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Annual Report of the Inspector of Gaols For the Year Ended March 31st, 1952 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1953

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Annual Report
of the
Inspector of Gaols
For the Year Ended
March 31st, 1952
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1953  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the Inspector of
Gaols for the year ended March 31st, 1952.
ROBERT. W. BONNER,
A ttorney-General.
A ttorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 17th, 1952.  TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Introduction     7
Oakalla Prison Farm—
Men's Section     8
Women's Section  9
Gaol Libraries, Men's and Women's Sections  11
Young Offenders' Unit  12
Nelson Gaol  15
Kamloops Gaol  17
Prince George Gaol—
Men's Gaol  18
Women's Gaol  19
Report of the Librarian  19
Forestry Camp  22
Staff-training  24
Report of the Provincial Probation Branch  25
Appendix—
Statistics of Institutions  29
Statistics of Provincial Probation Branch  36  Report of the Inspector of Gaols, 1951-52
Hon. R. W. Bonner, Q.C,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C
Sir,—I have pleasure in submitting the Annual Report covering the Provincial Gaols
for the year ended March 31st, 1952. In submitting this Report, I would like to make
reference to several new developments which took place during the last fiscal year.
Of particular interest in this connection was the experiment which took place in
co-operation with the British Columbia Forest Service, Department of Lands and Forests,
where we conducted a forestry camp to which a group of eleven young offenders were
released from the Young Offenders' Unit of Oakalla Prison Farm under provision of the
" Ticket of Leave Act." This experiment proved to be very interesting and, I feel,
productive of good results. Mr. R. M. Deildal, Assistant Probation Officer, was in charge
of the project. His report, which is quoted below, is an excellent account of the
experiment and a valuable reference document.
The rehabilitative aspects of such a programme were brought out. It was also
proved it is possible for a project of this type to be conducted co-operatively. It is hoped
that as a result of our experience during the past year we will be able to enter into a more
extensive programme of this nature next summer.
Another feature of the year's work which should be mentioned is the Young
Offenders' Unit, Oakalla Prison Farm. We have now completed a full year of the
programme in that institution, and I am quite pleased with the developments which have
taken place. It was unfortunate that Mr. T. A. Camm, who started in with this Unit as
Director, found it necessary to relinquish his position because of ill health. Mr. B. J. C.
McCabe, who had been formerly Classification Officer of the Unit, was promoted to the
top administrative position, and while there have been, and probably will be for some
time, difficulties of organization because of the fact that this type of programme is
something decidedly new, I feel that, by and large, we have made definite progress.
One of the recommendations of the Commission Report called for the completion of
a job analysis of prison personnel at Oakalla Prison Farm. This was carried out in
co-operation with Mr. Williscroft, of the Civil Service Commission. It is hoped that the
results of this will assist in arriving at a more satisfactory salary scale and also a type of
organization of the Gaol staff which will make for a more extensive treatment programme
for inmates.
The institution of a staff-training programme for staffs of Oakalla (Men's and
Women's Gaols), Young Offenders' Unit, and New Haven is a new venture well in
keeping with modern penological thought. Mr. H. G. Christie, who conducted this
training programme with the co-operation of the University of British Columbia, has
reported on results herein.
The Occupational Therapy Programme in the Women's Section at Oakalla Prison
Farm is going ahead very satisfactorily under the direction of Miss Maybee. I hope that
a similar programme may soon be afforded to inmates of the Women's Gaol, Prince
George.
The first full year's report on the part of Mr. Konrad Egilson, Librarian for the Gaol
Service, is of interest and is to be commended because of the very fine analysis given
concerning the state of the libraries in the various institutions and the suggestions made by
Mr. Egilson regarding what might be done to make this particular part of the institutional
facilities of greater value in a total training programme. U 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
On the whole, I feel that we have made considerable progress during the past year,
and that if plans which have been formulated for next year can be carried out, the
reorganization of our Gaol service should go ahead fairly rapidly. It is to be hoped that
before long we will be able to announce the appointment to such key positions as full-time
Medical Officer, Chaplains (both Protestant and Roman Catholic), Psychologist, Deputy
Warden (Treatment), a school-teacher, and a social worker, some of these to be attached
directly to the staff of the Inspector of Gaols and others to be attached to the staff of
Oakalla Prison Farm.
These above positions, with the exception of the Chaplains, have been advertised,
and we are hopeful that, as a result, suitable persons will be found to fill them. With the
addition of this personnel, together with additional supporting staff, in our Gaol Service,
we will move forward into an era of constructive programme and treatment.
Included in this Report is a resume of the development of the Provincial Probation
Branch, together with statistical tables showing number of new cases dealt with during
1951—52 compared with other years since inception of the Branch. There are also
figures showing Courts served and number of referrals by Courts. This report has been
included in this form because it is the first printed account concerning this Branch, and
it is felt that as a matter of record some historical resume should be presented.
The statistical reports covering all phases of the programme, detailed information
concerning inmates, and some facts concerning personnel, as well as statement of
expenditures and costs per capita, covering Oakalla Prison Farm, both Men's and
Women's Gaols, Nelson, Kamloops, and Prince George are attached.
OAKALLA PRISON FARM
Men's Section
Warden J. Millman reports as follows: —
" I beg to submit herewith Gaol reports, Men's and Women's Sections, for the fiscal
year ended March 31st, 1952. The annual returns for all prisoners received during the
year are being forwarded under separate cover. Also, please find enclosed statements
covering operation of the Sheet-metal Plant, Laundry, Shoemaker-shop, Tailor-shop,
Paint-shop, Women's Gaol, a summary of Gaol punishments for the year, a complete
inventory of live stock and equipment, a report of library statistics, and a report covering
the first year's operation of the occupational-therapy programme in the Women's Gaol.
" The statements of revenue and expenditure indicate that owing to adverse conditions such as poor root-crops, higher cost of feeds, loss of the poultry flock through
Newcastle disease, etc., the farm operations have resulted in increasing deficits in every
section except the piggery, but the picture in so far as the shops and industries are
concerned is much brighter, and profits from that quarter offset the farm losses with
a comfortable margin to spare.
" The fiscal year ended with the Sheet-metal Plant still not operating in its new
quarters in the Quonset hut due to insurmountable difficulties of manufacture. These
are, however, gradually being ironed out, and commencement of operations in the new
quarters in the near future appears to be assured.
" New construction for the fiscal year included renovation of a former large woodshed into a well insulated and ventilated vegetable-storage shed similar to those in use at
the Provincial Mental Hospital, and which will, I think, be a vast improvement over
previous storage facilities; a new fire-hall; installation of an 8-inch sewer-line; surface
water line and four manholes from the new boiler-house; a chain link fence around the
Young Offenders' Unit; concrete floor in the Blacksmith-shop; extension of the library
in the main building and new shelving throughout; alterations to the Paint-shop; and
general maintenance and repairs. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1951-52
U 9
" Construction of our new boiler-house got under way late in 1951 and is destined
to be in operation sometime during the summer of 1952.
" The population of the recently established Young Offenders' Unit has not increased
as rapidly as anticipated, the Director of that Unit claiming that a greater number of
youths cannot be handled without increases in staff. It is understood that this problem
is presently under consideration by the Department, and it is to be hoped that the Unit
will be operating at full or near-full capacity before the end of the next fiscal year.
" The report of the Librarian is indicative of the continued enthusiasm and enjoyment with which this phase of prison life is received. The increasing circulation is due
in no small part to the wide selection of reading provided in all fields, and the new
Librarian is to be commended for his efforts in this connection.
" The Occupational Therapy Programme in the Women's Gaol under the direction
of Miss Maybee has exceeded our expectations. Operations in some directions are
limited due to lack of funds available for materials, but the sale of finished articles under
the auspices of the Elizabeth Fry Society has been a very material help in this connection.
The interest shown by those inmates participating in the programme would indicate that
it is well worth while, and it is to be hoped that it will soon be found possible to institute
a similar programme in the Men's Gaol.
" General behaviour and health of the inmates in both Men's and Women's Gaols
is relatively the same as the previous year. Health and medical services are very satisfactory, with the exception of dental treatment, and I again recommend that some
provision be made to employ a dentist on a part-time basis to provide free dental service
to the extent of alleviating suffering amongst the inmate population.
" Overcrowded conditions in both Men's and Women's Gaols are, of course, an old
story now, but I would be remiss in duty if I did not once again bring this matter to the
attention of the Department and urge that action be taken in the immediate future to
provide additional prison accommodation either at Oakalla or some other point to relieve
this situation.
" In referring to my previous annual report, it will be noted that I made eight
recommendations for major improvements to the Gaol. I regret that to date none of
these recommendations have been carried out, and I strongly urge that they be given early
and favourable consideration. I further recommend that immediate steps be taken to
enlarge and modernize the dairy. The present structure is totally inadequate to process
the ever-increasing quantities of milk produced on the farm and to make the butter
required for the institution.
" In conclusion, I wish to take this opportunity of commending both the male and
female staffs for their loyal support and co-operation despite the oftentimes trying conditions resulting from our overcrowding and lack of adequate facilities. I also wish to
extend my thanks to the Salvation Army, the Roman Catholic Chaplain, the John Howard
Society, the Church of England Ministry, the Elizabeth Fry Society, and the Alcoholics
Anonymous group for their splendid efforts on behalf of the social and spiritual welfare
of our inmate population."
Women's Section
Mrs. E. Inkster, R.N., Matron in Charge, in reporting on activities of the Women's
Gaol for the year, gives the following details:—
" I hereby submit a report of the work and activities of the Women's Gaol for the
fiscal year 1951-52.
" Population
Average daily     55.926
Average monthly  1705.75 U 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
" Culinary
"A total of 61,080 meals was served. The usual extra rations were served at Easter-
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's.
" Edibles canned were as follows: 120 quarts of sauerkraut, 30 quarts of dill pickles,
308 quarts of mainly pickles, and 8 quarts of celery relish.
"Arts and Crafts Class
"Old material and scraps made into rugs, slippers, etc., 431 articles. New institutional material made up into aprons, nightgowns, uniforms, etc., 683 articles. Alterations on inmates' own personal clothing, 54 articles. Inmates' own materials such as
dressmaking, knitting, leatherwork, shellwork, etc., 682 articles. Practice work included
art, correspondence courses, costumes, crocheting, knitting, lampcraft, leatherwork, petit
point, picture-framing, rug-making, silver-wire jewellery, table decorations, tatting,
upholstery, etc. Progress during the first year of operation of the Arts and Crafts Department has been extremely satisfactory. There is no behaviour problem with inmates
whose interests are completely captured. Cramped conditions hamper the work and
make correspondence courses impractical.
" Library
" Library books have been issued each Monday and Friday throughout the year.
Each inmate is allowed two books and one magazine bi-weekly. The Library is an
extremely popular unit and is by far our best recreational project. Our average circulation
is 649 monthly. In April, 1951, the Library contained 945 books, and 80 new books
were added, making a total of 1,025 books.
" We appreciate the splendid co-operation which Mr. Egilson, Librarian, has
shown us.
" Mending
" Men's Gaol.—Repairs done for the Men's Gaol were as follows: —
Articles
Miscellaneous    285
Socks  18,052
Hickory shirts  3,207
Underwear   4,996
Jackets   969
Men's pants   6,943
Total  34,452
" Young Offenders' Unit.—Total articles mended amounted to 1,226.
" New Haven.—Total articles mended amounted to 639.
" Women's Gaol.—Wearing-apparel made from new material, 130 articles; repairs
made to miscellaneous garments, 992 articles.
" Laundry
" During the year 24,751 articles were laundered. We are lacking facilities, which
accounts for not handling larger amounts of our laundry, but we would prefer to do our
own entirely.
"Health
" The general health of inmates was excellent. The Gaol physician made bi-weekly
visits, and a doctor and nurse from the Provincial Venereal Disease Clinic made weekly
visits. There were eight inmates infected with syphilis and fifty-four with gonorrhoea.
These inmates were treated with penicillin; also three of the inmates were treated with
streptomycin. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1951-52
U 11
" Hospital
" There were four inmates hospitalized during the year.
" Recreation
" Miss Grace Walton, Provincial recreation instructress, has continued giving weekly
instruction to the inmates in basketball and square dancing. She has had very favourable
response from the inmates.
" Mrs. R. C. Weldon continues to do her good work by showing the girls a movie,
followed by a lecture, each month, under the auspices of the Women's Christian
Temperance Union.
" Church Services
" The attendance at the weekly church services is fair. The monthly services of the
John Howard Society have a favourable influence over the inmates.
" Major and Mrs. Wagner, of the Salvation Army, are continuing to do valuable
work in rehabilitating inmates by accommodating them at the Receiving Home until they
find employment. Mrs. Wagner helps us out greatly in any required transporting of
inmates.
" There are Roman Catholic morning services twice each month.
" Discipline
" The percentage of drug addicts and the number of inmates is still increasing
steadily, which has made it absolutely impossible to segregate the various types of
inmates. The conduct for the past year has been fairly good in spite of all of these adverse
conditions.
" Recommendations
" We are in desperate need of the extension to the building over the kitchen. This
has already been considered. The number of prisoners with long sentences is still
increasing, and the sentences are becoming longer. There are far too few single cells for
each of these to occupy. Our overflow annex at Prince George is also overcrowded now;
we are still transferring large numbers of inmates whenever it is possible for them to be
accepted. We are using every available space to the best possible advantage, but still we
have very little space left for Arts and Crafts activities. The machines, rug-frames, and
quilt-frames, etc., require a great deal of space, which we cannot spare without the
extension to the building.   We are not able to have looms in operation.
" Summary
" We feel that in spite of all of our handicaps we have had wonderful co-operation
from female staff, male staff, outside societies, churches, and also most of the inmates,
enabling us to have a fairly progressive year.
" The Arts and Crafts Programme, which the Elizabeth Fry Society fostered, is a
great asset and has definitely aided in improving the behaviour and contentment of the
inmates.
" In conclusion, Sir, I wish to thank you and all of your administrative staff for your
valuable advice and assistance with all of our numerous problems."
GAOL LIBRARIES, MEN'S AND WOMEN'S SECTIONS
Mr. Konrad Egilson, the Librarian for the Gaol Service, in reporting on the libraries
in both the Men's and Women's Sections at Oakalla Prison Farm, gives a statistical
summary of circulation of both fiction and non-fiction in these two institutions. These
figures are shown below. U 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the course of the year the floor area of the Men's Prison Library was enlarged
by 200 square feet. Fluorescent lighting was also installed. As a result of this increase
in floor area, it was possible to have an extra 312 feet of shelving added.
The combined circulations of the Men's and Women's Prison Libraries for the year
ended March 31st, 1952, was 57,134.
The Men's Prison Library accounted for 49,176 of this total. This breaks down
into four categories: Inmate reading (fiction and non-fiction) and staff reading (fiction
and non-fiction). Inmate fiction reading amounted to 41,428 and non-fiction to 7,048.
Staff fiction reading was 392 and non-fiction 308.
Circulation for the Women's Prison Library breaks down into the same four classes.
Inmate fiction was 3,466, with non-fiction 844. Staff fiction was 1,562, with non-fiction
1,257. In addition to this, a count was kept of magazine circulation, and it amounted
to 829.
Total fiction for all classes in both institutions was 46,848. Total non-fiction was
9,457.
In the same period the Men's Library received 967 new accessions. This did no
more than maintain the Library stock, as large numbers of books had to be withdrawn
from circulation because of the need for rebinding. The Women's Prison Library
received 136 new accessions.
In addition to the above, Mr. Egilson has submitted a complete annual report
covering all libraries in the Provincial Gaols.   This report appears in a later section.
YOUNG OFFENDERS' UNIT
Mr. B. J. C. McCabe, Director in Charge, reports as follows:—
" I beg to submit the following report on the operation of the Young Offenders' Unit
for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1952. In submitting this report, I would like to
draw to your attention the fact that my appointment to the Young Offenders' Unit as
Director did not take effect until April 14th, 1952.
" The year commenced with an inmate population of thirty-six inmates. The
average population for the fiscal year was fifty-two. Unfortunately, some escapes took
place, which were largely due to the inexperience on the part of the staff at that time, and
another factor was that the majority of the type of inmates received were ex-Industrial
School boys, who had been transferred on account of their escapes from that institution.
The general behaviour of the inmates while in custody was not very satisfactory during
the first few months of operation, but a slight improvement was noticed as a fuller
programme was organized.
" The general health of the inmate population was very good. The facilities of the
Prison surgeon were used, as also was the Out-patients' Department of the Vancouver
General Hospital, which co-operated to its fullest. The inmates, by appointment, were
permitted to attend the ear, eye, nose, and throat, dental, and orthopaedic clinics.
" In one instance, through the efforts of the aforementioned agency, one youth left
the institution after a successful operation had been made on his arm, thereby giving him
the use of three fingers on his right hand.
" The daily food ration for the institution was increased and improved on
recommendation of the Provincial Nutritionist, who visited the institution on several
occasions and gave valuable advice.
"As the building occupied by the Young Offenders' Unit was new, there were no
major problems regarding replacements, but an enlargement was made to enable the
Vocational Training Programme to extend its quarters by completing a section in the
basement of the institution, and it is now possible for at least two automobiles to be taken
care of at the same time. Two small Quonset huts adjacent to the main building were
put in order and made into an upholstery and radio shop. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1951-52
U 13
" Considerable work has been done on the playing-field, making it available, by
digging away the hard-pan, for use of football and baseball games.
" Vocational Training
"During April, 1951, the Vocational Training staff included a diesel course, a
partial cooking course, an academic study course, and a maintenance group. This
programme was carried on until July, 1951, at which time a regular school-teacher was
attached to the staff, and great interest was shown by the inmates in securing correspondence courses under the supervision of the school-teacher. During the month of
September, an upholstery instructor, who at that time was a member of the staff, set up
a shop in a Quonset hut. It was not until December that a mechanics and woodworking
instructor was added to strength, and the Vocational Training Programme continued to
improve from that date.
" The Trades Programme is under the general supervision of Mr. W. Holland, who
also instructs in diesel. He and his staff have developed a good knowledge of the needs
of the youpg inmates sent to the institution and, in many cases, have been instrumental
in guiding these youths to accept training that would prove valuable to them on their
release from the Young Offenders' Unit.
" The school-teacher, who is also a certified wireless and radio operator, directs a
course in radio, which is available to all inmates who can keep up with the course.
Inmates with at least Grade X standing have proved the most satisfactory students to date
in many instances.
" It is impossible to give an inmate a complete course in a trade due to, in some
instances, lack of space and, in a very small percentage of cases, lack of sufficient time to
serve on the sentence. However, the courses have been of great value, inasmuch as
they have assisted the youth in securing employment in which he could continue the
training he had commenced in the institution in a private business firm. A few of the
inmates have returned to take a vocational course in the evening—two in radio operation,
three to upholstery firms—and five or six have entered the armed services and will be
continuing their courses commenced while in the Young Offenders' Unit.
" The standard of the vocational instructors has been kept at a fairly high level, and
all appear to be proficient in their respective trades. During the past twelve months they
have gained a fair amount of knowledge in handling the many different types of inmates
that make up the institution, and although the supervisor instructors are not completely
sure of the proper approach, they appear to be quite willing to learn and consequently
have attended different lectures by outside authorities.
" It will be noted, however, that the institutional cook has not been able to give a
complete course in cooking due to his other work, but an improved course will be
arranged by the coming year.
" The Vocational Instruction Programme commences at 8 in the morning and
terminates at 3 in the afternoon, at which time the Socialization Programme is supervised
under Mr. O. Walling. The vocational instructors are well aware of the necessity of the
Socialization Programme and are becoming better acquainted with the type of work
Mr. Walling is doing.
" Shortly after the Upholstery Course was inaugurated, work from the Vancouver
Court-house was sent to the institution, and by March, 1952, numerous chairs for the
Supreme Court were upholstered to the satisfaction of the Court.
" Socialization
"Up until July, 1951, there was no definite programme under the heading of
socialization. The shifts were operated on a straight basis, but since Mr. Walling became
attached to the institution, a definite programme in this regard has been organized. U 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A sports programme commences at 3 p.m. and usually continues until dinner-time. The
evening programme consists of discussion groups, games, library, hobby work, and
individual guidance of the inmate by the unit supervisor.
" The building houses six units of thirteen boys, each under a supervisor, who is
constantly with this group and guides the group to work as a unit. Their problems are
discussed, and they are taught to respect one another's point of view and, in general,
accept the basic rules of society. They are taught to share their tobacco and such, and on
some occasions even share their discussions and problems with each other. An entirely
different approach is used during this afternoon and evening programme. The meal is
served with the supervisor at the head of the table, with each inmate helping himself to
the food on the table. Manners and cleanliness and so forth are part of this socialization
course. Difficulty was experienced when this system was first inaugurated. This difficulty
was anticipated due to the fact that many of the inmates were quite anti-social or had a
feeling that being in gaol was ' big shot.' However, through the efforts of Mr. Walling
and his staff a greater breakdown in this feeling was in evidence, and it is felt that he has
had a fair amount of success in changing the attitude of the inmates toward society.
" The afternoon staff consists of young men who have certain university training or
who have been proficient in the field of physical education and group work. They, as the
morning staff, attend different lectures given by outside authorities and have gained
knowledge of how to work with our inmates from these courses. Weekly staff meetings
are held usually under the direction of Mr. Walling or the Director reviewing both phases
of the treatment programme. The staff understand that both groups are essential in
endeavouring to work out a rehabilitation plan for the youths under their supervision
and realize the necessity for co-operation.
" Classification
" The Classification Officer has been a member of the staff since the institution
opened. It was his duty as a social worker to make all the necessary contacts with regard
to the inmate's welfare, to visit the home, to arrange for employment, and, in general, to
counsel the youth on an individual basis. Each inmate on his reception was interviewed
by this officer, and no matter what length of sentence he had, his personal release plans
were discussed and then either augmented or carried out on the lines of the inmate's
suggestions. The Classification Officer attended to all the contacts with other agencies,
both health and social, and assisted the inmates in determining their suitability for the
different trade courses available. It was even necessary at times for the Classification
Officer to assist in straightening out staff matters so as to ensure a more harmonious
feeling toward staff of the institution.
" In securing employment, the National Employment Service and other agencies
co-operated fully, but it was found that a personal contact by the Classification Officer
or a member of the staff made a better impression with an employer who intended to
place an ex-inmate in his firm. In this respect a vote of thanks is made to the Salvation
Army, the National Employment Service of both New Westminster and Vancouver, Bob
Cawston of the staff of the John Howard Society, and to the many private citizens who
are well known to the Classification Officer for their assistance and guidance in the placing
of these youths. During the last fiscal year there have been only two occasions when
employment was not secured on release of inmates. Many agencies, such as the United
Church Welfare, St. Vincent de Paul Salvage Bureau, and many private individuals have
assisted with their donations of clothing for needy inmates who, without the kindness of
these organizations, would not have had sufficient clothing to leave the institution.
" During February, 1952, Mr. T. A. Camm, who was Director of the Young Offenders' Unit since its inception, became ill and under doctor's advice was granted leave of
absence to take employment in a different section of the Prison Service.   Six members of REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1951-52
U 15
the institutional staff have also resigned since April, 1951; two returned for further
university education and four were unsuitable for the type of work undertaken at the
Young Offenders' Unit.
" It is only fitting at this time that a remark should be made regarding the many
types of inmates sent to the Young Offenders' Unit. As you are no doubt aware, the
physical aspects of the institution are closely confined, and consequently the segregation
is not as good as it could be. Every type of inmate, from the normal person to the
psychopathic, is housed in the one building, and unit segregation on occasions has
been made quite difficult due to our present housing facilities. This condition is also
a drawback to the treatment programme, as one individual can see the treatment of
another, and unless he is aware of the problem of his fellow inmate, he may sometimes
question the different approach used with one youth and not with the others. However,
it is realized by the Director and the staff of the institution that the authorities are well
aware of this condition, but it was felt that this problem should be mentioned briefly in
the Annual Report."
Staff of the Young Offenders' Unit is as follows: Director; Chief Custodial Officer;
Classification Officer; Vocational Officer; Educational Officer; Supervisor Clerk; Supervisor Cook; Supervisors, Custodial (6); Supervisors, Group Work (6); Supervisors,
Instructors (4); and Night Guards (2).
The table below shows the manner in which inmates have been occupied during
the year:—
April, 1951, to June, 1951
Per Cent
Diesel  50.0
Kitchen   10.0
Maintenance   24.0
Study  16.0
September, 1951, to
November, 1951
Per Cent
Diesel  36.2
Kitchen   10.3
Maintenance   24.1
School  19.0
Upholstery   10.4
July, 1951, to August, 1951
Per Cent
Diesel  46.3
Kitchen   9.9
Maintenance  21.9
School  21.9
December, 1951, to
March, 1952
Per Cent
Diesel  14.8
Kitchen   13.0
Maintenance   11.1
School  20.4
Upholstery   14.8
Motor mechanics   11.1
Woodworking   14.8
NELSON GAOL
In reporting on activities of the Nelson Gaol, Warden A. Tulloch has the following
to say:—
" During the past year the number of prisoners has decreased from the year before
due to the fact that no uprisings of the Doukhobors had to be handled at this institution,
but our extreme difficulty is still to be able to obtain suitable trusties to perform the
necessary duties in the Gaol.
"Staff Changes
" There have been several changes in the staff during the year. Senior Guard A.
Tulloch was promoted to the rank of Warden, Second Class. The other changes were
the employment of four additional men; the first two were ex-Constable George Blaney
and ex-Constable William Sharun to the ranks of First- and Second-class Guards respectively.   The estimates for this year provided for the employment of a Guard-Cook, and U  16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
this position was taken by Mr. Robert Walden, who later was released from this position
after proving unsatisfactory, but was again filled by Mr. Michael Ganzert as a Probationary Guard-Cook. Guard Donald J. Potosky was taken on permanently as a Fourth-
class Guard on May 1st.
"The staff at present is made up as follows: Alex. Tulloch, Warden (in charge of
Gaol); Andrew Niven, First Guard (office duties); Robert G. Thompson, First Guard
(general duties); George S. Blaney, First Guard (general duties); John H. McGinn,
Second Guard (general duties); William Sharun, Second Guard (general duties); Frank
H. Doyle, Third Guard (general duties); Donald J. Potosky, Fourth Guard (general
duties); and Michael J. Ganzert, Probationary Guard (kitchen cook).
" Population
" The population at the beginning of the year was 25. There were 371 inmates
received and 361 inmates discharged, leaving a total of 35 prisoners in the Gaol at the
end of the fiscal year. The peak of the inmate population was 45 and the lowest 16.
The daily average for the period was 30.7, as against 34.7 for the previous year, a
decrease of 4.
" Welfare and Recreation
"As in past years, the inmates not working with the outside gang are allowed the
freedom of the cell blocks during the day and, when weather permits, one hour of exercise
is allowed in the exercise-yards daily except Saturdays and Sundays. Due to finding
certain articles in the large cell block that could lead to an escape, all individual locks
were put back into service and all prisoners are locked up at 5 p.m. daily. The radio is
still controlled from the Gaol office at the same hours as in past years, and the prisoners
have various programmes to listen to until the lights are turned out by the guard on
duty at 9 p.m.
" Religious Services
" The Salvation Army still continues to hold services every Sunday morning between
10 and 11, and the Pentecostal Assembly meets on every second Sunday of each month,
with a good percentage of the inmates attending both of these services.
" Medical Care
"Again the general health of the prisoners in the past year has been very good, with
no hospital cases to report. We have been very fortunate, with so few cases requiring
segregation from other inmates. These needing attention were attended to by the Gaol
surgeon, Dr. F. M. Auld, either at his office or in the Gaol office. The provision for all
inmates to have chest X-rays for tuberculosis is still being carried on, with only two cases
of this disease being detected. However, our facilities here for handling the sick parade
are still extremely limited, especially when the doctor has both male and female prisoners
to examine.
" Farm Work
" Prison labour in the Gaol garden produced vegetables to the estimated value of
$649.58, this being an increase over last year when no garden was planted due to having
the Doukhobors in the Gaol annex and using the garden space for recreation purposes.
Although the garden has produced the above estimated value, the statistics show that
it cost more to feed the inmates this year than last year. This increase in costs is largely
due to the rise in costs of materials.
" Maintenance and Construction
" The only construction carried out this year was the repairing of the observation
cell after it was damaged by those insane inmates held therein over a period of time. This
work was done by the Public Works Department and was painted by prison labour. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1951-52
U 17
" On August 15th a sprinkling system was completed and checked by the local
fire chief and is now in working-order to handle fire in all or any one of the three buildings.
" On May 7th all walls in the kitchen, church-room, furnace-room, and laundry
were scraped of all whitewash and painted in a powder-blue colour trimmed in black;
all this work was carried out by prison labour. Other painted surfaces had been washed
several times during the year by prison labour.
" Discipline
" Taking everything into consideration, the discipline in the Gaol this year has
been very good, with no breach of the prison regulations to report."
KAMLOOPS GAOL
Warden W. T. Teal, in his resume concerning activities at Kamloops Gaol, reports
as follows:—■
" Population
" The summary of annual statistics attached hereto shows a slight decrease from
the previous year, but the number of days' stay of prisoners shows a marked increase.
This and a further increase in the number of arrests by the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police has taxed our facilities and accommodation to the utmost.
" Maintenance and Construction
" 1. The general maintenance was done by prison labour. The painting and decorating of the Gaol was deferred owing to the electric wiring in this portion of the building
being condemned by the Fire Marshal.
" 2. We completed a new fence around the Gaol, Provincial Home, and Provincial
Offices property. The two-car garage used for the Provincial Home station wagon and
Provincial Home Superintendent's car was repaired, a foundation and concrete floors
being put in.
" 3. The prisoners, under Deputy Warden J. D. H. Stewart, rocked, straightened,
and cleaned the debris from the channel of Peterson Creek for approximately 1 mile.
This creek flows through the east boundaries of the Gaol property.
" 4. In the fall we cut and hauled approximately 30 cords of wood (apple, maple,
birch, elm, and fir) from the Royal Inland Hospital ground. Letters of appreciation have
been received from the secretary of the hospital for the work completed on the hospital
property.
" 5. The Gaol, Provincial Home, Provincial Court-house, and Provincial Offices
lawns and flower-gardens have been maintained and improved by the prisoners under the
direction and supervision of the Deputy and Mr. A. Merridew, Provincial Home gardener.
" 6. The fence around the Provincial Home cemetery was removed and the dead
trees and other debris burned. We also excavated and refilled twenty-two graves at
the Provincial Home cemetery.
" Farms and Gardens
" The Gaol gardens produced a good yield of vegetables, and it was not necessary to
purchase any vegetables until March, 1952.
" The hay-crop was exceptionally good, and two crops of alfalfa were cut and
baled for the Tranquille Sanatorium farm.
" Medical Care
" The general health of the prison population was good, the exception being a mild
epidemic of bronchial and pneumonia diseases in February and March owing to the
inclement weather. U 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
" Welfare and Recreation
" We have no facilities for any recreation at this Gaol. The Library has been used
extensively by the prisoners during the past year.
" Religious Services
" The Gaol has no facilities for collective religious service owing to our institution
being used also as an R.C.M.P. lockup.
" Escapes and Recapture
"We had four inmates escape from the Gaol gardens on July 28th, 1951. The
Deputy Warden assisted in the recapture of one in the City of Kamloops on the same day,
one was picked up by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Kamloops later that night,
and two were recaptured by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police at Ashcroft on July
29th, 1951.
" Discipline
" Discipline has been well maintained throughout the year, and breaches of prison
rules and regulations amounted to twenty-five. In six cases, charges were laid before
me for offences committed under the regulations. In all cases a plea of guilty was entered.
The remaining nineteen cases were of a minor nature, and the offenders were reprimanded.
" Summary
" I must again draw your attention to the Gaol and the Gaol precincts. The locale
is, in my opinion, too congested for the continued safe operation of a gaol and of prisoners
confined therein. I would respectfully suggest that every effort be made to move this
institution to a more suitable site."
PRINCE GEORGE GAOL
Men's Gaol
Warden W. Trant states:—
" During the year the conduct of the prisoners was good. A total of three prisoners
during the year was sentenced to solitary confinement of eight hours or less. The Gaol
was painted inside twice during the year with prison labour. A garden lot was planted
at the rear of the Gaol, which kept three prisoners busy during the growing season. Three
or four more prisoners worked at cleaning the Gaol car and police cars during the summer.
In winter, five or six prisoners worked daily cleaning the snow from the sidewalks and
parking-lot at the Government Building. One prisoner cleaned the office and three
looked after dish-washing, serving meals, etc. One prisoner looked after a hot-water
heater.
" The Guards worked well during the year and obtained co-operation when working
prisoners. Two prisoners remodelled an old desk and office counter, making them into
furniture that is a credit to the office. They also remodelled the kitchen and built a first-
aid cabinet. During the year one Guard was reprimanded, but the offence was not serious
enough to warrant suspension.
"During the year 917 prisoners were booked in and 314 transferred to Oakalla
Prison Farm. One hundred and sixty-four prisoners were released by payment of fines.
This makes a lot of office work and necessitates one Guard-Clerk working in the office
steadily.
" The Public Works Department put a foundation under the building and levelled
the floor, as it had sunk over 6 inches in places.   They also built a storm-porch for winter.
" The Gaol here is not adequate. Sometimes the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
bring twelve prisoners from the city lockup in one day as well as prisoners arriving from
outside points." REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1951-52
U 19
Women's Gaol
Miss F. Zepik, Matron in Charge, submits the following report:—
" This institution has had a fairly good year. Our low month was in January, with
an average daily count of 19.2, and our high month was March, with a daily average count
of 41.
" The co-operation of the prisoners has been good, and breaches of discipline have
not been too serious. They try by willing work and behaviour to show appreciation for
recreation provided, films by the local Film Board, and music by local orchestra members
who have come in to play for the girls several times. On May 24th they produced a play
written by some of the girls. They made their own costumes and scenery out of Gaol
discards. On July 1st they produced a ballet, again with remnant costumes. During the
dull weather they have a weekly whist party.
" Church services are still held monthly by the Salvation Army. At Christmas and
Easter, Roman Catholic services were held at special request of the prisoners.
" Our clinic is still in the able care of Dr. J. G. McKenzie. We have at times had
quite a lot of sickness. In February and March we had to take epidemic precautions—
measles, chicken-pox, and scarlet fever being quite prevalent in the town, and several
cases in the homes of the Matrons. We were fortunate to have only one case of measles,
and we had one case of chicken-pox last summer. Several cases of surgery have been
absolutely necessary. Our doctor's co-operation is greatly appreciated. His speedy
action saved the life of a severe gastric hemorrhage case in March.
" We have not had the extra sewing from the hospital this past year, but have been
doing all the laundry from the Men's Gaol. Very much has been done in handicrafts,
and the display at the Prince George Fall Fair was of the best. It included baking and
garden produce as well as canning, of which we did 485 quarts in September.
" Some repairs needed about the building were done during the year, with more to
be done during the next year. A high wind broke part of the fence supports, and some
new parts were put in on the south wall. The whole wall was checked and found weak.
The roof was resurfaced but has leaked badly at times since.
" To the Department we extend our thanks for its co-operation in putting the staff
on a permanent basis, and for giving us an understanding and sympathetic Warden."
In commenting on the above report submitted by Miss Zepik, Warden Trant, who
is responsible for supervision of both the Men's and Women's Gaols, states: " During
the past year the exhibit for display at the Prince George and District Agricultural Fair
of canning vegetables and needlework was a credit to the institution. I would also state
this institution had a good year under the able supervision of Miss Zepik, Matron in
Charge, and a competent staff of Matrons and Guards."
REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN, PROVINCIAL GAOL SERVICE
Mr. Konrad Egilson, Librarian, reports as follows:—
" There had been no Librarian for nine months; none of the previous year's appropriation for books had been spent. In the month from accepting the position until the
new fiscal year commenced, two urgent tasks had to be completed: an inventory of what
books there were in the system had to be taken, and the appropriation had to be spent.
Both these were accomplished.
" Since each institution has its own particular problems, and since the details of
library administration have been worked out to meet these individual conditions, some
short consideration of the different institutions may be of value.
Men's Prison Library, Oakalla Prison Farm
" This library is the largest in the whole Department, caters to the largest population,
and is therefore the most important consideration. It was set up by the Vancouver Public
Library, and Mrs. J. C. Clucas had been in charge of it. U 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
" This library is entirely run by inmates—trusties who act as librarians. Since it
was not possible for the inmates to select their own books personally, an elaborate system
had been worked out to get around this difficulty. In the first place a mimeographed
catalogue of all the books in the library had been made up and distributed through the
building. On entering the institution, each inmate is given a blank card on which he is
required to list at least thirty titles from the catalogue which he would like to read. This
is turned in to the inmate librarian in charge of the wing, who takes it to the library, selects
a title from the thirty or more on the card from the shelves, strokes it off the card, and
later in the course of the day takes this book to him. The book, when taken off the shelf,
is both stamped with the date due back and also entered on an individual card as being
charged out to the inmate. Because the most popular books got the greatest number of
calls, they either wore out first or were so badly worn that they had to be put aside for
rebinding first. Consequently, these books, even though they were still being carried on
the catalogues, were no longer available when asked for. The catalogues were therefore
no longer indicative of the true state of the library stock, and new catalogues were
required.
" During the year more floor and shelf space for the library was asked for, and 200
square feet of added floor space and 312 feet of additional shelving were obtained.
Fluorescent lighting was also installed.
" The book-stock is definitely in need of some binding work being done on it. However, since there seems to be a definite possibility now that a binder will be forthcoming,
it is worth while to wait until that eventuality materializes. Nine hundred and sixty-seven
new titles have been added to the shelves in the past year.
" Women's Prison Library, Oakalla Prison Farm
" This library, though small, is in the best state of repair and the best looked after of
any of the Department libraries. It is under the direction of a staff member, Miss E.
Maybee, with inmate help. Of course, the population is small, which in part accounts
for the good state of repair of the books, but they have been well looked after.
" Because the number of borrowers from this library is small, it is possible to dispense with some of the procedures in lending out books which are necessary in a larger
set-up. The women are allowed to come in and choose their own books, which is a tremendous advantage, especially from the standpoint of them as borrowers. One of the
chief pleasures of a library is to be able to browse and select books to read. The number
of books which have been added to this library in the last year is not large—136 in all—
but is sufficient to maintain the stock. Books for occupational therapy, such as leather-
craft books, have been purchased, as well as some others. A fairly large number of
magazines are subscribed to and seem to be quite widely read and distributed, something
which is possible with such a small unit.
" Young Offenders' Unit
" This Unit came into existence during the course of the year, just after the beginning
of the fiscal year, as a matter of fact. There was a small nucleus of books which had been
chosen for what had been known at Oakalla as the " Star Group." When this group was
moved into its own building and became a separate institution, these books came with
them. The basic appropriation for library was a small one and did little to augment the
slender stock.   One hundred and ninety-nine new titles were added during the year.
" The responsibility for the library on the part of any one particular member of the
staff of the Young Offenders' Unit has not been settled owing to the fact that in accordance with the policy of continuing the programme on a group work basis, it is felt that
the supervisor of each group or unit should be responsible for the use of the library for
the members of his group. This has led to some difficulty in working out a definite policy
as to the distribution of books.   Furthermore, it has interfered in some respects in the REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1951-52
U 21
keeping of proper library statistics and has called for some readjustment in the use of this
service in the total programme of the institution. However, the matter will be worked out
in due course, and it is hoped by next year it will be possible to report a very satisfactory
arrangement in connection with the library in this particular institution. There is no
question about its popularity and the constructive use to which the books have been put,
but it is hoped that it might be possible to arrive at a better arrangement in the use of this
facility in the total programme.
"New "Haven
" The New Haven library organization is in keeping with the idea that the whole
matter of taking out books should be casual as if it were a home library. The book
appropriation is large enough to maintain the book-stock which was established by Mr.
C. K. Morison, Superintendent of the Public Library Commission. Thirty-eight new books
were catalogued and added during the year. This does not indicate the number of books
which the library received during the year because some books were added without being
catalogued, a practice which has been discontinued. The basic collection has not been
catalogued—another task awaiting opportunity for completion.
" Women's Gaol, Prince George
" This institution has a small appropriation for books and magazines. The Librarian
has been in correspondence with Miss F. Zepik, Matron in Charge, but has no first-hand
knowledge of conditions in the library there.
" Men's Gaol, Nelson
" This institution has a small appropriation for books and magazines, but the
Librarian has only correspondence knowledge of actual conditions in the library.
" Boys' Industrial School and Girls' Industrial School
" Mention is made of the above two institutions because the Librarian also provides
services to these two schools. This is as a result of an interdepartmental arrangement
which was worked out at the time of the appointment of a Librarian. The only result as
far as the Gaol Service is concerned is that the amount of work that it is possible to do
for the Gaols has been lessened somewhat. However, to date the arrangement seems to
be working out satisfactorily.
" The Future
" To date the library service has not been integrated with any educational programme
and its use as part of staff-training facility is in a very rudimentary stage. This, however,
is an easy thing to remedy, and as the policy of staff-training is proceeded with and worked
out through the co-operation of the University, greater attention will be paid to the
purchase of books which can be used in a programme of this type. The co-operation of
the Librarian is available at all times for this purpose.
" It is hoped that very soon it will be possible to appoint a school-teacher to the
staff of Oakalla Prison Farm, and that the development of any formal educational programme which comes into effect will be done in co-operation with the library facilities.
This will mean a shift in emphasis in the purchase of books. At the present time at least
two-thirds of the books being bought are primarily for recreational reading.
" Some attention will be given in the next year to the matter of statistics. While
statistics themselves are not of any value merely as statistics, they will be of great use,
for example, to the Medical Officer, the psychologist, to the social worker, and also to
the school-teacher. Also, it is hoped that the library may be used in some way in research
and in classification.
" There seems little doubt that a facility that is now being developed—the appointment of a full-time Librarian and the generosity which has been accorded to this part U 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
of the programme through the provision of funds in the various institutional budgets—
will mean that library services will play a much more important part in the total Gaol
training programmes as time goes on."
FORESTRY CAMP
Mr. R. M. Deildal, Supervisor in Charge of the Forestry Camp, submits the following report:—
" On June 18th, 1951, a group of eleven young offenders, whose ages ranged from
18 to 22 years, were released from the Young Offenders' Unit of the Oakalla Prison Farm
and taken to a forestry camp on the upper reaches of the Kettle River in the Monashee
Pass, 55 miles east of Vernon. The youths were discharged in custody under the provisions of the ' Ticket of Leave Act.' The party was flown to Penticton by Canadian
Pacific Airlines and from there were transported by a chartered bus to the camp area.
" The camp was set up by the British Columbia Forest Service of the Department
of Lands and Forests. Its organization was similar to that of the boys' camps that that
Department has had in operation for the past few years. The Forest Service personnel
in the camp included a foreman and a cook.
"All of the boys were serving gaol sentences of at least one year. Not all were first
offenders. In fact, some were serving their second terms in gaol, and others had records
of delinquency as juveniles. It was the purpose of the programme to provide them with
the opportunity of spending part of their sentence in constructive employment. The
duration of the programme was three and a half months, and at the end of September the
youths were discharged to the supervision of the Provincial Probation Branch.
" The boys were at all times under close supervision and were limited in their freedom of action. Each boy was, however, responsible for his own custody, since no means
of detaining him were available should he choose to leave camp without permission.
" Work
" The main work project for the summer was the completion of an 8-mile road
from our camp to Fish Creek, which enters the Kettle River to the south. The forest
is quite dense in this area, and the group spent several weeks falling and slashing the
trees on the right-of-way for the road. During the last three weeks of the period the
Forest Service sent in bulldozers, graders, trucks, and other road-building machinery,
and began the actual construction of the road. The boys assisted in this work, acting as
' swampers ' on the trucks, spreading gravel, etc.
" It proved to be an indisputable fact that when the youths were kept busy at work,
their general deportment and conduct was at its best, and at these times they appeared to
be happiest.
" The offenders were paid for their work by the Forest Service. Each boy was paid
at the rate of $3 a day plus board. Of his daily wage, $2.50 was deferred until his discharge, and 50 cents a day was given to him as spending money.
" Discipline
" In general, satisfactory discipline was maintained, both at work and during the
recreational time. There were, however, a few occasions when it was necessary to deprive
individuals or the group of privileges because of unsatisfactory conduct. Fortunately,
no misdemeanours were sufficiently serious to warrant the sending of anyone back to
Oakalla.
" On two occasions there were absences from camp without permission. In the first
instance two boys hitch-hiked to the town of Edgewood and returned later in the evening.
Two days later four others left camp for several hours. The offenders were punished
by a deprivation of privileges for two weeks and the imposition of extra duties. There
was no recurrence of this type of misconduct. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1951-52 U 23
" On August 2nd one boy deserted the camp and the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police were informed within a few hours after his disappearance. He was apprehended
and returned to the Young Offenders' Unit as a violator of the terms of his ticket of leave.
" There were frequent disciplinary problems of a minor nature, such as lateness for
work, occasional insolence, and neglect of duties. However, these situations were dealt
with without much difficulty.
" Recreation
" The camp was situated in an area that provided excellent opportunities for recreation. Within a radius of a few miles there were lakes and streams abounding with fish.
It was a fine country for hiking and exploring, and in the Kettle River and the near-by
Mclntyre Creek one could pan gold colours. It was a disappointment to find that these
youths indicated no genuine interest in the out-of-doors life. They refused to take
advantage of the opportunities for fishing and exploring, but preferred to go to town
or remain in the camp area and read and talk.
" The Librarian of Oakalla Prison Farm and New Haven provided the camp with
a selection of fifty pocket-size books. A careful record was made of the circulation of
the books, and the condition of each after three months of wear and tear. Nearly all
the boys made frequent use of the library, and it was found that at the end of the period
the books were in surprisingly good condition.
" The Forest Service provided baseball and softball equipment. Little use was
made of this, largely because the land around camp was not suitable as a playing area.
The boys were allowed to use the fishing-tackle which belonged to the supervisor and
foreman, and the Forest Service offered to secure more tackle, but this offer was not
taken advantage of due to the general lack of interest in fishing.
" Fire-fighting
" During part of the month of August the group was engaged in fire-fighting. There
were two major fires—one on the Lower Arrow Lake and the second several miles west
of the camp-site. For some time the group was split, half being on the Arrow Lake fire
and the remainder on the other fire. The boys took their places on the fire-fighting lines
along with the residents of the local villages. They worked long hard hours and made a
very favourable impression on the men with whom they worked. Prior to the fires there
was very little community acceptance of the boys when trips were made outside the camp,
but afterwards a marked change in attitude toward them by the residents of Needles and
Edgewood was noticed.
"After the fires were over, it was found that the group had been classified as a fire-
suppression crew by the Forest Service. For a while there was some question as to
whether the boys would receive fire-fighters' pay. Eventually it was decided that they
should receive their regular wages for the first eight hours of each day spent fighting fires.
For the hours worked each day in excess of the first eight, they received fire pay at the
rate of 75 cents an hour. After the fire season was over, the boys received cheques
ranging in amount from $35 to $65, depending on the number of days worked. Regarding the future forestry programme, it is deemed advisable to make similar arrangements
for fire pay. This year each individual received his fire-pay cheque direct from the Forest
Service, with the result that there was some difficulty in controlling the spending of the
money. It is recommended in future such payments should be made to the deferred
account of the individual.
" Employment
" Discussions were held with each boy regarding his plans for employment after his
discharge. It was thought to be very important that each should have the opportunity to
go to a suitable job immediately after his release from the camp.   An attempt was made U 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
to obtain jobs that would be within the limits of their training and capabilities. Some of
the lads presented good work histories; others had histories of frequent changes of jobs,
arising from lack of motivation at work, misconduct, and inefficiency. After observation
of all youths on the work project, it was possible to make an evaluation of each individual's work habits. With the co-operation of other Probation Officers, the Young
Offenders' Unit, National Employment Service, and other employment agencies, most of
the boys were able to make a choice of two or three job prospects. This was a successful
aspect of the programme because within a few days after discharge all the boys were
placed in suitable employment.
"Administration
"As there was no precedent to go by, no definite rules and regulations had been
drawn up for the administration of the camp, and these had to be worked out as the
programme progressed. The division of authority between the representative of the
Provincial Probation Branch and the Forest Service officials caused some slight confusion,
but most of the difficulties in this respect were resolved without any trouble. Close cooperation between Mr. Deildal, the Supervisor, and Mr. Haggart, the Forest Ranger and
the foreman of the camp, took place at all times, and frequent consultations were held.
It is recommended, however, that discussions at a higher level take place before the
opening of the camp next year and a definite set of rules and regulations be drawn up
and a clear-cut policy laid down.
"Before going to camp, each boy was given an issue of clothing and equipment.
The cost of the issue was deducted from his deferred pay. The camp foreman set up a
commissary in which the boys were able to purchase tobacco and chocolate bars. Of the
daily wage, each boy was advanced 50 cents, the rest being deferred until the camp
programme closed. The amount of commissary purchases that was allowed to each
inmate was $1.50 each week. In general, this commissary arrangement worked out fairly
satisfactorily."
Credit for the success of this experiment should be given to the British Columbia
Forest Service personnel, Nelson District. They were at all times very co-operative and
helpful and took a sincere interest in attempts made toward the rehabilitation of the boys.
The relationship which existed between Mr. Deildal and the Forest Service representatives was one of utmost co-operation, and it is felt generally that the first year's experiment in the forest-camp programme for young offenders was a successful one.
STAFF-TRAINING
Mr. Hugh G. Christie, in charge of staff-training for the Gaol Service for the fiscal
year 1951-52, submits the following:—
" In the fiscal year 1951-52 a grant was made to the University of British Columbia
by the Attorney-General's Department, making possible the appointment of a full-time
University lecturer in criminology. The services supplied to the Department by the
University were in the form of advice on the social-work aspects of administration and
lectures to the staff of the Gaol Service.
" The advice on administration took the form of regular meetings with the senior
staff of the Young Offenders' Unit to assist in the organization of the institution as a
treatment centre for more reformable youths. Although the University consultant had
no authority to enforce his advice, the discussion which arose from this interjection of
the theoretical along with the practical points involved resulted in more logical planning.
The Young Offenders' Unit is at present unquestionably one of the most hopeful experiments in institutional treatment existent in Canada.
" The staff-training portion of the work for the Department took the form of lectures
to the Young Offenders' Unit, the New Haven Borstal staff, and the staff of the Oakalla
Prison Farm.   All staff at the New Haven Borstal participated in weekly evening discus- REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1951-52
U 25
sions, which, because of their informality and the smallness of the group, reached a higher
level than study in the other institutions. In the Young Offenders' Unit the lectures were
carried out during afternoon sessions with good success. The lectures here were, however, more concerned with the application of modern methods to be applied in their new
organization. Here, as in the Borstal unit, the response to the idea of additional training
in correctional work was good. In the main prison at Oakalla, however, the problem of
carrying on staff-training was more difficult. The pressing staff shortage and the absence
of suitable lecture-rooms made the arrangement of classes difficult, and the interest in
training seemed far less evident than in the units dealing with the more reformable groups.
" The first class of approximately forty officers was not made compulsory and
followed the same mimeographed lecture material used in the other institutions. The
largeness of the classes and the wide discrepancy between the methods discussed and
actual practice in Oakalla made acceptance of the material difficult. An examination
held at the close of these lectures indicated that, except in a few cases, very little knowledge had been gained. This course was therefore made compulsory for all staff, and
although the same method of lecturing was used, the examination held at the termination
of lectures showed a marked increase in the standing of the 120 men involved. A few
of the staff refused to write the examination, and the marks ranged from zero to 100 per
cent. These tests were not expected to measure more than the man's interest and ability
in absorbing the theory of modern correctional work and, therefore, could not be considered as a measure of an officer's suitability for many forms of prison work. The type
of knowledge involved in the lectures given was, however, basic to any modern treatment
programme, and it, therefore, will be interesting to see in the future whether there is any
relationship between the ability to understand theory and the ability to do successful work.
" It appeared obvious throughout the lectures at Oakalla that the classes would
have been more effective if handled in smaller informal groups. It is recommended that
classes in the future contain no more than twenty staff members, and that the discussion
rather than the lecture method be encouraged.
"An experiment in teaching University students, both male and female, the fundamentals of institutional work was also attempted at the Young Offenders' Unit. Classes
of selected criminology students were admitted to the institution in the evenings twice
weekly, where they were instructed in the proper methods of supervision. These students
later, although accompanied by regular staff, took over supervision of inmate activity
with an unusually high degree of success for all concerned. This project seemed to be a
a particularly valuable type of field work for University students planning to enter the
field of criminology. It also provided a means of assessing their aptitude in a practical
way. The enthusiasm of inmates for this opportunity to mix with people from outside
made this a valuable contribution to the programme, which I would recommend for
other years.
" This year's experiment in using University staff to assist in staff-training at a prison
seems to indicate that the method has unquestionable merit. The fact that the Oakalla
administration was not under any obligation to accept the ideas presented avoided any
disurbance to the institution's routine. The presence of a person to carry out training,
who was in no way subservient to the prison, guaranteed the free and uninhibited discussion of theory and practice. It would seem that if this method of training is continued,
it will undoubtedly make a creditable contribution to the improvement of correctional
work in British Columbia."
REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL PROBATION BRANCH
The present Provincial Probation Branch has developed from the appointment of
a Follow-up Officer on May 1st, 1942. This appointment followed a modification in
Government policy occasioned by the stresses and changes brought about by the war. U 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
New Haven, the training-school for young offenders, was closed at the end of April, 1942,
as a sufficiently large number of young offenders suitable for training in this institution
was not being received at Oakalla Prison Farm. With the closing of New Haven, the
Star Class at Oakalla was strengthened, and one of the main functions of the Follow-up
Officer was to assist time-expired releasees to become readjusted to society.
It had long been realized that the provisions of sections 1081, 1082, and 1033 of
the Criminal Code could not be completely implemented until the Courts had available
an officer to whom they could turn for pre-sentence investigations and under whose supervision they might place offenders to whom a suspended sentence was granted. The
Follow-up Officer assumed these two responsibilities for the Courts of the Greater Vancouver area, but concentrated primarily on the Vancouver Police Court, as probation
facilities were available to the Judge of the Vancouver Juvenile Court.
The Follow-up Officer has always been responsible to the individual Magistrates and
Judges, but he was initially responsible to the Inspector of Gaols for administrative purposes, and reports concerning his activities were sent to that Department.
As time passed, the Follow-up Officer came to be known as the Probation Officer,
and with the passing of the Provincial " Probation Act" in 1946 the duties and responsibilities of the Provincial Probation Officer and his assistants were clearly defined.
The original Follow-up Officer laboured by himself without stenographic assistance
from May, 1942, until February, 1945, when stenographic help was made available to
him. In October of the same year the first assistant to the Follow-up Officer was
appointed, and following this appointment, Courts in the New Westminster, Burnaby,
and Richmond areas had available the services being given to the Vancouver Police Court.
In April and November, 1947, two more Assistant Provincial Probation Officers
were added to the staff and a branch office was opened at Abbotsford, which gave probation services to all the Courts in the Lower Fraser Valley.
Following the appointment of another Assistant Probation Officer in October, 1948,
a second branch office was opened this time in Victoria, and probation services were made
available to the Courts on Vancouver Island.
The year 1949 was another year of expansion. With the appointment of an assistant
in May, it was possible to establish a branch office at Vernon. A second assistant was
appointed in June, and this officer assisted in the Vancouver Court, as referrals from this
Court had increased to the point that one person could not keep up with the demands
made for services.
During the year 1950 a further appointment made possible the opening of a branch
office at Nanaimo in August. Early in this year the Provincial Probation Officer was
appointed as one of the three members to act on a Commission to inquire into the correctional facilities of the Province and to make recommendations regarding needed changes.
Following the recommendations of this Commission, the Provincial Probation Officer was
appointed to the position of Inspector of Gaols on March 1st, 1951.
In July, 1951, further additions were made to the staff, and, as a result, it was possible
to open a branch office at Penticton and also to establish an office in Nelson. That same
summer, because of a decision to experiment with a forestry-camp programme, a further
addition was made to the Probation staff, and supervision of this project was taken over
by this Department.
As a result of the appointment of the Provincial Probation Officer to the position of
Inspector of Gaols mentioned above, it was felt that some additional assistance in the work
of the administration of the branch was necessary. During the fall of 1951, Mr. C. D.
Davidson, who had been in charge of the Victoria branch, was given the appointment to
the position of Chief Assistant Provincial Probation Officer. Following this appointment,
Mr. Davidson moved to Vancouver, his place in Victoria being taken by Mr. A. E. Jones.
Coincidental with this move, new accommodation for this branch was found in the Parliament Buildings. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1951-52 U 27
In November, 1951, an agreement was made with the Municipality of Burnaby
whereby the Provincial Probation Branch would supply probation services to the Burnaby
Juvenile Court, at a fixed monthly charge. This agreement has been beneficial to both
parties and has made it possible for this municipality to have the services of a trained
officer with the resources of the Probation Branch at his disposal.
During the years of the expansion of the Provincial Probation Branch the number
of Courts to which services have been given has increased to the point that by the end of
March, 1952, 102 individual Courts had received services. There has been a steady
increase in the number of referrals from the Court of Appeal, occasioned perhaps by the
amendment to section 1081 of the Criminal Code, which gave this Court the power to
place convicted offenders on probation.
Of the 591 offenders placed on probation under the supervision of the Provincial
Probation Branch during the fiscal year of 1951, 406 came from Juvenile Courts, but
some of this group were adults who were charged with contributing to the delinquency
of a juvenile. In the rural areas there is a greater need for juvenile probation services
than for services in the adult field, whereas in urban areas the services of the Branch are
almost exclusively in the adult field as the individual jurisdictions have made provision
for their own juvenile probation services in accordance with the requirements of the
" Juvenile Courts Act."
The lack of adequate detention facilities for juveniles in rural areas, apart from the
lockups used for adults, is a matter of real concern to the Probation Officers as well as
the Juvenile Court Judges and police. It is hoped that in the future a solution to this
problem can be found.
The appended statistical report indicates that almost as many pre-sentence reports
are prepared on offenders who are not placed on probation as are prepared on those who
eventually receive probation from the Courts. This is not wasted effort, however, as the
pre-sentence reports are forwarded to the institutions concerned and are utilized as the
basis of the treatment plan for the inmate. Another important aspect would seem to be
that Magistrates and Judges are relying on the pre-sentence reports to assist them in the
imposition of sentence to the end that worthy cases receive the best remedial treatment.
The ruling philosophy of the Provincial Probation Branch is " constructive treatment
on an individual basis."
As at March 31st, 1952, the staff of the Provincial Probation Branch was as
follows:—
E. G. B. Stevens, Provincial Probation Officer.
C. D. Davidson, Chief Assistant Provincial Probation Officer.
Assistant Provincial Probation Officers
R. J. Clark, Vancouver office, serving Burnaby and Richmond areas.
G. G. Myers, Vancouver office, serving Courts of Vancouver.
E. H. B. McGougan, Nanaimo office, serving the upper part of Vancouver
Island.
A. E. Jones, Victoria office, serving the lower part of Vancouver Island.
J. M. Putnam, Abbotsford office, serving Fraser Valley.
D. L. Clark, Penticton office, serving the Southern Okanagan area.
A. L. Langdale, Vernon office, serving the Northern Okanagan area.
H. W. Jackson, Nelson office, serving the Nelson-Trail area of the Kootenays.
R. M. Deildal, Vancouver office, serving the New Westminster area.
CONCLUSION
This Report should not be concluded without some mention being made of the cooperation which has been given this Department by the many agencies and persons who
have given of their time and effort toward the furtherance of programme in the institutions, U 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
the social and spiritual rehabilitation of inmates, and the efforts that have been made to
modernize our whole Gaol Service.
Particular mention should be made and words of thanks expressed to the John
Howard Society, the Elizabeth Fry Society, the Salvation Army, ministers and priests of
the various denominations, Probation Officers, and all others who have had occasion not
only to visit our institutions regularly, but who have interested themselves in individual
inmates. The Warden and executive officers of all our Gaols, the Matrons and the Guards
are once again to be commended for the loyalty with which they have carried out their
duties.
In closing, I would like to make the following recommendations:—
(1) The suggested additions and alterations to the main Gaol building at
Oakalla Prison Farm should be pushed forward immediately.
(2) Immediate provision should be made for additional temporary accommodation at Oakalla.
(3) The construction of a new Gaol, as recommended in the Commission
Report, should be expedited.
(4) Considerable study should be given to the desirability of improving Gaol
facilities at Nelson, Kamloops, and Prince George.
(5) Early consideration should be given to the removal of the Women's Gaol
from the present site at Oakalla to an alternative site where there would
be room for a larger building to give greater accommodation or where
there would be an opportunity for the construction of a cottage-type
institution.
(6) Every consideration should be given to the expansion of the present Probation Branch. Requests for the furtherance of this service have been received from other parts of the Province, and it is recommended that these
requests be granted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
E. G. B. STEVENS,
Inspector of Gaols. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1951-52
U 29
APPENDIX
ANNUAL REPORT ON GAOLS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 3 1st,  1952
Oakalla
Young
Offenders'
Unit
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Totals
1. Total number of county gaols in B.C	
2. Total expenditure for gaol maintenance
in B.C.—
Year ended March 31st, 1952	
Year ended March 31st, 1951	
3. Average  total  maintenance   cost  per
day per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1952	
Year ended March 31st, 1951	
Average dietary cost per day per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1952	
Year ended March 31st, 1951	
4. Number of prisoners committed—-
Year ended March 31st, 1952	
Year ended March 31st, 1951	
$827,302.04
698,097.57
$3.20
2.26
$0.76
.59
5,983
5,969
$124,164.67
$41,358.27
37,198.45
$6.97 | $3.84
2.29
$0.97
99
$0.73
.60
371
591
$27,794.27
15,313.65
$2.99
1.98
$0.65
.53
810
733
$79,761.55
58,304.63
$4.20
2.94
$1.24
.62
1,105
910
$1
,100,380.80
750,609.67
$4.09
2.37
$0.91
.59
!,368
i,203
I. Movement of Population, Year Ended March 3 1st, 1952
Oakalla
Young
Offenders'
Unit
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
On register, April 1st, 1951..
Received—
From gaols and lockups..
By transfer-
By recapture	
By revocation of licence	
By forfeiture of ticket of leave-
By internal movements	
Insane	
Juveniles	
Deportation	
From bail	
Committed for trial-
Sentenced  	
Totals-
Discharged—
By expiry of sentence-
By ticket of leave	
By deportation	
By pardon	
By escape	
By death..
By payment of fines	
By release of Court order (including bail).
By transfer-
By internal movements-
Totals 	
On register, March 31st, 1952-
757
4,927
41
5
838
6,740
3,766
27
11
17
5
5
166
642
420
835
5,894
846
33
95
1
1
1
25
215
1
12
4
1
1
143
804
	
132
396
22
23
2
10
6
11
1
182
5
22
5
139
75
361
57
35
23
40
137
60
1
907
1,145
535
146
15
108
514
3
194
45
315
808
25
74
878
5,375
114
11
2
1
2,693
9,246
5,019
55
14
19
19
5
528
716
859
975
1,071 8,209
1,037
• U 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
II. Commitments
1950-51
1951-52
Decrease
Increase
Murder 	
Manslaughter	
Crimes—
Against the person.
Against property „
Against public morals and decency	
Against public order and peace	
Other offences not enumerated above..
Insanity..
Number of prisoners sentenced	
Number of days' stay of prisoners	
Average number of prisoners per month..
Average number of prisoners per day	
Escapes..
Escapes and recaptured-
Deaths in gaols	
10
242
1,637
494
3,316
393
25
6,860
333,034
27,814
914
10
7
9
14
16
237
1,689
148
4,702
560
26
7,062
363,150
24,342
893
19
11
5
5
346
3,472
21
52
1,386
167
1
802
30,016
III. Sex
Oakalla
Young
Offenders'
Unit
Nelson
Kamloops
r>r:nr-e
George
Total
4,505
425
95               201
                  14
731
79
917
192
6,449
710
Totals.       	
4,930
95               215
810
1,109
7,159
IV. Educational Status
Illiterate    _	
206
3,150
1,489
85
56
39
33
107
74
1
96
600
112
2
326
641
131
11
661
4,554
1 845
College or university             _ _
99
Totals ....
4,930
95
215
810
1,109
7,159
V. Nationality
(Place of Birth)
British—
3,722
532
11
93
175
21
754
26
889
64
16
5,633
643
Tnfqls
4,265
93                196
780
969
6,303
Foreign—
185
389
31
60
2
8
10
1
4
26
27
107
1
5
226
Europeans	
532
33
65
665
2
19
30
140
856
4,930
95
215
810
1,109
7,159
VI. Habi
TS AS TO 1
Jse of Intoxicants
419
1,403
3,108
43
41
9
206
11
34
765
18
270
821
491
1,757
4,911
Totals                    .    	
4,930
95
215
810
1,109
7,159 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1951-52
VII. Habits as to Use of Drugs
U 31
Oakalla
Young
Offenders'
Unit
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
4,593
337
95
214
1
809
1
1,056
53
6,767
392
Totals               	
4.930      1           95      1         215
810      1      1.109      1      7.159
VIII. Occupations
135
300
376
1,798
580
38
226
861
266
165
185
1
6
2
44
4
11
27
24
4
30
139
18
123
5
60
589
10
3
20
13
29
188
825
28
1
25
296
344
Domestic.— 	
656
3,395
640
Professional  - —  —
42
282
888
266
165
185
Totals   	
4,930
95
215
810
1,109
7,159
IX. Racial
White	
Coloured	
Indian	
Mongolian-
Hindus—	
Totals..
4,358
46
467
43
16
90
4
1
4,930
95
191
23
1
215
545
4
261
822
2
283
2
6,006
52
1,038
46
17
810 1,109 7,159
X. Civil State
Single	
Married-
Widowed ..
Separated ..
Divorced..
Totals .
3,086
990
151
687
16
89
6
155
47
13
4,930
95
215
516
169
73
52
810
567
396
35
111
1,109
4,413
1,608
272
850
16
7,159
XI. Ages
Under 21 years  _	
21 to 25                                  	
544
571
589
1,088
1,057
753
328
78
17
22
21
41
58
46
22
5
41
117
69
165
249
130
39
62
163
149
327
217
139
52
747
889
?5 to 3n
848
30 to 40                              	
1,638
40 to 50              	
1,569
50 to 60                              _ -   - - _
1,044
Over 60
424
Totals _ _  . _
4,930
95
215
810
1,109
7,159
XII. Creeds
1,770
695
636
149
648
167
406
63
58
5
8
17
47
261
30
28
4
7
1
13
1
4
7
103
17
22
41
4
12
1
15
499
71
98
5
10
41
36
2
34
14
630
78
81
39
79
27
105
18
10
42
3,032
Church of England   	
889
841
193
785
Baptist. -   	
240
572
84
107
20
8
Buddhist                          _ - -	
17
Others    	
47
324
Totals                 	
4,930
95
215
810
1,109
7,159 U 32
BRITISH COLUMBIA
XIII. Duration of Sentence
Oakalla
Young
Offenders'
Unit
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
Under 1 month..
1 month and under 2 months	
2 months and under 3 months	
3 months and under 6 months	
6 months and under 12 months—
12 months and under 18 months..
18 months and under 24 months..
Sentenced to penitentiary	
Probation  	
Stay of proceedings-
Unfinished	
To hang 	
Not guilty	
Indefinite	
Suspended	
Young Offenders' Unit-
Quashed  	
Habeas corpus	
Withdrawn	
New Haven 	
Dismissed	
Mental Hospital	
Totals	
2,528
333
218
431
460
188
84
159
6
6
227
2
14
2
72
51
9
2
20
40
63
14
4,930
5
14
41
23
10
95
104
57
27
19
6
215
524
155
54
39
22
4
810
736
137
32
46
47
22
11
7
1
10
11
13
1,109
3,892
682
331
540
549
255
118
167
9
17
227
3
32
12
89
51
9
2
20
40
63
14
7,159
XIV. Previous Convictions
1,665
679
404
270
233
163
137
125
94
82
74
71
68
54
50
45
43
49
62
20
32
24
39
20
240
79
6
102
82
10
3
114
42
20
11
7
9
5
3
_
1
2
304
124
85
79
44
30
28
15
8
7
5
6
5
7
6
4
4
4
4
3
3
34
641
199
81
39
19
17
12
10
8
8
8
9
5
3
5
1
5
3
4
3
3
4
1
2
1
2,806
1     _ 	
1,054
2  _   -
3      _	
593
399
4      _ _ —
303
5    _	
6  	
7  _ _ _	
219
182
153
8      _ _ __  - —
110
Q
97
10
87
11       _  	
86
12      - _ 	
78
11
64
14         	
62
15      	
16    	
50
52
17        	
56
18     	
70
20        —
23
21      -	
39
23      - -  -	
30
24       _	
40
26    	
25
27     -   — —  - - —-
241
49     - - -	
113
60     _  	
6
Over 60  - - _
102
Totals ..      	
4,930  |    95
215
810
1,109
7,159
66.49
13.68
47.00
42.00
54.72 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1951-52 U 33
XV. Offences for Which Prisoners Were Committed and Sentenced during the Year
Commitments
Male
Female
Total
Sentences
Male
Female
Total
(a) Crimes against the person—
Abduction	
Abortion 	
Assault, common-
Assault, felonious-
Attempted suicide	
Cutting, wounding, and attempting same-
Shooting with intent	
Stabbing-
Manslaughter-
Murder	
Carnal knowledge	
Rape with assault with intent to rape-
Totals ._
(*)
Crimes against property—■
Arson and incendiarism	
Burglary and housebreaking..
Robbery	
Forgery— 	
Fraud	
False pretences-
Conspiracy	
Larceny-
Theft of automobile	
Taking auto without owner's consent-
Receiving stolen goods	
Trespass	
Totals ._
(c) Crimes against public morals and decency—
Bigamy.
Indecent assault —
Indecent exposure-
Gross indecency	
Incest..
Inmates and frequenters of houses of ill
fame
Keeping houses of ill fame-
Juvenile delinquency	
Perjury 	
Prostitution	
Seduction— _	
Buggery-
Habitual criminal-
Totals ..
(d)
Crimes against public order and peace—
Breaches of the " Liquor-control Act "	
Breaches of the " Excise Act "	
Breaches of the by-laws  	
Breaches of the " Narcotic and Drug Act'
Breaches of the " Motor-vehicle Act "	
Carrying of unlawful weapons— 	
Cruelty to animals..
Drunk and disorderly	
Escaping from constable-
Escaping from prison	
Gambling_
Lunatics and persons unsafe to be at large-
Nude parading-
Obstructing an officer	
Selling or giving liquor to Indians .
Unlawful shooting	
Vagrancy  	
Cause disturbance — —
Totals ..
(e) Other offences not enumerated above	
Grand totals of (a), (6), (c),
(d), and (e) -	
1
1
70
99
3
6
1
15
13
9
6
224
5
254
126
67
36
142
5
528
146
78
98
18
1,503
4
17
12
3
2
74
3
1
2,298
1
137
134
24
2
153
5
10
17
338
265
109
3,493
415
5,754
1
1
73
103
3
6
1
15
14
9
6
232
2
12
6
3
9
31
4
1
6
1
5
256
138
73
39
151
5
559
150
79
104
19
1
1
1
1
65
3
68
111
6
117
3
	
3
8
	
8
10
10
6
6
8
8
1
1
214  |
75  |  1,578
10
4
17
12
3
2
2
76
3
11
119  |    14  |
133
159
118
110
1
63
84
2,457
1
137
252
24
2
263
5
10
18
401
349
109
535
4,028
64
696
479
6,450
3
471
139
154
52
318
4
661
164
85
119
42
1
9
15
3
42
38
1
3
29
18
2
1
2
2
74
3
1
137
2,869
3
162
147
29
2
121
1
34
22
337
163
46
77
104
339  |
1
64
83
6
4,066
544
1,416
67
8,045
743
223
3
472
148
169
55
360
4
669
165
85
127
43
2,212  |   118  I  2,330
3
29
18
2
1
3
2
75
3
3
142
3,032
49
162
224
29
2
225
1
34
23
401
422
6
4,610
1,483
8,788 U 34
BRITISH COLUMBIA
XVI. Employment of Prisoners
(Per Cent of Population)
Oakalla
(Men)
Oakalla
(Women)
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
(Men)
Prince
George
(Women)
0.245
29.676
2.302
0.575
7.346
12.474
3.014
27.00
3.00
5.00
52.00
9.00
70.390
0.630
33.00
33.00
0.42
90.69
Sick _ ._
2.82
	
2.58
Farm and garden 	
16.078
12.902
20.00
2.20
44.368
47.00
4.00
64.00
4.29
100.000
100.000
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
XVII. Number of Officers and Employees on March 3 1st, 1952
Oakalla Nelson Kamloops
Prince
George
Men's Institutions
Warden	
Deputy Warden, Custody	
Deputy Warden, Treatment-
Gaol surgeon (part time) —
Bursar  	
Chief Gaoler	
Chief Engineer	
Building Instructor-
Warden's Secretary ...
Kitchen Steward	
Senior Guards	
Foreman Instructor-
Social Worker	
School-teacher	
Assistant Engineers	
Guards, Industrial Shops..
Guards, Clerks  _
Guards, Farm	
Guards, Disciplinary.—
Medical Attendant	
Hospital Orderlies 	
Guards, temporary	
Other male employees-
Total male employees..
3
9
8
3
81
1
3
5
1
10 | 7 |
Women's Institutions
Matron in Charge..
Matrons	
Other female employees ,
Guards, male 	
Total employees .
15 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1951-52
U 35
ITS
ON
a
o
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r^ os ci tr~ tr- cn       Os rt CD tr~
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en rf  m tr- rt ri
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mHTfo>HmHO
cn vo r-
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m as
rt
en
m
rn
o
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ir
rs
en
es
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>n
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r-
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o m
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l-H    00
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tn
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a> <u U 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICS OF PROVINCIAL PROBATION BRANCH
Court
Referrals
from
Apr. 1,
1951,to
Mar. 31,
1952
Total
Referrals
from
May 1,
1942,to
Mar. 31,
1952
Court
Referrals
from
Apr. 1,
1951,to
Mar. 31,
1952
Total
Referrals
from
May 1,
1942,to
Mar. 31,
1952
Court of Appeal	
Assize Court, Vancouver	
County Court, Vancouver 	
Police Court, Vancouver City. _
Juvenile Court, Vancouver City—
District Police Court, Vancouver-
Police Court, North Vancouver—
District Police Court, North Vancouver	
Police Court, West Vancouver	
Police Court, University Area	
District Juvenile Court, Vancouver
Juvenile Court, North Vancouver..
Juvenile Court, West Vancouver—
Juvenile Court, University Area	
County Court, New Westminster.—
Police Court, New Westminster	
Police Court, Burnaby	
Police Court, Richmond 	
Police Court, Port Coquitlam	
Juvenile Court, New Westminster-
Juvenile Court, Burnaby	
Juvenile Court, Richmond	
Juvenile Court, Ladner	
Juvenile Court, Port Moody	
Juvenile Court, Port Coquitlam—
Juvenile Court, Maillardville	
Police Court, Chilliwack	
Police Court, Agassiz	
Police Court, Mission	
Police Court, Abbotsford	
Police Court (Surrey), Cloverdale
Police Court, Langley	
Police Court, Haney	
Police Court, Matsqui 	
Juvenile Court, Chilliwack	
Juvenile Court, Agassiz 	
Juvenile Court, Mission	
Juvenile Court, Abbotsford	
Juvenile Court (Surrey), Cloverdale	
Juvenile Court, Langley	
Juvenile Court, Haney	
Juvenile Court, Matsqui	
Juvenile Court, Sumas	
District Juvenile Court, Chilliwack
Juvenile Court, Hope	
Police Court, Penticton	
Juvenile Court, Princeton	
Juvenile Court, Penticton—	
Juvenile Court, Osoyoos	
Juvenile Court, Keremeos	
Juvenile Court, Oliver 	
Juvenile Court, Summerland	
Juvenile Court, Merritt	
Assize Court, Vernon	
County Court, Kelowna 	
Police Court, Vernon	
Police Court, Salmon Arm	
Police Court, Kamloops	
Police Court, Goldstream	
Juvenile Court, Vernon	
13
4
17
23
12
15
789
33
12
1
14
4
9
.
1
1
6
41
83
12
1
6
1
8
6
106
13
57
9
6
1
11
21
30
33
77
10
17
1
3
3
36
1
1
9
1
	
3
1
2
6
10
2
3
1
2
13
50
6
14
8
19
3
18
26
83
16
49
10
19
	
5
	
3
4
3
1
1
6
11
15
18
2
2
1
3
7
10
2
3
2
4
1
2
7
17
3
2
1
64
Juvenile Court, Salmon Arm	
Juvenile Court, Armstrong	
Juvenile Court, Kamloops	
Juvenile Court, Kelowna	
Juvenile Court, Chase— 	
Juvenile Court, Lumby. 	
County Court, Nelson	
Juvenile Court, Nelson	
Juvenile Court, Trail	
Juvenile Court, Rossland	
Juvenile Court, Creston 	
County Court, Nanaimo 	
Police Court, Nanaimo	
District Police Court, Nanaimo	
Police Court, Port Alberni	
Police Court, Ladysmith	
Juvenile Court, Nanaimo 	
Juvenile Court, Alberni  _
Juvenile Court, Port Alberni	
Juvenile Court, Ladysmith	
Juvenile Court, Parksville	
Juvenile Court, Qualicum Beach ..
Juvenile Court, Courtenay	
Juvenile Court, Campbell River	
Assize Court, Victoria	
County Court, Victoria	
Police Court, Victoria 	
Police Court, Saanich	
Police Court, Esquimalt	
District Police Court, Victoria..	
County Court, Duncan	
Police Court, Duncan	
Police Court, Sidney	
Juvenile Court, Victoria 	
Juvenile Court, Saanich	
Juvenile Court, Esquimalt	
District Juvenile Court, Victoria _
Juvenile Court, Duncan	
Juvenile Court, Chemainus 	
Juvenile Court, Sidney 	
Juvenile Court, Ganges 	
Juvenile Court, Central Saanich.—
Probation—
Under 20 years of age	
Between 20 and 25 years of age-
Over 25 years of age 	
Married probationers 	
Single probationers- 	
Total probationers  	
Follow-up cases—
Under 20 years of age	
Between 20 and 25 years of age-
Over 25 years of age	
Married 	
Single	
Total follow-up cases —
Pre-sentence reports  (other than
probation cases) 	
Total new cases dealt with	
Social histories prepared (re candidates for New Haven)	
Miscellaneous	
1
5
40
1
2
14
7
7
3
1
16
1
28
3
1
3
3
1
5
10
1
3
3
1
1
16
4
1
496
49
46
40
551
591
22
11
3
30
33
472
1,096
93
74
4
7
3
79
1
1
2
14
7
7
3
1
37
5
3
2
66
4
6
8
1
4
1
9
1
1
64
9
1
1
2
2
3
10
2
1
2
29
6
1
1
4
1,670
399
177
208
2,038
2,245
287
93
14
21
373
394
2,001
4,641
74 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1951-52
Referrals, 1942-52
U 37
m
3
g
OV
T
en
rt
Os
in
!
ON
vs
ON
I
ON
00
1
Ov
O.
3
oo
Ov
o
3
Ov
>n
i
vs
OV
CvJ
vs
1
Ov
8-
"a a
63
24
49
60
56
54
46
57
31
105
50
84
142
61
117
158
35
122
276
36
262
350
28
349
455
14
461
591
33
472
2,246
394
Pre-sentence  reports  prepared  in  cases  where
2,001
136
170
134
239
320
315
574
727
930
1,096
4,641
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid. Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1953
420-1252-8964   

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