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EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31ST 1953 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1954

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EIGHTH  ANNUAL  REPORT
OF THE
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
POWER COMMISSION
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st
1953
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1953  To Colonel the Honourable Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the British
Columbia Power Commission for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1953.
W. A. C. BENNETT,
Premier.
Victoria, B.C.,
June 30th, 1953.
The Honourable W. A. C. Bennett,
Premier, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—The Annual Report of the British Columbia Power Commission covering the
fiscal year 1952-53 is respectfully submitted herewith in accordance with section 93 of
the " Electric Power Act."
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
W. W. FOSTER,
Commissioner.
F. L. SHAW,
Commissioner.
S. R. WESTON,
Chairman.
Victoria, B.C.,
June 30th, 1953. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section
I. General Review-
Page
_    7
II. Legal—
1. Legislation	
2. Compensation for Expropriated Properties-
3. Acquisition of Electrical Properties	
4. Rights-of-way and Property Acquisitions __
5. Water Licences	
III.
  22
  22
  22
  22
  23
  25
2. Transmission Plant  28
3. Distribution Plant  30
Construction—
1. Production Plant
IV. Operation—
1. Production	
2. Transmission..-.
3. Distribution	
4. Rate Schedules.
  34
  38
_____ 39
_____ 43
49
V. Surveys and Investigations—
1. Power Projects	
2. Transmission Projects  49
3. Distribution Projects  49
VI. Financial  52 LIST OF DIAGRAMS
Customer Growth, 1945-53	
Average Consumption and Kwh Charges by Fiscal Years—
Residential Classification, 1946-53.	
Commercial Classification, 1946-53	
Page
.    8
. 12
13
Yearly Power Production in Kwh, 1946-53  35
Sources and Disposition of Energy Requirements, 1952-53  37
Disposition of Revenue by Functions, 1952-53 and 1951-52  60
Disposition of Revenue by Expense Classifications, 1952-53 and 1951-52  61
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Spillimacheen Power-house Site     6
Power-houses for New Districts—
Fort St. James  11
Queen Charlotte-Skidegate  11
Terrace Power-house Interior.  27
Vernon-Kamloops 63-kv Transmission-line—
Building Armstrong-Salmon Arm Section  29
Salmon Arm Substation  29
Pole-setting by District Crew  42
Puntledge Substation and Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited Power-house  50
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
Table
LIST OF TABLES
1.—Services Acquired and Installed, 1946-53  7
2.—Summary of Growth Made during Fiscal Years 1952-53 and 1951-52  9
3.—Statistics Relating to the Supply of Electrical Energy, 1946-53  14
4.—Generating Capacities in Kw Showing Net Increase during Fiscal Year.— 26
5.—Circuit-miles of Transmission-lines Showing Net Increase during Fiscal
Year  30
6.—Distribution-line Construction during Fiscal Year  33
7.—Power Generated and Purchased, Fiscal Years 1952-53 and 1951-
8.—Disposition of Power, Fiscal Years 1952-53 and 1951-52	
9.—Sources of Power, Fiscal Years 1952-53 and 1951-52	
■52_
36
36
38
Table 10.—Investment-per-customer and Customers-per-mile Averages, by Power
Districts, as at March 31st, 1953  41
Rate Schedules  44-48
Financial Statements .  56-72 ■o
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-t-> Eighth Annual Report of the British Columbia Power
Commission, Fiscal Year Ended March 31st, 1953
I. GENERAL REVIEW
During the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1953, the electrical-energy requirements
increased by 39.1 per cent, or 148,100,340 kwh over the previous year. The increase in
this seventh full year of operation is virtually three times the total requirement for the
first complete twelve-month period, 1946-47, which amounted to 50,951,849 kwh.
Emphasizing the growth even more is the fact that purchased power now comprises but
one-half of 1 per cent of requirements (2,350,721 kwh), whereas in 1946-47 it was
43.5 per cent (22,283,930 kwh). The output from the Commission's own plants has
increased over eighteen times, from 28,667,919 kwh to 524,502,927 kwh, during this
seven-year period.
The year showed a net increase of 3,597 customers, so that the total services billed
in March, 1953, amounted to 49,509. No services were acquired by either expropriation
or purchase during the year. Table 1 is a record of previously existing services acquired
and net new connections installed by the Commission since it began operations on
August 1st, 1945. It will be noticed that new services now amount to 45 per cent
of total installations.
Table 1.—Services Acquired and Installed, 1946-53
Period Ended Mar. 31
Services
Acquired
Net
Services
Installed
Total for
Period
Cumulative
to End of
Period
1946                _ _	
13,270
7,151
1,000
831
4,686
473
103
—325
Nil
832
1,786
3,431
3,318
3,321
4,075
2,600
-640
3,597
14,102
8,937
4,431
4,149
8,007
4,548
2,703 1
-965 f
3,597
14,102
1947      ...
23,039
1948    	
1949 -    _        _  .
27,470
31,619
39,626
44,174
1950. _                             	
1951                                                                   	
1952 _    .    .                  ...
Sold June, 1951   	
1953       	
45,912
49,509
Totals...  _  	
27,189
22,320
49,509
Generation capacity in kilowatts and number of units, line mileages in transmission
and distribution plant, revenues and expenditures, all continued to show appreciable
growth commensurate with the Commission's general expansion.
Two new power districts commenced operations in 1952, providing electrical energy
to the residents of the Fort St. James and Queen Charlotte-Skidegate areas for the first
time. As at March 31st, 1953, there were 261 customers being billed in these newly
established operations.
During the year the Clowhom Falls hydro plant came into production. This
power-station, destined to serve the Seechelt Peninsula, added 3,000 kilowatts to the
Commission's total of installed capacity. Increases in diesel-generated units in several
widely scattered power districts accounted for the balance of the 4,470 kw installed
during the year. " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
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o REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1952-53
I 9
The installation of the final two units expanding the John Hart generating-station
at Campbell River was nearing completion at the year-end. The capacity at this plant
will then increase by 50 per cent to its ultimate of six 20,000-kw units. Full utilization
of this potential is only possible through additional storage.
In the transmission field another step toward completion of the Vernon-Kamloops
ring was added. Work on the final portion of the remaining gap, Chase to Salmon Arm,
is now in progress. This double circuit will, when completed, improve the reliability of
service to Kamloops, Armstrong, Enderby, Salmon Arm, and Chase. The Clowhom-
Sechelt 63-kv transmission-line was also brought into operation during the year.
One hundred and eighty-three miles of distribution-lines were constructed during
the year, compared with 190 miles added in the preceding fiscal year. Extensions to
outlying areas were built in practically every power district.
A summary of these and other figures is contained in Table 2, illustrating the growth
made during the period under review.
Table 2.—Summary of Growth Made during Fiscal Years 1952-53 and 1951-52
Number of generating units in operation	
Generating capacity in kilowatts... ._ 	
Transmission-lines (over 23 kv) in circuit-miles..
Distribution-lines in circuit-miles 	
Number of power districts in operation... —
Energy generated and purchased, in kwh —
Number of customers—
Residential 	
Commercial    -	
Power _. - - — 	
Street-lighting — —
Total number of customers..
Average monthly consumption in kwh—
Residential  	
Commercial  _-.	
Power   	
Average charge per kwh paid by—
Residential customers 	
Commercial customers....	
Power customers  -
Revenue—
Power Districts—■
Electric-energy sales 	
Miscellaneous  	
Sales under section 21, " Electric Power Act'
Total revenue 	
Operating expenses—
Labour 	
Fuel	
Other direct operating expenses	
Customer accounting and collecting	
Gross revenue assessment (3 per cent)..
Administration and general expense	
Purchased power  _	
Interest on capital in operation..
Total direct expenses	
Operating surplus (excluding provision for reserves)..
Provision for reserves—
Maintenance and renewals —	
Sinking fund..
Contingencies ..
Totals	
Net operating surplus (transferred to stabilization reserve )..
Year Ended Mar. 31
1953
78
128,315
592.5
2,724.2
27
526,853,648
41,383
7,126
934
66
1952
Percentage
Increase
68
123,845
570
2,541
25
378,753,308
38,193
6,779
876
64
49,509
45,912
173
560
4,165
2.9c
2.7^
1.7 r
$4,646,650.21
67,956.28
151
518
3,701
3.1c
2.8C
1.1 f
1,064,867.18
66,281.94
14.7
3.6
3.9
7.2
8.0
39.1
8.3
5.1
6.6
3.1
14.6
8.1
12.5
—6.4
-3.6
14.3
2.5
$4,714,606.49
1,187,737.72
1,131,149.12    |
764,080.70    j
14.1
55.4
$5,902,344.21    I $4,895,229.82
20.6
$620.
531.
225.
305
139
215.
19
131.34
462.29
,405.63
290.83
349.26
070.63
,350.28
$572,283.00
439,066.83
190,128.27
267,180.44
121,983.57
194,456.59
47,147.22
$2,056.
1,513
060.26
160.95
| $1,832,245.92
1,177,975.36
8.4
21.0
18.5
14.3
14.2
10.6
-58.9
12.2
28.4
$3,569,221.21     | $3,010,221.28    j 18.6
$2,333,123.00    [ $1,885,008.54    |        23.8
$1,089,881.93
746,921.66
102,649.56
$878,084.50
649,578.84
88,364.73
$1,939,453.15
$1,616,028.07
24.1
15.0
16.1
20.0
$393,669.85    |     $268,980.47 I 10
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
Not only have the facilities provided by the Commission been increased commensurate with customer growth, but resulting from promotional rates and the general demand
for electrical appliances there has been a more intensive use of power in all classifications.
The average consumption for residential service increased 14.6 per cent during the year
to 173 kwh monthly throughout the Commission's undertaking. Several districts show
an average consumption in excess of 200 kwh monthly.
Statistics showing classification averages for all power districts for their total period
of operation under the Commission is set out in Table 3, located at the end of this section.
Other pertinent information will be found portrayed in graphic form. The average charge
per kwh again dropped for both residential and commercial customers. In the former
case the decrease was from 3.1 to 2.9 cents per kwh, while in the commercial field the
average charge was reduced from 2.8 to 2.7 cents per kwh.
The net operating surplus of $393,669.85 is the highest in any year of the Commission's operation. This surplus has been transferred to the rates stabilization reserve
for credit to the various power districts in which it originated (see Statement 4, page 62).
The dissemination of information concerning the Commission's activities was continued during the year through the co-operation of newspapers, notably the weeklies of
the Province, and other periodicals. The publication of the house organ " Progress,"
which is widely circulated, was continued on a quarterly basis.
This Eighth Annual Report describes in detail the year's activities under the functional headings of " Legal," " Construction," " Operation," " Surveys and Investigations,"
and " Financial." REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1952-53
I 11
Power-house at Fort St. James commenced operation on November 17th, 1952.
Capacity of this plant is 250 kw from three diesel units.
Queen Charlotte City-Skidegate receives electricity from this new power-house.   It has three
diesel units, with a total capacity of 250 kw.   This plant was energized December 15th, 1952. I 12
ELECTRIC POWER ACT '
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British Columbia Power commission!
GRAPH SHOWING  INCREASE  IN RESIDENTIAL CONSUMPTION
AND   REDUCTION   IN  KWH. CHARGE TO   CUSTOMERS
1946- 1953.
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1946-7         1947-8          1948-9        1949-50       1950-51       1951-52       1952-53 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1952-53
I 13
British Columbia Power Commission
GRAPH SHOWING INCREASE IN COMMERCIAL CONSUMPTION
AND REDUCTION IN KWH.CHA.t6E TO CUSTOMERS
1946-1953.
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1946-7              1947-8             1946-9            1943-50          I950-SI             1951-52            1952-53 I 14
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
Table 3.—Statistics Relating to the
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Residential Service
Commercial
Power District
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Kwh
Kwh
$
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$
Kwh
1947
90
4.00
4.5
29,556.13
662,644
2,474
18,405.25
530,739
1948
122,940.07
2,907,171
2,938
90
3.80
4.2
77,132.03
2,010,020
1949
136,368.13
3,765,710
3,208
102
3.70
3.6
81,429.61
2,901,691
1950
147,834.51
4,961,178
3,354
125
3.75
3.0
83,036.08
3,218,867
1951
170,960.60
6,319,938
3,527
153
4.15
2.7
87,070.95
3,630,063
1952
200,374.52
7,963,080
3,615
187
4.70
2.5
98,171.61
4,417,944
1953
223,598.20
9,160,934
3,774
206
5.05
2.4
103,102.22
4,408,326
Alert Bay .. .
1947
5,858.78
53,000
110
43
4.70
11.0
9,219.72
119,000
1948
6,848.87
96,520
132
68
4.85
7.1
10,076.96
199,110
1949
8,896.85
194,099
169
108
4.95
4.6
10,817.20
356,670
1950
11,880.90
312,594
179
151
5.75
3.8
10,458.64
319,851
1951
15,979.11
449,860
330
165
5.85
3.6
11,364.57
371,979
1952
23,948.49
673,231
374
159
5.65
3.6
14,091.68
503,667
1953
28,582.99
823,970
397
176
6.10
3.5
18,138.95
707,367
1948
14,650
48
8.35
17.5
2,567.51
66
2,488.95
17,195
1949
5,917.23
32,646
109
34
6.15
18.1
7,293.14
49,924
1950
5,102.24
77,432
186
53
3.45
6.6
7,367.02
174,199
1951
10,604.06
203,641
242
78
4.05
5.2
11,271.61
351,894
1952
17,219.56
423,878
338
122
5.00
4.1
16,882.28
591,829
1953
23,536.37
611,697
394
139
5.35
3.8
21,567.55
797,885
1949
6,543.76
91,199
713
64
4.60
7.2
4,812.59
75,319
1950
36,238.20
668,051
794
72
3.95
5.4
24,327.20
563,367
1951
41,010.51
987,061
922
96
4.00
4.2
25,729.35
869,279
1952
58,810.50
1,832,349
1,081
152
4.90
3.2
36,259.51
1,611,396
1953
91,403.32
3,192,802
1,432
204
5.85
2.9
46,756.96
2,165,247
Clinton  _	
1952
89
4.90
5.5
323.62
5,898
66
436.22
11,148
1953
3,980.72
71,708
77
88
4.90
5.6
5,898.43
158,120
1947
1,255.30
21,247
93
76
4.50
5.9
1948
28,846.60
381,012
837
45
3.40
7.6
9,409.21
221,106
1949
37,677.14
521,950
860
51
3.70
7.2
11,632.05
270,818
1950
108,602.24
2,059,626
2,371
77
4.05
5.3
59,351.00
1,548,844
1951
123,435.83
2,953,547
2,511
101
4.20
4.2
66,144.69
1,884,695
1952
133,371.58
4,061,701
2,663
133
4.35
3.3
57,567.79
2,441,895
1953
165,245.47
5,688,534
2,860
171
4.95
2.9
68,307.59
2,969,044
1950
72
4.70
6.5
37,671.29
576,005
1,031
53,373.83
839,652
1951
53,604.86
1,114,412
1,151
86
4.15
4.8
45,911.80
1,429,969
1952
63,104.75
1,382,433
1,208
97
4.40
4.6
53,875.31
1,683,201
1953
70,213.49
1,528,669
1,362
100
4.60
4.6
62,542.12
1,930,571
1953
111
112
6.10
5.4
2,019.82
37,157
925.27
21,171
1947
6,275.26
44,200
124
31
4.35
14.2
7,513.21
74,000
1948
6,855.41
53,994
141
34
4.30
12.7
8,488.36
98,407
1949
6,846.84
102,008
158
57
3.80
6.7
8,098.93
210,186
1950
8,692.40
168,454
173
84
4.35
5.2
9,876.01
290,431
1951
10,611.69
213,611
197
93
4.65
4.9
9,261.30
284,817
1952
12,310.42
294,922
211
105
4.70
4.5
9,979.59
315,991
1953
14,089.41
350,557
231
133
5.35
4.0
12,469.15
419,814
1 Denotes total number of customers at respective dates of acquisition.
Note.—The average monthly consumption and the average monthly bill are based on the average number of customers for the REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1952-53
I 15
Supply of Electrical Energy, 1946-53
Service
Power Service
Street-lighting Service
Totals
7. "
o n
<-< 8
fl
13
Is
o s
2 B
S3
<m
3 S
«B
O  Ih
ts a
!i
*Z US
3. 3
11
"o-A
Or a
5£
1
15
fa
Is
Zo
if
427
484
534
526
534
518
536
28
36
70
82
104
116
120
151
188
230
242
37
36
75
75
352
368
402
419
284
297
310
325
25
46
54
54
62
60
61
63
Kwh
425
365
472
509
573
698
689
180
274
409
344
384
478
641
126
130
255
396
539
621
311
324
421
636
772
301
356
14.70
14.00
13.25
13.10
13.75
15.50
16.10
13.95
13.80
12.40
11.25
11.75
13.40
16.45
18.30
19.00
10.80
12.70
15.35
16.80
19.90
14.00
12.45
14.30
16.70
11.80
13.30
3.5
3.8
2.8
2.6
2.4
2.2
2.3
7.7
5.1
3.0
3.3
3.1
2.8
2.6
14.5
14.6
4.2
3.2
2.9
2.7
6.4
4.3
3.0
2.3
2.2
3.9
3.7
3,456.37
15,913.73
24,387.59
31,175.68
32,720.48
39,731.53
48,475.93
3,734.55
2,610.06
1,547.41
3,638.55
4,246.50
5,243.46
5,878.14
Kwh
32,633
431,583
1,028,897
1,944,961
2,343,641
2,716,845
3,406,880
73,700
54,640
54,202
173,343
260,899
300,363
294,580
40
40
46
52
55
56
59
25
7
8
10
10
10
14
c.
10.6
3.7
2.4
1.6
1.4
1.5
1.4
5.1
4.8
2.9
2.1
1.6
1.7
2.0
1,732.96
6,776.41
6,376.81
7,284.06
7,816.70
8,662.21
9,289.96
180.00
134.00
169.02
750.15
1,156.50
1,664.00
1,899.50
Kwh
(Date of acquisition:
26,148
134,571
154,383
173,894
205,163
217,684
245,605
53,150.71
222,762.24
248,562.14
269,330.33
298,568.73
346,939.87
384,466.31
Kwh
Jan. 1, 1947.)
1,252,164
5,483,345
7,850,681
10,298,900
12,498,805
15,315,553
17,221,745
(Date of acquisition:   Aug. 1, 1945.)
3,600 1 18,993.05 249,300
300 1 19,669.89 350,570
3,800 3 21,430.48 608,771
28,796 2 26,728.24 834.584
55,152 3 32,746.68 1,137,890
68,631 3 44,947.63 1,545,892
73,438 5 54,499.58 1,899,355
392.85
1,675.04
912.12
4,067.09
8,009.69
11,956.14
944.98
5,745.58
8,088.86
20,668.68
24,484.52
32.78
379.97
(Date of acquisition:   Burns Lake, Nov. 1, 1947;  Decker Lake, Feb. 15, 1950.)
2,803
18,801
47,738
162,162
296,945
374,496
26,896
163,895
368,471
990,851
1,748,917
748
10,375
5
10
10
12
3
9
12
18
24
14.0
8.9
1.9
2.5
2.7
3.2
3.5
3.5
2.2
2.0
1.4
4.4
3.7
125.00
362.98
618.16
632.60
962.05
1,080.27
77.65
671.54
847.50
1,344.00
1,892.25
315.00
3,872
1
17,544
1
22,301
1
25,446
1
23,481
2
37,364
2
5,574.31
15,248.39
13,999.54
26,575.36
43,073.58
58,140.33
(Date of acquisition:
1,553
1
27,019
2
43,800
2
44,200
2
74,000
2
12,378.98
66,982.52
75,676.22
117,082.69
164,537.05
38,520
118,915
321,670
743,143
1,336,133
1,821,442
Jan. 1, 1949.)
194,967
1,422,332
2,268,611
4,478,796
7,180,966
(Date of acquisition:   Feb. 1, 1952.)
792.62 I 17,794
11,010       1 I     10,574.12 I       251,213
(Date of acquisition: Royston, Jan. 1, 1947; Cumberland, June 5, 1947;  Courtenay-Comox, Apr. 1, 1949.)
295
12.50
4.3
298
12.80
4.3
395
15.15
3.8
436
15.30
3.5
525
12.40
2.4
597
13.75
2.3
370
23.50
6.4
415
13.35
3.2
467
14.95
3.2
516
16.70
3.2
282
12.35
4.4
135
13.75
10.2
162
14.00
8.6
317
12.25
3.9
428
14.55
3.4
407
13.25
3.3
436
13.75
3.2
535
15.90
3.0
2,021.40
2,547.31
10,727.61
11,406.34
14,554.66
17,541.92
25,294.65
14,660.21
24,483.26
37,421.63
861.04
745.06
417.82
510.46
626.44
682.29
670.36
2
78,362
95,115
3
373.740
43
396,791
38
553,337
47
652,776
51
38
455,775
710,574
44
1,165,089
49
1,728,142
56
8,700
~ 7
5,914
6
5,631
5
7,940
6
14,364
5
22,058
5
17,318
5
2.6
2.7
2.9
2.9
2.6
2.7
5.6
2.1
2.1
2.2
1,422.52
2,598.61
7,040.13
7,096.72
7,048.34
7,284.85
2,576.25
2,094.00
2,217.76
2,364.41
40,175
77,731
211,374
214,765
205,285
214,100
1,255.30
41,699.73
54,455.11
185,720.98
208,083.58
212,542.37
258,379.83
21,247
720,655
965,614
4,193,584
5,449,798
7,262,218
9,524,454
(Date of acquisition:   June 30, 1949.)
36,968
40,663
66,363
73,484
118,916.02
116,270.87
143,681.08
172,541.65
1,908,400
3,295,618
4,297,086
5,260,866
(Date of commencement of operation:   Nov. 17, 1952.)
  I .... I       2,945.09 I 58,328
9.9
12.6
7.4
6.4
4.4
3.1
3.9
954.60
500.45
796.76
1,302.00
1,320.00
1,372.04
1,442.37
(Date of acquisition:   Sept. 1, 1945.)
25,000
1
33,104
41,899
1
42,923
1
41,089
1
47,684
1
15,604.11
16,589.28
16,160.35
20,380.87
21,819.43
24,344.34
28,671.29
151,900
158,315
350,929
508,724
555,715
674,060
835,373
2,877
2,943
3,464
3,790
3,934
4,118
4,191
4,371
152
191
205
255
269
430
475
510
1161
99
154
262
335
454
524
831
837
956
1,124
1,331
1,700
103
105
115
2,593i
93
916
940
2,770
2,921
3,116
3,334
1,278
1,355
1,494
1,569
1,745
136
158
177
201
218
242
263
278
300
4.2
4.1
3.2
2.6
2.4
2.3
2.2
7.6
5.6
3.5
3.2
2.9
2.9
2.9
14.5
12.8
4.4
3.6
3.2
3.2
6.3
4.7
3.3
2.6
2.3
4.5
4.2
5.9
5.8
5.6
4.4
3.8
2.9
2.7
6.3
3.5
3.3
3.3
5.0
10.2
10.5
4.6
4.0
3.9
3.6
3.4
whole year rather than on the actual number shown, which is for the month of March. I 16
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT '
Table 3.—Statistics Relating to the Supply
*_J *■*
Residential Service
Commercial
Power District
o
a
a
o
§
5
a
o
Hf
o
a
o
■o
o.
S
rt oj
a
Js
si
s
s.5
8
a
US
.2 C
>
>r>
>'=.
>
PUW
r<
U
Zo
<u
<B5
K 5
<*s
o
$
Kwh
Kwh
$
c.
$
Kwh
1950
1,676.35
33,625
109
89
4.45
5.0
1,490.47
31,659
1951
6,613.02
150,347
144
98
4.30
4.4
5,309.95
110,980
1952
8,656.34
212,376
161
116
4.75
4.1
6,776.09
169,501
1953
11,045.58
290,602
177
143
5.45
3.8
8,396.03
222,214
1947
11,103.42
107,300
269
37
3.80
10.3
10,076.62
141,300
1948
11,470.01
184,792
342
51
3.20
6.2
12,647.95
291,137
1949
16,558.16
349,212
398
78
3.70
4.7
15,721.28
497,161
1950
20,696.73
544,149
468
102
3.90
3.8
17,673.17
579,248
1951
25,597.47
692,109
543
113
4.15
3.7
22,372.45
872,093
1952
7,785.53
209,913
126
4.65
3.7
7,412.33
262,143
1951
2,765.95
50,995
63
94
5.10
5.4
1,652.71
33,715
1952
5,397.75
123,651
82
149
6.50
4.4
2,851.20
83,031
1953
7,129.04
186,863
92
184
7.00
3.8
3,717.42
107,258
1947
29,586.47
835,165
2,354
118
4.25
3.6
34,612.54
656,614
1948
113,315.36
3,176,827
2,588
107
3.80
3.6
136,481.20
2,647,482
1949
124,136.04
3,717,417
2,778
116
3.85
3.3
157,761.03
3,034,725
1950
148,675.32
4,512,023
3,257
124
4.10
3.3
189,534.87
3,815,925
1951
175,898.82
5,405,709
3,546
131
4.30
3.3
214,193.92
4,546,975
1952
202,195.05
6,735,688
3,709
154
4.60
3.0
187,839.43
4,769,416
1953
237,720.20
8,169,187
4,022
177
5.15
2.9
170,613.99
4,748,897
1950
9,645.54
111,310
412
54
4.70
8.7
8,351.60
110,564
1951
19,004.41
316,770
456
61
3.65
6.0
9,990.24
238,092
1952
24,872.10
499,190
509
86
4.30
5.0
12,480.61
331,332
1953
30,202.29
680,446
551
108
4.80
4.4
13,779.49
380,192
1951
11,167.21
222,981
278
81
4.05
5.0
9,322.58
253,256
1952
17,723.60
456,291
313
115
4.70
4.1
12,570.49
377,856
1953
21,778.95
589,576
350
146
5.40
3.7
16,800.94
643,945
1948
3,643.72
46,091
82
68
5.35
7.9
3,872.34
109,177
1949
5,782.38
83,536
81
83
5.75
6.9
6,714.59
192,801
1950
7,769.87
98,745
150
70
5.50
7.9
8,205.45
248,445
1951
9,489.21
113,450
162
63
5.25
8.4
8,500.60
254,891
1952
1951
2,596.75
30,829
62
53
5.20
3.70
8.4
7.0
2,281.86
68,068
4,262.80
60,984
388
2,944.07
93,220
1952
18,213.40
293,263
397
62
3.85
6.2
11,975.47
322,835
1953
20,831.96
373,648
414
77
4.30
5.6
14,041.05
405,484
1947
7,952.72
75,000
217
30
3.20
10.6
3,804.34
48,400
1948
9,347.76
99,211
230
37
3.45
9.4
5,317.30
79,093
1949
11,278.30
203,261
272
66
3.65
5.5
5,399.76
129,445
1950
13,435.91
288,992
285
86
4.00
4.7
6,761.13
168,762
1951
14,956.98
347,610
296
99
4.25
4.3
7,276.23
195,984
1952
17,499.74
394,212
410
102
4.55
4.4
7,898.01
230,500
1953
26,051.53
572,384
457
108
4.95
4.6
10,416.84
260,304
1 Denotes total number of customers at respective dates of acquisition.
Note.—The average monthly consumption and the average monthly bill are based on the average number of customers for the REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 17
of Electrical Energy, 1946-53—Continued
Service
Power Service
Street-lighting Service
Totals
o _.
% E
Sfo
J5*_
o E
1
o
"f
3
c
o
a
§
oi_
Sf
->
3
c
E
oi,
L_,    £>
u
c
(-.
E
o "
•5 E
SisZ
U
> u
ll
5 s
5s
2
>   i-
O
u
>
a
la
£w
a
u
>
Si
s
us
a
3 3
a
si
>
3
us
a
ll
3 3
ZU
<u
<»
B-a
V.
O
ZU
B.P.
V.
u
ZU
e.
U
ZU
0- a
Kwh
$
c.
$
Kwh
c.
$
Kwh
$
Kwh
c.
68
41
204
9.60
4.7
643.48
26,128
i
2.5
3,810.30
14,408.87
91,412
364,065
151
4.2
49
199
9.50
4.8
2,366.00
100,738
i
2.4
119.90
2,000
2
196
3.9
50
285
11.40
4.0
2,650.55
132,170
i
2.0
462.25
8,023
2
18,545.23
522,070
214
3.6
52
363
13.70
3.8
2,737.54
151,620
i
1.8
444.00
10,384
2
22,623.15
674,820
232
3.4
190
48
284
20.20
7.1
252.60
4,800
4
5.3
286.00
27,676
1
21,718.64
281,076
322
7.7
84
316
13.75
4.4
195.04
5,437
2
3.6
749.00
27,867
1
25,062.00
509,233
429
4.9
91
436
13.80
3.2
1,678.91
75,516
4
2.2
1,110.00
52,680
1
35,068.35
974,569
494
3.6
117
440
13.40
3.1
3,814.88
200,091
8
1.9
1,190.50
54,195
1
43,375.28
1,377,683
594
3.1
143
539
13.80
2.6
8,447.28
334,490
14
2.5
1,420.00
64,600
1
57,837.20
1,963,292
701
2.9
510
14.40
2.8
3,516.21
137,145
2.5
408.57
16,050
19,122.64
625,251
3.0
728
1                       1
of nnerafinn:   Mav 10   1950.1
17
244
12.00
4.9
40.62
1,060
1
3.8
216.00
4,250
1
4,675.28 I         90,020
82
5.2
15
449
15.40
3.4
144.69
2,140
1
6.8
269.92
9,000
1
8,663.56          217,822
99
4.0
17
539
18.70
3.5
350.47
12,990
1
2.7
267.00
8,850
1
11,463.93          315,961
111
3.6
(Da
. 1947:  Chase. Sent. 30. 1949.1
3.1011
609
392
20.60
5.3
11,258.70
452,823
116
2.5
1,553.75
62,870
1
77,011.46
2,007,472
3,080
3.9
650
335
18.25
5.2
72,421.50
3,473,306
120
2.1
4,809.85
199,320
1
327,027.91
9,496,935
3,359
3.5
710
363
18.90
5.2
70,700.45
3,164,181
118
2.2
4,772.75
197,149
1
357,370.27
10,113,472
3,607
3.5
779
423
21.00
5.0
99,468.88
4,723,241
118
2.1
3,687.81
170,104
2
441,366.88
13,221,293
4,156
3.3
822
465
21.95
4.7
118,516.97
6,019,243
133
2.0
7,319.61
258,171
3
515,929.32
16,230,098
4,504
3.2
821
479
18.85
3.9
126,074.30
6,859,516
145
1.8
9,997.53
397,717
3
526,106.31
18,762,337
4,678
2.8
837
475
17.10
3.6
142,053.72
8,190,291
149
1.7
13,517.95
536,667
3
563,905.86
21,645,042
5,011
2.6
.Date of acmiisition:   Sent. 30. 19491
467
72
287
23.35
7.6
16.00
9
1
89.76
2,992
1
18,102.90
224,875
486
8.0
79
271
11.35
4.2
43.22
2
1
248.31
8,277
1
29,286.18
563,141
537
5.2
80
352
13.30
3.8
3,116.25
149,912
3
2.2
521.57
14,900
1
40,990.53
995,334
593
4.1
81
397
14.40
3.6
7,553.03
364,652
5
2.1
1,381.60
45,448
1
52,916.41
1,470,738
638
3.6
(Date
tl. 31, 1950.)
557,893
104
82
302
11.10
3.7
2,418.18
76,770
3
3.2
123.75
4,886
1
23,031.72
364
4.1
87
367
12.20
3.3
5,061.87
211,190
6
2.4
300.00
11,940
1
35,655.96
1,057,277
407
3.4
97
554
14.45
2.6
6,011.01
319.500
6
1.9
300.00
13,644
1
44,890.90
1,566,665
454
2.9
(Date
135
45
316
11 20
3.5
781.38
13,545
14
5.8
8,297.44
168,813
141
4.9
40
358
12 45
3 5
1,696.03
33,621
14
5.0
14,193.00
309,958
135
4.6
45
471
15.55
3.3
2,166.62
83,936
15
2.6
351.40
15,960
1
18,493.34
447,086
211
4.2
46
457
15.25
3.3
2,281.59
104,895
12
2.2
594.00
23,790
1
20,865.40
497,026
221
4.2
445
14.90
3.3
486.81
20,979
2.3
163.08
4,820
5,528.50
124,696
4.4
(Date of sale:   June 27, 1951.)
1        1                       1
. Date of ar.auisit.inn :   Tier   30. 1950.1
237
473
~~ 80
397
12.55
3.2
775.71
54,550
7
1.4
659.00
25,400
1
8,641.58
234,154
476
3.7
81
337
12.45
3.7
4,440.88
238,704
7
1.9
2,845.38
93,329
1
37,475.13
948,131
486
4.0
89
383
13.25
3.5
4,525.27
208,530
8
2.2
2,870.00
112,900
1
42,268.28
1,100,562
512
3.8
(Date
250
52
76
6 00
79
529.68
7,500
12
7.1
12,286.74
130,900
281
9.4
65
114
7 70
67
383.11
2,440
5
15.7
15,048.17
180,744
300
8.4
65
167
7.00
4.2
361.70
5,195
8
7.0
301.79
6,314
1
17,341.55
344,215
346
5.0
68
211
8.45
4.0
421.08
6,860
7
6.1
360.00
7,690
1
20,978.12
472,304
361
4.5
67
243
9.05
3.7
676.49
18,146
9
3.7
372.00
7,620
1
23,281.70
569,360
373
4.1
85
278
9.50
3.4
707.47
18,279
9
3.9
426.71
8,827
2
26,531.93
651,818
506
4.1
98
226
9.05
4.0
924.73
26,182
9
3.5
478.90
8,995
2
37,872.00
867,865
566
4.4
whole year rather than on the actual number shown, which is for the month of March. I 18
; ELECTRIC POWER ACT'
Table 3.—Statistics Relating to the Supply
i-  u
rt a
an
>,2
Residential Service
Commercial
Power District
o
c
a
B
ot-
(- si
$8
£13
2 S
>>
a
a
o
o
3
O
•a
a
S
rt u
WO
c
Si
3
us
a
ll
5 o
<, us
3
0}
3
.S3 3
Si
B P
> O
>izi
6.W
A
U
ZU
<U
<tD
tfc-
Bi
u
$
Kwh
Kwh
$
c.
$
Kwh
1947
299,777.93
5,933,381
7,477
72
3.65
5.1
140,757.69
3,506,220
1948
378,033.10
7,839,393
8,278
83
4.00
4.8
188,970.81
4,394,887
1949
377,682.07
9,802,055
9,102
94
3.60
3.8
230,543.15
7,473,774
1950
439,755.84
13,787,333
10,696
116
3.70
3.2
269,599.68
9,910,654
1951
533,452.06
18,342,407
11,457
137
4.00
2.9
284,898.18
11,860,216
1952
632,634.81
23,504,327
11,886
168
4.50
2.7
303,459.89
13,045,396
1953
717,541.45
27,959,758
12,345
192
4.95
2.6
326,542.52
14,253,130
1947
173,236.77
4,169,895
4,167
87
3.60
4.2
112,465.09
2,715,790
1948
203,025.85
5,242,519
4,791
97
3.75
3.9
133,269.83
3,107,124
1949
256,731.80
7,034,583
5,660
111
4.05
3.6
158,666.22
3,772,011
1950
315,280.21
9,163,547
6,296
125
4.30
3.4
170,180.39
3,937,094
1951
363,571.94
10,892,651
6,992
134
4.50
3.3
189,948.09
4,486,445
1952
403,901.89
12,712,482
7,067
149
4.75
3.2
185,266.79
5,400,563
1953
423,655.89
13,876,180
7,423
158
4.85
3.1
179,223.61
5,744,737
1947
5,984.54
68,059
244
36
3.15
8.8
3,212.77
41,002
1948
11,098.89
180,318
312
53
3.25
6.2
5,943.78
116,398
1949
15,424.04
331,954
360
80
3.75
4.6
7,444.17
172,653
1950
18,778.35
445,273
398
96
4.05
4.2
9,135.29
255,698
1951
19,902.87
494,949
403
103
4.15
4.0
8,710.20
219,192
1952
22,501.99
591,971
407
121
4.60
3.8
9,435.23
215,682
1953
24,824.35
682,253
424
135
4.90
3.6
9,651.18
221,910
Queen Charlotte..	
1953
94
6.25
6.7
1,167.77
17,538
109
295.58
7,244
1947
9,856.63
127,000
252
45
3.50
7.7
13,962.69
171,200
1948
11,726.60
172,363
312
51
3.50
6.8
15,086.51
316,178
1949
15,435.00
273,872
403
66
3.70
5.6
17,464.16
458,739
1950
22,004.89
430,700
510
78
4.00
5.1
24,771.04
708,675
1951
30,995.64
691,357
647
99
4.40
4.5
32,168.21
985,701
1952
44,674.48
1,115,355
823
125
5.00
4.0
38,307.61
1,237,776
1953
60,069.19
1,574,975
1,054
140
5.30
3.8
49,243.72
1,579,094
Sechelt    .
1947
15,609.09
139,159
423
30
3.40
11.2
5,747.09
70,300
1948
20,850.30
255,328
628
40
3.25
8.2
7,488.11
139,777
1949
30,391.53
446,248
763
52
3.55
6.8
10,946.95
315,380
1950
39,875.07
591,434
892
• 55
3.70
6.7
12,007.80
409,694
1951
45,541.72
719,286
1,005
61
3.90
6.4
13,489.84
468,241
1952
55,572.30
1,001,136
1,155
78
4.25
5.5
15,401.04
557,216
1953
65,516.05
1,311,247
1,195
93
4.65
5.0
19,255.74
684,472
1947
10,920.33
102,000
245
36
3.85
10.7
9,737.67
75,000
1948
10,577.48
158,769
308
49
3.30
6.7
10,867.63
247,854
1949
15,814.70
333,809
369
83
3.90
4.7
14,248.84
445,398
1950
20,670.41
567,052
396
123
4.45
3.7
17,006.03
528,626
1951
26,268.37
827,678
447
160
5.10
3.2
18,996.01
625,436
1952
34,114.29
1,183,651
516
203
5.85
2.9
21,706.23
763,395
1953
45,871.27
1,745,725
595
257
6.75
2.6
26,756.43
989,303
1947
2,850.84
17,100
62
26
4.30
16.7
3,692.31
33,100
1948
4,736.81
52,155
186
38
3.50
9.1
5,984.98
93,072
1949
9,853.09
136,816
261
50
3.55
7.2
6,649.24
133,184
1950
14,296.73
256,957
328
73
4.05
5.6
8,667.07
228,086
1951
20,466.73
431,932
381
99
4.70
4.7
12,694.89
361,448
1952
30,837.65
820,306
519
152
5.75
3.8
21,401.10
754,939
1953
50,368.91
1,483,796
701
198
6.70
3.4
32,377.87
1,091,288
1 Denotes total number of customers at respective dates of acquisition.
Note.—The average monthly consumption and the average monthly bill are based on the average number of customers for the REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 19
of Electrical Energy, 1946-53—Continued
Service
o u
ii
ag
ZU
U
8 e
11
^  CO
a
a
<S
Power Service
■se
!_, fl)
■P
la
zu
||
5_!
p. a,
Street-lighting Service
a
o
I
E
3
us
a
o
U
rt us
_. §
la
Totals
a
p.
E
3
us
a
o
U
11
if
ZU
af
Kwh      :
can, etc., Aug. 1, 1945;
Kwh
1,048
310
1,203
320
1,503
444
1,684
511
1,811
567
1,787
604
1,829
656
795
303
889
306
976
335
1,031
325
1,094
345
1,125
404
1,135
424
45
114
55
192
64
245
71
320
70
257
75
245
76
247
16
259
85
174
101
279
115
358
151
442
171
524
187
570
230
612
74
91
94
139
120
235
126
272
141
294
139
333
147
387
66
88
102
237
108
356
117
380
118
456
125
520
133
654
35
80
56
149
66
170
73
267
97
336
138
535
168
597
12.45
13.80
13.70
13.90
13.65
14.05
15.05
12.55
13.15
14.10
14.05
14.60
13.85
13.25
8.90
9.80
10.55
11.40
10.20
10.75
10.70
10.55
14.20
13.30
13.60
15.45
17.10
17.65
19.10
7.40
7.45
8.15
7.95
8.50
9.20
10.90
11.40
10.40
11.40
12.25
13.85
14.85
17.70
8.95
9.60
8.50
10.15
11.80
15.15
17.70
4.0
4.3
3.1
2.7
2.4
2.3
2.3
4.2
4.3
4.2
4.3
4.2
3.4
3.1
7.8
5.1
4.3
3.6
4.0
4.4
4.3
4.0
8.2
4.8
3.8
3.5
3.3
3.1
3.1
8.2
5.3
3.5
2.9
2.9
2.8
2.8
12.9
4.4
3.2
3.2
3.0
2.9
2.7
11.1
6.5
5.0
3.8
3.5
2.8
3.0
198,306.40
223,901.54
213,174.35
180,688.34
153,102.85
181,147.89
184,843.82
125,087.98
138,914.71
142,438.12
158,882.09
171,728.37
188,191.04
203,266.94
2,841.19
4,372.84
6,594.36
8,529.56
10,153.72
11,980.94
11,496.41
3,451.98
2,315.88
2,533.81
4,317.93
12,478.65
32,846.69
67,506.47
2,228.27
776.33
3,382.78
887.78
3,500.17
5,280.19
4,839.09
3,178.94
3,343.17
6,234.69
9,862.89
13,795.42
18,373.90
22,668.72
279.98
1,033.73
2,391.44
5,460.17
8,608.39
10,997.03
licum, Jan
1, 19
13,187,560
294
14,448,894
307
15,227,253
131
14,405,610
149
13,175,567
144
13,149,065
150
11,946,301
153
226
7,566,512
8,205,735
244
7,959,110
244
8,936,704
249
9,029,754
249
10,126,748
222
11,906,475
230
12
79,335
297,533
15
368,399
16
433,152
20
548,738
24
711,198
23
758,737
21
104,260
22
102,581
13
165,523
17
282,410
25
604,306
28
1,858,511
29
4,123,750
38
4
83,400
11,993
6
97,746
8
11,526
7
88,002
13
149,719
15
113,220
14
28
47,000
154,791
15
478,732
17
428,428
21
655,441
21
691,151
22
897,378
22
6,145
3
30,494
7
154,869
11
384,739
15
550,384
17
626,026
23
$        I    Kwh
Chemainus, Mar. 15,
1.5
1.5
1.4
1.3
1.2
1.4
1.5
1.7
1.7
1.8
1.8
1.9
1.9
1.7
3.6
1.5
1.8
2.0
1.9
1.7
1.5
12,563.58
13,680.38
13,940.97
16,476.86
21,175.79
24,027.65
27,556.18
9,571.83
9,900.79
10,672.98
12,034.99
13,465.83
17,629.80
20,881.39
325.01
660.00
730.00
870.00
870.00
860.54
870.00
446,398
474,242
467,616
610,789
823,658
851,661
893,660
1947;
Kwh
Ladysmith, Nov. 1, 1949.)
651,405.60
804,585.83
835,340.54
906,520.72
992,628.88
1,141,270.24
1,256,483.97
23,073,559
27,157,416
32,970,698
37,831,986
44,201,848
50,550,449
55,052,849
(Date of acquisition:   Aug. 1, 1945.)
434,708 8 420,361.67 14,886,905
449,066 8 485,111.18 17,004,444
489,535 13 568,509.12 19,255,239
490,284 8 656,377.68 22,527,629
568,998 8 738,714.23 24,977,848
578,984 8 794,989.52 28,818,777
479,843 8 827,027.83 32,007,235
(Date of acquisition:   Aug. 7, 1946.)
10,952 2 12,363.51 199,348
23,946 2 22,075.51 618,195
27,291 2 30,192.57 900,297
34,070 2 37,313.20 1,168,193
36,090 2 39,636.79 1,298,969
36,290 2 44,778.70 1,555,141
39,050 2 46,841.94 1,701,950
3.3
2.3
1.5
1.5
2.1
1.8
1.6
2.7
6.5
3.5
7.7
4.0
3.5
4.3
6.8
2.2
1.3
2.3
2.1
2.7
2.5
4.6
3.4
1.5
1.4
1.6
1.8
(Date of commencement of operation:   Dec. 15, 1952.)
1,463.35  ] 24,782
374.00
518.40
776.80
1,059.18
1,367.41
1,582.00
1,645.00
38.50
306.28
504.22
750.00
1,036.25
1,228.52
684.00
707.00
1,078.00
1,204.65
1,332.00
1,331.98
1,390.42
93.00
152.50
497.27
522.00
522.00
564.84
1,355.90
(Date of acquisition: Aug. 1, 1945.)
50,808
50,112
40,006
25,625
38,162
41,556
52,775
27,645.30
29,647.39
36,209.77
52,153.04
77,009.91
117,410.78
178,464.38
453,268
641,234
938,140
1,447,410
2,319,526
4,253,198
7,330,594
(Date of acquisition:   Sept. 1, 1945.)
1,500
11,498
16,503
26,683
36,106
43,089
(Date
8,758
13,580
33,415
43,400
50,800
52,200
63,760
23,584.45
29,153.24
45,027.54
53,274.87
63,281.73
77,289.78
90,839.40
292,859
408,598
870,872
1,029,157
1,302,212
1,744,177
2,152,028
of acquisition:   Sept. 1, 1945.)
24,520.94
25,495.28
37,376.23
48,743.98
60,391.80
75,526.40
96,686.84
232,758
574,994
1,291,354
1,567,506
2,159,355
2,690,397
3,696,166
(Date of acquisition:   Sept. 20, 1945.)
9,000
7,450
20,530
18,140
20,030
18,712
58,630
6,636.15
11,154.27
18,033.33
25,877.24
39,143.79
61,411.98
95,099.71
59,200
158,822
321,024
658,052
1,198,149
2,144,341
3,259,740
8.6081
8,823
9,793
10,740
12,542
13,426
13,837
14,339
4,477
5,196
5,932
6,893
7,584
8,343
8,422
8,796
288
303
384
442
491
499
507
523
125
289
360
427
536
688
847
1,042
1,324
337
501
730
893
1,027
1,162
1,312
1,360
293
340
426
496
536
588
665
752
59
98
246
335
413
494
675
893
2.8
3.0
2.5
2.4
2.2
2.3
2.3
2.8
2.9
2.9
2.9
3.0
2.8
2.6
6.2
3.6
3.4
3.2
3.1
2.9
2.8
5.9
6.1
4.6
3.9
3.6
3.3
2.8
2.4
8.1
7.1
5.2
5.2
4.9
4.4
4.2
10.5
4.5
2.9
3.1
2.8
2.8
2.6
11.2
7.0
5.6
3.9
3.3
2.9
2.9
whole year rather than on the actual number shown, which is for the month of March. I 20
• ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
Table 3.—Statistics Relating to the Supply
Residential Service
Commercial
Power District
c
.2
O v.
SSo
sa-a
8
O
3
£
Si
a*
2.
Si sz
3X
<_>
S
•aV.
C
3
us
fl
si
S
a
3
•2 a
Si
a
5 3
> o
S S3
B,W
A
U
ZU
<u
<m
Oh CI
«
u
$
Kwh
Kwh
$
c.
$
Kwh
Ucluelet-Tofino 	
1952
136
6.40
4.7
8,853.03
187,334
164
3,721.53
120,262
1953
16,136.16
394,638
207
170
6.95
4.1
7,298.46
192,842
1947
49
5.00
10.2
4,462.45
43,800
78
7,917.34
70,000
1948
4,424.41
64,373
106
60
4.15
6.9
6,138.75
101,171
1949
5,858.85
114,864
125
84
4.25
5.1
6,608.10
177,005
1950
7,325.58
173,711
144
109
4.60
4.2
7,784.69
217,696
1951
9,628.04
263,654
188
138
5.00
3.7
8,889.64
316,218
1952
14,519.85
427,588
219
174
5.90
3.4
13,464.30
593,061
1953
19,851.63
633,500
276
211
6.60
3.1
18,848.43
802,779
1941
7,324.45
85,300
116
66
5.70
8.6
11,386.30
150,600
1948
7,184.58
126,285
157
76
4.30
5.7
13,546.73
292,938
.
1949
9,625.70
197,675
202
90
4.35
4.9
16,069.72
432,245
1950
12,718.04
292,533
259
103
4.45
4.4
19,239.98
568,683
1951
15,918.77
433,415
272
136
5.00
3.7
20,724.82
603,354
1952
20,806.24
663,830
300
192
6.00
3.1
23,017.00
747,488
1953
26,251.51
896,297
353
228
6.70
2.9
27,555.79
941,499
1947
621,611.11
12,484,250
18,705
74
3.70
5.0
392,510.63
8,403,265
1948
957,493.33
21,051,771
22,434
84
3.80
4.5
653,211.43
14,482,126
1949
1,096,821.61
27,732,914
25,991
96
3.80
4.0
778,320.73
21,099,129
1950
1,448,626.62
40,120,724
32,688
110
4.00
3.6
1,018,198.44
28,674,720
1951
1,761,708.67
52,700,354
36,548
126
4.20
3.3
1,128,836.90
35,348,153
1952
2,082,820.23
67,800,885
38,193
151
4.65
3.1
1,174,530.20
41,627,531
1953
2,428,683.52
82,904,641
41,383
173
5.05
2.9
1,274,523.33
46,854,137
2 See Statement 2, " Combined Operations—Financial Summary."
Note.—The average monthly consumption and the average monthly bill are based on the average number of customers for the REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 21
of Electrical Energy, 1946-53—Continued
Service
Power Service
Street-lighting Service
Totals
*£ so
O i_
_.o
So
3 w
Ii
a
a
o
Hf
3
a
o
a
E
o S2
t-, si
s E
St*!
ID
a
o
a
S
O u
n £
u
3
a
o
a.
£
O v-
Sf
£2
3S
s
Sw
C
3
£2
a
3
us
S2
a
3
E2
Sm
J_ 3
> o
3 a
3 3
3 a
si S
ZU
<u
<B5
Bin
BJ
u
ZU
P.O.
bs
u
ZCJ
«
u
ZU
Bift
Kwh
$
c.
$
Kwh
c.
$
1                1
Kwh     I                    $          1       Kwh
c.
_
43
383
11.85
3.1
3,104.75
204,447
2
1.5
244.76
9,464 j    1 1     15,924.07
521,507
210
3.1
51
345
13.05
3.8
9,892.35
702,820
4
1.4
793.00
26,962       2         34,119.97
1,317,262
264
2.6
106
45
129
14.65
11.3
1,008.31
12,200
4
8.3
180.00
3,285
13,568.10
129,285
128
10.5
52
168
10.20
6.0
621.87
9,106
5
6.8
180.00
2,250
11,365.03
176,900
164
6.4
57
278
10.35
3.7
560.09
9,884
6
5.7
446.50
16,140
13,473.54
317,893
189
4.2
62
310
11.10
3.6
637.83
11,221
6
5.7
577.60
22,160
16,325.70
424,788
213
3.9
72
414
11.65
2.8
2,188.18
66,772
9
3.3
648.00
25,100
21,353.86
671,744
270
3.2
79
672
15.26
2.3
4,138.48
136,364
10
3.0
696.00
28,130
2
32,818.63
1,185,143
310
2.8
95
748
17.55
2.3
5,748.10
181,413
11
3.2
749.61
27,520
2
45,197.77
1,645,212
384
2.7
(Date
161
64
207
15.20
7.6
3,059.51
53,000
22
5.8
452.00
3,689
22,222.26
292,589
203
7.6
86
311
14.40
4.6
1,269.63
38,452
10
3.3
461.40
8,400
22,462.34
466,075
254
4.8
102
385
14.30
3.7
1,813.19
64,472
14
2.8
792.00
29,297
28,300.61
723,689
319
3.9
110
439
14.85
3.4
2,867.45
99,413
15
2.9
792.00
26,321
35,617.47
986,950
385
3.6
116
438
15.05
3.4
3,452.08
161,854
17
2.1
841.00
29,840
40,936.67
1,228,463
406
3.3
112
535
16.48
3.1
6,598.81
266,962
17
2.5
1,001.06
32,473
51,423.11
1,710,753
430
3.0
119
658
19.25
2.9
8,829.97
402,921
17
2.2
1,092.00
35,866
63,729.27
2,276,583
490
2.8
(C
f existing pi
28,950.73
27,189
23,039
3,494
278
13.00
4.7
359,255.52
21,713,423
816
1.7
1,112,892
24
1,402,327.99
43,713,830
3.2
4,188
308
13.90
4.5
471,260.08
27,343,260
818
1.7
40,816.20
1,436,651
30
2,122,781.04
64,313,808
27,470
3.3
4,911
382
14.10
3.7
483,722.36
28,909,668
677
1.7
45,807.17
1,679,586
40
2,404,671.87
79,421,297
31,619
3.0
6,070
420
14.90
3.6
553,600.90
32,970,990
816
1.7
59,963.26
2,080,484
52
3,080,389.22
103,846,918
39,626
3.0
6,691
460
14.70
3.2
587,241.59
35,681,969
875
1.6
73,008.62
2,646,267
60
3,550,795.78
126,376,743
44,174
2.8
6,779
518
14.60
2.8
719,876.46
41,660,820
876
1.7
87,640.29
2,916,915
64
4,064,867.18
154,006,151
45,912
2.6
7,126
560
15.25
2.7
841,053.28
49,166,290
934
1.7
102,390.08
3,234,728
66
4,646,650.212
182,159,796
49,509
2.6
whole year rather than on the actual number shown, which is for the month of March. I 22 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
II. LEGAL
1. LEGISLATION
The "Electric Power Act" was amended at the 1953 Session of the Legislature
to increase the Commission's borrowing limitation from $60,000,000 to $80,000,000.
2. COMPENSATION FOR EXPROPRIATED PROPERTIES
Under the judgment of the Honourable Mr. Justice Wilson of June 10th, 1952,
the sum of $12,815.96 was paid to the estate of Silas Freeman Olney, as compensation
for the site of the Commission's generating plant at Alert Bay.
3. ACQUISITION OF ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES
No electrical properties were acquired by the Commission during the fiscal year
April 1st, 1952, to March 31st, 1953.
4. RIGHTS-OF-WAY AND PROPERTY ACQUISITIONS
During the fiscal year the following progress was made in the acquisition of
right-of-way easements required for the Commission's main transmission systems:—
(1) The 63-kv transmission-line from Monte Creek to Chase required the
acquisition of a right-of-way 60 feet in width for a distance of 18.3 miles.
The fine crossed thirty-one parcels of land registered in the names of
eleven owners. To date, settlement with ten of the owners has been
effected and negotiations with the remaining one are progressing.
(2) Survey plans for the 63-kv transmission-line right-of-way from Armstrong
to Salmon Arm were registered on the 9th day of February, 1953, and
negotiations with the private-property owners for the necessary right-
of-way easements were commenced. This line requires the acquisition
of a right-of-way 60 feet in width for a distance of 21.1 miles, affecting
112 parcels of property registered in the names of ninety-one owners.
To date, settlement with seventy-six owners has been effected and the
remaining claims are in various stages of completion.
(3) In the course of the year, three of the five outstanding right-of-way claims
in the first section of the 60-kv transmission-line to Harmac (MacMillan
& Bloedel) pulp-mill at Cedar, Vancouver Island, were completed.
(4) Survey plans of the four sections of the 132-kv transmission-line from
Nanaimo substation to Harmac (MacMillan & Bloedel) were received for
deposit. Plans covering two of the sections have been approved, and
settlement with three of the five property-owners included in these two
sections have been completed. Settlement with the property-owners on
the two remaining sections is held up pending approval of the plans.
(5) Survey plans for the Duncan transmission 60-kv and 23-kv tie-line to
Duncan 60/23-kv substation were received and registered. This line
requires the acquisition of a right-of-way 120 feet in width for a distance
of 1 mile, affecting only five parcels of property registered in the names of
five owners. Negotiations with the property-owners for the necessary
right-of-way easements are now under way.
(6) Preliminary survey plans covering the Salmon Arm-Chase 63-kv transmission-line right-of-way were furnished, and the work of contacting the
private-property owners, prior to entry, has been completed, as has
the cruising of the merchantable timber on the right-of-way. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 23
(7)
(8)
Survey plans have been received for deposit covering the additional width
required along the main Vancouver Island 132-kv transmission-line right-
of-way. This additional width is necessary in order to accommodate the
60-kv transmission-line from Nanaimo to Parksville.
In the course of the year, right-of-way easements over the three parcels
of land crossed by the 132-kv transmission-line from John Hart generating
plant to the Elk Falls Company's sulphate mill at Duncan Bay were
completed.
In rural areas throughout the Province, distribution-line extensions necessitated the
acquisitions of numerous easements by way of right-of-way over private property.
The following applications were completed under the " Navigable Waters Protection
Act," in connection with overhead and underwater cable crossings of navigable rivers
and lakes:—
Underwater cable crossing of Discovery Passage from a point on MacLean
Road, Campbell River, to a point in District Lot 209, Sayward District,
required for the 6,900/12,000-volt distribution-line to serve the residents
of Quadra Island.
Overhead cable crossings of the numerous bays along the Salmon Arm of
Seechelt Inlet, required for the Clowhom Falls-Sechelt 63-kv transmission-
line.
Two overhead cable crossings of the South Thompson River, Kamloops
Division of Yale District, required for the Monte Creek-Chase 63-kv
transmission-line.
Substation-sites were acquired at the following places:—
(1) Nanaimo—from The Corporation of the City of Nanaimo.
Cedar—from MacMillan & Bloedel Limited.
Departure Bay—from Jean Burns.
Parksville—from Edward Blakely.
Vernon—from Walmar Paul Huebner.
Survey plans have been received for deposit covering the 63-kv substation-site at
Kamloops and the 60/23-kv substation-site at Duncan.    Negotiations for purchase
of the two sites are now in progress.
5. WATER LICENCES
Applications for conditional licences to divert and use water from Necoslie Spring
at Fort St. James and Sturdy Creek at Queen Charlotte City were made to the Comptroller
of Water Rights in connection with the Commission's new diesel electric generating plants
at these sites.
With reference to Buttle Lake, the Commission reported in its last Annual Report
that the decision of the Comptroller of Water Rights, giving notice of his intention to issue
a conditional licence to store water in Buttle Lake, had been appealed to the Minister of
Lands and Forests.
On April 30th, 1952, the Minister handed down his decision on the merits of the
appeal, upholding the decision of the Comptroller.
Thereafter the Commission applied to the Comptroller to issue the necessary licences
and, as a result, on June 4th, 1952, Conditional Licences Nos. 20713 and 20714 were
issued, authorizing respectively the diversion of 1,358 cubic feet per second at Elk Falls
and the storage 360,000 acre-feet per annum in Buttle Lake.
Subsequently, on February 9th, 1953, the whole matter was referred to a Special
Committee of the Legislature " to inquire into the validity of the proposals of the Commission with respect to the storing of water in Buttle Lake for power purposes and the
objections thereto and to recommend to the Legislature with all convenient speed whether
(1)
(2)
(3)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5) I 24 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
or not, in the pubhc interest, the British Columbia Power Commission should be permitted
to exercise its rights under the licence."
Hearings were held by the Special Committee over the period February 23rd to
March 19th, following which, in a report dated March 23rd, 1953, it recommended that
the Commission should be permitted to exercise its rights under the storage licence,
subject to certain additional conditions superimposed upon those of the Comptroller
of Water Rights. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1952-53
I 25
III. CONSTRUCTION
1. PRODUCTION PLANT
Athalmer
A diesel-electric generating unit of 250-kw capacity released from Terrace was
installed.   There is now available 700 kw in three units.
Burns Lake
An extension to the power-house was constructed to permit installation of two
additional units. One 250-kw diesel generating unit has been transferred from Quesnel,
and the other unit will be installed early next year following release from Sechelt. The
resulting plant capacity will be 1,200 kw.
Clinton
The generating capacity of the Clinton plant was increased from 100 kw to 150 kw
by the installation of a third diesel-electric portable set.
Clowhom Falls
The hydro generating-station at Clowhom Falls, which was almost ready for
operation at the beginning of the last fiscal year, underwent load and efficiency tests and
commenced supply to the Sechelt Power District on May 13th, 1952.
The initial stage of this development consists of two hydro-electric units, each of
1,500 kw capacity.
Fort St. James
A generating plant designed for three units was constructed and brought into
production on November 17th, 1952. The installation consisted of two 50-kw portable
diesel generating units released from Vanderhoof and Terrace and a 150-kw unit released
from Westbank.
Hazelton
Installation of a 100-kw unit obtained by transfer from Comox was completed early
during the year, making the total capacity of the plant 300 kw.
Houston
Installation of a 100-kw diesel-electric generating unit was completed, resulting in
a plant capacity of 190 kw in four units.
John Hart
Completion of the third and final phase of the John Hart Development, comprising
two additional generating units rated 20,000 kw capacity each, was delayed from the
originally scheduled date of early in 1953 until the summer of that year. This delay arose
from a strike of the general contractor's carpenters lasting for ten weeks during the winter.
Other contributing factors were late delivery of certain items of equipment. At the end
of the fiscal year the steel-pipe line was nearing completion, and work on the surge-tank
was well advanced. The power-house extension was substantially complete, and work
was progressing on the installation of the turbines.
Completion of this phase of the John Hart Development will bring the total plant
capacity to 120,000 kw, consisting of six generating units rated at 20,000 kw each.
Nakusp
A portable unit of 30 kw was installed and used during the peak-load winter months.
Generating capacity of 300 kw is now available in two diesel-electric units and one
hydro-electric unit. I 26
"ELECTRIC POWER ACT"
Queen Charlotte
A building was constructed and two 50-kw portable diesel generating units from
Burns Lake and a new 150-kw diesel unit were installed. The plant was brought into
production on December 15th, 1952.
Quesnel
The installation of a new 8 00-kw diesel-electric generating unit and transfer of
a 250-kw unit to Burns Lake resulted in a net increase of 550 kw, the total plant capacity
now being 3,200 kw in five units.
Sechelt
Availability of hydro-electric power from Clowhom Falls early in the year brought
about the close-down of the generating-station at Sechelt.
Terrace
A second 600-kw diesel generating unit was purchased and brought into service in
place of a 250-kw diesel unit transferred to Athalmer. The plant capacity is now 1,500
kw in four units.
Ucluelet-Tofino
Rehabilitation of a 100-kw diesel generating unit, acquired with the generating
plant, was carried out.
The power-house was enlarged by the construction of an additional bay, and the
installation of a fifth unit, having a capacity of 675 kw, was nearing completion at the
end of the year.   The resulting plant capacity will be 1,075 kw.
Table 4.—Generating Capacity in Operation at Beginning and End of the
Fiscal Year, Together with Additions and Removals Made during the Year
Type1
Capacity at
Mar. 31, 1952
Installations
during Year
Removals
during Year
Capacity at
Mar. 31, 1953
Plant Location
Number
of
Units
Total
Capacity
in Kw
Number
of
Units
Total
Capacity
in Kw
Number
of
Units
Total
Capacity
in Kw
Number
of
Units
Total
Capacity
in Kw
Alert Bay
D
D
D
D
H
D
D
D
D
D
H
S
D
HD
D
D
HD
H
D
D
D
d
H
D
4
2
4
2
5
3
2
3
4
4
2
2
5
5
2
3
4
3
3
2
4
800
450
700
100
2,280
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
5
1
	
4
3
5
3
2
5
3
3
3
4
4
4
2
3
3
5
2
3
4
4
3
2
4
250
250
50
3,000
700
	
150
3,000
2,280
250
	
250
100
100
450
200
90
80,000
2,700
500
270
2,650
810
5,200
1,370
1,150
300
550
22,500
775
450
300
	
190
80,000
2,700
500
Kamloops—	
30
250
800
300
Queen Charlotte	
Quesnel   	
250
250
810
3,200
5,200
1,370
600
100
250
1,500
400
550
22,500
775
Totals  	
	
68
123,845
17
5,780
7
1,310
78
128,315
i D=diesel-electric; H=hydro-electric; S=steam-electric
Capacities are based on name-plate ratings converted to kw at I
) per cent power factor. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 27 I 28 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT ".
2. TRANSMISSION PLANT
Vancouver Island System
Service to the area between Bowser and Craig's Crossing was improved and provision
for system load-growth increased by the construction of a 60-kv transmission-line from
Nanaimo to Parksville with a terminal substation at Parksville.
The substation at Duncan Bay and the necessary switching and control additions
at John Hart Development were completed and placed in service. This substation,
terminating the recently constructed 132-kv transmission-line to Duncan Bay, consists
of two 20,000-kva 132/13.8-kv three-phase transformers and will supply the Campbell
River Power District in addition to the Elk Falls Company Limited.
Construction of a 132-kv single-circuit line on wood-pole H-frame structures from
Nanaimo substation to Harmac was started, and construction of the substation, including
installation of two 16,000-kva three-phase transformers, was substantially completed by
the end of the year.
The work of dismantling the turbines of Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited
at Puntledge and the substitution of two 5,000-horsepower synchronous motors, together
with associated control gear, was started during the year, and the installation of the first
unit was substantially complete at the end of the year.
Capacity of the Nanaimo Pine Street substation was increased by the installation of
three 3,333-kva 60/13.8-kv transformers, thus releasing three 2,500-kva transformers
which will be used elsewhere in the Commission's system.
Extensive studies on voltage-control of the Vancouver Island transmission system
were made. As an initial step necessary to provide adequate regulation of voltage with
increased power demand, one 15,000-kva synchronous condenser, starting and control
equipment, and 12-kv metal-clad switch gear were ordered for shipment in April, 1954.
This equipment will be installed in a new building to be constructed at Nanaimo.
Two 5,000-kva 132/12-kv transformers were received at Alberni during March,
1953. These transformers will be installed later in the year, to bring the total capacity
of Alberni substation to 30,000 kva.
Vernon-Kamloops System
The step-by-step construction of the second 63-kv circuit from Vernon to Kamloops
via Salmon Arm was continued. Sections extending from Armstrong to Salmon Arm
and Monte Creek to Chase, aggregating 44.5 miles, were completed during the year;
63-kv substations taking power from this line and stepping down to distribution voltage
were constructed at Chase, Enderby, Salmon Arm, and Canoe. In addition, a new
1,500-kva 63-kv substation was constructed at Mission Hill, near Vernon, to improve
service in the Coldstream and Okanagan Lake areas.
The construction of this 63-kv transmission-line through the North Okanagan area
was necessary because the existing 33-kv system, which it supersedes, was overloaded.
The completion of the loop to Kamloops, scheduled for the fall of 1953, will also provide
improved and more reliable service to that city.
Clowhom-Sechelt System
The 63-kv transmission-line from Clowhom Falls to Sechelt and the terminating
1,500-kva 63-6.9/12-kv substation at Sechelt were placed in operation on May 13th,
1952, to serve the Sechelt Power District. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION
1952-53
I 29
^i^^^rrit&s^
w,h *~nErss-5_svKrs a a=« ■=
' a capacity of 3,000 kva. I 30
ELECTRIC POWER ACT'
Table 5.—Transmission-lines in Operation at Beginning and End of the Fiscal
Year, Together with Additions Made during the Year
Location
Voltage,
Kv
Length in Circuit-miles
Mar., 1952
Additions
Removal
Mar., 1953
Vancouver Island System—
132
132
60
60
60
60
207.0
4.6
32.6
10.0
15.7
17.0
207.0
4.6
32.6
10.0
15.7
17.0
269.9
17.0
286.9
Whatshan-Vernon-Kamloops System—
132
63
33
44
63
63
63
75.0
42.7
61.0
45.0
69.5
6.9
27.5
17.0
75.0
42.7
61.0
45.0
|          69.5
Kamloops-Vernon line to Salmon Arm
|          34.4
__   _                    17.0
300.1
44.5
61.0          |        283.6
Clowhom Falls-Sechelt system—
63
22.0
22.0
570.0
83.5
61.0          1        592.5
3. DISTRIBUTION PLANT
During the last fiscal year the distribution system was increased by 183.3 miles of
line, as compared with 190.3 miles during the previous year. A total of 4,440 new
services were added to the system, and 270 street-lights were installed.
Entirely new distribution systems were built to serve the Queen Charlotte City area
and the village of Fort St. James. Major improvements were carried out in the North
Okanagan and Nanaimo-Duncan Power Districts.
The principal items of distribution-plant construction are detailed below under the
various power districts.
Alberni
Extensions to serve Stirling Arm and Great Central Lake were completed, and a
12-kv feeder from the Alberni terminal to the MacMillan & Bloedel Plywood Division
plant was placed in service. In all, 11.1 miles of line were built, services were increased
by 227, and 6 street-lights were installed.
Alert Bay
Distribution construction totalled 0.2 mile, with the addition of 52 new services and
10 new street-lights.
Burns Lake
One and one-half miles of line were built, including eight primary extensions involving three railway crossings. Transformer capacity was increased by 266 kva, 6 streetlights were added, and 96 new services were run.
Campbell River
A submarine cable was laid between Vancouver Island and Quadra Island to supply
the newly constructed distribution system on the southern portion of Quadra Island.
The rapid growth of this district called for construction of 442 services, 6 miles of
distribution circuit, and 17 street-lights. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1952-53
I 31
Clinton
There was no line construction in this district, but 15 services were added from
lines already in existence.
Comox Valley
The district was enlarged by the addition of 19 miles of primary and secondary line,
256 new services, and 1 street-light. Major extension was the 13.8-kv three-phase line
to serve the R.C.A.F. airport at Comox.
Dawson Creek
Three and one-tenth miles of distribution-line were added, 151 services were built,
and 5 new street-lights were installed.
Fort St. James
A new distribution system, consisting of 12 miles of distribution circuit and 140
services, was constructed to serve this recently formed power district.
Golden
Twenty-four new services were added and 1 mile of new circuit was constructed,
including a 0.5-mile rural extension.
Hazelton
Construction included 0.5 mile of secondary line and 27 new service installations.
Houston
Only minor improvements were made;  12 new services were added.
Kamloops
Three and one-half miles of 2/0 copper feeder from the new terminal station at
Lome Street were completed. Delivery was taken, late in the year, of the first of two
2,500-kva unit substations, 11.5-2.3 kv, and installation commenced. Approximately
7 miles of light primary and secondary were replaced with heavier conductor. New
construction totalled 15.8 miles and 415 services.
Lake Cowichan
Forty-two new services and 6 street-lights were added, and 1.6 miles of line
constructed.
Lake Windermere
Line construction amounted to 1.5 miles; 65 new services were added.
Merritt
In addition to the building of 0.5 mile of secondary line, 42 services were run and
3 street-lights were installed.
Nakusp
Services were increased by 70, and line additions totalled 1.5 miles of primary.
Nanaimo-Duncan
System improvements were continued. A second 3,750-kva unit substation was
received, and installation commenced in Nanaimo. Also, in Nanaimo the conversion
from 2.3 kv to 2.3/4 kv commenced. Primary circuits in the townsite area were
rebuilt.   A new substation of 600 kva capacity, 2.3/4 kv, was constructed at Departure I 32 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
Bay, and the capacity of the Wakesiah Avenue substation was increased from 600 kva
to 1,000 kva.
Reconstruction and voltage conversion was completed at Ladysmith, and primary
circuits were rebuilt in the townsite area at Duncan.
A new 4,000-kva substation, 23—2.3 kv, with automatic on-load tap-changing, was
installed at Duncan. A 1,000-kva 23-2.3/4-kv substation was built and placed in service
at Parksville, to improve service conditions in that area.
In the South Cowichan area, work started on the rebuilding and voltage conversion
of inadequate primary circuits.
In all, 34.8 miles of primary and secondary circuits were constructed; 106 streetlights and 703 new services were installed.
North Okanagan
Construction during the year included 27.2 miles of line, 423 new services, and
17 street-lights.
Several major improvements were undertaken: the rebuilding of lines serving the
Okanagan Landing area was completed; the voltage conversion and rebuilding of the
Coldstream-Kalamalka Lake system was practically completed; East Salmon Arm and
North Canoe were converted from 6.9 kv to 6.9/12 kv; one-third of the Armstrong
system was rebuilt at 2.3/4 kv; a new substation was installed at Salmon Arm and four
outgoing circuits were constructed.
Peachland-Westbank
Work commenced on the Shannon Lake extension. Construction of the extension
to the ferry-landing was authorized, but awaits highway relocation.
Additions during the year included 2.9 miles of distribution circuit and 29 new
service connections.
Queen Charlotte
This new district commenced operation on December 15th, 1953. A distribution
system 8.6 miles in length was built to serve 132 customers.
Quesnel
To accommodate the needs of this rapidly growing district, 12.2 miles of new line
were built, 338 services were connected, and 2 street-lights were added.
Sechelt
The Gibsons substation was increased in capacity from 112 kva to 450 kva, and
the distribution transformer capacity increased by 223 kva.
Twelve new street-lights and 133 services were added, and 6.8 miles of primary and
secondary line constructed.
Smithers
Two and one-half miles of line were built, and 121 new services and 5 new streetlights were installed.
Terrace
In this rapidly growing district, 6.7 miles of line were constructed, and 43 streetlights and 259 services were added.
Ucluelet-Tofino
A street-light system of 25 units was brought into operation at Ucluelet. Sixty-five
new services were added, and 3.5 miles of line constructed. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 33
Vanderhoof
A total of 1.3 miles of distribution-line were built.    Street-lights were increased
by 6 and services by 87.
Williams Lake
Construction of 1.5 miles of distribution circuits and 74 services was completed.
Table 6.—Distribution-line Construction during Fiscal Year
Ended March 31st, 1953
Power District
Voltage,
Kv
Miles of Line Added
New
Services
Added
Streetlights
Added
Primary
Secondary
Total
6.9
2.3
2.3
2.3
13.2
6.9
2.3
2.3
13.2
2.3
6.9
2.3
2.3
2.3
6.9
11.5
2.3
2.3
2.3
2.3
2.3
6.9
2.3
6.9
13.2
2.3
6.9
2.3
6.9
2.3
2.3
6.9
2.3
6.9
2.3
6.9
2.3
6.9
2.3
2.3
7.6
0.5
      8.1
1.2
1.3
0.4
1.8
       3.5
10.2
3.8
     14.0
2.5
8.0
0.7
6.7
4.8
     11.5
1.2
1.3
1.1
0.4
       1.5
27.7
2.0
0.2
     29.9
0.6
18.6
     19.2
0.8
1.2
      2.0
6.1
3.8
5.2
       9.0
0.1
3.6
       3.7
0.7
0.3
       1.0
4.4
2.0
0.6
0.2
3.0
0.2
0.3
2.5
5.0
0.6
4.0
0.3
0.5
4.3
0.4
0.2
0.5
4.9
8.0
0.9
2.5
3.2
3.1
1.5
2.3
1.5
0.7
1.3
11.1
0.2
1.5
6.0
19.0
3.1
12.0
1.0
0.5
15.8
1.6
1.5
0.5
1.5
34.8
27.2
2.9
8.6
12.2
6.8
2.5
6.7
3.5
1.3
.1.5
227
52
96
442
15
256
151
140
24
27
12
415
42
65
42
70
703
423
29
132
338
133
121
259
65
87
74
6
10
6
17
1
5
Fort St. James    	
Hazelton _ — 	
Kamloops — 	
6
106
17
Quesnel   	
Sechelt.-    	
2
12
Terrace	
5
43
6
	
Totals  	
131.6
51.7
183.3
4,440
270 I 34
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
IV. OPERATION
1. PRODUCTION
A new hydro generating-station at Clowhom Falls was brought into production in
May, 1952, and connected by a 63-kv transmission-line to the Sechelt distribution system.
The generating-station at Sechelt was closed down, and the different units are being
disposed of by transfer to other locations as circumstances demand.
Two new diesel generating-stations were installed with the opening of two additional
power districts—one at Fort St. James, which was brought into production in November,
1952, and the other at Queen Charlotte City, opened in December, 1952. As in all other
power districts, service in these areas is on a twenty-four-hour basis.
At John Hart hydro generating-station, production continued throughout the year
without equipment failure. Output at this station continued on an upward trend during
the winter, and reached the record figures of 45,520,000 kwh and 45,460,000 kwh in
October and November respectively, with a maximum demand of 79,500 kw and a load
factor of 79.4 per cent occurring in the latter month.
During this time a period of prolonged drought caused concern, for precipitation
in October of 0.80 inch was the lowest recorded for that month in twenty-eight years, and
the available storage supply dropped in November to 38.0 per cent. However, in
November and December a total rainfall of 24.77 inches restored conditions to a safe
margin.
The Elk Falls Company at Duncan Bay started operation in June, 1952, with
a recorded demand in that month of 12,960 kw. In March, 1953, power requirements
of the company reached 10,634,400 kwh and a demand of 16,536 kw.
The results of four years' work in landscaping the John Hart townsite area are now
very evident, and the fact that 1,980 persons signed the register during the past year
(probably less than half the total number visiting the plant) indicates its growing
popularity as a tourist attraction.
Clearing operations around Campbell Lake consisted largely of collecting, piling,
and burning debris. Work was carried out by the use of two floating A-frames, a scow,
and three work-boats. At the beginning of the year two crews operated on a double-shift
basis in order to expedite the work. These were later reduced to a single crew of eleven
men and a foreman, and under the favourable climatic conditions of the past winter the
work progressed rapidly. Campbell Lake has been kept clear at all times, so that there
has been no inconvenience or recorded complaints from the public. Merchantable logs
were separated from the debris and sold, and a large number of poles suitable for
construction on some of the Commission's projects were salvaged.
The Whatshan hydro generating-station, which was brought into production in May,
1951, was the main source of supply of electrical energy for the North Okanagan and
Kamloops areas. One of the turbines installed has been the subject of investigation by
the manufacturer, in an effort to overcome vibration evident at certain loads. The source
of the trouble has now been ascertained, and remedial measures will be applied in the
near future.
During part of the year Shuswap Falls generating-station operated at reduced output
while certain necessary repairs were being effected. The plant was shut down entirely
for a short time in April when the forebay was cleaned out, and, during the late fall,
output was reduced to a low figure while steel lining was being installed in the sluice
tunnels and frost-proofing constructed over the gate structures. A start has been made
on landscape improvements at both Whatshan and Shuswap Falls.
Kamloops steam plant was maintained as a stand-by source of power pending
completion of an alternative transmission-line, now in course of construction, between
Kamloops and Salmon Arm. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 35
British Columbia Power Commission
GRAPHIC   REPRESENTATION OF TOTAL  YEARLY
PRODUCTION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY   FOR  THE
7 YEAR PERIOO   1946-1953. SHOWING  PROPORTIONS
PRODUCED  BY   COMMISSION PLANTS  AND PURCHASED POWER.
540
525
SIO
435
480
465
4-SO
435
420
405
330
375
3SO
£   330
0
3   3/5
i 300
* 285
S Z70
3; 255
£   Z40
* 225
2IO
135
I BO
165
ISO
135
ISO
105
90
75
60
45
SO
IS
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Purchased I 36
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
Table 7.—Power Generated and Purchased (Kwh)
Source
Fiscal Year Ended Mar. 31
1953
I
1952
Percentage
Increase
Generated—
Alert Bay-
Ath aimer..
Barriere.	
Burns Lake..
Clinton.	
Clowhom Falls .
Dawson Creek-
Fort St. James...
Golden	
Hazelton	
Hope...	
Houston	
John Hart-
Kamloops-
Lillooet	
Merritt-
Nakusp-
Queen Charlotte.
Quesnel	
Sechelt- -
Shuswap Falls..
Smithers	
Terrace	
Ucluelet-Tofino..
Vanderhoof	
Whatshan..
Westbank..
Williams Lake  	
Totals 	
Purchased—
West Kootenay Power & Light Co. Ltd..
B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd	
Canadian Collieries (D.) Ltd 	
Hillcrest Lumber Co. Ltd	
Totals.
Totals generated and purchased..
2,292,046
1,942,900
2,200,220
305,804
2,554,783
6,060,994
75,750
993,170
747,560
366,040
413,140,000
9,500
1,276,800
762,592
30,680
8,342,960
271,407
13,736,472
4,226,720
3,818,835
1,526,700
2,126,662
55,094,400
2,599,932
524,502,927
2,177,713
171,728
1,280
2,108,275
1,377,750
2,721,220
1,647,160
22,000
5,095,456
810,745
577,120
750
276,176
284,110,000
311,140
121,551
1,187,550
708,210
4,978,749
2,295,939
13,440,840
3,212,060
2,675,642
641,910
1,608,676
43,512,800
484,910
2,009,132
375,935,761
2,350,721
526,853,648
2,817,547
378,753,308
,477,308
47.4
625,200
514,079
—66.6
200,960
—99.4
8.7
41.0
33.6
1,290.0
19.0
22.5
29.5
32.5
45.4
-97.0
7.5
7.7
67.6
-88.2
2.2
31.6
42.7
137.8
32.2
26.6
29.4
39.5
— 16.6
39.1
Table 8.—Disposition of Power (Kwh)
Disposition
Fiscal Year Ended Mar. 31
1953
1952
Percentage
Increase
Total generated and purchased-
Less station services 	
Net generated and purchased...
Less transmission, transformation losses-
Delivered wholesale	
Percentage transmission and transformation losses..
Less sales under section 21—
B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd._
MacMillan & Bloedel Ltd. (Alberni).	
MacMillan & Bloedel Ltd. (Harmac) —
West Kootenay Power & Light Co. Ltd...
Elk Falls	
Canadian Collieries (D.) Ltd.-
Totals 	
Delivered to power districts for distribution..
Less distribution losses 	
Distribution-system sales...	
Percentage distribution losses..
526,853,648
2,260,835
378,753,308
2,333,573
524,592,813
34,789,799
376,419,735
28,260,125
489,803,014
6.6%
109,827,200
31,933,000
50,309,280
1,932,047
91,829,600
1,516,800
202,455,087
20,295,291
182,159,796
10.0%
348,159,610
7.5%
88,141,800
35,703,000
50,325,120
837,160
173,152,530
19,146,379
154,006,151
11.1%
287,347,927 175,007,080
39.1
-3.1
39.4
23.1
40.7
24.6
— 10.6
—0.03
130.8
64.2
16.9
6.0
18.3 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1952-53
I 37
Sleom    S.500K.W.H.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
POWER COMMISSION
GRAPHIC  REPRESENTATION   OF
SOURCES AND DISPOSITION OF
TOTAL ELECTRICAL   ENERGY
OUTPUT FOR   FISCAL YEAR I 38
ELECTRIC POWER ACT'
Production from the nineteen diesel generating-stations in use increased from
30,928,309 kwh to 39,203,413 kwh, a difference of 8,275,104 kwh or 26 per cent. The
amount of diesel fuel required to produce this energy would fill 340 tank-cars. This is
equivalent to six freight trains of fifty-seven cars each, with a combined length of almost
32/4 miles.
Operating results improved over the past year as district loads and plant efficiency
increased. The production per gallon of fuel-oil increased from 13.88 kwh to 14.33 kwh,
as a result of which the cost of diesel fuel per kwh produced decreased from 1.447 to
1.256 cents.
The preceding tables indicate the increase in energy production during the fiscal year
as compared with the preceding twelve-month period.
Table 9.—Sources of Power
ource
Fiscal Year Ended Mar. 31
s
1953
1952
Percentage
Increase
Kwh
Per Cent
Kwh
Per Cent
485,290,014
39,203,413
9,500
2,350,721
92.1
7.4
0.5
344,700,577
30,928,309
306,875
2,817,547
91.6
7.6
0.1
0.7
40.8
26.7
—96.9
— 16.6
Totals          	
526,853,648
100.0
378,753,308
100.0
39.1
2. TRANSMISSION
Operation of the Vancouver Island transmission system was normal throughout the
year, with no major interruptions. Lightning and accident were responsible for system
disturbances on four occasions, with one momentary interruption to service. With extremely light snow conditions during the past winter there was almost a total absence of
sleet-jump on the 132-kv transmission-line conductors. On only three occasions were
there system disturbances (one originating on the B.C. Electric system) which could be
attributed to that cause. Regular patrol of the transmission-lines was also easier than in
previous years because of the milder winter.
Heavy rainfall during the winter damaged right-of-way and access roads, but did not
adversely affect tower footings. The expense of maintaining access roads is presenting a
major problem because of the cessation of logging operations in areas where such roads
have been used for access and patrol purposes. Many of these roads must be maintained
in a passable condition, and bridges kept in a reasonable state of repair.
A substantial amount of reclearing of right-of-way was completed, approximately
260 acres of deciduous growth being sprayed and a small acreage of coniferous trees
slashed. Bolts were tightened on seventy-six steel transmission towers, and no serious
condition was noted.   This maintenance programme is proceeding.
Routine preventive maintenance of all 60- and 132-kv oil circuit-breakers, transformers, and switch gear on the Vancouver Island system was completed as scheduled,
and assistance provided in the matter of initial adjustments and insulating-oil treatment
on new construction projects. Ground fault protective relaying was studied with a view
to improvement in operation, and relay settings revised.
The Commission's Vancouver Island radio-telephone system has been improved,
both for reliability and quality, and was expanded to include the Clowhom and Sechelt
stations. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53 I 39
The new Duncan Bay substation, which serves the Elk Falls Company mill and the
Campbell River Power District, was placed in operation in April, and the Parksville substation, with the new 60-kv line serving it from Nanaimo, in the latter part of November.
In the Kamloops-Okanagan system several interruptions to service were caused by
lightning and falling trees, and two because of movement of a transmission-line structure
in a slide area near Whatshan. A continuing programme of brushing and removal of
danger trees was carried out during the year. In the section of the Whatshan-Vernon line
between Cherryville and Lavington, several thousands of trees were removed. Along the
Kamloops-Vernon line, additional trees were removed in particularly troublesome areas,
and where the line is especially inaccessible. Further clearing was carried out on the
Vernon-Salmon Arm transmission-lines in some especially troublesome locations. Re-
clearing, to the extent of about 40 acres, was completed along the Shuswap Falls-Vernon
63-kv line.
Access roads to transmission-lines for patrol and maintenance purposes have received attention, with continued repair and improvement. In some instances, roads have
been rerouted with improved grades suitable for the snowmobile on winter patrol.
A programme of placing spare poles and timbers at strategic locations for emergency
repair purposes along the transmission-line rights-of-way is continuing.
Only the most essential maintenance of switch gear and apparatus was completed
during the year, due to lack of adequate experienced staff. This deficiency has been
corrected, and the maintenance schedule accelerated.
Completion of a 63-kv transmission-line from Vernon to Salmon Arm, and the
installation of new substations at Armstrong, Enderby, Canoe, Salmon Arm, and Long
Lake in the North Okanagan District, and a 63-kv line from Monte Creek to Chase with
a new substation at Chase have greatly improved operating conditions in those areas.
Additional load can now be adequately handled.
Emergency interconnection with the West Kootenay Power and Light Company was
made on several occasions with satisfactory results.
The Clowhom Falls to Sechelt transmission system performed satisfactorily since it
went into operation on May 13th, 1952, although two serious interruptions, due to severe
storms, occurred during winter months. No trouble was experienced with the line at its
higher elevations, where access is slow and difficult. A substantial programme of additional clearing and falling of danger trees was completed, so that the chance of service
interruptions should now be materially reduced.
Special work carried out by the Transmission Maintenance Section included hi-pot
testing of all 60- and 132-kv apparatus, the expansion of the high-voltage testing laboratory to include insulators and hotsticks, and the testing and placing in operation of the
North Okanagan and Nanaimo Power Districts radio communication systems. New
transformers and oil circuit-breakers were filled with hydro-volified oil before being placed
in operation, and acceptance tests and pre-operational adjustment were made on all new
apparatus placed in service.
The test laboratory at Nanaimo handled the following tests: 13 rubber blankets
(dielectric), 721 rubber gloves (dielectric), 322 insulating-oil samples (dielectric), 85
insulating-oil samples (acidity and interfacial tension).
3. DISTRIBUTION
The year was marked by general system changes toward increased capacities and
improved voltage conditions, necessitated by the continued growth of load. In all districts, over 6,000 kva capacity was added to distribution transformers; third wires and
heavier conductors were installed as required throughout the system. Complete rebuilding
and conversion of voltage was required in certain areas as described under " Construction." I 40 "ELECTRIC POWER ACT"
Operation commenced in two new power districts—Fort St. James and Queen Charlotte Islands—where agents were appointed to operate the systems. The Commission's
promotional-rate schedules, now universally in effect throughout the undertaking, were
made available in these new districts. The Quadra Island addition to the Campbell River
Power District commenced operation, serving 163 customers.
Street-light modernization was continued in Chemainus, Cumberland, Kamloops,
and Nanaimo, and in most districts additional units were installed.
More circuit-reclosers were installed for improved efficiency and economy of operation. These devices, mounted on poles and inserted into distribution circuits at strategic
points, open the circuits when faults occur and immediately reclose, thereby restoring the
service after a momentary interruption if the fault has been of a transitory nature.
The use in homes of electric ranges and water-heaters continues to increase. To
ensure equitable billing, close attention was given to demand ratings and the application
-si demand meters. This attention is particularly necessary as use of energy increases.
Customer interest in expanding the individual utilization of energy was stimulated by the
use of printed material and addresses to interested groups.
Normal system maintenance was carried out during the year, including pole testing,
treatment, stubbing, and replacement. Over 600 poles were replaced, and approximately
300 were stubbed.
Reclearing of brush and trees was carried out as an operating function on approximately 100 miles of distribution-line.
Considerable economy of operation was achieved by the introduction, in the North
Okanagan District, of radio communication between headquarters and the various vehicles
working on the system. This method of control has established its value, particularly
during periods of storm trouble as well as in normal operation over a wide area.
The two Meter Sections, at Kamloops and Nanaimo, carried out the reverification of
meters as required by law and handled 11,638 meters. A start was made on the conversion to 60-cycle operation of a number of modern 25-cycle meters released from the
Comox Valley area. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 41
Table 10.—Number of Customers, Circuit-miles of Distribution-lines, and
Investment in Distribution Plant, by Power Districts, Together with
Customers-per-mile and Investment-per-customer Averages, as at March
31st, 1953.
Power District
Number of
Customers
Distribution
Mileage
Distribution
Investment!
Customers
per Mile
per
Customer!
Alberni	
Alert Bay 	
Burns Lake 	
Campbell River-
Clinton	
Comox Valley ...
Dawson Creek.
Fort St. James.-
Golden _.
Hazelton	
Houston-
Kamloops.
Lake Cowichan	
Lake Windermere..
Merritt	
Nakusp	
Nanaimo-Duncan	
North Okanagan	
Peachland-Westbank-
Queen Charlotte	
Quesnel ...
Sechelt	
Smithers-
Terrace	
Ucluelet-Tofino..
Vanderhoof-
Williams Lake...
Totals..
4,371
510
524
1,700
115
3,334
1,745
136
300
232
111
5,011
638
454
512
566
14,339
8,796
523
125
1,324
1,360
752
893
264
384
490
120.1
17.2
18.2
96.3
1.7
166.4
114.3
12.0
12.0
11.4
5.1
168.0
20.2
41.9
18.1
57.7
740.9
761.5
47.0
8.6
42.5
60.5
60.4
34.3
32.7
31.3
23.9
49,509
2,724.2
$749,919.92
122,089.48
102,815.25
604,814.70
18,553.43
835,533.01
314,685.45
54,018.81
60,890.30
59,138.27
31,569.46
1,126,795.80
119,223.99
187,026.48
99,776.51
215,028.76
3,637,860.81
2,450,742.71
203,927.49
56,397.75
248,704.64
297,305.59
202,661.91
163,992.04
136,000.52
98,980.83
86,534.41
512,284,988.32
36.4
29.7
28.8
17.7
67.6
20.0
15.3
11.3
25.0
20.4
21.8
29.8
31.6
10.8
28.3
9.8
19.4
11.6
11.1
14.5
31.2
22.5
12.5
26.0
8.0
12.3
20.5
18.2
$171.58
239.39
196.21
355.77
161.33
250.61
180.34
397.20
202.97
254.91
284.41
224.86
186.87
411.95
194.88
379.91
253.70
278.62
389.92
451.18
187.84
218.61
269.50
183.64
515.15
257.76
176.60
$248.14
1 Exclusive of metering equipment, which averaged $29.75 per customer. I 42
"ELECTRIC POWER ACT'
A district crew sets a pole in the year-round task of maintaining, improving, and building
distribution systems in twenty-seven power districts. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 43
4. RATE SCHEDULES
With the main task of bringing all power districts under the Commission's promotional-rate structure now completed, the 1952-53 fiscal year produced no major adjustments in schedules.
Because of the rapid growth in Quesnel and the increased consumption per customer
brought about, in part at least, by promotional rates, a review of all accounts subject to
special minimum charges was made. The result of this survey was that 205 residential
customers had their special minimum charges reduced to the regular level of $1 per
month per kw of billing demand.
Similar surveys in other power districts will be made in this next fiscal year.
Rates for all classes of service as in effect at March 31st, 1953, are listed for all
power districts in the following tables. I 44                                                    " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
A. Residential Service Rates
Available for residence lighting, heating, cooking, and single-phase motors indi
vidually rated at 2 horse-power or less used for domestic purposes.
Monthly
Block I
Block II
Block III
Power District and Rate Zone
Minimum
per Kw of
(First 20 Kwh
per Month per
(Next 60 Kwh
per Month per
(Balance of
Monthly
Demand
Kw of Demand)
Kw of Demand)
Consumption)
$
Cents per Kwh
Cents per Kwh
Cents per Kwh
.55
7
2
„      (Zone 2)..          	
1.00
8
2
1
Alert Bay    _          	
1.00
12
2V-.
Burns Lake  _	
1.00
12
2'/2
1.00
10
2
„    (Zone 2) 	
3.33
10
2Vs
1.00
1.00
12
8
2
„           „     (Zone 2) 	
1.001
10
2
1.00
10
2Vz.
Fort St. James     	
(5)
12
2'/2
Golden     	
1.00
12
2»/2
1.00
3.00
12
12
2Vi
2'/2
Houston    	
.55
7
2Vs
(Zone 2).        _ 	
1.00          !                   8
2Vs
1.00
10
2Vi
1.00
12
2Vi
Merritt  	
1.00
12
2"/2
Nakusp  _ —	
1.002
12
21/2
.55
7
2
„             „       (Zone 2)	
1.00
8
2
(Zone 3)   	
1.00
10
2Vz
.55
7
2Vz
„             „        (Zone 2)  _	
1.003
8
2V-.
1.00*
10
2Vz
(5)
12
2Vi
Quesnel (Zone 1)  —       	
1.00
10
21/2
„       (Zone 2)  	
1.00          1                12
2»/2
Sechelt  _	
1.00
12
rvz
Smithers 	
1.00
10
2Vi
Terrace  	
1.00
12
2Y2
Ucluelet-Tofino— 	
(6)
12
2Vz
Vanderhoof. 	
1.00
12
2Vs
1.00
10
21/2
,,           „     (Zone 2)  _
1.00
12
21/2
Note.—Minimum billing demand, 2 kw.
Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent.
1 $5.50 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in that area between Royston and
Mud Bay.
2 $5 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in Needles-Edgewood-Fauquier only.
3 $5 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in Falkland-Westwold-Monte Lake only.
* $5.50 per month or $2 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in the Lakeview Heights Subdivision
(V.L.A.) only.
5 $5 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater.
8 $6 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater.
A residential service is deemed to have a minimum demand of 2 kw; if a range is
installed or if the measured demand is 2.5 kw but does not exceed 8 kw, the billing
demand is 3 kw;  if the measured demand exceeds 8 kw, the billing demand shall be
such metered demand less 5 kw.
■ REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
B. Commercial Service Rates
I 45
Available for lighting and other electrical equipment in all premises excepting single
and duplex residences, at 115/230 volts, or, where available and where the contract
demand is not less than 25 kilowatts, three-phase four-wire 115/208 volts.
Power District and Rate Zone
Monthly
Minimum
per Kw of
Demand
Block I
(First 30 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block II
(Next 60 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block III
(Balance of
Monthly
Consumption)
Alberni (Zones 1 and 2).
Alert Bay.  	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River (Zones 1 and 2)..
Clinton _	
Comox Valley (Zones 1 and 2).
Dawson Creek	
Fort St. James  	
Golden  __
Hazelton..  	
Houston 	
Kamloops (Zone 1)..
(Zone2)_.
Lake Cowichan	
Lake Windermere ....
Merritt _ 	
Nakusp	
Nanaimo-Duncan (Zones 1 and 2)..
(Zone3)._	
North Okanagan (Zones 1 and 2)..
Peachland-Westbank	
Queen Charlotte 	
Quesnel (Zones 1 and 2)..	
Sechelt	
Smithers 	
Terrace 	
Ucluelet-Tofino..
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake (Zones 1 and 2).
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.001
1.00
1.002
1.00
(6)
1.00
1.00
3.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.003
1.00
1.00
1.00*
1.00
(5)
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
(«)
1.00
1.00
Cents per Kwh
8
12
12
10
12
12
12
12
12
12
9
10
10
12
12
12
10
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
Cents per Kwh
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Cents per Kwh
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Wz
l'/2
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
NOTE.-
-Minimum billing demand, 2 kw.
Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent.
1 $3.33 per kw of billing demand in Zone 2 only.
2 $5.50 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in that area between Royston and
Mud Bay.
3 $5 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in Needles-Edgewood-Fauquier only.
4 $5 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in Falkland-Westwold-Monte Lake only.
5 $5 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater.
6 $6 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand whichever is the greater.
A commercial service is deemed to have a minimum demand of 2 kw. Where the
measured demand exceeds 5 kw, the billing demand is 75 per cent of such measured
demand. I 46
ELECTRIC POWER ACT'
C. Power Service Rates
Available for motors and other electrical equipment, excluding lighting and space
heating, at available phases and voltages.
Power Districts (All Zones)
Monthly Service Charge
per Kw of
Demand
Block I
(First 50 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block II
(Next 50 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block III
(Balance of
Monthly
Consumption)
Alberni	
Alert Bay	
Burns Lake.	
Campbell River-
Clinton*	
Comox Valley-
Dawson Creek-
Fort St. James*-
Golden	
H azelton *	
Houston* 	
Kamloops	
Lake Cowichan.	
Lake Windermere .
Merritt	
Nakusp 	
Nanaimo-Duncan.	
North Okanagan	
Peachland-Westbank..
Queen Charlotte*	
Quesnel	
Sechelt 	
Smithers 	
Terrace 	
Ucluelet-Tofmo
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake..
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
Cents per Kwh
3
3
3
3
5
3
3
5
3
5
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Cents per Kwh
l'/2
2
2
IVi
3
1*4
2
3
2
3
3
Wz
Wz
2
2
2
Wz
Wz
Wz
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Cents per Kwh
Vz
1
1
Vz
1
Vz
1
1
1
1
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Vz
Note.—Minimum contract demand, 5 kw.
Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent in all districts except those marked with an asterisk (*).
Monthly minimum bill is $1 per kw of billing demand. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 47
D. Primary-power Service Rates
Available for establishments requiring power at the primary voltage of the distribution system and at a single point of delivery.
NOTE.-
-Minimum contract demand, 67 kw.
Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent.
Monthly minimum bill is $1 per kw of billing demand.
Power Districts (All Zones)
Monthly Service Charge
per Kw of
Demand
Block I
(First 50 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block II
(Next 50 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block III
(Balance of
Monthly
Consumption)
Cents
50
85
85
50
50
85
85
50
50
85
85
85
50
50
50
85
85
85
85
85
85
Cents per Kwh
21/2
3
3
2>/2
2Vz
3
3
2>/2
2'/2
3
3
3
2Vz
2'/2
2>/2
3
3
3
3
3
3
Cents per Kwh
Wz
2
2
Wz
Wz
2
2
Wz
Wz
2
2
2
l'/2
Wz
Wz
2
2
2
2
2
2
Cents per Kwh
Vz
Alert Bay	
1
1
Campbell River2 ..
Vz
Clinton1 	
Vz
1
Fort St. James1  	
Golden  	
1
Vz
Vz
1
1
Nakusp.   	
Nanaimo-Duncan3 	
1
1/2
Vz
Vz
1
Sechelt..  _	
1
Smithers.  	
1
1
Ucluelet-Toflno1
1
1
i Owing to limitations of generation or transmission equipment, primary-power service is not available in these power
districts.
2 Owing to limitations of transmission equipment, primary-power service is not available in Zone 2.
3 Owing to limitations of transmission equipment, primary-power service is not available in Zone 3. I 48
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT '
E. Street-lighting Service Rates
Street-lights
The uniform street-lighting schedule is now available in all power districts served by
the Commission, although a few contracts relating to older-type installations are still in
force in some areas.
Two types of street-lighting service are available: —
(a) Overhead.—Under which the Commission installs, owns, operates, and
maintains overhead street-lighting equipment and supplies energy for the
operation of lights daily from one hour after sunset until one hour before
sunrise. The customer municipality pays the actual cost of materials for
renewal of lamps and glassware.
Ornamental.—Under which the street-lighting equipment is owned by and
maintained at the expense of the customer municipality. The Commission supplies energy for the operation daily from one hour after sunset
until one hour before sunrise.
The schedule of charges under each of these types of service for various lamp
capacities is as follows:—
(b)
System of Wiring
Capacity Rating of Lamp
Net Rate per Lamp per Month
Overhead
Ornamental
Multiple 	
100 watts                       ...
$1.50
2.00
2.50
3.00
3.50
6.00
1.30
1.75
2.10
2.60
$0.75
200 watts. _       	
1.25
300 watts _  	
1.75
400 watts - _             _.   ..
2.25
son wptts
2.75
1,000 watts  _	
5.25
100 candle-power 	
250 candle-power	
400 candle-power  	
600 candle-power  	
.55
1.00
1.35
1.85
Note.—The Commission will expend not over $100 per street-lamp.   Any excess over $100 per lamp shall be paid
for by the contracting customer.
Traffic-lights
Energy charges for traffic-lights are as follows:—
Two-colour centre suspension type, $3 per month per lantern.
Three-colour corner set of four lanterns, $8.50 per month per set.
Decorative Lighting
During the year an energy charge of 2 cents per kwh, based on the estimated use of
lighting for decorative purposes, was also established.
F. Irrigation Service Rates
Available for motor-driven pumps used for irrigation purposes, including testing of
pipe-lines, from April 1st to October 31st, in all power districts, served wholly from
hydro-electric sources.
Rate:—
$5. per month per horse-power of maximum demand for minimum period of
three consecutive months.
17 cents per day per horse-power of maximum demand for all use in excess of
the minimum contract period.
Note.—Minimum contract period, three consecutive months.   Discount for prompt
payment, 10 per cent. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
1 49
V. SURVEYS AND INVESTIGATIONS
1. POWER PROJECTS
Necessary field surveys, investigations, and studies were carried out covering the
construction of a new hydro-electric generating-station which will be undertaken following
acquisition of the existing generating plant on Puntledge River now owned by Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited. The transfer of this property will take place on May
11th, 1953. These surveys showed that the proposed installation should consist of a
single 35,000-horsepower turbine driving a 30,000-kva generator to be located adjacent
to the existing plant. Following decision regarding the location and nature of this installation, land surveys necessary to define the actual land to be acquired from the company
were carried out.
During the summer of 1952 surveys were carried out in connection with possible
future additional storage in Whatshan Lake and diversion of Barnes Creek into Whatshan
Lake. A drilling programme to determine the suitability of subsoil conditions for increased Whatshan Lake water-level in the vicinity of the dam was undertaken.
Preliminary surveys, started during the preceding fiscal year, covering the power
possibilities of Kokish River, which enters the sea at Beaver Cove on Vancouver Island
near Alert Bay, were completed and led to the conclusion that a small hydro-electric
development serving the local area, including Alert Bay and Sointula, is quite feasible and
will be economically justifiable as soon as the load in the area is sufficient.
Studies of water-power sites in the vicinity of Terrace, which were started during the
preceding year, were also carried to completion. Comparison of the cost of development
of these local sites with the cost of purchased power transmitted from the Aluminum
Company of Canada's system at Kitimat indicated that the latter source would be the more
economical to serve anticipated requirements at Terrace. Construction of a transmission-
line between Kitimat and Terrace will be facilitated as rail and road communications are
developed between these two points. All activities in this area have been watched closely,
and the railroad company and agencies concerned in a road access have been kept advised
of the probable future requirements of the Commission with respect to transmission-line
construction.
Studies based on earlier surveys made on Spillimacheen River were continued with
a view to development of power on this river as soon as economic conditions warrant.
2. TRANSMISSION PROJECTS
On the Vancouver Island system, land surveys for an extension of the 132-kv
transmission-line from Nanaimo to Harmac were completed.
Detailed studies of regulator and voltage control of the 132-kv Vancouver Island
system indicated that installation of a synchronous condenser at Nanaimo will be required
during 1954.
Final surveys for the extension of the 60-kv system from Nanaimo to Parksville were
also completed.
Planning and field work, including acquisition of right-of-way for the second 63-kv
circuit from Vernon to Kamloops via Salmon Arm, were continued in advance of actual
construction of this step-by-step development.
3. DISTRIBUTION PROJECTS
Detailed surveys covering distribution facilities were made in connection with the
following communities not presently served by the Commission:—
(1) North Thompson River area extending from Barriere to Vavenby.
(2) The community of Blue River. I 50
; ELECTRIC POWER ACT : REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 51
(3) The Slocan area extending from New Denver to Crescent Valley.
(4) The Village of McBride and adjacent rural areas in the upper part of the
Fraser River Valley.
Detailed studies and plans for development of distribution facilities were made of
various areas within the Commission's system, the more important being in the Duncan
and Quesnel areas. r
I 52
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT '
VI. FINANCIAL
GENERAL
The financial results of the year's operations reflect the rapidly growing demands
made upon the Commission's service and the growing economy of operation which these
demands make possible.
The following table sets forth the principal features of the year's financial operation,
together with comparative figures for the two preceding years:—
Year Ended Mar. 31
1951
1952
1953
Gross revenue  __ _   —
Direct expenses (including interest)  	
Direct expenses as percentage of gross revenue	
Average charge per kwh paid by—
Residential customers  	
Commercial customers 	
Power customers _    	
Average gross capital investment!     	
Net surplus transferred to stabilization reserve  	
Net return (percentage of net surplus to average investment) 	
Capital turnover (percentage of gross revenue to average investment)
Capital expenditure  _  	
Provided from operations for—■
Maintenance and renewals  _— _ 	
Sinking fund    _ 	
Contingencies    -   	
Interest    	
Reserves as percentage of operating plant (plant in operation plus
inactive plant)—
Maintenance and renewals	
Contingencies     	
Sinking fund...    .  _   	
$4,064,641.79
$2,639,731.16
65%
3.3*
3.2(f
1.6*
$42,101,517.32
$152,413.16
0.36%
9.7%
$8,495,196.90
$713,004.50
$482,483.33
$77,009.64
$964,966.78
3.0%
1.4%
4.0%
$4,895,229.82
$3,010,221.28
61%
3.1*
2.8*
1.7*
$49,143,232.50
$268,980.47
0.55%
10.0%
$5,945,674.69
$878,084.50
$649,578.84
$88,364.73
$1,177,975.36
2.9%
1.2%
4.5%
$5,902,344.21
$3,569,221.21
60%
2.9*
2.7*
1.7*
$55,549,919.15
$393,669.85
0.71%
10.6%
$7,314,947.76
$1,089,881.93
$746,921.66
$102,649.56
$1,513,160.95
3.4%
1.3%
5.6%
1 Average between investment at beginning and end of year.
The Commission's financial position at March 31st, 1953, is shown in detail in the
following statements:—
1. Balance-sheet.
2. Combined Operations—Revenue and Expenses.
3. Combined Operations (Power Districts).
4. Power District Operations (Detailed).
5. Plant and Related Reserves.
6. Construction Work in Progress.
7. Maintenance and Renewals Reserve.
PLANT
Details of the plant in operation and work in progress shown in the balance-sheet
are contained in Statements 5 and 6. Net additions to plant in operation during the year
totalled $5,667,788.64.
There was a further substantial increase in retired-plant balances. This account
represents the residual book value of certain plant which has been disposed of and the
book value of other plant which has become obsolete. These costs relate principally to
plant taken over in the original expropriations and acquisitions. The greater part of the
increase during the year ended March 31st, 1953, is represented by costs of the Sechelt
and Barriere generating plants, superseded by the Clowhom Falls and Whatshan hydro
plants respectively. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1952-53 I 53
Full provision for interest and sinking fund on plant values, shown under the headings of " Retired-plant Balances " and " Plant-acquisition Adjustments," continued to be
made by a charge to operations. Plant in operation and inactive plant carry the same
provision for interest and sinking fund, together with an additional provision for maintenance and renewals.
CURRENT ASSETS
The reserve for bad debts at March 31st, 1953, amounted to $15,117.32, which
has been deducted from the total of accounts receivable. Accounts written off at March
31st, 1953, totalled $6,215.26.
Included in "Accounts Receivable—Other" is the amount of $12,784.66, representing accounts which are over ninety days old.
The inventory of materials and supplies is shown at average cost. Comparative
figures for the years ended March 31st, 1951, 1952, and 1953, are as follows: 1951,
$1,040,305.45; 1952, $1,132,731.53; 1953, $1,077,841.25. Physical inventories were
taken at all warehouses and district stores on March 31st, 1953.
DEFERRED CHARGES
Organization expense was written down by $15,906.03 during the year. The
amortization of bond discount was continued with respect both to Provincial Government
advances under section 46 and Commission issues under section 53 of the " Electric
Power Act."
SINKING FUND
The full requirement of all sinking funds is on deposit with the Minister of Finance.
No advantage has been taken of the deferment allowed by sections 52 (2) and 53 (11)
of the " Electric Power Act."
LONG-TERM LIABILITIES
Three sinking fund bond issues were sold by the Commission during the year, to
a total value of $3,500,000. Each has a forty-year term and an interest rate of 4 per
cent. The proceeds of these issues were used for the repayment of short-term borrowings
for capital purposes.
No Provincial Government advances were made to the Commission under section 46
of the " Electric Power Act."
All interest costs had been met in full at March 31st, 1953.
The borrowing limitation under section 53a of the " Electric Power Act" was
increased from $60,000,000 to $80,000,000 in March, 1953.
All Commission borrowings, whether long or short term, are guaranteed by the
Province of British Columbia, both as to principal and interest.
CURRENT LIABILITIES
Commission notes for $5,000,000, required for capital purposes, were held by the
bank at March 31st, 1953.
The gross revenue taxes set aside during the year ended March 31st, 1953, for
payment to municipalities under section 62 of the " Electric Power Act" amounted to
$92,205.35, being 14 per cent greater than the amount so set aside during the year
1951-52.
RESERVES
The maintenance and renewals reserve increased by $436,398.56 during the year,
after providing for plant retirements amounting to $265,040.48. I 54 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
The amount set aside by the Commission during the year under section 64 of the
"Electric Power Act" was $65,472.26, an increase of $17,326.21 over the amount
provided in the preceding year.
The contingencies reserve {see clause (c) of section 56 of the "Electric Power
Act") increased by $100,876.90 to $672,405.18 at March 31st, 1953.
STABILIZATION RESERVE
This reserve was increased by $393,669.85 during the year, being the net operating
surplus as detailed in Statements 2, 3, and 4.
OPERATIONS
Statements 2, 3, and 4 give in detail the results of operations during the year.
PLANT, WORK IN PROGRESS, AND MAINTENANCE AND RENEWALS
Statements 5, 6, and 7 give details of plant values and related reserves at March
31st, 1953.
EMPLOYEES' SUPERANNUATION
The balance of the employer-employee contributory superannuation fund was
$1,009,622.17 at March 31st, 1953, according to the Provincial Government Superannuation Commissioner, administrator of the fund. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 55
AUDITORS' REPORT
We have examined the balance-sheet of the British Columbia Power Commission
as at March 31, 1953, and the related statement of combined operations for the year
ended on that date, and have obtained all the information and explanations we have
required. Our examination included a general review of the accounting procedures
and such tests of accounting records and other supporting evidence as we considered
necessary in the circumstances.
We report that, in our opinion, the accompanying balance-sheet and related statement of combined operations have been drawn up so as to exhibit a true and correct
view of the state of the affairs of the British Columbia Power Commission as at March 31,
1953, and the results of its operations for the year ended on that date according to the
best of our information and the explanations given to us and as shown by the books of
the Commission.
ISMAY, BOISTON, DUNN & CO.,
Chartered Accountants.
Victoria, B.C.,
June 24th, 1953. I 56 "ELECTRIC POWER ACT"
BALANCE-SHEET AS
Assets
Capital assets—
Plant and equipment in operation at values estimated by the Commission at dates
of acquisition plus additions at cost (Statement 5)—
Generation   $26,488,224.95
Transmission          10,292,919.62
Distribution      12,859,117.12
General         1,342,301.61
Construction work in progress (Statement 6) —
Generation    $3,766,378.76
Transmission     1,090,501.85
Distribution   308,197.72
General     8,804.02
$50,982,563.30
       5,173,882.35
Inactive plant (Statement 5)   495,276.25
Total plant and equipment  $56,651,721.90
Surveys and investigations   133,024.52
Plant-acquisition adjustments (Statement 5)        1,509,267.10
Retired-plant balances (Statement 5)   803,994.77
$59,098,008.29
Current assets—
Cash on hand and in banks      $763,831.53
Accounts receivable, less reserves—
Light and power   $479,652.21
Other         32,926.00
        512,578.21
Construction and operating materials and supplies     1,077,841.25
Unexpired insurance and other prepaid charges   76,552.29
2,430,803.28
Deferred charges, less amounts written off—
Organization and preliminary expense         $77,219.80
Bond discount        443,666.16
520,885.96
Sinking fund for retirement of long-term liabilities, deposited with Minister of Finance      2,882,248.75
$64,931,946.28 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53 I 57
AT MARCH 3 1st,  1953 Statement 1
Liabilities
Long-term liabilities—
The Government of the Province of British Columbia—
General advances   $31,724,890.25
Bond discount—general advances   243,645.40
1 Central Interior Development Act"
Bonds payable—
3 per cent, due 1967
3 per cent, due 1968
3% per cent, due 1991
Deferred agreement payable—purchased plant
$31,968,535.65
60,000.00
$32,028,535.65
  $7,000,000.00
  6,000,000.00
  3,000,000.00
4 per cent, due 1992   3,500,000.00
19,500,000.00
214,882.82
$51,743,418.47
Current liabilities—
Notes payable—bank 	
Accounts payable and accrued charges 	
Accrued interest on borrowings 	
Gross revenue taxes, municipal areas 	
Contractors' deposits and balances payable
Customers' deposits 	
$5,000,000.00
359,765.54
232,383.83
92,205.35
124,473.17
89,356.06
5,898,183.95
Reserves*—
Maintenance and renewals (Statement 7)
Gross revenue assessments, unorganized areas
Contributions in aid of construction 	
Contingencies   	
$1,772,397.57
226,428.04
89,168.53
672,405.18
2,760,399.32
Stabilization reserve—
Balance, April 1st, 1952      $1,254,025.94
Surplus from operations, year ended March 31st,  1953   (Statement 2)     393,669.85
1,647,695.79
Sinking fund reserve (Statement 5).
2,882,248.75
$64,931,946.28 I 58 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
Statement 2
STATEMENT OF COMBINED OPERATIONS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 3 1st,  1953
Revenue—
Power districts—
Electrical-energy sales _
Miscellaneous revenue
Power sales under section 21 of the " Electric Power Act" and related revenues
Total
$4,646,650.21
67,956.28
$4,714,606.49
1,187,737.72
$5,902,344.21
Expenses— Operating Costs
Direct— Generation      Transmission Distribution
Labour  $311,960.48    $47,576.41 $260,594.45 $620,131.34
Fuel        531,462.29       531,462.29
Other operating expenses  116,631.11      22,800.13 85,974.39 225,405.63
Customer accounting       305,290.83 305,290.83
Gross revenue, 3% assessment _-     139,349.26 139,349.26
Administration and general expenses 	
Purchased power 	
56,926.23
19,350.28
11,058.70       147,085.70
215,070.63
19,350.28
Interest on investment in plant,
other than construction work
in progress 	
$1,036,330.39    $81,435.24     $938,294.63  $2,056,060.26
833,584.52    284,151.32       395,425.11    1,513,160.95
$1,869,914.91  $365,586.56 $1,333,719.74 $3,569,221.21
Operating Surplus (excluding provision for reserves).
$2,333,123.00
Provision for reserves—
Maintenance and renewals   $401,479.01 $188,655.81 $499,747.11 $1,089,881.93
Sinking fund   411,066.65    140,255.10 195,599.91 746,921.66
Contingencies       102,649.56 102,649.56
$812,545.66 $328,910.91     $797,996.58 $1,939,453.15
Net Operating Surplus, year ended March 31st, 1953 (transferred to stabilization
reserve)
$393,669.85 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53 I 59
Statement 3
STATEMENT OF COMBINED OPERATIONS, SEGREGATING REVENUE AND EXPENSES
TO SHOW POWER DISTRICT REVENUE, COST OF POWER DELIVERED TO POWER
DISTRICTS, AND COST OF DISTRIBUTION
Revenue (power districts)—
Electrical-energy sales   $4,646,650.21
Miscellaneous revenue  67,956.28
Total power district revenue     $4,714,606.49
Expenses (detailed on Statement 2) —
Cost of power—
Direct expenses—
Generation    $ 1,869,914.91
Transmission           365,586.56
  $2,235,501.47
Provision for reserves—
Generation       $812,545.66
Transmission           328.910.91
     1,141,456.57
$3,376,958.04
Less power sales under section 21  of the " Electric Power
Act" and related revenues      1,187,737.72
Cost of power delivered to distribution systems   $2,189,220.32
Cost of distribution—
Direct expenses—
Operating and administrative      $938,294.63
Interest on investment in distribution plant       395,425.11
 — $1,333,719.74
Provision for reserves—
Maintenance and renewals       $499,747.11
Sinking fund        195,599.91
Contingencies         102,649.56
797,996.58
Total cost of distribution    2,131,716.32
Total expenses   $4,320,936.64
Net operating surplus, year ended March 31st, 1953  (transferred to stabilization
reserve)     $393,669.85 I 60
; ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   POWER   COMMISSION
DISTRIBUTION   OF  REVENUE   BY FUNCTIONS
FUNCTION
Generation
Transmission
Distribution
Power   Purchased
Net  Surplus
Total Revenue.
1351-52
$ 2,255,239.41
543,383.11
1,760, 279.6/
47,14 7.22
268,980.47
$ 4,395,229.82
IS52-53
2,663,110.29
694,497.47
2,131, 7/6.32
13,350.28
333,<S69.8S
5,902,344.2/
1951-52
1952-53. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 61
British Columbia power commission
disposition   of   revenue
Fixed   Charges.- 1351-52
Maintenance & Renewols. $   878,084.50
Interest 1,177,975  36
Sinking  Fund 649, 578. 84
Contingencies 83, 364. 73
Total Fixed Charges $2,734,003.43
So/aries,Wages&  Welfare. $   871,0/4.14
Materials, Fuel & Lube. 507,866.73
Other Expenses 272,3/6 .61
Taxes. 133,901. 22
Purchased Poyver 4 7,147 .22
Net Surplus 268,380.47
Total /?evenue. $ 4,895,229.32
1352 - 53
$1,089,881 .93
1,513, 160 . 95
746,921   66
102,649 56
$3,452,(5/4 . 10
$ 367,066.96
592, 146-63
324,026.47
IS3, 467. 92
/ 9,350.28
333,669.85
$ 5,902,344 21
1951 - 52
1952-53 I 62
"ELECTRIC POWER ACT"
POWER DISTRICT
Summary of Revenue and Expenses
Accumulated Stabilization
Customer Statistics
Kwh Statistics for the
Alberni
Alert Bay
Burns
Lake
Campbell
River
Clinton
Revenue—
$223,598.20
103,102.22
9,874.71
$28,582.99
18,138.95
5,878.14
$23,536.37
21,567.55
11,956.14
$91,403.32
46,756.96
9,217.88
$3,980.72
5,898.43
379.97
38,601.22
9,289.96
1,080.27
15,266.64
1,892.25
1,899.50
315.00
Sub-total                              	
$384,466.31 1 $54,499.58
5,656.85 |         750.95
$58,140.33
1,108.60
$164,537.05
2,756.79
$10,574.12
133.91
Total revenue  	
$390,123.16 | $55,250.53
$59,248.93
$167,293.84
$10,708.03
Expenses—
Allocated cost of power production _	
Distribution expenses, direct—
$192,279.45
66.585.67
$21,991.13
12.098.93
$28,771.76
12,839.22
3,475.62
$79,684.71
28,148.83
15,563.95
$4,274.73
3,766.89
24,991.12 1      4,288.02
538.15
$283,856.24 | $38,378.08
$45,086.60
$123,397.49
$8,579.77
Operating surplus before provision for distribution
$106,266.92
S16.872.45
$14,162.33
$43,896.35
$2,128.26
Provision for distribution reserves—
1
$40,428.08 |    $6,724.01
12,373.94        2,119.46
8,820.36 j      1,139.40
$3,523.02
1,719.21
1,103.64
$17,498.66
7,720.72
2,985.72
$870.82
266.60
Contingencies.- _	
19.80
$61,622.38 |    $9,982.87
$6,345.87
$28,205.10
$1,157.22
Surplus for year ended March 31st, 1953	
Stabilization reserve, April 1st, 1952 	
$44,644.54
63,462.79
$6,889.58
29,938.71
$7,816.46
18,348.56
$15,691.25
27,207.25
$971.04
110.49
Accumulated stabilization reserve, March 31st, 1953..
$108,107.33 | $36,828.29
$26,165.02
$42,898.50
$1,081.53
Customers, March 31st, 1953—
Residential  _ ~ „
Commercial _ _	
Power    	
3,774                397
536                  94
59        |           14
2                      5
394
116
12
2
1,432
242
24
2
77
36
1
1
4,371        j        510
524
1,700
115
Kwh, year ended March 31st, 1953—
1
9,160,934 |       823,970
4,408,326 |       707,367
3,406,880 |       294,580
245,605 |         73,438
611,697
797,885
374,496
37,364
3,192,802
2,165,247
1,748,917
74,000
71,708
158,120
10,375
11,010
Power.  - 	
17,221,745
1,899,355
1,821,442
7,180,966
251,213 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53
I 63
OPERATIONS
for the Year Ended March 31st, 1953
Reserve as at March 31st, 1953
as at March 31st, 1953
Year Ended March 31st, 1953
Statement 4
Comox
Valley
Dawson
Creek
Fort
St. James
Golden
Hazelton
Houston
Kamloops
Lake
Cowichan
Lake Windermere
$165,245.47
68,307.59
16,228.37
$70,213.49
62,542.12
23,453.73
$2,019.82
925.27
$14,089.41
12,469.15
670.36
	
$11,045.58
8,396.03
2,737.54
$7,129.04
3,717.42
350.47
$237,720.20
170,613.99
74,843.72
17,455.73
49,754.27
13,517.95
$30,202.29
13,779.49
407.48
	
$21,778.95
16,800.94
3,494.25
	
1,313.55
13,967.90
2,364.41
7,145.55
1,381.60
2,516.76
7,284.85
1,442.37
444.00
267.00
300.00
$258,379.83
3,939.90
$172,541.65
5,178.53
$2,945.09
18.69
$28,671.29
286.49
$22,623.15
390.05
$11,463.93
292.97
$563,905.86
6,269.53
$52,916.41
820.92
$44,890.90
805.59
$262,319.73
$177,720.18
$2,963.78
$28,957.78 | $23,013.20
$11,756.90
$570,175.39
$53,737.33
$45,696.49
$112,906.88
58,162.54
25,684.35
$68,479.93
34,436.40
10,994.81
$974.50
1,006.46
420.06
$10,864.24
10,624.63
2,132.90
$7,551.68
5,132.92
1,991.34
$4,238.51
2,728.47
1,038.48
$270,247.05
83,321.67
37,540.43
$22,222.12
11,267.90
4,128.89
$21,526.27
10,377.59
6,049.71
$196,753.77
$113,911.14
$2,401.02
$23,621.77 | $14,675.94
$8,005.46
$391,109.15
$37,618.91
$37,953.57
$65,565.96
$63,809.04
$562.76
$5,336.01
$8,337.26
$3,751.44
I
1
$179,066.24 | $16,118.42
$7,742.92
$35,829.88
12,704.30
5,421.24
$15,849.70
5,441.63
3,709.32
$705.42
212.70
$2,046.21
1,054.71
620.16
$1,998.52
984.06
467.52
$1,697.31
513.23
221.40
$60,596.15
18,571.86
13,267.80
$6,710.03
2,043.75
1,045.08
$6,043.81
2,987.08
905.64
	
$53,955.42
$25,000.65
$918.12
$3,721.08
$3,450.10
$2,431.94
$92,435.81
$9,798.86
$9,936.53
$11,610.54
98,810.01
$38,808.39
105,172.04
-$355.36
$1,614.93
15,847.09
$4,887.16
2,610.81
$1,319.50
1,692.36
$86,630.43
422,896.48
$6,319.56
23,196.69
-$2,193.61
—10,653.32
...
$110,420.55
$143,980.43
-$355.36
$17,462.02
$7,497.97
$3,011.86
$509,526.91
$29,516.25
-$12,846.93
2,860
419
51
4
1,362
325
56
2
111
25
	
231
63
5
1
177
52
1
2
92
17
1
1
4,022
837
149
3
551
81
5
1
350
97
i
3,334
1,745
136
300
232
111
5,011
638
454
5,688,534
2,969,044
652,776
1,528,669
1,930,571
1,728,142
73,484
37,157
21,171
350,557
419,814
17,318
47,684
290,602
222,214
151,620
10,384
186,863
107,258
12,990
8,850
8,169,187
4,748,897
8,190,291
536,667
680,446
380,192
364,652
45,448
589,576
643,945
319,500
214,100
13,644
9,524,454
5,260,866
58,328
835,373
674,820
315,961
21,645,042
1,470,738
1,566,665 I 64
! ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
POWER DISTRICT
Merritt
Nakusp
Nanaimo-
Duncan
North
Okanagan
Peachland-
Westbank
Queen
C arlotte
Revenue—
$50,831.96
$26,051.53
$717,541.45
326,542.52
56,767.19
243.63
127,833.00
27,556.18
$423,655.89
179,223.61
119,715.83
10,936.77
72,614.34
20,881.39
$24,824.35
9,651.18
8,452.75
2,163.73
879.93
870.00
$1,167.77
14,041.05  |    10,416.84
4.525.27  1          806.29
295.58
118.44
...      ...
2,870.00 |         478.90
Sub-total -- _ _	
$42,268.28 | $37,872.00
419.50 |         484.65
$1,256,483.97
18,189.18
$827,027.83
8,209.44
$46,841.94
389.12
$1,463.35
2.57
Total revenue 	
$42,687.78 | $38,356.65
$1,274,673.15
$835,237.27
$47,231.06 I $1,465.92
Expenses—
Allocated cost of power production
Distribution expenses, direct—
1
$13,086.08 | $12,625.25
11,163.90 |    12,581.18
1
3,516.14 j      7,008.64
$576,846.05
248,301.17
117,925.23
$446,586.27
184,851.69
81,638.11
$20,711.35
12,802.46
6,797.14
$521.96
580.13
Interest on investment in distribution
282.03
$27,766.12  | $32,215.07
$943,072.45
$713,076.07
$40,310.95
$1,384.12
Operating surplus before provision for
distribution reserves 	
$14,921.66
$6,141.58
$331,600.70
$122,161.20
$6,920.11
$81.80
Provision for distribution reserves—
1
$3,747.85 |    $6,777.86
1,738.67 |      3,461.13
950.76            676.56
$160,999.96
58,322.27
29,037.36
$78,278.73
40,357.89
20,101.32
$6,903.10
3,356.56
1,129.56
$476.78
143.48
....
$6,437.28 | $10,915.55
$248,359.59
$138,737.94
$11,389.22
$620.26
Surplus for year ended March 31st, 1953 —
$8,484.38
8,777.33
—$4,773.97
— 197.07
$83,241.11
6,683.86
-$16,576.74
273,413.25
-$4,469.11
—21,168.52
-$538.46
	
Accumulated stabilization reserve, March
31st, 1953.	
$17,261.71
— $4,971.04
$89,924.97
$256,836.51
-$25,637.63
—$538.46
Customers, March 31st, 1953—
414
89
8
1
457
98
9
2
12,345
1,829
153
12
7,423
1,135
230
8
424
76
21
2
109
16
512
566
14,339
8,796
523
125
Kwh, year ended March 31st, 1953—
373,648
405,484
208,530
112,900
572,384
260,304
26,182
8,995
27,959,758
14,253,130
11,946,301
893,660
13,876,180
5,744,737
11,906,475
479,843
682,253
221,910
758,737
39,050
17,538
7,244
Power  _	
_.
1,100,562
867,865
55,052,849
32,007,235
1,701,950
24,782 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1952-53 I 65
OPERATIONS—Continued Statement A—Continued
Quesnel
Sechelt
Smithers
Terrace
Tofino-
Ucluelet
Vander-
hoof
Williams
Lake
Former Power
Districts
Totals
$60,069.19
49,243.72
18,890.20
$65,516.05
19955.74
$45,871.27
7.6.756.43
$50,368.91
32,377.87
4,982.83
$16,136.16
7,298.46
9,892.35
$19,851.63
18,848.43
5,748.10
$26,251.51
27,555.79
3,863.58
$2,428,683.52
1,274,523.33
409,691.59
30,918.30
400,443.39
102,390.08
3,057.69 I    13,496.75
48,616.27
1,645.00
1,781.40 |      9,171.97
1,228.52 j      1,390.42
6,014.20
1,355.90
4,966.39
793.00
749.61
1,092.00
$178,464.38
2,664.72
$90,839.40 | $96,686.84
1,906.75 j     2,922.64
$95,099.71
1,683.21
$34,119.97 | $45,197.77
1,120.93 |         943.71
$63,729.27
610.09
$4,646,650.21
67,956.28
$181,129.10 | $92,746.15 | $99,609.48
$96,782.92
$35,240.90 | $46,141.48
$64,339.36 |    | $4,714,606.49
$94,226.22
26,289.48
$29,420.05
30,575.55
9,692.90
$44,414.52
17,789.83
6,820.70
$37,201.97
21,166.85
4,984.82
$15,444.53
9,272.50
4,066.93
$22,429.72
10,910.73
3,174.59
$29,693.39
11,511.04
3,004.90
	
$2,189,220.32
938,294.63
7,675.15
395,425.11
$128,190.85 | $69,688.50 | $69,025.05
$63,353.64
$28,783.96
$36,515.04
$44,209.33
$3,522,940.06
1                      1
$52,938.25 | $23,057.65 | $30,584.43
$33,429.28
$6,456.94
$9,626.44
$20,130.03
$1,191,666.43
1                      1
$7,844.12 | $11,757.16       $6,828.01
3 802.18         4,795.95 |      3,371.64
$5,335.87
2,472.35
1,572.12
$4,144.49
2,008.00
414.36
$3,051.60
1,569.52
835.32
$3,079.96
1,487.02
1,295,76
$499,747.11
195,599.91
102,649.56
2,989.92 1      1,965.60 |      1,953.84
$14,636.22 | $18,518.71  | $12,153.49
$9,380.34
$6,566.85
$5,456.44
$5,862.74
$797,996.58
$38,302.03
68,828.36
$4,538.94 | $18,430.94
9,047.45  |    27,820.81
$24,048.94
25,117.74
—$109.91
—3,560.01
$4,170.00
—330.75
$14,267.29
44,463.82
$393,669.85
1,254,025.94
$16,489.71
$107,130.39
I
$13,586.39 | $46,251.75
$49,166.68
-$3,669.92
$3,839.25
$58,731.11  |      $16,489.71  | $1,647,695.79
1,054
.     230
38
1
1,195        j        595
147                 133
14         I           27
701
168
23
1
207
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52,775 |        43,089 j        63,760
1,483,796
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626,026
58,630
394,638
192,842
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46,854,137
49,166,290
3,234,728
7 330 594 1    7 157 078  I    3.696.166
3,259,740
1,317,262
1,645,212
2,276,583
182,159,796 I 66
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
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Statement 6
STATEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION WORK IN PROGRESS
AS AT MARCH 31st,  1953
Generation Plant
Alert Bay   $14,519.02
Athalmer    I  3,634.38
Burns Lake ___  7,176.10
Dawson Creek   137,255.16
Hazelton     155.65
John Hart   3,180,434.52
Merritt     117.68
Queen Charlotte   11,853.00
Quesnel   13,944.50
Smithers      101,437.24
Terrace   7,892.13
Tofino-Ucluelet     136,331.84
Vanderhoof     388.98
Whatshan   25,962.90
Williams Lake   125,217.10
Preliminary charges, surveys, and investigations, including sundry
maintenance and recoverable costs  58.56
Total  $3,766,378.76
Transmission Plant
Vancouver Island system   $906,974.54
Interior system  181,084.89
Sechelt     21.32
Preliminary charges, surveys, and investigations, including sundry
maintenance and recoverable costs   2,421.10
Total  $1,090,501.85
Distribution Plant
Burns Lake    $ 1,464.05
Campbell River   440.18
Comox Valley   48,581.08
Dawson Creek   95.96
Kamloops     68,594.54
Lake Windermere    361.13
Nanaimo-Duncan     122,692.63
North Okanagan   46,267.63
Peachland-Westbank    362.45
Queen Charlotte  ______ 192.50
Terrace   4,789.00
Meter Department, Coast Region   479.27
Meter Department, Interior Region  1,061.08
Preliminary charges, surveys, and investigations, including sundry
maintenance and recoverable costs   12,816.22
Total      $308,197.72 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1952-53 I 69
Statement 6—Continued
STATEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION WORK IN PROGRESS
AS AT MARCH 31st,  1953—Continued
General Plant
Service buildings and equipment 	
Transportation equipment	
Preliminary charges, including sundry maintenance
Total
Generation
Summary
Distribution       	
General             .
Total '.	
$3,174.58
2,426.20
3,203.24
$8,804.02
$3,766,378.76
1,090,501.85
308,197.72
8,804.02
$5,173,882.35 I 70
' ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
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