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Railway Department PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT Year Ended December 31st 1952 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1953]

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 Railway Department
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
Year Ended December 31st
1952
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1953  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to present herewith the Annual Report of the operations and
activities of the Railway Department for the year ended December 31st, 1952, with
Appendices.
W. R. T. CHETWYND,
Minister of Railways.
Victoria, B.C., February 3rd, 1953. Victoria, B.C., December 31st, 1952.
The Honourable W. R. T. Chetwynd,
Minister of Railways, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Thirty-fifth Annual Report of the Railway
Department, covering the year 1952, together with Appendices.
Your obedient servant,
J. S. BROADBENT,
Assistant Deputy Minister.
i Report of the Railway Department
The continued industrial expansion within the Province intensified the activities of
the Department, with many new transportation installations pursuant to the " Railway
Act."
The staff of the Department, as of December 31st, 1952, consisted of Deputy
Minister, Assistant Deputy Minister, Chief Inspector, three Inspectors, two draughtsmen,
secretarial stenographer—grade 2, and a senior clerk-stenographer.
The railways supervised by the Department include common carriers, industrial
railways, and equipment used in conjunction with industrial operation of railways.
The head office continued in charge of the records of the Department, and in the
studies relating to extensions of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway to develop the
untouched natural resources of North-east British Columbia, and co-operated with the
Construction Department of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company in the completion of the extension of the railroad from Quesnel to Prince George. The Inspecting
Engineers continued the inspection of the road-bed, track facilities, shops, mechanical
facilities, and equipment of all the railways operating under the jurisdiction of the
Department.
With the increased use of the aerial tramway within the Province, further work was
done with regard to the safety and operation of this means of transportation. The published report on Construction, Safety, and Operation of Passenger Carrying Aerial
Tramways, along with rules and regulations as to their operation, received world-wide
recognition and was in great demand.
In the field of diesel locomotives, studies were made with regard to axle loadings
on light rail and the problem of excessive flange wear.
ANNUAL INSPECTION OF THE PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN
RAILWAY, SQUAMISH TO QUESNEL
Road-bed and Track
The work as outlined in detailed reports of the company's Operating Department in
1951 covering betterments and replacements has been carried forward during 1952, and
before the winter freeze-up all important projects which affect the safety of the railway
were completed. Concrete cribwork along Anderson and Seton Lakes has made this
section of the line much safer.
In several cases the Bridge Building Department of the company replaced wooden
bridges, some of which are of creosoted-timber construction. In other cases they renewed
many of the older types of bridges with steel-deck spans set on concrete abutments, with
necessary river and creek diversions.
During the winter season of 1951-52 washouts occurred on the line, which were
taken care of in the usual manner. At Whisky Creek (Mile 288.7) a washout occurred
which necessitated a main-line diversion with a very heavy fill.
The tie-replacement programme for 1952 was carried out, and 100,000 untreated
ties were installed. Studies were made regarding the economy of installing creosoted
ties, and it was found that if they were installed, a considerable saving would be made
over a period of thirty years.
The light rail (60 and 70 pounds) in use on the railway is now 35 to 40 years old.
When light motive power, light equipment, and loads with small traffic were the order II 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of the day, 60-pound rail was considered adequate. However, with to-day's heavy
motive power, heavy loads, longer trains, and increased traffic, this steel is not only too
light but is fast becoming worn out, and, therefore, a programme should be instituted
whereby so many miles each year would be relaid with 85- or 100-pound rail. The
70-pound rail on the Pavilion Hill is badly worn and should be replaced with at least
85-pound rail as soon as possible.
On the Cheakamus Hill, north of Squamish, 21 miles of light rail have been
replaced with 85-pound rail. This rail is showing excessive wear on the curves, and
a study attributes the cause of the wear to sharp flanges on the heavy diesel locomotives.
It was recommended to the company that it should make modern facilities available to
its Mechanical Department to efficiently take care of wheel-changing on its diesel locomotives. The initial cost of proper mechanical facilities to take care of this matter is
only a small fraction of the cost of a few miles of ruined rail.
Switch-lamps have been installed on all main-line turnouts. Switch-targets have
been painted, and, with few exceptions, all crossing signs are in order.
Motive Power and Rolling-stock
Over the past five years it has been the company's policy to replace steam-locomotives with diesel-electric motive power, and to this end the company is now operating
fourteen diesel locomotives with a few remaining steam-locomotives. The first six
diesel-electric units procured are 660 horse-power with two-axle trucks employing 18-ton
axle loading. The last eight diesel-electric units procured are 1,600 horse-power with
three-axle trucks employing 20-ton axle loading, with power on two axles of each truck,
the centre axle being an idler. Inspections reveal that the 1,600-horsepower diesels
show considerable flange wear, and it is evident when the flanges become worn, rail
wear becomes very noticeable on curves, especially if such curves exist on heavy adverse
grade.
In defence of the diesel it must be borne in mind that on a mileage or tonnage
basis the 1,600-horsepower units obtain double or triple the mileage as do the steam-
locomotives with the same amount of flange wear, but due to their high availability or
greater hours in actual service the flange wear shows up in a shorter time. Flange wear
on the company's units is comparable with that on units of other railways in mountain
territory, and builders of diesel locomotives are studying the problem to reduce this
wear. In the meantime, or until a type of wheel or truck is developed which will reduce
flange wear, all that can be done is to maintain the flanges and turn or change wheels
before they wear down to a limit where rail-cutting commences. It is believed flange
oilers will help to reduce flange wear, and they should be given a fair trial. As previously
stated, adequate modern machinery and handling devices are required by the Mechanical
Department to handle this vital phase of operation.
With regard to axle loading, 20 tons per axle was considered the limit, but it has
been shown in a report submitted by the Department that 60-pound rail can be loaded
up to 30 tons per axle provided speed is controlled, and that speed is the major factor
where heavy power is used on any rail below 100 pounds per yard.
With the exception of the problem of sharp flanges on the diesel motive power,
motive power and rolling-stock was well maintained and is in first-class condition.
Monthly reports are kept up by the company. Boilers and pressure-vessels are regularly tested and certified.
Stations and Terminal Facilities
Stations at Quesnel, Williams Lake, and Lillooet have been considerably improved,
and concrete platforms now exist at these points. Other wayside stations have also been
improved. Additional tracks and yard facilities are quite noticeable over the last two
years. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1952 II 7
At Lillooet the roundhouse has been revamped, with steam heat being installed.
At Williams Lake the roundhouse has been improved, and modern steam heat added.
At this terminal the trackage serving the roundhouse has been relocated, and oil-storage
tanks are being permanently installed.
At Squamish shops a great improvement can be reported. Better tracks and fuelling
facilities now exist, and the car-shop and woodworking-shop are improved. However,
as outlined previously, improved facilities for wheel wear, machine tools, cranes, equipment, and housing to service the diesel locomotives are more necessary than ever at
Squamish terminal, and a programme should be instituted with long-range planning to
this end.
Squamish Car-barge Slip
This slip is in poor condition and should be replaced with a new slip. It is recommended that it would be more economical to build a new slip alongside the present one
and, when completed, repair the present slip so it would be serviceable in case of
emergency. It is necessary for the Bridge and Building Department to continue with
necessary heavy repair on the present slip to keep it operating.
Summary and Conclusion
Provided the programme of maintenance of way and structures is continued and
speed is properly controlled on light rail, the line is in a safe condition for continued
operation.
A programme to replace the light rail with at least 85-pound rail should be instituted
immediately.
Wheel-flange wear on locomotives must be taken care of before it reaches a point
where rail wear occurs.   Better shop facilities are required to take care of this matter.
The barge-slip at Squamish must be attended to immediately.
QUESNEL-PRINCE GEORGE EXTENSION OF THE
PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN RAILWAY
Upon application an inspection was made of this extension, from which it was
considered sufficiently completed to allow the operation of special passenger and a freight
service. An order was subsequently passed authorizing same. On November 1st, 1952,
an inaugural passenger-train was run to Prince George. Arrangements were made to
commence a tri-weekly freight service on January 12th, 1953. Following are some of
the highlights of the new construction.
Cottonwood River Bridge
This bridge employs a 700-foot continuous-deck span supported on four reinforced-
concrete piers, the anchor pier being on the north end of the span, and three 80-foot
deck-plate girders on the south approach and one 80-foot deck-plate girder on the north
approach, all supported by reinforced-concrete piers. The bridge is well constructed
and is in a safe condition for traffic. No movement of piers or abutments has taken
place.
Ahbau Bridge
This bridge is a steel viaduct type with 100-foot spans and 60-foot tower spans
with concrete abutments and concrete footings under the steel towers. The bridge is
well constructed and in safe condition for traffic.
Canyon Creek Bridge
,
This bridge is a 150-foot through-truss supported on concrete abutments. The
bridge is well constructed and in safe condition for traffic. II 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Track and Road-bed
The track is laid from Quesnel to a temporary interchange with the Canadian
National Railways at the east end of the Canadian National Railways Fraser River
Bridge at Prince George, a distance of 81.9 miles. The line is laid with 85-pound steel
and is in good alignment. It is well ballasted with crushed rock, crushed gravel, and
pit-run gravel, depending on the nature of the subgrade. Cuts are well daylighted, fills
are properly sloped and drained, and ditching and other drainage is well planned. In
all, considering the unstable type of country, an excellent construction job has been
carried out.
Summarizing, the line is in a safe operating condition for freight-trains and special
passenger-trains between Quesnel and Prince George, but until stations and facilities for
passenger accommodation exist between these points, no regular passenger service can
be inaugurated.
ANNUAL INSPECTIONS OF INDUSTRIAL RAILWAYS
MacMillan & Bloedel Limited, Copper Canyon and Nanaimo River.
British Columbia Forest Products Limited, Port Renfrew.
British Columbia Forest Products Limited, Youbou.
MacMillan & Bloedel Limited, Franklin River.
Comox Logging & Railway Company, Ladysmith.
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited, Union Bay.
Elk River Timber Company Limited, Quinsam.
MacMillan & Bloedel Limited, Port Alberni.
British Columbia Forest Products Limited, Bear Creek Bridge, San
Juan Division.
Comox Logging & Railway Company, Headquarters Division.
In all cases the general condition of the track was good, and necessary replacements
and repairs are being taken care of, for which follow-up inspections will be made.
INSPECTING ENGINEERS' REPORT
R. E. Swanson, Chief Inspector. W. E. Tyler, Inspector.
J. H. Carmichael, Inspector. W. F. Thomas, Inspector.
During 1952 the railways in British Columbia operated to full capacity. The
common-carrier railways operated with freight traffic somewhat increased over previous
years. The usual inspection and repairs to existing rolling-stock were made under the
supervision of the Department Inspectors.
Logging, mining, and small industrial railways were periodically inspected during
the year, with the usual follow-up inspections made of road-bed, bridges, and rolling-
stock, with reports submitted to the Victoria office.
Logging-railways
On standard-gauge logging and mining railways, locomotive boilers and pressure-
vessels were inspected and certified during the year, and the Inspectors supervised boiler
repairs and replacements as well as repairs to motive power, rolling-stock, bridges, and
structures. Passenger-carrying equipment on logging-railways continued to be improved
during the year under the Inspectors' recommendations and supervision. Motor rail-cars
on logging-railways which carry workmen were inspected and certified in accordance
with the rules. All trackage and bridges were inspected, and reports submitted to the
Victoria office. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1952 II 9
Mining-railways
On mining operations where arrangements exist with the Chief Inspector of Mines,
locomotives, rolling-stock, and surface trackage were inspected, and locomotives certified
with reports submitted to the companies and copies to the Chief Inspector of Mines.
Locomotive operators on this type of railway were examined and special permits issued.
Safety meetings and safety talks regarding narrow-gauge operations and mining-railways
were continued during the year, which had a tendency to reduce accidents on this type
of operation.
Train-dispatch
Improvements continued to dispatch systems on logging-railways during the year.
The radio-telephone communication system between dispatcher and train crews installed
at Englewood continued to give exceedingly good results, and it is surprising that other
logging companies have not adopted this system, which minimizes rail accidents to a great
extent.
Grade Crossings
The department received plans during the year for approval of level crossings. The
locations were inspected, and approval granted or refused. In some cases it was necessary
for Department Inspectors to run levels and submit plans. Existing crossings were inspected in the interests of public safety.
A study covering level grade crossing protection started in 1951 was continued
through 1952. In some cases automatic protection at level crossings was recommended,
and at the present writing one such installation is being installed on the Elk River Timber
Company's level crossing of the Island Highway at Campbellton, Vancouver Island.
Street and Common-carrier Railways
Street-railways and common-carrier railways under Provincial jurisdiction were
inspected during the year. These were found to be in good condition, with replacements,
repairs, and improvements being carried out by the companies. Locomotives were certified and rolling-stock periodically inspected. Considerable street-railway in the City of
Vancouver was abandoned during the year. Where street-railways were abandoned,
trolley-buses and gas-buses superseded the use of street-cars. In cases where persons have
been seriously injured by street-cars or by other means on common-carrier railways, the
rolling-stock or motive power involved was impounded by the police until inspected and
released by Department Inspectors. In cases of fatal accidents, Inspectors made investigations, forwarding reports to the Victoria office for the Minister's attention. Where
necessary, corrective measures were imposed upon the company to avoid recurrence of
such accidents.
Industrial Trackage
The private industrial trackage serving the several pulp-mills and industrial plants
in British Columbia was inspected during the year. It can be reported the trackage in
these installations was in good condition. The locomotives were inspected and certified.
In some cases it was necessary to approve close clearances where applications were made
by the companies.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Regular periodic inspections were made of the rolling-stock and equipment of the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway. All boilers and pressure-vessels were inspected and
certified. A number of the steam-locomotives on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway have
been taken out of service, and it was necessary to make special inspections to keep the
existing steam motive power in operating condition. Two additional diesel-electric locomotives of 1,600 horse-power each were procured during 1952, making a total of fifteen
diesel-electric units now in operation on this railway. II 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In accordance with the terms of the " Railway Act," the annual inspection of the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway was made by track-motor from Squamish to Quesnel. All
bridges, structures, station and terminal facilities, as well as mechancial facilities, were
inspected, and a report submitted. This report covered the condition of the railway and
replacements for 1953 in detail. It can be reported here the railway is in a safe condition
for continued operation, and if the maintenance and replacement programme, as recommended, is carried forward in 1953, the future safety of the railway will be assured;
however, it must be borne in mind the 60-pound rail in use on this railway is now 40 years
old, and with increased traffic, together with the fact that heavy diesel locomotives are now
operating on this rail, it becomes increasingly important that the speed of all trains be
carefully controlled by the company. It is also recommended that a programme be
instituted immediately whereby several miles of 60-pound rail will be replaced by at least
85-pound rail each year until the worn 60-pound rail is replaced by heavier steel. The
worn 60-pound rail could be used for extensions and sidings.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Extension
Acting in accordance with the Minister's instructions, an inspection was made of
the Pacific Great Eastern Railway extension (under construction) from Quesnel to Prince
George. This inspection was made by track-motor and was conducted in order that the
new line could be opened for freight traffic during the latter quarter of 1952. A separate
report was submitted covering this inspection. It can be reported here that the new line
was in such condition by the end of October that it was declared safe for freight traffic
and for special inaugural passenger-trains under restricted conditions. The line was
officially opened on November 1st, 1952.
Fire Inspections
Four hundred and seventy-five inspections were made, covering fire-protective
appliances of locomotives on the Canadian Pacific Railway, Canadian National Railways,
and Great Northern Railway in British Columbia. Reports of these inspections were
forwarded to the British Columbia Forest Service, and as each Department Inspector is
appointed by the Board of Transport Commissioners at Ottawa as Board of Transport
Commissioners Fire Inspectors, copies were also forwarded to the Board in Ottawa. The
Inspectors acted with the full authority of the Board of Transport Commissioners on the
transcontinental railways with respect to fire-protective appliances. Where defects were
found, the Inspectors ordered the locomotives out of service. Sixty-one inspections were
made of fire-protective appliances on steam-locomotives operating on logging and mining
railways.   The Forest Service received copies of these reports.
Dieselization of Railways
A study of dieselization of logging-railways was started during 1951 and was continued during 1952. This was followed up by actual operating tests on several of the
logging-railways. The test locomotive built during 1951 for the Canadian Forest Products
Limited has continued to give satisfactory service under logging conditions at Englewood
during 1952. Certain of the companies are considering the use of diesel locomotives;
however, the trend in many cases during 1952 was for the abandonment of logging-
railways, to be superseded by the use of logging-trucks. In order to avail the Department
with the best information possible regarding the maintenance and servicing of diesel
locomotives, two Department Inspectors proceeded to La Grange (111.), Schenectady,
Montreal, and Kingston where diesel-electric locomotive classes were attended. The two
Inspectors received diplomas on the completion of the courses, and it is intended to have
two more Inspectors attend the courses and classes during 1953. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1952 II  11
Diesels on Light Rail
A study concerning the use of diesel locomotives operating on light rail was made
during 1951 and carried forward during 1952. Reports were submitted to the Victoria
office so that the information gathered may be made available to the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway and other railways operating under the Department's jurisdiction. The study
revealed that on certain railways in the United States and Eastern Canada, rail loadings
of 31 tons per axle are being imposed on 56- and 60-pound rail by diesel locomotives
where speeds do not exceed 20 to 35 miles per hour.
Certification of Logging-truck Drivers
During the first quarter of 1952 the management of the Canadian Forest Products
Limited, Englewood Division, approached the Department with the request that Inspectors
from this Department examine and certify logging-truck drivers. The company pointed
out that on its rail operation, where all operators are certified, the accident-frequency
rate was much lower than on the truck operation, where none of the drivers were certified.
The rules and regulations made pursuant to the " Railway Act " permit the examination
and certification of applicants in any specialized field of air-brake application; consequently, arrangements were made to prepare the truck operators of this company for
examination and later to examine and certify them as to their knowledge of air-brakes and
general truck safety. Air-brake and diesel educational films and slides were procured,
and lectures conducted by the Inspectors at the Englewood operation so that the drivers
who were to be examined could be properly educated as to the use of air-brakes and
diesel engines. All drivers at Englewood operation were subsequently examined and
certified.
The Comox Logging & Railway Company approached the Department during the
second quarter of the year making the same request as did the Canadian Forest Products
Limited, and, consequently, educational lectures were conducted at Ladysmith, and all
operators of logging-trucks were subsequently examined and certified. Later the Harrison
Lake Division of Canadian Forest Products Limited made the request for certification of
operators, and lectures were conducted at these operations, and all operators examined and
certified.
Air-brake Instruction Lectures
Requests for the certification of logging-truck operators have been received from the
British Columbia Forest Products Limited, Port Renfrew and San Juan Divisions, where
lectures were conducted and men instructed. Requests have also been received for this
service to be extended to the Powell River Company and the Alaska Pine group of operators. Two lectures were given to the management personnel of the Powell River Company
regarding safety of operation in air-brakes on logging-trucks. A lecture on bus and truck
air-brakes was conducted in the Parliament Buildings, Victoria, for the benefit of the
British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Vancouver Island Coach Lines, Island
Freight Company, and the Commissioners of the Public Utilities Commission. In all,
seventeen lectures were conducted at various points in British Columbia regarding safety
in truck operation and the application of air-brakes.
Truck Air-brake Improvements
At the Englewood operation our attention was drawn to the fact that the air-brakes
as normally applied on logging-trucks were not fool-proof, nor were they safe under all
heavy-grade conditions. A study made by the Department resulted in improvements to
the existing logging-truck air-brakes. These improvements, while simple in principle,
utilize standard air-brake parts so installed that should the driver lose his air-pressure
the truck will go into emergency and come to a stop and, further, should there be a lack II 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of compressed air to supply the air-brake system it becomes impossible to move the
logging-truck into operation. Other added safety features were devised which have been
applied to the logging-trucks at the Englewood operation, and it has been reported to this
office that the safety of the logging-trucks has been very much improved by the application
of devices recommended by the Department Inspectors. Englewood operation has cooperated with the Department to such an extent that whenever there was an accident with
a logging-truck, the company enplaned an Inspector from Vancouver to make a thorough
investigation of the conditions leading up to the accident. In this manner the Inspectors
have been enabled to bring about the recommendations which have led to the improvement
of the logging-truck air-brake.
Alcan Project
During the second quarter of 1952 it became necessary to extend the services of this
Department to the Morrison-Knudsen Company of Canada Limited, contractors on the
Alcan project, where a large power-development is being constructed. This company had
constructed the largest aerial tramway in Canada to serve the various portals of the tunnels
it is driving through the mountain for power-supply. This aerial tramway is over 1 mile
in length and rises 2,600 feet up the side of a mountain. It employs a 300-horsepower
hoist, which hauls a 10-ton skip up and down the aerial tramway so that seventy-five men
can be conveyed to and from the various portals, and also so that locomotives, bulldozers,
lumber, and other material can be taken up and down the mountain. The freight capacity
of the aerial tramway is 28 tons, and the passenger capacity is 75 men. It was necessary to
make two preliminary inspections of this aerial tramway before a final inspection was
made and a certificate issued warranting its safe operation. In order that a certificate for
operation could be issued, it was necessary that a safety-brake be constructed on the aerial
tramway so that in case the haulage-cable broke, the skip would come to a stop automatically. This was considered necessary as men were being hauled up and down the
aerial tramway. A type of brake was suggested by the Department which was later constructed and installed. This brake employs the use of standing cables and hydraulically
operated brakes. It was tested in November, 1952, and pronounced satisfactory and safe
for operation, and a certificate was issued authorizing the operation as an aerial tramway.
Several miles of underground tunnels, shafts, and raises are being excavated at
Kemano Bay on the Alcan project. Underground and surface railways are employed in
this operation as well as underground hoists, and as the operation did not come under the
" Metalliferous Mines Act," it became necessary for the Department to draft regulations
from the " Metalliferous Mines Act" and assist the Morrison-Knudsen Company of
Canada Limited to formulate rules and regulations for safe operation of its aerial tramway,
underground and surface railways, and hoisting operations. These rules and regulations,
when drafted, were approved by the Minister and passed by Order in Council. It also
became necessary for the Department to set up a system so that the company could
examine its locomotive operators, hoist operators, and tramway operators at Kemano,
and upon receipt of the completed examination papers the Department issued permits for
the various employees who have passed satisfactory examinations to operate the equipment. In addition to setting up this system of examination by the company, the Inspectors
from the Department conducted several safety lectures at the various operations of
Morrison-Knudsen Company of Canada Limited on the Alcan project. This was done to
familiarize the operators of locomotive equipment with railway operation.
Aerial Tramways
The three passenger-carrying aerial tramways in the vicinity of Vancouver and the
passenger-carrying aerial tramway at Rossland were inspected during the year, and certificates of operation issued by the Department. These tramways continued to operate in
a safe condition, and no serious accidents were reported during 1952.   In certain cases, RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1952
II 13
however, accidents were avoided by the use of safety devices recommended by the Department. Several aerial-tramway engineers and designers consulted the Department during
the year with respect to aerial-tramway design on projected aerial tramways in British
Columbia and other parts of Canada. The report on construction and safety in operation
of aerial tramways which was published by the Department in 1951 has been well received
in all parts of the world, and, during 1952, copies were requested from New Zealand,
Australia, England, and the United States.
Waterworks-construction
During the year, inspections were made of the hoisting and skip equipment at the
Cleveland Dam being constructed adjacent to Vancouver. An aerial tramway is employed
on this project, which was surveyed and inspected by Department Inspectors.
At a tunnelling operation near Nanaimo Lake, Vancouver Island, an air-locomotive
was hydrostatically tested and passed for safe operation.
Safety and Accident-prevention
The safety-first educational programme instituted in 1947 was stepped up during
1952, and safety lectures employing the use of educational safety films were shown at
several of the logging operations. There was one fatal accident during 1952 on a logging-
railway. This accident was the result of a log falling off a loaded logging-car while it was
being unloaded at the railway dump. This accident was attributed to thoughtlessness on
the part of the injured workman rather than a failure or misuse of equipment. One fatal
accident occurred on the underground railway of the Alcan project prior to the time the
Department made inspections and instituted its safety programme at this operation. This
accident was attributed to thoughtlessness and ignorance on the part of an uncertified
locomotive operator.
In order to intensify the competitive spirit for safety on the logging-railways, a safety
trophy was suggested in 1950. It can be reported at this time that during 1952 the Engle-.
wood operation of the Canadian Forest Products Limited has been such that the safety
award should be presented to this company for the year. On the mining-railways, the
Morrissey, Fernie & Michel Railway was presented with a trophy in token of its outstanding safety record for 1951 and 1952.
Following is a report of the inspection work performed during the year 1952: —
Hydrostatic tests applied to boilers  146
Internal and external inspections of boilers  9
Internal-combustion locomotives inspected and certified  18
Internal-combustion locomotive cranes inspected and certified 8
Air-locomotives hydrostatically tested  10
Power rail-cars inspected and certified  47
Diesel-electric locomotives inspected and certified  21
Electric locomotives inspected on narrow-gauge electric railways   15
Electric locomotives inspected on Alcan project  12
Locomotives inspected other than hydrostatic tests  136
Number of cars inspected on industrial railways  1,062
Number of cars inspected on common-carrier railways  125
Miles of underground trackage inspected at Alcan project  8
Number of miles of track inspected  1,100
Number of aerial tramways inspected in British Columbia  5
Number of aerial-tramway inspections conducted  15
Locomotive engineers examined and certified  11 II 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Conductors examined and certified  13
Power-car operators examined and certified  14
Locomotive-crane engineers examined and certified  7
Train-dispatchers examined and certified  1
Internal-combustion locomotive engineers examined and certified   2
Engineers  examined and certificates issued,  Pacific  Great
Eastern Railway  9
Electric-locomotive operators examined and certified, Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada Ltd  36
Underground hoistmen examined and certified,  Morrison-
Knudsen Co. of Canada Ltd. (Alcan project)  31
Logging-truck operators examined and certified  65
B.C. Electric Railway street and interurban cars inspected  12
B.C. Electric Railway diesel and electric locomotives inspected
and certified  16
Accidents investigated on B.C. Electric Railway  14
Fatal accidents on B.C. Electric Railway  3
Accidents investigated on logging and industrial railways  6
Fatal accidents on logging-railways  2
Accidents investigated on Pacific Great Eastern Railway  2
Fatal accidents on Pacific Great Eastern Railway  1
Accidents investigated on logging-truck roads  4
Kemano project hoist designs approved  2
New diesel-electric locomotives imported  2
Inspections made of fire-protective appliances on industrial
railways   51
Inspections made of fire-protective appliances on locomotives
of C.P.R., C.N.R. and G.N.R. for Board of Transport
Commissioners   475
Safety lectures conducted by the Department  5
Truck air-brake lectures conducted by the Department  17
LIST OF APPENDICES
A list of Executive Council certificates issued is given in Appendix A.
Accidents on railways under Provincial jurisdiction are shown in Appendix B.
Industrial railways operating during the year are shown in Appendix C.
A list of locomotive cranes in industrial plants inspected by the Department is shown
in Appendix D.
A summary of the mileage of all railways operating in the Province is shown in
Appendix E.
J RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1952 II 15
APPENDICES
APPENDIX A
Certificates Issued under the Provisions of the " Railway Act "
Certificate No.
Granting B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. exemption from standard clearances
at freight-sheds, Carrall St., Vancouver  792
Amending Rule 62, Part I, Location, Construction, and Clearances  793
Approving standard freight tariffs on the line of the B.C. Electric Railway
Co. Ltd.   794
Granting District of Matsqui leave to construct a level crossing over tracks
of B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. at Brewster Road  795
Approving application of B.C. Forest Products Ltd. to construct a bridge over
Three Arms Creek, Renfrew District  796
Granting B.C. Forest Products Ltd.  leave to construct an extension to a
logging-railway, Renfrew District  797
Approving standard freight tariffs on the line of the B.C. Electric Railway Co.
Ltd., and rescinding Certificate No. 794  798
Approving aerial tramways Lifts Ltd., Hollyburn Aerial Trams Ltd., and Red
Mountain Ski Club Society to be common-carrier railways, and rescinding
Certificates Nos. 308, 314, and 315  799
Approving aerial tramway Grouse Mountain Resorts Ltd. to be a common-
carrier railway  800
Approving Rules and Regulations, Part XI, Governing Location, Construction,
and Operation of Aerial Tramways  801
Granting leave to B.C. Forest Products Ltd. to construct a bridge over Sam
Creek, Renfrew District  802
Approving special rules and regulations for operation of an aerial tramway at
Kemano by the Morrison-Knudsen Co. of Canada Ltd  803
Approving location of line of aerial tramway of the Morrison-Knudsen Co. of
Canada Ltd. at Kemano  804
Approving by-laws setting forth standard rates to be charged for traffic by
Hollyburn Aerial Trams Ltd., Grouse Mountain Resorts Ltd., and Lifts
Ltd.   805
Granting leave to B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. to construct a spur track
across Thirteenth St. at Third Ave., New Westminster  806
Approving application of Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co. to operate its line
of railway from Quesnel to Prince George  807
Approving standard freight tariff on the line of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.   808
Granting Districts of Surrey and Delta leave to construct a level crossing over
B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd. tracks at Townline Road  809
Approving application of Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co. to reconstruct
bridge at Mile 148.9 from Squamish  810
Approving construction and operation of Howe Sound Pulp Co. Ltd  316
Approving construction and operation of Morrison-Knudsen Co. of Canada
Ltd.  317 II 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDIX B
Accident Report, 1952
Killed Injured
B.C. Electric Railway Co. Ltd.-
Passengers     __ 44
Employees     __
Other persons     2 15
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.—
Passengers     __
Employees
Other persons   1
Industrial Railways—
Employees   2 4
Other persons   __
Locomotive cranes—Employees   __
Totals   5 63
J RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1952
II 17
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II 19
. II 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDIX D
List of Cranes and Other Auxiliary Motive Power in Industrial Plants
Inspected by Railway Department
Alaska Pine & Cellulose Ltd Crane No. D.R. 304.
Alberta Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 42998 B.C.
Anderson Bros. Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 11905 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 302.
Arrowhead Wood Preservers Ltd Crane No. D.R. 293.
Crane No. D.R. 322.
Crane No. 22633 B.C.
Associated Foundry Ltd Crane No. 21532 B.C.
Baxter, J. H., & Co. Ltd Internal-combustion Crane No. 1.
B.C. Cement Co. Ltd Crane No. 21439 B.C.
5 narrow-gauge gasoline-locomotives.
B.C. Forest Products Ltd. (Sawmill) Crane No. D.R. 320.
Britannia Mining & Smelting Co. Ltd 6 narrow-gauge electric locomotives.
Burrard Dry Dock Co. Ltd Crane No. 50514 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 292.
Gas Locomotive Crane No. 4.
Capital Iron & Metals Ltd Crane No. D.R. 295.
Crane No. 44386 B.C.
Columbia Cellulose Co. Ltd Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada Ltd.—
Kimberley Crane No. 12772 B.C.
Electric Locomotive No. 1.
Electric Locomotive No. 2.
Electric Locomotive No. 3.
Trail 12 narrow-gauge electric locomotives.
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd Crane No. 44129 B.C.
Crane No. 44317 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 347.
Derrick Crane No. 19.
Dominion Tar & Chemical Co. Ltd Crane No. 44441 B.C.
Gas-switcher No. 1.
Crane No. D.R. 283.
Gas Locomotive Crane No. 6.
Esquimalt Dry Dock Crane No. 22582 B.C.
Portable Boiler No. D.R. 314.
Hillcrest Lumber Co. Ltd. (Sawmill) Crane No. 40049 B.C.
Crane No. 44315 B.C.
Jamieson Construction Co. Ltd Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
King, M. B., Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 12430 B.C.
Lions Gate Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 12370 B.C.
Lumby Timber Co. Ltd Crane No. D.R. 343.
Mayo Lumber Co. (1943) Ltd Crane No. D.R. 321.
MacMillan & Bloedel Ltd.—
Sawmill Crane No. 40929 B.C.
Crane No. 44666 B.C.
Pulp-mill Gas Internal-combustion Locomotive No. 50.
Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
Northern Construction Co. Ltd Crane No. 43505 B.C.
Osborn Bay Wharf Co. Ltd Crane No. 21526 B.C.
Prince Rupert Drydock & Shipyard Crane No. D.R. 290.
Robertson & Hackett Mills Ltd Crane No. 12545 B.C.
Sigalet & Co. Ltd Crane No. 21089 B.C.
Sooke Lake Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 22632 B.C.
Timber Preservers Ltd   Crane No. 43807 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 288.
Timberland Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 12368 B.C.
Vancouver Steel Co. Ltd Crane No. D.R. 316.
Victoria Machinery Depot Ltd Crane No. D.R. 291.
Crane No. D.R. 305.
Western Bridge & Steel Fabricators Ltd   Crane No. D.R. 308.
Crane No. D.R. 309.
Yarrows Ltd Crane No. 376. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1952
II 21
APPENDIX E
Mileage of All Railways Operating in the Province
Mainland
^      Island
Total
Main
Line
Sidings
Main
Line
Sidings
Main
Line
Sidings
Under the jurisdiction of the Board of Transport Commissioners for Canada—
1,858.31
1,302.34
140.77
42.58
514.21
349.09
37.44
19.12
210.76
90.17
44.49
23.98
2,069.07
1,392.51
140.77
42.58
558.70
373.07
37.44
19.12
Totals -
3,344.00
919.86
300.93
68.47
3,644.93
988.33
Under the jurisdiction of the Provincial Government—
434.95
109.87
30.28
7.00
38.17
41.75
25.00
16.52
15.00
31.05
434.95
109.87
521.03
7.00
47.42
41.75
25.00
Industrial railways—
Standard gauge.  — —	
Standard gauge, Queen Charlotte Islands....	
490.75
104.84
121.36
15.00
9.25
3.75
34.80
620.27
129.32
500.00
108.59
1,120.27
237.91
3,964.27
1,049.18
800.93
177.06
4,765.20
1,226.24
Total mileage of all railways in British Columbia, 5,991.44.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1953
320-253-2105   

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