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Civil Service Commission REPORT FROM JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 31ST 1952 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1953]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Civil Service Commission
REPORT
FROM JANUARY 1st TO DECEMBER 31st
1952
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1953  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits the Report of the Civil Service Commission,
Province of British Columbia, from January 1st to December 31st, 1952.
WESLEY D. BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1953. The Honourable Wesley D. Black,
Provincial Secretary,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—In conformity with the provisions of section 7 of the " Civil Service Act"
(chapter 51, "Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948"), I have the honour to
submit herewith the Report of the proceedings and work of the Civil Service Commission
from January 1st to December 31st, 1952.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
H. M. MORRISON,
Chairman, Civil Service Commission.
Victoria, B.C., January, 1953. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Chairman: Hugh M. Morrison.        Member:  J. V. Fisher.
Administrative Assistant: A. Partridge.
PERSONNEL STAFF
Chief Personnel Officer: R. L. W. Ritchie.
Classification Officer: A. G. Richardson.
Personnel Officer, Vancouver:  S. B. Williscroft.
Personnel Officer: J. Meryl Campbell.
Personnel Assistant: D. J. Slader.
CLERICAL STAFF
Miss M. Dixon.
Mrs. G.
Brule.
Mrs. G. Knott.
Miss P.
Hearle.
Miss J. McCuaig.
Miss D.
Thorpe.
Miss E. Wood.
Mrs. C.
A. Evans.
Mrs. M. Yole.
Miss W
E. Brown.
Mrs. M. Dempster.
Miss E.
L. Christie.
Miss D. Claydon.
Miss S.
Duckworth
Mrs. M. Ross.
Miss B.
Meyers.
Miss J. Olafson.
Miss M
M. Dewar.
Vancouver Office
Mrs. M. M. Young. Miss P. C. MacDonald.  CONTENTS
Report of the Civil Service Commission
Report of the Chief Personnel Officer __.
Report of the Classification Officer	
Page
.    9
. 15
. 17
Report of the Personnel Officer, Vancouver  18
Appendix A.—Order in Council—Regulations re Leave of Absence  20
Appendix B.—Order in Council—Regulations re Salary Revisions  20
Appendix C.—Statistics  21  Report of the Civil Service Commission
Pursuant to Section 7 of the " Civil Service Act," from
January 1st to December 31st, 1952
The year 1952 was one of full activity for the Civil Service Commission and its
staff. During the year there were indications of the developing of a period of stability,
which possibly will afford a reduction of time spent on recruitment, wage, and position
classification questions, and an increase in time for the management problems of staff
size, efficiency, and training.
Staff turnover remained heavy, although not as great as in 1951. In-service promotional procedures and competitions imposed a heavy burden on the Selection Division
of the staff of the Commission. Particularly during the first half of the year, salary and
classification negotiations and subsequent salary adjustments occupied a great deal of
the time of the Commission's Classification Division and also the Administrative and
Records Division.
The Commission held frequent meetings throughout the year, and, in addition, each
member reviewed numerous reports for final consideration and disposal. From time
to time, representatives of various employee groups, and departmental officials, were
heard on matters covering a wide field of conditions of employment, salaries, and position
classification.
SIZE OF CIVIL SERVICE
During the year the enrolment in the Civil Service rose from 7,994 to 8,543, an
increase of 549 or 6.8 per cent (see Table I, Appendix C). Much of this increase was
due to the expanding of services in Government institutions, particularly in hospitals.
The opening of the Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital in Vancouver accounted for 197 of
the 594 increase. In addition, a comparison of the enrolment in the two years 1951
and 1952 shows that there were 101 more temporary civil servants in 1952 than in 1951.
An analysis, giving type of appointment and enrolment in each department of Government, is given in Table III, Appendix C. It should be noted that the figures given
in this tabulation are as at December 15th and not December 31st. This fact explains
why the grand total is 8,558, and not 8,543 as in Table I, which gives figures up to
December 31st.
This Commission wishes to restate its belief in the desirability of the establishment
of a division the duties of which would be to review constantly departmental establishments and staffs for the purpose of achieving the greatest efficiency possible, consistent
with service to the public. Such a division, composed of technicians trained in management procedures, would examine organizations and work procedures, would be available
to advise and assist departments, and would afford independent advice to the Government
or Treasury Board when proposals are made for increase of staff.
In connection with the above comments, the following paragraph is reproduced from
last year's Annual Report:—
" This type of work essentially is management engineering, and requires trained
personnel for the achieving of the greatest results. We are convinced that economies
could be achieved, particularly by instituting systems of work simplification in such large
operations as hospitals, institutions, and big accounting systems. It is obvious, as stated
in previous reports, that there should be a division on organization and methods, headed
by a competent and experienced management engineer. Such a division would operate
in co-ordination with the present Classification Division, and its members (probably two HH 10
BRITISH COLUMBIA
technicians) would constantly operate in the field. Also, it would give the Commission
greater technical support when advising the Government in connection with section 15
of the ' Civil Service Act.' "
Even without an Organization and Methods Division, the Commission, through
its Classification Division and with the fullest co-operation from the respective departments, actually has effected staff economies, with the elimination of forty-six positions
throughout eleven departments.
We also would refer to the Classification Officer's report, where, in addition to the
eliminations mentioned above, he credits, due purely to classification determinations,
an approximate financial saving for the year of $20,000, and for all services of his
Division, including establishment surveys, he estimates for the year a saving close to
$100,000. This Commission feels that if the expenditure of such money can be avoided
through the efforts of a heavily worked Classification Division, immeasurably greater
expenditures could be avoided if a division, specifically set up for the purpose, were
established and staffed with technical personnel qualified in management procedures.
RECRUITMENT AND PERSONNEL SERVICES
Appointments and Recruitment Rate
During the year, 2,468 new (that is, probationary and temporary) and confirmed
permanent appointments (that is, employees who have successfully completed probationary periods in 1952) were made to the Civil Service (see Table II, Appendix C).
There were 1,992 separations between January 1st and December 31st, 1952, as
against 1,963 separations in 1951 (see Table VII, Appendix C). In the same period
1,047 gained permanent appointment to the Service (see Table VI, Appendix C). This
latter figure includes probationary appointments carried over from some of the 1,191
probationary employees appointed in 1951. Of the 2,468 new appointments, 1,417 were
probationary and 673 were temporary (see Table II, Appendix C). Thus, by adding the
number of probationary appointments (1,417) and the number of temporary appointments (673), it is possible to arrive at the number of actually new appointments made
during the year, which was 1,417 plus 673 equals 2,090, being 24.5 per cent of the total
enrolment of 8,543 as at December 31st, 1952. This 24.5-per-cent recruitment rate for
1952 is fairly high, and it continues the upward trend since 1950.
Year Recruitment Rate Year Recruitment Rate
1947.  37.0 1950   18.5
1948  31.7 1951  22.4
1949  23.6 1952 24.5
Of the total number of temporary and probationary male appointments made during
the year and still on staff as at December 15th, 51.9 per cent were veterans with war
service.   This is comparable with 55.5 per cent for the previous year.
Year
Total
Number of
Male Initial
Appointees
Number
of Veteran
Appointees
Percentage
of Veteran
Appointees
1951                                 	
542
616
301
320
55.5
1952	
51.9
In respect to the total Civil Service enrolment, the percentage of males with war
service now stands at 60, a decline of 1 per cent since 1951 (see Table XIII, Appendix C).
SEPARATIONS
There were 1,992 separations from the Civil Service during the year.   An analysis,
according to departments, is given in Table VII, Appendix C.   Fifty-eight Civil Servants CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT HH 11
were superannuated, and, in accordance with the " Civil Service Act Amendment Act,
1946," retiring-leave payments to thirty-one persons were made, a total of $25,986.
Resignations amounted to 1,665; deaths in the Service, 20; dismissals, 53; completion
of temporary appointments, 146. The Chief Personnel Officer's analysis of the reasons
for staff turnover (see page 16) indicates no divergence from normal trends. It is
interesting to note that of the total number of separations, 43 per cent occurred in
Government institutions and 51 per cent were clerical workers in all departments. This
relationship is a rough approximation to the enrolment relationship of these two great
groups in the Service.
Evidence of screening during probationary periods and of disciplinary action is to
be found in the following figures, as reported for the year (1951 figures are given in
brackets):—
(1) Number of Civil Servants whose probationary periods
were extended  68  (43)
(2) Number of Civil Servants who were suspended from
duty, but not dismissed     8  (12)
(3) Number of Civil Servants who were dismissed  53  (66)
Here is proof that the Civil Service is no haven for the weary or the lazy.
GENERAL ELIGIBILITY EXAMINATIONS
General assembled stenographic, clerical, and junior draughting examinations for
the establishment of eligibility lists in the junior classifications were held eight times
during the year in Victoria, in addition to constant smaller and individual examinations
in the Commission's office. In Vancouver it again was found impossible to maintain
lists for a reasonable period of time. Hence, applicants were examined constantly in
the Commission's Vancouver office. Interior points were served through the never-
failing courteous assistance of Government Agents, who, when necessary, conducted
examinations.
The Chief Personnel Officer, in his report, states that in the Victoria centre the total
number of applicants who were examined in these junior written examinations amounted
to 1,087. Of this number, 698 or 64.2 per cent (as against 67 per cent in 1951 and
71 per cent in 1950) qualified.
In the Vancouver area, 290 persons were examined, of which 211 or 72.7 per cent
(as against 88 per cent in 1951) qualified.
PROMOTIONAL POLICY
The policy of employee promotion, giving priority to employees within the Service,
provided they are judged fully qualified in all respects, was faithfully adhered to throughout the year. Procedures and coverage in posting or advertising of vacancies were
restudied and reorganized, with satisfactory results. Promotional panels are almost
continuously in action. These panels are composed of representatives of the department
or branch concerned and the Civil Service Commission. Such panels also sit and examine
applicants from outside the Service. In short, there is a constant search going on to
obtain the best qualified personnel for the conducting of the public business of the
Province.
The work entailed in this procedure has placed a very heavy load upon the
Recruitment Division and the Vancouver office. In order to ensure against unnecessary
work, some procedures have been stream-lined and others are being studied with the
same aim in view. As shown in the Chief Personnel Officer's report, 396 vacancies were
posted, of which 280 or 82 per cent of those filled were filled within the Service and
62 or 18 per cent of those filled were from outside the Service. HH 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
IN-SERVICE TRAINING
The usual training courses, conducted by the various departments and referred to
in previous Annual Reports of this Commission, were continued throughout the year.
In addition to the formal departmental courses, some departments conduct annual or
biennial conferences of their key field personnel.
Personnel Officer Miss J. Meryl Campbell, in addition to her heavy recruitment
duties, managed to extend her intensive supervisory training courses. The Chief Personnel
Officer reports that 317 personnel of supervisory capacity benefited from these courses.
It will be noted that they have been extended to the larger centres in the Interior of the
Province. The Commission is pleased to report that these courses are well received by
the participants, and have evoked very favourable comments from various departmental
officials.
It also might be noted that personnel officers appointed to various departments spend
about two weeks solely with Civil Service Commission officials in order to become familiar
with procedures.
THE VANCOUVER OFFICE
The work load on this office continues to grow. The staffing of the new Pearson
Tuberculosis Hospital greatly accentuated this trend. The report of Personnel Officer
Williscroft (see page 18) shows that there were effected through his office 952 appointments, in comparison to 640 in 1951 and 495 in 1950.
If this trend continues or maintains present levels, the appointment of a specially
trained interviewer in this office may become necessary. The matter is under consideration, as it is obvious that relief in some form may have to be found.
The Personnel Officer in charge, as stated in his report, also assists the Classification Division in position and organization investigations, as well as performing innumerable other personnel services to the offices and institutions in his area. This is as it
should be, because, by such functioning, he acts as a liaison officer between the Commission and Civil Service operations on the Mainland.
The Vancouver office is in urgent need of new quarters. Its operations have
expanded much beyond the present three undersized offices. It is to be hoped that the
new quarters in the old Workmen's Compensation Building, promised by the Public
Works Department, will be ready in the near future.
CLASSIFICATION AND SALARY PLAN
The Classification Officer's report indicates that this Division had another busy
year. The total number of official reviews amounted to 811. This may be compared to
977 in 1951, 697 in 1950, and 874 in 1949. It therefore is obvious that the function
of position-classification reviews is a constant process. It is the best-known device to
date towards maintaining employee morale, by assuring the employee that there is a
constant guard against salary discrimination. The Classification Officer observes in the
second paragraph of his report that more salary briefs from groups, other than the
B.C. Government Employees' Association, had to be dealt with than in former years.
Studies of such briefs, of course, had to be correlated with the studies being done in respect
to the negotiations being conducted between the Government and the B.C. Government
Employees' Association.
Resulting from these negotiations, this Commission was requested by the Government to give the entire salary situation study, and, as a result, to formulate a report with
recommendations. Such was done, and the Commission's recommendations were
adopted. The entire cost-of-living bonus was incorporated into salary (see Appendix B
for reproduction of Order in Council No. 1302/52); a general increase of 5 per cent
was granted; further increases were made in the upper brackets in order to compensate CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT HH 13
for the dollar deterioration which affected these salaries through the impact of the maximum feature of the former cost-of-living bonuses, and also in order to bring these salaries
more in line with industrial salaries; and similar further increases were given many
beginning and intermediate levels, such as hospital personnel grades and steam engineers,
so as to bring them in line with prevailing outside salaries. Thus, as of April 1st, 1952,
the Civil Service salary structure was again brought into general line with the economic
cost-of-living index, salaries being set at 187.7 per cent of 1939 as against an index of
189.1. Incorporation of the cost-of-living bonuses brought a corresponding change in
the salary plan. As of December 15th, 1952, the average salary paid to Civil Servants
was $244.19. This should be compared with the average salary of all wage earners in
the Province which, as reported by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, was $60.29 per
week or approximately $260 per month.
DEPARTMENTAL ESTABLISHMENTS
The Classification Officer also stresses the fact that his Division has been able to
give more time to study staff organization and procedures. This, together with classification work, has undoubtedly effected financial savings.
Comment already has been made on the importance of this work and its great
possibilities.
SICK AND SPECIAL LEAVE
During the period October 1st, 1951, to September 30th, 1952, a total of 50,905
days' sick-leave were granted, 40,089V_: with pay and 10,815Vi without pay, an average
of six days per Civil Servant enrolled as at the latter date (see Table IV, Appendix C),
as compared with the average for the previous twelve-month period of 6.2 days. Not
included in this total is sick-leave granted under the Workmen's Compensation Board
and Department of Veterans' Affairs, some 203 cases.
Fifty-one employees are on leave of absence serving with units of Her Majesty's
Forces, under the provisions of Orders in Council Nos. 2223/50 and 2857/50, and two
Civil Servants are serving with United Nations organizations in the Far East. Thirty-five
were granted leave during the year for the purpose of training with Reserve units of Her
Majesty's forces or to take officers' training courses.
Special leave for further training and study, some with the assistance of Federal
health grants, was granted to thirty-four employees.
The delegation of the recording of routine sick-leave to the various departments,
as from October 1st, 1951, is continuing to function very satisfactorily.
By Order in Council No. 741/52 (see Appendix A), regulations were made pursuant to section 60 of the " Civil Service Act " governing the granting of leave of absence
to Government employees for training with the Reserve forces.
GRIEVANCES
No formal grievances were heard during the year, although personnel work between
all concerned prevented some grievances from becoming formal ones.
Decision negative to the employee presenting the grievance was rendered in respect
to one heard in 1951 and mentioned in the 1951 Annual Report. No appeal of the
decision was made.
RECORDS AND IMPLEMENTATIONS
The outstanding work of the clerical staff during the year was the fast and efficient
dispatch of the necessary changes in all the employee records caused by the change in
pay plan. This was the second successive year such a change was faced and mastered
by the staff. HH 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
EMPLOYEE RELATIONS
Relations with the various employee associations continue on a high plane. The
doors of this Commission continually are open to their representatives and also to
individual employees who seek advice and guidance.
The Commission is happy to record that some Interior centres were visited officially,
marking a resumption of this important part of its employee relations.
In June, the Chairman visited the following Government centres: Lillooet, Clinton,
Williams Lake, Prince George, and, shortly afterwards, Dawson Creek and Fort St. John.
In all these centres he met with practically all employees; assisted in solving some
personnel problems; and discussed and studied organization with all senior key officials.
Such visits not only are welcomed by the officials and employees but also are impressive
and instructive to this Commission and its staff as affording an opportunity of gaining
greater understanding of the many problems faced by Civil Servants in the fore ranks of
serving the people. Upon the whole, the Chairman is impressed by the loyalty and fine
service rendered by these officials and their staffs. As already mentioned, Miss Campbell
spent a week in Nelson and a week in Kamloops in connection with her supervisors'
training course.
CO-OPERATION WITH UNITED NATIONS TECHNICAL BRANCH
At the request of Ottawa officials, the Commission, with your consent and full
accord, was pleased to welcome R. E. Mais, Establishment Officer, Government of
Jamaica, in connection with a fellowship from the International Economic and Technical
Co-operation Division of the United Nations. This Commission was honoured to be
thus chosen for study. Mr. Mais studied for a month the public personnel system as
administered by this Commission.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
The Commission wishes to express its appreciation of the co-operation given in
its work by the various departments of Government, by Federal and Provincial Civil
Service Commissions, and by various other Government officials. The great and continuing assistance rendered by Government Agents in conducting local clerical examinations again is noted with thanks and appreciation.
Finally, the Commission desires to express to each member of its technical and
clerical staff appreciation for the usual and never-failing efficient and loyal support.
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION.
H. M. Morrison,
Chairman.
J. V. Fisher,
Member. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
HH 15
REPORT OF THE CHIEF PERSONNEL OFFICER,
R. L. W. RITCHIE, B.A.
1. Recruitment
In accordance with policy, the majority of positions above " beginning levels " are
filled by internal competition and promotion, as indicated in the following table: —
Per Cent
Number Filled
Positions posted in 1952  396
Positions filled by in-service appointments  280 82
Positions filled by outside appointments     62 18
Positions posted but not yet filled     54
Constant attention is being given to the improvement of the promotional policy to
expedite appointments. Delay occasionally is encountered in issuing notices of vacancies
and in holding of panel examinations, and certain suggestions for the modification of the
programme have been discussed with the Employees' Association, which suggestions now
are under review. Generally, however, the promotional policy is functioning effectively
in offering opportunities for advancement to the Civil Servants, and by careful selection
providing well-qualified persons for job vacancies. Eligibility lists are being maintained,
where practicable, in classifications where appointments are frequent.
2. Examinations
The number of persons who were examined and who qualified in the Victoria area
were as follows:—
Classification
Number
Number
Examined
Qualified
2S1
197
291
200
247
111
79
43
136
105
53
42
1,087
698
Per Cent
Qualified
Junior Clerks, Grade A .
Clerks, Grade l_
Typists .
Stenographers, Grade lA-
Stenographers, Grade 2 _
Junior Draughtsmen, Grade A .
Totals 	
70
69
45
54
47
79
64.2
3. Training
The intensive course in supervisory training was continued under the direction of
Miss J. M. Campbell, Personnel Officer, during the year, and was extended to include
supervisors in the Interior of the Province. The following number of supervisors attended
the lectures during 1952:—
Department Location Number Attending
Victoria _
. Kamloops
.Nelson	
Finance	
Finance	
Finance	
Forest Service Victoria	
Forest Service Vancouver.__
Forest Service Kamloops .__.
Forest Service Nelson	
Welfare Vancouver...
Welfare Kamloops.___.
Welfare Nelson	
Health Nelson	
Health Kamloops ...
44
8
9
67
44
26
18
12
6
3
2
2 HH 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department Location Number Attending
Health Tranquille  21
Agriculture Kamloops  3
Agriculture Nelson  4
Labour Kamloops  1
Labour Nelson  1
Public Utilities Kamloops  2
Public Utilities Nelson  2
Public Works Kamloops  8
Public Works Nelson  13
Attorney-General Kamloops  11
Attorney-General Nelson  10
Total...: .  317
The Civil Service Commission has assisted in training Personnel Officers for the
Forest Service, Public Works Department, and Division of Tuberculosis Control, Health
Branch.
4. Staff Turnover
The following is an analysis of staff separations recorded during the past two years
(complete records are not available prior to 1951):—
Reason for Separation 1951 1952
To further education  13 14
Marital status  15 17
Moved from job locality  14 14
111 health  8 7
To accept other employment  20 19
Services unsatisfactory, dismissed, etc  17 10
Miscellaneous reasons or unknown  13 19
Totals   100 100
It may be noted that there has not been a significant change in this distribution since
1951, indicating that the causes of turnover are in keeping with normal expectations. The
majority of those seeking to further their education consists of hospital employees entering
nursing training. The number leaving to accept other employment was higher in the first
half of 1952, perhaps a seasonal indication, although as previously these are distributed
over a variety of classifications and there is no evidence of marked causes of dissatisfaction. Of the total number of separations, 43 per cent occurred in the Government
institutions and 51 per cent were clerical workers in all departments.
5. General
As a staff service agency, an important function of the Personnel Division is in
assisting departmental officials in problems of personnel administration, supervision,
interpretation of policy, etc. Employee counselling is offered on an informal basis and
harmonious staff relationships are being sustained. This Division is conscious of its
special responsibility toward the general public and has offered service and assistance to
the utmost of its powers. Acknowledgment is again made of the close co-operation of
the Department of Veterans' Affairs, the National Employment Service, and the Workmen's Compensation Board. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
HH  17
REPORT OF THE CLASSIFICATION OFFICER,
A. G. RICHARDSON, M.A.
. During 1952, the Classification Division continued to carry out reviews of individual
positions and classifications throughout all departments of the Civil Service. Some
improvements were made in the methods of evaluating positions and more numerous
contacts were made with other organizations for purposes of receiving information concerning their methods of evaluation and salaries paid. The actual number of reviews is
indicated by department on Table XV, Appendix C, and this requires no further elaboration. The table does not include reviews made of twenty-four positions in the Liquor
Control Board.
The year differed from previous years in two respects—the larger number of briefs
received from separate groups of Civil Servants, in addition to the request for an over-all
increase in salaries received from the B.C. Government Employees' Association, and a
more concentrated effort to control the establishment of new positions in the various
departments of the Government. In the case of the former, separate briefs were received
from ten different groups, which were studied and analysed, often involving several meetings with the spokesmen for the group. As a result, revisions in salaries were made over
and above the general increase to five groups, whereas it was considered that the remaining
five groups were adequately compensated as a result of the general increase.
The control of increases in establishments was given more attention during the year.
This involved exhaustive studies of requirements, organization, and the methods utilized
by departments to determine staff requirements. Generally the departments co-operated
in supplying information necessary to analyse their staff requirements and were willing
to try arrangements designed to economize in staff. Often these reviews resulted in
a complete study of establishment and methods of delegating duties, including shift
arrangements. Establishment studies were completed for eight sub-units. During the
year, departments requisitioned for the classification and filling of forty-seven new positions. After investigation by the Classification Division and with the concurrence of the
departments concerned, this number was reduced to twenty-seven. In addition, there
were twenty-seven requests for replacements which, upon investigation, were not made.
The classification schedules were amended during the year, in that thirty positions
were deleted and nineteen positions added, a net result of eleven less positions indicated
in the schedules.   These were absorbed in other classifications or eliminated entirely.
The major salary revision approved by the Government succeeding representations
made by the B.C. Government Employees' Association resulted in a complete change of
Civil Service pay plan. The revision incorporated all cost-of-living bonuses, approved a
general over-all increase of 5 per cent, and approved additional increases to higher-level
positions. The entire pay plan was recalculated according to a definite plan, and all
positions in the higher levels were reviewed separately for placement in this new pay plan.
The results required new notices of appointment to be issued to all Civil Servants.
During the last five months of 1952, records were kept to give some indication of
the actual financial saving made by this Division on classification reviews. The detailed
list appears in Table XVI, Appendix C, for this period, and it is estimated that for a full
fiscal year savings of $20,000 are effected by classification reviews alone.
The reviews of establishments, which involve the critical analysis of all requisitions
for new positions and replacements, have resulted in savings of approximately $45,000,
indicated in the list of new positions requested and not filled, and approximately $38,000
in replacements requested and not made, a total of approximately $83,000 for a full year.
In addition, there are other items of savings which might be included in administration and bargaining procedures, but these are difficult to determine. For example, a
group of employees may ask for increases considerably higher than those finally agreed
upon, which is a type of saving resulting from work performed in this Division.
The total estimated savings listed in the attached tables amounts to approximately
$100,000 for a full year, which, of course, carries on from year to year. HH 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE PERSONNEL OFFICER, VANCOUVER
S. B. Williscroft, B.A.
During 1952 the main activities of the office concerned: —
(1) Recruiting clerical and institutional personnel.
(2) Assessing positions for classification purposes.
(3) Acting on promotional panels.
(4) Investigating complaints made by personnel.
(5) Conducting departmental organizational surveys.
(6) Providing information to Government officials and personnel and to the
public regarding provisions of the " Civil Service Act" and its regulations.
Greatly increased activity was experienced in recruiting personnel, as 952 appointments were processed compared with 640 in 1951 and 495 in 1950. A summary showing the distribution of these appointments by position classification is shown on Table
XIV, Appendix C.
The work of this office in recruiting staff for the Division of Tuberculosis Control
was assisted considerably as a result of the employment of a divisional personnel assistant.
This official arranges interviews between candidates for employment and the supervisors
concerned and generally absorbs much of the detail work involved.
A recent change was instituted also in the method of processing Civil Service
appointments made on the Mainland, which has the effect of reducing the amount of
stenographic and clerical work performed in this office and in speeding up the formal
implementation of the appointments. Prior to November last, requisitions for appointments were forwarded to this office and subsequent referral notices were returned here.
These were then processed and forwarded to the Victoria office of the Civil Service
Commission for finalization. Investigations disclosed that this procedure appeared to
foster delay in the implementation of appointments; it required the exchange of a considerable amount of unnecessary correspondence; and it resulted in the maintenance of
numerous dependent files. Accordingly, a new system was inaugurated whereby the
requisitions are retained in the Victoria office of the Civil Service Commission and the
referral notices are returned to that office directly by the department concerned. Such a
system ensures that department officials are made aware of staff changes and make it their
responsibility to advise the Civil Service Commission of them without delay. To date,
the system has functioned satisfactorily. It has decreased the amount of correspondence
and filing in this office; it has accelerated the implementation of appointments in most
cases; and it has provided a good means of determining which departments have contributed to the delay in implementing appointments in the past.
During 1952, this office assisted the Classification Officer by reviewing a total of
forty-one positions concerning individuals who made requests to have their positions
reviewed. In addition, fourteen surveys were conducted in regard to office organizations.
It is a pleasure to report that no dismissal actions were investigated during the year and
that only two contemplated suspension cases required attention.
The present promotional policy resulted in an increased work load in the past year,
as 198 competitions closed in this office. These competitions, involving the initial screening of applications, arranging for selected candidates to appear before panels, and, in
many cases, subsequently transferring and replacing personnel, have become one of the
most time-consuming functions. Coupled with these competitions are the promotions
affecting the staff of the Provincial Mental Hospitals, which, during 1952, involved
approximately seventy positions on the Mainland. These promotions are handled by a
permanent panel, of which your Personnel Officer is a member, and, again, it is gratifying
to note that no grievances have resulted from its administration.
This office has continued to receive most satisfactory co-operation from the Hospital
Insurance Service in the use of its teletype facilities during 1952. Partly as a result of
this relationship, it has been possible to provide local Government officials with speedy CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
HH 19
assistance regarding staff matters that has allowed them to settle personnel problems
without the disruption of good relations that often accompanies such situations.
The in-service training courses instituted on the Mainland during 1951 were continued during the past year, and their effectiveness has been reflected by an increasing
number of supervisors displaying an active interest in the organization of their staff. As
such interest no doubt will result in a more efficient use of personnel, it is hoped that the
courses will continue.
It is anticipated that during the spring this office will be moved to a new location,
which will provide facilities that are badly needed to handle the increasing number of
applicants for Civil Service employment. At present, restricted quarters have hindered
the proper administration of this function. However, all persons employed in stenographic and clerical positions have been subjected to standardized examinations and their
selection has been made on a merit basis. When larger quarters are procured, it is
planned to expand the examination system to include as many of the tradesmen positions
as possible, as it is felt that, when used in conjunction with personal interviews, such will
allow for greater selectivity in placement. HH 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDICES
APPENDIX A
Order-in-Council—Regulations re Leave of Absence
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
The undersigned has the honour to report that the Civil Service Commission, constituted under
the " Civil Service Act," has made regulations pursuant to section 60 of the " Civil Service Act " governing the granting of leave of absence to the Provincial Government employees for training with the
Reserve Forces, a copy of which resolution and regulations are attached hereto:
And to recommend that the said regulations be approved.
Dated this 1st day of April, a.d. 1952.
WM. T. STRAITH,
Provincial Secretary.
Approved this 1st day of April, a.d. 1952.
E. T. KENNEY,
Presiding Member of the Executive Council.
Resolution Passed by the Civil Service Commission Pursuant to Section 60 of the
" Civil Service Act "
Resolved that the regulations attached hereto governing the granting of leave of absence to
Provincial Government employees for Reserve Forces training be made by the Commission, pursuant
to the provisions of section 60 of the " Civil Service Act ":—
(1) Where a Provincial Government employee is required to take annual training with
Her Majesty's Reserve Forces, leave of absence may be granted on the following basis:—
(a) Special leave may be granted without pay; provided, however, that, where it
is certified that the pay and allowances granted by Her Majesty's Reserve Forces are
less than the remuneration ordinarily received from the Provincial Government, the
employee may be paid the difference between the Reserve Forces pay and his Provincial
Government remuneration.
(b) Where a Provincial Government employee takes the annual Reserve Forces
training during his annual vacation leave, he may, during such annual leave, be paid his
full remuneration from the Provincial Government in addition to any pay and allowances received from the Reserve Forces.
(2) Where a Provincial Government employee makes application to take a prescribed course
of training for the purpose of qualifying for a higher rank in the Reserve Forces,
special leave for the purpose may be granted, such special leave to be without pay.
(3) That any leave to be granted, pursuant to sections 1 and 2 of these regulations, shall
be subject to the approval of the Deputy Minister of the department concerned.
APPENDIX B
Order in Council—Salary Revisions
To His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor in Council:
The undersigned has the honour to report that Order in Council No. 1643, approved July 13th,
1951, made provision for the payment of a cost-of-living bonus to employees of the Provincial
Government, the table of rates attached to the said Order being made to apply effective April 1st, 1951:
And that it is proposed to include the said cost-of-living bonus within the basic salary or salary
range for each position:
And further that it is proposed to revise the classification schedules of the Civil Service by
rescinding the existing Schedule of Salary Ranges and substituting therefore Schedule 1, as attached:
The undersigned therefore has the honour to recommend that, pursuant to the provisions of the
" Civil Service Act," Schedule 1 attached hereto, being the revised Schedule of Salary Ranges, which
includes the aforesaid cost-of-living bonus and certain increases, be made to apply, effective April 1st,
1952, and the " salary reference number " shown opposite each position in the Classification Schedules
J CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
HH 21
shall apply to the respective position in the revised Schedule of Salary Ranges; provided, however, that
the positions shown in Schedule 2, as attached, shall take the " salary reference number " as listed:
The undersigned has the honour to recommend further that the aforesaid general revision,
made effective April 1st, 1952, which incorporates the cost-of-living bonus with salaries, together
with the percentage increase granted in addition to such incorporation, also shall apply to all Provincial Government employees heretofore entitled to the cost-of-living bonus, whose positions do not
form part of the Civil Service classification schedules.
Dated this 30th day of May, a.d. 1952.
W. T. STRAITH,
Provincial Secretary.
Approved this 30th day of May, a.d. 1952.
W. T. STRAITH,
Presiding Member of the Executive Council.
APPENDIX C—STATISTICS
Table I.—Enrolments in the Civil Service from 1933 to December 31st, 1952
Year Enrolment
1933-34   1,424
1934-35   1,484
1935-36   1,541
1936-37  —__  1,607
1937-38   1,718
1938-39   1,889
1939-40   1,941
1940-41   1,951
1941-42   1,851
1942-43   1,822
1943-44  2,018
Year Enrolment
1944-45  2,159
April 1, 1945, to Dec. 31, 1946 4,664
1947   5,425
1948  6,417
1949  7,345
1950   (2   under   sec.   2   (a),
" Civil Service Act ") .... 7,694
195i   (11   under  sec.   2   (a),
"Civil Service Act")..... 7,994
1952  8,543
Table II.—Appointments to the Civil Service from 1933 to December 31st, 1952
Year
Probationary
Temporary
Permanent
Total
1933-34              	
1,230
984
1,191
1,417
170
248
258
279
297
328
342
356
352
474
491
547
2,058
2,048
2,041'
507
441
600
673
98
85
78
104
185
133
146
121
88
173
184
155
1,245
815
867
370
290
339
378
268
1934-35 	
333
1935-36                     	
336
1936 37                               	
1937-38               	
482
1938-39                                                                     	
461
1939-40      	
488
1940-41 	
477
1941-42          	
440
1942-43  	
647
1943 44                            	
675
1944-45 _	
702
April 1st, 1945, to December 31st, 1946. „	
1947-   	
3,303
2,863
2,908
1948                 	
1949    	
2,107
1950         _
1951     	
1,715
2,130
1952	
2,4682
1 Included in this number are 1,062 appointments of a probationary nature.
2 Included in this total are 632 Civil Servants who terminated their service before December 31st, 1952. HH 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table III.—Number of Civil Servants Enrolled in Departments of Government as at
December 15th, 1952, According to Nature of Appointment and Sex
Department
Permanent
Probationary
Temporary
Total
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
1
98
257
134
353
4
611
43
731
44
18
878
29
824
6
34
3
43
166
169
203
1
1,080
33
133
17
9
712
34
117
2
31
4
141
423
303
556
5
1,691
76
864
61
27
1,590
63
941
8
65
7
17
15
29
98
2
57
1
142
1
37
1
4
6
39
43
53
233
10
54
4
1
252
4
25
4
13
56
58
82
331
12
111
5
1
394
5
62
1
8
1
1
3
6
97
14
1
25
20
1
2
13
12
16
319
1
9
49
1
7
3
3
14
15
22
416
1
23
1
74
1
27
1
3
1
106
275
152
388
4
806
45
802
45
19
1,045
30
881
8
38
3
51
218
224
272
1
1,632
44
196
21
10
1,013
39
149
2
38
4
157
493
Education 	
Finance	
Fisheries   	
376
660
5
2,438
89
998
66
29
2,058
Public Utilities Commission	
69
1,030
10
76
Totals	
4,065
2,753
6,818
411
728
1,139
169
432
601
4,645
3,913
8,558
Table IV.-
-Sick-leave Granted from October 1st, 1951, to September 30th,
According to Departments of Government
1952,
Department
Number of
Civil Servants as at
Sept. 30, 1952
Days' Sick-
leave with
Pay
Average
Days per
Employee
Days' Sick-
leave without Pay
Average
Days per
Employee
4
158
481
385
651
5
1,229
661
91
992
66
29
2,047
69
1,040
8
77
484
427
2,8561/2
1,369
2,603
5.834V4
4,681i/2
555
2,699!/2
325
121
11,729
355
3,710
102
346
2,375i/2
in
5.9
3.6
4.0
4.7
7.1
6.1
2.7
4.9
4.2
5.7
5.1
3.6
12.8
4.5
4.9
15
434!/2
212
2441/2
2,955
1,5191/2
621/2
2291/2
28
65
3,933
72
619
12
414
Agriculture  _	
0.1
0.9
0.6
0.4
Fisheries— ~ 	
Health                    _	
2.4
2.3
0.7
0.2
0.4
Municipal Affairs     	
2.2
1.9
Public Utilities Commission  _	
1.0
0.6
0.2
Welfare        	
0.9
8,477
40,0891/2
10,8151/2
Over-all sick-leave averages covering all Civil Servants:—With pay, 4.7 days;   without pay, 1.3 days; total, 6 days. CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
HH 23
Table V.—Number of Civil Servants Appointed to Departments of Government from January 1st to December 15th, 1952, Still on Staff at the End of the Year, According to
Nature of Appointment and Sex.
Department
Permanent
Probationary
Temporary
Total
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Premier's Office  	
1
1
10
3
9
40
4
11
2
1
23
1
29
1
2
12
10
15
71
4
12
1
1
80
3
9
7
1
3
22
13
24
111
8
23
3
2
103
4
38
8
7
15
13
26
95
2
49
124
1
26
4
6
39
39
52
226
10
51
3
1
236
3
22
4
13
54
52
78
321
12
100
3
1
360
4
48
8
1
1
3
2
70
6
19
15
1
1
8
10
13
215
1
7
38
5
3
2
9
13
15
285
1
13
57
20
1
3
1
9
26
19
37
205
6
66
2
1
166
2
70
1
5
	
9
59
59
80
512
15
70
4
2
354
6
36
14
1
18
85
78
117
717
Labour.. —   .
21
136
Mines 	
6
3
520
8
106
1
19
Totals	
136
227
363
362
692
1,054
118
301
419
616
1,220
1,836
Number of veterans included in this report, 320.
Table VI.—Number of Civil Servants Granted Permanent Appointment during 1952
and Still on Staff at the End of the Year
(These figures include probationary appointments carried over from the previous year.)
Department
Male
Female
Total
1
8
23
9
27
94
6
71
6
2
76
3
66
4
1
10
32
35
41
251
7
27
3
3
205
5
26
5
2
18
55
44
68
345
13
98
9
5
281
8
Public Works                                                                                             	
92
9
Totals                .
396
651
1,047
Table VII.—Numbef
of Separations
IN 1952
, According to Department of Government
Department
Superannuated
Resigned
Deceased
Dismissed
Completed
Temporary
Appointment
Transferred
Cancelled1
Enlisted
Total
Premier's Office 	
4
5
2
10
1
6
1
10
17
2
1
14
91
53
102
673
21
135
7
2
438
11
93
24
2
1
6
1
3
1
2
4
2
1
4
19
3
22
2
2
14
4
75
2
1
1
16
2
26
3
1
1
7
7
1
3
1
1
4
1
3
9
1
3
2
1
1
1
14
Attorney-General 	
Education 	
Finance  	
Health and Welfare
100
76
118
803
24
159
10
3
495
Public Utilities Commission ..
Public Works	
14
145
30
Totals	
58
1,665
20
53
146
23
7
20
1,992
1 Did not report for work. HH 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VIII.—Number of Civil Servants Appointed to Departments of Government from
January 1st to December 15th, 1952, According to Certain Age Intervals, as at December 15th, 1952.
Interval
Male
Female
Total1
Under 21                                                            	
102
133
152
117
91
74
36
22
27
1
19
602
389
210
187
162
71
33
25
11
4
704
21-25                                                            	
522
26-30                                                                                      	
362
31-35                                                                          -   -
304
36-40                                                      	
253
41^.5                                                                                           . —              	
145
46-50                                                                         — 	
69
51-55                                                   - 	
47
56-60                                               ...               	
38
61-64                                                                                	
1
23
Totals            	
774
1,694
2,468
Included in this total are 632 Civil Servants who terminated their service before December 15th, 1952.
Table IX.—Civil Service Enrolment According to Certain Age Intervals,
as at December 15th, 1952
Interval
Male
Female
Total
Under 21              	
115
397
677
715
724
558
479
391
331
243
15
806
904
587
459
496
301
150
135
72
3
921
21-25  . 	
1,301
26-30     —	
1,264
31-35 .... 	
1,174
36 40
1,220
41-45               	
859
46-50            ...               ...              	
629
51-55                	
526
56-60           —.   .
403
61-64        —	
243
■ 18
Totals. —	
4,645
3,913
8,558
Table X.—Salary Statistics
(Median salary, $233 per month.)
Basic
Monthly Salary
<_50-<_ 1 on
Number
of
Employees
14
Percentage
of
Employees
0.16
101-
150	
200
892
10.42
151-
2,019
23.59
201-
250                        	
                2,625
30.68
251-
300                        	
.          1,407
16.44
301-
350 _
..                          605
7.07
351-
400
465
5.43
401-
450
                 152
1.78
451-
500 - _                          	
                145
1.69
501-
550	
        60
0.70
551-
600
92
1.08
601-
650                         	
....              ......                22
0.26
651-
700-...          	
       23
0.27
701-
750	
         22
0.26
751-
801—           	
          8
0.09
830.
         7
0.08
Totals	
  8.558
100.00 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
HH 25
Table XI.—Basic Monthly Salary Commitment According to Classification
Groups, as at December 15th, 1952
Number of
Group Employees
Administrative (AD)   89
Clerical (CL)   3,024
Executive (EX)  17
Manual (ML)  1,228
Professional (PR)  1,411
Technical (TE)   2,786
Miscellaneous   3
Totals  8,558
Total Amount of
Salary Involved
$38,866
600,965
13,205
270,200
492,348
673,370
821
$2,089,775
Table XII.—Number of Male Veterans Appointed during the Period
January 1st, 1952, to December 15th, 1952
Veterans
320
Total males appointed    616
Percentage of veterans  51.9
Table XIII.—Total Number of Male Veterans in Provincial Civil Service
Veterans	
Total male employees...
Percentage of veterans..
2,788
4,645
60.0
Table XIV.—Distribution of Appointments by Position Classification Initiated
and Tabulated in the Vancouver Office
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11
12
13.
14.
15.
16
17.
18
19.
20.
21
22
23.
24.
25.
26
27.
28
29
30,
31.
32
33,
Administrative Assistant, Grade 1	
Assistant Director of School Broadcasts .
Bacteriologist 	
Bacteriologist, Assistant 	
Baker 	
Barber 	
Butcher 	
Carpenter
  2
  1
  5
  7
  1
  2
  1
  2
Cleaner   78
. Clerk, Grade 1  42
  11
  2
  3
  20
  2
  1
  72
  1
  12
  4
  5
  1
Clerk, Grade 2	
Clerk, Intermediate, Grade 1 .
Clerk, Intermediate, Grade 2.
Clerk, Junior, Grade A	
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk-Stenographer, Senior ....
Clerk-Typist 	
Court Usher	
Cook 	
Dairyman 	
Dental Assistant	
Dental Officer, Grade 2	
Dietitian   13
Driver   5
Driver—Technician   1
Electroencephalograph Technician  1
Engineer—Stationary   17
Engineer—Stationary, Chief
Gardener 	
Hairdresser 	
Handyman	
Home Supervisor	
Housekeeper	
1
10
2
1
2
2 HH 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XIV.-
-Distribution of Appointments by Position Classification Initiated
and Tabulated in the Vancouver Office—Continued
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
78.
79.
80.
81.
82.
83.
Industrial Therapist 	
Inspector—Electrical 	
Inspector—Motor Carriers	
Inspector—Social Security and Municipal Aid Tax Branch
Instructor—Girls' Industrial School	
Instructor—Staff Nursing 	
Instructor—Recreational, Male 	
Instructor—Recreational, Female 	
Instructor—Handicrafts 	
Instructor—Travelling Fire Unit-
Janitor   14
Kitchen Helper, Male  31
Laboratory Assistant   3
Laundress   15
Labourer  2
Laundry Helper, Male  5
Maid  .  62
Maintenance-man   2
Nurse's Aide  100
Nurse, Head  14
Nurse, R.N  71
Nurse, Superintendent   5
Occupational Therapist   8
Operator—Elevator   1
Operator—Machines   3
Operator—P.B.X.   16
  31
  2
  2
  2
  1
  9
  1
1
  1
  9
Orderly 	
Orderly Chief	
Outfit Maker and Glassware Cleaner	
Pharmacist 	
Pharmacist, Chief	
Physician 	
Physiotherapist 	
Power-mower Operator	
Psychological Clinic Assistant	
Seamstress  	
Secretarial Stenographer        11
Senior Stenographer       2
Social Worker, Grade 2       1
Stenographer, Grade 1a     25
Stenographer, Grade 2
Stockman 	
Supervisor, School for the Deaf and the Blind-
Supervisor—Vista 	
Teacher	
Vegetable-man 	
Ward Assistant	
Watchman 	
X-ray Assistant	
X-ray Technician	
47
6
5
1
11
1
60
6
3
2
Total
952 CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION REPORT
HH 27
Table XV.—Classification Reviews by Department in 1952 with Comparative
Figures for 1949, 1950, and 1951
•
c
.2
Vea
■O.S a
£■3 o
MM
a
'>
<*■%
•a 3
HTj .-
If §
P OBh
"c.
2c
•3 *g
c "> s,
h. _, on
° » J.
S c_.
,_i'3 o
u o
Upward Revisions
of Positions,
Including Several
Employees
Downward Revisions
of Positions,
Including Several
Employees
Reviews of Positions,
Including Several
Employees, Resulting in No Change
s_
O
H
8
42
15
93
33
49
42
8
37
74
5
4
52
3
32
6
2
1
1
1
3
1
19
1
1
19
8
4
8
31
4
4
23
2
8
21
1
32
3
2
1
7
8
8
2
5
8
4
19
1
34
1
5
2
2
1
14
50
Education  	
23
133
Fisheries    __
Health  	
Welfare1.^ 	
48
56
86
10
51
105
9
5
Provincial Secretary2 	
129
6
Railways     	
1
77
6
2
Total, 1952 	
Total, 1951 ■ ,:
Total, 1950 	
Total, 1949                             	
505
585
474
540
55
61
32
31
143
296
174
248
97
14
10
22
6
1
1
5
5
20
6
28
811
977
697
874
1 Includes positions in Accounting Office, Departments of Health and Welfare and Provincial Secretary.
2 Includes positions in Queen's Printer. HH 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table XVI.—Final Civil Service Commission Position Classifications in Relation to Original
Department Estimates Financial Saving, August to December, 1952
(Does not include savings effected through establishment surveys.)
Classification
Requested Classification
Final Disposition
Amount
Saved
during
Current
Fiscal
Year
(1952-53)
Clerk, Grade 2_	
Clerk-Stenographer	
Stenographer, Grade 2-
Clerk, Grade 2—	
Clerk-Stenographer 	
Clerk, Grade 1  —
Senior Stenographer	
Librarian, Grade 1	
Secretarial Stenographer, Grade 1.
Intermediate Clerk, Grade 1	
Four Clerk-Typists  _.
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk, Grade 1	
Stenographer, Grade 2 ...
Clerk, Grade 1	
Senior Stenographer	
Clerk, Grade 1	
Clerk, Grade 1	
Stenographer, Grade Ia.
Clerk, Grade 2..
Senior Clerk-Stenographer.
Clerk-Stenographer	
Senior Stenographer	
Junior Clerk 	
Clerk, Grade 2	
Senior Clerk, Grade 1	
Intermediate Clerk, Grade 1~
Senior Clerk, Grade 1	
Chief Draughtsman 	
Supervising Draughtsman	
No classification 	
Junior Draughtsman	
Social Worker, Grade 5	
Social Worker, Grade 2	
Social Worker, Grade 1	
Teacher, Grade 3	
Senior Bacteriologist_
Director of Registration and Collection  	
X-ray Technician, Grade 2 ...
X-ray Technician, Grade 2...
Audit Accountant, Grade 2„
Audit Accountant, Grade 2*
Cleaner  	
Plumber	
Janitor.	
Intermediate Clerk, Grade 1..
Senior Clerk-Stenographer	
Stenographer, Grade 2	
Intermediate Clerk, Grade 1-
Senior Clerk-Stenographer.....
Clerk, Grade 2 _.
Senior Clerk-Stenographer..
Librarian, Grade 1 	
Clerk, Grade 2_
Intermediate Clerk, Grade 1-
Four Clerks, Grade I_
Intermediate Clerk, Grade 1-
Clerk, Grade 2	
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk, Grade 1	
Senior Clerk-Stenographer.—
Clerk, Grade 2  	
Clerk, Grade 1 -
Stenographer, Grade 1a	
Intermediate Clerk, Grade 2_
Senior Clerk-Stenographer—
Clerk-Stenographer..
Senior Clerk-Stenographer	
Tabulating Operator, Grade 1..
Intermediate Clerk, Grade 1—.
Senior Clerk, Grade 2 _
Intermediate Clerk, Grade 2	
Senior Clerk, Grade 2	
Map Editor-in-chief	
Chief Draughtsman	
Senior Draughtsman .
Intermediate Clerk, Grade 1..
Supervisor, Grade 1	
Social Worker, Grade 3	
Intermediate Clerk, Grade 1..
Teacher, Grade 4 	
Senior Bacteriologist	
Increase to next pay level	
X-ray Technician, Grade 3—
X-ray Technician, Grade 3...
Audit Accountant, Grade 3..
Audit Accountant, Grade 3..
Janitor 	
Plumber	
Janitor—	
Clerk, Grade 2 	
Clerk-Stenographer _ —
Clerk-Typist 	
Clerk, Grade 2	
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk, Grade 1 _	
Senior Stenographer  .	
Clerk, Grade 1 	
Secretarial Stenographer, Grade 1
Clerk, Grade 2 	
Four Clerk-Typists	
Clerk, Grade 2	
Clerk, Grade 1	
Stenographer, Grade 2 	
Clerk-Typist..	
Senior Stenographer	
Clerk, Grade 1	
Position eliminated	
Position eliminated	
Clerk, Grade 2.	
Senior Stenographer	
Clerk, Grade 1	
Senior Stenographer 	
Junior Clerk.	
Clerk, Grade 2	
Senior Clerk, Grade 1 	
Intermediate Clerk, Grade 1	
Senior Clerk, Grade 1_ _
Chief Draughtsman —
Supervising Draughtsman. 	
Draughtsman, Grade 2	
Clerk, Grade 2 	
Social Worker, Grade 5	
Social Worker, Grade 2  	
Clerk, Grade 2 	
Teacher, Grade 3	
Bacteriologist	
Not granted   	
X-ray Technician, Grade 2	
X-ray Technician, Grade 2	
Investigator, Forest Accounting....
Investigator, Forest Accounting....
Cleaner .— _
Maintenance-man	
Half-time Janitor 	
$96
56
360
96
56
49
84
300
40
105
400
184
280
35
315
48
60
825
640
300
35
35
28
125
96
144
54
144
864
132
252
264
288
155
192
96
258
80
96
96
216
216
138
500
654
Total..
$9,487
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1953
370-253-9718

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