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DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL of the Public Health Branch Department of Health and Welfare ANNUAL… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1954

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIVISION OF
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
of   the   Public   Health   Branch
Department of Health and Welfare
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year 1952
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1953 ■ ■
Victoria, B.C., May 4th, 1953.
To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report on Tuberculosis in the Province of British Columbia for the year 1952.
ERIC MARTIN,
Minister of Health and Welfare. Department of Health and Welfare (Health Branch),
Victoria, B.C., May 4th, 1953.
The Honourable E. C. Martin,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to December
31st, 1952.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT, M.D, D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health.
Department of Health and Welfare (Health Branch),
Division of Tuberculosis Control,
2647 Willow Street,
Vancouver 9, B.C., May 4th, 1953.
G. F. Amyot, Esq., M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to December
31st, 1952.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. KINCADE, M.D.,
Director, Division of Tuberculosis Control. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Letter of TransmittaL
Letter of TransmittaL
List of Tables	
List of Charts	
Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis ControL
Introduction :	
(a) National Health Grants	
(b) Trends in Treatment of Tuberculosis-
(c) Death Rates	
(d) Tuberculosis in Older Persons	
(e) X-ray Programme	
(/) Travelling Clinics	
(g) New Cases	
(/.) Social Service	
(i) Nursing 	
(/) Teaching Programmes	
(k) General 	
Page
_ 3
_ 4
. 7
9
_ 11
. 13
. 13
. 14
. 14
. 15
. 15
. 16
. 16
. 17
. 17
. 18
- 19
Statistical Section  21
(a) Clinics -  23
  35
  39
  52
  55
  60
  72
(b) General Summaries	
(c) Institutions	
(d) Tuberculin Testing	
(e) Known Cases of Tuberculosis.
(/) Notifications of Tuberculosis.-
(g) Tuberculosis Mortality	  INDEX
LIST OF TABLES
Clinics
Page
Table   1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent at Each Centre,
1952	
24
Table 2
Table 3
Table 4
Table 5
-Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1952  25
-Treatment and Tests at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1952  26
Report of Survey Clinics, 1952  27
New Examinations and Re-examinations in the Units Operated by This
Division during Years 1948 to 1952 (Excluding Indians)  27
Table 6.—New Diagnoses Other than Negative in Persons Examined by Diagnostic
Clinics, by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age-groups, 1952 (Excluding
Indians)  30
Table   7.—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Examined by Clinics, by Infection
and Condition, 1952  31
Table 8.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Survey Clinics, and
General Hospital Units, 1943-52  32
General Summaries
  35
Laboratory Report, 1952  36
Tests Carried Out in the Respiratory Physiological Laboratory, 1952  36
Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics, 1943-52  37
Dental Report, 1952  37
Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report, 1952  38
Table   9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1952
Table 10
Table 11
Table 12
Table 13
Table 14
Institutions—Summaries
Table 15.—Institutions—General Summaries, 1952___
Table 16
Table 17.
Table 18,
Table 19,
Table 20,
Table 21,
Table 22,
Table 23,
Table 24,
Table 25,
Table 26,
Table 27,
  39
-Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) Given by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1943-52  40
-Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions in Each Age-
group, 1948-52  40
-Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1952  42
-Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1952  44
-Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1952  44
-First Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1952  45
-First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1948-52  45
-Readmissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1952  46
-Readmissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1948-52  46
Institutions—Discharges
-Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1948-52  48
-Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length
of Stay, 1952  50
-Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Home
Condition, 1952  50 F 8 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Page
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions on Medical Advice, by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Home Condition, 1952  51
Table 29.—Discharges from Institutions against Medical Advice, by Condition on
Discharge, Sex, and Home Condition, 1952  51
Tuberculin Testing
Table 30.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Racial Origin, 1952  52
Table 31 .—Tuberculin Testing Results by Type of Survey, 1952  53
Table 32.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Age-group and Diagnosis, 1952  54
Known Cases of Tuberculosis
Table 33.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1948-52  55
Table 34.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population
of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st,
1948-52  55
Table 35.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1948-52  55
Table 36.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District and
Sex, 1952 (Excluding Indians)  56
Table 37.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District and
Sex, 1952 (Indians Only)  57
Table 38.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in British
Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1952 (Excluding Indians)  57
Table 39.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Present Condition,
and Age-group, 1952 (Excluding Indians)  59
Table 40.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-
lndian Population, and the Indian Population, 1943-52  60
Notifications of Tuberculosis (Form TB. 1)
Table 41.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1948-52  60
Table 42.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1948-52  61
Table 43.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, 1948-52  61
Table 44.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases by Statistical Area, by
Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1952  61
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District and Sex,
1952 (Excluding Indians)  62
Table 46.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District and Sex,
1952 (Indians Only)  64
Table 47.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups (Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1943-52  65
Table 48.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Racial Groups (Including Dead Cases Reported for the First
Time), 1952  67
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1952  69
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1952 (Excluding Indians)  70 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952 F 9
Page
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1952 (Indians Only)  71
Table 52.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis in British Columbia, 1948-52  72
Tuberculosis Mortality
Table 53.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1948-52  72
Table 54.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Other-
than-Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area,
1948-52  72
Table 55.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Indian
Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1948-52  73
Table 56.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1952 (Excluding Indians)  73
Table 57.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1952 (Indians Only)  74
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-groups, 1952  75
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1943-52  76
Table 60.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia
by Age-groups, 1948-52  79
Table 61.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by Age-groups, 1948-52  79
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by
Age-groups, 1948-52  79
Table 63.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1948-52  80
Table 64.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1948-52  81
Table 65.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by Length
of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1952  82
LIST OF CHARTS
Chart   1.—Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control  11
Chart   2.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics, 1943-52
(Excluding Indians)  28
Chart   3.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics, 1943-52
(Excluding Indians)  29
Chart 4.—X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary
Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals,
1943-52  33
Chart 5.—X-ray Examinations Made by Institutions, Diagnostic and Treatment
Clinics, Survey Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals,
1943-52  34
Chart   6.—Percentage Distribution of Admissions to Institutions by Age-groups,
1948-52  41
Chart   7.—Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1952  43 F 10 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Page
Chart   8.—First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution),
1943-52  47
Chart   9.—Percentage Distribution of Discharges from Institutions According to
Condition on Discharge, 1943-52  49
Chart 10.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in British
Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1952 (Excluding Indians)  58
Chart 11.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1943-52  66
Chart 12.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1952  68
Chart 13.—Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1943-52  77
Chart 14.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population and the
Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1952  78
Chart 15.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1948-52  80
Chart 16.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1948-52  81 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
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zo . Report of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, 1952
G. F. Kincade, Director
INTRODUCTION
Probably foremost in our minds at the time of the last Annual Report was the reduction of the waiting-list and its eventual elimination through .the opening of the Pearson
Tuberculosis Hospital in May, 1952. This opening so markedly reduced the waiting-list
that at the present time there are less than fifty people waiting for beds in our Provincial
sanatoria.
The remodelling at Tranquille Sanatorium was completed, and, as a result, fifty
additional beds were made available near the end of the year. When these beds are
available and the Pearson Hospital is finally staffed and working to full capacity, the
present waiting-list will undoubtedly be eliminated.
However, it should be pointed out that the present waiting-list is from a highly
selected group, and undoubtedly additional cases could benefit from a sanatorium regime
or should be in a sanatorium for the protection of others. If these standards for admission
were applied, the expansion of Pearson Hospital to its eventual capacity of 528 beds
would undoubtedly be required.
One of the biggest jobs in the Division during the past year was the setting-up of
a personnel section and the clarification of staff complements to cover all the activities
of the various units so that this phase of the work would be put on a sound basis. This
was a long and painstaking procedure and, when applied to almost a thousand members
of the staff, represented a great deal of work and detailed study. During the critical
period in the spring when a large number of appointments and transfers were necessary
with the opening of Pearson Hospital, this work was greatly retarded by the resignation
of the first personnel assistant. However, with the appointment of the present personnel
assistant the organization has come along rapidly. It is expected that when the personnel section is properly organized and the office routine set up, the personnel assistant
will be able to devote considerable time to the investigation of office procedures and
organizational work.
As forecast in the last Annual Report, the two largest sanatoria have now the
services of trained administrative assistants. The purpose of these positions is to relieve
the medical superintendents of all that part of the work directly related to business so that
the superintendents may confine most of their attention to the gradually expanding
medical organization necessary for the treatment of tuberculosis. The administrators,
having had formal instruction and experience in hospital management, should improve
further efficiency in our sanatorium operations.
NATIONAL HEALTH GRANTS
National health grants continue to be of great assistance to the Division. To date
$294,000 has been allocated of the $370,329 made available by Ottawa. Approximately
58 per cent of this amount is being used in continuing projects, but new and improved
services were also provided under these grants.
The X-ray services were expanded with the installation of photoroentgen equipment
at Burnaby Hospital, University of British Columbia Health Service, Mission Hospital,
Dawson Creek Hospital, and Abbotsford Hospital. Additional darkroom installations
are being provided for three health units.   Equipment was provided this year to complete
13 F 14 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
the furnishing of the pathology laboratory at Tranquille and the departments of respiratory
physiology and physiotherapy at the Willow Chest Centre. A project is now being
considered for the modernization of the X-ray department at Tranquille.
Approval has been obtained for the expansion of the admission X-ray programme
to the smaller hospitals in the Province. At the present time this service is provided
only in those hospitals large enough to warrant the provision of photoroentgen equipment.
It is now planned to pay all the smaller hospitals $2 for each chest X-ray taken on
admission, using their own equipment.
Assistance continues to be provided for postgraduate training. During the year one
doctor completed his training and returned to the Division. At the present time three
nurses and one doctor are receiving postgraduate training, and a project is being submitted
for the training of a second physician. One of the staff is taking a course as a medical-
record librarian and will return to the Division in that capacity. Funds are available for
short courses for senior personnel, and two members of the staff took such courses during
the year.
Throughout the various units of the Division, eighteen members of the staff are
being paid through National health grants.
Plans are being made for the expansion of the rehabilitation programme by providing
rehabilitation officers for both Tranquille and Pearson, and expansion of the physiotherapy
service by providing a part-time physiotherapist at Tranquille.
The project to provide P.A.S. and streptomycin was enlarged to provide isoniazid
as well.
Approval was not received for the continuation of the out-patient occupational
therapy or the home-care service in the Vancouver area. The payment for streptomycin
injections in the home was also discontinued.
TRENDS IN THE TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOSIS
In reporting the work of the Division of Tuberculosis Control the changing concepts
in the treatment of this disease should be pointed out. From the extensive studies that
have been made through the use of streptomycin and P.A.S., it is now evident that
resistance of the tubercle bacillus to streptomycin can be, to a great extent, controlled
by its combination with P.A.S. and its use in smaller dosages over long periods of time.
With the fear of resistance removed, it is now possible to treat and control tuberculosis
in over 75 per cent of cases with resistance developing and without toxic effects on the
patient. This has greatly broadened the use of these drugs, and it is now felt that if
a patient needs treatment for tuberculosis, he should have antimicrobial therapy. Where
formerly patients were treated from three to six months, they are now being treated from
one to two years and even longer with these drugs. The addition of isoniazid to the
armamentarium has further broadened the attack against tuberculosis, so that medical
cures can frequently be expected.
With the advances in chest surgery and refinements in techniques, pulmonary
resections are commonplace and, in fact, may soon outnumber surgical collapse procedures. Where formerly we hoped for arrest of the disease, we now strive for eradication. This new approach, while offering great hopes to patients, is also stimulating
to those who conduct their treatment. However, it does put the treatment of tuberculosis
on a highly technical plane and requires extensive investigation of patients with modern
equipment. Nevertheless, there is no doubt that when patients are treated in this way
the relapse rate will be greatly reduced.
DEATH RATES
The death rate from tuberculosis in 1951 continued to decline, and a rate of 18.9
per 100,000 was recorded for the other-than-Indian population, as against 21.6 the TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 15
previous year. The final corrected death rate for 1951 for the total population was 25.1,
as against 27.5 in 1950. Since 1946 the annual number of deaths has been exactly cut
in half, from 576 to 292. This reduction in mortality continued in 1952, there being
215 deaths, compared with 292 in 1951. This was chiefly due to a considerable reduction
in Indian and Oriental deaths. The mortality rate in 1952 for the total population was
17.9 per 100,000, as against a rate of 25.1 for 1951.
While the tuberculosis death rate for British Columbia approximates the death rate
for Canada and is reasonably satisfactory considering the rate of reduction, there is one
area in the Province where the death rate for other than Indians is three times that of the
average. This indicates the need for a concentrated effort in that area. It is pleasing
to report that discussions have already been held and plans are being laid for a special
effort in that area.
TUBERCULOSIS IN OLDER PERSONS
For some time the problem of tuberculosis in the older person has given some
concern. From the Annual Reports it will be seen that the incidence of tuberculosis in
this group is becoming more apparent, and that the death rate by age-specific groups
is higher than in other groups. However, it should be pointed out that for the older
persons the death rate is falling, as in the younger age-groups. It is also apparent that
this problem is more serious among the older male patients than among the older females.
This is confirmed by an analysis of patients in sanatoria at the present time. As of
October 20th of this year a spot survey was made, and it was shown that 552 beds were
occupied by males, while 286 were occupied by females—a ratio of almost 2 to 1 for the
males. Of the 552 male beds, 252 or 45.6 per cent were occupied by persons 50 years
of age and over. Of the 286 female beds, 24 or 8.6 per cent were occupied by persons
in these age-groups. In all there were 276 persons, 50 years of age and over, occupying
32.3 per cent of the total of 838 beds. In view of the fact that 24.4 per cent of the
admissions in 1951 were for patients 50 years of age and over, it is apparent that these
people tend to accumulate in sanatoria. The trend in admissions is also interesting
because in 1947 this group represented only 16.7 per cent of the admissions. From this
it is apparent that special consideration must be given to this problem by this Division.
The first consideration that presents itself is in respect to accommodation. Is a
highly developed medical service required to treat this type of patient or would ordinary
convalescent care be sufficient? Is there any justification in restricting this type of patient
to a strict sanatorium regime, when most of them have little hope of cure and have, for
the most part, already received the maximum benefit from sanatorium care? In any event
it is apparent that tuberculosis in the older person is becoming one of our greatest
problems, and closer study of this problem than has been given in the past must be
carried out.
X-RAY PROGRAMME
At the time of the last Annual Report it was pointed out that the work of the mobile
survey unit would need critical review to determine a future course in this matter. The
work for 1951 was analysed, and, as a result of this analysis, it was shown that this was
not an expensive undertaking compared to other methods, and that the yield in cases found
was very satisfactory. The cost of 42 cents an examination compared favourably to the
rates paid to hospitals for miniature films, and the case-finding rate of 2.2 cases per
thousand compared favourably with other clinics. It was therefore recommended that
this service be continued, particularly where it reached into areas that otherwise could not
be covered.
It was also decided that the mobile X-ray programme should be on a continuous
basis. This Division is grateful to the British Columbia Tuberculosis Society for providing
a new truck and generator, which should enable us to carry out this work in every part F 16 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
of the Province. There was an unavoidable delay in starting this work in the fall due to
non-delivery of equipment, but it was undertaken, and the unit continued to work in the
Lower Fraser Valley until the end of the year. At the first of the year it will be available
for work on Vancouver Island, and it is expected that the summer season will be devoted
to work in the Interior. It has been asked that all areas of the Province submit their
requests for use of this equipment so that the itinerary can be planned. Once this is
established, it is hoped that a pattern can be developed so that the unit may move continuously throughout the Province each year, it being understood, of course, that it will
no visit those areas that have been supplied with photoroentgen equipment.
In spite of a great deal of effort, the results from admission X-ray surveys have not
been as good as was anticipated this year, although there was an improvement over the
previous year, there being 46,384 admission X-rays during 1952, as against 28,700 in
the previous year. It is to be hoped that this showing will improve because the programme
is backed by all the official organizations connected with hospitals, particularly the British
Columbia Hospital Insurance Service, which has taken an active interest in this work and
is attempting to stimulate the hospitals to make a better showing. The staff of the
Division must take every opportunity to promote this work and point out its advantages
both to the staff of the hospitals and to the patients. When some of the larger hospitals
are approximating 90 per cent examination of admissions, it is difficult to understand why
in smaller hospitals, where the organization is less complicated, similar results cannot be
achieved. However, it is encouraging to note that most hospitals, where requested, have
co-operated very well in the examination of out-patients. While the poor showing in
respect to admissions is to be regretted, it must be remembered that it is of considerable
importance that this examination was made available for out-patients.
Encouraged by the Chilliwack experiment, where an organizational plan for
canvassing the population to have chest X-rays at the survey unit in the hospital was
carried out, the British Columbia Tuberculosis Society is considering provision of an
organizer to expand this work to other centres in the Province. In this way it is hoped
that all of the centres with photoroentgen equipment will be organized along the same
lines as Chilliwack, and that a continuous survey at each centre will be carried out.
Credit should be given here to the members of the Junior Red Cross of Chilliwack, who
gave splendid co-operation.
In 1952 there were 190,558 X-ray films taken in the clinics of the Division, general
hospitals, and health units, as against 196,872 in 1951.
TRAVELLING CLINICS
It is pleasing to report that the district work of the Division through travelling clinics
is now on a more satisfactory basis. Because additional staff was made available through
new appointments, medical consultants are now able to accompany the travelling clinics
on their visits to the various areas. This has long been desired, and its accomplishment
makes for the provision of a better medical service and the promotion of closer relations
among the Division, the health units, and the practising physicians.
When consideration is given to the fact that a third of our known cases, or
approximately 5,000 persons suffering from tuberculosis, are scattered throughout the
smaller centres of the Province, and that their follow-up and supervision must be carried
out by the travelling clinics and the field health service, it can be seen that the provision
of the necessary services is a considerable task.
NEW CASES
The number of new cases discovered during the year amounted to 1,383. This was
a reduction and was partly due to changes in the system of notification whereby cases
which are healed on diagnosis are not included in the central index of known cases but TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 17
are followed by public health personnel on a referral basis. However, over and above
this there was an actual reduction in the number of new cases in 1952, but the extent
of this reduction is difficult to estimate. The new cases, broken down into racial groups,
show the following:  Indians, 282; other than Indians, 1,101; and into age-groups:—
Indians
0- 4
34
51
40
36
29
14
24
15
15
5
12
7
Other than Indians
0- 4        .   	
43
5- 9	
5- 9	
10-14	
15-19          	
29
10-14	
15-19
22
56
20-24
20-24        	
94
25-29
25-29	
113
30-39    _   	
30-39	
40-49	
50-59	
60-69	
70-79
?05
40-49    _   	
168
50-59	
60-69	
70-79
139
120
75
80 and over	
Not stated	
80 and over	
Not stated	
19
18
The sources of reporting of new cases during the year were as follows:—
Stationary clinics:   Tranquille, 10; Vancouver, 388; Victoria, 44;  and New
Westminster, 69.
Travelling clinics:  Interior, 46; Coast, 50; Island, 18; and Kootenay, 39.
Reported from outside the Division of Tuberculosis Control, 719.
SOCIAL SERVICE
During the year there was almost a complete change in the personnel of the Social
Service Section, but in spite of this a full complement of workers was maintained, and
the Section is now fully staffed.
A new policy of referral of patients was established, and is working out most
satisfactorily. Instead of waiting for a crisis to develop before a patient is referred to
the Social Service Section, it has become routine where social-work staff is available for
all newly admitted patients to be visited by the ward social worker soon after admission.
The purpose of this introductory visit is twofold—to acquaint the patient with the kind of
help that is available to him from the Social Service Section and to give the social worker
an opportunity of getting to know something about the patient as a person and how he
is responding to the pressures that are part of a long-term disabling condition. In all the
work on the wards the closest team relationship is maintained with the doctors, the nurses,
the rehabilitation officer, and other allied workers in order to achieve the common goal,
which is to help the patient accept his tuberculosis and fight it effectively with the weapons
which are available to him in the hospital setting.
The home-maker service, instituted in 1948 under National health grants to provide
housekeeping assistance in select homes of tuberculosis patients, was discontinued in
1952. The purpose of this service was to assist in relieving the acute shortage of beds
existent at that time. It was designed as a short-term project, and discontinued because
it was felt that the opening of the Pearson Hospital would relieve the shortage.
NURSING
In preparing the report on the nursing services for the past year, there does not seem
to be a great deal in the general picture that can be considered as entirely new, but steady
progress has been made toward maintaining standards and improving services to the
patients.   The time seems opportune, therefore, to review the changes and developments F  18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
that have entered into the reorganization and expansion of the nursing services during the
past decade.
Four factors that stand out as a basic part of the nursing organization are as
follows:—
(1) The educational programmes for tuberculosis nursing at the undergraduate and graduate levels.
(2) In-service education for orientation of new staff, both auxiliary and professional nursing personnel. An article was prepared on the programme
at Tranquille for publication in The Canadian Nurse.
(3) Review and subsequent standardization of procedures and isolation
technique to arrive at uniformity for the various institutions throughout
the Division. This is important because lack of uniformity, among
institutions or among wards, can result in confusion.
(4) Studies made toward developing patient-centred care, which included staff
quota requirements and demonstrations and experiments with the team
nursing plan.
Under the team plan, assignments are based on patients' needs rather than ward
duties; for example, a group of patients is assigned to a professional nurse who is
responsible for their total nursing care, including the supervision of the duties done for
them by auxiliary personnel, aides, and orderlies. General staff nursing, done under this
pattern, is proving satisfactory from two standpoints: (a) Better over-all care for the
patients, and (b) greater satisfaction for the staff nurse. However, it should be pointed
out that successful implementation of the team nursing principle is dependent on three
important requirements:—
(1) Adequate numbers of well-prepared staff who are physically and professionally able to carry full responsibility for a group of patients and
direction of auxiliary-staff members.
(2) A proper proportion of professional and auxiliary staff in relation to the
patient quota and volume of nursing-service requirements.
(3) Convenience of physical layout of ward, patients' rooms and service areas,
and adequate equipment.
Much planning, organization, and staff education are still necessary before the team
nursing plan can be implemented successfully in the various institutions of this Division.
Nevertheless, actual experimentation with the plan has progressed to the extent that the
Division's nursing service was invited to present a demonstration on team nursing to
the Western Canada Institute for Hospital Administrators at the workshop which was
arranged by the School of Nursing at the University of British Columbia for the nurse
representatives to the Institute.
Additional factors that have a direct bearing on the nursing service are as follows:—
(1) The need for review and subsequent revision of practices and policies on
such routines as charting. Elimination of time-consuming and repetitive
routines would tend to make more time available for the nurse to spend at
the bedside or in consultation with co-workers, allied workers, relatives,
and patients in the interests of better care and understanding of the
patients.
(2) Instruction for orderlies: The setting-up of a basic course of instruction
and demonstration on essential procedures would strengthen and improve
patient-care.   Implementation would be at the local level.
TEACHING PROGRAMMES
As in previous years, a variety of teaching programmes was undertaken to provide
instruction in tuberculosis nursing. The majority of nursing students were undergraduates from Mainland hospitals.   These students spent five weeks with the Division. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 19
A lesser number from Victoria hospitals attended classes for one week in Vancouver and
then returned to Victoria for clinical experience.
The teaching programme also included practical-nurse students and public-health-
nurse students, who undertook courses or attended programmes planned to provide
experience.
The number and types of programmes were similar to those conducted in the
previous year.
The Pearson Hospital, the Jericho Beach Hospital, the Willow Chest Centre, and
the New Westminster Chest Clinic are all being used for student experience.
GENERAL
At this time, mention must be made of the splendid co-operation among parts of
the Division and of the excellent relations with other departments of Government. The
Division of Tuberculosis Control must depend on a great many agencies to carry out its
programmes and to conduct its day-to-day business. It is therefore gratifying to be able
to state that every assistance possible has been extended to this Division.
With other organizations, such as the Indian Health Service, the closest and most
cordial arrangements for mutual assistance have been maintained. The British Columbia
Tuberculosis Society, as in the past, has been a tremendous force in the campaign against
tuberculosis. The work of the Preventorium Board is also noteworthy in that it provides
the facilities, not available within the Division, for the treatment of tuberculous children.
Plans are at present under way for the expansion of the Preventorium from forty to eighty
beds.
To all these and many other organizations who assist in this work, the Division,
therefore, records its sincere appreciation.  STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
for the Year January 1st to
December 31st, 1952  TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
CLINICS
Map of British Columbia Showing Statistical Publication Areas
F 23
Province of British Columbia—
Population, 1,198,000.
Area, 366,255 square miles.
Travelling clinics—
Kootenay Clinic (Nelson)—Statistical Areas 1 and 2.
Interior Clinic (Kamloops)—Statistical Areas 3, 6, 8, 10c, lOd.
Coast Clinic (Vancouver)—Statistical Areas 4, 7, 9c, 9d, 9e.
Island Clinic (Victoria)—Statistical Area 5.
Survey Clinic. F 24
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent
at Each Centre, 1952
Travelling Diagnostic Clinics
Interior
Centre Visited Days
Allenby   2
Armstrong  3
Burns Lake   4
Copper Mountain  3
Dawson Creek   3
Enderby  IVi
Fort St. John  1
Island Mountain Mine-Wells.  1
Kamloops   11
Kelowna   XAVi
Merritt  1
McBride    1
Nickel Plate Mine  2
Oliver  5V£
Centre Visited
Penticton   _ _ 	
Days
..           7
Prince George  	
       %Vi
Princeton       	
AVi
Quesnel    _ _ . 	
       81/2
Revelstoke 	
       5
Salmon Arm   . . __
6
Smithers   _     ______
2
Summerland     _ __
__    __....      2
Vanderhoof     _  ,
       4
Vernon   ._          -
.     MVi
Wells 	
       2
Williams Lake	
       3
Total (26 centres )_
II81/2
Coast
Centre Visited Days
Hazelton   2
Marpole (Provincial Infirmary) 3
Ocean Falls  3
Powell River  9
Prince Rupert  25
Centre Visited
Smithers  	
Squamish 	
Terrace 	
Total (8 centres).
Days
2
8
10
62
Fraser Valley
Centre Visited
Abbotsford 	
Ashcroft 	
Bridge River	
Chilliwack 	
Days
10
3
1
17
Centre Visited
LiUooet 	
Lytton	
Mission 	
Centre Visited Days
Campbell River  12
Courtenay   26
Chemainus        6V2
Duncan   29
Ladysmith   10V4
Lake Cowichan       7
Days
3
3
9
Total (7 centres)     46
Island
Centre Visited Days
Mount St. Mary       2
Nanaimo  48
Port Alberni (and Alberni)  23 Vi
Qualicum        2
Total (10 centres)  166^
Kootenay
Centre Visited Days
Castlegar   9
Cranbrook  5
Creston   6
Fernie   4
Golden  2
Grand Forks   7
Greenwood  2
Invermere   2
Kaslo   1
Kimberley   5
Centre Visited
Michel 	
Nakusp 	
Nelson 	
New Denver	
Rossland 	
Salmo 	
Trail	
Slocan City	
Days
5
5
48
3
5
3
30
I
Total (18 centres)  143 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 25
Table 1.^Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent
at Each Centre, 1952—Continued
Mobile Survey Clinic
Coast and Fraser Valley
Centre Visited                                  Days                        Centre Visited Days
       2                New Westminster   13
       3                Pender Harbour  2
       1                 Port Coquitlam  2
       3               Port Moody  4
      4               Roberts Creek  1
       1               Sechelt   3
       1                Selma Park  1
      4               Wilsons Creek   1
Maple Ridge       1 	
Total (17 centres)  47
Agassiz —	
Gibsons 	
Half moon Bay
Hammond 	
Haney
Harrison Hot Springs..
Harrison Mills 	
Hope
Examinations at the diagnostic and treatment clinics of the Division totalled 38,802.
This is a slight decrease from 1951, when 40,266 cases were examined. This reflects
the use of hospital miniature-film surveys as a screening method, so that diagnostic clinics
confine their services more and more to known and suspected chest conditions. New
examinations showed a 21-per-cent decrease from last year, while there was a slight
increase in the number of re-examinations. Of the 38,802 examinations made, 15,024
or 38.7 per cent were between 30 and 50 years of age and 10,918 or 28.1 per cent were
over the age of 50 years.
Table 2.
—Diagnostic
and Treatment Clinic Report,
1952
Item
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O ts
ZP tu
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17,280
1,825
5,574
2,749
1,446
2,172
3,568
3,459
729
38,802
8,993
29,809
15,443
Type of case—
3,256
14,024
8,094
5,930
1,216
1,598
14,466
17,280
185
211
522
1,303
393
910
248
1,577
1,825
12
13
1,608
3,966
2,014
1,952
219
678
4,677
5,574
284
252
437
2,312
1,801
511
123
319
2,309
2,749
134
114
326
1,120
335
785
1,446
1,446
17
22
688
1,484
715
769
142
43
1,987
2,172
42
31
1,473
2,095
773
1,322
114
1
3,453
3,568
34
47
488
2,971
977
1,994
155
331
2,973
3,459
26
28
195
534
341
193
195
534
729
4
9
14,366
1,969
3,413
33,422
38,802
638
727
Reason for examination—
Referred from survey  - -
Age-groups examined—
0-4.	
 M.
F.
5-9 > 	
  M.
F.
346
266
15
14
182
143
69
49
47
48
44
58
96
84
85
88
9
11
893
761
10-14       -       j	
 M.
256
198
9
21
47
37
33
27
38
53
52
65
125
119
63
86
19
20
642
F.
626
15-19	
 M.
F.
233
261
35
119
73
93
16
33
20
40
40
72
136
171
99
129
18
28
670
946
20-24...1 ,	
  M.
F.
458
664
70
173
131
201
68
106
26
59
48
92
82
213
74
181
9
45
966
1,727
25-29   -.-
 M.
F.
756
1,234
127
163
198
303
111
148
39
74
50
126
135
264
118
239
26
45
1,560
2,596 F 26
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1952—Continued
Item
91
a
0 £
=  Si
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1
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H
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Age-groups examined—Continued
30-39 M.
F.
40-49 M.
F.
50-59                                    M.
1,679
2,274
1,727
1,374
1,513
717
1,403
601
683
241
17,280
16,413
106
590
124
47
17,280
2,012
126
302
4,539
2,529
1,464
232
39
464
342
104
135
412
14
148
1,244
3,174
176
286
165
155
108
78
53
28
5
1,825
1,754
4
12
55
1,825
188
1
610
241
129
92
9
1
158
1
13
42
75
265
476
730
387
416
386
280
389
189
246
131
5,574
5,285
39
222
2
26
5,574
587
10
91
1,602
680
170
28
1
86
38
42
138
49
6
245
1,801
239
351
232
199
232
111
201
110
125
43
2,749
2,702
26
14
6
3
2,749
75
35
21
867
418
214
30
5
9
27
29
14
112
48
3
101
743
106
133
102
81
77
39
187
41
171
33
1,446
1,403
12
27
4
1,446
95
8
60
265
122
101
16
	
1
11
4
5
17
201
540
189
219
227
190
199
85
154
52
102
35
2,172
2,049
4
25
94
2,172
132
1
40
645
324
113
19
40
102
31
3
3
18
238
423
297
438
268
279
111
154
188
104
84
33
3,568
3,339
100
43
78
8
3,568
199
7
49
1,107
105
573
40
8
28
44
129
108
1
535
635
274
503
286
295
246
154
242
80
135
29
3,459
3,340
86
3
30
3,459
124
13
28
1,283
174
296
154
35
2
36
1
26
46
3
430
808
67
98
39
77
53
41
56
30
26
9
729
707
4
8
10
729
14
1
3
254
119
53
12
2
1
6
4
21
46
25
52
116
3,503
5,032
3,433
3,066
3,031
F.
60-69 M.
1,658
2,863
F.
70 and over , , M.
F.
1,235
1,577
554
38,802
White  	
36,992
295
1,027
376
Other   	
114
Usual occupations.	
Clerks.— .  	
38,802
3,426
202
1,204
Housewives „_	
Labourers—
Common— 	
Skilled -	
10,803
4,600
3,076
540
Miners—
Coal '   	
121
589
Nurses—
G raduate _	
Student  _	
725
228
418
939
Students—
136
University    _	
Other      _ 	
161
3,121
8,505
The number of pneumothorax refills has been reduced considerably, indicating the
more restricted use of this procedure.
Table 3.—Treatment and Tests at Diagnostic and Treatment Clinics, 1952
Item
Stationary
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
New
Westminster
Travelling
Coast
Kootenay
Interior
Fraser
Valley
Island
Total
Pneumothorax—
Initial	
Refill..
Pneumoperitoneum—
Initial 	
Refill	
Bronchoscopy.	
B.C.G. vaccinations-
Aspirations	
Fluoroscopes —
Tuberculin tests given..
7,743
1,974
185
354
18
1,830
5,618
511
25
35
552
430
6
1,006
8
479
266
4
1,657
3,916
860
199
30
2
1,138
1,432
53
1
120
55
687
6
10,179
2,678
185
805
24
5,232
12,083 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
Table 4.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1952
F 27
Clinics
Willow
Chest
Centre
Victoria
New
West
minster
Mobile
Provincial
Metropolitan
Stationary
Metropolitan
Health
Unit
Courtenay
General
Hospitals
Total
Total examined	
New tuberculosis cases..
Prim ary	
Minimal—
Active 	
Activity undetermined _
Arrested  _
Inactive	
Moderately advanced—
Active	
Activity undetermined..
Arrested	
Inactive	
Far advanced-
Active 	
Activity undetermined_
Arrested-. 	
Inacti v e 	
Non-pulmonary-
Known tuberculous cases__
P rimary _.
Minimal—
Active	
Activity undetermined-.
Arrested	
Inactive	
Moderately advanced—
Active	
Activity undetermined -
Arrested	
Inactive	
Far advanced—
Active  -
Activity undetermined-
Arrested	
Inactive. —  __.
Non-pulmonary..
Suspect...—.	
PI eurisy	
Cardiac disease	
Not yet diagnosed .
Negative  -
Other	
32,856
47
2
69
76
15
64
32,406
160
9,617
10,552
29
7,654 |
15 |
	
5
6
3
9
2
2
1
1
2 |
3 [
7 1
2 |
1  |
	
	
..     .
8 1
	
3 |
4 |
	
	
1 |
	
  |
4
17
11
9,570
15
6
16
1
7
10,462
31
5 |
14 |
1  j
5 |
7,591  |
15 j
58,579
23
32,182
58
1,304
71
1
2
5
18
30
1
2
7
3
59
4
6
14
21
27
44
14
24
58,311
65
54
47
10
33
31,826
95
1,298
4
76,573
110
1
1
4
363
2
9
9
71
186
4
27
24
3
2
3
11
4
164
246
317
165
74,415
793
229,317
282
10
54
49
42
44
20
2
1
5
520
3
17
22
111
246
16
6
38
33
5
2
4
13
4
330
461
358
309
225,879
1,178
Not included are 4,222 miniature films taken in St. Joseph's General Hospital, Victoria, as no results are available,
and 355 miniature films taken of the staff at Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital.
During 1952 there were 21,603 new examinations performed by stationary clinics,
compared with 26,110 in 1951. Re-examinations in stationary clinics increased by
3,746 from 55,481 re-examinations in 1951 to 59,227 in 1952. No substantial change
was indicated in the examinations performed by travelling clinics.
Table 5.—New Examinations and Re-examinations in the Units
Operated by This Division during Years 1948 to 1952
(Excluding Indians.)
Year
Total
Examinations
Stationary Clinics
Travelling Clinics
Mobile1
Survey
Clinics
New
Examinations
Reexaminations
New
Examinations
Reexaminations
1948     -	
95,237
97,631
132,195
119,099
99,858
36,564
37,553
45,144
46,489
I
6.236        !          7.293
127,081
1949                   	
5,765
3,897
3,116
3,170
7,824
9,463
7,958
8,204
140,722
1950	
1951                    	
35,816
26.110
47,269
55.481
35,750
26,434
1952    	
21.603        1        59.227
7,654
1 Excludes mobile unit operated by Vancouver Metropolitan Health Committee (see Table 8). F 28
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 2.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics,
1943-52
NO. OF CASES
(IN 000's)
(Excluding Indians.)
TOTAI          -_.
•
^
NEW
/
EXAMINATIONS
kM-b «•
/
/
t
>
M
*■
^^*
— «-.
\
\
f
^*
•
N
__ «*
r* ^^
f
1943       1944       1945       1946       1947       1948       1949       1950       1951       1952 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 29
Chart 3.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics,
1943-52
(Excluding Indians.)
NO. OF CASES
(IN 000's)
20
TOTAL
EXAMINATIONS
•<
•*«-.
NEW EXAMINATIONS                     ** *» *
""          REEXAMINATIONS                                                 ^^
^•.
	
---
1944 1945 1946 1947
1949 1950 1951 1952 F 30
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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ft TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 31
During 1952, 664 new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were diagnosed by the clinics
of the Division, compared with 940 cases in 1951. Among the new cases found, 412
or 62.0 per cent had minimal pulmonary tuberculosis, and 131 or 19.7 per cent had
moderately advanced pulmonary lesions. The number of cases with inactive or arrested
tuberculosis totalled 193 or 29.1 per cent, 305 cases or 45.9 per cent were classified as
active, while there were 160 or 24.0 per cent in whom the clinical status was not determined at the time of reporting.
During 1952 the recommended National Tuberculosis Association's notification for
tuberculosis was adopted. This eliminated certain healed tuberculous cases previously
included in the case register of tuberculosis and accounts for some of the reduction in
new cases found.
Table 7.—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Examined by Clinics,
by Infection and Condition, 1952
Infection and Condition
Stationary
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
New
Westminster
Travelling
Koote-
6
......
1
6
1
35
32
13
8
4
4
10
6
8
14
7
4
1
1
5
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
Interior
Island
Total
Primary .
Inactive..
Arrested..
Active	
Activity undetermined-
Condition not stated—
Minimal.
Inactive „
Arrested..
Active	
Activity undetermined.
Condition not stated.	
Moderately advanced -
Inactive 	
Arrested	
Active	
Activity undetermined .
Condition not stated	
Far advanced..
Inactive	
Arrested	
Active	
Activity undetermined-
Condition not stated	
Total pulmonary...
Inactive	
Arrested	
Active	
Activity undetermined-
Condition not stated	
5
27
216
32
40
72
72
6
7
59
12
46
1
3
40
2
388
39
55
198
94
2
2
1
25
3
6
14
2
13
3
9
1
2    |        2
....    |    —
49
23
6
8
12
2     | 2
....     |     ......
....     |    ..._.
10
1
5
4
44
4
9
27
3
1
69
29
7
18
15
50
13
5
23
9
39
8
5
9
15
2
37
9
5
8
15
14
2
11
1
46
18
9
2
7
11
14
19
1
......
1
64
1
5
42
11
5
412
90
66
129
127
131
12
15
84
19
1
57
1
3
50
3
664
104
89
305
160
6
Source: Case Examination, Form TB. 1. F 32
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The total number of X-ray examinations increased from 278,734 in 1951 to 281,319
in 1952. There were slight increases in X-ray examinations taken in the institutions of
the Division, stationary survey clinics, and general hospitals.
Table 8.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Survey Clinics,
and General Hospital Units, 1943-52.
Institutions
Stationary
Travelling
Mobile
Stationary
Metropolitan
General-
hospital
Units
Year
Diagnostic
Survey
Diagnostic
Survey
Provincial
Metropolitan
Total
1943      	
4,121
3,881
3,858
6,667
5,196
6,111
6,432
6,412
6,361
7,106
24,199
14,315
11,075
16,781
20,986
24,144
27,695
28,500
19,192
27,450
4,374
26,174
28,850
45,810
44,196
57,428
56,374
54,585
52,399
53,380
13,329
12,124
12,613
11,289
12,996
13,399
13,508
13,360
11,074
11,374
2,914
764
763
1,063
91
	
	
46,023
1944   -   -
55,868i
89,799i
99,103i
155,6741
127,0811
140,7221
115,275
1945	
	
146,939
1946	
180,413
1947	
240,111
1948 	
228,254
1949
	
244,731
1950	
80,686i
26,434
7,654
45,210
71,410
80,795
228,753
1951    	
1952	
57,509
58,579
24,355
32,182
278,734
281,319
l No breakdown available for mobile units prior to 1951.
Source: X-ray Ledger TB. 73 and Clinic Ledgers TB. 71 and TB. 41. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 33
Chart 4.—X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals,
1943-52.
.00
275
250
225
^TOTAL
200
'
150;
125
100
■i.^
€s^
 ^
7^—--
"L"^
75
50
/
/
/
STATIONARY
CLINICS
« — —
***
X
'
--•	
>
25
— ■"■"■.«
0«»
TRAVELLING
CLINICS
	
""""*"■«•.
_>    *—*    «■■    —
ri
1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 Chart 5.—X-ray Examinations Made by Institutions, Diagnostic and Treatment
Clinics, Survey Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals, 1943-52
^WTOTAL
/       .
1 1
1
N
\
%
1
1
1
1
\
%
\
\
*
/
!  i
1        1
1
\
\
\
%
%
\
/
r
\
TOTAL      tf
SURVEY^
/
1
1
1
\
#"
\
\
/
/     »
'    /
1
1
1
\
\
\
/
t
:^,_,
/   I
/
>
.<
\
/
t
/
^*
/    f
11
1     1
t
/
t
GENERAL
HOSPITALS
4
*
*
*
,-"'
1      1
/ /
f     f
f
f
/
-__. «_____
■++
—— «_-
*
,___#
*
t
	
i /
_ .____ -
— — *
*•
•_■ **•
"W» «* —
v
INSTITUTIONS
—-
100
1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952
34 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952 F 35
GENERAL SUMMARIES
Table 9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1952
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
New
Westminster
Jericho
Beach
St.
Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital
Pearson
Total
X-rays taken....   —	
Chest X-rays—
Flat—
22,753
1,917
17,294
357
20
12
202
279
350
1,619
25
12
108
58
6
45
12
3,334
8,919
122
135
26
117
132
5
22
4,473
1,982
1,888
11
1
120
3
214
24
10
57
47
33
2
4,529
552
70
3
8
6,018
356
5,385
7
26
52
16
37
76
1
7
22
3
4
1
1,395
1,301
24
1
2,908
2,879
2
11
1,138
21
663
425
160
1
30
6
13
3
11
771
3
16
80
63
17
288
9
1,129
646
94
1
1
145
5
139
4
12
45
7
18
1,080
103
12
38,024
8,268
24,838
V.D. Division 	
Stereoscopic—
364
33
42
Planograph—
549
303
Other chest—
746
1,734
Gastrointestinal—
48
12
Bones and joints—
230
137
9
Other—
111
15
Flouroscope—
11,337
12,025
122
Electrocardiogram—
233
29
V.D. Division .	
117
177
Lipiodol injection—
14
22
Source: X-ray Ledger TB. 73. F 36
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 10.—Laboratory Report, 1952
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
New
Westminster
St.
Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital
Jericho
Beach
Pearson
Kootenay
Total
Sputum tests—
Routine—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Concentrated—
In-patient	
Out-patient 	
Stomach washings—
In-patient  	
Out-patient...	
Guinea-pig inoculation-
In patient	
Out-patient	
Blood-tests—
Sedimentations—
In-patient...	
Out-patient	
Haemoglobin—
In-patient	
Out-patient 	
Red-blood count—
In-patient	
Out-patient_
White-blood count-
In-patient  	
Out-patient	
Differential—
In-patient..
Out-patient-
Blood chemistry	
Other special blood tests
Kahn—
In-patient. 	
Out-patient	
Urinalysis—
Routine—
In-patient 	
Out-patient 	
Quantitative—
In-patient  	
Out-patient 	
Smear..  	
Cultures—
Sputum—
In-patient... 	
Out-patient 	
Other-
In-patient  	
Out-patient	
Other tests 	
5,859
3,171
301
729
1,306
15,121
1,961
496
483
106
795
107
591
107
560
503
272
96
2,931
561
183
626
950
131
66
189
307
677
11
1,019
I
3,033
255
356
30
436
118
1,585
274
846 I
229
586
60
573
48
580
57
266
653
338
103
3,246
121
1,707
198
49
15
122
396
749
302
18
225
17
296
17
242
17
484
3
337
1,920
19
121
14
19
7
19
7
10
3
10
2
10
2
2
12
1
25
2,129
920
555
42
340
38
93
1
305
1
161
75
176
56
18
636
25
1,186
12
132
7
611
45
535
107
417
22
431
22
431
22
230
44
252
65
739
65
27
269
36
280
23
83
3,934
6,083
6,252
255
807
936
436
118
4,472
18,450
4,003
895
1,814
209
2,410
197
2,015
205
1,133
1,398
1,011
285
i,048
775
104
520
1,261
2,860
852
85
I 1,526
Source: Daily Laboratory Ledger TB. 72.
Table 11.—Tests Carried Out in the Respiratory Physiological
Laboratory, 1952
Type of Test
Willow Chest
Centre
Pearson
Tranquille
Vital capacity 	
Maximum breathing capacity..
Bronchospirometry. 	
Basal metabolism 	
Pleural pressure _   _
319
202
15
14
1
98
26 tuberculosis control report, 1952 f 37
Table 12.—Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics, 1943-52
Total
Institutions
Clinics
Year
Total
Wil
Tran
Vic
Total
Wil
Tran
Vic
Total
Wil
Tran
Vic
low
quille
toria
low
quille
toria
low
quille
toria
1943  _   ..
184
157
26
1
117
90
26
1
67
67
1944.  ....
243    1    204
31
8
143
108
30
5
100
96
1
3
1945...	
285
274
9
2
127
117
9
1
158
157
1
1946.....	
353
334
3
16
174
160
3
11
179
174
5
1947	
452
366
72
14
297
211
72
14
155
155
	
1948    .....
700
415
258
27
552
273
252
27
148
142
6
1949..    	
683
437
210
36
554
308
210
36
129
129
1950	
652
485
146
21
486
319
146
21
166
166
1951	
721
539
145
37
513
332
145
36
208
207
1
1952
738
545
154
39
553
360
154
39
185
185
	
	
Source: Institu
tional Le
dger TB
70 and Clinic Ledger TB.
71.
Table 13.—Dental Report, 1952
Willow
Chest
Centre1
Tranquille
Victoria
Jericho
Beach
Pearson
Total
Patient-visits—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Examinations—
In-patient- _
Out-patient	
Consultations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Extractions—
In-patient	
Out-patient-
uut-patient	
Fillings, including cement bases—
In-patient	
Out-patient-
Prophylactic treatment—
In-patient	
Out-patient-
Out-patient	
Surgical removal, impacted teeth—
In-patient	
Out-patient-
Denture fittings—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
X-rays	
Other	
1,165
473
240
60
73
18
372
140
458
358
103
42
355
176
2,930
139
1,818
1
19
688
663
389
50
163
16
25
45
232
754
1
516
3,556
218
72
59
5
31
1
81
754
65
48
17
105
26
5
3
144
497
10
605
184
24
156
209
40
201
1,599
19
4,209
524
857
76
158
18
1,366
140
1,574
430
961
48
39
1
1,297
184
9,336
233
1 Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source: Ledger TB. 74.
I F 38
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 14.—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report, 1952
WilgwChest     Tranqume
Victoria
Pearson
Total
Patient-visits—
In-patient	
Out-patients	
Eye—
Examinations—
In-patients	
Out-patients	
Prescriptions—
In-patients	
Out-patients...
Refractions—
In-patients..
Out-patients	
Other treatments-
In-patients	
Out-patients......
Consultations—
In-patients..
Out-patients..
Ear, nose, and throat—
Examinations—
In-patients.-
Out-patients..
Treatments—
In-patients.-.
Out-patients..
Consultations—
In-patients	
Out-patients	
Surgical procedures..
222
39
143
4
82
1
104
1
75
33
274
1
160
54
19
32
115
40
23
17
32
12
20
531
40
342
4
152
1
146
1
38
204
33
Source: Ledger TB. 75.
' TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
INSTITUTIONS
F 39
The number of patient-days increased from 273,960 in 1951 to 286,827 in 1952.
This increase may be due partly to the opening of the new Pearson unit, which recorded
a total of 37,263 patient-days. The decrease in initial pneumothoraces from 201 in 1951
to 119 in 1952 and the increase of pulmonary resections from 40 in 1951 to 90 in 1952
indicates the changing trends in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.
Table 15.—Institutions—General Summaries, 1952
Item
Willow
Chest
Centre
Tranquille
Victoria
St.
Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital
Jericho
Beach
Pearson
Total
Patient-days  .	
68,787
338
355
30
1,076
31
1,303
106
47
9
31
4
115,220
306
297
53
2,685
12
354
26
43
1
19
1
26,532
100
102
22
650
8
573
24
6,129
12
18
1
137
32,886
52
54
1
128
3
563
37,263
181
64
12
355
21
766
24
286,827
989
890
Treatments—
Pneumothoraces—
119
Refill -rt rt 	
5,031
Pneumoperitoneum—
75
Refill                   	
110
3,669
180
Thoracoplasties—
Stage 1
3
93
10
Stage 2 	
50
Stage 3                                         	
	
	
5
Stage 4    .     - 	
2
2
	
1
10
16
1
27
39
1
15
42
4
2
53
Phrenic—
19
1
13
22
33
6
3
4
Resection—
13
1
9
6
14
154
8
23
42
Pneumonectomy. 	
Thoracoscopy- 	
12
1
39
	
15
360
16
543
152
179
28
553
37
24
195
2
2
3
777
71
6
14
223
2
6
1
195
Autopsies _	
46
Source: Clinic Ledgers TB. 71 and TB. 41 and Institutional Ledger TB. 70; Admission Form TB. 78 and Discharge
Form TB. 79.
L F 40
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 16.—Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) Given by
Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1943-52
Total
Initial
Refill
Year
Total
Initial
Institutions
Stationary
Clinics
Traveling
Clinics
Total
Refill
Institutions
Stationary
Clinics
Traveling
Clinics
1943	
14,937
16,828
17,121
21,883
21,919
21,788
22,393
401
344
327
413
354
339
334
392
337
325
397
350
336
328
279
201
119
5
2
4
5
14,536
16,484
16,794
21,470
21.565
21,449
22,059
20,853
20,044
15,244
9,132
10,375
9,678
12,347
12,698
12,745
11,066
9,174
6,769
5,031
5,255
5,841
6,892
8,799
8,616
8,617
10,873
11,649
13,247
10,160
149
1944 	
268
1945 	
5
1
2
5
7
6
6
11
3
1
1
1946          	
324
1947  	
251
1948 	
1949 	
87
120
1950.
21,139
20,251
15,369
286
207
125
30
1951
28
1952. 	
53
Source: Clinic Ledgers TB. 71 and TB. 41 and Institutional Ledger TB. 70.
It is of interest to note the gradually increasing number of patients of 50 and over
admitted to sanatoria from 1948 to 1952. This ranged from 139 patients or 17.1 per
cent of admissions to 280 patients or 28.3 per cent of admissions.
Table 17.-
-Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions
in Each Age-group, 1948-52
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
Age-group
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
0- 9 years 	
10-19    „
56
287
214
115
68
49
22
3
6.9
35.2
26.3
14.1
8.4
6.0
2.7
0.4
2
56
328
243
157
89
70
25
3
0.2
5.8
33.7
25.0
16.1
9.1
7.2
2.6
0.3
18
61
312
224
131
87
70
25
1.9
6.6
33.7
24.1
14.1
9.4
7.5
2.7
5
42
262
241
151
109
82
36
0.6
4.5
28.2
26.0
16.3
11.7
8.8
3.9
9    |      0.9
58    |      5.9
70-79    „
219    |    22.1
30-39    „     !                     	
245    |    24.8
40-49    ,
178    |    18.0
50-59    „
126    |    12.7
60-69    „                           	
95    |      9.6
59    |      6.0
Totals _ -
814
100.0
973
100.0
928
100.0
928
100.0
989    1 100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 41
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t«
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O
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o
H
D
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2
o
z
M
U
B5
W
H
U
L F 42
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Admissions by diagnosis during 1952 indicate that 383 or 38.7 per cent had moderately advanced pulmonary tuberculosis, while 324 or 32.8 per cent had minimal pulmonary lesions, and 209 or 21.1 per cent had far advanced tuberculosis. Of the total
admissions among males, 63.7 per cent were over 40 years of age, while among the total
admissions for females only 21.7 per cent were over 40 years of age. It should be noted
that the children under 14 were patients admitted temporarily from the Preventorium
for tonsillectomy.
Table 18.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1952
Diagnosis
Age-group   ;
1
S
"3
s
5
S
>.
7. T_
<3 si
CS  li
it a
o-g
■a
O
a
&_3
W.-5
P
p >,c
gf.§
j.33
32.-=
M^   ___
m
n«
3-H3
HO, 5
w
Si
VI
O
u C
Si 00
SP cs
55
X
Si
in
>.
SP
7.
o
H
cd
o
H
S
CS
H
0
0- 4 years _.... ..
 M.
3
1
2
6
19
13
1
5
10
14
2
4
1
6
1
1
1
2
1
	
1
1
3
1
1
4
1
2
2
3
1
2
3
2
2
15
39
31
54
56
78
103
142
119
59
111
15
86
9
56
3
5- 9     „     1	
F.
 M.
4
5
10-14     ..   	
 M.
	
4
15-19     ..    	
 M.
1
3
3
_-
54
20-24    „   	
 M.
85
25-29    „     	
 M.
1
24
15
15
f.
8
34
28
7
134
30-39    „  _
 ...M.
6
30
38
29
F.
7
43
58
29
245
40-49     ..    	
 M.
7
35
47
26
29
15
_-
178
50-59    „	
 M.
1
36
45
27
F.
1
5
7
2
	
126
60-69    „ _	
 M.
1
10
46
27
F.
  M.
F.
 M.
F.
2
5
1
1
95
70 years and over  -	
20
22
2
14
1
	
	
59
Totals	
24
26
176
148
232
151
144
65
2
4
1
6
10
584
405
50
324
383
209
6
1
16    |    ......
1
989
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. Chart 7.—Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1952
0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180
AGE GROUP
10-19 YRS
20-29 YRS
30-39 YRS
40-49 YRS.
80 100 120
NO. OF ADMISSIONS
43 F 44
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The opening of the Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital in Vancouver accounts for the
increase in the number of admissions during the year. However, admission to this institution did not start until May, and the institution was not fully occupied until the end of
the year. The full impact of these new beds will not be reflected until next year. It is
noted that admission of Chinese increased from 42 to 75.
Table 19.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1952
Racial Origin
Diagnosis
Primary
Minimal
Moderately
Advanced
Far
Advanced
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
without
Effusion
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
with
Effusion
1
3
	
4
—
1
—
1
	
—
	
—
	
	
—
1
1
1
1
Other
Diagnoses
Total
White	
  M.
F.
T.
  .M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Hindu  	
  M.
Half-breed and Indian _
Not stated..
Totals..
Grand totals.-
17
134
22
116
39
250
F.
T.
_M.
F.
T.
-M.
F.
T.
..M.
F.
19
9
28
6
4
10
2
3
5
3
3
15
13
28
184
122
306
28
2
30
4
3
7
1
1
2
4
6
10
11
17
28
113
46
159
10
2
12
7
1
1
1
2
5
7
12
10
22
4
9
13
24
26
176
148
232
151
144
65
1      I
6
10
50
324
383
209
16
453
318
771
60
15
75
19
9
28
3
5
8
7
16
23
42
42
84
584
405
989
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 20.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1952
Type of Case
Diagnosis
Primary
Minimal
Moderately
Advanced
Far
Advanced
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
with
Effusion
Tuberculous
Pleurisy
without
Effusion
Other
Diagnoses
Total
by Sex
Total
First admission ..
.....M.
F.
M
F.
M
F.
Continuation of
M
F.
Totals	
M
F.
19
16
132
104
39
35
131
57
95
79
5
14
65
26
78
34
353
213
214
158
12
30
24
26
176
148
232
151
144
64
6
10
584
405
Grand totals	
50
324
383
209
16      |
566
372
42
989
989
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 45
During 1952 there were 566 first admissions, of which 37.3 per cent were admitted
to Tranquille, 23.0 per cent to the Willow Chest Unit, 20.7 per cent to the Pearson Hospital, and 13.4 per cent to the Victoria units.
Table 21.—First Admissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1952
Total
Institution
Diagnosis
Willow1
Tranquille
Victoria
Jericho Beach
Pearson
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary.     	
Minimal 	
Moderately advanced	
35
236
188
91
4
12
6.2
41.7
33.2
16.1
0.7
2.1
13
47
41
10.0
36.1
31.5
12
84
78
34
1
2
5.7
39.8
37.0
16.1
0.5
0.9
6
40
17
10
2
1
7.9
52.6
22.4
13.2
2.6
1.3
1
10
12
8
1
3.1
31.3
37.5
25.0
" 3.1
3
55
40
18
1
2.6
47.0
34.2
21
1
7
16.3
0.8
5.3
15.4
Tuberculous pleurisy
0.8
Totals         	
566
100.0
130
100.0
211
100.0
76
100.0
32
100.0
117
100.0
1 Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 22.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1948-52
Diagnosis
Year
1948
Number
Per
Cent
1949
Number
Per
Cent
1950
Number
Per
Cent
1951
Number
Per
Cent
1952
Number
Per
Cent
Primary-.
Minimal-
Moderately advanced-
Far advanced	
Tuberculous pleurisy-
Other diagnosis	
Totals-
3 I
148 j
226 I
98 j
4 I
7 I
0.6
30.5
46.5
20.2
0.8
1.4
486
100.0
1
0.2
3
174
31.8
199
242
44.2
208
117
21.4
107
6
1.1
3
7
1.3
6    1
547
100.0
526
0.6
37.8
39.6
20.3
0.6
1.1
11
203
214
106
3
4
100.0
541
2.0
35
37.5
236
39.6
188
19.6
91
0.6
4
0.7
12    |
100.0
566
6.2
41.7
33.2
16.1
0.7
2.1
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78. F 46 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 23.—Readmissions by Institutions and Diagnosis, 1952
Total
Institution
Diagnosis
Willow1
Tranquille
Victoria
Jericho Beach
Pearson
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Num-     Per
ber      Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
8
2.2
19.9
46.8
30.1
0.2
0.8
7
34
76
54
1
4.0
19.8
44.2
31.4
0.6
1
15
45
28
2
1.1
16.5
49.4
30.8
2.2
6    |    23.1
16    |    61.5
4    |    15.4
4
7
7
1
21.1
36.8
36.8
5.3
15
30
!.9
Minimal ....
Moderately advanced	
74
174
112
1
3
23.4
46.9
29.7
Tuberculous pleurisy
Other diagnosis	
Totals	
372
100.0
172
100.0
91
100.0
26    | 100.0
19
100.0
64
100.0
i Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form TB. 78.
Table 24.—Readmissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1948-52
Year
Diagnosis
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Num-       Per
ber        Cent
Num-       Per
ber     :  Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary 	
27
125
82
" 1
11.5
53.2
34.9
0.4
1    |       0.3
56    |      17.4
153    j      47.5
107    |      33.2
5    |        1.6
2    |       0.6
39    |      12.9
161    |      53.3
99    |      32.8
1    |        0.4
2    1       0.6
65    ||    20.8
148    |      47.3
97    j!     31.0
1    |        0.3
8
74
174
112
1
3
2.1
19.9
Moderately advanced	
46.8
30.1
0.3
0.8
Totals          .. .   .
235
100.0
322    1    100.0
302    |    100.0
313    |    100.0
372
100.0 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 47
PERCENT
60
Chart 8.—First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis
(Percentage Distribution), 1943-52
-
'.
^04*
^ —
MODERATELY
4*
A
ADVANCED
"*■•
s
%
A
st
—— - —
m «_■____*> ■>
\
A
/
/
\s
MINIMAL
V
-  m
/
AS.
FAR ADVANCED
^\
/
OTHER      —.
**
PRIMARY
1943 1944 1945 - 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 F 48
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
There were 890 discharges from institutions during 1952. Based on the revised
clinical classification of condition, of those discharged 42.8 per cent were active improved,
21.4 per cent were arrested, 15.6 per cent were active unimproved, and 13.0 per cent died.
Table 25.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1948-52
Condition
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Inactive 	
Arrested 	
Active improved	
Active unimproved	
Dead _	
132
419
86
148
31
18.0
50.0
13.4
15.2
3.4
158
510
118
99
18
17.5
56.4
13.1
11.0
2.0
40
190
381
139
116
24
4.5
21.4
42.8
15.6
13.0
16.2
51.4
10.5
18.1
3.8
177
491
131
149
33
166
517
121
102
36
17.6
54.9
12.9
10.8
3.8
Other diagnosis	
2.7
Totals
816
100.0
981
100.0
903
100.0
942
100.0
890
100.0
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79.
Note.—The designation of condition as used in the above table corresponds to the definitions recommended by the
National Tuberculosis Association in 1951.   The following is a reconciliation of the new definitions with those previously
used in Annual Reports of this Division.
Old New
Apparently cured. Inactive (three years).
Arrested. Arrested (six months).
Apparently arrested. Arrested (three months).
Quiescent. Active improved.
Active— Active-
Improved. Improved.
Unimproved. Unimproved. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 49
Chart 9.—Percentage Distribution of Discharges from Institutions
According to Condition on Discharge, 1943-52
PERCENT
60
/
"^^
/
*x.
AaiVE
IMPROVED
i
/
/
/
\
\
\
/
/
/
N
\
\
/
/
/
\
\
/
/
f
\
/
\
30
\
DEAD
/
7>
^^*» ^^
,sk
4
/
f
^X_-_-»^
ARRESTED
	
A
•
4
ACTIVE
J,  ** *
/
/
UNIMPROVED
r*
*
*
4*
4*
N
X
-- f
!
;
.
>x
m, - |    OTHER
DIAGNOSIS
	
""■ •»• mm
"•"•.-.^
-^'
7
0
1943        1944        1945       1946        1947       1948        1949        1950       1951       1952 F 50
department of health and welfare
Table 26.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex,
and Length of Stay, 1952
Condition on Discharge
Length of Stay in Institution
Under 1
Month
1-4
Months
4-8
Months
8-12
Months
1-2
Years
2-3
Years
3-5
Years
Over 5
Years
Total
by Sex
Total
Inactive	
M.
F.
5
9
Arrested  _
M.
F.
10
16
Active improved.. 	
M.
F.
4
1
Active unimproved
M.
F.
19
53
Dead	
.....M.
27
F.
7
Non-pulmonary..
-M.
F.
Non-tuberculous M.
F.
Undiagnosed..
Totals.,	
Grand totals-
F.
..M.
F.
24
25
24
12
10
6
71
58
156
129
20
13
68
58
13
6
14
3
19
32
44
54
12
4
18
31
44
33
10
5
10
19
21
84
106
200
181
65
74
82
34
40
190
381
139
116
2
10
12
119
83
81
98
80
77
31
16
463
427
179
157
890
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79.
Of the total 890 discharges during the year, 637 or 71.6 per cent were discharged
on medical advice. Home conditions for those who were discharged showed that in 647
cases or 73,8 per cent the conditions were satisfactory, while in 115 cases or 12.9 per cent
the conditions were unsatisfactory. Of 115 discharged to unsatisfactory home conditions,
96 left against advice.
Table 27.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge,
Sex, and Home Condition, 1952
!
Condition on Discharge
Home Condition
■a
Si
>
o
u
o ft
>E
tJ'S
>
- <
•a
u
93
Ih
<
0
>
ID
<0
Si
Q
M
cd
§
o-g
cq
3
O
3
o
i   '-
§j.
zs
•a
OJ
o
c
__
.2
-3
a
5
rt
4
O
H
Satisfactory          —	
M.
F.
__M.
152
154
43
43
63
22
11
—
77
105
7
1
19
20
1
2
2
1
79
32
2
4
4
6
4
1
1
-._
303
354
74
Unknown  —
F.
M.
F.
M
27
(5
1
1
......
41
86
32
[         Totals     	
200
181
65
74
::::
84
106
19
21
82
34
2
5
5
8
4
463
F.
427
Grand Totals ____
381
139
—
190
40
116    1        2
10
12
890 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 51
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions on Medical Advice, by Condition
on Discharge, Sex, and Home Condition, 1952
Condition on Discharge
Home Condition
■a
Si
>
>.
0
•a
£
as
•a
rt
>
a &
93
63
>.
C
3
M
■s 5
II
.6 J
Q C
>
93
o
cS
■a
cS
a)
b J
eg
Zo.
i  i-
C o>
3
<P
<
<
0
Z3
&
H
Satisfactory _	
 M.
136
33
76
19
1
4
6
275
F.
146
59
—
102
20
2
2
4
4
339
Unsatisfactory   	
....M.
9
5
1
15
F.
2
	
—
1
	
—
	
	
	
3
Unknown    - ..
 M.
4
	
	
,	
._—
	
1
	
5
F.
 M.
	
	
	
	
	
	
—
	
Totals  -
149
148
33
59
81
103
19
20
1
2
-----
2
5
4
7
4
295
F.
342
Grand Totals	
297
92    |	
1
184
39
3
2
9
11
637
Table 29.—Discharges from Institutions against Medical Advice, by Condition
on Discharge, Sex, and Home Condition, 1952
Condition on Discharge
Home Condition
u
!>!
SP li
PP ft
<s
•a
a
>
o
03 ft
p
>
CO
0>
N
>
o
rt
•a
c.
03
b.
n
B
o
AB
eg
BO
s
o
B
o
_■ K
°-2
Si
oa
O
S
bo
c3
•3
a
3
<P
<
<
n
Za
Z3
P
H
Satisfactory _ _
 M.
15
9
24
F.
8
4
3
—
—
—
15
Unsatisfactory  	
.... M.
33
22
2
57
F.
24
11
i
—
1
—
37
Unknown    	
_.   M.
1
	
	
	
	
	
l
2
F.
 M.
—
	
—
—
—
—
Totals	
49
.   32
31
15
3
2
i
	
l
1
84
F.
51
Grand Totals 	
81
46
......    I        5    |        1
1              1
—
l
l
135
Source:  Institutions, Discharges, Form TB. 79. F 52
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
- «■
TJ
TJ
□ u       u
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F 55
KNOWN CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS
There were 15,927 known cases of tuberculosis, excluding Indians, on the register
at the end of 1952. The check that was initiated in 1950 of known tuberculosis cases
was continued in 1952 with satisfactory results. During 1952 an extensive check was
also made, with the co-operation of the Indian Affairs Department, of all known tuberculosis cases among Indians.
Table 33.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1948-52
Area
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
287
768
767
9,399
2,447
832
364
662
719
79
488
313
802
871
10,038
2,641
908
404
822
896
141
647
315
807
913
10,337
2,742
930
430
854
974
153
972
336
821
889
10,371
2,768
949
472
942
1,001
160
316
776
862
10,543
2,822
938
458
996
Area 9..    	
Area 10              	
1,045
171
Totals... 	
16,812
18,483
19,428
18,709
15,927
Table 34.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1948-52
Area
1948
1949
1950   I   1951
1
1952
239
764
714
8,978
2,018
546
179
285
274
57
474
260
798
799
9,607
2,152
573
179
330
327
76
637
264
802
827
9,887
2,183
583
190
335
374
77
915
275
816
789
9,872
2,167
548
200
355
304
78
258
770
Area 3  -
Area 4 	
754
10,058
2,181
511
192
359
331
Area 10          _ 	
83
14,528
15,738
16.438   1  15.404
15,497
Table 35.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1948-52
Area
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
48
4
53
421
429
286
185
377
445
22
14
53
4
72
431
489
335
225
492
569
65
10
51
5
86
450
559
346
240
519
601
76
57
61
6
100
499
601
401
271
587
697
82
58
6
108
485
641
427
266
637
714
Area 10            	
88
Totals       	
2,284
2,745
2,990
3,305
3,430 F 56
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 36.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
and Sex, 1952
(Excluding Indians.)
Health Unit and School District       Male   Female   Total
Health Unit and School District       Male   Female   Total
East Kootenay—
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
West Kootenay—
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
South Okanagan—
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
North Okanagan—
School District No
School District No
School District No
School District No.
South Central—
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
Cariboo—
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
School District No.
Upper Fraser Valley-
School District No.
School District No
Boundary—
School District No.
School District No
School District No
Metropolitan Health
School District No.
School District No
School District No
School District No
School District No
Simon Fraser—
School District No
School District No.
11..
12..
13_
14_
15..
16-
17..
23-
77-
. 19..
20	
21	
22	
. 33	
35	
36	
37	
Committee-
38	
39	
. 41	
44	
45	
53
33
28
9
29
7
34
102
26
13
30
64
3
22
118
21
28
48
20
68
163
5
3
21
11
11
23
38
13
21
45
36
28
6
32
13
23
123
19
10
30
57
3
18
119
17
28
29
17
82
150
1
3
15
19
14
26
30
13
17
.40..
43_
54
44
19
24
115
135
78
46
178
158
26
30
78
83
3,657
2,851
272
264
185
153
70
57
315
293
281
225
98
69
56
15
61
20
57
225
45
23
60
121
6
40
237
38
46
77
37
150
313
6
6
36
30
25
49
68
26
38
98
43
250
124
336
56
161
6,508
536
338
127
608
506
North Fraser Valley—
School District No. 42 	
School District No. 75	
School District No. 76	
Upper Island—
School District No. 47	
School District No. 71 	
School District No. 72  	
Skeena—
School District No. 50... 	
School District No. 51	
School District No. 52	
School District No. 53	
School District No. 54	
Peace River—
School District No. 59  	
School District No. 60	
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of
Health-
School District No. 61 (part)*	
Saanich and South Vancouver Island—
School District No. 61 (part)2	
School District No. 62	
School District No. 63	
School District No. 64	
Central Vancouver Island—
School District No. 65	
School District No. 66	
School District No. 67	
School District No. 68 	
School District No. 69	
School District No. 70	
School districts not covered by
health units—
School District No. 6	
School District No. 7 	
School District No. 8	
School District No. 10.	
School District No. 34	
School District No. 46	
School District No. 48	
School District No. 49	
School District No. 58	
School District No. 61 (part)3
School District No. 73	
School District No. 74	
Unorganized	
Totals	
75 |
45
44 |
43
13 |
9
75 |
57
58 [
65
38
6
5
147
44
9
27
420
165
32
28
17
40
20
37
99
20
78
11
132
50
13
58
51
13
25
12
79
19
14
42
8,417
41  |
10
2
88
39
23
31
13
335
121
21
19
9
55
20 |
43 I
82 |
17 |
84
5
110
34
17
56
35
25
18
8
50
29
7
38
7,080
120
87
22
132
123
79
16
7
235
83
32
58
21
755
286
53
47
26
95
40
80
181
37
162
16
242
84
30
114
86
38
43
20
129
48
21
80
15,497
1 Includes Victoria and Esquimau only.
2 Excludes Victoria, Esquimau, and Oak Bay.
3 Includes Oak Bay only. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 57
Table 37.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
and Sex, 1952
(Indians only.1)
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
Health Unit and School District
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay—
2
15
11
4
2
2
11
7
9
12
12
13
24
2
11
7
3
8
5
4
6
6
2
7
I         8
12
10
37
4
26
18
7
10
" 5
6
17
13
2
16
20
24
23
71
10
1
66
91
52
129
22
62
123
16
42
66
8
24
7
6
35
1
79
2
6
7
North Fraser Valley—
School District No. 42. 	
School District No. 75..	
School District No. 76	
3
6
44
6
3
17
55
88
98
128
5
32
3
7
5
13
2
42
3
24
17
1
34
1
3
17
40
70
75
10
264
7
5
38
11
4
24
48
86
104
151
3
4
21
2
3
18
49
4
13
19
2
25
1         8
1       15
47
77
|       80
1       13
315
10
11
82
School District No. 4.  -
School District No. 5... 	
Upper Island—
School District No. 47  _
School District No. 71     	
17
7
West Kootenay—
School District No. 9	
School District No. 72	
Skeena—
School District No. 50	
School District No. 51	
School District No. 52  	
School District No. 53	
School District No. 54	
41
School District No. 11  	
School District No. 12.	
School District No. 13    	
103
174
202
South Okanagan—
279
3
School District No. 15  :
Peace River—
School District No. 59. 	
9
School District No. 17 	
School District No. 23 	
School District No. 60    ..
53
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of
Health-
School District No. 61 (part)2
Saanich and South Vancouver Island—
School District No. 61 (part)3
School District No. 62 	
School District No. 77	
North Okanagan—
School District No. 19  1
School District No. 20               .   -
School District No. 21	
5
10
6
South Central—
School District No. 63.	
31
2
Central Vancouver Island—
School District No. 25	
6
1
30
45
28
4
36
46
24
91
School District No. 29..           -
7
37
School District No. 68_	
36
School District No. 69 	
School District No. 70	
3
62
10
67
12
1       34
69
8
59
School District No. 28    	
School districts not covered by
health units—
School District No. 6	
School District No. 7 	
28
54
8
School District No. 56	
1
School District No. 8   	
Upper Fraser Valley—
22
40
4
10
20
26
4
14
3
School District No. 10.         ,
School District No. 34	
11
Boundary—
School District No. 35	
School District No. 36	
School District No. 46.	
32
School District No. 48	
School District No. 49 	
School District No. 58 	
87
147
School District No. 37 -	
Metropolitan Health Committee—
4
School District No. 61 (part) *	
School District No. 73 	
1
17
1
36
4
1
|         5
j       18
43
2
1        2
I         6
155
School District No. 39	
School District No. 74 - 	
23
579
Totals    	
1,662
1,768
3,430
■
Simon Fraser—
School District No. 43...	
1 These figures include 159 Indians of white status.
2 Includes Victoria and Esquimau only.
3 Excludes Victoria, Esquimau, and Oak Bay.
* Includes Oak Bay only.
Table 38.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis
in British Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1952
(Excluding Indians.)
Population
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Total
Total	
74.1
61.8
86.8
1
237.2 1 353.7
447.9
367.1
531.9
871.6
750.8
990.4
1,545.8
1,362.6
1,714.9
2,044.0
1,863.8
2,211.6
2,130.2
2,072.4
2,196.0
2.043.9    1.876.3
1,620.0
2,073.5
1,056.5
1,574.5
2,064.7
1,050.1
1,322.9
1,398.5
1,243.1
Male	
Female	
235.5
239.0
382.3
324.1
2,522.9
1,517.5
2,410.6
1,224.9 F 58
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 10.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis
in British Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1952
(Excluding Indians.)
"ATE MALE
3,000       2,500        2,000        1,500 1,000 500 0
FEMALE RATE
0 500 1,000 1,500        2,000        2,500       3,000
0-4
10-14
30-39
3,000        2,500        2,000        1,500 1,000 500 0
0 500 1,000 1.500        2,000        2,500       3,000 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 59
Of the 15,497 known tuberculosis cases registered, 14,320 or 92.4 per cent were
pulmonary and 1,177 or 7.6 per cent were non-pulmonary. The number of cases with
inactive or arrested pulmonary tuberculosis totalled 10,408 or 72.7 per cent of the total
pulmonary cases, while 2,749 or 19.1 per cent were registered as having active pulmonary
tuberculosis.
Table 39.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Present
Condition, and Age-group, 1952
(Excluding Indians.)
Age-
group
Diagnosis
rt
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rt
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ri
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91
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7
7
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9
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201
81
61
48
39
8
4
4
Inactive	
6
49
54
26
18
9
8
2
4
1
1
178
Arrested 	
30
86
68
36
30
26
9
2
2
2
1
1
293
2
15
12
4
2
36
Active unimproved	
10
15
17
5
2
5
1
55
Active (not stated)	
20
18
7
3
1
1
2
52
Activity undetermined
1
4
1
1
7
13
14
13
6
9
7
19
4
2
2
2
91
Minimal -
2
9
23
113
300
763
2,133
1,783
1,313
1,198
574
129
59
8,399
1
2
4
8
62
246
883
861
622
600
279
54
25
3,647
1
5
9
42
136
345
879
655
501
445
211
57
16
3,302
2
14
16
41
83
55
38
24
20
5
2
300
Active unimproved	
1
1
6
25
39
102
65
42
45
19
2
2
349
Active (not stated)	
1
25
29
48
74
45
33
24
14
4
297
Activity undetermined
2
10
15
22
55
44
27
17
8
3
4
207
Not stated	
1
4
8
17
22
57
58
50
43
23
8
6
297
Moderately advanced —
5
11
39
154
337
939
752
602
517
283
57
26
3,722
Inactive.  	
2
8
47
172
178
128
87
54
4
4
684
Arrested..  	
1
4
7
73
163
467
355
262
246
124
31
8
1,741
Active improved-	
1
3
6
16
17
29
38
72
107
60
70
50
63
39
27
2
12
1
4
300
Active unimproved
59
35
411
Active (not stated)    -
1
2
10
24
42
73
56
67
51
23
3
4
356
Activity undetermined
1
5
9
13
23
15
18
19
9
3
115
1
5
6
7
5
25
18
14
16
11
2
5
115
4
2
6
11
46
86
304
319
205
136
90
21
12
1,242
165
Inactive   	
1
8
50
50
34
10
8
3
1
Arrested—  	
1
1
15
24
98
119
62
42
32
4
398
Active improved	
6
11
40
32
19
16
10
1
135
Active unimproved	
2
1
1
10
16
59
63
43
39
22
5
1
262
Active (not stated ).....
6
9
20
46
39
32
23
14
3
4
196
Activity undetermined
2
	
1
7
3
6
2
1
22
1
4
3
5
7
4
13
9
4
3
6
5
64
Pulmonary tuberculosis
1
3
2
12
15
24
27
10
3
Pleurisy with effusion ___...
3
2
18
15
30
13
11
6
1
2
101
Pleurisy without effusion
3
1
4
7
8
2
1
26
Far advanced tuberculo-
2
5
6
3
6
25
67
61
80
135
262
213
131
97
39
29
32
1,177
Totals	
94
242
282
311
663
1,390
3,726
3,113
2,301
1,992
1,004
239
140
15,497
Source: Case Examination, Form TB. 1. F 60
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 40.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-
Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1943-52.
Total
Other than Indians
Indians
Year
Known
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Known
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Known
Cases1
Deaths2
Ratio
1943  	
1944	
1945       	
10,260
11,469
13,116
14,069
15,408
16,812
18,483
19,428
18,709
18,927
613
517
525
576
536
442
406
313
292
215
16.7
22.2
25.0
24.4
28.7
1
1
1
1
1
8,914
9,861
11,212
12,254
13,430
14,528
15,738
16,438
15,404
15,497
405
346
363
369
362
286
295
239
212
180
22.0:1
28.5:1
30.9:1
33.2:1
37.1:1
50.8:1
53.3:1
68.8:1
72.7:1
86.1:1
1,346
1,608
1,904
1,815
1,978
2,284
2,745
2,990
3,305
3,430
208
171
162
207
174
156
111
74
80
35
6.5:1
9.4:1
11.8:1
1946    -.
8.8:1
1947   ..   	
11.4:1
1948	
1949. .    .   	
1950...	
1951	
38.0:1
45.5:1
62.1:1
64.1:1
14.6:1
24.7:1
40.4:1
41.3:1
1952   	
88.0
1
98.0:1
1 These figures include:   1947, 141 Indians of white status;   1948, 84 Indians of white status;   1949, 93 Indians of
white status;   1950, 160 Indians of white status;   1951, 127 Indians of white status;   1952, 159 Indians of white status.
2 These figures include deaths of:   1947, 9 Indians of white status;   1948, 12 Indians of white status;   1949, 8 Indians
of white status;   1950, 4 Indians of white status;   1951, 10 Indians of white status;   1952, 3 Indians of white status.
NOTIFICATIONS OF TUBERCULOSIS
During 1952 there were 1,383 new notifications of tuberculosis, compared with
1,688 in 1951. This represents a decrease of 18.1 per cent. Notifications among Indians
also showed a decline, there being 282 in 1952, compared with 356 in 1951.
Table 41.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1948-52
Area
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
Area 1         -      -
44
78
71
988
382
93
74
179
139
35
7
18
39
62
125
1,019
298
95
69
210
191
75
1
18
27
71
83
889
259
69
41
88
120
34
3
15
48
94
80
852
198
71
56
133
121
17
5
13
27
44
Area 3.         _ -	
Area 4         —  -.
53
748
178
72
Area 7    - 	
27
113
Area 9 	
Area 10                      	
92
11
2
15
Totals                ,	
2,108
2,202
1,699
1,688
1,383 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 61
Table 42.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1948-52
Area
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
Area 1       '   	
Area 2 	
Area 3    _	
Area 4	
40
78
58
913
276
50
30
61
102
988
219
41
27
71
64
853
144
27
38
94
67
816
151
29
20
43
44
730
134
28
Area 7    . .
24
50
36
14
3
13
19
62
57
27
1
17
18
35
54
15
3
15
19
58
36
6
5
13
15
39
29
Area 10                                                           -  .
1
2
15
Totals	
1,555
1,624
1,326
1,332
1,101
Table 43.-
-New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1948-52
Area
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
4
13
75
106
43
50
129
103
21
4
5
9
1
23
31
79
54
50
148
134
48
1
19
36
115
42
23
53
66
19
10
13
36
47
42
37
75
85
11
7
Area 2                   _ -
1
9
18
44
44
Area 7  	
12
74
63
Area 10
10
Totals                        —  .
553
578
373
356
282
Table 44.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases by Statistical Area,
by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1952
Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Total __.._	
1.0
0.7
0.7
1.1
0.8
1.7
1.4
2.7
4.3
0.7
1.2
Other-than-Indian...	
0.7
0.7
0.6
1.1
0.5
0.7
0.9
1.1
1.8
0.1
0.9
Indian 	
16.3
8.0
8.6
5.2
7.7
9.3
5.5
13.5
12.3
13.8
9.7 F 62
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
and Sex, 1952
(Excluding Indians.)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Male        Female       Total
Dead
Male        Female       Total
East Kootenay—
School District No. 1 	
School District No. 2 	
School District No. 3	
School District No. 4 	
School District No. 5	
School District No. 18	
West Kootenay—
School District No. 9	
School District No. 11	
School District No. 12	
School District No. 13 —
South Okanagan—
School District No. 14	
School District No. 15	
School District No. 16	
School District No. 17	
School District No. 23	
School District No. 77	
North Okanagan—
School District No. 19  —
School District No. 20	
School District No. 21.	
School District No. 22	
South Central—
School District No. 24 	
School District No. 25	
School District No. 26	
School District No. 29	
School District No. 30	
School District No. 31 	
Cariboo—
School District No. 27 	
School District No. 28.	
School District No. 55	
School District No. 56	
School District No. 57	
Upper Fraser Valley—
School District No. 32	
School District No. 33	
Boundary—
School District No. 35 	
School District No. 36	
School District No. 37	
Metropolitan Health Committee—
School District No. 38	
School District No. 39 	
School District No. 41	
School District No. 44 	
School District No. 45... 	
Simon Fraser—
School District No. 40 _ __
School District No. 43  __
North Fraser Valley—
School District No. 42	
School District No. 75	
School District No. 76 	
Upper Island—
School District No. 47 	
School District No. 71	
School District No. 72	
Skeena—
School District No. 50 	
School District No. 51.—	
School District No. 52	
School District No. 53	
School District No. 54	
Peace River—
School District No. 59-	
School District No. 60	
4
10
2
9
3
1
5
1
7
11
11
1
6
258
22
19
4
13
15
10
7
6
1
11
14
6
2
4
7
	
2
2
2
1
2
4
9
19
1
5
7
5
10
4
7
10
1
1
4
3
3
1
6
1
11
171
18
15
5
16
14
2
1
1
4
4
7
16
5
13
3
2
9
4
10
12
17
2
17
429
40
34
9
29
29
12
10
5
18
18
10
4
1
29
2
1
......
1
1
1
1
	
1
—
1
1
1
9
1
38
2
1
	
3
	
1
1
1
	
	 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1952
F 63
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
and Sex, 1952—Continued
(Excluding Indians.)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Male        Female       Total
Dead
Male        Female       Total
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of Health-
School District No. 61 (part)1	
Saanich and South Vancouver Island—
School District No. 61 (part)2	
School District No. 62  	
School District No. 63	
School District No. 64 _ 	
Central Vancouver Island—
School District No. 65  	
School District No. 66	
School District No. 67	
School District No. 68 	
School District No. 69 	
School District No. 70 __  	
School districts not covered by health units—
School Distr:
School Distr:
School Distrj
School Distri
School Distri
School Distri
School Distri
School Distri
School Distri
School Distri
School Distri
School Distr
Unorganized.
Ex-Province..
Unknown	
ct No. 6..
ct No. 7	
ct No. 8__.
ct No. 10..
ctNo. 34...
ct No. 46.
ct No. 48-
ct No. 49...
ct No. 58-
ctNo. 73...
ct No. 74...
ctNo. 61 (part)3..
Totals..
19
3
1
1
1
4
3
3
8
1
4
1
4
1
1
5
11
2
3
2
2
3
2
3
14
1
20
6
2
1
425
39
3
2
1
7
4
4
13
1
6
1
1
9
14
6
3
3
4
5
3
5
15
2
1,037
51
1 Includes Victoria and Esquimau only.
2 Excludes Victoria, Esquimau, and Oak Bay.
3 Includes Oak Bay only. F 64
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 46.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
and Sex, 1952
(Indians only.)
Live
Dead
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
East Kootenay—
School District No. 1. —	
1
1
2
1
1
School District No. 2       ..
2
2
School District No. 3   -   ,    ....
	
2
2
1
1
School District No. 18       -
West Kootenay—
School District No. 9. -   	
SchoolDistrictNo.il   	
School District No. 12  	
	
School District No. 13 .-. 	
	
South Okanagan—
School District No. 14   	
1
1
2
School District No. 15...    	
1
1
School District No. 16  	
School District No. 17.     ....
2
2
School District No. 77. —
North Okanagan—
School District No. 19	
.   ..      1
School District No. 20    _	
1
1
School District No. 21 _	
1
1
School District No. 22  _	
2
2
1
1
South Central—
School District No. 24-	
3
1
4
School District No. 25	
1
1
	
School District No. 26-   	
	
School District No. 29   	
5
2
7
School District No. 30  -  	
3
7
10
School District No. 31   - .
6
2
8
Cariboo—
School District No. 27   	
6
8
14
School District No. 28 	
2
5
7
School District No. 55     ..
6
1
7
1
3                4
School District No. 56.    _	
8
10
18
2
2
School District No. 57	
1
Upper Fraser Valley—
School District No. 32    	
3
3
School District No. 33.	
Boundary—
School District No. 35... 	
1
	
1
School District No. 36 	
1
1
2
School District No. 37 	
Metropolitan Health Committee—
School District No. 38         ..   .
	
1
1
School District No. 39  	
1
1
1
1
School District No. 41.    ..
2
2
School District No. 44   .
1
1
School District No. 45   	
        1       -	
Simon Fraser—
School District No. 40   	
School District No. 43.	
North Fraser Valley—
School District No. 42	
School District No. 75    	
1
1
School District No. 76  	
2
2
Upper Island—
School District No. 47	
2
2
School District No. 71  ,. _	
School District No. 72  ,	
3
3
Skeena—
School District No. 50— 	
9
4
13
1
1
School District No. 51..	
9
6
15
School District No. 52—  	
5
8
13
School District No. 53 -  	
11
10
21
1
1
School District No. 54 	
        1       .
Peace River—
1                    |
School District No. 59  	
1
1
        1
School District No. 60  -	
2
2
4
2                 2
1        1 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 65
Table 46.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Health Unit and School District
and Sex, 1952—Continued
(Indians only.)
Health Unit and School District
Live
Male
Female
Total
Dead
Male        Female       Total
Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of Health-
School District No. 61 (part)1	
Saanich and South Vancouver Island—
School District No. 61 (part)2	
School District No. 62	
School District No. 63	
School District No. 64	
1      I
Central Vancouver Island—
School District No. 65  	
School District No. 66	
School District No. 67	
School District No. 68	
School District No. 69 	
School District No. 70	
School districts not covered by health units-
School District No. 6 	
School District No. 7  	
School District No. 8	
School District No. 10	
School District No. 34-
School District No. 46 .
School District No. 48..
School District No. 49..
School District No. 58-
School District No. 73..
School District No. 74..
School District No. 61 (part)3..
Unorganized  	
Ex-Province  	
28
I
Totals..
139
53
261
12
9      |        21
i Includes Victoria and Esquimau only.
2 Excludes Victoria, Esquimau, and Oak Bay.
3 Includes Oak Bay only.
Table 47.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1943-52
Racial Origin
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1,688
1,163
419
62
44
2,153
1,446
558
108
41
2,079
1,519
417
111
32
2,108
1,448
553
88
19
2,202
1,525
578
78
21
1,699
1,220
373
86
20
1,688
1,209
356
100
23
Total  	
White            	
2,373
1,973
256
120
24
2,616
1,864
645
81
26
1,383
999
Indian* 	
Chinese —
282
85
17
i Includes notifications of:   1947, 21 Indians of white status;   1948, 27 Indians of white status;   1949, 34 Indians of
white status;   1950, 10 Indians of white status;   1951, 21 Indians of white status;    1952, 26 Indians of white status. F 66
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 11.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1943-52
NC
OF CASES
TOTAL     ^.
^^WHITE
*
_j»
"V
/
"^
\
***
N
^
/
\
s_
^INDIAN
/
X
"^^
^
N
/
ZS
CHINESE
N
f
\
^4>~*
""■"V-^
/
\
^.-^m- —
*** *i*.
_,— -
""^
"^ «
4>
/
m -__ ..^
\
X..
\
X
JAPANESE
*N_
**
v
tfl — * —
10
1943 1944
1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 67
Table 48.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Racial Groups (Including Dead Cases Reported for the First
Time), 1952.
Age and Sex
White
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
Chinese
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
Japanese
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
Indian*
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
Total
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
0- 4 years  M.
F.
T.
5- 9    „    _  M.
F.
T.
10-14   „      M.
F.
T.
15-19    „ M.
F.
T.
20-24   „      M.
F.
T.
25-29    „    M.
F.
T.
30-39    „ M.
F.
T.
40-49    „     M.
F.
T.
50-59    „     M.
F.
T.
60-69    „ M.
F.
T.
70-79    „ M.
F.
T.
80 years and over M.
F.
T.
Not stated ......  M.
F.
T.
Totals -. M.
F.
Grand totals	
22
20
42
14
14
28
12
10
22
16
30
46
37
49
51
55
106
89
108
197
101
61
162
36
124
75
18
93
51
14
65
9
5
14
6
14
573
426
999
2.2
2.0
4.2
1.4
1.4
2.8
1.2
1.0
2.2
1.6
3.0
4.6
3.7
4.9
8.6
5.1
5.5
10.6
10.8
19.7
10.0
6.1
16.2
3.7
12.5
7.5
1.8
9.3
5.1
1.4
6.5
0.9
0.5
1.4
0.8
0.6
1.4
57.3
42.7
100.0
4
3
7
2
1
3
1
2
3
4
1
5
15
15
25
25
10
10
5
"5
4
" 4
85
8.2
1.2
9.4
4.7
3.5
8.2
2.3
1.2
3.5
1.2
2.3
3.5
4.7
1.2
5.9
17.6
17.6
29.5
29.5
11.8
Tl!
5.9
5.9
4.7
4.7
90.6
9.4
100.0
13
4
17
5.9
5.9
5.9
5.9
11.8
11.8
5.9
5.9
17.6
5.9
23.5
29.3
29.3
5.9
5.9
11.8
11.8
76.4
23.6
100.0
24
10
34
28
23
51
15
25
40
17
19
36
14
15
29
7
7
14
10
14
24
11
4
15
7
8
15
5
5
9
3
12
4
3
7
151
131
8.5
3.5
12.0
9.9
8.2
18.1
5.3
8.9
14.2
6.0
6.7
12.7
5.0
5.3
10.3
2.5
2.5
5.0
3.5
5.0
8.5
3.9
1.4
5.3
2.5
2.8
5.3
1.8
1.1
3.2
1.1
4.3
1.4
1.1
2.5
53.5
46.5
46
31
77
43
37
80
27
35
62
40
52
92
56
67
123
63
64
127
105
124
229
117
66
183
110
44
154
107
18
125
70
17
87
18
8
26
12
6
18
-
814
569
282    I    100.0    I   1,383
3.3
2.3
5.6
3.1
2.7
5.8
2.0
2.5
4.5
2.9
3.7
6.6
4.1
4.8
8.9
4.6
4.6
9.2
7.5
9.1
16.6
8.4
4.8
13.2
8.0
3.1
11.1
7.7
1.3
9.0
5.1
1.2
6.3
1.3
0.6
1.9
0.9
0.4
1.3
58.9
41.1
100.0
1 Includes notifications of 26 Indians of white status.
Source: Case Examination, Form TB. 1. F 68
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 12.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia
by Diagnosis, 1952
INDIANS ONLY
DEAD          LL
t
'R/NfA R Y
31.9 7.
'          MINIMAL         \
25.? 5.              \
.    MODERATELY^-j
\    ADVANCED       /
■PULMONAR)^
yofl
JA1 //
' //I
Ml
is \
V?&
Q Q
/J. 5 7.
EXCLUDING INDIANS
■
D£AD NON-PULMONARY
1.4%
PULMONARY NOT STATEi
O. 6 %
TUBERCULOUS
PLEURISY /.SX TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 69
Although the number of new notifications is down considerably from last year, the
percentage distribution of pulmonary and non-pulmonary lesions remains substantially
unchanged. It is also interesting to see that the notifications are down about 50 per cent
from the peak year of 1947, when 2,616 new cases were reported in spite of intensified
case-finding programmes. It is worth noting, however, that among the other-than-Indian
group there was a small percentage increase in cases diagnosed as primary and far advanced, and in some non-pulmonary lesions. Among Indians, small percentage increases
are noted among cases diagnosed as minimal and in some non-pulmonary lesions.
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia
by Diagnosis, 1952
Diagnosis
Excluding Indians
Indians Only
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
88
8.0
90
31.9
498
45.2
73
25.9
220
20.0
38
13.5
102
9.3
18
6.4
7
0.6
49
4.5
17
6.0
17                    1.5
9
3.2
105
9.5
33
11.7
15
1.4
4
1.4
1,101
100.0
282
100.0
Primary-
Minimal-
Moderately advanced-
Far advanced	
Pulmonary, type not stated-
Dead, pulmonary 	
Tuberculous pleurisy-..	
Dead, tuberculous pleurisy-
Non-pulmonary	
Dead, non-pulmonary 	
Totals	 F 70
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1952
(Excluding Indians.)
Age-group
Diagnosis on Notification
-_■ rt
<*8
•OK"1
22
<_N g
T cs
Al
■* S2
V a
Ov g
mi*
p\ g
<=>•__
fa
•szr*
5 n
cs <u
So
■a
o <-
"rt
O
H
Pulmonary—■
__M.
17
21
1
14
14
1
6
4
1
1
4
11
17
2
6
2
2
2
2
21
23
8
13
3
3
35
38
14
12
5
2
1
58
58
15
21
13
9
1
3
61
35
19
7
11
8
1
2
	
3
3
-
42
19
38
6
8
2
1
1
6
2
1
39
8
26
3
13
1
1
2
9
18
2
3
2
2
1
3
2
3
1
4
41
Minimal   	
F.
M.
F.
-M.
47
291
207
19
1
8
2
147
F.
—M.
73
69
Far advanced with silicosis	
F.
M.
F.
M.
30
3
1
13
1
6
1
6
Deadi     __	
F.
M.
F.
rt__M.
1
42
7
18
21
39
15
14
29
7
5
12
16
29
45
34
41
75
54
52
106
90
89
179
97
53
150
96
30
126
91
12
103
58
12
70
13
3
16
10
4
14
599
F.
T.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
365
964
Tuberculous pleurisy—■
1
2
1
_
2
4
1
1
	
2
1
1
9
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion .
Deadi   .   —       	
......
	
6
1
1
- 1       -
...      1 -.
	
	
1
_
2
2
4
2
4
6
1
.....
1
1
1
	
	
2
2
	
	
1
1
2
10
F.
T.
M.
F.
M.
F.
__M.
7
17
Non-pulmonary—
Meninges          	
Intestines and peritoneum	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
	
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
3
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
~~3
_._
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
.......
1
1
___
3
1
1
.     _
1
5
2
-
1
2
F.
rt...M.
5
5
Skin   _ -	
F.
M.
F.
M.
8
3
5
2
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
12
F.
___.M.
15
14
F.
M.
F.
._.M.
21      6
1
14
.—!.,. ...
.— |.—
 1-	
1
1
1
.......
3
1
1
3
1
2
Other non-pulmonary —	
Deadi  __ _	
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
„„M.
2
2
2
9
6
1
4
1
41      5
5!      2
91      7
6
7
13
1       1
11       41       9
7
9
6
15
1        1        1
3|      1|      1      54
F.
T.
„..M.
4
	
51    211      91      6
61    251    18!    13
31      11      11     66
61      2|      2|   120
Total notifications 	
1
221    15
1
121    23
47,
1        1        1
561    951 1061  103
102
18
120
1
611    141    12
663
F.
T.
21
43
14
29
10
22
33
56
52
94
57
113
110
205
62
168
36
139
15
76
4
18
6
18
438
1,101
i Dead on notification.
Source: Case Examination, Form TB. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 71
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1952
(Indians only.1)
Age-group
Diagnosis on Notification
as
u
i   si
tn
2§
28
,X si
2>«
it i-
ski
<_\ g
v. w
o\ g
7 a
fl
ifi
OS g
q\ g
\c?i
ON   g
s <-
cs si
So
Si
O cs
ZZ
O
H
Pulmonary—
Primary —     -	
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
....M.
16
6
20
17
1
6
15
3
6
2
1
5
4
5
6
2
2
2
2
~4
4
7
5
3
2
2
1
5
4
1
1
2
4
6
i
5
5
3
1
3
2
4
3
4
—
43
47
35
Moderately advanced  	
6       1
1
.. 1      3
31
1
9
1
1
7
38
27
11
3
1
1
1
12
F.
rt-.M.
1
1
1
 1 "
 1- . .
1
 1      1
 1     2
6
F.
	
F.
Dead2             	
10
F.
....M.
- -1      21 I |	
7
1
19      22
11
21
32
15
14
29
13
15
28
1         1         1
7!      61    101      7
61    121      21      8
131    181    121    15
5
5
81      4
31      3
111      7
1
 I    127
F.
T.
M.
F.
M.
F.
_...M.
7
26
18
40
1   109
 -1   236
Tuberculous pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion	
~~l
1
.
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
11
.
.. ...1
 1.       .
1
—..—■
	
1
1
 1	
 1
 1-	
1
1       3
. 1       4
1
 1       2
—.1
—. 1  	
1        1        1
— 1 1 . 1.....
F.
...-M.
1   1   1   •
1         1
1         1
1
2
3
1
1
1        1        1
1      11—...1	
 1 -- 1 - 1	
1      11 -- 1.	
:::::
1        1        1
- 1- 1 1       5
F.
T.
M.
F.
—M.
1
2
1
2
 1- 1- 1       4
1 —-1 1       9
Non-pulmonary—
Meninges  	
.. ....
1        1
I
I
 I	
..I —
1
i
1
 1— .
 1-	
1
1
11-
....... 1
....... |
1
F.
_.M.
1
1
""~2
6
2
3
3
1
1
1
	
i
1
F.
.M.
1        1
1
 I V;
l
Skin 	
F.
M.
F.
...M.
2
1
1
1
2
13
F.
1
	
	
	
I
'"~z
	
_:__:.
7
Genito-urinary system  	
M.
F.
 M.
"~1
	
2
1
F.
 M.
. i    ii	
1      1
1
1 1	
2
Other non-pulmonary	
Dead2   — 	
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
T.
_..M.
1
2
	
	
1
	
1  1 	
1
—..
 1.. ..   1
-..-i. i-	
1
2
2
.... 1      1
I -
Total non-pulmonary	
4
2
1
6
5
5    11
3
3
6
1
3
4
....
1
3
2
1      5
1         1
11 1-	
21. 1	
31  1 -
i    i
ii i -
~1.l-~~1.z~
19
18
37
1
241    28
15
25
40
1
17
19
36
14
15
29
I
7I    10
111     7      5
i    i
91   41	
151
F.
T.
10
34
1    23
51
7
14
1    14
1    24
1
4
15
1
I      8
I    15
1
i
1      5
1
3
12
1      3
1      7
1
|=
131
282
1 Includes notifications of 26 Indians of white status.
2 Dead on notification.
Source: Case Examination, Form TB. 1. F 72
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 52.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
in British Columbia, 1948-52
Total
Other than Indians
Indians
Year
New
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
New
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
New
Cases1
Deaths2
Ratio
1948         	
1949  . ...	
1950  ..
2,108
2,202
1,699
1,688
1,383
442
406
313
292
215
4.8:1
5.4:1
5.4:1
5.8:1
6.4:1
1,555
1,624
1,326
1,332
1,101
286
295
239
215.
5.4
5.5
5.5
fi 3
1
1
1
1
1
553
578
373
356
282
156
Ul
74
80
35
3.5:1
5.2:1
5.0:1
1951	
4.5:1
1952	
ISO       1    fi1
8.1:1
i-lncludes notifications of: 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 34 Indians of white, status; 1950, 4 Indians of
white status;   1951, 10 Indians of white status;   1952, 26 Indians of white status.
2 Includes deaths of: 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 7 Indians of white statu:,; 1950, 4 Indians of white
status;   1951, 10 Indians of white status;   1952, 3 Indians of white status.
TUBERCULOSIS MORTALITY
Table 53.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1948-52
Total Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
Area
Area
9
10
33
14
19
10
18
6
23
11
5
5
158.4
107.8
86.7
75.4
80.3
44.3
110.3
76.4
23.5
33.8 |
Total
Mortality—
1948	
1949 	
1950.  	
1951 	
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1948 	
1949	
1950	
1951	
1952	
37.0
8.3
16.2
10.0
10.6
10
20
11
24
11
13
9
10
11
7
18.9
30.3
20.4
33.0
19.9
17.5
15.0
12.9
17.8
8.8
184
207
162
138
129
29.1
31.7
24.3
21.3
19.3
72
61
44
42
26
I
30
20
18
12
10
12
12
4
10
4
58
40
33
30
I    1*
38.5
32.5
22.8
19.5
|    11.8
| 74.9
| 52.9
| 46.5
| 28.7
I 23.3
I
I
85.9
81.7
26.6
54.8
21.4 I
183.3
122.9
99.3
74.5
33.9
I
442
406
3131
2882
2123
40.9
36.4
27.5
24.8
17.9
i Excludes death of 1 ex-Province resident.
2 Excludes deaths of 3 ex-Province residents and 1 area-not-stated resident.
3 Excludes deaths of 3 ex-Province residents.
Preliminary figures for 1952.
Table 54.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area,
1948-52.
Other-than-Indian Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality—
1948                          rt...
7
1
3
2
3
29.3
4.2
12.4
7.4
10.7
9
11
11
9
«
17.0
20.4
20.0
15.0
17.8
15
12
12
8
6
23.1
16.8
16.4
10.5
7.6
174
196
160
129
125
27.7
30.2
24.1
20.0
18.8
51
40
32
33
19
28.0
21.7
17.0
15.8
8.8
11
13
5
7
6
30.9
38.9
14.6
18.9
15.7
2
4
1
5
2
16.5
31.3
7.6
31.7
12.1
7
5
9
■5
4
25.9
21.7
31.8
17.2
11.1
7
6
5
8
1
46.8
37.6
30.7
50.8
6.1
3
6
1
1
24.5
48.2
7.8
7.2
286
1949.                  	
1950
295
3291
1951	
1952
2082
1773
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1948	
27.1
1949                                 	
27.2
1950             	
21.5
1951           	
18.4
1952	
15.4
i Excludes death of 1 ex-Province resident.
2 Excludes deaths of 3 ex-Province residents and 1 area-not-stated resident.
3 Excludes deaths of 3 ex-Province residents.
Preliminary figures for 1952. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 73
Table 55.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1948-52
Indian Population
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area     Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality-
19481	
19491—.
19501	
19511—.
19511
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1948	
1949	
1950  	
1951   	
1952	
10
11
2
9
4
21
21
12
9
7
275.
301
54
302
115
405.
400.
228.
157.
122.
19
7
13
5
4
428.1
157.3
286.7
105.9
84.5
10
8
3
5
2
51
34
24
24
10
541.7 1092.
422.2 | 702.
155.0 484.
216.5 I 440
91.9 | 183
26
13
13
15
5
443.4
217.8
212.5
294.1
97.7
11
4
3
10
2
1547.1
490.1
380.'
1801.1
276.1
156
Ul
74
80
35
557.1
388.4
255.2
280.7
120.7
1 Includes deaths of:   1949, 8 Indians of white status;
status;   1952, 3 Indians of white status.
Preliminary figures for 1952.
1950, 4 Indians of white status;   1951, 7 Indians of white
Table 56.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1952
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
1
1
Area No. 4b—Continued
Vancouver...  . . ..
66
6
1
1
2
1
13
1
6
2
4
2
2
3
2
1
2
2
1
1
23
4
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
-
1
1
....
Unorganized. —
1
89
Area No. lb	
1
1
3
1
2
7
3
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
10
1
3
1
2
1
2
80
3
1
1
1
Burnaby     	
North Vancouver District	
Eburne 	
10
1
2
3
1
Area No. 5a.	
1               1
1
3
1
2
1
::::       1
_   i    i
....      1        2
17
I
1
7
Oak Bay	
3
1
4
Area No. 5c 	
2
2
1
1
....
....
1
1
1
1
1
30
1
15
2
1
110
4
5
2
1
Unorganized 	
2
Area No. 7b 	
Area No. 7c _	
Chilliwack  	
2
2
Haney ~	
Area No. 8d.-              .
Quesnel-  	
Area No. 9c. _ 	
Stewart 	
2
2
Surrey	
1
1
132
2
45
1
177
3 F 74
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 57.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1952
(
Indians only.1)
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Area No. 3a.	
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
2
3
2
1
1
1
Area No. 7b	
Unorganized	
Area No. 8c	
Unorganised
Area No. 8e	
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
Area No. 4b_	
Vancouver	
1
3
3
Area No. 8f	
3
1
1
1
3
3
Area No. 9c	
Stewart 	
Unorganized
Area No. 9d—  	
3
1
2
Alert Bay	
1
1
1
1
2
2
15
20
35
i Includes 3 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 75
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-groups, 1952
Excluding Indians
Indians Only^
Age-group
3
o
H
0
.-.26
o-as
S'P
HtStn
M
a
A
TB. of
Intestines
and
Peritoneum
PPSiO
H>0
c
rt
• c c
ffl S'S
o
rt
TB. of
Genitourinary
System
o b 9
^ si cs
P9gj;
HOO
pis
Under 1 year	
1
2
2
6
4
12
25
21
28
45
29
5
1
4
4
12
23
20
25
44
28
5
i
i
2
2
	
	
	
	
1
1
1
1
1
—
5- 9   „   _	
10-14    ,,
15-19    „	
20-24    „    	
25-29    „    	
—
30-39	
i
1
	
	
40-49    „	
50-59    „	
i
60-69    „    .... —
70-79    „	
80 and over    	
—
Totals
180
166
6
	
1    |    .	
1
	
2
3
2
Under 1 year	
1
4
4
1
3
3
2
5
2
4
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
3
3
2
4
2
4
2
1
3
3
3
	
1
	
	
     |          1
	
5- 9    „   	
10-14   „	
15-19    „    	
20-24    „    	
25-29    „
30-39    „     	
	
40-49    „    	
50-59    „     	
60-69    „  ..
70-79    „      	
80 and over 	
	
Totals 	
35
28
6    1       ...
1
     1      ......
j
|          1
	
i Includes 3 Indians of white status.
Source:   Death Registrations, 1952. F 76
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The death rate from tuberculosis in 1952 continued to decline, and a rate of 15.4
per 100,000 population was recorded for the other-than-Indian population, as against
18.9 the previous year. The death rate in 1952 for the total population was 17.9, as
against 25.1 in 1951. Deaths among the Indian population showed a considerable reduction, there being 35 deaths in 1952 for a rate of 120.7, compared with 77 deaths in 1951
for a rate of 270.2 per 100,000 population. In the other-than-Indian group, 107 or 59.4
per cent of the deaths occurred in patients over 50 years of age.
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1943-52.
Total Province
Indians
Excluding Indians
Year
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100.000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100.000
1943                       .   	
613
517
525
576
536
442
406
313
292
215
900,000
932,000
949,000
1,003,000
1,044,000
1,082,000
1,114,000
1,138,000
1,165,210
1,198,000
68.1
55.5
55.3
57.4
51.3
40.9
36.4
27.5
25.1
17.9
208
169
173
207
1741
1561
1111
741
77 »
351
24,522
25,139
25,758
26,400
27,000
28,000
28,500
29,000
28,478
29,000
848.2
672.2
671.6
784.1
644.4
557.1
389.5
255.2
270.4
120.7
405
348
352
369
362
286
295
239
215
180
875,478
906,861
923,242
976,600
1,017,000
1,054,000
1,085,500
1,109,000
1,136,732
1,169,000
46.3
1944
38.4
1945
38.1
1946                      .   ... .
37.8
1947
35.6
1948. 	
1949
27.1
27.2
1950  - 	
1951 	
1952..-    	
21.6
18.9
15.4
Chinese
Japanese
Excluding Indians and
Orientals
Year
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100.000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100.000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
1943            .     .
36
41
40
44
40
33
22
24
31
23
16,915
16,063
15,848
15,600
15,400
15,200
14,900
15,000
15,933
15,900
212.8
255.2
252.4
282.1
259.7
217.1
147.7
160.0
194.6
144.7
24
10
16
13
12
8
5
6
4
2
16,103
15,610
14,695
7,000
7,000
7,000
7,500
8,000
7,169
7,400
149.0
64.1
108.9
185.7
171.4
114.3
66.7
75.0
55.8
27.0
345
297
296
312
310
245
268
209
180
155
842,460
875,188
892,699
954,000
994,600
1,031,800
1,063,100
1,086,000
1,113,630
1,145,700
1
41.0
1944             	
33.9
1945      	
33.2
194.;
32 7
1947 	
31.2
1948    .                      	
23 8
1949     .   ...   ...
25.2
1950.	
19.2
1951	
16 2
1952    .   .
13 5
1 Includes deaths of: 1947, 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 8 Indians of white
status;   1950, 4 Indians of white status;   1951, 7 Indians of white status;   1952, 3 Indians of white status.
Note.—" Indian deaths " includes all deaths of persons of Indian racial origin, whether they were Indians under
the meaning of the " Indian Act " or not, except in the 1943 to 1946 deaths, where the term applies only to Indians
within the meaning of the " Indian Act."
Source: Mortality—Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1943 to 1951, inclusive (1952 death registrations preliminary
only). TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1952
F 77
Chart 13.—Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1943-52.
RATE
1,000
9on
son
s_
7on
\
INDIANS
600
■;nn
-inn
inn
A'
A
CHINESE
■   Mi   ■■    MB
.'-'
"--.
700
inn
\
J
/
/
f
JAPANESE
\
\
\
N
\
S
>
mm   t»
•
4*
4*
t
90
\
/
\
no
\
/
\
y
v
70
\
/
\
A
\
(iO
\N
/
S
\
50
-    TOTAL
\
40
^*
\
^
—   "-—    -
EXCLUDING INC
IA£S 8 ORIENT/
EXCLUDING
*~   INDIANS
us\
\
\
30
70
N
m  mm   *-a_---i
-»--,
\
in
v <
>
>
1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 F 78
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The percentage of the other-than-Indian deaths occurring in tuberculosis institutions
increased considerably over the previous year. Of the 180 tuberculosis deaths, 96 or
53.3 per cent occurred in tuberculosis institutions, 45 or 25.0 per cent occurred in general
hospitals, and 23 or 12.8 per cent occurred at home. Among the Indians, tuberculosis
deaths according to the place of occurrence remained substantially the same as in 1951.
Chart 14.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population and
the Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1952
EXCLUDING INDIANS
INDIANS ONLY TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1952
F 79
Table 60.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1948-52
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
25-29
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Year
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
30-39
Years
Total
17
17
10
11
5
12
9
6
5
3
5
5
2
2
1
21
13
8
8
3
15
6
8
6
3
29
25
17
18
15
42
34
21
20
13
52
45
30
30
27
43
56
49
56
40
27
24
28
24
27
6
7
5
3
5
1948 —	
1949	
1950	
1951  	
11
12
5
7
7
280
253
189
190i
1952 	
149
1
i Excludes 1 Indian (male) age not stated.
Preliminary figures for 1952.
Source:   Annual Reports of Vital Statistics.
Table 61.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of
British Columbia by Age-groups, 1948-52
Year
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Total
Years
12
11
13
8
1
12
5
6
1
3
8
8
2
4
2
13
19
11
4
5
13
11
13
4
7
4
4
1
11
3
2
3
3
3
1948	
1949. 	
1950.— _	
1951 _	
17
8
6
11
2
22
16
11
14
4
18
20
14
8
11
25
36
21
22
15
16
15
23
11
10
162
153
124
101
1952  _	
66
1
Preliminary figures for 1952.
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1948-52
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Year
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
Total
1948
29
28
23
19
6
24
14
12
6
6
13
13
4
6
3
28
20
11
18
43
29
19
22
7
33
26
22
14
14
54
61
38
40
30
58
49
44
31
23
65
64
41
34
32
56
67
62
60
47
31
28
29
35
30
8
7
8
6
8
1949 	
406
1950.	
1951	
313
29U
1952	
9
215
1 Excludes 1 Indian (male) age not stated.
Preliminary figures for 1952.
Source:   Annual Reports of Vital Statistics. F 80
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 65.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by
Length of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1952
Place of Death
1-5
Months
6-11
Months
1
Year
2
Years
3
Years
4
Years
5
Years
Over 5
Years
Not
Stated
Total
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
41
82
11
18
6
3
45
96
16
23
Totals.	
1
4
3
1
1
2
7
152
9
180
Source:   Death registrations, 1952.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty.
1953
375-653-4262  

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