not very plentiful.
Pheasants.—Hunting of this wonderful game bird provides enjoyment to large
numbers of hunters residing in the fairly heavily populated areas of the Lower Mainland;
so much so that it has become a very difficult problem to provide sufficient birds to satisfy
this large number of hunters, especially in a fairly restricted hunting area which in recent
years has become more restricted through increased population.
The Delta region is probably the most heavily hunted, with good to fair sport being
obtainable in the areas on the north and south sides of the Fraser River as far east as
Rosedale.
During the 1952 open season, fair bags of pheasants were secured, and reports
indicate that there were more birds present than during the 1951 season.
Migratory Game Birds
Ducks and Canada Geese.—-Climatic conditions prevented any great amount of
hunting, although birds were more numerous than in the past years. Fair bags of ducks
were frequently secured off the mouth of the Fraser River.
During the summer a greater number of resident ducks were to be noticed in many
sections of the Division.
Black Brant.—In the Boundary Bay area, the principal hunting territory for brant,
birds were not very plentiful during the open season, but after the season expired, large
concentrations of brant were to be observed.
Snow Geese.—As in the case of brant, these birds were far more plentiful after the
hunting season had finished than during the period when shooting was permitted.
Band-tailed Pigeons.—These birds were to be found in scattered numbers throughout the Division and were probably more numerous on the Lower Mainland in sections
frequented by pigeons each year.
Wilson's Snipe.—While not very plentiful, they are not hunted to any great extent.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds
Cougar, red fox, bob-cat, and racoon, along with black bear, have been responsible
for numerous complaints of damage, and many of these animals were destroyed during
the year. Crows and big-horned and snow owls are the principal noxious birds to be
found in the Division, but their numbers are being kept down through constant shooting.
Domestic dogs and cats have been responsible for the destruction of game and
domestic animals and birds. A number of reports of dogs running deer have been
received and attended to with considerable success.
Game Protection
Attention is drawn to the statement of prosecutions found in another portion of
this Report.
Game Propagation
The policy of purchasing and releasing pheasants in suitable habitat has continued,
and, from returns received, many of these released birds were brought to bag during the
open season. K 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Game Reserves
The existing game reserves in the Division have been constantly patrolled, and these
areas have provided rest and a haven for migratory waterfowl especially.
Fur Trade
Reduction in fur prices has been very noticeable, and, as a result, trapping has not
been carried on as extensively as in past years.
Registration of Trap-lines
Through this system of trap-line control the registered trapper is afforded protection, and there would appear to be very little doubt that this system has been responsible
for a regulated fur harvest each year.
Registration of Guides
As this Division cannot be classed as a good big-game country, there have been
very few guides operating in the area.
Special Patrols
Many patrols have been made during the year, but none of these can be classed
as special patrols.
Hunting Accidents
See statement on " Hunting Accidents."
Game-fish Culture
A great many lakes and streams have received plantings of trout from the Smiths
Falls Hatchery at Cultus Lake. For further particulars, attention is drawn to the distribution statement which is to be found in another portion of this Report.
Summary
All Game Wardens in the Division express appreciation for assistance rendered by
personnel of other Government departments, Game Associations, farmers and sportsmen
in general.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE FISHERIES MANAGEMENT DIVISION
By Dr. P. A. Larkin, Chief Fisheries Biologist
In 1952 the Fisheries Management Division began its first year of operations as
an integrated unit. Estimates for the Hatchery Branch and Scientific Fisheries Branch
were combined, both Branches coming under the direction of the writer, and the administration of all of the fisheries work was reorganized. The fisheries work is now set up
under four divisions, each in charge of a permanent staff fisheries biologist; namely,
Protection, Management, Research, and Hatcheries. Each Branch has an assistant
fisheries biologist. While this organization is not completely consistent with modern
concepts of fish-cultural practice, it is an expedient arrangement which, while it reflects
current problems and past practices, nevertheless has proven exceptionally suitable to
handling the accelerating fisheries work of the Department. The staff of the Division
was increased by the appointment of six permanent men in 1952 as a part of the
programme of expansion. The new appointments were mostly recruited from former
temporary staff, and in consequence all of the new men have done exceptional work
in their first year with the Department.    The following annual reports of the four REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 31
Divisions in the Fisheries Branch clearly indicate that 1952 was a year of considerable
accomplishment.
Hatchery Division
The statements of trout liberations from Departmental hatcheries indicate the
bustling activity characteristic of the hatchery staff. Some striking changes were made
in the hatchery work in 1952. Loon Creek Hatchery, for the first time, raised advanced
fry for planting in Cariboo lakes. This programme was successful and will be accelerated
and improved in 1953. Summerland Hatchery acquired five new rearing-ponds which
were used in large part for raising fingerlings for planting in Shuswap Lake. Cut-throat
brood stock at Smiths Falls Hatchery produced sufficient eggs to allow a switch over to
cut-throat rearing at both Smiths Falls and Puntledge Park Hatcheries. However, difficulties in obtaining condemned liver and spleen for trout-food at the hatcheries as a
consequence of foot-and-mouth disease embargo put a crimp in an otherwise successful
year of operation. A large fraction of the trout at the Summerland Hatchery had to be
released in December and January as a necessary economy; there was a heavy loss at
the Smiths Falls Hatchery because of dietary deficiencies, and all hatcheries had to do
a resourceful job of manipulating stocks of trout-food in the emergency.
Substantial improvements were made ih the permanent installations of all of the
hatcheries during the year.
Hatchery Biological Experiments
By I. Barrett, Division Fishery Biologist
Further experiments on the effects of starvation on various aspects of the physiology
of the Kamloops trout were conducted at the Summerland Trout Hatchery from October,
1952, to March, 1953. These experiments were a continuation and extension of those
which had been run during the winter of 1951-52 at the same hatchery.
The study involved an investigation of the following physiological aspects of
starvation: Activity (cruising speed); tolerance to high temperatures; respiration
(carbon dioxide-oxygen relation); active metabolism; total fat content; total water
content; haemoglobin content of blood; protein content of blood serum; and growth
rate. The fish used were of two age-groups—17 to 20 months old and 8 to 10 months
old. These formed the basis for a duplicate set of experiments over the six-month course
of the current investigation.
Although the analysis of the data is incomplete, some generally indicative results
and trends of the research can be seen. There is a drop in the cruising speed (swimming
ability) of starved trout, although this drop is not directly proportioned to the length of
time that the fish have been starved. Starved Kamloops trout are more sensitive to high
temperatures than are unstarved ones. A greater percentage of starved fish die, and
die sooner, than do control trout held in the same lethal-temperature bath. In the respiration work it has been shown that starved fish are less able to extract oxygen from
water in the presence of carbon dioxide than are well-fed trout at an intermediate range
of carbon-dioxide content. Above and below this range there is no apparent difference
of effect of carbon dioxide on either starved or unstarved trout. There is some indication
that trout unfed for long periods require more oxygen than their unstarved counterparts
to do the same amount of work. However, the data on this point require further
analysis.
The total fat content of the starved fish drops steadily until after 100 days of starvation; there is almost no fat left in the body. A slight increase in the water content of
the starved fish indicates a possibility of a disruption in osmotic balance and in salt
content. Both the blood ha.moglobin and the serum protein content vary greatly within
the control Kamloops trout due to a variety of factors and therefore present little possibility of determining changes due to inanition.    In addition, there is a general loss of K 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
weight (possibly complicated by an intake of water) and a drop in growth rate with
prolonged starvation.
A general pattern readily emerges from these findings. When trout are starved,
they lose weight and start to use their own body fats and tissue proteins to maintain life.
Their osmotic balance is upset. Vitamin, mineral, and hormonal relationships are
disrupted. The starved fish become excitable, compared to well-fed trout. In other
words, the fish are subject to a number of internal stresses, initially induced by starvation.
When these fish are exposed to additional external experimental stresses—swift currents,
high temperatures, high carbon-dioxide dosages, and induced work—they cannot respond
to these stresses as well as well-fed fish. These results and their obvious implications
may be applied (with reservation) to some hatchery practices and to some problems
of population dynamics.
Protection Division
By R. G. McMynn, Division Fishery Biologist
Activities of the Protection Division during the year 1952-53 are briefly outlined
in the following report. These activities appear to fall most conveniently into four categories—Water Licences, Pollutions, Obstructions, and Research.
Water Licences.—The submission by the Comptroller of Water Rights of all water-
licence applications, renewals, and extensions to the Game Commission for their clearance
and approval has again proven to be a most valuable service. Our early notification of
all proposed industrial and mining developments which plan to utilize water enables us
to evaluate such projects in the light of their anticipated effects on the game and sport-
fish resources of the area. In many cases, recommendations for the protection of the
wildlife resources have been made and acted upon.
A new system of processing and filing all water-licence applications was initiated
during the latter part of 1952. This system, incorporating printed forms, is proving to
be most effective in the handling of the many applications which are received each month.
Last year 906 water-licence applications, renewals, or extensions were investigated
by Game Department personnel. The following breakdown indicates the number of
applications studied in each division during the year 1952-53:— Applications
" A " Division  180
" B " Division  267
" C " Division  248
" D " Division     40
" E " Division  171
Total  906
Pollutions.—A number of stream pollutions (or potential stream pollutions) were
investigated by the Game Department in 1952-53, and in most cases successful abatement
was achieved.
Mining activities, especially in the Kootenay Districts, were responsible for a number
of investigations (competently dealt with by Fishery Supervisor Robinson). Although
mine tailings usually do not contain chemical substances which are directly harmful to
fish, the silting problem often destroys trout spawning-grounds as well as the food
organisms upon which fish normally thrive. Rather than outlining details of each investigation (available in the files), the numerous pollution studies are summarized in the
following breakdown:—
(1)  Mining pollutions:—
(a) Abatement plans completed:—
Highland Belle, base metal, Kettle River.
Kootenay Belle, base metal, Kaslo Creek. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 33
(b)
Mastodon mine, base metal, Mastodon Creek.
Estella mine, base metal, Wasa Lake.
Hudson Bay mine, base metal, Sheep Creek.
Jackson Basin, base metal, Kaslo Creek.
Blue Belle, base metal, Kootenay Lake.
Deeks-McBride, gravel-washing, McKay Creek.
Deeks-McBride, gravel-washing, Capilano River.
Capilano Crushing Company, gravel-crushing, Capilano River.
Canadian Exploration, base metal, Salmon River.
Pending:—
Ainsworth Base Metals, base metal, Woodbury Creek.
Canadian Exploration, tungsten, Salmon River.
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, base metal, Healy Creek.
(2)  Other pollutions:—
(a) Abatement completed:—
Marysville Fertilizer Plant, gypsum, St. Mary River.
Canadian Pacific Railway, oil pollution, Coquitlam River.
Cowichan River, sewage chlorination.
(b) Pending:—
Canada Packers, vegetable-cannery, Atchelitz Creek.
Cawston Cannery, vegetable-cannery, Lowe Brook Slough.
Fraser Valley Milk Producers, milk wastes, Luckakuck River.
Celanese Corporation, pulp and paper, Arrow Lakes.
Slaughter-house, Luckakuck River.
As a result of the Province's present industrial boom, 1952 produced a number of
obstruction problems, chiefly in the form of dams.   In order that sport-fish interests might
be protected, many of these projects were investigated and reported upon.   In the following projects, protection of the sport-fish resource was achieved through the construction
of fish-ladders, the clearing of reservoirs or the regulation of water spillage to provide
minimum flow:—
Springbank Dehydration Company, irrigation, control of spillage.
Hicks Lake, recommendation of dam-removal.
Lardeau River, log-driving, strong objection by Game Department—results
still pending.
Harmac Pulp-mill, water storage at Fourth Nanaimo Lake, reservoir-clearing
and fish-ladder.
One Mile Creek, irrigation-dam, fish-ladder.
Small River, irrigation-dam, fish-ladder (now being constructed by Federal
Fisheries Department).
Theodosia River, river diversion, provision of minimum flow.
Buttle Lake, proposed storage, public hearings.
Rainy River, water storage, provision of minimum flow.
Spillimacheen River, power and water storage, reservoir-clearing recommended
(pending development).
Coquihalla River, oil pipe-line, alternate route suggested and will be followed.
Violamac Mines, Wilson Creek, power-dam, reservoir-clearing recommended.
St. Mary Lake, outlet-clearing recommended.
General.—In addition to the above investigations, a number of other duties were
carried out by the Protection Division during the year 1952.    These can be briefly
summarized as follows:—
(1) Scale readings of all cut-throat trout scale samples submitted by anglers
from the Lower Mainland.
(2) Poisoning of Goodacre Lake in Victoria. K 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(3) Preparation for publication of a paper entitled " The Effects on Sport Fish
of Present and Future Water Utilization on the Campbell River Drainage
System."
(4) Lake surveys of Stave Lake, Alouette Lake, and St. Mary Lake.
(5) An intensive investigation of Salmon River (Langley area). The interim
report follows.
Salmon River.—Many streams on the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island have
had their drainage-basins largely denuded of forest-cover by the increasing utilization of
land for agriculture. Many small diversions take water from these streams for domestic
or irrigation purposes. These land- and water-use practices tend to increase the rate of
run-off, lower the water-table, and reduce minimal summer stream-flows to the detriment
of fish populations.
The Salmon River in Langley Township is a good example of the above trends, and
a continuing investigation has been carried out on this stream since July, 1952. The
purposes of the investigation are to evaluate the stream as a spawning and rearing area,
to estimate the effects of land use, and to formulate remedial measures if possible.
It has been found that the stream is a substantial spawning and rearing area for
cohoe salmon and sea-run cut-throat trout, with large areas of excellent spawning-gravel,
cover, and food production in the upper reaches. The mature trout provide a fair
sport-fishery when on their spawning migrations to the river.
Although the stream-banks are largely untouched in the upper reaches, the surrounding land in the drainage area has been increasingly used for agriculture. This has
resulted in more rapid drainage, with attendant violent fluctuations in stream-flow.
Winter floods scour the bottom in the lower reaches and remove all fish-food organisms
temporarily. Food production in the upper reaches is high throughout the year. Actual
diversion of water for domestic and irrigation purposes does not constitute a significant
reduction in flow, but the generally decreased water-holding capacity of the drainage area
has probably resulted in reduction of fish habitat during the dry summer months.
As no natural storage areas are available in the headwater region of Salmon River,
little can be done to conserve water in the face of increasing agricultural expansion.
The remaining brush and forest-cover along the stream-banks could well be left untouched
to provide shade, cover, and to prevent erosion.
Management Division
By S. B. Smith, Division Fishery Biologist
With the appointment of G. E. Stringer as Assistant Fisheries Management Biologist
in May, 1952, it was possible to plan for considerably broader field operations in 1952-53.
However, since Mr. Stringer was not available to this Division until August, the major
portion of field activities in the Fisheries Management Division took place in August and
September.
The period from April 1st to August 1st was occupied mainly with completion of
research dealing with methods of calculating fish lengths from scales and with variations
in growth of trout in Paul Lake. It is planned to gather some further complementary
data during the coming summer, and the research should be in a sufficient state of
preparedness to make possible submission for publication by November or December,
1953.
Routine laboratory work, scale-readings (from samples submitted by anglers),
investigations of the Vedder and Seymour Rivers, together with some time devoted to
planning and setting up routine recording systems for data pertinent to this Division,
occupied most of the month of July. In addition, two field-trips to the E. C. Manning
Provincial Park were carried out to assist in establishment of an extensive creel-census
programme for the lakes in the park. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 35
Activities in August were confined mainly to investigation of fish reclamations and
transfers. Extensive field-trials were carried out with an electrical fish attractor, with
which it was hoped that large numbers of fish could be captured in the period of low
water when they had become stranded, particularly below irrigation diversions. The
electrical equipment was tried out in five localities (Alouette River, Loon Creek, Upper
Paul Creek, Quilchena Creek, and Aberdeen Creek). It is with regret to say that
encouraging results were not obtained, and that future possibilities of reclaiming stranded
fish with the type of equipment presently available do not appear too hopeful.
Also in August a modified Oneida trap-net was used for investigation of the possibility of transferring large numbers of small fish from over-populated lakes to waters
where they might provide additional sport-fishing. It was particularly hoped that fish in
the length range 6 to 8 inches might be trapped and transferred to lakes containing coarse
fish, in the expectation that survival of the transferred fish would be sufficient to provide
an important adjunct to hatchery liberations in those waters. For the lakes which were
investigated, it was found that the effort required to operate the trap-net (in terms of
wages for two men) was not compensated by the returns in the number of fish captured.
However, the possibility has not been discounted that lack of success was due to hot
summer weather (and lack of movement of fish into the shallow zones where the nets
were operated) or that more suitable lakes could have been chosen.
Investigation was made of the opportunities for introductions of bass to waters
unsuitable for the production of trout. Bass were trapped in Shannon Lake near West-
bank, in the Okanagan Lake area, and transferred to Yellow Lake near Keremeos.
Results of this initial transfer will not be known for at least two years, but ease of
capturing bass has led to planning for trapping and transfer of this species in 1953 from
Shannon Lake to Garcia Lake in the vicinity of Merritt. This and other proposed
transfers of bass will be observed closely in subsequent years.
One major fish reclamation was carried out during the first week in September.
In company with members of the Vernon Rod and Gun Club, approximately 5,000 fish,
6 to 8 inches in length, were salvaged from the outlets of Aberdeen and Haddo Lakes
in the Lumby area. These fish were transferred by tank-truck to Kalamalka Lake near
Vernon. It is planned to carry out the above reclamation project three times during the
summer of 1953.
Preliminary organization of an anglers' survey was completed in October, 1952, and
a questionnaire form was drawn up. The purpose of the survey by questionnaire was
pointed toward assessment of the economics and distribution of the British Columbia
sport-fishery. It was not found possible to carry out the survey in the fiscal year of 1953,
but it is planned to complete this work in early 1954. Analysis of the Manning Park
creel-census data was completed and forwarded to the British Columbia Forest Service,
Parks and Recreation Division, in January, 1953. The programme proved to be highly
successful, and recommendations regarding management of the sport-fishery in Manning
Park are outlined in detail in the report.
Over 400 resort operators were circularized in January, 1953, requesting assistance
in gathering catch statistics on the lakes and streams where resort businesses are operating.
To date, response has been gratifying, with more than 150 operators signifying their
willingness to co-operate. Record-books and cards have been sent to all those who have
replied, and it is expected that eventually over 200 resort operators will give assistance.
Game Wardens will assist with the resort operators' fishing records, and it is hoped that
most of those operators keeping records for the British Columbia Game Department will
be contacted personally this summer.
Record-books similar to those supplied to resort operators have been printed and
will be made available to Game Wardens for the summer fishing season in 1953. These
latter record-books will enable Game Wardens to gather catch data from anglers during
the course of their routine patrol activities.
• K 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
It is felt that catch data supplied by Game Wardens and resort operators, together
with results of the proposed anglers' survey by questionnaire, will make possible the first
comprehensive evaluation of the sport-fishery of the Province. Completion of this work
will be given every attention, in the hope that publication will be possible by February
or March, 1954.
A comprehensive review of the literature pertaining to aquatic-weed control by
chemical treatment was carried out during the past two months. It has been submitted
in report form to the British Columbia Department of Agriculture and the British
Columbia Game Commission.
Fishing records gathered at the British Columbia Game Department checking-station
at Cache Creek, covering the period 1949 to 1952, inclusive, are in the final stages of
preparation.   A report covering analysis of these data will be available shortly.
Activities presently are centred on the compilation of pertinent field information on
lakes and streams which support sport-fishing. Record-cards have been printed and will
list all available data regarding management of the various areas. Liberations of trout
for the period 1948-52 and for subsequent years will also be recorded on these cards.
It is hoped that as the file becomes more complete, it will provide the means of facile
inventory of management problems and activities, and will aid greatly in future planning
in this Division.
Time spent on routine analyses, laboratory work, scale-readings, and similar work
has not been stressed, although it has occupied, in some months, a considerable portion
of the time available. If previously discussed plans materilize for transfer of G. E.
Stringer to a position as regional biologist, it is suggested that consideration be given to
the appointment of a technician for this Division in 1954.
In conclusion, it may be stated that much of the success of work accomplished in
this Division in the past twelve months can be attributed to the continuing enthusiasm
and energy of G. E. Stringer as Assistant Fisheries Management Biologist.
Research Division
Lake Surveys
By T. G. Northcote, Assistant Fishery Biologist
In termination of a general limnological survey of British Columbia inland waters
initiated in 1949, investigations were carried out largely in the Princeton-Merritt area,
Kootenay, Cariboo, and Northern Districts of the Province in 1952: Six lakes in the
area between Princeton and Merritt (Garcia, Marquette, Corbett, Courtney, Glimpse,
and Harmon); eleven lakes in the Kootenay District (Christina, Wilgress, Jewel, Hanson,
Premier, Kiakho, Rosen, North Star, Surveyor's, Grave, and Lillian); twenty-three lakes
in the Cariboo (Pavilion, Loon, Eighty-three Mile, Watch, Fawn, Horse, Sheridan,
Bridge, Crystal, Twin, Lac des Roches, Canim, Clearwater, Lac la Hache, Dempsey,
Felker, Chimney, Spain, Loomis, Onion, One-eye, Sapeye, and Tatlayoko); fifteen lakes
in the Northern District (Dragon, Bouchie, Ness, West, Graveyard, Cluculz, Oliver, Prud-
homme, Rainbow, Chapman, Dennis, Kathlyn, Hart, Azouzetta, and Charlie); Tunkwa
Lake near Kamloops; Gallagher Lake near Oliver; and St. Mary Lake on Saltspring
Island.   Fifty-eight lakes in all were surveyed by crews between May and October.
Compilation and analysis of data from these and previous years' investigations has
proceeded during the remainder of 1952 and spring of 1953. Data on file include map
of lake giving depth contours, calculation of surface area and length of shore-line, notes
on drainage and spawning areas, vertical distribution of temperature and dissolved
oxygen, penetration of light, chemical analysis of lake-water, qualitative and quantitative
abundance of plankton, ocurrence of bottom flora and fauna, age determinations of trout,
and stomach-content analysis of all species of fish present. These data are integrated to
give indication of lake productivity which may be used to guide future management
policies for the lakes. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
K 37
Kokanee in Kootenay Lake
By E. H. Vernon, Assistant Fishery Biologist
A study of kokanee in Kootenay Lake was initiated to determine if these fish exist
as separate small populations, each spawning in a separate stream, or whether the
spawning run to any one stream may be regarded merely as a part of a general
interbreeding lake population.
In August and September of 1951 some 1,200 kokanee were collected from eight
streams in Kootenay Lake. During the winter of 1951-52 some preliminary studies were
carried out to explore techniques of analysis of these data. About 200 further specimens
were collected from three streams in September, 1952.
Preliminary investigation of the data indicated that kokanee in Kootenay Lake were
broadly separable into three groups:—
(a) South-end fish, spawning in Cultus, Midge, Sanca, and Goat Creeks,
averaging approximately 18.5 centimetres and 55 grams, and predominantly 3 years old at maturity.
(b) North-end fish, spawning in Meadow Creek and Lardeau River, averaging
approximately 21.5 centimetres and 105 grams, and maturing at 4 years
of age.
(c) West Arm fish, spawning in Kokanee and Redfish Creeks, averaging
approximately 24.5 centimetres and 155 grams, and maturing at 3 years
of age.
Because of these apparent groupings, samples of fifty-two fish were taken from
Cultus Creek in the south end, Kokanee Creek in the West Arm, and Lardeau River in the
north end. Measurable morphological features of these three groups were compared.
No absolue differences were found, but statistical differences in lateral-line scale count,
vertebra, count, gill-raker count, and pyloric ca_ca count indicate that these three groups
are separate populations.
These three groups were also compared on the basis of body proportions. The
relations to fork length of head length, eye diameter, and peduncle length were compared.
Here again no absolute differences were found and the statistical differences were not as
clear-cut, but again suggest that these three groups are separate populations.
Further work is now being directed toward comparison of fish from different creeks
in each of the three main areas noted above. Fish collected in 1952 will also be compared
with those of 1951 to evaluate differences between years as well as between areas.
Kamloops-trout Growth-studies
By S. B. Smith, Division Fishery Biologist
The growth of scales of rainbow (Kamloops) trout from the time of first scale
formation was investigated. A method for the calculation of fish lengths at ages previous
to capture was developed. Use of the above method of calculation of fish lengths made
possible the study in more detail of the growth of Paul Lake trout.
It was found that in Paul Lake the intense sport-fishery was selective of faster-
growing fish in all year-classes available to the fishery. Samples drawn at random from
the anglers' catches in this case could not be considered as representative with respect
to growth rate. In some years significant differences in the mean lengths of spawning
and non-spawning fish were found to obtain, suggesting a possible relationship between
growth rate and attainment of sexual maturity.
A major change in lake ecology was detectable from comparisons of growth rates
over the period 1946-51. During this time, growth of Paul Lake trout fluctuated until
1948, from which year onward it became more variable and declined steadily. Introduction of the redside lake shiner (Richardsonius balteatus Richardson) possibly in 1945, K 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
increase in numbers of that species, and eventual competition with trout for food was
suggested as the reason for the decline in growth rates of the trout.
Much of the data and conclusions drawn from the above research are directly
applicable to fishery management problems of the British Columbia Game Department.
SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES OF THE GAME MANAGEMENT
AND RESEARCH BRANCH
By Dr. J. Hatter, Chief Game Biologist
Introduction
In looking back over 1952 and the activities of the newly formed Game Management
Branch it is apparent that some significant progress has been made. For the first time in
the history of the Province a short season on cow moose was declared in order to partially
alleviate the over-population of moose in many of the Interior districts. Anyone familiar
with the management of big game will realize that initial seasons on the female sex are
attended by much criticism and opposition. This usually stems from minority groups
and individuals who do not understand the dynamics of wild ungulate populations and
the need to control them, if possible, in balance with the safe carrying capacity of the
winter range. It was revealing, however, to observe the manner in which the majority
of our sportsmen accepted the decisions of the Game Department without critical
comment.
Sayward Forest on Vancouver Island was reopened to deer-hunting after three years
of closure, and some valuable information was gathered relative to the welfare of deer on
this highly productive area.
The introduced Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep at Squilax were opened to hunting
for the first time in many years. Here also we gained some information on hunter success
and, even more important, the response of hunters to special seasons of this type.
Plans were laid and approved for a marked change in the existing policy of liberating
pheasants. All major releases in the future will be composed of adult hens in March,
prior to the breeding season, and cock birds liberated during the month of September.
There will be no further releases of juvenile birds in midsummer. Under the old system,
hen pheasants were exposed to the adversities of the winter season before any benefits
could be obtained from the production of young.
The above constitute a few major advances made during 1952, and I hope they
mark the preliminary steps in realizing greater harvests from our game populations, many
of which show characteristics of only light cropping in the past. A more liberal approach
to the harvest of big game would seem to be a healthy one, particularly in light of
intensified predator-control and past irruptions of game species followed by periodic
declines.
Management
Big Game
Moose.—Examination of winter ranges in the early spring constituted one of the
most important phases of our moose-study. Inspections were made in the following
districts: Bridge Lake, Eagan Lake, Green Lake, Vidette, Beaver Valley, Big Creek, and
Meadow Lake.
In almost all instances continued over-use and depletion of the palatable winter
foods was found to exist. In several areas noticeable browsing was found present on
secondary browse species, and even unpalatable forms, such as lodgepole pine and
soopolalfie (Shepherdia canadensis), showed signs of browsing.
Due to the United States embargo resulting from the outbreak of foot-and-mouth
disease, few non-resident moose-hunters visited the Province in 1952. This situation,
combined with unusually difficult hunting conditions, reduced the moose-kill recorded at
Cache Creek from 2,270 in 1951 to 1,260 in 1952 (latter including 351 cow moose). REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 39
During the either-sex moose season during the last week of November, 351 cow
moose were checked through Cache Creek. Uteri were collected from thirteen females
over the age of 18 months. Of this number, twelve were pregnant but only one carried
a twin pregnancy. The fertility rate based even on this small sample may well reflect
poverty conditions during the winter months. A marked contrast was found to exist in
the fertility of the Cache Creek sample and the sample of forty-odd uteri from Wells Gray
Park where approximately one-third of the adult cows carried twin foeti. The winter
range in Wells Gray Park still furnishes an abundance of palatable forage species, a
condition undoubtedly responsible for the high rate of increase observed in the moose
population.
Experimental use of two types of aircraft, one a De Haviland Beaver and the other
a Cessna 170 with wide flaps, showed the latter to be preferable for use in taking a
census of moose. Cost per hour of flying the Cessna 170 was half that of the larger
aircraft.
Bighorn Sheep.—The Squilax band of introduced bighorns was opened to shooting
for one week at the beginning of the deer season in September. Five rams were recorded
killed.
An intensive study of native California bighorn sheep was commenced in Churn
Creek basin. Lawson Sugden spent from November to June in the basin, where a cabin
was constructed for his convenience. No results of the study are available at this time,
except that cougar predation has appeared as an important limiting factor on the winter
range. Further work will be extended to the lambing-grounds and to the summer range.
The Wildlife Management Institute has contributed $500 to partially finance the summer
work. We are most grateful to this organization for its assistance in this important
project.
Periodic inspections were made of the Vaseaux Lake and Ashnola bands of bighorn.
A census was also taken of the band of sheep near Riske Creek, and future plans for
harvesting or removal studied.
Elk.—An aerial survey of the elk herd at Princeton was undertaken on February
12th, 1953. A total of sixty-seven animals was counted. Work on this population has
become of routine nature and periodic studies will be carried out by E. W. Taylor.
Deer.—-Investigation and research on deer has constituted the most important single
activity of D. J. Robinson, game management biologist on Vancouver Island. An interim
report on the deer of Sayward Forest has been completed, and at the time of writing is
in the process of being mimeographed for distribution to sportsmen and Department
personnel.
A state of over-population is now manifest over much of the Sayward Forest and
an either-sex season is highly advisable.
The deer harvest in the Interior was greatly reduced last year due to unfavourable
hunting conditions during the dry fall. Due to the light snowfall, few deer entered the
lower winter ranges even as late as February, and many sportsmen believed the deer
to have suffered a die-off, but in April when the green grass appeared, mule deer entered
the open ranges in large numbers. It is remarkable how alarmed people may become
when they fail to see deer in midwinter and how they fail to take into account climatic
conditions.
Upland Game Birds
Pheasants.—-The Department's policy with respect to the purchase and liberation of
pheasants, as previously mentioned, underwent a major revision during the past year.
In future, releases will consist of adult hens in March and cock birds during the summer
months, and has been designed to yield greater benefit from moneys expended on pheasant
liberations. Loss of juvenile hens between release and the breeding season almost a
year later has been great.    Likewise, the return of banded juvenile cocks to the hunter's K 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
bag has not been too encouraging. Under the new plan it should be possible to obtain
some production from sexually mature hens released just prior to the breeding season.
Cock birds released in September will also be exposed to fewer hazards before they
contribute to the kill one month later.
Chukar Partridges.—The release of chukar partridges has been continued. Liberations were made at Vaseaux Lake, Keremeos, and also near Ashcroft at the mouth of the
Bonaparte River. The birds have seemingly done well during the mild winter, and on a
number of occasions they have been seen at considerable distances from the place of
release. So far, however, there is no absolute proof that past releases have resulted in
any natural production.   All released birds have been banded.
Blue Grouse.—Blue-grouse shooting was superlative in many Interior localities last
fall. Good sport was also enjoyed on Vancouver Island, where a good harvest was
experienced before the birds migrated out of reach of the majority of hunters.
Ruffed Grouse.—The birds were still reasonably plentiful in most Interior districts,
but in localities where they have been most plentiful over the past two seasons they are
now apparently lower in numbers. For example, at Bridge Lake a marked decline was
evident, whereas in some localities not believed to be optimum, reports were received of
the " best yet" populations. There is thus the suggestion that the ruffed-grouse decline,
now due, is not taking place uniformly, but rather the crash is occurring first in those
localities where the highest populations were first reached.
Fur-bearing Animals
Beaver.—Eleven beavers were trapped in the Courtenay area and transported to the
Queen Charlotte Islands, where they were released at Yakoun Lake and on the Tlell
River.   This is the second release since 1949.
Waterfowl
The five-year duck-banding programme initiated in 1948 was concluded last summer.
The three-man field party under the leadership of Glen Smith realized a successful catch
of over 3,000 waterfowl.
Quarterly presentation of the Pacific Flyway Report has continued as in previous
years.
It has been most difficult to integrate waterfowl studies with work on resident
species, especially big game. During the spring migration the assessment of browsing
intensity on moose winter ranges has made it extremely difficult to obtain reliable information on waterfowl populations passing through the Interior.
The Hunter Sample
The hunter sample this year was varied from the preceding two years. Instead of a
straight "one in fifteen" and "one in twelve" contact of licensed hunters of 1950 and
1951 respectively, it involved the selection of every tenth ordinary firearms licence and
every fifth general firearms licence, extra-general firearms and special firearms licence.
In the Vancouver and New Westminster agencies, all licence types were subjected to a
straight " one in ten " sampling.
The initial hunter sample for the 1952-53 season had a potential coverage of 12.03
per cent of the Provincial hunting population. The returned portion of the sample gave
a 5.35-per-cent coverage, which is considered adequate to give accurate trends in the
game harvests. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
Summary of the 1952 Harvest of Major Game Species
K41
Ducks
Grouse
Pheasants
Deer
68,136
135,324
100,073
25,707
10,543
61,124
12,884
201.927
6,347
24,792
15.329
6,533
2,234
5,825
39.789      1        1.551
2,967
25,889
	
339,783
341.613      1      48.019
17,559
Moose
South of Quesnel  3,889
North of Quesnel  1,898
Kootenays   423
Peace River  632
Total  6,842
Special Survey of Pheasant-hunters
The survey of the 1952 pheasant season was conducted in the manner of that
first held in 1951, hence comparisons of trends between the years may be made with
reliability.
Hunter response to the recent mailed questionnaire was only 37.8 per cent, a decline
from the 53.9-per-cent return obtained from those contacted in 1951. The number of
licensed pheasant-hunters increased from 16,672 in 1951 to 19,159 in 1952, a gain of
14.9 per cent for the Province as a whole. Vancouver Island and the Queen Charlotte
Islands were the only major regions showing a lessening of hunter numbers in 1952.
The distribution of regional relative hunting pressure throughout the recent season
did not change greatly from that of the previous year. Hunting pressure on Vancouver
Island was apparently less intense than in 1951, while in certain areas of the Interior and
Kootenay Districts marked increases were noted. The Lower Mainland was still the
most heavily gunned region and received over 71 per cent of the hunting pressure of the
Province. The Okanagan, Vancouver Island, Kamloops-Cariboo, and Kootenay Districts
followed in that order, bearing 15.5, 7.6, 4.0, and 1.5 per cent of the total hunting
intensity respectively. In all regions, over 80 per cent of the hunters confined their
pheasant-hunting activities to the general area in which they were resident.
Individual hunting success averaged 2.8 cocks per man per season in 1952, as compared to 2.6 in 1951. This improved Provincial average was due in large measure to
more successful hunting in the Okanagan and Lower Mainland Districts (Table I).
In spite of what appeared to be a rather quiet opening in some areas, the season kill
of pheasants for 1952 was in excess of that of the previous year by 29.3 per cent. As
estimated, 48,551 cocks were harvested in British Columbia during the 1952 season.
Vancouver Island and Queen Charlotte Islands were the only major regions in which the
total bag was below that of 1951; all other districts showed increased kills in 1952. The
Okanagan area in particular appeared to enjoy very good hunting compared to that found
in other sections. When the ratio of kill to hunting pressure is considered for this district
and measured against that for other parts of the Province, it would appear very definitely
that the pheasant population in certain sections of the Okanagan is still being relatively
underharvested.
During 1952 a total of 8,895 cocks was released throughout the Province. Of this
number, 8,709 were banded birds. Band recoveries reported in the sample survey
indicate that 33.9 per cent compares fairly closely with the four-year mean of 31.0 per
cent return estimated for cocks liberated on the Delta study area. K 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table I.—Harvest Data and Estimates for the 1951 and 1952 Pheasant Seasons
Regions of Hunter Residence
and Areas Hunted
Average Number of Birds
per Hunter per Season
Estimated Number of
Cocks Harvested
Banded Cocks as a
Percentage of the
Regional Sample Kill,
1952
1951
1952
1951
1952
2.25
3.31
2.01
1.67
2.18
2.34
2.92
1.96
2.43
3.29
2.67
3.47
3.30
2.19
2.51
2.83
3.23
1.87
3.00
3.18
4.17
3.25
2.17
2.61
2.77
2.35
2.66
]
}-      2.80
J
1.50
)       2.78
2.90
1.93
2.71
1.37
2.12
2.15
1.50
2.91
2.82
3.96
3.25
3.13
3.26
2.00
2.54
3.03
4.03
3.86
2.06
3.43
3.92
4.16
3.90
2.56
3.18
3.00
2.62
2.71
2.61
2.27
2.13
1.50
1,447
1,114
691
269
851
341
2,733
1,146
1,511
1,446
2,342
4,335
5,962
2,793
299
448
916
393
166
84
1,803
3,645
603
59
539
41
180
50
r    47
-j         869
L          55
34
(        159
123
1,534
733
309
280
782
96
3,113
1,862
1,616
2,657
3,708
5,263
6,419
2,911
712
713
1,221
765
316
166
3,388
5,117
706
171
1,063
68
141
107
245
1,427
7
104
196
613
22
3.06
2.65
3.69
Alberni    	
6.39
4.62
Agassiz  : 	
13.35
11.91
Mission — 	
16.39
11.11
9.27
12.09
1.71
Delta          _
8.76
7.80
10.71
1.89
2.32
10.05
4.17
No release
No release
No release
No release
3.69
2.58
No release
No release
1
8.25
Kamloops —■- —-	
r
J
' 11.78
No recovery reported
2.17
No release
Totals and averages	
2.66
2.81
37.5221
48,551
5.06                |
1 Eleven birds shot on Saltspring Island not shown.
Opinions have been voiced to the effect that pheasant-hunting would soon decline
were it not for the annual stocking of farm-raised birds. Such arguments are hardly
tenable when the proportion of released to wild cocks bagged is examined (Table I).
In 1951 it was estimated that the planted birds contributed only 7.2 per cent of the total
harvest. On the basis of the more extensive 1952 sample, this group comprised only
5.06 per cent of the Provincial pheasant-kill.
Public Relations
Greater effort has been to distribute reports and results of investigations and research
to enforcement personnel and to Rod and Gun Clubs. In the past year numerous such
reports have been especially prepared for the consumption of Game Wardens and sportsmen's organizations.
It is felt that this activity is vital in the absence of a Departmental news-letter or
publication. Several of the circulars dealt with the problems of harvesting big game and
especially the need to embark on either-sex season on moose and deer.
The members of the Management Division have availed themselves of opportunities
to address conferences and sportsmen's meetings on various topics connected with the
management of wildlife. Although it is often difficult at the time to see just what is
accomplished in this phase of our work, it is now beginning to appear that it is having the
desired effects in gaining public support and interest in game-management practices. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 43
PREDATOR-CONTROL BRANCH
G. A. West, Supervisor of Predator-control
The destruction of noxious mammals and birds was up considerably in the Province
during 1952. This upswing was partly because of increased co-operation and effort by
the Game Wardens and predatory-animal hunters. However, much of the increase was
probably because of increased predator populations in some areas and the introduction
of hunters into other regions.
Generally speaking, it is felt that we are holding our own against, or have control of,
the larger and more important predators. Traps, coyote-getters, hounds (in the case of
cougars), and rifles were the main weapons in eliminating predators in specific complaints, but poison was the most important mass killer of predators.
The principal predators and their relationships can be broken down and presented
as follows:—
Bears.—These animals caused a multitude of complaints from every major settled
and (or) grazed area in the Province. A total of 189 bears (182 blacks and 7 grizzlies)
was destroyed by the Department to alleviate the damage or nuisance caused by bears.
The lower coastal area was probably troubled more than any other comparable district,
but there was little damage other than to fruit-trees, garbage-cans, etc. The density in
some areas was considerable; 52 bears, of which 29 were killed by Department personnel,
were destroyed in North Vancouver.
In the Interior regions, bears caused damage to orchards, bee-hives, and, in some
instances, live stock.   One hundred and twenty-three bears were destroyed in these areas.
Cougars.—Cougars were again numerous in 1952. Although bounty and Departmental kills (465 and 111 respectively) were slightly lower than in 1951, it might be said
that the unusual weather experienced during the fall and early winter months was partially
responsible for the lower number taken. Under ordinary circumstances the kill probably
would have been larger than the number shown for 1952.
The registered bonus cougar-hunters on Vancouver Island have accounted for 59
of a total of 243 cougars presented for bounty. This total represents an additional
$1,180 in paid bounties but also represents a very substantial saving in time. The time-
saving enables the predatory-animal hunters in the Department to be available for the
long patrols to the west coast and for area hunting. These patrols are very expensive and
often yield small returns because of the difficulties encountered, but they are necessary
evils and are unavoidable under the present circumstances.
At this point I should like to point out that the Game Wardens and predatory-animal
hunters in " B " Division have completed a very fine job of hunting and killing cougars
during the past year.
Coyotes.—On the whole, coyotes were under control. Only in isolated instances
were coyotes more than a nuisance in areas that are treated annually with poison stations.
However, Williams Lake and district were very well populated with coyotes during the
summer. The increase came mainly through large litters, and this is thought to have a
direct connection with the game die-off in the area during the spring of 1952. Predatory-
animal Hunter Mortensen did very well against the increase, with 216 coyotes accounted
for and many more dead of poison.
It is anticipated that the new areas opened to control will be reduced in their populations of coyotes and the predation kept to a minimum. However, at the present time,
Predatory-animal Hunters Fletcher (Smithers) and Ellis (Dawson Creek) have just
begun their operations, and consequently it is early for any definite conclusions.
Coyotes may well become a problem in the Lower Fraser Valley in the future,
especially on the north side of the river. A total of twelve, nine more than in 1951, was
destroyed by Game Warden Cliffe and Predatory-animal Hunter Hillen. K 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Just as a matter of interest it might be mentioned here that Assistant Supervisor
E. H. Samann reports that the removal of coyotes from the ranges in the Kamloops region
had no apparent effect on the small-mammal populations. This conclusion was the
result of three years of trapping small mammals on predetermined areas.
Foxes.—Foxes have ceased to be a major menace in many parts of the Fraser
Valley. A total of 216 was destroyed during the year in this area by the Game Wardens,
and the predatory-animal hunter, Mr. Hillen, tallied 158 foxes, and probably many more
were destroyed but these carcasses were never found. At any rate, many of the poultry-
farmers have extended their thanks to the personnel responsible for the decrease in the
fox population.
Predatory-animal Hunter A. M. Hames used coyote-getters with telling effects
against the foxes at Wolf Lake and Tsolum River on Vancouver Island. He has received
favourable reports that indicate the population of foxes was reduced considerably.
Wolves.—Wolves were of major importance in the northern sections of the Province
and were a source of concern. Thanks to Inspector W. A. H. Gill, " D " Division Game
Wardens and Predatory-animal Hunter M. Warren, the numbers were reduced substantially. The probable number of wolves destroyed during the year is unknown, but the
minimum was 195 destroyed in "D" Division and 18 destroyed in "C" Division.
Poison appeared to be the only method to effect mass killing of wolves, and thus it
was on this premise that the operations were based. The conventional capsules were
used extensively, but it was believed that 1080 baits, well placed, would be just as effective.
At present, experiments with 1080 are being carried out by Inspector Gill and Predatory-
animal Hunter Warren.
As more territory becomes accessible to the predatory-animal hunters for control
purposes, it is felt that the wolf populations of the northern portions of the Province will
be reduced to the point where they can be controlled to a definite degree.
Sundry Predators.—Some of the smaller predators such as bobcats and racoons
caused considerable trouble in the Fraser Valley and Vancouver Island. Racoons were
responsible for a good portion of the damage to poultry stocks on Vancouver Island, and
both of the above species were troublesome in the Fraser Valley. However, by the use
of traps and hounds, Department personnel reduced the populations of these predators,
and losses of poultry were kept to a minimum.
For details concerning the major and minor predators see table following, which
gives the numbers for 1951 and 1952 of each species destroyed in each Division.
There were 442 complaints received and investigated by Department personnel in
the control of predators during 1952. This represents an increase of 128 or 41 per cent.
This need not necessarily indicate an increase in predators, but rather an increased availability of personnel to handle complaints.
The poisoning programme undertaken by the Predator-control Branch, with the very
able assistance of many of the Game Wardens, was a successful undertaking. A total of
366 poison baits was placed. Although no figures of destroyed predators were available,
the success was measured by the decrease in predation or by the absence of predators.
Broadly speaking, poison baits were operating in the following areas:—
(1) Peace River—only a few stations.
(2) Smithers-Prince George.
(3) McBride.
(4) Williams Lake-Chezacut.
(5) Empire Valley-Seventy Mile.
(6) Kamloops-Merritt.
(7) Okanagan-Princeton.
(8) North Thompson River.
(9) Nelson-Castlegar.
(10) Creston-Cranbrook-Canal Flats. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
K 45
Plans for 1953 include the above areas on a wider scale plus new areas. It is anticipated that, by using aircraft, areas not poisoned to any degree before will be thoroughly
covered with poison baits placed in the appropriate locations. This will include nights
over the Bonaparte Plateau, Horsefly Lake, and the Chilcotin in addition to the areas to
be poisoned in the north.
Various localities on the Lower Mainland and on Vancouver Island will receive
treatment to combat the complaints of wolves.
Investigations will be made during the spring and early summer months in the
vicinity of Kitimat, Bella Coola, and possibly the Itcha Mountains near Anahim Lake in
efforts to determine the predator situation in these areas. If warranted, a system of
control will be instituted if at all possible.
At this point I would like to thank all members of the Department for the splendid
co-operation shown during the past year. My special thanks to those Game Wardens
who have aided the Predator-control Branch by placing poison baits and being responsible
for them in their Detachments.   In doing this they have been of tremendous help.
Vermin Destroyed, 1951 and 1952
Divisions
Total
Species
"A"
"B "
"C"
"D"
"E"
1952
1951
1952
1951
1952
1951
1952
1951
1952
1951
1952 I 1951
Bear  	
3
115
25
74
2
62
1
1
82
40
61
40
12
13
76
79
44
27
1
I
3
2
56
60
40
26
53
58
17
178
5
367
55
2
72
7
18
40
7
202
14
316
56
2
150
2
14
65
1
53
236
10
9
3
195
1
44
1
39
187
10
3
1
1
1
93
51
23
366
2
12
94
216
81
48
2
3
2
240
3
3
24
26
3
36
15
189 |  91
54 |  12
Cat (wild)	
788 |  619
111 |  117
659 |  546
260 |  177
Fox _   	
229 |   31
72 |  207
Racoon	
Skunk  	
147 |  77
56 |  18
Wolf  ____
216 |  107
1 | _ __
Totals  _
282
224
253
240
779
803
573
380
895
355
2,782 | 2,002
59
1
28
1
6
59
4
15
2
3
211
36
37
15
121
7
238
20
29
12
54
25
985
29
120
67
511
16
1,087
38
159
59
580
22
265
52
71
68
15
188
24
33
27
22
1
1,289
20
108
14
8
70
712
21
64
9
5
56
2,809 | 2,284
138 j  107
F.agle
Hawk	
364 |  300
Owl _	
165 [  109
655 |  661
Merganser- 	
99 |  107
29
25
58
52
129
164
83
99
90
6
41
7
389 [  381
6 |   7
Totals  	
124
108
485
430
1,857
2,109
554
394
1,605
915
4,625 | 3,956
Grand totals	
406
332
738
670
2,636
2,912
1,127
774
2,500
1,270
7,407 | 5,958 K 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS
Comparative Statistics,
1913 to 1952, Inclusive
Prosecutions
Revenue
Derived from
Sale of Game
Calendar Year
Informations
Laid
Firearms
Confiscated
Derived from
Convic
Cases
Fines
Licences
Fur Trade
tions
Dismissed
Imposed
and Fees
1913      	
188
181
7
$4,417.50
$109,600.80
1914                  	
294
273
21
5,050.00
92,034.20
1915 	
279
258
21
4,097.50
72,974.25
1916. _	
127
110
17
2,050.00
66,186.97
1917 _.__   _
111
97
14
1,763.50
65,487.50
1918
194
167
17
5
3,341.00
75,537.00
1919
267
242
25
36
6,024.50
116,135.00
1920          _   	
293
266
27
46
6,073.00
132,296.50
$5,291.39
1921 _ _	
329
312
17
74
6,455.00
114,842.00
24,595.80
1922	
359
317
42
44
7,275.00
127,111.50
51,093.89
1923           __ _   .
309
280
29
24
5,676.50
121,639.50
60,594.18
1924    .
317
283
34
24
4,758.00
125,505.50
56,356.68
1925..   __	
296
279
17
43
5,825.00
123,950.50
56,287.78
1926                    	
483
439
44
39
7,454.00
135,843.50
62,535.13
1977
518
469
49
47
10,480.50
139,814.00
71,324.96
439
406
29
7 283 50
140,014.75
142,028.22
58,823.07
47,329.89
1929
602
569
33
54
9,008.00
1930      _
678
636
32
33
9,572.75
147,660.00
45,161.11
1931 ___-
676
625
51
40
8,645.00
137,233.31
46,091.08
1932....     __	
538
497
41
37
5,493.50
141,269.55
40,363.79
1933 _
498
474
24
22
3,531.00
135,876.94
44,167.48
1934	
477
454
23
4
5,227.82
149,955.11
47,102.81
1935....   	
454
438
16
19
4,399.50
148,689.64
49,831.95
1936	
451
436
15
14
3,965.00
157,647.30
52,196.50
1937. 	
585
552
33
20
5,332.50
177,771.33
53,697.48
1938   	
613
574
39
42
5,729.50
192,024.07
44,963.87
1939
547
526
21
21
4,776.50
193,170.53
49,187.00
1940 __ ._   _
440
419
21
18
5,197.00
188,605.20
68,466.33
1941  _
446
430
16
9
4,977.50
213,267.67
63,125.30
1942 	
409
392
17
27
5,079.50
205,451.71
68,475.07
1943  	
356
342
14
18
5,554.50
207,661.72
58,354.03
1944 _ __
379
372
7
8
5,570.50
238,902.36
70,363.23
1945.- _ 	
652
632
20
30
8,381.50
352,228.85
104,250.95
1946
819
798
21
39
10,921.00
502,555.25
107,357.72
1947 _	
895
878
17
56
11,837.50
597,529.30
99,344.14
1948
1,142
1,117
25
74
17,537.00
610,383.56
73,392.08
1949                             _   _
1,115
1,099
16
86
18,148.50
656,997.38
61,543.26
1950  _.    	
1,359
1,337
22
69
22,923.00
706,591.06
71,335.44
1951.... _	
1,489
1,468
21
83
24,087.50
830,178.59
76,454.56
1952  _
1,504
1,476
28
87
25,755.00
856,971.22
58,713.48
21,927
20,920
987
1,321
$319,675.57
$9,649,623.34
$1,948,171.43 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952 K 47
Summary of Total Revenue Derived from Sale of Various Licences,
Collections, etc., January 1st to December 31st, 1952
Revenue derived from—
Sale of resident firearms licences.
Sale of deer, moose-elk, goat, and pheasant tags	
Sale of resident anglers', guides', and prospectors' firearms licences	
Sale of non-resident firearms licences and outfitters'
licences 	
Sale of non-resident anglers' licences	
Sale of fur-traders', taxidermists', and tanners' licences,
and royalty on fur	
Sale of confiscated and surrendered fur	
Sale of confiscated firearms	
Sale of big-game trophy fees from non-residents	
Prosecutions—fines imposed under the "Game Act"
Miscellaneous revenue	
Total.
$398,012.00
88,983.00
154,936.00
26,964.00
165,620.00
58,713.48
307.20
234.07
20,365.00
25,755.00
1,549.95
$941,439.70
' K 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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llll K 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Revenue Derived from Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and
Prospectors' Firearms Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1952
Anglers
Guides
Free
Farmers
Prospectors
Government
Agency
$1
$2
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
No.
Amount
Alberni 	
Ashcroft	
671
89
7
6
70
253
382
236
1,230
749
717
11
192
138
1,066
85
912
153
174
1,948
783
169
5,369
182
778
18
716
341
588
344
12
107
468
351
31
4,947
735
$671.00
89.00
7.00
6.00
70.00
253.00
382.00
236.00
1,230.00
749.00
717.00
11.00
192.00
138.00
1,066.00
85.00
912.00
153.00
174.00
1,104
284
65
170
1,358
806
2,059
2,285
820
592
702
709
284
218
2,749
291
1,871
462
478
$2,208.00
568.00
130.00
340.00
2,716.00
1,612.00
4,118.00
4,570.00
1,640.00
2
5
4
59
137
11
15
6
7
33
43
2
62
18
6
1
2
98
46
20
6
19
4
2
14
6
2
2
$15.00
8
5
3
13
7
29
35
11
10
29
14
1
9
5
1
24
18
9
37
1
10
39
12
55
5
8
29
1
35
48
39
47
24
20
5
39
145
26
18
44
$1.00
$2,895.00
657.00
45.00
565.00
1,550.00
110.00
130.00
60.00
26
12
30
37
26
71
4
20
15
14
83
6
55
83
14
3
106
1
16
66
10
53
5
8
41
9
3
70
39
2
209
60
24
385.00
3,287.00
3,232.00
Courtenay	
1.00
4,482.00
5,082.00
1,936.00
	
1,230.00
1,184.00
1,404.00
1,418.00
568.00
436.00
5,498.00
582.00
3,742.00
924.00
956.00
2,156.00
4,330.00
1,014.00
18,942.00
956.00
3,644.00
2,584.00
1,104.00
3,776.00
3,568.00
2,334.00
1,798.00
972.00
4,522.00
2,374.00
1,464.00
20,550.00
3,452.00
65.00
330.00
490.00
20.00
1,998.00
2,451.00
Golden	
	
1,919.00
780.00
574.00
Kamloops..	
665.00
1.00
3.00
2.00
1.00
7,230.00
667.00
4,657.00
LiUooet  	
Merritt 	
135.00
1,214.00
1,131.00
1,948.00
783.00
169.00
5,369.00
182.00
778.00
18.00
716.00
341.00
588.00
344.00
12.00
107.00
468.00
351.00
31.00
4,947.00
735.00
1,078
2,165
507
9,471
478
1,822
1,292
552
1,888
1,784
1,167
899
486
2,261
1,187
732
10,275
1,726
4,104.00
Nelson  	
60.00
	
5,173.00
1,183.00
New Westminster
10.00
5.00
24,326.00
1,138.00
Penticton.__	
Pouce Coupe.
20.00
855.00
1.00
2.00
4,443.00
3,459.00
1,820.00
4,552.00
435.00
225.00
60.00
220.00
55.00
20.00
155.00
60.00
10.00
20.00
10.00
1,530.00
4,381.00
2,738.00
2,031.00
1,134.00
Quesnel  ...   .
1.00
5,010.00
2,880.00
1,555.00
25,512.00
4,207.00
Vancouver	
5.00
2,810
101
2,810.00
101.00
1,730
711
3,460.00
1,422.00
1
147
6,280.00
12.00
3,065.00
Totals        .
27,939
$27,939.00
59,518
$119,036.00
780
$7,970.00
1,234
905
$35.00
$154,980.00
44.00
Total. .  _
	
$154,936.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 51
Revenue Derived from Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Outfitters'
Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1952
Government Agency
General
Firearms
Licences
General
Firearms
Licences
(Alternative)
General
Firearms
Licences
(Special)
Ordinary
Firearms
Licences
Outfitters'
Licences
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
5
7
57
10
78
22
1
56
40
27
7
2
2
4
305
89
16
103
34
19
2
3
8
1
2
85
7
25
1
1
3
1
4
8
5
2
3
2
1
2
1
15
13
1
1
6
2
$15.00
5
2
1
6
1
6
1
3
41
1
1
15
1
3
1
.
$15.00
15 00
Afl'H
$125.00
175.00
1,425.00
250.00
1,950.00
550.00
25.00
1,400.00
1,000.00
	
$15.00
125.00
45.00
15.00
60.00
175.00
1,470.00
265.00
6.00
	
	
2,016.00
550 00
25 00
120.00
75.00
3.00
18.00
3.00
$50.00
1,573.00
1,093.00
3.00
675.00
175.00
50.00
50.00
100.00
30.00
45.00
30.00
	
18.00
738.00
175 00
	
50.00
30.00
	
80.00
100.00
$50.00
15.00
30.00
3.00
9.00
18.00
7,625.00
2,225.00
400.00
2,575.00
850.00
475.00
50.00
	
7,714.00
2,225.00
415.00
15.00
225.00
195.00
15.00
123.00
3.00
150.00
50.00
3.073.00
1,098.00
490.00
	
50.00
3.00
3.00
75.00
200.00
25.00
50.00
2,125.00
175.00
625.00
	
75 00
15.00
	
215.00
25.00
50.00
90.00
30.00
45.00
2,260.00
175 00
_..
655.00
.__
Totals	
1,017
$25,425.00
1
$50.00
71
$1,065.00
83
$249.00
5 | $250.00
$27,039.00
75 00
	
Total  	
—
.._
_.__
____
	
$26,964.00 K 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Revenue Derived from the Sale of Non-resident Anglers' Licences,
January 1st to December 31st, 1952
Government Agency
Anglers' Licences
(Other than
Canadian)
$3.50
Anglers' Licences
(Canadian)
$5
Anglers' Licences
(Canadian)
Anglers' Licences
(Minor)
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
122
24
16
12
93
299
616
587
608
16
39
158
119
366
64
834
116
1,290
18
91
178
539
11
9,532
2,040
438
272
75
84
70
135
32
67
344
795
8
611
286
232
102
$854.00
168.00
112.00
84.00
651.00
2,093.00
4,312.00
4,109.00
4,256.00
112.00
273.00
1,106.00
833.00
2,562.00
448.00
5,838.00
812.00
9,030.00
126.00
637.00
1,246.00
3,773.00
77.00
66,724.00
14,280.00
3,066.00
1,904.00
525.00
588.00
490.00
945.00
224.00
469.00
2,408.00
5,565.00
56.00
4,277.00
2,002.00
1,624.00
714.00
	
11
1
18
43
18
34
107
108
4
567
437
2
58
6
37
3
2
21
79
9
80
11
32
416
30
9
11
7
14
16
66
5
37
15
16
7
$6.00
12.00
$55.00
5.00
90.00
6
12
1
7
86
100
104
114
2
54
92
37
7
157
12
249
3
17
12
60
1,780
312
70
55
1
6
9
34
2
5
39
83
61
51
29
$915.00
185.00
Atlin _	
202.00
1.00
7.00
86.00
100.00
104.00
114.00
85.00
2
3
1
215.00
90.00
170.00
535.00
540.00
873.00
$7.00
10.50
3.50
2,276.00
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
4,592.50
4,751.50
4,910.00
10
7
229
35.00
24.50
801.50
147.00
20.00
2,835.00
2,185.00
10.00
2.00
54.00
92.00
37.00
7.00
157.00
12.00
249.00
3.00
17.00
12.00
60.00
319.50
Fernie  __ —
4,796.50
3,110.00
2,609.00
—
455.00
290.00
30.00
185.00
15.00
10.00
105.00
395.00
45.00
400.00
55.00
160.00
2,080.00
6,285.00
	
854.00
9,464.00
3.50
144.00
1
664.00
1,366.50
4,228.00
122.00
7
24.50
1,780.00
312.00
70.00
55.00
1.00
6.00
9.00
34.00
2.00
5.00
39.00
83.00
68,928.50
14,647.00
1
3.50
3,299.50
4,039.00
1
1
3.50
3.50
529.50
150.00
45.00
55.00
35.00
70.00
80.00
330.00
25.00
185.00
75.00
80.00
747.50
544.00
1,034.00
261.00
544.00
2,527.00
1
19
6
3.50
5,981.50
81.00
66.50
61.00
51.00
29.00
4,589.50
2,128.00
Victoria	
21.00
1,754.00
35.00
7
7.00
756.00
21,339
$149,373.00
289 |    $1,011.50
2,337
$11,685.00
3,676
$3,676.00
$165,745.50
Less refunds	
125.50
T"tnl
	
|
	
	
	
$165,620.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
K 53
Revenue Derived from Sale of Fur-traders', Taxidermists', and Tanners'
Licences, and Royalty on Fur, January 1st to December 31st, 1952
Government Agency
Resident
Fur-traders'
Licences
Resident
Fur-traders'
Licences
(Transient)
Royalty
or Tax
on Fur
Taxidermists'
or Tanners'
Licences
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
2
10
1
1
2
3
1
19
3
7
2
3
34
18
1
4
2
1
2
7
1
2
12
1
22
5
1
2
1
4
2
1
8
6
306
50
55
4
2
35
149
1
11
2
$3.50
72.49
1.50
939.06
46.94
.25
26.70
1.50
11.25
11.60
9.00
1
1
4
1
2
5
2
$3.50
Atlin -
$50.00
	
122.49
	
1.50
250.00
1,189.06
46.94
$100.00
100.25
Crmrtfvnay
25.00
25.00
26.70
25.00
26.50
11.25
11.60
50.00
75.00
59.00
75.00
12.22
41.70
$2.00
2.00
8.00
2.00
2.00
400.00
414.22
41.70
25.00
475.00
75.00
175.00
50.00
25.00
200.00
100.00
_ 200.00
11,074.83
4,091.14
2,030.37
141.75
6.00
1,314.46
34,315.72
1.50
99.50
3.50
11,757.83
4,268.14
2,205.37
391.75
4.00
10.00
6 00
75.00
850.00
1,393.46
35,875.72
1.50
700.00
looob
4.00
103.50
450.00
553.50
Totals...	
106
$2,650.00
18
$1,800.00
682
$54,256.48
16
$32.00
$58,738.48
25.00
TotaL  __- _	
_._
$58,713.48 K 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1952, Inclusive
Year
Fur-traders',
Fur Royalty
Tanners', and
Total
or Tax
Taxidermists'
Licences
$24,595.80
$6,195.00
$30,790.80
51,093.89
6,365.00
57,458.89
60,594.18
6,930.00
67,524.18
56,356.68
6,090.00
62,446.68
48,737.78
7,550.00
56,287.78
56,045.13
6,490.00
62,535.13
61,629.96
9,695.00
71,324.96
51,563.07
7,260.00
58,823.07
40,769.89
6,560.00
47,329.89
40,431.11
4,730.00
45,161.11
41,056.08
4,925.00
45,981.08
36,253.79
4,110.00
40,363.79
39,592.48
4,575.00
44,167.48
42,697.81
4,405.00
47,102.81
44,986.95
4,845.00
49,831.95
46,186.50
6,010.00
52,196.50
47,257.48
6,440.00
53,697.48
39,423.87
5,540.00
44,963.87
44,238.00
4,949.00
49,187.00
62,745.33
5,721.00
68,466.33
56,755.30
6,370.00
63,125.30
63,176.07
5,299.00
68,475.07
52,122.03
6,232.00
58,354.03
63,412.23
6,951.00
70,363.23
93,793.40
10,559.00
104,352.40
98,766.72
8,591.00
107,357.72
92,637.14
6,707.00
99,344.14
66,939.08
6,453.00
73,392.08
56,563.26
4,980.00
61,543.26
65,205.44
6,255.00
71,460.44
70,799.56
5,655.00
76,454.56
54,256.48
4,457.00
58,713.48
$1,770,682.49
$197,894.00
$1,968,576.49
1921..
1922...
1923-
1924..
1925.-
1926.
1927...
1928.
1929-
1930-
1931..
1932..
1933-
1934..
1935-
1936.
1937-
1938-
1939-
1940.
1941._
1942..
1944                                                —  	
1945                                               _ _	
1946
1947                                                  _	
1948.     _        - _	
1949
1950 _ _          - _ _   	
1951
1957                      —                           	
Totals     _ _ REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
K 55
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.2 1
ell REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
K 57
List of Fur Confiscated under "Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1952
Confiscated from—
Confiscated at—
Kind of Fur Confiscated
Date of
Confiscation
rt
JZ
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Feb 19
Ben W. Lubie
3
—
1
1
2
8
	
3
3
1
1
2
76
9
1
i
2
2
1
1
4
„   21
Chas. M. Ward	
Hope 	
Giscome   	
„   29
4
Mar   6
3
2
1
7
„   12
Campbell River	
Armstrong-	
Fort Nelson 	
Courtenay	
Oliver 	
„   19
7
„   21 -_
A. F. George	
Fur found by Game Warden
C E. Estlin.	
21
„   17 	
17
Daniel Pinski  ...
F. E. Pinski 	
Frank Marsell	
Edwin M. Chase — _
„   17	
„   24 .__
„   28
Keremeos. 	
Manning, Alta	
___. | ....
.... | _.
.... | ._.
1 1 ....
140
35
May 15	
,,   15
Mara 	
4
J. W. McPherson     .
2
36
15
60
19
Notch Hill-	
10
Beal Carlick          	
2
July 17	
Dec.  3	
3
Fort St. James..	
Sardis  — 	
H. J. Newfeld	
Victor Skalk-	
Totals- 	
1
4
8
1
1
16
4
85
1
7
331
Note.,—The sum of $307.20 was received during 1952 from the sale of confiscated and surrendered fur.
List of Firearms Confiscated under "Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1952
Date of
Confiscation
Confiscated from—
Confiscated at—
Kind of Firearms
Confiscated
Rifles
Shotguns
Blair Davidson  	
C. F. Hendry	
.,    10              	
Fort Nelson  	
Henry Martens    .__	
H. B. Gobin  _	
,   26
Port Coquitlam	
1
„    31
Hans Rutter  	
„   31
Penny.	
William Bartsoff— _	
N. Fjist
Kelowna	
S. T, Kanfrvn
"    -,
Darrington, Wash	
*   ..
A. McDonald	
S. Niedjalski _ -
Penny  _  __   _______
„    12
Sardis „ — 	
„    12
Apr 24
1
„    24
Donald Stubbs    _ ~
„    24
„   24
„   24
Cobble Hill          _ _.
„   24
„   24
„   24
Ovstpr Bay
„    24
F. M. Gentry	
„   24
Victoria  	
ii   25
J. A. Camarta
Hedley                  __   .___
28 K 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA
List of Firearms Confiscated under "Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1952—Continued
Date of
Confiscation
Confiscated from—
Confiscated at—
Kind of Firearms
Confiscated
Rifles
Shotguns
May 15       —
M. R. C. Haller	
P. Bevargia _ 	
P. Giir rlalln
"7
„    19
„    19 _
„    23       _	
C. Kerr _.	
M. Smith. _	
„   23      	
„    23    	
1
William Nespick  	
A. Fisher  _
„    12	
„    17 _	
„    17           	
Alcide Fillion    	
Gerhard Furano 	
Lee Ying- -
William Vogel. _
R. L. Stewart 	
Tassin  Berkey,   DeWild,   Francis,
and McAdams 	
T. A. Martin 	
Prince George ... .
Tabor Creek.  ■ _    __    „..
July   5	
„    16	
„    16. _	
Enderby 	
Aug. 19	
„    19
Ladysmith.	
„    19     _	
1
„    19
Robert Petty __	
Robert Woods   _	
F. H. Archer. _	
D. R. MacDonald  	
B. M. Archer  	
Lenzie Nash  —-	
George Kimpton	
1     i
„    19    _            	
i
i
',    19
Windermere	
-
,,    19	
Windermere'       	
Sept. 10
„    10
1
Oct.    8
8 	
James Hotchkiss	
W. M. Parker	
Victoria  _	
„      8
8
8
R. Hale _	
L. M. Schram 	
Vancouver  .	
Olalla 	
Nov. 21 	
„    21        	
Thomas D. Johnson  	
Hans Gichann  	
Fresno, Calif	
21
„    21
Vancouver   .   .
„   21            —_
A. Jenkins-           —
L. A. Lutz	
C. Pierce 	
K. Gill 	
William Ballantyne 	
J. P. Gunderson  	
Vancouver    	
Vancouver-	
Bloedel 	
Mission __ ___
Victoria	
Sal fair
„   21
„   21 —	
„   21	
„   21 	
„   21  - -
21
—
„   21           	
Garry Johnson ,	
L. Scheffer „    	
Vancouver  	
•   "
21
R. Hupfau 	
E. Sienkiewick. _	
Nickel Plate ..—	
„    21     	
Penny	
21
21
John Ewart	
J. G. Wally -
W. H. Lembke __ '
„    28	
Dec.   3	
3
1
1
Ashcroft	
Ashcroft     	
Vancouver...	
Kamloops 	
1
"      4	
„     4 _
„     4	
„    10    _	
Mario Sabu	
C. S. Henry ,	
P. Dohn _ _	
1
"7
R. I. Smith 	
Prince George 	
i
75        |        12
1
Note.—The sum of $234.07 was received during 1952 from the sale of confiscated firearms. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
Bounties Paid during the Year Ended December 31st, 1952
K 59
Government Agency
Wolves
$40
$25
Cougar
Bounty, $20   Bonus, $20
Coyote, $4
Total
Alberni	
Atlin 	
Barkerville—- -
Burns Lake	
Clinton —	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Cumberland	
Duncan.—•_	
Fernie  	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Kamloops 	
Kaslo -— -	
Kelowna	
LiUooet	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson 	
New Westminster
Penticton	
Pouce Coupe-	
Powell River..	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
Quesnel 	
Revelstoke 	
Rossland 	
Smithers 	
Salmon Arm	
Vancouver	
Victoria	
Vernon 	
Williams Lake	
Totals	
21
3
210
148
184
94
1
25
2
53
675
47
3
6
85
18
27
23
2
14
8
25
5
6
6
22
11
2
3
2
5
1
1
2
6
24
39
10
53
465
32
59
11
5
381
404
190
44
119
42
365
12
91
86
457
1
120
11
77
409
324
32
81
133
13
21
94
72
35
1
164
974
4,769
$1,060.00
119.00
20.00
6,834.00
2,096.00
2,340.00
1,120.00
540.00
645.00
216.00
806.00
328.00
2,280.00
48.00
464.00
784.00
1,948.00
584.00
725.00
84.00
368.00
5,376.00
100.00
5,916.00
2,498.00
364.00
972.00
97.00
84.00
1,001.00
408.00
670.00
1,004.00
856.00
5,796.00
$48,551.00 K 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Comparative Statement of Bounties Paid from 1922 to 1952, Inclusive
Calendar Year
Wolves
Cougars
Coyotes
Crows
Magpies
Eagles
Owls
Amount
1922 	
1923                  	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
366
285
196
261
265
301
472
461
519
725
524
395
488
524
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
172
5,770
10,046
2,246
70
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
14,840.00
1924
20,398.40
1925 	
1926
1,025
1,389
403
1
24,397.00
41,077.00
1927  	
1928 - _	
1929  '	
1930    _ ._ _
2,487
3^427
65,377.95
50,709.25
42,122.00
36,090.25
1931 _	
1932
42,036.15
80 00
1933
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
1,659
1,002
1,039
1,017
1,321
1,202
932
1,102
1,156
1,180
991
753
728
	
6,285.00
1934     -  ...
1935
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
1,971
2,038
1,924
1,546
1,221
1,259
5,506
2,720
2,976
3,911
6,847
9,822
5,202
4,769
6,825.00
12,374.00
1936	
1937 _ 	
1938 _	
1939
	
20,350.00
19,540.00
21,018.00
26,399.00
1940
	
23,131.00
1941
16,868.00
1942                            	
	
17,397.00
1943                                	
	
16,587.00
1944                           	
20,243.00
1945
	
46,627.00
1946
22,392.00
1947  _     ..-	
1948.       	
1949
36,386.00
58,344.00
70,501.00
1950 _	
J951
73,688.00
51,133.00
1952
48,551.00
Totals   	
21,720
12,424
118,486
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$1,012,261.80
Big-game Trophy Fees Paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1952
Species
Government Agency
1
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4
3
3
~6
15
2
7
2
18
9
2
1
2
2
2
9
4
3
6
~ 5
5
5
1
1
8
4
1
22
17
1
3
5
2
2
5
43
7
~3
6
~i
6
1
~~3
18
~2
~3
~6
2
15
2
23
22
27
2
7
3
49
15
9
~~6
12
i
7
1
6
3
1
__
"42
6
~~i
29
3
1
6
9
3
6
~25
9
7
6
3
14
9
$2,610.00
Atlin	
435.00
195.00
1,015.00
Courtenay...	
45.00
2,260.00
2,740.00
Kamloops	
35.00
130.00
5.00
Nelson , _
100.00
920.00
985.00
5.00
5,065.00
1,580.00
350.00
Revelstoke-   —	
50.00
115.00
Vancouver -	
1,050.00
820.00
78
102
57
ii
48
192
71
104
26
$20,510.00
145.00
	
	
~~
—
—
	
	
	
	
$20,365.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
K 61
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1952
Description of Offence
Divisions (See Foot-note)
c
6
Fines or
Penalties
Imposed
Game Animals
Allowing dogs to run or hunt deer-
Buying or selling game animals illegally..
Exceeding bag-limit on game animals.-
Hunting or killing game animals with rim-fire shells or
metal-cased bullets	
Hunting, killing, or possession of game animals under
1 year of age-
Hunting, killing, or possession of game animals during
close season	
Hunting, killing, or possession of game animals of
female sex	
Pit-lamping or hunting game animals at night-
Possession of game animals on premises of logging camp.
Possession of untagged moose, elk, or deer-
Possession of game animals from which evidence of sex
removed	
Firearms
Carrying firearms on a game reserve 	
Carrying  loaded  firearms  or  discharging  same  from
automobile	
Carrying or possession of unplugged shotgun _
Discharging firearms on or across highway-
Minors carrying firearms unaccompanied by an adult-
Non-residents in possession of unsealed firearms	
Fur Trade and Trapping
Baiting traps with game meat-
Destroying beaver houses-
Failing to make returns on trapping licence..
Fur-trader failing to keep proper record-book..
Interfering or trapping on another person's trap-line-
Possession of untagged beaver-pelts  	
Possession of unprime pelts  	
Trading in pelts without a licence-
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence-
Trapping during close season-
Trader or trapper evading payment of royalty	
Licences
Non-residents carrying firearms without a licence..
Non-residents angling without a licence-
Residents carrying firearms without a licence-
Residents angling without a licence	
Migratory Game Birds
Exceeding bag-limit or possession-limit-
Hunting migratory game birds from power-boat-
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours..
Hunting migratory game birds with a rifle...
6
3
32
30
Hunting migratory game birds in prohibited areas 	
Hunting,  possession, or killing migratory game birds
during close season	
Upland Game Birds
Allowing dogs to hunt game birds during prohibited time-
Exceeding bag-limits on upland game birds-
Hunting pheasants during prohibited hours or when snow
on ground.
Hunting, killing, or possession of upland game birds
during close season.
Possession of untagged pheasants-
Possession of upland game birds with plumage removed-
12
20
91
61
47
4
1
14
10
49
36
18
4
9
7
5
5
74
125
30
11
10
6
__.. |
5
2
2
5
13
47
28
7
7
13
199
21
11
21
11
1
1
1
1
15
4
1
4
19
4
1
40
49
273
266
1
3
44
7
5
20
44
7
3
5
2
2
5
13
49
28
10
7
14
200
21
11
21
11
1
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6
1
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19
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275
266
1
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8
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$135.00
50.00
125.00
50.00
405.00
1,665.00
2,175.00
2,250.00
540.00
170.00
130.00
55.00
1,756.00
240.00
105.00
83.50
120.00
50.00
25.00
10.00
625.00
55.00
10.00
130.00
375.00
60.00
50.00
1,850.00
495.00
3,167.00
2,632.50
150.00
30.00
1,080.00
80.00
50.00
295.00
30.00
35.00
20.00
1,060.00
70.00
20.00 K 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1952—Continued
Description of Offence
Divisions (See Foot-note)
"A"
B"
D"
a
o
U
O «s
A B
Fines or
Penalties
Imposed
Special Fishery Regulations
Angling for trout during close season	
Allowing sawdust to pollute river-
Exceeding bag or possession limit on trout 	
Jigging, molesting, or taking fish on spawning-grounds-
Possession of or using fish-roe in prohibited area	
Taking or possession of undersized trout	
Using more than one line or rod-
Using gear designed to catch more than one fish-
Unlawfully selling trout	
Miscellaneous
Cold-storage operator failing to keep record-books—	
Giving false information to Game Warden to  obtain
licence or obstruction	
Guide failing to make return of hunting trip or failing
to complete the form on reverse side of a nonresident licence	
Guiding without a permit or licence	
Guide failing to report violations of " Game Act "_
Killing big game while acting as guide-
Keeping live game animals in captivity without a permit-
Non-resident hunting big-game animals without a guide	
Operating a cold-storage plant without a licence or permit
Trespassing on private property	
Totals..
165
1 I
173
442
252
60
4
2
4
8
S
11
1
1
18
444
28
64
1
12
9
24
23
24
16
1
1
20
13
10
1
1
1
3
1
26
64
I
12
10
24
25
25
16
1
1
22
13
10
1
1
2
3
1
28
$508.50
20.00
155.00
135.00
425.00
275.00
240.00
117.50
10.00
10.00
210.00
140.00
460.00
50.00
50.00
25.00
60.00
10.00
345.00
1,476
1,504
$25,755.00
Gaol Sentences
Killing game animals of the female sex—3, total of six months.
Trapping fur-bearing animals during close season—1, five days.
Giving false information—1, thirty days.
Note.—"A" Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. "B" Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. "C" Division: Kamloops, • Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and LiUooet areas. "D" Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. "E " Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Mainland areas. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
K 63
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Summary of Game-fish Culture Distributions, Showing Eggs, Fry,
and Fingerlings, 1952
Kind of Game Pish
Eggs
Fry
Fingerlings
472,310
4,390,580
865,000
364,270
10,000
4,294,634
75,440
104,000
127,949
1,145,732
Total.
5,727,890
4,744,344
1,377,681
Summary of Game-fish Eggs, Fry, and Fingerlings at Departmental
Hatcheries, December 31st, 1952
Hatchery
Cut-throat
Eggs or Fry
Eastern Brook
Eggs or Fry
Kamloops
Fingerlings
or Fry
12,690
3,447
298,400
200,095
Smith Falls
96,580
	
300,589
Totals
16,137
298,400
597,264
Eggs
Fry
Fingerlings
Summary
Total distributions
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1952.
Total 	
5,727,890
4,744344
1,377,681
11,849,915
911,801
12,761,716 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
Returns from 2,450 Holders of Special Firearms Licences, Showing Big Game,
Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals Killed, Season 1951-52
Big Game
Bear
463
Caribou     16
Deer „  560
Moose  412
Mountain-goat
Mountain-sheep
     35
     10
Wapiti (elk)     36
Fur-bearing Animals
Beaver _
Fisher	
Fox	
Lynx	
Marten _
Mink	
Muskrat
7,105
499
546
1,316
7,436
6,328
28,013
Otter	
Racoon	
Skunk 	
Squirrel	
Weasel	
Wildcat	
Wolverine
Predatory Animals
Cougar      112 Wolves
Coyote  1,438
386
593
197
217,105
16,623
116
148
236 report of provincial game commission, 1952
Summary of Liberation of Game Birds, 1952
K 77
Area
Vancouver Island-
Alberni	
Courtenay 	
Cowichan	
Nanaimo-Parksville	
Victoria (North and South Saanich).
Totals
Pheasants    Chukar Partridges
150
475
462
300
950
2,337
Lower Mainland—
Agassiz	
  252
  1,082
  2,981
  2
Lulu Island -  1,216
Chilliwack
Delta	
Essondale .
Langley	
Matsqui	
Mission (Hatzic and Nicomen Island) _
Pitt Meadows	
Sumas Prairie	
Surrey	
Totals -
Interior—
Ashcroft	
Cache Creek
Creston	
Enderby 	
Grand Forks
Kamloops	
Keremeos -	
LiUooet	
Merritt	
Oliver	
Penticton	
Salmon Arm
Summerland
Smithers 	
Totals 1
643
1,473
1,370
1,855
1,565
1,468
13,907
149
300
100
200
437
200
106
200
200
200
400
200
20
200
108
360
2,712
668
Note.—Total cost covering purchase of all game birds listed was $38,265.50. K 78 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1952
Number and Kind oj Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1952
Pheasants     4,192 Ducks     45
Quail  5 Partridges  307
Number and Kind of Birds Raised, 1952
Pheasants  24,956 Partridges  815
Quail  2
Number and Kind of Birds Purchased, 1952
Pheasants  344
Number and Kind of Birds Sold, 1952
Pheasants  20,561 Partridges  692
Quail  3
Number and Kind of Birds Killed, 1952
Pheasants     2,997 Ducks     31
Quail  2
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1952
Pheasants     5,934 Ducks     14
Quail  2 Partridges  430
Note.—During the year 1952 there were 106 licensed game-bird farmers in the
Province, but during the year 1952 seventeen of these farmers discontinued business.
There were two nil returns. Game-bird bands sold to licensed game-bird farmers during
the year 1952 amounted to $238.70 (2,387 bands at 10 cents each).
Miscellaneous Revenue, 1952
Sale of Lists to Various Licence-holders, etc.
112 Game Convention minutes at 75 cents per copy	
2,387 game-bird bands at 10 cents each	
235 trap-line transfer fees at $2.50 each	
Proceeds, sale of trout-eggs.
Proceeds, sale of live fur-bearing animals..
Proceeds, permits to export game meat-
Proceeds, fee for tagging deer and moose hides.
Proceeds, sale of three fur-traders' lists	
Proceeds, sale of live cougar	
$84.00
238.70
587.50
235.50
70.00
70.00
182.50
4.50
77.25 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952 K 79
LIST OF GUIDES AND NON-RESIDENT OUTFITTERS, 1952
Definition of Guide Licence Classifications
A First-class Guide shall be one who has acted as a guide in the Province for a period
of at least three years in the ten years immediately preceding his application for a guide's
licence, and who has suitable equipment for outfitting any person desiring to hunt game.
A Second-class Guide shall be one who has acted as a guide in the Province for a
period of at least three years in the ten years immediately preceding his application for
a guide's licence, but who cannot qualify as a First-class Guide.
An Assistant Guide shall be one who cannot qualify as either a First-class or Second-
class Guide, and shall be entitled to act as a guide in the hunting of game birds or in
angling for trout, and after securing a permit so to do from the Game Commission, when
employed by or under the supervision of a First- or Second-class Guide, to guide big-game
hunters.
Vancouver Island and Mainland Coast North to North End of Vancouver Island
Class of Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence Name and Address of Guide Licence
Alsdorf, William, Campbell River. 2nd Robertson, George R., 2329 Blanshard St.,
Brimacombe, Herbert, Stuart Island 2nd Victoria 2nd
Flesher, Eric Reed, Phillips Arm  2nd Vanstone, James, Campbell River 2nd
Hancock, Joseph, Lake Cowichan    1st Stanton, James, Minstrel Island    1st
Hancock, Arthur C, Lake Cowichan    1st Smith, Calvin, Box 550, Courtenay  2nd
Kay-Nichols, Caesar, Sayward  2nd Williamson, David, Campbell River..- 2nd
Marshall, Donald, Campbell River 2nd Wilson, Jack, Sproat Lake 2nd
Mainland Coast (Stewart South, Including Bella Coola)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Brynildsen, Guy Alger, Bella Coola 2nd
Bugnella, Angelo, Stewart  2nd
Letho, John, Stewart 2nd
Mack, Clayton, Bella Coola    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Moody, David, Bella Coola..
Nygaard, Martin, Bella Coola..
Class of
Licence
 2nd
_____   1st
Si Wallace, Andrew Stephen, Bella Coola  2nd
Skuce, Herb, Ocean Falls    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Cullis, Herbert W., Taft	
Dawson, V. N., Adams Lake
Adams Lake-Salmon Arm-Revelstoke-Vernon Areas
Class of Class of
Licence Name and Address of Guide Licence
  2nd Harrison, Bryan R., Adams Lake     1st
  2nd Harrison, Robert Owen, Adams Lake    1st
—   1st Laforme, George W., Revelstoke    1st
__- 2nd May, Arthur William, Celista  2nd
Robertson, Douglas G, Squilax  2nd
Small, Roy, Trout Lake    1st
Wader, Loyd, Sicamous  2nd
DeSimone, Samuel H., Revelstoke	
Engler, John, Lumby	
Haestfield, Francis N., Chase 2nd
Hansen, Chase E., Cherryville 2nd
Hansen, Lee, Kamloops    1st
Hansen, Lee, Salmon Arm    1st
Cassiar District (Atlin-
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Ball, George, Telegraph Creek    1st
Carlick, Tom, Telegraph Creek 2nd
Carlick, Walter, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Clever, Gene B., Bennett  2nd
Dennis, Alex., Telegraph Creek 2nd
Dennis, John Greyke, Telegraph Creek    1st
Edzerza, George, Atlin    1st
Frank, Benny, Telegraph Creek 2nd
Jack, Alex., Telegraph Creek 2nd
Telegraph Creek District)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Jack, Henry Taku, Atlin  2nd
Mutts, Alix, Telegraph Creek 2nd
Nelson, William H., Telegraph Creek  2nd
Nole, Bill, Telegraph Creek 2nd
Nyman, Robert, Atlin 2nd
Lashovts, Frank Pete, Telegraph Creek 2nd
Williams, Jack, Atlin 2nd
Asp, Phillip, Lower Post 2nd K 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA
West Kootenay (Including Nelson-Creston, Kootenay Lake, and Lardeau)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Cummings, Arnold, Boswell  2nd
Danet, Seldom, Ferguson    1st
Drummond, James, Burton 2nd
Fletcher, Jaye R., Nelson 2nd
Horswill, Robert, Robson 2nd
Koch, Charles A., Sanca  2nd
MacNicol, J. W., Johnson's Landing 2nd
Class of
Licence
2nd
2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Marshall, Clark A., Burton	
Newbrand, Emil, Box 109, Nakusp..
Oliver, George J., Gray Creek 2nd
O'Neil, Richard, Sirdar 2nd
Rodgers, James L., Creston    1st
Schwartzenhauer, Carl, Deer Park  2nd
Boundary Districts (Grand Forks West to Princeton, Including Kettle Valley and Ashnola)
Class of
Licence
... 2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Bradshaw, George A., Westbridge	
Clark, Herbert G., Keremeos    1st
Gold, Robie Booth, Bankier 2nd
Holding, Richard, Princeton  2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Lewis, James W., Princeton	
Manion, William B., Tulameen	
Wright, Brian (Pat), Princeton  2nd
Hall, D. Elmer, Westbridge 2nd
Class of
Licence
.__._   1st
2nd
Kamloops District (Savona-North Thompson-Clearwater)
Class of
Licence
.____ 2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Blackman, William, Valemount	
Blair, Percy, Little Fort  2nd
Boule, James, Savona    1st
Brousseau, Cliff, Savona    1st
Brown, Starr Alfred, Little Fort  2nd
Burdett, Mrs. Loretta, Savona  2nd
Burdett, George, Savona    1st
Carter, Cecil, Black Pool  2nd
Comeau, William R., Savona    1st
Cooper, Norman T, Savona  2nd
Cooper, Phillip, Westsyde    1st
Ellis, Bux., Battle St., Kamloops    1st
Farquharson, James, Kamloops  2nd
Fennell, A. C, Chu Chua  2nd
Grant, Gordon, McLure    1st
Hagen, Harry, Barriere 2nd
Helset, Ted, Clearwater    1st
Hogue, John, Clearwater  2nd
Hoover, Eldred, Black Pines    1st
Humphrey, A. C., Knutsford  2nd
Johnson, Stan, Black Pool  2nd
King, Mervin L., East Black Pool  2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Korsvick, George, Valemount.
Lafave, John, Louis Creek..
Class of
Licence
 2nd
    1st
Latremouille, Joseph, Little Fort    1st
Lean, Theodore B., R.R. 1, Clearwater    1st
Lloyd, William, Criss Creek  2nd
Loveway, Thomas, Little Fort  2nd
Ludtke, Charles D., Clearwater  2nd
Ludtke, Laurence, Clearwater    1st
McDiarmid, Garfield, Clearwater    1st
Marriott, Robert, Heffley Creek  2nd
Murray, George E., Savona     1st
Nelson, Gerald, Kamloops (Black Pines) 2nd
Peel, Murrill A., Pritchard    1st
Rainer, Karl, Darfield  2nd
Sand, Martin J., Vavenby  2nd
Scott, Duncan, Barriere    1st
Small, Reg, Clearwater    1st
Thacker, George, Walhachin     1st
Turner, John, Criss Creek 2nd
Tuson, Clifford, Savona    1st
Whittaker, John, Lac la Jeune, Kamloops— 2nd
Wilson, Donald, Vinsulla 2nd
Peace River District and Lower Post
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Anderson, Edward, Dawson Creek  2nd
Anderson, Stewart, Box 534, Dawson Creek   1st
Artemenko, William, Fort St. John 2nd
Beattie, Donald, Hudson Hope 2nd
Beattie, Robert, Gold Bar 2nd
Belcourt, Clarence, Big Slough (near Hazel-
mere P.O., Alta.) 2nd
Gelcourt, Maglorie, Big Slough (near Ha-
zelmere P.O., Alta.) 2nd
Brown, Wesley J., Mile 175, Fort St. John__   1st
Calliou, John, Kelly Lake (Goodfare P.O.,
Alta.)  2nd
Calliou, Sam, Moberly Lake 2nd
Callison, E. O., Mile 422, Alaska Highway   1st
Callison, Dennis W., Fort Nelson    1st
Cameron, Patrick, Moberly Lake    1st
Cameron, Ralph, Moberly Lake 2nd
Cooke, Frank Edward, Fellers Heights 2nd
Courvoisier, Henry C, Fort Nelson    1st
Dalziel, George C. F., Lower Post 2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Davidson, J. O., Muddy River    1st
Dhenin, Rene G., Fort St. John    1st
Durney, Milo, East Pine    1st
Elden, Otto, Little Prairie 2nd
Fleet, Delbert L, Fort St. John 2nd
Garbitt, Theophile S., Moberly Lake    1st
Golata, Frank W., Dawson Creek    1st
Hambler, Albert, Kelly Lake  (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.)  2nd
Hambler, Joe, Kelly Lake (Goodfare P.O.,
Alta.)     1st
Johnston, Freddie, Teslin Lake, Y.T 2nd
Kruger, William, Hudson Hope  2nd
Larson, Albin O., Fort Nelson    1st
Letendre,  James,  Kelly Lake   (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.)   2nd
Letendre, Roland, Kelly Lake (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.)  2nd
Longhurst, William James, Fort St. John
(Mile 147)     1st REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 81
Peace River District and Lower Post—Continued
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
McDonald, Charlie, Fort Nelson 2nd
McGarvey, Morris M., Taylor    1st
MacLean, Arthur J., Fort St. John    1st
McLean, William, Little Prairie    1st
Mould, Tom, Muncho Lake    1st
Neilson, Gordon, Fort Nelson  2nd
Neilson, Gordon R., Fort Nelson  2nd
O'Dahl, Joel, Fort Nelson    1st
Paquette, Morris, Moberly Lake    1st
Peck, Donald R., Mile 200, Trutch    1st
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Peterson, A. H, Fort Nelson    1st
Pitts, Ray W., Fort St. John  2nd
Powell, Gary J., Hudson Hope  2nd
Ross, James A., Mile 147, Fort St. John    1st
Rutledge, Leo, Hudson Hope    1st
Thomas, John, Arras  2nd
Varley, Jim, Coal River 2nd
Wawyandie, Paul, Kelly Lake (near Good-
fare P.O., Alta.) 2nd
Watson, James H, Fort St. John  2nd
Prince George District "A " (Prince George East to Jasper)
Class of Class of
Name and Address of Guide                             Licence Name and Address of Guide                             Licence
Bergammer, Joe, Fort McLeod 2nd Jensen, Arne, Dome Creek 2nd
Boyko, Wm., Finlay Forks  2nd Jensen, Ernest H., Dome Creek    1st
Brooks, George, South Fort George    1st Johnson, Howard T., South Fort George— 2nd
Cannon, Walter L., Sinclair Mills 2nd Johnson, John H., South Fort George  2nd
Corless (Jr.), Richard F., Prince George....   1st Mintz, Arthur J., Tete Jaune 2nd
Gaugh, Allen H, Prince George    1st Monroe, Everett A., McBride  2nd
Hale, Stanley, Dome Creek  2nd Neighbour, Hersch, Tete Jaune    1st
Hargreaves, Roy F., Mount Robson    1st Sande, Walter J., Sinclair Mills    1st
Henry, Gordon K., Box 225, Prince George   1st Simmons, Herbert, Box 1973, Prince George   1st
Henry, Walter L, Prince George    1st Witter, Henry L., Box 165, Prince George 2nd
Hooker, James B., Dome Creek    1st Zlotucha, Antoni, Prince George 2nd
Prince George District " B " (Prince George West to Terrace)
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Bennett, Vernon, Southbank  2nd
Braaten, Edwin, Southbank  2nd
Campbell, Theodor Blair, Hazelton  2nd
Cooke, Ted, Vanderhoof  2nd
Cowan (Jr.), Hugh S., Clemretta  2nd
Davidson, Charlie B., Vanderhoof-    1st
Donald, Jimmy, Burns Lake 2nd
Fletcher, Allen Eugene, Smithers  2nd
Foote, Charles H, Fraser Lake  2nd
Gilliland, Donald W., Germansen Landing 2nd
Grainger, Barry, Noralee 2nd
Harrison, Alford J., Burns Lake 2nd
Haugen, Karl, Manson Creek  2nd
Henson, Frank E., Marilla    1st
Hipp, Anthony J., Terrace	
Johnson, George Martin, Vanderhoof..
Knox, John, Ootsa Lake	
Kohse, Louis, Vanderhoof	
Loback, Wesley L., Marilla	
2nd
2nd
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
2nd
1st
1st
McNeill, John W., Ootsa Lake    1st
Lord, Walter H., Tchesinkut Lake	
Loss, Helmar Frederick, Topley	
McConachie, H. R., Fort St. James..
McNeill, Clifford, Ootsa Lake..
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Meier, John, Vanderhoof  2nd
Menard, Gerard, Nithi River..
Moran, Thomas E., Vanderhoof-	
Morgan, James E., Ootsa Lake	
Munger, Francis W. R., Box 24, Houston..
Murray, Ronald W., Fort St. James	
Nelson, George, Vanderhoof	
Nelson, John N., Clemretta	
2nd
2nd
1st
2nd
2nd
1st
1st
Pease, Clarence A., Nithi River    1st
Plowman, Clarence, Endako  2nd
Prince, Alex., Fort St. James  2nd
Prince, Teddy, Fort St. James 2nd
Rowland, Edward F., Decker Lake  2nd
Seyforth, Joe, Fort St. James 2nd
Shea, James B., Telkwa ,    1st
Smith, Craig H., Fort St. James    1st
Smith, Richard H, Fort St. James  2nd
Towrond, Peter N., Noralee  2nd
Van Tine, Edward, Ootsa Lake    1st
Vanzanten, James H., Francois Lake 2nd
Walker, Thomas A., Fort St. James    1st
Wheeler, William H., Burns Lake 2nd
Winsor, William J., Isle Pierre  2nd K 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cariboo District "A " (100-Mile House South, Including Ashcroft)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Baker, James A., Clinton 2nd
Baker, J. C, Clinton    1st
Cleveland, R. C, Bridge Lake    1st
Chabara, Anna, 70-Mile House  2nd
Cleveland, J. G., Bridge Lake    1st
Cleveland, L. C, Bridge Lake    1st
Cleveland, Weston, Eagan Lake    1st
Coldwell, H. W., Jesmond    1st
Collins, M. A., Cache Creek    1st
Dougherty, Charles A., Ashcroft    1st
Dougherty, E. G, Clinton    1st
Dyer, Guy H, 70-mile House 2nd
Eden, Donald D., 70-Mile House  2nd
Eden, R. B., 70-Mile House 2nd
Faessler (Jr.), C. L, Fawn P.O    1st
Fenton, Henry, Big Bar Creek  2nd
Fen ton, Walter, Big Bar Creek    1st
Flaherty, R. J., Fawn    1st
Forde, H. D. W., Clinton  2nd
Fowler, Norman A., Loon Lake 2nd
Gaines, Clinton, Fawn  2nd
Gammie, Bert, 70-Mile House    1st
Graf, Mike, R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
Grid, Percy, 70-Mile House  2nd
Grinder, Louise, Clinton  2nd
Grypuik, Sam, Cache Creek 2nd
Hansen, John F., Bridge Lake    1st
Hansen, Wesley B., Bridge Lake  2nd
Higgins, Ed, Fawn P.O    1st
Higgins, K. E., Fawn 2nd
Higgins, M., Bridge Lake    1st
Hodges, E. W., R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
Horn, Walter A., 70-Mile House 2nd
Huckvale, J., Fawn    1st
Hunter, Mickey, Ashcroft  2nd
Hutchison, D. B., 70-Mile House  2nd
Johnson, Claude, Bridge Lake    1st
Johnson, J. A., 100-Mile House  2nd
King, C. L, R.R. 1, Fawn 2nd
King, Gordon B., R.R. 1, Fawn  2nd
Knauf, H. G., Fawn  2nd
Larson, J. O., Bridge Lake    1st
Larson, K. J., Fawn  2nd
Leavitt, F. W., R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
LeBourdais, Joe, Clinton  2nd
Levick, J. S., R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
Lewis, Victor, Dog Creek 2nd
Long, C. H, Fawn P.O 2nd
Loring, Ed, Clinton  2nd
MacLean, D., Fawn 2nd
McMahon, Jesse C, 70-Mile House    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
McNeil, B. S., Fawn P.O    1st
McNeil, H. M., Fawn P.O    1st
Mathewson, A. E., Ashcroft  2nd
Matier, J. H, Clinton    1st
Mooring, A. R., Fawn    1st
Nordgren, Jonas, Fawn P.O  2nd
Olafson, H. J., R.R. 1, Fawn 2nd
Parent, S. J., Fawn 2nd
Park, A. H., 70-Mile House  2nd
Park, Jack P., 70-Mile House  2nd
Parkes, G. L., 70-Mile House 2nd
Perault, Joe, Jesmond  2nd
Petrie, Donald, Bridge Lake    1st
Pigeon, C. L., Clinton    1st
Pigeon, J. R., Clinton    1st
Pigeon, Norman, Clinton 2nd
Pollard, Harold, Clinton    1st
Powell, H. J., Fawn P.O    1st
Powell, T. G., Fawn    1st
Reinertson, R. L, 100-Mile House    1st
Reynolds, A. J., Jesmond    1st
Reynolds, H. D., Jesmond    1st
Roberts, R. V, Fawn P.O    1st
Scheepbower, J. A., 70-Mile House 2nd
Scheepbower, John C, 70-Mile House 2nd
Scheepbower, William, 70-Mile House 2nd
Scott, Douglas, 100-Mile House    1st
Sedman, John E., R.R. 1, Fawn  2nd
Siebert, John, Jesmond    1st
Singleton, Fred, Fawn P.O  2nd
Thomason, D. M., Bridge Lake    1st
Thorsteinson (Jr.), C, Fawn  2nd
Umphrey, S. T., Fawn P.O 2nd
Van Horlick, Buster, Clinton  2nd
Vequeray, R. J., Jesmond    1st
Walsh, F. C, 70-Mile House 2nd
Watkins, Bud, Cache Creek 2nd
Whitley, W. P., 70-Mile House 2nd
Wilkinson, Thomas H., Fawn 2nd
Winteringham, Frank, Fawn  2nd
Womack, C. B., Fawn    1st
Young, William, Clinton  2nd
Bayne, A. H, Canim Lake    1st
Bessette, Arthur, Ashcroft 2nd
Dean, J. C, R.R. 1, Fawn 2nd
Grinder, Walter, Jesmond    1st
Higginbottom, A. H, Jesmond    1st
Houseman, J. J. 100-Mile House  2nd
Lehman, Bert, LiUooet 2nd
Vecqueray, A. E., Clinton  2nd REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 83
Cariboo District " B " (100-Mile House North to Marguerite
and Williams Lake, East of Fraser River)
Name and Address of Guide
Abram, A. E., Lac la Hache..
Class of
Licence
  2nd
Archie, Charlie, Buffalo Creek    1st
Archie, George, Canim Lake    1st
Archie, Jacob, Canim Lake    1st
Ash, Chris, Big Lake  2nd
Asserlind, H. C, Keithley Creek  2nd
Atkins, Daniel, Horsefly  2nd
Barrett, Stan, Horsefly 2nd
Bob, Edward, Canim Lake    1st
Bobb, E. R., Marguerite  2nd
Bowe, Alfred, Williams Lake  2nd
Bryce, Jack, Big Lake  2nd
Christopher, David, Canim Lake  2nd
Decker, English, Canim Lake  2nd
Dick, Mathew, Alkali Lake  2nd
Eagle, Clifford B., Lac la Hache    1st
Gibbons, M. L., Williams Lake    1st
Goetjen, Charles E., Horsefly    1st
Graham, James W., Horsefly  2nd
Graham, John, Horsefly 2nd
Greenlee, E. L., Canim Lake    1st
Gunn, J. M., Horsefly    1st
Hamilton, G. G., Williams Lake  2nd
Hamilton, H. M., Lac la Hache    1st
Hamilton, Pete, Williams Lake  2nd
Hamilton, Roy M., Williams Lake  2nd
Hamilton, Thomas, Williams Lake — 2nd
Hockley, George, Horsefly    1st
Hooker, F. C, Horsefly    1st
Hooker, S. B., Horsefly    1st
Hooker, Frederick P., Horsefly    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Hubbard, I. H., Horsefly	
Jacobsen, John, Big Lake.	
Jenner, Ernest, Horsefly_.
Class of
Licence
—_    1st
.-- 2nd
—_ 2nd
Johnson, Zale A., Clinton    1st
Jones, Fred, Horsefly    1st
Jones, Lawrence, Horsefly    1st
Kelly, James A., Soda Creek  2nd
Krebs, L. B., Lac la Hache  2nd
McBurney, Aubrey, Keithley Creek  2nd
McDougall, Robert, Big Lake    1st
Michel, Sam, Williams Lake 2nd
Morgan, Bud, Likely    1st
Morris, D. L., Forest Grove    1st
Nicol, Shelley, Horsefly    1st
Oak, Ernest, Horsefly  2nd
Paxton, H. E., Macalister  2nd
Pinkney, Robert, Canim Lake    1st
Racher, W. J., Horsefly    1st
Robertson, William, Macalister  2nd
Roper, Alf, Canim Lake    1st
Sharp, William, Ochiltree..
Vaness, lohn, Horsefly__
Walters, Glen, Horsefly..
2nd
1st
1st
2nd
1st
Webster, Alister, Horsefly	
Walters, Leonard, Horsefly	
Wiggins, Wiley, Miocene  2nd
Williams, Aubrey, Horsefly    1st
Williams, Mrs. Thelma, Horsefly  2nd
Wotzke, Herbert, Williams Lake  2nd
Wynstra, Jack, Horsefly 2nd
Cariboo District " C " (Quesnel
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Allen, George H, Quesnel    1st
Armstrong, Wilfred, Quesnel 2nd
Cochran, James Dean, Barkerville    1st
Coldwell, Harry B., Punchaw    1st
Harrington, Alex. G., Quesnel    1st
Knudson, Leonard E., Box 841, Quesnel.— 2nd
Laurent, Louie, Quesnel (Nazko)  2nd
Lavoie, George Chas., Batnuni Lake 2nd
Martin, George, Wells 2nd
Barkerville, North from Marguerite)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Miller, Issac Edward, Punchaw    1st
Moffat, Ronald H, R.R. 1, Quesnel    1st
McKort, Irvin James, R.R. 1, Alexandria 2nd
O'Leary, Arthur, Quesnel    1st
Orr, William M., Chilliwack 2nd
Quanstrom, Carl, Quesnel  2nd
Rawling, Arden L., Quesnel  2nd
Sorum, Erick, Quesnel 2nd
Tibbies, Fred C, Quesnel    1st
Cariboo District " D " (Chilcotin District, Cariboo West of Fraser River)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide . Licence
Blatchford, John A., Alexis Creek    1st
Bliss, Bill, Alexis Creek    1st
Bryant, Alfred, Anahim Lake    1st
Bullion, Jimmie, Hanceville  2nd
Buttler, Leonard, Tatla Lake  2nd
Camille, Francis, Dog Creek    1st
Capoose, Oggie, Anahim Lake  2nd
Christy, Frank, Pavilion _  2nd
Clayton, John H, Anahim Lake 2nd
Church, R. H, Big Creek    1st
Christy, Thomas, Moha 2nd
Collier, Eric, Meldrum Creek 2nd
Cunningham, C. B., Bralorne    1st
Dester, Batiste, Kleena Kleene    1st
Dorsey, Lester, Anahim Lake    1st
Edwards, Ralph A., Hagensborg  2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide ■  Licence
Elkins, Joe, Alexis Creek.  2nd
    1st
 2nd
 2nd
    1st
    1st
Elkins, Thomas, Alexis Creek._
Erickson, Carl B., Anahim Lake..
Garner, Thomas, Alexis Creek	
Hance, Grover, Hanceville	
Hansen, Fred, Kleena Kleene..
Haynes, Harry, Alexis Creek    1st
Haynes, Kenneth W., Tatlayoko Lake    1st
Henderson, John, Tatlayoko Lake    1st
Henry, Cecil, Hanceville    1st
Henry, Eagle Lake, Alexis Creek__    1st
Holte, Andy, Anahim Lake    1st
Holte, Thomas, Anahim Lake  2nd
Holtry, Lewis, Anahim Lake 2nd
Hudson, E. R., Kleena Kleene 2nd
Hugo, Mark, Hanceville    1st K 84
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cariboo District " D " (Chilcotin District, Cariboo West of Fraser River)—Continued
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Jack, Johnny, Alexis Creek 2nd
Johnson, T. W., Riske Creek    1st
Johnson, Vic, Riske Creek 2nd
  2nd
    1st
    1st
 2nd
 2nd
    1st
 2nd
  2nd
    1st
Mulvahill, William, Redstone 2nd
Nicholson, Donald R., Tatla Lake  2nd
Nicholson, Terrence, Tatla Lake  2nd
O'Keefe, W., Bridge Lake    1st
Osterlund, Ed, Moha 2nd
Paxton, Alex., Alexis Creek      1st
Paxton, Ann, Alexis Creek  2nd
Oleman, Patrick, Shalalth  2nd
Petal, Henry, Alexis Creek—  2nd
Knolls, Alvis, Redstone	
LeLievre, Lind, Penticton	
McKill, Clarence, Kleena Kleene..
Mack, Maxine, Alexis Creek	
Maindley, John, Alexis Creek	
Maxted, William, Big Creek	
Moore, K. B., Tatlayoko Lake	
Mullens, B. A., Tatla Lake	
Mulvahill, R., Redstone	
Name and Address of Guide
Rafferty, A. T., Riske Creek..
Robson, Bert, Atnarko	
Rosette, Augustine, Gang Ranch .
Ross, Eddie, Redstone-
Class of
Licence
.___. 2nd
  2nd
    1st
2nd
Ross, Peter, Redstone 2nd
Schuk, Edward, Tatlayoko Lake 2nd
Squinas, Thomas, Anahim Lake    1st
Stephenson, Donald, Alexis Creek.
Sulin, Willie, Anahim Lake	
Ulm, Roy C, Soda Creek..
Watson, Arthur, Alexis Creek..
... 2nd
___ 2nd
... 2nd
... 2nd
Watt, Bruce, Big Creek  2nd
Wilson, David F., Tatla Lake    1st
Weir, Donald J., Alexis Creek    1st
Wilson, Dave, Tatla Lake    1st
Wilson, Thomas J., Big Creek  2nd
Witte, Duane, Hanceville    1st
Witte, Frank, Big Creek    1st
Woods, Billy, Hanceville    1st
Yoxall, Alfred, Alexis Creek  2nd
East Kootenay "A " (Cranbrook-Invermere-Golden Districts)
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Anderson, Charles D., Windermere    1st
Asimont, Horst, Invermere 2nd
Bjorn, Henry Manning, Fort Steele 2nd
Brewer, Carl, Invermere 2nd
Buckman, Alan, Fort Steele 2nd
Cloarec, Leon Jean, Cranbrook 2nd
Cooper, Albert B., Invermere  2nd
Drysdale, Alistair James, Skookumchuck  2nd
Dubois, Vaughn, Windermere    1st
Goodwin, Elwood, Edgewater    1st
Gould, Percy, Canal Flats    1st
Hanson, Tyvegert, Wilmer    1st
Harrison, William, Edgewater    1st
Hogan, Charles A., Harrogate    1st
Jimmy, Joe, Windermere  2nd
Johnston, Alex., Invermere  2nd
Kain, Isador, Wilmer 2nd
King, Norman, Golden    1st
Lindborg, Alex., Golden    1st
McClain, J. I., Spillimacheen    1st
Class of
Licence
2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Mcintosh, Ewen M., Athalmer	
McKay, Gordon, Invermere    1st
Mitchell, Robert A., Brisco 2nd
Morris, Edward, Golden 2nd
Nicol, Arthur Henry, Fort Steele    1st
Nixon, Walter, Invermere    1st
Pommier, Emile, Skookumchuck  2nd
Rauch, Harold, McMurdo 2nd
Richter, Frank, Invermere    1st
Sheek, Wesley P., Spillimacheen 2nd
Sykes, Harry, Spillimacheen    1st
Tegart, George, Edgewater    1st
Tegart, Hiram W., Brisco    1st
Thompson, Jack, Edgewater  2nd
Tegart, James, Brisco    1st
Thompson, James, Edgewater    1st
Thompson, Lioel, Edgewater    1st
Tyler, Graham, Invermere 2nd
White, James Freeman, Fort Steele    1st
Wolfenden, Winston, Brisco    1st
East Kootenay District " B " (Cranbrook East to Crowsnest, Including Fernie and Natal)
Class of Class of
Name and Address of Guide                             Licence Name and Address of Guide                             Licence
Baker, Martin, Natal    1st Kubinec, Pete, Fernie 2nd
Baher, Mike (Mathias), Natal    1st McGinnis, Earl, Natal    1st
Barnes, Alfred, Fernie    1st McGuire, Albert, Flagstone, 2nd
Barnes, James N., Fernie    1st Porco, Albert, Box 289, Natal    1st
Cutts, Jack, Fernie 2nd Philips, Frank,   1551  St. Andrew's Ave.,
Dvorak, Frank, Fernie    1st North Vancouver    1st
Dvorak, Wenzel, Fernie 2nd Riddell, H. S., Wardner 2nd
Eftoda, Gordon, Natal    1st Rosicky, Anton, Wardner    1st
Gravelle, Nick, Flagstone 2nd Rothel, Malcom, Natal    1st
Hammer, Andy, Wardner.  2nd Travis, Frank, Natal 2nd
Hicks, Phillip, Fernie    1st Washburn, L. F., Flathead    1st
Holley, Tom, Natal 2nd REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 85
Assistant Guides
Vancouver Island, Lower Mainland, and Mainland Coast
Durrant, Jesse, Campbell River.
Garner, Lloyd D. G., Cultus Lake.
Gillespie, G. K., Lake Cowichan.
Harford, H, 800 Bute St., Port Alberni.
Komo, Harry, Lake Cowichan.
McDonald, Leslie, Campbell River.
Stanwood, Larry,  145 Ninth Ave. E.,
Rupert.
Prince
Revelstoke-Salmon Arm and Okanagan Districts
Beacott, Phil, Sicamous.
Davis, George E., P.O. Box 480, Revelstoke.
Graham, I. C, Sicamous.
Martin, Peter, Sicamous.
Wallis, Edward H, Revelstoke.
Young, A. H., Sicamous.
Gold, R. B., Bankier.
Grand Forks-Greenwood
Lawrence, George V., Hedley.
Kamloops District
Melvin, Savona.
Hansen, Howard, Little Fort.
Harrop, Frank, Valleyview, Kamloops.
Humphrey, Frank, Knutsford.
McLean, Bob, Okanagan Falls.
McLean, Cliff, Black Pines.
Morton, Alf, Barriere.
Orum, Colin M., Mount Robson.
Peterson, Ross, Savona.
Phillips, Roy, Savona.
Ralston, Dave, Summerland.
Wagner, Martin, Battle St., Kamloops.
Wharton, Francis, Little Fort.
Peace River
Arhus, Carl, Fort Nelson.
Beattie, Robert H, Hudson Hope.
Belcourt, Francis, Mile 47, Fort St. John.
Belcourt, George, Little Prairie.
Bigfoot, Charlie, Mile 232, Fort Nelson.
Brady, Otto, Mile 147, Alaska Highway.
Brown, John, Fort St. John.
Calliou, Joe, Little Prairie.
Calliou, Peter, Fort St. John.
Cardinal, Alex., Moberly Lake.
Courvoisier, Lawrence, Bear Flat.
Courtepatte,   Alfred,   Kelly   Lake   (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.).
Couterille, Prince, Moberly Lake.
Cryman, George, Moberly Lake.
Davis, Albert, Moberly Lake.
Davis, Angus, Moberly Lake.
Desjarlais, Louis, Moberly Lake.
Dopp, Bruce David, Fort St. John.
Forfar, Craig, Lower Post.
Frank, Ernest, Lower Post.
Gauthier, Eugene, Kelly Lake (Goodfare P.O.,
Alta.).
Gauthier, John, Moberly Lake.
Gauthier, Alexis, Moberly Lake.
Gladu, Fred, Kelly Lake (Goodfare P.O., Alta.).
Goodrich, Gordon, Pouce Coupe.
Gray, George D., Kelly Lake (Goodfare P.O.,
Alta.).
Hambler, George, Kelly Lake (Goodfare P.O.,
Alta.).
Jackson, Bobbie, Teslin Lake.
McGarvey, George M., Hudson Hope.
McGuire, Colum, Rolla.
Madison, Noel, Pouce Coupe.
Major, Donat A., Fort St. John.
Millar, W. E., Fort St. John.
Mitchelle, Gabriel, Moberly Lake.
Napoleon, Felix, Moberly Lake.
Napoleon, Tom, Moberly Lake.
Nichols, Frank C, Little Prairie.
Peck, O. Keith, Hudson Hope.
Peck, Vernon L., Hudson Hope.
Powell, Jack K., Fort St. John.
Rissling, Peter, Dawson Creek.
Ross, Lynn, Mile 147, Alaska Highway.
Ross, Donald G, Fort St. John.
Southwick, Harvey, Fort St. John.
Southwick, Tullie O., Fort Nelson.
St. Pierre, Sam, Trutch.
Thomas, Albert N., McLeod Lake.
Trea, Joe, Taylor.
Vince, Robert G, Fort St. John.
Watson, Gordon Edmond, Fort St. John.
Quock, Charles, Telegraph Creek.
Cassiar
Ward, Jimmie Joseph, Atlin. K 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Prince George District "A "
Boyko, William, Finlay Forks.
Hall, Cyril, Box 1369, Prince George.
Key, Robert, Prince George.
Marsh, Henry, McBride.
Olson, John V., Box 1369, Prince George.
Sait, Fred, McBride.
Van Somer, Art, Fort Ware.
Witter, Wilbert H, Box 165, Prince George.
Zlot, Mike, Box 792, Prince George.
Zlot, Martha, Prince George.
Prince George Dictrict " B
Anderson, Duncan M., Babini.
Bhornstad, J., Fort St. James.
Brumblay, Fred, Germansen Landing.
Charlie, Michel, Marilla.
Christie, E. D., Southbank.
Cornell, James, Fort St. James.
Easter, Cal, Fort St. James.
Foote, Charles W., Fraser Lake.
Harrison, William James, Burns Lake.
Hoff, William M., Chief Lake.
Hughes, Rolland, Vanderhoof.
Isadore, T., Fort McLeod.
Keys, Stewart, Vanderhoof.
Lord, Roy, Tchesinkut Lake.
Lord, Samuel, Burns Lake.
Mattess, August, Fort St. James.
Melville, Kennedy, McLeod Lake.
Plowman, Enid A., Endako.
Quilty, James, Nadina River.
Sackner, Stewart, Vanderhoof.
Van Tine, Douglas L., Ootsa Lake.
Van Tine, James, Ootsa Lake.
Abbs, R., Fawn.
Alexander, Richard, Shalalth.
Black, J. P., Bridge Lake.
Boyd, Jack, 70-Mile House.
Chappell, T. S., Cache Creek.
Dahlgren, C, Bridge Lake.
Duncan, Peter, Clinton.
Duncan, T. W. G., 100-Mile House.
Felix, John, Shalalth.
Flaherty, R. W., Fawn.
Francis, E. G., 70-Mile House.
Gaelick, W., Fawn.
Grandberg, Norman, Fawn.
Hadwick, Al, 70-Mile House.
Heigh, Arthur M., Pavilion.
Higgins, Elmer, Bridge Lake.
Ogden, Lawrence, Lac la Hache.
Ogden, Pete, Lac la Hache.
Anderson, Alvin P., Quesnel.
Cariboo District "A "
Hogg, G. W., 70-Mile House.
Johnson, Wayne C, Bridge Lake.
Keir, James D., Bralorne.
Kelley, C. E., Fawn.
Kent, W. R., Lytton.
Knauf, E. C, Fawn.
Krinke, Paul, Bridge River.
Lowes, J. H, Canim Lake.
Maclnnis, John, Barkerville.
Peters, Benjamin, Shalalth.
Peters, Jacob, Shalalth.
Reinertson, J., 70-Mile House.
Schwartz, Thomas, Bralorne.
Shields, Freddie, Shalalth.
Shulldes, B., Jesmond.
Cariboo District "B "
Waite, Ronald G., Williams Lake.
Cariboo District "C"
Wilkinson, Hugh John, Punchaw.
■ REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1952
K 87
Auchinachie, James, Alexis Creek.
Betal, Tony, Alexis Creek.
Blatchford, Bob, Alexis Creek.
Bonner, James, Big Creek.
Boy, Billy, Alexis Creek.
Bullion, Sammy, Alexis Creek.
Buttler, Lee, Tatla Lake.
Cahoose, Gus, Anahim Lake.
Chell, Otto, Alexis Creek.
Deaur, Buck, Hanceville,
Elkins, P., Anahim Lake.
French, Robert, Redstone.
Grambush, Donald, Anahim Lake.
Gregg, Frank, Kleena Kleene.
Holte, James, Anahim Lake.
Lucyk, Peter, Alexis Creek.
Lulua, Tommy, Alexis Creek.
Moore, Gerry, Alexis Creek.
Cariboo District " D
Pinter, Andy, Hanceville.
Quilt, Jack, Hanceville.
Quilt, Johnny, Hanceville.
Rosette, Alex., Gang Ranch.
Rosette, Raymond, Gang Ranch.
Sammy, Eugene, Alexis Creek.
Sing, Isaac, Anahim Lake.
Snow, C. B., Summer Land.
Squinas, Harry, Anahim Lake.
Thompson, C. A., Anahim Lake.
Timothy, Dominic, Kleena Kleene.
Timothy, Isador, Kleena Kleene.
Turner, George, Hanceville.
Turner, Timothy, Kleena Kleene.
Ulm, Roy C, Soda Creek.
Warde, Don, Soda Creek.
Wier, Donald A., Alexis Creek.
Wilson, Gordon, Anahim Lake.
Nelson-Creston
Blackmore, Robert C, New Denver.
Cummings, Ray, Boswell.
Kootenay District "A "
Alexander, Michael, Spillimacheen.
Barbour, J. A., Wilmer.
Dendy, Dennis, Edgewater.
Dorion, Douglas, Golden.
Goodwin, Dave, Invermere.
Hynes, Ben, Spillimacheen.
King, Ronald, Golden.
Nixon, Arthur J., Invermere.
Pommier, Louis Emile, Cranbrook.
Smith, Mrs. J. M., Fort Steele.
Smith, Dennis, Fort Steele.
Wells, John, Athalmer.
Kootenay District " B "
Baker, Fred, Natal.
Bennet, John, Natal.
Bush, William, Ta Ta Creek.
Cunliffe, John, Fernie.
Gravelle, Alex., Flagstone.
Letcher, George, Fernie.
Logan, Mrs. Doris May, Wardner.
McFarlane, Kenneth, Natal.
McKenzie, Fergus, Fernie.
Peters, Donald, Fernie.
Rosicky, Andrew, Wardner.
Sharpe, Gerald, General Delivery, Oliver.
Singleton, John, Fernie.
Waytula, Ogie, Natal.
Whiting. Renal, Natal.
Wormington, Samuel Frank, Box 535, Kimberley.
Non-resident Outfitters
Beloud, Ben, Mile 1,016, via Whitehorse, Y.T.
McCullough, Henry, Wambley, Alta.
Ray, Jack, Hinton Trail, Alta.
Russell, Andy, Twin Butte, Alta.
Sunderman, Kelly, Hythe, Alta.
■ K 88 BRITISH COLUMBIA
PERSONNEL OF GAME COMMISSION AS AT DECEMBER 31st,  1952
Attorney-General (Minister) Hon. R. W. Bonner, Q.C Victoria.
Game Commission (members) James G. Cunningham Vancouver.
Frank R. Butler. Vancouver.
Scientific Branch
Scientific Advisers  Dr. W. A. Clemens Vancouver.
Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan Vancouver.
Chief Game Biologist Dr. J. Hatter Vancouver.
Regional Game Biologist E. Taylor Vancouver.
Regional Game Biologist P. W. Martin   Kamloops.
Regional Game Biologist D. J. Robinson Nanaimo.
Chief Fisheries Biologist Dr. P. A. Larkin Vancouver.
Division Fishery Biologist C. C. Lindsey Vancouver.
Division Fishery Biologist R. G. McMynn Vancouver.
Division Fishery Biologist S. B. Smith Vancouver.
Assistant Fishery Biologist I. Barrett Vancouver.
Assistant Fishery Biologist T. G. Northcote Vancouver.
Assistant Fishery Biologist G. E. Stringer Vancouver.
Assistant Fishery Biologist E. H. Vernon Vancouver.
Assistant Fishery Biologist F. Maher Vancouver.
Technical Hatchery Officer D. R. Hurn Vancouver.
Stenographer Miss M. Jurkela Vancouver.
Game-fish Culture Branch
Fishery Supervisor-
Fishery Officer..
._C. H. Robinson..
_E. Hunter	
..Nelson.
.Nelson.
Fishery Officer R. A. McRae Nelson.
Hatchery Officer J. J. Phelps Nelson.
Fishery Officer F. S. Pells Cultus Lake.
Fishery Officer F. H. Martin Cultus Lake.
Hatchery Officer-
Fishery Officer.	
Hatchery Officer..
Hatchery Officer-
Fishery Officer	
Hatchery Officer__
_J. C. Lyons	
.J. D. Inverarity..
_G. Law	
_N. W. Green..
_A. A. Higgs___
_E. R. Inglis—_
_Cultus Lake.
.Courtenay.
.Courtenay.
..Summerland.
.Summerland.
.Summerland.
Headquarters
Chief Clerk-
Intermediate Clerk-
Intermediate Clerk-
Clerk..
Secretarial Stenographer.-
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk-Stenographer	
_H. D. Simpson...
J; McLellan	
..Miss. I. Lawson..
_.W. Fowkes	
.Miss J. Smith	
.Mrs. M. Drinkwater..
_Miss E. P. Golder.	
.Miss A. Lenagan	
.Miss R. McKay	
Miss A. Sien	
.Mrs. J. Whitfield	
-Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
-Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
-Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
"A" Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Lower Mainland)
Inspector.	
Intermediate Clerk-
Stenographer	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Corporal Game Warden-
Game Warden	
_G. C. Stevenson.
_X>. Keirs	
_.Miss J. Bull	
_J. W. Jones	
_.R. W. Sinclair—
_.W. S. Webb	
_.R. S. Hayes	
_.C. E. Estlin	
__F. P. Weir	
-O. Mottishaw.	
_.F. H. Greenfield..
_. Victoria.
..Victoria.
..Victoria.
-Royal Oak.
..Victoria.
-Alberni.
..Campbell River.
..Courtenay.
..Duncan.
-Nanaimo.
..Nanaimo. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1952
K 89
' B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts)
Inspector C. F. Kearns_.
Clerk-Stenographer	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
_Miss A. L. Burton_.
„R. A. Rutherglen...
_.P. D. Ewart	
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden..
.1. W. Bayley	
_.R. R. Farquharson..
 B. Rauch..
 J. J. Osman	
 _W. A. McKay-
Corporal Game Warden A. F. Sinclair-
Game Warden-
Game Warden-
Game Warden..
.J. V. MackilL.
_.A. Monks	
_A. F. Gill	
-Nelson.
..Nelson.
..Nelson.
-Castlegar.
..Cranbrook.
..Cranbrook.
-Creston.
.-Fernie.
..Golden.
..Grand Forks.
..Invermere.
.Penticton.
..Princeton.
' C " Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts)
Inspector	
Stenographer-
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden.
Game Warden.
Game Warden
Game Warden.
Game Warden.
_.R. M. Robertson..
..Miss S. D. Noble..
_.J. P. C. Atwood—
-H. Tyler	
_.W. T. Ward	
_.K. R. Walmsley..
..W. I. Fenton	
_.D. D. Ellis.
_.R. S. Welsman-
_.E. M. Martin	
-Kamloops.
-Kamloops.
..Kamloops.
-Kamloops.
..Kamloops.
..Alexis Creek.
..Clinton.
.Kelowna.
-LiUooet.
..Merritt.
H. J. Lorance Quesnel.
G. A. Lines Revelstoke.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden A. S. Frisby Vernon.
Game Warden E. Holmes Wells.
Game Warden L. Jobin Williams Lake.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River,
and Yukon Boundary Districts)
Inspector W. A. H. Gill _ Prince George.
Clerk R. J. Guay Prince George.
..Mrs. E. Brown Prince George.
.A. J. Jank Prince George.
_.L. I. Olson Prince George.
Stenographer-
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden W. H. Richmond Burns Lake.
Game Warden J. A. McCabe Fort Nelson.
Game Warden B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Game Warden H. O. Jamieson..
Game Warden J. Dowsett	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Corporal Game Warden-
Game Warden	
Clerk-Stenographer	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
_.J. M. Hicks-
-.G. Taylor	
-E. Martin	
_C. J. Walker..
-Miss U. V. Raymond..
_.L. J. Cox	
_.J. D. Williams	
_.L. G. Smith	
..Fort St. John.
..Lower Post.
..McBride.
..Pouce Coupe.
-Prince Rupert.
-Prince Rupert.
..Prince Rupert.
..Smithers.
-Terrace.
-Vanderhoof.
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley District)
Corporal Game Warden-
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
_.L. R. C. Lane—
..R. S. King	
_R. K. Leighton..
_.F. R. Lobb	
_.H. D. Mulligan..
_.H. L. Rose	
Corporal Game Warden-
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
_.W. J. Mason	
-.D. A. MacKinlay„
..A. J. Butler	
_.H. P. Hughes-	
_.W. H. Cameron..
..P. M. Cliffe	
_.F. Urquhart	
_.B. E. Wilson	
...Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
.-Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
-Vancouver.
..Alert Bay.
..Alert Bay.
_Chilliwack.
..Cloverdale.
.Ladner.
..Mission.
..Port Coquitlam.
-Powell River. K 90
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Predator-control
Supervisor of Predator-control G. A. West—
Assistant Supervisor of Predator-control—E. H. Samann.
J. Dewar	
-W. J. Hillen..
_G. Haskell—
Predatory-animal Hunter..
Predatory-animal Hunter..
Predatory-animal Hunter..
Predatory-animal Hunter__
Predatory-animal Hunter..
Predatory-animal Hunter__
Predatory-animal Hunter..
Predatory-animal Hunter._
Predatory-animal Hunter..
Predatory-animal Hunter N. Lingford..
._M. Morigeau	
.A. M. Hames—
-C. G. Ellis	
..M. W. Warren..
_A. E. Fletcher..
_M. Mortensen..
-Vancouver.
..Kamloops.
..Nanaimo.
-Abbotsford.
..Cranbrook.
..Fairmont.
..Merville.
-Pouce Coupe.
..Prince George.
..Smithers.
-Williams Lake.
..Kamloops.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1953
1,200-753-4665      

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