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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Eighty-first Annual Report 1951-52 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1953

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Full Text

 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Eighty-first Annual Report
1951-52
By the Superintendent of Education
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1953  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Eighty-first Annual Report of the Public Schools
of the Province.
TILLY JEAN ROLSTON,
Minister of Education.
February, 1953.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
1951-52
Minister of Education:
The Honourable Tilly Jean Rolston.
Deputy Minister and
Superintendent of Education:
F. T. Fairey, B.A., LL.D.
Deputy
Superintendent of Education:
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed.
Executive Assistant to the Deputy Minister:
R. C. Grant, B.A.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools:
J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Paed., C. J. Frederickson, B.A., Burnaby.
Greater Victoria. William Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
John Gough, M.A., Greater Victoria. R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster.
C. G. Brown, M.A., Burnaby. K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Surrey.
Inspectors of
J. E. Brown, M.A., Victoria.
J. N. Burnett, E.D., M.A., Vancouver.
C. L. Campbell, M.A., Nanaimo.
T. G. Carter, M.C., Vancouver.
Joseph Chell, M.A., Mission City.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Grand Forks.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Telkwa.
G. W. Graham, B.A., Prince Rupert.
S. J. Graham, B.A., Chilliwack.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Abbotsford.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Paed., Nelson.
I. H. R. Jeffery, B.A., Kimberley.
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), Cranbrook
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed., Trail.
H. McArthur, B.A., Kamloops.
Schools in School Districts:
J. J. McKenzie, B.A., Nelson.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Kamloops.
Earl Marriott, B.A., Dawson Creek.
A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., Williams Lake.
W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A.;
F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T., Nanaimo.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., New Westminster.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., New Westminster.
L. B. Stibbs, B.A., Salmon Arm.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., M.B.A., Duncan.
A. S. Towell, M.A., Vernon.
A. Turnbull, M.C., M.M., B.A., Penticton.
R. G. Williston, B.A., Prince George.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS
T. R. Hall, B.A., Principal.
F. C. Boyes, M.A., Vice-Principal.
Mrs. Geraldine Birkett, B.A., B.Ed.
E. B. Broome, M.A., B.Ed.
L. E. Brown, B.P.E.
Miss F. I. Burnham.
H. H. Grantham, M.A., Ph.D.
Vancouver:
F. C. Hardwick, M.A.
Miss A. J. Kilgour, B.A.
J. McGechaen, M.A.
Miss M. E. McManus, Mus.Bac,
Miss M. E. Maynard, B.A.
E. G. Ozard, B.A.
C. W. Truax, B.A., B.Ed.
M.A.
Miss Z. M. Manning.
Miss Stella Shopland, B.A., Librarian.
Model School:
Miss M. J. MacDonald, A.T.C.M., B.A.
H. O. English, B.A., B.S.A., Principal.
H. C. Gilliland, M.A., Vice-Principal.
Miss K. M. Baker, B.A.
G. A. Brand, B.A.
Miss W. A. Copeland.
Victoria:
Miss D. M. Daniels, B.A.
H. E. Farquhar, B.A.
D. B. Gaddes, A.T.C.M., B.Mus.
A. W. Johns.
F. H. Johnson, M.A., D.Paed. N 6 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1951-52
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Registrar: T. F. Robson.
Assistant Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education:  H. A. Jones.
Inspector of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A.
Director of Home Economics: Miss Bertha Rogers, B.Sc., M.A.
Inspector of Home Economics:  Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.S.
Director, Educational and Vocational Guidance: H. P. Johns, M.A., Ph.D.
Acting Director, Recreation and Physical Education:  R. J. Phillips.
Director, Visual Education:  J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director, School Radio Broadcasts:  Philip J. Kitley, M.A.
Director, Educational Reference and School Service: Mrs. Muriel Scace, B.A.
Director, Summer School of Education: F. H. Johnson, M.A., D.Paed.
Director, Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed.
Director, School and Community Drama:  H. S. Hurn, B.A.
Director of High School Correspondence: Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence:  Mrs. Anna B. Nash.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch: P. G. Barr.
Departmental Comptroller: S. E. Espley.
Chief Clerk: R. D. Smith.
Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind: C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D.
Research Assistant: J. R. Meredith, B.A.
School Planning and Construction: W. F. MaRR.
Chairman, Assessment Equalization Board: D. K. Kennedy. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report of the Superintendent of Education  11
Report of the Deputy Superintendent of Education  30
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver  34
Victoria  35
Report of the Director of the Summer School of Education  37
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  46
Report of the Director of Home Economics  53
Report of the Director of the Division of Educational Reference and School Service 55
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver.  57
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)  63
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)  71
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)  73
School District No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)  74
School District No. 36 (Surrey)  75
Reports of District Inspectors :  77
Report of the Superintendent, The School for the Deaf and the Blind  110
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  112
Elementary Correspondence School  116
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch  117
Report on Adult Education—
Industrial Education  120
Correspondence Instruction—
High School  125
Elementary School  126
Recreation and Physical Education  126
School and Community Drama  128
Report of the Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance  132
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts  136
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  138
Report of the Director of Visual Education  141
Report of the Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act"„__ 143
Report of the Secretary, Local Committee, Strathcona Trust  144 N 8 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  11
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  12
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils According to Different Classes of Schools  12
Teachers' Certificates  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  13
Comparison of Enrolment and Cost per Pupil to Provincial Government  14
Cost per Pupil on Various Bases for the School-year 1951-52  15
Children of Foreign Parentage  16
Number of School Districts  16
Number of Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  16
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  17
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  18
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  18
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  19
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  19
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District 2. 20
Number of District Supervisors, Relieving Teachers, Visiting Teachers  21
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils  21
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each Type
of School  23
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  23
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  24
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1951-52 by Provincial Government  25
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1951-52 by School Districts  26
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various
School Districts  149
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  184
Information re Examination Papers Inside back cover 	
The Honourable Tilly Jean Rolston, Minister of Education.  Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1951-52
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1953.
To the Honourable Tilly Jean Rolston,
Minister of Education.
Madam,—I beg to submit herewith the Eighty-first Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1952.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
173,354 to 183,112, and the average daily attendance increased from 154,077 to 163,364.
The percentage of the regular attendance was 89.21.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Large
Municipal
Large Rural
Rural
Total
6,472
9,203
4,709
6,836
14,028
6,307
374
3,321
1,134
55,919
202
4,313
236
304
811
13,510
27,544
11,016
1,248
7,846
1,858
496
977
44,559
11,967
2,111
13,817
115,106
Totals	
66,416
87,919
27,426
1.351
183,112
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High Correspondence School classes, regular students
(exclusive of the 2,397 officially registered in high,
superior, or elementary schools)        999
In the Elementary Correspondence School classes, regular
students      1,877
Under section 13 (g) of the " Public Schools Act," pupils
receiving instruction  29
2,905
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme  2,251
Night-schools  17,737
Vancouver School of Art  153
Vancouver Vocational Institute  1,588
High Correspondence School (adults only)  2,550
Elementary Correspondence School (adults only)  292
Carried forward
27,476
11 N  12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Brought forward  27,476
Adult education—Continued
Recreational and Physical Education classes  42,259
Summer School of Education (1951 session)  1,465
Normal School, Vancouver  343
Normal School, Victoria  169
Industrial and vocational teachers-in-training  91
Victoria College  3161
University of British Columbia  5,5482
1 This figure does not include an enrolment of 839 in the special evening courses.
2 This figure does not include ths following enrolments:   1951 summer session, 976;
correspondence courses, 339.
77,667
1951-52 extra sessional classes,
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade for
the school-year 1951-52:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
741
11,248
10,807
10,619
9,813
9,124
8,580
7,946
7,170
6,098
4,838
3,435
2,692
476
758
9,947
9,640
9,895
9,275
8,618
7,961
7,507
7,047
6.424
5,400
3,938
2,880
235
1,499
Grade I     	
21,195
Grade II    .._.	
20,447
Grade III  -      	
20,514
Grade IV .   — -	
19,088
Grade V-   -	
17,742
Grade VI    	
16,541
Grade VII.— —
15,453
Grade VIII      _     .    ..
14,217
Grade IX  __  - 	
12,522
Grade X   	
10,238
Grade XI   -      	
7,373
Grade XII..       	
5,572
Grade XIII..  	
711
Totals.— - -- —   -  - .
93,587
89,525
183,112
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number
of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per
teacher are shown in the following table:—
Number of Teachers
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
Type of School
Grade
Teachers
Special
Instructors
Total
454
877
322
77
405
60
3,483
191
327
123
48
7
161
63
645
1,204
445
77
453
67
3,644
63
13,510
27,544
11,016
1,858
11,967
2,111
115,106
7.38
15.04
6.02
1.01
6.54
1.15
62.86
29.75
31.40
34.21
24.12
Elementary-senior high schools...
Elementary-junior high schools-
29.54
35.18
33.04
Totals	
5,678
920
6,598
183,112
100.00
32.25 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
N 13
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number
with or without university degrees:—
Number of Teachers
Type of School
With
University
Degrees
Without
University
Degrees
Total
525
916
330
13
174
18
349
24
120
288
115
64
279
49
3,295
39
645
1,204
445
77
453
67
3,644
63
Totals    	
2,349
4,249
6,598
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR
PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and
also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877-78—
1882-83	
1887-88 _
1892-93—
1897-98.	
1902-03	
1907-08—
1912-13.	
1913-14	
1917-18.	
1922-23	
1927-28.	
1928-29.	
1929-30	
1930-31	
1931-32	
1932-33.	
1933-34—
1934-35—
1935-36-	
1936-37-.-
1937-38-	
1938-39—
1939-40—
1940-41-
1941-42-
1942-43..
1943-44-
1944-45..
1945-46-
1946-47-
1947-48-
1948-49-
1949-50 -
1950-51-
1951-52..
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
597
859
246
,118
,668
,784
854
,948
,959
912
873
942
956
025
092
194
220
248
224
055
162
354
512
833
116
496
873
,272
598
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
101
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
183,112
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
163,364
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
88.88
89.21
$48,411,141
60,758.75!
U3,679.36l
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.28s
3,532,518.95s
3,765,920.69s
3,743,317.08s
3,834,727.19s
4,015,074.37s
2,849,972.02s
2,611,937.80s
2,835,040.74s
2,972,385.04s
3,277,660.23s
3,524,962.69s
3,630,670.78s
3,585,769.00s
3,963,848.24s
4,028,397.88s
3,924,243.53s
4,244,898.82s
5,022,534.59s
5,765,205.50s
9,398,473.46s
12,468,653.18s
17,363,430.94s
22,809,631.23s
25,830,076.88s
26,885,980.43s
$215
425
604
1,220,
4,658,
4,634
3,519
7,630,
9,261
11,149
10,008,
10,061
9,719,
8,941,
8,213,
8,458,
8,775.
9,593,
10,193,
10,640,
10,521
10,982,
11,120,
11,502,
12,231,
13,683,
14,818,'
20,176;
25,768,:
35,538,i
47,726,'
54,195,
57,881,
,056.222
,555.10
357.86
509.85
,894.97
877.56
,014.61
,009.54s
,094.98s
,996.27s
,255.66 s
,387.99s
,333.81s
,497.34s
,369.04s
,156.00s
,353.78s
562.64s
,367.08s
740.47s
,684.92s
364.49s
801.94s
291.35s
,029.35s
538.18s
625.81s
,930.53s
,392.09s
079.88s
750.37s
133.95s
559.48s
1 The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
2 This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
3 This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University. N 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL
TO PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT
The following table shows the enrolment during the last eighteen years and also the
cost to the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
School-year
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance
20.40
23.47
21.35
24.46
22.93
26.10
24.05
27.18
24.85
27.92
24.52
27.14
27.82
32.25
28.51
33.13
28.82
35.59
29.81
34.46
33.97
39.51
36.56
41.67
58.24
66.17
74.54
84.21
97.76
109.42
124.59
138.63
131.15
147.56
128.78
144.38
1934-35-
1935-36-
1936-37-
1937-38-
1938-39..
1939-40-
1940-41-
1941-42-
1942-43-
1943-44-
1944-45-
1945-46-
1946-47-
1947-48..
1948-49-
1949-50-
1950-51-
1951-52..
117,
116,
118
120,
120,
120,
119,
118,
115
119
125,
130,
137
146
155
164
173,
183
,233
,722
,431
,360
,934
,459
,634
,405
,447
,043
,135
,605
,827
,708
,515
,212
,354
,112 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
N   15
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE
SCHOOL-YEAR 1951-52
Grand total cost of education	
Less—
Grant re salaries and enrolment, Victoria College.-     $21,486.22
Special grant to Victoria College        30,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia  2,260,226.47
$57,881,559.48
Normal School, Vancouver-
Normal school, Victoria-
Cost of night-schools	
Correspondence schools-
High school	
Elementary school _
Adult education	
Special grant under section 13 (g) of Act-.
135,015.05
100,372.45
27,747.11
171,221.79
71,478.29
484,204.67
1,360.00
3,303,112.05
Net cost for total enrolment of 183,112 pupils  $54,578,447.43
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  298.06
Cost per pupil per school-day (191 days) on total enrolment  1.56
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 163,364  334.14
Cost per pupil per school-day (191 days) on average daily attendance.. 1.75
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 18 3,112 pupils
for year ($26,885,980.43-$3,303,112.05)     23,582,868.38
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment  128.78
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (191 days) on
total enrolment  .67
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily
attendance  144.3 8
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (191 days) on
average daily attendance  .75
Cost per capita for year on population of 1,170,000 (1952 estimate)— 46.641
Cost per capita per school-day (191 days) on population of 1,170,000 .241
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on population of
1,170,000  20.16 2
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day (191 days)
on population of 1,170,000.  .ll2
1 Computed on the net total cost of $54,578,447.43, which includes debt and capital charges.
2 Computed on the net total cost to the Provincial Government of $23,582,868.38. N 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the
Province during the year 1951-52 was as follows:—
Type of School
o
x>
o
09
.3
3
U
Q
o
co
Senior high schools— 	
Junior-senior high schools 	
Junior high schools  	
Superior sch ools	
Elementary-senior high schools.-
Elementary-junior high schools..
Elementary schools	
Totals	
169
315|        5
540
146    292
197
176[     11
24
2|      12
170
70|       8
15
141 ....
910
1,688[1,017
49
118
46
67
62
5
415
149
486
112
32
165
43
1,699
385
1,062
525
44
386
231
3,887
2
257
203
240
231
14
153
14
985
143
406
83
33
146
942
2,025 2,411jl,345|   762
I I
2,686
6,520
399
1,840
1,753
144
284
140
6
122
16
862
169
343
168
16
71
18
1,035
474
1,515
441
65
307
108
3,769
264
426
252
9
126
23
1,572
560   3,063
1,070| 6,999
569
151
347
188|
2,986
475
2,133
677
3,801122,839
1,574
1,820
6,679
2,672
6,686]39,172
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1951-52: —
Municipal school districts       7
Large municipal school districts     35
Large rural school districts     35
Rural school districts (unattached)      24
Total number of districts — 101
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 13,510; of this
number, 6,463 were boys and 7,047 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1951-52 in each
district are shown in the following table: —
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
6
2
2  ■
1
1
1
5
1
2
11
2
21
6
6
14
16
29
11
142
28
43
22
3
3
68
17
12
13
2
30
9
9
22
20
35
18
201
35
59
28
3
5
110
30
16
339
56
11. Trail                                                                   ..—.               	
586
155
175
412
451
33. Chilliwack  -	
826
34   Abbotsford                                      -  -                 	
407
4,352
755
1,365
574
79
67
2,158
475
278
Totals                 -   --            - - 	
30
454
645
13,510 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
N  17
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school year was 27,544; of
this number, 13,420 were boys and 14,124 were girls. The number of schools, number
Of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1951-52 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2. Cranbrook -
3. Kimberley-	
5. Creston —	
7. Nelson 	
8. Slocan _	
9. Castlegar  	
11. Trail 	
12. Grand Forks	
14. Oliver  	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos 	
20. Salmon Arm	
23. Kelowna 	
24. Kamloops 	
28. Quesnel 	
32. Fraser Canyon	
35. Langley— _	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond-	
39. Vancouver.	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam 	
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
52. Prince Rupert	
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South..
62. Sooke 	
63. Saanich 	
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan	
67. Ladysmith	
70. Alberni 	
71. Courtenay	
75. Mission 	
76. Agassiz 	
77. Summerland	
Totals....	
16
18
20
5
10
12
13
11
20
31
7
14
18
25
11
6
31
67
13
22
184
27
33
25
8
22
16
18
18
14
17
26
13
10
29
7
23
6
11
23
26
27
5
10
15
19
15
26
41
10
17
27
39
14
9
42
91
17
31
264
35
46
30
10
31
24
25
25
17
24
33
17
15
39
9
32
9
15
487
591
579
160
248
363
437
304
500
869
207
450
545
965
338
199
992
2,210
353
775
6,347
888
989
736
218
658
533
587
531
361
468
692
359
309
916
198
712
169.
301
1,204 N 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 11,016, of this
number, 5,638 were boys and 5,378 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1951-52 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
7. Nelson    	
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
2
1
13
25
23
18
22
19
73
30
30
17
35
17
21
33
30
24
28
24
103
40
43
21
54
24
457
11. Trail   __	
843
22. Vernon                         	
672
23. Kelowna—   	
571
33. Chilliwack _	
694
34. Abbotsford   _..	
568
39. Vancouver  -	
2,525
1,074
41. Burnaby - 	
1,110
596
1,192
714
Totals - -	
16
322
445
11.016
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 1,858; of this number,
982 were boys and 876 were girls. The number of schools, number of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1951-52 in each district are
shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2
1
3
3
2
3
8
2
3
8
2
4
3
2
3
9
4
3
6
3
9
3
2
3
8
2
3
8
2
4
3
2
3
9
4
3
6
3
9
88
44
75
13. Kettle Valley  ...   	
202
18. Golden         	
57
53
27. Williams Lake     . .                                                     	
175
29. Lillooet	
31
46. Sechelt  _ 	
146
61
22
51. Portland Canal       —	
44
256
85
64
73. Alert Bay                . - _	
144
75
236
Totals             —	
26
77
77
1,858 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
N  19
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was 11,967;
of this number, 6,044 were boys and 5,923 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1951—52 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
4.
6.
10.
13.
17.
18.
20.
21.
22.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
39.
48.
49,
50.
53.
55.
56.
58.
60.
64.
69.
71.
72.
73.
74.
Fernie -	
Windermere.—
Kaslo 	
Arrow Lakes...
Kettle Valley..
Princeton	
Golden 	
Salmon Arm.	
Armstrong-Enderby..
Vernon -	
Kamloops 	
Barriere 	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
Ashcroft	
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon	
Vancouver	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Terrace	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof.	
McBride	
Peace River North..
Saltspring	
Qualicum-
Courtenay	
Campbell River-
Alert Bay	
Quatsino..
Unattached districts-
Totals	
35
7
7
6
6
21
7
9
11
12
6
5
5
16
6
19
20
10
4
16
22
18
3
6
14
10
24
10
25
5
5
10
43
8
7
6
6
26
7
9
12
14
6
5
5
18
8
22
20
11
4
20
24
19
3
6
18
13
26
11
28
5
5
13
1,110
198
219
135
128
706
183
250
377
399
152
117
147
515
176
447
482
345
95
496
506
583
75
144
264
291
229
453
309
690
341
838
141
122
304
405
453
11,967
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was 2,111;
of this number, 1,100 were boys and 1,011 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1951-52 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
34. Abbotsford                	
2
1
1
23
27
10
24
31
12
780
977
354
4
60
67
2,111 N 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1951-52
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 115,106; of this
number, 59,940 were boys and 55,166 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1951-52 in each
district are shown in the following table:—■
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
6
6
6
6
7
6
11
14
13
4
13
3
7
3
5
5
4
5
6
11
7
7
17
25
7
17
19
3
7
3
7
13
17
18
33
8
9
46
6
18
9
12
11
4
12
8
6
6
3
1
7
8
5
11
5
32
9
30
19
27
12
12
5
16
6
5
9
28
29
8
26
6
42
24
29
11
87
15
8
29
37
13
4
6
19
29
22
44
72
59
7
6
18
30
3
7
3
18
71
49
56
119
24
79
851
67
159
39
67
103
40
22
37
8
6
4
1
33
20
12
15
8
62
10
55
22
241
30
35
7
43
24
15
9
30
30
8
29
6
44
24
29
11
92
15
8
30
38
13
4
6
19
30
23
46
73
61
7
6
18
30
3
7
3
18
72
51
56
119
24
80
950
70
163
39
69
108    .
42
22
38
8
6
4
1
33
20
12
15
8
63
10
56
22
249
30
35
7
44
24
15
164
2. Cranbrook  	
908
3. Kimberley   ._ .           	
4. Windermere  	
1,009
208
733
74
1,446
548
9. Castlegar	
852
334
11. Trail   	
12. Grand Forks     j    	
2,832
577
13. Kettle Valley                                              i
114
14. Oliver 	
1,013
1,316
367
81
18. Golden                                                   	
115
619
873
695
22. Vernon                                       .      	
1,547
23. Kelowna  _L	
2,400
24. Kamloops   ;	
1,756
109
26. Birch Island   ...                              	
101
27,   Williams T akp.
283
847
29. Lillooet                                                                  .
61
30. Ashcroft                         '.  	
94
31. Merritt	
50
560
33. Chilliwack   -	
34. Abbotsford       : 	
2,599
1,680
1,728
4,459
37. Delta                                                                     	
827
2,886
28,987
2,706
41. Burnaby -	
5,908
1,418
2,559
3,989
1,517
46. Sechelt -	
584
1,172
123
49. Ocean Falls. —
95
50. Queen Charlotte                                      	
77
51. Portland Canal.. - 	
9
1,160
652
370
329
56. Vanderhoof  	
195
1,721
58. McBride                                             J	
172
1,408
353
9,146
852
1,044
118
1,232
750
464 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
N 21
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
68. Nanaimo...
69. Qualicum-
70. Alberni.—
71. Courtenay..
72. Campbell River—
73. Alert Bay 	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission 	
76. Agassiz..
77. Summerland-
Unattached districts-
Totals....	
17
4
8
14
18
8
5
16
3
1
21
829
66
6
55
45
24
9
5
36
10
12
33
3,483
69
6
58
45
24
9
5
37
10
12
34
3,644
2,145
189
1,875
1,571
416
113
82
1,152
317
460
811
115,106
DISTRICT SUPERVISORS, RELIEVING TEACHERS, AND
VISITING TEACHERS
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
39. Vancouver.-
41. Burnaby	
43. Coquitlam-
59. Peace River South-
61. Greater Victoria-
Totals	
38
5
1
2
17
63
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
Fernie —
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere-
Creston	
Kaslo	
Nelson	
Slocan—„—
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes-
Trail	
Grand Forks-
Kettle Valley-
Oliver 	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm—
Armstrong-Enderby..
Vernon	
Kelowna 	
Kamloops	
Barriere... 	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
9
7
7
7
9
8
15
17
14
7
16
4
11
4
6
6
6
7
8
14
9
10
21
27
8
6
22
21
44
44
47
15
49
15
74
34
41
19
146
26
22
49
68
20
25
15
28
52
39
93
124
90
12
11
42
47
52
53
56
16
59
15
86
34
44
19
174
30
22
56
79
23
30
15
31
56
44
112
144
106
12
11
44
52
1,274
1,395
1,600
406
1,400
337
2,477
796
1,215
525
4,698
881
444
1,513
2,185
574
787
355
827
1,573
1,247
3,030
3,967
2,873
226
248
973
1,361 N 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
29. Lillooet    —                                           	
6
10
4
9
15
22
19
38
9
10
59
9
23
10
14
13
5
14
10
10
8
4
2
8
10
8
12
7
33
10
31
20
34
14
14
6
17
7
7
19
6
9
18
20
11
7
17
4
2
25
24
27
13
28
122
102
87
186
37
101
1,266
125
259
66
100
142
65
34
62
32
24
7
4
49
29
24
23
21
80
18
73
36
344
44
52
17
69
37
35
100
30
84
74
52
20
13
59
16
23
52
27
27
14
31
135
117
98
210
41
111
1,576
145
301
74
116
157
72
36
72
34
25
7
4
57
29
26
23
21
88
18
83
40
430
47
59
20
77
41
42
123
32
97
81
55
20
13
69
19
27
56
539
30. Ashcroft	
576
31. Merritt  	
395
854
33. Chilliwack       -	
34. Abbotsford 	
4,119
3,435
2,720
6,669
37. Delta „ 	
1,180
38. Richmond          	
3,661
42,707
4,535
9,360
42. Maple Ridge                   	
2,306
3,548
44. North Vancouver	
5,159
2,253
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
948
1,891
651
49. Ocean Falls                        	
678
50. Queen Charlotte 	
51. Portland Canal-	
152
53
1,693
875
693
593
571
2,308
58. McBride           	
401
1,939
806
12,496
62. Sooke 	
1,213
1,512
64. Saltspring	
427
1,924
1,109
1,127
3,334
879
70. Alberni                                     	
2,791
2,388
72. Campbell River 	
1,318
73. Alert Bay 	
398
279
1,864
486
761
1,351
Totals  -
1,005
5,678
6,598
183,112 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
N 23
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of teachers
employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance in each type
of school for the school-year 1951-52:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Total
Boys
Girls
Average
Daily
Attendance
Senior high	
Junior-senior high-
Junior high	
Superior..
Elementary-senior high...
Elementary-junior high..
Elementary 	
Not stated	
30
52
16
26
48
4
829
645
1,204
445
77
453
67
3,644
63
13,510
27,544
11,016
1,858
11,967
2,111
115,106
6,463
13,420
5,638
982
6,044
1,100
59,940
7,047
14,124
5,378
876
5,923
1,011
55,166
Totals..
1,005
6,598
183,112
93,587
89,525
11,742.05
24,374.20
9,897.17
1,625.70
10,616.69
1,908.88
103,199.56
163,364.25
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars only)
paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of
Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers earning less than $1,100
are excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Number of
Teachers
High
Salary
Low
Salary
Average
Salary
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools-
Junior high schools	
Superior schools..
Elementary-senior high schools..
Elementary-junior high schools-
Elementary schools	
454
877
322
77
405
60
3,483
$5,989
5,431
4,997
4,502
5,802
4,954
6,050
$1,800
1,184
1,637
1,641
1,196
1,960
1,000
$4,201
3,516
3,584
2,785
2,925
2,872
2,788
Supervising Principals
24
43
15
14
2
60
$6,814
6,740
6,780
6,310
5,805
6,310
$4,820
4,571
5,120
4,459
4,833
3,494
$5,964
5,640
5,843
5,455
5,319
5,537
Special Instructors
.
167
284
108
34
5
101
63
$5,880
5,950
5,880
5,700
5,107
6,100
13,758
$1,000
1,341
1,000
2,105
2,440
1,000
1,245
$4,187
3,664
3,473
3,234
3,728
3,109
Unclassified	
4,125 N 24 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, excluding part-time teachers,
teachers attached to the Bureau of Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and
teachers earning less than $1,100 per annum:—
Number Number
Salary Range                           of Teachers Salary Range                           of Teachers
$1,100-$1,199  10     $3,900-$3,999  110
1,200- 1,299  14      4,000- 4,099  92
1,300- 1,399  15      4,100- 4,199  119
1,400- 1,499  27      4,200- 4,299  156
1,500- 1,599  18      4,300- 4,399  124
1,600- 1,699  61      4,400- 4,499  107
1,700- 1,799  63      4,500- 4,599  96
1,800- 1,899  159      4,600- 4,699  110
1,900- 1,999  261      4,700- 4,799  54
2,000- 2,099  237      4,800- 4,899  66
2,100- 2,199  191      4,900- 4,999  104
2,200- 2,299  280      5,000- 5,099  56
2,300- 2,399  280      5,100- 5,199  34
2,400- 2.499  245      5,200- 5,299  79
2,500- 2,599  230      5,300- 5,399  69
2,600- 2,699  225      5,400- 5,499  17
2,700- 2,799  220      5,500- 5,599  19
2,800- 2,899  260      5,600- 5,699   7
2,900- 2,999  229      5,700- 5,799  24
3,000- 3,099  203      5,800- 5,899  13
3,100- 3,199  223      5,900- 5,999  10
3,200- 3,299  190      6,000- 6,099  21
3,300- 3,399  267      6,100- 6,199  10
3,400- 3,499  298      6,200- 6,299   6
3,500- 3,599  169       6,300- 6,399..- ._— 10
3,600-3,699  174      6,400 and over  18
3,700- 3,799  254 	
3,800- 3,899  189 Total 6,523 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT N 25
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1951-52
Minister's office  $14,227.29
General Office  106,259.49
Text-book Branch (free texts, maps, etc.)  277,185.98
High Correspondence School  171,221.79
Elementary Correspondence School  71,478.29
Industrial Education  7 8,144.03
Visual Education  59,384.45
Inspection of Schools  294,242.17
Normal School, Vancouver  135,015.05
Normal School, Victoria  100,372.45
School for the Deaf and the Blind  245,473.95
Basic and supplementary grants  8,624,145.46
Special salary grant paid under section 13 (g) of the Act  1,360.00
Teachers' superannuation (7 per cent)  1,512,266.15
Special aid to school districts  7,350.00
Special aid to rural areas  3,571,796.02
School buildings and essential new equipment  7,623,764.43
Education of soldiers' dependent children  14,002.20
Examinations   63,651.76
Conveying children to central schools  944,512.88
Summer School  47,098.90
Adult Education—
Extension and Adult Education  29,370.93
Recreational and Physical Education  136,411.96
Urban Occupational Training  34,774.94
Rural Occupational Training  12,424.3 4
Student-aid bursaries  116,298.00
Re-establishment training  5,499.65
Apprentice-training   494.44
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement  148,930.41
School radio broadcasts  26,986.31
Division of Curriculum  16,971.22
Division of Educational Reference and School Service  21,579.10
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  40,350.71
Educational and Vocational Guidance..._   10,465.90
Assessment Equalization Board  12,846.89
Incidentals and contingencies  19,3 9 6.42
University of British Columbia—
General grant  $2,174,866.48
Teacher-training  16,749.99
University Endowment Lands  68,610.00
  2,260,226.47
Special grant to Victoria College  30,000.00
Total expenditure by Government  $26,885,980.43
Amount expended by districts (including debt and capital charges)     30,995,579.05
Grand total expenditure  $57,881,559.48 N 26 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1951-52
No. and Name of School District
Total
Expenditure!
Government
Grants
District
Expenditure
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere..
5. Creston	
6. Kootenay-	
7. Nelson	
8. Slocan..
9. Castlegar-
10. Arrow Lakes..
11. Trail 	
12. Grand Forks	
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan-
15. Penticton 	
16. Keremeos 	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke	
20. Salmon Arm„
21. Armstrong-Enderby-
22. Vernon 	
23. Kelowna	
24. Kamloops	
25. Barriere	
26. Birch Island	
27. Williams Lake..
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. Ashcroft	
31. Merritt	
32. Fraser Canyon..
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey.. 	
37. Delta. 	
38. Richmond-
39. Vancouver-
40. New Westminster..
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam-
44. North Vancouver-
45. West Vancouver—.
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Ocean Falls	
50. Queen Charlotte.-
51. Portland Canal	
52. Prince Rupert	
53. Terrace	
54. Smithers- 	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Vanderhoof	
57. Prince George..
58. McBride	
59. Peace River South.
60. Peace River North-.
61. Greater Victoria.—
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich-
64. Saltspring-
65. Cowichan	
66. Lake Cowichan..
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni-
71. Courtenay-
72. Campbell River..
73. Alert Bay.	
I
$274,778.57
312,543.63
351,582.53
73,664.73
528,528.94
68,878.87
466,684.15
239,951.50
378,125.68
108,637.03
1,940,326.64
185,817.63
127,273.30
340,471.12
640,904.60
170,974.18
175,986.79
76,921.89
295,143.81
306,683.87
219,476.10
1,709,339.52
690,540.38
549,098.75
114,071.10
182,939.15
261,142.58
274,702.12
164,889.64
183,868.91
81,664.37
276,135.16
1,008,245.78
1,266,209.77
468,629.09
950,510.84
232,230.25
1,129,031.59
12,150,904.06
883,955.11
1,637,027.82
432,829.57
1,051,462.02
991,685.07
804,959.97
576,956.96
449,042.83
489,895.40
262,965.41
80,394.15
18,285.62
590,559.08
209,190.41
141,071.03
151,944.23
122,044.67
528,738.44
139,640.43
893,486.26
443,025.15
3,687,993.98
255,887.87
819,973.05
142,985.61
444,892.01
312,066.50
772,803.03
1,399,948.99
472,498.63
810,222.56
510,955.19
425,740.79
120,822.32
$165,647.19
155,407.38
138,213.53
54,402.91
330,098.84
40,837.22
206,400.40
143,564.03
193,497.74
88,706.22
829,532.66
109,417.21
76,201.13
236,748.93
243,241.97
108,108.13
107,043.62
57,601.49
149,782.43
157,552.08
109,897.34
842,350.88
311,912.40
251,439.49
71,566.09
104,058.44
196,522.58
202,392.10
24,474.98
99,622.44
44,854.99
171,556.39
426,932.21
621,994.82
204,321.02
378,451.83
70,555.87
453,510.90
2,853,548.53
206,688.56
542,179.85
186,021.47
458,384.92
369,217.46
253,142.76
314,078.44
190,563.04
214,866.75
86,430.59
36,977.34
9,434.31
184,989.20
134,299.50
115,344.58
115,200.27
99,890.85
245,234.46
90,879.73
538,534.61
264,287.99
1,134,233.70
150,638.93
385,896.50
92,764.35
215,007.44
148,252.31
355,596.28
642,222.90
265,025.06
362,293.50
303,843.01
260,199.41
62,331.24
$109,131.38
157,136.25
213,369.00
19,261.82
198,430.10
28,041.65
260,283.75
96,387.47
184,627.94
19,930.81
1,110,793.98
76,400.42
51,072.17
103,722.19
397,662.63
62,866.05
68,943.17
19,320.40
145,361.38
149,131.79
109,578.76
866,988.64
378,627.98
297,659.26
42,505.01
78,880.71
64,620.00
72,310.02
140,414.66
84,246.47
36,809.38
104,578.77
581,313.57
644,214.95
264,308.07
572,059.01
161,674.38
675,520.69
9,297,355.53
677,266.55
1,094,847.97
246,808.10
593,077.10
622,467.61
551,817.21
262,878.52
258,479.79
275,028.65
176,534.82
43,416.81
8,851.31
405,569.88
74,890.91
25,726.45
36,743.96
22,153.82
283,503.98
48,760.70
354,951.65
178,737.16
2,553,760.28
105,248.94
434,076.55
50,221.26
229,884.57
163,814.19
417,206.75
757,726.09
207,473.57
447,929.06
207,112.18
165,541.38
58,491.08
1 Includes debt and capital charges. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
N 27
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1951-52
—Continued
No. and Name of School District
Total
Government
District
Expenditure!
Grants
Expenditure
$83,832.54
$12,591.81
$71,240.73
1,141,320.77
537,271.14
604,049.63
152,426.32
66,456.32
85,970.00
188,004.33
70,017.55
117,986.78
4,495.00
3,276.47
1,218.53
15,823.98
11,949.35
3,870.63
19 754.94
19 754.94
3,814.15
836,90
	
2,977.25
2,911.03
2,715.28
195.75
5,947.22
5,621.76
325.46
4,712.50
4,551.74
160.76
2,723.79
2,317.22
406.57
4,134.65
1,416.37
2,718.28
3,463.45
3,433.37
30.08
5,471.00
3,817.04
1,653.96
3,661.27
1,928.92
1,732.35
5,307.72
4,493.19
814.53
4,858.09
4,588.07
270.02
3,154.91
403.09
2,751.82
3,231.00
3,142.64
88.36
30,343.12
15,701.26
14,641.86
3,123.35
3,038.53
84.82
14,027.88
11,365.15
2,662.73
26,813.39
13,530.29
13,283.10
12,857.66
6,693.36
6,164.30
78,704.27
44,060.80
34,643.47
68,101.03
35,731.66
32,369.37
13,158.21
6,429.36
6,728.85
$51,959,636.35
$20,964,057.30
$30,995,579.05
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz.-	
77. Summerland..
Unattached
Atlin..
Bamfield	
Belmont Park..
Butedale	
Camp Mile 163..
Camp Mile 300..
Camp Mile 456..
Chezacut	
Esperanza..
Fort Nelson _	
Fort Nelson Airport.
Kildonan 	
Kyuquot-
Lower Post	
Sarita River 	
Sydney Inlet	
Tahsis River...	
Tatlayoko 	
Telegraph Creek..
Tofino	
Tulsequah 	
Ucluelet	
University Hill..
Zeballos	
Totals..
1 Includes debt and capital charges.
EXAMINATION SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS, 1952
University Entrance
The fifteen General Proficiency Scholarships, each of $175, awarded by the University of British Columbia, with the accompanying fifteen scholarships, each of $225,
generously granted by the Chris Spencer Foundation, were won by the following:—
Place
Name
School
Per Cent
1st in B.C.
95.7
2nd in B.C. <
(tie)      \
King Edward High School (Vancouver)	
Kitsilano High School (Vancouver) 	
)        94.8
S
86.9
Lida Tanya Zinovich __ 	
90.6
91.5
92 6
North Surrey Junior-Senior High School
88 0
94 4
Area 7
Alan Brian Karme   	
King Edward High School (Vancouver)
93.1
90 6
94 7
Area 10
93 6
(Dawson Creek)  	
83.3
94 4
Saltspring Elementary-High School (Ganges)
93 9 N 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
The Governor-General's Silver Medal for the highest standing in the University
Entrance examinations was won by Sonia Crampton Stuart. Two students, Adrienne
Todd and Mervyn Clarice Weir, tied for the Governor-General's Bronze Medal for the
second highest standing in the University Entrance examinations. A Bronze Medal was
awarded to each of the winners.
Senior Matriculation
The six Royal Institution Scholarships, each of $200, awarded by the University
of British Columbia for general proficiency, were won by the following:—
Name
School
Per Cent
Mennonite Educational Institute (Abbotsford)	
Mennonite Educational Institute (Abbotsford)	
Prince Charles Junior-Senior High School (Creston)
92.3
90 3
88.9
88.8
87.6
85.8
REVIEW
The statistical returns shown on the preceding pages reflect the continued growth of
the educational system of the Province in keeping with the growth of population and
industrial development.
It is the responsibility of the Department of Education to adapt the curriculum of
the schools to conditions in a rapidly changing situation, so that our young people will
be well prepared to meet the challenge of a fast-growing Province. For this reason,
important changes have been made in the curriculum. These are dealt with in the report
of the Assistant Superintendent, who is also Director of Curriculum.
The annual increase in enrolment of approximately 9,000 students, which commenced in 1947-48, is expected to continue at approximately the same rate for several
years. For this reason, Boards of School Trustees continue to plan for increased school
enrolment. Despite the large number of new schools opened in the last four years, no
decrease in the building programme can be counted upon for another two years.
TEXT-BOOK RENTAL PLAN
It is gratifying to report that the service given by the Text-book Branch is maintained in a high state of efficiency. Reports from all school districts indicate that this
service, which has now become routine, has contributed greatly to the efficiency of the
schools.
RETIREMENTS
Two senior Inspectors of Schools retired on superannuation at the end of the school-
year. After many years of outstanding service, Mr. H. McArthur, for some time stationed
at Kamloops, and Mr. J. E. Brown, who has served in many parts of the Province and
finally in the Victoria district, were suitably remembered by their colleagues.
Mr. T. R. Hall, teacher, principal, inspector, and finally principal of the Provincial
Normal School, Vancouver, was also superannuated at the end of the school-year. To all
these officials, the thanks of the Department is due for their contribution to education and
the welfare of thousands of young people.
The Elementary Correspondence Branch lost the services of Mrs. Anna B. Nash
(nee Miller), through marriage, during the year. She is largely responsible for the
organization of this branch and the splendid work carried on for many years. Thousands
of children in the sparsely populated parts of the Province, who have no regular school,
have cause to remember the work this lady has done. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT N 29
APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS
The following appointments and promotions have been made during the year:—
To be Inspectors of Schools:—
Mr. H. D. Abbott, appointed to Telkwa.
Mr. F. L. Irwin, appointed to Abbotsford.
Mr. G. E. Johnson, appointed to Peace River.
To be Director of Elementary Correspondence School:  Mr. A. H. Plows.
To Vancouver Normal School:—
Mr. F. C. Boyes, to be principal.
Mr. E. B. Broome, to be vice-principal.
Miss Kathleen Meredith, instructor of physical education.
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Dr. F. Henry Johnson has assumed the direction of the Summer School of Education
in Victoria, vice Dr. H. P. Johns. Dr. Johns established an enviable record for the school.
In accordance with Departmental practice, he relinquished the post after five years'
service.
OTHER SERVICES
Several Departmental officials brought distinction upon themselves and the Department by accepting appointments, as visiting lecturers at various universities, during the
past summer, as follows:—
Dr. H. P. Johns, University of Southern California.
Dr. W. A. Plenderleith, University of Alberta.
Dr. H. H. Grantham, San Jose College.
Mr. George Brand, University of Manitoba.
Dr. H. H. Grantham, Provincial Normal School, Vancouver, has been granted leave
of absence for one year to accept an appointment to the Government of Indonesia as
educational adviser.
It is with pleasure that I offer my thanks to all members of a very efficient staff for
their continued devoted work during a year of change and expansion. I am sure that the
people of this Province are well satisfied with the standards of education maintained in
our Province.
I have the honour to be,
Madam,
Your obedient servant,
F. T. FAIREY,
Superintendent of Education. N 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION
REPORT OF H. L. CAMPBELL, B.A., M.Ed., DEPUTY
SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION
During the past three years an extensive reorganization of the secondary-school
curriculum has been under way. This reorganization has been designed to provide a programme of studies which would challenge the interests and capacities of the able students,
who are proceeding on to the professions, while at the same time meeting the needs of
the majority of young people, who now seek some secondary education. It is rare indeed
in these days to find a parent who does not wish some secondary education for his child,
and in ever-increasing degree the commercial and industrial world is insisting upon it.
" Mass secondary education, however, presents a challenge. Can the school provide
adequate cultural and vocational training for the many, and at the same time treasure and
develop to the full those superior minds to whom society must ever look for the solution
of its problems? In other words, can the modern composite secondary school so train
the great majority of youth that, in addition to cultural development, it will enjoy and be
capable of doing the arduous physical tasks of drawing fish from the sea, logs from the
forest, minerals from the mines? "
To these purposes the curriculum organization of British Columbia schools is
devoted.
As has been noted in previous Reports, the Administrative Bulletin of the Department of Education sets forth the purposes of the current curriculum reorganization as
follows:—
(1) To make possible in the secondary-school curriculum a greatly increased
offering of elective courses designed to meet student and community needs.
(2) To increase the number of elective courses which may be studied by those
desiring High School Graduation (University Programme).
(3) To give to such fields of study as Art, Music, Drama, Home Economics,
Agriculture, Commerce, and Industrial Arts equal status with other subjects in respect of High School Graduation (University Programme).
(4) To permit students of high ability to take advanced courses in fields of
special interest and aptitude and to become highly qualified in those fields.
(5) To encourage in all students in secondary schools the development and
pursuit of strong intellectual and vocational interests.
Academic Standards
The following quotations from the Department's Administrative Bulletin, 1952-53,
provided to all schools, would seem to indicate that the preservation of desirable standards
is still of considerable concern in British Columbia schools: —
"... to ensure by the adjustment of the curriculum content that the fundamental
skills are mastered by all."
" . . .we recognize that the main problems of the secondary school are the final
mastering of the fundamental skills."
"... the Department wishes to voice its concern for the teaching of the use of the
English language. In our opinion the effective use of the vernacular should be the concern
of all Teachers in all subjects in all written and spoken work. We think that all pupils in
all subjects should be regularly required to write, and that their products should be
marked, returned and revised."
"... high performance in a limited number of courses is to be preferred to
mediocre performance in a maximum number of courses."
" . . . it is hoped that this adjustment of the curriculum will provide a full and
challenging four-year high school programme for all students.    It is possible, however, EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION N 31
that in exceptional cases bright students may be able to complete on a high performance
level two courses, such as Mathematics 20 and 30 in the one year, or Mathematics 10, 20
and 30 in two years."
"... home study and the carefully prepared assignment have definite educational and character-forming values. Principals should require that home study and
assignments be given to the maximum prescribed in Article 1, Clause 5, of the Rules and
Regulations of the Council of Public Instruction, and carefully checked by teachers."
" . . . if a student, after adequate guidance, enrols for a course, gets well into the
course, and cannot or will not achieve satisfactorily, he should not be permitted to ' drop '
the course. Rather, he should be required to struggle with it and be ' failed ' if necessary.
He may, however, be persuaded not to enrol for a second course in that subject. It is very
bad practice to permit students to discontinue everything which proves difficult."
"... the school-year is relatively short and while co-curricular activities such a%
concerts, school fairs, gymnastic displays, sports and games are important and have a place
in the total educational programme, they should not be permitted to infringe to any considerable extent upon the time scheduled for regular class periods."
"... in schools where there are several classes studying the same subject in the
same grade, provision for individual differences may be made by ability or homogeneous
grouping, with an enriched and challenging course for the bright and a modified course in
minimum essentials for the slow-learning."
"... if slow-learning pupils are not required to waste their time attempting to
master material which is beyond their ability, they can, in a favourable educational
climate, do a very thorough job on essentials and be much better prepared than by pursuing a common course, which attempts to meet the needs and capacities of both bright
and dull."
"... course modification does not imply courses which differ in essential content.
Modified and enriched courses will have the same minimum basic fundamental skills and
learnings. In the modified course the student proceeds slowly to master the basic
essential skills in simple form. In the enriched course the same basic skills are learned,
but they are extended to the more involved and difficult applications."
"... the time allotment for English for each of the Grades VII, VIII and IX
has been increased to 280 minutes (seven periods) with no increase in credits."
"... new text-books in spelling are now provided for Grades VII, VIII and IX.
Regular formal instruction in spelling in these grades is now required and the teaching
procedures outlined in the texts should be followed. Teachers of all subjects in all
grades of high school must emphasize the specialized spelling content of their subjects
and should insist upon correct spelling in all written work."
"... teachers of all subjects in all grades must insist upon clear, neat and legible
writing in all work. Formal instruction should be given to and practice required from
those students whose handwriting falls below a desirable standard."
" . . . in all grades the fundamental elements of simple sentence structure, such
as subject, predicate, object, complement, clauses, phrases, parts of speech and relations,
should be reviewed and stressed."
"... in all grades teaching and review of correct English usage and expression
should form an important part of the English course. Teachers of all subjects must insist
upon a high standard of oral and written expression even to the extent of penalizing the
student in informal classroom tests."
"... in all subjects ample apportunity should be given during class periods for
written and oral expression with kindly and critical evaluation by students and teachers."
"... reading ability is fundamental in its relation to the progress of all students
in all subject fields and to success in life pursuits. A basic aim of reading instruction is
to help pupils understand what they read and study." N 32 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
"... arithmetic should form an integral part of Mathematics 10, 20 and 30,
and provision should be made for the testing of fundamental arithmetical skills in all
courses in High School Mathematics."
" . . . we tend to forget that no learnings are permanent and that all skills deteriorate rapidly if not exercised frequently."
"... mathematics is a cumulative skill subject. Each teacher of Mathematics,
even to Grade XII, should see to it that all previously learned skills in arithmetic and
mathematics generally are given frequent review and drill."
"... the study of the languages, Latin, French, German and Spanish, with their
demands for concentration, judgment and discrimination, can make a significant contribution to young people, particularly to those who are better-than-average students.
New Courses
In furtherance of the curriculum adjustment, the following new courses were prepared and prescribed for the school-year under review in this report: In English, Courses
Nos. 20 and 21; in Effective Living, Course No. 30; in Home Economics, Home Furnishing (Course No. 23), Child Care and Home Nursing (Course No. 24), Homemaking
(Course No. 30), Clothing Selection and Construction (Course No. 31), Foods and
Nutrition (Course No. 32); in Languages, French (Course No. 91), German (Course
No. 91), Latin (Course No. 91), Spanish (Course No. 91); in Science, Courses Nos. 10
and 20; in Social Studies, Course No. 20; in Agriculture, Courses Nos. 10, 20, 21, 30,
31, and 91; and in Physical Education, courses for Grades VII to XII.
New Text-book Adoptions
It is the policy of the Central Curriculum Committee that, if possible, each course
in each subject, and the prescribed text-book for each course, should be examined and
evaluated once in each ten-year period. Only in this way can courses and texts be kept
functional.
It is necessary to have new text-book adoptions (a) when new courses not previously
offered are prescribed, (b) when text-books which have been in use for a ten-year period
are revised by their publishers and appear in new editions, and (c) when a text becomes
obsolete and must be replaced by a more modern text.
The following texts, or new editions, were prescribed for the year under review:—
English:
Prose of Our Day, for English 30.
Golden Caravan, for English 31.
On Stage, for English 31.
Adventures in English Literature, for English 91.
Social Studies:
Democracy in Action, for Social Studies 20.
This New Canada, for Social Studies 30.
Our Canada, for Social Studies 30.
Modern History, for History 91.
Canadian Social Studies Atlas, for Social Studies 7 and 10.
Effective Living:
Into Your Teens, for Effective Living 8.
French:
Lisons Done, for French 91.
Cours Moyen de Francais, Part 1, for French 92.
Recueil de Lectures, for French 92. EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION
N 33
German:
German Review and Composition, for German 92.
Cora, for German 92.
Genialische Jugend, for German 92.
Drei Kamaraden, for German 92.
Hohensonne, for German 92.
Spanish:
El Camino Real, Book Two, for Spanish 92.
Cuentos de las Espanas, for Spanish 92.
La Fuente de las Calaveros, for Spanish 92.
La Nela, for Spanish 92.
Latin:
Second Year Latin, for Latin 92.
Selections from Virgil, for Latin 92.
Home Economics:
Today's Home Living, for Home Economics 91.
Clothing for Moderns, for Home Economics 91.
Family Meals and Hospitality, for Home Economics 91.
Curriculum Revisions under Way
In order to complete the cycle of revision in each ten-year period, some evaluation
and, if necessary, some revision of course content is always under way. It requires about
two years to complete a revision from the time it is initiated until the revised course and
new text are in the schools.   The following revisions are under way at present:—
Music:  For all Grades I to XII.
Geography:  Social Studies 31 and Geography 91.
Social Studies:  Economics 92 and Law 93.
English:  English 40, 41, and 93.
Mathematics:  Mathematics 20, 30, and 100.
Science:  Chemistry 91 and Physics 91.
Languages:  French 110, German 110, Latin 110, and Spanish 110. N 34
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS
Provincial Normal School, Vancouver
REPORT OF T. R. HALL, B.A., PRINCIPAL
The fifty-first session of the Provincial Normal School, Vancouver, began on September 10th, 1951, and ended on June 25th, 1952. Enrolment and results are indicated
in the following table:—
Men
Women
Total
109                        234
96                        214
343
310
The figures show a decrease from those of the previous year. In the case of men
students the decrease amounted to some 12 per cent, while for the women the decrease
was approximately 9 per cent. There seems to be no easy explanation for the smaller
enrolment, but the drop in numbers was not sufficiently great to be alarming. I might
add that the reduced registration had the compensation of fitting our limited accommodation much more comfortably than the larger group of the previous year.
The following students graduated with distinction standing: Kenneth Peter Blanche,
George Alfred Dew, Eva Madelon Hallman, Derek Arthur Henry MacDermot, Patricia
Marie MacEwen, Mrs. Agnes Hay Rosene, Dorothea Mary Ross, and Elizabeth von
Rosenbach. The special award from the British Columbia Teachers' Federation for
the outstanding student of the year was presented to George Alfred Dew. Special book
awards from the staff of the Normal School were made to Derek MacDermot, Patricia
MacEwen, and Dorothea Ross. Their work for the year had been such that it merited
this recognition.
The wide range in the academic standing of students noted in earlier reports continued. Nineteen students held university degrees, and thirty-six had second or third
year standing. Twenty-five had completed their first year at university and seventy-six
had secured full Senior Matriculation. Eighty-nine students—over one-quarter of the
total enrolment—had the minimum entrance requirement of University Entrance. Six
students were graduates of the Vancouver School of Art and Design.
Probably the most important factor in teacher-training is the practical work as seen
or undertaken in standard classrooms. This school has been particularly fortunate in
this regard. The principals and staff members of the Model and Simon Fraser Schools
cannot be commended too highly for the time and attention which they have given to
our students. Mr. H. N. McCorkindale, Superintendent of Schools for Vancouver, his
assistants, the principals and staff members of the Vancouver schools continued to do
everything in their power to further the work of our training programme. Inspector
R. S. Shields of New Westminster, Inspector C. G. Brown of Burnaby, and Inspector
William Gray of North Vancouver have been most generous in their offers of assistance.
During the past few years, Inspectors in the Fraser Valley and in the various Interior
districts have become increasingly interested in placing our students for the spring prac-
ticum. We fully appreciate their efforts in this regard and wish to thank them accordingly. The students constantly wonder at the kindness and patience shown by Inspectors
and teachers who share in this work. To them, too, we wish to express our thanks and
sense of obligation.
The Provincial Model School, consisting of three ungraded classrooms, is of great
value to our students.   Miss Manning and her staff have been completely co-operative PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS
N 35
in opening their classrooms for observation and participation. Many students have the
opportunity of seeing a rural school in action for the first time. This part of their training is of very real value when they accept positions in the more remote areas of the
Province.
The health of the students was once more in the capable hands of the Metropolitan
Health Committee. We cannot speak too highly of their work. Staff and students alike
appreciate their efforts.
It is good to be able to report that the character and attitude of the student-body
remained at a high level. We feel that in the years ahead these young people will make
no small contribution to education in this Province.
Provincial Normal School, Victoria
REPORT OF H. O. ENGLISH, B.A., B.S.A., PRINCIPAL
The thirty-eighth session of the Provincial Normal School at Victoria opened on
September 10th, 1951, and closed on June 25th, 1952. Enrolment and results are shown
in the table below:—
Men
Women
Total
Enrolment _	
Awarded diplomas-
Withdrew ..	
Incomplete	
135
124
11
169
148
19
2
Honour Standing and Awards
The following students graduated with honour standing: Jessie Frances Ayers,
Vernon; Maida Fay Dunkley, Victoria; Leonard Franklin Lythgoe, Nelson; William
Bruce Naylor, Victoria; Brenda Carolyn Shunter, Kelowna; Patricia Ruth Evelyn Sinnott,
Victoria; and Elizabeth Claire Yardley, Victoria.
The Denton Memorial Award for all-round achievement and leadership was won
jointly by Maida Fay Dunkley and William Bruce Naylor. This senior annual award is
the gift of the Normal School class of 1943-44.
The British Columbia Teachers' Federation medal and prize for the leading student
was awarded to Brenda Carolyn Shunter. This award, which was made for the first time
in this session of 1951-52, is a practical evidence of the interest of the British Columbia
Teachers' Federation in teacher education. That interest and support is gratefully
acknowledged.
Observation and Practice-teaching
Observation and practice-teaching were spread throughout the year—a dominant
factor in the work of this school. The observation programme was initiated in September
in the Normal School auditorium, where our primary specialist, Miss W. A. Copeland,
provided two demonstration sessions with primary classes. Thereafter, for a large part
of the year, demonstration sessions were provided by the teachers of the Greater Victoria
School District in their own classrooms. In October and January, six student-teachers
were assigned for observation to each classroom for one-half day each week. In November and February they were assigned to classes in pairs for one-half day a week in the two
weeks preceding each practice-teaching period.   At these times their work was to study N 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
the methods used in the classes that they were going to teach. During the year, demonstration lessons were provided, not only in Greater Victoria and its surrounding areas,
but also throughout the Province, in 148 schools by 418 teachers. To these colleagues
we offer grateful thanks.
Practice-teaching this year was again increased in total time—from eight to nine
weeks. This work was done in three unbroken blocks, as follows: Two weeks in the
latter part of November, three weeks in February, and four weeks immediately following
the Easter holidays. We believe that the increase in length in the last two periods of
practice-teaching has resulted in a material improvement in our work. Each student-
teacher had 264 hours of observation and practice-teaching in the classrooms of the
public schools during the year. Altogether, 311 classrooms in 121 schools throughout
the Province were used for practice-teaching. We extend sincere thanks to all the
teachers, principals, and Inspectors who so ably co-operated with us in the arrangement
and supervision of this important part of teacher education.
Health Services
Dr. J. L. Gayton, Medical Health Officer, carried on an efficient general supervision
of the health of our student-teachers. He examined all of them early in the first term.
During the year there were many re-examinations, special examinations, and consultations. Whenever the need was indicated, students were referred to their private
practitioners for appropriate treatment. Tests and immunizations included Schick test
(for diphtheria), diphtheria toxoid, smallpox vaccination, T.A.B.T., and X-ray examinations. Mrs. J. A. Walker, P.H.N., Saanich Health Centre, rendered enthusiastic and
skilful assistance in these health services.
As in preceding years, Dr. Gayton arranged a series of special lectures on health
matters. Those participating and their topics were as follows: Dr. A. N. Beattie,
"School Medical, Nursing, and Sanitation Services"; Dr. J. L. Gayton, "Communicable
Diseases and Immunization"; Dr. A. B.,Sinclair and Dr. John Nelson, "Venereal Diseases "; Dr. K. Alstad, " Tuberculosis "; and Mrs. K. Beard, " Provincial Health Services
and Health Material Services."
Civil Defence
At the beginning of the first term a course of lectures on civil-defence affairs was
organized, with the ready assistance of Mr. L. G. Hatcher, Civil Defence Co-ordinator
for Greater Victoria. In addition to Mr. Hatcher, those responsible for lectures and
demonstrations were Major A. Cathcart Bruce, Mr. F. T. Donegani, and Mr. J. E.
Bayliss, Deputy Fire Chief of Victoria. These lectures were attended and enjoyed by
teaching, office, and building staffs in addition to the whole student-body.
First Aid
During the year, as in the past several years, evening classes in first aid were
conducted for the student-teachers by the St. John Ambulance Association. At the
conclusion of nine weekly sessions, 149 student-teachers successfully completed the
course and have since been awarded first-aid certificates. For a series of well-enjoyed
and competently conducted classes, our thanks are extended to St. John Ambulance
Instructors Ernest J. Harwood, Alex M. Jarvie, William Gardner, and David Patterson,
and to the association's Victoria Centre secretary, Mrs. Jean Lindal. SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
N 37
REPORT OF F. HENRY JOHNSON, M.A., D.P^d., DIRECTOR
At the thirty-ninth session of the Summer School of Education held in Victoria and
Vancouver from July 2nd to August 1st, 1952, a record enrolment was reached of 1,608
teachers. This represents an increased attendance of 10 per cent over that of the preceding year. It is noteworthy that over half the teachers attending were working toward
certificates beyond the Elementary Basic. Sixty-eight courses were offered at the Victoria
Section of the Summer School, with another thirty-two courses in Industrial Arts and
Commercial Education at the Vancouver Section. The faculty of sixty-one was composed principally of prominent British Columbia teachers, with eleven visiting members
from other Canadian Provinces and the United States.
While a record enrolment is gratifying as an indication of keen interest among our
teachers in their professional training, it does present difficult problems of accommodation. This year at the Victoria Section of the Summer School there were twenty-three
classes with an enrolment of 100 or more. Cafeteria and library facilities were also
understandably strained. Both to the faculty and the teachers, however, I am grateful
for their cheerful co-operation under difficulties. At the close of this, my first year as
Director of the Summer School of Education, I wish to thank Mr. H. L. Campbell and
my predecessor in office, Dr. H. P. Johns, for their advice and assistance. Grateful
acknowledgment is also due to the librarians of the Public Library Commission, Victoria
City Library, the Normal Schools, and to Mrs. Scace for their contributions to our
library.
Courses and Enrolment (Summer Session Only)
Figures for the numbers of courses offered, numbers of instructors, and total enrolment for the past five years are shown in the table below:—•
Courses
Instructors
Enrolment
Victoria Section, 1952                  - —
68
32
49
12
1,499
109
Totals for 1952                               - -   	
100
88
91
85
81
61
56
48
52
48
1,608
1,465
1,462
Totals for 1951                -            —
Totals for 1950     	
Totals for 1949               	
1,308
Totals for 1948                      -  	
1,197
Courses Offered
Victoria Section
Philosophy, Administration, and Psychology of Education:               Enrolment
15. Introduction to Educational Sociology  124
50. Techniques of Classroom Management  203
51. Rural School Problems  121
52. School Organization and Administration in British Co
lumbia      77
66. Organization and Administration of the Elementary
School   104
67. Home, School, and Community Relations
116. Psychology of Learning	
128. Remedial Education 	
125
88
130
78
110
132. Tests and Measurements in the Improvement of Learning
152. Child Guidance 	
156. Disciplinary Problems in the Elementary School  151
202. Remedial Reading  118 N 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1951-52
Kindergarten-Primary Education: Enrolment
150. Growth and Development of Children     72
583. Language Arts and Literature in the Kindergarten     22
588. Methods in Kindergarten Education     23
589. Kindergarten Demonstration Class     38
590. Principles and Practices of Primary Education     85
591. Primary Observation and Laboratory _1     85
592. Social Studies and Science in the Primary Grades  168
593. Reading in the Primary Grades  131
594. Problems in Primary Methods     97
596. Language and Literature in the Primary Grades  157
597. Arithmetic in the Primary Grades  105
Intermediate Grades Education:
200. Language Arts in the Intermediate Grades  64
212. Creative Writing     36
215. Producing the One-act Play  36
216. Speech Arts  34
278. Natural History of British Columbia  40
301. Social Studies in the Intermediate Grades  137
Arts and Crafts:
9a. Visual Education Workshop   43
9b. Visual Education Workshop   26
217. Puppetry  34
357. Creative Expression in Elementary-school Art  55
366. Ceramics   24
370. Murals   53
381. Introductory Drawing and Painting  53
386. Introductory Lettering  34
391. Advanced Drawing and Painting  46
395. Crafts:   Lino-cuts   35
398. Industrial Design   14
399. Interior Design and Decoration  30
401. Creative Expression in Secondary School Art  41
Music:
440. School Music in the Elementary Grades  62
443. Choral Music and Conducting  97
445. Intermediate Harmony and Counterpoint       3
447. Advanced Music Literature and History       8
448. Instrumental Ensemble       4
453. Rudiments  47
455. Sight-reading and Ear-training   30
464. Advanced Harmony and Counterpoint       3
467x. Curriculum Workshop in Music Education  28
469. Summer School Chorus  115
Library Service:
410. School Library Organization and Administration  32
411. Functions of the School Library  25
414. Book Selection  18
420. Great Books Seminar  37
Guidance and Counselling:
190x. Counsellors' Conference  20
191. The Individual Inventory in Guidance  27
192. The Use and Interpretation of Tests in Guidance  23 SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
N 39
Physical Education: Enrolment
520. Physical Education for the Elementary Classroom Teacher 119
544. Elementary Folk and Square Dancing  83
Home Economics:
650. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  42
651. Problems in Home Economics Education  27
First Aid and Civil Defence:
513. First Aid and Civil Defence  74
Indian Education:
805. Workshop in Problems of Indian Education  47
Typewriting:
604. Practical Typewriting  32
Senior Matriculation:
212. Creative Writing  36
213. Senior Matriculation English  130
316. Senior Matriculation Canadian History  154
Vancouver Section
Commercial Education:
620. Stenography Theory and Teaching Methods  16
626. Book-keeping Practice  16
627. Applied Typewriting  16
631. Business Machines  20
Industrial Arts Education:
1. Principles and Techniques of Elementary Education  14
14. The Curriculum: Its Objectives and Procedures  6
110. Educational Psychology  15
220. Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Junior High
School  13
224. Freehand Sketching Applied to the Industrial Arts  12
225. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  9
227. Elementary Woodwork  7
228. Elementary Wood-turning  4
229a. Farm Mechanics (Woodwork)   4
229b. Farm Mechanics (Electricity)   7
229c. Farm Mechanics (Metalwork)   5
231. Elementary Electrical Theory  6
232. Elementary Electrical Shopwork  7
234. Art Metalwork T  13
235. Elementary Sheet-metal Work  15
236. Elementary Machine-shop Work  7
238. Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Senior High
School  11
241. Practical Geometry  10
242. Freehand Sketching  15
243. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  20
245. Advanced Woodwork (Benchwork)  13
246. Advanced Wood-turning  12
247. Practice in the Use of Woodworking Machinery;   Care
and Maintenance  4
248b. Farm Mechanics (Metalwork)  10
249. Advanced Sheet-metal Work  16
250. Advanced Machine-shop Work *.  8 N 40
Total in 1952.
Total in 195L
Total in 1950.
Total in 1949.
Total in 1948.
public schools report, 1951-52
Student Courses1
1 These figures are totals of all course enrolments.
5,776
4,104
4,443
3,649
3,618
Registration
The following tables indicate the experience, types of school, and grades taught by
teachers attending the Summer School. Table IV shows the number seeking Advanced
certificates and the type of certificate sought. Candidates for the Elementary Basic
certificates are not shown.
Table I.—Teaching Experience of Those Registered
13 or more years  236
10 to 12 years     8 5
7 to 9 years  105
4 to 6 years  188
1 to 3 years	
Less than 1 year_.
Unreported	
Total
892
71
31
1,608
Table 11.—Type of School in Which Teachers Taught in 1951-52
More than 10 rooms  653
7 to 10 rooms  201
4 to 6 rooms  207
3 rooms     83
2 rooms  141
1 room  171
Unreported or did not
teach this year  152
Table III.—Grades Taught by Teachers Enrolled
       6
  157
  177
  201
  246
Grade VIII  356
Grade VII  375
Grade VI  339
Grade XIII
Grade XII _
Grade XI ___
Grade X ____.
Grade IX ___.
Grade V _
Grade IV
Grade III
Grade II _
385
434
499
490
Grade I  474
Kindergarten      13
Special classes     16
Unreported  130
Table IV.—Special Certificates Sought
(This table includes only candidates for certificates beyond the Elementary Basic.)
Primary  262
Intermediate  155
Art      86
Commercial     30
Music      74
Library     35
Home Economics     46
Industrial Arts  70
Physical Education  36
Counsellor  35
S.A. (Instructor)  28
Handicapped  4
Not specified  18
Total.
879 SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
N 41
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PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52 summer school of education n 43
Faculty
Abercrombie, Miss Mary E., Primary Instructor, Dawson Annex School, Vancouver.
Allen, Miss Audrianna, B.A., Elementary Curriculum Assistant, Seattle Public Schools,
Seattle, Wash.
Alsbury, A. T., B.A., B.Ed., Vice-Principal, Vancouver Technical High School, Vancouver.
Amess, Fred A., Dip., V.S.A., Director, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Aspell, Peter, Dip., V.S.A., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Bailey, Miss Jean G. K, B.Ed., Intermediate Supervisor of Burnaby Schools, Burnaby.
Bisshopp, Miss Kathleen E., Art Specialist, Como Lake Junior-Senior High School,
Coquitlam.
Bose, Roy George, M.A., Ph.D., Professor of Psychology and Guidance, Santa Monica
City Schools, Santa Monica, Calif.
Buckley, John M„ M.A., Commercial Instructor, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Carl, G. Clifford, M.A., Ph.D., Director, Provincial Museum, Victoria.
Collins, Miss Kathleen E., M.A., Primary Supervisor and Curriculum Consultant,
Burnaby.
Copeland, Miss Winnett A., Primary Specialist, Provincial Normal School, Victoria.
Cottingham, Miss Mollie E., M.A., Assistant in English and Social Studies, John Oliver
High School, Vancouver.
De Branscoville, Mrs. Freda, R.N., A.R.C.T., F.T.C.L., Speech Therapist and Teacher
of Dramatics, Vancouver.
Dolmage, Miss Grace, M.Sc.Ed., Co-ordinator, Child Guidance Clinic of Greater Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Man.
Eaton, Mrs. Edna M., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Home Economics Instructor, McPherson Park
Junior High School, South Burnaby.
English, J. F. K, M.A., B.Pasd., Municipal Inspector of Schools, Greater Victoria School
Board, Victoria.
Ferguson, Miss Nancy, B.A., Physical Education Instructor, Central Junior High School,
Victoria;
Foord, Miss Esme N., M.A., B.Paed., Counsellor and Guidance Co-ordinator, Kamloops
Schools, Kamloops.
Ford, C. R., B.Sc, M.A., Supervisor of Technical Training, Federal Department of
Labour, Ottawa, Ont.
Gaddes, Donald Boyce, B.Mus., A.T.C.M., Music Instructor, Provincial Normal School,
Victoria.
Gibson, W. S., Machine-shop Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Gilmour, Mrs. Helen, Music Specialist, Cowichan High School, Duncan.
Hanslow, Ralph A., L.Th., B.A., Art Instructor, John Oliver High School, Vancouver.
Hartley, Gordon F., B.A., Head of Physical Education Department, Victoria High School;
Director, Victoria City Playgrounds, Victoria.
Hatton, Mrs. Evelyn, B.Sc.(H.Ec), Home Economics Instructor, Delta Junior High
School, Ladner.
Heywood, Robert H., B.A., Head of Commercial Department, Victoria High School,
Victoria.
Hutchinson, H. F., Industrial Arts Instructor, Trail High School, Trail.
Johnson, Miss Muriel, B.H.Sc, Dietitian, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Kelly, Eric, M.A., Social Studies Instructor, John Oliver High School, Vancouver.
Kipling, Rudyard T., B.A., Principal, Willows Elementary School, Victoria.
Lampard, Miss Dorothy, M.A., Head of Reading Clinic, Child Guidance Clinic, Winnipeg, Man. N 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1951-52
Lane, Edwin I., B.A., Art Instructor, West Vancouver Junior-Senior High School, West
Vancouver.
Lanning, Walter, B.A., B.L.S., Librarian, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Lidstone, John, B.Sc, Supervisor of Art and Manual Arts, Vancouver Schools, Vancouver.
Lochhead, Douglas G., M.A., B.L.S., Librarian, Victoria College, Victoria.
Lyons, John P., A.B., Northwest Regional Director, Great Books Foundation, Tacoma,
Wash.
Lythgoe, E. W., Head of Department of Technical-Vocational Training, Victoria High
School, Victoria.
Lytle, Donald E., Assistant Director of Visual Education, Department of Education,
Vancouver.
Maaske, Roben J., M.A., Ph.D., President, Oregon College of Education, and State
Director of Elementary Teacher Education, Monmouth, Ore.
Mahaffy, Miss C. Elizabeth, B.A., M.D., Assistant Medical Health Officer, Victoria.
Mahood, D. E., M.Ed., Ed.D., Instructor, Provincial Normal School, Moose Jaw, Sask.
Merrick, Charles J., Draughting Instructor, Gladstone Junior-Senior High School, Vancouver.
McKinny, Miss Kathleen B., B.Sc, B.Ed., Librarian, S. J. Willis Junior High School,
Victoria.
McManus, Miss Mildred, Mus.Bac, M.A., Instructor, Provincial Normal School, Vancouver.
Norton, Miss Miriam, M.A., Instructor in English, Provincial Normal School, Winnipeg,
Man.
O'Connell, Miss M. Sheila, B.A., Primary Specialist, Vancouver School Board, Vancouver.
Pritchard,  Vaughan G., B.A.,  Commercial  Specialist,  Central Junior High  School,
Victoria.
Reid, Mrs. Mary N. K, B.Sc(H.Ec), Home Economics Instructor, Lord Byng High
School, Vancouver.
Rickard, Victor E., Vocational Instructor, Como Lake High School, Coquitlam.
Roberts, Ifor, Assistant Supervisor of Music, Vancouver Schools, Vancouver.
Russell, Albert E., Sheet-metal Work Instructor, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Smith, Gordon A., Dip., V.S.A., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Smith, Henry L., M.A., Principal, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Strong, C. J., M.A., Inspector of Technical Classes, Department of Education, Victoria.
Toder, Mrs. Dorothy M., Primary Specialist, Teacher-in-Charge, Spring Ridge School,
Victoria.
Wallace, Lawrence J., B.A., M.Ed., Counsellor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Waller, Leslie G. P., M.A., B.Ed., Inspector of Indian Schools for the Province of
Alberta.
Williams, Miss M. V., R.N., Public Health Nurse, Victoria.
Wrenn, C. Gilbert, Ph.D., Professor of Educational Psychology, University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis, Minn.
Wright,  Stanley J., B.Sc,  Industrial Arts Instructor,  Vancouver Technical School,
Vancouver.
Student Activity Society
Auditing dates do not permit the inclusion here of the 1952 accounts. The following
statement is of the accounts of the preceding or 1951 session, as audited by Ismay,
Boiston, Dunn & Co., chartered accountants. SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
N 45
Receipts
Activity fees paid by students (less refunds)  $2,922.00
Additional income (cash receipts, cafeteria, etc.)  731.75
TotaL  $3,653.75
Disbursements
Fees and expenses of artists, lecturers, etc	
Social affairs, dances, picnics, entertainment..
Service charges and incidentals	
TotaL_
Excess of disbursements over receipts-
Disbursements re Cafeteria Fund	
$2,860.54
970.87
195.00
$4,026.41
$372.66
725.00
Excess of disbursements over receipts for the year  $1,097.66
Funds on hand, December 31st, 1951  (after deducting
excess of disbursements as above)  $1,171.08
Winter In-service Courses
Under the direction of this Division, in-service teacher-training courses carrying
credits toward teachers' certificates were offered in six centres throughout the Province;
that is, Vancouver, Victoria, Courtenay, Mission City, Nanaimo, and Abbotsford.
A total of 23 courses were offered, enrolling 312 teachers, an increase of 66 teachers
over the previous year's enrolment. N 46 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL
AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
This report covers the work of the following for the school-year 1951-52:—
(a) Industrial Arts (Woodwork and Draughting) in elementary schools.
(b) Industrial Arts (Woodwork, Draughting, Metalwork, and Electricity) in
junior and senior high schools.
(c) Industrial Arts Option Courses in high schools—"A," Woodwork and
Draughting, and " B," Metalwork and Draughting — for University
Entrance.
(d) Vancouver Technical School.
(e) Vancouver School of Art.
(/) Night-schools.
(g) Teacher-training.
(h)  Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
(i)  Vancouver Vocational Institute.
Industrial Arts
Elementary Schools and Junior High Schools
(Report prepared by Lieut.-Col. C. J. Strong, M.A.,
Inspector of Technical Classes.)
Industrial Arts continued to expand during the school-year 1951-52. The increasing
popularity of Industrial Arts courses, together with the increasing school population,
indicates that serious consideration should be given to the problem of training a larger
number of Industrial Arts and Vocational teachers each year. For the past three years,
since our teacher-training unit was established at the Vancouver Vocational Institute, we
have required twice the number of teachers that our present facilities are able to train.
There are sixty-one school districts in which Industrial Arts is established, these
being Abbotsford, Agassiz, Alberni, Armstrong, Ashcroft, Burnaby, Campbell River,
Chilliwack, Castlegar, Coquitlam, Courtenay, Cowichan, Cranbrook, Creston, Delta,
Fernie, Fraser Canyon, Grand Forks, Kamloops, Kelowna, Keremeos, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Lake Cowichan, Langley, Lillooet, Maple Ridge, Mission, Nanaimo, Nelson, New
Westminster, North Vancouver, Ocean Falls, Peace River South, Peace River North,
Penticton, Powell River, Prince George, Prince Rupert, Princeton, Qualicum, Quesnel,
Revelstoke, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Saltspring, Sechelt, Smithers, Sooke,
Southern Okanagan, Surrey, Summerland, Trail, University Hill, Vancouver, Vernon,
Greater Victoria, West Vancouver, and Williams Lake.
The quality and quantity of work done in junior high-school Industrial Arts classes
is steadily improving. Shops are generally well equipped, and teachers are better qualified
than at any previous period. The great majority of teachers attending the 1952 Summer
School had completed their Secondary Conditional certificates and were working toward
completion of their Secondary Basic certificates. The rapid expansion of Industrial Arts,
with the consequent increase in number of teachers, has made the work of inspection and
supervision heavy. The recent appointment of Mr. Thomas A. Quayle as Inspector
of Technical Classes will make possible more effective supervision and inspection of
Industrial Arts teachers. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
N 47
Senior High Schools
The increasing number of students taking Industrial Arts courses in senior high
schools is encouraging. The programme of studies for junior-senior high schools has
received considerable attention during the past year. A revised and improved programme
has been printed and will be used in all schools offering Industrial Arts. In addition to
courses previously offered, the new Industrial Arts 24, 34, and 94 will appear for the
first time and should be popular in smaller centres. In these courses boys may take
woodwork, metalwork, and draughting for five periods each week and receive credits
toward High School Graduation or University Entrance.
Industrial Arts Option for University Entrance
The total number of individual elementary-school and junior and senior high-school
shops in the Province (of which fifty-two are general shops) is 253.
The total number of individual elementary-school and junior and senior high-school
instructors is 226.
The total number of pupils participating is as follows:—
Elementary schools     3,609
Junior high schools  13,268
Senior high schools     5,861
22,738
The Vancouver Technical School
The following report has been prepared by Mr. S. J. Wright, B.Sc, vice-principal
of the Vancouver Technical School:—
.   " The courses offered at the Vancouver Technical School are as follows:—
"(1) Technical Graduation for Boys and Girls: This includes, besides the
academic subjects, courses in Sheet Metal, Printing, Woodwork, Diesel,
Pattern-making, Machine-shop, Automobile Mechanics, Foundry, Building-construction, Electricity, Welding, Draughting, Hairdressing, Ladies'
Tailoring, Home Economics, Food Servicing, and Commerce.
"(2) University Entrance with Shopwork, Home Economics, and Commerce
options.
"(3) Special advanced courses in the several shops.
" Plans for a new junior high-school wing and alterations to the old building,
including a much needed new cafeteria and gymnasium, have been prepared for submission to the Department of Education.   We are looking forward to much improved
facilities for our laboratories and shops.
"A new Ludlow typesetting-machine was installed in the print-shop this year. The
print-shop was also the recipient of the gift of a used Vandercook cylinder proof-press
from a Vancouver publishing firm.
Mr. Gordon Darling, vice-principal since 1944, and a member of the teaching staff
of the Vancouver Technical School since 1921, retired after thirty-one years of distinguished service in education. Miss Fisher, women's tailoring instructress, and Mr.
Reed, boys' cooking instructor, also retired this year.
" Mr. A. T. Alsbury, vice-principal, was promoted to the principalship of the King
George High School, and Mr. J. M. Buckley to the principalship of the Macdonald
Elementary School.
"Mr. S. J. Wright, member of the Technical School staff since 1929, has been
promoted to the vice-principalship of the Vancouver Technical School.
" There has been a continuation of the gratifying demand for our graduates from
business and industry.   Practically all of our graduates were placed by the end of June." N 48
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Analysis of Enrolment
Grade
University
Entrance
Commercial
Technical
Specials
Total
Grand
Total
Boys  1  Girls
Boys  1  Girls
Boys  1  Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys and
Girls
XII	
XI  	
21    |      13
27    |      10
24    |        9
14    j      18
5    |      37
15    I      75
8    |    172
8    j      67
52    ]      22
141    j     23
171    |      19
150    j      49
25'
72
213
252
103
190
224
172
72
133
200
134
175
323
X	
424
IX	
306
Totals	
86    |      50
36    |    351
514    |    113
53    |     25
I
689    |    539
1
1,228
1 Technical.
2 Commercial. s Cooking.
The Vancouver School of Art
Mr. Fred Amess, principal of the Vancouver School of Art, has prepared the
following report:—
" The enrolment for the year in day classes, evening classes, summer (evening)
extension classes, and Saturday morning junior classes is as follows:—
Male
Female
Total
12
44
56
45
52
97
105
182
287
20
38
58
84
106
190
266
422
688
Day-school, part time-
Day-school, full time-
Evening school-
Evening school (extension) -
Saturday morning	
Totals	
" With the closing of the D.V.A. enrolment, the school numbers are naturally down
from the peak years. However, the school attendance is levelling off and can even be
expected to rise slightly as the quality of its accommodation becomes known.
" The higher proportion of male to female students than formerly indicates that more
students are considering art as a profession. The high rate of job placement has proved
encouraging, and the return of students to the senior years is greater.
" The standard of professional training given was recognized by the Vancouver firm
of Pumps & Power, which commissioned R. Kovach, a third-year student, to make the
complete drawings for a commemoration booklet.
"As formerly mentioned, the students did well in a national competition. Chris
Taylor won the first prize and special recognition for originality, while Don Murray
received a special award for lettering.
" Of the staff, Mr. J. L. Shadbolt received an award in Eastern Canada, and Mr.
L. Thomas an award in a Florida competition.
" The school moved to its new quarters in March. There was little interruption
in the school work, and the great enthusiasm of staff and students more than offset any
inconvenience. We should like to stress the pleasure we find in working in clean,
beautifully coloured, and well-lit surroundings. The completion of the colouring of the
exterior adds greatly to the quality, of the building.
" We held the official opening of the school on Friday, March 28th, 1952. The
school was honoured by having as its platform party the following: Mr. and Mrs.
Charles H. Scott; Mayor F. J. Hume; Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister of Education;
Dr. Norman MacKenzie, President of the University of British Columbia; Mr. J. Edwin
Eades, Chairman of the Board of School Trustees; Mr. E. D. King, Architect, Vancouver
School Board; Mr. H. N. MacCorkindale, Superintendent of Schools. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION N 49
" The Annual School Open House, Studio Night No. 2, which this year was combined
with the Evening School Exhibition, was a highly successful affair. This joint effort of
staff and students attracted 2,000 visitors.
" The graduation was held on Friday, May 30th. Mr. Harry Adaskin, Professor
of Music of the University of British Columbia, gave an address which was an inspiration
not only to the nineteen graduating students, but also to the entire assembly.
" To the retiring members of our staff, presentations were made at the graduation
banquet.
" We would like to pay tribute to Mr. C. H. Scott and Miss G. M. Melvin. Mr.
Scott's leadership both as a principal and instructor has been a great inspiration to all
the staff. He was always a sage counsel, a splendid critic, an example, and a friend.
We wish him well in his new life and know that his strong interest in the school will
continue. Miss Melvin, who has worked so long and so closely with Mr. Scott, is retiring
this year. The length of her service and the many distinctions earned mark Miss Melvin
as a great teacher. We would note Miss Melvin's contribution as an illuminator and
book-designer and the esteem in which she is held by staff and students.
" Please accept from the staff and students of the Vancouver School of Art our
thanks for the many services rendered to us by the British Columbia Department of
Education."
NiGHT-SCHOOLS
Night-school classes of three different types are operated in the schools of this
Province:   (a) Vocational classes, (b) non-vocational classes, and (c) apprenticeship
classes.   School Boards operate the night-schools in response to local needs, and classes
must be approved by the Department of Education before grants are paid.
The enrolment during the year 1951-52 was as follows:— students
Vocational     5,232
Non-vocational  12,505
Apprenticeship classes     1,245
Total  18,982
Training of Industrial Arts and Vocational Teachers
Industrial Arts teachers are trained mainly at the Summer School, which is held at
the Vancouver Technical School. The Vocational Teacher-training Unit in the Vancouver Vocational Institute is used to train Vocational teachers, and the course is of
eleven months' duration.
The trainees are carefully selected from men who have completed High School
Graduation or Junior Matriculation with the Industrial Arts courses of a junior-senior
high school. Approximately eighty men are interviewed each year, and fourteen are
selected from that number to take training. The men selected must be qualified tradesmen. The School has been in operation now for three years, and the men who have
graduated are doing excellent work. Men who are selected as Industrial Arts teachers
may be tradesmen, or may have taken Normal School or University training, after which
they attend Summer School to obtain their Industrial Arts teacher's certificate.
Vocational teacher-training courses have also been given for Vocational-Commercial
teachers and Vocational-Agriculture teachers.
Mr. T. A. Quayle has done excellent work as instructor of Vocational teacher-
training classes, and has now been promoted to the Department of Education as an
Inspector of Technical Classes.
The cost of Vocational teacher-training is shared equally by the Provincial Department of Education and the Federal Department of Labour. N 50
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
The enrolment during the past year was as follows:-
Part-time courses	
Full-time courses	
Summer School	
Students
- 77
. 14
.    80
TotaL
171
High-school Commercial and Agricultural Courses
During the past year the placement of Commercial students has been very good.
There continue to be more office positions available than there are students trained by
the Commercial classes.
The enrolment in the following school districts was as follows:—
Students Students
Abbotsford	
-      251
Agassiz	
82
Alberni	
-      215
Ashcroft	
7
Burnaby 	
Campbell River
Castlegar
952
62
104
Chilliwack 	
-      246
Coquitlam 	
Courtenay 	
Cowichan 	
90
96
-      136
Cranbrook 	
-      118
Creston	
-      203
Delta _       	
..      135
Fernie	
70
Grand Forks   	
72
Howe Sound	
8
Kamloops	
Kelowna	
175
„      237
Keremeos	
32
Kimberley - .
Ladysmith    —
Lake Cowichan 	
125
59
-_      115
Langley 	
Lillooet 	
354
15
Nanaimo 	
Nelson      -
310
138
New Westminster
North Vancouver
Peace River North
Peace River South
Penticton	
Powell River
229
371
40
155.
266
103
Prince George	
131
Prince Rupert
98
Princeton 	
Quesnel	
Richmond 	
Saanich         _ -
63
22
205
63
Salmon Arm	
61
Sechelt	
Sooke        -   -
42
41
Southern Okanagan _
Surrey        - -
121
654
Trail -   	
501
Vancouver  _
Vernon	
Greater Victoria	
West Vancouver
4,815
223
.      872
163
Total	
. 13,992
Maple Ridge       206
Mission       140
The enrolment in the Agricultural classes has increased this year.   Some students
have taken Agriculture as an option and others have taken it as a Vocational course.
Students
  48
  110
  78
  25
  51
  103
  154
  25
Ladysmith  55
Langley   201
Maple Ridge  51
Mission   37
Armstrong
Burnaby —
Chilliwack
Cowichan .
Creston	
Kamloops -
Kelowna —
Keremeos _
New Westminster _
Peace River South.
Penticton	
Quesnel	
Saanich 	
Salmon Arm	
Southern Okanagan
Surrey	
Vernon	
Total.
Students
65
58
75
21
6
62
17
17
46
1,305 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
N 51
Teacher-training
The training of Industrial Arts and Vocational teachers of industrial work has been
conducted on a full-time basis in the Vancouver Vocational Institute under the supervision of Mr. T. A. Quayle, who conducts the classes for the Department of Education,
Technical Branch. Under the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement the cost of
training has been shared equally by the Provincial Department of Education and the
Federal Department of Labour.
The Summer School for Industrial Arts teachers, held at the Vancouver Technical
School, provides an opportunity for many teachers to get credit toward obtaining their
Industrial Arts teacher's certificate.
Despite the training given, it was necessary to bring trained teachers from other
Provinces to fill some of the positions available.
The enrolment for Industrial Arts and Vocational teacher-training during the past
year was as follows:— students
Part-time courses     77
Full-time courses      14
Summer School     80
Total  171
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement
Under this agreement between the Dominion Department of Labour and the
Provincial Government, extra grants are paid to School Boards who offer Vocational,
Commercial, Agricultural, and Industrial courses. Vocational courses are offered in day
and evening classes.   Enrolment for the year was as follows:—
Number of
Pupils
Number of Teachers
Part Time
Full Time
Day-schools	
Night-schools  	
Teacher-training	
Bursaries to Vocational students-
Totals	
3,975
5,232
91
9
180
i
9,307
82
204
1
287
Vancouver Vocational Institute
The Vancouver Vocational Institute is operated by the Vancouver Board of School
Trustees, and the training is designed to prepare young men and women for gainful
employment in trade or industry.
All classes receive grants under the Dominion-Provincial Vocational Schools'
Assistance Agreement, with the exception of the class in Power-machine Sewing, the costs
in connection with which were paid under the Schedules C and M of the Dominion-
Provincial Vocational Training Agreement. N 52
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1951-52
The school enrolment report covers the period July 1st, 1951, to June 30th, 1952,
and is as follows:—
Name of Class
Number of
Instructors
Number
Enrolled
Number
Withdrawn
Number
Completed
Training
Number
Still
Training
Number
Placed
Number
Who Have
Taken
Up-grading
1
2
1
1
1
3
2
3
2
31
61
33
76
30
61
119
119
38
37
17
231
40
260
7
72
101
20
18
5
17
137
40
18
4
6
3
8
10
13
17
43
6
1
1
106
11
61
3
21
15
7
7
3
19
" 4
17
34
18
37
11
17
62
54
19
18
6
16
4
40
36
5
6
5
3
46
To
10
19
12
22
8
17
37
21
13
18
9
35
9
29
11
50
8
3
11
19
9
4
15
30
18
45
9
33
59
55
8
16
5
12
14
2
32
36
3
7
3
2
21
5
2
Barbering	
~ 9
1
14
3
Commercial, Secretarial	
Diesel Operating . 	
1
Electricity... 	
1
90
4
Navigation	
170
Power-sewing 	
	
2
Watch-repairing 	
53
Welding Up-grading      	
Woodwork and Joinery	
31
Totals	
35
1,588
369
464
374
432
381
Enrolment of Pupils, July 1st, 1951, to June 30th, 1952
July	
August 	
September
October	
November
December .
337
334
449
539
523
463
January _
February
March	
April 	
May 	
June 	
535
572
573
553
520
507 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS N 53
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, B.Sc.(H.Ec), M.A., DIRECTOR
Total number of students taking Home Economics:—
Elementary schools     2,427
Junior high schools  13,716
  16,143
In Grade VII     6,106
In Grade VIII     6,229
In Grade IX     3,790
In special class (handicapped children) 18
16,143
School for the Deaf and the Blind  28
Senior high schools      7,099
High-school boys        165
Technical students        507
Private schools        385
Indian schools  98
483
In elementary grades (Grades VII and
and VIII)       264
In high school (senior grades)         219
483
Total number of students taking Home Economics
courses   23,753
There are 123 Home Economics centres in public schools, 6 in private schools, and
2 in Indian schools throughout the Province.                       centres Rooms
One-room centres     72 72
Two-room centres     46 92
Three-room centres       9 27
Four-room centres       3 12
Five-room centres       1 5
Totals  131 208
Indicative of the expansion of Home Economics in the Province during 1951-52,
Home Economics centres were opened for the first time at:—
Ashcroft:  Lady Byng Elementary-High School.
Castlegar:  Stanley Humphries Junior-Senior High School.
Chemainus:  Chemainus Junior High School.
Quesnel:  Quesnel Junior-Senior High School.
Clinton:  Clinton Elementary-High School.
Fort St. John:  Fort St. John Junior-Senior High School.
Gibsons Landing:  Elphinstone Junior-Senior High School.
Squamish:  Squamish High School.
Williams Lake:  Williams Lake Elementary-High School. N 54 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
An additional Home Economics all-purpose room was equipped in the Chilliwack
Junior High School.
New school buildings with Home Economics centres were opened during the session
1951-52 at the following:—
Alberni:  Alberni District High School.
Burnaby:  McPherson Park Junior High School.    (Kingsway West centre was
closed and pupils taken to the new school.)
Coquitlam:  Como Lake Junior-Senior High School.
Cranbrook:  Mount Baker Junior-Senior High School.
Creston:  Prince Charles Junior-Senior High School.
Ladysmith:  Ladysmith Junior-Senior High School.
North Vancouver:  Sutherland Junior High School.
Port Moody:  Moody Junior-Senior High School.
Prince Rupert:  Booth Memorial High School.
Rossland:  Rossland Junior-Senior High School.
Trail:  J. Lloyd Crowe High School.
The Home Economics rooms at the School for the Deaf and the Blind were renovated during the 1951-52 session.
At Wells the Home Economics centre was reopened, after being closed for several
years, and was moved to the Wells-Barkerville United High School. The equipment was
renovated, and some new fittings and equipment were added.
There were 205 Home Economics teachers on the staffs of the schools in the Province, showing an increase of 22 over the total for last year. Of these, 72 were graduates
in Home Economics from the University of British Columbia.
The demand for Home Economics teachers still exceeds the supply, and teacher-
training courses, offered through Summer Schools in this Province, were continued. For
the first time, Home Economics teachers taking teacher-training through Summer School
were offered the option of taking the third summer session at Victoria Summer School
or the University of British Columbia. A number of teachers took advantage of the
opportunity of completing the third session at the Victoria Summer School.
Seventy teachers at Summer School attended Home Economics courses offered in
Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics, and Problems in Home Economics.
Mrs. Edna M. Eaton, B.Sc.(H.Ec), Mrs. Evelyn Hatton, B.Sc.(H.Ec), and Mrs.
Mary N. K. Reid, B.Sc.(H.Ec), were the instructors. Miss Muriel Johnson, B.H.Sc,
with Miss Joyce Crabtree, B.Sc.(H.Ec), B.Ed., and Miss Norah de B. Vicars,
B.Sc.(H.Ec), as her assistants, directed the work of the cafeteria at the Summer School
of Education.
The revision and editing of Home Economics courses was completed during the
past year. It is expected that the Home Economics Bulletin, 1952, will be ready for
distribution at the beginning of the fall term. This bulletin will include all Home Economics courses for junior and senior high schools of this Province.
Miss Catherine G. Furneaux, B.Sc.(H.Ec), was appointed as Inspector of Home
Economics on January 1st of this year. Miss Furneaux has taught in Surrey, New Westminster, Powell River, and University Hill Schools, and was for two years a section
officer in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the war.
Miss Mildred C. Orr, B.A., B.Sc.(H.Ec), and Miss Catherine G. Furneaux,
B.Sc.(H.Ec), Inspectors of Home Economics, attended the Seventh Biennial Convention of the Canadian Home Economics Association, which was held in Saskatoon, Sask.,
June 24th to 26th, inclusive. Miss Furneaux also attended the pre-conference course
on Family Life Education, June 18th to 23rd. EDUCATIONAL REFERENCE AND SCHOOL SERVICE N 55
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL REFERENCE AND SCHOOL SERVICE
REPORT OF MURIEL A. SCACE, B.A., DIRECTOR
The Division of Educational Reference and School Service is charged with the
responsibility of publishing British Columbia Schools, the official organ of the Department
of Education, which is issued quarterly in elementary and secondary editions. It is
also responsible for the library of the Department of Education and for the preparation of
reference materials for Departmental officials, Inspectors of Schools, teachers, and Curriculum Committees. The activities of this Division for the school-year 1951-52 may
be summarized as follows:—
" British Columbia Schools "
British Columbia Schools, the official publication of the Department of Education,
is sent free of charge six times during the school-year to all teachers in the Province.
It is designed to provide in-service professional aid, to assist teachers in keeping abreast
of the latest developments in the field of education, to list new teaching aids and materials,
and to acquaint teachers and officials with changes in the Programmes of Studies and with
new regulations of the Department of Education.
The publication of a Departmental magazine for teachers was initiated in September,
1944, with the publication of The Rural School, which was sent to both elementary and
secondary teachers in the rural areas. Many requests were made that this magazine
be available to all elementary teachers, and in February, 1946, The Rural School was
replaced by British Columbia Schools, Elementary Edition, which is currently issued on
a quarterly basis to all teachers in the elementary grades. In October, 1946, the publication of a Secondary Edition of the magazine was also undertaken, with free distribution, on a quarterly basis, to all teachers in secondary schools. During the school-year
1951-52, 15,250 copies of the Elementary Edition were published and 10,475 copies
of the Secondary Edition. This issue provided a sufficient number of magazines to
supply all teachers and principals, Inspectors of Schools, Departmental officials, and
School Boards throughout the Province. In addition, copies were supplied, upon request,
to teachers in private schools, Indian schools, and schools supported by religious denominations. Copies of each issue of the magazine were supplied to all students of the
Vancouver and Victoria Normal Schools and of the teacher-training department of the
University of British Columbia. Complimentary copies were also sent to all Provincial
Departments of Education throughout Canada, to a number of State Departments of
Education across the border, and to numerous educators, educational organizations, and
libraries in both Canada and the United States. Files of the magazine were sent, upon
request, to U.N.E.S.C.O. House in Paris for the use of students at international seminars
of education.
The substantial increase in school enrolment, now averaging nearly 10,000 yearly,
with the subsequent increase in the number of teachers, is reflected in the number of
magazines required to supply the teachers of the Province. The following figures are
of interest: In September, 1946, 3,300 copies of the Elementary Edition were printed;
for September, 1952, 5,300 copies of the Elementary Edition were required; in October,
1946, 2,000 copies of the Secondary Edition were printed; for October, 1952, 3,700
copies of the Secondary Edition were required. There has been a marked increase in
the number of magazines sent upon request to private and Indian schools, and to schools
supported by religious denominations. N 56 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Reference and School Service
Reference Library Services
A reference library is maintained in the Department of Education under the Director
of this Division. The resources of this library are available to all Inspectors of Schools,
Departmental and Normal School officials, and teachers engaged upon special research
projects. It is stocked with a wide range of professional books in the field of education,
and is kept up to date through careful evaluation and selection of the best current literature in the field. During the year 1951-52 approximately 300 new books were added
to the collection. In addition, 150 regularly published educational periodicals, pamphlets, and bulletins are received annually. Of these, 110 are secured through subscription and 40 upon a free or exchange basis. The library also contains a wide selection of
text-books supplied by publishing firms.
The Director of this Division is responsible for the selection of books for the
Teachers' Professional Library administered by the Public Library Commission. Through
this library service, teachers in all parts of the Province are provided with free access
to a wide range of the best and most up-to-date professional literature in the field of
education.
Text-books and Teaching Materials
This Division maintains contacts with all educational publishers and evaluates supplementary books and teaching materials of all kinds. Text-books are secured from
publishers for text-book selection committees and teacher committees engaged in curriculum revision. Valuable materials of this type are brought to the attention of teachers and
officials through British Columbia Schools.
Programmes of Studies and Curricular Materials
The Director of this Division acts as secretary of the Central Curriculum Committee,
and in that capacity is concerned with the procuring and the preparation of professional
materials for use by members of committees engaged in curriculum revision, and with
the editing, final preparation for printing, and actual publication of Programmes of
Studies.
Special Activities
Special activities of this Division include the compilation and writing of many special
reports and of certain record forms and school reports at the direction of the Superintendent and the Deputy Superintendent of Education. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER) N 57
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER)
	
REPORT OF H. N. MacCORKINDALE, B.A., SUPERINTENDENT
OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment
Like many school areas, the most pressing problem before the Vancouver Board of
School Trustees is that of providing sufficient classroom accommodation to take care of
the increased enrolment and, at the same time, provide for a rapidly shifting school population within the district boundaries itself.
In 1947 the citizens of this school district approved a long-term school building
by-law for $9,000,000. Under the approved building programme for the school-year
1952-53, practically all the funds provided by this by-law have now been appropriated
and allocated. This long-term plan was an excellent far-sighted idea indeed. It made
possible for economic long-term planning which otherwise would have been out of the
question.
The need for a new long-term plan for at least five years is more urgent than ever.
The children born in the first year of the post-war period will enrol in Grade I at the
opening of school September next. Because of the very high birth rates since the end of
World War II, there will be, in the next five years, the greatest rate of increase in school
enrolment yet experienced. Vancouver is no exception to the trend of increased school
attendance. By a very conservative figure, the Vancouver City school system will
increase by 15,500 by 1957.
According to these statistics, it is imperative that this school district have a long-
term school building programme endorsed by its ratepayers by the end of the present
calendar year, otherwise the need for classroom accommodation will be desperate. I have
every confidence that the ratepayers of this district will endorse such a by-law in order
that opportunities will be made available for their children, the country's greatest asset.
School Buildings
The following buildings were completed during the school-year 1951-52:—
Lord Byng Secondary School (addition):   Nine standard classrooms, eleven
special classrooms, one double gymnasium, one auditorium, one cafeteria.
Moberly Elementary School (addition): Nine standard classrooms.
Selkirk Elementary School (addition):  Gymnasium-auditorium.
General Wolfe Elementary School (addition):   Gymnasium-auditorium.
Lord Kitchener Elementary Unit No. 2 (now Trafalgar Elementary School):
Thirteen classrooms, one lunchroom.
David Lloyd George Unit No. 3 Addition (now Sir Wilfrid Laurier Elementary
School): Eight standard classrooms, one lunchroom.
Lord Nelson Elementary School (addition):  Gymnasium-auditorium.
Portables: Three classrooms.
Vancouver School of Art: Modernization and reconstruction of old Administration Building, fourteen special classrooms.
The following buildings were under construction during the school-year 1951-52:—
Kerrisdale No.  2 Addition  (now Southlands Elementary School):   Eight
standard classrooms, one gymnasium-auditorium, one lunchroom.
Edith Cavell No. 2 Addition:  Six classrooms, one lunchroom.
Gladstone Secondary School  (addition):   Sixteen standard classrooms, six
special classrooms, one auditorium, one gymnasium, one Industrial Arts
shop, one draughting-room. N 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Plans are being prepared for the following:.—
Addition to the Vancouver Technical School:  Eighteen standard classrooms,
five special classrooms, one double gymnasium, one cafeteria.
John Oliver High School Second Addition: Eighteen standard classrooms, five
special classrooms, three junior Industrial Arts shops, five Home Economics laboratories, one auditorium, one cafeteria.
Maple Grove Unit No. 1 Addition: Four standard classrooms, one gymnasium-
auditorium, one lunchroom.
Maple Grove Unit No. 2 Addition:  Eight classrooms, one lunchroom.
Carleton No. 2: Seven classrooms.
Nelson No. 2:  Six classrooms.
Britannia High School (addition): Three classrooms, four special classrooms,
one gymnasium, one cafeteria.
Portables:  Six classrooms.
Van Home Elementary School (addition):  Three classrooms.
Begbie Elementary School (addition):  One classroom.
Douglas Elementary School (addition): Two classrooms.
Nightingale Elementary School (addition):  One gymnasium-auditorium.
Brock Elementary School (addition):  Gymnasium-auditorium.
Woodland Elementary School (addition): Assembly-room and lunchroom.
In concluding this section of the building programme of this school district, I should
like to pay special tribute to the Board of School Trustees and to our Director of Building
Construction and Maintenance, Mr. E. D. King, for the splendid work which has been
done in order to keep pace with the rapidly expanding needs of the system.
Testing
The following tests were given during the school-year 1951-52:—
(a) Number of individual intelligence tests given, 1,167.
(b) Number of pupils given group intelligence tests, 12,103. (This applies to
the tests actually administered by the personnel of the Bureau of Measurements.)
(c) Intelligence tests were given to 238 prospective Grade Ib pupils who were
under 6 years of age prior to December 1st, 1951. (Pupils 6 years of age
in December, 1951, were tested.) Ninety-two of the 238 were admitted
on trial to Grade Ib, and the remainder, 146, were rejected as being
unlikely to succeed in the work of the first grade. During September the
Detroit Beginning First-Grade Intelligence Test (Revised) was administered to all Grade Ib pupils.
Commencing September, 1952, the practice of testing children who
will be 6 in December will be discontinued. For several years it has been
the policy of the Vancouver School Board to admit a child to Grade I in
September if he will have reached his sixth birthday by November 30th
of the school-year concerned. Under the new Vancouver School Board
regulation governing admission of pupils to Grade I, all children who will
be 6 by December 31st will be admitted to Grade I.
(d) For June, 1952, achievement tests in the fundamental subjects were given
to approximately 4,450 pupils of Grades VI, VII, and VIII—Grades VI
and VII pupils in junior high-school areas for promotion to junior high
school; Grade VIII pupils in senior high-school areas for promotion to
senior high school. This type of standardized test aids principals and
Inspectors in maintaining levels of achievement. Tests were administered
by the classroom teacher under the direction of the principal, and promotion lists were submitted to the Bureau of Measurements. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER)
N 59
(e) Vancouver General Hospital probationary classes in nursing were tested—
one class each in September and February.
(/) Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the Blind—forty-one
pupils given the Pintner-Paterson Performance Scale.
(g) Pupils Entering from Private Schools.—A policy instituted this year was
that of administering tests to under-age pupils entering Grades II and III
in the public schools after having attended private schools. Pupils in this
category are those entering Grade II who are under 7 years of age and
those entering Grade III who are under 8 years of age as at November
30th.   Resulting placements were as follows:-—
In Grade III: One pupil to remain; one pupil demoted to Grade II.
In Grade II:   Twenty-one pupils to remain; eight pupils to remain
on six weeks' trial; seventeen pupils demoted to Grade I.
(These statistics are for September.)
(h) Bryant Reading Tests, Grades I to VI, Inclusive.—During January and
May sets of tests prepared and standardized by Mr. S. J. Bryant, principal
of Lord Nelson School, were administered to all pupils in Grades II to
VI, inclusive. The findings indicate that such tests should be given two
or three times each school-year. It is anticipated that other tests will be
prepared. A survey of this type enables administrators to establish and
adjust the author's norms for each grade. In order to increase the reliability of the tests, an error count for tests given in May is under way.
Principals of elementary schools have made many favourable comments about the tests, and they appreciate the kindness of Mr. Bryant in
making the results of his work available to all elementary schools through
the medium of the Bureau of Measurements.
(/) Provincial Testing Programme.-—(1) Survey of English Composition
(March).—The Departmental Committee on Testing recommended that
a Composition survey be carried out in Grades VII and VIII during the
school-year 1951-52. Accordingly, Dr. C. B. Conway, Director of the
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research, Department of Education,
Victoria, requested that a random sample of the Provincial school population" for Grades VII and VIII should be tested—approximately 4,500
students in Grade VII and 5,500 in Grade VIII. Vancouver pupils
selected numbered about 1,100 pupils from Grade VII in elementary and
junior high schools and 1,400 from Grade VIII in elementary and junior
high schools. Testing materials, instructions, etc., were distributed
through the Bureau of Measurements. The rating of compositions was
done by the classroom teachers and checked by the Division of Tests,
Standards, and Research. The rating scale used was the Willing Composition Scale.
(2) Comprehensive and Survey Tests (June 12th and 13th).-—
Under the direction of the Department of Education, a comprehensive
examination was administered to University Entrance candidates in certain
schools in the Province of British Columbia and a test in Science 20 to
all Science 20 classes in the Province. In Vancouver, Dr. Conway chose
Britannia High School and Fairview High School of Commerce for the
composite examination which was given to English 40 University Entrance
candidates. To quote Dr. Conway, "The purpose of the examinations
is to obtain data that will help to solve some of the problems that have
arisen as curricular changes have been introduced." N 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Since the retirement of Mr. R. Straight a year ago, the Bureau of Measurements
programme has been under the direction of Dr. S. A. Miller. As the new head of this
important research department, he has made a very splendid contribution.
The Vancouver School of Art
The enrolment in all departments for the year was very encouraging. The following
is a summary:—
Male
Female       Summary
Day-school, part time-
Day-school, full time-
Evening group	
Saturday mornings	
Totals	
12
45
125
84
44
52
220
106
56
97
345
190
266
422
688
Special mention should be made of the different honours which have been awarded
to both teachers and students of this school:—
J. L. Shadbolt, staff member:  Winner of the prize awarded by the Montreal
Museum of Fine Arts for a competition in water-colour painting.    Mr.
Shadbolt has been invited to serve as one of the guest instructors in
drawing at the summer session of the California School of Fine Arts.
L. A. Thomas, staff member:  Winner of a special prize in an art competition
held in the State of Florida.
J. A. S. Macdonald, member of the Art School evening staff and on the staff of
the Gladstone Secondary School: Winner of the Emily Carr Scholarship,
providing for further study in Art.
C. Taylor, student:  Winner of the first prize in the nation-wide Booth Design
Competition sponsored by the Canadian Display Designers and Builders
Association, Toronto, and winner of a special prize for originality in the
same competition.
D. Murray, student:  Winner of a special prize in lettering in the Booth Design
Competition sponsored by the Canadian Display Designers and Builders
Association, Toronto.
The work of the year was marked by certain outstanding events.
At this point I should mention the retirement of Miss Grace M. Melvin, Head of the
Department of Design. She was a very competent and inspirational staff member from
the opening of the school in 1925.
The old School Board administration offices were remodelled into fourteen special
rooms for Art instruction. On March 28th, 1952, the school moved into its splendid
newly remodelled quarters. It was officially opened by Mr. C. H. Scott, who had retired
from the services of the Vancouver School Board a month earlier. Mr. Scott was the
director of this school since its inception more than a quarter of a century ago.
As director of this school and as an Art teacher, he was a great inspiration to all Art
education in the Province of British Columbia. It can be truly said that Mr. Scott was
one of the great pioneers of Art and Craft education in this Province. He made the
Vancouver School of Art the heart of Art education at the Coast. We shall miss his sage
counsel and his splendid constructive criticism.
Evening Classes
The table which follows shows a classification of 125 different subjects offered
in the thirty-five different centres according to their nature and purpose. It should be
noted that in the Shop and Technical-Vocational division there is no breakdown to show SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER)
N 61
the number of subjects offered to the Apprenticeship and Non-apprenticeship groups.
This will occur in another section of the Department's report on Vocational Education.
Classification
Number
of
Subjects
Number
of
Classes
Enrolment
Number
of
Teachers
Male
Female
Total
27
59
13
13
12
16
2
2
65
33
96
52
13
59
53
31
3
1,423
627
2,416
637
78
91
411
576
67
	
1,238
105
1,026
222
1,586
624
310
210
	
2,661
627
2,521
1,663
300
1,677
1,035
886
277
41
27
83
43
Teacher-training (including kindergarten-teacher training)
Homemaking 	
54
28
33
17
2
Totals                                    	
152
433
6,588
5,988
12,576
351
Special mention should be made of the excellent organization and administrative
work being done by Mr. Graham Bruce, Director of Evening Classes and Adult Education.
Instruction
In providing for better instruction in both the elementary and secondary schools,
the principals have been assigned supervisory time to help the staff grow and develop.
Special groups of pupils for remedial instruction in many of the subjects have improved
under the direct supervision of the principal or someone assigned to that work by him.
The Inspectors have visited the classes of all newly appointed teachers in order that
ways and means may be planned for helping them. The special supervisors of Art,
Music, Home Economics, Physical Education, Industrial Arts, and Primary Grades have,
in co-operation with the Superintendent and his staff, conducted many in-service training
courses for the teaching staff.
During the year considerable progress has been made in expanding the counselling
and mental-health services. The number of counsellors has been increased, and the
facilties for doing their work improved. The counselling programme has been more
closely linked with industry than ever. The counsellors and staff of the National Employment Service have worked very co-operatively with our staff. Opportunities were
provided by the Chartered Accountants' Institute of British Columbia and by the Board
of Trade for the counsellors to discuss their mutual problems with these groups.
The programme of mental health has been extended so that now there are two
co-ordinators working in the elementary schools and secondary schools of two of the
districts. The success of this programme of the mental-health co-ordinators justifies
some type of expansion in this field. It is to be hoped that in the not too distant future
the mental hygiene, guidance, and counselling will become more closely integrated.
Superannuation
The following members of the staff retired on superannuation. They are all to be
highly commended for the many years of loyal and efficient service rendered.
Secondary Schools
Commencement Date
C. W. Abercrombie, Britannia High September, 1922.
G. Darling, (vice-principal), Technical High September, 1921.
Miss E. A. Fisher, Technical High September, 1944.
H. B. Fitch (principal), Templeton Junior High   -August, 1912. N 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Mrs. I. V. Green, John Oliver High September, 1923, to
June, 1927, and
November, 1928,
to June, 1952.
F. Lowe, Kitsilano Junior High September, 1923.
Miss J. McDowall, Lord Byng High September, 1922.
Miss C. A. MacKenzie, Kitsilano Junior High October,  1916.
A. V. McNeill, Kitsilano Junior High September, 1922.
R. H. Manzer (principal), King George High  September, 1927.
Miss G. W. Melvin, School of Art September, 1927.
C. H. Reed, Technical High February, 1947.
C. H. Scott (principal), School of Art August, 1914.
Elementary Schools
Miss L. Bampton, Dawson February, 1917.
S. J. Bryant (principal), Lord Nelson November, 1912.
Miss M. Brydon, Douglas February, 1928.
Miss N. L. Carson, Queen Mary September, 1917.
Miss M. Cattell, Rhodes January, 1911.
Mrs. K. J. Fraser, Hudson February, 1925.
Miss S. M. Ingham, Gordon February, 1926.
Miss E. G. Jenkins, Gordon March, 1927.
W. R. Johnson (principal), Bayview February, 1918.
Miss L. M. Nesbitt, Carleton September, 1925.
Mrs. E. M. Webb, speech therapist September, 1939.
I regret to report the death of the following members of the staff who served the
system so well:—
Miss E. W. M. Bauld, General Gordon School;  deceased, July 24th, 1951;
appointed, October 18th, 1937.
L. Jantz, Lord Byng High School; deceased, September 17th, 1951; appointed,
February 1st, 1937.
In concluding this brief report I wish to thank the Mayor, City Council, Police
Department, Fire Department, Parks Board, Library Board, and the officials of these
organizations for their magnificent help at all times.
To the press, I am particularly indebted for their good reporting of the many intricate problems considered during the year.
Needless to say, the excellent work accomplished by this school system could not
have been achieved without the whole-hearted support and co-operation of all the members of the Board of School Trustees.
To you, Sir, and to the officials of your Department, I am most grateful for your
advice, guidance, and help. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS N 63
REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)
REPORT OF J. F. K. ENGLISH, M.A., B.P^d., MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The growth in school population has progressed steadily during the past five years,
showing an approximate over-all increase of 2,400 pupils.   This increase is spread over
the Component parts Of District No. 61  as follows:  Percentage Increase
Esquimalt  156 20
Saanich   1,254 54
Victoria  530 10
Oak Bay  330 28
View Royal  130 100
When school opens in September there will be in the neighbourhood of 3,000 children more than there were in 1946. Parallel with this growth the school building programme is being slowly but surely developed. The Oak Bay Junior High School will be
ready for classes in September. A contract has been let for the alterations and additions
to Mount View High, and tenders at present are being called for the Macdonald Park
Primary School. Construction of the new Central Junior High School will likely get
under way in the early autumn.
A good year's work has been accomplished in all schools throughout the system.
On the whole, our present staff is the best we have ever had, caused partly by the careful
selection of new teachers last summer, but also in large measure by the enthusiasm of
all personnel in this system.
Victoria College
(W. Harry Hickman, M.A., Docteur de l'Universite de Paris, Principal)
On February 28th Victoria College was stunned by the sudden death of Dr. J. M.
Ewing. During eight years of principalship he devoted his intellect and energy to assuring Victoria College students, augmented considerably by veterans of World War II, of
a wide choice of academic courses, given with the best of facilities and by a highly
qualified faculty.
Although the first year was larger and the second year smaller than in 1950-51,
enrolment for the session was 316, three students less than in the previous year.
The College Evening Division, which for four years has offered credit and non-credit
courses under the direction of Mr. Robert T. Wallace, this year increased its attendance
by 60 per cent.
College notes with pride that in the May graduating lists at the University of British
Columbia ex-students of Victoria College led four faculties—Arts and Science, Applied
Science, Home Economics, and Pharmacy.
As the session closes, members of faculty and staff look forward to fall classes which
will register in the administrative offices and study in the new library of the Ewing
Building.
Victoria College has served this community for fifty years. To celebrate the golden
jubilee, plans are being made to hold a Victoria College Week in October and to institute
a Fiftieth Anniversary Library Fund as a tribute to all former professors of the College. n 64 public schools report, 1951-52
Victoria High School
(H. L. Smith, M.A., Principal)
It is my considered opinion that at no time in my experience as principal of the
Victoria High School has the tone of the school been higher than at present. The relationship between staff and students has been most harmonious, I am happy to report,
and, because of the harmony and spirit of co-operation which prevail, one of the main
objectives of the secondary school, the inculcation of democratic citizenship, has resulted
spontaneously. It is with the sense of great pride and satisfaction, therefore, that I pay
tribute to a most efficient, loyal, and self-sacrificing staff, and an unusually co-operative
and responsive body of students.
Because of the excellent facilities provided at the Victoria High School for a comprehensive programme of instruction, and because of a wide variety of co-curricular
activities, the provision for the individual differences of a large school population is being
realized with conspicuous success. Through the co-operation of the Greater Victoria
School Board and other agencies, improved facilities are being provided and new equipment added. The Gyro cinder track, completed last year, has proved of great service
both to our own students and to the youth of our community, and it is hoped that before
long much-needed tennis-courts will be added to the other excellent facilities now
available.
Oak Bay High School
(Charles A. Gibbard, B.A., Acting Principal)
The enrolment of Oak Bay High School increased from 349 at the end of June last
year to 376 in September.   During the year the enrolment has shown little change.
As very few students have selected the general programme, the school maintains
its predominantly academic character.
Mr. D. H. Hartness, principal since 1932, has been unable to take over his duties
this year owing to a serious and prolonged illness. Mr. E. W. Tanner, Commercial
teacher since 1926, was forced into retirement by ill-health at the end of December.
As a result of these and an unusual number of other staff changes, this has been a difficult
year.
Mount View High School
(J. M. Thomas, M.A., D.Psed., Principal)
Enrolment for the school-year shows a substantial increase over the previous year
and a greater increase in average daily attendance. Prospects are for a continuing
increase in enrolment at a faster rate. The present building programme calls for the
addition of two classrooms to the present building. Even with these two additional
rooms the school will be too crowded for best efficiency.
A broad programme of co-curricular activities has been carried. All members of
the staff have shared in promoting these activities. Teachers in the Industrial Arts and
Home Economics Departments have co-operated and shared responsibilities equally
with teachers in academic courses.
Cultural activities in the school have been actively promoted. Music, both instrumental and choral, Drama, Folk-dancing, and Art have been featured.
Esquimalt High School
(Clive Kelly, B.A., Principal)
School opened about a week late in September because the building programme
carried on during the summer months was not quite complete on September 4th.
The school operated throughout the whole year without locker facilities and with
the accompanying problems.   These difficulties were compensated for in large measure REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS N 65
by the completion in February of the new auditorium-gymnasium, which has provided
excellent facilities for Physical Education, Music, Drama, and school functions.
The school continued to have a very active and full programme of curricular and
co-curricular activities, the results of which have, in the main, proved very satisfactory.
Mount Douglas High School
(Eric Forster, B.A., B.Ed., Principal)
Enrolment at the school for the current year has been 140, an increase from last
year. The fact that advanced Commercial work and Technical work are taken at another
high school tends to keep enrolment in the senior grades at a point lower than it normally
would be.
The school offers a varied programme—Drama, Music, Art, Journalism, Commercial, as well as a full and well-balanced variety of activities in its extra-curricular
programme. The school is considerably handicapped by lack of an auditorium-
gymnasium, but prospects seem bright for this necessary addition in the near future.
Central Junior High School
(William McMichael, B.A., Principal)
Total enrolment in the junior high grades, plus those in two special classes, is 510—
276 boys and 234 girls. The anticipated construction of a new school building on the
present site will in all probability lead to a transfer of some Grade IX pupils to Victoria
High School and to the adoption of a shift system for the remaining classes.
Tests given during the year have shown that the students conform to a normal range
of intelligence and that their achievement has been, on the whole, in accord with their
abilities. Their studies have been supplemented by audio-visual aids, guest speakers,
and school journeys. In the Home Economics and Industrial Arts Departments, the
products of their labours attest to interest and effort on the part of the students.
S. J. Willis Junior High School
(B. C. Gillie, B.A., B.Ed., Principal)
Our second year at S. J. Willis has seen us able to proceed with a full programme for
the first time, since all equipment and construction details have been completed with but
a few exceptions. The student-body, with some 500, increased to about 630, with eighteen
registered divisions as against sixteen last year, and a staff of twenty-eight compared to
one of twenty-five a year ago.
For the first time we have been able to make a fairly thorough survey of work
standards in the school through standardized tests given both by the Child Study Department and by our own staff. Results indicate that, while a fair average is maintained, there
is a great deal which can be done to improve the general standing. We hope over a period
of the next two or three years to improve this. In this connection it should be noted that
for the first time we instituted two remedial classes—-one in Grade VII and one in Grade
VIII—for the purpose of giving individual and remedial treatment to those students in
both these grades who were having special difficulties. Each of these classes has been
taught all academic work by one teacher—Miss Grace Farr in the case of Grade VII and
Mr. Donald Smith in Grade VIII. Results to date indicate that this procedure merits
continuation and expansion, which we hope will be possible in the future.
The extra-curricular activities of last year have been carried on with increasing
success, and we now find that approximately 75 per cent of the school's student-body
participates in one or more of the various athletic and non-athletic extra-curricular activities available. N 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
A very valuable gift was made to the school by the Kiwanis Club of Victoria North
in the form of a complete set of curtains and back-drops for the stage, to the value of
approximately $1,000. The whole of the staff and the student-body feel particularly
grateful for this splendid gift.
Elementary Schools
(John Gough, M.A., Assistant Municipal Inspector of Schools)
When the elementary schools opened their doors in September, 1951, their facilities
were able to accommodate an enrolment that had increased by approximately 400 during
the summer vacation. This was made possible through (a) the erection of a portable
one-room annex at both Doncaster and McKenzie Avenue Schools; (b) the development
of classrooms in the basements of Oaklands, Margaret Jenkins, and Willows Schools;
(c) the reopening of a two-room annex at Quadra School; and (d) the construction of
the Frank Hobbs (five rooms) and the Strawberry Vale (four rooms) Schools.
That teacher turnover continues to be an important factor in the organization of this
school district becomes evident when it is remembered that about forty appointees joined
the elementary-school staff in September, along with two teachers on exchange from the
British Isles. All of these received guidance from Inspectors and supervisors who visited
their classrooms during the year.
Turning to the instructional aspect of school administration, it can be reported that
a very satisfactory standard of classroom instruction was maintained through the conscientious and effective efforts of teachers and principals, most of whom were asked to
enrol relatively large classes. The supervisors made an important contribution to this,
also, by stimulating and directing teacher growth and development along lines described
in the reports that follow. It is encouraging to see that more and more thought is being
given to guiding pupil growth so as to reduce failures to the minimum and also to providing group instruction to ensure the continuous progress of nearly all children from
year to year.
Kindergarten-Primary Department
(Miss Marian D. James, Director)
The Primary Department of the Greater Victoria Schools has grown during the past
few years by leaps and bounds. Owing to the extra number of classes in the schools it
has been difficult to make as many classroom visits as is desirable. Office routines, interviews, and meetings have occupied many hours during the year. However, in spite of
difficulties, the programme of the Department has moved ahead, and many interesting
features of the work have proved most stimulating. Better parent-teacher-pupil relationships seem to be developing throughout the system. The programme of preparing young
children for school has grown.
Regular Primary meetings were held during the year. Of particular interest was
the contribution made by Mr. Wilfred Johns, of the Victoria Normal School. His
demonstrations and discussions of Primary Art were greatly appreciated. Committees
of Primary teachers worked with me during the year to clarify, formulate policy, and to
produce helpful material on the non-graded school programme, the integrated programme,
and a new primary report form.
Teaching Aids Department
(Miss Marian D. James, Supervisor in Charge)
The work of this Department has increased greatly during the year, owing to the
increasing number of teachers and pupils in the elementary grades. One thousand two
hundred and twenty-six sets of readers, 18,000 separate readers, were loaned to elementary Grades I to VI.   About 150 music-record loans were made to teachers during REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS N 67
the year.   Many materials required for special projects in Practical Arts, Social Studies,
and Science were supplied to all teachers during the year.
Primary, Junior, Intermediate, and Senior Crafts Department
(Miss A. Verna Turner, M.A., Director)
About twenty pupils attended each of five special classes. The age-groups represented were: Primary, 7 to 9 years; junior, 9 to 11 years; intermediate, 10 to 14 years;
senior, 13 to 17 years. In all four classes, handcrafts played an important part in
instruction, and the three " R's " were related to the activities wherever possible.
Primary Craft Classes
Steady progress was made in adjustments, in work habits, and in the basic subjects
of reading, language, printing, writing, arithmetic, and spelling. A start was made in
singing and in art. Drawing and painting were correlated with social studies and science.
Noticeable improvement was made by some of the pupils in speech and motor coordination.
Junior Craft Classes
A basic programme of reading, writing, spelling, and arithmetic was enriched by
the inclusion of handwork, toy and novelty making, clay-modelling, weaving, spool knitting, ordinary knitting, paper-cutting, drawing, painting in various media, making of
booklets, murals, masks, vases, and oilcloth toys.
Games, creative dramatics, radio programmes, and educational films added interest
to school-life.
Intermediate Craft Classes
The basic programme stressed phonics, reading, spelling, language, arithmetic, and
writing. Individual help was given where necessary, and an effort was made to give
each child the feeling of accomplishment and security. In the programme for social
studies, science, health, art, and music, several interesting projects were completed during
the term.
Senior (Boys) Craft Classes
The daily teaching programme consisted of instruction in the basic academic subjects, together with various forms of handwork, woodwork, and metalwork.
A variety of woodwork projects, such as coffee-tables, garden chairs, children's
rocking-horses, lawn ornaments, and serving-trays, were made.
Educational films were used to illustrate science, social studies, and health topics.
As a means of arousing interest in our city and its history, school journeys were made
to the Parliament Buildings and to Helmcken House.
Senior (Girls) Craft Classes
A programme including all the basic subjects was worked out for this division, with
an emphasis on reading and arithmetic. The basic idea of remedial reading was followed in the teaching of language, spelling, science, and social studies, and a series of
work-sheets were built in each subject to aid in remedial treatment.
Many kinds of handcrafts were taught, care being taken to choose those having
either a therapeutic value or an educational objective. Among the handwork processes
which were taught were various types of raffiawork, including braided and woven baskets,
raffia dolls and animals. N 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Department of Physical Education
(George Grant, B.A., Director)
Twenty-eight new teachers of physical education in the elementary grades (III to
VIII) and nine additions to the junior and senior high-school staffs this year have
received a considerable amount of the supervisory time available. Altogether there are
140 teachers of physical education in the elementary schools (exclusive of Grades I
and II) and seventeen in the junior and senior high schools. Visits, discussions, and
teaching of sample lessons have formed part of the assistance given.
In-service Training.—In-service training of the meeting type resolved into meetings
called for specific purposes with very worth-while results.
From September to December the supervisor and selected teachers previewed all
health and physical-education films coming to District No. 61 weekly, doing three each
Monday morning, and prepared a summary of each, suggesting grades for which each
was most suitable.   It is hoped that these will act as guides for future requests.
Loans of text-books from the Physical Education Office amounted to forty, fewer
than in past years, and probably accounted for by the fact that all schools with Grades
VII to XII now receive from the Department four excellent physical-education texts
for teacher use.
Child Study Department
(Miss A. Verna Turner, M.A., Director)
Standardized tests of many kinds were given throughout the year in various grades.
Grade IV was tested in reading, vocabulary, spelling, and arithmetic; Grade VI, in
reading and arithmetic; and Grade VIII, in work-study skills and mathematics.
Three tests were administered for the Provincial Department of Education, Division
of Tests, Standards, and Research. Two of these were surveys in composition and
science, and one, a comprehensive examination, given to a few candidates for Junior
Matriculation.
Scholastic aptitude surveys were made in Grades IV, VIII, XI, and XIII. Over
150 individual psychometric examinations were administered to distinguish remedial
reading cases from candidates for special classes. With the co-operation of the Mental
Health Department, seven special classes were formed for next year.
Apart from the achievement tests used by the Child Study Department, there were
tests in reading and arithmetic which were supplied by the Child Study Department to
principals and teachers. These tests were used as teaching aids to diagnose weaknesses
and to improve instruction.
Work-books in reading were made quickly available to the schools for use with
remedial reading cases. Probably the most important contribution made by the Child
Study Department is the emphasis it places on the reading skills and the identification
and treatment of retarded readers before they reach high school.
Audio-Visual Department
(Denis W. Brown, B.A., Director)
The demand for audio-visual aids has been growing steadily. Special efforts were
made during the year, through additional in-service training of teachers, to stress effective
use and to improve the mechanics of departmental operation.
The staffs from both elementary- and high-school levels were instructed in the
use of non-projected and projected aids, with special emphasis on map and globe work.
Effective Living and Home Economics groups were instructed in the best use of non-
projected aids, and the night-school class was filled to capacity. Co-ordinators' meetings,
involving both elementary and high schools, gave these representatives an opportunity to
keep abreast of changes and developments in the audio-visual field. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS N 69
The installation of audio-visual bulletin-boards in all schools simplified the mechanics
of ordering materials and familiarized teachers with available items.
School Dental Health Services
(Dr. Hugh Clarke, D.D.S., Director; Dr. David Parfitt, D.D.S., Assistant Director)
Our new Preventive Dental Health Programme has been well received by the parents,
and more and more children in the younger age-group are now under dental care. During
the coming year we will continue to invite parents to bring in their pre-school children
when coming to our clinics for the Kindergarten and Grade I classes. If our programme
is to be successful, we must start with very young children and attack the problem where
it begins. A child who has had all his dental defects corrected and has been taught good
oral hygiene habits in the formative years of life is our best means to the much desired
end of prevention.
The following is a summary of the work of the Dental Department for the past
year:—
Dental examinations made  15,799
Parents interviewed     1,212
Fillings of all kinds     2,354
Teeth extracted        173
Miscellaneous treatments .        722
Prophylaxis (teeth cleaned)        272
Mental Health Department
(Miss Edna Lawrence, Director)
The work of the Mental Health Department has expanded considerably during the
1951-52 year in the following ways:—
Increased number of special classes, necessitating a greater number of home-
visits in order to interpret the function of these classes to the parents.
Closer liaison with the Health Department in the matter of records and reports.
The establishment of a permanent clinical team at the Child Study Guidance
Clinic, which meant a 40-per-cent increase in the number of referrals and
thus more clinical conference.
This also involved much more time spent in the preparation of case-histories of
pupils of the clinic.
The following is a statistical summary of the yearly activities of the Mental Health
Department:—
Visits
Schools       220
Parents _      114
Parents (craft placement)       880
Total  1,214 N 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Contacts
Principals  221
Teachers  205
Counsellors   20
Pupils  42
School Board officials  205
Medical Health Officers  18
Public health nurses  139
Health educators  14
Family and children's service  160
Provincial welfare  3
City welfare  14
City doctors  4
Child Guidance Clinic  52
Canadian Institute for the Blind  6
Juvenile Officers  8
Total  1,111
Conferences
Child Guidance Clinic .  24
City Health Centre '.  37
Saanich Health Unit  37
Social welfare  3
Family and children's service  23
Music Department
(H. J. Bigsby, B.A.(Mus.Ed.), Director)
The energies of the Music Department have at all times been directed toward three
objectives for all schools—mainly the attainment of a satisfactory standard of achievement, a workable and helpful procedure for reaching this level, and finally an equal
opportunity for all schools to experience and participate in all the worth-while phases
of the school music programme.
An intensified programme of recording classroom music was undertaken this year
on the Music Department's recording-machine. The value of such a machine, preferably
the magnetic tape type, in all schools at a not too distant time cannot be overemphasized.
The schools assisted in Education Week activities by contributing a musical programme for one of the broadcasts. Certain music groups of this district were included
on two B.C. School Broadcasts programmes, which cover the whole Province. Work
has just been completed on the recordings of representative samplings of school music for
the Junior Red Cross. The purpose of these recordings is an international exchange of
good music.
Home Economics Department
(Miss Beth T. Ramsay, M.A., Director)
The enrolment in Home Economics has shown an increase this year, with approximately 1,425 students having received instruction from thirteen full-time and one part-
time teacher.
Two craft classes have been given instruction in both foods and clothing, and I feel
they have benefited from this type of work. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS N 71
The opening of two new centres this coming fall will be much appreciated by the
teachers involved, and will eliminate our poorest centres.
Industrial Arts and Vocational Training
(John S. White, Director)
This year has been marked as one of consolidation of positions gained and concerted
efforts made to accommodate the growing needs of our community.
Curricular studies and shopwork proceeded under the organized and approved plan,
both in the Vocational-Technical School and in the Industrial Arts Department throughout the city, and it is generally felt that an increased interest in this field is being shown
and that the planned extension of facilities comes just in time.
All in all, vocational and technical training have taken some very comprehensive
steps forward during the past year, but there is still plenty of room for further exploration
work and advancement in this field.
Evening Classes
(John S. White, Director)
With the opening of the night-school on Tuesday, October 2nd, 1951, seventy-five
classes were successfully launched.
The total enrolment for Leisure Time Enjoyment, Vocational and Apprenticeship
Courses was 1,418, but this number was swelled to 1,460 in January when additional
courses were started, even though a few courses were terminated in December, 1951.
A departure was made from the usual night-school closing in March, and this year
a particularly artistic display was erected at the Art Centre of Greater Victoria, whose
facilities were used for this occasion. Works from all Art classes—sculpture, art metalwork, leathercraft, woodwork, table decoration, and floral arrangements—were beautifully displayed and highly appreciated by a large and enthusiastic crowd of visitors on
the days the showing was open to the public—March 29th and 30th.
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)
REPORT OF ROY S. SHIELDS, B.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
The enrolment in the New Westminster schools during the present school-year
showed a steady increase over the previous year; based on monthly reports, the average
attendance in the elementary and secondary schools in 1951-52 was 4,416; the staff
numbered 145.
The Board of School Trustees—Mr. Arthur W. Mercer (chairman), Dr. W. A.
Robertson, Mr. B. W. Bowell, Mrs. P. Amy, Mrs. H. Culter, Mrs. I. MacFarlane, and
Mr. Cecil Watson (members)—have been keenly alert to the requirements of our school
population, and, with the successful building of the new junior high school behind them,
launched a much-needed programme of senior high-school construction to accommodate the students of the Duke of Connaught and T. J. Trapp Technical High Schools in
one senior composite high school to be built on the 35-acre site arranged for earlier by
the City Council and the Board of School Trustees. In the by-law presented, $40,000
was allocated for a lunchroom at the junior high school, omitted previously because of
increased cost of building.   Reflecting the confidence of the citizens of New Westminster N 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
in the Board of School Trustees, the by-law for $775,000 passed successfully in April
of this year. Elementary-school needs have not been forgotten, and discussions are now
under way for a four-room addition to Lord Tweedsmuir School. A fully equipped
lunchroom and a primary room were opened at the Kelvin Elementary in September,
1951.
Definite progress in all phases of educational work has been evident throughout the
school organization. In the elementary divisions, where some of the main purposes are
to give all pupils a sound foundation of knowledge and the developing of correct attitudes
necessary for life, efficient work is being done. Teachers are using recommended procedure in instructional work with confidence and success. There is a commendable
flexity in organization, increased sharing in classroom activities by pupils, and a more
definite bond of co-operation in the relationships between pupils and teachers.
A greater variety of illustrative materials is in use, and audio-visual education
receives its proper attention.
Tests substantiate the feeling that fundamental subjects are receiving proper attention. It is a pleasure to note the careful consideration by the trustees of satisfactory
pupil-load for elementary teachers and principals.
The organization of the junior high school is a credit to its principal, Mr. R. W.
Adams, his assistant principal, Mr. B. W. Cooper, and the capable staff of able and
enthusiastic teachers.   The excellence of work is gratifying.
In senior high-school work, incentive to more intensive work is provided by the
many scholarships now offered by interested organizations.
Again it is a pleasure to note the number of teachers and principals attending
summer schools; the effect is felt in a keener professional attitude.
Testing, an essential part of the teaching process, has been successfully carried out
under the direction of Dr. C. B. Conway.
Night-school classes, under the principalship of Mr. F. G. Morris, have enjoyed a
most successful year, and tribute is paid herewith to Mr. Morris for his organizing ability
and enthusiastic leadership.
Instruction in health is receiving its proper attention by the Simon Fraser Health
Unit, under the directorship of Dr. E. W. Wylde. First-aid courses for teachers have
been ably conducted by Mr. .1 E Hanna, of the junior high-school staff.
Mrs. Grace Blackie, of the Duke of Connaught High School staff, retired on superannuation in June; we shall miss her. Her genial disposition and efficiency marked her
as one of the great teachers of our city.
It is with regret that I report the passing of Mr. A. M. McDermott, of the T. J.
Trapp Technical High School staff. For thirty-two years his counsel and guidance were
an inspiration to all with whom he worked.
Special days during the year were suitably commemorated, especially the Eighty-
second May Day Festival, when it was the honour of the city to have as guests Lieutenant-
Governor Clarence Wallace and Mrs. Wallace.
It has been an opportunity to work effectively with the Provincial Normal School,
under Mr. T. R. Hall, principal, and with the Education Faculty of the University of
British Columbia, under Dr. A. W. Macintosh, Acting Head.
Again it is a pleasure to refer to the hearty co-operation and able assistance given
at all times by the Department of Education and to the careful attention given to all
school affairs by the Board of School Trustees, keen business-men and women who give
of their time and ability without remuneration. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS N 73
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)
REPORT OF C. G. BROWN, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS,
AND C. J. FREDERICKSON, B.A., ASSISTANT MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Since the last report, the new housing projects continue to be developed in Burnaby.
This growth of new homes increases the demands for additional school accommodation.
The present year's enrolment was 9,338, divided as follows: Elementary school, 6,210;
junior high school, 2,087; and senior high school, 1,041. These pupils were distributed
over the various grades in the following order: Grade I, 1,104; Grade II, 1,106; Grade
III, 1,101; Grade IV, 948; Grade V, 892; Grade VI, 763; Grade VII, 718; Grade
VIII, 732; Grade IX, 637; Grade X, 487; Grade XI, 340; Grade XII, 196; and Grade
XIII, 18. The instructional staff was composed of 301 teachers. We anticipate, for the
coming year, an enrolment exceeding 10,000.
A number of new units were brought into operation during the past year. The new
schools, with their improved facilities, improved lighting and heating, created an environment which was conducive to good learning situations. The morale of both the staff and
the pupils received a lift, and a fine educational climate prevails in all the new schools.
It is interesting to note the pride the children have in the new surroundings and the care
they take of the new equipment. No data, as yet, have been compiled as to the beneficial
results with regard to eyesight and the general health of the pupils in the new schools, but
it is anticipated that there will be a general improvement in the physical health as well
as in the mental health of the children.
To assist in the administrative work, Mr. C. J. Frederickson was appointed to the
Burnaby inspectoral staff. Mr. Frederickson has taken over much of the classroom
visitation and has given specific attention to the testing programme and visual education.
He has associated himself with the primary and intermediate supervisors in directing a
very profitable in-service teacher-training programme.
The services of Mr. H. J. McPherson, school social worker, and Mr. J. A. Findlay,
mental-hygiene co-ordinator, were amplified this year, and a considerable load was carried, particularly in the field of the social worker. The Metropolitan Health Committee,
Unit No. 5, under the guidance of Dr. W. F. Sunderland, continues to administer the
school health services. Although the health unit feels the pressure of the expanding
school population, nevertheless, very fine services have been rendered and exceedingly
good reports have come in relative to the work of the unit director and his nursing staff.
Unfortunately, due to economic unrest, the building programme, which already has
been delayed one year through failure to market the Burnaby bonds, received a further
set-back this year. The new term, therefore, will open with the school units still unfinished. To meet this emergency, the Board has developed a plan to utilize portable buildings, which will afford some relief.
An interesting feature of this year's school activities was the emphasis upon the
Burnaby Diamond Jubilee. Throughout the year, Social Studies projects upon the
history of Burnaby and special jubilee productions gave the pupils and the public an
opportunity to commemorate in a memorable way this important milestone in Burnaby's
history.
For some time past the Burnaby administrative staff and teaching staff have been
co-operating in working out plans for a differentiated teaching programme to meet the
many levels of ability which are found in all the classes of the respective schools. To
make the teaching programme effective, a change in promotional policy was necessary.
This year a concerted effort was made to describe the student's progress in terms relative
to his capacity for learning and in relation to those phases of development other than N 74 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
academic. The usual grading examinations were given for school record purposes, but
for placement purposes anecdotal records were made of each child's school progress, and
these records were passed on to the new teacher or principal so that appropriate groupings and classification may be made for next year's work. During the coming term an
attempt will be made to have frequent reference to these records.
In concluding this report, appreciation is expressed for the co-operativeness of the
principals and the teaching staff, for the progressiveness with which the Burnaby School
Board has dealt with the problems of education, and for the very fine encouragement and
assistance that have been rendered by the Department of Education and the various
officials under the direction of the Superintendent.
School Districts No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)
REPORT OF WILLIAM GRAY, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
In this inspectorate during the year 1951-52 there were in operation eighteen
schools, attended by 7,157 pupils, instructed by 227 teachers. Of these pupils, 4,992
lived in North Vancouver and 2,165 in West Vancouver. Of the teachers, 156 were
employed by the North Vancouver School Board and 71 by the Board of West Vancouver.
This represents an increase over the preceding year of 7 per cent in the number of pupils
attending the schools of North Vancouver and 13 per cent in those enrolled in West
Vancouver. As similar increases have been taking place during the past ten years, in
neither district are there any unoccupied classrooms. Consequently, provision of additional schools and classrooms has been the main interest of the members of the respective
School Boards.
North Vancouver
The building programme for the year in School District No. 44 included three
projects: An addition of six classrooms, library, and extension of the cafeteria to Sutherland Junior High School, three additional classrooms and activity-room to Highlands
Elementary School, and an addition of two classrooms to Norgate Elementary School.
All three projects are expected to be ready for the reopening of schools in September.
The junior high school is now a complete building, and no further additions are
contemplated. The enrolment in that school in September will be slightly over 800,
and it is felt by the School Board that the school should be no larger. The next extension
of junior high-school facilities will most likely be in the western section of the school
district, in which new subdivisions have sprung up and caused congestion in the elementary schools.
With regard to the improvement of older school buildings, a progressive policy is
being followed, providing for modern heating units and better lighting of classrooms.
Financially, the school district has so far been able to construct new schools and
improve old ones without resorting to borrowing through sale of bonds.
At the beginning of the year the pool library was placed in charge of Miss E. E. Tufts,
formerly librarian at Point Grey Junior High School, and excellent progress was made
during the year. A grant was received from the Public Library Commission, the purpose
being to develop a plan for operating school libraries in an urban area such as North
Vancouver. It is hoped that the experiment will result in the development of suitable
technique for administering school library service. As stated by the pool librarian,
" It should not be lost sight of that the librarian's task has not ended with the acquisition REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS N 75
and circulation of books to the schools, but is actively concerned in the use of these
books and with the development of an interest in reading by the pupils."
West Vancouver
With annual increases in school population of 10, 12, and 13 per cent over the past
few years, the construction of new buildings to care for the excessive increase has been
the chief concern of the Board members. At the middle of the year the new senior
high-school building was opened, so that now there are two separate buildings—one for
senior students and the older building for junior high-school grades. All secondary pupils
in the school district are accommodated in one or other of these schools.
The policy of erecting smaller elementary schools to reduce transportation is still
being followed, and a new four-roomed elementary school at West Bay has now been
completed and will open in September. Plans are now under way to construct an
elementary school in the eastern section of the district.
An interesting project initiated by the West Vancouver High School deserves particular mention. The Fine Arts Committee of the High School Parent-Teacher Committee, with the co-operation of the principal and teaching staff, organized a series of
lectures for the students entitled " How the Artist Does His Work." Ten lectures were
given on such subjects as Poetry, Art, Music, and Architecture by well-known artists in
these fields. For the first two or three lectures, from 80 to 100 students were selected
to comprise the audience, but owing to the demand the last few lectures were heard by
the entire school body of over 500 students. The experiment was enthusiastically
received by both students and teachers, and resulted in a stimulation of interest in the
Fine Arts. The members of the parent-teacher body who arranged this project are to
be congratulated on their interest and effort.
General
The North Shore Health Unit supplies health services to the schools of both School
Districts Nos. 44 and 45. Mental-health clinics continue to be held each month, and
with the appointment next year of a mental-health co-ordinator a better understanding
by the teaching staff of the aims and results of such clinics should develop.
With an increasing number of teachers being employed each year, the matter of
supervision of instruction becomes more difficult, but considerable assistance is received
from the various principals.
Appreciation is expressed for assistance in my work received from officials of the
Department of Education, School Board members and personnel, and teaching staffs.
School District No. 36 (Surrey)
REPORT OF K. B. WOODWARD, B.A., B.Paed.,
MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
In School District No. 36 the increase in enrolment continued at what may now be
considered a normal rate; that is, ten new classrooms would have taken care of it. The
peak enrolment was 6,657 pupils in thirty-three elementary schools and five junior-senior
high schools. Two new classrooms were added at Fleetwood and two at Grosvenor Road,
and one each at David Brankin and Ray Shepherd. The year ended with only six classrooms on double shift, the smallest number for several years. N 76 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Because of lack of classroom space in the junior-senior high schools, it was necessary
to enrol Grade VII classes in seven of the elementary schools. They were transported
to the high schools for Home Economics and Industrial Arts.
Surrey is faced with a difficult transportation problem. About 1,200 pupils are
transported to the high schools, and about 100 to the elementary schools each day.
In addition to this 400 pupils are carried from elementary to high schools for special
subjects. This is all done by seven buses and is possible only by having each vehicle
make three or four trips. This in turn means the staggering of hours at the schools
concerned.
Because of having so few buses, it is necessary to maintain a minimum distance of
3 miles before transportation is granted. This is a major source of dissatisfaction in the
district. The parents feel that heavy traffic on some of the roads makes them dangerous
for children walking and the poor condition of others makes walking very uncomfortable
and, at times, difficult. However, to lower the minimum distance would necessitate more
buses, and the Board does not feel able to provide them.
In conclusion, I would like to express my appreciation of the fine co-operation which
I have received from the principals and teachers of District No. 36 during the past
school-year. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 77
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
School Districts No. 62 (Sooke), No. 63 (Saanich), No. 64 (Saltspring),
and Unattached School District at Belmont Park
REPORT OF J. E. BROWN, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The school population in this inspectorate continues to increase at a normal rate.
The most recent territorial acquisition has been the addition of the unattached Belmont
Park School District, which contains the new John Stubbs Memorial Elementary School.
School District No. 62 (Sooke)
This district extends from the western boundaries of Greater Victoria to the mountains beyond Port Renfrew. During the school-year just ended, the Board operated
twelve elementary schools and two high schools, with a total of forty-seven teachers.
At present the Board is considering the consolidation of a number of small one-room
schools and enlarging the schools at Langford, Colwood, and Sooke. It is anticipated
that a by-law to be presented will provide for new much needed high-school accommodation.
School District No. 63 (Saanich)
This is now a large municipal district comprising all of Central Saanich Municipality,
part of Saanich Municipality, and the rural areas of Saanich and James Island. The
year saw the completion of new elementary schools at Sidney and Brentwood and both
elementary and high schools at Royal Oak. A number of other schools have been
enlarged and improved. The Board is now ready to proceed with the erection of the
deferred auditorium-gymnasium at Mount Newton High School. The present organization includes three secondary and twelve elementary schools, a staff of fifty-nine
teachers, and a total enrolment of 1,473 pupils. A projected enrolment for the next
six years would indicate that a new school will shortly be required at Swartz Bay.
Additions to North Saanich High School and to a number of elementary schools will also
be required.
School District No. 64 (Saltspring)
This district comprises a number of gulf islands, the largest and most populous being
Saltspring, with a twelve-room consolidated elementary-high school. School business
is administered by a seven-member Board, representative of all the islands and elected
at annual meetings held in the various attendance areas. Although transportation
between islands is poor, all members of the Board have co-operated in a determination to
provide equality of opportunity for all children of school age. To this end, high-school
courses have been offered in elementary schools, tuition of pupils attending city schools
has been paid, and boarding facilities provided in the high-school centre. Plans are being
completed for building a new three-room school at Galiano.
Belmont Park School District (Unattached)
This district was recently formed to take care of the children of navy personnel
residing adjacent to the Canadian Services College, Royal Roads, and attending the
recently constructed John Stubbs Memorial Elementary School in Belmont Park. The
school was opened in October, 1951, with a principal and a staff of six teachers. Children from kindergarten age to Grade VI have been included. Ample provision has been
made for expansion.    Grade VII and VIII pupils will probably be admitted in September. N 78
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
As this is my final report on developments in this inspectorate, I wish to express my
sincere appreciation to School Boards, principals and teachers, pupils and parents for
many courtesies, and to wish them and my successor, Dr. W. A. Plenderleith, success in
future undertakings.
School Districts No. 38  (Richmond), No. 73   (Alert Bay), Unattached School
District at University Hill, and Provincial School for the Deaf and the Blind
REPORT OF J. N. BURNETT, E.D., M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School Organization
Schools
Teachers
District
High
Jr.-Sr.
High
Elem.-
High
Superior
Elem.
Graded
Elem.
Ungraded
High and
Jr. High
Elem.
and Sup.
Special
No. 38 (Richmond)..
No. 73 (Alert Bay)...
Unattached—
University Hill
Provincial   School
for the Deaf and
the Blind
1
....
1
1
2
7
2
8
31
2
6
81
18
7
20
1         1
2
2
7
10
39
105
20
Totals:  Schools, 23 (including School for the Deaf and the Blind); teachers, 164.
School District No. 38 (Richmond)
The past school-year saw a continuation of the steady increase in school population.
All Grade VII and approximately half of the Grade VIII students were again retained in
the elementary schools. In the whole school system all available classroom space was
utilized to capacity and no part-timing of classes was necessary.
A four-room primary school in the R.C.A.F. area on Sea Island was organized in
September for pupils in Grades II and III. This relieved the acute accommodation
problem at the Sea Island school and, in fact, contributed greatly to the solution of the
accommodation problem throughout the district.
The construction of a new junior-senior high school was commenced in the late fall
of 1951, and it was confidently expected that it would be ready for use in September,
1952, and thus relieve the accommodation pressure. Because of labour unrest, however,
work was suspended in June and to date has not been resumed. It will now be late
in the year or perhaps the beginning of 1953 before use can be made of the new structure.
In the meantime it is fully anticipated that the two newly organized schools, Richmond
Junior-Senior High and Cambie Junior High, will be placed on the shift system, utilizing
the present junior-senior high-school building.
Plans for the reconstruction of the old Bridgeport Elementary School were finalized
and approved by the Department. This work should be carried out in late summer and
will provide greatly improved facilities for both teachers and pupils alike.
School District No. 73 (Alert Bay)
In the Canadian Forest Products logging area an experiment in consolidating pupils
above Grade VI in one room at the Woss School was carried out. The venture proved
very successful, and it is hoped that because of the advanced educational facilities offered,
the establishment of a high school may be possible in the foreseeable future. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 79
The contract for the first unit of the new Port McNeill School was awarded in the
late spring and should be ready for occupation by the commencement of the new term.
This area is growing, and it is doubtful if the three available rooms will satisfy requirements this fall.
Detailed planning of the proposed new Alert Bay Elementary-High School is still
being held in abeyance until a water-supply on the site has been proved. Drilling has
been arranged for the summer, and it is hopefully expected that the last of the many difficulties obstructing this project will be cleared away so that definite progress and perhaps
completion may be anticipated during the school-year 1952-53.
It is pleasing to note that teacher accommodation is being given serious attention,
and that this year new teacherages with modern conveniences were provided at Englewood
and Mitchell Bay.
University Hill
The school population in this area is showing accelerated growth. In January the
converted army hut moved to the school-site from Acadia Camp had to be partitioned
to provide two classrooms. It is thought that even further emergency accommodation
will have to be found for the opening of the new term in September.
Progress has been made toward the provision of a new junior-senior high school.
A splendid site has been obtained from the Provincial Government, and preliminary
sketch-plans have been prepared and approved by the Department. It is the intention to
submit a by-law for the approval of the taxpayers this fall.
General
During the school-year, under the direction of the Division of Tests, Standards,
and Research, surveys of English Composition in Grades VII and VIII and General
Science 20 were carried out. Standardized tests in writing, spelling, and arithmetic were
administered during school inspections, and it is gratifying to report that on the whole
substantial improvement was noted in these fundamentals over former years.
No difficulty was experienced in obtaining teachers for the various schools this past
year. Excellent co-operation was received from all Boards, principals, and teachers,
and is herewith acknowledged. It is also fitting at this time to record appreciation of the
sympathetic attitude and assistance extended by the Deputy Minister and his various
Departmental officials in all matters.
School Districts No. 69 (Qualicum) and No. 70 (Alberni), and Unattached School
Districts at Bamfield, Esperanza, Kildonan, Kyuquot, Sarita River, Sydney
Inlet, Tahsis River, Torino, and Ucluelet.
REPORT OF C. L. CAMPBELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate, which includes a large municipal, a large rural, and ten small
unattached school districts, employs the services of 148 teachers.
School District No. 69 (Qualicum)
With the passing of the by-law mentioned in last year's report, it was thought that
the district's accommodation problem would soon be solved. Great was the disappointment, therefore, when the lowest tenders for the new buildings at Parksville and Qualicum
were substantially above the amounts provided in that by-law. Because of the critical
shortage of pupil accommodation, it was decided to build as much of the projects as N 80
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
money would allow and submit another by-law for the balance. It is confidently expected
that the classroom portions of each building will be ready for occupancy early in the
autumn term. Teachers and parents alike will be most happy to see the end of several
years of swing shift.
School District No. 70 (Alberni)
On October 1st pupils and teachers moved to the splendid new Alberni District
High School, with accommodation for 1,000 pupils. The official opening, sometime
later, marked the end of a long and strenuous building programme for the Alberni Valley.
For the first time in a number of years all pupils were housed in comfortable, modern,
and uncrowded schoolrooms.
Unattached Districts
As usual there was considerable teacher turnover in these rather isolated West
Coast schools. Several districts were extremely fortunate, however, in persuading very
capable teachers to return for a second year. The provision of suitable housing and a
friendly and appreciative attitude has helped enormously in this.
Two rooms are being added to the new building at Ucluelet, and this school has
been raised to the status of an elementary-senior high school. This is the first of the
unattached districts to be able to provide proper high-school facilities.
All School Boards in the inspectorate are to be congratulated on their sincere efforts
to bring the older schools up to the standards of the new buildings. Practically all schools
now have modern sanitation, electric lighting, and are decorated in bright, attractive
colours.
School Districts No. 37 (Delta), No. 47 (Powell River), and No. 74 (Quatsino)
REPORT OF T. G. CARTER, M.C., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Delta
In this district the progress made during the year toward the provision of needed
school accommodation has been disappointing. Plans prepared for the presentation of
a by-law were abandoned, and the much slower policy of payment for all new school
construction out of current revenue adopted. Two rooms of the new Richardson School
were constructed, and these were opened in January. Also, approval was secured for an
addition to the junior-senior high school at Ladner.
The elimination of the traffic toll from the Pattullo Bridge has stimulated settlement
in the North Delta area, and here the situation continues especially acute to the extent
that a considerable number of both elementary- and high-school pupils must still seek
enrolment in Surrey.
Powell River
The accommodation provided by the extensive school building project recently
completed in this district is now occupied to capacity. In addition, much necessary
equipment is lacking, and a long-delayed grounds-improvement programme is yet to be
undertaken.
Quatsino
A by-law authorizing the construction of new schools at Port Alice and Port Hardy,
with teacherages at Port Hardy and Quatsino, was passed in October by a large majority.
This project, which should be completed during the coming year, will fulfil the objective REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 81
of the School Board to ensure throughout the district good, well-equipped school buildings
and desirable living-quarters for all their teachers.
General
Over all my inspectorate the year has been one of steady growth in population.
Many of the new-comers have been displaced persons and, to assist these, special
language classes were organized at both Ladner and Powell River.
While all my schools have been adequately staffed, experience in the selection of
teachers has emphasized the shortage of those qualified for instruction in Commercial
subjects, Music, Physical Education, and even Home Economics and Industrial Arts.
School Districts No. 42 (Maple Ridge) and No. 75 (Mission)
REPORT OF J. CHELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 42 (Maple Ridge)
The schools opened in September, 1951, with a registration of 2,255 pupils, an
increase of 127 over that of September, 1950. It is apparent that September, 1952, will
see a further increase, particularly at the secondary level. This area is now on the periphery of Greater Vancouver. As travel is measured in time rather than distance, it is
inevitable that the trend to fringe areas will increase. The Board has been aware of this
trend and successfully presented a by-law in June, 1951. It is hoped that before too
long construction of the major units may begin; the need is urgent. The time-lag between
by-law and building is a matter of some concern; planning for the interval places a heavy
burden on trustees and secretaries. Some smaller units provided for in the by-law should
be ready early in the fall term. During the year an extensive programme of improving
lighting, heating, and insulation has been carried out.
A successful night-school programme was organized. To meet a need, the Board
arranged for two classes for new Canadians. These were well attended and drew much
favourable interest and comment. An in-service training class for teachers was well
attended.
In June, 1952, Mr. W. H. Longton, principal of Hammond School, retired after
many years of faithful service.
The passing of Trustee F. W. Cusick on August 19th, 1952, is recorded. Mr.
Cusick served for years as trustee for Pitt Meadows on this Board. He was chairman of
the Board at the time of his death. The district has lost a valuable servant; his considered judgment will be missed at school meetings.
School District No. 75 (Mission)
The building programme in this area is nearing completion. The new high school
will relieve a situation which has been tenable only through the whole-hearted cooperation of all concerned. Other schools in the district have been reconstructed as part
of a five-year plan; the Board is to be commended for its initiative in providing a classroom environment in rural schools which compares favourably with any in the Province.
At the present time the Board is aware of further elementary-school needs. At both
eastern and western ends of the district new settlements are developing.
Night-school classes were organized to meet a wide range of interests. An in-service
training programme for teachers was initiated; it is hoped this will continue. N 82 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
At the close of the term due recognition was paid to Mr. H. D. Abbott, principal of
the junior-senior high, on his appointment to the staff of Inspectors, and to Mr. W. A.
Stafford on his retirement after many years of loyal service.
General
Principals met regularly during the year. The Education Week programme met
with gratifying response. It is a pleasure to record the contribution made by the public
health unit, as it serves both districts.
In conclusion, I wish to acknowledge the patience, yet determination, with which
trustees met their problems, the courtesy and co-operation of secretaries, and the contribution of principals and teachers in the educational process.
School Districts No. 12 (Grand Forks), No. 13 (Kettle Valley), and No. 14
(Southern Okanagan)
REPORT OF C. E. CLAY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The past year has shown a slight increase in attendance over the previous one in
all districts in this inspectorate. Progress has been steady and quite satisfactory. The
number of teachers with temporary certificates, owing to lack of qualifications, has been
reduced to one. Standardized tests from the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research
were administered, and a regular programme of standardized tests was carried out.
Once again I would like to express my appreciation for the splendid co-operation that
has been given me by the secretaries, principals, staffs, and trustees.
District No. 12 consists of the school system of the City of Grand Forks and two
rural schools, Kettle River North and Brown Creek. The total number of teachers
employed in this district during the past year was thirty-one, an increase of two over
the previous year. The number of pupils taking boarding allowance shows a considerable increase.
The Boundary Drama Festival was held here this year and was very successful.
A marked improvement in the standard of work presented was noted.
District No. 13 was hard hit by the loss of the Greenwood Elementary-High School
on January 2nd. The Board of School Trustees of School District No. 12 (Grand
Forks) immediately offered to accommodate the high-school students from Greenwood.
Arrangements were made to transport them between the two cities daily by bus, and
this worked quite satisfactorily. The elementary-school pupils were housed in temporary quarters in the old hospital. As a by-law was in the process of preparation, it was
hoped that this would carry and make it possible to provide a modern elementary-senior
high school to accommodate the elementary-school children of the City of Greenwood
and the high-school pupils of the entire district. With the defeat of the by-law, plans
had to be changed, and arrangements are now being made to build a part of the proposed
school to accommodate pupils in and around Greenwood. The number of pupils in this
school district who are attending school away from home shows a marked increase, and
the parents of these children deserve much credit in making every effort to give their
children an opportunity to attend high school.
District No. 14 also showed an increase in enrolment in all schools, particularly in
the elementary schools at Osoyoos and Oliver. At present Grades VII and VIII pupils
from the Osoyoos area are being housed in the elementary-school building there, and
plans are under way to extend this school in order to accommodate the junior high-school REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 83
grades. Once again Southern Okanagan Junior-Senior High School was host to the
High School Drama Festival, which included schools from Keremeos and Grand Forks,
as well as schools from the neighbouring cities in the State of Washington.
School Districts No. 53 (Terrace), No. 54 (Smithers), and No. 55 (Burns Lake)
REPORT OF H. C. FERGUSON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The past year has been devoted to the consolidation of recent gains and the formulation of future plans. The school population, which is now in excess of 2,000, has been
accommodated in thirty schools staffed by seventy-five teachers. Of the teachers
employed, thirty-seven held permanent appointments. Although this is an improvement
over former years, the rate of teacher turnover is still very high and consequently affects
adversely the continuity of learning as well as the effectiveness of instruction. Improvement in the living and working conditions of teachers, the provision of more and better
means of transportation and communication, the introduction of a greater number of
the amenities of life, all following closely in the wake of a rapidly increasing population
caused by immigration and industrial expansion, will undoubtedly assist Boards to
secure and retain more or less permanent staffs.
In District No. 53 (Terrace), the influx of families seeking and gaining employment
with the Columbia Cellulose Company and the Aluminum Company seriously overtaxed
existing school facilities. The energies of the Board have largely been expended in
making a survey of its school plant in the light of present and future requirements and
in the preparation and presentation of a new school building by-law. By-law No. 3,
seeking the ratepayers' consent to an expenditure of half a million dollars for a ten-year
plan of construction and improvement, was narrowly defeated in April. The Board
started immediately on By-law No. 4, calling for the same expenditure. This was successfully ratified by the voters on June 23rd.
In District No. 54 (Smithers), overcrowding necessitated the use of temporary
accommodation at several points in the district. This Board, also, made a study of its
requirements and drafted By-law No. 2, which will be placed before the ratepayers in
the early fall. It is planned to expend some $400,000 for reconstruction, additions, new
buildings, and equipment.
In District No. 55 (Burns Lake), all new accommodations provided in By-law
No. 1 were occupied. Temporary classrooms at Burns Lake and Southbank had to be
opened. Increased enrolment was caused largely by the families of employees of Mannix
Construction, which is working for Alcan. It is not anticipated that this increase will
be permanent, and, therefore, the Board did not consider a new by-law. The flooding
of the Ootsa Lake area in September will bring to a close the Alexander Manson School
and will possibly necessitate the closing of the school at Wistaria. Although these are
new buildings, they were designed so that they could be transported to other parts of the
district. The Board plans to relocate the Alexander Manson School at Grassy Plains
to take the place of the Southbank division. Two portable classrooms have been built
to accommodate the increased enrolment at Burns Lake. A new school is being built
at Noralee, on a site that will more adequately serve the attendance area.
Each district makes use of both contract and district-owned transportation. Terrace
District purchased a new fifty-five-passenger bus and established a route to the Benches
and the Keith Estate. A new forty-eight-passenger vehicle is planned for the Hazelton
area.    Smithers purchased a forty-eight-passenger bus and established a route to include N 84 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Haggmans Camp and Barrett Lake. This fall a panel bus is to be purchased for the
Glentanna-Driftwood district. Burns Lake inaugurated several new routes with the
purchase of a forty-eight-passenger bus and two panel buses. Two new buses—a forty-
eight- and a fifty-five-passenger—have been delivered to replace smaller vehicles on the
Uncha-Grassy and Cheslatta routes. The small buses so liberated will be placed on the
Tintagel and Babine routes.
It has been most gratifying to work with the principals and teachers in these districts.
Many possess considerable experience in the classroom, and most keep themselves well
posted on recent trends through professional reading and attendance at Summer School.
Visitations were made to schools as frequently as possible, and at the end of the term,
reports were prepared on learning situations. Monthly bulletins, treating with professional and administrative matters, were sent to teachers throughout the year. Schools
participated in standardized testing programmes at the third, sixth, and ninth years.
Primary teachers administered the Monroe Reading Tests, and all teachers gave mental
aptitude tests to bring records up to date. Testing programmes were discussed and outlined with principals of secondary schools, and interest inventories, aptitude tests,
achievement and English tests were administered. Pupils in the junior high-school
years were given the Departmental test in English Composition. In June, comprehensive
classification lists were prepared, showing the placement and disposition of each child.
These were checked by the principals and reviewed by the Inspector. While this entailed
a great deal of work on the part of teachers, it was obvious that they gave considerable
time and thought to the project.
In the six years since the Cameron Report, school enrolments in these districts
have more than doubled. The old log school-house with the rickety, well-carved desks
has been replaced by modern buildings with up-to-date equipment. Schools whose
enrolments were always marginal and whose operation was a matter of conjecture from
year to year have been closed, and the pupils assured of continuous education by the use
of transportation and centralized schools. These changes have been wrought by local
Boards, whose members have been untiring in their efforts to provide, as far as possible,
equal educational opportunity for all.
To the members of these Boards, to their secretary-treasurers, to the principals and
teaching staffs, and to the officials of the Department in Victoria, I wish to express my
sincere thanks for the co-operation and assistance which I have received while Inspector
in these districts.
School Districts No. 49 (Ocean Falls), No. 51 (Portland Canal), No. 52 (Prince
Rupert), and Unattached School Districts at Butedale and Tulsequah
REPORT OF G. W. GRAHAM, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Schools in this inspectorate have been adequately staffed with qualified teachers.
Some difficulty has been experienced in obtaining fully qualified teachers for secondary
schools. Testing would indicate that the work is being maintained at a very satisfactory
standard. School Boards have been able to provide satisfactory accommodation in all
cases but one. Parent-Teacher organizations have taken an active interest in the schools
and in some cases have provided extra equipment and services to the school. In two of
the areas, dental clinics have been in operation, while Prince Rupert receives the services
of the Prince Rupert Public Health Unit. In all districts night-school classes and classes
for new Canadians have been conducted. Twenty-eight staff members of the thirteen
Indian day-schools in this area were visited upon invitation. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 85
The Board of School Trustees of District No. 49 continues its programme of
improving the schools in this area. In November the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister
of Education, accompanied by Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of
Education, officially opened the new addition to the Charleson School at Ocean Falls.
This new construction, including a gymnasium-auditorium, Industrial Arts shops and
classroom unit, plus the remodelling of the Home Economics room and Science laboratories, greatly improves the facilities of this school. It is now well fitted to carry out the
programme from kindergarten to senior high school. Negotiations to build a three-room
school at Bella Coola are progressing. This school will serve the needs of both native
and white children. Consideration is being given to modernizing the school at Bella
Bella. A new school was established at the Northern Pulpwood Camp at South Bentinck
Arm.   The good maintenance of schools in District No. 49 is a credit to this School Board.
The enrolment at Stewart Superior School and Premier School in School District No.
51 (Portland Canal) has remained steady. The fluctuation of school population is a problem at Alice Arm. The school was reopened in January, but was closed again in March.
School buildings in this district are old but are being satisfactorily maintained. With the
commencement of logging operations at Stewart, the accommodation problem may
change.
The steady increase in enrolment in Prince Rupert makes a growing demand for
accommodation. The new addition to Booth Memorial High School, opened by the
Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education, in November, has brought good facilities for Physical Education, Industrial Arts, Home Economics, Library, and Commercial
to the high school. The new King Edward Elementary School, occupied in September,
replaced the former building. It is already filled to capacity. The need for further
accommodation brought about the renovation of the two-room Seal Cove School. School
facilities at Port Edward are entirely unsuitable. Elementary-school children have to be
transported to Prince Rupert. A by-law is being submitted to provide proper accommodation for this area. A one-room school has been opened at Sunnyside Cannery. The
school at Port Simpson has been closed due to lack of student population.
A small school is operated on cannery property at Butedale. A school was established at Tulsequah, on the Taku River, to meet the needs of children in this mining
community.
The successful operation of schools in this area is made more effective by the cooperation of Boards and employees. May I express my appreciation for the splendid
co-operation I have received in this area.
School Districts No. 76 (Agassiz) and No. 33 (Chilliwack)
REPORT OF S. J. GRAHAM, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 76 (Agassiz)
District No. 76 is a small district with three schools enrolling 420 pupils and
employing nineteen teachers.
Teacher turnover has remained high, but improvement in this respect may be
anticipated with the completion of the district's building programme. During the year
a second room was added to the Harrison Hot Springs School, substantial improvements
made at the Harrison Mills School, and a contract let for a new elementary-high school
in Agassiz. n 86 public schools report, 1951-52
School District No. 33 (Chilliwack)
This district operates thirteen elementary schools, one junior high school, and a
senior high school. One hundred and thirty-four teachers were employed to instruct the
3,900 pupils who were enrolled in the district schools.
In June the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education, was present for the
official opening of two new elementary schools and the gymnasium-auditorium addition
to the senior high school.
The work of the schools throughout this year was very satisfactory. The Chilliwack
District is fortunate in that its schools benefit from a permanency of staff, which is unique
in these times. I would like to mention in particular the excellent contribution which
the junior high school is making to the educational progress of the area. Limited classroom accommodation has forced the organization of the junior high school on a Grades
VII and VIII basis.
In 1938 and again in 1945 the ratepayers of the Chilliwack District approved money
by-laws to cover the cost of large-scale building programmes. The accommodation
provided by the new schools has not kept up with the increasing population of the district,
and for the last two years temporary classrooms have had to be found at the rate of three
or four each year. This situation will continue at the same rate for the next several
years. The School Board would like to be able to build at least four new classrooms
each year out of the annual budget.
Again this year I would like to thank the members of the School Boards and the
secretaries with whom I have worked for their unfailing courtesy and helpful consideration.
School Districts No. 32 (Fraser Canyon) and No. 34 (Abbotsford)
REPORT OF WILLIAM H. GRANT, B.S.A., B.Ed.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
It is with a sense of deep gratification that one looks back over the 1951-52
school-year because of the very considerable achievement that has again been made in
the fields of school accommodation and of educational progress.
School District No. 32 (Fraser Canyon)
On November 15th, 1951, a modern one-room school unit at Boston Bar and the
final wing of the Hope Elementary-High School were officially opened by the Honourable
W. T. Straith, Minister of Education, assisted by the Deputy Minister and Superintendent
of Education, Dr. F. T. Fairey. This event was of significance because it marked the
culmination of a building programme, extending over several years, which was made
necessary by the unprecedented growth of the population in this area.
Hand in hand with this provision of new accommodation has gone the improvement
of existing facilities so that the Board of School Trustees can view with satisfaction
well-established and well-maintained school plants throughout their district. It is safe
to say that in the not too distant future all school buildings will have been brought to
a satisfactory standard in this respect.
A competent staff of teachers has worked throughout the year with interest, vision,
and enthusiasm. Both in the tests conducted by the Division of Tests, Standards, and
Research and in those conducted through this office in co-operation with teachers, results
show a very favourable comparison with other districts and with the Province as a whole.
Enrolment of pupils has shown a healthy increase—12 per cent over that of the previous
year. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 87
School District No. 34 (Abbotsford)
The outstanding event of the school-year in this district was the official opening on
November 14th, 1951, of seven new elementary-school buildings, totalling thirteen
classrooms, by the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education, and Dr. F. T. Fairey,
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education.
The opening of these schools marked the first new school building in this district for
a period of about twenty years. It marked, also, a departure from centralizing elementary
education to one of placing smaller elementary schools within reasonable walking distance
of the pupils' homes. Furthermore, ten of the thirteen rooms were built by the school
district construction crew under their own building superintendent, with savings up to
30 per cent effected and with no loss in quality of the construction. All buildings were
erected on the standard plan of the Department of Education and furnish close to the
ultimate in space, lighting, air-conditioning, sanitation, and convenience.
Along with the completion of these buildings has gone the construction of a much
needed new junior high school which, when completed, will furnish twenty-seven new
teaching areas and accommodate up to 750 pupils. A highly essential activity-room
at the Upper Sumas Elementary School should prove a boon to both the school and the
community. It is hoped that these buildings will be ready for occupancy early in the
new school-year.
Following a policy set several years ago, the Board of Trustees is, as funds permit,
reconditioning and reconstructing existing buildings so as to improve their functional
qualities as well as to maintain the buildings in good repair.
The provision of the above new accommodation necessitated a far-reaching
reorganization of the school system and teaching staff during the year. The teaching and
office staff, and more particularly the secretary-treasurer and the principals, are to be
commended on the efficient manner in which the reorganization was effected. To distribute some 400 to 500 pupils from the centralized Airport School of 1950-51 out to
thirteen new rooms with the concomitant reorganization of existing small schools was
a task of major proportions.
Schools in this district have been competently staffed throughout the year. Except
for special fields, there has been no difficulty in securing qualified teachers. Living and
working conditions for teachers have been generally satisfactory, and a very harmonious
relationship exists between the teaching staff, on the one hand, and the secretary-treasurer
and Board of School Trustees on the other.
The enthusiasm and earnestness of teachers in the district is reflected in the
attendance at in-service educational functions sponsored by the local B.C.T.F. association
and others. Night-school classes in Physical Education, Visual Education, Civil Defence,
and in Pottery and Ceramics Courses showed a good representation of teachers.
Education Week programmes were organized and carried out by teachers working
co-operatively and individually. An excellent music festival was organized and executed
by the teaching staff, assisted by one of the local service clubs. In May some seventy
teachers from this and adjoining districts attended a day-long reading demonstration.
Educationally, substantial progress has been made during the year. Attendance
at school has been satisfactory and has not been interrupted too seriously by severe
weather. Surveys of educational progress reveal that a good standard of achievement
in school subjects is being maintained.
The enthusiasm, interest, and attention which have constantly been displayed by
School Board members, seeking no other emolument than that of being of service to their
communities, and that of their secretary-treasurers continue to be a source of great
inspiration to myself. I welcome the opportunity to express my heart-felt thanks for
their kindness, consideration, and courtesy to me. I wish, also, to thank the Deputy
Minister and Superintendent of Education and the other members of his staff for the
patience, tolerance, and co-operation they have shown toward me in carrying out my
duties in this inspectorate. N 88 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
School Districts No. 6 (Kootenay Lake), No. 7 (Nelson), and No. 8 (Slocan)
REPORT OF E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.P/ed.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 6 (Kootenay Lake)
A by-law presented to the ratepayers in April of this year passed with a substantial
majority. As a result, the following buildings will soon be under construction: Two
classrooms and an auditorium-gymnasium addition to the Kaslo Elementary-High School,
two one-room schools replacing the aged buildings at Ainsworth and Retallack, and the
addition of four classrooms to the existing one-room school at Riondel.
During this school-year additional teachers were employed for Kaslo and Riondel
Schools, and to meet the continually increasing enrolment, further increases in the staffs
of these schools are planned for next year. It is proposed to reopen the school at Argenta
in September.
No insurmountable difficulties were met in providing teachers in this extended
district, and the resignation, owing to illness, of three rural-school teachers during the
year resulted in a minimum loss of time. In general, a satisfactory quality of instruction
was provided.
School District No. 7 (Nelson)
During this school-year eighty-six teachers were employed, with additional appointments for the Nelson High School, Harold Lakes Elementary, Salmo Elementary (two),
and Central Elementary. Further staff increases are proposed for September in the Salmo
Junior-Senior High (two), Nelson Junior High, Harold Lakes Elementary, and Blewitt
Elementary.   This will bring the total to ninety-one teachers in this school district.
It is interesting to note that this represents an increase of twenty-six teachers since
the establishment of the larger administrative unit in 1946. During this period no school
by-law has provided funds for additional classrooms. The Board has been able to
provide twelve new classrooms and three temporary buildings out of current revenue, but
the remaining classes have been accommodated by utilizing basement and attic rooms by
dividing rooms into two and by enlarged classes in the junior and senior high schools.
It is apparent that a by-law is necessary in this school district to provide for the expansion
that has occurred.
The quality of teacher replacements in this district continued to show the improvement trend of last year. However, it should be mentioned that it was difficult and
sometimes impossible to obtain fully qualified teachers of the secondary level for
Commercial subjects and girls' Physical Education.
School District No. 8 (Slocan)
Thirty-four teachers were employed during the past school-year. This increase of
four over the previous year was made necessary by the greater pupil population in the
Sandon Elementary School and in each of the junior-senior high schools at New Denver,
Slocan City, and South Slocan. The construction of one additional classroom on each
of these three secondary schools was completed shortly after the fall opening. The
additional unit to provide central heating, washroom facilities, and office space for the
Slocan City Elementary School was also completed for this year.
The progress that has been made by this Board of School Trustees in providing
adequate school facilities is commendable. There has been efficient and far-sighted
planning that has produced worth-while results. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 89
School Districts No. 3 (Kimberley), No. 4 (Windermere) and No. 18 (Golden)
REPORT OF I. H. R. JEFFERY, B.A, INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate, with headquarters at Kimberley, embraces the large municipal
school district of Kimberley and the two large rural school districts of Windermere and
Golden.
In January a third senior high division was opened at the Invermere Elementary-
Senior High School in Windermere School District. This was prompted not so much
by a general district population increase as by the additional holding power of the year-
old secondary school and its improved facilities for increased course options.
The buildings and facilities for each of the seven schools in Golden School District
are in need of attention or replacement. The Board of School Trustees and the general
populace are becoming increasingly aware of the need of material improvement, which
should in turn advance general education according to needs, abilities, and interests,
especially on the secondary-school level. The Board plans to present a money by-law
for permission to erect a six-room elementary-senior high replacement at Golden and
a four-room elementary-senior high building at Parson for consolidation of Harrogate,
Castledale, Parson, and McMurdo rural sections.
A Kimberley School District by-law for a five-year building programme was defeated
on March 17th. Estimates based on a recent check indicate a sharp increase in school
population in the immediate future. Industrial expansion under way indicates a further
population increase.   A reduced by-law is being prepared for presentation in the fall.
The cost of providing the necessary pupil-transportation facilities is creating great
concern in this inspectorate, especially in the large rural school districts of Windermere
and Golden. It is becoming increasingly difficult for Boards to decide on limits for the
conveyance of pupils.
Especially in Kimberley, the most populous section of the inspectorate, there can be
noticed an awakening of interest in adult education, both academically and vocationally.
During the past year Kimberley Parent-Teacher Association organized and sponsored
night-school classes in pottery-making, sewing, and woodwork. A short course in English
for new Canadians was offered. It is felt that the stage is now set for extended night-
school organization directly under the Board and the Department of Education.
With a view to the desirability of establishing kindergarten classes in selected public
schools of the school district, a representative group of Kimberley citizens co-operated
with the Inspector of Schools, principals, and teachers in the formation of the Kimberley
Pre-school Education Committee. Its initial organization and accomplishments indicate
that the Committee should prove of educational value.
The testing programme conducted by the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research
was supplemented by a minimal district programme of tests administered as a teaching
aid. Standardized test ordering, distribution, and instruction for one-room rural schools
by near-by larger schools proved effective.
The East Kootenay Administrative Council continued this year with regular
meetings. The deliberations of principals and vice-principals, together with the three
Inspectors of Schools, were most valuable.
During the school-year amicable relationships have existed between the three
Boards of School Trustees, their secretary-treasurers, and the respective teaching staffs.
I am indebted to all district personnel for their whole-hearted co-operation. Trustees
and representatives have given generously of their time and effort to ever improve
education. I wish to express my gratitude and appreciation to the officials of the
Department of Education and to other branches of government service for leadership
and assistance. N 90
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
School Districts No. 1 (Fernie) and No. 2 (Cranbrook)
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.),
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School population has steadily increased in this area since the reorganization
of 1946, most markedly in District No. 2. The following table offers a comparison of
enrolments in June, 1946, and June, 1951.
Enrolment
Increase
1946
1951
of Increase
District No. 1
Grades I to VI 	
674
295
173
774
312
208
100
17
35
15
Grades VII to IX    	
6
Grades X to XIII      .
20
Totals   .,.,„,
1,142
1,294
152
13
District No. 2
Grades I to VI    .. .
610
231
142
904
325
160
294
94
18
48
Grades VII to IX 	
41
Grades X to XIII 	
13
Totals '   	
983
1,389
406
41
This increase, coupled with the growing tendency for population to concentrate
in the larger centres, has brought accommodation problems. In District No. 1 additional
classrooms were opened at Jaffray and Grasmere, while a new school was established
at Foothills, 16 miles north of Natal. Money by-laws providing for expenditure of more
than $1,000,000 were presented to the ratepayers and passed by convincing majorities.
Plans are now being completed for a large addition at Fernie, a new junior-senior high
school at Sparwood for the Michel-Natal area, new rural schools at Elko and Newgate,
a one-room addition at Jaffray, and reconstruction of the existing Fernie and Michel-Natal
buildings. It is hoped that at least some of these projects will be well under way by the
close of 1952. In District No. 2 the Board was forced to reopen the old Cranbrook
High School building to furnish facilities for four primary divisions.
District No. 2, with a small total assessment and a relatively large number of pupils,
has had to face an increasingly difficult financial problem in providing for school costs.
Stringent economy and some curtailment of the least essential school services have been
necessary. Both districts have also had difficulty in staffing their secondary schools with
fully qualified specialist and junior high-school teachers.
In the purely educational field there has been a gratifying improvement at the
elementary-school level in standards attained by pupils in the tool subjects, while there
has been no lowering of achievement in the appreciation and content aspects of the
curriculum.
Miss Lida Zinovich, of the Fernie Elementary-Senior High School, brought distinction
to herself and her school by winning the University Entrance Scholarship for the area
in the June examinations.
During the year, tests in spelling from Grades II to IX and in arithmetic from
Grades III to VI were administered by the teachers under the Inspector's guidance.
In addition, some restricted use of standardized tests was made in the smaller schools in
Grades V, VI, and VIII. The larger schools plan their own standardized testing
programme.
Increasing interest in school dramatics was manifested by the large number of entries
and the high standards of performance by schools of this inspectorate in the annual REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 91
festival at Creston.    Local productions in both music and drama showed a marked
increase in number as well.
Thanks are again due to the members of the two Boards of Trustees and their local
representatives for their unremitting efforts on behalf of the children of the area.
School District No. 11 (Trail)
REPORT OF W. E. LUCAS, B.A., B.Paed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
During the year 1951-52 a total of 4,705 school-children were enrolled in School
District No. 11 (Trail) and 175 teachers were employed to teach them. The increase
in the number of pupils over the preceding year amounted to 169.
The extensive building programme of this district was continued. In September,
1951, the J. Lloyd Crowe High School was occupied by the senior high-school students
of the City of Trail, the Municipality of Tadanac, and the rural areas of Warfield,
Fruitvale, Parks Siding, Beaver Falls-Montrose, Columbia Gardens, Casino, Oasis, and
Genelle. This modern, composite high school is designed and equipped to meet the
varied interests, needs, and abilities of students in Grades X to XIII inclusive. In addition
to the usual academic courses leading to University Entrance and Senior Matriculation,
the school provides courses in the Fine Arts and in the vocational and technical fields.
The shops for auto mechanics, the metal trades, carpentry, and the electrical trades are
exceptionally well equipped for the industrial centre of Trail.
The subdivisions at Genelle and Montrose were provided with new one-room and
two-room schools respectively. These were occupied in November, 1951, and relieved
the overcrowding in other schools.
The excellent job of remodelling the East Trail Elementary School was completed
for the opening of school in September. This school was renamed the Laura J. Morrish
School as a tribute to the work of Mrs. Morrish, who retired as principal of that school
in June, 1951.
The Fruitvale Elementary-Junior High School is nearing completion and will be
ready for occupancy in September, 1952.
All schools in District No. 11 appeared to be well organized, and the standard of
instruction was maintained at a high level. No great difficulty was experienced in staffing
the schools. There is, however, a definite shortage of good qualified Commercial teachers,
Music teachers, and Physical Education instructors.
Principals of both the graded elementary schools and the secondary schools have
been given time to supervise instruction and to provide the necessary leadership for the
in-service training of teachers.
Regular meetings of the elementary-school principals were held during the year to
discuss problems and to present material intended to improve the work in the schools.
These proved of value to all concerned and will be continued in the future.
All secondary schools and most of the elementary schools have maintained an active
interest in drama and music. Student groups participated in the West Kootenay Music
and Drama Festivals and in many intramural programmes. The keen interest shown and
the high level of attainment were most encouraging and were a tribute to the principals
and teachers in charge.
The testing programme of previous years was continued and expanded somewhat
in the junior high-school grades. These standardized tests were used to discover and
diagnose pupil weaknesses in order that resulting instruction might be more effective. N 92 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1951-52
Classes for new Canadians were continued in the Trail Central School and in the
Trail Junior High School.
Night-school classes continued to expand, especially in the vocational courses. The
excellent facilities which will be available in the J. Lloyd Crowe High School will make
possible many new courses for the year 1952-53.
In conclusion, I should like to express my appreciation for the co-operation and help
which I have received during the year from the Department of Education, from the School
Board and its secretary-treasurer, and from the principals and teachers of School District
No. 11.
School Districts No. 24 (Kamloops) and No. 31 (Merritt)
REPORT OF H. McARTHUR, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The new junior-senior high-school building begun last year in Kamloops is now
nearing completion, and the Board expects that it will be ready for occupation in
September.
In several other respects this has been a year of comparative frustration for the
Kamloops Board. Rejection of the budget by the Kamloops City Council led to
arbitration proceedings, which resulted in elimination of all capital amounts. Urgent
improvements to buildings and grounds have had to be postponed. Much needed
equipment cannot be provided. The Board is left without even means of equipping the
Allan Matthews Elementary School, which is to open in September in the old high-school
building. Another cause of frustration was the long delay in filling the vacancies caused
by the lack of nominations for School Board positions in the municipal elections. It was
not until June that the Board was able to secure its complement of city members.
The Kamloops Board suffered a serious loss in May when Mr. A. F. Matthews, who
for forty-three years had been connected with education in the district as principal of the
Kamloops High School, Inspector of Schools, and School Trustee, retired. As a tribute
to his outstanding work, the Board has given his name to the city elementary school now
being organized.
The return last January to the citizens of Merritt Municipality of the right to elect
a council and school trustees was welcomed by the School Board. This change now
makes it possible for the Board to submit money by-laws to the municipal ratepayers.
Hitherto, all sums required for capital as well as for operating expenses have had to be
secured through the annual budget.
Two classrooms, constituting the first unit of an extensive addition to the Merritt
school buildings, are now under construction. The new building at Douglas Lake will
be opened in September.
A health unit under the direction of Dr. John Leishman is at present being organized
in the area covered by Districts Nos. 24, 25, 26, 29, 30, and 31. It replaces the former
nursing service.
The trustees in this inspectorate are conscientious and sincere in their efforts to
improve the schools. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 93
School Districts No. 5 (Creston), No. 9 (Castlegar), and No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
report of j. j. Mckenzie, b.a., inspector of schools
During the past year the number of teachers in this inspectorate has increased by ten.
The increases have occurred in School District No. 5 (Creston) and School District No. 9
(Castlegar). During the coming year further increases will be necessary in Districts
No. 9 and No. 10. The increases in school population are in general due to the opening
of new residential areas and an increase in the holding power of the secondary schools
because of the broader programme which can now be offered in some of the consolidated
high schools.
School District No. 5 (Creston)
The enrolment in both elementary and secondary schools has remained steady
throughout the year. A slight increase in the secondary enrolment is expected this fall.
Last September secondary-school pupils occupied the new Prince Charles Junior-Senior
High School, which was officially opened in April by the Honourable W. T. Straith,
Minister of Education. Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister and Superintendent, also took
part in the ceremonies.
During the year the students of the Vocational Agriculture class carried out an
extensive programme which proved very worth while. A number of these students
attended an agricultural fair in Bozeman, Mont. They participated in the many branches
of the programme, earning for themselves a good reputation and the praise of the officials.
A song-fest, entitled " Musical Trails," involving all elementary schools of the district
was held in April. All pupils participated in the programme. The quality of the music
rendered and the enjoyment derived by the pupils speak well for the instruction and
supervision given music throughout the district. Drama in the secondary school received
good staff leadership, and the students benefited greatly from this activity.
The reorganization of the Creston Elementary School into primary and intermediate
divisions was completed. Pupils were grouped homogeneously, and instruction geared
to their abilities. Results to date prove promising. I wish to commend the staff for their
full co-operation and the principal for his leadership and supervision.
School District No. 9 (Castlegar)
The school population in this district continues to increase, particularly in the areas
of Kinnaird and Castlegar. This increase is likely to continue for some time and will
undoubtedly necessitate finding additional accommodation in the near future. A substantial increase in the enrolment of the Stanley Humphries Junior-Senior High School
is expected this fall. Senior Matriculation will be offered for the first time in this school
district, commencing in September. The results of the University Entrance examinations
speak well for the quality of instruction offered during the past year and the efficient
leadership given by the principal.
The school which was organized at Glade last year continued to thrive to the point
of overcrowding. Additional accommodation may be necessary in order to take care of
the contemplated increase.
It appears that the building expansion thought necessary in the Castlegar area as
a result of Celgar operations can be postponed for some time.
School District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
The past year has seen an increase in the enrolment, particularly in the Needles and
Nakusp regions. This term it has been necessary to add a teacher to the high-school staff
at Nakusp, using one of the old buildings as a classroom. This now means that all
available school buildings in Nakusp are in use. N 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
As the teacher turnover in this district is somewhat high, there was some difficulty
in filling all vacancies with fully qualified teachers. However, all schools were staffed,
even though some vacancies occurred in the middle of the school-year.
General
All schools were staffed during the year, although there was some difficulty finding
fully qualified secondary-school teachers. It appears that with the commencement of the
present school term the same difficulty will be in evidence. This is particularly true in
the fields of Physical Education and Commerce. However, it is hoped that suitable
instructors will be found before school opening for the vacancies which exist at present
in these fields.
During the year a full testing programme was carried out in all districts for diagnostic
and achievement purposes. These tests supplemented those given by the Department.
All teachers and principals co-operated to the fullest in this programme. Tests in spelling,
which originated in this office, were administered to all junior high-school students at
various times during the year.
In conclusion, I wish to acknowledge with thanks the splendid spirit of co-operation
shown by members of the School Boards, secretary-treasurers, principals, and teachers
during the past year.
School Districts No. 25 (Barriere), No. 26 (Birch Island), No. 29 (Lillooet),
and No. 30 (Ashcroft)
REPORT OF F. A. McLELLAN, M.A., B.P^d., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 25 (Barriere)
The new high school was completed this year and officially opened in May by the
Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education, and Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister
and Superintendent. In June the first class to receive all their high-school education
within the district graduated. Of the forty-four high-school students at present enrolled
in the new school, it is probable that not more than ten would have received a high-school
education had not a district high school been established. Increased enrolments, particularly in the lower grades, and the need of replacing some of the very old buildings still in
use would indicate further building requirements in the near future.
School District No. 26 (Birch Island)
This year marked the completion of several years' careful work and planning by the
Board of School Trustees in co-operation with the Department of Education in the official
opening by the Honourable W. T. Straith of Clearwater Elementary-High School. This
school is an adaptation to local needs of the Department's Standard Plan No. 22.
This district has been faced during the past several years with an increasingly
difficult task in staffing the schools with suitably qualified teachers who are prepared to
remain longer than one year. Housing accommodation of a type more comparable
to urban conditions appears to be one source of the trouble. No doubt some serious
consideration will be given to this aspect of the problem in succeeding years.
School enrolments continue to increase at a rapid pace, the increase over 1951 being
approximately 18 per cent, with an equal or larger increase being apparent for 1952-53. reports of district inspectors n 95
School District No. 29 (Lillooet)
The school-year 1951-52 showed continued progress in educational growth, and all
schools were functioning adequately. Pachelqua School was closed, and pupils are being
transported by bus to Lillooet. Night-school was introduced at Bralorne, and Commercial, Industrial Arts, and English classes were conducted successfully. The increased
number of secondary-school pupils carrying on in larger schools since the introduction
of Home Economics and Industrial Arts is quite noticeable. A new school and teacherage
across the Fraser River at Pavilion and an addition of an activity-room at Lillooet are
proposed. The joining of this district with the new Central Health Unit means better
health care for the pupils of this area.
Mention should also be made of the continued co-operation of the Parent-Teacher
Associations and business-men of this district, which makes it possible for students to
attend the district and Interior track meets, and this year for a large number of pupils
to attend the Royal Visit.
School District No. 30 (Ashcroft)
The past year has shown a marked increase in enrolment, particularly at the Clinton
and Lytton Schools, one division being added at Clinton and Lytton. In June, 1952, the
agreement was finalized with the Department of Citizenship and Immigration whereby
the pupils from the St. George's Indian Residential School from the Grade VII level and
up would be enrolled in the Lytton High-Elementary School. Approximately sixty pupils
from St. George's School are now attending the Lytton School. The Department of
Citizenship and Immigration is paying a grant toward the cost of the construction of the
new school on a per pupil basis. Full courses in Home Economics and Industrial Arts
are now being offered at Lytton for the first time, and the Home Economics facilities
at Ashcroft and Clinton are now being enlarged.
A new school has been established at Loon Lake, where cabins have been rented
on a temporary basis, offering schooling to some fifteen pupils who have not been able
to attend school previously.
A large fifty-five-passenger bus has been purchased for the Lytton transportation.
An extra bus has been added to the Clinton run and the bus route extended approximately
10 miles north, now going to the 74-Mile and picking up eight to ten children who have
not been able to attend school previously.
School District No. 30 has recently joined the South Central Health Unit No. 6 and
is working toward obtaining preventive dental service.
For a variety of reasons this district met with some difficulty this year in staffing the
rural schools. Once again this district placed first in the Central Mainland District
Track Meet.
In concluding this report, I wish to express my thanks to all my School Boards, their
secretary-treasurers, the principals and their staffs for the splendid co-operation they have
extended to me throughout the year. The trustees in particular have given most generously
of their time and effort to bring about satisfactory solutions of their many problems. The
fact that they serve so well without remuneration is worthy of the highest commendation. N 96 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
School Districts No. 59 (Peace River South), No. 60 (Peace River North), and
Unattached School Districts at Atlin, Camp Mile 163, Camp Mile 300, Camp
Mile 456, Fort Nelson, Fort Nelson Airport, Lower Post, and Telegraph
Creek.
REPORT OF E. MARRIOTT, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The opening of the John Hart Highway in July, 1952, has provided a direct outlet
from the Peace River area to the Pacific Coast. This, together with the extensive activity
in the development of the oil and gas of this region, will have a marked effect on the
economy of this part of the Province and will result in the need for additional educational
facilities throughout the district.
The improvements to the existing schools and the provision for new schools projected
in the by-laws for both School Districts No. 59 and No. 60 and approved by the ratepayers in 1950 have been completed over the past three-year period. This building
programme provided facilities of a good standard for the area as a whole, with the
exception of the inability of School District No. 60 to complete the construction of its
new junior-senior high school owim; to greatly increased construction costs. The growth
in school enrolment has exceeded the increase anticipated in 1950, and as a consequence
the schools are already filled to capacity. Additional classroom space in the larger
centres will be required in the immediate future.
The completion and the official opening of the new elementary schools at Pouce
Coupe and Dawson Creek in School District No. 59 were of outstanding significance
to the educational progress of the Peace River area. The Honourable W. T. Straith,
Minister of Education, and Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of
Education, participated in the opening ceremony. The new twenty-room elementary
school at Dawson Creek provides the best in modern school accommodation and is
a tribute to the progressive and untiring efforts of the members of the Board of School
Trustees to meet the educational needs of a growing community. The improvement
of the schools in the rural districts has also been noteworthy. The new schools completed during the summer of 1951 at East Pouce, Sunset Prairie, and Willow Valley
were in use during the past school-year. An additional classroom was added to the
school at Moberly Lake and a new school was opened at Little Prairie. The old school
at Kelly Lake, replaced in 1951, was reopened as a temporary classroom to provide for
a second division.
The enrolment at the South Peace Junior-Senior High School has grown steadily,
necessitating the provision of two temporary classrooms for the coming school-year.
This increase in enrolment at the secondary level has also been reflected in the demand
for more dormitory accommodation. A new wing is under construction and will provide
the required accommodation for September, 1952.
Three new rural schools are under construction for School District No. 60. These
include a two-room school at Montney, a two-room school at North Pine, and a one-
room school at Upper Pine.   These schools will replace outmoded buildings.
The delay in the construction of the North Peace Junior-Senior High School has
been a serious handicap in providing a satisfactory secondary programme for this
district. The first unit of the new school housing the shops for Industrial Arts and
Home Economics has been completed and will be occupied during the 1952-53 school-
year. Temporary accommodation will continue to be used for the remaining classes
until further construction is authorized by the ratepayers.
Camp Mile 300 at Fort Nelson on the Alaska Highway is the largest centre of
population between Fort St. John and Whitehorse in the Yukon Territory. The expansion of commercial facilities at this point reflects the mining and oil activity in the
north-eastern portion of our Province.   Provision for a superior school at this centre REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 97
is planned. The enrolment at the old trading-post at Fort Nelson has steadily increased,
necessitating a larger classroom. This school provides accommodation for Indian children from surrounding districts. A new school was provided at the maintenance camp
at Mile 456 on the Alaska Highway in September, 1951. A new permanent army camp
is being established at Mile 295, which will also require school accommodation within
a year.   The school enrolment at Atlin and Telegraph Creek remains relatively stable.
It was possible to secure fully trained teachers for all of the schools in the Peace
River inspectorate during the past school-year. The number of teachers with full
qualifications for their respective assignments has steadily increased, and a consequent
improvement in educational standards is noted.
The Boards of School Trustees, the secretary-treasurers, the principals, and the
teachers are all deserving of the highest tribute for their co-operation and fruitful efforts
in meeting the educational needs of this northern inspectorate. Toward the end of the
school term the appointment of Mr. G. E. Johnson, supervising principal of the Dawson
Creek Elementary School, to the staff of Inspectors for this Province was announced.
School Districts No. 23 (Kelowna) and No. 77 (Summerland)
REPORT OF A. S. MATHESON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
With the immediate building programme completed in both these districts, the school-
year has been one of quiet effort to achieve the aims for which our system of public-
school education is maintained, namely, to foster and promote the highest possible
development of the individual child in ways that are at once conducive to his individual
well-being and all-round growth and to the good of the society of which he is a member.
The needs of the whole child—physical, mental, moral, and social—and the challenge
to promote the development of enlightened and worthy citizens have been kept constantly
before administrators, supervisors, and teachers alike. It is gratifying to me to be able
to report that the great majority of our school trustees and professional workers are
unselfishly devoted to these ideals of education and are striving, year by year, to improve
educational policies, programmes, and procedures in order to realize their purpose more
fully. The number of those who think in terms of academic achievement to the virtual
exclusion of considerations of individual and social welfare is pleasingly diminishing.
Nevertheless, worthy standards of academic attainment, commensurate with the ability
of the pupil, are receiving due emphasis. As a result, both the holding power of the
schools and the quality and scope of their training are improving and increasingly meeting the varying needs of the pupils and the community. Many problems and difficulties
beset the way, but real progress is apparent.
School District No. 23 (Kelowna)
The net enrolment was 3,967, of which 2,400 were in elementary schools and 1,567
in secondary schools. The teaching staff numbered 143, and there were twenty-one
schools in operation, as follows:—
Four 1-teacher elementary schools.
Five 2-teacher elementary schools.
Four 3-teacher elementary schools.
Two 5-teacher elementary schools.
One 10-teacher elementary school.
One 26-teacher elementary school. N 98 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
One 24-teacher junior high school.
One 6-teacher junior-senior high school.
One 21-teacher junior-senior high school.
One 20-teacher senior high school.
Vocational day-school classes and night-school classes were conducted in the
Kelowna, Rutland, and Westbank centres. In September Auto Mechanics was added
to the vocational offerings in Kelowna, and the results have been encouraging. The
local garage operators lent their enthusiastic support to the project and, through an
advisory committee, provided excellent guidance to the initial effort. They were also
very generous in loaning equipment to supplement the Board's initial provision. The
work in Vocational Agriculture at Kelowna, Rutland, and Westbank has continued to
gain momentum. Amongst the night-school classes special mention should be made of
the classes in English and Citizenship held in Kelowna for new Canadians. By means
of these classes over thirty immigrants were assisted in their adjustment to a new life.
Another pleasing feature in this district is the giving of instruction on band instruments
and music as credit courses and the development of school bands at Kelowna and Rutland.    During the past two years much progress has been made in this respect.
New building requirements in the near future include:—
(1) A two-teacher elementary school for the rapidly developing Lakeview
Heights (V.L.A.) area on the west side of Okanagan Lake.
(2) Additional space for the vocational courses at Kelowna and Rutland.
(3) The erection of the deferred Winfield Junior High, for which provision
was made in the 1949 by-laws.
(4) The replacement or reconstruction of some old rural elementary buildings,
especially those at Westbank and Peachland. The School Board made
provision in its 1952 estimates for the reconstruction of the latter, but,
because of the determined opposition of the Kelowna City Council, the
necessary sum was struck out by an Arbitration Board.
School District No. 77 (Summerland)
The net enrolment was 761—460 in the elementary-school grades and 301 in the
secondary-school grades. Two consolidated schools meet the needs of the whole district—an elementary school of twelve divisions and a junior-senior high school of eleven
divisions.   The total teaching staff numbers twenty-seven.
This was the first full year in which the new junior-senior high school was in operation, and a noteworthy improvement in the effectiveness and scope of the work has been
discernible. The Commercial and Practical Arts courses have been firmly established,
and the curricular offerings have been expanded. The introduction of courses in Agriculture and Biology is to be commended. Plans are being made for the expansion of
the work in music by the provision of instruction in band instruments and music and the
organization of a school band.
In the matter of buildings and equipment, this district is generally in an excellent
position. However, the on-coming enrolment indicates that both the Industrial Arts
and the Home Economics Departments will have to be enlarged in 1953. Further
expansion in the elementary-school enrolment would necessitate new accommodation
if reoccupying basement rooms is to be avoided.
Much use is being made of the new high-school facilities by adult groups, and the
School Board has pursued a generous and enlightened policy in respect to such use.
Last winter several night-school classes were successfully operated. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 99
School Districts No. 27 (Williams Lake), No. 28 (Quesnel), and
Unattached School Districts at Chezacut and Tatlayoko
REPORT OF W. J. MOUAT, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
This district has had to contend with problems arising from a general population
increase, several temporary increases due to lumbering operations, and the fact that it
has a very large and thinly populated area. The excellent co-operation of the Board of
School Trustees, secretary-treasurer, principals, and teachers has made it possible to do
this without loss to the students, although it was necessary to readjust bus routes, temporarily use inadequate rooms, and resort to other expedients.
The Board has implemented the greater part of its by-law of the previous year. As
a result, this September will see the Williams Lake High School in excellent new quarters,
a new high-school dormitory operating in Williams Lake, a completely modern two-room
school at 100-Mile, and several new modern one-room schools. Last September the
Board instituted Industrial Arts and Home Economics classes. These classes are looking
forward to new quarters in September.
Five Board members and many representatives must come over an average distance
of 60 miles to meetings. In both cases the attendance is excellent, and the progress this
district has made is due, to a great extent, to the unselfish service given by its trustees and
representatives.
School District No. 28 (Quesnel)
Quesnel District has been faced with a rapidly expanding school population. This
last year saw a period of double-shifting in Quesnel Elementary School, followed by the
use of temporary accommodation in church halls, a community hall, basements, a converted shack, and a number of reconditioned obsolete buildings.
During this time the Board, through the excellent work of its secretary-treasurer and
maintenance staffs, made these quarters as serviceable as possible and, at the same time,
planned a comprehensive by-law to take care of the immediate future needs of the district.
This by-law secured the approval of the voters by a wide majority. Consequently,
although conditions will be little improved and perhaps even more crowded this school-
year, a year from now should see a great improvement.
It is only fair to say that the principals and teachers worked under extremely difficult
conditions this last year. Their loyalty and enthusiasm overcame a good deal of the
difficulties, and I am sure that, coupled with the tireless energy and enthusiasm of the
secretary-treasurer and the Board, it will surmount them again this year.
Chezacut
The Chezacut Board continued to provide a very valuable service in this community.
Tatlayoko
As Official Trustee, I reopened this school in September, 1951. It seems to be
providing a needed service well. N 100 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1951-52
School Districts No. 50 (Queen Charlotte) and No. 68 (Nanaimo)
REPORT OF WILLIAM A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D.P;ed.,
F.R.S.A., F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment
During the school-year 1951-52 there were 7 teachers employed in School District
No. 50 and 121 teachers employed in School District No. 68. These 128 teachers
enrolled a total of 3,341 students.
Buildings, Grounds, and Equipment
In School District No. 50 the funds from the $200,000 by-law are being utilized
to build a new elementary-high school at Masset and an elementary school at Queen
Charlotte City. These two schools will be ready for occupancy in September. Two
additional elementary schools—one at Sandspit and one at Port Clements—will be built
during the next school-year. These buildings should meet the needs of the Queen Charlotte School District for a considerable length of time.
In the rapidly expanding School District No. 68, the need for new accommodation
continues to require the addition of ten rooms per year. To meet this need and to replace
the obsolete junior high-school building, a money by-law for approximately $2,000,000
will have to be presented to the ratepayers in the very near future.
Health Services
The health services of all schools in this inspectorate continue to be provided by
the Central Vancouver Island Public Health Unit. In addition to the vast amount of
work done among the pre-school children by the personnel of the health unit, a very
thorough programme of preventive work in immunization, inoculation, and vaccination
has been completed for those in attendance at the public schools.
Mental-health clinics were held monthly by the travelling clinic to assist those children who had special behaviour problems.
A full-time school dentist was added to the health-unit staff this year.
In addition to the regular health services, the Nanaimo District School Board provides a mental-health co-ordinator, who has achieved excellent results during his two
years in this capacity.
Staff and Educational Progress
The fact that very few staff changes were necessary during the past two years is an
indication that the teachers in these districts are generally satisfied with their conditions
of employment. In the few cases where staff replacements were necessary, the School
Boards were able to secure outstanding teachers who adjusted themselves effectively to
the existing organization.
It is a pleasure to report that the educational growth of the students and the
standard of classroom instruction continues to be maintained by these well-qualified
instructors at a very high level.
Conclusion
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation for the co-operation which I have
received during the year from the officials of the Department of Education and from the
teaching staffs and School Boards of School Districts No. 50 and No. 68. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 101
School Districts No. 43 (Coquitlam) and No. 46 (Sechelt)
REPORT OF C. T. RENDLE, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 43 (Coquitlam)
An extensive building programme was completed in September and was marked by
the opening of the following schools: —
(a) Viscount Alexander Elementary School, Port Coquitlam.
(b) Moody Junior-Senior High School and Moody Elementary School, City
of Port Moody.
(c) Como Lake Junior-Senior High School and Mountain View Elementary,
Municipality of Coquitlam.
The Viscount Alexander Elementary School was officially opened by the Honourable
W. T. Straith, Minister of Education. Como Lake Junior-Senior High, Moody Junior-
Senior High, and Moody and Mountain View Elementary Schools were opened by
Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education.
The new construction provided approximately sixty-five additional classrooms.
Accommodation and equipment are excellent. The Board of School Trustees is to be
congratulated upon the successful completion of its initial building programme. There
is every indication that additional building will have to be undertaken in the near future.
The additional classrooms made it possible to eliminate shift classes for the first time
in several years.
The small three-room high school in Port Coquitlam was closed. The students
now attend the Moody High School and participate in the advantages of a larger school
offering a broad and varied programme adjusted to pupil requirements. Grades VII and
VIII students attending the Viscount Alexander Elementary School are also transported
to Port Moody for instruction in Home Economics and Industrial Arts.
The Moody High School was accredited in June, 1952.
An efficient maintenance department continues to maintain and improve the older
buildings within the school district.
In addition to the testing programme carried out by the Division of Tests, Standards,
and Research, a common testing programme is conducted by the principals.
Principals' meetings were held regularly throughout the year. Discussion of
common problems of administration and supervision have been helpful in the successful
operation of the schools. Monthly meetings of the primary teachers, under the direction
of Miss Andrew and a committee of teachers, were instrumental in improving the quality
of teaching at the primary level.
The dental programme established by the Board in conjunction with the Simon
Fraser Health Unit has been well received. Co-operation between the school authorities
and local department of health is commendable.
Miss Bournes, principal of the Alderson Elementary School, retired in June of this
year, after thirty-four years of valued service to the community. She was honoured, on
the occasion of her retirement, by the Board of School Trustees, local teachers' association, and parent-teacher organization.
School District No. 46 (Sechelt)
The completion of the building programme in the Sechelt District provides accommodation which compares favourably with other school districts. New schools are
located at Gibsons, Roberts Creek, Pender Harbour, Egmont, and Nelson Island.
The Elphinstone Junior-Senior High School, complete with library, science laboratory, shops, and auditorium-gymnasium, provides excellent facilities for a secondary-
school programme.   This school was opened in February, 1952.
PROVINCIAL LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B. C. N 102 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Junior and senior high-school students formerly attending the Sechelt Elementary-
High School are now transported to Gibsons. The consolidation of the high schools
has made it possible to offer a reasonable programme of instruction, including Home
Economics, Industrial Arts, and Commercial courses. It is anticipated that the high-
school students from Port Mellon will be transported to Gibsons when the road between
these two centres is completed. The additions and renovations to the elementary schools
at Gibsons and Sechelt should also be mentioned.
The services of a maintenance-man were obtained this year. The Board has been
well compensated for the additional expenditure involved, and it is to be commended for
the improved physical conditions in the school buildings.
Dental services were also provided in School District No. 46. Some difficulties were
experienced by the Board in retaining the services of a part-time dentist. However, much
good work has been accomplished. The services of the public health nurse are appreciated throughout the area.
Conclusion
The interest and co-operation of the Boards of School Trustees, secretary-treasurers,
area representatives, principals, and teachers are most gratifying.
My sincere appreciation is extended to them for the many courtesies during my first
year in this inspectorate. I also wish to acknowledge the invaluable assistance of my
predecessor, Inspector C. J. Frederickson, in acquainting me with the problems of the
school districts.
School Districts No. 35 (Langley) and No. 48 (Howe Sound)
REPORT OF H. D. STAFFORD, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 35 (Langley)
Finance.—The secretary-treasurer to the School Board gives close attention to sound
procedures in his administration of the business and financial affairs of the school district.
Trustees spend much time making certain that true economy is practised. Scrutiny of
details and thorough review of their policies in management and education precede the
preparation of the annual school budget. It is a dollars-and-cents expression of their
deliberations.
Accommodation.—Favourable comments upon the neat appearance of school buildings show that systematic repair and maintenance of property have been successful. The
need for additional buildings is stressed by full utilization of elementary buildings and
emphasized by an overcrowded secondary school.
Staffing.—Most cordial relationships continue between its many employees and the
School Board. Concern is expressed over the inability to obtain fully qualified teachers
for Physical Education, Commerce, Home Economics, and Industrial Arts.
School Programme.—Close ties unite teachers and parents in the eighteen community-centred elementary schools, as they share responsibilities for child-growth. In
addition to the regular curricula of a large secondary school, many stimulating co-
curricular activities are available for student participation.
With few exceptions, the entire teaching staff has given good service; service considerably beyond the implications of contract. Mrs. T. Gregg gave effective leadership
at a refreshing one-day clinic for the study of techniques in primary reading. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 103
School District No. 48 (Howe Sound)
Finance.—Financial matters receive close examination and are in good order. The
major building projects having been completed, unless there is unforeseen expansion,
there should be a slight decrease in tax requisitions.
Accommodation.—On May 21st, 1952, the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of
Education, and Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education,
officiated at the opening of a Quonset-type school building at Pemberton and an imposing
junior-senior high-school building at Squamish. The School Board is to be congratulated
for the attention given to the school building projects within the district.
The senior high school at Britannia Mines was closed at the end of June. A five-
year contract is to be negotiated for the conveyance of students in Grades VII to XII to
Squamish. This is done so that the high-school students may have better facilities and
greater teacher resources.
Staffing.—Little difficulty has been experienced in obtaining teachers for the schools;
however, the problem of obtaining satisfactory living accommodation was not readily
resolved.
School Programme.-—-Teachers and trustees are to be commended for their concern
with the welfare of pupils and especially for the opportunities given to students to broaden
their point of view. The educational trips to Vancouver, the University, and the Provincial Legislature were most profitable.
While not entirely satisfied with student scores on Departmental tests in the high
schools, I am confident that, with the increased stability of the teaching staff, a higher
standard of pupil performance will be realized.
School Districts No. 20 (Salmon Arm) and No. 19 (Revelstoke)
REPORT OF L. B. STIBBS, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
There are two large municipal school districts in this inspectorate. Salmon Arm
(District No. 20) is a very large one and is made up of the City of Salmon Arm, the
District Municipality, and an extensive rural portion. Revelstoke (District No. 19) comprises the City of Revelstoke and the rural area. There has been a steady but not a heavy
increase in school population over the last four years in both districts. Consolidation of
schools, especially in the Salmon Arm District, has made the increase in pupil population
appear somewhat greater than is actually the case. The increase in school enrolment from
September, 1948, to September, 1951, was 110 for Revelstoke and 151 for Salmon Arm.
During the year the new addition to the Falkland Elementary High School was
officially opened by the Inspector of Schools. This completed the extensive consolidation
of schools throughout the district. It would appear that too much consolidation has taken
place in District No. 20, and the School Board will now have to consider the advisability
of opening at least some of the former rural schools so that young children can be educated in buildings closer to their homes. The Salmon Arm District owns and operates
eleven buses, while private contracts supply transportation as well.
A modern, attractive addition to the Revelstoke High School was completed in
November, 1951, and on the twenty-first of that month the building was officially opened
by the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education, and Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy
Minister and Superintendent of Education. Thus a well-planned building programme
commenced by the School Board several years ago was successfully completed. While
some improvements could naturally be effected in the schools throughout the district, the N 104 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
renovations, additions, and constructions completed have brought about very desirable
standards. It is interesting to note the mining development now progressing on properties north of Revelstoke and in the Lardeau country. It would appear that schools will
be needed in these communities in the near future.
A confused and complicated problem developed in the Salmon Arm School District
when a Board of Arbitration ordered a reduction of $80,500 in the amount of the ordinary
estimates for 1951. The parties concerned were the District School Board, City Council,
and the District Municipality. Since the problem was a local one, numerous meetings
were held jointly and separately by these bodies, as well as by interested parents in the
areas concerned, to attempt to find a solution to this unusual problem but without
complete success. It subsequently developed that the city agreed to pay its share of the
proposed reduction, and the Department of Education stated that the normal grants for
the rural portion of the district would continue to be paid. However, the District Council
decided to stand by the arbitration award. The School Board, much against its will, had
therefore to restrict school attendance owing to lack of funds. On September 30th a
number of teachers and other personnel were dismissed, and for the next three months
approximately 510 pupils from the District Municipality did not attend school, although
those from the city and rural areas did so. While these pupils were without school
accommodation, they were not denied the facilities of education, since the Department of
Education made available correspondence courses to all without charge. A large portion
of the municipal children affected enrolled in the Correspondence School, and when they
returned to school in January, 1952, it was found that many had made excellent use of
the correspondence lessons.
I would take this opportunity to sincerely thank the trustees and the teachers who
have served their communities and schools so efficiently and conscientiously during this
past school-year. I would especially commend the members of the Salmon Arm Board
and the teaching staff for their co-operation and assistance during 1951.
School Districts No. 71 (Courtenay) and No. 72 (Campbell River)
REPORT OF C. I. TAYLOR, B.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment
School District No. 72 continued to show steady increase during the year. In January, 1952, there were 1,306 pupils, as compared to 1,066 in January, 1951. Most of
this increase has been in the environs of Campbell River itself. Figures for the Campbell
River School show this growth:   1942, 106;  1946, 201;  1950, 524; and 1952, 835.
In January, 1951, School District No. 71 enrolled 2,164 pupils, and in January,
1952, 2,345.
Buildings
By-law No. 2, presented to the ratepayers of District No. 72 on May 30th, 1952,
received a good majority. This by-law provides for three new elementary schools in
the Campbell River area and two portable one-room schools for the islands. Overcrowding in Campbell River will necessitate shifts until these schools can be built.
District No. 71 let contracts for Courtenay Elementary, Courtenay High, Cumberland High Addition, and Tsolum Elementary during the year. These schools are in
process of construction at time of writing. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
N 105
Organization
Comox High School was closed on June 26th, 1952; the pupils will attend Courtenay High School next term.   The vacated classrooms will be used by Comox Elementary.
Staff
A loyal and efficient staff of 136 teachers serve the schools of these districts. This
is an increase of eight over last year. Staff meetings of the teachers of the primary
section, the intermediate section, and the junior high section were held twice during the
year—a total of six in-service training meetings. The principals met once a month.
All teachers new to the districts, all teachers in new positions in the district, all elementary-school and junior high-school teachers were inspected and reports issued. One
Indian school was inspected.
General
School activities in the fields of music, drama, and sport were carried on; two good
festivals were held and two track meets. A course in drama was held under the direction
of the Summer School of Education.
Comox Airport was opened in June as a permanent R.C.A.F. station, and a separate school district was formed. A six-room elementary school is being constructed to
accommodate children of R.C.A.F. personnel.
School trustees and representatives in both districts deserve praise for their untiring
service and helpful co-operation.
School District No. 65 (Cowichan), No. 66 (Lake Cowichan),
and No. 67 (Ladysmith)
REPORT OF B. THORSTEINSSON, B.A., M.B.A.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate, with offices located in Duncan, embraces the following school
districts: (1) No. 65 (Cowichan), (2) No. 66 (Lake Cowichan), and (3) No. 67
(Ladysmith).
The enrolment and staffs in these school districts as of June, 1952, are as follows:—
District
Pupils
Schools
Teachers
Elementary
Secondary
1,211
750
715
648
359
379
17
7
7
79
41
42
Totals	
2,676
1,386
31
162
School District No. 65 (Cowichan)
During the year solid progress has been made in this school district. The new school
buildings recently provided have served their purpose well. On September 27th, 1951,
the Shawnigan Lake three-room elementary school, last of the new schools to be constructed in the area, was opened by Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister and Superintendent
of Education. However, this has not adequately provided for all the pupils in the area.
In September it was necessary to accommodate 135 of the Duncan pupils in the Fairbridge N 106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
school buildings. To meet this problem, the Board has undertaken to build an additional
new three-room school at Somenos. With the co-operation of the Municipal Councils
the Board has been able to adopt the wise policy of providing schools as required from
current revenue.
The consolidated high school, which was opened in this area in September, 1950,
is gradually gaining general acceptance by the public. Evidence of this appreciation
was manifested during " open house," which was organized by the Parent-Teacher
Association and the high-school teaching staff and held on May 30th, 1952. More than
1,000 visitors were accommodated, and the public response to the displays arranged
was interested and enthusiastic.
Adult night-school classes organized in the new high school again proved popular
in the district, and classes were offered to 190 persons in the following areas of instruction:
Art, art leatherwork, book-keeping, dressmaking, typewriting, woodworking, automotive
mechanics, carpentry, and English for new Canadians. The latter course was introduced
for the first time to aid those new arrivals to this country who had not yet mastered the
language.    Results were very good.
School District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)
Educational affairs in this area were marked during the year by the formal opening
on October 11th of the Lake Cowichan Elementary School, the addition to the Lake
Cowichan High School, and the Home Economics and Industrial Arts addition. An
appropriate ceremony was held in the school auditorium, and the opening address was
delivered by the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education. During the year the
Gordon River School was moved from a dwelling-house, which had served for one year,
to a building especially remodelled for school purposes. A suitable teacherage was
provided.
It is pleasant to report that teacher-trustee relationship in this area is operating on
a desirably high plane. This has been the result of a genuine desire to co-operate one
with another in the best interests of education.
School District No. 67 (Ladysmith)
The results of years of planning finally bore fruit in this district during the 1951-52
school-year. Urgently needed new school accommodation was made available for the
increasing number of pupils. The new schools have been especially well planned and
are now serving well the educational needs of the district. The following schools were
officially opened by the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education: —
School Date
1. Thetis Island (one-room) October 13th, 1951.
2. Junior high, Chemainus  March 22nd, 1952.
3. Mount Brenton (two-room addition)  March 22nd, 1952.
4. Ladysmith Junior-Senior High   May 30th, 1952.
While it was somewhat less difficult to staff the schools this year, the district was
not able to obtain the services of fully qualified Physical Education teachers for the high
school. In these circumstances the Board is fortunate to have the services of two
efficient teachers willing to carry this work.
Special tribute should be paid to the late Mr. F. VandeCasteyen, who for so many
years served well the Ladysmith schools. He had been for years a prominent member of
the Board of School Trustees, and in recent years he had occupied the position of
secretary-treasurer. His untimely death brought to a close a period of long and faithful
service to the Ladysmith School District. In the spring of 1952 he was succeeded as
secretary-treasurer by Mr. R. W. Ovenden. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 107
In concluding this report, tribute should be paid to the fine work carried out by
a loyal group of competent teachers. Their devotion and constant attention to duty has
resulted in the good academic standard which has been attained throughout the schools.
The School Board members, too, deserve special commendation. Theirs is a great
responsibility; their efforts offered so willingly form the corner-stone of future educational progress.
School Districts No. 21 (Armstrong-Enderby) and No. 22 (Vernon)
REPORT OF A. S. TOWELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
It was reported last year that the relatively rapid increase in school population which
characterized the decade 1940-50 had almost completely ceased in this inspectorate.
The same stability of enrolment has continued during the school-year 1951-52, so that
general conditions have changed little from the preceding year.
In order to assist the two School Boards to forecast accommodation needs during
the next few years, a census of all pre-school children in both districts was undertaken.
The work was done by small teams of pupils working under the direction of teachers,
and coverage was quite thorough. When the lists of names and ages were complete,
they were broken down into year-groups, and a count was made of the number that
would be seeking admission to the schools in September of each of the next six years.
The results showed that the birth rate had become stabilized at a level somewhat
below the peak of the immediate post-war years, and that the above-mentioned levelling-
off of enrolment might be expected to continue for some years, provided that new
population did not again begin to move into the district.
School District No. 21 (Armstrong-Enderby)
In this district the accommodation problem, already bad, became a good deal worse
during the year. The Provincial Fire Marshal, who had long been acutely aware of the
dangerous fire-hazard existing in the ancient and decrepit Armstrong High School building, finally forbade its use as a school after January 1st, 1952. Although he was finally
persuaded to relax this ban to the extent of permitting continued use of two ground-floor
classrooms, the problem of housing seven divisions can be imagined. A sufficiency of
floor space, scattered among various adjacent buildings, was finally secured, and the
school was enabled to continue in operation, though with sadly impaired efficiency.
Meantime the School Board, under stress of this emergency, rushed its building
programme to the by-law stage, and in the spring of 1952 the vote was taken. Unfortunately, the by-law was heavily defeated, and at the date of this writing nobody knows
just what the next step will be.
School District No. 22 (Vernon)
The affairs of the Vernon School District proceeded smoothly and efficiently
throughout the year. Work began on the final major project of the building programme
—the senior high-school gymnasium-auditorium. By the end of June the building was
so near completion that, for the first time in many years, the school was able to conduct
its graduation exercises on its own premises.
Another step forward was taken in the Cherryville area, which lies some 20 miles
east of Lumby. Here a second classroom was added to the modern one-room school
recently constructed. This, with the purchase of a small bus, permitted the closing of
two near-by one-room schools—Richlands and Medora Creek—both of which had been N  108 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
very inadequately housed. Thus, by this small but desirable consolidation, a modern
two-teacher school now serves the scattered community formerly served by three one-
room eight-grade schools. Only two of this latter type now remain in the Vernon District, and both are so located as to make it unlikely that they will be replaced by anything
better, at least for a considerable time to come.
In conclusion, it is with much pleasure that I again record the happy relations and
the fine co-operation that have characterized all those with whom my work has brought
me into contact. If the same altruism, kindliness, and selfless devotion were to be found
in all other fields of human endeavour, the world would be a far better and happier place.
School Districts No. 15 (Penticton), No. 16 (Keremeos), and No. 17 (Princeton)
REPORT OF ALEX TURNBULL, M.C., M.M., B.A.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate consists of School Districts No. 15, No. 16, and No. 17, with
headquarters at Penticton. There is a staff of 132 teachers with 3,545 pupils enrolled
in seventeen schools.
For the first time in many years, accommodation has been adequate. Students were
housed under normal conditions, and an uninterrupted programme was possible throughout the year. The intensive building construction is beginning to show results. Only
two projects—a new school at Allison Pass and an extra room at Naramata—await completion.   These will be ready in the early fall.
Formal opening of the new buildings in Penticton took place in May when the
Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education, and Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister
and Superintendent of Education, officiated. Dedication of the new high school, gymnasium, auditorium, cafeteria, and Carmi Elementary School was carried out in suitable
ceremonies. The culmination of this extensive programme was a great tribute to the
untiring and at many times discouraging work of trustees and staff over a period of years.
The influence of physical equipment upon educational standards is becoming increasingly evident. The general tone throughout the schools, quality of work, and academic
achievement shows distinct improvement. All new centres are actively used by the
community for the promotion of dramatics, musical festivals, athletics, general entertainment, and night classes. It is evident that the schools are contributing to an enriched
community life.
Night-schools continue to expand. In addition to those at Penticton and Princeton,
a new one was organized at Keremeos. Among the many classes, those for new Canadians
are receiving strong support.
Under the direction of able teachers, academic progress has been very satisfactory
throughout. Regular testing was carried on under the Division of Tests, Standards,
and Research. The work of the numerous members of the teaching staff who assisted
in these surveys is appreciated. As a pleasing conclusion to the year's work, Miss Sandra
Cardinall, of Penticton, won the scholarship for this division in the June examinations.
Penticton was again privileged to enjoy the experience of an overseas exchange
teacher. Miss Sheila McCorkindale, of Glasgow, took the place of Miss Elizabeth
Sutherland on the elementary-school staff at Jermyn Avenue School.
Members of the Department of Public Health contributed their usual high standard
of service throughout the schools. The formation of the new dental unit for this area
has been received with great satisfaction. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS N 109
Maintenance of schools is given increased attention, and efficient supervision by
Board officials is showing good results. Because of this interest, working conditions
in all schools, whether new or old, have greatly improved in recent years.
Transportation of pupils continues to show an increased demand. Children in
remote sections of each district present many problems. Extra buses will be required in
both Princeton and Keremeos Districts next year.
In conclusion, may I again express appreciation for the splendid co-operation which
I received from trustees and staff.    It has been a pleasure to associate with them.
School Districts No. 56 (Vanderhoof), No. 57 (Prince George),
and No. 58 (McBride)
REPORT OF R. G. WILLISTON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School accommodation problems continue to be most pressing in all districts. The
dental programme in School Districts No. 56 and No. 57 made a successful start during
the year and augmented the valuable service rendered by the Cariboo Health Unit. The
Library Commission continues to provide an enlarging efficient service throughout the
School District No. 56 (Vanderhoof)
Two new divisions were opened in Vanderhoof Village and one in Fort St. James.
The two-room Fort Fraser School burned on February 13th. All five divisions mentioned
were housed temporarily. A new Fort Fraser School should be in operation in the late
fall. Portable prefabricated schools have been erected at Vanderhoof and Braeside and
appear to be very satisfactory.   Two teacherages were acquired for Fort St. James.
Plans are nearly complete for the presentation of a by-law to provide badly needed
accommodation throughout the entire district.
School District No. 57 (Prince George)
A by-law for $678,900, which will provide thirty-five classrooms plus an auditorium,
was passed in May with a majority of more than 90 per cent. The loss by fire of the
seven-division Connaught School in October made double-shifting necessary on a large
scale for the balance of the year. During the year the maintenance division has constructed six one-roomed schools, four teacherages, and made extensive renovation to two
schools. In addition, a centralized fire-proof heating building was constructed at the
dormitories and six temporary classrooms provided for use this fall. Lack of accommodation has curtailed the programme offered in the junior-senior high school and indicates
the need for a new senior high school.
In June, the Honourable Byron Johnson, Premier, and the Honourable W. T. Straith,
Minister of Education, officially opened the recently enlarged and renovated Central
School in Prince George.
School District No. 58 (McBride)
The highlight of the year was the visit of the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of
Education, and Dr. Fairey, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education, to the
graduation exercises of the McBride High School.
The schools at Valemount and Dunster were renovated during the year. A new
school and teacherage were built at North Croydon and a teacherage at Red Pass. The
new high school in McBride nears completion. A new administrative office was secured
in McBride.   The latter building will combine some living accommodation for teachers.
This has been a happy, active, progressive year. Pupils, teachers, trustees, and
Board employees have worked co-operatively and with good spirit to further educational
aims throughout the area. N 110
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND
REPORT OF C. E. MACDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., SUPERINTENDENT
Attendance
The enrolment for the past term is shown as follows:—
Day Pupils
Residents
Totals
31
9
87
27
118
36
Totals
40
114
154
This is the highest enrolment in the history of the school, as is evidenced by the
table below:—
1920-21 .  51      1940-41   88
1925-26   79      1945-46   111
1930-31   85      1950-51   141
1935-36   92      1951-52   154
There is no indication that the present increase in enrolment is directly attributable
to causes other than general growth in the Provincial population.
Health
As well as the usual children's illnesses and minor accidents, we experienced four
cases of scarlet fever, four of measles, and four of chicken-pox. All in all, a total of
582 days of hospitalization resulted from various causes.
General Remarks
I am pleased to report that the new deaf primary unit was ready for occupancy with
the reopening of school. It was officially opened on November 1st by the Honourable
Byron Johnson, Premier; the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education; and
Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education. Numerous other
Provincial and civic officials, together with many parents and friends, attended the opening ceremony.    It was a happy occasion.
It was announced at the November 1st ceremonies by the Honourable the Minister
of Education that steps would be taken as soon as possible to prepare plans for a new
fire-proof unit for the blind. This, I am pleased to report, is under way at the present
time.
As well as the desirability of effecting a complete separation of the deaf and the blind
departments, the need for a separate unit arises from the fact that the number of blind
children is increasing at an unprecedented rate. This situation is attributable to a condition of blindness known as retrorental fibroplasia, a frequent concomitant of prematurity
with a birth weight of 3 pounds or less. At the moment, we anticipate enrolling fifty-five
new blind students within the next six years, of whom approximately 75 per cent are
blind as the result of retrorental fibroplasia. Increases are similarly anticipated in other
schools for the blind in Canada and the United States and will doubtless continue until
medical science finds the solution to this new problem.
During the spring a committee of doctors and educators held monthly meetings
at the school, under the chairmanship of Dr. Reba Willets, for the purposes of studying
problems relating to nursery-school training of deaf children, adequate care and training SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND N 111
for hard-of-hearing children, a speech-therapy programme, and the like. In a relatively
short time a great deal of work has been accomplished.
A panel of specialists and an operating procedure have been adopted by the committee for the purposes of screening border-line cases presently attending this school and
for screening potential applicants for admission. This panel comprises a paediatrician,
an otologist, an ophthalmologist, an audiometrist, a psychiatrist, a psychologist, and
myself as superintendent of the school. From the reports of this panel it will now be
possible to obtain a complete appraisal of each aurally or visually handicapped child to
be enrolled for training at this school.
Miss Mabel Blake, vice-principal, retired at the end of the term after more than
thirty years of faithful service to this school. Miss Blake has been untiring in her efforts
to advance the work of the deaf and the blind and leaves behind her a wealth of silent
tributes to the success of her life's work.
In concluding my report, I wish to thank the officials of the Department of Education,
members of the school management committee, and the entire staff for their splendid
co-operation and support. N 112 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1951-52
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
High School and Vocational Courses
REPORT OF MISS EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. ES L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the year
1951-52 was 5,943.   This figure shows an increase of 115 over 1950-51.
Correspondence courses were taken by students in the following classifications:—
Students registered in schools— per Cent
1. School-age students registered in high and superior
schools. (Throughout this report the term
" school-age " refers to students under 18 years
of age.)   1,765
2. School-age students registered in elementary
schools       132
Total number of school-age students  1,897
3. Students of 18, 19, and 20 registered in their local
schools       497
4. Students of 21 or over registered in their local
schools   3
Total number of students registered in their
local schools taking one or more correspondence courses  2,397      40.4
Students not registered in schools—
1. School-age students unable to attend school because of physical disability        70
2. School-age students gainfully employed        73
3. School-age students studying courses at home because of the distance factor      194
4. School-age students in institutions—Girls' Industrial School, Boys' Industrial School, Oakalla
Prison Farm, British Columbia Penitentiary        39
5. School-age students not registered in schools for
other reasons         22
6. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years not registered in
their local schools      601
Total number of students under 21 not
registered in their local schools and
obtaining their education by correspondence       999      16.8
7. Adult students (21 years and over)  2,547      42.8
Total number of students  5,943    100.0 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS N 113
The students enrolled may be classified as to age in the following three groups: —
Per Cent
1. Pupils under 18 years of age  2,295      38.6
2. Pupils 18, 19, and 20  1,098      18.5
3. Pupils of 21 years of age and over  2,550      42.9
Totals  5,943 100.0
Some of these students took a full year's work in six high-school courses. Others
registered for only one or two courses. The number of students who enrolled in each of
the high-school subjects during the year was as follows:—
English Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  749
English Grammar and Composition 10, 20, 30, 40  829
Social Studies 10, 20, 30  541
Science 10, 20, 30  413
Mathematics 10, 11, 20, 30, 91  1,521
Latin 10, 20, 91  318
Spanish 10, 20, 30  130
French 10, 20, 91  372
Effective Living 10, 20  383
Health 20, 30  90
Agriculture 10, 20  206
Social Studies 32  38
Geography 91   14
Homemaking 10, 20, 30  326
Art 10, 20  214
Record-keeping 11  536
Junior Business 12  32
Book-keeping 34, 91, 95  409
Mathematics 12  63 '
Shorthand 21, 31   238
Typewriting 10, 20 _.  816
Secretarial Practice 92, 93  1
English 9 3  50
Journalism 31   38
Biology 91   72
Chemistry 91   83
Physics 91  66
German 90 -  98
Bible Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  62
Mechanical Drawing 10, 20  224
Sheet-metal Work 20 ..___,  9
Metal-mining   5
Auto Mechanics 91,92 , .___....__ _,__ 190
Diesel Engineering 91  56
Electricity 20  171
Radio 57, 58  13
Elementary Geology 29  46
Forestry 30  55
Art 39  40
Frame-house Construction  72
Home Furnishing 23  31
Total  9,620 N 114 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
This figure is, of course, larger than the figure given for the number of students
enrolled, since the majority of the students were registered for more than one course.
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Senior Matriculation courses
was as follows:—
English Literature 100  110
English Composition 101     91
Mathematics 101  118
French 101      8 3
Latin 101 :     14
History 101 _•     75
Chemistry 100     36
Physics 100     26
Homemaking 91        7
Agriculture 100     12
Total  572
The number of students who enrolled in each of the non-credit courses may also be
classified in the following table:—
Steam Engineering Ia, Ib, IIa  427
Aviation I  10
House Painting and Decorating  8
Industrial Mathematics  94
Soils and Field Crops  1
Poultry-keeping   6
Practical Design  48
Glove-making   16
Air Navigation I, II  11
Mathematics for Steam Engineering Ha  42
Fruit-growing  2
Accountancy for Credit Unions  11
Spherical Trigonometry  8
English 19  303
Total  987
Students in rural elementary schools and superior schools, hospitals, and inmates
of public institutions were not required to pay fees. Students of small high schools were
required to pay an annual fee of $3. Other students paying fees were those who have
the privilege of attending a high school having six or more teachers, employed students
of 16 or over, students enrolled for Senior Matriculation courses, and students living
outside this Province.
Most students paid their own fees. However, in the case of 637 students the fees
were paid by their School Boards.
The following is a classification of students who were exempted from tuition fees:—
1. Hospital cases -  145
2. British Columbia Penitentiary  101
3. Oakalla Prison     72
4. Girls' Industrial Home     21
5. Boys' Industrial Home     27
6. New Haven    40
7. On relief or equivalent       5
8. Disabled students at home     32
9. Students needed at home     17
Total  460 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS N 115
All students were asked to indicate their chosen vocations.   The following summary
shows the choices of those who gave this information:—
Professional—
Teachers   415
Nurses  316
Medicine   8 6
Science   12
Law  25
Art   47
Theology  22
Pharmacy  27
Miscellaneous  42
Commercial  5 00
Skilled labour (mechanics, technicians, steam engineers, etc.) 241
Police  19
Aviation   38
Her Majesty's Forces  45
Civil Service  12
Agriculture and farming _■  73
Forestry   62
Mining   2
Journalism   28
Diesel and steam engineering  511
Radio   23
Miscellaneous  155
Not given  3,242
Total - 5,943
Completion of Courses
A total of 84,725 papers was marked during the year, which is a slight increase over
the number of papers marked in the preceding year. The Director and staff do everything possible to induce students to complete their courses.
New Courses
Social Studies 20, Effective Living 20, French 91, Latin 91, Art 20, Typewriting 20,
Extra-mural Music 21, and Diesel Engines were the new courses offered during the year.
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 5,078 students with material from our course
in English I for New Canadians; 536 students were supplied with material from the
English II for New Canadians, and 303 students took the course in English II (English
19) by correspondence. Classes in English were held in thirty-four night-school centres,
and material was supplied for other classes and individuals in 146 small, isolated places
throughout the Province. N  116
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF MRS. ANNA B. NASH, DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1951-52 there were 1,877 pupils enrolled in the Elementary
Correspondence School. Of these, 1,747 were enrolled at Victoria and the remaining
130 were enrolled at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District. The tabulation below
shows the enrolment by month and grade for each of these localities.
enrolled at victoria
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Total
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
September 	
150
104
112
102
78
77
72
68
763
October  	
225
158
167
156
133
130
126
118
1,213
November 	
256
176
189
185
151
145
139
130
1,371
December 	
276
180
200
192
156
155
142
134
1,435
January   	
291
191
210
197
166
163
154
144
1,516
February.	
292
200
221
203
172
172
163
154
1,577
March.	
293
207
238
212
181
183
168
163
1,645
April 	
292
221
248
220
185
189
175
168
1,698
May
278
237
259
231
188
191
181
169
1,734
268
237
260
229
197
185
197
174
1,747
ENROLLED AT POUCE COUPE (PEACE RIVER BRANCH)
September  	
13
16
9
9
11
6
5
2
71
October	
15
19
13
10
12
9
6
4
88
November	
17
23
17
12
13
11
6
5
104
December 	
18
25
19
12
15
11
6
7
113
19
25
20
12
15
12
7
8
118
February. .—	
22
25
21
13
15
12
8
8
124
March     	
22
26
21
13
16
12
8
8
126
April 	
23
26
21
13
16
12
8
8
127
May   	
24
26
21
13
16
11
10
9
130
June	
24
26
21
13
16
11
10
9
130
The number of papers corrected in the two centres was as follows: Victoria, 166,084
papers; Pouce Coupe, 15,119 papers. This makes a total of 181,203 papers marked
during the year.
The staff in Victoria consisted of the Director, twelve full-time instructors, one part-
time instructor, and an office staff of five members. In the Peace River there is one
full-time instructor and one part-time instructor to handle the work of that branch.
When the marking becomes too heavy for the staff at the school, lessons are sent to
outside markers. These are qualified people who mark papers in their homes. This is
a part-time occupation.   The services of thirteen outside markers were used this year.
Adult pupils wishing to complete their elementary schooling are enrolled in the
Elementary Correspondence School. This year the enrolment of adults for the year
was as follows:—
September
October _
  28
  131
November   145
December  179
January   193
February   224
March   238
April   256
May  276
June   292
There were 5,772 papers of adult students corrected during the year. TEXT-BOOK BRANCH N 117
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE
The year 1951-52 has been another year of strain for this office. We still suffer
from lack of space in the office and shipping-room. The volume of business handled
grows each year, for succeeding years bring more pupils, which to us means more classrooms, more books, more expense, and more work. This year we participated in a completely new venture for British Columbia, as we were required to supply free text-books,
and books under the Rental Plan, to pupils other than those enrolled in public schools.
A distribution of this kind to schools and teachers over whom the Department of Education has no control introduces many administrative difficulties, which effort, patience,
and co-operation may in due course diminish.
The Rental Plan is developing as anticipated, and since 99 per cent of the pupils
in Grades VII to XIII who attend our public schools are participating in this voluntary
plan, it is obviously appreciated by, and is of advantage to, pupils and parents. From
a financial point of view the plan is progressing, and the mechanics of fee collections
and recording of stock in schools appears to be satisfactory to all concerned.
In addition to administering the Rental Plan and supplying the required free textbooks, the usual secretary forms, etc., were supplied to schools and School Boards, as
and when required, and orders from the various dealers throughout the Province were
processed and completed.
To purchase and distribute the free supplies issued during the school-year 1951-52
to public schools and in connection with correspondence courses required an expenditure
of $277,185.98;  5,149 free requisitions were received and filled.
Combined orders, free and saleable, reached the large total of 17,562. From these
orders the sum of $499,625.80 was collected and deposited in the Treasury.
A total of 2,396 Rental Plan requisitions was received, checked, and completed,
and $257,419.15 in rental fees, and for lost and damaged books, was collected and
deposited in the Treasury. During the school-year $3,113.35 was refunded to pupils
who left the school system prior to March 31st.
Once again I am happy to express appreciation to a very loyal and hard-working
staff, and to all school officials, particularly secretary-treasurers, for their many acts of
co-operation. Without support of this nature, satisfactory reports of this kind cannot
be made.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OFFICER IN CHARGE, TEXT-BOOK BRANCH,
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 3 1st, 1952
The accompanying financial statements are presented in the form suggested by the
Audit Branch, and indicate a successful year's operation, my twenty-first, and the third
to include the Rental Plan.
Stock
The stock on hand in our warehouse, $316,403.41, is valued at publisher's price,
plus incoming freight. Rental stock on hand, $327,957.86, is the value of the books in
the schools (Rental Plan), less depreciation, but it does not take into account the transportation and other costs involved in moving these books from our shipping-room to
the various schools of the Province, nor does it give us an opportunity to cover the office
overhead.
Sales
Our sales to dealers, etc., amounted to $593,806.84, and discount allowed was
$104,084.46. n 118 public schools report, 1951-52
Rentals
We received $253,289.78 in rental fees from the various schools, an increase of
14 per cent over the previous year. It will be noted that the Rental Plan statement shows
a deficit of $145,139.40. There are two principal reasons for the deficit, which, under
the circumstances, was fully anticipated: (1) No subsidy to the Rental Plan was included
in the final estimates, and (2) additional costs connected with extending the plan to
private schools.
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 3 1st, 1952
Sales
Revenue—
Sales  $593,806.84
Less discount     104,084.46
Net sales  $489,722.38
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31st, 1951  $323,646.38
Purchases for year (cost, freight, and duty)     431,188.36
$754,834.74
Inventory, March 31 st, 1952     316,403.41
Cost of sales     438,431.33
Gross profit :     $51,291.05
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages     $36,430.52
Packing and general expenses         3,567.12
Freight and delivery         7,222.34
Sundry expenses         1,153.70
—       48,373.68
Net profit transferred to Capital Investment Account       $2,917.37
Rentals
Rental Fees collected  $253,289.78
Inventory, March 31st, 1951  $356,641.26
Plus purchases for year (cost, freight, and duty)     334,441.00
$691,082.26
Inventory, March 31st, 1950 $439,940.66
Less three years' depreciation at 33VS per cent
per annum     439,940.66
Inventory, March 31st, 1951 __ $314,991.57
Less two  years'  depreciation at 33VS per cent
per annum     209,994.38
  $104,997.19
Carried forward  $104,997.19 $691,082.26 $253,289.78 TEXT-BOOK BRANCH N 119
Rentals—Continued
Brought forward  $104,997.19 $691,082.26 $253,289.78
Inventory, March 31st, 1952 __„.__ $334,441.00
Less  one  year's   depreciation at 33V& per cent
per annum     111,480.33
 ■    222,960.67
     327,957.86
$363,124.40
4 dd expenses—
Salaries and wages     $26,588.25
Packing and general expenses         2,603.40
Freight and delivery         5,271.12
Sundry expenses  842.01
       35,304.78
     398,429.18
Excess  of expenditure over revenue transferred to Capital Investment
Account   $145,139.40
Balance-sheet, March 3 1st, 1952
Assets
Imprest Account—
Cash on hand  $100.00
Cash in bank     350.00
  $450.00
Inventory—
Stock on hand     316,403.41
Consigned text-books  $691,082.26
*Less depreciation     363,124.40
     327,957.86
Accounts receivable       15,261.23
Obsolete stock on hand       10,046.94
Subsidies provided for Text-book Rental Plan  $64,497.20
Less 1949-50 profit       1,697.68
62,799.52
Rental Plan profit, 1949-50         1,697.68
$734,616.64
* Third-year depreciation on 1949-50 inventory    $146,646.88
Second-year depreciation in 1950-51 inventory    104,997.19
Depreciation on 1951-52 inventory     111,480.33
$363,124.40
Liabilities
Treasury advances  $450.00
Reserve for obsolete stock  10,046.94
Suspense Account  809.37
Capital Investment Account  723,310.33
$734,616.64 N 120
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION
Industrial Education
H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL
EDUCATION
Under the general heading of "Adult Education," two groups of classes are administered by the Department of Education. These groups are: (1) Those that are conducted in co-operation with the Federal Government, and (2) those that are the direct
responsibility of the Province. The reports of the responsible officers are grouped here
for convenience.
Industrial Education—H. A. Jones, Director of Technical and Vocational Education.
(1) Canadian Vocational Training Programme.
(a) Classes operated under the Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement.
(b) Classes operated under the Dominion-Provincial Apprentice Training Agreement.
(2) Night-schools (see Industrial Education report.)
Correspondence Instruction—
*High School—Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L., Director.
^Elementary School—Mrs. Anna B. Nash, Director.
*Recreational and Physical Education—R. J. Phillips, Acting Director.
*School and Community Drama—H. S. Hum, B.A., Director.
* See separate report following.
(1) CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMME
During the fiscal year 1951-52 the following schedules of the Dominion-Provincial
Vocational Training Agreement were in operation: Schedule C (Urban Occupational
Training); Schedule E (Rural Training); Schedule H (Student Aid); Schedule M
(Unemployed Workers' Training); Schedule K, Section 2 (Training Workers for Occupations Necessary for National Defence). In addition, under the Apprentice Training
Agreement, training was given to regularly indentured apprentices at night-schools and
by correspondence.
(a) Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement
Schedule C—Urban Occupational Training
Under this schedule a class operated in power-machine sewing at the Vancouver
Vocational Institute, and two classes, one in Automotive Mechanics and one in Diesel
Mechanics, were in operation at the Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training School at
Nanaimo. The cost of this training was shared equally between the Federal Department
of Labour and the Provincial Government.
The total enrolment during the fiscal year 1951-52 was as follows:—
Men
Women
Total
Nanaimo
11
27
68
11
27
Vancouver
68
Totals                 	
38
68
106 REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION N 121
Schedule E—Rural Training
The Eighth Annual Dominion-Provincial Youth Training School was held at the
Youth Training Centre at the University of British Columbia, from January 7th to March
1st, 1952. This school is sponsored jointly by the Federal Department of Labour and
the Provincial Department of Education; it is administered by the University Department
of Extension.
Fifty-six rural young people, representing nearly every district in British Columbia,
were enrolled in this training programme. The majority of these thirty-three men and
twenty-three women were given recommendations to attend the Youth Training School
by District Agriculturists and Women's Institutes.
The courses of study were much the same as those offered in the previous two years.
This year, however, the students had more free choice of subjects, which proved very
satisfactory. The boys' major courses included carpentry, blacksmithing, agricultural
engineering, farm motors, and handicrafts, and the girls' courses included sewing, handicrafts, weaving, home management, nutrition, cooking, and child psychology. Other
courses in which both boys and girls received instruction included farm management,
record-keeping, clubs, government, home planning, live stock, horticulture, soils and
crops, bee-keeping, dairying, guest lecturers, discussion groups, public speaking, and
field-trips. All the foregoing courses were attended during the day. Each evening the
students had another two hours of instruction on such subjects as dramatics, photography,
first aid, projection, publication, party planning, physical education, and a reading period.
Throughout this eight-week school, emphasis was placed on guiding the students to
do things for themselves collectively, as well as on giving them the best possible technical
instruction. The students elected a student council, published a weekly paper, wrote
the material for a school annual, organized and ran a co-operative canteen, took turns
at kitchen and janitorial duties, planned weekly parties, and formed numerous committees
for various projects and activities carried out during the course of this school.
The staff for the Youth Training School was drawn from nearly every possible
source, with the Extension Department and the Faculty of Agriculture of the University
of British Columbia forming the nucleus. Other speakers and instructors were obtained
from the Provincial Department of Agriculture, the Federal Department of Agriculture,
commercial firms and individual specialists. Seventy-six different persons instructed at
this year's school.
Schedule H—Student Aid
Under the provisions of the Dominion-Provincial Student Aid Schedule, students
of academic merit who are in need of it may secure financial assistance to enable them
to proceed with their education beyond the level of the secondary school. The awards
granted are in the form of 60 per cent bursary and 40 per cent loan, which is repayable
one year after the recipient has entered employment.
Awards are made by the Selection Committee, consisting of the Deputy Minister
and Superintendent of Education, who acts as chairman, the Assistant Superintendent
of Education, the Director of Technical and Vocational Education, and representatives
of the various institutions concerned. Wherever possible, each applicant is interviewed
by the Committee.
During the past year, 574 awards, ranging from $50 upwards, were made to students
attending the institutions listed below.   The total fund available was $120,000.
Number of Students
Institution .   ' Assisted
Section I.—Students in any faculty and in any year—
University of British Columbia  368
Victoria College     23
King Edward High School       2
Kelowna High School       1 N 122 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Number of Students
Institution Assisted
Section I.—Students in any faculty and in any year—Continued
Langley Junior-Senior High School	
Duke of Connaught High School	
North Vancouver High School	
Nevada Cottey College	
University of Alberta	
McGill University     18
University of Oregon     1
University of Western Ontario	
University of Manitoba	
Queen's University       2
University of Ottawa       2
University of Washington       4
University of Toronto     13
Ontario Veterinary College       7
Royal Roads .       1
Walla Walla College       1
460
27
82
Section II.—Nurses in training at hospitals—
Royal Columbian Hospital  8
Vancouver General Hospital  6
Royal Jubilee Hospital  8
St. Paul's School of Nursing-  2
St. Joseph's Hospital  3
Section III.—Students attending Normal Schools—
Victoria Normal School  49
Vancouver Normal School .  33
Section IV.—Students attending public technical, vocational, or
art schools where fees are charged—
Vancouver Vocational Institute  2
Massachusetts Institute of Technology  1
Vancouver School of Art  2
Total number of awards  574
Schedule M—Unemployed Workers' Training
Those eligible for training under this schedule are young men and women who have
been previously employed, but who wish to take training for a new job which will suit
their native interests and ability.
During the fiscal year 1951-52, fifty-one women received instruction in power-
machine sewing, and fifty-two men were instructed in power-saw operation.
Rehabilitation Training of Civilians
The Council for the Guidance of the Handicapped recommends applicants for
training to a committee consisting of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education
and a representative of the Unemployment Insurance Commission. In most cases, fees
for vocational training are paid, and in needy cases subsistence allowance is also granted.
For the period ended March 31st, 1952, eight handicapped people received
instruction at the Vancouver Vocational Institute. REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION N  123
(b) Apprentice-training
The technical training of apprentices is the responsibility of the Department of
Education. Arrangements are made with the local School Boards for the training at
night-school classes. The apprentices who cannot attend night-school are provided with
correspondence instruction.
The Department of Labour, Ottawa, and the Department of Education, British
Columbia, share equally the full cost of the apprenticeship training. During the past year
a great amount of work has been done in preparing trade analyses so that in the future
it is hoped that better standards for the training of apprentices will be provided.
The enrolment per class for the year 1951-52 was as follows:—
Vancouver  Enrolment
Auto Body and Fender Repair  32
Auto Mechanics  57
Auto Electricity     7
Auto Front-end Alignment     8
Auto Transmission     5
Auto Tune-up     2
Boat-building   17
Blue-print Reading     6
Building-construction  64
Benchwork and Joinery  25
Calculus      1
Commercial Art     1
Diesel Servicing     4
Draughting  81
Engineering (Stationary)     3
English  .     1
Electricity   49
Glass-working      9
Lead-burning   10
Lithography—
Plate-making  10
Presswork  22
Machinists  97
Mathematics       89
Mechanical Drawing
Motor Controls and Relays     6
Oil-burner Service     3
Painting and Decorating     6
Pattern-making  10
Plumbing  48
Plastering   24
Quantity Surveying  17
Radio      3
Refrigeration            2
Strength of Materials     3
Sheet Metal  86
Steam-fitting   20
Show-card Writing     1
Sign-painting     4
Welding—
Gas  19
Arc  29
—     889 N 124 PUELIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Victoria  Enrolment
Art Metalwork  3
Auto Body and Fender Repair  23
Automotive Mechanics  48
Carpentry .  24
Commercial Lettering  2
Electricity  34
Joinery—Cabinet-factory  13
Machine-shop  25
Marine Engineering  17
Mechanical Draughting  8
Plumbing  19
Practical Mathematics  60
Sheet-metal Work  34
Steam Engineering  2
Welding  8
—     330
New Westminster—
Electricity  6
Machinists  5
Mathematics  3
Duncan—
Automotive Mechanics       6
Carpentry	
Correspondence Courses—
Automotive Mechanics  26
Building-construction  14
Carman (Railway)   1
Costs and Specifications for Builders  1
Diesel Engineering  5
Electricity  3 5
Electric Meters and Measuring Devices  1
Machinists  1
Mathematics  24
Mechanical Draughting  9
Painting and Decorating.  3
Plumbing  1
Power-house Design  2
Practical Telephones  1
Radio-construction  4
Refrigeration  1
Sheet Metal  30
Steam Engineering  5
14
—       15
—     164
Total enrolment  1,412 REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION N 125
Enrolment Summary
The enrolment summary of the classes administered by the Industrial Education
Branch during the year 1951-52 is as follows:—
Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement— Enrolment
Schedule C—Urban Occupational Training     .106
Schedule E—Rural Training        56
Schedule H—Student Aid      574
Schedule M—Unemployed Workers' Training      103
Dominion-Provincial Apprentice Training Agreement  1,412
Total enrolment  2,251
High School Correspondence Adult Education
MISS EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. £S L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the school-
year 1951-52 was 5,943. Of this number, 18.5 per cent or 1,098 were between the ages
of 18 and 20, and 42.9 per cent or 2,550 were 21 years of age or over. Thus 61.4 per
cent of our students can be classified as adults. This is an increase of 1.7 per cent over
the figures of 1950-51. There was an increase of 327 students in the number of students
over 21 and a decrease of 160 in the number of students between the ages of 18 and 20.
There were adult students among those registered for every course offered by this
department, as indicated in my report of High School and Vocational Courses.
The following is a classification of the occupations of students 18 years of age and
over who gave information as to their employment:—
Apprentices      120
Army, Navy, Air Force       35
Civil Servants        23
Police   5
Domestic workers        32
Farming and ranching.         50
Firemen, engineers      277
Forestry        18
Housewives         89
Lumbering         85
Merchants         19
Mining        26
Office-workers      242
Professional—
Teachers  169
Nurses     81
Miscellaneous    44
      294
Railroad        10
Skilled labour      261
Unskilled labour ,      156
Miscellaneous       56
Total  1,798 N 126 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Elementary Correspondence School Adult Class
MRS. ANNA B. NASH, DIRECTOR
In the school-year 1951-52 the enrolment in the adult class of the Elementary
Correspondence School was 292 students. The enrolment figures for the year are as
follows:—
September      28 February   224
October  131 March   238
November   145 April   256
December  179 May  276
January   193 June   292
During the year, 5,772 papers of adult students were corrected.
Recreation and Physical Education Branch
R. J. PHILLIPS, ACTING DIRECTOR
The Recreational and Physical Education Branch has, during the past year, continued
to work toward its objective, which is to encourage and assist communities to develop
programmes of physical recreation. Also, through its contact with the high schools of the
Province, the Branch was able to advise and assist many schools with their Physical
Education programmes.   We feel that a great deal more could be done in this regard.
The Branch again assisted in the organization and promotion of six invitational
tournaments or meets which were sponsored by various high schools in the Province.
The results were as follows:—
Sport Host Winner
Girls' volleyball    .Maple Ridge High School Queen Elizabeth.
Boys' volleyball ... Maple Ridge High School Maple Ridge.
Curling Nelson High School Vernon.
Boys' basketball... University of British Columbia ... Duke of Connaught.
Girls' basketball... King Edward High School South Burnaby.
Track and field Victoria High School Victoria.
The registration and attendance in the Pro-Rec Physical Fitness centres was as
follows:—
Pro-Rec Centres:  Number of centres, 244; registration, 17,695; attendance,
217,706.
Special Events:  Number of events, 90; number of members, 5,867; number
of visitors and spectators, 21,575.
Community Centres: Number of centres, 12; registration, 24,564; attendance,
473,178.
Location of Pro-Rec Centres
Vancouver and New Westminster.—There were fifty-three Pro-Rec centres for
women, seven mixed, and thirty-five for men.
Fraser Valley.—Abbotsford, Albion, Aldergrove, Barnston Island, Chilliwack,
Cloverdale, County Line, Fleetwood, Haney, Harrison Hot Springs, Hjorth Road,
Kennedy, Langley, Mission, Murrayville, Ocean Park, Ruskin, Yarrow. REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION N 127
Okanagan-Kootenay.—Chapman Camp, Cranbrook, Falkland, Fernie, Glenmore,
Grand Forks, Greenwood, Grindrod, Invermere, Kamloops, Kelowna, Kimberley, Nara-
mata, Nelson, Okanagan Centre, Oliver, Osoyoos, Oyama, Peachland, Rossland, Salmon
Arm, Summerland, Vernon, Westbank.
Victoria.—There were ten centres for women, seven for mixed, and seven for men.
Vancouver Island.—Brentwood, Campbell River, Cedar, Courtenay, Great Central,
Happy Valley, Port Alberni, Youbou.
Northern British Columbia and West Coast.—Britannia, Francois Lake, Prince
Rupert, Quesnel, Sechelt, Squamish.
Names of Community Centres
Chemainus Community Centre, Courtenay Recreational Association, Kamloops
Athletic Association, Kimberley Amateur Athletic Association, Kitsilano War Memorial
Community Centre, Marpole Community Centre, Nelson Civic Centre, North Vancouver
Memorial Community Association, Prince George Civic Centre Association, Prince
Rupert Civic Centre Association, Sunset Memorial Centre, Trail Athletic Association.
Fitness Demonstrations
In the spring of the year the ever-popular physical-recreation demonstrations were
held in various communities and participated in by great gatherings of Pro-Rec members
of all ages and both sexes.
On May 16th and 17th, 1952, at Exhibition Gardens, Vancouver, the Pro-Rec
Women's Division, under the direction of Mrs. Hilda Keatley, Provincial Supervisor for
Women, gave two performances of the 1952 Pro-Rec Revue. Very favourable comment
was heard from many who saw the presentations, and the Pro-Rec members themselves
were pleased and greatly stimulated by the display.
Mr. J. G. Gould, M.L.A., Mrs. Nancy Hodges, M.L.A., and Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy
Minister and Superintendent of Education, were special guest speakers.
Gymnastic Competition
The Provincial Pro-Rec centres' annual gymnastic competition continues to offer
many opportunities to young men interested in this type of competitive athletics.
Performers entering this contest come from many widely scattered points of the Province,
and those participating are of a wide range of ages and an even greater span of abilities,
from the novice to the champion.
The New Westminster High School gymnasium was again selected as the competition-
site, and proved suitable and satisfactory in every way. Director of the meet was Mr.
Jerry Mathisen, Men's Pro-Rec Provincial Supervisor.
Recreation for the Blind
Recreation programmes for the blind or partly blind have gone ahead through the
initiative of the Pro-Rec Branch and its sightless recreation director, Mr. Joseph Lewis,
who does a Province-wide job of recreation with the White Cane Clubs through the
auspices of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind.
The C.N.I.B. White Cane Choir achieved a remarkable victory in the British
Columbia Music Festival in Vancouver. The choir, under the very able leadership of
Mrs. Mildred Seymour, scored a total of 172 points, as against the 161 of its sighted
competitor. '   •
The victory was a well-deserved one, as the choir rehearsed in Spartan fashion
preparing for the contest. As an award, the choir obtained possession of the Thomas
Taylor Shield, symbolic of choral-group victory. N 128 PUELIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Also in Vancouver, the Gadabouts Club for blind women completed its first major
project by turning over to the Camp Referral Agency of the Community Chest and
Council a cheque for $250 to sponsor camping for underprivileged children, especially
girls.
The C.N.I.B. White Cane Fishing Club on the Lower Mainland now has a membership of over seventy. These and many other recreational activities have been included to
expand the field of recreation for the blind under Mr. Lewis's direction.
Leadership Training
Much emphasis is placed on the importance of leadership training for those wishing
to instruct in physical-recreation activities. Every effort is also exerted to maintain and
improve the high standard of training given at the JPro-Rec Summer School. Communities
throughout the Province are taking advantage of these courses by sending their young
leaders for four weeks in August for the men's course, and two weeks in September for
the women's course. Many of the students were billeted in order to reduce living expenses
to a minimum. Subsidies also proved very helpful. Forty students attended the men's
course, and thirty-seven the women's course.
Travelling Clinics
The travelling clinics on basketball have proved very popular, and Mr. John Willox
is to be congratulated for the fine work he has done in this field. Accompanied by Staff
Member J. Dickerson, Mr. Willox travelled through North Central British Columbia and
conducted clinics during October, 1951, at Vanderhoof, Prince George, Wells, Quesnel,
Williams Lake, Ashcroft, Kamloops, and Vernon. The high schools were visited in each
case during the day, and evenings were spent with local basketball groups.
In addition to this, Mr. Willox travelled to Nanaimo, Parksville, Lake Cowichan,
and Chemainus on the Island, and to sixteen high schools on the Lower Mainland. It has
been estimated that approximately 6,000 students, coaches, and referees were contacted
in this way, and beneficial results are expected in the form of uniform interpretation of
rules, good sportsmanship, and increased interest in basketball generally. It is hoped
that other sports may be stimulated in the same way.
School and Community Drama Branch
REPORT OF H. S. HURN, B.A., DIRECTOR
During the past year the work of the School and Community Drama Branch has
followed the general pattern of the past few years, and though there has been no very
marked development, definite progress has been made.
Adult Drama
A few new groups were organized and contacts were made which will ensure a start
for several more in September. Visits were paid to as many groups as possible, and
these were much appreciated.
Contrary to our expectations, the demand for our material aids, curtains and lights,
increased considerably, and the staff was very busy keeping this material in circulation.
The standard of work is constantly improving, and many of the plays presented in
the one-act play festivals were excellent. REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION
N  129
Further steps were taken to complete the zone organization, and if and when this
can be brought to completion, much good will accrue from it. Zone committees will have
more authority, but at the same time will take over more responsibility, and the development of drama will be in proportion to the energy and ability of the committee to develop
it. Already some have taken sole responsibility for the planning of short courses designed
to aid in the raising of standards. As an extension to this planning, the British Columbia
Drama Association was reorganized to bring into the executive representatives from the
Interior areas. This innovation was naturally highly pleasing to those engaged in drama
away from the larger centres of Victoria and Vancouver, especially to those who have for
many years worked faithfully in the smaller places. A degree of financial assistance will
be necessary for the work of this organization.
There is developing a wider concept of community drama involving theatrical
activities other than the straight play. This is all to the good, as also is the increased
readiness on the part of all arts groups to work with full co-operation. In smaller
communities, in particular, there is little merit in drawing a heavy line of demarcation
between the various types of theatrical entertainment or between music, art, and other
forms of artistic endeavour.
Effort was made to encourage an interest in pageantry, using local history as a theme
and local people to write it. The suggestion has been acted upon in at least one area, and
it will be interesting to see the result.
For many years between the wars the burden of amateur theatre was borne largely
by our mature citizens, those with a background of theatre, generally in the " Old Land."
Many of these now feel that the burden should be handed over to younger people, and
it is satisfying to know that of those who have benefited from instruction in drama in the
educational system are making their presence felt in a most encouraging manner.
The Dominion Drama Festival final was held in St. John, N.B., in May of this year;
the British Columbia Regional Festival was held in Vancouver in January. The Regional
Festival was won by the Victoria Theatre Guild with " The Heiress," but due to the heavy
expense involved in travelling such a distance, the Guild was forced to abandon any idea
of taking part in the final.
This national festival works under the handicap of a lack of money; it is an expensive
project, and to date the Federal Government has not deemed it advisable to implement
the recommendation of the Massey Commission relative to Federal aid to the festival.
The Dominion Drama Festival executive has awarded the 1953 final festival to
British Columbia for the first time, and Victoria will act as host. It is hoped that the
people of our capital city will assist in making this national project a great success.
One sign of a healthy amateur drama movement is a satisfactory standard of
production; a second is the degree of audience support. It is pleasing to report that both
of these are definitely improving. No group yet has been able to compete successfully
with ice-hockey, but there is much evidence to support the view that more people are
becoming interested in " things of the spirit." If community theatre is a desirable
adjunct to community fife, and as such should be encouraged, it is refreshing to realize
that there are many such groups making every effort to fulfil their function, and more of
our citizens becoming interested in their product. Invariably, those who are engaged
in the work of community drama are good solid citizens imbued with the right spirit of
community enterprise.
One factor adversely affecting sustained good work in theatre, and temporarily
preventing continuance of the activity in some of the smaller communities, is the degree
of transiency of population. The loss of even one key person, particularly a director, is
always keenly felt.
The Canadian Drama Award, for which the secretarial work is a responsibility of
this Branch, was conferred by the Governing Committee on Mrs. Hilda Buckley Allen,
Regina, Sask.; Mr. Robert Gill, Toronto, Ont.; Miss Betty Mitchell, Calgary, Alta.;
Mr. John J. O'Toole, Fairville, N.B.; and Mrs. Dorothy White, Ottawa, Ont.
5 n 130 public schools report, 1951-52
School Drama
There has been a decided increase in the number of students taking drama for credit.
There are so many aspects to drama instruction that teachers who take on the responsibility automatically find themselves involved in work that is difficult and heavy. This is
especially so when instruction leads to practical production. Play production is an
involved process which makes heavy demands upon the leader, and the burden of these
demands is accentuated when there is only one person to assume it.
As many ex-students of school drama classes are now playing a prominent role in
adult drama productions, it is obvious that one of the aims of participation in dramatic
work in school is being achieved.
There has been continuing stress laid on the value of well-organized dramatics at the
elementary level, and to assist teachers further courses have been made available at the
Summer School.
It is planned to offer two courses each year from the following: Speech, Directing
the School Play, Puppetry and Creative Dramatics. These are designed for the elementary
school.
The school drama essay competition showed an increase in the number of entries.
The standard has always been extremely satisfactory from both the theatrical and the
literary standpoint, while many essays have been accompanied by art work of much
distinction.   Original and research types of essays submitted are about equal in numbers.
The Lake Como High School, New Westminster, won the Times Shield for the best
group of six essays submitted.
Individual prize-winners were (1) Ann Heywood, Victoria High School, "Two
Savoyards "; (2) Ella Madsen, Lake Como High School, "A Student Appraises Canadian
Radio "; (3) Don Eccleston, Kitsilano High School, " Radio Drama "; and (4) Sheila
Munro and Cyril Slater of Lord Byng High School (tied for fourth place).
J. Lloyd Crowe High School, Trail, won the prize for the group scrap-book
competition. Individual prize-winners were (1) Sylvia Berg, Victoria High School, and
(2) Sally McGill, Victoria High School.
J. Akehurst, Esquimalt High School, won the prize for the best play, entitled
" Mr. Gabriel Calls Thrice." A special prize for art work was presented to Belle
Luscombe, Victoria High School.
It is gratifying to note the prominent part that teachers take in connection with
community theatre in their respective communities. Many prove to be accomplished
organizers, as well as keen players and directors.
Short courses have been planned in several places, some connected with night-
schools.
Festivals
Twenty-nine festivals were held throughout the Province as follows: Adult drama
festivals, 7; school drama festivals, 6; adult and school drama festivals, 7; music, speech,
and drama festivals, 7; speech arts festivals, 1; and music festivals, 2. The usual
assistance was given by this Branch to all festivals featuring speech and drama. Special
praise should be accorded to the energetic committees for their organization of these
festivals, and the adjudicators on whose comments and criticisms so much depends.
A new music festival was started in Prince George, and the success of the project
promises well. This festival bids fair to become a focal point of artistic endeavour in
the north central part of the Province, with possible co-operation from the Peace River
District.
A small but most commendable start was made with a school drama festival in the
Surrey district. REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION
N  131
Scholarships and Awards
It is pleasing to report that the policy, adopted several years ago by the Victoria
School Festival Committee, of giving opportunity to outstanding players to attend summer
schools of the theatre has been followed by other festival committees. There is much to
commend in this practice.
The following British Columbia players received scholarships this year: Margaret
Martin, Prospect Lake; Kirk Franks, Kelowna; Cyril Slater, Vancouver; Gerald Guest,
David Gurr, and Jenefer Ford, Victoria.
Mr. Donal Wilson, for several years a teacher at the North Saanich High School, has
recently completed with fine success a Canadian Hockey Foundation Scholarship at Yale.
Mrs. Agnes Binns, of the Kamloops Little Theatre, was awarded first and second
prizes in the Ottawa Drama League Playwriting Competition.
Professional Companies
Two professional companies are operating in British Columbia, both in Vancouver.
The Everyman Theatre produces plays of distinction in a small theatre on Main Street,
and the Totem Theatre plays, for the most part, popular successes in arena style down
town. The latter company has had outstanding success and is making plans to extend
its work considerably.
It is expected that Victoria and other cities on Vancouver Island will soon have the
benefit of professional theatre, a company having recently been formed with headquarters
in the York Theatre at Victoria, an excellent one for the purpose.
The presence of good professional companies serves as a stimulus to amateur
theatre, and there is no doubt about their value to the smaller communities.
Tribute
This Branch would like to pay tribute to the very many citizens of British Columbia
who give so much of their time and ability to further the cause of community theatre. N 132 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1951-52
EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE
REPORT OF HAROLD P. JOHNS, M.A., Ph.D., DIRECTOR
In 1947 the Province of British Columbia instituted a system of financial assistance
to local School Boards by which it was possible to pay salary grants on behalf of teachers
engaged as full-time or half-time counsellors. This plan had two obvious merits: it
recognized in a tangible way the added cost to School Boards of a service such as counselling and at the same time, because of the provision requiring Departmental approval,
it gave to the Department of Education a practical means of ensuring the adequacy of
the service offered in each school and of the personnel engaged as counsellors.
The fact that there has been a steady but gradual progress, with no indication of
a rapid and ill-conceived expansion merely because of the availability of special grants,
is testimony to the wisdom of the plan introduced in 1947. The following table shows
the development of counselling services in secondary schools of British Columbia:—
Table I.—Schools and Counsellors
Number of Schools Number of Counsellors
with Approved (Engaged Half Time
Counselling or Full Time in
Year                                                                                      Service Counselling)
1948-49  34 85
1949-50  36 89
1950-51   50 103
1951-52  55 141
Closely associated with the establishment of adequate counselling services is the
provision of trained personnel.
At the recent session of the Summer School of Education, three courses—Counsellors'
Conference, The Individual Inventory in Guidance, and The Use and Interpretation of
Tests in Guidance—were offered as part of the continuous programme of counsellor-
training. Dr. C. Gilbert Wrenn, Professor of Educational Psychology, University of
Minnesota, was in charge of the first course, and Miss Esme Foord, Counsellor and
Guidance Co-ordinator, Kamloops, taught the remaining classes. Seventy counsellors
were registered in these courses. Of a less specialized nature, and intended for the
general classroom teacher rather than the counsellor, were two courses, Child Guidance
and Disciplinary Problems in the Elementary School, conducted by Miss Grace Dolmage,
Co-ordinator, Child Guidance Clinic, Winnipeg, Man.
In addition to the above, the following courses were given as winter in-service
classes, through the courtesy of the School Boards indicated in each case (enrolments
are shown in parentheses):—
Nanaimo:  Principles of Guidance in Personality Adjustment (17).
Vancouver:  Mental Hygiene (19).
Victoria:   Effective Living Workshop (18).
During the school-year 1951-52, the Division of Educational and Vocational
Guidance continued to supply materials to counsellors and others engaged in guidance
work. Eight issues of B.C. Employment Trends (now issued as Pacific Tides) were sent
to all high-school principals and counsellors. Two lists of Guidance Pamphlets Currently
Available were distributed, listing and classifying 167 guidance monographs. In addition, 31 monographs were distributed directly to secondary schools. Four of these, sent
out on a class-set basis, were made available through the co-operation of the Department
of Labour, Ottawa.
Of major importance in 1952 was the survey conducted during the year to determine
the extent of emphasis being placed on character growth and development in the elemen- EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE
N 133
tary schools of the Province.   The valuable assistance of the more than 300 elementary-
school teachers who participated is gratefully acknowledged.
Once again, through the co-operation of the Vancouver Board of Trade and the
Pacific National Exhibition, the annual vocational guidance job-study competition was
conducted. Reports from schools throughout British Columbia indicate that 11,125
job surveys were completed during the past school-year. While all schools have not
reported and the total cannot therefore be taken as complete, nevertheless it may be
assumed that as similar conditions applied in previous years a comparison may justly be
made. The following is a list of totals for each of the years the competition has been
held:—
Year Total Year Total
1945_46   15,500 1949-50     9,381
1946-47     8,257 1950-51  10,078
1947-48     9,919 1951-52  11,125
1948-49  12,321
1 Approximate.
This year's total of 11,125 represents the second highest number of surveys yet
submitted and is just over 1,000 less than that of the peak year of 1948-49. Much of
the ground lost when it was found necessary to revise the basis of the competition has
now been regained. This fact is further borne out by the steady increase during each
of the last three years. One thousand and forty-seven more studies were submitted
this year than last. The 1951-52 total, it might also be pointed out, represents an
increase of 102 per cent over the number made in the initial year of the competition.
A second important feature is the growing diversification of studies submitted.
The major increase in the proportion of surveys being made of secondary industries,
noted for the first time last year, has been maintained and slightly increased. These
facts are illustrated in the two tables which follow. N  134 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Table II.—Summary of Studies Made
Primary industries—
Agriculture—
Fruit-farming   138
Dairy-farming   194
General farming  299
  631
Forest—
Pulp and paper  341
Other lumbering industries  220
  561
Fishing (including canning)1  372
Mining (including smelting)1  397
Business services—
Sales, advertising, etc.   537
Secretarial, clerical, office work  687
Investment, banking, etc.  128
1,961
Transportation, communications, electric power, and other
public utilities—
Transportation   495
Telephone, telegraph, etc., electric power  320
        815
Construction         619
Secondary industries—
Woodwork, furniture, etc.  561
Automotive, etc., engines  594
Machine-shops, printing   376
Chemicals, paints, etc.  310
Clothes, textiles, etc.   236
Foodstuffs   224
Shoes, leather goods  140
Electrical, radios, etc.   315
Sheet metal  214
Building supplies, cement, etc.  161
3,131
1,352
Total itemized     7,878
Not classified in reports     3,247
Total   11,125
1 Includes secondary phases of industry;   for example, canning, smelting, etc. EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE
N  135
Table III.—Relative Proportion of Studies Dealing with Primary
and Secondary Industries
1949
1951
1952
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
2,152
2,042
51.3
48.7
1,574
2,500
38.7
61.3
1,961
3,131
38.5
61.5
Totals	
4,194
100.0
4,074
100.0
5,092
100.0
Furthermore, it should be emphasized that fishing and mining, although classed as
primary industries, include studies dealing with secondary industries based on the primary
products. Had it been possible to segregate these studies, the result naturally would
have been to decrease the number of research projects listed under primary industries
and to increase those fisted under secondary industries.
The winners of the three bursaries awarded were as follows:—
First—Irma Culos, Brooks Junior-Senior High School, Powell River.
Second—Evelyn Elder, Gladstone Junior-Senior High School, Vancouver.
Third—Patricia Crane, Sutherland Junior High School, North Vancouver.
To the Brooks Junior-Senior High School, Powell River, the school attended by
Miss Culos, was awarded the George Powell Vocational Guidance Challenge Shield.
In closing this report, may I once again express my very deep appreciation of the
encouragement and advice offered by Dr. F. T. Fairey, the Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education, and Mr. H. L. Campbell, the Deputy Superintendent and
Director of Curriculum. Finally, I believe a sincere word of appreciation is due to the
many principals, counsellors, and classroom teachers who by their constant efforts are
establishing in British Columbia a pupil personnel programme of which this Province
can well be proud. N 136 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., DIRECTOR OF SCHOOL
RADIO BROADCASTS
New Assistant Director
At the close of the school-year Mr. A. M. Fotheringham, former Assistant Director
of School Broadcasts, left to take a C.B.C. position in Toronto, and his place has been
taken by Miss Margaret A. Musselman.
Direction of School Radio Broadcasts
During the past twelve years the actual production of British Columbia school radio
broadcasts has come more and more under the direct supervision of this Division. While
the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation assumes responsibility for the production of the
programmes, the location of the office of the school radio broadcasts in the C.B.C. Vancouver offices means that full organizational details have been placed under the direction
of this Division. On several occasions during this last year the Division assumed full
production responsibility for broadcasts.
The Year's Programmes
British Columbia school broadcasts included 218 separate programmes during the
year, covering 150 half-hour periods, of which 94 originated in this Province. Approximately 30 per cent of the air-time was shared co-operatively with the other Western
Provinces, and just under 20 per cent of the offerings were the Canada-wide " National
School Broadcasts " prepared by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto.
Making allowances for overlapping, especially in those programmes particularly
planned for rural schools, one-quarter of the programmes were suited to primary grades,
two-thirds to intermediate grades, two-fifths to junior high-school grades, and one-tenth
to senior high-school grades.
Since radio programmes, like other supplementary teaching devices, are not confined
to subject-matter classifications, it has not usually been the practice to announce them
as belonging specifically to any one subject. However, the year's programmes may be
classified according to dominant subject relation: Music, 41 per cent; Social Studies, 23
per cent; English, 12 per cent; Science, 10 per cent; Health and Guidance, 8 per cent;
Art, 4 per cent; and French, 2 per cent.
Two new departures in the pattern of the year's programmes were an increased
emphasis on geography and a broadening of the scope of the primary programmes to
include some English material as well as music. As in previous years, it was possible to
arrange for several one-occasion broadcasts, wherever possible keyed to current events.
One worth special mention made use of actual recorded material from the Festival of
Britain.
Almost 1,000 classrooms listen to "Song Time," the most popular series. Following it in popularity were three other music series and the art programmes. Other series
which proved popular were Health, Western Canadian History, and Nature Science. By
count, the less popular programmes were almost invariably those which appeal to a
limited group of classes.
British Columbia school broadcasts were successful in winning another international
radio award during the year. A total of ten such awards have been won since school
broadcasting began in this Province. DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS N 137
Teaching Services
(a) Printed Aids.—Ten years ago two small mimeographed bulletins were prepared
each year. The following table showing the amount of material prepared this year will
indicate the growth of this function of the Division:— copies
Teachers' Bulletin  5,300
Bulletin Supplement  5,300
Primary Music Supplement (teachers)  3,000
Intermediate Music Supplement (pupils)  18,000
Hectograph maps (teachers)   5,000
French booklet (pupils)  5,500
Art supplement (teachers)  1,700
Guidance supplement (teachers)   200
(b) Teacher-training and School-visits.—The regular programme of instruction for
teachers in training was carried out. Several days were also spent with students at the
1952 Summer School of Education. As far as time allowed, the programme of school-
visiting was continued, intensive visits being made to Districts Nos. 38, 47, 48, 52, 53,
54, 55, 56, 57, 63, and 71, as well as visits to schools in the metropolitan areas.
Transmitter Services
Although a comparatively large area of the Province is still without adequate coverage, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation is progressively installing repeater transmitters in isolated localities, and an increasing number of schools can now receive the
programmes. During the year five new repeater stations were installed in the area
between Prince Rupert and Prince George.
Use of Broadcasts
Annual survey returns were made by approximately 70 per cent of the schools.
Assuming that most of those not reporting are unable to hear school broadcasts, nearly
one-third of the schools of the Province are still beyond the reach of a transmitter.
However, there are only seven districts where no schools listen.
On the basis of reported listeners, well over 50 per cent of the schools of the Province
made use of school broadcasts during the year.
Evaluation
A total of over 200 teachers assisted with day-to-day evaluation of programmes
during the year. In addition, thirty evaluators in schools adjacent to the broadcast centre
telephoned their comments immediately after a broadcast was received. This proved to
be of considerable value, not only because it made possible immediate response, but also
because specific questions for each broadcast could be discussed.
Equipment
The number of schools with no radio equipment still stands at slightly more than
18 per cent of those reporting; eighty-seven schools report having central sound equipment; and there are fifty-five magnetic recorders in school use. This equipment is
proving more and more valuable in making radio programmes fully available to larger
departmentalized schools.
May I close this report by expressing my appreciation to the many individuals and
groups who with interest and energy have assisted us this year. N 138 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1951-52
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed., DIRECTOR
The testing programme carried out during the school-year 1951-52 consisted of
English Composition in Grades VII and VIII, Handwriting in Grades VII and VIII,
Science 20 in Grade X, and Composite Achievement in Grade XII.
The survey of English Composition was carried out by applying the Willing Composition Scale to twenty-minute compositions that were written under uniform conditions
by 5,630 pupils in Grades VII and VIII. The scale is an old one, with grade equivalents
that were established at the time of the First World War. All compositions were rated
by classroom teachers for story value and form value (errors per hundred words), then
one-fifth of the compositions, selected at random, were rerated by two to four employees
of the Division. In general, quite close agreement was obtained between teachers' and
" experts' " ratings for story value, in spite of the subjectivity of the ratings. The average
number of errors marked by the " experts," however, was much higher than the average
number marked by the teachers. This was not due to the adoption of higher standards—
errors were limited to those of spelling, elements of grammatical constructions, capitalization, and punctuation. Only simple agreement in number and case and the use of periods,
commas, question marks, and quotation marks were required. Nevertheless, a rather
surprising result of the survey is that the pupils are closer to the 1918 grade equivalents
in form value than in story value.
Grade Equivalents for Medians of Ratings, March, 1952—
Willing Composition Scale
Grade VII-6
Grade VIII-6
Story Value
Form Value
Story Value
Form Value
V-9
V-8
VI-9
VI-4
Vl-3
VII
VI-6
It will be noticed that from Grade VII to Grade VIII the pupils appear to have
levelled off in terms of 1918 grade-equivalents.   Other conclusions were:—
(1) The Grade VIII students had a greater output than those in Grade VII
(231 words v. 204 words per twenty-minute composition). Therefore,
the relative number of errors decreased from 9.7 to 8.9 per cent, although
the absolute number of errors increased from 19.7 to 20.6.
(2) There was a tendency for the pupils in secondary schools to write more
words per minute than those in the same grades in elementary schools.
This seems to indicate that the secondary-school or junior high-school
type of organization leads to greater freedom of expression. But the
secondary-school pupils showed a significant increase in the number of
errors.   This is in line with their increase in fluency.
(3) Although secondary schools have a higher proportion of teachers with
university degrees and a higher proportion of specialists who teach
English to several classes, the teachers in such schools have a much poorer
record as far as accuracy of marking is concerned. The question arises
as to whether or not emphasis on errors, carried only to the extent of
careful marking, has a tendency to reduce the fluency with which pupils
write. DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH N 139
In order to measure the quality of pupils' handwriting under normal conditions—
that is, when they were not attempting to write in copper-plate style—the Ayres Handwriting Scale was applied to a sample of 600 of the Grades VII and VIII compositions.
It is not possible to make comparisons in terms of grade levels between paragraphs written
under average conditions and material from which the pupils know their handwriting is to
be judged. Nevertheless, the table below indicates that in handwriting, too, the children
are on a plateau from Grade VII to Grade VIII. There is no significant difference
between the means.
Ayres Handwriting Scale
(Applied to first drafts of twenty-minute English compositions.)
Per Cent Distribution—Four Raters
Ayres Rating Grade VII-6 Grade VHI-6
90  1.3 0.7
80  3.6 3.1
70  9.2 9.8
60  17.0 16.4
50  26.0 27.5
40  27.8 25.5
30  9.8 12.0
20  5.3 4.9
Mean     48.8 48.4
Number of pupils      300 300
Number of ratings  1,200 1,200
The first terminal course test was administered to 5,775 Science 20 students during
the second week of June, 1952. This test had not been used previously, and, therefore,
there are no standards with which the mean scores of 85.6 for public schools and 75.7 for
private schools may be compared. The difficulties of items that had been used previously, however, indicate that the standing of the public-school Science 20 students is
approximately half-way between those in the old General Science III and General Science
IV courses.
A four-hour composite test designed to measure achievement in English, Social
Studies, Mathematics, Science, and French was administered to approximately half of the
Grade XII students who were taking the University Programme. This was a continuation
of the experiment that was begun in 1951.
The distributions of scores for June, 1951, were almost exactly duplicated in June,
1952, which is an indication not only of the accuracy of sampling, but also of the stability
of the student-body over a two-year period. The norms for the French section, while
stable for comparable students from one year to the next, indicate that there is great
variation in achievement among students who have completed courses of different levels
at different times.   The mean scores obtained in two years of testing are as follows:—
French 101, current year  45.3
French 91, current year  31.6
French 20, previous year  18.9
French 30, current year  36.9
French 30, previous year  31.1
The scaling of Matriculation examinations again was effectively carried out by members of the Division. Experiments are being continued to determine the most efficient
methods of scaling and the effect of variations of the percentage of passes on different
types of schools. N 140 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1951-52
Immigration and Enrolment
Publication of the Jurte, 1951, Census report indicates that previous estimates of
child population that had been made in this Division have been too low. The discrepancies of the estimates for different age-groups were:—
Per Cent Per Cent
0-4 years     +3.3 10-14 years     —9.2
5-9 years     —0.3 15-19 years  —24.8
The estimates were based on British Columbia births, minus deaths, plus net immigration shown by family-allowance payments. The variation shown in the upper age-
groups may indicate either that a large number of teen-age children are migrating to the
Province without being detected either by changes in family-allowance records or by
public-school enrolment, or perhaps that there was an unexpectedly large migration of
children during the years just before family-allowance payments were started.
Although immigration and emigration were in balance in 1950, immigration has
resumed its upward trend in 1951 and 1952. Apparently we must prepare for an increase
in enrolment of 90,000 before 1962. After that, there may be an additional increase of
five or six thousand before the peak is reached about 1965. DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
N 141
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education
covering the period September 1st, 1951, to August 31st, 1952:—
District Number and Name
Motion Pictures
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Film-strips
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
1. Fernie.. —
2. Cranbrook 	
3. Kimberley	
4. Windermere	
5. Creston	
6. Kootenay Lake..
7. Nelson —
8. Slocan 	
9. Castlegar —
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks  _
13. Kettle Valley	
14. Southern Okanagan..
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos 	
17. Princeton 	
18. Golden	
19. Revelstoke 	
20. Salmon Arm	
21. Armstrong-Enderby..
22. Vernon	
23. Kelowna_	
24. Kamloops 	
25. Barriere 	
26. Birch Island	
27. Williams Lake	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. Ashcroft	
31. Merritt 	
32. Fraser Canyon..
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey 	
37. Delta _
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
40. New Westminster-
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam	
44. North Vancouver...
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Ocean Falls	
50. Queen Charlotte .
51. Portland Canal	
52. Prince Rupert	
53. Terrace	
54. Smithers	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Vanderhoof	
57. Prince George..
58. McBride	
59 and 60. Peace River..
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich.. 	
64. Saltspring	
522
13
130
95
3
1,247
370
305
13
947
228
274
124
279
545
272
341
127
416
985
425
563
906
138
43
76
237
161
428
280
866
626
1,150
460
682
7,766
767
1,589
829
637
708
244
417
44
474
651
124
669
285
110
45
696
4,551
435
205
9
199
5
48
48
1
491
164
108
7
435
81
70
35
136
261
105
135
64
162
416
129
278
470
71
11
40
128
67
188
163
487
240
535
206
296
4,020
405
759
356
257
365
138
164
17
185
315
68
306
5
HI
39
33
259
2,331
161
77
6
65
11
16
25
67
19
173
38
7
65
14
85
51
150
60
114
121
81
6
5
286
53
125
243
65
31
3
9
6
76
112
48
20
46
10
14
21
49
16
114
24
65
7
67
10
49
38
109
50
89
69
53
3
5
184
42
76
171
51
30
0
4
6
58
60
26
7 N 142
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1951-52
Motion Pictures
Film-strips
District Number and Name
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
331
167
54
594
8
922
365
333
150
142
1,085
256
481
513
178
77
33
244
3
380
246
221
69
60
503
114
213
284
8
76
21
30
14
107
1
7
69. Qualicum ~          ...              ...
7(1,   Alherni
47
15
19
77,   Tamphpll River
73    Alert Ray
14
75. Mission 	
73
1
Totals	
33,175
263
15,262
207
2,309
1,615
33.438         1      15.469
2,309
1,615
The motion-picture library contains 1,451 film titles. There are 664 duplicate
prints of the titles in most popular demand, bringing the total to 2,115 films. The
film-strip library contains 3,500 film-strips.
The Division received 33,438 requests for motion pictures, to meet which it was
able to supply 15,469 films or approximately 46 per cent. This represents a monthly
shipment of 1,547 films.
The Division received 2,309 requests for film-strips between January, 1952, and
June, 1952. Of this, it was able to supply 1,615 or about 70 per cent. This involved an
average monthly shipment of 269 strips. Attention is drawn to the fact that the figures
pertaining to film-strips listed above do not cover the whole term but are for the period
of January, 1952, to June, 1952. Here one should remark that the interest in this medium
is increasing and an increased demand and turnover is anticipated.
Five hundred and five schools registered with the Division for service during the
1951-52 term. From the information supplied by registration cards submitted by these
schools, the following statistics have been compiled:—
Number of schools possessing motion-picture projectors1  301
Number of schools borrowing motion-picture projectors  131
Number of schools borrowing motion-picture projectors provided by a source other than the school district     46
Total number of schools using the motion-picture
service  47 8
Number of schools possessing film-strip projectors..
Number of schools borrowing film-strip projectors.
70
4
Total number of schools using the film-strip service     74
1 This includes different types of 16-mm. sound motion-picture projectors. " EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT " N 143
EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT"
REPORT OF MRS. F. M. KINSMAN, SECRETARY
OF THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1951-52 a total of 208 applications was considered by the
Commission. Of these, twenty-one were turned down, fourteen because the family
income was higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes, two because the
pupils had not attained Grade IX standing, and five for various other reasons. One
hundred and eighty-seven applications were approved for grants, eighty-eight receiving
assistance for the first time, sixty-four for the second year, twenty-five for the third year,
and ten for the fourth year. Students were distributed by grades as follows: Grade IX,
35; Grade X, 64; Grade XI, 57; Grade XII, 31. During the year ten students dropped
out and grants were discontinued.
Grants paid per student were as follows:—
September  $50.00
December  20.00
March   9.75
Total for the year, per pupil  $79.75
Total for the year, all pupils     13,961.25
Expenses amounted to $37.83, leaving a balance of 92 cents from the total vote of
$14,000 allocated to the "Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act" for the fiscal
year 1951-52. N 144 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1951-52
THE STRATHCONA TRUST
REPORT OF T. F. ROBSON, SECRETARY, LOCAL COMMITTEE
Physical Training
Physical Education awards were made to the school in each inspectorate judged to
have provided the best programme of Physical Education during the school-year. Thirty-
five tablets were engraved and sent for attachment to shields by Inspectors of Schools who
arranged for transfer of shields between the schools concerned.
Assistance for teachers taking further training in Physical Education was provided
as follows:—
William Kushnir:   University of British Columbia, 1952-53, winter session,
$100.
William B. Wilson:  University of British Columbia, 1952-53, winter session,
$100.
Lois Withers:  University of British Columbia, 1953, summer session, $100.
Olive J. Mitchell: University of British Columbia, 1953, summer session, $100.
The two films " Rural Schools Indoors " and " Rural Schools Outdoors " were
circulated by the Department's Visual Education Branch and received favourable comment from teachers.
Cadet Training
The Area Cadet Officer reported that nearly all cadet corps had increased attendance,
exceeding expectation of instructors, and that the new training policy will provide a basic
standard of training throughout Canada.
A new school cadet corps was formed at New Denver.
The longer cadet training camp resulted in a higher standard of training. Corps with
instructors trained at camp showed most improvement.
Cadet Trades-training
In this phase of the work an additional course, Operator—Wireless and Line, was
introduced in conjunction with the Operator R.T. course.
The instructors' refresher course was from June 30th, 1952, to July 12th, 1952, and
the trades-training camp was from July 14th, 1952, to August 29th, 1952.
Of the 605 cadets eligible to attend camp, 592 attended and, at the end of the two
weeks' adjustment period, 494 remained to complete the course. The number of candidates who attended and qualified was as follows:—
Course Candidates Qualified
Driver-mechanic  205 40
Operator R.T.   65 32
Senior Leader  200 32
W. and L  10 5
Successful cadets received a bonus of $100. All cadets participated in sports, for
which prizes were given.
Shooting
The D.CR.A. cadet team improved on last year's performance, and two cadets
entered the Governor-General's Trophy shoot.
Parker Hale sights were awarded at Vernon to the best shot and the runner-up.
Special Dominion Camp
The national cadet camp at Banff, Alta., was held from July 21st, 1952, to August
9th, 1952, for 155 senior cadets from across Canada.   Western Command was required THE STRATHCONA TRUST N  145
to supply a pipe and drum band, and British Columbia sent four pipers and five senior
cadets. All Banff cadets attended a two-week smartening-up course at Vernon before
leaving for Banff.
Competition entries were as follows: R.M.C., 10 teams; D.CR.A., 21 teams;
First Aid, 21 junior teams; Signalling, 28 Morse.
Cadet Proficiency
Eighteen cadet proficiency awards were made, the Rossland and Nelson High Schools
tying for first place.
Finance
Funds at the disposal of the Local Committee amounted to $2,799.62, and expenditures for the year were $1,195.81, leaving a balance on hand of $1,603.81. Of this, $200
is payable for deferred awards for Physical Education, leaving an operating balance of
$1,403.81.  STATISTICAL RETURNS  STATISTICAL RETURNS
N 149
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