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Department of Trade and Industry REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1952 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1953]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Trade
and Industry
REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1952
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1953  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the year ended December 31st, 1952.
RALPH CHETWYND,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Office of the Minister,
Department of Trade and Industry,
Victoria, British Columbia. Honourable Ralph Chetwynd,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the year ended December 31st, 1952.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
EDWIN G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
For the Year Ended December 31st, 1952
In this report of the activities of the Department of Trade and Industry will be noted
many general and specific references to the continued industrial and commercial growth
of British Columbia. Throughout the whole network of our economy have been woven
new threads of progress—new industries and commercial enterprises, communications,
power development, markets, and increased population.
Although the primary industries of forestry, fisheries, and mining are expected to
show a slight decline in gross value of production from last year's peak, due to market
and other difficulties, it is estimated that agricultural production will show a substantial
gain.
A highlight is the ever-increasing value of production in our secondary industries—
a heartening trend, since it indicates steady progress toward the goal of full utilization of
the resources of this Province. A satisfactory domestic market for most items of production is apparent, though on the export side the loss or restriction of " traditional " markets
presents a difficult and ever-present situation only offset by a consistent search for new
outlets.
New developments in the past year include continued expansion in the important
pulp and paper industry, container plants to serve the canning and bottling industries, the
opening of the Hart Highway and completion of the Quesnel-Prince George link of the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway, increased hydro-power output through new and existing
plants, construction of oil pipe-line from Alberta, and the distinct possibility that natural
gas from the same source as well as from proven wells in British Columbia will also be
piped to the industrial centres of the Pacific Northwest.
The sum total of industrial development in British Columbia is reckoned in the
billions of dollars and indicates the faith of investors in this Province. At the same time,
there are many smaller industries anxious to locate here but unable to do so because of
inadequate finance, mainly through inability to transfer capital from soft-currency countries. This Department has many of these inquiries to deal with and mention is made
of the problem at this time since some of these projects would fit nicely into our economy.
During the past year, the Department carried out its usual programme of industrial
and tourist advertising with good results. As noted in last year's Report, British Columbia
has received much good publicity in periodicals and institutional reports published in
Canada and foreign countries.
A complete resume of the activities of the various branches of the Department of
Trade and Industry is outlined in the following report.
NEW INDUSTRIES AND PRODUCTS
The past year has brought additions to British Columbia's fast-growing list of manufactured products, and if inquiries dealt with by the Department are any indication, the
very satisfactory rate of increase will be continued.
Of particular interest this year was the opening of a large newsprint-mill on Vancouver Island, the first new mill for production of this essential commodity in many years.
Construction started and is almost completed of a metal-container plant and a plant site
has been acquired by a nationally known glass-container firm. The Department was active
in the survey of a chemical firm to establish a plant for production of chemicals required
by the pulp industry.   A plant-site has been chosen by this firm.
A tungsten-refinery was an important addition to the ever-increasing range of
products, while the newly opened asbestos deposit in Northern British Columbia is
rapidly coming into full production.   Many inquiries have been received throughout the FF 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
year pointing up interest in the full use of raw materials, particularly metals. There is
scope in many directions for ventures of this nature.
Development was not confined to the larger projects, as many new and smaller
factories were established for the production of such items as aluminium awnings and
other products of this versatile metal, communications equipment, toys, pottery, souvenir
jewellery, orthopasdic equipment, wood products, building materials, metal structural
items, builders' hardware, boats and marine equipment, furniture, canned fruits and
vegetables, and materials for the printing trades. All these items indicate another healthy
year of progress in the industrial and commercial development of this Province.
There is continuing interest in basic steel production from British Columbia iron
ores, particularly in view of shipments of this commodity to foreign smelters. A steel-mill
producing some forms of structural steel would be a great asset to the Province-wide
expansion programme.
During trips to Eastern Canada, contacts were made by Departmental officials with
firms interested in establishing branch plants in British Columbia.
SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT
Interdepartmental Industrial Advisory Committee
This Committee meets at the call of the Chair to consider industrial problems which
affect various departments of the Government service.    The Committee has been extremely helpful in furthering industrial development throughout the Province.
The following is the personnel of this Committee:—
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry (Chairman).
J. V. Fisher, Deputy Minister of Finance (Vice-Chairman).
E. S. Jones, Deputy Minister, Public Works Department.
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
J. T. Gawthrop, Director, Regional Development Division, Department of
Trade and Industry.
C. Hopper, Assistant Deputy Minister of Lands.
R. Bowering, Public Health Engineer, Branch of Public Health.
Dr. C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests.
G. P. Melrose, Deputy Minister of Lands.
W. H. Robertson, Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
T. L. Sturgess, Administrative Assistant, Department of Trade and Industry.
G. T. Hatcher, Director, Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of
Trade and Industry.
Dr. H. Sargent, Chief, Mineralogical Branch, Department of Mines.
G. Alexander, Deputy Minister of Fisheries.
Col. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister of Education.
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL
Under the chairmanship of the Minister of Trade and Industry, the Research Council held monthly meetings, at which were considered many scientific problems of vital
interest to the Province.
Industrial advancement is contingent upon scientific research, and it is very gratifying to the directors of the Council that industry is taking advantage of the services which
the Council provides.
The Council was organized in order to perform the following functions:—
(1) To co-ordinate the work of existing and prospective research units within
the Province of British Columbia:
(2) To initiate and undertake research work in any field of particular interest
to the Province; to apply the results of research toward the development DEPARTMENT of trade and industry
FF 7
of new products, the improvement of industrial processes, and the establishment of new industries based on the resources of the Province:
(3) To assist in the development of the technical status of the industries in
the Province of British Columbia through a fuller utilization of scientific
methods and industrial research:
(4) To provide fellowships, scholarships, bursaries, and rewards and pecuniary
and other aids, in order to facilitate and encourage original scientific and
industrial research:
(5) To provide for the publication of the results of the research work and to
enter into such arrangements as may be necessary with regard to patents
arising out of the work done by or for the Council.
The board of management consists of the following personnel:—
Chairman—Hon. Ralph Chetwynd, Minister of Railways, Trade and Industry,
and Fisheries of the Province of British Columbia.
Provincial Government—
G. P. Melrose, Deputy Minister of Lands.
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry.
Dominion Government—
Dr. R. E. Foerster, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B.C.
National Research Council—Dr. G. M. Shrum, University of British Columbia.
University of British Columbia—
Dr. W. A. Clemens, professor and head of Department of Zoology.
Professor A. H. Finlay, Department of Civil Engineering.
Dr. G. F. Laird, Department of Agronomy.
Industry—
P. Walrod, manager, B.C. Fruit Processors Ltd., Kelowna, B.C.
H. Dalton, manager, B.C. Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association.
Prentice Bloedel, vice-chairman, Bloedel, Stewart & Welch Limited, Vancouver, B.C.
C. E. Webb, consulting engineer.
James Eckman, Canadian Fishing Company Limited, Vancouver, B.C.
M. M. O'Brien, managing director, Bralorne Mines Limited, Vancouver,
B.C.
Labour—H. Neelands, secretary, Typographical Union, Vancouver, B.C.
To provide improved facilities required by the great demand for services, the Council
started construction of an addition to its new building.    The addition will be ready for
occupancy by mid-summer, and it will provide much more efficient handling of the
majority of the Council's activities and, in addition, a safe home for a large part of tie
valuable laboratory equipment acquired in the years since the Council's formation.     ^^
Combined with its better facilities is the ever-increasing background of experience
of the Council staff, which is a growing asset to the Province and one in which industry
can well place its confidence.
INDUSTRIAL ADVERTISING
The Department continued to advertise the opportunities for new industrial enterprise in the Province. This advertising stressed the natural resources of the Province and
their relation to secondary production.
The advertisements were placed in the following selected publications in Canada and
the United States: Fortune, Newsweek, Time, U.S. News & World Report, Nation's
Business, Dun's Review, Business Week, Time (Canadian), Canadian Business, Indus- FF 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
trial Canada, Saturday Night, Financial Post, Financial Times, Monetary Times, Maclean's, and Western Business and Industry.
The results of this campaign have been most gratifying, and from the inquiries
received it is evident that much attention has been drawn to the advantages of British
Columbia.
CO-OPERATIVE CONTACTS
The Department has consistently co-operated with the British Columbia Boards of
Trade, Chambers of Commerce, the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and The Greater Vancouver Metropolitan Industrial Development
Commission, and the assistance which these organizations have so willingly and cheerfully
provided is appreciated.
INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH
The Deputy Minister has continued to serve on the board of management of the
British Columbia Research Council. The Department continues to act as a clearinghouse for application of research results and assists in acquainting industry with facilities
offered by the Council.
INTERPROVINCIAL CO-OPERATION
The Deputy Minister represents the Province of British Columbia on the Provincial
Governments Trade and Industry Council. This organization works very closely with the
Federal Department of Trade and Commerce, the banks, railways, and other interested
trade-promotion groups in an effort to further the industrial life of Canada in general and
the respective Provinces in particular.
INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT FUND
Statement of Loans Outstanding at December 31st, 1952
Principal
B.C. Livestock Exchange Limited  $2,000.00
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE REPRESENTATIVE, BRITISH COLUMBIA HOUSE,
LONDON
The work at the London office of the Department of Trade and Industry at British
Columbia House maintained a high level of activity, for the same reasons as pertained in
the previous year.   These factors are as follows:—
(1) The interest in the Province as a sphere for industrial enterprise;
(2) The continuing urge of those engaged in trade and industry to transfer
their present activities to other parts of the Commonwealth;
(3) The increase in purchases of British Columbia products by British ministries and departments, and those firms who have been authorized to conclude private trading agreements;
(4) The continuing trade and business emigration inquiries from Continental
countries.
British business-men and industrialists are becoming increasingly aware of the possibilities of British Columbia as a sphere for investment, as a market, and as a manufacturing centre.
This has been evidenced by a marked increase in the number of inquiries received at
the Industrial and Trade Office, British Columbia House, during the year 1952. No less
than forty-six firms sent sales representatives on survey missions to the Province. In most
cases, advice was given on itineraries, letters of introduction were provided, and statistical
sales data supplied. Since the creation of this office in 1947, this is the largest number of
such visits which has been so arranged. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 9
Business Emigration
Inquiries from prospective emigrants, both British and Continental, who wish to
become established in business or industry in Western Canada, are computed to be 142,
up to the end of the year.
It is still difficult to advise such individuals on the best course to follow after their
arrival because of the stringent regulations governing sterling transfers.
New Enterprises
A Great Industrial Project on Annacis Island
Over two years ago the Duke of Westminster appreciated the importance of
participating in the expansion of Canada when George K. Ridley, the chief agent of the
Duke of Westminster's estates, conferred with the Agent-General on the possibilities of
British Columbia. It was pointed out that secondary industries in the Province were still
underdeveloped and greatly needed, and that there was a unique opening for the creation
of an industrial estate which could offer ready-made factories at long-term rentals, with
power and transportation facilities, and thus save the heavy, initial overhead cost
incidental to the starting of all manufacturing enterprises.
Undeveloped and Unknown.—Accordingly, in May, 1951, three of the executives
of the Westminster estates—George K. Ridley, G. I. Barty-King, legal adviser, and
Langshaw Rowland, chief forester—accompanied by H. F. E. Smith, the Industrial and
Trade Representative of the Department of Trade and Industry in British Columbia
House, London, England, arrived in British Columbia to survey the situation. Through
the Government Department of Trade and Industry a comprehensive tour of the Lower
Mainland was arranged, and it was whilst visiting the New Westminster area that the
attention of the party was drawn by Frank Wilson, secretary, New Westminster Board of
Trade, to a hitherto undeveloped tract, prominent enough on the maps, but almost
unknown even to the inhabitants of adjacent districts. This was Annacis Island, a tract
3 miles long and three-quarters of a mile wide, about half a mile down the Fraser River
from the New Westminster docks, and 12 miles by road from the centre of Vancouver.
The Duke's representatives proceeded to the island, looked it over, and were impressed
by its possibilities.
So much was this the case that on returning to England they lost no time in taking
steps to acquire the ownership of Annacis, and it has now been announced that all
preliminary arrangements have been concluded for the immediate development of a
substantial area there. It may be added that the island will not long remain an island.
Over the narrow and shallow channel which separates it from New Westminster a
causeway is to be constructed, and when this is built it will give the island direct access
by road and rail to the mainland.
Annacis Island.—Annacis Island comprises approximately 1,200 acres of solid soil
well above flood-level. It has a long frontage on the main tidal channel of the Fraser,
and will eventually link up at the north-east end with the docks at New Westminster,
which are about to be extended to cope with increasing traffic. Its rail connections
include the Canadian National and Canadian Pacific Railways to the east, the Great
Northern Railroad to the south, and the B.C. Electric Railway for local communication.
To its strategic position in relation to the ports of Vancouver and New Westminster can
be added its close proximity (40 miles) to the United States border and the prosperous
industrial centres of Seattle and Portland.
Present plans embrace the clearing of an initial site of some 200 acres, and the
provision of essential services, including sewerage, power and light, roadways, rail and
dockage facilities. On this site it is proposed to erect buildings for leasing to firms in
accordance with their specific requirements, or, alternatively, to grant long-term leases FF 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
to companies who wish to erect their own factories. There will also be ample housing
accommodation made available on the mainland within easy distance of the site, and
houses will be constructed for employees of British firms where necessary.
Opportunity for British Firms.—The Duke and his advisers emphasize that it is
their strong belief that British firms, if they are to hold their North American export
market or create new markets, must eventually establish plants in Canada, and it is with
this end in view that every assistance will be offered to those who elect to take advantage
of the exceptional economic facilities offered by the industrial estate on Annacis Island.
British firms familiar with the success which has attended the operation of the trading
estate system here will not need to be reminded of the opportunities for overseas
expansion which are opened up and placed at their disposal by this similar enterprise in
fast-growing and progressive British Columbia.
Other Projects
During 1952 there were established in the Province the following, all indicative of the
trend towards Western Canada: A large retail shoe-store chain from the United Kingdom
established its first branch and head office in Vancouver; a Dutch firm with Dutch capital,
producing pre-cut houses, opened at Prince George; a firm of builders employing a new
method of house construction is in the advanced process of formation in the Province;
and a large producer and distributor of oil-engines has established a sales and service
depot to serve Western Canada.
The plans of several other British companies are well advanced to establish branch
plants for assembly and service.
British Columbia-United Kingdom Trade
The year 1952 brought a substantial increase in the number of British and Continental firms who have concluded agency and distribution arrangements. This has been
done either by agreements with existing agency houses or wholesalers, or by the opening
of sales offices. It is thought that this increase in facilities for the sale of British goods in
Western Canada will expand over the next twelve months.
It is hoped that the principles laid down at the recent Commonwealth Conference in
London will pave the way for a revival of the sale of British Columbian produce in Great
Britain, so that timber, metals, fish, apples, etc., will be able to enter this market more
freely. Throughout the year it has been the policy to bring to the attention of ministries
and other Government agencies, private traders, and distributors the unsatisfactory position which presently exists in this regard.
Liaison, Visitors, Trade Fairs, etc.
Close contact is maintained with Canada House, Provincial Houses, Canadian
Department of Immigration, branches of Canadian banks and Canadian business institutions. By this means it is possible to provide new business and professional emigrants
with a plan of action designed to reduce their difficulties when they arrive in the Province.
The many letters of thanks received at this office from recent emigrants testify to the effectiveness of this procedure.
Introductions and contacts were provided for the many British Columbia businessmen who called at this office during their visit to the United Kingdom. In many
cases introductions were effected which led to the securing of agency contracts and
representation.
The Industrial and Trade Representative in London attended all exhibitions and trade
fairs which had a bearing on British Columbia trade requirements. These exhibitions
included machine tools, engineering, public works, textiles and clothing, housing, agricultural machinery, printing machinery, welding equipment, motor-cars, etc. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
FF 11
OFFICE OF TRADE COMMISSIONER
PRIME OBJECTIVES
The office has helped in a co-ordinated effort of detailed planning, as follows :•—
(1) For new industrial establishment:
(2) For plant extensions:
(3) For overseas and domestic market surveys:
(4) For practical application of research results:
(5) For adequate regional participation in prime defence contracts and subcontracts :
(6) In selected phases of public relations.
All the work was carried out in co-operation with other Provincial departments in
British Columbia, Dominion Government departments, and departments of other Provincial Governments throughout Canada, and commercial organizations in the Province.
LIAISON WITH DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE
Some of the liaison work with Ottawa is cleared through the office of the Western
Representative of the Dominion Department of Trade and Commerce (Foreign Trade
Service) in Vancouver. Other contacts are effected direct. The Vancouver office uses
the Office of Trade Commissioner, Victoria, as a central contact to ensure the closest
co-operation with Provincial units, and with Commercial Counsellors, Commercial Secretaries, and Trade Commissioners overseas.
OTHER OTTAWA CONTACTS
Reference should also be made to other contacts, as follows: —
(1)  Industrial Development Bank:
Export Credits Insurance Corporation:
Canadian Standards Association:
Federal departments concerned with industrial research:
Purchasing Agents of foreign Governments:
Purchasing structure of the Department of Defence Production.
NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS PROGRAMME
Contract Awards
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)
The Department of Defence Production maintains direct contact with the Department, and general policy of contract awards is discussed and cleared through a small
committee, with headquarters in Vancouver and recognized at Ottawa. Effective contact
at Ottawa is maintained with the Director, Small Industries Division, Department of
Defence Production.
Information Available
The following types of information are now immediately available at Victoria or
can be secured on short notice, in co-operation with the committee in Vancouver:—
(1) Prime contracts awarded through the purchasing structure of the Defence
Production Department over given periods, where value exceeds $10,000
and listings of " letters of intent" for larger purchases and allocations:
(2) Smaller contract awards, foodstuffs, etc., cleared through the district
offices of Department of Defence Production—one in Vancouver and one
for the Island in Victoria:
(3) Information for Canadian sub-contractors on United States procurement
in Canada: FF 12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
(4)
(5)
(6)
(7)
(8)
(9)
(10)
Lists of prime contractors who may have sub-contract work available:
Equipment,  facilities,  etc.,  in  selected plant locations,  especially for
smaller industries or for proven idle facilities in larger plants:
Information on priorities affected by the controlled-materials plan in the
United States:
Information on priorities, controls, etc., for materials supply from Canadian sources:
Samples for inspection by prospective contractors. The most practical
way of handling sample displays was under regional consideration at the
close of the year:
Charts, etc., covering the set-up of the new Department of Defence Production and the Associated Crown Company, Department of Defence
Construction:
A listing of personnel and staff changes in the Department of Defence
Production.
Representations
The Department of Trade and Industry has stressed the following points as far as
British Columbia is concerned:—
(a) Equitable basis of quotations, to allow prices f.o.b. places of delivery
where possible:
(b) Allocations to split larger volume purchases so that local deliveries can
be handled by local production, where practicable:
(c) Procurement of sub-contracting supplies, especially for the ship-building
industry and ship-repairs, from local sources.
EXPORT SURVEYS
A main function of the office continues to be assistance to industry groups and
individual firms in connection with their export problems.
INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR
Committee Organization
The Department is represented on the committee in charge of all British Columbia
arrangements for the Canadian International Trade Fair. This includes survey and
action for exhibitor, buyer, and visitor participation, and for special phases of publicity
and public relations connected with the Fair. Reference is made elsewhere in this Report
to the Department of Trade and Industry's Departmental exhibit.
Plans for 1953 were well under way at the close of the year.
The Department of Trade and Industry has already agreed to active participation,
and the appointment of a field representative working with the local committee ensures a
cross-section survey of exhibitor and buyer prospects in the Province.
The Department, through the committee, has received the active co-operation of
trade groups, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and Boards of Trade. The administrator of the Fair from Toronto headquarters paid a visit to the Province during the year.
Department Exhibit
For the third year the Department of Trade and Industry entered an exhibit at the
Trade Fair held at Toronto, June 2nd to 13th, 1952. The exhibit was constructed with
British Columbia plywoods and is a pictorial and statistical presentation of this Province's
industries and progress. It commanded marked attention and compared favourably with
other Provincial exhibits.   Hundreds of inquiries were received for information on all DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 13
aspects of our economy.   Many inquiries concerned settlement, travel, and employment,
while many valuable contacts were made for branch-plant, office, or warehouse establishment.   Sources of supply for British Columbia products were provided in many cases.
Thirty-five countries were represented by over 3,000 exhibits.
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN
The British Columbia Industrial Design Committee includes representation from
the Department of Trade and Industry, Department of Education, University of British
Columbia, Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver Board of Trade, Vancouver
School of Art, British Columbia Research Council, and the Dominion Department of
Trade and Commerce.
The Committee has co-operated with the National Industrial Design Committee in
local planning. It has assisted in publicity and public relations, to encourage appreciation
of industrial design and its importance as a factor in production and marketing of British
Columbia products.
The Committee has assisted in building up reference libraries on industrial design.
It has assisted in local planning for national design competitions sponsored by industry.
Direct financial assistance was secured from the National Gallery, Ottawa, with
smaller contributions from British Columbia sources.
HANDICRAFT PRODUCTION
A revised edition of the Directory of Handicraft Producers and Products was published in 1952. As in 1951, this Directory listed producers in British Columbia known to
be interested in finding a market and in a position to supply reasonable demands. Distribution of the Directory was made to retail and wholesale firms as a guide for any handicraft items they might wish to purchase. Additional distribution was made in Eastern
Canada and the United States. Through the co-operation of a Vancouver supply-house,
the opportunity was taken to distribute an invitation to many handicraft workers to send
in particulars of production for listing in the Directory.
Contact was maintained by correspondence with Eastern Canadian Provinces, some
of which have extensive educational programmes for handicraft development.
UNITED KINGDOM SURVEYS
The work of the Industrial and Trade Representative at British Columbia House
is covered in the general section of this Annual Report.
The Department at Victoria has cleared the Representative's work under headings
of Branch-plant Establishment, Investment Surveys, Special Industrial Surveys, Agency
Inquiries, Itineraries, and Introductions.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN
This Bulletin, listing trade inquiries, licence manufacture opportunities, and news of
general commercial interest, has been published for the past three years. It has been
the means of establishing contact between foreign firms and British Columbia importers
and manufacturers. Many of the trade inquiries reach us through our Industrial and
Trade Representative at British Columbia House, London, while the majority of licence
manufacture opportunities are supplied by the Industrial Development Division, Department of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa.
PUBLIC RELATIONS AND COMMITTEE WORK CO-OPERATION
The Department has continued the effective basis of co-operation with foreign consulates and with the Trade Commissioners of Commonwealth countries.    Once again FF  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
special reference must be made to the happy basis of co-operation with the United Kingdom Trade Commissioner Service and with the offices of the Australian Government
Trade Commissioner at Vancouver and Ottawa.
Itineraries and Committees
The office has been responsible for itinerary and other arrangements for business
visitors from Eastern Canada and overseas, and visiting trade missions and special
industrial-survey parties. It has worked in direct co-operation with the Foreign Trade
Service Office in Vancouver for the arrangements in British Columbia for visiting Trade
Commissioners and officials from Ottawa.
The office is represented on several standing committees of the Vancouver Board of
Trade, and the Department has continued financial assistance to the Transportation
Bureau of the Board of Trade to help it serve the smaller Boards of Trade in other parts
of the Province in a very constructive programme. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
FF 15
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics during 1952, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is, as its name
implies, a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is to
provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into economic
questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and compile economic
statistics of interest to the Province.
In order to carry out these objectives, the Bureau is divided into the following
divisions: Economic research, market research, statistical, and mechanical tabulating.
To ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured to follow the policy of
building up a small corps of professionally trained persons who could be relied upon to
perform a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been the policy to make the
services of the technical personnel continuously available to all other departments of the
Government.
Since other Governmental agencies are also concerned with the collection of statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication has
been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour, Provincial Secretary, and Health and Welfare. During 1952 the essential statistical services performed
for the other Provincial departments, as well as for the Department of Trade and Industry,
were maintained. Before proceeding with a description of the services performed by the
various divisions during the year, a brief review of business activity in British Columbia
is presented.
REVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Preliminary statistical returns for 1952 indicate that business activity continued the
upward trend established in recent years. The basic industries will probably show a slight
falling off in dollar values from the 1951 figures; however, the manufacturing industry
will probably show a moderate dollar-value gain over 1951. Price increases have been
relatively small, about 3 per cent in the last year with signs of levelling off toward the
end of the year. Retail sales increased to new highs and even when deflated for price
increases and population increases a fair per capita increase is indicated. There has
continued to be considerable activity in the construction industry, both heavy construction
and in residential and business construction.
Incomplete returns indicate the net value of production of primary and secondary
industries amounted to some $1,126,000,000* in 1951 as compared with $971,879,000t
in 1950 and $840,181,000f in 1949.
* Preliminary estimate.
t Dominion Bureau of Statistics. FF 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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1940 1942
1944 1946
YEARS
1948 1950        1952
6.0
CON
SUMPT
ON OF ELECTR
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X 4. 5
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160
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1940        1942        1944        1946        1948        1950       1952
YEARS
1940        1942       1944        1946        1948       1950        1952
YEARS
1952 Figures Subject to Revision DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
FF 17
ECONOMIC       INDICATORS       IN        BRITISH       COLUMBIA
250
225
200
175
150
125
100
75
50
25
RETAIL PRICES
193!
-19
9 =
100
PRICES
(INDEX NOS.)
250
WHOLESALE PRICES
225
200
175
150
125
100
75
50
25
1935-1939 =
100
1940   1942   1944   1946   1948   1950   1952
1940 1942 1944 1946 1948 1950 1952
VALUE
OF
CONTRACTS AWARDED
CONSTRUCTION
(in Millions of Dollars)
450
400
350
l
\
300
"•
\
\
250
\
\
.no
\
ISO
1
100
1
50
0
VALUE
OF
BUILDING PERMITS
90
/
\
80
/
70
/
60
/
50
/
40
>
/
10
/
20
/
10
0
1940 1942
1944 1946
YEARS
1948 1950 1952
1940 1942
1944 1946
YEARS
1948 1950 1952
1952 Figures Subject to Revision FF 1.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1950 and 1951,
with Preliminary Estimates for 1952
Unit or
Base
Period
1952
Preliminary
Estimates8
1951
1950
Mining—l
Total value of production-
Gold production	
Silver production	
Copper production	
Lead production.	
Zinc production 	
Coal production—	
Forestry—2
Total value of production-
Timber scaled . 	
Paper production—	
Fisheries—3
Total value of production-
Pack of canned salmon	
Agriculture—4
Total value of production .
Apples—
Total shipments-
Domestic shipments  	
Export shipments	
External trade—5
Export of canned salmon  	
Export of planks and boards, Douglas fir~
Export of red-cedar shingles.- 	
Internal-trade—
Total retail sales5  — —	
Department stores.
Motor-vehicle dealers..
Gasoline consumed**	
Railway freight loaded in British Columbian-
Consumption of electric powers 	
Sales of life insurance5   	
Construction—5
Contracts awarded	
Building permits issued- — 	
Finance—Bank debits5  	
Tourist trade—Automobile entries on 60-day permits5-
Employment—5
All employment    	
Manufacturing.
Iron and steel products-
Lumber products	
Pulp and paper	
Mining  	
Logging.  	
Construction	
Communication..
Transportation —
Services— —
Trade —	
Salaries and wages?..
$
MB.M.
Tons
Cases
Boxes
Boxes
Boxes
Cwt.
MFt.
Sq.
000$
000$
000$
Gallons
Tons
000 Kwh.
000$
000$
000$
000$
Number
1939=100
1939=100
1939=100
1939 = 100
1939=100
1939=100
1939=100
1939 = 100
1939=100
1939=100
1939=100
1939=100
160,415,000
8,840,000
5,820,000
12,680,000
40,440,000
57,510,000
9,900,000
496,506,000    ]
4,937,965
521,609    j
56,000,000 |
1,286,468 |
I
165,000,000 | 159,782,000
I
175,659,591
10,345,858
7,768,118
11,980,155
50,316,015
66,448,242
10,233,353
504,807,930
4,696,347
484,581
83,812,704
1,955,475
292,185
1,151,485
2,093,767
1,294,875
133,576
358,055
185,000,000
11,888,688
4,457,298
159,826
166,273
94,264
11,111,011
262,550
191.3
191.6
293.7
179.9
220.2
115.8
156.4
317.4
235.2
180.8
183.2
203.2
875,000,000
3,884,213
1,986,455
1,897,758
321,796
1,281,467
2,563,585
1,137,867
120,203
314,011
172,742,019
11,600,237
4,186,972
135,971
381,548
87,344
9,945,579
247,801
190.3
200.5
298.2
205.4
208.7
102.2
199.5
259.3
219.7
186.4
181.5
204.5
825,000,000
148,155,060
11,404,270
7,666,151
9,889,458
44,391,530
48,882,765
10,025,626
468,371,142
4,560,080
477,628
68,821,358
1,482,560
136,546,300
7,051,622
3,179,228
3,872,394
322,062
1,146,805
2,881,584
1,061,020
113,273
256,870
157,363,848
10,834,135
3,960,698
124,280
81,240
92,008
8,446,567
221,642
180.7
187.1
262.6
195.7
183.0
102.0
172.9
252.4
198.1
165.1
178.9
198.4
718,202,028
1 British Columbia Department of Mines.
2 British Columbia Department of Lands and Forests, Forest Service.
3 British Columbia Department of Fisheries.
4 British Columbia Department of Agriculture.
5 Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
n British Columbia Department of Finance.
7 Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Labour Division.
8 Subject to revision. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
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saviioa _o sNomiw FF 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ECONOMIC RESEARCH DIVISION
One of the major functions of this Division is providing economic counsel to the
Government. In line with this objective, numerous projects and reports have been completed during the past year for various departments. In particular, considerable assistance was given to the following branches of the Government (involving in some cases
loan of staff): Regional Development Division, Department of Finance, Attorney-
General's Department, and the Department of Labour.
In addition to work done for Government departments, hundreds of requests of an
economic and statistical nature have been received from private individuals, corporations,
newspapers and business publications, and Boards of Trade. These requests covered a
wide range of topics, too numerous to detail individually. In some cases these inquiries
call for the provision of statistical information readily available from our files and library.
In other cases they require lengthy tabulations and a considerable amount of research.
The helpful co-operation of the staff of the Provincial Library and other departments
of the Government is worthy of mention in this regard.
During the past year attention has been given to improving the service provided by
this Division. A small increase in clerical staff has permitted the extension of statistical
collection, which in turn has increased the basic data necessary for economic investigation.
Two members of the Research Staff returned from postgraduate courses this spring,
and their further technical training has enabled this Division to provide greater assistance
to Government and public inquiries.
The Monthly Bulletin was again published by this Division and has been widely
distributed throughout the Province. It provides a concise review of current business
activity and carries as well significant statistical indicators. An added feature in recent
months has been a section dealing with regional statistics. The Bulletin also reports each
month on the external trade through British Columbia customs ports. An analytical commentary on trade conditions is generally included in this section of the Bulletin.
Several special articles considered to be of wide interest were published in the
Monthly Bulletin during 1952. These dealt with the following subjects: Trends in
"Real" Earnings Over the Years 1939 to 1951, Seasonality of Employment in British
Columbia, Value and Volume Changes in Retail Trade, and Population Trends in British
Columbia as Shown by the 1951 Census.
Special Surveys
Wage-rate Surveys
At the request of the Civil Service Commission, another study of wage rates and
working conditions was completed. The survey was restricted to the metropolitan areas
of Vancouver and Victoria, in contrast to the wider geographical studies of previous
surveys. A questionnaire was sent to all firms in these areas employing 100 or more
persons and dealt with days and hours worked per week, vacation policy, sick-leave
policy, and wage rates for selected occupations. The response of the firms was very good,
and information useful both to the Civil Service Commission and to this Division resulted
from the survey. A mimeographed summary report was mailed to the co-operating
establishments.
The Clerical Salary Survey of the Vancouver Board of Trade was again tabulated
and analysed by this Division. The results of the survey were published in a comprehensive report showing salary ranges and average salaries for thirty-three office occupations within the Vancouver area. The publication also includes a section outlining the
policies of the participating firms with respect to working conditions. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 25
Assistance was also given to the Vancouver Board of Trade in preparing a small
survey dealing with wage rates and working conditions of warehouse and shipping-room
employees in the Vancouver area.
Many reports showing occupational wages were prepared for the Department of
Labour during the past year. The information was compiled from sources such as the
wage-rate studies referred to above, collective-bargaining agreements, and statistical
returns from industrial firms which are filed with this Bureau.
Trade-union Organizations
As in previous years a directory of trade-union organizations was compiled by this
Division for the Labour Relations Board. The membership statistics showed that organized labour was 48.93 per cent of the total paid working force in non-agricultural occupations in British Columbia as at December 31st, 1951. A study of union membership by
industrial categories showed the following distributions:— Percent
Wood and wood products  22.48
Public service  18.78
Construction  11.46
Foods      9.20
Other transportation     8.15
Mining and quarrying      6.27
Metals      6.08
Steam-railway transportation     5.01
Personal service     4.73
Communications      2.21
Light, heat, and power     1.57
Printing and publishing      1.56
Clothing and footwear     0.62
All others     1.88
STATISTICAL DIVISION
This Division is responsible for the collection, compilation, analyses, interpretation,
and publication of statistical information. Also, it is the duty of this Division to assist
other departments in the compilation of statistical information and to establish uniform
statistical methods throughout the service. In addition, it co-operates with other statistical
bureaux in the elimination of duplication and answers inquiries relating to statistical data.
Following is a brief outline of the statistics compiled in this Division.
External Trade of British Columbia
The agreement between this Bureau and the External Trade Branch, Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, consummated in the fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under
this agreement the Bureau receives monthly a duplicate set of punch-cards showing in
detail the importation and exportation of every commodity normally listed in the Federal
trade reports which has been recorded at customs ports located in this Province. While
these records do not distinguish the exported merchandise originating in British Columbia
nor the imports destined for consumption in this Province from the other goods passing
through these customs ports, the records do provide the basis for a very comprehensive
annual report on the foreign trade of British Columbia.
Preliminary statements showing the external trade through British Columbia customs
ports covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over are now published annually. Until June, 1950, detailed monthly statements were also published.
For reasons of economy, this publication has been condensed and combined with an FF 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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cntscsr-THTHcnTHcnr-
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TH                                                 CS               TH
r»
w-
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1
o
u
•§
m
O
rt
__i   O   _«
!
tH
0
Ih
Pi
rt
13 c
11
d prodi
and pr
roduct
s	
0
■P.
X
■&
u
M
D. I?   to
t- ftt3 Z
C w PI'S   c
rt  rt "O  S    &
•3
w
imals and anima
>res, textiles, and
>od, wood produ
n and its produc
n-ferrous metals
n-metallic miner
Mnicals and allie
scellaneous prod
Totals, all
o
a
i
o
Q
>
■a
a
■a s
_?£
T
C
c
t-
_c
±_ *-i _:
3 ° £
Ofl
<
c
<
a
C
u
c
2
c
rZ
0
% DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 27
abbreviated form of another discontinued publication, Business Activity, to form the
major components of the Bureau's Monthly Bulletin.
The discontinuance of fairly detailed monthly published external-trade figures
has resulted in increased requests for import and export information, which has been
supplied to all inquirers.
Tables 2 and 3 give a brief insight into British Columbia's foreign trade for the
eleven-year period 1941 to 1951. The peak year for exports was 1951, there being a
slight drop in 1949 from 1948. Imports have tripled since 1945 and exports are more
than 2Vi times as great. Preliminary figures for the first six months of 1952 indicate
a substantial increase in the value of exports and a small increase in the value of imports.
Table 4.—Twelve Leading Exports of British Columbia, 1951
Value
Rank Commodity ($000,000)
1. Planks and boards, Douglas fir  110.4
2. Planks and boards, hemlock  46.1
3. Lead in pigs, refined lead  38.1
4. Newsprint  34.8
5. Shingles, red cedar  27.2
6. Planks and boards, cedar  26.4
7. Zinc spelter  23.2
8. Wood-pulp sulphite kraft  17.8
9. Pulp sulphite  15.2
10. Cattle      13.5
11. Copper, fine in ore       9.5
12. Fertilizers, phosphate       8.5
The above table indicates the importance of our lumber, pulp and paper, mine and
smelter products, and live stock.
British Columbia products, exported through all Canadian ports, went to over 100
countries in 1951; however, two of these, the United States and the United Kingdom,
bought 80 per cent of these exports. Since the end of the war the United States has taken
an increasing proportion of our total exports until 1950 when it reached 79 per cent.
In 1951, however, this dropped to 56 per cent. The United Kingdom, which took 8 per
cent of British Columbia's exports in 1950, took 24 per cent in 1951. Ten countries took
over 92 per cent of all our exports.   These leading customers are set out as follows:—
Table 5.—The Ten Leading Countries to Which British Columbia
Exported in 1951 Percentage
Rank Country Value of Total
1. United States  $287,070,625 55.8
2. United Kingdom   124,423,989 24.1
3. Japan   23,725,214 4.6
4. Australia   10,313,573 2.0
5. Union of South Africa  7,905,294 1.5
6. Hawaii _  6,260,902 1.2
7. Belgium  5,173,650 1.0
8. Germany   4,602,640 0.9
9. France  4,467,226 0.9
10. New Zealand  3,978,640 0.8
All other countries       37,317,281 7.2
Total, all countries  $515,239,034 100.0 FF 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A continental breakdown of British Columbia exports shows North and Central
America and the West Indies bought 57 per cent, Europe 28 per cent, Oceania 4 per
cent, Asia 7 per cent, Africa 2 per cent, and South America 2 per cent.
Table 6.—The Eleven Leading Imports from Foreign Countries for
Consumption in British Columbia, 1951
Value
Rank Commodity ($000,000)
1. Crude petroleum for refining  22.6
2. Coffee, green, imported direct  12.8
3. Sugar, raw, imported direct  11.7
4. Ores of metals, n.o.p  10.2
5. Logging machinery and parts  8.6
6. Gasoline, under .8236 specific gravity  8.3
7. Traction engines, gasoline  6.9
8. Automobiles, passenger (under $1,200)  6.8
9. Copra, not prepared  6.6
10. Heavy fuel-oils, Nos. 4, 5, and 6     5.6
11. Diesel fuel     5.2
The presence of four petroleum products among our eleven leading imports shows
that California oil-producers can still compete effectively in the British Columbia market.
This situation will probably be altered with the completion of the pipe-line from Alberta
sometime next year.
Although British Columbia imported from eighty-six countries in 1951, three-
quarters originated in the United Kingdom and the United States. United Kingdom
imports dropped from $44,000,000 in 1950 to $39,000,000 in 1951, while imports from
the United States rose from $140,000,000 to $201,000,000 in 1951. The top ten
countries listed below provided over 90 per cent of all imports.
Table 7.—Ten Leading Countries from Which British Columbia
Imported in 1951 Percentage
Rank Country Value of Total
1. United States  $201,022,949 63.0
2. United Kingdom  39,398,554 12.3
3. Australia   8,248,328 2.6
4. Brazil   8,147,089 2.6
5. Philippines   7,205,851 2.3
6. Fiji   5,964,054 1.9
7. Peru   5,054,249 1.6
8. India   4,912,812 1.5
9. B.E.I, and others  4,480,287 1.4
10. Japan  4,471,680 1.4
All other countries       29,987,725 9.4
Total, all countries  $318,893,578 100.0
A breakdown of our imports by continents reveals that in 1951 North America
supplied us with 65 per cent, Europe 15 per cent, South America 6 per cent, Asia 8 per
cent, Oceania 5 per cent, and Africa less than 1 per cent.
The gap between our total imports and exports narrowed slightly in 1951, compared
with 1950; in that year imports were 59.7 per cent of exports, but in 1951 were 61.9 per
cent.   The balance is still closer than in 1939, when the ratio was around 50 per cent. department of trade and industry ff 29
Transportation and Freight Rates
The freight-rate structure of Canada is at the present time being thoroughly overhauled; therefore it is extremely important that a constant watch be kept over those rates
which vitally affect the British Columbia economy. The importance of a constant study
of this subject has been demonstrated with the introduction of the " one and one-third
rule," which, as predicted by British Columbia, has resulted in the cancellation of several
of our very favourable transcontinental rates.
The introduction of the $7,000,000 subsidy on traffic moving between the East and
the West has also required considerable study and argument. British Columbia favoured
the application of the subsidy on a percentage basis or any other means which would give
greater relief to the shippers and receivers with longer hauls than to those with shorter
hauls. The Province was opposed by Manitoba, who favoured a fixed amount per 100
pounds as the basis for the subsidy. A compromise solution, based on both methods,
was finally decided upon by the Board.
One successful outcome of the Royal Commission on Transportation Report has
been the relaxing of mixing restrictions on western traffic.
British Columbia has strongly and successfully opposed the October, 1952, application for an 8-per-cent increase in freight rates. In this case, British Columbia argued
that with the decline in prices to our basic industries, business could not stand further
increases in freight rates. Connected with the above application was an application for
increase domestic grain rates and also one for a rate base and fixed rate of return for the
railways. Some increases in domestic grain rates, however, have been granted and, at
the time of writing, the rate base and rate-of-return application is being opposed.
Consideration has also been given to the problems posed at the " Pre-hearing Conference " of the Board of Transport Commissioners in early 1952, which was attended by
a senior member of the Research Division. The Board is preparing " working papers "
drafting its plan for equalization, which will be submitted for consideration to such groups
as shippers' associations and the Provincial Counsel and Advisors. These papers will be
followed by regional hearings which will undoubtedly require a great deal of this Bureau's
attention.
In addition, a history of British Columbia's participation, since 1946, in freight-rate
matters has been prepared. Further assistance has been given to Victoria business
interests in preparing a case for terminal rate parity with Vancouver. Also, preliminary
research and accumulation of tariffs has been carried out on behalf of the Attorney-
General and his counsel in order to discover the element of mountain differential in our
passenger-rate structure. At the present time an application for complete removal of the
mountain differential in passenger rates is before the Board of Transport Commissioners.
During the year the Assistant Director was appointed as secretary to the Advisory
Committee on Freight Rates. In this way the efforts of the Bureau are being co-ordinated
with the needs of practical traffic managers in commerce and industry.
Co-operative Statistical Agreements
The co-operative statistical agreements with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and
other Federal offices increased during 1952. The fields of co-operation and the dates of
the original agreements are as follows: (1) Mining Statistics, 1926; (2) External-trade
Statistics, 1938; (3) Cost-of-food Statistics, 1939; (4) Provincial Government Payroll
Statistics, 1949; (5) Forecast of Capital and Repair and Maintenance Expenditures for
Provincial, Municipal, and Other Local Authorities, 1950; (6) Census of Construction
Statistics—Building Permits, 1951. In addition, copies of Dominion Bureau of Statistics
annual " Census of Industry " forms and monthly reports on " Production, Shipments and FF 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Stocks on Hand in British Columbia Sawmills" have been received since 1948. Commencing in 1953, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics has agreed to supply this office with
duplicates of their " Operations in the Woods " forms.
The Cost of Living
During the year the Dominion Cost-of-living Index showed the first appreciable drop
since before the war. At the beginning of the year the index registered an all-time high
of 191.5. It then declined for four successive months to a reading of 186.7 at May 1st,
rose slightly for June and July, and then dropped again, reaching 184.8 as of November
1st. The index stood at 184.2 on December 1st. Lower food costs, particularly for
meat, were largely responsible for the decline in living costs.
Consumer Price Index
In October, 1952, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics began publication of the " Consumer Price Index," which is to be the successor to the old " Cost-of-living Index."
The new index remains, in character and general purposes, the same as the old
Cost-of-living Index. However, the goods and services selected for purposes of computing the new index conform with post-war expenditure patterns and should reflect more
realistically current changes in living costs due to prices.
In order to determine the items and proportions to be used in the new base budget,
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics conducted a survey of family expenditure covering
some 3,600 urban Canadian families. The survey covered the year ended August 31st,
1948. It was decided that the central core of family types whose expenditure patterns
were similar enough for their changes in living costs resulting from price change to be
adequately represented by one index could be defined as those families (a) living in
twenty-seven Canadian cities with over 30,000 population; (b) ranging in size from two
adults to two adults with four children; and (c) with annual incomes during the survey
year ranging from $1,650 to $4,050.
Detailed information on expenditures was submitted by 1,517 families with these
attributes.
The year 1949 is the base period of the new Consumer Price Index. This index will
measure the percentage change in prices between 1949 and, for example, January, 1952,
rather than between January, 1952, and 1935-39, as in the case of the old Cost-of-living
Index. Calculations of the percentage change between any two points in time will yield
exactly the same result regardless of the base period used.
A comparison of the monthly figures of the old Cost-of-living Index and the new
Consumer Price Index from 1949 to 1952 is shown in Table 8 of this Report.
Each month the Bureau of Economics and Statistics releases the latest cost-of-living
figures to a mailing list of some 160 individuals and organizations. Starting in December,
this release included both the Cost-of-living Index and the Consumer Price Index, and
this practice of including both indexes will continue until the Cost-of-living Index is no
longer calculated.
British Columbia Cost of Food
During the year, this Bureau completed revision of its quarterly Cost-of-food Index
covering fifty-one British Columbia centres. Information regarding comparative food
costs in the various centres is available upon request. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
FF 31
Table 8.—Total and Main Components of the Consumer Price Index and the Cost-of-
living Index, from January, 1949, to December, 1952
(1949=100)1
Total Index
Food
hi
<_
13
e
u
P.
Clothing
2c
o o
* a
3 fi
o a
ffio
ci. oo
.5   C
_C^
*_k ">
00-2 w
•-- cl <o
m S ___
si?
h i
C c.
O-S
!f F
•So'-'
SI
C.P.I.
C. of L.I C.P.I.
1
C. of L.
C.P.I.
C.ofL.
C.P.I.
C.ofL.
C.P.I.
C.ofL.
C.P.I.
C.ofL.
1949—
99.8
99.3
100.8
99.6
99.2
98.9
99 7
99.3
99.9
99.5
98.9
98.3
February..	
99.7
99.2
99.7
98.7
99.3
98.9
99.7
99.3
100.2
100.0
99.4
99.5
99.4
99 0
98.7
98.1
99.2
98 9
100 0
99 8
100.1
100.1
99.5
99.5
99 3
99 1
98 1
97 8
99.6
99 5
100 2
100 1
100.1
100.1
99.5
99.7
99 2
99 2
97 9
98 3
99.7
99 5
100 3
100 1
99.8
99.7
99.8
99.7
June 	
99.6
99.8
99.2
100.0
99.7
99.5
100.3
100.1
99.7
99.4
99.8
99.7
July _
100.0
100.8
100.2
102.1
100.3
100.3
100.3
100.1
99.7
99.4
99.8
99.8
August	
100.4
101.2
101.3
103.1
100.2
100.3
100.1
100.1
99.6
99.5
99.9
100.1
September 	
100.4
100.9
101.2
102.0
100.5
100.7
100.2
100.2
99.6
99.7
99.9
100.1
October	
100.6
100.9
100.8
101.0
100.5
100.7
99.8
100.5
100.6
100.7
100.9
101.1
November..	
101.0
100.6
101.9
100.1
100.5
100.7
99.7
100.3
100.5
101.0
101.0
101.1
December
100.5
100.4
100.3
99.5
101.0
101.6
99.7
100.3
100.4
100.8
101.1
101.3
100 0
100 0
100 0
100 0
100 0
100 0
100 0
100 0
100 0
100 0
100 0
100 0
1950—
January	
100.1
100.1
98.1
98.2
101.1
101.6
99.6
100.1
100.6
100.9
102.0
102.2
February.	
100.2
100.5
98.4
99.2
101.1
101.6
99.5
99.9
100.6
100.8
102.2
102.6
March _	
100.9
101.8
98.8
100.5
104.7
107.9
98.9
99.1
100.8
100.8
102.2
102.6
April	
101.2
102.0
99.3
100.7
104.9
107.9
99.2
99.0
101.2
101.3
102.2
102.7
May  _	
101.2
102.0
99.3
100.8
105.1
107.9
99.1
98.7
101.1
101.2
102.2
102.7
June _ .
101.9
102.9
100.9
103.0
105.9
107.9
99.1
98.7
101.5
101.3
102.3
102.8
July..	
102.7
104.2
102.6
105.6
107.4
109.7
99.1
98.7
101.6
101.4
102.4
102.9
August 	
103.3
104.8
103.8
106.7
107.8
109.7
99.3
98.8
102.6
102.4
102.5
102.9
September	
104.3
105.6
105.4
107.8
108.7
110.2
99.9
99.6
103.4
103.9
103.0
103.1
October.	
105.9
106.2
107.6
108.4
109.0
110.2
100.6
100.2
104.6
104.6
105.2
103.5
November 	
106.4
106.2
108.4
107.7
109.5
110.9
101.0
100.8
105.1
105.3
105.4
103.6
December	
106.6
106.4
108.4
107.8
109.6
110.9
101.3
101.0
105.5
105.9
105.7
104.1
Year... .
102 9
103.6
102.6
103.9
106.2
108 0
99 7
99 6
102.4
102.5
103 1
103 0
1951—
January... 	
107.7
107.3
109.0
108.5
110.0
110.9
102.6
102.2
107.1
107.5
107.4
105.4
February. _	
109.1
109.0
111.0
110.5
110.4
110.9
105.1
105.1
108.6
109.6
108.0
106.4
110.8
111.7
111.8
113.1
114.1
115.5
115.2
117.4
111.5
111.8
111.9
111.9
106.7
108.5
107.2
108.6
110.5
111.4
112.3
113.1
108.3
108.6
107.0
April	
107.8
May _	
112.2
113.2
114.3
116.0
112.4
111.9
109.0
110.0
112.7
114.6
110.4
109.2
June 	
113.7
114.5
115.8
118.1
115.2
113.7
109.5
110.6
113.8
115.5
111.8
109.5
July—	
114.6
116.7
117.9
123.0
115.5
113.7
109.7
110.8
114.3
115.9
112.2
110.4
August.	
115.5
117.5
119.0
123.8
115.8
113.7
110.7
111.7
115.1
116.8
113.4
111.6
September.	
116.5
118.0
120.5
123.7
117.2
116.0
111.9
113.0
115.5
117.2
113.6
111.8
October...	
117.1
118.4
121.3
123.0
117.2
116.0
114.1
116.8
115.8
117.7
114.1
112.0
November. 	
117.9
118.9
122.5
123.3
118.2
117.7
114.5
117.2
115.9
117.8
114.8
112.5
December 	
118.1
118.8
122.5
122.8
118.2
117.7
115.2
117.7
116.4
118.1
115.0
112.5
113.7
114.8
117.0
118.8
114.4
113.8
109.8
110.9
113.1
114.7
111 5
109 7
1952—
January..   	
118.2
119.1
122.4
123.2
118.3
117.7
114.9
117.6
116.4
118.4
115.5
113.1
February.	
117.6
118.7
120.8
122.2
118.3
117.7
113.5
116.3
116.3
118.0
115.8
113.7
116.9
116.8
117.6
117.4
117.6
117.2
119.1
118.3
119.1
119.4
118.9
118.9
112.9
112.5
115.3
114.9
116.9
116.8
118.6
118.5
116.4
116.6
114.1
April    	
114.8
115.9
116.0
116.1
116.1
116.5
116.9
115.5
115.7
116.0
115.9
116.7
118.0
119.6
120.4
120.6
118.9
120.2
120.2
112.3
111.8
111.7
114.7
114.3
114.2
116.2
115.9
115.9
117.1
116.5
116.3
115.6
115.7
115.6
114.4
114.4
July...  .	
114.4
August	
116.0
116.7
115.7
117.2
120.6
120.2
111.6
113.9
115.8
116.1
115.8
114.8
September .	
116.1
116.0
115.8
115.4
121.2
121.1
110.9
113.4
116.0
116.1
115.8
114.8
October 	
116.0
115.0
115.1
113.0
121.5
121.1
109.9
112.9
116.2
116.3
116.4
115.3
November	
116.1
114.9
115.7
112.8
121.4
121.1
109.8
112.2
115.9
116.1
116.6
115.5
115.8
116.5
114.6
116.6
114.1
116.8
111.4
116.9
122.2
120.2
121.9
119.8
109.7
111.8
112.2
114.4
116.1
116.2
116.5
117.1
116.6
116.0
115.5
Year    	
114.6
1 Cost-of-living Indexes arithmetically converted to the base 1949= 100.
C.P.I.-^Consumer Price Index. C. of L.-=Cost-of-.iving Index. FF 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 9.—Dominion Bureau of Statistics Index Numbers of the Cost of Living in
Canada, by Years 1913-52 and by Months in 1952
Adjusted
to Base
100 for
August,
1939
On Base of Average Prices 1935-39=
100
Date
Total
Food
Rent
Light
and
Fuel
Clothing
Home
Furnishings and
Services
Miscellaneous
1913	
79.1
1
79.7             88.3
74.3
76.9
88.0
70.3
1914 	
79.4
80.0
91.9
72.1
75.4
88.9
70.3
1915	
81.0
87.6
103.7
81.6
88.3
104.5
92.7
103.3
133.3
69.9
70.6
75.8
73.8
75.4
83.8
96.8
110.8
130.3
70.9
74.5
81.5
1916	
1917 --	
1918
117.4
129.0
149.3
131.5
120.3
118.3
130.0
150.5
132.5
121.3
152.8
163.3
188.1
143.9
121.9
80.2
87.6
100.2
109.2
113.7
92.2
100.7
119.9
127.6
122.2
152.3
175.1
213.1
123.4
147.0
91.4
101.2
110.3
112.5
112.5
1919	
1920
1921 	
1922  	
1923	
120.7
118.6
119.6
121.7
119.5
120.6
122.8
120.9
126.3
116.6
117.4
117.4
122.2
119.2
116.8
145.1
141.7
141.3
111.7
109.6
107.5
1924    	
1925  	
1926 -	
120.8
121.8
133.3
115.9
116.8
139.1
106.1
1927 _ 	
118.9
119.5
119.9
120.5
130.8
131.5
114.5
117.3
114.4
113.2
135.6
135.5
105.1
104.8
1928 	
1929   	
120.7
119.8
108.2
98.2
93.7
121.7
120.8
109.1
99.0
94.4
134.7
131.5
103.1
85.7
84.9
119.7
122.7
119.4
109.7
98.6
112.6
111.8
110.0
106.8
102.5
134.8
130.6
114.3
100.6
93.3
105.0
105.4
103.3
100.4
98.2
1930..	
1931         	
1932 	
1933 	
1934... 	
94.8
95.6
92.7
93.2
102.1
97.1
97.8
1935 	
95.4
96.2
94.6
94.0
100.9
97.6
95.4
98.7
1936  	
97.3
98.1
97.8
96.1
101.5
99.3
97.2
99.1
1937	
100.4
101.2
103.2
99.7
98.9
101.4
101.5
100.1
1938 _.	
101.4
102.2
103.8
103.1
97.7
100.9
102.4
101.2
1939	
100.7
101.5
100.6
103.8
101.2
100.7
101.4
101.4
1940 	
104.8
105.6
105.6
106.3
107.1
109.2
107.2
102.3
1941 	
110.8
111.7
116.1
109.4
110.3
116.1
113.8
105.1
1942     ...               	
116.1
117.5
117.0
118.4
127.2
130.7
111.3
111.5
112.8
112.9
120.0
120.5
117.9
118.0
107.1
108.0
1943 	
1944	
118.0
118.9
131.3
111.9
110.6
121.5
118.4
108.9
1945	
118.6
119.5
133.0
112.1
107.0
122.1
119.0
109.4
1946 	
122.6
123.6
140.4
112.7
107.4
126.3
124.5
112.6
1947 	
134.4
135.5
159.6
116.7
115.9
143.9
141.6
117.0
1948  	
153.8
155.0
195.5
120.7
124.8
174.4
162.6
123.4
1949	
159.6
160.8
203.0
123.0
131.1
183.1
167.6
128.8
1950	
165.2
166.5
211.0
132.9
138.3
182.3
169.2
132.6
1951	
183.1
184.5
241.1
140.0
147.1
203.1
194.4
141.3
1952   	
186.0
187.5
237.4
147.4
151.1
209.4
197.8
147.6
January	
190.0
191.5
250.0
144.8
151.2
215.3
201.1
145.7
February.	
189.3
190.8
248.1
144.8
151.3
213.0
200.1
146.5
March  _
187.6
189.1
241.7
146.3
152.5
211.2
200.8
146.9
April     	
187.2
188.7
240.2
146.3
152.5
210.4
200.5
147.9
May    	
185.2
186.7
235.3
146.3
150.6
210.1
198.2
147.4
June _	
185.8
187.3
237.0
147.9
149.8
209.3
197.2
147.4
July —.
186.5
188.0
239.5
147.9
149.8
209.1
196.7
147.4
August.	
186.1
187.6
238.0
147.9
150.1
208.6
196.0
147.8
September	
185.0
186.5
234.2
148.9
150.3           207.7
195.8
147.8
October  	
183.5
185.0
229.3
148.9
150.9
206.7
195.9
148.5
November	
183.3
184.8
229.0
148.9
151.1
205.5
195.5
148.8
December	
182.7
184.2
226.1
149.9
152.7
205.4
195.3
148.8 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
Table 10.—Food Indexes for Canada and British Columbia
FF 33
The Dominion Bureau of Statistics food-group index adjusted to the base 1936=100
and the Bureau of Economics and Statistics British Columbia cost-of-food index also on
a base of 1936=100 are given below.
Adjusted to base 1936=100.
2
Month
Canada1
British
Columbia
Month
Canada1
British
Columbia
1939—
August  __ —_ 	
September _ 	
First of
Month
101.53
101.64
108.69
111.15
111.55
106.85
106.85
107.16
107.16
106.75
106.13
107.67
107.78
107.77
108.49
111.15
111.55
112.17
111.25
111.45
112.58
112.17
115.03
119.22
124.03
126.07
125.97
128.22
126.58
125.05
125.87
126.48
126.48
127.10
129.04
133.23
132.53
131.39
132.72
135.38
135.79
130.16
129.55
130.57
131.60
132.82
133.84
134.76
136.20
136.50
135.90
136.09
135.69
134.46
133.84
134.05
134.46
134.66
134.05
134.97
134.46
134.15
133.74
134.56
133.23
Fifteenth
of Month
94.48
103.90
104.38
104.74
101.51
100.43
100.97
101.22
102.53
101.77
101.51
103.47
103.84
103.33
104.92
106.30
107.39
107.03
108.93
109.02
111.42
111.81
116.09
117.07
120.55
121.10
121.24
123.93
121.57
120.99
122.55
123.71
1945—
First of
Month
133.13
133.54
133.95
133.95
134.66
136.40
138.65
139.26
137.22
136.30
137.01
137.32
135.79
135.48
136.09
138.14
140.80
145.30
147.44
147.96
146.42
149.80
149.90
144.69
148.77
150.31
152.04
155.01
158.38
161.25
163.39
164.21
169.02
175.15
177.51
182.72
186.30
190.29
190.08
191.00
195.50
198.26
205.83
207.16
208.49
210.02
209.30
206.54
206.75
204.91
203.58
202.97
203.99
207.46
211.86
213.91
211.66
209.61
207.87
206.44
203.89
205.83
208.59
209.10
209.20
Fifteenth
of Month
128 82
April 	
May 	
June 	
July   ....
December  	
1940—
129.33
January  	
February 	
130 96
September 	
October	
November 	
130.17
July   -	
1946—
January 	
February	
March 	
April  	
May 	
June  •	
July 	
September 	
127.87
134.98
1941—
138.43
September 	
May  — _
November 	
144.64
July  	
August   	
September 	
1947—
January 	
February... ._.	
152.43
December  	
1942—
January _   	
February   .,.
May...	
June 	
July _.  	
159.38
April   -
October.. 	
November 	
December...  	
1948—
January.  	
February 	
March 	
125.12
182 36
July                        	
August  _	
128.39
October _____  	
134.63
May  	
June	
July 	
198.97
1943—
January  '	
February  	
207.38
134.19
September  	
October 	
November 	
209.12
135.46
July -
1949—
132.45
September _  	
February 	
March.  	
205.57
April  	
. 132.05
May	
June  	
July —	
208.61
1944—
January  	
128.28
209.77
October   	
November... _  	
December  	
1950—
January 	
February 	
March 	
205.82
June —  	
July  	
128.42
September  	
128.06
204.88
November  	
April 	
May  	
December   	
127.95
208.18 FF 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table 10.—Food Indexes for Canada and British Columbia—Continued
Month
Canada1
British
Columbia
Month
Canada1
British
Columbia
June.
July -
August.
September-
October	
November-
December.-
1951—
January	
February.—
March. -
April —
May	
June. 	
July-
August.	
September-
First of
Month
213.70
219.12
221.57
223.72
225.05
223.52
223.72
225.15
229.45
239.16
243.76
240.70
245.19
255.32
257.06
256.75
Fifteenth
of Month
219.02
216.12
227.11
235.63
247.53
October.	
November.
December.
1952—
January	
February-
March 	
April	
May	
June.	
July	
August	
September
October.	
November.
December-
First of
Month
255.32
255.82
254.91
255.62
253.68
247.14
245.60
240.59
242.33
244.89
243.35
239.47
234.46
234.15
231.19
Fifteenth
of Month
249.12
245.93
236.00
(2)
1 Adjusted to base 1936 = 100.
2 Not calculated on a comparable budget.
Table 11.—Index Numbers of the Cost of Living at Vancouver, B.C., by Years 1940—52
and by Months in 1952
(Base:   August, 1939 = 100.)
Home
Date
Total
Food
Rent
Fuel
Clothing
Furnishings and
Services
Miscellaneous
1940	
103.7
105.9
99.6
108.8
108.8
104.3
100.4
1941 — - 	
109.1
117.0
99.8
109.5
114.8
109.5
103.4
1942	
114.2
128.8
100.6
111.5
119.2
112.9
105.2
1943  	
117.3
134.8
102.0
111.3
121.6
114.1
107.8
1944 -  - --	
117.9
133.5
103.4
114.2
123.6
115.7
108.7
1945  	
119.2
136.0
104.8
114.2
125.5
115.7
108.8
1946  -  '._.
123.0
142.2
106.2
116.1
128.9
122.1
111.1
1947 	
134.9
161.9
109.4
128.6
146.6
137.0
115.8
1948  	
155.6
198.7
112.1
135.1
182.5
157.4
126.2
1949	
162.0
208.7
113.9
139.5
192.7
161.3
131.3
1950.— -	
167.8
218.2
122.7
141.0
191.0
163.7
135.8
1951 	
185.2
245.9
128.9
158.3
213.1
187.3
143.7
1952—
January. 	
193.6
259.2
131.9
169.2
227.7
194.6
147.5
February  	
192.5
255.6
131.9
170.8
226.5
194.4
147.7
192.2
252.5
134.0
176.9
224.8
195.6
147.9
192.3
252.7
134.0
176.9
222.9
196.1
148.5
190.6
244.7
134.0
176.9
223.0
194.5
152.7
June   	
190.6
244.2
135.4
176.9
222.2
194.2
152.7
July  	
189.8
242.0
135.4
176.9
220.8
194.2
152.7
August 	
189.5
240.8
135.4
176.9
220.7
194.2
153.0
September 	
189.0
239.6
135.6
176.9
219.6
194.4
153.0
187.3
234.5
135.6
176.9
218.4
194.0
153.0
November 	
187.6
235.5
135.6
176.9
218.4
193.9
153.0
December   -	
188.1
237.0
136.2
176.9
218.1
193.7
153.0
Source:   Canada, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, "Prices and Price Indexes.' DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 35
Mining Division
This Division collects and compiles mining production statistics with the exception
of coal, and same are made available to the Provincial Department of Mines, the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and to the Bureau of Economics and Statistics. The
information, when collected, is made available for general use in a form which preserves
the confidential aspects of individual company's or operator's returns when it is
requested. Mining statistics in detail will be found in the Annual Report of the Minister
of Mines. Many special compilations dealing with data not readily available were
provided to other departments and outside agencies. Contact is maintained at all times
with officials of the Department of Mines, consulting with and providing much data for
special bulletins issued by that department. This Division also maintains up-to-date
records on mining statistics, which are kept in the Central Records Branch of the
Department of Mines. These records represent years of research and compilation by
the Mining Division, and are considered to be an integral part of a most comprehensive
departmental source of information on the production from every British Columbia mine
reported to have shipped ore for treatment at a smelter or refinery. Production statistics
are in course of preparation covering the items listed under " Industrial Minerals " and
" Miscellaneous Metals."
The Division continues to provide the mineral production value on a Census
Division basis, and Table No. 12 shows the production for the years 1947, 1948, 1949,
1950, and 1951 on the several regions involved. In order to provide a handy reference,
the essential mineral production statistics, as originally published in the Department of
Mines Annual Report, are given in Table No. 13. The 1951 Report of the Minister
of Mines makes available to the public statistics of mineral production for 100 consecutive years. The total gross value of mineral products to the end of 1951 is more than
$2,890,000,000. The value of all mineral products in 1951 was $175,659,591, an
all-time record, the year 1948 being the previous high with a production value of
$152,524,752. In 1951 iron ore having a value of $790,000 was mined on Vancouver
Island and exported to Japan. Production of tungsten was begun late in 1951, but no
shipments of tungsten concentrates had been made by the end of the year. Of the
by-product metals, greater quantities of antimony, bismuth, and cadmium were produced
in 1951, but the recovery of tin was less than in 1950. The record total value in 1951
and the high total value of mineral production in recent years are traceable principally
to high prices for the metals silver, copper, lead, and zinc. Since 1936 the entire copper
output of British Columbia has been exported for smelting, refining, and marketing.
In 1951 some copper-lead concentrates were shipped to Europe but the copper concentrates produces at the Britannia and Copper Mountain mines went to Tacoma, Wash.
Most of the silver, lead, and zinc mined in British Columbia has, after concentration,
gone to the Trail smelter for smelting and refining. The annual report of the Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company for 1951 indicates that most of the refined lead and
zinc has gone to Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States, in approximately
equal proportions. The same report indicates that two-thirds of the silver refined at
Trail was exported, all of it to the United States.
The number employed in all branches of the mining industry of British Columbia
in 1951 was 17,863. Major expenditures by the industry include salaries and wages,
$52,561,952; fuel and electricity, $7,283,051; process supplies, $24,724,101; freight
and treatment on ores and concentrates of metals, $25,096,743; Federal taxes,
$26,818,476; Provincial taxes, $5,037,113; municipal and other taxes, $631,743; levies
for Workmen's Compensation, silicosis, and unemployment insurance, $1,956,254.
These items amount to $144,109,433.   Dividends paid in 1951 amount to $40,921,238. FF 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Table 13.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1950 and 1951
FF 37
Description
1950
1951
Quantity
Value
Quantity
Value
Principal Metals
Gold-
Placer, crude 	
 oz.
19,134
283,983
9,507,225
42,212,133
307,122,803
324,263,778
$598,717
10,805,553
7,666,151
9,889,458
44,391,530
48,882,765
23,691
261,274
8,215,884
43,249,658
273,456,604
333,910,764
1
$717,911
9,627,947
Silver    	
7,768,118
11,980,155
50,316,015
66,448,242
Copper      	
Lead    	
 lb.
 lb.
 lb.
Totals  -	
$122,234,174
     | $146,858,388
  lb.
Miscellaneous Metals
643,540
162,616
650,540
4,952
111
796,403
281,160
$216,229
369,138
1,535,274
12,132
9,239
828,259
281,160
1,310,836
191,471
1,164,933
582
113,535
22
346,718
$622,647
 lb.
451,872
3,122,021
 lb.
Indium     	
1,368
Iron ore          	
  tons
790,000
2,085
Tin ....  	
.lb.
495,807
Tungsten (WO3)     	
 lb.
Totals  	
$3,251,431
$5,485,800
Industrial Minerals
1,440
4
144,325
7,886
92,882
456,000
$17,284
108
268,411
104,590
620,108
1,248
8
144,235
5,727
124,729
$16,224
223
Flux (quartz, limestone) —  	
 tons
292,100
73,767
Gypsum and products  	
  tons
 tons
 lb.
 .lb.
263,072
Mica        	
5,533
606,000
7,462
Sulphur   — 	
  tons
143,000
1,421,806
194,874
1,840,992
Totals     	
 No.
$2,437,840
$2,493,840
	
Structural Materials
Brick—
3,910,500
1,974,380
$103,840
54,503
254,262
32,264
191,016
428,418
5,860
11,335
3,088,296
1,133,776
990,257
3,723,487
188,675
1,720,000
3,127,888
$23,982
Face, paving, sewer   	
 No.
153,575
 tons
380,742
Clavs    -    	
6,706
14,786
60,255
171,481
410,206
4,695
10,393
3,311,439
221,454
1,164,049
241,723
972,178
4,837
1,251,327
Rubble, riprap, crushed rock 	
 tons
1,145,072
3,355,693
Stone       _ 	
 tons
26,758
309,350
Totals..—  	
	
$10,205,989
      1    $10,588,210
Fuel
Coal       	
 tons
1,542,404
$10,025,626
1,574,362
$10,233,353
—      | $148,155,060
$175,659,591
Labour Statistics Division
In accordance with the established procedure mentioned in previous reports, the
Labour Division of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics continues in the work of
collection and compilation of annual labour statistics for the Provincial Department of
Labour. Published under heading of " Statistics of Trades and Industries," the complete text and tables resulting from a summarization of the 1951 survey is contained in
the statistical section of the Annual Report of the Department of Labour for that year.
Continued increase in the many thousands of firms listed in the departmental files
has resulted in a more complete survey each year, the greater coverage also adding to FF 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
the accuracy and importance of the collected information when tabulated and released
in statistical form.
In addition to the routine annual preparation of Department of Labour statistics,
the Labour Division each year completes a variety of supplementary projects, including
Table 14.—British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Area for the
Comparative Years 1948 to 1951
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1
1948                      1949                      1950
1
1951
No. 1   	
No. 2         - 	
No. 3   	
No. 4  	
$13,731,856
23,578,250
16,857,531
245,729,208
85,360,435
6,070,725
15,593,568
8,009,315
7,170,882
1,557,047
2,731,389
$14,196,272
25,465,483
17,162,800
268,168,929
69,824,047
6,709,107
13,991,506
7,109,097
7,793,375
2,586,330
1,156,849
$14,730,880
28,152,569
17,986,918
276,660,854
87,321,304
7,793,958
17,053,224
11,492,745
9,749,718
1,352,763
2,139,119
$16,925,795
33,803,674
21,563,865
326,844,763
No. 5   	
No. 6  :.  	
No. 7—	
No. 8   	
106,834,119
10,905,394
22,065,843
18,808,909
No. 9   	
19,560,533
No. 10 	
2,140,056
2,291,684
Totals	
$426,390,206
$434,163,795
$474,434,052
$581,744,635
Chart 1.—Census Divisions
CENSUS
DIVISION DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 39
regional break-downs of employment and payroll information, current lists of industrial
firms in size groups, and various statistical analyses of Provincial labour data requested
periodically by outside interests, business and banking institutions, Boards of Trade, and
other Governmental departments.
Occupational wage-rate information is currently obtained from industry through
the medium of a section in the annual questionnaire dealing with this subject. Data
collected is retained by the Labour Division to be used as a source of information in
replying to inquiries relating to industrial wage-rates, occupational studies, etc., and in
various labour research projects conducted from time to time by this Bureau. With
the co-operation of the Department of Labour, a file is also maintained to provide
current information concerning union wage-rates and conditions of employment as set
down in the latest union agreements in effect between labour and management. In this
way such information is readily at hand, and may be made available without delay when
required by the proper authorities.
Indicating the expansion and development occurring in various sectors of the
Province, the attached table and divisional map are again presented, showing the relative
amounts of industrial payroll, salaries and wages, attributable to each of the ten census
areas, the summary of all divisions each year representing the total payroll figure for all
industrial firms reporting in the annual survey.
Concentration of the labour force in varying degree throughout the ten statistical
areas may be noted in the table for the comparative years 1948 to 1951, and while the
totals are restricted to industry, and therefore not to be considered as representing the
entire Provincial payroll, the comparative yearly record does, however, serve as an indication of progressive changes occurring in the economic growth of the various regional
areas.
Health and Welfare
Increases in Social Allowances agreed to by municipalities on a new percentage
basis have, during the year, necessitated modification and changes in the compilation of
monthly statistics covering numbers and costs.
The big factor in all welfare statistics has been the implementation of the Federal
Government's Old Age Security policy, and the new reciprocal agreements covering
the Old Age Assistance group, with the subsequent transfer of large numbers of persons
receiving assistance from one group to the other. It is expected that this work is almost
complete, and that definite trends will now be established for these types of assistance,
when new statistical forms, more suitable for recording purposes, will be compiled.
The work of collection, assembly, and dispatch to Ottawa of statistics covering
monthly building permits for 105 municipalities and regulated areas within British
Columbia, and payroll records for the Provincial Government employees, has been
improved and maintained throughout the past year.
The Chief Clerk in charge of this section of the work was loaned to the Civil Defence
Division from January to November, at which time he transferred to the Civil Defence
Division.
Tourist Trade
The volume of tourist travel to British Columbia from foreign countries has shown
an increase in 1951 over all previous years, while the volume of travel to Canada as
a whole has decreased slightly. Final figures for British Columbia for 1952 indicate
that travel has not fallen off as was expected when the Canadian dollar reached parity
with the United States dollar.   Instead a slight increase is evident over 1951.
Table 15 gives figures for tourist travel to British Columbia from the United States
over a 12-year period.   Chart 2 gives a breakdown of automobiles visiting Canada from FF 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
the United States by state of origin, with the number visiting British Columbia and the
Yukon indicated in red.
Expenditures by United States travellers in Canada during 1951 show a slight
decrease over 1950. However, British Columbia received an increased share of the
total—from 13.5 per cent in 1950 to 15.3 per cent in 1951. Interprovincial tourist
travel is not measured by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, but it is undoubtedly
important and adds considerably to the total of tourist expenditures in British Columbia.
United States Travel United States Travel
Year Expenditures in Canada Year Expenditures in Canada
1941   $107,000,000 1947  $241,100,000      •
1942       79,000,000 1948  267,400,000
1943       87,000,000 1949  267,100,000
1944     116,600,000 1950  259,700,000
1945     163,300,000 1951   258,000,000
1946     216,100,000 1952  258,000,000
It is interesting to note that Canada no longer enjoys a credit balance of tourist
expenditures. The balance of payments on travel between Canada and other countries
has decreased sharply, from a high net credit of $145,000,000 in 1948 to a net debit of
$60,000,000 in 1952. The net debit with overseas countries has steadily increased from
$9,000,000 in 1948 to $24,000,000 in 1952. However, it is the balance of payments
with the United States which has undergone the greatest change, from a net credit of
$154,000,000 in 1948 to a net debit of $36,000,000 in 1952. Total expenditures by
United States tourists in Canada decreased from $267,000,000 in 1948 to $258,000,000
in 1952, whereas expenditures by Canadian tourists in the United States increased from
$113,000,000 in 1948 to $294,000,000 in 1952. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
FF 41
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BRITISH COLUMBIA
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MARKET RESEARCH DIVISION
This Division is responsible for market research studies, industrial and location
surveys, the collection of market statistics, and statistics relating to new industries, new
plants, and additions to existing plants.
This Division assisted in the preparation of the 1952 edition of the Regional
Industrial Index. The 1952 edition of the British Columbia Trade Index was released
during the year. Also a publication entitled " Retail Trade Movement in Burnaby,"
which analyzed the retail-trade patterns in Burnaby, was released in November.
Many miscellaneous requests, principally relating to regional statistics and
marketing, were answered.
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION
During 1952 the Mechanical Tabulation Division continued to operate as a service
bureau for those departments of the Government which do not operate punched-card
equipment. Departments and branches taking advantage of this service are listed below,
showing the name of the job done for each:—
Department of Attorney-General—Motor Accident Statistical Reports.
Department of Education—
Statistical Report of Pupils and Teachers.
Teachers' Records.
Department of Finance—Furniture Inventory.
Department of Health and Welfare—
Cost of Drugs Survey.
Social Allowance Statistics.
Department of Labour—Annual Statistical Report.
Department of Lands and Forests—
Forest Inventory.
Gazetteer Files.
Department of Provincial Secretary—
Civil Service Personnel Statistics.
Queen's Printer Job-cost Records.
Department of Trade and Industry—
Labour Statistics.
Trade Statistics.
Trade Index File.
Special Surveys.
British Columbia Liquor Control Board—
Warehouse Audit Control.
Store Audit Control.
Licensee Beer Records.
Payroll.
Price Lists.
Interdiction Lists.
No new applications of major importance were undertaken during the year, but
considerable time was spent in the revision and development of current jobs in an effort
to (a) increase the value of the job to the customer, and (b) increase the general operating efficiency of the Division. The result of our effort is shown by a reduction of staff and
machine rental for the year. As part of this programme the " time card " system used in
the Division was completely revised so that accurate machine rates could be established
for costing purposes. FF 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
To meet the diversity of work handled, the Division is equipped with a complete
set of tabulating-machines, including alphabetic tabulators, sorters, reproducing gang
summary punches, and end printing document punches, a collator, an interpreter, and
a multiplying punch, as well as alphabetic punches and verifiers.
The staff is composed of a senior supervisor, an assistant supervisor, three senior
machine operators, seven machine operators, a senior key-punch operator, seven keypunch operators, a senior clerk-stenographer, and three clerks. Two members of the
British Columbia Liquor Control Board are attached to the Division to maintain liaison
between the two departments.
One senior machine operator was sent to the International Business Machines
Training School in Endicott, N.Y., for a supervisory training course.
While Stevenson & Kellogg Ltd. were conducting their survey of the various
Departments, we were called upon by them to give technical advice on proposed and
existing punched-card applications. It is felt that there is a possibility that some new
jobs may develop as a result of their investigation.
PUBLICATIONS
Monthly Bulletin
This publication has been continued and expanded. Statistics relating to census
divisions have now been included; in addition, special articles have been included at
various times within the year. Included is a statistical summary of business indicators
relating to British Columbia's economy (see notes under Economic Research Division).
External Trade
Monthly statistics covering external trade are contained in the Monthly Bulletin.
A statement of external trade through British Columbia customs ports and covering
commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over is published annually.
British Columbia Trade Index
The latest edition of this publication was released in November and lists the products
manufactured by British Columbia industries. In addition, a supplementary publication
was-also released, which included a directory of advertising agencies, radio stations,
wholesalers and distributors, manufacturers' agents, merchandise and produce brokers,
and importers and exporters.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics
This publication was first issued in 1948; the fifth edition was released early in
1952. This publication provides general and historical facts and statistics relating to
British Columbia under the following headings: Population, education, government and
finance, judiciary, banking, transportation, communication, retail trade, agriculture,
fisheries, forestry, mining, manufacturing, water power, tourists, and economic activity.
Retail Trade Movement in Burnaby
This publication delineates the trade patterns in Burnaby (see notes under Market
Research Division).
Summary of Business Activity in British Columbia
This publication is a companion of the Monthly Bulletin and provides a compact
source of annual statistics relative to the economy of the Province. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 45
REPORT OF REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT DIVISION
At the close of 1952 the continued high level of industrial expansion in the Province
showed little sign of receding and new industry and plant expansion reached the
impressive annual total of $380,000,000. This figure includes only major enterprises
actually under construction or projected during the calendar year under review. The
total does not take into account many millions of dollars embracing the smaller businesses
and individual enterprises throughout the Province (one regional centre in Northern
British Columbia alone reporting no less than 110 new enterprises started during the
year).
A steady and healthy community growth in practically all regional centres has
accordingly been reported by the field offices of the Division, this being more significant
perhaps in the Eastern and Northern Interior sections of the Province, where several
large-scale industrial projects are now commencing to stabilize the economy of British
Columbia's vast hinterland.
Probably the two major highlights, marking the year under review of greatest
importance to the industrial pattern of the future, were the linking of the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway with its present northern terminus and bringing into being a north-south
rail route through the heart of the Province to tide-water. Secondly, the start of construction of an oil pipe-line connecting the vast Northern Alberta oilfields with the Pacific
Coast, which cannot fail to have a far-reaching impact on the future industrial fabric of
the Province.
Industrial concerns desiring to capitalize on the expanding economy of this Pacific
Coast region are increasing year by year and at the same time are tending to step up their
quest for details of the Province's resources, industrial facilities, and market information,
judging by the increasing tempo of inquiries constantly reaching the Department. The
area development work of this Division is consequently continuing to grow in importance
in providing industry with the basic data required to enable them to determine the
complex factors involved in plant location, and the Division has been so far successful
in keeping abreast of these requirements and the rapidly changing industrial scene.
FIELD OFFICES
The regional offices of the Division have all reported a substantial increase in work
during 1952. The territory covered by each field office is so great in area that our field
representatives have found difficulty at times in covering their ground as often as desired.
Despite this handicap, all sections of the Province have been contacted by our field
representatives during the year and they have provided a service to business and industry
which continues to be favourably received in all regions of British Columbia.
The regional offices of the Division are located as follows:—
Nelson:  Region 1—East Kootenay;  Region 2—West Kootenay.
Kelowna:   Region 3—Okanagan;   Region 6—Kamloops and South Central
British Columbia.
Prince  George:    Region  8—Central  British  Columbia;   Region  9—North
Coastal Area (Prince Rupert and Queen Charlottes); Region 10—Peace
River.
Victoria: Region 4—Lower Mainland; Region 5—Vancouver Island and Gulf
Islands.
FIELD SURVEYS
Nelson Office—Region One (East Kootenay) and Region Two
(West Kootenay)
Industrial development in the Kootenays during the year 1952 indicates continuing
progress. FF 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Some base-metal mines in the late fall were affected by the drop in the price of base
metals, but it is estimated that annual production will compare favourably with total
production in 1951.
The forest industry showed continued activity in the region, and the annual cut is
estimated to be slightly higher over the previous year.
The importance of the forest industry to the area's economy will be greatly increased
following the award of a management licence to a large pulp and paper industry.
The amazing growth of the Kootenays in manufacturing is shown by the gross value
of production, which in 1945 reached $67,020,370, and in 1949 had more than doubled
to a figure of $147,836,624, which represented 15.41 per cent of the gross value of all
manufacturing in British Columbia. The production of minerals has also grown
tremendously. In 1946 the value of mineral products from this area was $56,937,931,
and in 1950 had almost doubled to a total of $103,637,044, representing 72 per cent of
the value in mineral products for the whole Province. Coal production in 1951 was
1,141,942 tons, and this represented 71 per cent of all coal production in British
Columbia. In the same year, coke production was 172,449 tons, being the only coke
produced for sale west of the City of Winnipeg.
The following is a summary of mineral production in relation to the rest of the
Province: 100 per cent of coke produced for sale in British Columbia, 100 per cent
of British Columbia's and Canada's refined lead, 100 per cent of British Columbia's and
75 per cent of Canada's refined zinc, 100 per cent of British Columbia's and 63 per cent
of Canada's refined silver, and 100 per cent of British Columbia's primary production of
high-analysis chemical fertilizer (54 per cent of Canada's production).
The Kootenay region is one of the world's most important producers of tungsten;
is Canada's only producer of tin, indium, and bismuth.
A tabulation follows of projects under way or announced during the year 1952: —
Smelter revision and expansion, Trail     $12,000,000
Zinc-plant addition         3,200,000
Mine and mill, Riondel         3,000,000
Mine and mill, Salmo         2,750,000
Power development, Pend d'Oreille       30,000,000
Fertilizer plant, Kimberley         9,000,000
Mine development, Salmo  1,000,000
Pulp-mill, Castlegar       65,000,000
Power-line, Bonnington-Kimberley         3,000,000
Coke-ovens, Michel  1,100,000
C.P.R. diesel shop, Nelson         1,600,000
Telephone expansion programme  900,000
Total   $ 132,550,000
A brief outline of some of the new enterprises which commenced operation in the
territory during 1952 is appended:—
Region One—
Cranbrook—
(a) Two auto courts.
(b) Masonic hall.
(c) Drive-in theatre.
(_.) Bowling-alley.
(e) Post-office addition.
(/) Hotel modernization.
(g) Sash-and-door-plant expansion. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 47
Fernie—
(h) Arena construction.
(/) Coke-ovens.
Kimberley—
(/')  Construction of fertilizer plant.
(k)  Construction of power-line.
(/) Two gas-stations.
Invermere—
(m)  Three auto courts.
(n) Theatre.
(o) New store.
Golden—
(p) Auto court.
Region Two—
Castlegar—
(a) New hotel.
(_.) Two auto courts.
(c) New business block.
(d) Expansion to business block.
Creston—■
(e) Hospital construction.
(/)  Hop-kiln and drying plant.
(g)  Auto court.
Kaslo—
(h) New bank building.
(.) New business block.
(/*) New auto court.
Nelson—
(k) Drive-in theatre.
(I)  Three banks and wholesale blocks.
(m) C.P.R. diesel shop.
(n)  Government Forest Service office.
Rossland-Trail—■
(o)  Ready-mix-concrete plant.
(p)  Auto court.
(q)  Topsoil company.
(r)  Smelter revision.
(s)  Power plant.
Salmo—
(0 Extension to hotel.
(u) Extension to mill.
In addition to those mentioned above, a large amount of money has been expended
during the year on the development of mines throughout the region, and expansion and
construction of schools, hospitals, Government buildings, etc.
Summarization of the Work of the Regional Advisory Committee
During the year under review, a number of executive meetings of the Regional
Advisory Committee were held. Discussions mainly surrounded the establishment of a
" regionally planned area " in the important Castlegar-Trail-Boundary section of the
Columbia River. The Committee continued their efforts towards the increase of tourist
trade, rural electrification, agricultural development, and the development of parks,
beaches, and public camp-sites. FF 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Nelson field office prepared the following special reports during the year: —
(1) A survey of the regions' industrial status and potential.
(2) An industrial report prepared for the Associated Boards of Trade and
Chambers of Commerce of South-eastern British Columbia.
(3) A report for the Fifth Regional Conference of the Community Planning
Association at Trail.
Specific Assistance to Industry (Regions One and Two)
The Nelson field office reports the following:—
(1) Inquiry from a United States firm interested in the establishment of a large
machine-shop in the Kootenays.
(2) The Nelson office negotiated in bringing to Canada a Bavarian ceramics-
manufacturing firm who are now established in Vancouver.
(3) Inquiry from British Columbian interests regarding the use of fluorspar
and talc.
(4) Inquiry from Kootenay interests regarding the agency for the United
Kingdom for prefabricated houses.
(5) Inquiry regarding the manufacture of tourist souvenirs by British Columbian interests.
(6) Numerous inquiries from the United Kingdom regarding occupational
opportunities.   A number of families located in the Kootenays.
(7) Inquiry regarding the manufacture of glass by utilizing salvaged bottles
from the city dumps.
(8) Continued assistance to the hop-growing industry regarding the obtaining
of supplies and labour problems.
(9) Inquiry  regarding  corrugated   boxes   (paper)   for  British   Columbian
interests.
Inquiries in Process of Completion
(a) The preparation of a composite map showing forest, mining, agriculture,
and manufacturing development in the Kootenays.
(b) A close watch is being maintained on possible development of a pig-iron
industry in the Kootenays.
The Nelson field-service office conducted arrangements during the year for several
parties of distinguished visitors through the East and West Kootenays, including the
United Kingdom Trade Commissioner and other officials. A special tour was also
planned for the representative of the British Columbia Research Council to promote
better knowledge and understanding by business firms in the Kootenays of the Council's
functions.
Kelowna Office—Region Three (Okanagan) and Region Six
(South Central British Columbia)
The future development of this area of the Province will be largely affected by two
important industrial developments. The Trans-Mountain Oil Pipe-line, carrying oil from
the vicinity of Edmonton to Vancouver, at a cost in excess of $86,000,000, down the
valleys of the North Thompson and the Fraser Rivers, will affect the whole economy of
the Southern Interior. In the Border country, the development of the $75,000,000 pulp
and paper project at Castlegar will affect the economy of the watershed of the Kettle River.
The Kettle River-Border country has also felt the benefit of electricity being made
available to communities from Midway to Bridesville. This has resulted in a substantial
increase in irrigated acreage in the area, assistance to industries, and added convenience
to farmers and other residents. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 49
Another important industrial project which will have a marked effect outside its
locale of operation is a project at Chase River, which will include a lumber and planing
mill, at present under construction, to be followed by a dry-kiln and pressed-board plant.
Planer-mill capacity will be from 50,000 to 75,000 feet per shift of finished lumber.
Pressed-board plant will have a capacity of fifty tons per shift, and it is proposed to
increase this next year to 100 tons. Total investment is $2,000,000, with up to 275 men
employed at the plant and in the woods. This programme also calls for the construction
of fifty to seventy-five houses.
The 1952 fruit-crop of the Interior is estimated to total $20,000,000, about
$3,000,000 over last year. The vegetable-crop will total about $3,000,000, including the
largest tomato-crop ever harvested, amounting to about $1,500,000 dollars. Ninety-five
per cent of these totals originate within Regions Three and Six, the large preponderance
being in Region Three.
The year-end will see an all-time record in lumber cut in Region Six, with log scale,
poles, and posts well in advance of other years. The Cariboo has made tremendous
strides in lumber production, and the North Thompson is well ahead of last year.
Region Three cut will be about the same as former years, with a slight tapering-off toward
the end of the season.
Mining has held its own. No new production has been achieved in the year, but
prospecting and staking is active. About fifty properties are in production or under
development and from 900 to 1,000 mineral claims in good standing.
New Industries and Industrial Expansion
Region Three.—Grand Forks: The bus depot has moved into improved quarters,
enlarging to twice its former size:  a baker opened a new retail outlet.
Kelowna: Mining exploration company, investment of $40,000 (with two employees); automotive and electrical accessories (wholesale), investment of $40,000
(with four employees); retail merchandising outlet, investment of $265,000 (with eighteen
employees); food services store expansion, investment of $8,500 (with two employees);
interior decorating firm expansion, investment of $2,000 (with one employee).
Keremeos: Upholstering and cabinet-making, investment of $1,500 (with two
employees); bakery and restaurant, investment of $10,000 (with three employees).
Penticton: Bottled-gas sales, investment of $70,000 (with seven employees); toy
manufacturer, investment of $12,000 (with six employees); freight lines maintenance
garage expansion, investment of $30,000 (with three employees); new auto court, investment $5,000 (with two employees); new auto court, investment of $13,000 (with three
employees); motel expansion, investment of $8,000; auto-court expansion, investment
of $3,000.
Vernon: Propane-gas installations and service, investment of $3,000 (with three
employees); investment house, investment of $40,000 (with two employees); bank
expansion, investment of $40,000; finished lumber and tie concern expansion, investment
of $20,000 (with thirty employees); organic fertilizer plant, investment of $2,000 (with
one employee).
Princeton: Princeton properties (bentonite diamond-drilling progressed according
to plan during the summer, results are reported to be satisfactory); Princeton brewing
firm expansion, investment of $45,000.
Region Six.—The progression of the Trans-Mountain Oil Pipe-line will develop an
impact on the whole region. The whole cost will be in excess of $86,000,000, with
a total pipe-length of approximately 693 miles. The line will employ, at peak seasons,
somewhere between 1,800 and 2,000 men. Within this region (Mount Robson to
Merritt), a distance of some 304 miles or a little less than half the total distance and cost,
the value of the line should approximate $40,358,000.   Within an area from Swift Creek FF 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
in the north and Merritt in the south, a distance of some 260 miles, approximately 500
men are employed at peak seasons. A pumping-station is being located 2 or 3 miles
outside of Kamloops.   This construction is valued at $1,500,000.
New Enterprises, 1952
Region Six—Kamloops: Machine-shop, body shop, and office expansion, investment of $90,000 (with twelve to fifteen employees); sawmill and logging service expansion, investment of $12,000 (with one employee); feed supplies expansion, investment
of $4,000; office and retail outlets renovation, investment of $30,000; service-station
and parts expansion, investment of $12,000 (with two or three employees); dine-and-
dance business expansion, investment of $15,000; food services expansion, investment
of $35,000 (with five employees); hardware and home furnishings, investment of
$50,000 (with four employees).
Lower North Thompson: Lumber-mills in the district have, in the aggregate,
expanded 25 to 30 per cent. Tourist courts are showing a marked expansion. Barriere—
Planer-mill expansion, investment of $23,000 (with ten employees). Chinook Cove—
planer-mill expansion, investment of $5,000 (with five employees). Louis Creek—sawmill expansion, investment of $2,000 (with three employees).
Merritt: New moving-picture theatre, investment of $50,000 (with three employees).
Savona: Dressed fir and pine sawmill expansion, investment of $250,000 (with
thirty-five employees).
Advisory Committee
Region Three.—The executive of the Advisory Committee in this region dealt with
the undernoted:—
(1) Five park-sites in the Princeton area, three sites in the South Okanagan,
and one at Westbank were recommended. Subsequently, a lookout point
and three over-night camping-sites were recommended between Penticton
and Summerland.
(2) Regulation of eating establishments.
(3) A request was referred to the appropriate department to consider ways
and means of dealing with irrigation and seepage problems resulting in
damage to properties owned by third parties.
(4) The Committee recommended that a Board be set up to inquire into
flooding conditions.
(5) The Committee urged early provision for the passage of a Soil Conservation Act.
(6) The Sub-committee reported on:—
(a) Diversified Agriculture, particularly in frost-damaged areas.
(b) A proposal for a single Irrigation Authority, covering a large area,
such as a watershed.
(c) Irrigation Survey—Kettle River Watershed, completed during the
year.
(d) Public Health Brief.
(e) The framing of a general policy looking toward progressive agricultural land development.
(/) A tabulation of water-use and available water-supplies.
Region Six.—In this region the Industries Sub-committee was active.   In February,
1952, a joint general meeting was held.    Various executive meetings followed, and in
November the Industries Sub-committee met jointly with the Advisory Committee and
the following items were dealt with:— DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
FF 51
(1) Barriere Watershed.—Suggestion that the City of Kamloops consider
taking over the power-dam as a future domestic water-supply. This
suggestion was subsequently acted upon by the city.
(2) Power—
(a) Extension.—A request was made to the British Columbia Power
Commission regarding certain areas in the region to which extension
of power service seemed justified, and was subsequently dealt with
by the Commission.
(b) Power Development.—A survey of the Clearwater River watershed
was recommended.
(c) Alternate Line.—The Committee has favoured alternate source of
supply from Vernon to Kamloops and also from Whatshan to Vernon.
(3) Agricultural Development—Thompson River Watershed.—Recommendations looking toward progressive and orderly development, agriculturally,
of the whole watershed.
(4) Mill Waste.—The Committee met with representatives from the British
Columbia Research Council, the Forest Products Laboratories, the Range
Experiment Station, Interior lumbermen, and the British Columbia Beef
Cattle Growers' Association. The possibilities of molasses production, of
hardboard, and pressed fuel are under active consideration.
Special Projects
(a) Dutch Settlers.—Various meetings were held and correspondence exchanged
in relation to the finding of a suitable area for the settlement of a group of Dutch settlers,
varying in number from ten to a hundred families. Suggestions as to areas of settlement
were offered.
(b) German Baptists.—Negotiations seeking a satisfactory location for the settlement of a group of German Baptists established in Manitoba but desirous of coming to
British Columbia.
(c) Mill-waste Survey.—Tabulation made of all beef and dairy cattle, sheep, and
swine.
(d) Fruit Alcohol.—Investigation into the possibility of production of industrial
alcohol from fruit-waste.
(e) Apricot-marketing Problems.—Data is being assembled looking toward additional market outlets.
Assistance to Industry
(a) Deer and Moose Hide.—Information obtained and supplied to a Calgary firm.
(b) Customs information obtained for Spitfire Burners manufacturer.
(c) Cannery. — Continuous contacts maintained with Vernon officials looking
toward the establishment of a large cannery in the Vernon area.
(d) Small Pallets.—Packing-house with a surplus referred to two possible outlets.
(e) Sprinkler Equipment.—Information on irrigation and sprinkler demand supplied
to a large manufacturing concern. Two supply firms were provided with information
about possible demand for sprinkler installations in the Kamloops area.
(/) Senior Stenographers.—A business college was supplied with information as to
opportunities for employment in laying out its syllabus for the fall of 1952.
(g) Retail Outlet for Ripe Fruit.—Survey for local packing-house.
(h) Toy Manufacture.—Supply problems discussed and alternate supply-houses
suggested to new operation.
(.) Production-cost detail obtained for interested fruit-grower.
(/') Community Cannery.—Contacts again made and suggestions offered for establishment of such a cannery. FF 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(k) Clay.—Sample obtained from Falkland and forwarded to ceramic operation
in Nelson.
(/) Shell-builder.—Assistance rendered in obtaining special-dimension yellow cedar
for Kelowna firm.
(m) Light Baggage.—Suggested possibility for manufacture in the Okanagan made
to three interested parties.
(n) Fine Pulp from Fruit-tree Prunings.—Investigations continuing toward development of this industry.
Industrial Inquiries
(a) Fruit-pits.—Information supplied to interested party in Vancouver as to tonnage
and availability.
(b) Woollen-mill.—Inquiry received from a group of sheep-raisers, an interested
woollen-goods salesman, and a Polish evacuee with woollen machinery available in West
Germany for export.
(c) Grape-basket Manufacture.—Possibilities of grape-basket manufacture were
investigated.
(_.) No. 5 Wheat.—Inquiries received from the Fraser Valley Poultry Dealers
regarding possibilities of purchase.    Information supplied.
(e) Cherry-stems.—Inquiry received for a possible economic outlet. Contacts
made with a Parisian firm.
(/) Machine-shop.—Various inquiries instituted and opinion offered regarding the
probabilities for the successful establishment of a large machine-shop in the Interior.
(g) Propane-gas Sales and Services.—Investigated difficulties in marketing and
customs regulations for an operation in Penticton.
(h) Shirt and Men's Wear.—Referred inquiry to Victoria regarding a large eastern
firm establishing in the Interior.
(.) Safflower.—Inquiry received and investigation made into the possibility of
growing safflower.
(/') Population Data.—Radio station supplied with population figures and other
data.
(k)   Devil's-club Root.—Inquiry re source of supply.
(/) Cascara Bark. — Information obtained as to markets and price for possible
supplies.
Contacts with National and British Columbia Research Councils
The Kelowna field office maintained close liaison with the British Columbia Research
Council and Technical Service, National Research Council, and arranged numerous
industry contacts for their representatives throughout both Regions Three and Six during
the year, and a wide variety of industrial problems were reviewed. Our field representative was also in continuous contact with the Boards of Trade and Junior Chambers of
Commerce in all centres of the regions, and had conferences with municipal bodies on
such matters as trade waste, water contamination, country meat-killing, and related
industrial problems.
The following surveys were conducted during the year by our field office:—
(a) Irrigation Survey—Okanagan and Similkameen.—Annual survey again
conducted through co-operation of Water-users' Improvement Districts.
(b) Kettle Valley Watershed.—Full inquiry made from all water-users and
potential water-users regarding irrigated and additional irrigable acreage.
Data assembled and edited for production of a brochure and submitted to
Victoria in November.
(c) National Industrial Zoning.—Two sample firms and municipal office in
Kelowna interviewed.    Forms completed and returned. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
FF 53
(d) Motion-picture Inquiry. — Survey of various Okanagan communities,
check-up on land values and sites, and report made to Victoria.
(e) Population Movement.—Periodic check-up on movement of population in
and out of the Okanagan Valley, with reports to Victoria.
A number of distinguished visitors were welcomed to the regions during the year,
and the field office was utilized to full advantage in arranging industrial tours in the
larger centres.
Victoria Office—Region Four (Lower Mainland) and Region Five
(Vancouver Island and Gulf Islands)
Industrial growth in Region Four during the year under review was greatly stimulated
by the announcement of the projected $82,000,000 oil pipe-line linking the Lower Mainland with the Alberta oilfields, resulting in the construction of a 200-acre oil-tank farm
planned for Burnaby, a $10,000,000 refinery addition at Shellburn, and a $13,500,000
refinery addition will be undertaken at loco to increase the daily capacity from 12,000
barrels to 22,500. Other major oil companies have also indicated large expansion programmes and additional property has been acquired for this purpose.
A $30,000,000 electrification programme for the Lower Mainland during the year
had a stabilizing effect on the industrial economy of the region—$6,500,000 of this
amount was allocated to completion of the 80,000-horsepower Wahleach Lake hydroelectric plant, and $3,000,000 for high-tension lines to bring power down the Fraser
Valley into Vancouver.
Industrial expansion in Region Five centred principally on the construction, newsprint, and mining industries. The $2,000,000 plywood factory in Victoria, under construction last year, commenced operations with approximately 225 employees. The
$2,000,000 Federal Post-office Building in Victoria was completed during the year and
was opened to the public. The newsprint-mill at Campbell River, one of the largest
of its kind in the world, also was officially opened during the year and commenced production. The magnetite-iron-ore project near Campbell River continued to expand, with
the mill designed for an average production of 2,500 long tons of concentrates per day.
More than $3,000,000 has been invested so far on construction of roads, mill, and wharf.
A large-scale housing project and other defence projects are contemplated in the
Comox district. These projects, together with the newsprint operation and the expanding
iron-ore development, emphasize the growing industrial importance of Upper Vancouver
Island.
Business Inquiries
The volume of inquiries directed to the field office during the year was unusually
heavy.   A few of the inquiries handled are listed hereunder:—
(1) An inquiry requesting information on possibilities of establishing a ship-
chandlery business in Nanaimo or Steveston.
(2) Inquiry from a citizen of Oakland, Calif., on employment, taxes, and
purchase of industrial property in British Columbia. Detailed information sent forward.
(3) Request for information on the possibility of operating a secondary
industry by using power developed from a river on private property.
(4) An inquiry received from an Australian manufacturer on possibilities of
establishing a ceramic industry on Vancouver Island. Considerable
research was done on this and information forwarded on factory location,
duty tax on transfer of equipment, markets, and source of raw material.
(5) Inquiry from Brisbane, Australia, re possibilities of establishing an electrical contracting business in the Vancouver area. FF 54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(6) Request from Toronto, Ont., for data on establishing a dental laboratory
in either Victoria or Vancouver. Information provided on importation of
equipment from England and dental-supply firms in British Columbia.
(7) Inquiry from England concerning establishment of a factory for production of plastic tubing to cover electric wires, etc. This is a new process.
Suggestions were made concerning factory space and business contacts
arranged.    Inquirer is continuing to assess all possibilities.
During the year, the regional office assisted in arranging itineraries and supplying
information to manufacturers, business executives, and other officials. Trade Commissioners from Ottawa, posted to various parts of the world, were escorted through some
of the larger industrial plants on Vancouver Island to familiarize themselves with the
current industrial activity taking place on Vancouver Island. Appointments were also
arranged for several business executives and specific information supplied on industrial
development and commercial enterprises.
New Industries
The following partial list of new industries, commercial enterprises, and building
projects have been announced during the year:—
Region Four (Lower Mainland)—
Abbotsford—■
(a) Sash and door factory (with seven employees).
(b) New post-office and telephone-office completed.
(c) Proposed new winery.
Burnaby—
(d) Two-and-one-half-million-dollar can-plant, located on a 40-acre
site, manufacturing can containers of all types.
(e) Six-million-dollar department and mail-order store, to be built
on property already purchased.
(/)  Wire-rope factory, constructed at a cost of $340,000, manufacturing wire ropes of all sizes.
(g)  Ten-million-dollar refinery expansion at Shellburn.
(h)  One-hundred-and-fifty-thousand-dollar    plant    manufacturing
electric water-heaters and bronze boilers.
(.) Proposed twelve-million-dollar glass-factory  (to employ 600
men).
Chilliwack Area—
(/')  Furniture-factory manufacturing occasional tables.
(k)  Construction of large barracks at army camp in Sardis.
(/) Dog-food plant manufacturing 500 cases per day at Yarrow.
(m) Proposed new winery at Sardis.
Hope—
(n) Sash and door factory.
(o) New business block under construction.
(p) Branch bank.
Mission City—
(q) Seventy-thousand-dollar factory for remanufacturing lumber.
New Westminster—
(r) Concrete-block company, capitalized at $50,000, to manufacture
solid concrete building blocks.
(s) Wood-working plant, capitalized at $100,000, to manufacture
red-cedar lumber (with sixty employees). DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 55
(.)  Boat-works plant producing car-top boats.
(u) Furniture-factory manufacturing hassocks,
(v)  Three-hundred-thousand-dollar furniture and appliance building,
largest of its kind in Western Canada.
Port Coquitlam—
(w) New  tungsten-refinery to  handle  tungsten  ores   (employing
approximately 18 men).
Port Moody—■
(x)  Proposed plant to manufacture radios and electronic equipment.
Twenty-five-acre site set aside for this plant.
Richmond Area—
(y)  Factory manufacturing marine steering-wheels.
Sechelt Area—
(z)  New 4,000-horsepower hydro-electric plant of British Columbia
Power Commission commenced operation.
Sumas—
(aa)  Proposed new winery.
Vancouver—
(bb) Electronics plant manufacturing television and radio antenna
communications systems, radar, and industrial products.
(cc)  Laminating plant, capitalized at $100,000, to manufacture glued
laminated wood products and laminated timber trusses and
beams.
(dd) New paper-bag factory, approximate cost $600,000.
(ee)  Proposed $4,000,000 steel plant, with electric furnace, dock,
and other facilities, to smelt iron ore from Vancouver Island.
(fj) New cement-mix plant and storage building, costing approximately $75,000.
(gg) New plant manufacturing brass and aluminium castings.
(hh)  Ceramics plant making art pottery (with nine employees).
(ii)  Awning plant, manufacturing ventalized  aluminium  awnings
(with 25 employees).
(//) Lamp-factory manufacturing lamps, chandeliers, and picture-
frames.
(kk)  Metal-factory manufacturing brass ferrules, floor flanges, and
castings.
(//)  New furniture factory manufacturing modern furniture.
Region Five (Vancouver Island)—
Alberni—
(a) New auto-body shop (with 6 employees).
Comox—
(b) Four-million-dollar cantilever hangar under construction.
(c) One hundred and fifty of proposed 300-unit housing project
completed for R.C.A.F. personnel.
Courtenay—
(_.) New court-house and municipal hall constructed.
Duncan—
(e) New curling-rink officially opened.
Langford—
(/) Rock-gas plant—filling and storage plant and warehouse.
Parksville—
(g) New theatre constructed, with approximate capacity of 490. FF 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(h) Block of stores completed, comprising hardware, jewellery, and
dress shops.
Port Alberni—
(_) New shingle-mill (with 30 employees).
Victoria—
(/) Two-million-dollar plywood factory commenced operation (with
225 employees).
(k)  Jam plant manufacturing jams, marmalade, mixed peel, and
cake fruits.
(/) Large curling-rink nearly completed.
(m) Two-million-dollar post-office building opened to public.
Prince George Office — Region Eight (North Central British Columbia),
Region Nine (North-western Coast and Queen Charlotte Islands), and
Region Ten (Peace River and North-eastern Interior).
Prince Rupert
The fishermen's strike during the past season may adversely affect this district, but
considerable building and improvement in city stores is most noticeable. A number of
new enterprises have commenced building and many other stores have improved their
premises and installed modern building fronts.
Fifty moderate-rental houses are under construction by Central Mortgage & Housing
Corporation. Residential construction totalled $862,453 and industrial construction
$166,600 during 1952.
Business-men have shown most enthusiastic reception over the commencement of
construction of a railway-car ferry-slip at Prince Rupert, which will eventually transport
eight full railroad-cars. This undertaking by the Canadian National Railways will be in
temporary operation in January or February, 1953. The slip is for the use of Alaska-
British Columbia Transportation Company, subsidiary of a Vancouver towing concern,
which will transport machinery, equipment, and supplies for the paper industry. The
industry is building a slip at Ward's Cove, Alaska, near its operation. It is anticipated
that other slips will be constructed in other Alaskan ports and that a major part of
Alaskan freight will be carried from the East over the Canadian National Railways via
Prince Rupert.
Carloading.—Along the Smithers Division of the Canadian National Railways,
carloadings have increased year by year since 1946, with the exception of the year 1949.
The 1952 car shipments up to and including the month of October amount to 15,732,
5,280 of which were for Canadian destination and 10,452 for United States destination.
These figures are total car shipments, including lumber, and show an increase of 2,236
cars over the previous year. Products shipped from Burns Lake include ten cars of
perlite in October. Silver, lead, and zinc shipments amount to 194 cars over the year.
Live stock for 1952 has decreased from the average of 100 to thirty-three cars.
Terrace
Much improvement is apparent in renovation of buildings at Terrace. Logging in
connection with the Columbia Cellulose operation has been fully active during the past
year. Work on clearing right-of-way for the Canadian National Railways construction
between Terrace and Kitimat has commenced, and contracts for clearing and burning
will be operative during the whole winter. Conditions generally are prosperous and land
values remain high. The possibility of co-operating with Alaskan Development Agencies
by the Provincial Government has been under consideration. Discussions have commenced with the Associated Boards of Trade of Central British Columbia. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 57
Smithers
Due to the price drop in base metals, a number of mining operations have ceased
working, which is having an adverse effect on the economy of this locality. Since there
is only one smelter in British Columbia, it is not possible to have ore smelted, and the
drop in base-metal prices is responsible for the shut-downs.
Telkwa
The local collieries are in full capacity and supplying Columbia Cellulose with 200
tons of coal per day. Consideration is being given to extending this output to 400 tons
per day.   A housing project is contemplated.
Copper-mining operations have been engaged for the last two years in prospecting
a large mineralized zone in the Howson Basin, 40 miles south-west of Telkwa. Expenditures totalling approximately $100,000 in this survey have been made to date, and there
is considerable hope that this area will prove a valuable base-metal source. This undertaking is directly due to the efforts of this Division.
Considerably more testing and drilling will be necessary to prove the whole field.
To date, large deposits of silver-zinc-lead have also been located, and information indicates that considerable copper deposits are located in this area.
Burns Lake
A hardware company has enlarged their store into a first-rate modern hardware
store covering a full block, and have increased their garage facilities as well. This has
been the main construction during the past year and has run into an expenditure of
approximately $125,000. It is anticipated that Burns Lake will feel the benefits from a
construction of two or three small dams to the south by the Alcan operations. This work
was started in the fall of 1952 and no doubt some benefits will be felt at this point.
Generally speaking, the community is prosperous and optimistic.
Vanderhoof
The Kenney Dam, which has contributed so much to the economy of Vanderhoof
and the surrounding area, is now completed, with the result that most of those employed
have been released, with a few still remaining at the dam-site to complete the roadway
across the dam. This reduction so far has not been felt and business generally is still
very good.
Lumbering in the area is still at reasonably high level and agriculture remains the
same as in numerous past years. Considerable building has taken place in Vanderhoof
during 1952, amounting to a total of $410,307.
Our field office has kept in close touch with this development and assisted on occasions in supplying general and specific information to village officials and Board of Trade
officers of the village.
Prince George and District
The City of Prince George comprises an area of 1,092 acres, located at the confluence of the Fraser and Nechako Rivers. The city is located in the geographical centre of
British Columbia, at approximately the same latitude as the Cities of Prince Rupert and
Edmonton, and roughly midway between these latter centres. The unique position of
Prince George places it in an enviable position. With a population of approximately
6,000, it is by far the largest city in North Central British Columbia. The nearest large
urban centres are at Kamloops (350 miles to the south) and Prince Rupert (475 miles
to the west). Number
of Mills
Year
Number
of Mills
. 345
1951	
  551
384
1952 (June)	
 :__ 660
447
Of this total, there were forty-one mills within a 40-mile radius of the city whose daily
cut exceeded 15,000 board-feet and ranged as high as 150,000 board-feet.
Total Government log-scale in the area has also increased, as is shown by the following figures, in thousand board-feet:— Fort George Prince George
Year Forest District Area
1946  148,651 13 3,627
1947  220,600 172,291
1948  283,581 212,748
1949  250,282 189,199
1950  311,867 241,244
1951  418,694 308,254
The Government Forester for the district estimates that the 1952 cut is up 30 per
cent on a monthly basis over 1951. In 1951 the average daily mill capacity was 4,370
thousand board-feet.
FF 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Municipal improvements continue and cement sidewalks have been installed on
most of the downtown streets, and all roads between Third Avenue and Seventh Avenue
are now paved between Vancouver and George Streets. This has greatly improved the
appearance of the city.
Industrial Development.—The central location of the city has encouraged the development of distribution industries. Many large companies are now using Prince George
as their north-central distribution outlet.
Confidence in the future of the area is emphasized by the establishment of two new
banks in the past two years.
Building construction in the city has been carried on at a rapid rate, as indicated by
the value of building permits as shown below:— Year 1952
Year 1951 (to October 27th)
Residential   $502,400 $979,335
Industrial and commercial     408,375 1,008,150
The increase in the number of industrial permits is particularly striking. This total is
primarily made up by new lumber-mills, warehouses, and smaller manufacturing establishments.
Two new developments are contemplated for the area in the form of a $25,000,000
pulp-mill to be built near the city for a paper company operating on a forest management
licence. The plant would employ approximately 300 men with 350 men in woods operations. The second development would be in conjunction with the proposed natural-gas
pipe-line. This would necessitate the establishment of a large pumping-station near the
city and also provide a supply of low-cost fuel for future industrial development.
Forest-products Industry.—The main activity in Prince George is associated with
the lumber industry. The City is in the centre of the largest stand of merchantable softwood timber in the Interior of the Province. From the city eastward to the Alberta
boundary the valleys of the Fraser River and its tributaries are densely forested with
spruce, fir, cedar, hemlock, pine, and cottonwood. White spruce is the principal product
and the reserves of spruce in the area contiguous to Prince George are 13,208,700
thousand board-feet. In the Fort George Forest District, which includes a large area,
there were 660 sawmills in operation in June, 1952. In 1951, 74 per cent of these mills
were in the area surrounding Prince George. The number of mills has increased rapidly
over the past five years, as shown by the following figures:—
Year
1948	
1949	
1950	 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 59
During the winter of 1951—52 the mills in the area shipped a daily average of forty
cars of lumber. In 1951 the Fort George Forest District had a total of 13,873 cars
carrying an estimated $29,000,000 worth of lumber out of the district.
The market for white spruce is primarily in Eastern Canada, and the demand has
remained steady over the past few years despite the fluctuating demand for lumber experienced by the Coast operators.
Agriculture.—Dominion Government soil-surveyors estimate that there are about
250,000 acres of good agricultural lands available for settlement in the Prince George
district. These are located in the gently rolling plateau country extending from 20 to 30
miles in all directions from the city. The area is best suited to mixed-farming enterprises, which entails live stock, grain, legumes, and grasses. Eighty per cent of the operations are mixed farms with 10 per cent growing seed. Principal farm income is derived
from clover-seed, grain, beef, pork, and poultry products in that order.
Crop yields are quite high, as evidenced from the figures released by the District
Agriculturist as follows: Spring wheat, 27 bushels per acre; oats, 60 bushels per acre;
and barley, 23.5 bushels per acre.
The demand for agricultural produce exceeds supply by a considerable margin.
Fifty per cent of the meat consumed is imported, as are 50 per cent of the vegetables and
40 per cent of the milk. A new meat-packing plant has recently been established in the
city, with a daily capacity of fifty head. There are approximately 500 farms in the Prince
George area, and since climatic and soil conditions are suitable for agriculture it is expected
that this number will increase with the growing local need for agricultural produce, more
particularly dairy products.
Transportation.—Transportation and communication lines are well developed in the
area. The Canadian National Railway, which runs from Edmonton in the east to Prince
Rupert in the west, has large machine-shops at its Prince George centre. This line runs
approximately eight trains a day during the summer months. Canadian National Railways officials now consider this line to be a better paying proposition than their main
line running from Jasper to Vancouver.
The Pacific Great Eastern line from Squamish, near Vancouver, to its northern
terminus at Prince George was officially opened on November 1st of this year. The
Pacific Great Eastern is now planning the construction of a $2,000,000 barge-slip at
Squamish in order to speed service at the southern end of the line.
The completion of the John Hart Highway to the Peace River area has now opened
this latter area to Prince George. Previous to this, the only southern outlet from the
Peace River was through Edmonton. Canadian Pacific Airlines provides twice-daily
service between Prince George and Vancouver. Truck transport is well developed by a
number of firms operating in four directions from the city. Twice-daily service to Vancouver is given by the bus-fines.
Electricity.—The city generates its own power with three 1,000-k.w. generators
driven by diesel engines. It is expected the system will be enlarged by a fourth unit in
the next few months. This utility provides a large source of revenue for the city. At
present, the city finds it very difficult to keep up with the demand for power since consumers are increasing at such a rapid rate:— Number of
Year Electricity Consumers      Cash Receipts
1947   1,380 $139,298
1948   1,728 178,095
1949   1,859 197,934
1950   2,034 226,615
1951   2,215 282,423
1952 (to September 30th)  2,505     371,000!
1 Year-end estimate. FF 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
New consumers are now being added to the rolls at approximately fifty per month.
The contemplated natural-gas pipe-line will pass near the city, providing a more
economic fuel for operating the diesel units. Conversion of these engines from diesel
oil to natural gas will at least cut the fuel costs in half. The 1951 fuel charges for these
units were $75,000.
Water.—The city-owned system obtains its water from the Nechako River and provides service to approximately 1,900 consumers. A flat charge of $100 to new customers
defrays a large portion of the capital expenditure necessary to provide increased service.
Sewerage.—The city owns 4 miles of sewers, which provide the commercial and a
portion of the residential area with sewerage service. The system was built out of revenue,
and the new customer now pays for the full cost of providing this service to the building
served.   It is anticipated that the revenue from this utility for 1952 will be $5,000.
Extension of City Boundaries.—The approval of the City Council, the voters of the
city, and residents of the fringe area has been obtained to authorize the inclusion of an
additional 1,225 acres of land bordering the present city limits. This will increase the
city area from 1,092 acres to 2,317 acres, thereby adding an estimated 3,500 people and
800 dwellings. Approximately 200 of these dwellings are being serviced by the city
water system and 500 by electric light. The inclusion of the fringe area will increase
the city population by approximately 65 per cent and reduce the tax burden on the present
taxpayers.
The value of building construction from January to August, 1952, for this area was
$617,000.   This figure is also based on the 1941 value of buildings and improvements.
It is expected that approval of Provincial authorities permitting incorporation of this
additional area into the city will be forthcoming within the next three months.
Assistance to Industry.—1. Cariboo meat-packing plant: Initiated sale of property
to new owner.
2. Prefabricated houses: The initiation of this development started at British
Columbia House, and at the request of the Agent-General for British Columbia the principals of the company were piloted through matters regarding obtaining sites, materials,
etc.   This plant is now in operation and some houses have been built.
3. Bowron coal: Information forwarded to parties interested in the possibilities
of developing the coal on Bowron River.
4. Planing-mill: Close co-operation was maintained between the representatives
of the wall-board production plant now in operation. This consists of the use of chemically treated shavings combined with concrete to produce a wall-board 3 inches thick
and lesser thicknesses.   Several houses are now under construction using this material.
5. Packing-house: Information and data were supplied to this company dealing
with distribution and quantities of goods and materials pertaining to Prince George area,
with a view to establishing a distribution operation.
6. Builders-supply company:  Data supplied.
7. New hotel: Interviews were arranged between owner prospect and department,
resulting in likelihood that construction for a new hotel will commence early in 1953.
8. Brewery: Assistance given company representative regarding a site for a brewery.
9. Oil exploration: Co-operation with oil company's investigations in the Peace
River. Interviews were arranged for representatives to meet appropriate authorities in
Victoria for further information.
10. Giscome clay: Following an inquiry from Region One, and subject to the probable construction of gas-line which is at the present under survey through the Pine Pass,
the Giscome clay may be brought into production on site since the matter of fuel and
power has been an obstacle in the way of development.
New Enterprises Reported in 1952, City of Prince George.—Since January, 1952,
the substantial total of 110 new business enterprises has been established during the year, DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 61
including twenty-one builders, one contractor, three electricians, two painters, two plumbers, one machine-shop, twenty-one service trades, three merchants, two law firms, and
four engaged in the professional services.
Quesnel
Quesnel, during 1952, has experienced a continuation of prosperity and growth.
Western Plywood Company has added to their plant (70 by 150 feet) at a cost of
approximately $20,000.
In the new regulated area 1 Yi miles south of Quesnel, eighteen dwellings at a cost
of $60,000 and seven commercial structures at a cost of $50,000 have already been built,
and other buildings are under way. In West Quesnel, a great amount of building has
taken place, totalling $250,000, of which $30,000 is commercial. Another residential
area outside of the regulated area has sprung up, twenty residences having been built
averaging $3,000 each.
Quesnel Cattle Sale.—Quesnel cattle sale for 1952 was thirty head less than in 1951
and approximately one-third less in total money return; 979 head were sold, returns for
same being $124,692.
Quesnel Village.—In Quesnel Village a great deal of building has taken place during
1952. To date, ninety-nine building permits have been issued, forty-eight of which are
commercial (including alterations and additions) and fifty-one residential (including
additions and improvements), totalling $270,065 for commercial permits and $137,080
for residential.
Williams Lake
Williams Lake has experienced steady growth, even though experiencing considerable drop in returns from cattle sales.
Water-mains have been extended at a cost of $2,800. Building (both commercial
and residential) has continued to a total of $256,000 for commercial permits and
$129,100 for residential.
Dawson Creek-Fort St. John, Region Ten (Peace River)
The whole Peace River area is experiencing great activity in oil and gas developments, with the major activities centering around Fort St. John, where sixteen wells have
either been drilled or are in the process of drilling. Of these, all showed findings of
either gas or oil, two of insufficient quantity to be considered producers. Four of the
wells produced oil, the balance being gas.
In October, our field representative accompanied a party of officials of one of the
world's largest oil producers to the northern oilfields. The party visited approximately
twenty-different locations where drilling was under way. Information gathered by these
officials covered geology, geophysical exploration and drilling, operational problems,
staff, mechanical, housing, climate, and terrain.
Further exploration will be carried out next year by this company with a view to
becoming actively interested in this field.
The Dawson Creek and Fort St. John districts have shown increased development
since the end of the war. There has been a marked activity in purchases of land, improvements to homes and buildings, and general construction. In 1950, Dawson Creek was
the largest shipper of grain in the Commonwealth (3,380,000 bushels). The population
of Dawson Creek has steadily increased each year, now estimated at 5,000. In 1951,
in the Fort St. John area, several townships of land were sold. Farmers flocked to this
district, mainly from Saskatchewan, with others from Alberta, Manitoba, and this
Province. Excluding the abnormal boom when the Alaska Highway was being built,
1951 was the best business-year for merchants of Dawson Creek. Two elementary
schools were built in 1951, at an estimated cost of $800,000, and building permits FF 62 BRITISH COLUMBIA
amounted to a total of $434,370 for combined commercial and residential permits
(including additions and improvements).
Agriculture.—Results from land-utilization surveys during the past years south of
the Peace River indicate that through continuous selection practically all the Crown
lands suited for cropping are now owned. Remaining Crown parcels left will be required
to extend adjacent occupied properties. Further settlement will need to look to the as
yet undeveloped areas north of the Peace River, or the undeveloped or partially developed
privately owned lands. It might be added that not too much suitable Crown land remains
within reasonable distance of road access, schools, and community facilities north of the
river.
A temporary northern limit has been established on settlement in order to confine
settlement as far as possible to areas where facilities such as road and schools already
exist, until such time as the still available and suitable Crown land is taken up, when the
limit could be re-established further north.
Practically the whole Peace River Block is under oil leases, and all of the major
oil companies are active in exploration and drilling for oil and gas with increasingly
interesting results.
Hart Highway.—A great deal of work has been accomplished on construction
during the fall of 1952, and the highway is in good condition. Some little work is still
required to the extreme north or for about 8 miles south of Dawson Creek, but, generally
speaking, the highway is now in good shape for travel.
No scheduled trucking is yet operative over the highway. A great number of trucking permits are being considered at this time. The estimated number is fifty or more.
None has yet been granted. The biggest bottle-neck on the highway is due to the inadequate bridge crossing the Little Salmon River, about 15 miles north of Prince George.
Up until December, 1952, the load restriction on this bridge was held at 5 tons, but
during December this was raised to 15 tons, which is still inadequate for heavy trucking.
Other smaller bridges to the north would need to be strengthened.
Two northern freight concerns of Dawson Creek, operating scheduled trucking
between Dawson Creek and Edmonton, Dawson Creek and Yellowknife, and Dawson
Creek and Whitehorse, have thirty-seven trailer-units and five large trucks. These two
trucking companies are applying jointly for a permit for a trucking service between
Vancouver and Whitehorse, and are prepared to meet a four-day service between these
two points.
During the past year the traffic has been quite heavy in both directions, with more
cars coming south from as far as Alaskan points than those going north. The Department of Public Works carried out a road-check on traffic this past year but information
has not yet been made available.
INDUSTRIAL MAPPING OF REGIONAL CENTRES
The composite industrial maps compiled by the Division continue to be in wide
demand and the series covering the Greater Vancouver metropolitan area is now nearly
out of print. The area will be subject to further study in the light of major developments
of the past two years concerning many industrial sections in Metropolitan Vancouver.
A revision of the existing composite map is accordingly under early consideration.
The composite map of the Lower Fraser Valley was completed during the year and
will be off the press early in 1953. This map includes the entire Fraser Valley region
from the eastern boundary of the metropolitan area of Vancouver to the Fraser Canyon
at Hope. The map will contain a breakdown of information on the potential industrial
sites, rail and power facilities, water-supply, and other industrial factors of this rich
region.   With this current information now available for all of the municipalities in the DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
FF 63
area, it is confidently anticipated that many industries will become interested in the Fraser
Valley.   The map will be given wide distribution.
Work projected in the ensuing calendar year will include mapping of additional
regional centres as time and staff permit, and the planning and projection of a resources
map of the Province.
AREA SURVEYS
A survey of the Sooke Basin area on Vancouver Island was made in conjunction
with the Industrial Bureau of the Victoria Chamber of Commerce and the B.C. Electric,
together with the Industrial Agent of the Canadian National Railways and the Sooke
Chamber of Commerce. It was felt that the Sooke Harbour area offered many attractions
for potential industries. The Division was instrumental in furnishing data on the resources of the area and also providing maps indicating available Crown lands and private
property. Several meetings were held, culminating in a ground survey of the entire Sooke
Basin area.   The study of this area is continuing.
REGIONAL INDUSTRIAL INDEX
The third edition of this publication came off the press early in 1952. A considerably augmented printing over previous issues was found necessary to meet the
ever-increasing demand from business, industrial, and other concerns in all parts of the
continent seeking the type of detailed information provided in this Index of the seventy-
nine districts of the Province. At the close of the year, distribution had reached 2,500
copies, a large proportion of which had been ordered and paid for by industrial and
financial concerns. Distribution of the Index also included all Government Agencies,
Boards of Trade, municipal offices, and most of the major libraries across the country.
During the ensuing year the Index will be revised and brought up to date in preparation
for the next edition, to be published early in 1954.
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
During the year the Division carried out a survey conducted by the field representative in Victoria to determine the provisions of early-closing by-laws in the various municipalities in the Province. Complete information on this subject was obtained and compiled
in a pocket-sized booklet in response to numerous inquiries from business-men, sales
managers, and tourists. The usefulness of this booklet has been indicated by the many
requests for additional supplies received from manufacturing firms in the Province. FF 64 BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT TRAVEL BUREAU
GENERAL
In 1952, British Columbia's economy benefited to the extent of an estimated
63,000,000 new tourist dollars, according to calculations based on the increase in travellers' vehicle permits issued over the year.
The 262,550 traveller's vehicle permits issued at British Columbia border points
established a record year in the visitor industry. Previous records were 247,801 in 1951
and 221,642 in the year before. Over the year there was a 5.9-per-cent improvement on
1951 tourist traffic.
Thus, with an average of three persons admitted with each car, British Columbia
played host in 1952 to well over 1,500,000 visitors and, basing estimates on figures determined through several official surveys, it is very conservatively held that British Columbia's
tourist industry benefited the Province to the following extent:—
Those entering on traveller's vehicle permits spent an
estimated  $29,000,000
Visitors arriving by public carrier     21,000,000
Visitors arriving indirectly, domestic and interprovin-
cial tourists     .13,000,000
Total tourist expenditures (estimated)   $63,000,000
The foregoing estimate shows the extent to which British Columbia benefited from
tourist dollars brought in to the Province from outside. This, however, is not a complete
picture of the tourist economy of the Province, which picture must include the British
Columbians who patronize the resorts and stopping-places in their own country. A
survey, made at the end of the 1952 tourist season, discloses that only 32 per cent of
tourists registered were citizens of the United States; 17 per cent were from other parts
of Canada; 50 per cent were British Columbians; and 1 per cent came from other parts
of the world. On this basis, then, the true economy of the tourist industry is represented
by a figure greatly in excess of the estimated figure given above.
The volume of tourist traffic to British Columbia, as indicated by the traveller's
vehicle permits, has more than kept pace with the population increases of the major
markets of Washington, Oregon, and California, and the upward trend was maintained in
1952 in the face of increased competition and an adverse exchange situation. While mail
and counter inquiries showed a growing interest in camping out and in the less expensive
type of accommodation, the average vacationing carload of three people spent approximately the same as in 1951 ($85 D.B.S.)
The Canadian dollar reached parity with the United States dollar in January and in
March was at a premium. While the Bureau watched carefully, this situation had no
apparent adverse effect on the tourist traffic, and no adjustments were required in the
advertising and promotional campaigns.
These campaigns were predicated on the Bureau's belief that 1952 would be the
greatest vacation-travel year in history. Economic conditions had never been more
favourable; employment and incomes were at an all-time high; more people (40,-
000,000) in the United States were eligible for paid vacations; Federal Reserve Board
studies indicated a sharp rise in consumer savings which might be drawn upon to finance
trips; and our facilities for handling and accommodating the tourist traffic were never
better. The campaigns, both at home and abroad, were also conducted with the knowledge that those whom we wished to attract to our vacation fields were subject to the
varied impacts of $35,000,000 worth of competitive advertising. The $8,000,000,000
to $10,000,000,000 United States travel market now receives attention from all forty-
eight States and every part of the free world. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY
FF 65
250
/
NUME
CUSTOM
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5 PORTS IN
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BRITISH C
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1926-19
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150
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The tourist industry has never been static and there is no yardstick for measuring
a " normal" or " basic " year. Trends, habits, and travel and vacation patterns are
constantly changing. The measure of success is the swiftness with which facilities can be
adjusted to the changes of the times. In recent years, the tendency has been for the
vacationer to keep on the move; to take advantage of the modern automobiles and other
transport to cover as much territory and see as many different scenes and places or fish
as many streams and lakes as time will permit. The average car travels 1,200 miles on
vacation and the average tourist in the Province spent less than three days at any one
place. Nevertheless, British Columbia's improved highway system and her high standard
of accommodation have encouraged the visitor to extend both his mileage and length
of stay in the Province and, while one or two old resort communities miss a percentage of
the business which, a few years ago, settled in for a vacation period, our accommodations
generally have been able to adapt to the new trends. In the urban areas particularly, new
investment in tourist accommodation reflects large capital interest in the industry, and
through 1952 this interest was rewarded by a high rate of occupancy.
The chief vacation interests of our visitors are reported by the operators of tourist
accommodation as sightseeing, fishing, resort facilities, hunting, and camping, and in that
order. The percentage of guest-interest in the various facilities was reported as sightseeing, 51.7 per cent; fishing, 46.8 per cent; resort facilities, 46.7 per cent; hunting, 16.4 FF 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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(saNVsnoHX ni) aanssi simnsd stdihsa DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 67
per cent; and camping, 13.8 per cent. There was much duplication of interest. Many
would combine sightseeing, say, with their enjoyment of summer resort attractions, but
it was interesting to note that from a tabulation covering the whole of British Columbia,
fishing, scenery, and other outdoor attractions are still a tremendous magnet to the
Province and one which further development of parks and camp-sites will enhance.
FIELD WORK
Promotional activity through personal contact was slightly increased in out-of-
province territories. The dissemination of travel information through this phase of the
Bureau's publicity programme continues to centre around the annual promotional trip
through the Western United States. As in former years, the Assistant Commissioner
carried out this work in ten western States and the Province of Alberta. Emphasis was
placed on supplying travel detail and discussing new features in our tourist facilities with
travel counsellors at travel agencies, automobile clubs, Chambers of Commerce, oil companies, information centres, transportation companies, plus State, Provincial, and Federal
Government offices. While working in the United States during March and April, speaking engagements with service clubs, lodge and social groups provided exceptional contact
opportunities. British Columbia films were shown on a number of occasions and a television appearance was made in San Francisco, when photographs of the Province were
displayed. Profitable time was given to staff writers of prominent magazines and newspapers resulting in a number of British Columbia travel articles being published at suitable
intervals.
Field work in this Province and Alberta took on wider proportions than in previous
years. Special attention was given to the tourist information centres in the national parks
and at Canadian ports of entry. The call for British Columbia travel literature and
information at these points in both Provinces is particularly heavy, and the staffs are
given high credit for the co-operation they have extended. Edmonton, Calgary, Macleod,
and Lethbridge were supplied with substantial quantities of travel material, which is indicative of the increasing traffic in British Columbia travel from these areas.
The Bureau's encouragement of British Columbians to see their own Province first
was supported by contacts with the local travel bureaux, acquainting the travel consultants
in each instance with the domestic and international travel situations, and replenishing
literature stocks. Similar information, coupled with advertising guidance, was frequently
discussed with operators of tourist accommodation. Excellent results were obtained from
a bureau booth at a Vancouver Automobile Show, exhibiting literature and photographs
of interest to the vacationist.
British Columbia's automobile clubs and the Auto Court and Resorts Association
continue to play most important roles in our visitor industry, and liaison was maintained
between these and other such organizations working so closely with the Bureau.
The wide area over which our potential tourist traffic is to be found receives a relatively small coverage by this medium, and the encouraging results from this type of
promotion would indicate its extension whenever possible.
ADVERTISING
Advertising investments in 1952 generally followed the pattern developed over the
years and found to be so productive in the past. March, April, and May issues of high-
circulation national magazines were supported and followed through to July by space in
daily newspapers throughout the West. Heavier schedules were run in California, Oregon,
and Washington, which constitute our major market. Copy themes featured regional as
well as general interests and attractions, the initial advertisement in every section being
in the form of an official invitation to " Visit Beautiful British Columbia."   The inquiry FF 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA
response to this advertisement taxed the Bureau staff for several weeks, opening the
campaign most effectively.
Sixteen national magazines and forty-eight newspapers were used, with a total
circulation of over 22,000,000 and a gross of 58,000,000 impressions.
A further 11,000,000 invitations to " Visit Alluring British Columbia Miles
North " were extended as traffic flowed past strategically placed painted bulletins in the
vicinity of Seattle, Portland, Tacoma, Grant's Pass, and Spokane. Our contract renewal
called for repainting with fresh design.
Inquiry returns from the winter advertising campaign conducted through the Prairie
Provinces and Eastern Canada again indicated that this investment was more than justified. Further justification came from the operators of tourist accommodation, 51 per
cent of whom state that their season is definitely getting longer, and many of whom are
now keeping all or part of their premises available for winter tourist trade. This is particularly true on the Lower Mainland. While this campaign is a very modest one, it has
been favoured by considerable editorial support and has been very effective in bringing
British Columbia to the attention of other Canadians who wish to " escape winter." The
campaign has also had the effect of stimulating a large number of settlement inquiries.
All told during the year, the Bureau staff received 41,638 inquiries. During the
height of the season—April, May, and June—they averaged 487 per day with the record
day's mail reaching 803. The Bureau was fortunate this season in having a staff of young
ladies, all of whom were qualified by their training in the Bureau to handle this volume
expeditiously and thoroughly. As a result, most letters were given response within twenty-
four hours of receipt and all within forty-eight hours. Assistance given the prospective
visitor by the staff was the subject of many appreciative letters.
While the basic tourist advertising campaigns are prepared and placed through an
agency, the Bureau staff prepared over 150 general advertisements, including special
editions, issued orders for 2,883 advertisements for other departments, and checked all
advertising invoices for every branch of Government service.
RADIO
All radio stations in the Province co-operated with a programme designed to encourage British Columbians to spend their own vacations in British Columbia. Regional
attractions were featured in a series of thirty-two spot announcements and the increase in DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 69
inquiries from domestic sources during the run of announcements gave definite indication
that the campaign had some direct effect. The theme was very widely adopted by sponsors of commercial programmes and was also given generous support by radio-station
management generally.
PUBLICITY
In addition to the varied copy required for advertising purposes, the Bureau also
supplied articles and material for the writing of articles to editors and writers of such
publications as Travel, Harper's, Financial Post, Toronto Saturday Night, Toronto Star
Weekly, and many other magazines, week-end and daily newspapers, trade journals, business publications, and house-organs.
Bulletins and press releases were issued to newspapers, automobile clubs, touring
agencies, and information bureaux on the occasion of the opening of the John Hart
Highway. The articles and other releases of the Bureau covered industrial, commercial,
historic, and general fields as well as travel and tourism.
One television network and individual telecasters were provided with specially
selected programme material at their request. This material dealt with the tourist attractions of the Province.
LITERATURE
Of the thirty miscellaneous folders and booklets published by the Bureau, over
600,000 were distributed during the year.
All of the distribution was on request. Where the folders are handled by automobile
clubs, travel agencies, and other directional bureaux, every effort is made to ensure that
rack displays are protected by a counter. As a result, it is felt that the distribution is
effective and that the individual pieces fill the need for which they were designed with a
very minimum waste. However, the limited runs did not permit as wide and free a distribution as might be desired, particularly at entry-ports and tourist centres inside the
Province.
There were much heavier requests for literature supplies from domestic, United
States, and other Canadian points. Both regional and general literature was in unprecedented demand.
At intervals, governed by changes in road conditions but approximately bi-weekly
during the tourist season, the Bureau, with the co-operation of the Department of Public
Works, issued a series of current road-reports in map form. These reports carry detour
and surface conditions in a second colour over a base map and are used by automobile
clubs, oil companies, and travel counsellors throughout Canada and the United States.
Newspapers and radio stations receive the report and, through their main offices, gas
stations are also informed as to highway conditions. The timeliness of the road report
may also be credited in large measure to the twenty-four-hour production service afforded
by the Queen's Printer.
" Fishing in British Columbia " appeared in new format and carrying additional
information during the year; " Thunderbird Park " was rewritten and all standard folders
brought up to date as required. In addition, preparatory work was undertaken on a
revision of "Alluring B.C." and on the preparation of a small, one-colour booklet, " Fascinating Facts About B.C.," which, as its title implies, will be informative, general in its
coverage, and will serve to answer the thousands of general inquiries from school-teachers,
children, etc., at a lower cost. "Alluring B.C." will carry a tourist appeal only. Some
colour will be introduced into it as budget limitations permit, with a view to developing a
competitive general and prestige piece of tourist literature.
The highway map was corrected to the beginning of the season and produced in
quantity sufficient to supply reasonable demands of all outlets for the year. However, in
1953, it is proposed to issue a map more in conformity to standards found acceptable by FF 70 BRITISH COLUMBIA
the commercial travel-map publishers, and such a map is nearing completion through the
co-operation of the Chief Geographer.
In addition to its own tourist, general, and settlement literature, the Bureau was also
pleased to assist in the general distribution of parks and camp-sites folders published by
the Parks and Recreation Division.
As in previous years, the Bureau was able to assist in developing convention traffic
through the over-printing or inserting of special messages in standard literature. These
pieces were distributed by the organizations concerned as were the special-event folders,
which featured regional attractions in New Westminster, Chilliwack, Mission, Nelson,
Creston, Kelowna, Nakusp, and Vernon.
CO-OPERATIVE ACTIVITIES
While, in the Annual Report, the British Columbia Government Travel Bureau
takes credit for a major contribution to the development of the tourist industry of British
Columbia, it appreciates and acknowledges other and great factors contributing to that
development. Its officers also appreciate the splendid spirit of co-operation which pervades the industry and all those associated with it. The exchanges between the Bureau
and the Automobile Club of Southern California, the National Automobile Clubs, and
the State Automobile Associations of California, Oregon, and Washington have all
reflected a genuine interest in the visitor to the Pacific Northwest regardless of his destination or place of origin.
By these organizations, as by the oil company travel bureaux without exception,
British Columbia highways, facilities, attractions, and amenities have been treated most
truthfully and considerately. To their officers and staff, the Bureau is much indebted
for a comparatively trouble-free year in that all of them have gone to great lengths to
assure factual information for their clients and patrons.
The British Columbia Automobile Association also co-operated very closely with
the Bureau and took occasion to extend several courtesies appreciated by the Commissioner and his staff.
During the year, community and regional travel bureaux advanced their interests
considerably, and particular credit should be given this year to the Chambers of Commerce of Nanaimo and Kamloops whose travel bureaux, operating under full-time management, have rendered exceptional service to the traveller. The splendid activities of
these two civic organizations reflect a community appreciation of the tourist industry
which is expressed in many ways. In other sections of the Province, older-established
travel bureaux also continued to co-operate in the general interest. New Westminster,
Chilliwack, Trail, Kimberley, Kelowna, Revelstoke, Nelson, Cranbrook, Courtenay, and
a score of other centres rendered useful and effective service to many thousands of visitors
and, by co-operating with the Bureau, enabled it to round out a comprehensive programme of promotion and service.
The Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau and the Vancouver Tourist Association,
as through many preceding years, rendered a tourist service extending far beyond their
local and regional concerns.
The co-operation at all times of the Canadian Customs and Immigration Officers
at Border points was greatly appreciated by the Bureau. These busy officers took time,
as opportunity offered, to give factual information as requested and to handle such literature as the Bureau was able to afford the ports of entry. It is felt that the co-operative
and helpful attitude on the part of the Canadian border officials has contributed in no
small way to the development of the tourist industry in British Columbia.
The Bureau also appreciatively acknowledges the co-operation of the United States
Consular office, the United States Immigration Officers stationed in Victoria, and the DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 71
Canadian Superintendents of Immigration and Customs, all of whom have co-operated
very generously on matters pertaining to their respective fields.
In another section of this report, mention has been made of the liaison between the
Bureau and the Auto Courts and Resorts Association. The officers of the Association
have given considerable time to matters concerning the industry as a whole, and both
the Provincial and Regional Associations have extended much assistance to the Bureau.
As in the past, every courtesy and consideration has been extended to the Bureau
by the officers of the Evergreen Playground Association, in which British Columbia
maintains token membership.
Particularly friendly gestures have been made by the officers of the San Francisco
Sport Show where, notwithstanding that the Bureau has not taken space for a number
of years, the Province is given programme advertising without cost and extended many
courtesies.
British Columbia's interest in the Canada-wide promotion of the Canadian Government Travel Bureau has been well protected, and the directors and staff of the Ottawa
Bureau have been very ready at all times to discuss the many problems affecting the
tourist traffic. An exchange of literature and information provides the Bureau with
material on immigration, customs, and extra-provincial matters, while British Columbia's
literature is made available to the Canadian offices in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles,
and San Francisco.
The Acting Canadian Consul-General and his staff in San Francisco and the Canadian Trade Commissioner in Los Angeles at all times placed the resources and facilities
of their offices at the disposal of the Bureau, which facilities were frequently taken advantage of. Both offices were particularly helpful to the Assistant Commissioner on his
spring tour.
That the Bureau's relationship with all those associated in the development of the
industry has been maintained at a high co-operative level is a source of gratification to
the officers and staff.
CANADIAN TOURIST ASSOCIATION
The British Columbia Government Travel Bureau was British Columbia headquarters for the Seventh Tourist Service Educational Week Campaign sponsored in May by
the Canadian Tourist Association. Newspapers, radio stations, Chambers of Commerce,
and tourist organizations throughout the Province co-operated to accent public appreciation of the tourist industry.
The stimulation of interprovincial traffic; the problem of encouraging Canadians to
spend more of their vacations in Canada; the extension of the tourist season; and many
other important subjects were discussed at the annual meeting of the Association in
Niagara Falls, and it is anticipated that committees directed to further work already
under way in connection with these interests will report progress at the next annual
meeting of the Association, to be held in British Columbia in September. As many of
the objectives of the Association are international in scope, the Association works very
closely with United States organizations of similar character or objectives.
As past president of Canadian Tourist Association, the Deputy Minister is able to
contribute considerably to the discussions and the movement.
SETTLEMENT
Settlement inquiries are not solicited by the Bureau but in 1952 were received in
unprecedented volume. A very large number were from farmers in the United States who
wished to establish stock or other ranches in this country. There were also inquiries from
agricultural areas in other Provinces, which were attracted either by British Columbia's
climate or opportunities.    There were, again, a number of letters from people whose FF 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA
interest in hunting, trapping, and the outdoor life indicated that the Province is still considered by some in terms of the romance of the frontier.
This year, however, it was more obvious than ever before that British Columbia's
industrial development is becoming known and recognized throughout the world as from
practically every free country, letters were received from artisans and professional and
trades people who wished to know how they might fit into the expanding economy or what
living conditions here were like. South Africa, Britain, and the United States contributed
most to the correspondence.
While the Bureau must confine its interest to the furnishing of facts and figures and
the direction of prospective immigrants to the proper authorities, the information and
advice with which the official Canadian material is supplemented has been very appreciatively acknowledged.
The Department of Agriculture and the Department of Lands and Forests in Victoria
have advised the Bureau, and a full measure of co-operation has been enjoyed with the
Canadian Immigration Department and the National Employment Service    In London
the Agent-General for British Columbia has supported our work in this field as has the
Canadian Department of Labour.
In the settlement field, the Bureau has little advice as to the results of its interest,
but in many instances a continuance of correspondence over a period indicates that our
response to genuine inquiries brings satisfactory end results.
HISTORIC SITES
The British Columbia Government Travel Bureau has always been keenly interested
in the marking of historic sites, and during the year several bronze plaques were made for
installing at historic points of interest. Below is a photograph of the standard plaque
iurmshed by the Bureau to responsible individuals or organizations for erection at
authenticated sites.
«fc    _1 "?
;  '--vv ■■.,■:■*.•,.
.1 DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 73
"TOURIST ACCOMMODATION REGULATION ACT"
The Bureau's physical activities under the " Tourist Accommodation Regulation
Act" are covered by the accompanying tabulations. These figures are interesting in that
they demonstrate the general improvement of standards and accommodation throughout
the Province. Where in 1948 only 11 per cent of tourist accommodation rated four stars,
in 1952 30 per cent of accommodation rated four stars by the same standard of measurement. This fact not only reflects the interest of operators in raising their standards, but
also a greater appreciation of the industry by capital investors.
During the past two or three years, urban areas particularly have benefited from the
establishment of new first-class blocks of accommodation which meet all the most exacting standards.
The star-rating system is very definitely appreciated by the public, and at the
December Convention of the British Columbia Auto Courts and Resorts Association was
endorsed by the operators themselves. However, the very fact that general standards in
British Columbia have so vastly improved since the regulations were promulgated, and
that the past few years have seen such a great appreciation of tourist accommodation
continent-wise, may call for some revision of the grading formula, particularly in respect
to the width of the four-star bracket. To this end, the Auto Courts and Resorts Association has appointed a committee to study the problem and to assist the Bureau with its
findings and recommendations.
In November, a meeting was held with a committee of civic officials of the City of
Vancouver to discuss the questions of wider enforcement of the regulations by the municipality. The fact that certain municipalities issue rooming or lodging house licences to
premises catering to tourists is still an obstacle to the full implementation of the regulations. Discussion with the Vancouver authorities will be continued, and it is hoped to
reduce the number of premises catering to tourists which are exempted on technicalities
from the provisions of the " Tourist Accommodation Regulations Act" to the ultimate
end that all premises displaying a " tourist" shingle will at least meet the minimum
requirements.
In addition to the grading inspections by the Bureau staff, a very large percentage of
licensed tourist accommodation was also reported upon by sanitarians attached to the
Health Units, whose interest is in the maintainence of adequate health standards.
Officers of the Travel Bureau had frequent occasion and opportunity during the
year to co-operate with and in many ways assist operators of tourist accommodation, both
individually and through their local and Provincial organizations. The resources of the
Bureau, in respect of data concerned with the economics of the industry, construction,
and management, have been fully taken advantage of.
As the turnover in management and ownership of tourist accommodation is perhaps
greater than in any other business, the work of the Bureau in the educational field and in
the maintenance of standards is continuous throughout the year. The very active support
of its interests by the Division of Public Health Engineering and by the offices of the Auto
Courts and Resorts Association is of much assistance in this phase of the Bureau's
activities. FF 74 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Number of Tourist Accommodations, Graded and Ungraded
1952
1951
1950
1949
1948
Number Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
i
311    |      30
249    |      25
166    |      16
130    j      13
165    |      16
261
231
166
147
179
27
23
17
15
18
216
24
1
168    |     22
185    |      24
134    |      18
138    |      18
132    |      18
70
158
112
141
151
11
220
155
147
172
24
17
16
19
25
17
23
24
1,021
218
984
212
910
260
__
757    ]      ....
.-.    |      ....
632
Ungraded 	
Total licences and reg-
1,239
82
-
1,196
84
....
1
1,170    |      —
     |      ....
1
......    |      ....
—    |      ....
	
Grand total of active
1
1.321     I      —
1,280
1
.. ..    1      ....
1952
17 grades raised from 3 to 4 stars
1  grade raised from 1 to 4 stars
12 grades raised from 2 to 3 stars
7 grades raised from 1 to 3 stars
1 grade raised from 0 to 3 stars
2 grades raised from 0 to 2 stars
6 grades raised from 0 to  1 star
3 grades lowered from 4 to 3 stars
3 grades lowered from 3 to 2 stars
1 grade lowered from 1 to 0 star
Initially Graded 1952
4 stars ~ _
3 stars  	
2 stars _	
1 star 	
0 star 	
Total
24
14
12
4
6
60
New Licences
1952 -   74
Suspended
1952 (health O.K.) ....    8
Ceased Operating
1951     26
1952   40
TOURIST COUNCIL
The thirteenth meeting of the British Columbia Tourist Council was held in March,
under the chairmanship of the Deputy Minister. This advisory body, drawn from all
sections of the Province and all tourist interests, discussed a heavy agenda and was productive of many constructive suggestions and recommendations.
Major recommendations dealt with the establishment of tourist reception centres
under Provincial Government auspices at strategic points, the extension of advertising
programmes, and more frequent inspection of tourist accommodation.
During the meeting, regional problems as well as Provincial matters were fully
discussed, and the 1952 advertising programme approved as submitted by the agency.
The personnel of the British Columbia Tourist Council is as follows:—
Full Membership.—James T. Hunter, Kamloops Board of Trade; George I.
Warren, Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau; Howard Faulkner, Kelowna Board of Trade; C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests; F. R.
Butler, Commissioner, British Columbia Game Commission; J. V. Fisher,
Deputy Minister of Finance; E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of
Trade and Industry; Superintendent G. H. Archer, R.C.M.P.; Ernest
Evans, Commissioner, Government Travel Bureau; Neil McCallum,
Assistant Chief Engineer, Department of Public Works; T. D. Rosling,
Nelson Board of Trade; Dr. C. H. Worthington, Vancouver Tourist
Association; N. McCormick, Vancouver Tourist Association.
Associate Members.—Earle Dickey, Revelstoke Board of Trade; J. Pound,
Auto Courts and Resorts Association, Vancouver; J. S. Brown, Burns
Lake Board of Trade; E. Ely, British Columbia Hotels Association, Vancouver; D. F. Shaw, Chilliwack; Les Young, New Westminster Board of
Trade; Ralph Williamson, Dawson Creek Board of Trade; H. Kraupner,
Prince Rupert Chamber of Commerce; W. H. Wilson, Associated Boards
of Trade of East and West Kootenay, Cranbrook; D. A. H. Bayne,
Williams Lake and District Board of Trade, Williams Lake. r
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY FF 75
PHOTOGRAPHIC BRANCH
Two new 16-mm. colour-sound films, "B.C. Industries" and "Beautiful British
Columbia," were completed during the year and will be placed in circulation when returned by the sound producers. Three additional films were advanced towards final
editing—" Peace River and Alaska Highway," " B.C.'s Potato Industry," and " The Inside
Passage." In addition, a quantity of colour film was " shot " for the Dominion Government on " The Capital City of British Columbia," and footage was also obtained for
future use of steelhead fishing in the Cowichan River.
This branch co-operated very closely with the Grantland Rice Sportlight Productions
on production of a sport-fishing feature and also with the representative of Republic Films,
which company plans location shooting of a full-length feature, with a logging background,
on Vancouver Island within the next few months.
Two films, " Rails to Romance " and " Okanagan Valley," were televised by Radio
Station CMQ, SA., Havana, Cuba, and very favourably commented upon.
Circulation of the Bureau's films approximated 303,000, through audiences distributed as follows: British Columbia, 96,000; other Provinces, 12,000; United States,
100,000; United Kingdom, 95,000. The Bureau staff showed film to sixty-one audiences
in the Victoria district during the year and to fifty-one audiences in the branch theatre.
Still-photographic production totalled 31,300. Of these, some 8,222 were forwarded
to writers, publishers, advertising agents, and others for publicity and illustrative purposes.
The balance represents some prints made for stock purposes and others for various
Government departments from which assignments were accepted. Still-work was handled
for the Public Works, Health and Welfare, Hospital Insurance Service, Provincial
Museum, Provincial Archives, Agriculture, and Fisheries Departments and Branches.
Some sixty enlargements, 16 by 20 inches, were produced by the Bureau for various
displays and exhibitions, and two panels, 5 by 7 feet and two 3 by 5 feet, were prepared
as circulating window exhibits. One of the larger panels was placed with the Northwest
Airlines travel office in Chicago.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1953
1,450-253-9703 

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