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Mental Health Services PROVINCES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31ST… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1953

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
Mental Health Services
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 3 1st
1952
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952
L  To His Honour C. Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province oj British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the Director of
Provincial Mental Health Services for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1952.
W. D. BLACK,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
November 24th, 1952.  The Honourable W. D. Black,
Provincial Secretary,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—Submitted herewith is the report of the operations of the Provincial Mental
Health Services for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1952.
The following figures summarize the tremendous problem and challenge which are
facing the Mental Health Services:— _- D    , ,-.
° Total Population
Year Admissions Increase
1948-49 ________•_  1,260 354
1949_50   1,415 306
1950-51   1,811 235
1951-52  2,175 285
Whilst it is true that out of the total admissions for the foregoing four years aggregating 6,661, 1,063 were over 65 years of age and 385 under 15 years of age, it will be
observed that 5,213 patients between those ages have been admitted during the four-
year period and that we are caring for 1,180 more patients than we were at March
31st, 1948.
However, the picture is not entirely without its bright side. The Crease Clinic of
Psychological Medicine received, during the year under review, 963 patients, of whom
791 were returned to the community within the period of four months. Of those discharged from the Crease Clinic during the year, 87.3 per cent were able to be discharged in full direct to the community. Therein, and in treating mental illness in still
earlier stages, lies our great hope of being able to arrest the rate of admission of patients
to the Provincial Mental Hospital itself.
Why the Mental Health Services and Mental Hospitals should be relegated to the
background of public interest is very hard to understand by those of us who are closely
allied with and responsible for dealing with this tremendous problem. People are prone
to consider our patients in the mass rather than as individuals who, before they came
under our care, were citizens living their own lives and having their own interests.
It is perhaps because the fear of the unknown and the strange is still prevalent.
This will exist until mental illness is recognized and accepted as treatable and curable,
as is physical illness if discovered in its early stages. There is no reason for any lessening of the optimism that I expressed in my letter of transmission contained in the
1950-51 Report. However, that optimism was predicated on the hope that the anticipated facilities to be made available to that hard-working and inspired section of Civil
Servants who are charged with the tremendous task of administering to the mentally
sick would materialize. These facilities are required urgently, not only to accommodate
the increasing numbers of our citizens who are admitted annually, not only to enable
an extension of modern treatment techniques which even with the present limited operation have already brought our Mental Hospitals so rapidly out of the custodial era and
into the true hospital era, but to help those who have not yet reached the stage where
domiciliary care is required and to extend preventive services. Without these facilities
the new Mental Hospital, complete in all branches to accommodate 1,500 patients,
plans for which were optimistically shelved two years ago, is inevitable within the next
five years.
For the next few years, at least, our programme of urgent construction must play
a dual role, and in this connection I would refer you to " Future Policy " in Dr. Gee's
report.   Side by side should be developed:—
(a) Accommodation to relieve the present overcrowding in Essondale, which
retards the great efforts of our treatment staff in giving adequate individual attention to the patients. Coupled with this is the need for
accommodation to prevent still further overcrowding. At this writing
it is predicted that by March 31st,  1953, we shall have 290 patients
L Q 6 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
more in residence than we had at the beginning of the year, and during
that same period not less than 2,800 patients will have been admitted.
Projected plans include 300 beds at Woodlands and 300 at the Homes
for the Aged.    These, when complete, would relieve the situation at
Essondale to a certain extent.
(b} A day hospital and out-patient unit.    The need for these is most pressing.    In operation, they will do much to prevent the necessity for the
admission of patients requiring domiciliary care for whom no facilities
exist at the present time.   It is confidently anticipated that these facilities
in operation should effect a levelling-off and perhaps a gradual reduction
in the numbers of our domiciled patients, notwithstanding the steady
increase in the population of British Columbia,
(c) An  observation  and treatment centre for emotionally  disturbed pre-
adolescents.    This unit has been advocated by the Juvenile Courts for
years to help this category to become useful citizens.    They are at the
" fork of the Y " and will break one way or the other—to mental illness
or to crime—maybe both.
It is, perhaps, not generally realized that mentally ill persons are still subject to all
the physical ills of the mentally well.    Included in our patient population are nearly
200 suffering from active tuberculosis.    Communicable diseases are very difficult to
control in an overcrowded environment.   I am glad to be able to report that the plans
for the 220-bed tubercular-mental hospital may be ready for tenders before the end of
the fiscal year 1952-53.
Since you, Sir, assumed your important portfolio, you have managed to find time
on many occasions to visit the Mental Hospitals and have familiarized yourself with the
vastness of the operation. I venture to think that you have realized the challenge. The
6,000 patients in our Mental Hospitals and the group of Civil Servants who are dedicated to their treatment and ultimate discharge are grateful to you for your help and
encouragement.
It is gratifying to note that leaders in the community are becoming increasingly
aware of the need for education in mental health.
I strongly commend to your attention the staff of the Provincial Mental Health
Services. Under the able day-to-day administration and leadership of Dr. A. M. Gee,
Director of Mental Health Services, the staff, the members of which are dedicated to
the welfare of the patient, carry out their duties efficiently and with the utmost patience
and understanding.
Finally, Sir, I must refer to the great loss that our Mental Health Services suffered
in the death of one of our most valued colleagues. Dr. Gee, in his report, refers to the
serious illness of Dr. E. J. Ryan. It is with the utmost regret that I have to report the
death of Dr. Ryan, which occurred shortly after the end of the period covered by the
report. In Dr. Ryan, who at the time of his death was Senior Medical Superintendent
at Essondale, and whose association with the Mental Hospitals extended over some
thirty-five years, all of us have lost a dear friend, and the Province an able and faithful
servant.
Respectfully submitted.
R. A. PENNINGTON,
Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Deputy Provincial Secretary's Office,
November 22nd, 1952, TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART I.—MEDICAL
Page
Officers and Staff, List of .... , ... 11
Chart—Showing Admissions, Discharges, Deaths, and Net Increase _:  13
Report—Director of Mental Health Services  15
Report of Crease Clinic—Dr. Davidson  28
Reports of Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale—
Report by Dr. Ryan  29
Treatment Services—Dr. Davidson  30
Department of Occupational Therapy—
(a)  Women's Division—Mrs. Draper.... _■_  33
ib) Men's Division—Mr. Hall .  33
Department of Recreational Therapy—Mr. Brown ... __„ .  36
Audio-Visual Department—Mr. Walker  37
Library Report—Mrs. Fraser  39
Department of Physical Medicine—Dr. Davidson  40
Dental Department—Dr. Johnsen ___  41
Optical Report—Mr. Woodbridge :  41
Beauty-parlour Report—Mrs. Townsend ___:  42
Department of Dietetics—Miss Pelling :  42
Department of Neurology—Dr. Fister _. ._...:  43
Laboratory Report—Dr. Nicolson _■_  44
Department of Radiology—Dr. Jackson .  47
-■■■•    Department of Psychology—Miss Elart .  48
Department of Social Service—Miss Carroll •_ :  51
•    Department of Nursing Service—
(a) Women's Division—Miss Pullan.-.  56
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Creber ... 58
Department of Nursing Education—Miss Smith ....  58
Department of Rehabilitation—
(a) Women's Division—Dr. McNair . __. 59
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Addison  60
Reports of The Woodlands School—
Report by Dr. Sauriol  63
Educational Department—Mrs. Smith  66
Department of Occupational Therapy—
(a) Girls' Division—Miss Morrison _._ ,__ 68
(b) Boys' Division—Mr. Mercer  69
Department of Recreational Therapy—Mr. Lynes ,  69
Department of Dentistry—Dr. Mathison .  71
Department of Dietetics—Miss Neighbor  71
Department of Radiology—Mr. Barteluk .  72
Department of Nursing Service—
(a) Women's Division—Miss Sanders  72
ib) Men's Division—Mr. Elliot •  73
Department of Nursing Education—
(a) Women's Division—Miss Johnstone  74
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Nash  74
Department of Psychology—Mr. Borthwick  75
Department of Social Service—Miss Carroll  76
Statistical Report—Miss Hardy  78 Q 8 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Reports of Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz— page
Report by Dr. d'Easum  81
Department of Occupational Therapy—Mr. Helander  82
Report of Shoe and Tailor Shops—Mr. Campbell  82
Department of Recreational Therapy—Mr. Lowndes  83
Dental Report—Dr. James  84
Department of Nursing Service—Mr. McLeod  84
Department of Nursing Education—Mr. Lowndes  85
Reports of Geriatrics Division—
Report by Dr. Caunt  87
Tables on Movement of Population  89
Reports of Child Guidance Clinics—Dr. Byrne  91
(a) Social Service to Child Guidance Clinics—Mr. Ricketts  96
(b) Psychology Department—Miss Munro  98
Report of Research Division—Dr. Gibson  100
Medical Statistical Tables, Mental Hospitals—
1. Movement of Population  103
2. Summary of Operations since Inception  105
3. Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths  106
4. Districts from Which Patients Were Admitted  107
5. Number of Attacks at Time of Admission  108
6. Reported Duration of Attack Prior to Admission  108
7. Reported Cause of Attack in Patients Admitted :  109
8. Probation, Number Discharged on  109
9. Discharges,  Alleged Duration of Illness Prior to Admission in Those
Discharged .  109
10. Deaths, Cause of, and Length of Time in Hospital  110
11. Psychoses of First Admissions  114
12. Psychoses of Readmissions  115
13. Age-groups of First Admissions by Psychoses  117
14. Age-groups of Readmissions by Psychoses  118
15. Economic Status of First Admissions by Psychoses  119
16. Use of Alcohol of First Admissions by Psychoses....  119
17. Conjugal Conditions of First Admissions by Psychoses  120
18. Conjugal Conditions of Readmissions by Psychoses  121
19. Education of First Admissions by Psychoses  122
20. Nativity of First Admissions by Age-groups   123
21. Country of Birth of First Admissions .  123
22. Citizenship of First Admissions  124
23. Religion of First Admissions _____ 124
24. Age-groups of First Admissions    125
25. Age-groups of Readmissions  125
26. Previous Occupations of First Admissions _.—  126
27. Method of Commitment of First Admissions  127
28. Method of Commitment of Readmissions  127
29. Rural-Urban Status of First Admissions by Psychoses   127
30. Age-groups of Discharged Patients by Psychoses  128
31. Duration of Last Hospital Residence of Discharged Patients by Psychoses 129
32. Conditions of Patients on Discharge by Psychoses  130
33. Age-groups of Patients Who Died  130
34. Age-groups of Patients at Time of Death by Psychoses  131 TABLE OF CONTENTS Q 9
Medical Statistical Tables, Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine— Page
1. Movement of Population  133
2. Summary of Operations since Inception :  134
3. Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths  134
4. Districts from Which Patients Were Admitted  135
5. Number of Attacks at Time of Admission  136
6. Alleged Duration of Attack Prior to Admission  136
7. Alleged Cause of Attack in Patients Admitted  136
8. Number Discharged and Results  137
9. Reported  Duration  of  Mental  Illness  Prior  to  Admission  in  Those
Discharged  137
10. Deaths, Cause of, and Length of Time in Hospital  137
11. Psychoses of First Admissions  138
12. Psychoses of Readmissions  139
13. Age-groups of First Admissions by Psychoses _ 141
14. Age-groups of Readmissions by Psychoses  _ 142
15. Economic Status of First Admissions by Psychoses  143
16. Use of Alcohol of First Admissions by Psychoses  143
17. Conjugal Conditions of First Admissions by Psychoses  144
18. Conjugal Conditions of Readmissions by Psychoses  144
19. Education of First Admissions by Psychoses  145
20. Nativity of First Admissions by Age-groups  145
21. Country of Birth of First Admissions  146
22. Citizenship of First Admissions  146
23. Religion of First Admissions  147
24. Age-groups of First Admissions  147
25. Age-groups of Readmissions  148
26. Previous Occupations of First Admissions  149
27. Method of Commitment of First Admissions  150
28. Method of Commitment of Readmissions  150
29. Rural-Urban Status of First Admissions by Psychoses  150
30. Age-groups of First Admissions by Psychoses  151
31. Duration of Last Hospital Residence of Discharged Patients by Psychoses 152
32. Condition of Patients on Discharge by Psychoses  153
33. Age-groups of Patients Who Died  153
34. Age-groups of Patients at Time of Death by Psychoses  154
PART II.—FINANCIAL
Report—Business Manager  156
Expense Statement, Psychopathic Department  159
Expense Statement, Headquarters  159
Financial Tables—
Mental Hospitals—
A. Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost for Past Ten
Years  160
B. Yearly Gross Expenditure, Analysis of, for the Past Ten Years  161
C. Summary of Gross and Net per Capita Cost in All Hospitals  162
D. Expense Statement, New Westminster  163
E. Expense Statement, Essondale  164
F. Expense Statement, Saanich  165
Revenue, Table of, for Past Ten Years  166
Expenditures under Dominion Mental-health Grants  167 Q  10 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Financial Tables—Continued Page
Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine—Summary of Costs, per Capita, and
Population  168
Homes for the Aged—
Port Coquitlam—
Summary of Costs, per Capita, and Population  169
Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost since Inception 169
Vernon—
Summary of Costs, per Capita, and Population  170
Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost since Inception 170
Terrace—■
Summary of Costs, per Capita, and Population    171
Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost since Inception 171
Summary of Gross and Net per Capita Cost in All Three Institutions  172
PART III.—COLONY FARM
General Financial Report—Business Manager  174
Profit and Loss Account  174
Dairy and Herds Department—Profit and Loss Account  175
Work-horse Department—Profit and Loss Account  175
Hog Department—Profit and Loss Account  176
Cannery—Profit and Loss Account  176
Orchard and Truck-garden—Profit and Loss Account  177
Field Crops and Pasturage—Profit and Loss Account  177
Tractors—Profit and Loss Account  178
Trucks—Profit and Loss Account  178
Maintenance and Administration, General  178
Miscellaneous Statements, Inventories, etc.—
Produce Supplied to Essondale  179
Produce Supplied to New Westminster—.  179
Accounts Receivable  179
Remittances to Treasury  179
Summary of Equipment Inventories  180
Orchard and Truck-garden Inventory  180 DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
Hon. W. D. Black, Provincial Secretary.
R. A. Pennington, O.B.E., Deputy Provincial Secretary.
A. M. Gee, M.D., CM., Director of Mental Health Services.
E. J. Ryan, M.D., CM., Senior Medical Superintendent.
A. L. Swanson, B.A., M.D., CM., M.H.A., Deputy Medical Superintendent.
Frederick A. Matheson, Business Manager.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL AND CREASE CLINIC
OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE, ESSONDALE
A. E. Davidson, B.A., M.D., Clinical Director.
B. F. Bryson, B.A., M.D., CM., Assistant Clinical Director (Men's Division).
F. E. McNair, B.A., M.D., CM., Assistant Clinical Director (Women's Division).
J. M. Jackson, M.D., Director of Radiology.
G. A. Nicolson, B.A., M.D., Director of Laboratories.
W. P. Fister, M.D., M.R.CP.(Edin.), F.R.C.P.
(Can.), Director of Neurology.
L. I. M. Coleman, B.Sc, M.D., CM.
P. D. Croft, B.Sc, M.D., CM.
C E. Derkson, M.D., CM.
H. Lawler, M.D.
L. Richardson, M.D., CM.
H. Stephenson, M.D.
E. Powles, B.A., M.D., CM.
E. Leyland, B.S., M.B.
R. Laidlaw, M.D.
D. Nixon, B.A., M.D., CM.
Marie Bryant, M.D.
S. W. Jackson, B.Com., M.D., CM.
Alice Yakushavich, B.A., M.D., CM.
R. G. Christie, B.A., M.D.
I. Kent, M.D., M.R.CS.(Eng.).
A. D. Hancock, M.D., M.R.CS.(Eng.).
A. G. E. Rowe, M.D., M.R.CS.(Eng.).
H. O. Johnsen, D.D.S.
C B. Watson, M.A., Administrative Assistant.
Miss A. J. Elart,  B.A., Psychological Clinic
Assistant.
J.  W.  Borthwick, B.A., Psychological Clinic
Assistant.
W. R. Brown, Director of Recreation.
K. Woolcock, Pharmacist.
G. H. Walker, Audio-Visual Department.
W. Creber, Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
W. Pritchard, Head Male Instructor.
R.
N.
G.
W.
E.
W.
R.
Pullan, R.N., B.A.Sc, Director of
Smith,  B.A.,  R.N.,  Instructor of
Miss E. M.
Nursing.
Miss  O.  J.
Nursing.
Miss A. K. Carroll, B.A., M.S.W., Supervisor,
Psychiatric Social Service.
Mrs. M. Spencer, B.H.E., Dietitian.
Mrs.  K.  Draper,  B.A.,  O.T.Reg.,  Supervisor,
Occupational Therapy (Women's Division).
R. T. Hall, Supervisor, Occupational Therapy
(Men's Division).
Mrs. H. Fraser, B.A., B.L.Sc, Librarian.
Mrs. I. H. Wedge, Branch Secretary.
Miss A. D. Dingle, Senior Stenographer.
Consultant Staff:
F. A. Turnbull, B.A., M.D., F.R.CS.(Can.), Neurosurgery.
Jas. W. Wilson, M.D., CM., F.R.C.S.(Can.), M.S.(Minn.), General Surgery.
Geo. T. Wilson, B.A., M.D., CM., F.R.CS.(Can.), General Surgery.
Business:
J. F. Anderson, Assistant Business Manager.
L. Fox, Paymaster.
G. A. Grieve, Cost Accountant.
Rev. John F. O'Neil, Protestant.
W. Gueho, Cashier.
W. Headridge, Steward.
Miss A. Makita, Business Stenographer.
Chaplains:
Rev. Father J. P. Kane, Roman Catholic.
Trades:
W. R. Meadows, B.E.(CE.), Superintendent of
Public Works.
T. Lamb, Foreman of Works.
J. Wilson, Chief Engineer.
W. R. Parks, Gardener Foreman.
T. Harrison, Electrician.
G. Matthews, Plumber.
Colony Farm:
W. B. Richardson, B.Sc. (Agriculture), Superintendent.
J. C. Purse, Head Tailor.
D. Anderson, Laundryman.
A. L. Blair, Barber.
W. A. Wardle, Chief Cook.
J. C. Merrick, Baker.
H. Young, Chief Painter.
11 Q  12
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
OFFICERS AND STAFF, THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL, NEW WESTMINSTER
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., CM., F.A.P.A.,
F.A.A.M.D., Medical Superintendent.
C. E. Benwell, M.B., Deputy Medical Superintendent.
R. D. S. Herrick, M.D., D.P.H., D.P.M.
A. P. Gould, M.D., CM.
Drs. Kenny and Matheson, Visiting Dentists.
Miss V. M. Sanders, R.N., Superintendent of
Nurses.
Mrs. M. E. Marr, B.H.E., Dietitian.
Miss M. C Hardy, Supervisor, Psychiatric
Social Service.
P. Barteluk, X-ray Technician.
Bus
W. O. Booth, Deputy Business Manager.
Rev. P. C. McCrae, Protestant.
C. M. Doyle, Foreman of Works.
C. Hauck, Chief Engineer.
W. Mercer, Head Carpenter.
C. Stapleton, Head Gardener.
L. S. Davies, Electrician.
G. Coulson, Laundryman.
Miss E. A. Johnstone, R.N., Instructress of
Nursing.
Mrs. Peggy Smith, School Principal.
H. Mercer, Industrial Arts Instructor.
J. Lynes, Recreational Instructor.
Miss M. E. Morrison, Occupational Therapist.
Miss M. G. Coulson, Clerk-Stenographer.
J. Elliot, Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
R. Nash, Instructor of Male Psychiatric
Nursing.
J. B. Woodward, B.A., Psychological Clinic
Assistant (on active service).
A. Fraser, Steward.
Chaplains:
Rev. Father D. J. McIntosh, Roman Catholic.
Trades:
H. W. Brownjohn, Plumber.
R. T. Ballard, Shoemaker.
L. Arnold, Barber.
J. Fraser, Head Painter.
W. Jenkins, Head Cook.
V. G. Copp, Baker.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME, COLQU1TZ
L. G. C. d'Easum, M.D., Medical Superintendent.
A. C C. Loat, Deputy Business Manager.
P. McLeod, Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
HOMES FOR THE AGED
T. G. Caunt, M.D., Medical Superintendent.
G. A. MacKinnon, M.D., CM., Medical Super- W. E. Skillicorn, Supervisor, Terrace.
intendent, Vernon.
CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
U. P. Byrne, M.D., D.P.H., D.I.H., Director.
G. M. Kirkpatrick, M.D.
R. G. E. Richmond, M.D., M.R.CS.(London).
Mrs. M. Hopkins, R.N., B.A.Sc, Public Health
Nurse.
Miss M. Munro, M.A., Supervising Psychologist.
D. B. Ricketts, B.A., M.S.W., Supervisor, Psychiatric Social Service.
RESEARCH DIVISION
W. C. Gibson, B.A., M.Sc, M.D., CM., D.Phil.(Oxon.), Director. Admissions
2200
ADMISSIONS, DISCHARGES, DEATHS AND
NET INCREASE IN THE
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
1937-38    TO    1951-52 INCLUSIVE
2200
2000
1800
T
T
V
A
1 DISCHAR0ES TO COMMUNm
ES  DEATHS
NET INCREASE IN HOSPITAL POPULATION
Each column represents the total number of admissions for a specific year. Note that the increase
in admissions for the last few years has accelerated tremendously. This increase is the result of
population gains and ageing of the community, but it is chiefly the result of the ever-widening scope
of modern psychiatry. Each new unit opened quickly receives a heavy demand for its services from
the community.
The white portion of each column represents the number of patients discharged to the community.
It will be seen that the proportion of discharges has increased at an even greater rate than the number
of admissions. The utilization of the most recent advances in treatment and the early detection of
mental illness means that many patients who previously might have become public charges for the
remainder of their lives now may return to their homes and lead useful lives.
The shaded portion of each column represents the number of deaths. The death rate has
decreased in proportion to the numbers of admissions. This decrease is the result of the advances in
general medicine and the development of many of the so-called "wonder drugs." The life-spans of
the aged patients, especially have been increased by these new treatments.
The net increase in hospital population is represented by the blackened portion of each column.
During the last few years it will be seen that the annual increase has been well over 200 patients.
This means that each year additional accommodation must be provided for between 200 and 300
patients. This residue of accumulated patients is made up, to a great extent, by the mental-defective
and senile groups, for whom little can be expected in the way of treatment and rehabilitation.
From a survey of the above it will be seen that provision must be made for the treatment and
care of an additional 200 to 300 patients each year. Simultaneously, provision must be made for
earlier treatment on a day-hospital basis in an effort to avoid, where possible, more expensive prolonged in-residence treatment.
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14 REPORT OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
For the Twelve Months Ended March 31st, 1952
PART I.—MEDICAL
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
R. A. Pennington, Esq., O.B.E.,
Deputy Provincial Secretary,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—In compliance with the " Mental Hospitals Act," the Eightieth Annual Report
of the British Columbia Mental Health Services is submitted herewith.
ORGANIZATION
The organization of a staff of over 2,000 members presents a major problem, particularly during changing times and expanding services.
The problems presented in the care and treatment of those suffering from mental
illnesses are similar to the problems presented in the care of those suffering from physical
illnesses. The same basic types of service are required, necessitating different types of
institutions to meet those requirements. Thus, we must have an active short-term treatment area, paralleling the active wards of the general hospital. We must have a larger
area for the treatment of more resistant illness requiring a more prolonged treatment
period. Similar wards are found in general hospitals. Special hospitals are built for
such physical illness as tuberculosis, where a longer treatment period is needed. In general medicine, we have a number of children born with various crippling diseases requiring
special institutions for their treatment. In the realm of psychiatry, we have a similar
problem in the care and treatment of the mentally defective child, the child who is born
undeveloped mentally. Here the treatment problem is largely educational. A fourth
type of illness, shared by both general medicine and psychiatry, is caused by degenerative
diseases occurring in later life. Special institutions have been provided for the care and
treatment of this group, which is expanding at such a rate that it constitutes our greatest
problem at the present time.
To meet these needs, we provide active short-term treatment, limited to four months,
in the Crease Clinic. We provide more prolonged treatment in the Mental Hospital.
The treatment and education of the subnormal child is carried on at The Woodlands
School in New Westminster. The treatment of the ageing group suffering from degenerative mental diseases is carried out in the Geriatrics Division with branches at Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and Terrace.
Future organization must more clearly delineate these three groups—the psychotic,
the mental defective, and the senile—so that each may be admitted direct to their respective institutions. Special legislation will be required with respect to the mental defective,
and more accommodation will be necessary with respect to the senile. When this has
been accomplished, we will be better able to segregate these groups and render more
efficient service to all three.
15     , Q  16 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
In addition to the above services, as in general medicine, we operate preventive
services in the nature of Child Guidance Clinics. A good deal of public education in the
matter of mental health emanates from these units.
Similar to general medicine we need, but do not have as yet, an out-patient department in the form of a day hospital where patients may come for treatment and advice
while still remaining in their homes and in their employment. It is felt that with such
an addition to our armamentarium we would be able to prevent many from becoming
patients in the more prolonged treatment areas.
Great emphasis is being placed on rehabilitation and research in all branches of
medicine. I am pleased to report that these two newer departments in our organization
are functioning to great advantage. Detailed reports of these divisions will be found
elsewhere in this Report.
The general structure of the Mental Health Services remains unchanged during the
year under review. With increasing organizational demands it becomes more apparent
that the position of Deputy Director, shown vacant on the organizational chart, should be
filled in the near future.
We have found great difficulty in obtaining replacements in certain departments,
chiefly medical, occupational therapy, and dietary.
Certain radical changes have been made in our Nurses' Training School programme.
The course of training has been shortened to two years, without decreasing the content
of the course. A block system of training has been effective in speeding up the training
of nurses so desperately needed at this time due to expanding services. Student nurses
in training have been removed from Civil Service in so far as appointments are concerned,
and groups now report twice a year for training. A committee on nursing, chaired by
the Senior Medical Superintendent, has been set up to deal with all matters related to
promotion, appointment, and discipline.
The Council of Psychiatric Nurses which is responsible for the registering and
licensing of psychiatric nurses is proving of benefit, and the British Columbia Psychiatric
Nurses' Association provides a good influence. These changes all do much to raise the
standards of nursing personnel and training, which is reflected in better care to our
patient-groups. The addition of the psychiatric aide to our staff has proven satisfactory
in releasing many trained staff from activities unrelated to nursing.
Certain minor changes have been made with reference to the organization of the
medical staff. It has been found advantageous to remove the appointment of resident
physicians from Civil Service due to the fact that a great many of these physicians come
for a period of one or two years' experience with no intent to remain in the service. This
situation has been brought about by the requirements of the Royal College of Physicians
and Surgeons, Canada, who advise that no physician proceeding to certification in the
specialty may receive all of his training in any one centre. It is to be expected, therefore,
that we will have a great interchange of junior physicians. This situation will rectify
itself as a greater number of experienced and certified psychiatrists become available as
a result of the impetus of the present training programme. It is hoped that the postgraduate training of physicians in psychiatry will next year be under the segis of the
Medical School of the University of British Columbia.
ADMISSIONS AND SEPARATIONS
Table No. 1 gives in summary the total intake and separations occurring in the
Mental Health Services, including the Crease Clinic, the Provincial Mental Hospitals at
Essondale and Colquitz, The Woodlands School at New Westminster, together with the
three units of the Homes for the Aged at Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and Terrace. DIRECTOR'S REPORT Q 17
Table No. I.—Mental Health Services, April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Male
Female
Total
Intake
701
230
147
73
40
8
723
61
64
75
48
5
1,424
Non-psychotic    	
291
211
148
88
Returned from escape    	
13
1,199
976
2,175
Separations
619
141
27
225
561
188
8
121
1,180
329
35
Died  	
346
Totals                    	
1,012
878
1,890
Summary
  2,175
1,890
      285
Table No. II gives a comparative analysis of admissions over the past seven years.
Table No. II.—Mental Health Services
Year
Total
Admissions
Admissions
Voluntary
Population
Index of
Admissions
Over 65 Years
Under 15 Years
Admissions
Increase
Increase1
1945-46.	
834
206
49
33
147
17.62
1946-47	
880
207
52
40
140
15.91
1947-48 	
1,111
225
69
91
316
28.44
1948-49 	
1,260
270
63
165
354
28.09
1949-50	
1,415
230'
72
297
306
21.62
1950-51	
1,811
262
148
504
235
12.98
1951-52	
2,175
306
97
637
285
13 05
1 Percentage ratio of increase in population to admissions.
Reference to the above tables shows the increase of admissions over the years.
There is every indication that there will be a similar rise next year. However, in spite of
this sharp rise, the separations have kept pace and the population increase has not been
out of proportion as reflected in the index of increase. It must be borne in mind that the
Crease Clinic was in operation for the full twelve-month period. Here, the turnover is
very rapid, the maximum period of hospitalization being four months. Another factor
influencing the rise in admissions was the opening of the Home for the Aged unit at
Terrace, B.C., and the admission of 306 elderly patients, the highest number to be
admitted of this group in any year. You will also note a great increase in the-number
of voluntary patients, 637 such patients being admitted. A good many of these patients
were hospitalized for only a short period and the majority were admissions to the Crease
Clinic. Rapid medical and psychiatric advances have changed the whole pattern of
hospital care. Instead of a repository to keep mentally sick people, the hospital is
becoming a centre for diagnosis and treatment with a much greater turnover in population.
It must be pointed out that when medical progress shortens the hospital stay, it raises the
per-patients per diem cost. The horizons of psychiatry are widening very rapidly, and the
sphere of service to the community greatly extended.
Table No. Ill shows the intake and separations occurring in the Crease Clinic during
the twelve months under review. Q  18 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1951-52
Table No. III.—Crease Clinic, April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Male
Female
Total
Intake
392
27
3
1
521
19
0
0
913
46
3
1
Totals _ _       	
423
540
963
Separations
Dicharged in full to community  	
326
59
1
6
465
55
0
6
791
114
Discharged in full to Home for the Aged    .	
Deaths	
1
12
392
526
918
Summary
Intake 	
Separations
Net increase
963
918
45
In reviewing the above table, it must be remembered that all patients are discharged
at the end of the four-month treatment period by statute. Discharge may be to the
community or by committal to the Mental Hospital where a treatment period longer than
four months is required. It is important to note that of the group discharged during
the twelve-month period, 87.3 per cent were able to be discharged in full direct to the
community.
GENERAL COMMENTS
Generally speaking, the health of the patients has been very good throughout the
year. Mild epidemics of diphtheria, scarlet fever, and German measles occurred among
the children at The Woodlands School. The symptoms were not severe and the situation
was kept under control. The amount of laboratory work required in connection with such
illnesses indicated the need of laboratory services at The Woodlands School.
During the year we experienced a number of cases of diphtheria, limited to the East
Lawn Building, Women's Division, at Essondale. The great overcrowding in this area
creates a marked hazard with reference to infectious diseases. Under present conditions
it is impossible to segregate patients and infections spread rapidly. An active programme
of immunization is carried out continually, and it is only in this way that we are able to
keep free of major epidemics. The same preventive programme is carried out with regard
to our staff, who as a result of their employment are constantly exposed. The problem
of tuberculosis is also greatly increased by overcrowded conditions. An active case-
finding programme has been set up as well as staff immunization. We are indebted to
the local Medical Health Officers for assistance in dealing with our infective conditions,
and to the Division of Tuberculosis Control for guidance in our anti-tuberculosis programme. It is imperative that a special building be constructed for the treatment of
infectious illnesses, including tuberculosis. This building is at the present time in the
planning stage, and I would urge its construction at the earliest opportunity.
Dr. Ralph M. Chambers, Chief Inspector of the Inspection Board of the American
Psychiatric Association, conducted a complete survey of the hospitals in the Essondale
area. Dr. Chambers spent two weeks at the hospital and, following his visit, submitted
a comprehensive report which will be of assistance to us in future development.
Mental Health Week was observed in Canada for the first time during the first week
of May. Every effort was made to draw matters of mental health to the attention of the
general public. The annual graduating exercises for psychiatric nurses were held on
May 3rd, 1951.   The ceremony was held in the New Westminster lunior High School DIRECTOR'S REPORT
Q 19
Auditorium. Twelve hundred guests were in attendance. It is felt that the exercises do
a great deal to further public relations and stimulate recruitment of nursing personnel.
Mr. R. A. Pennington acted as chairman. The Honourable W. T. Straith, Provincial
Secretary, brought greetings from the Government. The main address of the evening was
delivered by Dr. H. P. Johns, Director of the Summer School, Department of Education.
Our first open-house day was held at the Crease Clinic on May 4th, this being one
of the events of Mental Health Week. The day was a great success, and some 500 people
toured the Clinic and saw its complete facilities. It is hoped to repeat this occasion
again in future years.
The fifth annual gymnastic display was held at The Woodlands School on April 19th
and 20th. This display was open to the public and on both occasions a capacity audience
greeted the performers.
The fourth annual sports day was held at Essondale on September 4th. This yearly
event is becoming increasingly popular, the whole day being spent on the lawns in sports
activities and games. The Vancouver Firemen's Band provided music throughout the
day. Hot dogs, ice-cream, and lemonade were served to the group, followed by outdoor
dancing. We were pleased to have with us our Minister and Deputy Minister on this
occasion.   A group of 1,500 patients participated in the activities.
The motion-picture film " Breakdown " was completed during the year. The film
was made by the National Film Board and was financed through Federal grants. The
hospital sequences were all taken at the Crease Clinic. The film had its premiere in
Chilliwack. It was shown as a main feature at the annual meeting of the American
Psychiatric Association in Cincinnati and the annual meeting of the Canadian Medical
Association in Montreal. Copies of this film have been in constant use as part of our
educational programme.
I am very happy to report that some much needed new construction is under way.
A new 100-bed unit has been completed at the Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam.
This building was opened for occupancy of elderly women on March 29th, 1952. This
will enable us to admit women from the waiting list whose admission has been long
delayed due to lack of accommodation.
The additional wards at the Home for the Aged at Terrace were brought into use
on October 23rd, 1951. One hundred and one male patients, together with a group of
fifty male patients from the Vernon unit, were transferred to Terrace by train. The
transfer of this group filled the Terrace unit to capacity.
On January 15th, 1952, a group of elderly patients was transferred by special train
from the Essondale area to the aged unit at Vernon. This group included thirty-three
women and twenty-three men.
I am pleased to report that the new recreational therapy centre at Essondale, " Pennington Hall," was opened for patient-use in September, 1951. This will be a great asset
to our recreational treatment programme. The equipment and furnishings for this
building are being obtained through Federal grants.
The bricking-in of the verandas on the west end of the West Lawn Building has
been completed.   This work has been urgently needed for security reasons.
The installation of a new switchboard at the Crease Clinic has been completed.
This board handles all telephone communications, both within the whole Essondale and
Home for the Aged areas at Port Coquitlam, as well as incoming and outgoing calls.
This greatly improves our service, which has been the cause of many complaints for
years.   Three operators are required to man the complete board.
Three new 100-bed units are under construction at The Woodlands School. On
their completion, it will be possible for us to transfer many mentally defective patients
from Essondale and also to admit a good number who are presently held on a waiting list.
There is an excess of 150 such patients under 6 years of age who are awaiting admission. Q 20 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
A contract was let in October, 1951, for the construction of a 100-bed Nurses'
Home to accommodate the additional staff that will be required to staff these units.
Contract has been let for a new laundry and stores building at Essondale. This
unit has been urgently needed for some time. Our present laundry plant is unable to
cope with present demands and extra shifts have been operating. When the new building
is in operation, it is proposed to do all the laundering for The Woodlands School as well
as the Essondale area. This will allow abandonment of the old laundry at The Woodlands
School, built in 1874.
MENTAL-HEALTH GRANTS
The Government of Canada for the fourth year made available to British Columbia
a grant to assist in providing mental-health services for the people. The Department of
National Health and Welfare has administered the grant on behalf of the Government
of Canada and has been most helpful in the consideration given to our projects, which
this year have included professional training, equipment and supplies, research, personnel,
and community mental-health programmes. A total of $347,669 was expended on these
projects in 1951-52.
Professional Training
Miss B. J. Mitchell completed a one-year course in teaching and supervision in
nursing at the University of British Columbia in June, 1951, and rejoined the staff of
the School of Psychiatric Nursing as instructor in the School of Psychiatric Nursing.
Miss A. J. Elart completed a one-year postgraduate course in clinical psychology
at San Jose State College in August, 1951, and rejoined the staff of the Crease Clinic as
Psychological Clinic Assistant.   -
Miss D. R. Begg completed a one-year course in psychiatric social work at McGill
University in July, 1951, and rejoined the staff of the Social Service Department of the
Crease Clinic as Case-work Supervisor.
Miss Margaret Stewart commenced a one-year course in psychiatric social work
at McGill University in September, 1951.
Miss Ada Parsons, R.N., completed a six-month postgraduate course in operating-
room technique and management at the Vancouver General Hospital in February, 1952.
Dr. B. F. Bryson completed a three-month postgraduate course in psychiatry at the
Langley-Porter Clinic, San Francisco, in October, 1951.
Grants to the Department of Psychology and School of Social Work, University of
British Columbia, were continued in 1951-52 but on a somewhat reduced scale in
accordance with the established policy. These grants were of assistance in providing
graduate instruction in clinical psychology and psychiatric social work for interested
students.
Two teachers of the public-school system were selected to attend the course in
" Mental Hygiene for Teachers " at the University of Toronto. They replace the two
trained last year who have now returned, each to his own school system, to carry out the
important duties of the Mental Health Co-ordinator. The tuition fees for these courses,
along with the necessary travelling expenses and living allowance for the year, have been
provided by mental-health grant bursaries.
Equipment and Supplies
The mental-health grant was of great assistance in providing the necessary audiovisual and recreational equipment for use in our new Recreational Therapy Centre,
Pennington Hall.
Our Research Colony at the University received a grant to permit the purchase of
necessary specialized scientific equipment. Some of the supplies and materials employed
in the research were purchased with the aid of the mental-health grant. DIRECTOR'S REPORT
Q 21
Occupational-therapy equipment and supplies were again authorized for the Crease
Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale and The Woodlands School, New
Westminster.
This support has been of great assistance in the development and maintenance of
our activities programme.
Specialized therapeutic apparatus has been supplied for the treatment services at
Essondale, and great assistance has been given to the scientific equipment for the
laboratory and dispensary in the new admission unit at The Woodlands School. The
new units at The Woodlands School have also been given aid in the provision of equipment for the playrooms.
Community Mental-health Programmes
The mental-health programmes of the local health authorities of Greater Victoria
and Greater Vancouver have continued to participate in the mental-health grant, and
projects for hiring professional personnel and the provision of travelling expenses have
received approval in the current fiscal year.
The Greater Vancouver Metropolitan Health Committee mental-health programme
was aided by the provision of a bursary to enable a public-health nursing supervisor to
attend the School of Social Work, University of British Columbia.
The psychiatric services at the Vancouver General Hospital have continued to
receive assistance by means of grants to pay salaries for personnel in the Epilepsy Clinic
and Psychiatric Ward.
Staff Increases
The consultant staff of the Mental Health Services was strengthened by the appointment of Dr. James Wilson and Dr. George Wilson as consultants in the specialty of
general surgery.
Dr. F. A. Turnbull continued to serve as consultant in neurosurgery.
Both these consultant services were supported by mental-health grants, and it is
hoped that consultants in other medical and surgical specialties may be appointed and
be supported by mental-health grants.
The Rehabilitation Department has continued to receive mental-health grant support
and is serving a most useful purpose, as the detailed report printed elsewhere discloses.
The large projects to provide salaries for physicians, psychologists, laboratory technicians, occupational therapists, dietitians, and psychiatric nurses have been continued
in 1951-52, and the treatment record of the Mental Health Services is the indication of
the value of these projects.
COUNCIL OF PSYCHIATRIC NURSES
The " Psychiatric Nurses Act" makes provision for a council to be known as the
" Council of Psychiatric Nurses " and states that the Council shall " govern, control, and
administer the affairs of licensed psychiatric nurses." The composition of the council is
established by the statute as follows:-
(a)
(b)
(c)
id)
The Deputy Provincial Secretary.
The Director of Mental Health Services, who shall be, ex officio, Chairman of the Council.
Five members appointed by the Hospital Council of the British Columbia
Mental Health Services, of whom at least one shall be a member of the
College of Physicians and Surgeons of British Columbia, and all of whom
shall hold office for a term of three years and be eligible for reappointment.
Four members appointed by the British Columbia Psychiatric Nurses'
Association, all of whom shall hold office for a term of three years and be
eligible for reappointment. Q 22 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
The Council, established in accordance with the terms of the Act, first met at the
Crease Clinic, Essondale, July 4th, 1951.   It was composed as follows:—
R. A. Pennington, Deputy Provincial Secretary, Victoria, designated a member
by the Act.
Dr. A. M. Gee, Director of Mental Health Services, designated Chairman,
ex officio, by the Act.
Dr. L. E. Ranta, Assistant to the Dean, Faculty of Medicine, University of
British Columbia, appointed by the Hospital Council.
Dr. A. L. Swanson, Deputy Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, appointed by the Hospital Council.
Mrs. E. H. Duke, Assistant Superintendent of Nursing, Hollywood Sanitarium,
New Westminster, appointed by the Hospital Council.
Miss E. M. Pullan, Director of Nursing, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale,
appointed by the Hospital Council.
C. B. Watson, Administrative Assistant, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale,
appointed by the Hospital Council.
R.   A.   Jones,   Psychiatric  Nurse,   Provincial  Mental   Hospital,   Essondale,
appointed by the British Columbia Psychiatric Nurses' Association.
Miss M. McCormick, Charge Psychiatric Nurse, Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, appointed by the British Columbia Psychiatric Nurses' Association.
R. Strong, Instructor, School of Psychiatric Nursing, Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, appointed by the British Columbia Psychiatric Nurses'
Association.
W. L. Pritchard, Head Male Nursing Instructor, School of Psychiatric Nursing,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, appointed by the British Columbia
Psychiatric Nurses' Association.
R. A. Jones resigned from the Council on November 20th, 1951, upon the occasion
of his transfer to the staff of the Home for the Aged, Terrace, B.C., and the British
Columbia Psychiatric Nurses' Association appointed G. P. Turner, Psychiatric Nurse,
Provincial Mental Hospital, to fill the vacancy.
At the first meeting of the Council, C. B. Watson was named as secretary to record
the minutes of the proceedings, and William Cross, Deputy Chief Psychiatric Nurse,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, was appointed registrar.
The major business of the first meeting was to draft the necessary regulations
covering the following matters:-—
(1) Definition of psychiatric nurse.
(2) Conduct of examinations.
(3) Duties of licensed psychiatric nurse.
(4) Issuing, suspension, and cancellation of licences.
(5) Fees and dues.
(6) Renewal of licences.
(7) Investigation of complaints.
(8) Meetings of the Council.
The final draft of these regulations was forwarded by the Chairman to the Minister
and they were approved by Order in Council No. 1956, dated August 14th, 1951.
The initial meeting of the Council also defined the duties of the registrar and set the
stipend to be paid him. In addition, the form of the licence and other related details were
determined.
Two further meetings were held by the Council in the fiscal year under review—on
November 30th, 1951, and February 18th, 1952. A major item of business at the second
meeting was the acceptance of graduates of the Schools of Psychiatric Nursing of the
Mental Health Services of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba, as well as graduates DIRECTOR'S REPORT Q 23
of the course in Psychiatric Nursing under the auspices of the Royal Medico-Psychological
Association in the United Kingdom, as eligible for licensing in British Columbia upon
equal terms with graduates of the School of Psychiatric Nursing conducted by the British
Columbia Provincial Mental Health Services.
At the second meeting of the Council the necessary instructions concerning revenues
and expenditures with respect to the administration of the " Psychiatric Nurses Act"
were given. The registrar deposits all revenues with the business manager, Provincial
Mental Hospital, and all expenditures are charged to a special appropriation established
for the purpose.
At the end of the fiscal year 356 psychiatric nurses had been granted a licence to
practise in British Columbia.
STAFF CHANGES
As expected, there has been a rapid turnover of resident physicians during the past
twelve months. This has been brought about largely by certain regulations imposed by
the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada with reference to the training
of psychiatrists.
The following physicians were appointed: Dr. E. E. Leyland, Dr. W. R. Laidlaw,
Dr. R. D. Nixon, Dr. Marie Bryant, Dr. J. H. Treleaven, Dr. Stanley Jackson, Dr. Alice
Yakushavich, Dr. G. A. May, Dr. R. G. Christie, Dr. Ian Kent, Dr. I. M. Fast, and
Dr. A. J. E. Rowe.
The following resignations were received: Dr. B. W. Murphy, Dr. A. J. Shulman,
Dr. J. W. Warne, Dr. H. C. Lowe, Dr. E. Gens, Dr. J. E. Graham, Dr. G. A. May,
Dr. J. H. Treleaven, and Dr. I. M. Fast.
Dr. H. O. Johnsen and Dr. C. R. Young were appointed as dental surgeons. With
the appointment of a second dentist we are for the first time able to give proper dental
service to our patient population.
Miss Mona Parsons, R.N., Director of Nursing, terminated her services with the
department. Our best wishes go to her on her subsequent marriage to W. R. Brown.
The vacancy caused by this resignation has been filled by the promotion of Miss Edith M.
Pullan to the position of Director of Nursing. The vacancy in the School of Psychiatric
Nursing caused by Miss Pullan's promotion has been filled by the appointment of Miss
Orma J. Smith as Chief Instructress of Nurses.
It is with regret that I note the death of S. W. Inrig, Deputy Business Manager at
Colquitz, and W. Broadfoot, Steward at Vernon. Both these men gave valuable service
during their period of employment.
FUTURE POLICY
The future policy shows very little change in that set forth in the report of last year.
It is more urgent. It should be directed toward two aims: (1) Increased early active
treatment to prevent patients entering into the long-treatment Mental Hospital area, and
(2) to alleviate the present overcrowding existing in the Mental Hospital. These two
programmes should be carried on simultaneously. Legislation is required whereby we
may admit mentally retarded patients direct to The Woodlands School. Further accommodation is required that we may admit the elderly patients direct to the Home for the
Aged without prior admission to the Mental Hospital. Most urgent is the need for the
construction of a building for the care of the tubercular group of our patient population.
At the request of the Federal Government, a survey of overcrowding was carried out.
The survey was based on the standards of square footage required per bed in each type
of service, and shows the bed capacity according to those standards, the beds presently
set up, the excess beds over the standard, and the percentage of overcrowding. Q 24 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
The following table gives a brief summary of these findings:—
Bed Capacity
Beds Set Up
Excess
Percentage
Overcrowding
West Lawn Building (men) _
Centre Lawn Building (men).	
Centre Lawn Building (women)
East Lawn Building (women)....
Veterans' Building (men).	
Farm Cottage (men)	
Farm Annex (men) 	
778
143
155
921
225
78
81
1,018
260
221
1,445
295
115
125
240
117
66
524
40
37
44
30.8
81.8
42.5
56.8
17.7
47.4
54.3
In addition to the overcrowding shown in the above figures, it should be pointed out
that basements and attics in all buildings are housing patients.
Continued expansion must be made for the ever-increasing load which we are being
called upon to meet in reference to the care and education of the mentally deficient group.
It is hoped that the Infectious Building presently planned may be called for tender at the
earliest opportunity, and that with its construction no further major buildings will be
required in the Mental Hospital proper. An analysis of the Mental Hospital population
shows that approximately 100 patients will reach the age of 65 years annually for the
next seven years. Some relief in overcrowding may thus be obtained by expansion of the
Home for the Aged accommodation and the transferral of these patients from the Mental
Hospital to the Home for the Aged. An additional 300 beds may be made available
in the Mental Hospital by expansion of The Woodlands School in New Westminster and
the transferral of 300 mentally deficient patients to The Woodlands School. In this
manner it is felt that the heavy expense involved in building an entirely new Mental
Hospital service may be obviated for the next few years.
It is therefore recommended that the future programme of the Mental Health Services
should be as follows:—
(1) Construction of adequate facilities to house the Child Guidance Clinic
activities. The present two houses being used for this purpose are entirely
inadequate and overcrowded. Further expansion is impossible, and we
are now refusing services due to lack of space in which to operate. This
would necessitate construction of a unit to house approximately sixty
offices.   It should be located in conjunction with—
(2) A Day Hospital where all active-treatment and teaching facilities would
be available on an out-patient basis. This unit should be located adjacent
to Vancouver. It should contain only ten to twelve beds for emergency
overnight care. It is felt that with such a treatment programme a great
deal could be accomplished toward reducing the admission rate to the
Mental Hospital and long-term care. In addition, the Day Hospital would
act as a screen to the Crease Clinic and be able to treat many patients
without admission to either institution.
(3) In this same area should be constructed a Children's Observation Home
for the in-residence observation and training of a small group of normal
children showing behaviour problems. This Home would operate in
conjunction with the Child Guidance Clinic. It should have a capacity
of twenty-five children. The construction of the above three units need
not involve heavy expenditure of money in comparison with the construction of Mental Hospital buildings.
(4) Further expansion is required in the Homes for the Aged to provide for
the maturing group in the Mental Hospital and thereby create vacancies
in the Mental Hospital wards, as well as care for those elderly persons
seeking admission to the Homes for the Aged. DIRECTOR'S REPORT
Q 25
(5) Further expansion is required in The Woodlands School to care for those
mentally uencent na< e_.it! n> • in the Mental Hospital, thereby creating
further vacancies in the Mental Hospital wards and in an effort to care for
the heavy admission of these patients. There are at the present time 103
applications on a waiting list for admission of children under 6 years
of age.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Again, the services are indebted to many individuals and organizations. Our work
is becoming more closely allied to other community efforts and agencies. The opening
of the Crease Clinic has done much to bridge the gap between hospital and community.
To all co-operating agencies I would like to express my sincere thanks.
Special thanks are due to our Minister, the Honourable W. T. Straith, who has
supported our work in the Cabinet and Legislature. This has been accomplished by
a personal knowledge of our services brought about by frequent visits to the various
branches. We also appreciate the fact that Mr. Straith has always been able to attend
the chief functions of the patient group during the year, and has participated in many
of their social activities.
Our department is closely associated with many other departments in the Government, chiefly the Departments of Health and Welfare, Public Works, the Attorney-General,
Finance, Civil Service Commission, and others. To them we owe a debt of gratitude in
facilitating our problems of organization and administratoin. Particularly may I draw
to your attention Dr. G. R. F. Elliot, Dr. Arthur Hakstian, Miss Amy Leigh, E. R.
Rickinson, C. D. Campbell, and W. R. Tait.
The Crease Clinic is indebted to many employees and friends who have supplied
numerous books and magazines for the patients' library. Special mention should be
made of The Reader's Digest, which sends twenty-five copies of their issue each month
as well as annual contributions of novel condensations.
The various returned soldiers' organizations and the Women's Auxiliaries of the
Canadian Legion have, as usual, provided much in the way of additional comforts to our
veteran group. We have been very happy to be able to reciprocate by donating to these
organizations large numbers of wooden pull-toys for their Christmas-tree parties for the
children of veterans. These toys have been produced by the patients in the occupational-
therapy shop at the Veterans' Pavilion.
We have had a number of concerts of particularly fine calibre this year which have
augmented our recreational programme.   Several bands have again donated their services.
I would like to express my appreciation of the co-operative spirit that exists in our
relationship with the British Columbia Government Employees' Association, and other
organizations within the Service.
The Director is always mindful of the work of all of his associates, and deeply
appreciates the harmonious relationships that make us one large family group. I wish to
thank all who have helped to raise the standard of treatment and care of the patients
during the year. It is only through such active co-operation and team-work that we can
be an outstanding constructive force in the community in which we serve.
The Superintendents and Directors of the various divisions of the Mental Health
Services are again deserving of commendation. Dr. E. J. Ryan has continued to function
over the main Essondale area. It is with regret that I have to report his absence over
a three-month period due to serious illness. Great improvements have been augmented
at The Woodlands School, and this branch is assuming more and more the aspects
of a treatment and educational centre for the defective child. It is hoped that with the
development of a social service department, some definite rehabilitation programme may
be worked out.   This branch continues under the capable leadership of Dr. L. E. Sauriol. Q 26
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Several minor changes have been accomplished at the Colquitz branch. Dr. L. G. C.
d'Easum continues to function as Medical Superintendent and Psychiatrist to the Child
Guidance Clinic on Vancouver Island. It is hoped that next year he will be freed from
this latter duty and will be able to devote his full time to the hospital work.
Dr. T. G. Caunt continues to give administrative supervision to the three units of the
Geriatrics Division. There has been great expansion in this area and a reallocation
of patients.
The work of the Child Guidance Clinics, under the direction of Dr. U. P. Byrne,
continues to be very heavy. This division is working under a very great handicap due
to lack of physical space. Our special thanks are due to this group. Our hopes are for
more spacious quarters in the near future.
I would draw your attention to Dr. W. C. Gibson, Director of the Research Unit,
and the work being undertaken outlined in his report.
Special mention should be made of the work done in the Department of Neurology.
The addition of this branch has done much to reclaim many lives to useful service who
heretofore were regarded as a total loss. Dr. W. P. Fister, as Director of Neurology, has
added much to the service.
I would like to express my appreciation to F. A. Matheson, Business Manager, and
his assistant, J. F. Anderson, for the complete co-operation that exists between the
business and medical administrations. I would also refer to your notice L. W. Fox, who
has rendered invaluable assistance to the Director's office and who has functioned as
a member of the Nursing Panel in addition to his many other duties.
To C. B. Watson I owe a debt of gratitude as Administrative Assistant. He has
made it possible for this office to function in spite of an ever-increasing volume of
administrative duties. With him is closely associated my personal secretary, Mrs. Isobel
Wedge.
Finally, Sir, to you my biggest debt of gratitude. I need only say that you are well
known to all members of the personnel group and to the greater number of the patient
population. It is only by this personal knowledge and active participation in our affairs
that you have been able to give to us the splendid leadership you have. For this close
association, we are grateful.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. M. Gee, M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services. DIRECTOR'S REPORT
Q 27
Graduation ceremonies, May 8th, 1952.
L Q 28 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
REPORT OF THE CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL
MEDICINE
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952.
The Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine has now been functioning for over a
year and the value of its contributions to the community is now becoming obvious. We
are now able to report on the operations of the first complete fiscal year.
Designed primarily for the active treatment of early and acute psychotic and
psychoneurotic states, the new Clinic has treated some 963 new admissions during this
twelve-month period. During this same period, 906 patients were discharged from the
Clinic, of which only 114 were committed to the Provincial Mental Hospital. The average
length of stay in hospital of these patients was approximately two months. This would
indicate a fairly active movement of patient population. Some 217 patients were
domiciled in the Clinic at the close of the fiscal year.
It is interesting to note that the number of patients requesting voluntary admission
to the Clinic has shown a definite increase. During the year 1951-52, there were 357
voluntary admissions, which means that about 37 per cent of our admissions come into
the Clinic in this manner.
All active forms of physical therapy and psychotherapy are administered in the
Clinic. Reports of these treatments will be included in the report of our treatment
services. It should be pointed out that since the patients' stay in the Clinic is limited to
four months, a very active treatment programme is necessary to ensure the patients
receiving full benefit of their hospitalization.
We are pleased to report that we have been able to start in operation an open ward
for men. This ward is open at all times and the patients have free access to and from this
ward. This element of freedom has an immense psychological effect on the welfare of the
patients cared for in this ward. It is hoped that we will soon be able to have a similar
ward for women.
Our educational programme has been greatly facilitated by the improved accommodations of the Crease Clinic. Lectures and clinics have been provided for many of the
university classes, including students in psychology, social service, nursing, education, and
medicine. In addition to these, various lay groups have either visited the Clinic or have
been addressed by members of the staff. These actvities are definitely a part of the
mental-hygiene programme.
During the past year an attempt has been made to organize a series of seminars and
lectures for our medical staff, which serves as part of their training programme. It is our
aim to increase these educational activities during the ensuing years.
Respectfully submitted.
A. E. Davidson, M.D.,
Clinical Director. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE Q 29
REPORTS OF PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
REPORT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I would refer you to Table No. 1 of the Mental Hospitals Statistical Tables for
many of the statistics used in this report.
On March 31st, 1951, the total number of patients on our books showed 4,803 and
there were admitted during the fiscal year 1,217 patients, making a grand total of 6,020
patients. The total discharges during the same period amounted to 1,442 patients with
the result that we finished the year with a total of 4,578 patients in residence. Of the
admissions during the year, a total of 114 patients were admitted to the Mental Hospital
from the Crease Clinic and 38 patients were discharged to the Crease Clinic from the
Mental Hospital, 284 were voluntary patients, 74 cases were admitted to the Mental
Hospital at Essondale and later transferred to The Woodlands School at New Westminster,
B.C., and the following were discharged in full from the Mental Hospital at Essondale and
admitted to the Homes for the Aged: To Terrace, 76 men patients; to Vernon, 23 men
patients and 33 women patients; to Port Coquitlam, 115 men patients and 27 women
patients. We will, of course, not be able to do this for the next year but sincerely hope
that The Woodlands School will be in a position to receive cases that we should transfer
from Essondale. From the above figures, it would appear that as soon as possible direct
admissions should be made to the Homes for the Aged and to The Woodlands School,
thus decreasing the number of patients admitted to the Mental Hospital at Essondale.
During the past year we were unfortunate in having an epidemic of scarlet fever
which affected the women's side, and we were in quarantine in the East Lawn Building
for nearly three months, with the result that it was necessary to curtail hospital activities
during this period.
The change-over of staff is also to be noted, especially on the women's side, and
while we have tried to increase the facilities of the Training School we find it difficult to
keep equal with the resignations. It would appear that this problem will increase during
the coming year.
With the increase in the population of the Province, there is an increase in the
number of applications for both men and women senile cases as well as in the number
of applications for very young children. This has been particularly noticed within the last
three months. The plans for further accommodation will depend upon the question of
the Tubercular Building at Essondale and the possible expansion of The Woodlands
School at New Westminster.
During the past year the Crease Clinic has been receiving a great number of cases
and has shown a considerable turnover. An average of nearly ten cases a month have
been discharged from the Crease Clinic and admitted to the Provincial Mental Hospital.
The Crease Clinic has been used as an intensive treatment centre and thus has required
a corresponding increase in staff.
The activities in the various departments about the hospital have been continued,
including occupational therapy, hydrotherapy, and physical therapy. Endeavours have
been made throughout the year to have patients participate in outdoor activities and be
occupied in every way possible. Attempts have also been made with the relatives of
various patients to arrange for the patients to go " on leave " to their homes. This
arrangement has resulted in an average of nearly 100 patients going " on leave " each Q 30
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
week-end and many of these " on leaves " have led to final " discharge on probation."
This method gives the relatives an opportunity to see how the patient reacts outside the
hospital.
During the past year a number of our staff have reached the age of superannuation
and have retired. The ensuing years will see an increase in the number of our older staff
being superannuated. Many of these members have spent long periods of time in the
service and have attended conscientiously to their duties. They will be greatly missed in
the years to come.
E. J. Ryan, M.D.,
Senior Medical Superintendent.
TREATMENT SERVICES
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the Treatment Services in the Mental Health
Services, Essondale.
The Treatment Services of the Mental Health Services have carried a very heavy load
during the past fiscal year. At the present time we have some 3,597 patients in our
Mental Hospital. A great many of these are long-term treatment cases who require a
great deal in the way of medical and nursing care as well as psychiatric care. During the
year 1951-52, 1,217 patients were admitted to the Mental Hospital and 963 patients were
admitted to the Clinic, making a total of 2,180 new admissions. This is a considerable
increase over past years and necessitates a great increase in both diagnostic and treatment
procedures.
Psychiatric therapy is extremely time-consuming. This is particularly true of the
various forms of psychotherapy. With increased medical staff we have been able to offer
a good deal more individual psychotherapy, although there are still many patients who
cannot have the time devoted to them that they should have. In addition to individual
therapy, we have also been able to increase the number of patients being treated by group
psychotherapy. We have had either three or four groups functioning throughout the
entire year.
The various forms of physical therapy are still used quite extensively.
(a) Coma Insulin.—All patients receiving coma insulin are at present being treated
in the Clinic. We have accommodation for the treatment of fifty-two patients at any one
time—twenty-six men and twenty-six women. These treatment facilities are very actively
used in the treatment of the many schizophrenic disorders.
RESULTS
Number of
Patients
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
Manic depressive  - f	
i
2                            1
251                          21
25
1
131                        72
14                            3                            1
6                          4
267
25                            26
138            1           if. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
DISPOSAL
Q   31
Discharged
Remaining
in Clinic
Transferred to
Mental Hospital
Manic depressive-
Schizophrenia	
Miscellaneous	
Totals..
2
179
9
15
2
190
58
2
60
(b) Convulsive Shock Therapy.—This form of therapy continues to be used actively,
both in the Clinic and in the Mental Hospital. In the Clinic this form of therapy is used
for the relief of disturbances of mood, either elations or depressions, with gratifying
results.
Treated in Clinic
RESULTS
Number of
Patients
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
Manic depressive	
Schizophrenia  	
Miscellaneous-	
98
206
55
25
18
7
15
27
6
49
113
31
9
48
11
Totals 	
359
50
48
193
68
DISPOSAL
Discharged
Transferred
to Insulin
Transferred to
Mental Hospital
Discharged
Later
90
116
47
2
58
1
3
32
7
1
1
1
Totals	
253
61
42
3
In the Mental Hospital electric convulsive therapy is also of particular value in
helping to relieve the disturbed symptoms of patients on the prolonged treatment services.
Treatment in the Provincial Mental Hospital
RESULTS
Number of
Patients
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
i
56
224
8
13
34
142
20
14
69
29              1              ....              |                1
R
Totals 	
309                          ....                          22   '
1                              1
196
91
DISPOSAL
Discharged
Transferred
to Insulin
Transferred
to Lobotomy
Remaining
in Hospital
Died Later
14
29
6
42
179
23
Schizophrenia.....  	
9                          6
1
1
Totals —
49
9                          6
I
244                            1
i Q 32
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
(c) Electronarcosis.—This form of therapy continues to give beneficial results in a
limited number of patients. Frequently patients who have failed to respond to other
forms of therapy will obtain favorable results with electronarcosis.
RESULTS
Total
Number
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
14
51
23
3
1
0
1
4
4
7
35
13
3
Schizophrenia 	
Miscellaneous  	
11
6
Totals	
88                          4                          9                          55
1                           1                           1
20
DISPOSAL
Discharged
Transferred
to Insulin
Transferred
to Lobotomy
Transferred
to Mental
Hospital
12
37
19
7
2
1
2
6
2
Totals. , _
68                            9
i
1
10
(d) Lobotomy.—Lobotomy has not been used as extensively as in previous years.
The majority of patients treated by this method have been those who have been presenting
disturbing and troublesome problems of adjustment in hospital.
RESULTS
Number of
Patients
Recovered
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
Manic depressive	
17
3
4
2
9
1
4
Totals -	
20
6                            10
!
4
DISPOSAL
Discharged
Transferred to
Coma Insulin
Transferred
to E.C.T.
Remaining
in Hospital
3
1
1
1
12
Miscellaneous ', ,.  	
2
Totals 	
4                              111
14
(e) Alcoholics.—During the fiscal year 1951-51 we had 217 patients seek admission
voluntarily to the Mental Hospital for the treatment of alcoholism. These patients are
treated mainly by psychotherapy, either individual or group. An attempt is also made to
co-ordinate our treatment programme with the programme of Alcoholics Anonymous.
Many other auxiliary forms of therapy, such as occupational therapy, recreational
therapy, physiotherapy, etc., all contribute to the total treatment programme. Reports of
these various departments will be noted elsewhere in the Annual Report.
Respectfully submitted.
A. E. Davidson, M.D.,
Clinical Director. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE Q 33
DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Women's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The staff of nine occupational therapists supervised the treatment programmes
in four workshops—the Crease Clinic, the Centre Lawn, the East Lawn, and the Home
for the Aged. Total number of treatments given during the year was 100,018. Average
number of patients registered for treatment was 473 and each workshop was open to the
patients for four and one-half hours daily, with the exception of Sunday. At the Crease
Clinic and Centre Lawn regular visits were made to the wards to contact patients unable
to attend the workshops. This was not possible in the East Lawn Building, where a larger
staff is required before a ward programme may be instituted. Gardening and sketching
classes were carried on during the summer months. Visits were made to the Nurses'
Infirmary as required.
The acute shortage of occupational therapists in Canada was reflected in this
department. We were able to overcome this handicap by securing staff through the
English and Scottish associations. Also a new classification—that of Instructor of
Handicrafts—was set up and two new staff members were employed in this capacity.
A period of three months' clinical training was provided for one University of
Toronto first-year student and one College of Puget Sound senior student. Affiliating
nurses and postgraduate students spent one week in the department and lectures on
occupational therapy were given to affiliating and student nurses. Provision has been
made for new staff members with no previous hospital training to attend the lectures given
to affiliating nurses.
A navy-blue uniform has been adopted as the official uniform for staff of the
Women's Occupational Therapy Departments in the Provincial Mental Health Services.
Three exhibits of handicraft were presented during the year—at Coquitlam for the
Women's Institute, at the Pacific National Exhibition, and at the British Columbia
Psychiatric Nurses' Association Fashion Show in New Westminster.
Included in the personnel of this department is a school teacher who conducts classes
for approximately thirty mentally deficient children, teaches English to non-English-
speaking patients, and supervises extension courses for patients.
We wish to thank Dr. Gee, the medical staff, the nursing staff and other personnel
who have given so freely of their time and counsel during the year.
Respectfully submitted.
Kathleen Draper,
Director, Occupational Therapy Department
( Women's Division).
Men's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director oj Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the annual report of the Male Industrial
Therapy, Trades and Occupational Therapy Departments, from April 1st, 1951, to
March 31st, 1952.
The Industrial Therapy and Trades consist of the following departments: Cabinet
and Woodworking Department, Upholstering Department, Tailoring Department, Copper-
shop, Metal Machine-shop, Shoe-shop, and Canvas, Weaving, and Basketry Department. Q 34 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
One of the outstanding projects accomplished in this Department during the past
year was the manufacturing of church furniture, which enabled us to complete a fully
equipped chapel in Pennington Hall for both Protestant and Roman Catholic services.
The furniture, consisting of altar, lectern, and prayer bench, is of solid rift-grained oak
and made in the Doric order of architecture. Vases, altar-vessels, candlesticks, and cross
were also made in this Department. The chapel has added greatly to the pleasure of the
patients at their divine services. The furniture was consecrated by the Bishop of New
Westminster at a special service.
The Upholstery Department has had a very busy year renovating all types of
upholstered furniture, also manufacturing of window-blinds, carpets, cushions, etc. This
department takes care of the needs of all the wards and Nurses' Homes. I feel that
this department is growing to such an extent that it would be advisable to make provision
for another upholsterer.
The Tailor-shop, consisting of head tailor and three seamstresses, has also completed
a busy and successful year. The aim and object of this department is the rehabilitation
of young women. Here they may learn power-machine operating, and if they stay a
sufficient length of time may become seamstresses. There is also a great deal of hand-
sewing done in this shop. Work accomplished during the year is as follows:—
Tailored clothing:—
112 suits, individually tailored to measure.
6 overcoats, individually tailored to measure.
29 special pants, individually tailored to measure.
105 khaki drill pants, individually tailored to measure.
Repairs and alterations:—
4,070 overalls and coveralls.
1,677 cloth pants.
853 coats.
134 vests.
8 overcoats relined.
403 strong dresses.
The Copper-shop still proves to be both a valuable and interesting asset to our
organization. Here, the patients may work in copper, aluminium, and stainless steel, and
produce countless valuable and useful articles for use in the Hospital. This department
does a great deal of repair-work for the kitchens, repairing cooking utensils, urns, etc.
Both acetylene and electric welding are used in this work.
The Metal Machine-shop accomplishes a great deal of maintenance repairs for the
Department of Public Works. This creates practical work for the patients whom we are
endeavouring to rehabilitate. In addition, many special articles are made for the
Occupational Therapy Departments.
The Shoe Department has been operated successfully during the year, carrying on
extensive repair-work and making considerable new stock, as well as special footwear for
deformed and crippled patients who require special attention of this kind. We also make
a special effort to teach shoe-making, as this is a well-equipped shop, and here again our
aim is rehabilitation.
In the Canvas, Weaving, and Basketry Department are manufactured canvas goods
of all types, rubber envelopes, rubber pillow-slips, mattresses of all sizes, laundry-bags,
etc. In addition, we repair all canvas articles for the Hospital, and a great quantity of
basketry and weaving is accomplished. The number of articles required for the benefit
of the patients is steadily increasing, but with the new equipment furnished by Federal
grants it is hoped that we will be able to cope with the demand.
D 5.—The activities consist of weaving, woodworking, clay-modelling, raffia work,
and bookbinding. There is a considerable amount of printing done on a hand-operated
press. There were some 60,000 copies of assorted forms and cards printed for use of the
Hospital during the year. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
Q 35
Crease Clinic.—The male Occupational Therapy Department has operated successfully during the year. We are teaching all the home crafts in this well-equipped and
efficient department, and feel that it is a credit to our institution. Number of patients
given treatment during the year totalled 942; number of patients discharged, 227; and
number of patients transferred to Provincial Mental Hospital, 37. The largest number
of patients are occupied in the woodworking-shops. Veneer inlays, lamps, trays, and
articles for use in the home are made. The art room is the next most popular, with
weaving taking the lead, followed by leather, metal-tooling, and a small group interested
in oils and water-colours. The pottery classes draw their attendance from the near-
discharge group. It is a mixed class, and gives the patient a social contact with the
opposite sex.   Also, the project can be finished quietly with no disturbing effect.
Colony Farm Veterans' Occupational Therapy Department.—This department consists wholly of veterans of World Wars I and II, and is organized to furnish them with
an outlet for their expression. Here we endeavour to teach them more along the lines of
hobby crafts. We have again carried on our project, instituted last year, namely, supplying Christmas toys to The Woodlands School, Provincial Mental Hospital (Essondale),
and Canadian Legion branches at New Westminster and Hope. There were over 400
assorted toys distributed to these organizations, and the patients derive a great deal of
pleasure in making these toys for their comrades' children.
In closing, I wish to express my sincere thanks to all my staff for their whole-hearted
co-operation, for without their full support this Department could not operate efficiently.
Respectfully submitted. _.   __  u
K. 1. Hall,
Supervisor of Industrial Therapy, Trades
and Occupational Therapy.
Patients' Christmas dance, December 28th, 1951, Pennington Hall, Essondale. Q 36 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL THERAPY
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—I beg to submit to you the following report showing programme and attendance
figures of the activities promoted by the Recreational Department from April 1st, 1951,
to March 31st, 1952.
Number of Total
Type of Activity                                                                                  Programmes Attendance
Bingo gatherings       4 1,101
Swimming      43 3,079
Dances—
Indoor—
Provincial Mental Hospital     27 8,795
Crease Clinic     25 1,408
Outdoor        4 791
Band concerts       5 1,460
Inter-ward cribbage and checker contests     13 88
Crossword, cryptogram, and puzzle contests     52 (*)
Physical-education periods, which include badminton,   tennis,   calisthenics,   archery,   softball,
gymnastics, etc., both indoor and outdoor  186 1,601
Bowling-alley programmes  139 2,236
Picnics      26 740
Music-appreciation hours       3 120
Variety parties and special programmes       6 2,425
" Leader-group " training periods        5 60
Free-time Crease Clinic recreation periods  200 4,000
Fourth annual field-day       3 1,400
Staff recreation—
Square Dance Club     23 795
Badminton      36 318
Swimming, diving, and life-saving classes     24 608
Special events—corn roasts, annual dance,
etc.        3 880
Calisthenics, gymnastic classes, etc     17 234
Bowling      73 1,473
Totals  917 33,612
1 Unestimated.
Following are special or progressive inaugurated events to our programme during
the year, and additional remarks:—
(1) New installations this past season include:—
(a) Horseshoe-pitching courts and equipment set up at the H.A.
grounds and the Colony Farm Cottage grounds.
(b) Clock-golf course and equipment installed at the H.A. and Vets'
Block grounds.
(c) Lawn-croquet court installed at C.F.C. grounds.
(2) Softball diamond cleared of old and obstructing trees, resurveyed, relined,
and enlarged to accommodate the newly formed patients' inter-building
1952 softball league. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE Q 37
(3) The new Pennington Hall recreation centre, although not completely
finished or furnished, was opened and used for recreational activities on
September 28th, 1951. The patients' dance on that date was a complete
success, with 400 attending and a vast improvement noted over the
previous ward style of dance programmes.
(4) This dance was quickly followed by a number of " firsts " in the new hall.
October 14th: First church service using the new altar furnishings. October 25th: Hospital graduates held their annual reunion for the first time
in the Pennington Hall auditorium. November 11th: Complete Armistice
service. December 28th: First big patients' Christmas dance in the new
auditorium. January 10th, 1952: Official opening of the new Coffee
Shop operated by the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. The
Coffee Shop has been well patronized by approximately 1,000 patients,
visitors, and staff per week.
(5) Hospital quarantine restrictions, hall building alterations, and tennis-court
reconstruction projects all seriously cut into our 1951-52 programme
causing cancellation of some types of classes for weeks at a time. However, the coming 1952-53 season should see the complete promotion of a
recreational programme with facilities and equipment equal to and better
than most community or similar projects.
Again I would like to express my thanks and appreciation for the assistance and
co-operation given our Department by the many staff personnel and allied departments
in the promotion of our various recreational activities.
Respectfully submitted.
W. R. Brown,
Director of Recreational Therapy.
AUDIO-VISUAL DEPARTMENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—The highlight of this year's activities is, of course, the completion of Pennington Hall, and the removal of the Department on November 2nd to the new quarters
provided therein. Some time will pass before all equipment in the Department will be
finally installed in its proper place.
After much discussion and research on the projection equipment for the hall, it was
finally ordered in December, and was being installed in March of this year. When in
operation, the patients can be assured of the best in film entertainment.
Our educational-film library has grown to 107 films, requiring a catalogue to fill
requests from many parts of the Province. An increase in the number of educational
films presented and loaned proved definitely that a keener interest is being shown in this
mode of teaching. Irrespective of some recreational films cancelled owing to quarantine,
and the usual slow-down in the educational films during the summer, the weekly average
of all types of films presented equals seventeen, a number which can hardly be exceeded
without an increase in staff or a deterioration in other phases of the Department.
The four-channel radio console has been moved to the new quarters from the Crease
Clinic, and is now supplying four radio programmes to the east wing of the Clinic and the
Veterans' Unit at Colony Farm, and one programme to the west wing of the Crease Clinic. Q 38 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
It is the intention to co-ordinate this console with the existing record-playing equipment,
in order that selected recorded music is the main source of programme material rather
than the radio. However, such a change does not appear warranted until such time as the
remainder of the hospital is also wired for four channels. Intermittent programmes of
selected music relayed throughout the lawns in the summer months appears to be much
appreciated, and this year the system has been extended to other areas.
In photography, the use of transparencies for projecting lecture material has become
popular with the staff, and a continual increase will be expected in their production. For
research work, our 16-mm. camera has no equal, and some good films have been secured.
It is hoped that sometime in the future many of the difficulties now encountered will be
overcome by a conditioned room for this purpose.
Recreational Motion-pictures
Number Total
of Shows Attendance
35-mm. presentations at Essondale  166 38,079
35-mm. presentations at Woodlands School     86 15,542
16-mm. presentations at Essondale, Home for the
Aged (Port Coquitlam), and Colony Farm 455 40,694
Total attendance  94,315
16-mm. Films Shipped to Other Institutions
Mental Home, Colquitz  95
Woodlands School  96
Home for Aged, Vernon  46
Provincial Home, Kamloops  46
Girls Industrial School  43
Boys Industrial School  49
Allco Infirmary  49
The 16-mm. projection equipment was loaned out 175 times.
Educational Motion-pictures
Number Total
of Shows Attendance
16-mm. presentations at Essondale  182 9,982
16-mm. films loaned  212 5,421
Photography
4x5 negatives exposed, black and white  489
4X5 negatives exposed, colour     82
8X10 prints produced  876
5X7 prints produced     48
3X4 prints produced  230
Miscellaneous prints produced     36
314X4 black and white transparencies  157
2>Va X4 colour transparencies     65
2X2 slides produced     54
16-mm. motion-picture film exposed, black and white and colour
(feet)   540 REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE Q 39
Records and Recordings
Domestic records loaned  398
Minutes of recorded material for clinical and miscellaneous purposes  .  360
Hours of music played on lawn     50
Respectfully submitted.
G. H. Walker,
Director, Audio-Visual Department.
LIBRARY REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith is a report of the medical and patients' libraries for the
fiscal year ended March 31st, 1952. There were no changes in personnel, and, as in the
previous year, the Librarian was most ably assisted by Miss Anne Ruzicka.
During the year the library at the Crease Clinic rendered weekly service to all the
wards in the Provincial Mental Hospital, including the Homes for the Aged and Veterans'
buildings on Colony Farm. Books were also supplied to the Home for the Aged in
Vernon, and to Vista in Vancouver. In addition, approximately 2,000 magazines were
distributed to the wards.
A record-player was built by the Audio-Visual Department, facilitating the playing
of classical music on alternate Mondays. Book reviews and talks on related subjects by
the Librarian or an occasional guest speaker were also regular features. A card catalogue
of the complete holdings of the patients' library was compiled and distributed in mimeographed form to the wards. The bright, attractive atmosphere of the library has been
further enhanced by the new policy of covering the dust-jackets of the books in plastic
covers, which more than double the life of the book as well as adding greatly to the
appearance.
The medical library became a member of the Medical Libary Association of the
United States, which gives it considerable prestige in the profession, and enables it to
participate in a world-wide duplicate exchange programme. The main catalogue was
revised and a shelf-list compiled, which will permit a quick inventory to be taken of the
main library or any of the departmental sections. The collection has been kept up to
date in medicine and psychiatry and their allied fields by a portion of the Federal mental-
health grant, which was again made available to the medical library for the purchase of
basic works.
Patients' Library
Book collection     3,966
New books added        304
Donations         200
Book losses     64
Book discards  130
4,470
194
4,276
Current magazine subscriptions  10
Number of books circulated  13,328 Q 40 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Medical Library
Book collection  1,360
New books added  279
1,639
Journals (medical and psychiatric)  68
Journals (technical, other departments)  44
Journals (bound volumes).
Pamphlets
Books borrowed on inter-library loan
Books lent on inter-library loan	
Number of books circulated	
112
123
475
59
9
1,253
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) H. M. Fraser,
Librarian.
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—Following is a report of the treatments given in the Physiotherapy Department
of the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952:—
Male
Female
Total
Infra-red and radiant heat-
Short-wave diathermy	
Ultra-violet light	
Steam baths —~	
Continuous-flow bath	
Foam baths 	
Sprays and douches ...
Sitz bath	
Whirlpool bath	
Electric-light cabinet..
Oatmeal bath	
Wax bath 	
Massage and remedial exercise .
Galvanism and Faradism	
Progressive relaxation 	
Chiropody  _	
Total number of treatments .
Total number of patients treated..
280
754
406
31
1,073
306
885
88
354
2
365
102
752
352
1,529
768
1,107
160
1,769
100
160
45
82
2,009
32
792
6,208
842
8,095
431
645
856
1,158
383
2,602
1,074
1,992
88
514
2
45
82
3,778
32
892
160
14,303
1,273
Respectfully submitted.
A. E. Davidson, M.D.,
Clinical Director. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
Q 41
DENTAL DEPARTMENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is the annual report of the Dental Department of the Provincial
Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C., for the year April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952.
All newly admitted patients able to present themselves were examined and dental
charts filed. All acute conditions were given precedence and relieved the same day as
reported. Dentures were made for patients recommended by members of the medical
staff, and dentures were repaired as required from day to day. Restorations of carious
teeth have been made as far as time would permit.
Examinations .   	
Summary
  1,567
Extractions    	
  1,515
Fillings 	
      653
Prophylaxis 	
      179
Treatments   ..
        89
X-rays              __
      201
General anaesthetic cases ..
        48
Dentures made	
      183
Dentures repaired	
      134
Dentures relined      ..
    .         50
Bridge repairs	
          6
Bridges made	
          2
Gold inlays 	
          2
Crowns 	
          2
Respectfully submitted.
H. O. Johnsen, D.D.S.
OPTICAL REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the optical work done at the Provincial Mental
Hospital and the Crease Clinic, Essondale, B.C., for the fiscal year April 1st, 1951, to
March 31st, 1952:—
Refractions   341
Major repairs  252
Minor repairs and adjustments     80
Respectfully submitted,
H. H. Woodbridge,
Optometrist. Q 42 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
BEAUTY-PARLOUR REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—The foliowing is a report of the above department for the fiscal year April 1st,
1951, to March 31st, 1952, covering the Mental Hospital and the Crease Clinic:
Shampoos  5,880
Finger-waves  5,802
Permanents       961
Marcels         5 6
Shaves   1,268
Oil treatments  2,371
Scalp treatments        15
Manicures   1,844
Hair-cuts  7,170
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) M. Townsend.
DEPARTMENT OF DIETETICS
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is a report on the work done in the Department of Dietetics
during the year April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952. The Department was sorry to lose
Miss Allman at Christmas, and as her place was not filled for the remaining part of the
year, Mrs. Spencer became the Acting Chief Dietitian.
This year the work has been devoted to the over-all improvement of facilities, which
will enable a higher standard of catering to be maintained for both patients and staff.
Equipment has been purchased for several of the kitchens and plans for the switchover from solid fuel to electricity in the Home for the Aged and West Lawn are being
drawn up. At the same time the kitchens will be remodelled and modernized to enable
greater working efficiency and higher culinary standards. Some of the equipment has been
installed in the Centre Lawn kitchen but the remainder is being held until the electric-
power booster has been installed and can take the load required. An electric bread cutting
and wrapping machine has been purchased for the bakery, which will be installed when the
power cables can take the extra load. This will enable the bakery to issue all the bread
evenly cut and wrapped to the wards, effecting greater economy and cleanliness in
addition to keeping it fresher than we are able to at present.
The kitchen in the Farm Annex was closed in July and the space used for extra
seating accommodation. The food is now being sent over from the Veterans' kitchen
on wagons.
Fresh vegetables^ from the farm were used throughout most of the winter with
canned vegetables from the cannery supplementing the spring shortage. During the
summer more runner beans and prune plums were harvested than it was possible to consume, so the surplus was frozen by a local company and used throughout the winter.
A food-testing plan has been introduced to enable the better commercial products
to be purchased and used throughout the hospital. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE Q 43
The control of flies presented a major problem during the summer and fall; a
powerful microsal spray-gun was purchased and rotated to each kitchen once a week.
There will be further research carried out in the coming fiscal year to reach a more
satisfactory result.
During this year our complement of staff was increased by two Cooks, one Kitchen-
helper, and five Dining-room Stewards. Thus our total staff is now three Dietitians, one
Chief Cook, one Deputy Chief Cook, one Cook Instructor, two Cooks—Grade VI, eight
Cooks—Grade III, fifteen Cooks—Grade II, thirteen Cooks—Grade I, two Scullerymen,
twenty-three Kitchen-helpers, and sixteen Dining-room Stewards.
Home for the Aged has one central kitchen, which is now supplying nine wards with
three meals a day to 375 patients, and the total number of meals served from the seven
kitchens at Essondale and Home for the Aged during the fiscal year was patients,
4,453,052; and staff, 280,344. The average number of patients on special diets was 100.
The average number of staff on special diets was ten. The department catered to the
following special functions: The graduation ceremony, two banquets, one dance, one
reception, and six teas.
The educational services have been increased and improved during this year.
A total of twenty-eight lectures were given to first- and third-year student-nurses in nutrition and diet therapy.
Five students graduated from the cook-training programme in June, 1951, at the
end of a three-year course. All these students received promotions to Cook—Grade I
within one month of graduation.
The next course started on October 1st, 1951, and was completely revised and
shortened to one year. Instruction is given in range-work, baking, and butchery, in
addition to lectures on the theory of institutional cooking. The course started with seven
student-cooks, who have spent at least one year in the kitchens as kitchen-helpers, and
were selected by their suitability for the work.
I would like to take this opportunity of thanking the heads and staff of other departments for their co-operation throughout this year. It has been greatly appreciated, for
without it the progress of the Department of Dietetics would be greatly retarded.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Heather V. R. Pelling,
Chief Dietitian.
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The past fiscal year has shown an increase in the neurological consultations
which were requested by the hospital staff. This is reflected in the number of electroencephalograms, of which 642 were carried out compared with 540 in the previous year.
Equally, the number of pneumograms done was 221 compared with 89 in the previous
year.
Twelve patients were referred to the neurosurgical service of the Vancouver General Hospital for further treatment. Two for an excision of an epileptogenic focus,
one for elevation of a depressed skull fracture, and nine for the removal of cerebral
neoplasms. The survey of all resident patients with a history of seizures is still being
carried out and is nearing completion.
A series of postgraduate lectures on electroencephalography and neurology was
given during the winter months. Lectures on neurological techniques were also given
to the nursing staff. Q 44 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1951-52
The neurologist continued also as a demonstrator in neuro-anatomy to the Faculty
of Medicine at the University of British Columbia, and gave clinical demonstrations to
the first-year University students in conjunction with lecture courses in neuro-physiology.
Respectfully submitted.
W. P. Fister, M.D.,
Director of Neurology.
LABORATORY REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the laboratories at
Essondale from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952:—
Blood—
Kahn, negative  2,412
Kahn, positive  88
Kahn, quantitative   54
Red-blood count  2,693
Haemoglobin  605
White-blood count  2,746
Eosinophile count, direct  50
Sedimentation rate ____. 1,245
Sternal puncture  2
Bleeding time  24
Coagulation time  22
Prothrombin activity  12
Platelet count  7
Reticulocyte count  3
Culture  7
Widal, etc.   12
Agglutination for B. abortus  4
Paul Bunnell  2
C02 combining power  2
Glucose   266
Glucose tolerance curve  8
Galactose tolerance curve  1
Insulin sensitivity   1
Amylase   1
Non-protein nitrogen   80
Urea nitrogen  8
Urea clearance  2
Creatinine   13
Cholesterol  3 2
Barbiturate  3
Bromide   42
Chloride   2
Calcium  6
Phosphorus   3
Alkaline phosphatase  3
Sodium  2 REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
Q 45
Potassium 	
Iron	
Lead	
Icterus index	
Van den Bergh	
Total protein	
Albumin-globulin ratio ....
Hanger flocculation	
Thymol turbidity	
Bromsulphalein excretion
Cerebrospinal fluid—■
Kahn, negative	
Kahn, positive	
Kahn, quantitative	
Colloidal gold	
Cell count	
Total protein	
Glucose 	
Chloride 	
Ultraviolet absorption spectrum
Urine—
Routine 	
Acetone	
Quantitative sugar	
Bromide 	
Iodide 	
Chloride 	
Benzidene 	
Quantitative albumin  ...
Two-hourly	
Phenolsulfonphthalein 	
Bile 	
Urobilinogen 	
Uroporphyrin 	
Phenylpyruvic acid	
Diastase 	
Arsenic 	
Barbiturate	
17-ketosteroid 	
Friedman 	
Preg-test 	
T.B. (24-hour specimen) 	
Smears—■
Miscellaneous 	
G.C. 	
T.B	
Vincent's organisms	
Diphtheria	
Fungus  -
Trichomonas 	
Sputum for T.B ,	
L
24-hour specimen for T.B.
Cancer cells	
3
4
1
19
20
10
6
11
9
3
236
42
34
289
498
694
3
5
248
9,676
3,605
463
1,885
2
1
920
264
4
3
23
32
1
17
1
1
2
15
44
36
3
879
45
29
5
283
2
4
231
4
3 Q 46 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1951-52
Cultures—
Miscellaneous   774
Diphtheria   632
Typhoid   1,223
Dysentery  1,228
T.B.  :  10
Fungus   3
Antibiotic sensitivity  54
Water  10
Faeces—
Parasites  21
Occult blood  31
Fat (quantitative)   3
Bile   1
Gastric contents—
Analysis (acid)   4
T.B  26
Occult blood   1
E.K.G.   201
B .M.R  169
Biopsies  11
Fluid for cancer cells  4
Autopsies   96
Animal autopsies   34
Sections  3,477
Diphtheria virulence  5
Agglutination for typhoid  26
Agglutination for dysentery  23
Ascitic fluid routine  1
Soap analysis  7
Arsenic in hair  1
Injections—
Typhoid vaccine  1,033
Diphtheria toxoid   148
Scarlet-fever toxin  15
Staphylococcus toxoid   37
Pollen antigen  38
Skin Tests—
Tuberculin   1,110
Pollen sensitivity  10
Brucellergen  1
Schick   341
Vaccinations for smallpox  206
Total  42,090
Respectfully submitted.
G. A. Nicolson, M.D.,
Pathologist. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
Q 47
DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The apparent fluctuation in number of patients examined in succeeding fiscal
years is due to the variation in time of completion of chest-survey work. This work is
being carried on continuously, but fluctuates so far as the time is concerned due to many
factors.
The increase in population at The Woodlands School and the consequent activity
of our Radiographic Laboratory there has put added work on the clerical staff here at
the Clinic.
Reporting and filing for The Woodlands School, Essondale, and Crease Clinic is all
done by the Crease Clinic staff.
When our surgery department becomes operative, we anticipate an increase in the
work of this Department.
Attached are the reports of the work performed in the Radiology Department from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952.
Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine,
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Number of films taken
_____ 4,315
Number of patients X-rayed	
Chests .              ..                ....
Patients
   1,007
2,327
Films
1,025
Extremities ...       ....
        53
149
Barium meals         ..       ...     ... .
        21
304
Barium enemas 	
Spines   _.            	
        15
      956
187
1,124
Skulls                            ...     ...   	
....    ....      121
293
Noses
            1
1
Ribs                                ..     ...    .	
.....    ....        13
27
Shoulders                         .              _.
......              5
16
Abdomens      .
         19
31
Pelvis       ______    .            ..
           5
9
Jaws      .      .               .....
           3
16
Sinuses .
...     ...          6
28
Gall-bladder ..     _          	
            4
23
Intravenous pyelograms	
          2
6
Pneumoencephalograms   	
        95
1,071
Soft tissue (oesophagus)	
          1
5
2,327
4,315 Q 48 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1951-52
Provincial Mental Hospital, April 1st, 1951,
to March 31st, 1952
Number of films taken _'_  12,055
Number of patients X-rayed     7,942
Patients Films
Chests   6,358 6,446
Extremities      464 1,347
Barium meals        37 521
Barium enemas        26 333
Spines       511 811
Skulls       153 408
Noses          14 46
Ribs         38 94
Shoulders         38 109
Abdomens         34 74
Pelvis         57 73
Jaws         12 41
Sinuses         18 69
Mastoids           9 29
Gall-bladder        24 107
Intravenous pyelograms         18 119
Cholangiograms           2 13
Pneumoencephalograms       120 1,370
Heart examinations          7 37
Soft tissue (oesophagus)          2 8
7,942 12,055
Respectfully submitted.
J. M. Jackson, M.D.,
Director of Radiology.
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of work performed for the fiscal year ended March 31st,
1952, at the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine.
The Department of Psychology has, first, provided psychological evaluations of those'
patients referred by the medical staff; second, has done appraisals of new nursing staff;
and third, has taken part in various educational services. Two Psychological Clinic
assistants, J. W. Borthwick and Mrs. J. C. Morton, were on staff throughout the year,
and Miss A. J. Elart rejoined our staff in September after a year of postgraduate training
at San Jose State College. Two interns, J. B. Woodward and Miss L. A. MacMillan,
who had commenced their internship the previous fiscal year, completed their training
in September and November, respectively. The former was then transferred to the staff
of The Woodlands School and the latter continued on with our staff. A third intern,
Miss F. J. Darroch, commenced training in November, which will continue on into the
next fiscal year. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE Q 49
The Department's chief function continues to be that of providing evaluations of
patients based on standardized methods and special techniques. The greatest change in
this programme has been the marked increase in the use of the projective techniques for
the evaluation of personality dynamics. They require special training to administer and
interpret. The two members of the Department who have taken further training under
the auspices of the mental-health grants have returned to the service with greater understanding of these techniques and are now teaching other members of the Department in
their use.
During the year the Department has undertaken a modified form of research, in
co-operation with the Department of Neurology, in an attempt to refine the evaluation
of various forms of brain-damage. A staff member has been present at each Friday
afternoon conference to present psychological findings which contributed to the diagnosis
and treatment plan of the patient. In February and March two members spent a day a
week at The Woodlands School. A number of patients at some time previous to their
admission to the Mental Hospital or the Crease Clinic have been examined by psychologists of the Child Guidance Clinics. Forty-nine abstracts of their findings were made to
be placed on the clinical files. Where necessary, these were supplemented by further
studies.
Two hundred and ninety-five patients were examined by the Department during the
year. A total number of 1,023 tests was administered, which is an increase of 28 per
cent over last year.   The following is a tabulation of the tests administered:—
Test Number
Arthur Point Scale  2
Bender Gestalt  31
Benjamin Proverbs  29
Detroit Reading  1
Differential Aptitude  2
Dominion Silent Reading  1
Draw-A-Person  2
Eisenson Test for Aphasia  1
General Clerical  1
Hanfman-Kasanin   3
Healy Picture Completion  1
House-Tree-Person   1
Incomplete Sentences  14
Kent E.G.Y  5
Kent-Rosanoff Word Association  3
Kuder Preference Record .  9
Lee Thorpe Occupational Interest Inventory  14
McQuarrie Mechanical Ability  1
Make-a-Picture Story  1
Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory  50
Monroe Reading   1
Otis Self-administering  3
Picture Concepts  6
Porteus Mazes  166
Practical Judgment  4
Progressive Matrices  16
Rapaport Word Association  2
Rogers Personality  1
Rorschach Method of Personality Diagnosis  103
Shipley Institute of Living Scale  132
Stanford-Binet Form L  45 Q 50 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Test Number
Stanford-Binet Form M  11
Symonds Picture Story  2
Terman-Miles Attitude Interest Analysis  4
Thematic Apperception  54
Wechsler-Bellevue Intelligence Scale 1  221
Wechsler-Bellevue Intelligence Form 11   7
Wechsler-Bellevue Intelligence Scale for Children  5
Weigl-Goldstein-Scheerer Color Form  21
Wechsler Memory Scale  45
Wide Range Achievement  1
Total   1,023
Another function of the Department is to provide a testing programme for the
personnel of the nursing service. Student-nurses and aides are administered a battery
of psychological tests when they first join the staff. These are used as a guide for the
School of Psychiatric Nursing and the administrative staff. On occasion, special tests
have been administered to students showing particular problems of adjustment. Two
hundred and fifty-four staff members were seen during the year and administered a total
of 759 tests. This is an increase of 7 per cent in the number of tests over last year.
The following is a tabulation of the tests administered:—
Test Number
Army Alpha  242
Bernreuter :       1
California Test of Personality  252
Kuder Preference Record  252
Otis Self-administering     11
Wide Range Achievement       1
Total   759
The Psychology Department contributes to the multiform educational projects of
the Mental Health Services. Three psychological interns were in training during the
year learning the special skills of clinical psychology. A total of thirty-eight hours of
lectures in basic psychology was delivered to psychiatric nurses in training. Four other
lectures were given to groups of affiliate nurses. Orientation talks regarding the function
of the Department were given to new medical staff and student social workers. A series
of twelve seminars on various psychological topics was completed by one of the members
of the staff with members of the medical staff and Psychology Department participating.
The Department participated in sixteen hours of demonstration clinics for various extramural groups.
In the coming fiscal year the Department hopes to enlarge its staff and expand it
services. The increase in medical staff and the more rapid turnover of patients in the
Crease Clinic has increased the demand for our own particular contribution to the team.
Permission has been granted to add two new members to our staff in the forthcoming
fiscal year. Training in group dynamics and other group methods is included in the
educational backgrounds of some of our members, and in the near future it is planned
that a greater contribution to the therapeutic aspects of the Hospital and Clinic will be
made through participation in group therapy.
Respectfully submitted.
J. W. Borthwick,
A. J. Elart,
Psychological Clinic Assistants. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE Q 51
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT, PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, HOMES
FOR THE AGED, AND CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The report of the case-work activity of the Social Service Department during
the past fiscal year will be reviewed under two broad headings: —
I. Review of social services to patients over the past fiscal year and the relationship these services bear to the function of social workers in the setting
of the psychiatric hospital and clinic.
II. Improvement over the past fiscal year in quality and quantity of the Department's services to patients and future plans for continuing development of
social services.
The social worker as he helps the patient referred to him engages in specific casework functions.    For example, on entering hospital, case-work services around admission
and reception are made available to the patient and his relatives.    Later the social worker
engages in case-work services closely related to the total treatment plan for the patient.
At some point toward the termination of treatment, the social worker brings to the patient
case-work services preparatory to his convalescence.   Then case-work services of a probationary or convalescent nature are brought to the patient as he leaves the hospital.
The latter function (probation) is one in which social workers have long been engaged
and for which they have always assumed extensive responsibility.    Besides the aforementioned case-work functions the social worker has responsibilities in education, community interpretation, and research.
Since the treatment of patients in both the Provincial Mental Hospital and the Crease
Clinic of Psychological Medicine is considered to be " a total push relationship situation "
which is patient centred, the social worker contributes his skill and services to the skills
and services of psychiatry, nursing, occupational, physical, recreational, and industrial
therapies. Each function of the social worker's skill is useful in the treatment of the
patient only in so far as it is purposefully related to the skills and services of the other
professions. The quality of the treatment afforded patients is wholly dependent upon
how ably the various professions can work together. Ability to work together involves
some knowledge of and respect for other professional skills, an awareness of the limitations in one's own professional skill, an understanding of the dynamics of human behaviour, and an ability to give and take (to work integratively). The relationships of the
various professions must be constantly evaluated and purposefully developed if treatment
is to be adequate.
I: Review of Social Services to Patients, April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
1. Referrals
A total of 2,100 patients was referred to the Social Service Department. Of these
referrals, 1,141 patients were referred from the Provincial Mental Hospital and 959
patients from the Crease Clinic.
2. Analysis of Case-work Services to Patients and Families
(a) Case-work Services in Admission and Reception of Patients to Provincial
Mental Hospital, Homes for the Aged, and Crease Clinic, April, 1951, to March 31st,
1952:—
L Q 52
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Total
Total   admissions,   Provincial   Mental
Hospital and Crease Clinic	
150
15
12
9
10
7
3
199
14
11
8
10
8
2
172
15
8
17
9
9
4
152
14
9
17
11
7
6
197
15
10
16
10
9
4
183
28
21
32
14
21
8
175
24
18
27
15
15
12
194
47
32
59
47
52
16
153
25
27
40
23
42
15
187
25
35
40
49
'   59
20
193
27
41
36
41
83
17
225
42
49
65
40
117
13
2,180
291
Interviews with patients on admission
273
366
279
Brief service to patients and relatives
Ward rounds, clinicals, etc 	
429
120
The inclusion of social work as an integral part of the admission procedure was
instituted at the Crease Clinic in April, 1951, and at the Provincial Mental Hospital in
September, 1951.
The responsibilities of the social worker in the admission of the patient have
involved: Assisting in outlining the services and facilities of the hospital and clinic to the
patient and his family; helping the family with the anxiety which surmounts when one
of the members becomes mentally ill; helping the family to understand the treatment
procedures used in the hospital and clinic; whenever possible to gather preliminary
information about the patient and his illness from either the patient himself, when able,
or the relative accompanying him; referring the relative to the continuing services of
a social worker to the end that through the growth of an understanding, sustaining, and
supporting relationship the relative is helped to understand the patient and to assist in
his treatment and his final rehabilitation.
Analysis of the case-work services in admission and reception indicates that 291
evaluative studies of the patient and his illness were undertaken. It has usually been
possible for the social worker on admission and reception to dictate this information on
the day following. Consequently the information is available for the psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, etc., within a few days of the patient's admission. In this way, arriving
at a provisional diagnosis, formulation of initial treatment plans, and mobilization of
the services within the hospital for the treatment of the new patient are all accelerated.
During the admission period, 279 interviews of a helping nature were undertaken
with relatives, 366 interviews with psychiatrists, and attendance at 120 ward rounds were
directed toward sharing social-history information obtained during the admission procedure with medical and nursing staff. Four hundred and twenty-nine interviews were
spent in brief services to relatives during which anxiety was often lessened and the relatives' help and understanding mobilized toward the treatment and rehabilitation of the
patient.
Some 273 interviews were spent in reception of the patient. Reception involves
helping the patient to accept the need for hospitalization; helping the patient to use
effectively toward treatment all hospital facilities; and helping the patient to use his
social worker in keeping and maintaining the interest of relatives, friends, employer, and
community.
Many patients come to hospital accompanied by ambulance or police escort, and
very often the patient is not aware that he is being admitted to a mental hospital.
Depending on the patient's condition, the social worker on admission and reception has
found it helpful to reassure him about hospital routines, treatment, and to ask about his
daily needs. A valuable opportunity is afforded for interpretation to escorts concerning
preparation of the patient for hospitalization and the value of good preparation in the
patient's ultimate acceptance and use of his treatment.
(b) Analysis of Case-work Services to the Patient during His Treatment Period.—
The 2,100 patients referred from Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic were
given social services comprising  13,221  interviews during the period of treatment. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE Q 53
Throughout this period the social worker is concerned with all aspects of the patient's
relationship with medical and nursing staff, with other patients, family, friends, and
community. The latter three areas of relationship are very important for to-day the
period of hospitalization tends to be shorter, more intensive, and given over to specific
and specialized treatment regimens. Family and community, therefore, must assume
increasingly more responsibility for the continuing social treatment of the patient following discharge from hospital. To assist family and community in assuming this function
adequately, the social worker has a very important interpretative and integrative role—
interpretative of the patient's needs in his ex-mural treatment and integrative of hospital
planning and community planning in the prevention and treatment of mental illness.
During the past fiscal year, 39 per cent of all interviews were directed to services to
patients in the ward. The social worker's contact with the patient in the ward during
hospitalization is directed toward building a supportive, understanding relationship,
throughout which the patient is helped to hold to whatever reality functioning he may
possess. Interest in wife, husband, children, and parents, etc., is kept alive, beside which
the patient is helped to do something about those problems of which he is aware and
concerned about. Some 20 per cent of all interviews were directed toward keeping up
the family's interest in the patient by allaying that often intense fear of the patient which
grew up prior to his hospitalization. This is done by familiarizing the relative with the
nature of the illness, its treatment, hospital routines; by helping the relative with his own
feeling concerning mental illness; and by helping with that feeling of guilt which the
relative often has concerning his own contribution to the patient's illness. Finally, through
support and clarification the relative is helped to see what he can do toward treatment
and rehabilitation of the patient. Thirty-one per cent of all interviews during the patient's
hospitalization were between the social workers and the psychiatrist in formulation
and reformulation of the patient's treatment plan. Fifteen per cent of all interviews were
spent in consultation with nursing, occupational and industrial therapy in the interests
of the patient and his use of the treatment services of the hospital. Some 5 per cent of
all interviews during the patient's hospitalization were spent with interested people and
agencies on behalf of the patients.
(c) Analysis of Case-work Services to the Patients during Convalescent Period.—
During the past fiscal year, 675 patients were referred to social service at the point of
leaving the hospital and clinic. Continuing case-work services directed toward rehabilitation were extended to these patients. Of the total number of patients referred at the
point of discharge, 297 were from the Provincial Mental Hospital, who were leaving to
go on trial visit or probationary visit to family, friends, or to the mid-way home—The
Vista. This mid-way home—a bridge between hospital and the demands of community
in social living—is operated under the Provincial Mental Health Services, and is available
for the use of the woman patient without resources in family or friends or whose family
is unable to provide the supportive help necessary in rehabilitation.
During the probationary period, the patient is a responsibility of the Hospital, and
by continuing help and supervision the social worker assists the Hospital in the discharge of its responsibility to the patient on probation. The social worker's help is
focused toward (a) re-establishing the patient in community; (b) helping the patient
to become self-supporting through assistance in locating work and accommodation;
(c) helping the patient to hold to his treatment gains; (d) supporting family, relatives,
or friends in understanding the patient and those changes which his illness may have
brought about; (e) and, wherever possible, to help the patient himself live comfortably
with and settle for these changes in his ability to plan and to do.
Many of these patients will probably always carry with them a varying residual of
their illness, necessitating protective family living, protective work placement, as well as
financial subsidization in maintenance. It is in these aforementioned areas that community agencies are assuming their responsibility for rehabilitation and social treatment. Q 54 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
It is in the area of interpretation to community and social agencies of the services and
facilities needed for this social treatment and rehabilitation of the mentally ill that the
social worker has an important role. The public welfare agency of the City of Vancouver
and also the public welfare agency of the Province—Social Welfare Branch—are giving
the Provincial Mental Health Services valuable rehabilitation services. Social Welfare
Branch is giving case-work services as well as social assistance as a means of rehabilitation. The Family Welfare Bureau is making its service available to a small number of
patients on discharge. The National Employment Service, Special Placements Section,
is a valuable community resource to the Mental Health Services in job-finding and
placement.
Three hundred and seventy-eight patients were referred from the Crease Clinic for
services of re-establishment in home and in community, that is family case-work services
or individual counseling or supportive case-work services. In many aspects, the two
latter types of service are an extension of the clinical service of the Crease Clinic into a
necessarily limited out-patient department service, so greatly needed in the total treatment and prevention of mental illness.
The Social Service Department engaged in 6,542 interviews of a rehabilitative :"ocus.
Twenty-nine per cent of all these interviews were focused on supportive or counseling
services to the patient. Thirty-one per cent of all interviews were spent in consultation
with the psychiatrist around pre-convalescent planning and convalescent follow-up services to the patient. Twenty per cent of all interviews were directed toward the support
of family during the period of rehabilitation service to the patient. A further 20 per cent
of all interviews were spent in soliciting the help of interested people or agencies on behalf
of the patient.
A sample study, comprised of fifty patients referred to social service for rehabilitation, revealed that initially each patient received an average of seven preparatory interviews involving a total of eight hours' work. Some 20 per cent of all patients referred at
the point of leaving hospital were directly assisted into job placement by the social
workers through their use, in the interests of the patient, of all available community
resources.
(d) The Responsibilities of the Social Service Department in Education and Training.—The first responsibility of social workers in education and training of personnel is
toward their own profession—social work. For the past two fiscal years, under the
Federal mental-health grants, twenty social-work students have had their field-work
placement in the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic. Although direct responsibility for the supervision of these students lay with the School of Social Work Training
Supervisor, plans for the general introduction and orientation to the Social Service
Department, hospital, clinic, and community agencies were evolved with the participation
of the Department. Introduction of students to interdepartmental co-operation between
social service and other departments of the hospital and clinic and the policies relating
thereto, as well as those policies related to the use of community resources, was the
responsibility of the Social Service Department. The Social Service Department attempted
to help the students feel the basic underlying philosophy of the service by working closely
with them, sharing through staff and through special studies. The contribution of the
Training Supervisor and the students to the Department's growth and services was of the
finest quality. Sixty-four periods of consultation were given by the Social Service Department to the student project in addition to fourteen special meetings.
The second responsibility of a Social Service Department in education and training is
to the development of the social-service staff. To this end, thirty-six staff meetings were
arranged and 976 hours of supervision were given to staff by the case-work supervisors.
The contribution of the social workers in staff meeting to the development of the
Department's organization, administration, improvement of social work skills, and services to patients has been outstanding. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE Q 55
The Social Service Department's contribution to the education of nursing staff and
psychiatric fellows has been geared to lecture periods and orientations, the content of
which was aimed at the explanation of the professional content and activities of social
work as well as sharing the knowledge of the social-work profession in the areas of inter-
familial, inter-cultural relationships, present-day stresses on family life, and knowledge
of helping resources in agencies and institutions within society.
During the last fiscal year, orientations were given to nine psychiatric fellows,
twenty-five public health nurses, ten in-service-trained social workers, and nine visitors
from other parts of Canada, Great Britain, Australia, and Japan.
Over fifteen hours of lectures were given to postgraduate nurses and psychiatric
nurses.
(e) Social Service Department's Responsibility in Research.—A special study of
the rehabilitation process was undertaken by the social workers. The method used was
that of case analysis. Conclusion and recommendations point out that the large percentage of a worker's time is presently taken up in rehabilitation in an effort to discover
resources. With the present 100 per cent patient coverage, this large number of referrals
is inevitable. When such referrals are received, workers are at present required to drop
other work and arrange for patient's removal from hospital. There is no central hospital
office at present having a knowledge of community resources and workers are required to
explore accommodation and jobs on an individual case basis. This results in duplication
by different workers and by each worker on different cases. Much time is consumed
in travel, in unsatisfactory telephone-lines, and in separate interviews with potential
employers or landladies.
Partial solution would seem to be the appointment of a rehabilitation person on staff.
Duties would include having available all resources known for accommodation, jobs, and
funds and also to act in a public-relations capacity to enlarge and increase these resources.
This person would then be consulted by individual workers, which would eliminate the
present duplication and overlapping of work and would free the workers to continue
giving valuable case-work services to other patients. This rehabilitation person would
do a large community-organization job to procure and be familiar with homes of various
services and standards, job possibilities, training facilities, and funds available. This
person would be the sole channel of contact with National Employment Service, with
Special Placements Department, with employment agencies, with personnel departments
of business organizations, with individual employers, with people providing accommodation, and also with organizations providing vocational training. In short, the rehabilitation person would have an over-all picture of the day-to-day community resources
which would then be available to individual workers when confronted with planning for
a patient's rehabilitation. We would expect the rehabilitation person also to arrange
with certain employing firms or agencies to accept a certain stated number of our patients
under the handicapped clause.
We see this rehabilitation person as necessarily being an alert, mature individual,
skilled in public relations, and having the prerequisite social-work training.
Individual workers would be enabled to consult with the rehabilitation person in a
routine manner and to discuss the various patients for discharge confidently and on an
individual basis. Some patients could then be referred for interview directly to the
rehabilitation person. There is need for greater care in discharge planning and also for
advance notice from medical staff contemplating discharge of a patient. A careful evaluation of the patient's potentials, abilities, and aptitudes should be made before proceeding
with discharge planning; this evaluation would be done on a team basis with the
Medical, Social Service, and Psychology Departments acting together. This could be
expected to result in the reduction of readmissions. Likewise, workers would give better
service in this whole area because they would be relieved of emergency rehabilitations
and would be able to save much time and energy by turning to the rehabilitation person
to discuss resource possibilities. Q 56 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
The social-service staff finds the present telephone service inadequate, and many
hours are frequently spent in trying to make telephone calls regarding rehabilitation.
Much of this time would be saved by the very fact that the rehabilitation person would
have resources at hand and individual calls would not be required.
Present resources in the community are also inadequate and although potential are
not available for use at this time. It would be hoped that the rehabilitation person in a
community-organization capacity would greatly extend these resources.
II. Review of Developments in Social Services Over the Past Year and
Future Plans for the Continuance of Development
In referrals of patients to social services, there has been a 38.42 per cent increase
over those referrals of the previous fiscal year. An additional service, that of social
services to the patient in the ward, has been developed. There has been a 48.06 per cent
increase in services to patients during the convalescent period and a 31.7 per cent increase
in the participation of the Department in education and training.
Plans for the next fiscal year involve development of social-service staff in the Homes
for the Aged and development of a separate social-service department in the Crease Clinic
with additional and concomitant plans for increasing and improving in-service training.
Thus we hope to equip this Department to assume responsibly and adequately the functions of social work in the clinical setting.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Alice K. Carroll,
Provincial Supervisor, Psychiatric Social Work.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICE
Women's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—The report on the activity of the Department of Nursing Service during the
fiscal year is presented herewith.
This year ended with the following personnel: Registered nurses, 25; psychiatric
graduate nurses, 92; psychiatric nurses-in-training, 244; psychiatric aides, 114; postgraduate students, 9; student psychiatric nurses, 18; and home housekeepers, 25; a total
staff of 527.   Resignations for the year numbered 296 and new appointments 322.
There were 35 more resignations this year as compared with last year. The reasons
given for resignation were as follows: Marriage, 39; illness, 35; other positions, 127;
unsuited to work, 25; temporary staff, 47; services terminated, 19; and to take student
course, 4. The attrition rate, as shown above, continues to be high. It has, therefore,
been difficult to maintain the constancy and quality of service desired. We have also had
considerable difficulty in procuring the services of the type of personnel who are capable
of giving adequate nursing care. We have found it necessary to employ many more
aides. On May 7th, we inaugurated the use of a distinctive uniform for the psychiatric
aide. The uniform is one-piece pink uniform as compared to the blue and white uniforms
of the psychiatric nurses.
Progress has been made in other areas of the Department. On September 1st,
our training programme for student psychiatric nurses was changed by Order in Council
No. 2001, 1951. Prior to September 1st, whenever replacements or additional nursing
staff were required we were forced through circumstances and lack of available trained REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE Q 57
staff to employ persons (who were untrained) under the classification of psychiatric
nurse-in-training. Some were really interested in training as psychiatric nurses while
others were merely interested in a job. Under the order in council we were able to separate these two groups. As a result, those desirous of training receive classroom instruction
before they are required to give nursing service, whereas, previously, students were
admitted to classes when the ward service could spare them. Another feature of this new
programme is its length. Better use is being made of the time spent in training through
better planning, hence the length of the course has been reduced to two years instead of
three. We have had evidence, even at this early date, of considerable improvement in the
quality of the nursing care. On November 21st, the first group commenced training—
twenty-six women and eight men. Students who were originally enrolled in the three-year
programme as psychiatric nurses-in-training have continued their course under the
previous system of training and regulations. Conducting a dual programme with these
groups has presented many problems, particularly with reference to the volume of
students. The School of Psychiatric Nursing have had a difficult task and they are to be
highly commended for their excellent work.
The facilities of the School of Psychiatric Nursing and the Department of Nursing
have been used to broaden psychiatric nursing education beyond our own student group.
These facilities have been used by the Schools of Nursing of the University of British
Columbia, Vancouver General Hospital, and Royal Columbian Hospital. Further
information is found in the School of Psychiatric Nursing report.
Graduation exercises were held for the second time in the New Westminster Junior
High School Auditorium. A total of eighty-nine students, both men and women,
graduated from the three hospital units of Essondale, The Woodlands School, and
Saanich.
There have been several changes within the senior staff of this Department. Miss
Mona E. Parsons, R.N., resigned in July from her position as Director of Nursing. She
left this nursing department having given seventeen years' very valuable service in the
capacity of Instructor of Nursing and later as Director of Nursing, which position she held
for six years.
Miss Beverley J. Mitchell, R.N., B.S.N., returned to the School of Psychiatric
Nursing in June, 1951, following the completion of her course at the School of Nursing
at the University of British Columbia.
On December 3rd, 1951, Miss Orma J. Smith, B.A., R.N., joined our staff as Senior
Instructor. Miss Smith comes to us with wide experience in teaching, administration, and
psychiatric nursing.
Miss Ada Parsons, R.N., completed in February a six-month postgraduate course in
operating-room techniques at the Vancouver General Hospital in preparation for the
opening of our operating-room.
We have experienced considerable illness amongst our staff and many have been
treated in the Nurses' Infirmary. We were fortunate to have the services of Doctor
Bryant, who replaced Doctor Gens.
In looking back over the year it has been an exceedingly busy one. Our major
difficulties centre around provision of adequate staff to meet the needs of the patients.
The interest, patience, and tolerance which is maintained by the senior staff members in
training new staff is very commendable. We also appreciate the fine assistance and
co-operation received from all departments.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Edith M. Pullan, R.N.,
Director of Nursing. Q 58 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Men's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is a report of the male nursing staff for the fiscal year April 1st,
1951, to March 31st, 1952.
The year ended with the following personnel: —
Psychiatric graduate male nurses (thirty-three of whom received
their certificates this year)  235
First-year student-nurses     24
Second-year student-nurses     67
Psychiatric aides     66
Total staff  392
There were five male nurses superannuated and two transferred, one to the business
office and one to Oakalla Prison Farm staff.   Twenty-nine have resigned.
I am more than pleased to report that it has been a year of advancement in mental
nursing. The use of physical restraint has been abolished, and a ward with unlocked
doors has been established, whereby patients may come and go at will. Both these
changes are a long step forward in the treatment of mental illness.
Monthly lectures were provided by the medical staff for all charge psychiatric nurses.
These were well received and of great benefit to all. It trust these lectures will continue,
and a larger number of the staff will be able to attend, as I feel these programmes are of
great value to all nursing personnel.
To all the doctors, nurses, clinical staff, and heads of departments who have helped
in no small measure the nursing staff, we are extremely thankful.
Respectfully submitted.
W. Creber,
Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—During the past year 563 student psychiatric nurses have received instruction.
Of this number 241 women students and 151 men students were from Essondale while
77 women students and 60 men students were from Woodlands.
The highlight of the year has been the inception of the two-year course. Twenty-
six women students and eight men students enrolled in the class that was admitted.
Lectures preceded ward experience and both were arranged as far as possible to correlate
theory and practice. The benefits to the patient, student, and staff derived from the
giving of lectures to the students before they were assigned to ward duty have been
obvious.
In order to establish the two-year course and at the same time give the best possible
educational advantage to students who are already taking the three-year course, frequent
repetition of lectures was necessary.
The two-month affiliate course was given to forty-two students from the Vancouver
General Hospital and to eighteen students from the Royal Columbian Hospital. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE Q 59
In the postgraduate course nine registered nurses were enrolled. The course has
been extended with good effect to include lectures in psychology, tours of the Boys' and
Girls' Industrial Schools, the Juvenile Court, and the Detention Home. The students
spent a day visiting the Psychiatric Unit at Shaughnessy Military Hospital and five days
in the Psychiatric Unit of the Vancouver General Hospital.
From the University of British Columbia thirteen public-health students came in
groups of two or three to spend three days on tours and observation of the Crease Clinic,
Provincial Mental Hospital, and Home for the Aged.
The educational programme is ambitious and is only possible because of the splendid
co-operation of the Medical, Nursing, Psychology, Dietary, Occupational Therapy,
Physiotherapy, Audio-Visual, and Recreational Departments. To them we wish to
express our deep appreciation and sincere thanks.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Orma J. Smith,
Senior Instructor.
DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITATION
Women's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith find report covering the activities of The Vista Rehabilitation Home for the fiscal year April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952.
The opening of the Crease Clinic in January, 1951, has been reflected in the intake
figures at The Vista in the current fiscal year. It will be noted that about half (seventeen)
of those admitted were from the Clinic.
Total number admitted to The Vista  32
Returned to the hospital     4
Rehabilitated to the community :  28
Rehabilitated to own home     8
Rehabilitated to job and lodging  20
There were some changes in personnel made during the year and, in consequence,
The Vista did not operate to capacity for several months; hence the number of patients
served was less than last year. We have been fortunate to secure Mrs. K. Rees as
supervisor, and at the close of the fiscal year had no vacant beds. Alterations are
proceeding to increase the accommodation from five to seven patients. Members of the
Social Service Department now continue at The Vista the contact initially made with
the patients in hospital, and they assist in many ways in the relocation of the patients.
For those patients who require some special assistance on the road back, The Vista
has proved most welcome and worth while. Quoting from a recent letter: "(The Vista)
restored my self-confidence so that I did not feel so inferior and ' beyond the pale ' when
I went to the Selective Service."
Respectfully submitted.
F. E. McNair, M.D.,
Assistant Clinic Director. Q 60
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Men's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
.Sir,—For your information, the following is the annual report of the Rehabilitation
Department for the fiscal year April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952, together with
a statistical summary of the cases involved.
Looking back, the year has been somewhat difficult from the job-placement point of
view. Last summer and fall, a prolonged fire season had its effects on some of our basic
industries; the winter was severe and with a late spring outdoor employment was delayed.
Coupled with this was a serious lack of export markets for our lumber commodities and
a threatening strike for higher wages and better working conditions by the total I.W.A.
membership.
In general, however, placement of patients has been gratifying. With careful
selection and a steady increase in employment contacts employers are noticeably much
more accepting of this type of rehabilitation service. It is, of course, a continual round
of explanation and interpretation, but gradually the ex-mental patient is being accepted
for his employability assets.
Referring to the statistical sheet, it is noted that out of 201 referrals, 169 were given
concrete assistance by this Department. This figure (169) is broken down into cases
fully rehabilitated, 108, and cases assisted by referral, counselling, or case-work services,
61, culminating in discharge from the hospital or clinic. Many hours and miles have
been expended in rehabilitating these patients. Total interviews number 1,073 and
mileage recorded is 8,104.
The Y.M.C.A. in Vancouver has been used as temporary lodging for some patients
but this has been done sparingly and with careful selection of patients. The Salvation
Army Hostel has also been used but on the basis of the patient paying his own way.
In submitting this report, I wish to thank the hospital staff for their co-operation
and teamwork during the past year. I feel also that thanks are due to many other agencies
in this Province for their interest, assistance, and accceptance of this Department. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
Q 61
Summary of Referrals
Respectfully submitted.
J. D. Addison,
Rehabilitation Officer.
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as
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cs
3
a
tt
>-.
as
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H
C3
3
£
a.
u
H
"cS
3
Schizophrenia  	
11
2
3
1
3
1
1
7
1
3
1
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
5
1
4
1
2
1
3
	
1
7
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
5
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
10
1
6
1
1
2
5
1
1
2
1
1
1
8
1
1
2
2
2
6
1
......
__
2
......
	
....
......
6
2
	
1
1
2
......
......
......
4
1
3
1
......
1
1
......
......
6
1
4
1
6
1
1
1
80
12
21
1
Psychopathic personality 	
9
2
6
35
1
1
2
8
3
6
2
5
Diabetic  	
1
2
2
No diagnosis  	
2
22
1
24
1
4
18
1
19
2
14
2
1
21
4
4
12
2
1
16
1
1
11
1
1
12
1
11
1
1
21
2
201
13
19
Total active rehabilitation cases „
21
13
19
15
17
9
17
10
11
10
13
8
9
8
14
9
9
4
11
6
9
6
19
10
169
108
Cases assisted by referral and
case work 	
Total interviews (doctors, staff,
patients, employers, etc.)	
8
......
4
8
7
1
5
1
5
5
5
3
9
61
1,073 Q 62
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1951-52
Three 100-bed units under construction, The Woodlands School, New Westminster. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL Q 63
REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL,
NEW WESTMINSTER
REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—It is with pleasure that I submit the report of The Woodlands School, New
Westminster, B.C., for the fiscal year April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952. The reports
of the various departments are included. This residential training school in the Province
of British Columbia is a school for the mentally retarded.
The Woodlands School has medical and surgical consultants as well as our full-time
medical staff services.
The Lawn House—a very old structure—was completely demolished in May. In
June the staff cafeteria was occupied for the first time by the staff.
In July the dining-rooms previously used by our staff were taken over by a small
group of patients after redecorating. In July the fire-escape ramps were totally completed
and in use.   These steel fire-escapes adjoin B.A.R. wards.
The new vegetable-garden has been further expanded.
The new Nurses' Home No. 3 (100 beds) was started in October, 1951, by contract
and should be ready for occupancy in the summer of 1952, unless some unforeseen
circumstances arise.
A concrete sidewalk was laid near the present auditorium.
Again one of the trees facing Columbia Street was decorated with coloured lights for
the Christmas season.   This was quite effective.
On Thursday, January 24th, there was power-line trouble on McBride Boulevard,
close to The Woodlands School. Our telephone switchboard was disrupted for several
hours. The fire-alarm mechanism at Centre had to be replaced. As a result of all this,
rewiring to fuse-boxes was required in two wings adjoining the administration section.
A bigger telephone switchboard was required because of our expansion at The
Woodlands School, and was therefore installed in the latter part of January, 1952.
On account of the expansion, an addition to the heating plant was started and should
be completed in the summer of this coming fiscal year.
New equipment for the shoe-shop was received and will be ready to be used in
another location in April, 1952.
A new electric range was placed in the domestic-science classroom in December,
1951.
As the laundry at the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, is not yet prepared to
centralize the work there for The Woodlands School, as planned, arrangements will have
to be made by The Woodlands School laundry to provide an afternoon shift in order to
look after the laundry requirements of the new staff and new patient population coming in
to occupy the new buildings.
The roads to the new buildings have not yet been laid by the contractor, but it is
hoped that this will be done by the latter part of April, 1952.
For many years I have recommended a new vocational building, including an
auditorium, to replace the present building, which should be torn down as it is very old
and a fire-hazard. I repeat that this type of building is essential for the mentally retarded.
The objective of a training school is the rehabilitation of the individuals in our care. Q 64 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Those young men and women who are unable to return to the community find happiness
in the achievements of certain vocations in the school. Many of these, when they go home
on visits, although they many not be able to stay indefinitely, are a greater pride to their
parents by their better behaviour and better socialization.
I would again point out that in our building projects consideration should be given
to more offices and also to more lecture-room accommodation, and classrooms should be
larger for teaching purposes to our own staff, outside groups, medical students, and
medical graduates.
The present new buildings, including the Nurses' Home, were erected on the site of
our beautiful airing park that we had for many years. It is hoped that the senior
playground for the senior pupils will be started and completed during the next fiscal year
within the residential grounds. The junior playground, with the proper equipment, is
near the school building.
Three years ago I requested consideration should be given for a rehabilitation centre
in a larger community where the boys and girls who are returning to the community could
have a place for intermediate guidance and direction. This service could be expanded as
conditions permitted. Boarding-out care in proper homes should be encouraged more
and more with finances available to carry this out when suitable boarding-homes are
available. It is difficult at present to find people who are in a position, or willing, to take
the responsibility of supervising a mentally retarded person.
At the fiscal year's end, admissions have not yet taken place directly to The
Woodlands School, so for the time being transfers of patient-pupils will continue to take
place from Essondale when the three new buildings are ready for occupancy, possibly
about the middle of May. It is hoped that admissions will occur directly to The
Woodlands School in the very near future under a new Mental Deficiency Act, as
proposed.
Interested relatives have continued to visit The Woodlands School by request and
have been given interviews by myself and our Social Service Department, in some cases by
the latter alone or by myself. Requests for visiting The Woodlands School as well as for
interviews in reference to prospective placements here or at Essondale of the mentally
retarded until such time as they are placed at The Woodlands School direct are becoming
more numerous.
Many of the parents who are ready for placement of their children are quite
disappointed when they are advised by us that we are unable to accept their child directly
here. The parents know of our expansion programme and find it difficult to understand
that admissions must take place at Essondale at this time. It is difficult for some of the
parents to evaluate the necessity of transferring some of the mentally defective that are
already a Essondale to us when our new buildings open. It would seem that the community need in recent years for various reasons is greater than we can accommodate in
reference to those children under 6 years of age and also many of those 6 years and over.
With these facts in mind, our further building programme should be considered at once,
as the public feel there is great need for the placement of certain mentally defective
children in a residential training school for the mentally retarded. This is in contrast to
a few years ago when parents of a mentally defective child were very reticent in placing
their child away from home.
Considering this change of public opinion, it is my view, with the fast-growing
population of British Columbia, that as soon as our present proposed plans for additional
accommodation for 300 patient-pupils materialize, we should immediately give consideration for early accommodation for additional beds. This recommendation is over and
above the buildings that will be occupied about the middle of May, 1952.
In September, 1951, the Social Service Department was started, with Miss M. Hardy,
R.N., as Supervisor of Psychiatric Social Work.   Miss Hardy came to us with years of REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL Q 65
experience with the Mental Health Services of British Columbia. Miss G. Macdonald
also came at this time. The Social Service Department is now meeting a long-felt want
for this type of service. We are now in a better position to have the social service come
directly in contact on a pre-admission basis, on the admission basis during the pupil's
residence with us, and for supervision of those pupils who return to the community. In
this way there is continuous liaison between the community, the parents, and the school.
Our expansion has already indicated the need for more social service workers in this
Department.
Clinical demonstrations during an orientation visit to the school building and some of
the cottages were given during the fiscal year to groups of University students in nursing,
in social work, in psychology, and to public health nurses, as well as to some medical
groups, graduate public health nurses from certain communities, Vancouver teachers of
special classes, affiliate nursing students of Essondale, and student-nurses from St. Paul's
School of Nursing. Various individuals who were professionally interested also received
orientation and an opportunity to visit. Some small groups received an intensive
orientation course of three days or more.
Mr. Woodward, Psychological Clinical Assistant, was here only a short time when he
joined the forces and is at present on leave of absence. We have been fortunate in
having part-time service from the Psychological Department of Essondale until such time
as we have this vacancy filled by a full-time psychologist.
In November, R. F. Nash, Instructor of Male Nurses, replaced Mr. Palm, who had
previously become one of our Deputy Chief Psychiatric Male Nurses.
Miss Pauline Glover, Speech Therapist at the Child Guidance Clinic, has been
coming to The Woodlands School every Tuesday since March 11th, 1952, for the day,
and will continue to do so to help in speech defects here. This will prove a clinical asset
for a certain number of our pupils.
Dr. Benwell, our Deputy Medical Superintendent, was made Chairman of Civil
Defence at The Woodlands School.
On March 31st we had a patient-pupil population of 808, plus 9 on probation,
making a total on the register of 817.
James McMillan, Shoemaker, retired in July, 1951, after thirty-three years of service
here.   He was replaced by R. T. Ballard.
Mrs. Marr, Dietitian, transferred to the Pearson T.B. Control Hospital in Vancouver
and was replaced by Miss Neighbor.
N. T. Delaney, Cook, retired in December, 1951.
H. Christie, Charge Psychiatric Male Nurse, who entered service August, 1941,
died February 25, 1952.   He was a veteran of World War I.
J. Fitzpatrick, Psychiatric Aide, who entered service May, 1943, retired in March,
1952.
The fifth annual gymnastic display was held for the public one evening in April.
A repeat performance was held a week later, as many were unable to attend on account
of the large crowd of the previous week.
Confirmation was given by Archbishop Duke in the auditorium here in May to a
large number of our Catholic pupils.
May Day in the City of New Westminster was quite an attraction as usual to many
of our pupils who saw the parade from our grounds and to those who attended at Queens
Park.
In June an inter-provincial delegation of the Psychiatric Nursing Association visited
the school and was also given a clinical demonstration.
We have continued as in the past to have staff clinics at the school one afternoon a
week.
Three school picnics under the supervision of the school-teachers were held in
the summer;  there were also two picnics sponsored by the psychiatric nurses of The
3 Q 66 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1951-52
Woodlands School.    The latter were held at Second Beach, Vancouver.    This was a
combined effort of the nursing staff and the Recreational Department.
The Woodlands School had an exhibit of handicraft in the Pacific National
Exhibition, Vancouver. In the latter part of August a number of our pupils attended the
Shrine Circus at the P.N.E.
In October all our pupils and patients who were able were on the lawn facing
Columbia Street to see Princess Elizabeth (now Queen) and the Duke of Edinburgh pass
by on their official visit to New Westminster.
Parties and dances are enjoyed by our pupils on such occasions as Hallowe'en,
Christmas, Valentine's, etc. At Christmas, Santa Claus presented gifts in the cottages to
our patient-pupils. On New Year's Eve, Monday, December 31st, a dance was held for
the pupils here in the recreational hall. The Psychiatric Nursing Chapter of The
Woodlands School and the Recreational Department co-operated in a combined effort
to make this event a great success.
A Christmas concert was held in the recreational hall of the school for relatives and
interested visitors. Many activities take place at the school as well as the cottages and
different departments during the festive season.
This past year has been a very heavy year with the building programme and the
planning for new patient-pupils. There has been much preparation, planning, and
organization in readiness to occupy the new buildings for the additional patient-pupil
population and the building of a 100-bed home for nurses. All these buildings will be
occupied early in the next fiscal year.
Please accept my thanks and appreciation for your support in our endeavours in the
continued improved care and training of our patient-pupils in the past year.
Will you please convey to the Provincial Secretary and his Deputy Minister my
appreciation for their ready co-operation in all matters for the welfare of our pupils.
Respectfully submitted.
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., CM.,
Medical Superintendent.
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the annual report for the fiscal year April 1st, 1951, to
March 31st, 1952.
During the past year two teachers resigned, Mrs. Siddall and Miss Farr, and were
replaced by Mrs. Roberts in July and Mrs. Kines in November. There are still eight
academic teachers.
Mrs. Cunningham, because of ill health, was forced to give up the position of
principal in favour of a position as kindergarten teacher. Mrs. Smith then became
principal on September 18th, 1951.
As the school enrolment is continually increasing, it has become necessary to have
three separate parties and picnics instead of the usual two. The junior group takes in all
the pre-school and play-class children, numbering between eighty and ninety. The intermediate group takes in the kindergarten children, the younger children in the primary
academic classes, and the ward classes, numbering between sixty-five and seventy-five.
This is the first year the ward classes have attended school parties and it has proven very
successful.   The senior group takes in all the remaining academic classes.   For Hallow- REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
Q 67
e'en, Christmas, and Valentine's these children join the evening parties.   For the picnic
in August they go to Queens Park for games and refreshments.
The fifth annual gym display was held in April. The teaching staff co-operated with
the recreation instructor in helping to make this a success.
During the month of May the Domestic Science classroom was painted. In August
the Industrial Arts room, the gymnasium floor, and the trimming of the school building
were painted or varnished, whatever the case happened to be.
Six of the teachers took children to Queens Park in May to witness the May Day
celebrations.
Staff holidays commenced July 1st and concluded September 28th, each teacher
taking the specified two weeks.
Four complete performances were given of the Christmas concert, three for residents
and one for visitors. Both pupils and staff worked very hard on preparations for the
concert and felt their efforts were justified by the four successful performances.
Santa Claus visited the school gymnasium on December 20th at 2.30 p.m. He was
heartily welcomed by the children, and his bag contained Christmas stockings, made by
the teachers and filled with candy, candy canes, and noisemakers. Apples and oranges
were distributed later. Presents for the children have been discontinued because of the
increasing school enrolment.
The hand-work done by the school children was combined with the hand-work done
in the Occupational Therapy Department and placed in the Pacific National Exhibition.
It was the first time The Woodlands School had displayed any work done by the residents.
The school gymnasium was used for a sale of work in December, combining work
from the Occupational Therapy Department, School Handwork and Industrial Arts
Department. The sale was a success and it was felt that the spaciousness of the
gymnasium helped to make it so.
Twelve of the older school boys, under the direction of Mrs. Davy, planted a
combination flower and vegetable garden in the space provided behind the school. This,
however, met a sudden death in the early summer as the grounds were needed for further
construction.
Mrs. Davy took on the momentous job of revising the library. It is now planned that
the books will be taken to the wards by the pupils.
For the past year twelve records, at the rate of one a month, have been obtained
from the Children's Record Guild. These have proven very satisfactory and are
thoroughly enjoyed by the younger students.
A Glee Club, under the direction of Mrs. Kines, was started in January. This
consists of girls who have fair voices and enjoy singing. At present only twelve attend,
but it is planned to increase this number and, if possible, include some boys.
At present there are thirty-two classes at school, fourteen of which are academic.
The others are pre-school, play classes, hand-work, and cooking.
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) Peggy Smith,
School Principal. Q 68 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Girls' Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the annual report of the Department of Occupational
Therapy for the year ended March 31st, 1952.
During the year this Department covered the following work in its aim to provide
special training for mentally retarded girls. The chronological ages of this group are
from 18 to 50 years, while their basic mental ages are from 3 to 12 years. With this in
mind, craft work must be chosen that is suitable, not only to the mental age of the pupil
but to the chronological age as well.
The crocheted articles are quite advanced because they are done by girls who are
of a fairly high mental level. For example, they crochet edgings, doilies, Chesterfield
sets, and table-cloths. A wider variety is covered in the knitting field, ranging from the
most elementary to more advanced knitting. Beginners do spool-knitting, knitted squares
for afghans and dish-cloths. Socks, mitts, children's and adults' sweaters are done by an
intermediate group, while baby shawls and the more complicated knitting patterns are
done by advanced workers. Embroidery follows a similar scale, from practice squares
through to hemstitching and cutwork.
This past year the girls again made blanket slippers and runners for the wards and
Christmas decorations for the cafeteria. A few of the girls who participate in the dances
made their own crepe-paper costumes for the Hallowe'en dance. A large project
accomplished by this Department was the making of five dozen assorted print and felt
stuffed toys to be distributed throughout the new buildings for use in the play classes.
Rug-hooking is still a very popular craft among the girls. They have added a loop-stitch
poodle rug to their repertoire this year. Hand-weaving showed considerable improvement this year and the pupils are becoming increasingly more interested in this craft.
There is also a good deal of machine-sewing turned out by this Department. The girls
finish off the hems of tea-towels and tea-cloths, make pot-holders, work-bags, simple
patchwork quilts, and fancy aprons.
A small ward work programme is also carried out with the co-operation of the nurses
on the wards. Fancywork and wool are supplied to girls who are interested in making
use of their spare time. Some of these girls have disabilities and cannot leave the wards,
while others work in different departments and are unable to attend the therapy classes.
The mending class, held one afternoon a week, has offered the girls a chance to do
their own personal mending so that they will become as self-sufficient as possible. At first
some of the girls were not very keen on doing their own mending, but now they are
gaining a great deal of satisfaction out of keeping their own clothes in good repair.
Each pupil is given individual instruction and allowed to progress at her own rate
of speed and according to her own limited capacity. As a result, this individual training
enables each girl to make good use of her spare time and encourages her to develop her
own personal aptitudes to their fullest extent.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Elizabeth M. Morrison,
Occupational Therapist. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL Q 69
Boys' Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I hereby submit a report covering the above Department for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1952.
Equipment of the shop has been augmented by the purchase of a jointer, portable
belt-sander, electric drill and various hand-tools under Federal Government grants. Full
and efficient use is being made of these additions by the boys. Replacements and repairs
were nil while the tools have been kept at peak condition. Boys have been taught to
sharpen and adjust the hand-tools. This has resulted in a real appreciation of their value
and the results of good care.
Supplies of expendable materials have been maintained at a working level. Economy
and care in their use has been carefully supervised to keep waste to an absolute minimum.
Advantage is still being taken of walnut salvaged from trees cut within the grounds.
In this respect we are hampered from making full use of the walnut by the lack of milling,
drying, and storage facilities.
The work executed by the boys has made a marked improvement during the year in
scope and workmanship. There is a feeling of satisfaction in the progress on the part of
all concerned. Projects have been carried out for different departments of the school.
A sale, conducted prior to Christmas, was enthusiastically supported by the staff and the
proceeds turned over to the business office.
Instruction has been given to meet the needs of the individual in most cases and
adjusted to groups when conditions warranted. The friendly and equitable treatment
of pupils has resulted in reciprocation and a friendly, co-operative attitude among the
boys.   Discipline has been excellent.
The Industrial Arts Shop has been favoured with many visits from the public and
members of the school staff. Remarks by outside groups engaged in similar work have
been encouraging. The doctors and nurses have been most helpful in their understanding
and assistance. Other departments with which we came in contact have been equally
co-operative.
The health, both physical and mental, has been carefully fostered to the limit of our
capacity while the boys are in the shop. Ventilation and elimination of dust still present
a problem from health and efficiency angles. The shop was redecorated and this helped
materially in the illumination. Due to the more advanced nature of the projects now
being carried out, crowding is more apparent in the working and storage space.
A review of the year presents a picture of sound progress, happy and useful work,
a feeling of pride and satisfaction on the part of the boys and instructor.
Respectfully submitted.
Harold Mercer,
Industrial Arts Instructor.
DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL THERAPY
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit my annual report from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st,
1952.
The following table gives a summary of enrolment, classes, and attendance in
recreational therapy:— Q 70
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Class
Enrolment
Periods
Attendance
14
16
17
70
72
28
16
4 a week
4 a week
4 a week
72 a year
72 a year
5 a week
Started January, 1952
1,376
1,772
980
Ladies  	
3,888
4,320
Ward boys. 	
3,840
336
Totals  	
233
16,512
5,808
750
23,070
During the year enrolment has increased 25 per cent, and with the opening of the
three new units we can anticipate a much larger increase in the coming year. Our
evening classes are overcrowded, and with an average attendance of 132 at our dances
we are in need of a much larger hall and hope this may be considered in conjunction with
a new auditorium.
We are well equipped with gymnasium apparatus and will not be requiring any
heavy equipment. We also have equipment on hand for our senior playground. Our
playrooms at Cedar Cottage have suitable play equipment and we have equipment on
hand for our three new units.
Our fifth annual display was held on the evenings of April 19th and 26th, 1951, for
visitors, and displays were put on in the afternoons of April 17th and 18th for those at
the school who were not in the display. We are proud of our young gymnasts who, from
year to year, show such a high calibre of performance and are so appreciated by the
public. The neat gym outfits and costumes add greatly to the colour of the various
numbers.
The social event of the year was the New Year's dance and party, which was put on
in co-operation with the Psychiatric Nurses' Association. Noisemakers, hats, balloons,
and prizes were given out and two circles had to be formed by the packed hall for the
singing of "Auld Lang Syne." It is most gratifying having the nurses' association taking
such an interest in our recreational programme. It is largely due to their interest that
ward recreation has proven so popular. Several wards have been equipped with play
equipment and play periods are supervised by the nursing staff. Beach parties and picnics
have proven popular and plans are under way for an extension of this programme for the
coming year.
Our growing recreation programme has been able to operate efficiently by co-operation from all departments and the sympathetic understanding that you, Dr. Sauriol, have
always had in the Recreation Department.
Respectfully submitted.
J. A. Lynes,
Recreation Director. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
Q 71
DENTAL REPORT
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—Enclosed please find our annual report to cover the year April 1st, 1951, to
March 31st, 1952:—
Extractions  265
Examinations  140
Prophylaxis  62
Fillings   113
Dentures  7
Total patients  550
We trust that this report covers the necessary information required.
Respectfully submitted.
Martin M. Mathisen, D.M.D.
DEPARTMENT OF DIETETICS
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—Following is the annual report of the Dietary Department for the year ended
March 31st, 1952.
Remodelling of the existing cafeteria for use by the staff was completed in the spring.
This cafeteria has a seating capacity for 120, which should prove adequate for any staff
increases in the near future. The kitchen staff was increased by two to cover the extra
service given when the cafeteria began operating in mid-June. A total of 56,239 staff
meals were served during the year.
While remodelling was in process, an office for the dietitian was established near the
cafeteria.
In anticipation of an increased population, additional equipment, as well as
replacements, was needed for the kitchen. Equipment purchased included a three-decker
steam-cooker, two seventy-five-gallon steam-kettles, and a Blakeslee potato-peeler. Also
purchased were six electrical food-conveyors for ward service.
With these facilities we hope to provide the new units with adequate and satisfactory
service.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Catherine L. Neighbor,
Dietitian. Q 72 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I wish to submit the report of the Department of Radiology for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1952.
Number of films taken  2,710
Number of patients X-rayed  2,461
Chests  2,262
Extremities       125
Intravenous pyelograms  3
Gall-bladders  2
Ribs        10
Spines        19
Abdomens   3
Pelvis  9
Nasal sinuses  2
Skulls        24
Teeth  2
  2,461
Besides the regular X-ray work carried on in this Department, a new system was
introduced whereby all patient-pupils and staff had chest X-rays semi-annually.
Respectfully submitted.
Peter C. Barteluk,
Registered Technician.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICE
Women's Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the report of the Department of Nursing Service for the
fiscal year April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952.
This year ended with the following personnel: Registered nurses, 4; psychiatric
graduates, 24; psychiatric nurses-in-training, 85; psychiatric aides, 41; home supervisors, 6. New appointments for the year were 80, resignations 75—with the following
reasons given: 111 health, to continue education, unsuited to the work, failure to pass
examinations, and to be married.
Owing to the new training-school plans inaugurated last September, the number of
nurses in training has diminished and our psychiatric-aide staff has increased considerably.
We have had a very busy year with the new accelerated course for our nursing staff,
but I feel it has been worth while as we have been able to send almost two-thirds of our
students to the classroom during this term.
We continue to expand our facilities. Our new 100-bed nurses' home will be ready
for occupancy in the near future. There is a large game-room in the basement which has
been one of our needs for staff recreation for a long time. We will also have a nurses'
infirmary in this home, which should make caring for the staff much simpler and more
comfortable. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL Q 73
Our recreational facilities continue to play an important part in our school
programme. Unfortunately, with the building of the new units and the nurses' home the
ground formerly used for outdoor activities is no longer available.
To all those who have helped in every way during this past year, we are very grateful.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Violet M. Sanders, R.N.,
Superintendent of Nurses.
Men's Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit this annual report of the Department of Male Nursing
for the fiscal year April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952.
Staff changes have been nominal this year. Members who left on retirement were
Joseph Fitzpatrick and William Sawtell. I also regretfully note the death of Henry
Christie just prior to an anticipated trip to Scotland.
Our estimates have been submitted and approved for an increase in staff, required to
open the new buildings which are nearing completion at this date.
Regular attendance at the weekly clinics has given us a beneficial knowledge of
diagnostic procedure as applied by the medical and psychological staff, and has shown
us the need of our well-organized Social Service Department. Our staff is now better
prepared to assist, with a clearer understanding, in the useful part they can take in
compiling these clinical records.
Senior staff meetings have been placed on a regular monthly schedule. These have
developed into healthy discussion periods that are difficult to keep within the allotted time.
Social activities with pupil attendance and staff supervision have reached an all-time
high this past year. The pupils have enjoyed picnics, weekly dances and picture shows,
gymnastic activities, with a visit to the Exhibition and Shriners' Circus. The boys on
group parole have shown a keen interest in the New Westminster Softball League games,
at which they enjoyed regular attendance. Many have also been out for visits and special
events with staff members from various departments. This accelerated social programme
has worked wonders with our behaviour problem. Misdemeanors have become a minor
detail, and we have not been troubled with pupils leaving the grounds.
Parole has been granted an increased number of boys and we have had a steady
increase in the number of boys who have been given useful occupation in every department
within this school.
To all those doctors, nurses, department heads, and their staff who have helped with
our many problems we are extremely grateful.
Respectfully submitted.
J. N. Elliot,
Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse. Q 74 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION
Women's Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the report of the Department of Nursing Education for
the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1952.
During the past year we have continued to present lectures to the students in the
" block system " of classes at the centralized school at Essondale. This has brought about
uniformity of teaching to the New Westminster and Essondale students. It has also
enabled us to enrol more students into the classroom and has provided the New
Westminster students with a better understanding of psychiatric nursing.
Since we were in a position to accelerate a number of students in their classroom
work this year, the waiting list of junior students for classes was relieved. Twenty-five
students were permitted, in this way, to complete two " blocks " of lectures within the
one year.
Twenty-one nurses completed the three-year diploma course in psychiatric nursing
and were graduated.
Special clinical demonstrations and lectures were provided by the medical staff
for our own senior students, general-hospital affiliation students, University of British
Columbia degree students, and public health nurses.
To all these nurses, doctors, and heads of departments who have helped so greatly
with the nursing education programme, we are extremely grateful.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Edith A. Johnstone,
Instructress of Nurses.
Men's Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the report on the Department of Nursing Education for
the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1952.
During the past year lectures have been presented on the " block system " of classes
in the School of Psychiatric Nursing at Essondale. This system has enabled us to enrol
more students and has given The Woodlands School students a better understanding
of psychiatric nursing.
The majority of lectures were given at Essondale and the rest, on the treatment and
care of the mental deficients, were given here. This was done in order to give the nursing
personnel a better understanding of this type of work.
This year nineteen students completed the course in psychiatric nursing. A course
of training is now in progress for psychiatric aides, which will be very helpful to them.
To all those doctors, nurses, and heads of departments who have helped greatly
with the educational programme, we are extremely grateful.
Respectfully submitted.
Ronald F. Nash,
Instructor of Male Nurses. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL Q 75
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of work performed for the fiscal year ended March 31 st,
1952, at The Woodlands School. A vacancy in this Department for over three years was
filled in September when J. B. Woodward transferred here upon completion of a year's
internship at the Provincial Mental Hospital and the Crease Clinic, Essondale. Mr.
Woodward commenced a leave of absence in February when he joined the Canadian
Army as a lieutenant. In March two members of the Essondale staff began one-day-a-
week visits to the School to provide a service for the more pressing cases. This temporary
arrangement will continue until the services of a full-time psychologist are acquired.
During the year, pupils referred by the medical staff were examined to aid in
evaluating their assets and liabilities. Some of this work was concerned with the
programme of training that the child would undertake, some was concerned with
rehabilitation, and some was a guide for the new programme of speech therapy. Nine
staff clinics and one University of British Columbia teaching clinic were attended.
Abstracts of psychological testing done at the Child Guidance Clinics amounted to
twenty-two.
Psychiatric nurses commencing their training were administered a battery of
psychological tests to be used in their future guidance.
The following is a tabulation of tests administered to pupils:—
Arthur Point Scale     3
California Test of Personality     3
Draw-a-Person      2
Kent Emergency Scale     4
Porteus Mazes  26
Progressive Matrices     1
Shipley Institute of Living Scale     3
Stanford Arithmetic Test     1
Stanford-Binet Form L  14
Stanford Reading Test     1
Wechsler-Bellevue Scale Form I  29
Wechsler-Bellevue Scale Form II     2
Total  89
Members of the nursing staff were administered the following tests:—
Army Alpha  27
California Test of Personality  27
Kuder Preference Record  27
Total  81
Respectfully submitted.
J. W. Borthwick,
Psychological Clinic Assistant. Q 76 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICE
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—On September 19th, 1951, a small beginning was made in the development
of a Social Service Department in The Woodlands School by the appointment of two
social workers. These workers are engaged directly in work with the children in the
institution, whereas prior to this the Social Service Department of the Provincial Mental
Hospital and Crease Clinic had extended to The Woodlands School a very limited
information-getting service. This limited service was not due to any lack of understanding
concerning the contribution of the social worker in a school and community programme
for the intellectually retarded, nor to any lack of realization as to the real and urgent needs
of pupils and patients in the School for social services, but rather to extreme understaffing
at Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic and unavailability generally of social
workers for appointment.
Present Participation of Social Service Department in The Woodlands
School Programme
Realistically, what the appointment of two social workers could bring in social
services to the excellent and well-advanced institutional programme which The Woodlands
School provides for the intellectually retarded is exceedingly limited. The social workers
were, therefore, hard put to it to choose a small area in the total institutional training
school programme in which the limited services (due to shortage of staff) could be used
to best advantage by the pupils, relatives, and the agency.
After careful consideration, social services were limited to (a) those case-work
services to pupils and relatives at the point of the admission and reception of the pupil to
the School; (b) continuing case-work services on a very selective basis to parents and
pupils after the pupil has become a resident in the School; (c) case-work services focused
on the rehabilitation of the pupil following his period of socialized education and training
in the School (again this latter service has had to be on a very selective basis); and (d) a
limited programme of community education and interpretation focused on the needs of
the intellectually retarded and the responsibility community has in providing services
geared to the continuing adjustment and social treatment of the mentally retarded.
Miss M. C. Hardy's statistical report of the six months' operation of social services
contained herein very ably outlines the activities of the Social Service Department of The
Woodlands School in the five aforementioned aspects of service. It also indicates how
limited the services, of necessity, were in adequacy of standards and in coverage.
Present Needs in the Development of Social Services
in The Woodlands School
The present need for an increased social service staff in The Woodlands School is a
matter of urgent necessity involving immediate consideration and planning. To meet the
needs of this advanced and well-planned institutional training school programme, a
programme which for many years now has left the field of custodial care and undertaken
a programme of training and rehabilitation, a basic minimal staff of six social workers,
including one senior case-work supervisor, is an urgent necessity.
The Contribution of the Social Worker to the Programme
for the Intellectually Retarded
1. The social worker in the setting of the institutional training school brings his skill
in the  understanding of the  dynamics  of human  behaviour,   the  understanding  of REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL Q 77
inter-personal, inter-familial, cultural, group, and community relationships, and his
understanding of the economic stresses on family life, and pools his skill with the skills
of psychiatry, psychology, education, nursing, recreational, and industrial personnel to
the better understanding, education, and training of each intellectually retarded pupil
resident in the School.
2. The social worker has a responsibility to help parents and relatives as they
consider placement in the School for the intellectually retarded child. Through such help
the parents often can prepare the child for the separation from the home and from the
familiar ways of doing things and familiar ways of living. Such help to parents is
extended through a carefully planned and purposefully directed orientation to the School,
affording an observation of the School programme. Through this and through a
supporting, helpful relationship the parents can reach a decision to place the child in the
School having worked through to a degree or at least having recognized those feelings of
rejection and guilt around having a defective child. As a result the parents are freed to
become active with the School throughout the pupil's training period and his final
rehabilitation.
3. On the admission of the child to the School the social worker helps him become
familiar with the institution. To live as part of a group in an institution is a new
experience and demands of any of us, including the intellectually retarded so placed, the
assumption of new responsibilities regarding ourselves and our feelings for others.
A period of adjustment is always involved and the social worker must help the pupil
through to a sound adjustment, for his whole response to the School programme of education and training depends on his first feelings in the institutional training school as well as
his ultimate adjustment to community. As the pupil feels his way into the School setting
and begins to play his part in it, his relationship with the social worker continues through
the use of frequent interviews. These are often self-sought, the pupil making his own
appointment through seeking out the social worker in his office or sending him a note
requesting a chance " to talk about things."
4. There is a responsibility to the parents of the intellectually retarded child which
the social worker must meet if the parents' interest, participation, and contribution in the
pupils' education and training are to be kept alive. That responsibility is one of
continuous interpretation to the parents of the pupil's adjustment. For example, the
request of a pupil or parent for permission for a home visit or holiday at home must take
into consideration where the pupil is in relation to his adjustment to the School and
probably factors in the parental home not helpful at that time to the pupil. Pupils and
parents can only accept such decisions if their relationship to the social worker is close,
understanding, meaningful, and free. To develop relationships through which parents
and social workers work together in the interests of the pupil, adequate staff, manageable
case loads, and adequate accommodation for interviewing must be provided.
5. Another responsibility which the social worker has is that of working
co-operatively, relatedly, and purposefully with all personnel in the training school who
are working directly with the pupil. The findings of the social worker concerning the
pupil as a person, his home, his parents, his potentialities, and community conditions must
be shared with other professions in the training school.
6. When it has been decided by the School that the pupil is stable enough within
himself and has profited sufficiently from the education and training programme in the
School to return again to the community, the social worker then commences to work
intensively with the pupil, the parents, and community for the return of this rehabilitated
pupil. Appraisal of community services available for the use of the pupil is involved as
well as appraisal of his own home for his return or a family-care home. Then the preparation of the parents, substitute parents, and community for the return of the pupil must be
undertaken and possibilities for employment explored. To return to the individualized
aspects of community living after living, often for long years, in the group setting of the Q 78 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
School makes great demands on the pupil's adjustment. It is very necessary, therefore,
that the pupil's relationship with the social worker be at this time a close understanding
one with frequent interviews and visits to the pupil, his residence, and his place of
employment.
7. Whatever the training school is doing and planning must be shared with
community. The School is an area where specialized educational and training skills are
brought together to help the pupil reach as stabilized an adjustment as possible. This is
accomplished by developing and helping him to enjoy whatever skills and potentialities he
has. This is further accomplished by helping the pupil to become aware of his worth and
value and helping him to live as easily as possible with his limitations and incapacities.
Community has a responsibility to provide those services conducive to the continuance of
the pupil's social adjustment—job placement and counselling services, suitable recreation
facilities, accommodation, and sheltered workshops. The social worker in the School has
a great responsibility to sit down with community social agencies and lay groups in order
(a) to bring about a greater understanding of the problems of mental deficiency to all in
community; (b) to awaken professional and lay groups in community to the need for a
well-integrated and co-ordinated programme for the mentally retarded; (c) to develop
more effective public relations between the School and community; and (d) to survey
continuously community resources and community needs in the services to the mentally
retarded.
Sir, in outlining in detail the responsibilities of the social worker in the institutional
training school, I trust that I have interpreted how great is the need in The Woodlands
School for the extension of the Social Service Department.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Alice K. Carroll,
Provincial Supervisor of Psychiatric Social Work.
Statistical Report
Number of New Cases Referred to Social Service Department
From Vancouver District (including Burnaby, New Westminster, and Coquitlam): —
Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale  32
Pupils at The Woodlands School  41
Prospective pupils  24
— 97
From Outside of Vancouver District:—
Admissions to Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale  25
Pupils at The Woodlands School  41
Prospective pupils     7
— 73
Total  170 REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL
Number of Cases Discharged on Probation
Q 79
To Vancouver District (including Burnaby, New Westminster, and Coquitlam):—
From Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale     0
From The Woodlands School     9
To Outside of Vancouver District:—
From Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
From The Woodlands School	
—     9
10
Total.
19
Report of Social Service Work Carried Out by Members of the Social
Service Department at The Woodlands School
Initial and subsequent case-work interviews with patients, families, doctors, and
other social agencies during hospitalization of patients  675
Case-work interviews for the purpose of rehabilitation, including follow-up case-work
services for patients discharged on probation  93
Cases summarized for clinical presentation  22
Child Guidance Clinic files abstracted  28
Supervisory Service by Mail
Letters to the Provincial field staff requesting social histories and probation visits
and of a general supervisory nature  77
Letters to other social agencies in and out of British Columbia  54
— 131
Social histories, probation and other reports, and letters of a general consultative
nature received from the Provincial field staff  36
Correspondence received from other social agencies in and out of British
Columbia   40
— 76
Orientation Periods
Prospective pupils' relatives  29
Field service staff  13
Public health nurses  15
Affiliate nurses  89
Hospital and clinical administrators from University of British Columbia  21
Special Assignments
Daily medical staff clinics attended by members of the Social Service Department... 126
Weekly teaching clinics attended by members of the Social Service Department     20
Other special assignments, including conferences with other social agencies and
lectures to nurses, in-service training groups, and community groups     21
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) M. C. Hardy,
Supervisor. Q 80
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1951-52
Coffee Shop, Pennington Hall, Essondale. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ Q 81
REPORTS OF PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—The following is the report of the Medical Superintendent for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1952.
Last year I reported the retirement of our Deputy Business Manager. This year
I regret very much to report the death, after a lengthy illness, of his successor, S. A. Inrig.
A. C. C. Loat, Senior Clerk here for many years, succeeded Mr. Inrig as Deputy Business
Manager.
Our patient-count at the beginning of the year was 283 and at the end of the year
286. During the year thirteen patients were transferred to this Institution from the
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, and two patients were returned from here to
Essondale.   One patient was considered cured and returned to Oakalla Prison Farm Gaol.
There were five deaths among the patients during the year. Three patients escaped
but were quickly returned to the Institution—the various police departments being most
co-operative.
Dr. G. Hall, although retired from private practice, continues to care for the physical
health of the patients. This has, on the whole, been quite satisfactory. No epidemics
of any kind occurred during the year. Dr. A. Beattie, of the Saanich and South Vancouver
Island Health Unit, arranged for the travelling unit of the Division of Tuberculosis Control
to visit us in April when all patients were chest-plated. Most of the members of the staff
availed themselves of this opportunity of having their yearly check. The Tuberculosis
Clinic in Victoria continues to check any doubtful films. There is only one active case of
pulmonary tuberculosis now present among the patients here to my knowledge.
I would like to draw your attention to the report of the Chief Psychiatric Male
Nurse, pointing out that out of 286 patients we have 170 usefully and gainfully employed.
A number of the staff left our employ during the year for various reasons and were
replaced by new men. I think we were fortunate in the past year in having staff the
majority of whom were very keen, co-operative, and interested in the welfare of the
patients in their care.
The dental care has, in my opinion, been inadequate and I would like to see more
attention given to this aspect of the patients' health.
The new airing-court was completed sufficiently to be used early in the year and is
a vast improvement over the old. During the winter it was seeded with grass, which has
taken well. A great advantage of this airing-court is that it has a cement sidewalk around
the inside of the enclosure and many patients are able to be out for exercise during the
winter months.
The training-school programme progressed smoothly.
The recreational and occupational therapy facilities were used to the limit and we
were fortunate in having a number of fine concert parties as well as the regular moving-
pictures for the patients' entertainment.
On the whole, the past year has been a rather routine one with no noteworthy event
to report other than the unfortunate loss of Mr. Inrig.
The various departments have been active—as detailed reports will show—and there
has been fine co-operation from and between the department heads.
I wish to express my appreciation for the assistance and support received during the
past year from yourself, the members of your staff who have visited here, and to the staff
members of this Institution.
Respectfully submitted.
L. G. C. d'Easum, M.B.,
Medical Superintendent. Q 82 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—During this year the Occupational Therapy Department had an average of
eighteen patients occupied daily. An extensive variety of handicrafts continued to be
taught, offering a wide scope of interest to the patients.
The patients are given instructions in woodwork, which includes wood-carving and
wood-turning as well as the making of furniture and general carpentry; leatherwork,
comprising tooling, carving, novelties, and the making of wallets, handbags, belts, etc.;
art metalwork, including hammering copper, spinning metal, metal-turning in making
vases, trays, cigarette boxes, and novelties. Instructions in making musical instruments,
such as guitars and violins, are given, and, in addition, plastic carving, shellwork, glove-
making, and weaving are also carried on. Gasoline-engine reconditioning and repairing
was introduced during this period and proved very successful.
The Occupational Therapy Shop is open from 8 a.m. until 9 p.m. Patients in the
shop from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. play cards, musical instruments, or work at any of the crafts
as they desire. They prefer this to staying in the wards in the evenings and it has proven
a very satisfactory arrangement.
Besides myself, there are two Assistant Instructors of Trades and Maintenance-men
and one Utility-man in this Department. The two Assistant Instructors' duties are to
help in the instruction of crafts to patients, the maintenance and erection of buildings,
the repair and building of new furniture, and to aid in keeping all tools, saws, and equipment in good working order. Their shifts are alternated so that the shop can be kept
open until 9 p.m. The Utility-man's duties are to paint, redecorate, wash windows, do
any general cleaning, and to relieve on wards on occasions when they are short of staff.
My duties are to instruct in all the crafts and trades mentioned above, to supervise
all repair-work, new building, painting, decorating, to order and maintain material and
supplies, and to keep expenditures at a minimum.
I might add that I think we had a very successful year—everything ran along
smoothly, the airing-court was finished, and numerous other jobs accomplished.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Helander,
Instructor of Trades and Maintenance-man.
SHOE AND TAILOR SHOPS
Dr. L.G.C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—The activities of the Shoe and Tailor Shops for the year April 1st, 1951, to
March 31st, 1952, follow:—
Shoe-shop.—This year repair-work increased greatly and we also branched out in
the repair of rubber boots and boot rebuilding. There has been considerable saving of
leather and less waste of material through the use of our new machines—finisher, heel
dies, skiver, etc.—with more old leather being used for building up. Canvas slippers, of
which we made 400 pairs, have been in demand in the wards.
Tailor-shop.—This Department continued to be very busy during the year and the
following work was completed:  Ward repairs—7,084 pieces; new material to steward's REPORTS OF MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ
Q 83
stores, etc.—60 bed-ticks, 123 bed-sheets, 65 drawers, 48 undershirts, 62 towels (roller),
217 towels (dish), 33 towels (dispensary), 87 coffee-bags, 88 tea-bags, 40 canvas blankets, 4 canvas meat covers, 1 canvas roller cover, 10 camisoles, 10 pillows, 22 pillow-
covers, 74 pillow-slips, 14 top-shirts, 24 nightgowns, 12 hospital caps, 48 painters' caps,
and 18 plastic bed-sheets.
The addition of a new sewing-machine and the installation of fluorescent lighting
during the year have greatly facilitated the work in this Department. There are normally
six patients occupied in the Shoe and Tailor Shops.
Respectfully submitted.
G. Campbell,
Foreman, Tailor-shop.
DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL THERAPY
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—The recreational activities established in previous years were maintained
during this period, the indoor activity usually ending in April each year. May to September, inclusive, sees tennis, lawn-bowls, croquet, volley-ball, golf, etc., played. Soft-
balls and gloves and a soccer ball are available and in constant use in the recreation court.
Walking parties and organized tennis games are featured whenever the teaching schedule
permits, but each Thursday evening is devoted to some suitable type of organized activity
using the unfenced recreation area in front of the main building.
During the winter months the Thursday evenings were spent in bridge tournaments,
chess games, and a variety of card games. Every fifth Thursday we have a bingo game,
which enables a larger number of patients to participate than any other type of activity.
Chess in particular and card games in general are enjoyed by a consistently large number
of patients.    Such games are fitted into whatever free afternoons are available.
The main dining-room sees constant activity two or three evenings a week under
ward personnel supervision, with volley-ball as the main attraction.
At Christmas time the staff responded very well to a request for home-cooking and
candy donations for a bingo party and concert. We were able to give the usual candy,
cigarettes, tobacco, cookies, etc., as general prizes and each of the fifty-three patients
attending was given an attractively wrapped donation as a parting gift. The singing of
carols and a few songs and recitations rendered by patients completed a very enjoyable
and successful party.
During the winter we moved the card games to the Top East Ward, where the
increased table space and quieter atmosphere resulted in a greater number of patients
taking part.    Ice-cream served at these events might also be an inducement.
I operated the movie-projector for approximately 15 per cent of the scheduled shows
during the period under review.
The new recreation-court should prove beneficial and we expect to expand activities
whenever requested equipment is obtained.
Respectfully submitted.
J. Lowndes. Q 84 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
DENTAL REPORT
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—I am forwarding a summary of dental work completed for the patients at the
Colquitz Mental Hospital from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952.
We were fortunate last year in obtaining some badly needed equipment, including
a chair, light, and an excellent dental cabinet, made at the hospital workshop.
I would like to submit two recommendations with the report. First, I feel the hospital should have a visiting dentist at least twice a month to cover the dental treatment
required; secondly, the fee payed visiting dentists will have to be raised to correspond
with rising costs.
Summary of Dental Work
Report covering dental treatment for patients at Colquitz Mental Hospital from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952:—
Dr. James' Office.—Dentures—Acrylic 6, reline 1; denture repair, 9; and extractions, 3.
Colquitz Mental Hospital.—Half-days, 10; work covered, approximately 70 extractions and 15 fillings.
Respectfully submitted.
T. W. James, D.D.S.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICES
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—There are 299 beds at the Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, which provide
accommodation for 292 resident patients, 6 hospital beds, and 1 spare room for emergency purposes.
During the year 1951-52, we had a daily average of 30 patients with full parole on
the grounds, 5 patients with partial parole, and 10 patients with pool-room parole, with
a daily average of approximately 100 engaged in some form of useful occupation in the
various departments, together with approximately 70 engaged in ward routine activities.
The daily average of patients confined to their rooms was 10—4 physically ill and
6 mentally disturbed.
The recreation-courts were in use daily during the year when weather permitted.
During the summer months the patients were out from 1 to 4 p.m. and 6.30 to 8.30 p.m.
Bi-weekly picture shows were held in the main dining-room, the average attendance
being 130. An increasing number of service clubs and organizations provided entertainment for the patients during the winter months and concerts put on by the patients and
staff were very popular and well attended.
The radio provides enjoyable entertainment for the patients. Besides the speakers
in the wards and in the dining-rooms, they have been installed in the Occupational
Therapy Department, Laundry, and Recreation-court. Individual radios have been provided for the Tailor Shop and the patients' steam-heated recreation-room on the grounds.
The Red Cross Society, the Britannia Branch of the Canadian Legion and the
Women's Auxiliary to the Britannia Branch provided comforts for ex-service patients
monthly.    Other organizations also supplied comforts at times. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ Q 85
The Salvation Army held services in the morning on the first and third Sunday of
each month. " They were accompanied by their band on several occasions. They also
provided Christmas packages which they handed to each patient personally. The Church
of England minister held service in the afternoons on the second and fourth Sunday of
each month. Roman Catholic patients were visited and mass was held by the priest
during each month.
The Travelling Library, Public Library Commission, Victoria, looked after our
reading requirements and changed the library twice during the year. Popular magazines
were provided for the patients' use by organizations and individuals. The Victoria Daily
Times also provided cross-Canada daily newspapers each Friday. These were thoroughly
enjoyed by the patients who read them.
The usual card games, chess, checkers, etc., with ward staff supervision, were in
continuous operation. Organized games with prizes, which included a bingo party once
a month, were held on Thursday nights.
During the winter months, volley-ball was played three nights a week in the main
dining-room, and when staff was available, tennis, croquet, lawn-bowls, and golf were
played during the summer months on the front lawns.
During the year April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952, nine members of the nursing
staff left the service for the following reasons: One resigned to go into business for himself, one transferred for duty to Essondale, two resigned for other employment, two
resigned due to illness, one resigned to move to Mainland, and two discharged (services
not satisfactory).
The co-operation between the different departments at Colquitz was excellent, and
the staff as a whole can look back on the past year with pride for a job well done.
Respectfully submitted.
P. T. McLeod,
Chief Psychiatric Nurse.
TRAINING-SCHOOL
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—On April 1st, 1951, Class C, comprising five students, was attending classes
and receiving third and final year instruction. This class completed all examinations
successfully and was ready for graduation—the first group of students from Colquitz to
complete the full three-year course.
The nine students of Class B were also taking their second-year instruction at this
time.
In May the graduating students attended the ceremony held in New Westminster and
received their diplomas. I attended with them, and a two-day tour of Essondale, Colony
Farm, Home for the Aged, and The Woodlands School was arranged. The graduates
were much impressed with the size and variety of the large institutions and particularly
the treatment procedures which were witnessed in the Crease Clinic. The short visit was
extremely valuable to the students and increased their appreciation of the magnitude of
Mental Health Services.
In July third-year instruction was begun for Class A, comprising eight students,
but with the resignation of Mr. Cameron the class numbered seven. Class D, originally
eight men, also numbered seven on the resumption of their instruction in their second year
(Mr. LeFeuvre transferred to Essondale).
My holidays were from August 13th to September 1st, inclusive, with classes being
held on all available days during August prior to the 13th. Q 86
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
In September Mr. Mackenzie resigned from the service leaving six students in
Class D, who, with Class A, continued classes during October and November. In
December second-year classes terminated for Class D and Class A completed their full
course in January, 1952, thus entitling them to be certificated as Psychiatric Nurses.
In February, Class B (seven students) resumed classes, this being their third and
final year. We also instituted instruction for a new group of students, designated as
Class E and comprising six men (this being the last group to be given instruction under
the old three-year curriculum, we understand).
Until the end of March, 1952, the last two groups were continuing classes with most
lecture periods being devoted to Class B, the idea being to enable them to complete their
full course and all successful students would then be eligible to graduate at the 1952
ceremony.
During this twelve-month period, a total of 422 hours was devoted to classroom
lecture periods, reviews, and examinations. Considerable time is spent, as conditions
demand, in actual instruction on the wards and hospital unit in administration of streptomycin, catheterisation, nasal gavage, etc., and any bed-side nursing techniques that are
practically possible. The physical health of our patients gives us very limited practical
experience in Nursing Arts procedure.
If much delay is expected in new buildings here, I would like to suggest that consideration be given to better day-room furnishings. We receive favourable comment from
all visitors on the cleanliness of this Institution, but the complete lack of any comfortable
seating and the drab day-room furniture is detrimental to the establishment and offers
no possible relaxation facilities for the many patients engaged in daily tasks throughout
the Institution.
Respectfully submitted. j LowNDES;
Instructor.
Aerial View, Home for the Aged, Vernon. REPORTS OF THE GERIATRIC DIVISION
Q 87
REPORTS OF THE GERIATRIC DIVISION, PORT COQUITLAM,
VERNON, AND TERRACE
REPORT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—I hereby submit the sixteenth annual report of the Geriatric Division of the
Provincial Mental Health Service, with attached tables, for the fiscal year April 1st, 1951,
to March 31st, 1952.
The three divisions of this service have functioned smoothly and satisfactorily during
this past year. The Port Coquitlam Home has been running practically to capacity at
all times.
The demand for the type of service offered by this Division of the Provincial Mental
Health Services continues to increase. During this year we received 263 sets of committal papers and a total of 414 visits or inquiries relative to the proposed committal of
aged men and women 70 years and over to our service—that is, a total of 677 men and
women. We have been able to admit nearly all the aged psychotic men requiring this
type of care. It has not been possible, however, to keep up with the demand for the
admission of aged psychotic women. The demand for this type of service will likely
increase through the years.
Dr. Chambers, Chief Inspection Officer of the American Psychiatric Association,
inspected this hospital on April 27th, 1951. We were also fortunate in having Dr.
Roberts, Dominion Government Neuropsychiatrist, and Dr. Joseph W. Willard, Director
of Research Division, Department of National Health and Welfare, visit this Home.
The general health of all patients has been very good in all the Homes during this
year. There have been no epidemic infections and very few surgical emergencies considering the type of patient cared for here. We are fortunate in having an orthopaedic
specialist on our consultation staff.
During the year and at every opportunity we have encouraged the care of the aged
at the home and community level in order that every case that can be looked after outside
this hospital should be cared for outside. If this procedure is always followed, more
room is then available in hospital for those cases that cannot be cared for in any other
situation.
On October 23rd, 1951, a special Canadian National Railways train was made up
in Vancouver, consisting of seven coaches, staff, dining, and baggage cars. A total of 151
men patients were moved to our Terrace Home for the Aged. Fifty of these patients were
transferred from the Home for the Aged, Vernon; twenty-five transferred from the Home
for the Aged, Port Coquitlam; and seventy-six were discharged in full from the Provincial
Mental Hospital, Essondale. The fifty cases from the Vernon Home were moved by two
coaches from Vernon and joined the special train at Kamloops on October 24th. Dr.
T. G. Caunt, Medical Superintendent, and W. Creber were in charge of this train with
twenty-five other male staff members. The whole movement of patients was made
smoothly, due to the necessary selection, preparatory work, and care taken, but especially
due to the alertness of all staff and experience gained in the previous movement of patients
to the Home for the Aged, Terrace. It is worthy of note that all of these patients were
old and included several blind and amputation cases. All patients and staff arrived safely
at Terrace on October 25th, where they were rapidly moved by bus to the Home for the
Aged.   This move made available, in our Annex building at Vernon, thirty-three beds, Q 88 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1951-52
which were then prepared for women. The move also liberated seventy-six beds for more
active cases at the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, and made twenty-five empty
male beds at the Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam, where they were more readily
available to centres of population. On January 15th, thirty-three aged ladies were discharged from Essondale direct to the Home for the Aged, Vernon. Twenty-three men
were discharged from Essondale and nine men transferred from Port Coquitlam to
Vernon. This move was made by means of four Canadian National Railways coaches
attached to the end of the regular second-section Canadian National Railways train out
of Vancouver. This move was made at night. Patients were placed in bed on arrival at
the train. They arrived at Vernon on January 16th. Dr. A. G. MacKinnon, Medical
Superintendent, Home for the Aged, Vernon, was able to come to the Port Coquitlam
Home on January 10th and was able to assist in preparing for this move of patients. He
thereby gained considerable experience in moving patients. This move was staffed with
Dr. T. G. Caunt, Dr. A. G. MacKinnon, four female nurses, and N. McDonald, Deputy
Chief, who was in charge of male staff. All patients arrived safely though the weather
was quite cold in the Interior. They were moved by heated buses from the station to the
Home for the Aged, Vernon, and suffered no harm from the move.
The aged men and women receive much satisfaction from our regular church services, which are conducted by the Reverend O'Neil and Father Kane, both of Port
Coquitlam.
The last 100-bed unit for aged patients was completed at Port Coquitlam this year.
It is for the care of aged women. Ward 8 was opened and occupied on March 19th.
Ward 9 will be opened when further female staff becomes available.
Dr. A. G. MacKinnon reports a satisfactory year at the Home for the Aged, Vernon,
where the general health of the patients has been quite satisfactory.
I visited the Home on several occasions and this Home was also inspected by Dr.
Chambers, of the American Psychiatric Association.
During this year four lots adjacent to the hospital were acquired, providing more
room for an airing-court and also a small dwelling which has been remodelled for a
nurses' home.
This Home has been able to care for all aged men and nearly all the aged women
requiring our type of care in this area of the Province.
Miss E. C. Clarke has continued her training of our nurses and aides.
It is with regret we report the death of William Broadfoot, Storeman at Vernon.
He died on July 13th, 1951.
The physical condition of the Vernon Home is being well maintained. We envision
the time when we will have a fire-resistant 100-bed unit and modern laundry located in
the Vernon area.
W. E. Skillicorn, Supervisor of our Home for the Aged, Terrace, reports all departments functioning satisfactorily.
The health of the patients has been excellent. In mid-July, Dr. G. May, who was
our attending physician, left that area and his practice was taken over by Dr. M. Weare
and Dr. R. Hicks.
The religious needs of the patients have been well cared for by the Terrace Anglican
minister and Catholic priest.
The attending staff was increased in October to care for the additional 151 patients
when the east wing of the Terrace Home was opened. Through voluntary transfer of
staff from the Provincial Mental Hospital and the employment of local aides, the Terrace
Home has been adequately staffed, though it is becoming increasingly difficult to maintain
permanent staff of the type best suited to our needs in adequate numbers through their
inability to secure housing accommodation in the Terrace area. During the year three
further suites were completed at Terrace—one in the single men's quarters and two in the REPORTS OF THE GERIATRIC DIVISION
Q 89
main hospital.    This has been of considerable assistance.    It may become necessary to
build further staff accommodation here, however, to accommodate married staff.
The water-supply and sewage-disposal are still problems in this area which will
require further attention.
Adequate stores of all types have been kept on hand. This precaution has frequently been found most helpful due to the uncertain rail and road conditions in this area
during the winter months. Since large stocks of coal must be kept on hand, a protective
shed or storage-bin for coal is needed.
As reported in Table 1, on March 31st, 1951, there were 434 men, 322 women, a
total of 756 patients, in the three Homes of this division of the Mental Health Services.
With the additional accommodation occupied at Terrace, the increased figures will be
noted—557 men, 388 women, making a grand total in residence March 31st, 1952, of
945. Tables 2, 3, and 4 will show how 355 new patients were taken into our service in
the three Homes during the year. This movement afforded considerable relief to many
homes and small hospitals in this Province.
There was a total of 147 deaths listed for these three Homes during the year and a
total of nineteen discharges. Fifteen of the total patients discharged in full were men and
four were women patients. This points up our rinding here that there are usually more
women on our waiting list for admission. The death rate of women in our population
has been less than one-half that found in the men's division and there is usually more
difficulty in discharging and rehabilitating women patients. The attached tables show
details of population movements.
I wish to gratefully acknowledge the assistance rendered by doctors, nurses, heads of
departments, and all members of the staff in the Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and Terrace
Homes for the Aged.
Respectfully submitted.
T. G. Caunt, M.D.,
Superintendent, Homes for the Aged.
TABLES ON MOVEMENT OF POPULATION
Table No. 1.—Movement of Patient Population, Provincial Homes for the
Aged, Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and Terrace, April 1st, 1951, to March
31st, 1952.
r
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
In residence, Port Coquitlam, March 31st, 1951 	
In residence, Vernon, March 31st, 1951  	
In residence, Terrace, March 31st, 1951 	
156
128
150
229
93
385
221
150
434
321
322
133
756
454
Admissions to Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and Terrace	
321
133
454
755
455
1,210
158
106
293
260
128
418
234
293
557
388
Total in residence, Vernon, March 31st, 1952	
Total in residence, Terrace, March 31st, 1952 	
Grand total in residence, Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and
Terrace, March 31st, 1952                       	
945 Q 90
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 2.—Movement of Patient Population, Home for the Aged,
Port Coquitlam, April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
156
130
229
65
385
195
286
128
294
34
Admissions, Port Coquitlam 	
580
Separations, 1951-52—
14
24
25
65
2
32
16
24
25
97
Deaths   	
162
Total in residence, Port Coquitlam, March 31st, 1952.	
158
260
418
Table No. 3.—Movement of Patient Population, Home for the Aged,
Vernon, April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male        Female        Total
In residence, Vernon, March 31st, 1951	
Admissions, Vernon   	
Transferred from Port Coquitlam. 	
Admissions from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale .
Separations, 1951-52—
Discharges _
Transferred to Terrace
Deaths	
Total in residence, Vernon, March 31st, 1952 .
128
93
221
14
11
25
24
24
23
33
56
1
2
3
50
50
32
7
39
137
106 128
I
92
234
Table No. 4.—Movement of Patient Population, Home for the Aged,
Terrace, April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
150
3
25
50
76
150
3
25
50
76
304
11
Transferred from Port Coquitlam 	
Admissions from Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale ..
304
11
Separations, 1951-52—Deaths	
11
11
293
293 REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS Q 91
REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
REPORT OF DIRECTOR
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—Attached herewith are consolidated summaries of the work done in the Child
Guidance Clinics throughout the Province from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952.
Reports from the Psychology and Social Service Departments are included.
Table No. 1 is a summary of the general activities of the Clinics. There has been a
significant increase in the number of clinics held in the Vancouver area and throughout
the Province. A regular clinic service is now provided at the Children's Hospital, the
Vancouver General Hospital Health Centre for Children, the Western Society for Physical
Rehabilitation, and, during the academic year, at the University of British Columbia, in
temporary quarters generously provided by their Department of Psychology. Clinics
were held on schedule at Oakalla. Clinics were held for the first time in Dawson Creek,
Vanderhoof, and Kelowna. It is anticipated that further clinics will be held in these areas
as required. The increased number of psychiatric interviews is an indication of the
increase in individual attention given each case. Both these developments have been
made possible by the realignment of psychiatric duties which resulted from the appointment to the staff of a psychiatrist-in-training from the Mental Hospital Service. This
arrangement has proven to be of considerable benefit to Clinic cases. It has been of
equal value to the various appointees. It is felt that every effort should be made to
continue this policy.
Table No. 2 is of interest in that it shows a considerable increase in adult males who
were examined for the courts. The total number of cases seen shows a decrease of nine
from the previous year.
In Table No. 3 the trends indicated last year have continued. The relative proportion of cases from social agencies continues to decline. This is significant in that a greater
burden is placed on the Social Service Department of the Clinics. This problem is discussed in detail in the report from that department.
Table No. 4 is for purpose of record and for comparison with other clinics. It shows
the problems and disorders which brought about the original referral to the Clinic.
Table No. 5, an analysis of age-groups and intelligence, while influenced by the
increase in adult males, continues to show that the majority of cases seen by the Clinic
are in the pre-adolescent age-group with average or better-than-average intelligence. This
leads to the conclusion that the majority of cases should respond to suitable treatment.
The work of the Psychology Department is covered in the report of Miss Munro,
with its attached Table No. 7, and that of the Social Work Department in the report of
Mr. Ricketts and Table No. 6. Both reports discuss in detail the significance of the
trends which they reveal.
During the year it became possible to appoint a suitably trained Speech Therapist
to the staff.   This appointment met a demand that had become very pressing.
It is well recognized that the need of hospital beds for mental cases equals, at least,
that for physical cases. It is not as well recognized that the field of mental health is as
complex as the field of physical health. Progress in the study of physical illness has
reached the stage where specific preventive measures are effective in many instances.
The study of mental illness has not as yet reached a parallel stage of development. Preventive measures are, in general, less specific.   Preventive measures may be considered Q 92
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
as primary and secondary. Primary prevention modifies living conditions in such a way
that psychologically determined disorders do not occur. This programme is based on
educational efforts—to help individuals to handle their own problems; to improve relations between parents and children so that the emotional needs of the child are met in an
adequate manner; and to improve the understanding of professional groups, including
teachers, nurses, social workers, and physicians, so that they are better equipped to foster
mental health in their clients. Secondary preventive measures include the early diagnosis
and treatment of disorders to prevent the development of severe symptoms and crystallization into patterns of maladjustment. A critical analysis and evaluation of a very large
number of cases of severe mental illness has proven that a favourable outcome depends
more on early diagnosis and treatment rather than on any specific type of treatment.
The Provincial Child Guidance Clinics are carrying on a programme of primary and
secondary prevention restricted only by the limit of their resources.
The pressing needs include increased accommodation for the Vancouver Clinic, the
placing of the Vancouver Island Clinic on a full-time basis, the establishment of an observation and treatment centre for pre-adolescent children who cannot receive adequate care
and treatment in any other way, and the provision of adult out-patient psychiatric service
with accompanying day-ward care.
Table No. 1.—Summary of Clinics' Activity, April 1st, 1951, to
March 31st, 1952
Number of clinics held
Physicals. 	
Urinalysis	
Playroom observations
Case conferences	
Consulting conferences
Private conferences	
Psychiatric interviews _
301
743
372
202
611
319|
94
1,741
I
28
|.
5 3
12] 10
3| 10
12| 10|
2j   31
23  20 [
I
I      I
1   8|
I —
16    3
I
I I
21
9
6
9
19
41
131
7
-I
131
1| 10
4| 27
... | 17
31
4| 28
8
48
1
I     I
5|   3|
7 14|
8 3|
-I -I
I
I
34[ 26
I
1|   4| 20|   387
I
3| 16| 70
50
3
41
5
27
118
31 If
39    4| 38
1,040
540
205
881
351
121
2,290
Table No. 2.—Number, Sex, and Status of All Cases Examined at Child
Guidance Clinic, April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
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1   1   1
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9
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3]   4
7
9
11
1
4 25
14
1     1     1
12]   7|   7]   4
1
211    1
1
15| 571   861
Males—
Adults
1      1      \      \
156|   1|--|   1  ....
244|   1    1    5    4
IIII
52|   1|   1|   1| _
155 .... _|   5    5
5
2
2
8
2
3
2
I
_...| ....
2 _
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_...|   2
1    2
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5
1
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1
6
1
1
.
2
12
1
8
1
1   ....
5]   5
1
11
l
3
3
3
1
2 -
7]    1
1
2] ....
1
2]    3
9| 30
....I    2
173
Children  	
Females—
Adults        	
370
70
2] 10
5|   5|   2
10] ... |   4] 22
248
Repeat cases  —	
152|   1|   1|   2|   4
3| __| ....
__.|   1
2|
2]....|   4
3]   2|   3
1
■2|   2|   3]  14
202
Males—
Adults-  	
Children— 	
Females—
Adults	
Children.- —	
I      1
42| -.- I -  1 -
64'| ____[   1|   1
11| ....... |._
35|   l| ....    1
2
2
13
2] ....
_  ....
1|-
::.
Z\ 1
... 1...
-1-
1
... | ...
1 _
1
l|-
1
.. I ....
2] _-
-1 -
....[ ....
2
2
I
ll 1
~1|   1
1          1
_...|      1
1    -
-    1  -
2| __
-1
21
-
2
1
H
2]
1
5
1
7
47
89
13
53
Total cases —.
759
4|   3| 14
1      1
12| 10]   8|   3|   5
IIII
9|   9
13
4
29
17] 14] 10
]
8]   4
1
23
3
18
71
1,063 REPORTS of child guidance clinics
Q 93
Table No. 3.—Sources of All Cases Referred to Child Guidance Clinic,
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Agency or Source
Number
of Cases
Total
Percentage
of
Distribution
217
219
26
11
5
3
1
3
81
37
9
4
8
1
1
9
1
2
78
43
3
2
59
3
8
99
60
72
1
485
131
148
62
107
60
72
1
45.51
12 32
Tuberculosis Division, Social Service Unit   _	
Mental Health Clinic, Vancouver      	
Child Health Centre  	
Indian Health Services     	
3. Schools-           _    	
13.89
Public-
Attendance officer    	
Other—
5.80
5. Adult Court _                .   ..
10.04
5.61
6.74
8. Other                 	
0.09
Totals—    	
1,063
1,063
100.00 Q 94
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 4.—Problems and Disorders Presented by the New Cases Given
Full Examination by Child Guidance Clinic, April 1st, 1951, to March
31st, 1952.
Children
Adults
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
1. Primary behaviour disorders—
(a) Habit disorders—
1
20
1
12
8
1
5
3
2
5
5
1
1
4
4
1
4
2
5
12
3
49
1
8
3
2
12
1
1
8
1
5
1
4
1
2
5
3
......
2
1
......
	
1
6
12
12
1
3
6
	
1
9
......
3
2
-----
	
2
1
1
1
2
4
59
2
5
2
1
26
1
9
1
1
2
1
3
1
5
16
9
11
1
2
1
Thumb-sucking _.	
3
31
2
Tantrums     .... 	
18
9
Other  	
(_.) Personality disorders—
3
4
6
3
2
10
12
3
Other                                       	
1
(c) Neurotic disorders—
Tics, habit spasms —	
Sleep-walking   	
Stammering    	
Overactivity	
Fears  	
3
1
4
5
1
5
2
13
Other  _	
id) Conduct disorders—
Truancy   	
33
3
136
Destruction of property   	
1
15
Cruelty                                                   	
14
5
Untruthfulness  	
1
25
2
5
40
1
Other                                  	
14
2. Psychotic and prepsychotic—
1
With juvenile general paresis	
With epidemic encephalitis	
Undifferentiated   	
Other    _	
3. Psychoneurosis and neurosis—
5
1
1
Psychasthenic type  	
1
1
Other. 	
4. Convulsive disorders—
Epilepsy 	
Other _	
5. Psychopathic personality _	
6 REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
Q 95
Table No. 4.—Problems and Disorders Presented by the New Cases Given
Full Examination by Child Guidance Clinic, April 1st, 1951, to March
31st, 1952—Continued.
Children
Adults
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
6. Educational disability—
(a) Associated with dull-normal or border-line intelligence
(b) Special mental disability—
Writing —	
Reading __ , - _	
1
11
1
4
4
3
10
1
......
1
30
10
4
13
14
82
1
3
3
1
7
3
3
2
8
2
4
2
1
20
4
5
8
10
60
2
2
3
3
1
1
1
1
6
53
......
1
1
4
2
7
1
15
1
Other -	
12
7. Behaviour disorder associated with somatic disorder—
8. Mental deficiencies—
3
7
6
19
4
5
(i) With other organic nervous disorders   ___	
2
1
1
9. Mental retardation __ _ _	
55
10. No ascertained mental deviation—
14
9
(c)  Speech problems _
21
2
24
142
9
(5)  Other     	
3
6
3               12
12. Borstal— ,	
53
Totals   _ 	
377
242
187         I           71         1         R77 Q 96
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 5.—Chart Comparing Ages with Intelligence Quotients of All
New Cases Seen at Child Guidance Clinic from April 1st, 1951, to March
31st, 1952.
Males
Females
0-19                                                  	
3
1
5
1
4
14
22
33
4
4
5
15
8
12
17
18
11
1
5
11
11
13
12
15
3
1
4
10
5
16
12
18
18
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
     j        3
20-49                                                    	
15
50-69                   	
......    ]      41
70-79                   	
.     |      28
80-89 	
90 99                                                	
|      46
.     |      57
100-109. 	
110-129 	
1      74
     |      67
130-139	
     |        4
140+      —
     |        6
91
87
71
83
7
1
1
--.    ]    341
Respectfully submitted.
Ultan P. Byrne, M.D., D.I.H.,
Director, Child Guidance Clinics.
Intelligence Quotient
Age in Years
1-4
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-24
25-29
I
30-34 I 35-39
]
40+
Total
0-19                     	
4
10
9
7
15
37
34
3
1
6
8
7
19
33
28
14
1
1
7
7
14
20
28
27
19
1
3
3
2
18
29
43
35
3
3
6
1
7
9
9
	
20-49                          	
20
50-69  	
70-79.   _	
80-89     -..._	
28
38
65
90-99      _ ...                         	
112
100-109  _ -. .
110-129                           	
144
111
130-139 	
8
140+         _ 	
....    |    .          ]        5
120
117
123
139
32
......     1     ...        1       ....     1     ..         1     531
•
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT
U. P. Byrne, Esq., M.D., D.P.H., D.I.H.,
Director, Child Guidance Clinics,
455 West Thirteenth Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Sir,—During the 1951-52 year the Social Service Department has continued to
develop in its contribution to Child Guidance Clinic services.
There has been a further increase in the number of Travelling Clinics held throughout the Province, which has made the social-service aspect of this a heavy job for the
case-work supervisor on this team. This position has been vacant during the latter part
of the year and this work has been shared by other members of the social-work staff.
The job not only involves the social worker's contribution to diagnostic and consultative
services but general organization, interpretation, and case consultation with the professional personnel who make use of Travelling Clinic services. It is, therefore, expected
that when the position is filled the social worker's time will have to be supplemented by
that of others on the staff.
The " corrections team," working with boys and girls from the Detention Home,
Juvenile Court, Boys' and Girls' Industrial Schools, Young Offenders Unit, and other REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS Q 97
agencies for delinquents, has also had a busy year. The case-work supervisor on this
team has been able to participate with the psychiatrist in some direct treatment with
delinquent cases, in addition to his responsibility in the area of diagnostic and consultative
help and treatment planning with the agency and institutional staffs.
Mention was made in the last annual report of the need for expansion in the student-
training programme for social workers. This expansion took place this year with the
establishment of a project in conjunction with the University of British Columbia School
of Social Work. Eight Master of Social Work and three Bachelor of Social Work
graduate students were in the group given field training in the Child Guidance Clinic.
The project was made possible by a Federal mental-health grant to the University of
British Columbia school, the student supervision being mainly the responsibility of
a supervisor provided by the school. Lack of space in the Child Guidance Clinic led to
provision of offices on the campus by the University. This arrangement made co-ordination with the rest of the clinic staff and programme appear somewhat difficult, but
this was worked out quite satisfactorily and the project has proved to be an important
beginning in provision of much-needed trained psychiatric social workers for the Mental
Health Services and other allied agencies.
The statistics which follow this report give a brief accounting of the services of social
workers during this year. The case-load count that is given covers only that aspect of
work where the social workers are giving direct and usually intensive case-work help to
parents and children. The number of cases carried during the year in the Vancouver
Clinic is about the same as in the last fiscal year. This gives the appearance of a levelling
off in the steady increase in this area of work in past years but it is actually more related
to a considerable staff turnover and shortage at present. The statistics fail to show the
large group of cases which were waiting for continued services before the end of the
fiscal year. These will be incorporated in the case-loads of new staff who are expected
early in the next fiscal year. It seems clear, therefore, that there is a continuing pressure
for more services in this area which will be difficult to meet with present staff and space.
While the number of cases receiving continued treatment has not risen, there has
been a significant increase of over 60 per cent in " total case-work interviews " in the
Vancouver Clinic. This does indicate that more help is being given in the individual case
and it suggests that a greater proportion of staff time is being given to direct services to
parents and children.
The social workers' participation in services to various community agencies is
covered rather indirectly in the statistics. They have responsibilities in the examination
and diagnosis of children, consultations with professional workers, treatment planning
and interpretation. The 1,017 "conferences attended in clinic diagnostic service" and
the 275 " cases given service " in Travelling Clinic are an indication of activities in this
area.
For the Victoria Clinic, the statistics when compared with those of last year indicate
a decline in almost all social services. This was the direct result of staff illness and
shortages which left that clinic without a full-time social worker for a period of over
three months. It has been hoped that a full team would be available to develop the
clinic in Victoria and this has now been definitely planned. It is to be expected, therefore, that services in that area will be increased considerably and an increase in social-
service staff will be necessary to meet these developments. Q 98 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 6.—Social Services of Provincial Child Guidance Clinics,
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Case-work Services
Vancouver
Victoria
1951-52
Totals
1950-51
Totals
146
54
200
198
194
18
11
36
6
12
230
24
23
259
15
24
223
54
277
298
351
194
157
102
66
36
453
267
193
481
281
Cases carried over to next fiscal year    _     ....
200
5,644
997
364
342
635
47
71
243
460
20
33
17
42
27
9
32
6,100
1,017
397
359
677
74
80
275
4,203
Conferences attended in agency diagnostic service...	
1,125
368
308
586
156
57
242
Respectfully submitted.
D. B. Ricketts,
Supervisor.
PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT
U. P. Byrne, Esq., M.D., D.P.H., D.I.H.,
Director, Child Guidance Clinics,
455 West Thirteenth Avenue, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith is a summary of the work of the Psychology Department
of the Provincial Child Guidance Service from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952.
Although a quantitative report in itself presents a very limited picture of the work and
function of the Psychology Department, a comparison with previous annual reports reveals
not only an increase and extension of the service as a whole, but shows some interesting
trends in the development of this Department.
One of the more significant changes is in greater use of projective techniques, which,
in keeping with the trend in psychological service elsewhere, reflects the increasing
emphasis on the psychologist's role as a professional person who is equipped to further
the understanding of the human personality. Another development is in the extension
of therapeutic procedures to include interviewing and play techniques, in addition to
reading therapy. The number of children being seen on this basis is still very small, with
the emphasis on the training of staff at present rather than on increasing the service.
The interne-training programme continues with the addition of three internes to our
staff during the year. There has also been an expansion of our orientation programme
for persons working in related fields.
In evaluating our contribution at this time, we are encouraged by our growth in the
area of diagnosis. In education and treatment, we have made a start. In research, one
of the major functions of the clinical psychologist, we look forward to the time when
staff, with the necessary training, will be able to utilize the valuable resources which are
available to us to add to our clinical knowledge.
Respectfully submitted. _ Marjory Munro, M.A.,
Psychologist. REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
Q 99
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■£ <u cu O Q 100 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
REPORT OF RESEARCH DIVISION
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—The annual report of the U.B.C.-Crease Clinic Research Unit from April 1st,
1951, to March 31st, 1952, follows:—
RESEARCH PROGRAMME
Work on the microscopic connections between the major lobes of the brain proceeded in Dr. Gibson's laboratory with the assistance of George Morrison, a graduate
student who received his Master of Arts degree with first-class honours in the fall convocation. Considerable progress was made toward establishing a sound histological basis
for future experimental work in animals and post-mortem work on human brains loboto-
mized for mental disease.
In Dr. Margaret Kennard's laboratory, with the assistance of Roy Griffiths, B.A.,
a graduate student, extensive studies were carried out upon temporal lobe removal in
the cat and in the isolation of olfactory, visual, and auditory pathways in this complex
area, as part of a basic work on temporal lobotomy in patients. Time-consuming conditioned reflex studies have been made on these animals and a great deal has been learned
which will later be of value in experiments on monkeys, once the colony is set up at the
University. In addition, Dr. Kennard has been completing work which she had started
previous to joining this laboratory on pain mechanisms, which is of considerable clinical
importance.
In the field of cerebro-vascular studies, Dr. John E. Harvey joined the laboratory
group, coming from the University of Chicago, where he had carried on research in the
Department of Neurosurgery. His time has been spent largely in setting up the highly
technical methods required for the direct observation of blood-flow in the cerebral vessels
of experimental animals. The simultaneous recording of blood-pressure has been
attempted, but the methods at hand are not yet sufficiently refined, we feel, to allow a
study to be made which can then be applied clinically to humans. The mechanisms of
cerebral thrombosis and of cerebro-vascular changes in senile patients are the main
concern of this study and will be pursued as opportunity presents itself.
SEMINARS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS
A weekly seminar has been conducted in the laboratory, at which the senior
researchers and those proceeding to research degrees have taken part. In addition, outside speakers from the Departments of Physiology and Psychology of the University and
Donald Samson, of the Geriatrics Project under D.V.A. at Shaughnessy Hospital, were
included. In the University Seminar on Experimental Medicine the three senior
researchers have given papers, in addition to Mr. Morrison and Mr. Griffiths, on the
problems which they have had in hand.
TRAVEL TO MEETINGS
During the year Dr. Margaret Kennard attended the American Neurological Association meetings in Atlantic City in June, and the meetings of the Association for Research
in Nervous and Mental Diseases in New York City in December. Dr. Gibson attended
the Second International Congress on Poliomyelitis in Copenhagen in September, and
visited other neurological research centres in Northern Europe before returning to
Vancouver. His trip was financed by the B.C. Polio Fund. Dr. Harvey proceeded on
a short visit to the Department of Physiology, University of Washington, Seattle, to
observe bio-physical recording mechanisms in use in that laboratory. REPORT OF RESEARCH DIVISION
Q  101
VISITORS
The following visitors have inspected the laboratory during the past year: R. A.
Pennington, Deputy Provincial Secretary; Dr. Robert Morison of the Rockefeller Foundation; Dr. Charles Roberts, of the Department 8f National Health and Welfare at
Ottawa; Sir Philip Livingston, retired Director-General of Medical Services for the
R.A.F.; Professor Robert Aird, Department of Neurology, University of California;
Professor Sigvald Refsum, University of Bergen, Norway; Dean Macdonald Critchley,
of the National Institute of Neurology, Queen's Square, London; Professor E. D. Adrian,
President of the Royal Society; Professor Joseph Dope, Department of Experimental
Medicine, University of Manitoba; Professor J. C. Eccles, National University of
Australia, Canberra; Dr. Clinton Woolsey, Research Professor of Neurophysiology,
University of Wisconsin; and Dr. John Griffin, Executive Director, Canadian Mental
Health Association, Toronto.
PERSONNEL
Director, Dr. Wm. C. Gibson, Associate Professor and Chairman of the Department
of Neurological Research, University of British Columbia; Dr. Margaret A. Kennard,
Senior Research and Associate Professor of Neurological Research since May 19th, 1951;
Dr. John E. Harvey, Senior Researcher and Associate Professor of Neurological Research
since July 1st, 1951; George E. Morrison, M.A., Research Fellow; Roy Griffiths, B.A.,
Research Fellow; Mrs. Violet Purkis, Secretary-Technician; Mrs. Mary Ware, B.A.,
Secretary-Technician since September 1st, 1951; and Mrs. Agnes Hooley, B.A., Research
Fellow since December 1st, 1951.
EQUIPMENT
Major additions to the laboratory's equipment during the year consisted largely of
photomicrographic apparatus and Sound Scriber recording apparatus. A very good
research library is being accumulated, consisting largely of journals dealing with the
basic sciences in nervous and mental diseases.
BUDGET
As in the previous year, the bulk of the financial assistance for the laboratory came
from Federal Mental Health Grant No. 609-5-89. A total of $23,139.47 was granted
by Ottawa towards the work of the unit, this amount representing $18,742 in personal
services and salaries, $865 for travel, $3,055.47 for equipment, $465 for supplies and
materials, and $12 for membership in Association for Research of Nervous and Mental
Diseases. In addition, the Provincial Government made available as part of the treatment grant to the Crease Clinic a sum of $9,600 for day-to-day expenses.
CONCLUSION
Looking ahead, I should say that there was a very bright future for the laboratory.
During the coming year, Dr. Kennard will be developing a long-range study of the
electroencephalographic abnormalities of mentally disturbed people. This work will
require from three to five years and will cover all age-groups eventually. The prognostic
value of such a study is felt to be very great. For this reason every effort will be made
to correlate the E.E.G. findings of the disturbed group and a control group with the
results of a thorough clinical psychological test battery. An amendment to the unit's
Ottawa grant has been proposed, to permit the employment of a Ph.D. research psychologist to assist Dr. Kennard in these studies, which stem from her extensive work in this
field concerning emotionally disturbed children. First-class fire-proof accommodation
in the Westbrook Building at the University has been offered by Dean Weaver. As
a result of a conference in Ottawa in December, a submission was made containing
a request for a Grass 8-channel E.E.G., an Offner wave-form analyser, and a stroboscope.
PROVINCIAL LIBRARY
VICTORIA. B. C. Q  102
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
However, it has been felt at the Provincial level that a grant for such apparatus could
not be forwarded to Ottawa this year.
It is our hope that eventually 1 per cent of the amount spent for mental hospitals
may be spent for research into mental disease. The stability required for research
institutions may have to be provided largely through Provincial funds, augmented to
some extent by Federal funds. Projects which are worth undertaking require from three
to five years usually before any real impact can be made on the problems under study.
It is axiomatic that the need for research laboratories would not exist if discoveries were
as near at hand as some would like to believe them. Researchers cannot be made to
perform miracles for administrators or for institutions, and the development of an
atmosphere in which good research can be done is a matter which takes considerable time.
It is to be hoped, therefore, that a maximum of stability may be provided for this
laboratory, together with a minimum of such difficulties as those outlined above in
matters of purchasing of equipment.
In concluding this report I can only echo the feelings expressed by Professor Cecil
Drinker at the opening of the McLean Hospital Laboratories for Mental Health Research
at Waverley, Mass., in 1947: " I have spent my life in laboratories of medical research,
but never have I seen so fertile an opportunity as we have here. It will take time. That
is a feature of research in medicine peculiarly objectionable to hospital administrators.
Research is interminably expensive, always technically in the red on hospital books, yet
in the end it has vast potentialities for profit, on which we must risk our judgment if we
hope for gain and are not satisfied to sit quietly by taking such care of our abnormal
patients as current practice dictates."
Respectfully submitted. w c GlBSON> M.D.;
Director of Research.
New 100-bed unit, Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam, under construction. STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
Q 103
MENTAL HOSPITALS STATISTICAL TABLES
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Mental Hospitals—Essondale,
New Westminster, and Colquitz—from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st,
1952
Movement of Population
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
1,827
429
283
97
2
2
5
1
1,638
361
149
7
2
3,465
790.
283
246
9
2
7
1
2,646
790
2,157
427
In residence, New Westminster, March 31st, 1951 	
On probation, carried forward from 1950-51, Essondale	
On probation, carried forward from 1950-51, New Westminster
On probation, carried forward from 1950-51, Colquitz	
On escape, carried forward from 1950-51, Essondale	
On escape, carried forward from 1950-51, New Westminster
On escape, carried forward from 1950-51, Colquitz	
4,803
Admitted during the year 1951-52—
512
30
228
6
14
344
25
56
2
856
55
284
8
14
1,217
Total  under  treatment,   Essondale,   New  Westminster,   and
Colquitz, April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952 	
Discharged during the period of April 1st,  1951, to March
31st, 1952—
(a) Essondale—
65
131
301
199
2
44
2
96
73
167
133
51
66
1
65
138
298
434
250
2
110
3
161
3,436
868
2,584
574
6,020
Died _    	
840
556
1,396
(ft) New Westminster—
1
7
10
1
4
2
11
2
4
9
21
As unimproved .	
Died 	
18
18
36
(c)  Colquitz—
1
2
1
6
1
2
1
6
As unimproved   	
Died    	
10
10
Total   discharged   from   Essondale,   New   Westminster,   and
	
1,442
Total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz ..
2,568
2,010
4,578 Q  104
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Mental Hospitals—Essondale,
New Westminster, and Colquitz—from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st,
1952-—Continued
Movement of Population
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
Essondale—
Total on books, March 31st, 1951 	
1,929
790
23
2
1,789
427
6
3,718
1,217
29
2
2,744
901
2,222
581
Admitted during 1951-52...    	
4,966
Discharged during 1951-52	
840
49
12
556
25
1,396
74
12
1,482
431
49
368
25
799
74
Total in residence, Essondale, March 31st, 1952	
1,843
1,641
3,484
New Westminster—
Total on books, March 31st, 1951	
480
41
393
24
873
Discharged during 1951-52    	
18
23
18
6
36
29
65
286
12
286
12
Total in residence, New Westminster, March 31st, 1952-	
439
369
808
Colquitz—
Total on books, March 31st, 1951.   	
298
12
298
10
2
10
2
12
1,843
439
289
1,641
369
3,484
808
286
Total in residence, Colquitz, March 31st, 1952 	
286
286
Total in residence, Essondale, March 31st, 1952	
Total in residence, New Westminster, March 31st, 1952 	
Total in residence, Colquitz, March 31st, 1952-.-  	
2,568
2,010
Grand total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and
Colquitz, March 31st, 1952 _	
	
	
4,578
Percentage of patients recovered and improved to admissions-
Percentage of discharges to admissions (deaths excluded)	
Percentage of deaths to number under treatment.. —
Daily average population	
36.07
92.77
3.12
4,567.29 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
Q  105
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Mental
Hospitals since Inception
Discharges
H
ti
Year
B
O
I
<
ti
0)
O
ti
ti
t_
ti
a)
>
O
0 a.
ZA
VI
ct
a
1°
-J <« Ih
» O rt
5t_ s
2SB
rt
to
0
ti
a
c.
ti
ti
u
a
u
g
<1_> 1)
0 tS
oS
<a  <*> rt
BDOS
a. a-T3
cl.p_;<
Percentage of
Discharges to
Admissions (D
Excluded)
Percentage of
Deaths to Who
Number under
Treatment
1872	
18
1
1
16
18
5.55
5.55
5.55
1873 	
15
10
2
5
14
2
31
66.66
80.00
16.12
1874. 	
12
4
3
19
5
26
33.33
33.33
11.53
1875...	
29
3
3
10
32
13
48
10.34
26.89
20.83
1876 	
22
11
3
5
35
3
54
50.00
63.63
9.35
1877 	
14
4
4
3
38
3
49
28.57
78.57
6.12
1878..	
16
7
3
8
36
2
54
43.75
62.50
16.16
1879. 	
18
4
1
8
41
5
54
22.22
27.77
14.81
1880  	
17
5
5
48
7
58
29.41
29.41
8.62
1881— 	
13
5
3
5
48
61
38.46
61.54
8.19
1882 	
7
3
1
2
49
1
55
42.85
57.14
3.63
1883..	
8
4
1
3
49
57
50.00
62.50
5.26
1884 	
10
2
4
2
51
2
59
20.00
60.00
3.33
1885  	
20
5
5
61
10
71
25.00
25.00
6.94
1886 -	
27
36
10
15
6
5
6
5
66
77
5
11
88
102
37.03
41.66
59.25
55.55
6.81
1887 -	
4.80
1888 —-	
26
12
6
3
82
5
103
46.15
69.23
2.87
1889	
41
14
5
4
100
18
123
34.15
46.34
3.25
1890   	
52
17
6
12
117
17
152
32.69
44.23
7.64
1891 — — 	
49
19
4
20
123
6
166
38.77
46.94
11.69
1892  —
52
17
10
13
135
12
175
32.69
51.92
6.95
1893  	
44
14
18
14
133
2
179
31.81
72.72
7.60
1894 	
80
13
19
19
162
29
213
16.25
40.00
8.92
1895	
62
29
11
20
164
2
224
46.77
64.51
8.92
1896— —.
64
23
25
9
171
7
228
35.93
75.00
3.94
1897 	
74
20
8
14
203
32
246
27.03
37.83
5.69
1898...	
81
27
13
19
221
18
.
285
33.33
49.38
6.66
1899	
101
31
32
21
234
13
.
327
30.69
62.37
6.42
1900 — ,,,
113
38
27
29
258
24
356
33.63
57.52
8.14
1901  .
115
40
20
25
284
26
377
34.78
52.17
6.63
1902- 	
121
30
31
25
311
27
413
24.79
50.41
6.06
1903 -	
139
38
37
26
349
38
466
27.34
53.96
5.57
1904  	
115
46
26
26
321
28
480
40.00
62.61
5.42
1905 —	
123
43
33
27
348
27
505
33.33
61.78
5.34
1906 -	
150
36i
43
28
388
43
552
23.03
52.06
5.04
1907..—	
221
48
43
39
461
73
666
21.30
41.20
5.08
1908	
230
681
56
57
507
46
765
28.30
53.90
7.44
1909  ...
232
732
77
40
536
29
816
31.00
64.60
6.40
1910 	
280
84
82
41
595
48
896
30.00
59.28
4.57
1911.. 	
332
67 s
114
60
690
105
1,034
19.57
54.42
5.83
1912 	
375
741
128
76
752
62
1,065
18.90
53.80
7.02
1913.. 	
380
90*
146
67
919
167
1,264
22.63
62.10
5.30
1914..... 	
402
58
126
74
1,027
108
1,364
14.43
45.77
5.43
1915 - —	
332
83
91
89
1,090
63 |
1,437
25.00
52.41
6.19
1916 	
353
732
96
80
1,205
115 1 —
1,527
20.68
47.87
5.24
1917	
371
88
78
106
1,301
96
1,650
23.72
44.74
6.42
1918 	
375
75
95
132
1,347
46
1,753
20.00
45.33
7.47
Jan. 1, 1919, to
March 31, 1920	
574
116
221
132
1,458
111
2,025
20.20
58.71
6.51
1920-1921	
489
88
173
122
1,566
108
2,043
14.17
72.60
5.97
1921-1922	
478
96
178
114
1,649
83
2,137
2,180
20.08
57 32
5.33
1922-1923 	
438
91
167
133
1,697
48
20.77
59.36
6.10
1923-1924 	
447
842
121
163
1,784
87
2,234
18.56
64.20
7.25
1924-1925 	
461
63
242
138
1,884
100
2,327
13.66
66.16
5.93
1925-1926	
475
575
240
142
1,995
111
2,434
2,565
12.00
62 53
5.83
1926-1927 	
494
764
171
161
2,125
130
15.38
50.00
6.27
1927-1928. 	
542
751
252
147
2,269
144
2,743
13.28
60.33
5.36
1928-1929.	
543
922
294
181
2,347
78
2,914
16.76
71.07
6.21
1929-1930	
602
1181
311
223
2,411
64
3,063
19.10
71.26
7.28
1930-1931..	
632
701
235
191
2,550
139
3,148
10.60
64.24
6.06
1931-1932	
562
58"
299
181
2,676
126
3,214
10.32
63.52
5.63
1932-1933..	
635
444
323
195
2,824
148
3,390
6.92
58.42
5.75
1933-1934..	
610
61 =
309
200
2,960
136
3,530
10.00
60.65
5.66
1934-1935	
653
71i
349
321
3,080
120
3,721
10.87
64.32
5.94
1935-1936	
679
631
304
291
3,180
100 ] 	
1
3,838
9.27
54.05
7.58
1 Three not insane.
' Five not insane.
2 One not insane.
3 Two not insane.
4 Four not insane.
G Six not insane. Q 106
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Mental
Hospitals since Inception—Continued
G
1
•o
<
Discharges
Vi
rt
ti
0
a
1*8
esss
fa*
Z «W
a_
pt
ti
u
a
a
IA
rt
<u
H
a
u
Q
ti
.S
B
3
O M
o2
■j os S3
Sf-c.l
a u S
111
<_,««:
Percentage of
Discharges to
Admissions (Deaths
Excluded)
0>
Year
tj
u
>
o
u
u
■a
o
o
o a>
ZA
O k.
<nj_: a.
o>-o
io 3 c
rt —. i_ tu
l||s
B.QZH
1936-1937... 	
793
78 =
300
268
3,301
121
4,067
9.96
63.60
6.59
1937-1938
834
74
330
207
3,487
186
4,255
8.87
67.30
4.86
1938-1939	
827
72s
345
208
3,612
125
4,471
8.71
78.72
4.65
1939-1940	
869
1117
455
230
3,710
98
4,713
11.39
88.50
4.88
1940-1941      	
864
1076
410
254
3,836
126
4,781
12.38
79.97
5.31
1941-1942	
834
7is
400
255
3,902
66
4,843
8.51
56.46
6.54
1942-1943	
803
91_
443
260
3,925
23
4,919
11.32
66.50
5.31
1943-1944	
840
87
423
309
3,960
35
4,965
10.36
61.66
6.02
1944-1945 	
822
96i»
377
300
4,019
59
4,960
5,014
10.46
58.39
6.04
1945-1946	
834
1178
352
240
4,110
91
14.02
57.43
5.84
1946-1947—	
880
9710
496
238
4,151
41
5,174
11.02
68.18
4.59
1947-1948 	
1,111
12411
560
240
4,269
118
5,447
11.34
63.64
4.40
1948-1949. 	
1,260
137i2
748
209
4,355
86    |    	
5,758
10.87
76.59
3.63
1949-1950	
1,415
195
787
202
4,602
247    |
1
5,999
13.78
69.40
3.37
VJ
B
O
1
<
Discharges
JD
a
o
a
c
V
2*8
K o rt
*->Fs 5
u
a)
u
O
u
cd
u
l-H
u
Q
U
a
£i
B
^^
O ra
pQ a.
•a
u
TJ;       S
2       J3^
Year
U
ti
>
O
o
u
p3
T3
0)
>
O
a
1
•a
o
§
c
5
11
Percentage of
Patients Recov
and Improved t
Admissions
Percentage of
Discharges to
Admissions
(Deaths Excluc
Percentage of
Deaths to Num
under Treatmei
1950-51                              	
1,499
1,217
169
138
421
301
414
438
284
252
223
188
4,538
4,578
40
64
4,815
6,020
39.35
36.07
67.04     3.53
1951 52
92.77  1 3.12
1
3 Two not insane.
10 Seven not insane,
psychosis.
0 Five not insane.
11 Three not insane;
7 Twelve not insane.
196 without psychosis.
* Ten not insane.
12 Two not insane:
9 Eight not insane,
seventy-eight without
Table No. 3.—Showing the Total Number of Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths
in the Mental Hospitals from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Admissions
Discharges
Deaths
Months
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
1951
April...   	
55
28
83
59
44
103
10
9
19
May	
64
45
109
61
44
105
11
7
18
June.	
59
45
104
57
45
102
12
7
19
July	
51
23
74
54
27
81
8
3
11
August _	
77
35
112
48
23
71
4
3
7
September	
67
34
101
44
24
68
9
3
12
October	
68
35
103
128
22
150
12
5
17
November	
68
36
104
36
28
64
11
6
17
December.	
56
33
89
43
31
74
7
5
12
1952
January 	
77
33
110
79
58
137
8
10
18
February 	
72
34
106
40
26
66
13
11
24
March 	
76
46
122
51
57
108
7
7
14
Totals 	
790
427
1,217
700
429
1,129
112
76
188 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
Q  107
Table No. A,
-Showing What Districts Contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Abbotsford	
Agassiz    	
4
1
3
3
3
1
2
1
1
31
1
1
1
1
1
8
3
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
~4
1
1
2
i
i
i
i
i
14
1
6
2
1
1
4
1
3
5
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
15
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
4
1
3
2
3
1
1
1
2
1
6
1
1
5
4
4
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
46
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
9
1
5
1
1
6
1
3
3
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
2
2
1
8
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
16
1
9
3
1
1
1
4
2
5
6
1
Brought forward	
142
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
3
14
1
1
2
1
63
15
1
2
2
1
3
5
1
5
1
1
1
2
2
1
4
7
3
2
1
1
4
1
2
1
2
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
6
76
3
2
1
2
1
1
1
3
4
3
1
31
15
1
~ 2
1
1
2
3
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
218
1
7
Lytton	
Lynmour          	
McBride 	
1
Aldergrove..	
Allenby—	
1
3
1
2
1
B ella Coola  	
Matsqui	
2
1
Merritt          	
Merville.. 	
Michel	
Mission	
Nanaimo	
Nakusp 	
3
Brookmere 	
Burnaby..	
Burquitlam—  	
1
1
6
18
1
1
Canyon  	
Natal 	
3
3
1
94
30
Oak Bay.  	
2
Cobble Hill -
2
2
100-Mile House ...
1
2
Oyama 	
1
1
5
5
1
8
2
Dawson, Y.T. ...         	
1
Port Kells  '	
1
Port McNeill	
2
Port Mellon  	
1
2
3
Evelyn  	
Premier...	
1
5
9
3
Queen Charlotte Islands...	
Red Pass  	
Refuge Cove  	
2
1
Golden  —	
1
1
Richmond _.	
5
2
Rolla 	
Rosedale— 	
Rossland  	
1
1
Heffley Creek   	
2
Hope.    —	
Hot Spring Cove..—	
Invermere	
Irvings Landing 	
1
1
Rutland  .,,,.,
Saanich  	
Saanichton 	
Salmo  	
2
9
1
2
Kamloops. 	
Kaslo
2
2
Kelowna 	
Kimberley	
Sechelt 	
2
Sooke...	
Spences Bridge 	
Squamish 	
Steveston...  	
Ladysmith— — 	
3
3
9
142
76
218
333
186      1
519 Q if
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 4.—Showing What Districts Contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952—Continued
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
333
2
7
2
393
2
6
26
1
1
186
1
4
1
192
3
31
519
2
1
11
2
1
585
2
9
57
1
1
773
2
2
1
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
418
1
3
1
2
1
1
1,191
3
Tlell
5
Trail
1
Tranquille 	
Whalley 	
White Horse, Y.T	
1
5
White Rock   	
4
2
1
Windermere 	
Winnipeg, Man	
Woodfibre	
Wycliffe  _	
Totals —  	
1
1
1
Carried forward	
773
418
1,191
1
790
427
1,217
Table No. 5.—Showing the Number of Attacks in Those Admitted
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Number of Attacks
Male
Female
Total
253
104
42
10
4
1
1
25
298
52
122
77
31
16
3
3
3
1
27
127
17
375
181
Third                                                    _  -
73
26
Fifth        .
7
Sixth                                                                                    	
4
3
Fijrhfh
1
Tenth                                                  _ _ _ 	
1
52
425
69
790
427
1,217
Table No. 6.—Showing the Reported Duration of Mental Illness Prior to
Admission in Those Admitted from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Duration of Attack
Male
Female
Total
45
134
21
30
32
38
16
5
2
298
163
6
23
76
21
23
21
28
14
6
2
127
80
6
68
210
„     6      „                                            - 	
42
„   12       „                                        _   -	
53
53
„     5    „                                         	
66
.,   10    ,,     _ 	
30
„   15    „                                      .        ...      ~~        	
11
Over 15    „                            	
4
425
243
life                                                      	
12
Totals
790
427
1,217 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
Q  109
Table 7.—Showing the Reported Cause of Attack in Those Admitted
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Alleged Cause
Male
Female
Total
Alcohol   —
Arteriosclerosis— 	
Avitaminosis...   	
Brain tumour.—	
Cardiac failure  	
Cardiovascular disease 	
Carcinoma __ ._	
Cerebral neoplasm	
Cerebral atrophy  	
Congenital   —	
Constitutional  	
Drugs — — 	
Epilepsy  	
Hematoporphyria 	
Huntington's chorea —
Hypertensive encephalopathy..
Hypertension 	
Hyperthyroidism.  	
Lobotomy 	
Lues (syphilis)	
Malnutrition 	
Metabolic disease —	
Osteomyelitis—	
Senility... 	
Trauma 	
Without psychosis 	
Totals  	
22
56
1
3
1
2
1
1
2
9
253
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
106
5
298
790
7
21
7
194
4
8
1
1
49
127
427
29
77
1
5
1
2
1
1
2
16
447
6
17
1
1
1
3
2
1
15
1
1
1
155
5
425
1,217
Table No. 8.—Showing the Number Discharged on Probation and Results
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Results
Male
Female
Total
65
133
3or
201
73
168
137
51
138
301
438
Totals                                                                  	
700
429
1,129
Disposition of discharged—
228
26
446
92
9
328
320
35
700
429
1,129
44
53
54
68
98
121
Table No. 9.—Showing Reported Duration of Mental Illness Prior to Admission in Those Discharged from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Alleged Duration
Male
Female
Total
52
65
40
27
35
23
41
16
50
223
128
46
57
28
29
33
25
17
13
32
61
88
98
68
56
„    3      „     -              — _	
„    6      „            	
68
. 12     „                     	
„    3    „                       	
216
700
429
1,129 Q 110
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952,
in the Mental Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz
Time in Hospital
Age
Certified Cause
Sex
Years
Months
Days
M.
41
7
10
13
Carcinoma of the kidney; paranoidal schizophrenia.
M.
18
8
2
Bronchopneumonia; mental deficiency—idiot.
M.
36
13
8
26
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; catatonic schizophrenia.
M.
72
31
9
29
Bronchopneumonia; hypertensive cardiovascular disease; generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
64
4
8
22
Cerebral thrombosis; cerebral arteriosclerosis; Huntington's chorea.
F.
65
1
4
4
Bronchopneumonia; involutional melancholia.
F.
83
9
Bronchopneumonia; senile dementia.
F.
65
19
11
5
Tuberculosis—abdominal.
F.
56
5
8
11
Coronary occlusion; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease; hypertensive
cardiovascular disease; paranoidal schizophrenia.
F.
56
1
9
14
Cerebral thrombosis; auricular fibrillation; chronic rheumatic pancarditis;
bronchopneumonia; manic depressive psychosis.
F.
63
1
6
27
Terminal bronchopneumonia (bilateral); carcinoma of the breast (postoperative) with metastases to both lungs, liver, aortic lymph nodes, and
skull; pre-senile dementia.
F.
70
6
27
Bilateral subdural hematoma; post-traumatic psychosis.
M.
85
1
7
9
Coronary occlusion; arteriosclerosis; diabetes; senile dementia.
F.
9
24
Bronchopneumonia; senile dementia.
M.
47
27
Acute pulmonary cedema due to luetic aortitis; general paresis of the insane.
M.
72
6
6
10
Bronchopneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
62
1
5
6
Bronchopneumonia; pulmonary tuberculosis; generalized arteriosclerosis.
F.
47
4
10
19
Coronary thrombosis; epilepsy.
M.
56
—
1
Cerebral thrombosis with hemiplegia; acute lobar pneumonia; chronic
alcoholism without psychosis.
F.
57
27
8
Bronchopneumonia; catatonic schizophrenia.
F.
85
—
22
Tox_emia; moist gangrene of right foot; arteriosclerosis; arteriosclerotic
dementia.
F.
15
1
6
25
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
44
1
4
5
Asphyxia; strangulation; hanging; paranoidal schizophrenia.
F.
65
4
Pneumococcal meningitis; lobar pneumonia; cerebral atrophy.
F.
4l
30
Bronchopneumonia; idiot without psychosis.
M.
64
1
2
19
Empyema; lobar pneumonia; Jakob-Creutzfeld syndrome.
M.
69
24
11
3
Terminal bronchopneumonia; carcinoma of the stomach; paranoidal
schizophrenia.
M.
67
17
Cerebral thrombosis; cerebral arteriosclerosis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
23
11
2
26
Tuberculosis of lungs; imbecile.
F.
66
5
1
24
Bronchopneumonia; Huntington's chorea.
M.
89
3
2
20
Chronic myocarditis; generalized arteriosclerosis.
F.
68
9
4
20
Bronchopneumonia; manic depressive—depressed.
M.
1
8
4
Bronchopneumonia; congenital heart defect; Mongolian idiot.
M.
50
._-
11
Exhaustion due to catatonic excitement; hypertension; paranoidal schizophrenia.
M.
57
1
3
20
Bronchopneumonia; chronic pyelonephritis; acute mania.
M.
75
7
11
13
Chronic myocarditis; paranoidal schizophrenia.
M.
35
5
4
2
Cerebral cedema; oculogyric crisis; post-encephalitic Parkinsonism; psychosis with Parkinsonism.
F.
76
30
4
11
Carcinoma of the breast; paranoidal schizophrenia.
M.
60
17
9
11
Acute pulmonary oedema; arteriosclerotic heart-disease; general paresis of
the insane.
M.
76
1
9
Coronary thrombosis; senile dementia.
F.
71
1
17
Hydrocephalus; hydrocephalic idiot.
M.
62
8
6
28
Acute pulmonary cedema; arteriosclerotic heart-disease; generalized arteriosclerosis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
17
16
	
	
Myocardial degeneration; pseudohypertrophic muscular; imbecility.
F.
21
	
9
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral agenesis.
F.
64
~7
3
Pulmonary cedema; cerebral thrombosis; senile dementia.
M.
69
17
4
28
Gastric haemorrhage; gastric ulcer.
M.
78
9
4
8
Terminal bronchopneumonia; carcinoma of the stomach; generalized arteriosclerosis; psychosis with somatic disease; Huntington's chorea.
M.
22
17
3
9
Epilepsy; idiocy.
M.
19
19
9
10
Pulmonary cedema; status epilepticus; epilepsy with mental deficiency.
M.
57
2
5
Acute pulmonary cedema; recent myocardial infarction; generalized arteriosclerosis; paranoidal state.
F.
91
12
6
4
Bronchopneumonia; senile dementia.
M.
33
8
19
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; simple schizophrenia.
F.
n1
	
8
24
Purulent meningitis; infected meningocele; hydrocephalus.
M.
66
1
12
Bronchopneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
57
12
5
20
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; paranoidal schizophrenia.
F.
88
7
Bronchopneumonia; senile dementia.
M.
67
27
~2
28
Bronchopneumonia; paranoidal schizophrenia.
1 Months. STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
Q 111
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952,
in the Mental Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz—
Continued.
Sex
Age
Time in Hospital
Years I Months
I
Days
Certified Cause
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
70
56
7
36
69
34
62
48
66
65
62
76
67
82
63
71
87
69
51
75
6
87
84
25
68
81
20
67
7
46
66
22
73
64
63
77
43
69
67
61
62
5
69
68
21
58
72
38
75
68
5
16
21
4
2
3
34
1
60
1
2
19
33
36
24
27
33
1
6
1
21
2
1
10
1
2
3
2
1
10
4
10
4
4
9
11
8
11
10
2
1
5
2
5
5
24
24
13
12
5
9
7
2
22
25
23
27
15
22
4
3
12
7
21
4
12
24
22
24
15
9
4
12
5
5
10
6
17
30
8
19
14
15
14
3
22
5
18
Bronchopneumonia; encephalomalacia; senile dementia.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; pontine haemorrhage; hypertensive heart-
disease.
Bronchopneumonia; mental deficiency—idiot.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis far advanced.
Coronary thrombosis; fractured hip; general paresis of the insane.
Bronchopneumonia.
Intracranial haemorrhage; hypertension; manic depressive—manic.
Cerebral haemorrhage; arteriosclerotic dementia.
Congestive heart failure;   arteriosclerosis;   hypertensive;   pre-senile dementia.
Cerebral thrombosis; chronic arteriosclerosis; myocardial degeneration;
bronchopneumonia.
Bronchopneumonia; pleurisy; chronic cystitis and pyelonephritis; simple
schizophrenia.
Bronchopneumonia; inanition; senile dementia.
Acute pericarditis; bronchogenic carcinoma of the lung; nepholithiasis;
chronic pyelonephritis; schizophrenia.
Hypertensive cardiac disease; senile dementia.
Cerebral haemorrhage; cerebral arteriosclerosis; paranoidal schizophrenia.
Bronchopneumonia; senile dementia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Acute pulmonary cedema; cerebral and general arteriosclerosis; diabetes
mellitus; arteriosclerotic dementia.
Bronchopneumonia; acute pyelonephritis; fatty degeneration of the liver.
Uraemia; chronic prostatic obstruction; senile dementia.
Acute bronchopneumonia; mental deficiency—imbecile.
Senility; senile dementia.
Myocardial failure; senile dementia; chronic bronchitis and gastric ulcers;
arteriosclerosis; senile dementia.
Cerebral thrombosis; diabetes mellitus; bilateral nephrosis of kidneys;
glaucoma; psychosis secondary to metabolic diseases.
Senility; senile dementia.
Bronchopneumonia; myocardial degeneration; chronic arteriosclerosis;
senile dementia.
Anterior poliomyelitis; mental deficiency—moron.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; coronary occlusion; generalized arteriosclerotic dementia.
Bronchopneumonia; mental deficiency.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis with cavitation; deteriorated paranoidal
schizophrenia.
Acute pulmonary oedema; hypertensive heart-disease; generalized arteriosclerosis; psychosis secondary to disease of the circulatory system.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; mental defective—idiocy with spastic
paralysis.
Bronochopneumonia; senile dementia.
Cerebral thrombosis; previous cerebral thrombosis.
Cerebral haemorrhage; simple schizophrenia.
Miliary tuberculosis; pulmonary tuberculosis; paranoidal schizophrenia.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; meningioma of the brain; psychosis with
epilepsy.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; carcinoma of the bronchus; psychosis resulting from brain tumours (secondary carcinoma).
Pulmonary thrombosis; bronogenic carcinoma of right lung; metastasis of
brain, left adrenal gland, and lymph nodes; organic psychosis.
Myocardial degeneration; paranoidal schizophrenia.
Cerebral accident; general paresis of the insane.
Acute pericarditis with effusion; bilateral pyonephrosis; benign prostatic
hypertrophy; paranoidal schizophrenia.
Coronary thrombosis; paranoidal schizophrenia.
Epilepsy (status epilepticus) idiocy.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; paranoidal schizophrenia.
Cerebral haemorrhage; chronic arteriosclerosis; chronic myocardial degeneration; previous minor cerebral haemorrhage.
Asphyxia; strangulation; hanging.
Bronchopneumonia; involutional melancholia.
Coronary thrombosis; general paresis of the insane.
Cerebral oedema; status epilepticus; epilepsy.
Pulmonary embolism; coronary sclerosis; diabetes mellitus; hypertensive
heart-disease.
Bronchopneumonia. Q  112
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1951, to March 3 1st, 1952,
in the Mental Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz—
Continued.
Sex
Age
Time in Hospital
Years I Months!   Days
Certified Cause
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
F.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
F.
M.
78
70
66
5
63
53
59
36
75
66
70
43
3
56
55
70
69
53
44
67
80
61
60
51
1
62
78
70
1
60
65
61
66
69
66
64
70
73
35
25
78
65
63
71
70
65
55
49
63
5
87
84
25
10
14
9
6
7
19
2
3
2
4
14
5
3
1
2
12
3
25
25
25
38
8
5
10
6
4
17
8
19
2
7
2
4
19
24
20
8
23
2
26
4
1
28
2
11
4
5
3
18
16
1
9
4
8
16
6
9
13
4
29
4
3
2
13
5
9
10
2
5
25
1
8
12
2
11
17
30
13
23
6
8
4
3
1
2
1
2
21
4
3
2
24
4
10
3
8
6
5
_-
1
3
20
3
18
2
10
19
1
10
11
.__
—
17
7
8
10
4
9
14
6
12
3
26
—
—
25
—
9
28
Myocardial failure; senile dementia.
Cerebral vascular accident; senile dementia.
Toxaemia; adeno-carcinoma of caecum; metastases to liver, lungs, and lymph
nodes.
Septicaemia; pleuro-pneumonia; Mongolian idiocy.
Acute pulmonary cedema; chronic hypertensive heart-disease with associated
arteriosclerosis.
Chronic myocarditis; exhaustion delirium.
Arteriosclerotic heart-disease; pre-senile psychosis.
Coronary occlusion; post-traumatic epilepsy with psychosis.
Auricular fibrillation; hyperthyroidism.
Cerebral tumour; psychosis due to brain tumour.
Senility; senile dementia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Spontaneous subarachnoid haemorrhage; mental deficiency—idiocy (cerebral
palsy).
Bronchopneumonia.
Cerebral haemorrhage; hypertensive cardio-vascular disease; arteriosclerotic
dementia.
Meningitis; hydrocephalic idiocy.
Malignant neoplasm of lung and bronchus; psychosis with cerebral neoplasm
(metastatic deposits).
Carcinoma of the rectum; paranoidal schizophrenia.
Cerebral haemorrhage; generalized arteriosclerosis; chronic hypertension;
diabetes mellitus.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Pulmonary tuberculosis; mental deficiency without psychosis—idiot.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; paranoidal schizophrenia.
Bronchopneumonia; senile dementia; Parkinson's syndrome.
Bilateral bronchopneumonia; senile dementia.
Cerebro-vascular accident; cerebral arteriosclerosis.
Lobar pneumonia; pulmonary tuberculosis; psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis.
Bronchopneumonia; Mongolian idiot.
Bronchopneumonia; microcephalic idiot.
Brain tumour.
Acute pulmonary cedema; hypertensive cardiovascular disease; generalized
arteriosclerosis.
Cardiac failure; myocardial degeneration with arteriosclerosis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
Acute gastro-enteritis; Mongolian idiot.
Bronchopneumonia.
Arteriosclerotic heart-disease; arteriosclerotic dementia.
Miliary tuberculosis; bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; paranoidal schizophrenia.
Adeno carcinoma; large bowel.
Acute pulmonary oedema; coronary occlusion; generalized arteriosclerosis;
arteriosclerotic dementia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; status epilepticus; involutional depression.
Bronchopneumonia; fractured right femur.
Bronchopneumonia; paralysis agitans; mental deficiency.
Ulcerative infarction; pulmonary atalectasis due to infarction.
Bronchopneumonia; senile dementia.
Pulmonary oedema; coronary occlusion; generalized arteriosclerosis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
Cerebral thrombosis; paranoidal schizophrenia.
Encephalomalacia due to aneurysm; meningeal artery (congenital).
Bronchopneumonia; myocardial degeneration; chronic hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
Terminal pneumonia; cyst of third ventricle of brain; arterlosclerot'c
dementia.
Uraemia; bilateral pyonephrosis.
Carcinoma of the stomach; paranoidal schizophrenia.
Myocardial degeneration; chronic arteriosclerotic heart-disease.
Bronchopneumonia; exhaustion of idiocy; spastic idiot.
Acute pulmonary cedema; chronic heart-failure; hypertensive heart-disease;
senile dementia.
Cardiac infarction; myocardial degeneration; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular
disease.
Months. statistical tables—mental hospitals
Q  113
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952,
in the Mental Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz—
Continued.
Time in Hospital
Age
Certified Cause
Sex
[
Years 1 Months
1
Days
F.
7
5
3
10
Cerebral anoxia; hypdrocephalus; pulmonary congestion and cedema.
F.
69
3
3
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
71
3
10
23
Bronchopneumonia; pyonephritis; senile dementia.
M.
31
3
Bronchopneumonia; congenital heart-disease—Fallot's tetralogy; mental
deficiency without psychosis; Mongolian idiot.
F.
79
3
1
7
Bronchopneumonia; chronic arteriosclerotic heart-disease.
M.
67
1
11
9
Pneumonia; cerebral vascular haemorrhage; generalized arteriosclerosis;
arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
57
21
Massive subarachnoid haemorrhage; hypertensive cardiovascular disease;
paranoidal state.
M.
63
9
11
10
Arteriosclerotic heart-disease; manic-depressive psychosis.
M.
69
2
3
12
Arteriosclerotic heart-disease; arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
75
21
Diabetes mellitus; uraemia; hypertensive cardiovascular; senile dementia.
F.
45
2
Acute intestinal obstruction; intussusception of the ileum.
M.
49
11
Uraemia; extreme malnutrition; catatonic schizophrenia.
M.
63
2
—
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral thrombosis; arteriosclerosis and hypertension;
arteriosclerotic dementia.
F.
74
1
25
Bronchopneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
61
2
28
Terminal bronchopneumonia; cerebral thrombosis; hypertensive psychosis
with cerebral arteriosclerosis.
F.
70
6
4
1
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
20
1
11
Status epilepticus; spastic paraplegia; mentally defective.
M.
68
....
21
Bronchopneumonia; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular renal disease; arteriosclerotic dementia.
M.
59
1
15
Bronchopneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis; psychosis due to cerebral
arteriosclerosis; Huntington's chorea.
M.
63
10
Cerebral cedema; exhaustion; catatonic schizophrenia; pulmonary congestion.
F.
64
3
6
Coronary occlusion.
M.
63
—
3
22
Terminal bronchopneumonia; cerebral thrombosis; generalized arteriosclerosis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
F.
36
2
23
Pulmonary embolism.
F.
14
8
22
Acute pulmonary oedema; pericardial effusion; scarlet fever (treatment
completed, non-infectious).
Months. Q 114
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 11.—Showing Psychoses of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Schizophrenic disorders, totals..
(a)
(ft)
(c)
(<0
(e)
Simple type.. —
Hebephrenic type .
Catatonic type	
Paranoid type	
Others.—     .
Manic depressive reaction, totals..
(a) Manic and circular.	
(ft) Depressive —
(c)  Others 	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states	
Senile psychosis  	
Pre-senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis.
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology, totals..
(-.)
(ft)
(c)
w
(e)
(/)
Resulting from brain tumour .
Resulting from epilepsy and other convulsive disorders 	
Psychosis secondary or due to infective or parasitic diseases 	
Psychosis due to allergic, endocrine, metabolic, and nutritional diseases
Psychosis due to diseases of circulatory system..
Psychosis due to diseases of nervous system and sense organs..
(g) Psychosis due to drugs and other exogenous poisons 	
(ft)  Psychosis due to accidents and violence  	
(i) Psychosis due to other conditions  — 	
Other and unspecified psychoses, totals   	
(a) Psychosis with psychopathic personality   	
(ft) Psychosis with mental deficiency 	
(c)  Other unspecified. —   	
Psychoneurosis, totals.-       	
(a) Anxiety reaction     _ 	
(ft) Hysterical reaction..
(c) Phobic reaction	
(_/) Obsessive-compulsive reaction	
(e) Neurotic-depressive reaction	
(/) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms-
-circulatory system..
(g) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—digestive system	
(ft)  Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—other systems	
(i)  Psychoneurosis—other types  	
Syphilis and its sequelae, totals  	
(a )  Congenital syphilis  	
(ft) Tabes dorsalis        	
(c) General paralysis of insane 	
(_0  Other syphilis of central nervous system.— 	
Without psychosis, totals   	
Pathological personality, totals     	
(a) Schizoid personality..
(ft) Paranoid personality   ..
(c) Cyclothymic personality
(d) Inadequate personality.—
(e) Anti-social personality	
(/) Asocial personality	
(g) Sexual deviation	
(ft) Other and unspecified   	
Immature personality, totals  ...:.....	
(a) Emotional instability  	
(ft) Passive dependency	
(c) Aggressiveness    	
id) Enuresis characterizing immature personality	
(e) Other symptomatic habits, except speech impediments
(/)  Other and unspecified 	
Alcoholism   	
(a) Acute     	
(ft)  Chronic _ 	
(c) Unspecified   _ 	
Drug addiction ~   	
Primary childhood behaviour disorders-
Mental deficiency, totals 	
(a) Idiocy	
(ft) Imbecility.—
(c) Moron	
(_/) Border-line .
(e) Mongolism..
100
16
4
21
46
13
9
4
5
3
12
104
14
49
18
28
4
4
1
2
5
3
21
8
1
3
11
1
10
200
8
1
1
1
2
1
1
112
112
(/) Mental deficiency with epilepsy..
(g) Other and unspecified types	
3
1
70
11
9
15
5
13
9
78
13
1
3
49
12
9
6
3
6
5
47
7
21
5
13
2
5
1
2
1
2
1
99
6
1
1
3
19
19
69
12
18
18
2
178
29
5
24
95
25
18
10
9
17
151
21
70
23
41
6
9
1
3
7
4
4
7
10
1
9
29
13
1
1
10
4
14
1
12
1
299
14
2
1
2
5
1
1
2
3
3
131
131
4
1
139
23
27
33
7
21
11
17 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
Q  115
Table No. 11.—Showing Psychoses of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952—Continued
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders..
Epilepsy     	
(a) Petit mal-
(ft)  Grand mal	
(c) Status epilepticus.—
(d) Other and unspecified-
Observation without need for further medical care-
Totals   	
305
880
Table No. 12.—Showing Psychoses of Readmissions from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Schizophrenic disorders, totals..
(a) Simple type 	
(ft) Hebephrenic type	
(c) Catatonic type.  _.
(d) Paranoid type _.
(e) Others  	
Manic depressive reaction, totals..
(a) Manic and circular	
(ft) Depressive — 	
(c) Others	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis 	
Pre-senile psychosis 	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis  	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology, totals  	
(a) Resulting from brain tumour     —	
(ft) Resulting from epilepsy and other convulsive disorders .
(c) Psychosis secondary or due to infective or parasitic diseases 	
(_/) Psychosis due to allergic, endocrine, metabolic, and nutritional diseases .
(e) Psychosis due to diseases of circulatory system _
(/)  Psychosis due to diseases of nervous system and sense organs .
(g)  Psychosis due to drugs and other exogenous poisons 	
(ft) Psychosis due to accidents and violence  	
(.)   Psychosis due to other conditions    	
Other and unspecified psychoses, totals...   	
(a) Psychosis with psychopathic personality 	
(ft) Psychosis with mental deficiency.. — 	
(c)  Other unspecified 	
Psychoneurosis, totals         _	
(a) Anxiety reaction     	
(ft) Hysterical reaction.. _
(c) Phobic reaction 	
(_/)  Obsessive-compulsive reaction.
(e) Neurotic-depressive reaction.-
(/) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—circulatory system ...
(g) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—digestive system	
(ft)  Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—other systems.—	
(;') Psychoneurosis—other types.— 	
Syphilis and its sequelae, totals.   	
(a) Congenital syphilis _  	
(ft) Tabes dorsalis..
(c) Cerebral paralysis of insane 	
(__) Other syphilis of central nervous system..
Without psychosis, totals 	
Pathological personality, totals.— 	
(a)  Schizoid personality  	
(ft) Paranoid personality....  	
(c) Cyclothymic personality..
(d) Inadequate personality....
(e) Anti-social personality	
(/) Asocial personality	
(g)  Sexual deviation.	
(ft) Other and unspecified.	
64
22
1
8
26
7
13
7
6
1
3
2
7
4
9
6
98
2
62
9
6
4
26
17
7
6
1
2
2
3
1
2
7
28
1
1
126
31
7
12
52
24
20
13
7
3
5
5
1
7
6
16
2
1
9
2
7
12
4
1
1
2
126
3
1 Q  116
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 12.—Showing Psychoses of Readmissions from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952—Continued
Occupation
Male
Female
Total
Immature personality, totals—
Emotional instability-
Passive dependency.—
Aggressiveness..
Other symptomatic habits, except speech impediments-
Other and unspecified    __
(a)
(6)
(c)
(d) Enuresis characterizing immature personality.
(e)
(/)
Alcoholism
(a) Acute 	
(6) Chronic   	
(c) Unspecified  _	
Drug addiction  	
Primary childhood behaviour disorders-
Mental deficiency, totals	
Idiocy....
Imbecility-
Moron —	
Border-line..
Mongolism..
(a)
(ft)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(/) Mental deficiency with epilepsy..
(g) Other and unspecified types..
87
87
1
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders .
Epilepsy        .    	
(a) Petit mal .__... 	
(b) Grand mal _    	
(c) Status epilepticus 	
(d) Other and unspecified-
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118 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
Q  119
Table No. 15.—Showing Economic Status of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Total
Dependent
Marginal
Comfortable
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Schizophrenic disorders 	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholia 	
100
9
3
12
104
14
49
18
28
1
5
21
11
8
1
112
3
1
70
3
2
78
9
6
5
47
7
21
5
13
4
8
3
6
2
19
1
69
2
178
18
9
17
151
21
70
23
41
1
9
29
14
14
3
131
4
1
139
5
2
7
4
1
63
3
19
8
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
61
1
10
1
2
18
8
1
4
4
1
2
61
2
17
4
1
3
81
3
27
1
12
4
3
1
3
1
3
1
1
122
3
93
5
3
11
40
11
30
18
20
1
5
19
10
7
109
2
9
2
2
68
9
5
3
29
7
13
4
9
7
3
4
2
19
1
8
161
14
8
14
69
18
43
22
29
1
5
26
13
11
2
128
3
17
2
2
1
	
Senile psychosis	
1
Alcoholic psychosis 	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology	
Syphilis and its sequela.	
Undiagnosed     _.
Without Psychosis
Immature personality	
	
Drug addiction	
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
Observation without need for further medical
Totals	
575
305
880
177
114
291
397
191
578
1
1
Table No. 16.—Showing Use of Alcohol of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Total
Abstinent
Temperate
Intemperate
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
100
9
3
12
104
14
49
18
28
1
5
21
11
8
1
112
3
1
70
3
2
78
9
6
5
47
7
21
5
13
4
8
3
6
2
19
1
69
2
178
18
9
17
151
21
70
23
41
1
9
29
14
14
3
131
4
1
139
5
2
36
6
3
51
6
23
8
1
2
7
1
1
1
1
66
2
47
7
2
4
41
5
18
12
3
6
4
61
2
83
13
2
7
92
11
41
20
1
5
13
1
4
1
1
1
127
4
48
3
3
7
46
7
21
16
3
7
8
4
3
1
29
2
4
1
5
2
2
1
1
3
2
2
1
5
77
5
7
8
51
9
23
16
4
8
11
6
2
1
8
1
16
2
7
1
5
18
4
7
2
4
112
2
1
2
2
1
1
5
1
1
19
3
18
2
8
Pre-senile psychosis  	
1
6
23
Psychosis with other demonstrable etiology —
Psychosis with psychopathic personality	
5
8
2
Without Psychosis
4
131
2
4
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
Observation without need for further medical
2
Totals                        	
575
305
880
215
212
427
177
60
237
183
33   1  916 Q  120
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
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Q  123
Table No. 20.—Showing the Nativity of First Admissions by Age-groups
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Age-group
Total
Canadian Born
British Born
Foreign Born
Unknown
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.       T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Under 15 years 	
15-19 years	
20-24    „    	
46
18
22
33
42
29
56
38
48
38
34
48
123
36
9
24
25
25
27
22
21
9
18
15
25
49
82
27
46
58
67
56
78
59
57
56
49
73
172
45
18
17
25
32
23
32
19
19
17
7
14
34
36
9
20
20
22
24
16
10
5
8
9
8
16
81
27
37
45
54
47
48
29
24
25
16
22
50
1
2
5
1
9
8
9
7
19
19
2
2
1
2
3
5
3
7
2
6
1
2
4
6
3
12
13
12
14
21
25
82
5
6
5
4
14
11
19
11
8
15
2
3
2
1
3
6
1
3
4
11
7
9
7
5
17
17
20
14
12
26
37
1
1
1
3
3
25-29    „	
30-34    „    	
35-39    „ ....
1
40-44    „    --	
1
45-49    „    	
50-54    „    	
1
55-59    „ 	
3
60-64    „    --	
65-69    „    ....	
70 years and over	
54 |    28
32         5
3
Totals	
575
305
880
302
203  I 505
1
134 |    61
1
195
130
41
171
9
9
Table No. 21.—Showing Country of Birth of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Country
Male
Female
Total
1
4
1
1
10
5
3
80
2
1
4
2
4
2
1
20
4
2
14
8
11
33
17
1
5
26
9
2
2
29
109
31
12
2
13
56
5
11
32
1
2
2
1
3
43
1
1
1
3
5
2
3
1
1
4
13
1
1
13
20
98
22
2
2
26
1
5
24
3
1
3
6
1
1
China                                                                                _ ~                             	
11
8
3
123
3
1
5
Holland
3
7
2
1
25
6
5
1
15
8
15
46
1
17
2
5
39
9
Wales                                                       	
2
2
Canada—
49
207
53
14
2
15
82
6
16
56
3
575
305
880 Q  124
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT.  1951-52
Table No. 22.—Showing the Citizenship of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Citizenship
Male
Female
Total
Canadian by Birth    	
British born who have resided in Canada five years or more 	
British born who have resided in Canada less than five years	
Alien born (naturalized)  _   	
Alien born who have resided in Canada five years or more (not naturalized)..
Alien born who have resided in Canada less than five years 	
Unknown   	
Totals    	
300
131
4
1
12
115
12
575
203
59
2
3
31
7
305
503
190
6
4
43
122
12
Table No. 23.—Showing the Religion of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1951 to March 31st, 1952
Religion
Male
Female
Total
1
98
17
1
1
6
1
4
4
2
2
47
3
7
1
15
5
48
120
101
1
1
3
1
1
1
51
32
66
5
4
2
1
1
2
3
9
3
2
9
3
20
61
62
5
1
42
4
1
164
22
Buddhist
5
3
7
2
6
7
2
2
56
3
10
1
17
14
3
68
181
163
1
6
4
1
Sikh                                                               	
1
1
93
36
Totals                                       - _  	
575
305
880 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
Q 125
Table No. 24.—Showing Age-groups of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1951 to March 31st, 1952
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
46
36
82
18
9
27
22
24
46
33
25
58
42
25
67
29
27
56
56
22
78
38
21
59
48
9
57
38
18
56
34
15
49
48
25
73
123
49
172
575
305
880
Under 15 years..
15-19 years	
20-24    „   	
25-29    „   _	
30-34    „    	
35-39    „    	
40-44    „    	
45-49    „    	
50-54    ,,    	
55-59    „    	
60-64    „   	
65-69
70 years and over-
Totals	
Table No. 25.—Showing Age-groups of Readmissions from April 1st,
1951, to March 31st, 1952
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
3
1
4
2
1
3
12
11
23
18
11
29
20
19
39
30
17
47
36
14
50
25
20
45
24
8
32
17
3
20
15
7
22
6
4
10
7
6
13
215
122
337
Under 15 years.
15-19 years	
20-24    „    	
25-29    „	
30-34    „   	
35-39    „    	
40-44    „    	
45-49    „   	
50-54   „    	
55-59    „    	
60-64    „   _
65-69
70 years and over-
Totals	 Q 126
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 26.—Showing the Previous Occupations of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Occupation
Male
Female
Total
Occupation
Male
Female 1   Total
1
Accountant	
Artist     	
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
19
2
5
2
12
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
13
2
37
8
1
1
2
1
4
1
4
1
6
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
5
1
19
2
1
9
2
13
1
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
2
1
4
1
13
2
37
8
1
1
Brought forward 	
Lumberman — 	
Machinist. 	
298
1
157
455
Auditor.   ...	
1
3       1      	
3
Manager	
2
1
1
7
1
6
14
1
87
1
1
91
2
6
2
Barrister _	
Mariner   	
Marine-oiler	
1
1
Mechanic   	
Milk-hand      	
7
1
Mill-worker. .—	
6
Bottler 	
Carpenter	
Caterpillar operator  __
Chambermaid	
Clerk
14
Musician  	
None    -  	
Nurse's aide   	
Nurse      —- 	
1
178
2
7
Office-boy  -	
1
Cook..          ...._	
Orchardist —- —	
Orderly   -	
Painter  	
Pensioner  	
Phys'C'an   	
Plumber  -
1
1      I      	
1
1
Decorator   —	
Dental mechanic	
5
16
1
2
1
1
2
	
3
5
19
1
2
Postal clerk.  	
1
Postman _	
1
2
Dressmaker	
Edgerman	
1
1
1
2
69
13
3
1
19
1
1
1
Railwayman  	
2
Engine-room attendant
Engineer   	
Faller 	
Farmer    	
Fishermsn	
Florist	
Retired         	
88
Salesman 	
13
3
1
1
Shoe-repairer  —	
Sign-writer  	
Skipper   	
1
1
1
1
1       I      ...
1
1      I          1
1
1
2
1
7
127
Smelterman   .,
1
Hairdresser	
Housekeeper  	
1
-       1         7
127
Stenographer	
Storekeeper  	
Student  	
1
5
1
1
1
2
2
7
1
1
2
8
1
1                    -       1            1
1       1      ......      !           1
6
Swamper   	
1
2
1
1
115
1
1
42
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
115
2
1
1
42
1
1
1
Teacher  	
3
Timekeeper 	
Tinsmith 	
2
2
1
1
Upholsterer 	
1
7
3
1
1
8
6
1
Unknown 	
Waiter  	
15
Logger  —
Longshoreman 	
Lumber inspector	
9
1
Writer 	
Totals 	
1
Carried forward 	
298
157
455
575
305             880
1                  1 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
Q 127
Table No. 27.—Showing the Method of Commitment of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Method of Commitment
Male
Female
Total
416
122
-----
10
24
3
256
28
19
2
672
150
Otherwise—
10
43
5
Totals _     - 	
575
305
880
Table No. 28.—Showing the Method of Commitment of Readmissions
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Method of Commitment
Male
Female
Total
100
106
3
6
88
28
6
188
134
3
12
215
122
337
Table No. 29.—Showing Rural-Urban Status of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Total
Rural
Urban
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
100
9
3
12
104
14
49
18
28
1
5
21
11
8
1
112
3
1
70
3
12
78
9
6
5
47
7
21
5
13
4
8
3
6
2
19
1
69
2
178
18
9
17
151
21
70
23
41
1
9
29
14
14
3
131
4
1
139
5
2
46
8
2
7
35
3
14
7
10
2
7
2
16
1
33
2
1
31
3
3
1
13
3
5
1
6
1
4
1
1
18
25
1
77
11
5
8
48
6
19
8
16
3
11
3
1
34
1
58
3
1
54
1
1
5
69
11
35
11
18
1
3
14
9
8
1
96
3
37
1
1
47
6
3
4
34
4
16
4
7
3
4
2
6
1
1
1
44
1
101
7
4
9
103
15
51
Alcoholic psychosis _	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology	
15
25
1
6
18
Syphilis and its sequela. 	
Without Psychosis
U
14
2
Alcoholism....    	
97
4
81
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
Epilepsy   	
2
Observation without need for further medi-
1
Totals 	
575
305
880
196
117
313
379
188
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129 Q 130
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1951-52
Table No. 32.—Showing Conditions of Patients on Discharge by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Pyschosis
Total
Recovered
Improved
Unimproved
Without
Psychosis and
Unclassified
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
1
F.  1 T.
1
M.
F.
T.
184
28
11
10
102
3
45
24
21
5
5
1
31
7
13
175
3
2
22
1
4
3
179
36
13
10
44
4
22
10
14
1
5
27
2
1
14
1
31
1
10
4
363
64
24
20
146
7
67
34
35
6
10
1
58
9
1
27
1
206
4
2
32
1
8
------
3
24
8
2
2
17
2
3
2
5
37
11
8
1
4
3
9
61
19
10
3
21
5
3
2
14
63
16
8
4
1
7
5
6
2
2
1
16
96
22
3
6
2
2
4
6
7
1
4
13
159
38
11
10
3
2
11
11
13
3
6
1
29
3
1
97
4
1
4
101
3
38
2
13
1
10
5
22
1
46 j 143
31     7
21     3
31     7
42 | 143
2|     5
18 |   56
I      2
13
:::::
14
1
Senile psychosis 	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology.
Psychosis with psychopathic personality-
4
1
5
17
2
15
Other and unspecified psychosis 	
21     1
...  1     1
1|     6
....   1
Without Psychosis
10
32
77
1
175 1   31
206
3 1      11     4
Primary childhood behaviour disorders ..
2 1 —-
  |	
2
Other and unspecified character, beha-
!
i |
4 !     4
1
8
Neurological disease without psychosis ..
Observation without need  for  further
medical care—mental	
— 1	
1
.... | ......
3
3
700
429
1,129
65
73
138
133 1 168
301
301
137
438
201
51 ! 252
Table No. 33.—Showing Age-groups of Patients Who Died
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
7
3
4
1
2
5
5
5
3
13
17
23
24
12
1
2
\
2
1
1
1
4
10
15
26
19
4
20-24    „                                     - 	
6
25 29    ,                                                         	
2
30-34    „                                  ,                     •  _ -- -
2
35 39                                                                               ...          _ 	
7
40-44    „                                                        - — -
6
45-49    „                                                             _ —
6
50-54    „                                   _ 	
4
55 59    „                                                                 _	
17
60-64    „                                        _ 	
27
65 69    „                              i                       	
38
50
Totals
112
76
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MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Aerial view of Essondale. STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
Q  133
CREASE CLINIC STATISTICAL TABLES
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operation of the Crease Clinic from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Movement of Population
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
69
289
134
101
321
219
170
610
353
69
423
101
540
170
Admitted during the year 1951-52—
963
Total number under treatment, April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Discharged during the year April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952—
S3
196
67
40
6
75
300
88
57
6
158
496
155
97
12
492
392
641
526
1,133
Died     : 	
918
100
115
215
Daily average population  	
Percentage of discharges on admissions (not including deaths)..
Percentage of patients recovered and improved to admissions....
Percentage of deaths on whole number under treatment 	
188.82
94.19
67.91
1.06 Q  134
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operation of the Crease Clinic
since Its Inception
Year
to
3
o
Vl
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and Improved to
Admissions
Percentage of
Discharges to
Admissions
(Deaths Excluded)
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Percentage of
Deaths to
Whole Numbei
under Treatme
Jahuary,
February, and
1951 ___	
264
963
26
158
38
496
23
155
7
97
li
170
215
1
I
-----1	
45 | ....
264
1,133
24.24
94.19
35.61
67.91
1951-52  	
1.06
Table No. 3.—Showing Total Number of Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Month
Admissions
Discharges
Deaths
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
1951
22
38
29
27
37
36
31
45
27
42
41
48
45
52
39
51
48
46
41
45
37
35
46
55
67
90
68
78
85
82
72
90
64
77
87
103
29
22
30
20
37
38
32
36
30
36
33
43
34
42
58
38
44
53
41
48
40
40
44
38
63
64
88
58
81
91
73
84
70
76
77
81
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
May -	
June  	
July                       	
1
2
1
August 	
1
October  	
November _	
December _	
1952
January 	
2
1
1
1
1
Totals	
423
540
963
386    |    520    |    906
1          !
6    |        6    [      12 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
Q  135
Table No. 4.-
-Showing What Districts Contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Abbotsford	
3
2
1
2
2
1
......
1
2
14
1
1
2
8
2
1
4
1
2
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
2
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
2
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
'I
1
1
1
1
1
6
3
1
1
5
3
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
6
1
4
1
3
4
1
5
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
6
3
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
27
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
14
5
1
1
1
9
1
3
2
2
2
4
1
1
1
5
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
13
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
9
1
5
1
7
1
1
1
2
1
3
3
1
1
1
Brought forward
Matsqui 	
99
2
1
2
11
3
29
1
1
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
6
5
1
3
2
14
6
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
3
4
1
4
1
162
4
14
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
106
5
3
6
1
2
1
4
36
22
1
1
2
1
8
1
1
1
2
4
2
3
4
2
1
3
1
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
236
5
23
1
1
4
2
1
6
2
1
2
1
205
Aldergrove	
7
1
Armstrong	
Mission City.	
Nanaimo 	
5
17
1
Athabaska  	
Barkerville	
Black Creek                  	
Naramata  	
Natal..	
Nelson -  	
2
1
7
65
North Hill ... 	
1
Burnaby... 	
1
30
Burquitlam 	
Canyon  	
Cassidy  	
Oak Bay - 	
2
1
3
2
Ceepeecee	
Chase 	
Chemainus  	
Chilliwack	
1
Parksville  —	
Peachland -	
Penticton 	
1
1
10
1
Cobble Hill                   	
Pioneer   	
1
2
Coquitlam	
8
9
Port Kells	
2
Port Moody ,	
5
1
2
Cumberland	
Prince George _	
18
9
Quesnel  	
Revelstoke _.  	
Retlaw, Alta.  	
2
3
1
Duncan	
Richmond	
Rosedale	
3
2
Englewood	
Enterprise Mine	
Ferguson	
Royal Oak 	
1
1
Saanich	
3
2
4
Franklin River	
Sardis	
4
2
Ganges	
Squamish  	
Smithers	
Sidney	
2
2
Haney	
1
1
Harrison Hot Springs	
Steveston  _	
Stewart—. -	
3
1
1
4
Honeymoon Bay	
Hopkins Landing	
Jaffray	
Surrey -	
Tappen	
Tlell	
4
1
1
1
Kamloops	
Kaslo —
Tomslake ..-  	
Trail	
1
8
2
Kemano —
Kimberley	
Kinnaird	
Koksilah  	
Vallican  	
Vananda	
Vanderhoof  	
Vancouver 	
Vernon  	
Victoria	
Warriner	
Wells. _	
1
1
1
398
9
37
1
1
Langford	
Westview	
Westwold. -	
2
1
6
Whalley... 	
Whitehorse, Y.T.
2
4
White Rock	
7
Whonnock	
2
1
2
Winfield. 	
Woodfibre...  	
1
1
2
Totals 	
Carried forward	
99
106
205
423
540
963 Q  136
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 5.—Showing the Number of Attacks in Those Admitted
from April 1st, 1951, to March 3 1st, 1952
Number of Attacks
Male
Female
Total
139
129
12
11
3
1
1
1
6
46
74
174
190
38
11
5
2
1
22
46
51
313
Second                	
319
Third                      	
50
Fourth                              	
27
Fifth 	
8
Sixth 	
2 ,
Eighth     _      .
2
Ninth _                                          	
1
Twelfth _  _.__	
1
28
92
125
Totals 	
423
540
963
Table No. 6.—Showing the Reported Duration of Mental Illness Prior to
Admission in Those Admitted from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Duration of Attack
Male
Female
Total
Under 1 week..
3 months-
6      ..     ..
„   12      „        	
„     2  years   	
„     5      „ _    	
„   10      „      	
„   15      „     __ 	
Over 15      „       	
Without psychosis (including mental deficients)-
Unknown  	
Life... 	
41
129
35
23
14
17
6
1
46
111
Totals..
423
41
183
50
24
22
25
7
2
46
140
540
82
312
85
47
36
42
13
3
92
251
963
Table No. 7.—Showing the Reported Cause of Attack in Those Admitted
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Alleged Cause
Male
Female
Total
Alcohol 	
Alzheimer's disease..
Arteriosclerosis	
Brain tumour 	
Cerebral palsy	
Constitutional	
Drugs  	
Embolus 	
Epilepsy..
19
10
1
1
336
1
Parkinson's disease..
Pregnancy  	
Senility.	
Syphilis.
Tuberculous meningitis..
Unknown   	
Without psychosis..
Totals	
1
4
1
4
45
423
467
3
1
3
1
4
3
1
44
540
25
2
14
2
1
803
3
2
3
1
4
4
5
1
4
89
963 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
Q  137
Table No. 8.—Showing the Number Discharged and Results
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Results
Male
Female
Total
83
196
67
40
75
300
88
57
158
496
155
97
386
520
906
59
1
55
114
1
326
465
791
Table No. 9.—Showing Reported Duration of Mental Illness Prior to Admission in Those Discharged from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Less than 1 week—.
1 month..
2 months .
3 „     __
6      ,,     _.
12      „     ..
2
3
3 years and over	
Without psychosis..
Unknown	
years
Totals..
Alleged Duration
Male
386
Female
45
34
79
59
81
140
30
49
79
.22
39
61
24
49
73
30
29
59
12
17
29
4
12
16
10
20
30
46
60
106
104
130
234
520
Total
906
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952,
in the Crease Clinic, Essondale, B.C.
Sex
Age
Time in Hospital
1              1
Years  1 Months I   Days
1                1
Certified Cause
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
F.
F.
M.
F.
65
43
68
14
59
67
38
60
49
42
69
49
	
i
i
i
i
2
21
13
3
23
10
1
25
13
16
8
1
2
Uraemia; chronic nephritis; tabo-paresis.
Acute pulmonary cedema; coronary occlusion with myocardial infarction:
chronic bronchial asthma.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; chronic diverticulosis.
Haemorrhage; ossophageal varices; hepatolenticular disease.
Coronary thrombosis; arteriosclerosis; arteriosclerotic dementia.
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral vascular accident; pre-senile psychosis.
Bronchopneumonia; acute ulcerative colitis; reactive depression.
Asphyxia; strangulation; hanging (suicide).
Bilateral bronchopneumonia; catatonic schizophrenia.
Pulmonary atelactasis; non-tropical sprue; bilateral nephrosis; psychosis
with somatic disease.
Acute pulmonary cedema; hypertensive cardio-vascular disease with generalized arteriosclerosis; hypostatic bronchopneumonia of lower lobes of both
lungs.
Asphyxia; involutional melancholia. Q 138
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1951-52
Table No. 11.—Showing Psychoses of First Admissions from April 1st,
1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Totals .
Schizophrenic disorders, totals..
(a) Simple type..
(b) Hebephrenic type..
(c) Catatonic type 	
(rf) Paranoid type	
(e)  Others.....	
Manic-depressive-reaction, totals.
(a) Manic and circular	
(b) Depressive	
(c) Other   ._..
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis 	
Pre-senile psychosis ..
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis .
Alcoholic psychosis..
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology, totals..
(a)
(b)
(c)
W
(e)
(/)
Resulting from brain tumour-
Resulting from epilepsy and other convulsive disorders 	
Psychosis secondary or due to infective or parasitic diseases 	
Psychosis due to allergic, endocrine, metabolic, and nutritional diseases..
Psychosis due to diseases of circulatory system .
Psychosis due to diseases of nervous system and sense organs..
(g) Psychosis due to drugs and other exogenous poisons.	
(/_) Psychosis due to accidents and violence 	
(0   Psychosis due to other conditions  	
Other and unspecified psychoses, totals 	
(a) Psychosis with psychopathic personality 	
(b) Psychosis with mental deficiency  	
(c) Other unspecified  __  	
Psychoneurosis, totals  	
(a) Anxiety reaction 	
(6) Hysterical reaction _	
(c) Phobic reaction.	
(d) Obsessive-compulsive reaction..
(e) Neurotic-depressive reaction	
(/)   Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms-
-circulatory system..
(g)   Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—digestive systems ...
(h) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—other systems	
It)  Psychoneurosis—other types 	
Syphilis and its sequelae, totals      —
(a) Congenital syphilis _	
(b) Tabes dorsalis 	
(c) General paralysis of insane 	
(..)  Other syphilis of central nervous system  	
Puerperium psychosis_ 	
Undiagnosed.
Without psychosis, totals	
Pathological personality, totals..
(a) Schizoid personality..
(b) Paranoid personality	
(c) Cyclothymic personality..
(_.) Inadequate personality....
(e) Anti-social personality.....
(/) Asocial personality	
(g) Sexual deviation 	
(h) Other and unspecified-
Immature personality, totals .
(a)
(b)
(c)
(rf)
(e)
(/)
Emotional instability..
Passive dependency.	
Aggressiveness..
Enuresis characterizing immature personality-
Other symptomatic habits, except speech impediments-
Other and unspecified —
Alcoholism, totals  	
(a) Acute 	
(6) Chronic   	
(c)  Unspecified 	
Drug addiction 	
Primary childhood behaviour disorders 	
400
182
38
3
27
76
38
25
16
9
9
6
1
3
10
17
6
1
1
2
1
3
1
2
84
38
12
2
21
1
1
9
4
2
4
46
15
1
1
6
3
1
3
1
1
495
183
28
9
18
70
58
38
23
15
18
8
3
4
4
4
11
1
3
2
1
1
2
1
173
77
15
9
39
1
2
8
22
1
1
4
41
9
2
895
365
66
12
45
146
96
63
39
24
27
14
4
7
14
21
17
2
4
2
1
2
2
3
1
6
1
5
257
115
27
11
60
2
3
8
31
5
2
2
1
4
4
87
24
3
1
9
4
3
1
3
10
6
1 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
Q  139
Table No. 11.—Showing Psychoses of First Admissions from April 1st,
1951, to March 31st, 1952—Continued
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Mental deficiency, totals..
(a) Idiocy..
(b)
(c)
(rf)
(e)
(/)
Imbecility..
Moron	
Border-line..
Mongolism..
Mental deficiency with epilepsy..
(g) Other and unspecified types..
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders-
Epilepsy, totals ..—   _	
(a) Petit mal   - - :	
(b) Grand mal	
(c) Status epilepticus..
(rf) Other and unspecified..
Neurological disease without psychosis—	
Observation without need for further medical care—mental-
Head injury of other and unspecified nature	
11
1
3
7
6
3
18
2
5
11
7
2
5
Table No. 12.-
-Showing Psychoses of Readmissions from April 1st,
1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Totals...
Schizophrenic disorders, totals..
(a) Simple type	
(_.) Hebephrenic type	
(c) Catatonic type	
(rf) Paranoid type 	
(e)  Others _
Manic-depressive-reaction, totals .
(a) Manic and circular	
(b) Depressive	
(c) Other-	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states	
Senile psychosis	
Pre-senile psychosis-
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology, totals..
(__)  Resulting from brain tumour...
(Z>) Resulting from epilepsy and other convulsive disorders..
(c)  Psychosis secondary or due to infective or parasitic diseases..
(rf) Psychosis due to allergic, endocrine, metabolic, and nutritional diseases .
(e) Psychosis due to diseases of circulatory system  .—	
(/) Psychosis due to diseases of nervous system and sense organs 	
(g) Psychosis due to drugs and other exogenous poisons   	
(A) Psychosis due to accidents and violence    _	
(/) Psychosis due to other conditions..—     —-	
Other and unspecified psychoses, totals..
(a) Psychosis with psychopathic personality-
(b) Psychosis with mental deficiency 	
(c) Other unspecified  	
Psychoneurosis, totals   —	
(a) Anxiety reaction - _ _
(b) Hysterical reaction  — 	
(c) Phobic reaction..
(rf) Obsessive-compulsive reaction..
(e) Neurotic-depressive reaction..
(/) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—circulatory system..
(g) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—digestive systems	
(h) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—other systems...	
(i) Psychoneurosis—other types  —	
23
8
2
4
1
1
4
1
3
45
17
4
1
1
9
2
7
3
3
14
7
68
25
6
1
5
10
3
11
4
6
1
1
1
21
11 Q 140
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 12.—Showing Psychoses of Readmissions from April 1st,
1951, to March 31st, 1952—Continued
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Syphilis and its sequelae, totals—   _	
(a) Congenital syphilis. -	
(b) Tabes dorsalis.—	
(c) General paralysis of insane __.
(d) Other syphilis of central nervous system..
Puerperium psychosis 	
Undiagnosed— _	
Without psychosis, totals  	
Pathological personality, totals 	
(a) Schizoid personality _ 	
(b) Paranoid personality   _
(c) Cyclothymic personality 	
(d) Inadequate personality  	
(e) Anti-social personality 	
(/)   Asocial personality  	
(g) Sexual deviation 	
(h)  Other and unspecified .„.__ 	
Immature personality, totals _ 	
Emotional instability-
Passive dependency....
Aggressiveness .
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d) Enuresis characterizing immature personality
(e)
(/)
Alcoholism
(a)  Acute	
{b) Chronic	
(c)  Unspecified _
Drug addiction »
Other symptomatic habits, except speech impediments .
Other and unspecified   	
Primary childhood behaviour disorders..
Mental deficiency 	
(a)  Idiocy..
(b) Imbecility..
(c) Moron	
(d) Border-line 	
(e) Mongolism  	
(/)   Mental deficiency with epilepsy..
(g)  Other and unspecified types .
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders _
Epilepsy „
(a) Petit mal	
(b) Grand mal...	
(c) Status epilepticus..
(d) Other and unspecified .
Neurological disease without psychosis  	
Observation without need for further medical care—mental _
Head injury of other and unspecified nature _.._  	 as
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141  STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
Q 143
Table No. 15.—Showing Economic Status of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Total
Dependent
Marginal
Comfortable
Psychosis
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
182
25
9
6
1
3
10
17
6
1
2
84
4
4
15
1
1
1
3
7
3
7
1
2
5
183
38
18
8
3
4
4
4
11
3
173
1
4
9
9
1
2
3
11
6
365
63
27
14
4
7
14
21
17
1
5
257
5
4
4
24
10
2
1
5
10
3
18
7
2
5
10
2
1
5
1
1
2
4
2
4
1
1
1
3
3
2
2
3
1
14
1
2
2
1
8
1
4
4
6
2
3
1
171
22
9
6
1
1
8
16
5
1
2
77
4
3
14
1
1
1
1
3
1
7
1
2
5
178
37
18
7
3
4
4
4
10
2
168
1
4
6
9
1
1
8
5
349
59
27
13
4
5
12
20
15
1
4
245
5
4
3
20
10
2
1
1
4
1
15
6
2
5
1
3
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
4
Paranoia and paranoid states	
Pre-senile psychosis  	
2
1
4
Puerperium psychosis  _ —
Undiagnosed.....  	
Without Psychosis
Alcoholism   	
Other and unspecified character behaviour and
Neurological disease without psychosis	
Observation without need for further medical
Head injury of other and unspecified nature —
Totals   	
400
495
895
1
28
21
49
363
470
833 |      9 1      4 |    13
1          1          1
Table No. 16.—Showing Use of Alcohol of First Admissions by Psychoses
Psychosis
Total
M.      F.       T,
M.      F.       T
Temperate
M.      F.       T
Intemperate
M.      F.       T
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis	
Pre-senile psychosis..
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis _
Psychosis with psychopathic personality-
Psychosis with mental deficiency	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology..
Psychoneurosis 	
Syphilis and its sequelae.  	
Puerperium psychosis 	
Undiagnosed 	
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality	
Immature personality	
Alcoholism 	
Drug addiction.
Primary childhood behaviour disorders .
Mental deficiency-
Other and unspecified character behaviour and
intelligence disorders	
Epilepsy
Neurological disease without psychosis	
Observation without need for further medical
care—mental	
Head injury of other and unspecified nature	
Totals    -	
182
25
9
6
1
3
10
17
1
2
6
84
4
400
183
38
18
8
3
4
4
4
3
11
173
1
4
2 I
3 [
365
63
27
14
4
7
14
21
1
5
17
257
5
4
4
24
10
2
1
5
10
3
18
7
895
213
165
27
18
6
3
4
4
3
10
144
2
3 I
420
263
41
27
9
4
7
12
1
4
16
185
2
3
3
1
27
1
1
79
18
124 I    63  I  187
21
2
17
63
12
23
4
21
1
17
1 Q 144
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 17.—Showing Conjugal Conditions of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Total
M. I F. I T.
I      I
Single
M. I F. I T.
I      I
Married
I      I
M. I F. I T.
I I
Widowed
M.IF.
I
Divorced
M.   F.   T,
Separated
M.
I      I
F. IT.
I
Schizophrenic disorders  —
Manic-depressive reaction..   	
Involutional melancholia  _ _.
Paranoia and paranoid states	
Senile psychosis.  	
Pre-senile psychosis. 	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis	
Alcoholic psychosis. _	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology _
Psychosis with psychopathic personality.	
Psychosis with mental deficiency 	
Psychoneurosis.	
Syphilis and its sequelae  	
Puerperium psychosis    —
Undiagnosed.  	
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality  	
Immature personality _	
Alcoholism  	
Drug addiction  	
Primary childhood behaviour disorders..	
Mental defi c iency	
Other and unspecified character behaviour and
intelligence disorders  _ 	
Epilepsy   	
Neurological disease without psychosis.—  ._
Observation without need for further medical
care—mental  	
Head injury of other and unspecified nature	
Totals  	
182
183
25
38
9
18
6
8
1
3
3
4
10
4
17
4
6
11
1
2
3
84
173
4
1
4
4
15
9
1
9
1
1
1
3
2
7
3
3
7
11
1
6
2
5
365|121
63| 5
27| 1
14| 2
4| —
7_
14| 3
211  11
7
4
1
1
5
2
2571 35
5 1
4| —
4|    2
9|
-I
24|
10|
2|...
1|    1| —
5|    3|    2
101    61    1
31    31	
18|    4|    7
71    1|    1
2|
Si
ll
400|495|895|216|117
'III
333
49
102
12
27
8
14
4
5
1
2
2
3
5
3
1
4
2
7
1
45
113
41-
7|~
1-
6|-
4|-
I
1|._
41 .
148|301|449|
15   15
33
41
6|  17
7| 15
2| 6
11 1
11 1
23 [ 22
I
I 27
1
131  16
Table No. 18.—Showing Conjugal Conditions of Readmissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Total
Single
Married
Widowed
Divorced
Separated
M.IF. IT.
M. 1 F. 1 T.
1      1
1      [
M.IF. IT.
1       1
1      \
M. I F. 1 T.
1      !
M.
F.
T.
1
M.I F. IT.
Mill
8|   171 25|    4|    7|  11
41    71  111    21    11    3
4
1
1
1
3
6    10
1
M| M
3
3
 j    1|    1
6|    7|    1
H    11-
 1    11—
 -I — I —
1    1 I ....
 1    ll    11. ...
 j	
11    1
1 | ... |    1
1 | .... |    1
1| — 1    1
— 1    11    1
 j	
Pre-senile psychosis   	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis..	
Alcoholic psychosis  	
1
— 1    1
|    1
2|    4
1
11
1
:| _
11.....
...... 1.....
--I--
......|....„
Zi T
......|...._.
 F~
	
—-i--
 I--
	
1|       1    1|    1
7|  14| 21|    2
— |    1|    1|_...
1     11     11
.1     1|    11-..
14
1
1
Psychoneurosis..	
Syphilis and its sequelae 	
Puerperium psychosis	
— I....
7
—
:::::
......
Without Psychosis
1
1
 1
 1 —
1|    1
- ^ _...
 I--
21    2
Primary childhood behaviour disorders 	
Mental deficiency  	
Other and unspecified character behaviour and
—
Epilepsy  _ — _	
Neurological disease without psychosis 	
Observation without need for further medical
1    2|    2
Head injury of other and unspecified nature	
-—I-	
231  45!  681   10
141 94
10
26
36
21 .....I     2
— 1    31    31    11    2
3
1 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
Q  145
Table No. 19.—Showing Education of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Total
I      I
M. I F. I T.
Illiterate
I      I
M. I F. I T.
I      1
Reads and
Writes
M.I
I       I
F. IT.
I
Common
School
F. IT.
I
High
School
University
I      I
M.   F. I T.
I       I
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis. 	
Pre-senile psychosis .
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis .
Alcoholic psychosis.
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology-
Psychosis with psychopathic personality....
Psychosis with mental deficiency 	
Psychoneurosis  —	
Syphilis and its sequela..	
Puerperium psychosis  	
Undiagnosed	
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality..
Immature personality	
Alcoholism	
Drug addiction.
Primary childhood behaviour disorders ._
Mental deficiency-
Other and unspecified character behaviour and
intelligence disorders   	
Epilepsy
Neurological disease without psychosis 	
Observation without need for further medical
care—mental   	
Head injury of other and unspecified nature .
Totals _
183
381
181
8|
3|
41
4|
41
11
3:
173]
1|
41
—I
151
11
1|
1|-
3)
71
I
31
71
11
2
5
40014951895
1|    1
-I	
I       I
"365|    11.
63 j
27]
14|
41
71
14
21
"I
1
51
257
5
4
4
I I-
I    11 1-
-I-	
101
2[
[—I I-
31—1-
5| .....|
32
21
41
-I    1
„| —|-
-I-
151 47
236
37
17
11
1
4
9
.....1  14
8| 12
.... I ....
31    4
1161172
11    1
4|    4
.....I    2
11
6
1
1
1
21    3
I
.1    3
71 13
41    5
-I
I    1
I    1
I    3
2
11
-I--I-
1
3
5
2
I    1
47
..[    3
I     1
31
254
3181572
82|140|222
I       I
11!
31
-I    11
5]  16
3|    6
11    1
1| -I    1
1|    1
11    2
91 16
4|-|    4
-I    H    1
-I I-
-I - I -
-I......I.
I      I
281 211 49
Table No. 20,
—Showing the Nativity of First Admissions by Age-groups
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Age-group
Total
Canadian
Born
British
Born
Foreign
Born
Unknown
M.
'■
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
1
M.      F.
T.
M.
F.      T.
Under 15 years	
15-19 years  	
20-24   „     	
8
30
54
65
47
50
41
31
19
28
13
14
6
17
54
71
71
77
46
46
29
35
21
21
1
14
47
108
136
118
127
87
77
48
63
34
35
1
8
28
43
51
38
38
22
17
7
12
2
6
6
15
47
56
57
60
30
21
9
14
6
6
14
43
90
107
95
98
52
38
16
26
8
12
....
1
1
3
2
3
8
3
1
10
9
7
2
5
6
8
8
9
10
12
12
13
11
1
3
6
9
10
11
17
13
13
22
22
18
1
......
1
10
11
7
9
11
11
11
6
......
....
2
9
6
9
7
15
8
9
1
12
20
13
18
18
26
19
15
4
  1 —
-- - 1 	
25-29    „    	
|
30-34    „ 	
|
35-39    „    	
|
40-44    „    	
.   1
45-49    „    _	
|
50-54    „     	
55-59    „	
60-64    „    	
2
2
|
65-69    „	
1  1      4
     1 -----
5
|
70 years and over	
...
-      1
-- 1 	
400
495
895
272
327
599
48
97
145
80  1     71
151   1
|
1 Q  146
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 21.—Showing Country of Birth of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Country
Male
Female
Total
1
3
1
1
5
2
4
30
1
9
2
1
2
2
10
1
4
9
5
8
8
3
15
1
23
114
22
11
11
29
1
14
47
4
2
1
2
70
......
-----
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
2
1
3
7
1
5
22
4
29
2
1
41
125
45
6
1
5
27
1
12
64
5
5
1
Brazil	
1
6
4
4
100
1
9
1
3
1
Holland    ...   .                                     	
3
3
3
13
Italy                                        	
2
2
1
7
Poland _	
16
1
10
30
1
12
3
United States    .  _	
44
2
2
Canada—
Alberta	
64
239
67
17
1
16
56
2
26
111
400
495
895
Table No. 22.—Showing the Citizenship of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Citizenship
Male
Female
Total
Canadian by birth. _ - —
British born who have resided in Canada five years or more-
British born who have resided in Canada less than five years..
Alien born (naturalized)..
Alien born who have resided in Canada five years or more (not naturalized)..
Alien born who have resided in Canada less than five years— _	
Unknown  —
Totals               	
272
43
5
33
31
16
400
327
88
9
39
23
9
495
599
131
14
72
54
25
895 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
Q  147
Table No. 23.—Showing the Religion of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Religion
Male
Female
Total
1
69
9
1
1
1
4
1
1
7
1
2
1
41
4
5
3
28
70
90
1
1
1
1
56
130
14
1
3
1
1
1
2
6
3
23
4
1
1
3
2
20
112
81
3
79
2
1
1
1
199
23
Buddhist - -	
2
4
1
5
Evangelical Free Church   „,.   -	
1
1
1
8
3
8
4
64
8
6
1
6
2
48
182
171
1
4
1
1
135
Sikh   	
2
1
1
400
495
895
Table No. 24.—Showing Age-groups of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
8
30
54
65
47
50
41
31
19
28
15
12
5
18
54
71
71
77
48
45
26
37
21
21
1
13
15-19 years _  	
48
20-24     „    _  _	
108
25-29     „	
136
30-34     „   .     .
118
35-39     „           	
127
40-44     „ _	
89
45-49      „   — 	
76
50-54     „   	
45
55-59     „   	
65
60-64     „   	
36
65-69     „        _   .   .
33
1
Totals  	
400
495
895 Q  148
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 25.—Showing Age-groups of Readmissions
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
Under 15
15-19 ye.
20-24     ,
years     — 	
1
1
2
2
3
3
5
2
1
1
2
	
2
5
6
8
7
8
3
1
2
1
2
3
6
25-29     ,
8
30-34     ,
10
35-39     ,
10
40-44     ,
11
45-49     ,
8
50-54     ,
3
55-59     ,
3
60-64     ,
2
65-69
4
Totals     _                                                        	
23
45
68 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
Q  149
Table No. 26.—Showing the Previous Occupations of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Occupation
Male   I Female
Total
Occupation
Male
Female
Total
i
7
257
12
4
5
7
2
1
1
1
6
1
1
6
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
8
1
9
1
1
10
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
23
2
3
1
1
7
1
2
1
1
395
1
3
2
13
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
5
1
3
4
26
13
7
1
3
8
652
Announcer.- _	
Artist _ —.-	
1
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
Mechanic.  	
12
4
5
Millworker.. ._	
7
2
1
Moulder....   	
1
Book-keeper  -  	
1
1
Bulb-grower  ._.. 	
9
2
14
1
1     i         1        1
Packer  ' 	
2
Carpenter __   _	
11
1
1
1
16
1
2
1
1
      1       11
6
1
10
26
1
6
Pharmacist 	
1
1
Clerk
1
1
1
1
Porter 	
1
Cook
1    1        1
1
1
1
1
1
6
2
1
1
25
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
91
1
2
39
2
2
6
1
1
32
1
2
......
1
335
__
1
32
25
335
91
2
1
39
2
2
6
2
1
Druggist  —	
11
1
14
1
Engineer  	
1
1
10
Faller
4
1
2
1
Soldier   	
3
Steelworker....  	
Stenographer   	
1
26
1
Stockbroker	
Student—   	
1
36
2
Housekeeper 	
10
Telephone operator 	
Tile-setter  	
Trainman      	
1
1
1
7
3
8
Watchman.  	
Welder...  	
1
2
Longshoreman   	
1
1
Manager-.—- ,	
400
495
895
257     1    395
652 Q 150
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 27.—Showing the Method of Commitment of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Method of Commitment
Male
Female
Total
276
124
293
202
569
326
400
495
895
Table No. 28.—Showing the Method of Commitment of Readmissions
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Method of Commitment
Male
Female
Total
13
10
28
17
41
Bv voluntary forms       	
27
23
45
68
Table No. 29.—Showing Rural-Urban Status of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Total
Rural
Urban
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Schizophrenic disorders _ 	
182
25
9
6
1
3
10
17
6
1
2
84
4
4
15
1
1
1
3
7
3
7
1
2
5
183
38
18
8
3
4
4
4
11
3
173
1
4
9
9
1
2
3
11
6
365
63
27
14
4
7
14
21
17
1
5
257
5
4
4
24
10
2
1
5
10
3
18
7
2
5
29
3
2
1
1
5
1
8
1
1
2
1
12
3
3
6
1
3
16
2
1
2
1
41
6
5
7
1
1
5
4
24
3
1
1
2
3
1
153
22
7
5
1
2
10
12
5
2
76
4
4
14
1
1
1
2
7
3
5
1
2
4
171
35
15
2
3
4
3
4
8
3
157
1
4
7
8
1
2
1
10
6
324
57
22
Paranoia and paranoid states  —	
7
4
6
13
\6
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology  	
13
1
5
233
5
4
4
Without Psychosis
21
9
2
1
Primary childhood behaviour disorders  	
4
8
Other and unspecified character behaviour and intelligence dis-
3
15
7
Observation without need for further medical care—mental...	
Head injury of other and unspecified nature	
2
4
400
495
895
55
50
105
345
445
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151 Q  152
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table No. 31. — Showing Duration of Last Hospital Residence of Discharged
Patients by Psychoses from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Total
Less than
1 Month
Less than
2 Months
Less than
3 Months
Less than
4 Months
4 Months
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
f. It.
I
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
1
M.I F.
1
T.
172
22
5
6
1
4
4
24
2
1
5
89
5
	
4
14
3
2
5
6
5
3
1
3
198
45
23
5
4
3
3
10
4
159
1
4
1
24
9
2
3
3
13
6
370
67
28
11
1
8
7
27
12
1
9
248
6
10
4
15
1
25
5
19
8
2
2
1
1
7
1
2
36
21
18
4
2
2
1
36
1
40
26
6
4
1
1
2
7
1
1
2
72
1
32
4
1
1
1
1
4
1
15
1
46
14
9
2
4
1
1
40
1
7
3
78
18
10
3
5
1
4
2
1
55
1
1
11
4
1
77
4
1
2
1
1
3
2
13
3
1
86
8
8
1
2
2
42
1
6
3
163
12
9
2
1
2
3
2
4
55
3
1
7
3
34
2
1
1
1
3
30
4
2
1
i
ii
64
6
3
1
1
1
Pre-senile psychosis	
1
2
10
1
3
5
1
2
13
6
1
Psychosis with psychopathic personality	
7
22
1
30
2
—
3
2
2
1
2
52
1
2
4
6
2
3
1
2
2
3
14
4
Undiagnosed 	
Without Psychosis
5
38
12
4
8
9
18
9
1
3
4
3
1
2
2
1
6
1
3
1
—
9
2
4
1
1
1
l
5
1
5
1
Drug addiction	
3
1
1
2
1
2
4
1
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
2
1
1
2
7
2
4
9
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
3
1
1
1
Other and unspecified character behaviour and
Epilepsy	
1
1
Observation without need for medical care—
Head injury of other and unspecified nature	
1
1
386
5201906
Ks
67
132
92
100
192
68
133
201
11511621777!  461   581104 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
Q  153
Table No. 32.—Showing Conditions of Patients on Discharge by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Psychosis
Total
Recovered
Improved
Unimproved
Without
Psychosis and
Unclassified
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
172
22
5
6
1
4
4
24
2
1
5
89
5
4
14
3
2
5
6
5
3
1
3
198
45
23
5
4
3
3
10
~4
159
1
4
1
24
9
2
-
3
3
....
13
6
370
67
28
11
1
8
7
27
12
1
9
248
6
4
5
38
12
4
8
9
18
9
1
3
22
15
3
1
17
1
22
2
I
....
....
28
18
5
2
1
20
1
]
....
z
50
33
8
1
19
1
1
42
2
1
z
....
....
.„_.
—
106
6
2
5
3
1
7
2
1
2
59
2
z
124
27
17
4
2
1
6
3
113
....
2
1
.._
~~
_...
....
230
33
19
9
5
1
8
8
1
5
172
2
2
1
44
1
1
1
3
2
8
1
6
46
1
1
2
3
3
_.„
26
1
1
3
90
1
1
1
1
3
6
3
1
34
2
1
9
::::
Z
4
14
3
2
5
5
3
1
3
z
24
9
2
3
13
6
Senile psychosis  	
Psychosis with psychopathic personality	
4
Without Psychosis
38
12
Alcoholism  	
4
8
Other  and unspecified  character  behaviour
18
Neurological disease without psychosis	
Observation without need for further medical
9
1
Head injury of other and unspecified nature.	
3
Totals  -	
386
520
906
83
75
158
196
300
496
67
88
155
40
57
97
Table No. 33.—Showing Age-groups of Patients who Died
from April 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1952
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
Under 1
15-19 ye
20 24
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
25 29
30-34
35 39
1
40 44
1
45 49
3
50-54
55 59
1
60-64
'
1
65 69
4
70 years
6
6
12 IT)
Os
m
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154 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
Q  155
Main entrance, Pennington Hall, Essondale. Q  156 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1951-52
PART II.—FINANCIAL
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the financial reports of the Provincial Mental
Health Services of British Columbia for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1952.
Patient-housing units operated under the Mental Health Services include the Crease
Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale; The Woodlands School at New
Westminster; the Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz; and the Homes for the Aged at
Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and Terrace.
The daily average patient population in the above units for the year was 5,562,
this being an increase of 204 or 3.8 per cent over the 1950-51 figures.
Gross operating costs amounted to $7,480,254.93, as against $6,235,527.93 in the
previous year, and resulted in the daily per capita costs rising from $3.19 to $3.67, an
increase of 48 cents.
Maintenance collections were $928,398.83, as compared with $763,884.12 for the
year 1950-51, an increase of $164,514.71 or 21 per cent.
While the above is the over-all picture, figures covering the individual units will be
found in the various statements of the report. These figures vary considerably as
between the different units due to location, type of patient, intensity of treatment,
facilities available, etc.
Dairy produce, meats, fruits, and vegetables to a value of over $370,000 were
purchased from Colony Farm during the year.
The sum of $347,668.62 was expended for equipment, personnel, and staff training
under projects approved by the Federal mental-health grants for the Province of British
Columbia. Particulars of this expenditure are covered in a statement included in this
report.
During the year under review, I am pleased to report that, in addition to the
regular maintenance of our plants and equipment, there were also a large number of
major improvements and additions carried out. Some of the main items in this regard
are as follows:—
Essondale.—Pennington Hall, our new recreational-therapy building, was completed and opened in September, 1951. The recreational and audio-visual equipment
for this building was supplied mainly by Federal health grants.
The verandas on the "A" side of the West Lawn Building were bricked in.
A new switchboard was installed in the Crease Clinic. This new switchboard
serves the whole of the Essondale area and has greatly improved our telephone service.
A new dish-washer and tea and coffee urns were installed on Ward C 4 to complete the remodelling of the dining-room in this area.
Fire-walls were installed in the Colony Farm Annex, and the kitchen in this building
was closed to allow for additional day-room space. Food service is now supplied by
the Veterans' kitchen.
A new fire-engine and a new hose-truck were received in May, 1951. Additional
garage space was built at the fire-hall for this equipment.
New street directional signs were received and installed.
New coal-storage facilities and a conveyer system were installed at the boiler-house.
This new installation eliminates the necessity for patients to handle coal. BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT Q  157
New electric ovens and a new bread slicer and wrapping machine were received.
This equipment will be installed and put into operation during the next year, at which
time the Essondale bakery will supply The Woodlands School with bread.
Two new washing-machines and a new flatwork ironer were received and installed
in the laundry to replace old equipment. This new equipment will be transferred to the
new laundry when it is built.
A new silver-washing machine was received and installed in the Crease Clinic kitchen
block.
An addition was added to the Occupational Therapy Building to provide extra work
and storage space.
A ventilating and air-conditioning system was installed in the Crease Clinic for
the operating suite, conference room, lecture room, and laboratory.
Contract was let for the construction of a new stores and laundry building.
Contracts were let for the alteration to the electrical-distribution system, the installation of a new transformer-vault, and the installation of a new street-lighting system in
front of the Centre Lawn and East Lawn Buildings.
Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam.—A new 100-bed unit was completed and
opened for female patients on March 29th, 1952.
The Woodlands School, New Westminster.—Contract was let for a new 100-bed
nurses' home to take care of the extra staff required to operate the new buildings at this
institution.
Contract was let for the extension to the power-house and for the installation of
a new boiler.
The coal-burning boiler was converted to oil.
The kitchen was extended, and the additional equipment required to service the
three new buildings was installed.
The greenhouse was completely renovated.
A small extension was added to the laundry, and a new flatwork ironer and new
presses were installed.
Work on the conversion of the patients' old dining-room into a modern staff cafeteria
was completed.
Hot-water mixing valves were installed in the bathrooms on the wards.
The old building known as Lawn House was demolished.
Good progress is being made on the construction of the three new 100-bed units.
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz.—A new airing-court was completed during the
year.
Home for the Aged, Vernon.—This unit was completely repainted on the outside
and partially redecorated on the inside.
Tenders were called for the rewiring of the institution in conduit, as recommended
by the Inspector of Electrical Energy.
The adjoining property and house were purchased, the house being converted into
additional housing facilities for nursing staff.
Home for the Aged, Terrace.—The other half of this institution was opened with the
transfer by special train of 101 patients from Essondale and 50 patients from Vernon on
October 23rd, 1951.
Three additional suites for the use of married staff were completed. Two of the
suites were installed in the main hospital building and the third in the single men's
quarters.
Staff
It is with a great deal of regret that I have to report the death of two of our key
personnel. S. W. Inrig, Deputy Business Manager at the Provincial Mental Home at
Colquitz, passed away on April 18th, 1951, after a lengthy illness, while W. T. Broadfoot, Q  158 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1951-52
steward, Home for the Aged, Vernon, died on July 13th, 1951. A. C. C. Loat was
appointed Deputy Business Manager, succeeding Mr. Inrig, and T. S. Groves was transferred from the Home for the Aged, Terrace, to the position of steward at the Home for
the Aged, Vernon, to replace Mr. Broadfoot.
The following resignations also took place during the year:—
S. M. Schofield, Superintendent of Public Works, resigned on April 25th, 1951.
He was replaced by W. R. Meadows.
Miss M. E. Parsons, Director of Nursing, resigned on June 30th, 1951, to be
married.    Miss E.  M.  Pullan was  appointed Director of Nursing to
replace Miss Parsons.
J. A. Hay, Superintendent of Farms, resigned on September 30th, 1951.   He
was succeeded by W. B. Richardson, the Assistant Superintendent of
Farms.
Miss M. B. Allman, Chief Dietitian, resigned on December 31st, 1951.
J. H. Wilson, Chief Engineer, Essondale, who was due for retirement on
April 30th, 1952, was transferred to the Pearson Hospital, Division of
Tuberculosis Control, Vancouver, as Chief Engineer on March  10th,
1952.    J. L. Wright was appointed to the position of Chief Engineer,
replacing Mr. Wilson.
Dr. R. M. Chambers, Chief Inspector of the Inspection and Rating Board of the
American Psychiatric Association, inspected and reported on the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale; Crease Clinic, Essondale; Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz; and the
Homes for the Aged at Port Coquitlam and Vernon.
Office space was rented at 1338 Commercial Drive, Vancouver, to provide facilities
for our Social Service Department.
A separate report has been prepared to cover the operation of Colony Farm.
In closing, I would like to express my appreciation of the many courtesies shown
and the close co-operation that has been maintained between the various departments of
the Government and of the hospital at all times.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
F. A. Matheson,
Business Manager. BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT Q 159
PSYCHOPATHIC DEPARTMENT
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1952
Salaries    $48,438.56
Office supplies  4,668.34
Telephone and telegraphs   1,468.92
Travelling expenses   7,978.00
Fuel, water, light, and power  1,183.18
Incidental expenses   2,720.17
Cost-of-living bonus   15,669.16
$82,126.33
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population: Essondale, 76.3 per cent; New Westminster,
17.5 per cent;  and Saanich, 6.2 per cent.
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT
Expense Statement, March 3 1st, 1952
Salaries    $61,115.33
Office supplies       3,764.65
Travelling expenses       1,721.12
Incidental expenses        2,433.11
Cost-of-living bonus      16,562.71
$85,596.92
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population: Essondale, 76.3 per cent; New Westminster,
17.5 per cent; and Saanich, 6.2 per cent. Q 160
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
FINANCIAL TABLES
MENTAL HOSPITALS
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each Year,
the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and Gross per Capita Cost
(For Past Ten Years)
Year
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Per Capita
Cost
1942-43, New Westminster1 	
605.17
3,042.06
284.06
601.15
3,047.75
279.61
606.25
3,072.84
277.87
610.36
3,163.61
283.67
626.29
3,217,03
286.48
628.00
3,275.41
290.31
631.75
3,394.08
287.76
650.83
3,556.78
287.02
763.81
3,425.98
286.82
799,47
3,485.14
282.68
$286,077.54
1,157,787.55
146,898.22
306,150.79
1,317,789.96
163,226.64
373,672.82
1,558,923.64
207,979.27
433,041.89
1,769,363.15
210,798.32
497,945.37
2,117,563.62
231,894.65
662,357.80
2,622,349.15
298,773.55
800,776.92
3,162,819.02
356,110.21
891,944.27
3,500,902.41
384,874.24
1,081,062.76
3,419,312.37
388,744.44
1,284,649.25
4,021,001.69
407,123.16
$472.72
1942 43, Essondale              _  	
380.59
1942 43, Saanich   	
517.14
509.28
1943 44, Essondale                                                            _ 	
432.38
1943-44, Saanich                            —_             . — _  •
583.77
616 37
1944-45, Essondale..      - 	
1944 45 SaaniYh
507.32
748 48
709 49
559 29
1945-46, Saanich                                         	
743.11
795 07
1946-47, Essondale......   	
1946-47, Saanich                                                 _ 	
658.24
809 46
1,054.70
800 62
1947-48, Essondale                        ...                  —                	
1947-48, Saanich                     	
1,029.15
1,267.55
931.86
1,237.52
1,370.55
984 29
1948-49, New Westminster. _ _ __	
1948-49, Essondale     	
1948-49, Saanich         ..                                                       	
1949-50, New Westminster                       ~     ..   ~   -
1949-50, Essondale       _     	
1949-50, Saanich                                                 ~                _	
1,340.93
1,415.35
998.05
1950-51, New Westminster _ ...	
1950-51, Essondale  .    _ 	
1950-51, Saanich         ...                                 	
1,355.36
1,606.88
1951-52, New Westminster   	
1951-52, Essondale       _ — .     „ 	
1,153.75
1951-52, Saanich
1,440.23
1 Maintenance expenditure includes cost-of-living bonus paid employees,
years' reports.
This is also included in all subsequent FINANCIAL TABLES
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MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Table C.—Summary Statement Showing the Gross and Net per Capita
Cost of Patients in the Three Institutions
Gross operating costs—
New Westminster
$1,284,649.25
Essondale       4,021,001.69
Saanich         407,123.16
Gross cost for the three institutions  $5,712,774.10
Less collections remitted to Treasury         615,725.75
Net cost for the three institutions
$5,097,048.35
Daily average population for the three institutions      4,567.29
Gross per capita cost, one year  $1,250.80
Gross per capita cost, one day  $3.42
Net per capita cost, one year  $1,115.99
Net per capita cost, one day   $3.05 FINANCIAL tables
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MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
Remarks
New Westminster
Essondale
Saanich
808
799.47
$1,606.88
$4.39
3,484
3,485.14
$1,153.75
$3.15
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Daily average population for one year....	
282.68
$1,440.23
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day	
$3.94
Revenue of Mental Hospitals for Past Ten Years
1942-43   $261,986.32
1943-44      322,522.87
1944_45      317,735.15
1945-46      350,163.87
1946-47      339,561.71
1947-48   $350,995.41
1948-49      477,680.57
1949-50      542,137.14
1950-51      534,185.06
1951-52      641,180.62 FINANCIAL TABLES Q 167
Expenditures Made under Federal Mental-health Grants for Province
of British Columbia, Year Ended March 31st, 1952
Crease Clinic—
Equipment      $6,623.91
Staff and personnel training     84,601.95
     $91,225.86
Mental Hospital, Essondale—
Equipment   $37,552.16
Staff and personnel training     52,819.27
90,371.43
Woodlands School, New Westminster—Equipment       19,864.79
Mental Home, Colquitz—
Equipment         $776.73
Staff and personnel training       7,476.00
8,252.73
Child Guidance Clinic, Vancouver—
Equipment     $2,001.32
Staff and personnel training       5,276.94
Neurophysiological Research Unit at University of British
Columbia—
Equipment     $5,772.90
Staff and personnel training     17,750.41
7,278.26
  23,523.31
Recreational Hall equipment at Mental Hospital, Essondale  14,638.14
Rehabilitation Department  4,170.76
Vancouver General Hospital  5,135.53
City of Vancouver—Staff and supplies  16,313.28
City of Victoria—Staff and supplies  7,330.87
National Film Board mental-health film  1,633.75
Consultant in Neurosurgery  5,200.00
Appointment in general surgery  3,600.00
General personnel training—
Short-term postgraduate     $1,190.96
Social service     19,231.05
Nursing       1,105.97
Psychology     22,264.41
Teaching        5,337.52
  49,129.91
Total   $347,668.62 Q  168 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
Summary of Costs for Year Ended March 31st, 1952
Salaries and Per Capita
Expenses Cost
Office, stores, and general       $6,758.86 $35.80
Medical care       76,070.40 402.87
Nursing and ward service     264,335.40 1,399.93
Dietary     155,887.14 825.59
Light, water, heat, and power       21,300.00 112.81
Laundry          6,000.00 31.78
Cars and trucking         1,200.00 6.35
Occupational and recreational therapy         1,701.75 9.01
Miscellaneous         4,749.47 25.15
Maintenance and repairs        19,860.09 105.18
Cost-of-living bonus      129,603.00 686.38
Gross cost  $687,466.11 $3,640.85
Less revenue, maintenance collections        25,454.87 134.81
Net cost  $662,011.24 $3,506.04
Reconciliation
Expenditure as per Public Accounts  $667,606.02
Add maintenance and repairs ____■       19,860.09
Total   $689,466.11
Remarks
Total patients in residence, March 31st, 1952  215
Daily average population for year 1951-52        188.82
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year  $3,640.85
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day  $9.95
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year  $3,506.04
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day  .       $9.58 FINANCIAL TABLES
Q  169
HOME FOR THE AGED, PORT COQUITLAM
Summary of Costs for Year Ended March 31st, 1952
Salaries and
Expenses
Office, stores and general  $302.73
Medical care   17,373.33
Nursing and ward services  187,967.56
Dietary  .  151,617.05
Light, water, heat, and power  36,823.84
4,920.00
  378.48
  2,881.82
  28,346.80
  74,056.56
Laundry
Cars and trucking __
Incidentals and unforeseen
Maintenance and repairs
Cost-of-living bonus	
$504,668.17
Gross cost j	
Less revenue, maintenance of patients       135,710.60
Net cost  $368,957.57
Per Capita
Cost
$0.80
45.60
493.31
397.91
96.64
12.91
.99
7.56
74.40
194.36
$1,324.48
356.16
$968.32
Reconciliation
Expenditure as per Public Accounts  $476,321.37
Add maintenance and repairs       28,346.80
Total   $504,668.17
Remarks
Total patients in residence, March 31st, 1952  418
Daily average population for year 1951-52  381.03
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year  $1,324.48
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day „__ $3.62
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year  $968.32
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day  $2.65
Average Number of Patients in Residence, Total Amount Spent
for Maintenance, and Gross per Capita Cost, 1942-52
Year
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Gross per
Capita Cost
1942-43                          	
130.32
129.78
132.25
137.10
202.44
326.75
372.03
380.15
384.74
381.03
$83,029.63
81,597.78
103,626.48
114,337.96
138,802.91
243,861.27
339,606.91
374,093.25
437,282.20
504,668.17
$637.12
1944 45                                                                                  	
783.56
1945 46
833 87
1946-47... -
1947-48                                -
685.65
746.33
1948-49.     --
1949 50                                                                                  	
912.85 •
984.07
1950-51                      _ 	
1,136.56
1951  52                                                                                        	
1,324.48 Q 170
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
HOME FOR THE AGED, VERNON
Summary of Costs for Year Ended March 31st, 1952
Salaries and
Expenses
$4,575.65
19,191.01
Office, stores, and general	
Medical care	
Nursing and ward services  91,695.79
Dietary  77,395.57
Light, water, heat, and power  12,757.81
Laundry     24,641.56
Incidentals and contingencies  7,345.51
Maintenance and repair  36,348.96
Cost-of-living bonus  35,697.19
Gross cost  $309,649.05
Less revenue, maintenance of patients       77,089.37
Net cost  $232,559.68
Per Capita
Cost
$21.14
88.67
423.67
357.60
58.95
113.85
33.94
167.95
164.94
$1,430.71
356.19
$1,074.52
Reconciliation
Expenditure as per Public Accounts  $289,472.52
Less increase in inventories       16,172.43
Add maintenance and repairs
$273,300.09
36,348.96
Gross cost   $309,649.05
Remarks
Total patients in residence, March 31st, 1952_
Daily average population for year 1951-52.	
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year	
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day_
234
216.43
$1,430.71
$3.91
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year  $1,074.52
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day  $2.94
Average Number of Patients in Residence, Total Amount Spent
for Maintenance, and Gross per Capita Cost, 1948-52
Year
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Gross per
Capita Cost
1948-49                            .     _
119.68
202.57
231.42
216.43
$150,706.50
215,009.96
244,853.02
309,649.05
$1,259.24
1949-50                                       -
1,061.41
1,058.05
1,430.71
1950-51 ..                                                         	
1951-52          _	 FINANCIAL TABLES
Q 171
HOME FOR THE AGED, TERRACE
Summary of Costs for Year Ended March 31st, 1952
Salaries and
Expenses
Office, stores, and general  $2,038.26
Medical care  8,557.94
Nursing and ward services  72,815.82
Dietary   77,974.13
Light, water, heat, and power  24,431.66
Laundry   3,190.41
Cars and trucking  612.09
Incidentals and contingencies  14,969.02
Maintenance and repairs  31,401.27
Cost-of-living bonus  29,706.90
Gross cost  $265,697.50
Less revenue, maintenance of patients       74,418.24
Net cost
$191,279.26
Reconciliation
Per Capita
Cost
$9.75
40.95
348.45
373.14
116.91
15.27
2.93
71.63
150.27
142.16
$1,271.46
356.12
$915.34
Expenditure as per Public Accounts  $235,003.09
Less increase in inventories  706.86
Add maintenance and repairs
$234,296.23
31,401.27
$265,697.50
Remarks
Total patients in residence, March 31st, 1952  293
Daily average population for year 1951-52  208.97
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year  $1,271.46
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day  $3.47
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year  $915.34
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day  $2.50
Average Number of Patients in Residence, Total Amount Spent
for Maintenance, and Gross per Capita Cost, 1951-52
Year
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Gross per
Capita Cost
1950-51 	
1951-52      	
74.07
208.97
$139,016.27
265,697.50
$1,876.82
1,271.46 Q  172
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
SUMMARY STATEMENT  SHOWING  THE  GROSS AND  NET PER  CAPITA
COST OF PATIENTS IN THE THREE INSTITUTIONS
Gross operating cost-
Port Coquitlam _
Vernon	
Terrace	
$504,668.17
309,649.05
265,697.50
Less collections remitted to Treasury.
Net cost of the three institutions	
$1,080,014.72
287,218.21
$792,796.51
Daily average population of the three institutions  806.43
Gross per capita cost, on year  $1,339.25
Gross per capita cost, one day  $3.66
Net per capita cost, one year  $983.09
Net per capita cost, one day  $2.69 FINANCIAL TABLES
Q  173
Pennington Hall, Essondale. Q  174
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
PART III.—COLONY FARM
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT ON COLONY FARM
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith please find profit and loss account and other financial statements
and reports covering the operations of Colony Farm for the fiscal year ended March 31st,
1952.
The Farm land has fully recovered from the serious flooding of 1948, and this,
coupled with an excellent crop-year, has enabled the Farm to show the largest profit of
any year so far recorded.
The profit of $96,723.30 comes chiefly from the following departments: Dairy and
Herds, Piggery, Cannery, Orchard and Truck-garden, and Field Crops.
The dairy herd, which was decreased in number following the loss by fire of stabling
in 1947, has again been built up to former numbers but is still short of being able to
supply our milk requirements. A further increase is only possible if more accommodation for the herd is provided.
The Farm fairly well meets our requirements of potatoes, beets, carrots, and turnips,
and, in season, of cabbage, lettuce, chard, etc., while the Cannery processes the greater
part of our canned fruit and vegetable requirements for the winter months.
During the year a contract was let for a new dairy, milking, and grain-feeding
quarters. This building will also house the Farm office. Work has been started on the
new shops building and horse-barn.
Machinery in the Cannery has been rearranged to speed up the work, and the can-
topping machine has been replaced.
Detailed statements covering operations of the various Farm departments for the
year will be found in the financial statements of the report tendered herewith.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
F. A. Matheson,
Business Manager.
PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT FOR YEAR ENDED MARCH 31
st, 1952
Department
Debits
Credits
Loss
Gain
$110,884.38
4,307.29
81,037.04
59.091.23
$152,662.29
5,134.00
124,472.74
77.902.15
$41,777.91
826.71
43,435.70
18,810.92
23.365.87    1        55.181.69
31,815.82
12,571.62
5,018.03
73,690.51
31,431.79
39,203.97
16,442.00
5,177.50
264.05
100,088.61
3,870.38
159.47
$73,426.46
68,656.82
39,203.97
Totals..	
$440,601.73
$537,325.03
$112,630.43
$209,353.73
112,630.43
$96,723.30 COLONY FARM
Q 175
DAIRY AND HERDS DEPARTMENT
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1952
By sales—
Live animals
Receipts
$13,446.50
Beef supplied to institutions  3,773.47
Dairy produce  129,664.32
By credit for manure  3,350.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1952  91,707.00
$241,941.29
Expenses
Salaries and upkeep  $43,389.58
Feed     65,770.80
Horse-labour	
Trucking 	
Tractor work	
Inventory, March 31st, 1951
Profit
192.00
810.00
722.00
89,279.00
200,163.38
$41,777.91
WORK-HORSE DEPARTMENT
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1952
Receipts
Horse-labour charged to crops, etc.
Credit for manure	
Inventory, March 31st, 1952	
Salaries and upkeep	
Expenses
$5,084.00
50.00
420.00
$2,975.00
Feed and pasturage       1,202.29
Inventory, March 31st, 1951  550.00
$5,554.00
4,727.29
Profit
$826.71 Q  176 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
HOG DEPARTMENT
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1952
Receipts
By sales—
Live hogs       $3,689.24
Pork supplied Essondale Hospital       91,248.92
Pork supplied New Westminster Hospital (Woodlands
School)          6,930.58
  $101,868.74
By credit for manure  600.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1952       22,004.00
$124,472.74
Expenses
Salaries and upkeep  $10,882.98
Feed  40,242.66
Light and power  800.00
Fuel 1  200.00
Horse-labour  1,470.00
Truck   1,585.00
Tractor  960.00
$56,140.64
Inventory, March 31st, 1951       24,896.40
!1,037.04
Profit     $43,435.70
CANNERY
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1952
Receipts
Supplies to—
Mental Hospital, Essondale  $60,084.57
Woodlands School, New Westminster  12,153.63
Mental Home, Colquitz  4,307.75
Tranquille Sanatorium  1,356.20
Expenses
Salaries   $4,980.00
Repairs   891.19
Fruit and vegetables  31,786.29
Sugar, spice, etc.  7,904.66
Cans, crates, and containers  9,453.09
Fuel   1,300.00
Water  500.00
Light and power ,  1,200.00
Tractor-hauling   16.00
Truck-hauling   1,060.00
$77,902.15
59,091.23
Profit :     $18,810.92 COLONY FARM
ORCHARD AND TRUCK-GARDEN
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1952
Receipts
Q 177
Produce supplied to—
Mental Hospital, Essondale	
Woodlands School, New Westminster
Boys' Industrial School	
Colony Farm cannery	
$36,415.69
4,386.70
417.64
2,464.36
$43,684.39
Inventory, March 31st, 1952       11,497.30
Salaries, seeds, etc. 	
Fertilizer, spray, and manure
Tractor work	
Fuel 	
Expenses
Inventory, March 31st, 1951
Profit 	
$6,867.27
1,500.00
3,000.00
50.00
$11,417.27
11,948.60
$55,181.69
23,365.87
$31,815.82
FIELD CROPS AND PASTURAGE
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1952
Crop
Acreage
Yield (Tons)
Yield per Acre
Value
Potatoes 	
_    71.75
1,062.00
14.80
$71,262.88
Turnips 	
7.00
152.00
21.70
8,515.19
Oat hay	
_    59.00
201.65
3.42
6,638.32
Silage 	
. 103.00
960.25
9.32
5,761.50
Onions	
_      3.50
41.45
11.84
5,465.72
Pasturage 	
244.50
2,445.00
$100,088.61
Costs
Horse-labour
$3,742.00
8,958.00
Tractor work
Trucking
1,197.50
MannrR
2,500.00
4,909.89
VprtiKvpr anrl snrav
Seed and sets
8,804.40
Supervision 	
1,320.00
31,431.79
Profit
$68,656.82 Q  178 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
TRACTORS
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1952
Salaries and upkeep	
Expenses
$10,904.43
1,667.19
Gasoline and oil 	
12,571.62
Profit 	
$3,870.38
1952
Profit and
2,071 hours' work at $2.50
TRUCKS
Loss Account, March 31st
$5,177.50
Salaries and upkeep	
Expenses
$4,568.07
449.96
Gasoline and oil	
5,018.03
Profit	
$159.47
GENERAL EXPENSES OF MAINTENANCE AND ADMINISTRATION
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1952
Salaries and miscellaneous expenses  $30,415.95
Horse-labour  474.00
Trucking   525.00
Tractor work       1,716.00
Gasoline and oil  302.02
Sundry   195.85
Loss on inventory of equipment       4,283.60
     $37,912.42
Proportion, Headquarters expense     $2,100.00
Repairs through Public Works Department     33,414.54
       35,514.54
$73,426.96
Less sundry credits  .50
$73,426.46 COLONY FARM Q 179
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.
Mental Hospital, Essondale—Produce Supplied by Colony Farm
for Year Ended March 3 1st, 1952
Dairy produce—
Milk, 903,840 lb     $60,955.37
Cream, 360 qt  208.74
Table cream, 1,984 gal         5,941.69
     $67,105.80
Meats—
Veal, 6,225 lb       $3,638.82
Hearts, livers, etc., 301 lb  134.65
Fresh pork, 239,525 lb       90,214.05
Pork plucks, 4,196 lb         1,034.87
—       95,022.39
Fruits and vegetables—•
Fresh  $107,314.03
Canned        60,084.57
     167,398.60
$329,526.79
The Woodlands School, New Westminster—Produce Supplied by Colony Farm
for Year Ended March 31st, 1952
Dairy produce—
Milk, 47,680 lb       $3,265.92
Cream, 102 qt  98.85
Table cream, 1,143% gal         3,421.90
       $6,786.67
Meats-
Fresh pork, 18,227 lb       $6,839.94
Pork plucks, 366 lb  90.64
         6,930.58
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh      $ 16,296.71
Canned        12,153.63
       28,450.34
$42,167.59
Accounts Receivable, March 31st, 1952
Sundry amounts due from live stock, etc., sold  $387.99
Remittances to Treasury
Sundry remittances to Treasury during year 1951-52 in payment of live
stock and produce  $452,725.66 Q 180 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1951-52
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.—Continued
Summary of Equipment Inventories, March 31st, 1952
Equipment in dairy  $4,148.00
Equipment in cannery  6,751.25
Horse and cattle barns and piggery  3,813.00
Farm implements   29,638.20
Pumping-stations and land-clearing  2,666.00
Butcher-shop  10.00
Carpenter-shop   998.45
Blacksmith-shop   788.40
$48,813.30
Orchard and Truck-gardens
Apiary supplies  $76.30
Plum-trees 1  1,624.00
Prune-trees 1  1,776.00
Pear-trees   1,523.00
Apple-trees   574.00
Cherry-trees   371.00
Rhubarb-clumps   3,000.00
Vegetables on hand  490.00
Garden tools and equipment  2,063.00
$11,497.30
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952
740-1152-8583

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