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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE VITAL STATISTICS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA SEVENTY-NINTH REPORT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1953

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 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
VITAL STATISTICS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
SEVENTY-NINTH REPORT
FOR THE YEAR
1950
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952  Victoria, B.C., August 25th, 1952.
To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Report on Vital Statistics in the
Province of British Columbia for the year 1950.
ERIC MARTIN,
Minister of Health and Welfare. Department of Health and Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., August 25th, 1952.
The Honourable Eric Martin,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Seventy-ninth Report on Vital Statistics in the
Province of British Columbia.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT,
Deputy Minister of Health and
Provincial Health Officer.
Division of Vital Statistics,
Victoria, B.C., August 25th, 1952.
G. F. Amyot, Esq., M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Seventy-ninth Report on Vital Statistics in
the Province of British Columbia for the year ended December 31st, 1950.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. H. DOUGHTY,
Director of Vital Statistics. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Introduction  11
PART I.—GENERAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY BY PLACE
OF RESIDENCE
Table 1.—Estimated Total Population of British Columbia, by Sex and Age-groups,
1921-50  13
Table 2.—Population of Organized Areas in British Columbia, 1950  14
Table 3.—Crude Birth, Death, and Marriage Rates for British Columbia, 1911-50 15
Table 4.—Number of Births, Deaths, and Marriages, 1946-50:
(a) Including Indians  16
( b ) Excluding Indians  16
Table 5.—Natural Increase, 1946-50  17
Table 6.—Illegitimate Births, 1941-50  17
Table 7.—Births and Deaths in Institutions, 1941-50  19
Table 8.—Age and Sex Mortality, 1946-50:
(a) Including Indians  20
(b) Excluding Indians  20
Table 9.—Comparison between the Age-specific Death Rates during 1930 and 1950 21
Table 10.—Summary of Important Causes of Death in British Columbia, 1941-50:
(a) Including Indians  23
(b) Excluding Indians  24
Table 11.—Four Chief Causes of Death in the Different Age-groups, 1950:
(A) Including Indians  25
(b) Excluding Indians  27
Table 12.—Mortality from the Cardiovascular-Renal Diseases, 1946-50  28
Table 13.—Mortality from Diseases of the Heart, 1950  29
Table 14.—Mortality from Cancer, 1946-50  29
Table 15.—Special Classification of Accidental Deaths, 1950  30
Table 16.—Mortality from Tuberculosis, 1946-50  31
Table 17.—Infant Mortality, 1946-50  33
Table 18.—Neo-natal, Infant, and Maternal Mortality Rates, 1941-50  33
Table 19.—Maternal Mortality, 1946-50  35
Table 20.—Mortality from Notifiable Diseases, 1946-50 :.  36
Table 21 .—Stillbirths, 1941-50 ,  37
Table 22.—Marriages by Conjugal Condition of Contracting Parties, 1941-50  37
Table 23.—Marriages by Months, 1941-50  38
Table 24.—Marriages Performed According to Type, 1946-50  39
Table 25.—Marriages Performed during 1950 According to Denomination and
whether Married by Banns or Licence  39
PART II.—ADMINISTRATION AND DIVISIONAL ACTIVITIES
Summary of Registration .  40
Table 1.—Summary of Registration, 1941-50  40
Table 2.—Total Number of Registrations in British Columbia, Distributed According to Statistical Areas, 1950  42
Summary of Registration among the Oriental Races  43
Table 3.—Registrations of Births, Deaths, and Marriages among the Chinese Population of British Columbia, 1946-50  43
Table 4.—Registrations of Births, Deaths, and Marriages among the Japanese Population of British Columbia, 1946-50  43 L 6 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Page
Summary of Registration among Indians  44
Table 5.—Registrations of Births, Deaths, and Marriages among the Indian Population of British Columbia, 1946-50  44
Completeness of Registration  44
Indians  44
Doukhobors _'  46
Registration of Births Other than Indians and Doukhobors  46
Delayed Registrations of Births  47
Registration of Deaths  47
Registration of Marriages  47
Documentary Revision  48
Fraudulent Registration of Births  48
Legitimation of Births  48
Statutory Notations Entered  48
School-teachers' Returns under the " Vital Statistics Act "  49
Change of Name  49
Table 6.—Number of Applications Granted for Change of Name, According to
Marital Status and Sex of Applicant, 1941-50 r  49
Table 7.—Number of Individuals Granted Change of Name, According to Marital
Status and Sex of Applicant, 1941-50  49
Adoption Orders  50
Decrees of Dissolution and Nullity of Marriage  50
Notice of Filing of a Will  50
Administration of the " Marriage Act "  50
Table 8.—Registration of Ministers and Clergymen  51
Table 9.—Ministers and Clergymen Registered under the " Marriage Act" by
Denomination, 1949-50  51
District Registrars' Offices, Inspections, etc.  52
Statistical Services  54
Microfilming of Documents  56
General Office Procedures  57
Table 10.—Correspondence Received, Searches Performed, and Revenue Received,
British Columbia, 1941-50  58
PART III.—DETAILED TABLES OF BIRTHS, DEATHS, MARRIAGES, ADOPTIONS, AND DIVORCES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1950 (CLASSIFIED BY
PLACE OF RESIDENCE).
Table 1.—General Summary of Births, Deaths, and Marriages in British Columbia
by Census Divisions, Cities and Villages of 1,000 Population and over, by Place
of Residence, 1950 :  59
*Table 1a.—General Summary of Births, Deaths, and Marriages in British Columbia
by Census Divisions, by Place of Occurence, 1950  60
Births
*Table 2.—Births (Exclusive of Stillbirths) by Months, Classified as Rural and
Urban in Each Census Division, by Place of Residence of Mothers, British
Columbia, 1950  60
Table 3.—Total Live Births and Live Births in Institutions, by Place of Occurrence
and Place of Residence of Mothers, British Columbia, 1950     60
* Detailed information under these headings may be secured on request, if reason sufficiently urgent. VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950 L 7
Page
Table 4.—Total Live Births and Live Births in Institutions, in Cities and Villages of
1,000 Population and over, by Place of Occurrence and Place of Residence of
Mothers, British Columbia, 1950           61
Table 5.—Legitimate and Illegitimate Births (Exclusive of Stillbirths) for the Province and Cities of 5,000 Population and over, by Place of Residence of Mothers,
British Columbia, 1950     62
Table 6.—Multiple Births Classified to Show Number of Children Born Alive and
Stillborn by Sex, by Place of Residence of Mothers, British Columbia, 1950__.    62
Table 7.—Births (Exclusive of Stillbirths) Classified According to Ages of Parents,
by Place of Residence of Mothers, British Columbia, 1950     63
Table 8.—Births (Exclusive of Stillbirths) Classified According to Racial Origin of
Parents, by Place of Residence of Mothers, British Columbia, 1950     64
Table 9.—Births (Exclusive of Stillbirths) Classified According to Birthplace of
Parents, by Place of Residence of Mothers, British Columbia, 1950     65
Infant Mortality
* Table 10.—Deaths of Children under One Year (Exclusive of Stillbirths) by
Months, Classified as Rural and Urban in Each Census Division, by Place of
Residence, British Columbia, 1950      .....      66
Table 11.—Total Deaths (Exclusive of Stillbirths) and Deaths in Institutions of
Children under One Year, by Place of Occurrence and Place of Residence,
British Columbia, 1950     66
Table 12.—Total Deaths (Exclusive of Stillbirths) and Deaths in Institutions of
Children under One Year, in Cities of 5,000 Population and over, by Place of
Occurrence and Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950       66
Table 13.—Deaths of Children under One Year (Exclusive of Stillbirths) by Age at
Death and Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950 .__        •     67
Table 14.—Deaths of Children under One Year (Exclusive of Stillbirths) Classified
According to Racial Origin and Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950....    67
Table 15.—Deaths of Children under One Year (Exclusive of Stillbirths) Classified
According to Birthplace of Parents and Place of Residence, British Columbia,
1950 :     68
Table 16.—Deaths of Children under One Year (Exclusive of Stillbirths) from
Certain Specified Causes, by Sex and Calendar Month of Death, by Place of
Residence, British Columbia, 1950      69
Table 17.—Deaths of Children under One Year (Exclusive of Stillbirths) from
Certain Specified Causes, by Sex and Age at Death, by Place of Residence,
British Columbia, 1950 ,     70
General Mortality
Table 18.—Total Deaths (Exclusive of Stillbirths) and Deaths in Institutions, by
Place of Occurrence and Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950     71
Table 19.—Total Deaths (Exclusive of Stillbirths) and Deaths in Institutions, in
Cities and Villages of 1,000 Population and over, by Place of Occurrence and
Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950     72
Table 20.—Deaths (Exclusive of Stillbirths) by Single Years of Age and Age-groups,
by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950     73
Table 21.—Deaths (Exclusive of Stillbirths) Classified According to Racial Origin,
by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950     76
Table 22.—Deaths (Exclusive of Stillbirths) Classified According to Birthplace, by
Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950     77
* Detailed information under these headings may be secured on request, if reason sufficiently urgent. L 8 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Page
* Table 23.—Deaths (Exclusive of Stillbirths) Classified According to Birthplace of
Parents of Decedents, by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950     77
Table 24.—Causes of Death by Sex and Age, by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950     78
Table 25.—Causes of Death by Sex, Marital Status, Birthplace, and Month of Death,
by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950       84
Table 26.—Causes of Death by Sex and Age, by Place of Residence, Vancouver,
1950     90
Table 27.—Causes of Death by Sex, Marital Status, Birthplace, and Month of
Death, by Place of Residence, Vancouver, 1950     90
Table 28.—Causes of Death by Sex and Age, by Place of Residence, Victoria, 1950    90
*Table 29.—Causes of Death by Sex, Marital Status, Birthplace, and Month of
Death, by Place of Residence, Victoria, 1950 __            90
Table 30.—Causes of Death by Sex in Census Divisions, by Place of Residence,
British Columbia, 1950     93
Table 31.—Causes of Death by Sex in Cities and Villages of 1,000 Population and
over, by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950    100
Marriages
Table 32.—Marriages by Months, British Columbia, 1950  105
Table 33.—Marriages by Marital Status of Bridegrooms and Brides, British Columbia, 1950  105
Table 34.—Marriages by Ages of Bridegrooms and Brides, British Columbia, 1950 106
Table 35.—Marriages by Religious Denominations of Bridegrooms and Brides,
British Columbia, 1950  107
Table 36.—Marriages by Birthplaces of Bridegrooms and Brides, British Columbia,
1950  108
Birth and Death Tables for Indians
Table 37.—Births of Indians (Exclusive of Stillbirths) by Months, by Place of Residence of Mothers, British Columbia, 1950  109
Table 38.—Legitimate and Illegitimate Births of Indians (Exclusive of Stillbirths),
by Place of Residence of Mothers, British Columbia, 1950   109
Table 39.—Births of Indians (Exclusive of Stillbirths) Classified According to Ages
of Parents, by Place of Residence of Mothers, British Columbia, 1950  110
Table 40.—Deaths of Indian Children under One Year (Exclusive of Stillbirths) by
Months, by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950  111
Table 41.—Deaths of Indian Children under One Year (Exclusive of Stillbirths) by
Age at Death, by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950  111
Table 42.—Deaths of Indian Children under One Year (Exclusive of Stillbirths)
from Certain Specified Causes, by Sex and Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950 ,  112
Table 43.—Total Deaths of Indians (Exclusive of Stillbirths) by Months, by Place
of Residence, British Columbia, 1950  112
Table 44.—Deaths of Indians (Exclusive of Stillbirths) by Single Years of Age and
Age-groups, by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950     113
Table 45.—Causes of Death of Indians by Sex and Age, by place of Residence,
British Columbia, 1950  114
Table 46.—Deaths of Half-breeds from Certain Causes of Death, by Place of Residence, British Columbia, 1950  117
* Detailed information under these headings may be secured on request, if reason sufficiently urgent. VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950 L 9
Adoptions
Page
Table 47.—Adoption Orders Filed in the Court Registry, British Columbia, during
Each Month of 1950 and the Monthly Totals from April, 1920, to December
31st, 1950  117
Table 48.—Adoptions by Year of Court Order and Sex of Children, and whether
Adopted by Man and Wife, by Man Only, or by Woman Only, British Columbia, 1950  117
Table 49.—Adoptions by Year of Court Order and by Sex and Legitimacy of
Children, British Columbia, 1950  117
Table 50.—Adoptions by Birthplace of Children, British Columbia, 1950, and Totals
from April, 1920, to December 31st, 1950  118
Divorces
Table 51.—Decrees of Dissolution and Nullity of Marriage and ludicial Separation
by the Time Elapsed between the Marriage and the Obtaining of the Decree
(in Years Only), British Columbia, 1946-50 1  118
Table 52.—Number of Children Affected by the Award of Custody under Decrees of
Dissolution and Nullity of Marriage and ludicial Separation, by Sex, British
Columbia, 1946-50  118
Table 53.—Decrees of Dissolution and Nullity of Marriage and ludicial Separation
by Sex of Petitioner, British Columbia, 1946-50  119
Table 54.—Decrees of Dissolution and Nullity of Marriage and ludicial Separation
by Month Filed in Court Registry, British Columbia, 1946-50  119
LIST OF GRAPHS AND MAP
Graph A.—Crude Birth, Death, and Marriage Rates for British Columbia, 1911-50
(Rates per 1,000 Population)     16
Graph B.—Illegitimate Birth Rates in British Columbia, 1941-50 (Rates per 1,000
Live Births)     18
Graph C.—Infant Mortality Rates, British Columbia, 1921-50 (Rates per 1,000
Live Births)      3 2
Graph D.—Maternal Mortality Rates, British Columbia, 1921-50 (Rates per 1,000
Live Births)     34
Graph E.—Marriages by Months in British Columbia, 1946-50     38
Graph F.—Summary of Registrations of Births, Deaths, and Marriages in British
Columbia, 1921-50     41
Graph G.—Adoptions in British Columbia, 1936-50     42
Graph H.—Divorces in British Columbia, 1936-50     42
Map 1.—Map of British Columbia, Showing Statistical Publication Areas     12  Vital Statistics Report, 1950
INTRODUCTION
This is the Seventy-ninth Report of the Vital Statistics of British Columbia, and
covers the calendar year lanuary 1st to December 31st, 1950.
The Report is divided into three sections. The first section presents in summary
form the pertinent vital statistics data of the Province for the current year, together with
comparative figures for earlier years. Brief narrative comments have been made as a
guide to the more important features of the statistics, and graphs have been included to
assist the reader in following time trends. A change of major importance was made this
year in the death classification system, and careful note should be made of the information
presented on this in the mortality section of the first part of the Report.
The second section covers the registration functions of the Division, administration
of the various Acts, inspection of District Registrars' offices, a description of the statistical
services provided by the Division, and an account of other matters of general interest. It
will be noted from this section that while the volume of registrations .received by the
Division this year continued to increase, the amount of the increase was small, measuring
less than 1 per cent. The increase in correspondence received was more substantial,
having been nearly 8 per cent. A slight decline occurred in the revenue received by the
Division under the Acts administered. Tables covering Oriental and Indian births, deaths,
and marriages have been added this year, as well as one showing correspondence, searches,
and revenue during the last ten years.
The concluding section of the Report presents a series of detailed tables covering
births, deaths, marriages, adoptions, and divorces. Separate tables are included dealing
with the Indian population of the Province.
It should be noted that birth, death, and stillbirth statistics for 1944 and later years
have been tabulated by place of residence, whereas prior to 1944 the practice had been
to present the data on the basis of place of occurrence. This method of tabulation is
generally found to be more useful, but it is important to be aware of the change-over when
comparing statistics relating to periods before and after January 1st, 1944.
The scope of the statistical services provided by the Division increased considerably
during the year. An important statistical project undertaken in 1950 was this Province's
participation in the national sickness survey. In addition, the survey of the crippling
diseases of children, which was commenced in 1949, was concluded this year, although
the tabulation and analysis of the data collected will continue in 1951. Activities of the
various statistical sections are discussed in the second part of the Report, and the material
included will give an indication of the scope of the work accomplished.
11 L 12
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Map 1.—Map of British Columbia, Showing Statistical Publication Areas VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 13
PART  1.—GENERAL STATISTICAL SUMMARY
BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE
POPULATION SUMMARY
In 1950 the population of British Columbia increased over 2 per cent, having risen
from 1,114,000 in 1949 to 1,138,000 in 1950. As noted in the Report on Vital Statistics
for 1949, there continues to be an excess of males over females in the population. In
1950 the males in the Province numbered 588,800, constituting 51.7 per cent of the total
population.   Females numbered 549,200, which was 48.3 per cent of the population.
The population in each of the various age-groups continued to increase over the 1941
figures. In the age-group under 5 years, the increase was 95.8 per cent, while at the
opposite end of the scale the population from 70 years up has increased 86.0 per cent.
Table 1.—Estimated Total Population of British Columbia, by Sex
and Age-group, 1921-50
(In thousands.)
Year
Age-group
Total
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70 and
Over
1921	
  T.
M.
F.
1931	
 T.
M.
F.
1941	
 T.
M.
F.
1942	
 T.
M.
F.
1943	
  T.
M.
F.
1944
T.
M.
F.
1945	
 T.
M.
F.
1946	
 T.
M.
F.
1947 -
 T.
M.
F.
1948
T.
M.
F.
1949	
 T.
M.
F.
1950.  ...
 T.
M.
F.
523.71
292.8
230.9
694.3
385.2
309.1
817.8
435.0
382.8
870.0
458.5
411.5
900.0
471.8
428.2
932.0
486.1
445.9
949.0
491.5
457.5
,003.0
521.7
481.3
,044.0
542.4
501.6
,082.0
562.5
519.5
,114.0
577.8
536.2
138.0
588.8
549.2
49.8
25.0
24.8
52.0
26.2
25.8
59.5
30.1
29.4
67.6
34.4
33.2
74.7
38.1
36.6
82.1
41.9
40.2
90.2
45.9
44.3
91.6
46.7
44.9
98.7
51.0
47.7
109.3
56.1
53.2
111.9
58.0
53.9
116.5
60.3
56.2
54.3
27.4
26.9
59.2
30.1
29.1
54.8
27.9
26.9
58.2
29.5
28.7
60.5
30.6
29.9
64.3
32.5
31.8
65.8
33.3
32.5
73.6
37.3
36.3
79.0
40.0
39.0
78.2
39.5
38.7
85.1
43.0
42.1
90.9
46.4
44.5
45.3
22.8
22.5
59.9
30.2
29.7
60.7
30.6
30.1
63.0
31.7
31.3
63.7
32.1
31.6
63.4
32.1
31.3
63.1
31.9
31.2
67.1
34.0
33.1
70.2
35.7
34.5
67.3
34.0
33.3
71.2
35.9
35.3
74.4
37.5
36.9
37.6
19.1
18.5
62.4
31.9
30.5
66.6
33.7
32.9
68.1
34.1
34.0
68.1
33.9
34.2
69.1
34.0
35.1
69.2
34.0
35.2
71.5
35.5
36.0
72.2
35.8
36.4
73.8
37.5
36.3
73.7
37.2
36.5
73.5
36.6
36.9
76.4
39.6
36.8
107.5
58.1
49.4
141.3
70.1
71.2
154.2
74.8
79.4
159.0
76.4
82.6
163.5
77.9
85.6
162.9
76.4
86.5
175.0
85.1
89.9
179.1
86.5
92.6
182.0
89.0
93.0
181.5
88.4
93.1
179.1
87.3
91.8
100.9
59.8
41.1
98.8
54.1
44.7
117.8
63.3
54.5
128.6
68.2
60.4
135.5
71.1
64.4
142.7
74.0
68.7
146.7
75.0
71.7
159.2
81.4
77.8
166.4
84.7
81.7
164.3
82.2
82.1
170.1
85.1
85.0
173.5
86.4
87.1
80.2
50.2
30.0
112.5
68.1
44.4
100.6
53.8
46.8
104.6
56.0
48.6
106.9
57.4
49.5
109.9
59.3
50.6
111.6
60.3
51.3
118.5
64.1
54.4
124.2
67.3
56.9
127.8
68.2
59.6
132.0
70.0
62.0
136.0
71.7
64.3
46.1
29.0
17.1
79.2
49.0
30.2
106.0
61.5
44.5
108.2
62.1
46.1
108.2
61.4
46.8
108.0
60.6
47.4
106.6
59.0
47.6
107.6
58.8
48.8
107.6
58.2
49.4
116.6
63.1
53.5
117.7
63.6
54.1
118.0
63.4
54.6
23.4
14.5
8.9
41.8
25.6
16.2
72.0
42.4
29.6
76.5
44.8
31.7
79.9
46.6
33.3
83.3
48.4
34.9
85.7
49.7
36.0
88.0
50.7
37.3
91.2
52.3
38.9
101.0
58.0
43.0
103.7
58.7
45.0
104.5
58.7
45.8
9.7
5.4
4.3
21.0
11.9
9.1
38.5
21.6
16.9
41.0
22.9
18.1
43.5
24.2
19.3
45.7
25.4
20.3
47.2
26.0
21.2
50.9
28.1
22.8
55.4
30.9
24.5
61.7
34.9
26.8
67.1
37.9
29.2
71.6
40.5
31.1
i Does not include 910 cases where age was not given.
Sources:—
Census of Canada, 1921, 1931, and 1941.
Dominion Bureau of Statistics Analytical Report No. 1 (Second Edition). l 14 department of health and welfare
Table 2.—Population of Organized Areas in British Columbia, 19501
Area
Population
Population
Cities
Alberni	
Armstrong __
Chilliwack	
Courtenay—
Cranbrook—..
Cumberland..
Duncan	
Enderby _
Fernie	
Grand Forks..
Greenwood	
Kamloops	
Kaslo 	
Kelowna	
Kimberley	
Ladysmith	
Merritt	
Nanaimo	
Nelson _	
New Westminster..
North Vancouver...
Penticton	
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland 	
Salmon Arm	
Slocan	
Trail  _.
Vancouver .
Vernon	
Victoria	
Total.
Districts
Burnaby	
Central Saanich.
Chilliwhack	
Coldstream	
Coquitlam __
Delta 	
Esquimau	
Fraser Mills _
Glenmore	
Kent	
Langley	
Maple Ridge .
Matsqui	
Mission	
North Cowichan —
North Vancouver-
Oak Bay	
Peachland	
1.
10.
6,
2.
2,
7,
6
35
15
11.
8
3
3
7
9
3
4
1
12
397
11
62
,000
,050
,000
,680
,000
,000
,000
,110
,000
,650
900
,500
200
,000
,000
,100
,150
,500
,900
,000
,335
300
200
000
,000
,000
,200
200
500
200
475
,390
140
000
,500
654,180
55,000
2,200
13,500
1,500
13,500
5,500
7,000
449
1,200
2,600
12,500
12,680
11,000
4,500
6,500
16,000
12,750
600
Districts—Continued
Pitt Meadows    	
Richmond 	
Saanich 	
Salmon Arm... 	
Spallumcheen  	
Sumas	
Summerland. 	
Surrey   —	
Tadanac  -	
West Vancouver .	
Total 	
Villages
Abbotsford 	
Alert Bay 	
Burns Lake 	
Campbell River 	
Castlegar 	
Chapman Camp ...
Comox — 	
Cranberry Lake 	
Creston	
Dawson Creek— 	
Fort St. John 	
Gibsons Landing	
Harrison Hot Springs	
Hope  	
Kinnaird 	
Lake Cowichan	
Lillooet :  	
Lytton	
Marysville	
McBride 	
Mission  	
New Denver .	
North Kamloops	
Oliver  	
Osoyoos 	
Parksville 	
Pouce Coupe	
Qualicum Beach	
Quesnel  	
Salmo  	
Silverton  	
Smithers	
Squamish  	
Stewart     	
Terrace  	
Torino __ 	
Vanderhoof— 	
Westview 	
Williams Lake	
Total.
Total, organized areas.
1,200
25,000
24,500
1,200
2,300
4,000
3,500
35,000
470
13,000
289,149
900
550
550
200
650
625
650
,350
150
000
500
,100
800
,200
900
,600
550
330
840
530
,500
800
,000
,350
864
900
350
600
,800
800
300
,460
780
500
,000
400
700
,000
,200
48,279
991,608
1 Estimates supplied by the Department of Municipal Affairs. SUMMARY OF BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND MARRIAGES IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1950
There were 27,116 births in 1950, a slight decline of 185 from the figure for 1949.
The birth rate also declined, being 23.8 per 1,000 population this year, as compared
to 24.5 per 1,000 population in the previous year. The birth rate for the Province this
year is the lowest in the Dominion, being slightly less than that for Ontario and Manitoba,
where a rate of 24.1 was recorded.
The upward trend in the number of deaths occurring in the Province, which has
persisted since 1944, with the exception of the slight decline in 1949, was continued
in 1950. The total number of deaths increased from 11,315 in 1949 to 11,581 this year.
The rise in population accompanying this increase was sufficient to hold the mortality
rate per 1,000 population at the 1949 rate of 10.2. As noted last year, the preponderance
of older people in the Province has an adverse effect on the mortality rate.
The total number of marriages continued to decline from the peak reached in 1948,
when 11,718 occurred. In 1949 there were 11,376 marriages, and in 1950 the figure has
decreased to 11,110. Despite this drop in the number of marriages, the rate of 9.8 per
1,000 population in the Province still ranks second highest in the Dominion, being
exceeded only by the rate of 10.4 in Alberta.
Since 1941 there has been an increase of 320,200 in the population in the Province,
from 818,000 to 1,138,000. There have been 217,820 births over this period and 101,801
deaths. Thus the natural increase in population, or excess of births over deaths, has been
116,019 during the ten-year period. The remainder of the increase in population,
204,181, was therefore due to immigration from other Provinces and countries.
Table 3.—Crude Birth, Death, and Marriage Rates for British
Columbia, 1911-50, Inclusive
Population
Births
Number     Rate
Deaths
Number      Rate
Marriages
Number      Rate
1911..
1912..
1913..
1914..
1915.
1916.
1917..
1918-
1919..
1920..
1921..
1922.
1923..
1924.
1925..
1926.
1927..
1928.
1929..
1930.
1931..
1932.
1933..
1934..
1935..
1936.
1937..
1938...
1939-
1940..
1941..
1942..
1943.
1944-
1945..
1946.
1947...
1948-
1949.
1950.
393
407
424
442.
450
456,
464
474
488,
507
525
541
555
571
588
606
623
641
659
676
694,
707
717
727
736
745
759
775,
792,
805
818,
870,
900
932
949.
1,003.
1,044,
1,082
1,114
1,138,
,000
,000
,000
000
000
000
000
000
000
,000
,000
,000
000
000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
,000
000
000
000
,000
,000
,000
000
5,841
8,008
9,199
10,418
10,516
9,841
9,450
9,445
9,506
10,492
10,653
10,166
10,001
10,119
10,342
10,063
10,084
10,385
10,378
10,867
10,404
10,214
9,583
9,813
10,013
10,571
11,279
12,476
12,373
13,830
15,038
16,808
18,802
18,999
18,877
22,609
26,286
25,984
27,301
27,116
14.9
19.7
21.7
23.6
23.4
21.6
20.4
19.9
19.5
20.7
20.3
18.8
18.0
17.7
17.6
16.6
16.2
16.2
15.7
16.1
15.0
14.4
13.4
13.5
13.6
14.2
14.9
16.1
15.6
17.2
18.4
19.3
20.9
20.4
19.9
22.5
25.2
24.0
24.5
23.8
3,660
4,313
4,619
3,974
3,832
3,887
3,896
5,394
5,792
4,739
4,208
4,907
4,997
5,004
4,945
5,474
5,750
5,910
6,397
6,400
6,114
6,150
6,221
6,378
6,857
7,222
7,973
7,460
7,517
8,315
8,505
8,869
10,012
9,697
9,756
10,137
10,613
11,316
11,315
11,581
9.3
10.6
11.9
9.0
8.5
8.5
8.4
11.4
11.9
9.3
8.0
9.1
9.0
8.8
8.4
9.0
9.2
9.2
9.7
9.5
8.8
8.7
8.7
8.8
9.3
9.7
10.5
9.6
9.5
10.3
10.4
10.2
11.1
10.4
10.3
10.1
10.2
10.5
10.2
10.2
4,509
5,235
5,012
4,296
3,393
3,169
2,861
2,858
3,740
4,690
3,889
3,763
3,943
4,038
4,223
4,418
4,720
4,942
5,155
4,697
3,879
3,604
4,048
4,771
5,034
5,451
6,191
6,135
7,862
9,624
9,769
10,877
9,385
8,434
9,262
11,762
11,852
11,718
11,376
11,110
11.5
12.9
11.8
9.7
7.5
6.9
6.2
6.0
7.7
9.3
7.4
7.0
7.1
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.6
7.7
7.8
6.9
5.6
5.1
5.6
6.6
6.8
7.3
8.2
7.9
9.9
12.0
11.9
12.5
10.4
9.0
9.8
11.7
11.4
10.8
10.2
-9.8-
15 L 16 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Graph A.—Crude Birth, Death, and Marriage Rates for British
Columbia, 1911-50
(Rates per 1,000 population.)
^^^ BIRTHS
<'\
I      \
■' A
DEATHS
y——•
"■^ m mm mm — »™
 «■*       'x
MARRIAGES
\
 **"    wr
'V'
i          I          1          1
i   i   f
BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND MARRIAGES
Male births in the total population exceed female births by 4.6 per cent, whereas
among the population excluding Indians this excess was only 4.2 per cent. A consideration of the death rates by sex in the population shows that the rate for males is over
50 per cent higher than that for females, being 12.2 per 1,000 population, compared
to 7.8 for females.
Table 4a.—Number of Births, Deaths, and Marriages (Including
Indians), 1946-50
Year
Births
Deaths
Male
Female
Male
Female
Marriages
1946   :	
1947  	
11,489
13,405
13,322
13,957
13,887
11,120
12,881
12,652
13,344
13,229
6,245
6,626
7,055
7,100
7,204
3,892
3,987
4,261
4,215
4,377
11,762
11,852
11,718
11,376
11,110
1948                                                       — -
1949  	
1950
Table 4b.—Number of Births, Deaths, and Marriages (Excluding
Indians), 1946-50
Year
Births
Deaths
Male
Female
Male
Female
Marriages
1946      -----	
1947  - -	
1948
10,793
12,703
12,633
13,217
13,159
10,503
12,203
12,009
12,673
12,557
5,896
6,276
6,748
6,756
6,874
3,519
3,654
3,953
3,927
4,126
11,585
11,671
11,499
11,199
10,933
1QdQ
1050 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
NATURAL INCREASE
L 17
During 1950 there were 15,535 more births than there were deaths, a decrease of
451 from the figure for the previous year. The rate of natural increase per 1,000
population declined from 14.4 in 1949 to 13.7 in 1950. This latter rate was the lowest
in the Dominion, ranking below the rate of 14.4 for Ontario. The highest rate of 26.9
occurred in Newfoundland.
Table 5.—Natural Increase, 1946-50
Male
Female
Both
Sexes
Population
(Estimated)
Rate of
Year
Births
Deaths
Excess
of
Births
over
Deaths
Births
Deaths
Excess
of
Births
over
Deaths
Excess
of
Births
over
Deaths
Natural
Increase
per 1,000
Population
1946.. .. :.	
1947  .   ...	
1948	
11,489
13,405
13,332
13,957
13,887
6,245
6,626
7,055
7,100
7,204
5,244
6,779
6,277
6,857
6,683
11,120
12,881
12,652
13,344
13,229
3,892
3,987
4,261
4,215
4,377
7,228
8,894
8,391
9,129
8,852
12,472
15,673
14,668
15,986
15,535
1,003,000
1,044,000
1,082,000
1,114,000
1,138,000
12.4
15.0
13.6
1949  .
1950	
14.4
13.7
ILLEGITIMATE BIRTHS
This year the first decline occurred in the number of illegitimate births since 1939.
The number of illegitimate births in 1949 was 1,639, as compared to 1,593 in 1950,
the rate per 1,000 live births having declined from 60.0 to 58.7. British Columbia has
the highest rate of illegitimate births in Canada. The second highest rate, 46.2, was
registered in Alberta.
Table 6.—Illegitimate Births, 1941-50
Including Indians
Excluding Indians
Year
Number
Rate per 1,000
Live Births
Number
Rate per 1,000
Live Births
1941                                        	
688
759
827
1,048
1,121
1,262
1,502
1,585
1,639
1,593
45.8
45.2
44.0
55.2
59.4
55.8
57.1
61.0
60.0
58.7
545
606
633
777
847
958
1,183
1,228
1,281
1,195
38 5
194?
38.4
1943. -                             	
35.8
1944
43.7
1945
44.9
1946
45.0
1947
47.5
194R
49.8
1949                                    -   - -                	
49.5
1950                                     -                          -   -
46 5 L 18
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Graph B.—Illegitimate Birth Rates in British Columbia, 1941-50
(Rates per 1,000 live births.)
INCLUDING
INDIANS
.*'
*"'
V
V
/
/
— —■ -
EXCLUDING
, INDIANS
/
7
"
1941 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 19
BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN INSTITUTIONS
An increase again occurred in births in institutions as a percentage of total births.
Of the 27,116 births in British Columbia, 26,261 or 96.9 per cent were in hospitals.
This was an increase of 0.2 per cent over the figure for 1949. While deaths in institutions
increased in number, the percentage of such deaths declined from 61.9 in 1949 to 60.7
in 1950.
Table 7.—Number and Percentage of Total Births and Deaths
in Institutions, 1941-50
Births
Deaths
Year
In
Percentage
In
Percentage
Total
Institu
of Total in
Total
Institu
of Total in
tions
Institutions
tions
Institutions
1941	
15,038
13,134
87.3
8,505
4,469
52.5
1942	
16,808
15,000
89.2
8,869
4,920
55.5
1943   	
18,802
17,319
92.1
10,012
5,783
57.8
1944 	
18,999
17,686
93.1
9,697
5,846
60.3
1945...	
18,877
17,649
93.5
9,756
5,734
58.8
1946 	
22,609
21,470
95.0
10,137
5,911
58.3
1947	
26,286
25,134
95.6
10,613
6,419
60.5
1948   .  	
25,984
24,960
96.1
11,316
6,739
59.6
1949.     	
27,301
26,387
96.7
11,315
7,007
61.9
1950                                          	
27,116
26,281
96.9
11,581
7,030
60.7 L 20
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
AGE AND SEX MORTALITY
Tables 8a and 8b show the number of deaths occurring in the various age-groups
of the Province for males and females in 1946-50 among both the Indian and non-Indian
population.
This table shows that male mortality exceeds that for females at all ages except
among those 90 and over. The greatest excess occurs in the age-group from 60 to 69,
there being more than twice as many male deaths in this group as female deaths.
Mortality reaches its lowest point in those from 10 to 19 years of age, during this period
of life only slightly over 1 per cent of all deaths occur.
Table 8a.—Age and Sex Mortality (Including Indians), 1946-50
Year and Sex
Male
1946
1947
1948
Male
1949
1950
Female — , 	
496
356
500
368
516
342
460 45 25 20 16 61
345| 36| 22| 19| 12| 34
I  I  I  1  1
125
70
1,611
742
1,644
776
1,744
877
1,805
819
1,858
855
1,549
887
1,533
913
1,777
1,011
1,762
1,108
1,918
1,164
995
770
6,245
3,892
6,626
3,987
7,055
4,261
7,100
4,215
7,204
4,377
Table 8b.—Age and Sex Mortality (Excluding Indians), 1946-50
Year and Sex
at
a
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ON
1
i
Ui
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at
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p-
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
Female- _	
28
261
I
7   34
10   24
I
16| 15| 101 46
12| 13     9| 23
35
24|
380
207
173 188
1081157
149|199 406 772|1,836
94J141 227 400|   842
I      I      I      I
1,592
720
1,619
766
801 1,723
391    858
786(1,783
405|   799
1,505
860
1,516
1,751
991
1,731
1,083
1,887 972
1,151
104
140
111
7471133
5,896
3,519
6,276
3,654
6,748
3,953
2 6,756
.... 3,927
6,874
4,126 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 21
THE IMPROVEMENT IN MORTALITY
Since the beginning of the century there has been a continuing improvement in the
mortality experience of the population in this Province. A comparison of age-specific
death rates between 1930 and 1950 gives some indication of what this improvement has
meant, even over the last twenty years.
The following table shows the rates of death per 1,000 population for the various
age-groups in 1930 as compared to the rates existing in 1950. It will be noted from this
table that for the male population the death rates have declined in each of the age-groups
except among those from 60 to 69, and even for this group the increase is not excessive.
The rate among male infants under one year has dropped by over 50 per cent, and the
same applies to each of the age-groups from 1 to 4, 5 to 9, 10 to 19, and 20 to 29.
In 1930, 60 per cent of the male deaths were among those from 0 to 60 years old and
40 per cent among those 60 years and over, while in 1950 only 32 per cent of the people
dying were under 60, the remaining 68 per cent being 60 or over.
For the female population the age-specific death rates have declined at all ages
except for those 90 years and over. The death rate among infants in 1950 is not quite
half that for 1930, but, as for the male population, in the age-groups up to 20 to 29 the
rate this year is less than one-half the rate for 1930. Among females the percentages
of deaths for those under 59 and from 60 on in 1930 and 1950 follow very closely those
for the male population.
Table 9.—Comparison between the Age-specific Death Rates
during 1930 and 1950
Males
Females
Age-group
1930
1950
1930
1950
Deaths
Rate
Deaths
Rate
Deaths
Rate
Deaths
Rate
0- 1 	
1- 4  	
5- 9  	
10-19  	
20-29	
326
106
89
154
264
277
531
654
702
575
278
44
67.2
5.0
3.0
2.6
4.7
5.0
8.0
14.2
29.1
62.5
173.8
440.0
460
106
61
84
177
222
418
786
1,858
1,918
995
115
33.1
2.3
1.3
1.1
2.0
2.6
5.8
12.4
31.7
60.9
121.3
143.8
236
99
57
125
170
156
260
298
361
363
222
33
50.3
4.8
2.0
2.3
3.5
3.5
6.1
10.5
23.6
55.0
138.8
165.0
345
89
34
59
112
154
241
411
855
1,164
770
142
25.9
2.1
0.8
0.8
1.2
30-39 	
1.8
40-49	
3.7
50-59   	
60-69 	
70-79	
80-89 	
90 and over	
7.5
18.7
49.5
113.2
177.5
THE CODING OF CAUSES OF DEATH
In order that the information shown on the medical certificate of cause of death may
be processed statistically, it is necessary that the underlying cause of death, as determined
from the certificate, be assigned a code number. These code numbers are contained in
the International Lists of Causes of Death. Where one cause of death only is mentioned
on the medical certificate of cause of death, no problem arises in the coding of the death.
If more than one cause is shown, however, it is necessary to determine which one of those
mentioned shall be chosen as the prime cause of death. Before 1950, uniform rules for
just cause selection were followed on this continent and elsewhere, in order to obtain the
maximum degree of comparability between statistics of various provinces and countries.
However, by 1950 it was felt that the quality of the medical certification had increased
to the point where more accurate statistics would be obtained by accepting the underlying
cause as stated by the certifying physician himself rather than by following a set of L 22 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
arbitrary rules. Thus in 1950 the Sixth Revision of the International Statistical Classification of Disease, Injuries, and Causes of Death was brought into use in Canada and
also in many of the other countries of the world. While under previous revisions of the
International List it was possible to obtain figures which were fairly comparable for the
periods covered by the various revisions, under the Sixth Revision this became more
difficult, inasmuch as both the code itself and more particularly the coding procedure
mentioned above were changed. The medical certificate of cause of death was set up in
such a manner as to bring out the underlying cause as decided on by the certifying
physician. This recognizes the fact that he is in a better position than anyone else to
determine the condition to which the death should be assigned. The statistics now
available on mortality, reflecting as they do the best obtainable opinion as to the underlying cause of death, will be of increased value in studies on the effect of the various
causes of death.
PRINCIPAL CAUSATIVE FACTORS OF MORTALITY IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA
It has been the practice in previous years to discuss the ten leading causes of death.
In doing so, it was realized that a certain arbitrary factor enters into the choices for the
leading causes of death, since some of these causes are actually groupings of a number
of associated conditions, and these groupings might vary according to the needs of the
individual researcher. Hence, it has been considered advisable to highlight in this Report
some of the more commonly accepted groupings of causes of death which constitute the
greater proportion of mortality occurring in the Province.
The following table shows ten of the important cause of death categories, ranked
according to the magnitude of the number of deaths they cause. The rating indicates
the position of each of these groups for the years during the period covered.
The remarks regarding comparability of mortality under the sixth and previous
revisions of the International List of Causes of Death, which were noted in the section
" The Coding of Causes of Death," should be taken account of in any consideration of
the mortality from the various cause of death groupings in 1950 and in previous years.
For information regarding the comparability of the mortality figures for some of the
specific cause of death groups as coded under the Fifth Revision and under the Sixth
Revision, reference should be made to the comments preceding the tables on these causes.
With particular reference to the mortality from the cardiovascular-renal diseases, including diseases of the heart and arteries, vascular lesions of the central nervous system, and
nephritis and nephrosis, the mortality attributed to these diseases in total has not been
seriously affected by the changes in medical certification procedures, and the statistics
should be useful in comparisons between 1950 and previous years. However, within
the broad category, there has been a redistribution of assignments to specific causes, to the
extent that direct comparison is not practicable for the individual groupings. VITAL STATISTICS REPORT  1950
L 23
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L 25
THE FOUR CHIEF CAUSES OF DEATH IN THE DIFFERENT
AGE-GROUPS
For the population under one year of age, four main causes of death—namely,
immaturity, injury at birth, pneumonia, and congenital malformations—accounted for
over half the mortality. Immaturity was charged with almost one-fifth of all infant deaths.
There were 105 deaths from injury at birth, and 101 from pneumonia. Congenital
malformations took 90 infant lives. When Indians are excluded, the above four causes
were responsible for 63 per cent of the mortality. The first and second causes are the
same for this group as for the total population. Pneumonia no longer appears as one of
the first four causes, however, being replaced by congenital malformations. In fourth
place is asphyxia and atelectasis.
In the age-group from 1 to 4 years, accidents caused over one-quarter of the deaths.
Pneumonia and tuberculosis accounted for over 10 per cent each, and congenital malformations 7 per cent. For the groups 5 to 9 and 10 to 19 years of age, the first three
causes are the same—namely, accidents, tuberculosis, and malignancies. Pneumonia
was in fourth place in the 5-9 group, and congenital malformations in the 10-19 group.
In the 20-29-year age-group, accidental deaths and tuberculosis retain their importance,
the first cause accounting for 39.4 per cent of the deaths, the second for 14.2 per cent.
Suicides caused 8.7 per cent of the deaths in this group, and malignant neoplasms 6.2
per cent.
For the group from 30 to 39 years of age, accidents continued to be the leading
cause of death. Malignancies were next in importance, followed by heart-diseases, which
made their first appearance among the four major causes in this age-group. Tuberculosis
took almost as many lives as heart-diseases. In all the age-groups from 40 on, diseases
of the heart lead other conditions in the amount of mortality caused. Malignant neoplasms were in second place in each age-group except the last, when they were replaced
by vascular lesions of the central nervous system. Accidental deaths were in third place
in the 40-49 group and in fourth place in each of the remaining age categories, third place
being taken by vascular lesions in the 50-59, 60-69, and 70-79 groups, and malignant
neoplasms in the 90-and-over group.
In the age-groups from 40 on, the four major causes—namely, diseases of the heart,
malignant neoplasms, vascular lesions of the central nervous system, and accidents—
accounted for over three-quarters of all the mortality which arose in these groups. In the
age-groups over 50, over 70 per cent of the deaths were due to either diseases of the
heart, malignant neoplasms, or vascular lesions of the central nervous system.
Table 11a.—Four Chief Causes of Death in the Different Age-groups
(Including Indians), 1950
Int. List
No.
Cause of Death
Deaths in
Age-groups
by Cause
of Death
Per Cent of
Deaths in
Age-groups
due to Speci-
fled Causes
Age-specific
Death Rate
per 1,000
Population
Deaths
from
Specified
Causes at
All Ages
774, 776
760-761
490-^93, 763
750-759
800-962
49CM93, 763
001-019
750-759
Under 1 Year—Deaths, 805
1. Immaturity  	
2. Injury at birth	
3. Pneumonia	
4. Congenital malformations -
1-4 Years—Deaths, 195
1. Accidental deaths —	
2. Pneumonia -	
3. Tuberculosis	
4. Congenital malformations
147
105
101
90
50
23
21
14
18.3
13.0
12.5
11.8
25.6
11.8
10.8
7.2
5.35
3.82
3.67
3.28
0.56
0.26
0.24
0.16
147
105
490
127
905
490
313
.127 L 26
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 11a.—Four Chief Causes of Death in the Different Age-groups
(Including Indians), 1950—Continued
Int. List
No.
Cause of Death
Deaths in
Age-groups
by Cause
of Death
Per Cent of
Deaths in
Age-groups
due to Specified Causes
Age-specific
Death Rate
per 1,000
Population
Deaths
from
Specified
Causes at
All Ages
5-9 Years—Deaths, 95
800-962
001-019
140-205
490-493, 763
800-962
001-019
140-205
750-759
800-962
001-019
963, 970-979
140-205
800-962
140-205
410-443
001-019
410^143
140-205
800-962
001-019
410-443
140-205
330-334
800-962
410-443
140-205
330-334
800-962
410-443
140-205
330-334
800-962
410-443
330-334
140-205
800-962
Accidental deaths.
Tuberculosis	
Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues - _	
Penumonia 	
10-19 Years—Deaths, 143
Accidental deaths.
Tuberculosis 	
3. Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues  „ -
4. Congenital malformations  - 	
20-29 Years—Deaths, 289
1. Accidental deaths	
2. Tuberculosis  _ 	
3. Suicides   -
4. Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lym
phatic and haematopoietic tissues_
30-39 Years—Deaths, 376
1. Accidental deaths .
2. Malignant neoplasm, including1 neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues	
3. Diseases of heart   - -	
4. Tuberculosis _ 	
40-49 Years—Deaths, 659
1. Diseases of heart 	
2. Malignant neoplasm, including' neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues— _	
3. Accidental deaths    —
4. Tuberculosis „ —	
50-59 Years—Deaths, 1,197
Diseases of heart — — - 	
Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues
Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
Accidental deaths    _ —
60-69 Years—Deaths, 2,713
1. Diseases of heart   	
2. Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues _ —
3. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
4. Accidental deaths — — —
70-79 Years—Deaths, 3,082
1. Diseases of heart  - - —	
2. Malignant neoplasm, including- neoplasms of lym
phatic and haematopoietic tissues
3. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
4. Accidental deaths _ _	
80 Years and over—Deaths, 2,022
1. Diseases of heart	
2. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
3. Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues _. _ -
4. Accidental deaths - _
42
12
55
15
10
7
114
41
25
18
96
53
39
38
156
150
102
44
440
277
104
78
1,089
578
286
121
1,337
474
444
112
956
319
147
101
44.2
12.6
9.5
5.3
38.5
10.5
7.0
4.9
39.4
14.2
8.7
6.2
25.5
14.1
10.4
10.1
23.7
22.8
15.5
6.7
36.8
23.1
8.7
6.5
40.1
21.3
10.5
4.5
43.4
15.4
14.4
3.6
47.3
15.8
7.3
5.0
0.46
0.13
0.10
0.06
0.37
0.10
0.07
0.05
0.64
0.23
0.14
0.10
0.55
0.31
0.22
0.22
1.15
1.10
0.75
0.32
3.73
2.35
0.88
0.66
10.42
5.53
2.74
1.16
24.31
8.62
8.07
2.04
57.59
19.22
8.86
6.08
905
313
1,729
490
905
313
1,729
127
905
313
207
1,729
905
1,729
4,043
313
4,043
1,729
905
313
4,043
1,729
1,194
905
4,043
1,729
1,194
905
4,043
1,729
1,194
905
4,043
1,194
1,729
905 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 27
Table 11b.—Four Chief Causes of Death in the Different Age-groups
(Excluding Indians), 1950
Int. List
No.
Cause of Death
Deaths in
Age-groups
by Cause
of Death
Per Cent of
Deaths in
Age-groups
due to Speci
fied Causes
Age-specific
Death Rate
per 1,000
Population
Deaths
from
Specified
Causes at
All Ages
774, 776
760-761
750-759
762
800-962
490-493, 763
750-759
140-205
800-962
140-205
490-493, 763
400-402
001-019
085
800-962
140-205
970-979
750-759
800-962
001-019
140-205
970-979
800-962
140-205
410-443
001-019
410-443
140-205
800-962
001-019
410-443
140-205
330-334
800-962
410-443
140-205
330-334
800-962
Under 1 Year—Deaths, 621
1. Immaturity	
2. Injury at birth     	
3. Congenital malformations.
4. Asphyxia and atelectasis ....
1-4 Years—Deaths, 134
1. Accidental deaths  	
2. Pneumonia    	
3. Congenital malformations  	
4. Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues 	
5-9 Years—Deaths, 69
Accidental deaths.
Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues 	
Pneumonia  	
Rheumatic fever  	
Tuberculosis	
4. Measles .
10-19 Years—Deaths, 101
1. Accidental deaths   	
2. Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues _ 	
3. Suicides   	
4. Congenital malformations  	
20-29 Years—Deaths, 243
1. Accidental deaths .	
2. Tuberculosis  	
3. Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lym
phatic and haematopoietic tissues .
4. Suicides 	
30-39 Years—Deaths, 340
1. Accidental deaths 	
2. Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues 	
3. Diseases of the heart	
4. Tuberculosis    	
40-49 Years—Deaths, 633
1. Diseases of heart 	
2. Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lym
phatic and haematopoietic tissues.
3. Accidental deaths	
4. Tuberculosis 	
50-59 Years—Deaths, 1,172
Diseases of heart 	
Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues
Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
Accidental deaths  	
60-69 Years—Deaths, 2,678
1. Diseases of heart	
2. Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues 	
3. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
4. Accidental deaths _    	
125
100
89
78
39
17
12
33
9
4
4
3
3
41
10
7
6
102
22
18
16
76
53
36
34
153
147
95
38
435
271
104
76
1,082
574
279
117
20.1
16.1
14.3
12.6
29.1
12.7
9.0
8.2
47.8
13.0
5.8
5.8
4.3
4.3
40.6
9.9
6.9
5.9
42.0
9.1
7.4
6.6
22.4
15.6
10.6
10.0
24.2
23.2
15.0
6.0
37.1
23.1
8.9
6.5
40.4
21.4
10.4
4.4
4.80
3.84
3.41
2.99
0.46
0.20
0.14
0.13
0.38
0.10
0.05
0.05
0.03
0.03
0.29
0.07
0.05
0.04
0.58
0.13
0.10
0.09
0.44
0.31
0.21
0.20
1.15
1.10
0.71
0.28
3.74
2.33
0.89
0.65
10.40
5.52
2.68
1.13
125
100
123
78
812
314
123
1,713
812
1,713
314
16
239
9
812
1,713
206
123
812
239
1,713
206
812
1,731
3,993
239
3,993
1,713
812
239
3,993
1,713
1,174
812
3,993
1,713
1,174
812 L 28
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 11b.—Four Chief Causes of Death in the Different Age-groups
(Excluding Indians), 1950—Continued
Int. List
No.
Cause of Death
Deaths in
Age-groups
by Cause
of Death
Per Cent of
Deaths in
Age-groups
due to Specified Causes
Age-specific
Death Rate
per 1,000
Population
Deaths
from
Specified
Causes at
All Ages
410-443
140-205
330-334
800-962
410-443
330-334
140-205
800-962
70-79 Years—Deaths, 3,038
1. Diseases of heart	
2. Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues
3. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
4. Accidental deaths 	
80 Years and over—Deaths, 1,967
1. Diseases of heart	
2. Vascular lesions affecting the central nervous system
3. Malignant neoplasm, including neoplasms of lymphatic and haematopoietic tissues 	
4. Accidental deaths  	
1,324
472
440
107
893
314
146
98
43.6
15.5
14.5
3.5
47.9
16.0
7.4
5.0
24.41
8.70
8.11
1.97
58.43
19.45
9.05
6.07
3,993
1,713
1,174
812
3,993
1,174
1,713
812
MORTALITY FROM THE CARDIOVASCULAR-RENAL DISEASES
The following table shows clearly the large proportion of all deaths among the
population which are caused by the cardiovascular-renal diseases. Over the past 'five
years this proportion has increased from 43.4 per cent to 48.4 per cent.
The mortality attributed to the cardiovascular-renal diseases in total has not been
seriously affected by the changes in medical certification procedures, and these statistics
should be useful in comparisons between 1950 and previous years. However, within the
broad category, there has been a redistribution of assignments to specific causes, to the
extent that direct comparison is not practicable for the individual groupings.
For the year 1950, diseases of the heart accounted for 72.2 per cent of all deaths in
the cardiovascular-renal group. Vascular lesions of the central nervous system took an
additional 21.3 per cent, and the other two conditions—diseases of the arteries and
nephritis and nephrosis—were responsible for the remaining 6.5 per cent of deaths.
Table 12.—Mortality from the Cardiovascular-Renal Diseases, 1946-50
Int. List
Cause of Death
Including Indians
Excluding Indians
No.
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
410-443
330-334
3,057
804
179
360
3,369
767
162
363
3,713
912
204
429
3,755
913
176
390
4,043
1,194
206
160
3,017
785
176
354
3,318
756
161
359
3,664
902
203
421
3,705
894
175
382
3,993
1,174
203
Vascular lesions of central nervous
450-456
590-594
154
4,400
4,661 | 5,258
5,234
5,603
4,332
4,594 | 5,190
5,156 | 5,524
43.4
43.9 |   46.5 |   46.3
48.4
44.4
45.2 |   49.2
47.5 |   49.8
Rate per 100,000 population ...
438.7
446.5
486.0
469.8
492.4
443.6
451.7 |492.4
1
475.0
498.1
DISEASES OF THE HEART
Arteriosclerotic and degenerative .heart disease caused over four-fifths of the mortality from all types of heart diseases, resulting in almost twice as many male deaths as
female deaths. It exacted its greatest toll in the 70-79 group but, as may be seen from
the table, took a considerable number of lives in each of the age-groups from 50 on. VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 29
Hypertensive heart disease caused 10.4 per cent of the deaths from heart disease,
these deaths being fairly evenly distributed between males and females. As was the case
for arteriosclerotic and degenerative heart disease, the greatest number of deaths from this
cause occurred in the 70-79-year age-group.
Chronic rheumatic heart disease accounted for 5 per cent of deaths due to diseases of
the heart, the remaining 3.1 per cent being caused by other and unspecified heart disease.
Table 13.—Mortality from Diseases of the Heart, 1950
Int. List
No.
Type of Heart-disease
0-19
20-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
80-89
90 and
Over
Total
410-416
420-422
Chronic rheumatic  M.
F.
Arteriosclerotic    and    degenera-
3
2
1
1
2
1
7
3
19
13
13
6
1
32
20
20
13
87
24
3
4
2
3
112
44
12
27
284
64
28
13
9
3
333
107
29
23
651
235
61
55
25
10
766
323
21
12
700
410
80
72
28
14
829
508
7
3
397
314
44
52
16
6
464
375
1
43
58
3
4
3
5
50
67
112
93
2,176
440-443
430-434
Hypertensive    	
Other diseases of the heart.
Totals  	
F.
M.
F.
_M.
F.
M
1,111
220
201
85
42
2,593
F.
1,447
MORTALITY FROM CANCER
Comparability for the mortality from cancer in 1950 and in previous years was not
greatly affected by the change-over from the Fifth to the Sixth Revision. The foot-notes
to Table 14 will indicate obvious inconsistencies between categories in the two revisions,
and will indicate where caution should be exercised in making direct comparisons between
the mortality from individual causes.
By far the greatest proportion of cancer deaths, 43 per cent, occur as the result of
malignancies of the digestive organs or peritoneum, and this percentage has varied little
over the past five years. The next most important site is the respiratory organs, where
11 per cent of fatal cancer occurring in 1950 was located. Cancer of the breast and
cancer of the genital system follow, having each caused almost 9 per cent of all deaths
from this disease. Cancer of the urinary organs caused 6 per cent of these deaths, and
this was followed by cancer of the male genital organs, 5 per cent.
Table 14.—Mortality from Cancer, 1946-50
Int. List
No.
Site of Cancer
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
140-148
150-159
160-165
171-176
170
177-179
180-181
190-191, 205
193
192, 194-204
Buccal cavity1	
Digestive organs and peritoneum _
Respiratory organs 	
Female genital organs _	
Breast       	
Male genital organs   	
Urinary organs  	
Skin2......   	
Brain and other nervous system3	
Other and unspecified sites* 	
Totals  	
Per cent of all deaths 	
Rate per 1,000 population
34
706
132
128
164
85
82
15
35
156
41
695
147
143
127
82
94
18
44
167
45
751
151
134
175
114
101
22
34
178
1,537
1,558
1,705
15.2
14.7
15.1
1.5
I
1.6
43
738
197
143
151
114
86
22
51
182
42
742
183
147
148
82
97
21
69
198
1,727
1,729
15.3
14.9
1.6
1.5
1 Under the Fifth Revision this category included cancer of the jaw-bone, whereas in 1950, under the Sixth Revision,
all bone cancer is included in 195,
2 Under the Fifth Revision this category excluded mycosis fungoides, now included as 205.
3 Under the Fifth Revision this category covered glioma of the eye, now included in 192 among other and unspecified
sites. Cancer of the nerve, formerly shown among other and unspecified sites, is now included in cancer of the brain and
other parts of the nervous system.
4 This category in 1950 includes cancer of the jaw-bone, formerly shown in cancer of the buccal cavity, and glioma
of the eye, formerly shown in cancer of the brain and other nervous system. It excludes cancer of the nerve in 1950,
this being included in cancer of the brain and other nervous system. L 30
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
SPECIAL CLASSIFICATION OF ACCIDENTAL DEATHS
The Sixth Revision of the International List of Causes of Death makes provision for
classifying deaths from external causes according to both the external cause and the
nature of the fatal injury which resulted from it. Thus it differs from previous revisions,
which treated only one aspect of these deaths—the external cause. A supplemental code
had been in use with certain of these categories, but this showed only the broadest
classifications of nature of injury, such as absorption of poisonous gas, burns, mechanical
suffocation, etc. The classification now in use makes it possible to obtain fairly detailed
information, both as to the external circumstances surrounding the accident and also as
to the type of injury which resulted from it, information which will be of considerable
use in studying accidental and violent deaths.
Table 15.—Special Classification of Accidental Deaths, 1950
Int. List
No.
Cause of Death
Male
Female
Total
E800-E802
E810-E835
E840-E845
E850-E858
E860-E866
E900-E904
E910-E936
E970-E979
E980-E985
E810-E835
E840-E845
E900-E904
E910-E936
E970-E979
E980-E985
E800-E802
E810-E835
E840-E845
E900-E904
E910-E936
E960-E965
E810-E835
E810-E835
E840-E845
E850-E858
E860-E866
E900-E904
E910-E936
E970-E979
E980-E985
E800-E802
E810-E835
E840-E845
E850-E858
E860-E866
E900-E904
E910-E936
E970-E979
E980-E985
E800-E802
E810-E835
E910-E936
E970-E979
E980-E985
Fracture of skull (N800-N804).
Railway accidents.:
Motor-vehicle accidents	
Other road-vehicle accidents..
Water-transport accidents	
Aircraft accidents	
Accidental falls  	
Other accidents  _	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury   	
Homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons  (not
in war)	
Fracture of spine and trunk (N805-N809)..
Motor-vehicle accidents  	
Other road-vehicle accidents-
Accidental falls _ —	
Other accidents 	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury.   	
Homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons  (not
in war)
Fracture of limbs (N810-N829)..
Railway accidents	
Motor-vehicle accidents	
Other road-vehicle accidents..
Accidental falls	
Other accidents 	
Late effects of injury and poisoning..
Dislocation without fracture (N830-N839)..
Motor-vehicle accidents	
Head injury (excluding fracture) (N850-N856)-
Motor-vehicle accidents	
Other road-vehicle accidents..
Water-transport accidents	
Aircraft accidents	
Accidental falls	
Other accidents	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury 	
Homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons (not
in war). _ _   	
Internal injury of chest, abdomen, and pelvis (N860-N869)..
Railway accidents- 	
Motor-vehicle accidents—	
Other road-vehicle accidents..
Water-transport accidents	
Aircraft accidents	
Accidental falls	
Other accidents   	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury— 	
Homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons  (not
in war)
Laceration and open wounds (N870-N908)..
Railway accidents.-
Motor-vehicle accidents    	
Other accidents  - 	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury...   	
Homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons (not
in war)	
147
12
51
1
2
2
30
40
7
2
46
20
1
10
10
3
45
2
5
1
35
1
1
84
15
1
1
1
20
6
40
101
6
32
1
1
2
6
40
9
4
18
3
2
6
6
26
3
13
15
70
5
65
1
1
23
10
6
1
4
2
21
12
173
15
64
1
2
2
35
42
10
2
61
28
1
17
10
2
3
115
2
10
1
100
1
1
1
1
107
25
1
1
1
26
7
44
2
122
6
44
1
1
2
6
43
13
6
21
3
4
6
7 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 31
Table 15.—Special Classification of Accidental Deaths, 1950—Continued
Int. List
No.
Cause of Death
Male
Female
Total
E900-E904
E870-E888
E900-E904
E910-E936
E850-E858
E860-E866
E910-E936
E850-E858
E870-E888
E890-E895
E910-E936
E970-E979
E800-E802
E810-E835
E850-E858
E860-E866
E900-E904
E910-E936
E960-E965
E970-E979
E980-E985
E800-E985
Superficial injury, contusion and crushing with intact skin surface
(N910-N929)	
Accidental falls._   	
Effects of foreign body entering through orifice (N930-N936)	
Accidental poisoning by solid and liquid substances	
Accidental falls	
Other accidents.
Burns (N940-N949).
Water-transport accidents-
Aircraft accidents	
Other accidents — 	
Effects of poisons (N970-N979)..
Water-transport accidents-
Accidental poisoning by solid and liquid substances-
Accidental poisoning by gases and vapours  _
Other accidents  —	
Suicide and self-inflicted injury-
All other and unspecified effects of external causes  (N950-N959,
N980-N999)	
Railway accidents	
Motor-vehicle accidents..
Water-transport accidents-
Aircraft accidents 	
Accidental falls 	
Other accidents	
Late effects of injury and poisoning-
Suicide and self-inflicted injury-
Homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons  (not
in war)  	
Total accidental deaths..
2
2
22
1
21
27
4
2
21
117
1
19
38
15
44
225
5
16
37
2
1
114
2
47
1
834
1
1
14
1
13
9
9
59
2
7
12
10
28
51
3
3
i
32
12
293
3
3
36
1
1
34
36
4
2
30
176
3
26
50
25
72
276
5
19
40
2
2
146
2
59
1
1,127
MORTALITY FROM TUBERCULOSIS
There was a considerable drop in the mortality from tuberculosis this year both in
number and rate, and as the comparability for this cause was not greatly affected by the
change in coding procedure under the Fifth Revision and under the Sixth Revision, this
decline may be considered to be for the most part a true decrease in tuberculosis mortality.
Deaths from tuberculosis of the respiratory system were down approximately 25 per cent
from the 1949 figure. For non-respiratory tuberculosis, there was a decline of 2 in the
number of cases to 42.
Table 16.—Mortality from Tuberculosis,
1946
-50
Int. List
Organ or Site Affected
Including Indians
Excluding Indians
No.
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
001 008
492
40
9
5
3
9
18
457
36
6
11
2
12
12
381
27
3
8
2
7
14
362
24
5
3
1
5
6
271
22
1
2
1
4
12
323
19
4
2
2
7
12
316
13
4
9
1
12
7
259
10
3
6
4
4
273
9
4
1
1
5
2
215
010
7
011
1
012 0 013 0
012.1-012.3,
013.1 013 3
1
014-018
3
019
10
Totals                 	
576
536
442
406 |   313
369
362
286
295
239
5.7
5.1
3.9
3.6 |    2.7
3.9
3.6
2.7
2.8
22
0.6
0.5
0.4
0.4
0.3
0.4
0.4
0.3
0.3
02 L 32
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
INFANT MORTALITY
Infant deaths in the Province continue to decline, having reached a low of 29.7 per
1,000 for the population including Indians and 24.1 for the population excluding Indians.
The rate for this Province is the lowest in the Dominion, being followed by that for
Alberta, 31.8. As will be apparent from the following table, there is a disproportionate
drop in the number of deaths from immature birth and an increase in the deaths from
certain other diseases peculiar to early infancy, such as atelectasis and injury at birth.
Under the Sixth Revision of the International List, immaturity was shown as a subsidiary
code qualifying some other definable condition where the other condition was known.
The deaths charged to immaturity above had no other condition stated. For this reason,
and becase of other major changes in the system of classifying infant deaths in the Sixth
Revision, direct comparisons between mortality from these causes in 1950 and in previous
years should not be made.
The table shows immature birth to be the leading cause of infant mortality, having
accounted for almost one-fifth of all such deaths. This cause was followed by injury at
birth, pneumonia, congenital malformations, and atelectasis. These five causes accounted
for two-thirds of all infant deaths.
Graph C.—Infant Mortality Rates, British Columbia, 1921-50
(Rates per 1,000 live births.)
RATE
90
8n
70
60
/        \\
f     *V   y
■nW
INCLUDING
INDIANS
40
30
20
EXCLUDING   \
INDIANS
'•S^
A        X
V-..
mi m^                 *
%yj^'
™\
10
1921
1926
1931
1936
1941
1946
1950 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
Table 17.—Infant Mortality, 1946-50
L 33
Int. List
Cause of Death
Including Indians
Excluding Indians
No.
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
800-965
18
29
4
69
24
16
75
125
2
no
239
7
2
133
35
41
5
53
40
9
85
119
11
105
300
15
17
124
39
40
1
26
27
21
73
115
2
103
303
10
4
104
41
35
7
35
17
11
93
120
12
123
274
6
1
83
33
84
10
24
14
26
105
90
5
101
147
2
5
159
15
27
2
50
21
5
71
117
1
38
,    212
1
31
36
3
31
38
34
39
1
17
26
7
70
110
45
270
32
33
7
20
15
6
91
113
3
49
244
2
1
52
28
762.0
78
500-502
9
571.0,
572,764
7
273
480-483
Diseases of the thymus gland	
11
6
760-761
85
115
1
55
255
3
6
75
100
750-759
89
085
490-493,
763
44
774,776
001-019
125
056
2
68
3
Other causes  _
Totals  -	
71
121
852
959
868
858
805
631
734
689
668
621
22,609
26,286
25,984
27,301
27,116
21,296
24,906
24,642
25,890
25,716
37.7
36.5
33.4
31.4
29.7
29.6
29.5
28.0
25.8
24.1
Table 18.—Neo-natal, Infant, and Maternal Mortality Rates for
British Columbia, 1941-50
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
Neo-natal mortality rates per
births—
1,000 live
21.1
19.2
50.2
36.7
30.0
142.9
2.7
2.2
10.0
20.0
19.1
35.3
35.5
29.5
127.5
2.7
2.5
4.9
23.3
22.2
41.4
37.8
31.8
131.2
2.5
2.3
6.2
23.7
22.0
49.1
40.4
32.8
153.1
2.6
2.4
5.8
24.1
23.1
39.0
42.0
34.3
151.1
2.6
2.4
5.7
22.1
19.7
47.2
37.7
29.6
168.3
1.7
1.4
6.1
22.4
20.8
52.9
36.5
29.5
163.0
1.2
1.2
7.2
21.1
20.1
40.1
33.4
28.0
133.4
1.1
1.0
3.0
19.8
18.7
39.7
31.4
25.8
134.7
1.0
1.0
2.1
17.8
17.1
31.4
Infant   mortality   rates   per
births—
1,000   live
29.7
24.1
131.4
Maternal mortality rates per
births—
1,000 live
1.0
0.9
2.1 L 34
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
MATERNAL MORTALITY
Maternal mortality declined only slightly during the year, the rate for the population
including Indians remaining the same as in 1950. That for the population excluding
Indians was down to 0.9 per 1,000 live births in 1950, as compared to 1.0 in 1949.
Graph D.—Maternal Mortality Rates, British Columbia, 1921-50
(Rates per 1,000 live births.)
RATE
9 	
7 	
INCLUDING
y\ INDIANS
-
V
EXCLUDING
INDIANS
VA
^^\
*\
<
»\
0 	
■*
1921
1926
1931
1936
1941
1946
1950 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
Table 19.—Maternal Mortality, 1946-50
L 35
Int. List
Cause of Death
Including Indians
Excluding Indians
No.
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
651-652
1
1
~ 4
2
6
14
5
2
3
3
2
4
2
5
6
5
3
2
5
1
1
3
6
5
4
3
1
2
2
4
1
6
6
6
1
6
2
2
~3
1
2
4
5
2
1
1
4
2
4
13
4
1
3
2
4
2
5
6
5
2
2
5
1
1
3
4
4
3
3
1
2
2
4
1
3
6
6
1
6
650
1
645
2
643-644
642
640-641,
646-649
670-672
680-684,
687
685-686
Toxaemias of pregnancy	
Other diseases and accidents of pregnancy-
Haemorrhage of childbirth and puerperium..
Infection during childbirth and puerperium
3
1
1
3
5
673-678
Other accidents and specified conditions of
2
660,
688-689
Other and unspecified conditions of childbirth and puerperium. 	
Totals  	
38
32
29
28
27
30
31
25
25
24
1.7
1.2
1.1
1.0
1.0
1.4
1.2
1.0
1.0
0.9 L 36
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
MORTALITY FROM NOTIFIABLE DISEASES
The figures below show deaths from notifiable diseases, the reporting of which is
required by the Province. The figures for mortality from syphilis in 1950 are not comparable with those for previous years, as changes in classification under the Sixth Revision
were such as to lower considerably the number of deaths ascribed to this cause. For most
other causes, however, comparability was not seriously affected.
Table 20.—Mortality from Notifiable Diseases, 1946-50
Int. List
No.
Cause of Death
Including Indians
1946     1947     1948     1949     1950
Excluding Indians
1946     1947     1948     1949     1950
132
062
049.1
140-205
057.0
087
043
370
055
045-046
082-083
052
086
064.2
480-483
060
110-117
063
085
089
041
281
058
491
490
080-081
096.2
681
094
104
050
051
084
061
095
128
001-019
059
040
100-103,
105-108
044
030-039
020-029
056
091
Actinomycosis.
Anthrax	
Botulism-
Cancer—
Cerebrospinal meningitis (epidemic).
Chicken-pox	
Cholera, Asiatic	
Conjunctivitis, acute	
Diphtheria-
Dysentery (amoebic and bacillary)..
Encephalitis	
Erysipelas1	
German measles	
Glanders	
Influenza.— 	
Leprosy 	
Malaria	
Gas gangrene-
Measles	
Mumps.-
Paratyphoid fever-
Pellagra2	
Plague-
Pneumonia—
Bronchial3—
Lobar3	
Poliomyelitis-
Psittacosis	
Puerperal septicaemia-
Rabies	
Rocky Mountain spotted fever-
Scarlet fever	
Septic sore throat	
Smallpox	
Tetanus	
Trachoma	
Trichinosis	
Tuberculosis ,	
Tularaemia	
Typhoid fever-
Typhus fever	
Undulant fever-
Venereal diseases—
Gonorrhoea	
Syphilis-
Whooping-cough-
Yellow fever	
Totals..
1,459
3
4
72
2
12
211
146
1
2
1
576
3
2
84
5
2,599
1,486
7
3
46
1
17
244
100
12
1
536
3
2
1,631
4
2
65
289
112
5
1
1,637
2
37
22
251
125
3
5
6
2
3
"442
406
	
1
~66
4
78
1
1,729
2
2
222
95
2
1
313
~ 1
37
10
1,441
3
2
53
47
1
17
1
	
~12
164
128
1
369
2
2
75
1,469
7
2
23
1
~4
~~3
1
212
87
12
362
2
60
6
1,616
4
1
44
242
102
4
286
61
2
2
1,615
2
30
222
106
3
295
73
1
2,554
2,650
2,584
2,502
2,263
2,262
2,384
2,371
1
1,713
2
2
28
187
82
1
239
i
34
6
2,319
1 For 1950 includes erysipelas due to preventive inoculation, immunization, or vaccination, which were excluded
prior to 1950.
2 For 1950 includes alcoholic pellagra, which was excluded prior to 1950.
3 For 1950 excludes bronchial, lobar, and other pneumonia of the new-born (under 4 weeks of age).   The number
of deaths in this category for 1950 was 11. VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
STILLBIRTHS
L 37
There were 369 stillbirths in British Columbia this year, a decline of 25 from the
figure for 1949. The rate for the total population was 13.6, and for the population excluding Indians, 13.4. British Columbia again had the lowest stillbirth rate in the Dominion,
ranking ahead of Alberta with a rate of 15.9, and well above the national average, 19.5.
Table 21.—Stillbirths, 1941-
50
Including Indians
Excluding Indians
Year
Number
of
Stillbirths
Number of
Living
Births
Rate per
1,000 Living
Births
Number
of
Stillbirths
Number of
Living
Births
Rate per
1,000 Living
Births
1941 	
1942
287
304
317
298
328
321
340
339
394
369
15,038
16,808
18,802
18,999
18,877
22,609
26,286
25,984
27,301
27,116
19.1
18.1
16.9
15.7
17.4
14.2
12.9
13.0
14.4
13.6
273
292
302
291
316
305
317
322
372
345
14,142
15,788
17,666
17,797
17,646
21,296
24,906
24,642
25,890
25,716
19.3
18.5
1943.
17.1
1944                         	
16.4
194S
17.9
1946  .
14.3
1947  —.
1948
1949  	
1950.               	
12.7
13.1
14.4
13.4
MARRIAGES
For the fourth successive year there has been a decline in both the number of
marriages and the marriage rate in the Province. This year there were 9.8 marriages per
1,000 population. Nevertheless, the rate for this Province again ranked second among
the Provinces of the Dominion.   Alberta again led with a rate of 10.4.
In 1935, 90.3 per cent of the people married were single, and by 1950 this figure
had declined to 82.8 per cent. Marriages where either or both parties were widowed
amounted to 6.0 per cent in 1936 and 6.8 per cent in 1950. When marriages involving
divorced people are considered, it is found that while in 1936, 3.7 per cent of the people
married were in this conjugal condition, by 1950 the proportion had increased to 10.4
per cent.
Table 22.—Marriages by Conjugal Condition of Contracting Parties, 1941-50
Conjugal Condition of Contracting Parties
Total
Number
of
Marriages
Marriage
Rate per
1,000
Year
Single
Widowed
Divorced
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
1941
8,745
9,643
8,203
7,176
7,811
9,957
9,835
9,668
9,467
9,266
8,649
9,538
8,077
7,116
7,733
9,723
9,676
9,618
9,329
9,137
525
598
585
669
619
652
684
676
701
683
583
613
668
657
751
838
827
805
842
831
499
586
597
589
832
1,153
1,333
1,374
1,208
1,161
537
676
640
661
778
1,201
1,349
1,295
1,205
1,142
9,769
10,827
9,385
8,434
9,262
11,762
11,852
11,718
11,376
11,110
11.9
1947,
13.1
1943	
1944
10.4
9 0
1945
1946
9.8
11 7
1947 	
1948
1949 ...	
1950...                         	
11.4
10.8
10.2
9.8 L 38
department of health and welfare
Table 23.—Marriages by Months, 1941-50
Year
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Total
1941	
505
604
635
760
760
1,129
878
994
885
871
831
917
9,769
1942  	
702
716
729
930
898
1,105
927
1,052
948
1,012
858
950
10,827
1943
659
703
686
723
741
1,044
906
826
781
752
720
844
9,385
1944
552
526
555
784
642
992
735
711
785
693
651
808
8,434
1945
532
539
571
643
657
1,096
928
900
932
804
786
874
9,262
1946 .   	
632
697
845
900
886
1,444
879
1,177
1,214
1,007
1,064
1,017
11,762
1947
650
754
749
995
1,034
1,361
1,022
1,241
1,140
980
968
958
11,852
1948  . .. 	
655
668
794
881
977
1,293
1,244
1,048
1,181
1,078
906
993
11,718
1949	
607
651
634
972
918
1,361
1,097
1,073
1,213
1,032
911
907
11,376
1950
498
562
562
914
828
1,323
1,132
1,105
1,380
984
824
998
11,110
Graph E.—Marriages by Months in British Columbia, 1946-50
MARRIAGES
1, 600
JFMAMJ    J   ASONDJ   FMAMJJ   ASONDJ   FMAMJJASONDJFMAMJ   J    ASONDJ
1946 1947 1948 1949
MAMJ    JASOND
1950 vital statistics report, 1950 l 39
Table 24.—Marriages Performed According to Type, 1946-50
Religious Ceremony
Tota
Year
Licence
Banns
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
1946.	
1947	
1948-	
1949   ..            	
1950	
8,421
8,183
7,903
7,296
7,240
71.6
69.0
67.5
64.1
65.2
2,366
2,568
2,593
2,686
2,638
20.1
21.7
22.1
23.6
23.7
975
1,102
1,222
1,394
1,232
8.3
9.3
10.4
12.3
11.1
11,762
11,852
11,718
11,376
11,110
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Table 25.—Marriages Performed during 1950 According to Denomination
and whether Married by Banns or Licence
Religious Denomination
Banns
Licence
Total
of Minister
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
883
6
42
12
2
25
78
116
15
80
657
1
663
58
42.4
100.0
11.5
31.6
13.3
46.3
2L0
75.8
10.8
16.0
55.0
2.1
14.7
17.1
1,201
322
26
13
29
36
293
37
124
27
422
538
46
3,844
282
57.6
88.5
68.4
86.7
53.7
100.0
79.0
24.2
89.2
100.0
84.0
45.0
97.9
85.3
82.9
2,084
6
364
38
15
54
36
371
153
139
27
502
1,195
47
4,507
340
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Gospel :	
100.0
100.0
100.0
Lutheran   -  _	
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100 0
100.0
100 0
2,638
26.7
7,240
73.3
9,878
100.0 L 40
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
PART II.—ADMINISTRATION AND DIVISIONAL
ACTIVITIES
SUMMARY OF REGISTRATION
Registration.—One of the principal functions of the Division of Vital Statistics is to
effect accurate registration of every birth, death, stillbirth, and marriage occurring in the
Province. The Division is especially vigilant in ensuring that such registration is complete.
To this end a number of checks have been instituted, such as the physician's notice of
birth, hospital returns, school returns of children enrolling for the first time, periodic
checks of marriage registers, Coroners' reports, motor-vehicle accident reports, cemetery
returns, and others. In order to assist the public in connection with delayed registration,
the Division has, over a period of years, done everything possible to obtain early records
of baptisms, burials, doctors' personal records, and other pertinent documents.
Volume of Registration.—While the volume of registration this year reached a new
peak, the amount of increase over the 1949 figure was small, being only 115. This is
less than a 1-per-cent increase. Table 1 shows the number of registrations accepted by
the Division over the ten-year period from 1941 to 1950:—
Table 1.-
-Summary of Registration
, 1941-50
Year
Live Births
Deaths
Marriages
Stillbirths
Adoptions
Divorces
Total
1941           	
17,025
18,346
20,068
19,962
20,229
23,870
26,758
26,965
27,786
28,079
8,617
8,916
9,918
9,833
9,848
10,212
10,768
11,444
11,311
11,506
9,828
10,905
9,476
8,549
9,317
11,875
11,892
11,773
11,374
11,076
308
313
338
321
340
331
355
343
399
373
191
157
249
303
330
402
509
680
760
807
563
847
886
1,031
1,366
2,052
1,880
1,744
1,557
1,422
36,532
1947
39,484
1943 -—
1944	
40,935
39,999
1945
41,430
1946
48,742
1947                       	
52,162
1948 -
1949
1950.    	
52,949
53,187
53,302 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1950
L 41
Graph F.—Summary of Registrations of Births, Deaths, and Marriages
in British Columbia, 1921-50
60,000
0l L
1921 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31  32 33 34  35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42  43 44 45 46 47 48 49 1950 L 42
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Graph G.—Adoptions in British
Columbia, 1936-50
Graph H.—Divorces in British
Columbia, 1936-50
1,000
2,500
1936 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50,
1936 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49'1950
The total number of current registrations is shown in the table below. These figures
include Indians and cover all registrations filed with the Division of Vital Statistics to the
end of December 31st, 1950, distributed according to place of occurrence in the various
statistical areas.
Table 2.-
-Total Number of Registrations, Distributed According
to Statistical Areas, 1950
Area
Living
Births
Deaths
Marriages
Area
Living
Births
Deaths
Marriages
1l
78
467
200
112
753
636
1,088
758
131
3,818
10,712
3,455
34
422
412
25
103
5
118
722
2
4
89
28
129
68
50
149
247
381
197
54
1,589
5,130
1,720
36
128
132
7
38
8
49
276
2
15
38
35
97
48
37
208
175
430
204
30
1,512
5,496
1,439
11
146
98
5
21
3
55
215
4
18
7a
105
247
363
39
11
240
138
160
5
2
13
6
352
2
16
12
no
302
1,812
27
15
60
68
14
1
59
24
40
1
2
8
5
110
1
3
1
18
53
525
33
lb
7b
7c 	
lc            - -   -
2a.     ..    	
92
2b               .....
8b..            . -	
8c
7c.
3a
8d
84
30
3h
8e -
3r
8f- .
29
4a         .   .  -
8g
4b      .	
5a	
9a            	
9b  .  	
9r
1
5
5b	
5c         .   .
9d
141
5d          ....
9e	
9f
1
5p
4
5f           	
10a	
4
6a
10b 	
10c-	
1 Od   	
Indian reserves	
Totals—	
6b	
6c         	
21
79
6d..
179
6e
61    .     .
28,079
11,506
11,076 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 43
SUMMARY OF REGISTRATION AMONG THE ORIENTAL RACES
Chinese
An increase occurred this year in the number of births of Chinese registered as compared with the number registered in 1949. In 1950 there were 196 births, of which 98
were males and a like number females. The previous year there was a total of 166 births.
Of the 196 births which were registered in 1950, 88 males and 86 females were born in
the year and 18 in 1949. The remaining four were born in prior years. No stillbirths of
Chinese were registered in 1950. Deaths registered during the year totalled 314, of which
301 were males and 13 were females. Of the total, 297 males and 12 females died in
1950, and 5 males and 1 female died in 1949. There were 97 deaths from heart disease,
42 from vascular lesions, 38 from cancer, and 19 from both tuberculosis and nephritis.
Deaths of infants under one year numbered 4, 3 males and 1 female. There were 80
marriages registered during the year, an increase of 11 over the previous year's figure.
The table below shows births, deaths, and marriages for the period 1946-50:—
Table 3.—Registrations of Births, Deaths, and Marriages among the Chinese
Population of British Columbia, 1946-50
Year
Births
Deaths
Marriages
Male
Female
Male
Female
1946                                                            	
69
81
70
88
98
64
67
69
78
98
371
312
288
270
301
18
21
18
13
13
71
1947                                                                    .    — -	
78
1948                                                    	
77
1949                                    	
69
1950                                              - - - 	
80
Japanese
Live births of Japanese registered in 1950 exceeded by 45 the number registered in
1949. A total of 129 births were registered, 70 males and 59 females. Of these, 121
were registrations of events occurring in 1950, 8 were of events occurring in 1949 and
prior years. No stillbirths were registered in the year. There were 51 Japanese deaths
registered in 1950, 36 males and 15 females. Of these, 49 occurred in 1950 and 2 in
1949. Fifteen deaths were attributed to heart diseases, 6 each to tuberculosis and
vascular lesions, and 5 to cancer. One infant male death and 2 infant female deaths were
registered in the year. Marriages registered during 1950 numbered 35, 2 more than for
the previous year.
Table 4.—Registrations of Births, Deaths, and Marriages among the Japanese
Population of British Columbia, 1946-50
Year
Births
Deaths
Marriages
Male
Female
Male
Female
1946                                  	
130
65
65
66
70
135
105
58
73
59
72
39
35
39
36
15
11
17
11
15
76
1947                                                              	
34
1948                                             -    -    -
38
1949
33
1950                                              	
35 L 44
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
SUMMARY OF REGISTRATION AMONG INDIANS
Indian live births registered during 1950 numbered 1,812, a considerable increase
over the figure of 1,520 registered the previous year. Of the births registered in 1950,
1,093 occurred during the year, the remainder, 719, being registrations of events occurring in prior years. In 1949, 1,217 of the registered births occurred during the year, 303
having occurred previously.
Stillbirths registered in 1950 numbered 25. There was a total of 525 Indian deaths
registered during the year, of which 291 were male and 234 female. Deaths occurring
during the year numbered 494. The remaining 31 occurred in 1949. Pneumonia
accounted for the greatest part of the mortality, there having been 77 deaths due to this
cause. Accidents caused only slightly less, 76 Indians having died accidentally. Tuberculosis accounted for another 70 deaths, and heart disease 41. Infant deaths numbered
195 this year, of which 107 were males and 88 females. Marriages declined slightly from
184 in 1949 to 177 in 1950.
Table 5.—Registrations of Births, Deaths, and Marriages among the Indian
Population of British Columbia, 1946-50
Year
Births
Deaths
Marriages
Male
Female
Male
Female
1946         	
1947                                ..            	
755
865
756
790
969
707
801
707
730
843
347
349
285
311
291
339
329
276
276
234
177
170
1948. -      	
1949      	
205
184
1950          .
177
COMPLETENESS OF REGISTRATION
Indians
Current Registrations
Efforts were made to retain the close contact with the Indian Superintendents and
the Indian Commissioner for British Columbia, in order to further the standards of Indian
registration which had been reached in 1949. However, restricted travel allotments made
this more difficult. There are many problems peculiar to Indian registrations which are
not found in other groups of the population, and the solution of such problems is aided
by personal interviews by the Inspector of Vital Statistics.
There is an increasing appreciation on the part of the Indian Superintendents of the
nature and importance of all vital statistics registration, but much still remains to be done
in the field of Indian registrations. For many generations, Indians have changed both
their given names and surnames at will. To stop such a long-standing practice requires
careful education of the people to the reasons for maintaining a continuity of names.
This can only be done slowly and methodically, for the majority of Indians have no
knowledge of the restrictions imposed by the " Change of Name Act" or the " Vital
Statistics Act," nor have they an adequate understanding of the necessity for uniformity
and accuracy in documentation. Therefore, there is need for the Indian Superintendents
to be constantly vigilant when registrations are being accepted in order to ensure that the
details agree with other documentation on Agency files. Only in this way can the standard
of Indian registration be elevated to the level attained for the remainder of the population.
Nevertheless, gratifying improvement was noted in the registration of Indian vital statistics,
and efforts will be continued in this direction during 1951. VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950 . L 45
As in former years, the Indian Commissioner for British Columbia was kept advised
regarding the progress of Indian registration, and his whole-hearted co-operation was
forthcoming. Through his assistance, there was a continuation and expansion of several
policies outlined in the Annual Report of this Division for 1949, including the
following:—
(a) Submission of report of enrolment of new Indian pupils in schools in
September, 1950, as a means of checking for completeness of birth
registration, continuity of names, etc.
(b) Submission to the Director of a copy of the latest nominal roll of members
in all Agencies in the Province, with monthly amendments thereto.
(c) Submission to the Director of many church records of baptisms and
marriages. These records were microfilmed and are now used as a basis
of verification when considering applications for delayed registrations and
for corrections of existing records.
During the year, visits were made by the Inspector of Vital Statistics to six Agency
offices. As well as checking the methods used in obtaining registrations, the Inspector
was able to give some assistance to the Superintendents in registration procedures.
Documentary Revision
The project of checking, correcting, typing, and reindexing Indian registrations filed
during the period 1917 to 1946, inclusive, was continued throughout the year.
During 1950 all the registrations of births and deaths of the Williams Lake Agency
and of the deaths in the Queen Charlotte Agency were revised and cross-checked. The
Agency copies of registrations, when completed, were placed in permanent binding and
returned to the Agency offices, along with a typewritten cross-reference index, prepared
by this Division.
Work in progress at the end of the year comprised largely the birth and death records
from Stuart Lake Agency, as well as birth records from Babine and Fort St. John Agencies.
The returns of newly enrolled pupils for the 1949-50 school term were not all
received by this Division until the spring of 1950, when ninety-seven schools reported
a total of 1,930 pupils enrolling for the first time in September, 1949. These returns are
of considerable value, since they provide an important means of checking completeness
of Indian birth registrations as well as a method of verifying names and other personal
particulars. The checking of the above returns revealed that in 55 per cent of the names
there were discrepancies among the school records, the Agency nominal rolls, and the
birth registrations. Where necessary, the latter were amended, while information necessary for correcting the school records or the Agency nominal rolls was referred to the
schools and (or) the Agencies for attention.
Delayed Registrations
Valuable additions were made in 1950 to our collection of Indian baptismal records,
thus assisting materially in the processing of applications for delayed registrations. In the
past, many births occurred in isolated localities without a medical practitioner or even
a midwife in attendance, and hence the problem of sufficient verification to support
applications for delayed birth registrations becomes a very real one. An attempt is being
made to secure complete birth registrations for all Indians now living. During the year
489 applications for delayed registration of Indians were approved. In addition, many
cases were pending at the end of the year, most of which were awaiting additional
documentation. L 46 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Deputy District Registrars in Indian Agency Offices
Through the kind consent of the Indian Commissioner for British Columbia, an
arrangement was completed in 1949 whereby senior clerks in the various Agency offices
were appointed as Deputy District Registrars and Issuers of Marriage Licences. The
advantages of this plan became quite apparent in 1950, as is partially shown by the
increase in the number of delayed birth registrations effected. Not all Agencies were
included in this development, but it is hoped that as staffs become sufficiently trained this
service may be expanded.
Doukhobors
Current Registrations
As a result of policies developed in recent years for stimulating Doukhobor registration, the orthodox Doukhobors generally do not oppose registration, although continuing education appears necessary in order to obtain the co-operation that is required.
However, a very real problem remains with the faction known as the Sons of Freedom.
This group stubbornly persists in refusing to obey the laws regarding registration of vital
statistics. The Division continued to employ a field representative to work with the
Doukhobors, and it is felt that the results obtained have justified the appointment. In
a few instances, Sons of Freedom have been persuaded to comply with registration requirements. There has been a continuation of the tendency of the Doukhobors to accept the
civil form of marriage, solemnized by a Marriage Commissioner. However, the number
of such ceremonies remains relatively small.
Little change is noted in the problems concerning the registration of deaths. Due to
the remoteness of some Doukhobor settlements, there are instances where deaths occurred
and burials took place weeks or even months before knowledge of such events was
received by the District Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages. Efforts are continually being made to educate the people to their duties in such cases, but the problem
has remained relatively constant.
Delayed Registration
Applications for delayed registration of birth continued to be received, and indications are that this situation will exist for some years to come. The field representative
endeavoured to clear up as many outstanding registrations as possible, but unless there
was some definite immediate incentive to obtain a birth certificate, it was difficult to
rouse sufficient interest to bring the cases to a conclusion.
Registration of Births Other than Indians and Doukhobors
Current Registrations
Apart from Indians and Doukhobors, there is virtually complete registration of
births within the Province, although some delays occur in registering births of children
born in remote areas. Almost all births in settled areas now occur in hospitals, in which
case each District Registrar receives notification from the hospital and from the attending
physician. Parents are then advised of their responsibility and are supplied with instructions for completing a birth registration. Therefore, the only events which may escape
the attention of the District Registrar are births which occur at home without medical
attention. These are exceedingly few, and generally the lack of registration is brought
to light in a relatively short time when application is made by the parents for Family
Allowance.
A few attempts to disguise true parentage on birth registrations were discovered.
Investigation of each case revealed that the inaccurate details were usually given in the
mistaken belief that the child's interests were being protected rather than from a strictly
fraudulent motive. VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950 L 47
The medical profession and hospital staffs alike, through their excellent co-operation
in furnishing notifications of births, again contributed substantially to the high standard
of completeness of birth registration presently enjoyed. The appreciation of the Division
is expressed to these groups for the valuable services rendered.
DELAYED REGISTRATION OF BIRTHS
The bulk of the delayed registrations of births accepted during the year covered
births which occurred prior to 1920. Of the other delayed registrations filed, many were
of illegitimates and others were reregistrations following cancellations.
The Division continued to render all possible assistance to the public in the matter
of obtaining delayed registration of birth. Many additions were made to the library of
church records of baptisms and marriages. In most cases, these additions were obtained
by microfilming church records and returning the originals to the custody of the respective
churches. As well as providing valuable supporting evidence for delayed registrations,
this microfilming of the church records is valuable to the churches themselves as a means
of record preservation should the originals be lost or destroyed.
One of the most valuable sources of verification in support of applications for delayed
registrations of births is the early census records maintained by the Census Division of the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics at Ottawa. Many persons have been able to obtain a
delayed registration of birth from the evidence contained in these early census records
when it had been impossible to obtain satisfactory verification from any other source.
A considerable increase of almost a third occurred in 1950 in the number of delayed
registrations which were accepted. These increased in number from 651 in 1949 to 861
in 1950. Of this total, 372 were delayed registrations of white live births and 489 of
Indian live births. This latter figure represents an increase of 203 over the figure for
1949, when 286 delayed registrations were accepted, and accounts for the major part of
the total increase.
REGISTRATION OF DEATHS
Except in isolated areas where travel conditions are difficult, virtually all deaths are
registered without delay. Only amongst the Indians and the Doukhobors do some deaths
go unregistered, and even with these groups, progress is being made. As in the case of
birth registration, a system of cross-checking has been established which ensures that
virtually every death becomes registered.
Effective January 1st, 1950, this Province adopted the new form of medical certification of the cause of death which had been recommended by the World Health Organization. This internationally accepted form of medical certification of the cause of death
was almost identical with the form previously in use in this Province, and, therefore, its
acceptance presented little difficulty.
REGISTRATION OF MARRIAGES
The responsibility for registering marriages, except civil marriages, rests with the
officiating clergyman. The periodic checking of marriage registers issued to the clergy
continued to show that the system is an efficient one, and that the clergymen themselves are
most attentive to their statutory duties in this regard. Whenever a new marriage register
is supplied to a clergyman, the completed book is called in for review. Should a marriage
be recorded in the church register without a corresponding registration having been
received by this Division, steps are immediately taken to secure the delinquent return.
A problem still exists among the Doukhobors, who generally persist in being married
by Doukhobor custom only. This is, of course, not so much a problem of registration
as it is one of the solemnization of a form of marriage recognizable under the laws of
this Province. Every effort is being made to help the Doukhobors to understand the
importance of accepting a legal form of marriage. L 48 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
DOCUMENTARY REVISION
This Division now has well over a million registrations of births, deaths, and marriages on file, and there is a constant demand for making notations and corrections on
these registrations. While the bulk of this documentary revision relates to birth registrations, the series of marriages and deaths are also in constant need of amendment. In
the birth series, the original registrations must be withdrawn from volumes in order to
add notations of alteration of names, corrections, notations of adoptions, or of legitimation. Marriage registrations must be amended to show notations of divorce or nullity,
change of name, and corrections. Amendments to death registrations usually consist of
corrections made by the informant.
An increase over the previous year was noted in the number of alterations of
Christian names of children under 12 years of age, and in the number of authorized
corrections made to records already on file. Adoption notations, changes in surnames,
and divorce notations remained approximately the same as in 1949. Likewise, there was
little change in the number of legitimations of births which were accepted.
Prompt revision of original registrations is a very important part of record maintenance, inasmuch as there is a constant demand for certificates which are based on these
original registrations. All registrations which have been amended are immediately
remicrofilmed, and the indexes are amended accordingly.
FRAUDULENT REGISTRATIONS OF BIRTHS
There was a total of 39 registrations of births which were found to have been
fraudulently or improperly obtained in 1950. This was a decrease of 8 from the previous
year's total. When it appears that a fraudulent registration has been accepted, a file is
set up to contain all correspondence regarding the case. After investigation, the persons
concerned with the registration are requested to show cause why the registration should
not be cancelled. If no representations are made, the registration is cancelled forthwith.
Most cases of fraudulent registration of birth occur as a result of a mother trying to
conceal the illegitimacy of a child born out of wedlock rather than to commit a fraudulent
3.Ct
LEGITIMATION OF BIRTHS
A child born out of wedlock and whose parents subsequently marry one another is
deemed to be legitimate by virtue of the " Legitimation Act." When proof of the legitimation is presented to this Division, a new registration is substituted for the original,
showing the details as at the time of birth, with the exception that the parents are shown
as being married to each other. A statutory declaration from the parents is also necessary,
setting forth certain information regarding the matter. In all cases of such intended
legitimation, the Superintendent of Child Welfare is notified so that there may be an
investigation of the circumstances surrounding the legitimation.
There were 114 legitimations of this nature during 1950, a considerable decrease
from the 151 carried out in 1949.   Of the total, 63 were males and 51 females.
STATUTORY NOTATIONS ENTERED
Where it appears that the information on a registration should be amended, on
receipt of a statutory declaration from someone with personal knowledge of the matter,
together with documentary evidence supporting the amendment, the necessary changes
may be made in the registration. There were 484 such notations in 1950, a considerable
increase over the number for 1949, when 406 were entered. A good percentage of the
changes were alterations of Christian names. These amounted to 142 in 1950, 126 in
1949. VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
SCHOOL-TEACHERS' RETURNS UNDER THE
STATISTICS ACT"
L 49
VITAL
The reporting of pupils enrolled for the first time is still required in certain school
districts for the purpose of checking whether the births of the children concerned have
been registered.   In the school-year 1949-50, 54 reports on these students were received
by the Division.   These reports covered 175 pupils, of which 156 were born in British
Columbia.   Upon a search of the records it was found that 12 of these births were not
registered.   In these cases the parents were contacted in order that a registration of the
birth could be effected.
CHANGE OF NAME
During 1950 there were 348 applications for change of name, a slight decrease from
the previous year's figure of 356. Thus the number of names which have been changed
since the " Change of Name Act " was assented to in 1940 amounted to 2,780 at the end
of 1950.
In order that a person may change his name in British Columbia, it is required that
he be 21 years of age, a British subject, and resident in British Columbia.
The table below shows the number of applications for change of name granted since
1941, by marital status and sex of applicant.
Table 6.—Number of Applications Granted for Change of Name, According
to Marital Status and Sex of Applicant, 1941-50
Marital Status of Applicant
Year
Single
Married
Widowed
Divorced
Separated
Totals
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1941	
55
7
37
2
3
4
3
98
13
1942 	
72
17
67
2
1
2
1
6
141
27
1943.	
59
25
92
5
3
5
4
10
158
45
1944	
67
27
74
8
2
5
2
25
145
65
1945 	
103
33
119
10
2
10
4
21
228
74
1946	
128
36
145
14
6
3
8
39
.
287
92
1947	
117
32
128
7
3
7
7
29
1
256
75
1948 	
142
35
130
3
10
5
15
17
297
60
1949	
128
46
140
11
3
4
4
19
1
276
80
1950   	
128
33
138
8
2
5
9
25
	
277
71
An application for change of name may cover more than one person. In the case,
for instance, of a husband and wife, only one application for change of name is necessary.
The table below shows the number of people affected by the applications for change of
name shown in Table 6.
Table 7.—Number of Individuals Granted Change of Name, According to
Marital Status and Sex of Applicant, 1941-50
Marital Status of Applicant
Year
Single
Married
Widowed
Divorced
Separated
Totals
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1941	
55
7
102
4
5
4
3
165
15
1942'. -
77
17
192
2
1
2
1
6
271
27
1943	
59
25
238
5
4
5
4
11
.
305
46
1944	
67
27
220
12
4
5
2
25
.
293
69
1945 — .
107
34
335
10
2
11
4
21
448
76
1946 	
135
36
395
14
6
3
8
39
544
92
1947	
120
32
347
9
3
7
7
29
1
478
77
1948	
142
35
346
4
10
5
15
17
513
61
1949	
129
46
409
14
3
4
4
19
1
546
83
1950   .
128
33
380
8
2
5
10
25
—
	
520
71 L 50 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
ADOPTION ORDERS
Adoptions in the Province are ordered by the Supreme Court. Upon notification
of this Division, a notation is made on the original birth registration showing the adoptive
name of the child, and this appears on any certificates subsequently issued from the
registration.   No information revealing the natural parents of the child may be issued.
During 1950, 807 adoptions were ordered by the Supreme Court, and for the 703
children born in this Province, notations of adoption were made on the birth registration.
The statistics in Tables 47 to 50 relate only to adoptions filed with the Supreme Court
Registry in British Columbia.
DECREES OF DISSOLUTION AND NULLITY OF MARRIAGE
The Supreme Court Registry provides this Division with a certified copy of the final
decree of dissolution or nullity of marriage entered in its records. On receipt of this
notice a notation of the divorce or annulment is made on the registration of the marriage
if it occurred in this Province. The notation shows the date and place of dissolution, and
any certificate subsequently issued from the registration contains a copy of this notation.
Where the marriage occurred outside of this Province, the Province of marriage is notified,
in order that the necessary notations may be made on the original registration of marriage.
Likewise, where there is a dissolution or nullity of a British Columbia marriage outside
this Province, the Division is notified in order that the necessary notations may be made
on our registrations.
Again this year there was a decline in the number of decrees of dissolution and nullity
of marriage filed with the Division from the peak of 2,051 registered in 1946. The
number this year was 1,412, a decrease of 131 from the 1949 figure. Of the total, 1,377
were dissolutions and 35 were nullities.
NOTICE OF FILING A WILL
In 1945 an amendment was made to the " Wills Act," making it possible for anyone
to file a notice with the Director showing the date of execution and location of a will.
Provision was also made for the addition of information regarding changes on account
of new wills, addition of codicils, etc.
As no specific forms were prescribed under the " Wills Act" for furnishing notices of
filing of wills, there has been a lack of uniformity in the size, shape, and content of the
notices received, thus creating a difficult filing problem. A recommended form was therefore devised and distributed to many law firms and trust companies in an effort to overcome this difficulty. This action has helped considerably, but more widespread use of
these forms by the legal profession would be of further assistance.
A new form of application for a will's search was also prepared and distributed.
By its use the applicant furnishes sufficient details to enable a more thorough search to be
made than was previously possible.
During 1950 there has been a greater number of wills filed than in any year heretofore. The total was 2,381, an increase of 819 over the figure for the previous year and
127 more than the previous high of 2,254 registered in 1947. At the end of 1950 there
were 8,028 notices of wills on file. Revenue searches of these notices continue at a rate
of over 400 per month.
ADMINISTRATION OF THE " MARRIAGE ACT "
During the year, applications for registration from two previously unregistered
denominations were accepted. In addition, applications for registration from four other
denominations were under consideration as at December 31st, 1950. Each application
is carefully investigated according to the requirements of the " Marriage Act," in order to VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 51
ensure that only bona fide religious groups are accorded the privilege of solemnizing
marriage.
All current registrations of marriage are checked to ensure that the officiating
clergyman has been duly registered pursuant to provisions of the " Marriage Act," In
seven cases it was discovered that the clergyman had not been authorized to solemnize
marriage, and appropriate action was taken to validate the ceremony.
Applications for an order of remarriage pursuant to section 47 of the " Marriage
Act " were approved in twenty-three cases.
A revision was made in Form M. 11, Certificate of Publication of Banns, in order
to provide more explicit instructions to the clergy.
REGISTRATION OF MINISTERS AND CLERGYMEN
There were 240 applications for registration granted by the Director this year, 6 more
than during 1949. Cancellations numbered 149, 3 less than in the previous year. At the
end of 1950, 1,736 ministers and clergymen were on register, 91 more than in 1949.
Table 8.—Registration
of Ministers and
Clergymen
Permanent
Temporary
Total
Total on register, December 31st, 1949 	
1,640
210
115
1,735
5
30
34
1
1,645
240
149
1,736
Table 9.—Ministers and Clergymen Registered under the
by Denomination, 1949 and 1950
Marriage Act,"
Denomination
1949
1950
Apostolic Church of the Pentecost.
Baptist Churches	
Bible Standard, Inc	
British Columbia Evangelical Mission-
Buddhist Churches of North America ..
Catholic Apostolic Churches	
Chaplaincy Service   	
Christadelphians —
Christian Missionary Alliance _
Christian Reformed Church	
Church of Christ	
Church of England in Canada-
Church of God-
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.-
Church of the Nazarene	
Church of the New Jerusalem	
Covenant Kingdom Ministry	
Dr. Clem Davies' Ministry	
Doukhobor Sect   	
Elim Tabernacle  	
Evangelical Free Church of North America	
Evangelical Church, North-west Canada Conference-
Evangelical Churches of Pentecost  	
Evangelical Mennonite Brethren._
Evangelical Mission Covenant Church of North America .
First Christian Church, Vancouver (Shelton Memorial)	
Free Church of England	
Free Church of Scotland .. 	
Free Methodist Church of North America .
Full Gospel Mission	
Full Gospel Tabernacle
Glad Tidings Temole Missionary Society-
Greek Orthodox Church	
HoPness Movement  _
11
11
87
97
1
1
3
7
8
8
1
1
10
11
3
3
11
13
3
7
3
3
250
253
10
11
12
16
27
28
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
4
5
5
5
1
	
1
4
5
2
2
9
10
1
1
15
17
5
5
1
3
2
3
6
6 L 52
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 9.—Ministers and Clergymen Registered under the " Marriage Act,"
by Denomination, 1949 and 1950—Continued
Denomination
1949
1950
International Foursquare Gospel Lighthouse-
Jewish  —	
Khalsa Diwan Society	
Liberal Catholic Church .
Lutheran Churches	
Mennonite Churches  	
Methodist Episcopal Church (Africa)..
Moravian Church	
New Presbyterian Church	
Open Door Evangelistic Church	
Pentecostal Assemblies of Canada .
Pentecostal Holiness Church	
People's Fellowship  	
Plymouth Brethren	
Presbyterian Churches.
Reformed Presbyterian Church-
Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints..
Roman Catholic Church	
Russian Evangelical  __ 	
Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church	
Salvation Army_
Seventh-day Adventists	
Shantymen's Christian Association .
Society of Friends.
Spiritualists (National and British Columbia Associations)..
Standard Church of America, Inc..
Ukrainian (or Ruthenian) Greek Catholic Church-
Ukrainian Greek Orthodox Church of Canada	
Ukrainian Orthodox Church of America	
Unitarian Churches	
United Church of Canada ...
Unity Metaphysical Centre..
Victoria Truth Centre	
Zion Tabernacle 	
Totals.
21
5
5
6
47
66
2
3
3
1
79
16
1
15
76
3
24
334
1
3
46
17
2
2
23
6
10
3
1
1
312
1
1
4
1.6401
22
5
6
6
50
69
2
3
3
1
79
16
1
17
76
3
23
346
2
3
50
23
2
2
24
5
15
5
1
1
326
1
1
1,7352
1 In addition, there were 5 temporaries (1 Church of England, 4 Roman Catholic).
2 In addition, there was 1 temporary (Plymouth Brethren).
DISTRICT REGISTRARS' OFFICES, INSPECTIONS, ETC
Changes in Registration Districts
Vancouver District
Since the Vancouver District office was established and made an integral part of
the Division of Vital Statistics in March, 1949, it has contributed greatly in dealing with
problems which previously had required personal attention from a representative of the
Victoria staff. This has been especially valuable in investigational work. Preliminary
investigations may be carried out and reports prepared in Vancouver so that only the
final stages of the problem cases require the attention of the central-office staff.
Trail District
Following the transfer from British Columbia Police to Royal Canadian Mounted
Police, it was decided by the administrative officers of the latter group to consolidate the
accommodation of their Trail Detachments. Due to the physical limitation of the new
space, it became impossible for a member of the police detachment to continue his appointment as District Registrar of Births, Deaths, and Marriages, and Marriage Commissioner.
Arrangements were subsequently made with the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles
whereby the clerk in charge of the Trail office of the Motor-vehicle Branch was vested
with these appointments on a temporary basis until a more permanent arrangement can
be made. The speedy co-operation of the Motor-vehicle Branch in this regard prevented
an embarrassing disruption of service in the Trail Registration District. VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950 L 53
Changes in Other Districts
After careful investigation by the Inspector of Vital Statistics, it was considered
expedient to close the office of the Deputy District Registrar at Chase and to consolidate
the services under the District Registrar at Kamloops. It was felt that the small volume
which had been handled at Chase did not justify the continuation of the service, particularly in view of the improved travel conditions, which gave the residents of that area
easy access to Kamloops.
Members of the British Columbia Police have served as District Registrars and
Deputy District Registrars in forty-two of the offices and sub-offices throughout the
Province. Accordingly, when the policing of the Province was transferred to the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police on August 15th, 1950, these offices became staffed by Royal
Canadian Mounted Police personnel.
Inspection
Fifty-two offices and sub-offices covering the lower half of Vancouver Island, Fraser
Valley, Okanagan, East and West Kootenays were visited by the Inspector of Vital
Statistics during the year. In addition, brief instructional visits were made to six Indian
Agencies. Several visits were made to the Vancouver office, as well as those at New
Westminster and North Vancouver. The purpose of these visits is to check the work that
is being carried out in the district offices and the procedures employed, to discuss difficult
cases with the District Registrars, and to carry out field investigations as required.
At the close of the year there were seventy-two registration districts under the supervision of District Registrars, in addition to which there were twenty-two sub-offices, a
special representative for the Doukhobors, a marine registrar, and eighteen Indian Superintendents who act ex officio as District Registrars of Vital Statitistics for Indians only.
Thirty-six of the District Registrars are Government Agents and Sub-Agents, while
members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police are serving as District Registrars and
Deputy District Registrars in charge of thirty-nine offices and sub-offices. Twelve offices
are staffed by other Government employees, such as Gold Commissioners, and the
remainder by non-Government employees. The marine registrar and the eighteen Indian
Superintendents are Dominion Government employees. At the present time there is no
District Registrar for the Registration District of Clayoquot, but the functions of that
office are carried out by the Government Agent at Alberni.
Manual of Instructions for District Registrars
A complete revision of the Manual of Instructions for District Registrars, Marriage
Commissioners, and Issuers of Marriage Licences was completed during the year. This
revision was carried out by the Inspector of Vital Statistics, and it includes many suggestions which were received from the field staff. The instruction manual has proved to be
of great assistance to the District Registrars and Marriage Commissioners in the field,
and it has played an important part in improving the quality and efficiency of the vital
statistics registration system.
Vital Statistics Information for Health Units
Commencing in January, 1950, a copy of every death registration was forwarded by
the District Registrars to the health-unit director of the area in which the deceased was
resident. Thus, for the first time, the public health field staff had complete and up-to-date
information covering deaths in their areas. Arrangements were also made whereby any
queries that became necessary regarding the statement of the cause of death as shown on
the death registrations should be channelled from the Division of Vital Statistics through
the health-unit directors to the private practitioners or Coroners. The response of both
the health-unit directors and the practising physicians to this system of querying has been
good, and it has resulted in more complete and accurate statistics on causes of death. L 54 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Equally important to the health unit is current information regarding births. At the
present time a brief notification is sent to the health unit from the District Regisrar of
every birth that takes place. However, it was felt that more detailed information would
be of great value to the health unit particularly if it could be obtained by them very shortly
after the birth had occurred. Considerable attention was given to this problem during
the year, and a suitable plan of action was worked out. The physician's notice of a live
birth or stillbirth has been augmented to include additional items of public health significance, and it will be prepared in duplicate. One copy will be forwarded immediately by
the District Registrars to the appropriate health unit, while the other copy will serve as
a temporary working record for the District Registrar, and will subsequently be transmitted to the central office of the Division for statistical processing. As well as providing
more complete birth information to the health units with a minimum of delay, the new
system will reduce the work involved for the District Registrars, since it will no longer be
necessary to prepare extracts from the birth registrations.
STATISTICAL SERVICES
The duties of the statistical sections of the Division are not limited to the collection
and compilation of vital statistics, but include a wide variety of services to a number of
different groups. Within the Department of Health, this includes the provision of population estimates and other vital statistics data, the setting-up and revising of records, forms,
and recording procedures, the preparation of special articles of a statistical nature relative
to public health, and the provision of routine statistical services required by the various
divisions. Assistance is given to the Divisions of Tuberculosis Control and Venereal
Disease Control in the preparation of their monthly, quarterly, and annual reports, and
in the completion of special assignments on request. Service to other departments of the
Government consists mainly of the provision of population estimates and data on vital
statistics.
Numerous requests are received from companies and private individuals for information of a statistical nature. These requests are dealt with on their merits and without
charge to the company or person concerned.
During the year the Division was fortunate in securing the services of two additional
statisticians under provisions of the Federal Health Grants. It thus became possible, for
the first time, to plan for adequate statistical services to all sections of the Health Branch
of the Department of Health and Welfare. It is the aim of the statistical sections not only
to meet the immediate statistical needs of the Healh Branch, but also to anticipate avenues
of additional service and to plan accordingly.
Demography
The registrations of births, deaths, stillbirths, marriages, etc., which come in to the
Division of Vital Statistics are the basis of a wide variety of useful statistics. Cross-
classifications are made according to age, sex, racial group, place of residence, place of
occurrence, etc. These data are summarized in monthly reports and are available upon
request. Each quarter a summary report is prepared for the Health Bulletin. Special
tabulations are prepared monthly for the Metropolitan Health Committee in Vancouver
and for the Victoria-Esquimalt Union Board of Health. A detailed statistical report is
published annually in accordance with the " Vital Statistics Act." Population estimates
are compiled for use within the Department in calculating birth rates, morbidity and
mortality rates, and for other purposes. As there has been no accurate count of the
population since the Dominion Census of 1941, population estimates have become less
reliable during the last few years. The period since the census has been one of marked
population increase, and hence estimates for small areas of the Province become increasingly hazardous. vital statistics report, 1950 l 55
Public Health Statistics
As well as the routine statistics provided to the Divisions of Tuberculosis Control
and Venereal Disease Control, a number of special tabulations were prepared. A follow-
up report on tuberculosis cases was completed in 1950. This report covered patients
discharged from tuberculosis institutions and followed up at six, twelve, and twenty-four
months after discharge.
A special study was made on cancer morbidity and mortality in this Province, and
the results were published in the bulletin of the Health Branch. Also published in the
bulletin were articles on accidental deaths, the new International Statistical Classification
of Diseases, Injuries, and Causes of Death, and the quarterly reports on vital statistics.
The special study on infant mortality based on birth-death linkage was continued, and
an analysis of the data covering the last five years was begun.
A statistical analysis of a nutrition study was completed during 1950 for the Nutrition
Service. Also completed was a series of graphs covering all important phases of vital
statistics and health statistics in this Province during the last five years.
During the latter part of the year the Division compiled the data for the statistical
appendices to the Provincial health-survey report, which has been carried out in each
Province under the Health Survey Grant. The full-time services of one of the research
assistants of the Division was diverted to this assignment.
At the request of the Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, a review of
the entire record system and recording procedures of the Division of Tuberculosis Control
was undertaken by this Division. A preliminary report containing recommendations was
presented to the Director and the staff of the Division of Tuberculosis Control at the
annual meeting of the Division on November 15th, 1950. Following a meeting with the
senior medical staff of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, all main policies regarding
the record system were agreed upon. However, a great deal of detail work is still required
to give effect to those policies.
Survey of the Crippling Diseases of Children
The survey of the crippling diseases of children was concluded on August 31st of
this year, by which time over 22,000 reports on crippled children in this Province had
been received. The information contained on these reports has been placed on punch-
cards, and preliminary tabulations have been made. Detailed cross-classification of the
data will be concluded in the early part of 1951.
Sickness Survey
A comprehensive survey of the incidence and prevalence of illness, and of the
amounts spent on the various types of medical care, was undertaken throughout Canada
during the year. The survey is being conducted as a co-operative effort between the
Department of National Health and Welfare and the respective Provincial Departments
of Health, and comes in response to the steadily increasing demand from many quarters
for reliable information on the volume and frequency of sickness suffered by the Canadian
people.
The organization of the broad aspects of the survey was carried out by the Department of National Health and Welfare, with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics providing
technical help and advice. The actual process of carrying out the survey has been undertaken by the respective Provinces. In British Columbia the survey has been organized
under the Division of Vital Statistics, with a full-time director of the survey appointed
under this Division. Throughout the Province, public health nurses are being used as
the enumerators, with health-unit directors acting as regional supervisors. In the metropolitan areas of Greater Vancouver and Victoria the municipal public health nurses are
serving as enumerators under the supervision of the Medical Health Officers. L 56 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The information sought is being obtained by means of a sample survey. In this
Province approximately 2,200 households, or about 6,000 people, are included in the
sample. The sample has been scientifically chosen in such a manner that it is representative of the Province as a whole. The various economic and industrial areas of the
Province are included in the sample in proportion to their size in the total population,
and the sample is so drawn that every person in the Province has an equal chance of being
included.
The sample has been designed to provide information on a Provincial basis concerning illnesses of the most frequent occurrence, and not to give precise information respecting relatively uncommon conditions. The line has been drawn at illnesses with an annual
incidence of 2 or more per 100 population. Data concerning illnesses which occur less
frequently than twice per hundred population per year will also be available, but they will
be less precise than those for the more common illnesses. However, even for many of
these less common conditions, fairly accurate national estimates will be available even
though reliable rates by Provinces separately will not be possible.
The survey is being conducted on a household basis, so that as well as yielding
information about individuals and their sickness experience, it will also provide considerable data on the experience of family groups and of household groups. The selected
households are being visited once a month for a period of one year, and the details of all
illnesses suffered by the occupants are collected. The enumerators have been carefully
trained in order that the information which they record will be as accurate as possible,
and that it will be unbiased by anything the enumerator might say or do.
The data collected will be used in two ways. Firstly, and of prime importance, as
a basis for Provincial and National estimates concerning sickness, medical care, and
expenditures for medical care; and, secondly, as an account of the experience of a specific
group of families. The estimates will be of two types. On the one hand, there will be
measures of the volume of such items as the total amount of sickness, the extent of disabling illnesses, the amount of medical care and other types of health care received for
this amount of sickness, volume of dental care, and the volume of expenditures for various
types of health care. On the other hand, there will ensue estimates of the incidence and
prevalence of different kinds of illnesses which occur as frequently as twice per hundred
population per year.
It will be clear that the present survey will not, by any means, tell all one might like
to know about illness in our population, but it will, for the first time, provide the broad
picture of sickness and of unfulfilled needs. It will indicate in what direction additional
information must be sought, and it will be of paramount value to the medical profession
in assisting the profession to apply its skills and resources to the greatest effect.
Statistical Procedures in Local Health Units
Early in 1950 a study of records and statistical procedures in the health units in the
Province was undertaken in order to assess the status of the present record system and
also to lay plans for an improved, standardized system. Considerable variation existed
in procedures employed by the various offices, each having developed its own records
independently. It was felt that the development of a uniform procedure manual, which
would be made available to all health units, would be an important contribution to local
health services. Considerable time has been given to this project during the year, and
the first drafts have been made of a manual of recording and statistical procedures for
health units.
MICROFILMING OF DOCUMENTS
All registrations of births, deaths, and marriages from the very earliest records right
up to the present date have now been microfilmed. VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950 L 57
The project of microfilming physicians' notices of birth from 1917 to 1948, inclusive,
was completed during the year. In addition, almost all files relating to correction declarations were placed on film and a project of photographing 2,600 files pertaining to
alteration of Christian name was concluded. The purpose of this undertaking is to
reduce the amount of filing space and filing equipment necessary to accommodate the
increasing volume of records in the custody of this Division.
Approximately 3,400 records of casualties of armed-forces personnel who were
residents of British Columbia, and who died or were presumed dead during service in
World War II, were microfilmed in order to preserve these records and make them available to the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
At the request of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, the entire numeric birth index
from 1925 to 1949 in use by the Family Allowance Division was microfilmed, and the
film forwarded to Ottawa. This film is being used in connection with a revision of the
numeric index which is presently being carried out by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
GENERAL OFFICE PROCEDURES
The new procedures for the processing of mail and certificates which were put into
effect in the previous year proved very satisfactory, and only minor additional changes
were necessary in 1950.
A new style of short-form death certificate was placed in use in the Victoria office
during August, and similar certificates will be used by the District Registrars as present
stocks become exhausted. The use of the short-form certificate is an important forward
step in vital statistics practice and is one which is strongly advocated by the Vital Statistics Council for Canada. The new certificate is based on the principle that the greatest
possible protection should be given to the public in preventing the unncessary disclosure
of facts which might be harmful or prejudicial to the family and relatives of the deceased.
Previously, death certificates had shown the primary and contributory causes of death as
certified by the attending physician or Coroner. This information may lead to considerable embarrassment, and even malice and harm, when the death has been due to a mental
condition, venereal disease, tuberculosis, cancer, or certain other diseases which to many
people convey a stigma. For most purposes a death certificate is required only to prove
the fact of death, not the cause, and disclosure of the cause of death to outside agencies
is generally unwarranted. The new certificate contains no mention of the cause of death,
although the information is obtainable from the Division of Vital Statistics when it is
required for legitimate reasons.
Again this year the volume of correspondence received by the Division registered an
increase. A total of 62,208 letters was received, 4,658 more than in the previous year,
which was a rise of nearly 8 per cent.
Ordinary revenue-producing searches costing 50 cents numbered 24,397 in 1950,
up 338 over the figure for 1949. Province-wide searches costing $2 numbered 115 this
year, compared to 104 last year.
Revenue collected in the Victoria office of the Division was $38,315.13 in 1950,
and of this, $33,810.63 was collected under the "Vital Statistics Act" and the remainder, $4,504.50, under the "Marriage Act." The comparable figures for 1949 were
$36,520.50 for total revenue, $32,147 for "Vital Statistics Act" revenue, and $4,373.50
for " Marriage Act" revenue.
While revenue from the Province under the "Vital Statistics Act" increased to
$43,021.75 in 1950, compared to $41,941.10 last year, revenue under the "Marriage
Act" declined to $46,082.50 this year, as compared to the $48,118 collected in 1949.
As a result, total revenue declined by almost $955 from $90,059.10 in 1949 to
$89,104.25 this year. L 58
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The table below shows how the volume of business conducted by the Division has
increased over the ten-year period 1941-50. It will be noted that the volume of correspondence received has increased by over 90 per cent and the number of ordinary
revenue-producing searches increased by almost as much, 85 per cent. Considerable
variation occurred during the war years in the number of special $2 searches, as a result
of the requirements of the armed forces.
Over the ten-year period an increase in " Vital Statistics Act" revenue of 80 per
cent was registered, corresponding to the increase in ordinary searches. " Marriage Act"
revenue showed only a 5 per cent increase from 1941 to 1950. During the period, while
marriages have increased, a greater proportion have been performed under banns, and in
these circumstances no fee is required.
Total revenue in the Province increased from nearly $68,000 in 1941 to over
$89,000 in 1950, a rise of almost one-third.
Table 10.—Correspondence Received, Searches Performed, and Revenue
Received, British Columbia, 1941-50
Year
Correspondence
Received
Ordinary
Paid
Searches
Special
Paid
Searches
" Vital Statistics Act"
Revenue
" Marriage
Act"
Revenue
Total
Revenue
1941-      - .".	
1942	
1943                                      	
32,615
36,805
32,385
35,397
37,600
46,732
46,137
51,190
57,550
62,208
13,181
15,120
14,379
20,431
21,320
23,932
22,682
23,645
24,059
24,397
53
1,118
706
892
847
101
83
104
104
115
$23,809.15
26,202.35
29,649.25
37,691.67
38,536.80
42,250.00
41,385.50
41,214.74
41,941.10
43,021.75
$43,912.00
45,741.50
40,397.50
38,379.00
42,197.00
51,147.00
50,855.00
49,681.00
48,118.00
46,082.50
$67,721.15
71,943.85
70,046.75
1944                                   	
76,070.67
1945 - - .   .
1946                          	
80,733.80
93,397.25
1947                                      	
92,240.50
1948    	
1949	
90,895.74
90,059.10
1950 	
89,104.25 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 59
PART III.—DETAILED TABLES OF BIRTHS, DEATHS,
MARRIAGES, ADOPTIONS, AND DIVORCES
IN BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1950
(Classified by Place of Residence)
TABLE 1.—GENERAL SUMMARY OF BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND MARRIAGES IN BRITISH
COLUMBIA BY CENSUS DIVISIONS, CITIES, AND VILLAGES OF 1,000 POPULATION
AND OVER, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE,  1950.
BIRTHS
(Exclusive of
Stillbirths)
DEATHS
NEONATAL
DEATHS
(Deaths
under 1
Month)
S
a
3
3
tfl
DIVISIONS, CITIES,
AND VILLAGES
All Ages
Under
1 Year
1-4
Years
W
0
1
1
1
Total
M.
F.
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
<
1
Total for the Province	
Division No. la	
Division No. lb  	
Division No. lc	
27,116
HI
491
187
123
829
508
1,084
698
159
3,817
10,491
3,354
66
561
406
93
193
88
260
588
17
89
168
149
49
260
351
77
43
220
260
204
54
10
31
53
384
53
52
72
9
119
285
12,714
125
153
65
138
109
61
57
215
215
76
168
191
579
575
213
101
53
221
245
13,887
60
255
90
61
423
269
554
355
81
1,951
5,320
1,747
35
296
201
50
96
37
140
293
9
40
78
80
31
156
185
42
22
115
142
108
23
7
12
29
192
25
30
38
4
55
150
6,477
63
72
38
71
54
31
30
112
110
28
82
92
297
305
109
53
31
111
126
13,229
51
236
97
62
406
239
530
343
78
1,866
5,171
1,607
31
265
205
43
97
51
120
295
8
49
90
69
18
104
166
35
21
105
118
96
31
3
19
24
192
28
22
34
5
64
135
6,237
62
81
27
67
55
30
27
103
105
48
86
99
282
270
104
48
22
110
IIP
11,581
38
139
76
54
160
265
405
208
53
1,428
5,212
1,763
50
198
142
25
53
19
86
262
15
31
60
38
20
75
79
27
26
70
89
50
31
6
11
22
143
24
20
6
4
32
66
6,567
34
80
16
64
37
37
17
116
116
21
136
100
247
220
55
26
12
49
72
7,204
26
82
52
33
102
179
249
153
32
877
3,176
1,055
32
126
88
11
38
13
61
188
7
23
42
25
13
45
57
24
12
51
62
36
18
4
9
14
92
11
17
4
3
18
44
4,021
23
39
8
43
22
23
12
88
65
14
86
6"8
147
126
31
19
7
42
50
4,377
12
57
24
21
58
86
156
55
21
551
2,036
708
18
72
54
14
15
6
25
74
8
8
18
13
7
30
22
3
14
19
27
14
13
2
2
8
51
13
3
2
1
14
22
2,546
11
41
8
21
15
14
5
28
51
7
50
32
100
94
24
7
5
7
22
460
3
4
4
2
11
6
23
15
1
62
126
46
3
15
9
3
6
4
3
15
5
5
7
2
8
6
2
7
16
5
6
2
1
2
10
5
3
2
■345
3
11
5
2
6
3
8
8
3
50
105
26
1
12
5
6
2
1
5
8
3
4
3
4
2
3
3
1
4
2
5
9
3
1
1
10
4
106
1
1
1
1
4
2
2
1
7
22
17
1
1
4
2
1
8
89
2
3
1
1
2
1
1
11
18
11
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
279
3
4
2
2
8
5
18
9
1
37
90
35
1
11
6
204
1
8
3
2
4
1
6
7
3
33
70
18
10
5
1
1
369
3
6
4
11,110
38
91
47
38
Division No. 2b — —
Division No. 2c.	
Division No. 3a.	
Division No. 3b- .	
Division No. 3c	
Division No. 4a	
- Division No. 4b. —
Division No. 5a. 	
Division No. 5b   	
16
3
14
7
2
53
142
47
4
4
6
1
1
1
4
9
207
160
438
202
29
1,565
5,501
1,469
15
139
Division No. 5d	
102
11
Division No. 5f 	
1
4
34
4
3
5
58
Division No. 6c 	
5
222
3
1
1
1
2
3
6
2
1
1
3
1
3
1
4
Division No. 6f 	
Division No. 7a 	
3
1
4
3
1
5
4
26
41
2
Division No. 7c. .   	
Division No. 8a	
1
3
5
3
1
2
1
75
99
9
2
2
4
2
5
1
1
3
5
1
4
Division No. 8d	
Division No. 8e	
6
2
2
2
2
4
82
46
42
16
3
1
8
1
5
2
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
Division No. 9d 	
Division No. 9e    ,
Division No. 9f   -	
1
1
6
2
2
155
6
8
4
5
5
188
5
2
3
3
3
1
2
6
1
8
3
14
6
5
2
3
2
4
9
127
3
5
1
2
1
3
2
1
26
1
2
2
5
89
2
4
1
3
161
2
4
23
Division No. lOd ,	
1
22
1
1
4
136
4
2
1
3
2
81
8,227
59
Chilliwack	
149
49
1
1
1
2
1
4
1
2
2
2
4
6
2
48
94
34
1
1
4
1
3
2
19
Kamloops 	
Kelowna —	
1
_
179
161
29
Nanaimo -	
Nelson -	
4
2
2
3
3
1
1
3
	
1
1
1
2
7
3
8
6
3
2
3
1
2
3
2
1
1
182
84
659
124
54
27
2
3
15
1
1
91
135 L 60
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 1.—GENERAL SUMMARY OF BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND MARRIAGES IN BRITISH
COLUMBIA BY CENSUS DIVISIONS, CITIES, AND VILLAGES OF 1,000 POPULATION
AND OVER, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, 1950—Continued.
BIRTHS
DEATHS
NEONATAL
DEATHS
(Deaths
under 1
Month)
CO
33
|
M
H
CO
CO
DIVISIONS, CITIES,
AND VILLAGES
(Exclusive of
Stillbirths)
AH Ages
Under
1 Year
1^4
Years
W
O
<
<
1
Total I    M.
F.
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
Cities—Continued
Revelstoke..	
94
140
356
7,329
196
1,039
129
31
98
47
78
186
3,706
102
543
81
19
62
47
62
170
3,623
94
496
48
12
36
35
27
57
4,143
103
747
53
20
33
22
17
39
2,544
67
419
33
12
21
13
10
18
1,599
36
328
20
8
12
2
5
3
94
3
12
6
2
4
1
1
1
80
8
1
1
2
17
3
~~12
2
1
1
2
3
3
67
3
9
5
1
4
1
_-
36
38
Trail 	
Vancouver	
1
55
_
4
103
3
12
1
132
4,881
161
787
Villages..
97
Creston.
27
1
70
TABLE 1 a.—GENERAL SUMMARY OF BIRTHS, DEATHS, AND MARRIAGES IN BRITISH
COLUMBIA BY CENSUS DIVISIONS, BY PLACE OF OCCURRENCE,  1950
Detailed information under this heading may be secured on request, if reason is sufficiently
urgent.
TABLE 2.—BIRTHS (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS) BY MONTHS, CLASSIFIED AS RURAL
AND URBAN IN EACH CENSUS DIVISION, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE OF MOTHERS,
BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1950.
Detailed information under this heading may be secured on request, if reason is sufficiently
urgent.
TABLE 3.—TOTAL LIVE BIRTHS AND LIVE BIRTHS IN INSTITUTIONS, BY PLACE OF
OCCURRENCE AND  PLACE OF RESIDENCE OF  MOTHERS,  BRITISH  COLUMBIA,
1950.
ALL LIVE BIRTHS
PROVINCE
Place of
Occurrence
Mothers' Residence
Elsewhere
Births to Resident
Mothers Occurring
Eisewhere
Place of
In
Canada
In
United
States
In
Canada
In
United
States
Residence
27,045
70
28
155
14
27,116
BIRTHS IN INSTITUTIONS
Total for British Columbia .
26,211
69
27
12
26,281 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 61
TABLE 4.—TOTAL LIVE BIRTHS AND LIVE BIRTHS IN INSTITUTIONS, IN CITIES AND
VILLAGES OF 1,000 POPULATION AND OVER, BY PLACE OF OCCURRENCE AND
PLACE OF RESIDENCE OF MOTHERS, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1950.
ALL LIVE BIRTHS
CITIES AND VILLAGES
Alberni	
Chilliwack-
Courtenay...
Cranbrook..
Creston „_
Duncan	
Fernie
Grand Forks..
Kamloops..	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith	
Mission	
Nanaimo	
Nelson.
New Westminster-
North Vancouver-
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Trail	
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Victoria	
Place of
Occurrence
2
3
_
124
372
127
105
617
499
105
322
511
382
2,182
649
414
3
"372"
360
105
140
538
9,970
372
2,292
Mother's Residence
Elsewhere
In
Canada
1
3
~1
89
267
68
56
404
290
37
235
361
196
1,668
211
212
1
157
120
26
8
187
2,724
181
1,269
In
United
States
Births to Resident
Mothers Occurring
Elsewhere
In
Canada
124
152
65
136
4
5
2
8
2
6
8
11
16
5
65
137
11
99
53
6
5
15
9
5
88
5
19
In
United
States
Place of
Residence
125
153
65
138
31
109
61
57
215
215
76
98
168
191
579
575
213
101
53
221
245
94
140
356
7,329
196
1,039
BIRTHS IN INSTITUTIONS
Alberni 	
Chilli wack	
Courtenay	
Cranbrook	
Creston   	
Duncan	
Fernie 	
Grand Forks ..
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith	
Mission	
Nanaimo	
Nelson .
New Westminster.
North Vancouver-
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Trail	
Vancouver	
Vernon	
Victoria	
1
1
3
3
3
_.-
123
89
372
267
127
68
103
55
616
404
499
290
105
37
320
234
507
359
379
195
2,181
1,668
648
210
412
211
1
1
372
157
358
118
104
26
140
8
538
187
9,927
2,720
372
181
2,286
1,269
124
152
65
136
4
5
2
8
2
6
8
11
16
5
65
136
11
99
53
6
5
15
9
5
88
5
19
124
153
65
138
30
109
61
56
214
215
7.6
97
166
189
578
574
212
99
53
221
245
93
140
356
7,290
196
1,033 L 62
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 5.—LEGITIMATE AND ILLEGITIMATE BIRTHS (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS)
FOR THE PROVINCE AND CITIES OF 5,000 POPULATION AND OVER, BY PLACE
OF RESIDENCE OF MOTHERS, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1950.
PROVINCE AND
TOTAL BIRTHS
LEGITIMATE
ILLEGITIMATE
CITIES
Total
M.
F.
Total
M.
F.
Total
M.
F.
Total for British Columbia
Cities—
27,116
215
215
168
191
579
575
245
356
7,329
196
1,039
13,887
112
110
82
92
297
305
126
186
3,706
102
543
13,229
103
105
86
99
282
270
119
170
3,623
94
496
25,523
211
210
161
189
548
558
232
347
6,792
188
984
13,062
no
107
78
91
279
296
120
181
3,413
98
517
12,461
101
103
83
98
269
262
112
166
3,379
90
467
1,593
4
5
7
2
31
17
13
9
537
8
55
825
2
3
4
1
18
9
6
5
293
4
26
768
2
2
3
Nelson..	
1
13
8
7
Trail
4
244
Vernon
4
29
TABLE 6.—MULTIPLE BIRTHS CLASSIFIED TO SHOW NUMBER OF CHILDREN BORN
ALIVE AND STILLBORN BY SEX, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE OF MOTHERS, BRITISH
COLUMBIA, 1950.
CLASSIFICATION OF BIRTHS                                                              Number
Twin births        296
Two males (both living)  	
One male and one female (both living)
Two females (both living)
One male living and one male stillborn
One male living and one female stillborn
One female living and one female stillborn
Two males (both stillborn)     	
Two females (both stillborn)  	
Triplet births
Three males (all livings-
Total multiple births	
Total single live births
Total single stillbirths
Total confinements
94
87
98
8
2
2
2
3
1
1
297
300
295
  26,543
-M. 13,599
_.F. 12,944
347
.M. 190
.. F. 157
 27,187
-M.
-F. VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 63
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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 10.—DEATHS OF CHILDREN UNDER ONE YEAR (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS)
BY MONTHS, CLASSIFIED AS RURAL AND URBAN IN EACH CENSUS DIVISION,
BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE,  BRITISH COLUMBIA,   1950.
Detailed information under this heading may be secured on request, if reason is sufficiently
urgent.
TABLE 11.—TOTAL DEATHS (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS) AND DEATHS IN INSTITUTIONS OF CHILDREN UNDER ONE YEAR, BY PLACE OF OCCURRENCE AND
PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1950.
ALL DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR
PROVINCE
Place of
Occurrence
Residence Elsewhere
Deaths of Residents
Occurring Elsewhere
Place of
In
Canada
In United
States
In
Canada
In United
States
Residence
798
—
2
,1                   1
5                     4                 805
DEATHS IN INSTITUTIONS
Total for British Columbia.
607
3 613
I	
TABLE 12.—TOTAL DEATHS (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS) AND DEATHS IN INSTITUTIONS OF CHILDREN UNDER ONE YEAR, IN CITIES OF 5,000 POPULATION
AND OVER, BY PLACE OF OCCURRENCE AND PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH
COLUMBIA,  1950.
ALL DEATHS UNDER ONE YEAR
Kamloops-
Kelowna ....
Nanaimo.—
Nelson .
CITIES
Place of
Occurrence
New Westminster..
North Vancouver-
Prince Rupert	
Trail	
Vancouver 	
Vernon 	
Victoria	
13
16
21
5
53
6
15
6
232
8
38
Residence Elsewhere
In
Canada
9
10
11
38
2
10
2
62
5
19
In United
States
Deaths of Residents
Occurring Elsewhere
In
Canada
In United
States
Place of
Residence
12
5
16
9
5
4
174
3
20
DEATHS IN INSTITUTIONS
12
14
21
5
51
6
14
6
204
8
38
9
9
11
38
2
10
2
60
5
19
1
2
..-
5
"5
~1
1
4
Kelowna -    	
7
10
5
14
9
4
Trail                                 	
4
148
3
20 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 67
TABLE 13.—DEATHS OF CHILDREN UNDER ONE YEAR (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS)
BY AGE AT DEATH AND PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1950
AGES
 Total
  M.
No.
805
460
345
218
127
91
75
44
31
54
32
22
25
18
7
18
10
8
8
3
5
10
7
3
408
241
167
33
16
17
26
11
15
16
11
5
AGES
 Total
No.
481
. M.
979
 — F.
1 month and under 2 months  _
2 months and under 3 months	
. -   -   .F.
 Total
-     M.
 -,F.
.   .. - Total
904
Under 1 day 	
...  Total
  M.
57
31
1 day 	
    F.
 Total
M.
26
41
M.
73
 F.
    .Total
  M.
"
 F.
18
 Total
46
 M.
 F.
?9
  F.
17
— -Total
 M.
  Total
37
- - M.
_   -   -   . F.
16
 F.
.. - Total
    M.
71
5 months and under 6 months	
 Total
44
 M.
■>6
5 days  - 	
-  F.
 Total
 M.
6 months and under 7 months 	
 F.
 Total
    M.
18
26
19
  F.
_ Total
  M.
7 months and under 8 months	
- F.
 - ..Total
7
13
 M.
  ,F.
6
 F.
 Total
 M.
- F.
7
Under 1 week 	
8 months and under 9 months -	
 .Total
 M.
16
10
9 months and under 10 months ' 	
 — .F.
  Total
6
weeks 	
__ Total
     M.
18
 _-  M.
6
 F.
     .F.
1?
 Total
10 months and under 11 months
.    Total
-    -M.
 F.
13
    M.
6
"                    '
 F.
 Total
7
11 months and under 12 months.	
 Total
 M.
11
  M.
9
,,                    ,
 F.
„                            „             	
 F.
2
TABLE 14.—DEATHS OF CHILDREN UNDER ONE YEAR (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS)
CLASSIFIED ACCORDING TO RACIAL ORIGIN, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH
COLUMBIA, 1950.
RACIAL ORIGIN
British -      - — --
No.
_  413
  216
     87
 -- 104
      6
RACIAL ORIGIN
European—Continued
Polish            	
No.
12
1
Scottish                    - 	
.    13
Other          	
Swedish .„  —- -   	
     11
  191
      4
9
4
Other	
2
Asiatic
     11
      3
-       6
—     3.
5
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Hindu  (East Indian).—   ....
      2
4
 -.   41
    28
       1
Other	
Indian -	
184
6
2
       1
2
       8
  —      1
 -    24
. -     13
2
Netherland  — -	
Norwegian    	
1 Including all Ruthenian Russians.
All origins   - 	
- - 805 L 68
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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L 71
TABLE  18.—TOTAL DEATHS  (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS)  AND DEATHS IN INSTITUTIONS,   BY  PLACE  OF   OCCURRENCE  AND   PLACE  OF   RESIDENCE,  BRITISH
COLUMBIA,  1950.
ALL DEATHS
Place of
Occurrence
Residence
Elsewhere
Deaths of Residents
Occurring Elsewhere
Place
PROVINCE
In Canada
In
United
States
In Canada
In
United
States
of
Residence
11,574
99
42
78
70
11,581
DEATHS IN INSTITUTIONS
Totals for British Columbia.
7,003
39
17
40
43
7,030 L 72
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 19.—TOTAL DEATHS (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS) AND DEATHS IN INSTITUTIONS, IN CITIES AND VILLAGES OF 1,000 POPULATION AND OVER, BY PLACE
OF OCCURRENCE AND PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1950.
ALL DEATHS
CITIES AND VILLAGES
Place of
Occurrence
Residence
Elsewhere
In Canada
In
United
States
Deaths of Residents
Occurring Elsewhere
In Canada
In
United
States
Place
of
Residence
Cities—
Alberni..
Chilliwack-
Courtenay-
Cranbrook	
Duncan	
Fernie 	
Grand Forks.
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
Nelson..
New Westminster..
North Vancouver-
Port Alberni 	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Trail	
Vancouver	
Vernon _
Victoria-
Villages—■
Creston...
Mission.-
9
17
6
11
84
44
25
203
138
19
196
113
563
223
80
10
4
60
108
43
30
72
4,490
125
1,017
36
39
55
11
12
97
40
6
80
29
366
60
34
26
45
14
4
25
690
29
368
21
15
3
14
27
64
10
52
7
4
2
9
15
8
20
16
49
57
9
16
8
15
8
7
1
9
327
7
100
5
9
4
30
34
80
16
64
37
37
17
116
116
21
136
100
247
220
55
26
12
49
72
35
27
57
4,143
103
747
20
33
DEATHS IN INSTITUTIONS
Cities—■
Alberni .
Chilliwack-
Courtenay—
Cranbrook-
Duncan	
Fernie
Grand Forks..
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo..	
Nelson .
New Westminster-
North Vancouver-
Port Alberni	
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Prince George	
Prince Rupert	
Revelstoke	
Rossland	
Trail
Vancouver.-
Vernon	
Victoria	
Villages—
Crest on	
Mission	
76
37
17
175
105
13
159
89
492
143
62
46
80
33
25
60
2,857
109
723
25
26
54
10
10
93
38
6
78
25
348
55
30
23
38
14
2
25
624
27
330
20
14
25
57
9
46
6
4
2
6
9
5
12
13
38
48
6
15
6
7
5
7
~5
237
7
85
2
5
2
18
25
58
9
46
29
31
11
89
78
12
93
77
183
136
38
15
6
30
48
26
23
39
2,481
89
478
7
17 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
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< < < L 90 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 26.—CAUSES OF DEATH BY SEX AND AGE, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE,
VANCOUVER, 1950
TABLE 27.—CAUSES OF DEATH BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, BIRTHPLACE, AND
MONTH OF DEATH, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, VANCOUVER,  1950
TABLE 28.—CAUSES OF DEATH BY SEX AND AGE, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE,
VICTORIA, 1950
TABLE 29.—CAUSES OF DEATH BY SEX, MARITAL STATUS, BIRTHPLACE, AND
MONTH OF DEATH, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, VICTORIA, 1950
Detailed information under these headings may be secured on request, if reason is sufficiently
urgent.  L 92
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 30.—CAUSES OF DEATH (INTERMEDIATE LIST)
BY
SEX,
IN
6
Z
CA
3
CAUSES OF DEATH
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168
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3
9
7
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4
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27
4
1
1
1
4
1
3
2
3
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14
3
3
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4
35
7
21
11
186
75
92
76
85
37
5
145
22
2
146
48
42
71
14
7
13
8
269
183
31
34
44
20
38
26
12
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139
82
57
1
76
52
24
1
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54
33
21
2
160
102
58
1
265
179
86
6
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405
249
156
4
1
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~~i
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208
153
55
6
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4
3
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2
53
32
21
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__
2
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~~2
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1428
877
551
14
8
1
1
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1
1
1
1
.
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
23
11
6
8
10
6
1
16
2
23
7
9
12
1
2
1
31
28
7
9
7
1
5212
3176
2036
79
45
2
2
1
6
1
16
1
I
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
16
3
9
4
98
31
50
37
40
19
4
83
15
1
66
31
21
31
6
2
7
4
138
89
15
13
27
12
1763
1055
708
12
14
1
1
3
1
1
_
2
1
1
2
1
1
10
2
6
4
22
19
15
11
20
7
17
3
1
24
7
8
18
2
1
1
32
23
5
6
4
3
50
32
18
1
198
126
72
i
142
88
 F.
S4
Al
A2
A3
Tuberculosis of respiratory system M.
            .        .F.
Tuberculosis of meninges and central
nervous system             .            M.
Ditto                                                        F.
Tuberculosis of intestines, peritoneum,
5
1
A4
A5
Tuberculosis of bones and joints F.
—
F.
=
__
A6
A9
General paralysis of insane.. ~      M.
-F.
—
	
~"*2
A10
j,                                                       F,
A12
A13
Paratyphoid  fever  and  other Salmon-
A16
F,
A17
l
1
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1
1
1
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1
4
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1
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2
4
3
3
3
1
1
11
6
1
1
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3
2
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
11
6
1
1
1
A18
	
~I
A19
A20
Erysipelas                                   .   .    , M.
—
_     .".' F.
A21
Diphtheria                                           . M.
F.
A22
A23
A28
     F.
Meningococcal infections    -             -F.
—
A29
Acute infectious encephalitis M.
F.
—
A30
A32
Late effects of acute poliomyelitis and
acute infectious encephalitis M.
Ditto     ...                                                 F.
Measles                                               M.
F
	
A34
~1
2
i
4
2
3
3
—
A43
A44
   ..F.
All other diseases classified as infective
and parasitic           ....                   M.
Ditto      .        F.
Malignant neoplasm  of buccal  cavity
and pharynx          ~      -M.
n»tn                                                             F,
—
A45
A46
A47
A48
Malignant neoplasm of oesophagus...M.
„                F.
Malignant neoplasm of stomach M.
 _    F.
Malignant neoplasm of intestine, except
rectum                                         M.
Ditto                                        F.
~2
2
F.
A49
A50
A51
Malignant neoplasm of larynx           M.
Malignant neoplasm of trachea, and of
bronchus  and lung not  specified  as
secondary                                          M.
Ditto F.
Malignant neoplasm of breast M.
    ..       .F.
	
1
4
3
A52
Malignant neoplasm of cervix uteri.—F.
Malignant neoplasm of other and unspecified parts of uterus F.
Malignant neoplasm of prostate M.
Malignant neoplasm of skin              M.
F.
Malignant neoplasm of bone and connective tissue         ...                        M.
Ditto -F.
Malignant neoplasm of all other and
A53
A54
A55
A56
A57
1
1
2
1
1
7
1
1
1
7
A58
A59
Ditto .  _ F.
Leukaemia and aleukaemia M.
                . ..    F.
Lymphosarcoma  and  other neoplasms
of lymphatic and haematopoietic system   ....   ,                                         M.
Ditto   . .    .                 .         -F.
3
1
—1 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 93
CENSUS DIVISIONS, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1950
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11
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A3
A4
A5
A6
A9
A10
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1
5
1
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A12
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A19
A20
A21
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A23
A28
A29
A30
A32
A34
A43
A44
A45
A46
A47
A48
A49
A50
A51
A52
	
2
—
A53
A54
A55
A56
A57
A58
—
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A59
1
1
1 L 94
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 30.—CAUSES OF DEATH
(INTERMEDIATE LIST)  BY SEX,
IN
CENSUS
0
Z
3
c
CAUSES OF DEATH
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>
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A61
Benign neoplasms and neoplasms of unspecified nature  M.
Ditto  F.
16
16
1
—
1
i
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1
—
2
3
6
3
1
3
1
~T
l
l
—
A62
A63
A64
A65
A66
 F.
Thyrotoxicosis with or without goitre .M.
.     . .F,
Diabetes mellitus  M.
 F.
Avitaminosis and other deficiency states
 M.
Ditto - F.
Anaemias    M.
         F.
Allergic disorders;   all other endocrine,
1
7
9
59
68
12
9
19
20
88
55
37
22
10
4
2
3
641
553
12
8
8
8
8
8
7
6
40
44
9
10
112
93
2178
1111
85
42
221
201
44
45
122
84
27
17
4
8
30
23
64
31
138
84
47
36
9
4
34
3
2
1
1
'1
1
7
4
__
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
3
5
~1
~~2
27
6
2
1
2
4
~~1
I
5
2
1
14
6
1
1
2
1
2
1
6
11
5
1
1
~i
i
i
8
11
1
1
1
~1
28
17
2
2
4
4
"1
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_
i
l
l
i
20
11
1
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1
2
2
3
61
27
1
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3
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l
2
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1
4
3
1
3
1
6
2
3
1
2
19
26
1
~T
1
3
~~3
2
64
47
1
~7
5
3
10
5
2
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1
2
1
1
1
8
5
2
__
1
1
3
1
11
8
l
l
5
1
1
1
7
9
1
1
2
2
5
7
11
7
2
1
1
1
102
72
1
1
2
2
1
5
11
3
3
13
5
268
114
15
8
25
23
10
4
24
9
5
2
1
3
2
7
6
14
6
4
3
1
2
4
25
27
6
6
8
11
43
19
17
9
3
2
1
1
282
253
3
3
2
2
3
3
4
4
21
18
4
4
67
49
985
567
32
16
129
117
20
23
44
44
9
9
6
4
4
35
8
52
39
7
9
4
2
20
3
2
3
11
14
1
4
2
11
9
2
2
96
106
1
1
2
3
1
1
6
6
9
15
397
223
12
9
21
22
6
9
26
10
5
5
5
2
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1
9
3
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2
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12
10
3
3
37
15
3
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3
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3
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3
A67
A68
A69
Ditto .  -  -F.
Psychoses       —        -    -M.
Psychoneuroses  and  disorders  of personality    M.
       F.
__
A70
 F.
Vascular lesions affecting central nervous system   M.
Ditto     F.
5
6
All
A73
Multiple sclerosis   - - - M.
F.
—
F
1
.   ..       .F.
All other diseases of the nervous system
and sense organs  M.
Ditto    - F.
A78
~1
1
1
1
2
39
11
~2
2
~2
2
~~3
~~1
~~4
~1
15
3
2
3
A80
A81
A82
F.
Chronic rheumatic heart-disease.  .   M.
 F.
Arteriosclerotic and degenerative heart-
disease   —M.
Ditto                —      F.
1
31
12
1
A83
A84
 F.
Hypertension with heart-disease M.
Hypertension without mention of heart
     .    M.
1
—2
1
?.
1
A86
A 87
    F.
Other diseases of circulatory system..M.
   F.
Acute upper respiratory infections —M.
 F.
Influenza  M.
        F.
Lobar pneumonia  M.
Bronchopneumonia M.
3
------
1
	
—
--
1
4
3
5
5
29
11
5
4
2
1
7
~2
1
1
1
~~ 1
2
A88
A89
A90
1
2
l
3
	
1
1
~1
1
__
1
2
~1
3
A91
A92
A93
Primary  atypical,   other,   and  unspecified pneumonia M.
Ditto    -   F.
Acute bronchitis   — M.
    F.
Bronchitis, chronic and unqualified ..M.
 F.
—
—
—
1
1
A94
Hypertrophy of tonsils and adenoids M.
--
A95
Empyema and abscess of lung-    M.
,,        ..        F.
Pleurisy       M.
     F.
All other respiratory diseases M.
  ' F.
5
3
3
1
64
16
41
8
45
7
3
1
1
....
1
—
—.
1
1
_
1
1
1
~3
4
—
—
3
3
2
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9
16
2
22
3
1
1
_
5
1
11
4
9
1
1
_
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l
—
A96
A97
A99
~3
~1
1
	
_
_
_
13
4
3
2
2
2
1
1
A100
A101
 .   F.
Ulcer of duodenum  M.
          F.
Gastritis and duodenitis M.
          F.
—- VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950 L 95
DIVISIONS, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1950—Continued
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1
1
—2"
1
"1
i
3
~1
1
11
1
"1
2
~3
"1
5
6
3
1
1
1
3
6
1
"1
~~i
2
1
3
2
71
1
1
1
"1
1
3
"1
1
1
1
1
.-
1
2
1
~~2
1
1
3
6
4
~1
__
__
23
7
1
1
4
1
1
_
"1
2
~2
2
1
"1
~~1
1
"1
2
3
1
1
1
"1
"1
~i
"1
~1
—
~~2
A60
A61
A62
—
71
l
~1
l
"1
l
A63
A64
2
~1
i
"1
"1
2
2
"1
A65
A66
A67
A68
A69
A70
A71
A72
A73
A77
3
1
"1
1
9
1
1
6
2
~1
2
"1
A78
_-.
3
1
8
1
~1
1
—1
~2
"1
"1
~2
2
1
1
"1
1
1
17
6
1
1
1
A79
A80
A81
A82
i
~2
2
2
~1
2
1
—
1
—2
_
"1
"1
	
"1
"1
~1
~1
1
1
"1
A83
A84
A85
A86
A87
A88
~1
2
1
1
~~2
1
. 2
~4
1
8
4
~2
"1
~~1
~2
~~2
2
1
"1
~1
1
1
1
"1
A89
A90
A91
.._.
	
—
A92
A93
A94
A95
A96
A97
A99
A100
A101 L 96
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 30.—CAUSES OF DEATH (INTERMEDIATE LIST)  BY SEX, IN CENSUS
0
Z
CA
3
C5
CAUSES OF DEATH
►4
o
H
O
Z
>
D
X
o
Z
>
Q
o
o
Z
>
a
cd
CN
O
Z
>
0
X
CN
o
Z
>
a
o
CN
o
Z
>
a
cd
cn
o
Z
>
X
cn
O
Z
>
0
o
cn
O
z
>
Q
nr
O
Z
>
0
X
o
z
>
Q
a
o
Z
>
a
X
o
Z
>
o
o
O
Z
>
•o
"n
O
Z
>
A102
Appendicitis   M.
  F.
Intestinal obstruction and hernia M.
F.
Gastro-enteritis and colitis, except diar-
17
4
41
31
34
20
33
15
25
20
33
23
8
1
94
57
28
13
8
4
94
17
10
4
8
2
2
6
5
3
2
8
15
1
1
1
9
10
7
14
28
19
31
28
74
31
42
42
9
10
10
5
22
12
92
73
22
29
50
28
	
1
2
1
—
i
"1
"1
1
l
l
"1
i
i
3
_-.
I
—2
4
2
1
1
~2
i
I
1
1
4
1
23
8
4
1
3
1
2
—j
1
1
1
...„.
1
~1
1
"1
"1
1
~~3
1
3
5
3
3
1
3
2
5
6
5
2
7
13
2
2
1
15
4
1
2
3
1
1
2
2
2
3
4
2
5
7
2
5
5
1
2
1
1
5
1
18
17
3
6
1
4
78
32
21
10
7
1
2
13
12
7
7
24
13
11
10
15
12
•3
39
20
13
8
2
2
51
4
3
2
3
4
4
1
1
2
6
1
1
5
6
3
8
13
8
16
12
33
14
14
17
7
5
1
1
3
4
20
13
4
3
1
324
143
51
28
28
3
4
4
5
1
1
2
6
3
?
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
A103
A104
1
"1
"1
1
1
~1
"1
"1
3
2
~2
1
1
1
A105
Ditto F.
1
A106
F.
—
—
A107
F.
Other diseases of digestive system—M.
F
Acute nephritis                          ....     M.
               F.
Chronic, other, and unspecified nephritis                                           M.
Ditto _                 .   F.
1
~1
"1
"1
"1
"1
2
l
"1
1
—
A108
15
10
2
1
2
2
10
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
5
1
7
1
10
4
1
2
1
4
1
9
7
2
3
4
4
88
40
12
7
6
.....
—
1
1
"1
1
A109
A110
1
3
5
2
1
""1
1
"1
1
"1
1
"1
1
5
1
3
1
1
1
5
2
3
1
1
26
10
6
1
5
2
~~2
~1
1
__
1
1
"1
2
1
Alll
 .'. F.
A112
A114
A115
A116
A117
A118
A119
A120
  _.F.
Hyperplasia of prostate                     M.
Other   diseases   of  genito-urinary   system                                                   M.
Ditto . -     .  .F.
Sepsis of pregnancy, childbirth, and the
puerperium                                  -.      F.
Toxaemias of pregnancy and the puerperium                                              F.
Haemorrhage of pregnancy  and childbirth                                   F.
Abortion without mention of sepsis or
toxaemia                                               F.
Abortion with sepsis.— F.
Other    complications    of    pregnancy,
childbirth, and the puerperium       F.
Infections   of   skin   and  subcutaneous
tissue            ...                      —    M.
Ditto _                 . ..F.
2
1
1
~1
1
1
1
~2
1
~~2
1
1
__
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
A121
—
—
A122
"1
"1
"1
3
1
~1
1
1
~~2
5
1
1
1
~1
2
6
1
1
2
14
2
1
1
2
1
A123
A124
   F.
Muscular rheumatism and rheumatism,
unspecified     _.M.
	
A126
A127
 -     .   F.
All other diseases of skin and musculoskeletal system                        M.
Ditto   ,,       .   F.
Spina bifida and meningocele M.
F.
"1
A128
A129
Congenital malformations of circulatory
system                                              M.
Ditto   F.
All other congenital malformations M.
     F.
Birth injuries     M.
   -.     F.
Postnatal asphyxia and atelectasis M.
         F.
Infections of the new-born..     M.
~1
1
1
l
l
l
2
2
1
2
1
4
1
• 2
A130
A131
A132
A133
2
~2
2
1
1
4
~~ 1
"1
1
1
2
2
A134
A135
A136
             F.
All other defined diseases of early infancy .                      .....               M.
Ditto   F.
Ill-defined diseases peculiar to early infancy, and immaturity unqualified M.
Ditto                                                    F.
Senility without mention of psychosis
M.
4
2
A137
Ditto ....                                               F.
Ill-defined and unknown causes.   M.
ii                                                        F-
1
4
1
26
2
3
5
1
~i
5
1
1
	
AE138
AE139
Alternative  classification  of  accidents,
poisonings,   and   violence   (external
cause)               —       M.
Ditto        ...                                 F.
Motor-vehicle accidents ..     .   M.
V
834
293
141
54
88
8
2
1
~~l
14
6
3
1
4
n
l
2
3
2
~1
17
2
6
"1
11
1
7
       F. VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 97
DIVISIONS, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1950—Continued
o
m
o
Z
>
Q
HH
m
o
Z
>
Q
rt
SO
o
Z
>
0
X
so
o
Z
>
P
u
SO
O
Z
0
CO
0
Z
>
CJ
SO
o
Z
Q
CO
O
Z
>
rt
p"
d
Z
>
Q
X
o
Z
>
a
CJ
P"
0
z
>
cd
00
o
Z
>
P
X
■00
O
Z
>
o
00
o
z
>
Q
•o
oo
o
Z
>
oc
o
z
>
a
CO
O
Z
>
q
oo
00
O
z
>
Q
OS
O
Z
>
X
Os
O
Z
>
CJ
COS
O
z
>
p
■a
o
z
>
0
o
as
o
Z
>
Oc
c
Z
>
P
cd
o
O
Z
>
P
o
Z
>
P
u
O
o
Z
>
P
•rt
o
O
Z
P
d
Z
CA
H
c
i—i
~~1
1
2
i
"71
"1
l
~2
~"2
—2
5
1
1
—2
1
1
2
~1
' 1
"1
1
i
~~2
1
1
--
..-.
~1
"1
1
"1
2
~2
1
1
i
i
"1
i
2
2
A102
'-
1
—
~
1
5
"1
3
2
1
-----
......
--
__
1
~1
A103
A104
A105
A106
A107
—
2
1
A108
A109
A110
"1
1
1
1
1
—
1
1
 i
l
2
"1
1
3
1
5
3
2
1
—
--
—
—
1
i
l
1
—
—
----
—
1
1
i
-._
—
1
~1
1
~1
Alll
—
—
1
A112
A114
A115
A116
A117
A118
A119
A120
A121
A122
1
..-.
~~2
1
~1
	
—
__
1
1
"1
~1
—
"1
~2
___
"1
2
~1
	
-—
~1
—
"1
—
—
—
—
A123
i
—
--
"1
A124
A126
A127
A128
A129
—
1
2
"1
—
—
—
~1
A130
A131
A132
—
	
	
—
2
—
—
—
—
......
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
A133
~i
2
1
4
1
"1
1
~1
2
1
~1
8
1
"1
1
2
3
1
"1
3
12
1
~~3
2
1
3
~~4
2
33
4
7
1
9
1
—
5
1
2
2
_
12
3
5
1
1
~~2
12
4
1
"1
i
4
~1
2
1
""•j
8
2
3
1
"1
"~2
11
4
9
4
"~2
1
1
1
4
~1
7
3
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
14
2
2
1
2
3
5
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
4
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
"1
1
1
3
2
~2
2
"1
4
1
_1
16
6
2
1
1
1
"1
71
l
"1
1
"1
l
1
4
"1
1
—
6
4
A134
A135
A136
A137
AE138
AE139 L 98
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 30.—CAUSES OF DEATH (INTERMEDIATE LIST)  BY SEX, IN CENSUS
d
Z
cd
X
u
cd
CN
XI
CN
o
CN
cd
cn
X)
cn
CJ
cn
cd
HCf
X
HI-
a
XI
in
CJ
in
■o
CA
3
CAUSES OF DEATH
<
o
Z
o
Z
0
Z
O
Z
O
Z
o
Z
o
z
O
Z
O
Z
o
Z
o
Z
o
Z
o
z
O
z
0
Z
3
O
H
>
P
>
P
>
P
>
P
>
P
>
R
>
p
>
P
>
P
>
P
>
5
>
3
>
3
>
a
>
5
AE140
AE141
Accidental poisoning                           M.
         F.
57
20
105
85
23
1
35
17
1
2
8
2
90
21
120
27
155
52
11
4
"1
"1
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
~~1
1
1
1
"~2
~1
~1
2
~1
1
~~2
~1
1
3
1
~~2
1
1
2
3
1
1
"1
2
5
1
3
2
"1
4
1
1
2
10
2
6
1
2
~~3
"1
1
~1
4
1
1
5
1
1
3
1
2
2
9
4
2
2
12
3
9
4
15
6
1
39
15
61
54
9
5
3
1
3
1
23
3
30
5
69
31
6
2
2
2
16
11
4
8
3
1
-
8
9
15
1
13
7
2
i
i
i
AE142
     ... .        F.
—
F,
AE143
Accident caused by fire and explosion
AE144
Ditto    ,    .  F.
Accident caused by hot substance, corrosive liquid, steam, and radiation .M.
Ditto F.
AE145
i
i
~4
~15
—
AE146
  F.
Accidental   drowning   and   submersion
 ..M.
•>
AE147
AE148
AE149
Ditto                                                         F.
All other accidental causes M.
   . F.
Suicide  and  self-inflicted injury       M.
          F.
Homicide and injury purposely inflicted
by other persons (not in war) .M.
Ditto                                                   F.
1
_
Alternative   classification  of  accidents,
poisonings, and violence  (nature of
injury)                       - - M.
Ditto                                                   ...    F.
834
293
2
1
14
6
ll
l
3
2
17
2
23
8
26
10
26
2
5
1
78
32
324
143
88
40
3
1
14
2
n
l
AN138
147
26
46
15
45
70
1
84
23
101
21
18
3
1
2
2
1
1
~2
2
2
3
"1
~~3
2
1
"1
"1
"1
4
1
~1
1
4
5
1
3
1
2
3
__
3
_
7
1
3
"1
3
~1
3
4
2
'""2
~~4
4
"1
1
~1
"1
21
3
3
1
5
4
4
3
8
3
2
2
59
11
24
13
23
41
1
32
10
31
13
1
12
1
5
5
11
8
4
16
2
2
1
—
3
1
1
~~2
1
1
1
AN 139
F.
T
AN 140
F.
AN141
AN143
AN144
AN145
— F.
Dislocation without fracture F.
Head injury (excluding fracture) M.
F.
Internal injury of chest, abdomen, and
pelvis                    M.
Ditto                                                 F.
Laceration and open wounds M.
F.
l
AN146
AN 147
Superficial injury, contusion and crushing with intact skin surface M.
Ditto ....                                                  F.
Effects of foreign body entering through
orifice                                                  M.
Ditto          .. .. .  F.
Burns .                                                    M.
  F.
Effects of poisons    M.
All   other   and   unspecified   effects   of
external causes                                M.
Ditto                                                    F.
2
1
22
14
27
9
117
59
225
51
	
l
5
2
~1
1
1
"1
~2
6
1
1
I
1
4
1
1
1
1
3
5
2
—
2
1
2
5
3
29
9
1
11
5
4
2
70
37
68
10
3
1
7
2
7
8
23
10
1
"1
1
1
1
1
~~2
3
—
AN148
AN 149
AN150
3
~~3
7
2
~~2
1
8
1 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 99
DIVISIONS, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1950—Continued
u
m
o
z
>
a
in
o
z
>
a
cd
so
o
z
>
p
X
so
o
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p
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SO
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SC
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>
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z
p
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>
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cd
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p
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3
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1
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1
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1
2
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1
3
12
1
1
3
"1
1
6
1
"~3
1
1
6
~3
~~4
1
33
4
7
1
_
1
"74
1
3
~~2
"1
13
1
—
1
~~1
1
1
5
1
1
__
4
..-
12
3
2
i
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3
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1
1
2
2
5
4
1
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12
4
1
2
1
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4
2
1
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4
1
1
"1
1
~1
1
~1
1
1
8
2
1
1
1
1
"1
"1
4
~~2
2
"1
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11
6
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4
2
"1
—
1
2
1
1
7
3
2
1
" 1
_
1
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i
l
l
2
1
3
~~3
1
3
14
2
~5
~
1
~1
1
5
1
"2
"1
5
1
"1
"1
4
"1
1
"1
3
"1
1
1
"1
_
1
1
"1
1
1
1
1
1
1
"1
1
3
2
"~1
2
2
"1
1
4
1
4
2
3
"1
16
6
1
1
~~4
1
2
1
—
1
1
~~1
1
7
1
1
	
1
"1
1
"1
4
"1
1
""I
1
__.
1
—
1
—
~1
4
2
1
"1
1
6
4
1
"~4
3
2
1
"1
1
2
1
5
3
—
~2
AE140
i
l
l
l
■ 2
—2
8
1
"1
1
.   1
1
1
4
~3
1
3
1
~1
~~2
1
AE141
AE142
AE143
AE144
AE145
AE146
i
2
4
1
~2
9
4
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L 109
TABLE 37.—BIRTHS OF INDIANS (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS) BY MONTHS,
BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE OF MOTHERS, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1950
TOTAL
MONTHS
PROVINCE
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135
103
123
122
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96
131
101
119
117
122
110
TABLE 38.—LEGITIMATE AND ILLEGITIMATE BIRTHS OF INDIANS  (EXCLUSIVE OF
STILLBIRTHS), BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE OF MOTHERS, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1950
PROVINCE
TOTAL BIRTHS
LEGITIMATE
ILLEGITIMATE
Total
M.
F.
Total
M.
F.
Total
M.
F.
1,400
728
672
1,002
517
485
398
211
187 L 110
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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3vovovovo,Z;  u VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 111
TABLE 40.—DEATHS OF INDIAN CHILDREN UNDER ONE YEAR (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS)  BY MONTHS, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1950
PROVINCE
hJ
<
H
O
h
MONTHS
e
CO
•o
CJ
Ph
xi
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at
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CO
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0
3
3
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3
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tj
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6
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(J
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Q
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184
25
14
12
14
11
16
21
18
17
16
11
*)
TABLE 41.—DEATHS OF INDIAN CHILDREN UNDER ONE YEAR (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS) BY AGE AT DEATH, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1950
AGES
 Total
       M.
F.
Total
         M.
F.
     Total
 _        M.
     F.
    Total
M.
 Total
  Total
Total
   .                                     M.
F.
  Total
M.
Total
.                                              M.
     F.
1 week and under 2 weeks 	
 Total
M.
. .            ___           __                          F
2 weeks and under 3 weeks	
 Total
M
P
 Total
_   --       M.
 Total
            M.
     F.
No.
184
108
76
20
13
7
6
2
4
4
4
3
2
1
1
1
34
22
12
4
2
2
3
1
2
3
3
44
28
16
AGES
1 month and under 2 months .
2 months and under 3 months .
3 months and under 4 months .
4 months and under 5 months .
5 months and under 6 months..
6 months and under 7 months..
7 months and under 8 months .
. Total
 M.
_.F.
.Total
. M.
_   F.
..Total
 _M.
F.
.Total
 M.
-F.
.Total
- f".
_.F.
8 months and under 9 months	
9 months and under 10 months.
10 months and under 11 months .
..Total
-- M.
.. F.
..Total
-M.
 F.
Total
 M.
.. - F.
-Total
_.__..M.
F.
11 months and under 12 months-
..Total
 M.
-F.
-Total
 _M.
 F.
No.
n
9
8
16
10
6
20
14
16
6
10
19
li
8
15
10
5
3
1
2
9
5
4
9
4
5
9
5
4
7
5
2 L 112
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 42.—DEATHS OF INDIAN CHILDREN UNDER ONE YEAR (EXCLUSIVE OF
STILLBIRTHS) FROM CERTAIN SPECIFIED CAUSES, BY SEX AND BY PLACE OF
RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1950.
Int. List
No.
CAUSES OF DEATH
Total
M.
F.
001-019
020-029
050
052
055
056
057
085
273
340
391,392
480-483
490-493
500-502
571,572
750-759
752
754
750,751,
752,
755-759
760,761
763
764
769
770
772
773
774,776
795
All causes	
Tuberculosis.-
Syphilis-
Scarlet fever-
Erysipelas	
Diphtheria-
Whooping-cough..
Meningococcal infections..
Measles-
Diseases of the thymus gland	
Meningitis (non-meningococcal)..
Otitis media	
Influenza.
Pneumonia (4 weeks and over)..
Bronchitis-
Enteritis (4 weeks and over)	
Congenital malformations	
Congenital hydrocephalus-
Congenital malformation of circulatory system-
Others under this title-
Injury at birth-
Pneumonia of new-born (under 4 weeks)..
Diarrhoea of new-born (under 4 weeks)	
Antenatal toxaemia	
Erythroblastosis-
Nutritional maladjustment 	
Ill-defined diseases peculiar to early infancy..
[ Immaturity.   	
I Ill-defined and unknown causes 	
| Other specified causes- 	
184
2
5
3
6
1
20
57
1
14
1
1
5
~3
2
~4
1
22
13
22
108
1
4
1
2
1
13
28
1
12
15
11
12
76
1
1
2
4
~7
29
~2
1
1
4
~2
1
"i
l
7
2
10
TABLE 43.—TOTAL DEATHS OF INDIANS (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS) BY MONTHS,
BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1950
PROVINCE
rJ
<
H
O
H
MONTHS
3
CO
si
CJ
P-
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CO
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CJ
3
3
Hi
3
00
3
<
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CJ
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Z
cj
CJ
Q
581
60
43
50
36
42
49
49
56
56
50
1
49  i  41 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 113
TABLE 44.—DEATHS OF INDIANS (EXCLUSIVE OF STILLBIRTHS) BY SINGLE YEARS OF
AGE AND BY AGE-GROUPS, BY PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1950
AGES
TOTAL
M.
F.
AGES
TOTAL
M.
F.
581
184
22
19
11
9
330
108
10
9
5
6
251
76
12
10
6
3
1
4
1
4
1
1
1
2
5'    ,.
3
52 . „
53     „
2
2 years
54    „   	
3    „ _   -
Total 50-54 years	
10
1
6
2
2
4
5
2
~2
5
4   „ 	
Total under 5 years	
245
7
6
5
7
1
138
2
4
4
4
1
107
5
2
1
3
1
56   „
1
57    „
6   „   _
58     „
2
7    „   	
59    „	
2
8    j,
Total 55-59 years..
15
1
1
1
6
2
9
1
"1
3
1
6
9    „	
Total 5-9 years	
26
4
1
7
3
15
~~3
1
2
2
11
__
~~S
1
61    „
1
62    „      	
11   „   .
63  ;;
3
12    „	
64    „      —	
1
13    „
11
2
5
6
6
5
6
2
3
3
3
5
5
14    „
Total 10-14 years
15
2
4
7
8
6
8
1
2
3
6
2
7
1
2
4
2
4
66    „
2
67    „
3
16    „    	
68    ,  	
3
17    „
69    „   .            ..                 ...    .. .
18    „	
24
7
4
6
4
1
16
6
4
4
2
1
19    „	
70 years
71 „    	
Total 15-19 years	
27
4
5
6
7
6
14
2
3
6
4
3
13
2
2
~3
3
1
73     "               '
2
21    „
2
?.?. ;;
74   „                       	
71    ,,
22
8
2
4
4
4
17   .
4
2
3
3
2
5
24   „         ..   .
Total 20-24 years	
28
7
3
2
5
1
18
3
2
1
3
1
10
4
1
1
2
4
76
77    „
1
26   „
7*    ',',
1
27    „    	
79    „
2
28    „
22
7
3
8
6
6
14
3
1
5
1
2
8
29    „
80 years	
81
Total 25-29 years -
18
5
2
5
1
3
10
4
2
3
1
8
1
~2
1
2
4
2
30 years	
31 „
82 ;;
3
83    „
5
32    „      	
84    „     	
4
33    „	
30
1
6
4
3
2
12
1
5
3
1
1
18
34   „     	
Total 30-34 years
16
2
4
3
7
4
10
1
3
2
5
2
6
1
1
1
2
2
86    „     	
1
87    „	
1
36    „
88
2
37    „      -        - .     .
89    „     	
1
38    „      	
Total 85-89 years	
16
3
2
1
11
1
._-
5
39    „
Total 35-39 years	
20
2
2
4
3
4
13
....-
2
2
1
7
2
1
2
1
3
2
91    „               	
2
40 years 	
41 „
9?    „
93    „      	
42    „
94    „    .
1
43    „
7
2
777
5
44   „       	
Total 40-44 years     	
15
1
2
3
2
3
6
1
2
1
~2
9
~2
2
1
45 years
46 „
97    „ - .
	
98     „
47    „   	
99    „     	
	
48    „ -
2
1
	
	
49    „     -	
100 years and over i	
Not stated  	
Total 45-49 years-	
11
6
5
2
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P
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t
oj
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4
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f
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oc
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5
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e*
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5
<
H
5
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HT
5
<
s
<
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a
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5
<
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z
<
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2
<
Hi
i
<
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z
<
z
<
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CO
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Z
<
o
z VITAL STATISTICS REPORT, 1950
L 117
TABLE 46.—DEATHS OF HALF-BREEDS FROM CERTAIN CAUSES OF DEATHS, BY
PLACE OF RESIDENCE, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1950
Detailed information under this heading may be secured on request, if reason is sufficiently urgent.
TABLE 47.—ADOPTION ORDERS FILED IN THE COURT REGISTRY, BRITISH COLUMBIA,
DURING EACH MONTH OF 1950 AND THE MONTHLY TOTALS FROM APRIL, 1920,1
TO DECEMBER 3 1st, 1950.
Month Filed
Year Filed
•o
i
CJ
Ph
IH
u
p.
<
2
o
3
bo
3
CJ
CO
u
O
>
o
Z
u
0)
Q
O   Hi
Z<n
&
o
H
1950
43
61
69
64
84
80
62
49
68
70
91
66
807
Totals, April, 1920, to Decem
ber 31st, 1950	
456
548
576
547
634
684
522
494
575
650
625
597
4
6,912
- Adoption Act assented to April 17th, 1920.
TABLE 48.—ADOPTIONS BY YEAR OF COURT ORDER AND SEX OF CHILDREN, AND
WHETHER ADOPTED BY MAN AND WIFE, BY MAN ONLY, OR BY WOMAN ONLY,
BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1948 TO 1950.
Year of Court Order
Number of Orders
Entered and
Certificates Issued
Adopted by
Total
Males
Females
Man and
Wife
Man
Only
Woman
Only
1948 _              	
1
14
394
ii
382
1
29
762
~~5
1
9
1
1949
30
1950
776
Totals          .            	
409
398
792
5
10
807
TABLE 49.—ADOPTIONS BY YEAR OF COURT ORDER AND BY SEX AND LEGITIMACY
OF CHILDREN, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1948 TO 1950
Year
Adoption
Ordered
Legitimate Births
Illegitimate Births
Not Given or Unknown
Total
Males
Females
Total
Males
Females
Total
Males
Females
Total
1948      	
~ 7
275
~~3
262
"io
537
1
7
105
Ti
116
1
20
221
~14
~~4
~18
1
1949  .
30
19<;n
776
Totals	
282
265
547
113
129
242
14
4
18
807 l m
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TABLE 50.—ADOPTIONS BY BIRTHPLACE OF CHILDREN,  BRITISH COLUMBIA,   1950,
. AND TOTALS FROM APRIL, 1920,* TO DECEMBER 31st, 1950
Place of Birth
Filed in
1950
Apr.,
1920,to
Dec,
1950
Place of Birth
Filed in
1950
Apr.,
1920,to
Dec,
1950
703
19
16
2
20
19
2
8
5,944
207
112
7
11
99
16
194
1
2
98
1
1
8
1
5
2
25
Alberta   —  	
Wales  	
Other British possessions	
3
g
6
Europe	
40
9
United States    .   - -	
Not given or unknown 	
Totals 	
108
Saskatchewan.	
22
807
6,912
1 Adoption Act assented to April 17th, 1920.
TABLE 51.—DECREES OF DISSOLUTION AND NULLITY OF MARRIAGE AND JUDICIAL
SEPARATION BY THE TIME ELAPSED BETWEEN THE MARRIAGE AND THE
OBTAINING OF THE DECREE  (IN YEARS ONLY),  BRITISH COLUMBIA,   1946-50.
Years Married
Number
Years Married
Number
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
19
55
105
137
180
199
164
140
117
117
90
84
75
54
57
19
70
82
119
146
150
160
150
115
109
88
83
68
61
47
18
58
102
92
120
125
134
148
116
97
80
76
62
54
52
16
52
59
114
99
110
114
99
118
100
76
64
68
58
49
12
47
70
89
99
88
90
97
98
96
76
50
42
47
46
15 years 	
16 „     	
17 „   	
55
53
53
41
33
108
60
40
5
10
41
42
38
36
37
110
65
38
4
2
34
35
34
34
34
121
63
49
5
1
32
30
28
36
28
106
63
28
3
7
37
1 year 	
29
34
3    „ 	
18 „   	
19 „	
28
4    ,
28
5    „        	
20 years but less than
25 years 	
25 years but less than
30 years	
30 years but less than
6    „         	
107
7    „    	
8    „        	
50
9    „            	
10    „        	
48
11     „        	
40 years and over
4
12    ,               '■        -.
10
Totals .
14    „         	
2,051
1,880
1,744
1,557
1,422
TABLE 52.—NUMBER OF CHILDREN AFFECTED BY THE AWARD OF CUSTODY UNDER
DECREES OF DISSOLUTION AND NULLITY OF MARRIAGE AND JUDICIAL SEPARATION, BY SEX, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1946-50.
Award of Custody
Males
Females
Total
1946
1947
1
1948 1 1949
1
1950
1946 1 1947
1
1
1948 1 1949
1
1950
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
To the petitioner	
To the respondent	
Not awarded   —
681
10
37
630
17
22
1
616 | 538
19 |    11
55 |    42
510
12
38
694 | 628
18 |    16
49 |    21
1
580 |  509
11 j    12
78 |    24
482
12
25
1,375
28
86
1,258
33
43
1,196
30
133
1,047
23
66
992
24
63
Totals _ 	
728 1  669
690 | 591
1
560
761 | 665
1
669 | 545
1
519
1,489
1,334
1,359
1,136
1,079 VITAL STATISTICS REPORT,  1950
L 119
TABLE 53.—DECREES OF DISSOLUTION AND NULLITY OF MARRIAGE AND JUDICIAL
SEPARATION BY SEX OF PETITIONER, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  1946-50
Dissolution of Marriage
Nullity of Marriage
Judicial Separation
Year
Sex of Petitioner
Sex of Petitioner
Sex of Petitioner
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
1946	
794
1,210
2,004
12
26
38
7
7
1947  	
659
1,167
1,826
21
29
50
2
2
1948 	
586
1,097
1,683
16
32
48
13
13
1949	
538
953
1,491
19
33
52
2
12
14
1950     -    _ .
487    1       890    1    1,377
1                 1
15              20             35
1                 1
10
10
TABLE 54.—DECREES OF DISSOLUTION AND NULLITY OF MARRIAGE AND JUDICIAL
SEPARATION   BY   MONTH   FILED   IN   COURT   REGISTRY,   BRITISH   COLUMBIA,
1946-50.
Year
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May
June
July
Aug.
Sept.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
Total
1946 	
163
149
170
190
208
253
191
20
105
199
186
215
2,049
1947-     _.	
180
186
157
173
159
207
130
18
99
186
165
220
1,880
1948	
147
140
182
166
154
207
158
26
79
138
188
159
1,744
1949 	
132
133
155
119
187
197
101
20
82
133
140
157
1,557
1950 	
'"
130
112
88
140
207
120
14
79
158
132
125
1,422.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952
995-852-7003 

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