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SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st 1952 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1953]

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
POWER COMMISSION
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st
1952
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952  To Colonel the Honourable Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor oj the Province oj British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the British
Columbia Power Commission for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1952.
BYRON I. IOHNSON,
Premier.
Victoria, B.C.,
June 30th, 1952.
The Honourable Byron I. Johnson, M.B.E.,
Premier, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—The Annual Report of the British Columbia Power Commission covering the
fiscal year 1951-52 is respectfully submitted herewith in accordance with section 93 of
the " Electric Power Act."
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
W.  W.  FOSTER,
Commissioner.
F. L. SHAW,
Commissioner.
S. R.  WESTON,
Chairman.
Victoria, B.C.,
June 30th, 1952. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section Page
I. General Review     7
II. Legal—
1. Legislation  22
2. Compensation for Expropriated Properties  22
3. Acquisition of Electrical Properties  22
4. Rights-of-way and Property Acquisitions  22
5. Property Sales  24
6. Contracts  24
7. Water Licences  24
8. Insurance  25
III. Construction—
1. Production Plant  26
2. Transmission Plant  31
3. Distribution Plant  34
IV. Operation—
1. Production  3 8
2. Transmission  43
3. Distribution  44
4. Rate Schedules  48
V. Surveys and Investigations—
1. Power Projects  54
2. Transmission Projects  54
3. Distribution Projects  55
VI. Financial    56 LIST OF DIAGRAMS
Page
Customer Growth, 1945-52     8
Average Consumption and Kwh Charges by Fiscal Years—
Residential Classification, 1946-52  16
Commercial Classification, 1946-52  17
Yearly Power Production in Kwh, 1946-52  39
Sources and Disposition of Energy Requirements, 1951-52  41
Disposition of Revenue by Functions, 1950-51 and 1951-52  64
Disposition of Revenue by Expense Classifications, 1950-51 and 1951-52  65
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
Clowhom Development—General View     6
Elk Falls Company Newsprint-mill, Duncan Bay, V.I  21
Clowhom Development—
View of Dam, Spillway, and Pipe-line  27
Interior of Power-house  27
John Hart Development—Power-house Extension  28
Whatshan Development—Opening Ceremony  30
Clowhom Development—
Transmission-line Construction  33
Sechelt Substation    33
Quesnel Power-house Interior  42
Rural Electrification Construction  45
Snowmobile for Patrol of Whatshan-Vernon Transmission-line  45
District Managers' Conference, Victoria  47
Map of British Columbia Showing Commission's Undertakings as at March 31st,
1952 1 Inside
Enlarged Map of Vancouver Island Area [-Back
Enlarged Map of Southern Interior Area J Cover
LIST OF TABLES
Table   1.—Services Acquired and Installed, 1946-52     7
Table   2.—Statistics Relating to the Supply of Electrical Energy, 1946-52  10
Table   3.—Summary of Growth Made during Fiscal Years 1951-52 and 1950-51...  19
Table   4.—Generating Capacities in Kw Showing Net Increase during Fiscal Year  31
Table   5.—Circuit-miles of Transmission-lines Showing Net Increase during Fiscal
Year  34
Table   6.—Distribution-line Construction during Fiscal Year  37
Table   7.—Power Generated and Purchased, Fiscal Years 1951-52 and 1950-51 .„ 40
Table   8.—Disposition of Power, Fiscal Years 1951-52 and 1950-51  40
Table   9.—Sources of Power, Fiscal Years 1951-52 and 1950-51  43
Table 10.—Investment-per-customer and Customers-per-mile Averages, by Power
Districts, as at March 31st, 1952  46
Rate Schedules 49-53
Financial Statements 60-77  Seventh Annual Report of the British Columbia Power
Commission, Fiscal Year Ended March 31st, 1952
I. GENERAL REVIEW
In this, the sixth full year of operation, the facilities provided by the Commission
for service to its customers continued to expand. Generating capacities were increased
by over 20 per cent with the completion of the Whatshan hydro development during
the year. Diesel installations were extended to an even greater extent. The mileage
of distribution-lines constructed, mostly in the outlying areas of the various power districts,
brought about a rise in the average investment per customer of 16 per cent.
During the twelve-month period ended March 31st, 1952, the number of customers
billed increased by 2,600. The distribution system at Clinton, serving 103 customers,
was acquired early in 1952. In June, 1951, the properties at Hope and Lillooet were
disposed of to the British Columbia Electric Company Limited as authorized by Special
Act of the Legislature. Although served by the Commission for less than six years, the
number of customers in these two areas had trebled, increasing from 325 to 965 during
that time.
Table 1 is a concise record of previously existing services acquired and net new
connections installed by the Commission since it began operations on August 1st, 1945.
Table 1.—Services Acquired and Installed, 1946-52
Period Ended March 31st
Services
Acquired
Net
Services
Installed
Total for
Period
Cumulative
to End of
Period
1946                                       - -	
13,270
7,151
1.000
831
4,686
473
103
325
832
1,786
3,431
3,318
3,321
4,075
2,600
640
14,102
8,937
4,431
4,149
8,007
4,548
2,703 >
965 (
14,102
1947   -  	
1948       --	
1949 	
1950          	
23,039
27,470
31,619
39,626
44,174
45,912
1951        	
1952   	
Sold June, 1951 - -	
Totals	
77.189        1         18.723
45,912
In 1943 a general survey of the Province was made by the Rural Electrification
Committee to locate the number of potential customers wherever the average density
was three or more to the mile of line required, in groups within practical reach of distribution systems. The survey disclosed 9,387 customers so located, 3,481 of whom
were in territory now served by the Commission. The Commission has installed 18,000
services in these areas.
Even more noteworthy is the extent to which the use of electricity has been
increased. By modern standards, availability of service must include more than merely
lighting, which is non-competitive at almost any level of rates. In six years, average
residential consumption has more than doubled, while the charge per kwh has decreased
by almost 40 per cent during the same period. This progress, shown in Table 2, is
attributable in part to the Commission's uniform promotional rate structure which is
now in force in all twenty-five power districts. The disappearance of the last of the
old tariffs acquired with predecessor companies was a notable event of the year. H 8
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT'
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51 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52 H 9
The effectiveness of the new schedules continues to be demonstrated both by the
undertaking's satisfactory financial position and by the steadily increasing use of power
per capita and decreasing cost of power per kwh. The average monthly consumption
was 151 kwh per residential customer and 518 kwh per commercial customer during
1951-52. These figures represent a 20-per-cent and 13-per-cent increase respectively
over the average monthly consumption in 1950-51. At the same time the average
charge per kwh dropped from 3.3 to 3.1 cents for residential customers and from 3.2
to 2.8 cents for commercial customers. This situation is illustrated by the accompanying graphs.
During the year under review, particular attention was given to the development
of sources of power to meet future demands. This aspect of the Commission's work
attracted widespread public attention and is therefore dealt with in some detail.
The principal source of power for Vancouver Island is now the Commission's lohn
Hart Development at Campbell River, the original planning of which was begun in
1945. The programme called for completion in three stages, each stage requiring the
installation of one pipe-line and surge-tank and two hydro-electric generating units, the
capacity of each unit to be 28,000 turbine horse-power or 26,500 electrical horse-power.
As each pair of units is installed, progressively greater water-storage capacity is required
to ensure their continuous operation.
The second stage of the development has been completed since October, 1949, so
that four generating units, with a total capacity of 112,000 turbine horse-power or
106,000 electrical horse-power, are in operation. Water-storage, sufficient only for these
four units, is provided by Lower Campbell Lake, dammed at Ladore Falls. The John
Hart station, as now installed, has not sufficient machine capacity to supply the peak
demand beyond December, 1952, which means that all four units would have to be put
into continuous operation about that time.
In a report dated March 17th, 1951, the Commission brought this situation to the
attention of the Government and requested authority under the " Electric Power Act" to
proceed immediately with Stage III of the John Hart Development. This authority was
granted, and the installation of generating units Nos. 5 and 6, bringing the total capacity
of the plant to 159,000 electrical horse-power, was begun.
While six units promise sufficient machine capacity to meet the demand until the
end of 1955, the potential river-flow in a low-water year would not supply the kilowatt-
hour load after December, 1954, unless additional storage is available by that date.
Consequently, the Commission applied to the Comptroller of Water Rights, under the
provisions of the " Water Act," for permission to store water in Buttle Lake. Buttle Lake
was chosen in place of Upper Campbell Lake after a careful investigation of the characteristics of both.   This investigation disclosed the following:—
(1) A dam at Buttle Lake would provide 15.63 billion cubic feet of storage.
Such a dam would be approximately 45 feet high, would raise the water
to a maximum of 29 feet above normal high water and, by reason of the
generally steep nature of the shore of the lake, would cause comparatively
little flooding of the surrounding land.
(2) A dam, 80 feet high, at the outlet of Upper Campbell Lake would provide
10.38 billion cubic feet of storage, or approximately two-thirds of that
obtainable at Buttle Lake. Such storage would not permit the development of the John Hart plant to its maximum capacity. The shore of
Upper Campbell Lake is generally flat, and a dam at its outlet would
result in the flooding of several thousand acres of land, a logging-railway,
a highway, and several established properties. The terrain at the outlet
of Upper Campbell Lake is not considered suitable as the site of a dam of
the required height. H 10
electric power act "
Table 2.—Statistics Relating to the
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Residential Service
Commercial
Power District
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Kwh
Kwh
$
c.
$
Kwh
1947
90
4.00
4.5
29,556.13
662,644
2,474
18,405.25
530,739
1948
122,940.07
2,907,171
2,938
90
3.80
4.2
77,132.03
2,010,020
1949
136,368.13
3,765,710
3,208
102
3.70
3.6
81,429.61
2,901,691
1950
147,834.51
4,961,178
3,354
125
3.75
3.0
83,036.08
3,218,867
1951
170,960.60
6,319,938
3,527
153
4.15
2.7
87,070.95
3,630,063
1952
200,374.52
7,963,080
3,615
187
4.70
2.5
98,171.61
4,417,944
Alert Bay      	
1947
5,858.78
53,000
110
43
4.70
11.0
9,219.72
119,000
1948
6,848.87
96,520
132
68
4.85
7.1
10,076.96
199,110
1949
8,896.85
194,099
169
108
4.95
4.6
10,817.20
356,670
1950
11,880.90
312,594
179
151
5.75
3.8
10,458.64
319,851
1951
15,979.11
449,860
330
165
5.85
3.6
11,364.57
371,979
1952
23,948.49
673,231
374
159
5.65
3.6
14,091.68
503,667
1948
48
8.35
17.5
2,488.95
2,567.51
14,650
66
17,195
1949
5,917.23
32,646
109
34
6.15
18.1
7,293.14
49,924
1950
5,102.24
77,432
186
53
.3.45
6.6
7,367.02
174,199
1951
10,604.06
203,641
242
78
4.05
5.2
11,271.61
351,894
1952
17,219.56
423,878
338
122
5.00
4.1
16,882.28
591,829
1949
6,543.76
91,199
713
64
4.60
7.2
4,812.59
75,319
1950
36,238.20
668,051
794
72
3.95
5.4
24,327.20
563,367
1951
41,010.51
987,061
922
96
4.00
4.2
25,729.35
869,279
1952
58,810.50
1,832,349
1,081
152
4.90
3.2
36,259.51
1,611,396
1952
323.62
5,898
66
89
4.90
5.5
436.22
11,148
21,247
93
5.9
1948
28,846.60
381,012
837
45
3.40
7.6
9,409.21
221,106
1949
37,677.14
521,950
860
51
3.70
7.2
11,632.05
270,818
1950
108,602.24
2,059,626
2,371
77
4.05
5.3
59,351.00
1,548,844
1951
123,435.83
2,953,547
2,511
101
4.20
4.2
66,144.69
1,884,695
1952
133,371.58
4,061,701
2,663
.133
4.35
'   3.3
57,567.79
2,441,895
1950
37,671.29
576,005
1,031
72
4.70
6.5
53,373.83
839,652
1951
53,604.86
1,114,412
1,151
86
4.15
4.8
45,911.80
1,429,969
1952
63,104.75
1,382,433
1,208
97
4.40
4.6
53,875.31
1,683,201
1947
6,275.26
44,200
124
31
4.35
14.2
7,513.21
74,000
1948
6,855.41
53,994
141
34
4.30,.
12.7
8,488.36
98,407
1949
6,846.84
102,008
158
57
3.80
6.7
8,098.93
210,186
••■■                i                   ..■■',
1950
~  8,692.40
168,454
173
84
4.35
5.2
9,876.01
290,431
1951
10,611.69
213,611
.   197
93
4.65
4.9
9,261.30
284,817
1952
12,310.42'
294,922
211
105
4.70
4.5
9,979.59
315,991
1950
1,676.35
33,625
109
89
4.45
: 5.0
1,490.47
31,659
1951
6,613.02
150,347
144
98
4.30
4.4
5,309.95
110,980
1952
8,656.34
212,376
161
116 .
4.75
4.1
6,776.09
169,501
Hope. -'— } —-
1947
11,103.42
107,300
269
37
3.80
10.3
10,076.62
141,300
1948
11,470.01
184,792
342
51
3.20
6.2
12,647.95
291,137
1949
16,558.16
349,212
398
78
3.70
4.7
15,721.28
497,161
1950
20,696.73
544,149
468
102
3.90
3.8
17,673.17
579,248
1951
25,597.47
692,109
543
113
4.15
• 3.7
22,372.45
872,093
1952
7,785.53
209,913
126
4.65
3.7
7,412.33
262,143
-
1 Denotes total number of customers at respective dates of acquisition.
Note.—jhe average monthly consumption and the average monthly bill are based on the average number of customers for the REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52
H 11
Supply of Electrical Energy, 1946-52
Service
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Totals
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O t*
II
427
484
534
526
534
518
55
65
75
78
87
28
36
70
82
104
120
151
188
230
37
75
75
352
368
402
284
297
310
46
54
54
62
60
61
41
49
50
48
84
91
117
143
Kwh
425
365
472
509
573
698
180
274
409
344
384
478
126
130
255
396
539
311
324
421
636
301
14.70
14.00
13.25
13.10
13.75
15.50
13.95
13.80
12.40
11.25
11.75
13.40
18.30
19.00
10.80
12.70
15.35
19.90
14.00
12.45
14.30
11.80
3.5
3.8
2.8
2.6
2.4
2.2
7.7
5.1
3.0
3.3
3.1
2.8
14.5
14.6
4.2
3.2
2.9
6.4
4.3
3.0
2.3
3.9
3,456.37
15,913.73
24,387.59
31,175.68
32,720.48
39,731.53
3,734.
2,610.
1,547.
3,638.
4,246.
5,243.
392.
1,675
912
4,067
8,009
Kwh
32,633
431,583
1,028,897
1,944,961
2,343,641
2,716,845
73,700
54,640
54,202
173,343
260,899
300,363
40
40
46
52 |
55
56
25
7
8
10
10
10
10.6
3.7
2.4
1.6
1.4
1.5
5.1
4.8
2.9
2.1
1.6
1.7
1,732.96
6,776.41
6.376.81
7,284.06
7,816.70
8,662.21
180.00
134.00
169.02
750.15
1,156.50
1,664.00
Kwh
(Date of acquisition
26,148 |
134,571 |
154,383 j
173,894 j
205,163 I
217,684 |
53,150.
222,762.
248,562.
269,330.
298,568.
346,939.
: Jan
.71  |
.24 j
14 |
33 j
73 |
.87  |
.Date of acquisition: Aug.
.05 I
3,600
300
3,800
28,796
55,152
68,631
18,993
19,669.
21,430.
26,728
32,746.
44,947
Kwh
. 1st, 1947.)
1,252,164
5,483,345
7,850,681
10,298.900
12,498,805
15,315,553
1st, 1945.)
249,300
350,570
608,771
834.584
1,137,890
1,545,892
2,877
2,943
3,464
3,790
3,934
4,118
4,191
4.2
4.1
3.2
2.6
2.4
2.3
.Date of acqu sition: Bums Lake, Nov. 1st, 1947; Decker Lake, Feb. 15th, 1950.)
152 [
191  |    7.6
205
255
269
430
475
5.6
3.5
3.2
2.9
2.9
944.98
5,745.58
8,088.86
20,668.68
32.78
2,803
18,801
47,738
162,162
296,945
26,896
163,895
368,471
990,851
748
4
14.0
8
8.9
5
1.9
10
2.5
10
2.7
3
3.5
9
3.5
12
2.2
18
2.0
2
4.4
125.00
362.98
618.16
632.60
962.05
77.65
671.54
847.50
1,344.00
3,872
1
17,544
1
22,301
1
25,446
1
23,481
2
5,574.31
15,248.39
13,999.54
26,575.36
43,073.58
38.520
118,915
321,670
743,143
1,336,133
1161     .__-
99     14.5
154 j 12.8
(Date of acquisition: Jan. 1st, 1949.) |
1,553
27,019
43,800
44,200
12,378.98
66,982.52
75,676.22
117,082.69
194,967 |
1,422,332
2,268,611
4,478,796
(Date of acquisition:  Feb. 1st, 1952.)
  I .- 792.62 I 17,794
(Date of acquisition: Royston, Jan. 1st, 1947; Cumberland, June 5th, 1947; Courtenay-Comox, Apr. 1st, 1949.)
295
12.50
4.3
298
12.80
4.3
395
15.15
3.8
436
15.30
3.5
525
12.40
2.4
370
23.50
6.4
415
13.35
3.2
467
14.95
3.2
135
13.75
10.2
162
14.00
8.6
317
12.25
3.9
428
14.55
3.4
407
13.25
3.3
436
13.75
3.2
204
9.60
4.7
199
9.50
4.8
285
11.40
4.0
284
20.20
7.1
316
13.75
4.4
436
13.80
3.2
440
13.40
3.1
539
13.80
2.6
510
14.40
2.8
2,021.40
2,547.31
10,727.61
11,406.34
14,554.66
25,294.65
14,660.21
24,483.26
861.04
745.06
417.82
510.46
626.44
682.29
643.48
2,366.00
2,650.55
252.60
195.04
1,678.91
3,814.88
8,447.28
3,516.21
2
2.6
78,362
95,115
3
2.7
373.740
43
2.9
396,791
38
2.9
553,337
47
38
2.6
5.6
455,775
710,574
44
2.1
1,165,089
49
7
2.1
9.9
8,700
5,914
6
12.6
5,631
5
7.4
7,940
6
6.4
14,364
5
4.4
22,058
5
1
3.1
2.5
26,128
100,738
1
2.4
132,170
1
4
2.0
5.3
4,800
5,437
2
3.6
75,516
4
2.2
200,091
8
1.9
334,490
14
2.5
137,145
2.5
1,422.52
2,598.61
7,040.13
7,096.72
7,048.34
2,576.25
2,094.00
2,217.76
954.60
500.45
796.76
1,302.00
1,320.00
1,372.04
119.90
462.25
286.00
749.00
1,110.00
1,190.50
1,420.00
408.57
40,175
77,731
211,374
214,765
205,285
1,255.30
41,699.73
54,455.11
185,720.98
208,083.58
212,542.37
21,247
720,655
965,614
4,193,584 j
5,449,798
7,262,218
(Date of acquisition: June 30th, 1949.)
36,968  |    2       118,916.02        1,908,400
40,663       2       116,270.87       3,295,618
66,363 |    2      143,681.08      4,297,086
(Date of acquisition:  Sept. 1st, 1945.)
25,000
33,104
41,899
42,923
41,089
15,604.11
16,589.28
16,160.35
20,380.87
21,819.43
24,344.34
151,900
158,315
350,929
508,724
555,715
674,060
(Date of acquisition: Nov. 1st, 1949.)
2,000
8,023
3,810.30
14,408.87
18,545.23
91,412
364,065
522,070
(Date of acquisition: Aug. 1st, 1945.)
27,676
27,867
52,680
54,195
64,600
16,050
21,718.64
25,062.00
35,068.35
43,375.28
57,837.20
19,122.64
(Date of sale:
1       I
281,076
509,233
974,569
1,377,683
1,963,292
625,251
June 27th, 1951.)
262
335
454
831
837
956
1,124
1,331
103
105
2,593i
93
916
940
2,770
2,921
3,116
1,278
1,355
1,494
1,569
158
177
201
218
242
263
278
68
151
196
214
190
322
429
494
594
701
728
4.4
3.6
3.2
6.3
4.7
3.3
2.6
4.5
5.9
5.8
5.6
4.4
3.8
2.9
6.3
3.5
3.3
10.2
10.5
4.6
4.0
3.9
3.6
4.2
3.9
3.6
7.7
4.9
3.6
3.1
2.9
3.0
whole year rather than cn the actual number shown, which is at the end of the fiscal year. H 12
' ELECTRIC POWER ACT'
Table 2.—Statistics Relating to the Supply
rri
al
■3"°
el o
JJ
Residential Service
Commercial
Power District
V
§
6
>
o
(2
g
i
S
3
as
a
o
U
•83
» S
II
E_ as
33
&8
an
a%
11
1*=.  VI
>%
i
c
0
a
u_e
II
st
g
3
s
>
Si
as
a
p
a
1
a
0
u
1951
1952
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1950
1951
1952
1951
1952
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1951
1952
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
$
Kwh
Kwh
94
149
118
107
116
124
131
154
54
61
86
81
115
68
83
70
63
62
53
62
30
37
66
86
99
102
72
83
94
116
137
168
87
97
111
125
134
149
36
53
80
96
103
121
$
5.10
6.50
4.25
3.80
3.85
4.10
4.30
4.60
4.70
3.65
4.30
4.05
4.70
5.35
5.75
5.50
5.25
5.20
3.70
3.85
3.20
3.45
3.65
4.00
4.25
4.55
(I
3.65
4.00
3.60
3.70
4.00
4.50
3.60
3.75
4.05
4.30
4.50
4.75
3.15
3.25
3.75
4.05
4.15
4.60
c.
5.4
4.4
3.6
3.6
3.3
3.3
3.3
3.0
8.7
6.0
5.0
5.0
4.1
7.9
6.9
7.9
8.4
8.4
7.0
6.2
10.6
9.4
5.5
4.7
4.3
4.4
ate of
5.1
4.8
3.8
3.2
2.9
2.7
4.2
3.9
3.6
3.4
3.3
3.2
8.8
6.2
4.6
4.2
4.0
3.8
$
Kwh
2,765.95
5,397.75
50,995
123,651
63
82
2,354
2,588
2,778
3,257
3,546
3,709
1,652.71
2,851.20
33,715
83,031
29,586.47
113,315.36
124,136.04
148,675.32
175,898.82
202,195.05
835,165
3,176,827
3,717,417
4,512,023
5,405,709
6,735,688
34,612.54
136,481.20
157,761.03
189,534.87
214,193.92
187,839.43
656,614
2,647,482
3,034,725
3,815,925
4,546,975
4,769,416
Lake Windermere  	
9,645.54
19,004.41
24,872.10
111,310
316,770
499,190
412
456
509
8,351.60
9,990.24
12,480.61
110,564
238,092
331,332
11,167.21
17,723.60
222,981
456,291
278
313
9,322.58
12,570.49
253,256
377,856
3,643.72
5,782.38
7,769.87
9,489.21
2,596.75
46,091
83,536
98,745
113,450
30,829
82
81
150
162
3,872.34
6,714.59
8,205.45
8,500.60
2,281.86
109,177
192,801
248,445
254,891
68,068
388
397
Nakusp	
4,262.80
18,213.40
60,984
293,263
2,944.07
11,975.47
93,220
322,835
7,952.72
9,347.76
11,278.30
13,435.91
14,956.98
17,499.74
75,000
99,211
203,261
288,992
347,610
394,212
217
230
272
285
296
410
3,804.34
5,317.30
5,399.76
6,761.13
7,276.23
7,898.01
acquisition: >
140,757.69
188,970.81
230,543.15
269,599.68
284,898.18
303,459.89
48,400
79,093
129,445
168,762
195,984
230,500
299,777.93
378,033.10
377,682.07
439,755.84
533,452.06
632,634.81
5,933,381
7,839,393
9,802,055
13,787,333
18,342,407
23,504,327
7,477
8,278
9,102
10,696
11,457
11,886
3,506,220
4,394,887
7,473,774
9,910,654
11,860,216
13,045,396
173,236.77
203,025.85
256,731.80
315,280.21
363,571.94
403,901.89
4,169,895
5,242,519
7,034,583
9,163,547
10,892,651
12,712,482
4,167
4,791
5,660
6,296
6,992
7,067
112,465.09
133,269.83
158,666.22
170,180.39
189,948.09
185,266.79
2,715,790
3,107,124
3,772,011
3,937,094
4,486,445
5,400,563
5,984.54
11,098.89
15,424.04
18,778.35
19,902.87
22,501.99
68,059
180,318
331,954
445,273
494,949
591,971
244
312
360
398
403
407
3,212.77
5,943.78
7,444.17
9,135.29
8,710.20
9,435.23
41,002
116,398
172,653
255,698
219,192
215,682
1 Denotes total number of customers at respective dates of acquisition.
Note.—The average monthly consumption and the average monthly bill are based on the average number of customers for the REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52
H 13
of Electrical Energy, 1946-52—Continued
Service
o a
„ u
is
Ja
*c
fi»
o5
5 3
s
_• s
% °
<u
<P3
II
S3
Power Service
i- 2
ll
5 3
ZO
1!
Si
Street-lighting Service
£
3
e
o
U
o
l- u
Is
Zu
Totals
P.
0
"Sa
si
Zu
._:
IS
Kwh
609
650
710
779
822
821
82
87
45
40
45
46
244
449
392
335
363
423
465
479
287
271
352
302
367
80
81
52
65
65
68
67
85
316
358
471
457
445
397
337
76
114
167
211
243
278
12.00
15.40
20.60
18.25
18.90
21.00
21.95
18.85
23.35
11.35
13.30
11.10
12.20
11.20
12.45
15.55
15.25
14.90
12.55
12.45
6.00
7.70
7.00
8.45
9.05
9.50
Kwh
4.9
3.4
5.3
5.2
5.2
5.0
4.7
3.9
40.62
144.69
11,258.70
72,421.50
70,700.45
99,468.88
118,516.97
126,074.30
1,060
2,140
Kwh $ Kwh
(Date of commencement of operation: May 10th, 1950.)
3.8 I      216.00 4,250 I    1 I       4,675.28 90,020
6.8 |      269.92 9,000       1 8,663.56 217,822
(Date of acquisition: Kamloops, Jan. 1st, 1947; Chase, Sept. 30th, 1949.)
I o._       11*: 1 s        1 zzi '._: £"> cn 1 nn mi AC o nm ats
7.6
4.2
3.8
3.7
3.3
3.5
3.5
3.3
3.3
3.3
3.2
3.7
7.9
6.7
4.2
4.0
3.7
3.4
16.00
43.22
3,116.25
2,418.18
5,061.87
781.38
1,696.03
2,166.62
2,281.59
486.81
775.71
4,440.88
529.68
383.11
361.70
421.08
676.49
707.47
452,823
116
2.5
3,473,306
120
2.1
3,164,181
118
2.2
4,723,241
118
2.1
6,019,243
133
2.0
6,859,516
145
1
1.8
9
2
1
149,912
3
2.2
76,770
3
3.2
211,190
6
14
2.4
5.8
13,545
33,621
14
5.0
83,936
15
2.6
104,895
12
2.2
20,979
2.3
54,550
7
1.4
238,704
7
12
1.9
7.1
7,500
2,440
5
15.7
5,195
8
7.0
6,860
7
6.1
18,146
9
3.7
18,279
9
3.9
1,553.75
4,809.85
4,772.75
3,687.81
7,319.61
9,997.53
89.76
248.31
521.57
123.75
300.00
351.40
594.00
163.08
659.00
2,845.38
301.79
360.00
372.00
426.71
62,870
1
199,320
1
197,149
1
170,104
2
258,171
3
397,717
3
77,011.46
327,027.91
357,370.27
441,366.88
515,929.32
526,106.31
2,007,472
9,496,935
10,113,472
13,221,293
16,230,098
18,762,337
(Date of acquisition: Sept. 30th, 1949.)
2,992
1
8,277
1
14,900
1
18,102.90
29,286.18
40,990.53
224,875
563,141
995,334
(Date of acquisition: Jan. 31st, 1950.)
4,886
11,940
23,031.72
35,655.96
557,893
1,057,277
(Date of acquisition: Aug. 1st, 1947.)
  8,297.44 168,813
  14,193.00 309,958
15,960       1        18,493.34 447,086
23,790       1        20,865.40 497,026
4,820     .... 5,528.50 124,696
(Date of sale: June 27th, 1951.)
!     I I
(Date of acquisition: Dec. 30th, 1950.)
25,400       1 8,641.58 234,154
93,329       1        37,475.13 948,131
(Date of acquisition: Sept. 1st, 1945.)
6,314
7,690
7,620
8,827
12,286.74
15,048.17
17,341.55
20,978.12
23,281.70
26,531.93
130,900
180,744
344,215
472,304
569,360
651,818
can, etc., Aug. 1st, 1945; Parksville-Qualicum, Jan. 1st, 1947; Chemainus, Mar. 15th, 1947;  Ladysmith, Nov. 1st, 1949.)
1,048
1,203
1,503
1,684
1,811
1,787
795
889
976
1,031
1,094
1,125
45
55
64
71
70
75
310
320
444
511
567
604
303
306
335
325
345
404
114
192
245
320
257
245
12.45
4.0
13.80
4.3
13.70
3.1
13.90
2.7
13.65
2.4
14.05
2.3
12.55
4.2
13.15
4.3
14.10
4.2
14.05
4.3
14.60
4.2
13.85
3.4
8.90
7.8
9.80
5.1
10.55
4.3
11.40
3.6
10.20
4.0
10.75
4.4
198,306.40
223,901.54
213,174.35
180,688.34
153,102.85
181,147.89
125,087.98
138,914.71
142,438.12
158,882.09
171,728.37
188,191.04
2,841.19
4,372.84
6,594.36
8,529.56
10,153.72
11,980.94
13,187,560
14,448,894
15,227,253
14,405,610
13,175,567
13,149,065
7,566,512
8,205,735
7,959,110
8,936,704
9,029,754
10,126,748
79,335
297,533
368,399
433,152
548,738
711,198
294
1.5
307
1.5
131
1.4
149
1.3
144
1.2
150
1.4
226
1.7
244
1.7
244
1.8
249
1.8
249
1.9
222
1.9
12
3.6
15
1.5
16
1.8
20
2.0
24
1.9
23
1.7
12,563.58
13,680.38
13,940.97
16,476.86
21,175.79
24,027.65
9,571.83
9,900.79
10,672.98
12,034.99
13,465.83
17,629.80
325.01
660.00
730.00
870.00
870.00
860.54
446,398
4
474,242
5
467,616
4
610,789
13
823,658
14
851,661
14
651,405.60
804,585.83
835,340.54
906,520.72
992,628.88
1,141,270.24
23,073,559
27,157,416
32,970,698
37,831,986
44,201,848
50,550,449
(Date of acquisition: Aug. 1st, 1945.)
434,708
449,066
489,535
490,284
568,998
578,984
420,361.67
485,111.18
568,509.12
656,377.68
738,714.23
794,989.52
14,886,905
17,004,444
19,255,239
22,527,629
24,977,848
28,818,777
(Date of acquisition: Aug. 7th, 1946.)
10,952
23,946
27,291
34,070
36,090
36,290
12,363.51
22,075.51
30,192.57
37,313.20
39,636.79
44,778.70
199,348
618,195
900,297
1,168,193
1,298,969
1,555,141
82
99
3,101'
3,080
3,359
3,607
4,156
4,504
4,678
467
486
537
593
104
364
407
135
141
135
211
221
237
473
476
486
250
281
300
346
361
373
506
8,608>
8,823
9,793
10,740
12,542
13,426
13,837
4,477
5,196
5,932
6,893
7,584
8,343
8,422
288
303
384
442
491
499
507
5.2
4.0
3.9
3.5
3.5
3.3
3.2
2.8
8.0
5.2
4.1
4.1
3.4
4.9
4.6
4.2
4.2
4.4
3.7
4.0
9.4
8.4
5.0
4.5
4.1
4.1
2.8
3.0
2.5
2.4
2.2
2.3
2.8
2.9
2.9
2.9
3.0
2.8
6.2
3.6
3.4
3.2
3.1
2.9
whole year rather than on the actual number shown, which is at the end of the fiscal year. H 14
ELECTRIC POWER ACT'
Table 2.—Statistics Relating to the Supply
w
H __
>.2
Residential Service
Commercial
Power District
0J
c
a
fi
E
o!
S E
So
o 6
3
fl
o
4)
c
_o
fi
E
_. u
a
3
._
11
S§
s
a
3
S'O
. -
.2 c
O
3 3
>~
«_ a
H.W
rt
O
ZO
<o
<m
rto.
rt
o
$
Kwh
Kwh
$
c.
$
Kwh
1947
9,856.63
127,000
252
45
3.50
7.7
13,962.69
171,200
1948
11,726.60
172,363
312
51
3.50
6.8
15,086.51
316,178
1949
15,435.00
273,872
403
66
3.70
5.6
17,464.16
458,739
1950
22,004.89
430,700
510
78
4.00
5.1
24,771.04
708,675
1951
30,995.64
691,357
647
99
4.40
4.5
32,168.21
985,701
1952
44,674.48
1,115,355
823
125
5.00
4.0
38,307.61
1,237,776
Sechelt  	
1947
15,609.09
139,159
423
30
3.40
11.2
5,747.09
70,300
1948
20,850.30
255,328
628
40
3.25
8.2
7,488.11
139,777
1949
30,391.53
446,248
763
52
3.55
6.8
10,946.95
315,380
1950
39,875.07
591,434
892
55
3.70
6.7
12,007.80
409,694
1951
45,541.72
719,286
1,005
61
3.90
6.4
13,489.84
468,241
1952
55,572.30
1,001,136
1,155
78
4.25
5.5
15,401.04
557,216
1947
10,920.33
102,000
245
36
3.85
10.7
9,737.67
75,000
1948
10,577.48
158,769
308
49
3.30
6.7
10,867.63
247,854
1949
15,814.70
333,809
369
83
3.90
4.7
14,248.84
445,398
1950
20,670.41
567,052
396
123
4.45
3.7
17,006.03
528,626
1951
26,268.37
827,678
447
160
5.10
3.2
18,996.01
625,436
1952
34,114.29
1,183,651
516
203
5.85
2.9
21,706.23
763,395
1947
2,850.84
17,100
62
26
4.30
16.7
3,692.31
33,100
1948
4,736.81
52,155
186
38
3.50
9.1
5,984.98
93,072
1949
9,853.09
136,816
261
50
3.55
7.2
6,649.24
133,184
1950
14,296.73
256,957
328
73
4.05
5.6
8,667.07
228,086
1951
20,466.73
431,932
381
99
4.70
4.7
12,694.89
361,448
1952
30,837.65
820,306
519
152
5.75
3.8
21,401.10
754,939
Ucluelet-Toflno	
1952
8,853.03
187,334
164
136
6.40
4.7
3,721.53
120,262
1947
4,462.45
43,800
78
49
5.00
10.2
7,917.34
70,000
1948
4,424.41
64,373
106
60
4.15
6.9
6,138.75
101,171
1949
5,858.85
114,864
125
84
4.25
5.1
6,608.10
177,005
1950
7,325.58
173,711
144
109
4.60
4.2
7,784.69
217,696
1951
9,628.04
263,654
188
138
5.00
3.7
8,889.64
316,218
1952
14,519.85
427,588
219
174
5.90
3.4
13,464.30
593,061
1947
7,324.45
85,300
116
66
5.70
8.6
11,386.30
150,600
1948
7,184.58
126,285
157
76
4.30
5.7
13,546.73
292,938
1949
9,625.70
197,675
202
90
4.35
4.9
16,069.72
432,245
1950
12,718.04
292,533
259
103
4.45
4.4
19,239.98
568,683
1951
15,918.77
433,415
272
136
5.00
3.7
20,724.82
603,354
1952
20,806.24
663,830
300
192
6.00
3.1
23,017.00
747,488
1947
621,611.11
12,484,250
18,705
74
3.70
5.0
392,510.63
8,403,265
1948
957,493.33
21,051,771
22,434
84
3.80
4.5
653,211.43
14,482,126
1949
1,096,821.61
27,732,914
25,991
96
3.80
4.0
778,320.73
21,099,129
1950
1,448,626.62
40,120,724
32,688
110
4.00
3.6
1,018,198.44
28,674,720
1951
1,761,708.67
52,700,354
36,548
126
4.20
3.3
1,128,836.90
35,348,153
1952
2,082,820.23
67,800,885
38,193
151
4.65
3.1
1,174,530.20
41,627,531
2 See Statement 2, " Combined Operations—Financial Summary."
Note.—The average monthly consumption and the average monthly bill are based on the average number of customers for the REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52
H 15
of Electrical Energy, 1946-52—
-Continued
Service
Power Service
Street-lighting Service
Totals
O |h
k2
as
eg
1
i
a. JZ
3 S
3
a
1
o.
I
O v.
8f
o
3
1
a
6
*tt en
O Ih
92 E
u
3
a
o
•a
a
S
O   tH
Si
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fl
3 3
5 3
s
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SW
>. _.
a
Si
>
3
as
a
ll
S3
|A
a
a
>
si
as
a
33
s
>
§
a
Si
s«
ZO
<o
<!<a
rt&
a
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ZO
rta
X
O
ZO
t*
O
ZO
Kwh
$
c.
$
Kwh
c.
$
Kwh
$
Kwh
c.
289
85
174
14.20
8.2
3,451.98
104,260
22
3.3
374.00
50,808
1
27,645.30
453,268
360
6.1
101
279
13.30
4.8
2,315.88
102,581
13
2.3
518.40
50,112
1
29,647.39
641,234
427
4.6
115
358
13.60
3.8
2,533.81
165,523
17
1.5
776.80
40,006
1
36,209.77
938,140
536
3.9
151
442
15.45
3.5
4,317.93
282,410
25
1.5
1,059.18
25,625
2
52,153.04
1,447,410
688
3.6
171
524
17.10
3.3
12,478.65
604,306
28
2.1
1,367.41
38,162
1
77,009.91
2,319,526
847
3.3
187
570
17.65
3.1
32,846.69
1,858,511
29
1.8
1,582.00
41,556
3
117,410.78       4,253,198
1,042
2.8
(Date
337
74
91
7.40
8.2
2,228.27
83,400
4
2.7
23,584.45
292,859
501
8.1
94
139
7.45
5.3
776.33
11,993
6
6.5
38.50
1,500
2
29,153.24
408,598
730
7.1
120
235
8.15
3.5
3,382.78
97,746
8
3.5
306.28
11,498
2
45,027.54
870,872
893
5.2
126
272
7.95
2.9
887.78
11,526
7
7.7
504.22
16,503
2
53,274.87
1,029,157
1,027
5.2
141
294
8.50
2.9
3,500.17
88,002
13
4.0
750.00
26,683
3
63,281.73
1,302,212
1,162
4.9
139
333
9.20
2.8
5,280.19
149,719
15
3.5
1,036.25
36,106
3
77,289.78
1,744,177
1,312
4.4
293
66
88
11.40
12.9
3,178.94
47,000
28
6.8
684.00
8,758
1
24,520.94
232,758
340
10.5
102
237
10.40
4.4
3,343.17
154,791
15
2.2
707.00
13,580
1
25,495.28
574,994
426
4.5
108
356
11.40
3.2
6,234.69
478,732
17
1.3
1,078.00
33,415
2
37,376.23
1,291,354
496
2.9
117
380
12.25
3.2
9,862.89
428,428
21
2.3
1,204.65
43,400
2
48,743.98
1,567,506
536
3.1
118
456
13.85
3.0
13,795.42
655,441
21
2.1
1,332.00
50,800
2
60,391.80
2,159,355
588
2.8
125
520
14.85
2.9
18,373.90
691,151
22
2.7
1,331.98
52,200
2
75,526.40
2,690,397
665
2.8
•
(Dateo
9,000
7,450
20th, 1945.)
59
35
80
8.95
11.1
93.00
1
6,636.15
59,200
98
11.2
56
149
9.60
6.5-
279.98
6,145
3
4.6
152.50
1
11,154.27
158,822
246
7.0
66
170
8.50
5.0
1,033.73
30,494
7
3.4
497.27
20,530
1
18,033.33
321,024
335
5.6
73
267
10.15
3.8
2,391.44
154,869
11
1.5
522.00
18,140
1
25,877.24
658,052
413
3.9
97
336
11.80
3.5
5,460.17
384,739
15
1.4
522.00
20,030
1
39,143.79
1,198,149
494
3.3
138
535
15.15
2.8
8,608.39
550,384.
17
1.6
564.84
18,712
1
61,411.98
2,144,341
675
2.9
(
t of r
43
383
11.85
3.1
3,104.75
204,447
2
1.5
244.76
9,464 1    1 1     15,924.07 1       521,507
210
106
3.1
45
129
14.65
11.3
1,008.31
12,200
4
8.3
180.00
3,285
1
13,568.10
129,285
128
10.5
52
168
10.20
6.0
621.87
9,106
5
6.8
180.00
2,250
1
11,365.03
176,900
164
6.4
57
278
10.35
3.7
560.09
9,884
6
5.7
446.50
16,140
1
13,473.54
317,893
189
4.2
62
310
11.10
3.6
637.83
11,221
6
5.7
577.60
22,160
1
16,325.70
424,788
213
3.9
72
414
11.65
2.8
2,188.18
66,772
9
3.3
648.00
25,100
1
21,353.86
671,744
270
3.2
79
672
15.26
2.3
4,138.48
136,364
10
3.0
696.00
28,130
2
of ac
1
32,818.63
quisition: Sep
22,222.26
1,185,143
t. 1st, 1945.)
292,589
310
161
2.8
64
207
15.20
7.6
3,059.51
53,000
22
5.8
452.00
3,689
203
7.6
86
311
14.40
4.6
1,269.63
38,452
10
3.3
461.40
8,400
1
22,462.34
466,075
254
4.8
102
385
14.30
3.7
1,813.19
64,472
14
2.8
792.00
29,297
1
28,300.61
723,689
319
3.9
110
439
14.85
3.4
2,867.45
99,413
15
2.9
792.00
26,321
1
35,617.47
986,950
385
3.6
116
438
15.05
3.4
3,452.08
161,854
17
2.1
841.00
29,840
1
40,936.67
1,228,463
406
3.3
112
535
16.48
3.1
6,598.81
266,962
17
2.5
(O
1,001.06
f existing pr
28,950.73
32,473
1
51,423.11
ctive dates of
1,402,327.99
1,710,753
430
27,189
23,039
3.0
3,494
278
13.00
4.7
359,255.52
21,713,423
816
1.7
1,112,892
24
43,713,830
3.2
4,188
308
13.90
4.5
471,260.08
27,343,260
818
1.7
40,816.20
1,436,651
30
2,122,781.04
64,313,808
27,470
3.3
4,911
382
14.10
3.7
483,722.36
28,909,668
677
1.7
45,807.17
1,679,586
40
2,404,671.87
79,421,297
31,619
3.0
6,070
420
14.90
3.6
553,600.90
32,970,990
816
1.7
59,963.26
2,080,484
52
3,080,389.22
103,846,918
39,626
3.0
6,691
460
14.70
3.2
587,241.59
35,681,969
875
1.6
73,008.62
2,646,267
60
3,550,795.78
126,376,743
44,174
2.8
6,779
518
14.60
2.8
719,876.46
41,660,820
876
1.7
87,640.29
2,916,915
64
4,064,867.182
154,006,151
45,912
2.6
whole year rather than on the actual number shown, which is at Ihe end of the fiscal year. H 16
ELECTRIC POWER ACT'
/60
*'    /40
K
it
0
v.
In
|    IBO
8
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~j
5:
K
*     /OO
0
eo
66
British Columbia Power Commission
GRAPH SHOWING   INCREASE   IN RESIDENTIAL CONSUMPTION
AND  REDUCTION  IN  KWH  CHARGC TO   CUSTOMERS
1946-1952V
a.
*
0
0
tr
\
\
\
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
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/
Vs.
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^
1346-1         194-7-8         1948-9         1349 SO      1350-51        J35I-3Z REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52
H 17
British Columbia Power Commission
GRAPH  SHOWING   INCREASE   IN  COMMERCIAL   CONSUMPTION
ANO   REDUCTION IN KWH. CHARGE TO  CUSTOMERS
1946-1952.
szo
510
BOO
490
480
470
460
?   450
'K.   440
%   430
\   4ZO
^   330
0
0    380
_J   370
\   360
O
£   3SO
340
330
320
3IO
300
230
28o
270
/
/
/
/
/
r
/
/
/
if
4
7
.if/
V
j/
f/
/
\    /
7^
i
i
!
N>
cv
1
Vs
!
v*
1
1
t
1
1
J
/
J
/
t
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54
4'/z4
4-4
3'/z4
34
tl.
o
l«l
>_.
1346-J 1947-8 1948-3
Z'/z4
194 9-SO       /9SO-5I        /9SI-SZ H 18 "ELECTRIC POWER ACT"
(3) Some 2 miles below the outlet of the Upper Campbell Lake there is a site
where a dam approximately 120 feet high might be built. If adequate
water-storage were available at Buttle Lake, 20,000 continuous horsepower could be produced at this site. This potentiality would be destroyed if Upper Campbell Lake were used for storage.
The paramount importance of the Buttle Lake storage and the need for its very early
development are therefore clear.
As at March 31st, 1952, the decision of the Comptroller of Water Rights, giving
notice of his intention to approve conditionally the Commission's application for permission to store water in Buttle Lake, was the subject of an appeal to the Minister of Lands
and Forests.   (This appeal was subsequently dismissed.)
Table 3, containing figures for the fiscal years ended March 31st, 1952 and 1951,
illustrates the growth made during the period under review.
The Commission has continued the expansion of its facilities as required to meet the
growing demand. In June, 1951, the Commission's second major hydro-electric development was brought into service, when the Honourable E. T. Kenney opened the Whatshan
plant of 22,500 kilowatts in two units. When required the capacity of this station can be
doubled.
The Clowhom Falls hydro plant, to serve the Seechelt Peninsula, was practically
completed by the end of the year and will be put in operation as soon as the 63-kv
transmission-line is fully built. Electric service in two more areas of the Province will be
made available with the construction of systems in Fort St. James and Queen Charlotte-
Skidegate during the summer and fall of 1952.
In the distribution field as well there was a continuation of the activity which has
been reported each year since the Commission commenced operations. Expansion was
particularly marked at Burns Lake, Campbell River, Quesnel, and Terrace, where the
combined total of customers increased by 25 per cent during the year. A new power
district was established at Ucluelet-Tofino, where over 200 customers received electrical
power for the first time.
Sales of power under the provisions of section 21 of the " Electric Power Act" have
had the effect of reducing the unit costs of energy to all power districts prior to distribution. Generation and transmission equipment represent large capital expenditures, the
charges on which must be carried by the cost of delivered power. Unit costs of energy
delivered can best be lowered by increased use of existing facilities, since any saving
realized is passed on to the power districts through a decreased wholesale unit charge.
To the advantage of all the Commission's customers, this objective is being achieved quite
rapidly through the supply of large quantities of energy to the heavy industrial loads on
Vancouver Island.
The John Hart plant and connected transmission system now has three such industrial loads. In the fiscal year 1950-51 the revenue from these accounts amounted to 43
per cent of the entire cost of generation (which includes all fixed charges) at the John
Hart plant plus the total expense of the Vancouver Island high-voltage transmission and
transformation system. For the year just closed, such revenue was 65 per cent of the
total expenses.
These contracts have made possible the installation of the present hydro-electric
development at Campbell River on a sound financial basis, and have directly benefited
the general public served by the Commission. As the revenues from these industrial
loads account for a greater proportion of the total production costs in relation to the
amount of delivered power consumed by them, their existence tends more and more to
reduce costs to the Commission's retail customers.
The net operating surplus of $268,980.47 for the year was achieved notwithstanding
the large increase in fixed charges on capital plant brought into operation at the beginning
of the year. This surplus has been transferred to the rates stabilization reserve to the
credit of the various power districts in which it originated {see statement 4, page 66). REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52 H 19
Table 3.—-Summary of Growth Made during Fiscal Years 1951-52 and 1950-51
Year Ended March 31st
Percentage
1952
1951
Increase
68
123,845
570
2,541
25
378,753,308
71
100,350
550
2,393
25
267,488,496
—4.2
23.4
3.6
6.2
Number of power districts in operation   	
Energy generated and purchased, in kwh 	
41.6
Number of customers—
38,193
6,779
876
64
36,548
6,691
875
60
4.5
Commercial      —
1.3
.1
6.7
45,912
44,174
3.9
Average monthly consumption in kwh—
151
518
3,701
3.1*
2.8*
1.7*
2.6*
$4,064,867.18
66,281.94
126
460
3,284
3.3*
3.2,.
1.6*
2.8*
$3,550,795.78
43,563.40
19.8    -
Commercial  _  	
12.6
12.7
Average charge per kwh paid by—
-6.1
— 12.5
6.2
—7.1
Revenue—
Power districts—
14.5
52.2
$4,131,149.12
764,080.70
$4,895,229.82
$3,594,359.18
470,282.61
$4,064,641.79
14.9
62.7
20.4
Operating expenses—
$572,283.00
439,066.83
•     190,128.27
267,180.44
121,983.57
194.456.59
47,147.22
$535,034.72
376,578.03
158,014.20
206,829.90
106,524.89
191,931.23
99,851.41
7.0
Fuel                                        	
16.6
Other direct operating expenses     	
20.3
29.1
Gross revenue assessment (3 per cent) __ _. 	
14.5
1.3
52 9
Interest on capital in operation _ 	
$1,832,245.92
1,177,975.36
$1,674,764.38
964,966.78
9.4
22.1
$3,010,221.28
$2,639,731.16
14 0
$1,885,008.54
$1,424,910.63
32 3
Provision for reserves—
$878,084.50
649,578.84
88,364.73
$713,004.50
482,483.33
77,009.64
$r,272,497.47~
23 2
34 6
Contingencies 	
14 7
Totals  	
$1,616,028.07
27 0
Net operating surplus (transferred to stabilization reserve).. _	
$268,980.47
$152,413.16 H 20 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
The dissemination of information concerning the Commission's activities was continued during the year through the co-operation of newspapers, notably the weeklies of
the Province, and other periodicals. The publication of the Commission's quarterly
house-organ " Progress," which enjoys a wide circulation, was continued without interruption.
This Seventh Annual Report describes in detail the year's activities under the functional headings of " Legal," " Construction," " Operation," " Surveys and Investigations,"
and " Financial." REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52
H 21 H 22 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
II. LEGAL
1. LEGISLATION
The "Electric Power Act" was amended at the 1952 Session of the Legislature to
clarify one of the financial provisions so that moneys borrowed by the Province under the
Act and advanced to the Commission to repay temporary loans shall not be considered
to reduce the borrowing authority under the Act, the original temporary loans having
already done so.
2. COMPENSATION FOR EXPROPRIATED PROPERTIES
The long protracted litigation between Nanaimo-Duncan Utilities Limited and the
Commission continued as to certain costs up to May, 1951, when final payment was made
to the company.
There is still pending the compensation to be paid to the estate of Silas Freeman
Olney, deceased, for the Commission's diesel power-site at Alert Bay. This case is
expected to come to trial shortly after the close of the fiscal year.
3. ACQUISITION OF ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES
The assets of Clinton Power and Light Company Limited were expropriated February 1st, 1952, at which time the system served 103 consumers in Clinton. There was
mutual agreement as to the compensation.
4. RIGHTS-OF-WAY AND PROPERTY ACQUISITIONS
During the fiscal year the following progress was made in the acquisition of right-
of-way easements required for the Commission's main transmission systems: —
(1) Ten of the nineteen outstanding right-of-way claims on the following main
transmission-line systems were completed:—
132-kv transmission-line, Whatshan to Vernon:
63-kv transmission-line, Vernon to Kamloops:
63-kv transmission-line, Vernon to Armstrong:
132-kv transmission-line, John Hart plant to Nanaimo and Port
Alberni.
These four lines covered a distance of 254.9 miles and crossed 892 parcels
of land registered in the names of 341 owners.   The nine remaining claims
are at this date in various stages of negotiation and completion.
(2) Survey plans covering the right-of-way for the Clowhom Falls-Sechelt
63-kv transmission-line were registered on July 19th, 1951, and the acquisition of the necessary easements by way of right-of-way over Crown and
private properties commenced. This line required the acquisition of a
right-of-way 100 feet in width over a distance of 22.64 miles, affecting
twenty-seven parcels of land registered in the names of ten owners. By the
end of the fiscal year all necessary easements were acquired and registered.
(3) Survey plans for the 60-kv transmission-line from the Commission's substation at Nanaimo to the MacMillan-Bloedel pulp-mill at Cedar, Vancouver Island, were completed and submitted for approval by the Land
Registry Office. One plan covering the first section of the line has to date
been approved, and negotiations for the required easements by way of
right-of-way over three of the eight parcels of property privately owned in
this section have been completed.
(4) The 132-kv transmission-line from the John Hart generating plant to the
Elk Falls Company's sulphate mill at Duncan Bay required the acquisition L
REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52 H 23
of a right-of-way 130 feet in width over a distance of 2.31 miles. The
line crosses six parcels of land registered in the names of three owners.
To date, settlement with one of the owners has been effected and negotiations with the other two are progressing toward completion.
(5) In the course of the year, right-of-way easements over the thirteen parcels
of land crossed by the 60-kv transmission-line from Duncan to Lake
Cowichan were acquired and registered.
(6) Survey plans for the 63-kv transmission-line from Monte Creek to Chase
were registered on the 10th day of December, 1951, and negotiations with
the private-property owners for the necessary right-of-way easements are
now under way. This line requires the acquisition of a right-of-way 60
feet in width over a distance of 18.3 miles, affecting thirty-one parcels of
property registered in the names of eleven owners.
(7) Preliminary survey plans covering the Armstrong-Salmon Arm 63-kv
transmission-line right-of-way were furnished, and the work of contacting
the private-property owners, prior to entry, has been completed, as has
the cruising of the merchantable timber on the right-of-way.
In rural areas throughout the Province, distribution-line extensions necessitated the
acquisition of numerous easements by way of right-of-way over private lands.
The acquisition of some 88.5 acres in Lots 1901, 3153, and 2030, Group 1, New
Westminster District, required for the Clowhom Falls dam and plant site, was completed.
The following applications were launched under the " Navigable Waters Protection
Act" in connection with overhead and underwater cable crossings of navigable rivers
and lakes:—
(1) Underwater cable crossing of Discovery Passage from a point on MacLean
Road, Campbell River, to a point in District Lot 209, Sayward District,
required for the 6,900/12,000-volt distribution-line to serve the residents
of Quadra Island.
(2) Underwater cable crossing of Lower Arrow Lake, West Kootenay District,
required for the 6,900/12,000-volt distribution-line to serve the residents
of Needles, Fauquier, and Edgewood.
(3) Overhead cable crossings of the numerous bays along the Salmon Arm of
Seechelt Inlet, required for the Clowhom Falls-Sechelt 63-kv transmission-
line.
(4) Two overhead cable crossings of the South Thompson River, Kamloops
Division of Yale District, required for the Monte Creek-Chase 63-kv
transmission-line. • •..._,
Substation-sites were acquired at the following places:—
(1) Dawson Creek, from D. F. Morey.
(2) Canoe, from Saskatchewan Federated Co-operatives Limited.
(3) Salmon Arm, from E. J. Pratt.
(4) Chase, from V. M. Oakland.
(5) Nanaimo, from J. R. and L. N. Hambly.
(6) Sechelt, from A. Crucil.
(7) Duncan Bay, from Elk Falls Company Limited.
(8) Westbank, from Crown, Provincial.
(9) Kamloops, from Department of Public Works, Provincial.
•'-•-      (10) Dawson Creek, from Crown, Provincial.
Diesel power-house sites were acquired at the following places:—
(1) Houston, from Houston Planer Company Limited.
(2) Queen Charlotte City, from Crown, Provincial.
-    "(3) Fort St. James, from Crown, Provincial.
(4) Quesnel (addition to site), lease from Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Company. H 24 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
5. PROPERTY SALES
The following lands and buildings located thereon, which were surplus to requirements, were disposed of:—
(1) Lots 24 and 25, Block 5, Town of Golden.
(2) Lots 25 to 32, Block 76, Plan 1054, Village of Smithers.
(3) Block 12 of District Lot 14, Group 1, Map 187, Kamloops Division of
Yale District.
The Commission's lands and plants at the Villages of Hope and Lillooet were sold
to British Columbia Electric Company Limited pursuant to the provisions of the " Hope
and Lillooet Electrical Systems Sale Act."
6. CONTRACTS
Contracts have been drawn and settled covering all major construction projects
undertaken during the year, together with numerous contracts for the supply of plant and
equipment required in connection therewith.
Apart from ordinary service contracts, agreements were completed for the supply of
industrial power in power districts and for the supply of street-lighting service in certain
incorporated villages and unorganized communities.
On March 14th, 1951, an agreement was concluded with Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir) Limited, Wellington Colliery Company Limited, and National Trust Company Limited. This provided for the purchase by the Commission, early in 1953, of the
colliery companies' hydro-electric plant on the Puntledge River, the requisite water
licences thereon, and certain other real and personal property.
7. WATER LICENCES
Water licences held by the Commission for storage and diversion purposes on the
following river and lakes were cancelled at the Commission's request, as of June 30th,
1951: (1) Conditional Licence No. 1474, Barriere River; (2) Conditional Licence No.
7934, East Barriere Lake; and (3) Conditional Licence No. 11385, North Barriere Lake.
Right-of-way Permit No. 537, issued in conjunction with Conditional Licence No.
7934, was cancelled on June 30th, 1951.
Permit No. 1026a, covering occupation of Crown lands, North Barriere Lake, was
cancelled on March 21st, 1952.
The following right-of-way permits, formerly held in conjunction with Conditional
Licence No. 1474 and covering transmission-lines, have now been noted under Conditional Licence No. 18525, Whatshan Diversion: (1) Permit No. 594; (2) Permit No.
611; (3) Permit No. 996; and (4) Permit No. 1303.
To meet the anticipated demand for power on Vancouver Island, and acting upon
the advice of its consulting engineers as to source, the Commission applied to the Comptroller of Water Rights, under the provisions of the " Water Act," to store water in Buttle
Lake. Objections having been filed to the granting of the application, the Comptroller
held a public inquiry into the application and the objections thereto at Courtenay and
Victoria between August 8th and September 8th, 1951.
On November 5th, 1951, the Comptroller handed down his decision, giving notice
of his intention to issue a conditional licence to the Commission for the right to store
water in Buttle Lake in accordance with its application, but subject to certain conditions.
The conditions provide for the harvesting of timber within the area that would be flooded,
the clearing and disposal of debris, the restocking of fish in the lake up to a specified limit
and cost, the maintenance of water-levels, the construction of a road and of camp-sites,
and the supply to the Comptroller of all plans, profiles, reports, etc., that he may require.
It is a further condition that the Commission shall not begin clearing or construction of
any portion of the proposed works until such time as the proposed dam-site at Buttle Lake REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52 H 25
has been fully investigated by drilling, and plans for clearing and construction approved
by the Comptroller.
Those objecting to the granting of such a licence made an appeal from this decision,
under the provisions of the " Water Act," to the Minister of Lands and Forests.
The preliminary question of jurisdiction was heard by the Minister, who, by a decision dated March 13th, 1952, held that the Comptroller of Water Rights had jurisdiction
to make the order referred to above. The Minister also found that he had jurisdiction to
hear the appeal on its merits, which hearing is expected in April, 1952.
8. INSURANCE
Insurance coverages on all phases of the Commission's operations were maintained
in force. There were certain rearrangements and deletions of some types of coverage
effected in order to meet the needs of the Commission.
No major claims under any of the coverages were experienced during the year's
operations. There were, however, a number of small claims under the fleet and property-
damage coverages which were reported and satisfactorily settled. H 26 "ELECTRIC POWER ACT"
III. CONSTRUCTION
1. PRODUCTION PLANT
Alert Bay
The diesel power-house was enlarged by the addition of a bay on the north end to
permit an increase in generating capacity. The installation of a fourth unit, transferred
from Westbank and having a capacity of 250 kw, was completed, with exception of a
switchboard panel not delivered by the end of the fiscal year. Total plant capacity is
now 800 kw in four units.
Barriere
When power from Whatshan became available in the Kamloops area, the Barriere
generating-station was removed from service, as being no longer economical to maintain.
The plant is being dismantled and the machinery will be stored for possible use elsewhere.
Burns Lake
The power-house building was extended by the construction of an additional bay,
with provision for further enlargement in the future. A 250-kw diesel generating unit,
obtained by transfer from Smithers, was installed in the new bay, increasing the plant
capacity to 700 kw in four units.
Clinton
Two 50-kw portable diesel generating units, from Westbank and Tofino, were
installed immediately upon acquisition of the Clinton property in February, 1952. The
generating equipment previously in use was not acquired, being deemed unsuitable for
the Commission's requirements. A third 50-kw generating unit was in process of installation at the end of the fiscal year.
Clowhom Falls
Construction of a hydro-electric generating-station at Clowhom Falls, which commenced in September, 1950, continued throughout 1951. Delivery of major items of
equipment, including turbines and generators, fell behind schedule late in the year.
Heavy equipment was unloaded during November and placed during December, 1951.
Switchgear was received and placed during the following month. Dryout runs were carried out during March, 1952, and by the end of the month and close of the fiscal year the
plant was ready for full-load tests.
The initial stage of this development, which is now approaching completion, consists
of two hydro-electric units, each of 1,500 kw capacity.
Dawson Creek
A 200-kw generating unit which had outlived its usefulness was removed. At the
end of the year, replacement by a new unit of 600 kw capacity and capable of dual-fuel
operation was complete and awaiting its test run by the manufacturers, bringing the available capacity to 2,280 kw with five units installed.
Hazelton
Installation of a 100-kw portable generating unit, by transfer from Comox Valley,
was nearing completion at the end of the year.   Resulting plant capacity will be 300 kw.
Houston
Increase of capacity from 90 kw to 190 kw was in progress as the year closed with
the installation of a 100-kw portable unit from Comox Valley. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52 H 27
Concrete dam and spillway and wood-stave pipe-line at Clowhom Falls Development.
Interior of power-house at Clowhom Falls Development showing two
horizontal-shaft turbines and generators. H 28
ELECTRIC POWER ACT'
c
B
o
&
i   —
c
o
J3
S
n.
o
cj
a
d
o REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52 H 29
John Hart
The third and final phase of the John Hart Development was commenced during
the year. This programme consists of an addition to the power-house building; the
construction of a third pipe-line, surge-tank, and penstock; installation of turbines and
generators, Nos. 5 and 6, each of 20,000 kw capacity; and two additional transformer
banks, each of 25,000 kva capacity, with the necessary additions to the switching-station.
The general contract was awarded to Campbell-Bennett Company Limited in September, 1951, with construction commencing in October. At the end of the fiscal year,
excavation for the wood-stave pipe-line was complete, concrete work had commenced on
the surge-tank footings, and had progressed on the foundations for the two turbines.
Deliveries of generators, turbines, transformers, switchgear, and other equipment
are scheduled for summer and autumn, 1952, with a view to completion by January, 1953.
Lake Cowichan
Availability of power from the John Hart Development made possible the removal
from service of the 75-kw diesel generating unit which was acquired with the property.
Merritt
A second diesel generating unit of 250 kw was completed and placed in service,
bringing the plant capacity to 500 kw in two units. Completion of the third unit awaits
arrival of its 250-kw alternator, the prime mover having been installed.
Quesnel
Two 600-kw diesel-driven generating units, purchased new, were installed in an
addition to the power-house, increasing the capacity by 1,200 kw to a total of 2,650 kw.
These new machines are similar to those installed in 1950-51 and are readily convertible
to gas fuel should such become available.
Smithers
Installation of a 560-kw diesel generating unit, commenced during 1950-51, was
completed, and a 250-kw unit was removed. The capacity of the plant is now 1,370 kw
in three units.
Terrace
An addition to the power-house building was constructed, permitting the installation
of two additional generating units. One unit, 600 kw, was purchased new, and the other,
250 kw, was transferred from Quesnel. These additions and the removal of one 50-kw
generating unit resulted in a net increase of 800 kw, the total capacity now being 1,150
kw in four units.
Vanderhoof
Capacity of the plant was increased 200 kw by the removal of a 50-kw diesel generating unit and the installation of a 250-kw unit from Smithers. There is now available
550 kw in three units.
Westbank
Completion of the cable across Okanagan Lake made it possible to obtain hydroelectric power from the West Kootenay Power and Light Company Limited at Kelowna
and to remove from service six diesel units totalling 740 kw.
Whatshan
The first generating unit of the Whatshan Development commenced operation on
April 29th, 1951, when it was parallelled with the Shuswap plant. Following completion
of the second unit, the Whatshan Development was officially opened by the Honourable
E. T. Kenney on June 28th, 1951. The development, in its first stage, consists of two
hydro-electric units, each of 11,250 kw capacity.  REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52
H 31
Table 4.—Generating Capacity in Operation at Beginning and End of the
Fiscal Year, Together with Additions and Removals Made during the Year
i D=diesel-electric; H=hydro-electric; S=steam-electric.
2 Hope and Lillooet plants were sold in June, 1952.
Capacities are based on name-plate ratings converted to kw at 80 per cent power factor.
Type1
Capacity at
March 31,1951
Installations
During Year
Removals
During Year
Capacity at
March 31, 1952
Plant Location
Number
of
Units
Total
Capacity
in Kw
Number
of
Units
Total
Capacity
in Kw
Number
of
Units
Total
Capacity
inKw
Number
of
Units
Total
Capacity
in Kw
Alert Bay   	
D
D
H
D
D
D
D
D
D
D
H
s
D
D
D
HD
D
HD
H
D
D
D
D
D
H
D
I
2
3
5
3
2
1
3
4
4
1
3
1
2
3
5
2
3
3
3
3
6
4
550
450
1,500
450
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
250
4
2
4
2
5
3
2
3
4
4
2
2
5
5
2
3
4
3
3
2
4
800
2
1
1
1,500
450
250
100
600
700
100
1,880
450
200
200
90
80,000
2,700
75
250
250
270
1,450
810
5,200
1,060
350
300
350
740
200
2,280
450
200
Hope2 	
200
90
	
80,000
2,700
1
3
1
1
1
6
75
250
Lillooet2-- -	
Merritt.  	
250
500
270
1,200
2,650
Sechelt               	
810
560
850
5,200
Smithers ■ 	
250
50
1,370
1,150
Ucluelet-Tofino —	
300
Vanderhoof 	
250
50
740
550
22,500
22,500
775
775
Totals 	
71      | 100,350
1
14      !    26,810
1
17
3,315
68      1 123,845
1
2. TRANSMISSION PLANT
Vancouver Island System
The 60-kv substation at Ladysmith, of 5,000 kva capacity, was completed during
the year and placed in service.
Energy from the John Hart Development was made available to the Lake Cowichan
Power District by the completion of a 60-kv transmission-line from Duncan to Lake
Cowichan; this work was commenced in 1950. The line is constructed for 60-kv operation but is at present in service at 23 kv.
Automatic reclosing equipment was installed on the Harmac-line circuit-breakers
at the Nanaimo substation.
Construction of 2.3 miles of 132-kv transmission-line to supply energy to Elk Falls
Timber Company Limited at Duncan Bay was completed. This is a double-circuit line
on wood-pole H-frame structures.
Two 20,000-kva three-phase transformers, 132/13.8 kv with on-load tap changers,
were received during February, 1952, and were installed in the newly constructed substation terminating the 132-kv extension at Duncan Bay. This structure, together with
necessary switching and control additions at the John Hart Development, approached
completion and will be energized very early in the next fiscal year. Service to the Campbell River Power District will also be supplied from this substation. H 32 "ELECTRIC POWER ACT"
Necessary materials and equipment were ordered for the construction of a 60-kv
transmission-line from Nanaimo with terminal substation at Parksville. This addition
has been planned to improve service and provide for system growth in the area between
Craig's Crossing and Bowser.   Construction is scheduled for the summer of 1952.
To meet the requirements of a contract covering supply of energy to Canadian Col-
leries (Dunsmuir) Limited, two 5,000-horsepower synchronous motors, together with
associated control-gear, were ordered for installation at Puntledge during late 1952 and
early 1953. These motors are to be mechanically connected to the existing 25-cycle
generators in the Puntledge power-house.
Two 16,000-kva three-phase transformers and other material were ordered for
installation in a projected substation at Harmac (MacMillan & Bloedel) by mid-1953.
The design for a 132-kv line from Nanaimo with the necessary additions to the Nanaimo
substation was also commenced.
Transformers were ordered, for 1953 delivery, to provide for doubling the present
15,000-kva capacity of the 132-kv substation at Alberni.
Vernon-Kamloops
Right-of-way surveys were completed and material ordered for 63-kv transmission-
lines from Armstrong to Salmon Arm and from Monte Creek to Chase. Construction
is scheduled for the summer of 1952. Transformers and other equipment have been
ordered for 63-kv substations at Mission Hill (Vernon), Salmon Arm, Enderby, Canoe,
and Chase. These substations will be constructed in 1952 to receive energy from the projected 63-kv lines and will improve present service as well as permit future load growth.
The 1,500-kva 63-kv substation at Armstrong, construction of which was commenced last year, was completed and placed in service.
A 1,000-kva 60-kv substation at Kelowna was completed and placed in operation.
This station receives energy transmitted over West Kootenay Power and Light Company
Limited's lines for transformation and delivery to Peachland-Westbank Power District by
means of the under-water cable crossing Okanagan Lake.
Radio communication was designed and installed for the Vernon-Kamloops system.
Whatshan-Vernon
The 132-kv transmission-line from Whatshan to Vernon, together with its terminals,
was placed in service on April 29th, 1951. A carrier current communication system was
installed and is in operation.
Clowhom-Sechelt
The Sechelt terminal of the Clowhom-Sechelt transmission-line, a 1,500-kva substation, 63-6.9/12 kv, was completed and ready for service at the end of the fiscal year.
A radio communication system was installed and put in operation.
The 63-kv transmission-line, constructed during the year across 22 miles of mountainous and heavily timbered country from Clowhom Falls to Sechelt, approached
completion and is expected to be in service early in the new fiscal year. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52 H 33
Transmission-line from Clowhom Falls to Sechelt zigzags along rugged shore-line of Salmon Arm.
Most of it had to be built from boats and rafts, as illustrated above.
New substation at Sechelt end of transmission-line from Clowhom Falls Development. H 34
ELECTRIC POWER ACT"
Table 5.—Transmission-lines in Operation at Beginning and End of the Fiscal
Year, Together with Additions Made during the Year
Location
Voltage,
Kv
Length in Circuit-miles
March, 1951
Additions
March, 1952
Vancouver Island system—
132
132
60
60
60
207.0
32.6
10.0
4.6
15.7
207.0
4.6
32.6
10.0
15.7
	
249.6                  20.3                269.9
Whatshan-Vernon-Kamloops system—
132
63
33
44
63
63
75.0
42.7
61.0
45.0
69.5
6.9
	
75.0
42.7
61.0
45.0
69.5
6.9
	
300.1                  ....            |        300.1
549.7
20.3
570.0
The 207 circuit-miles from John Hart plant to Nanaimo and Alberni is a double-circuit line on steel towers. The 4.6
circuit-miles from John Hart plant to Duncan Bay is a double-circuit line on wood poles. All other transmission-lines
are single circuit on wood poles.
3. DISTRIBUTION PLANT
The distribution system was increased during the year by 190.3 circuit-miles, as
compared with 431.2 miles built during the previous year. In the period under review
a total of 3,715 new services were added and 377 new street-lights were installed. Two
new power districts, Clinton and Ucluelet-Tofino, commenced operation during the fiscal
year.
In detail the various items of distribution-plant construction are described in respect
of each of the various power districts as follows:—
Alberni
Distribution construction totalled 2.8 miles, with the addition of 198 new services
and 27 new street-lights.
Alert Bay
Forty-six new services were installed, requiring the construction of only 0.2 mile of
Une.   Four new street-lights were put in service.
Burns Lake
Services were increased by 128, and 1.2 miles of primary and secondary line were
built.
Campbell River
In this rapidly growing district 7 miles of line were constructed, resulting in 262 new
services and 17 new street-lights. Construction commenced on a distribution system to
serve the southern portion of Quadra Island. This system will be supplied by submarine
cable from Vancouver Island.
Clinton
Operation commenced February 1st, 1952. Up to-the end of the fiscal year no new
construction work was undertaken. report of british columbia power commission, 1951-52 h 35
Comox Valley
Lines were extended to the south to bring service to those residing in the Buckley
Bay, Fanny Bay, and Mud Bay areas.   One hundred and eighty-six new services resulted
from the construction of 20.4 miles of distribution circuits.    Three street-lights were
added.
Dawson Creek
Nine new street-lights were installed and 139 new services were run; 3.4 circuit-
miles of line were built.
Golden
Nineteen new services and six street-lights were added and 0.2 mile of line constructed.
Hazelton
No additional line was constructed, but 27 services were installed from existing lines.
A street-light system of 24 units was brought into operation.
Houston
Fourteen new services were installed and 1.7 miles of line were built.
Kamloops
Two hundred and sixty-four new services were added and 20.7 miles of line were
constructed.   Seventy street-lights were installed.
The 12-kv loop, commenced in an earlier year, was completed. This permitted the
release of transformers at Fruitlands which, on retirement of the generating-station at
Barriere, were installed as a step-up bank to serve the 44-kv line to Barriere.
At Lome Street, new 12-kv metal-clad switchgear was installed in connection with
retirement of the Kamloops steam plant and as part of the long-range plans for 12-kv
primary service to the Kamloops area.
Pending delivery in 1953 of a unit substation, a 2,500-kva transformer bank,
11.5/2.3 kv, was installed on the substation-site at Sixth Avenue and Columbia Street.
Lake Cowichan
Street-lights were increased by 32.   New construction totalled 1.7 miles of line and
62 new services.
Lake Windermere
With the minor additions of one-half mile of line to the system constructed in
1949-50, 54 new services were installed.
Merritt
Seven additional street-lights and 25 new services were installed. One and one-tenth
miles of distribution circuits were built.
Nakusp
The district was enlarged by construction of 37 miles of lines, 153 new services, and
installation of 6 street-lights.   The major portion of line-construction took place in the
Needles area, where service was made available to Needles, Edgewood, and by submarine
cable to Fauquier.
Nanaimo-Duncan
New services added totalled 684; new street-lights, 113. These additions were
achieved with only 16.9 miles of new distribution-line construction.
Considerable effort was directed toward the maintaining and improving of a high
level of service. At Nanaimo a 3,750-kva substation of modern unit design was installed
at Fraser and Fitzgerald Streets, as the first step in a general distribution plan for the H 36 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
Nanaimo area. Further steps include the installation of additional unit substations at
load centres, together with conversion of distribution circuits from 2,300 volts to 2.3/4
kv. The new substation is designed for 2.3/4-kv operation. A 23-kv circuit was constructed to serve the substation.
At Ladysmith a new substation of 3,000-kva was placed in operation, and reconstruction of the Ladysmith distribution system was commenced. This reconstruction
involves conversion to 2.3/4 kv to provide required additional capacity.
The Chemainus distribution system was rebuilt and converted to 2.3/4 kv.
Work commenced on a new 23-kv circuit and distribution substation at Parksville.
Exclusive of new line-construction, existing distribution transformer capacity was
increased by 2,200 kva and improvements involving 18 miles of circuits were effected.
North Okanagan
Fifteen and nine-tenths miles of new circuits were built; 441 services and 17 streetlights were added.
Major system improvements were effected as follows: The distribution plant in
Enderby was rebuilt; the 6,900-volt line to Lumby and Lavington was converted to
6.9/12 kv; the West Salmon Arm 6,900-volt line was reconstructed; the Lumby distribution system was rebuilt and converted in voltage, as was the Armstrong rural area.
The rebuilding of the lines serving the Okanagan Landing area was approximately half
completed.
Peachland-Westbank
The 6.9/12-kv circuit from Kelowna to Westbank, including the cable crossing of
Okanagan Lake, was completed and placed in service. In all, 10.3 miles of new circuit
were built and 42 new services installed.
Quesnel
Two hundred and twenty-eight new services were installed in the rapidly expanding
area surrounding the Village of Quesnel. Two miles of lines were built and four streetlights added. As part of a plan of distribution to keep pace with system growth, two
circuits were converted from 2.3 kv to 6.9/12 kv.
Sechelt
Line-construction amounted to 4.6 miles; 126 new services were installed.
Smithers
Seventy-eight new services were installed, 4.4 miles of line constructed, and two
street-lights were added.
Terrace
The rapid growth of this district called for construction of 203 new services, 6.7
miles of distribution circuits, and 9 street-light units.
Ucluelet-Tofino
New construction and the rehabilitation of distribution facilities purchased from
War Assets Corporation, which had previously served Department of National Defence
installations only, required 29.2 miles of distribution-line, 228 services, and 20 streetlights.   The system was energized and service to the communities commenced on June
6th, 1951.
Vanderhoof
Seventy new services were added to the system, together with four-tenths of a mile
of distribution-line.
Williams Lake
Two miles of line were built; 38 new services and 7 new street-lights were installed. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52
H 37
Table 6.—Distribution-line Construction during Fiscal Year
Ended March 31st, 1952
Power District
Voltage,
Kv
Miles of Line Added
New
Services
Added
Streetlights
Added
Primary
Secondary
Total
6.9
2.3
2.3
2.3
13.8
2.3
0.5
0.3
      0.8
0.6
3.8
2.0
      5.8
16.3
3.1
     19.4
1.8
1.4
      3.2
1.5
7.0
9.3
     16.3
0.1
0.8
      0.9
0.8
32.0
9.0
0.8
1.6
     11.4
9.1
1.1
     10.2
7.2
0.7
     7.9
1.4
1.9
1.5
2.0
    3.5
2.6
25.2
0.1
11
2.0
0.2
0.6
1.2
1.0
0.2
0.2
0.2
4.4
0.8
0.5
0.3
5.0
5.5
5.7
2.4
0.6-
2.7
0.9
4.1
4.0
0.3
0 7
2.8
0.2
1.2
7.0
20.4
3.4
0.2
1.7
20.7
1.7
0.5
1.1
37.0
16.9
15.9
10.3
2.0
4.6
4.4
6.7
29.2
0.4
2.0
198
46
128
262
186
139
19
27
14
264
62
54
25
153
684
441
42
228
126
78
203
228
70
38
Alert Bay 	
27
4
Clinton   _ ...
17
13.8
2.3
6.9/12.0
2.3/4
3
Golden  	
9
6
24
6.9/12.0
2.3
11.5
2.3/4
2.3
70
32
Merritt 	
2.3
6.9/12.0
2.3
6.9
4.0
6.9/12.0
2.3
6.9/12.0
2.3/4.0
2.3
6.9/12.0
2.3
6.9/12.0
2.3
6.9/12.0
2.3
2.3/4.0
7
6
113
17
Quesnel  	
Sechelt -   	
4
2
9
Ucluelet-Tofino __ 	
20
Vanderhoof      .
7
Totals - 	
146.8
43.5
190.3
3,715
377 H 38 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
IV. OPERATION
1. PRODUCTION
Operation of the new hydro-electric generating-station at Whatshan and its transmission-line connection with the North Okanagan-Kamloops transmission system was
initiated on May 7th, 1951. An adequate source of power for the North Okanagan and
Kamloops Districts was thereby assured, and it became possible to dispense with the
operation of the Barriere hydro-electric and the Kamloops steam-electric generating-
stations, with concurrent economic benefits.
Power purchased from the West Kootenay Power and Light Company Limited at
Kelowna and transmitted across Okanagan Lake by submarine cable replaced diesel-
engine-produced power supplying the Peachland-Westbank District after July 18th, 1951.
The diesel generating-station at Westbank was shut down immediately, with equipment
slated for removal to other areas.
Two diesel generating-stations were added to the Commission's system during the
year. By purchase from the War Assets Corporation a 300-kw diesel plant, located
near Tofino, on Vancouver Island, was acquired and reconditioned to serve the Ucluelet-
Tofino Power District.   Operation of this station was first undertaken on June 6th, 1951.
The Clinton Power and Light Company disposed of its distribution system and a
building, employed by the company as a diesel generating-station, to the Commission.
Surplus diesel-electric equipment was installed in this building and the plant was placed
in operation on February 1st, 1952.
As will be noted from Table 9, the production of energy was increased by over
40 per cent.   Purchase of power decreased by 76.3 per cent during the year.
The John Hart generating-station production was equivalent to a load factor of
56.5 per cent for the year.
The generating-station at Shuswap Falls was unavailable after March 13th, 1952,
to permit of clearing the forebay of silt and debris which had reached depths of 25 feet
in front of the dam. An examination of the strata uncovered showed that the annual
deposit varied enormously year by year, from a few inches to several feet in depth.
Removal was effected by clearing the trash sluices and then by flushing the silt
through these sluices. The services of a diver were required to clear stumps and logs
from the sluice intakes during the sluicing process.
The turbines at the John Hart generating-station were unwatered for inspection,
no signs of cavitation being observed. The pipe-line and penstock supplying units Nos.
3 and 4 at this station was unwatered to permit of adjustments to the penstock pivot
valves. All switchgear in the step-up transformer and switching-station was inspected
and adjusted where required. This work included the processing of all transformer and
switch oil.
Clearing operations around Lower Campbell Lake were continued, and all but a
relatively small amount of timber on the highest levels was cut. It became necessary to
add two nautical bulldozers to the equipment in use on the lake in order to cope with
the large masses of debris set adrift by the operation of the lake at new and higher
elevations.
The work of landscaping the townsite at the John Hart generating-station was
extended to include the planting of nearly 250 trees and flowering shrubs. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52
H 39
British Columbia Power Commission
GRAPHIC   REPRESENTATION OF TOTAL  YEARLY
PRODUCTION OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY   FOR THE
6 YEAR PERIOO   1946-I95Z, SHOWING  PROPORTIONS
PRODUCED BY  COMMISSION PLANTS ANO PURCHASED POWER.
w
o
J: H 40
"ELECTRIC POWER ACT"
Table 7.—Power Generated and Purchased (Kwh)
Source
Fiscal Year Ended March 31
1952
1951
Percentage
Increase
Generated—
Alert Bay	
Athalmer	
Barriere	
Burns Lake..
Clinton	
Dawson Creek .
Golden	
Hazelton 	
Houston	
Hope —
John Hart	
Kamloops	
Lake Cowichan.
Lillooet	
Merritt-	
Nakusp	
Quesnel	
Shuswap Falls.
Smithers	
Sechelt 	
Terrace.   -
Tofino   .__  .	
Vanderhoof 	
Whatshan   	
Westbank  — 	
Williams Lake 	
Totals   	
Purchased—
West Kootenay Power & Light Co. Ltd.
B.C. Electric Railway Co., Ltd	
Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir) Ltd	
Hillcrest Lumber Co. Ltd	
Totals _ 	
Total generated and purchased	
2,108,275
1,377,750
2,721,220
1,647,160
22,000
5,095,456
810,745
577,120
276,176
750
284,110,000
311,140
121,551
1,187,550
708,210
4,978,749
13,440,840
3,212,060
2,295,939
2,675,642
641,910
1,608,676
43,512,800
484,910
2,009,132
375,935,761
1,477,308
625,200
514,079
200,960
2,817,547
378,753,308
1,414,710
776,550
11,434,751
900,620
3,989,820
692,510
405,960
118,074
7,300
184,936,000
3,223,770
250
588,350
273,240
657,708
2,837,930
33,774,280
2,499,369
1,659,188
1,412,812
911,735
1,589,140
1,452,150
255,556,217   |
3,038,560
2,591,800
5,593,119
708,800
11,932,279
267,488,496
49.0
77.5
—76.2
83.0
27.6
17.1
42.1
134.0
53.7
-90.5
—79.4
334.5
7.7
75.5
—60.1
28.5
38.4
89.5
76.4
—69.5
38.3
47.3
-51.5
-76.0
—91.0
-71.7
—76.3
41.6
Table 8.—Disposition of Power (Kwh)
Fiscal Year Ended March 31
1952
1951
Increase
378,753.308
2,333,573
267,488,496
2,099,338
41.6
11.1
376,419,735
28,260,125
265,389,158
24,586,597
41.9
15.0
348,159,610
7.5%
88,141,800
35,703,000
50,325,120
837,160
240,802,561
9.3%
45,914,400
30,678,000
24,331,680
7,085
44.5
Less sales under section 21—
92.0
16.4
107.0
175,007,080
100,931,165
73.5
173,152.530
19,146,379
139,871,396
13,494,653
23.8
41.8
154,006,151
11.1%
126,376,743
9.6%
21.8 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52
H 41
Steam: 3QB,875 KWH.   O-1 %
Purchased! S.BI7.S47 K.W.H-   Q-7%
\ Diesel-  30,928,309 K.W.H.   8-2%
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
POWER COMMISSION
GRAPHIC   REPRESENTATION   OF
SOURCES AND  DISPOSITION OF
TOTAL  ELECTRICAL    ENERGY
OUTPUT FOR   FISCAL YEAR
1951-52.
Residential'^
67,600,865 K.W.H
X\\\ / 7--3%^s\\\^
//Commercial   41,£27,531 K.W.H.      tt.O%-
///////////////////////////////////////
.   \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\V\\\.
&   Street   Lighting 44,577,735 KWH. I IB'/**
s\\N\\\\\N\\NN\\\\\\\\\W<\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\>:
V/////////////////////////////////////////////////////A
'Lasses   &  Station   Services    49,740077 K.VY.H.    13 1% H 42 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52
Table 9.—Sources of Power
H 43
Fiscal Year Ended March 31
Source
1952
1951
Percentage
Kwh
Per Cent
Kwh
Per Cent
Hydro-electric- 	
344,700,577
30,928,309
306,875
2,817,547
91.6
7.6
0.1
0.7
230,968,083
21,364,364
3,223,770
11,932,279
86.4
7.9
1.2
4.5
49.2
44.7
—90.5
—76.3
Totals	
378,753,308
100.0
267,488,496
100.0
41.6
2. TRANSMISSION
The 75-mile 132-kv transmission-line connecting the Whatshan generating-station
with a new 132/63-kv. step-down terminal located near Vernon was placed in operation
on May 7th, 1951.
As part of a programme to replace the overloaded 33-kv line from the Shuswap Falls
generating-station to substations along the Coldstream and the North Okanagan Valleys,
a 63-kv tap from the Vernon-Kamloops line terminating in a new step-down substation
at Armstrong commenced operation in July, 1951.
A combined radio-telephone carrier communication system connecting the Whatshan and Shuswap Falls generating plants with Vernon and Kamloops substations was
completed and provided much-needed communication facilities incidental to the operation
of the transmission system. A radio-telephone system between Clowhom Falls and
Sechelt was installed, which connects with the Commission's radio-telephone system on
Vancouver Island.
A new step-down 60/23-kv substation at Ladysmith assumed a portion of the load
of the Nanaimo-Duncan District during October, thereby relieving the overloaded condition at the Pine Street substation at Nanaimo.
Special attention was given to the removal of all danger trees adjacent to transmission-lines of major importance, this work having been well advanced at the end of the
year. Consequently there were no major interruptions to the 132-kv system on Vancouver Island, but wet snow loading in December, 1951, and faults originating, in some
cases, at points external to the Commission's system did cause voltage surges on several
occasions.
Patrol cabins were built at three points along the single-circuit 132-kv transmission-
line from Whatshan to Vernon, and a snowmobile was utilized for winter patrols over
this mountainous stretch with reasonable success. This line and its continuation to Kamloops at 63 kv gave excellent service during the year. A contributing factor was the
large amount of work done in removing danger trees.
Early in the summer two interruptions of about nine hours each occurred as a result
of trees contacting the line. Essential loads were supplied by the Shuswap Falls plant and
the interconnection with the West Kootenay Power and Light Company Limited during
these incidents. Subsequent to July 20th, 1951, no outages occurred on the line. On
several occasions the system was able to be of considerable assistance to West Kootenay
during periods of emergency.
The procedure for testing the condition of transformer and switch oil has been
expanded to include tests for neutralization number and interfacial tension number.
These, as well as the di-electric test already in use, provide full information as to the
condition of oil.
On Vancouver Island 82.5 acres of regrowth were chemically treated and considerable work was done on the maintenance of access roads. H 44 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
The various sub-transmission-lines on Vancouver Island and in the Interior were
interrupted due to a variety of causes. Among these were lightning, a transformer-
bushing failure at Shuswap Falls, collision by motor-vehicles, wind, trees, and disturbances originating on lines of other utilities which were connected to the Commission's
system.
3. DISTRIBUTION
The continual growth of load in all districts, particularly marked in those at Terrace,
Quesnel, Burns Lake, and Campbell River, made it necessary to increase conductor and
transformer capacities and, in some cases, to expedite plans for increasing distribution
voltages. As part of this programme, the first fully automatic regulating and transforming
distribution substation was established at Nanaimo.
The modernization of street-lighting systems, notably at Enderby and Kamloops, was
further continued.   New luminaries were also added in nearly all power districts.
The introduction of Regulation No. 5 rates in the North Okanagan and Kamloops
Districts made necessary a survey to classify all customers in these two districts as to their
demand ratings.
Weather conditions during the earlier winter months were less favourable for the
maintenance of service than usual. January, in particular, produced a series of violent
storms, the effects of which were felt at widely separated points in the Province and
caused a number of interruptions to service, none of which, however, was of long duration.
An unusual electrical storm passed over the Alberni and Campbell River Districts in
January and, at the former point, the prolonged dry spell of midsummer permitted an
accumulation of contamination from the pulp-mill to build up on insulators with damaging effects when the first rain fell.
The meter reverification programme for the year was completed, about 5,700 meters
being called in and reinspected. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52 H 45
Rural electrification continues to be important part of Commission's operations.    Above, building
13,000-volt 16-mile Fanny Bay line which was energized February 20th, 1952.
The Commission's new snowmobile which patrols the important Whatshan-Vernon 132,000-volt
transmission-line over the rugged Monashee Pass which is snow-bound in winter. H 46
' ELECTRIC POWER ACT'
Table 10.—Number of Customers, Circuit-miles of Distribution-lines, and
Investment in Distribution Plant, by Power Districts, Together with
customers-per-mile and investment-per-customer averages, as at march
31st, 1952.
Power District
Number of
Customers
Distribution
Mileage
Distribution
Investment1
Customers
per Mile
Investment
per
Customer!
4,191
475
454
1,331
105
3,116
1,569
278
214
99
4,678
593
407
486
506
13,837
8,422
507
1,042
1,312
665
675
210
310
430
109.0
17.0
16.7
90.3
1.7
147.4
111.2
11.0
10.9
5.1
152.2
18.6
40.4
17.6
56.2
706.1
734.3
44.1
30.3
53.7
57.9
27.6
29.2
30.0
22.4
$648,434.56
119,416.05
92,482.08
372,458.85
12,894.28
701,271.33
277,324.07
57,226.45
57,748.18
30,046.89
975,097.49
107,997.63
180,915.91
97,108.57
207,445.23
3,215,657.35
2,271,182.92
197,442.54
176,046.39
262,571.42
186,830.50
110,617.65
122,275.99
88,843.81
78,179.96
38.4
27.9
27.2
14.7
61.9
21.1
14.1
25.3
19.6
19.4
30.7
31.8
10.0
27.6
9.0
19.6
11.5
11.5
34.5
24.4
11.5
24.4
7.2
10.3
19.2
18.1
$154.72
Alert Bay 	
251.40
203.70
279.83
Clinton     	
122.80
225.05
176.75
205.85
Hazelton	
269.85
303.50
Kamloops  	
208.44
182.12
444.51
Merritt  	
199.81
409.97
232.40
269.67
389.43
168.95
Se.rhplt
200.13
280.95
163.88
582.27
286.59
Williams Lake 	
181.81
Totals               —
45,912
2,540.9
$10,647,516.10
$231.91
i Exclusive of metering equipment, which averaged $29.49 per customer.  H 48 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
4. RATE SCHEDULES
The year marked the disappearance of the last electric tariffs inherited with the
acquisition of predecessor companies, so that all customers are now charged under the
Commission's promotional-rate structure. Each classification of service has a uniform
type of schedule regardless of locality, although variations in the actual rate level do exist.
The final phase in this unifying process, which was commenced in 1946 by the
adoption of a newly designed rate structure (Regulation No. 5), in a few small areas,
was made possible by the completion of the Whatshan plant on the Arrow Lakes and the
60-cycle conversion programme on Vancouver Island. These developments enabled
Kamloops, the North Okanagan, and the balance of the Comox Valley areas to be brought
under promotional rates during the year. Generation-plant and distribution-line capacities were by then able to handle all anticipated load increases which the new schedules
could be expected to produce.
This rate structure is now in effect in all twenty-five power districts operating at the
end of the fiscal year. In addition, it has been adopted in two new areas scheduled to
receive power during the summer of 1952. All rates so established are set out in detail
on succeeding pages.
During the year a complete revision of the text of Regulation No. 5 took place. The
more important amendments thereto resulted in abolition of the seasonal service classification as such, customers in this category being permitted shorter minimum-contract
period. Amendments clarifying the availability clauses of the commercial and power
classifications were made, the wording as revised being set out in the headings of the
rate schedules listed below.
In the course of the year the final block of energy used for residential service was
increased by one-fifth of a cent per kwh, making the kwh charge 1 cent gross or 0.9 cent
net. This slight increase affected only a small portion of the residential customers, and
these to a very limited extent. The energy charge for power and primary power produced
by diesel plants was increased by one-half cent per kwh on the last two blocks only. As
the increased price still does not cover the cost of fuel in many areas, this raise is quite
in keeping with general conditions. Quantity discounts to power and primary-power
customers served by hydro plants were discontinued where possible.
In addition to the above, several minor rate adjustments, chiefly downward, were
made, with a view toward achieving greater uniformity. These adjustments—they cannot
be construed as rate revisions—took the following form:—
(a) Reduction in the regular minimum bills of customers in the outlying areas
of five power districts to a uniform $1 per kw of billing demand.
(b) Reduction in the primary power rate in two districts now linked with
hydro sources of power.
(c) The minimum bills of primary-power customers have been made uniform
at $1 per kw of billing demand.
(d) The irrigation power schedule was altered from a thirty-day to a monthly
basis for the convenience of customers.
The irrigation service schedule was extended, during the fiscal year, to all Vancouver
Island areas served from the John Hart plant.
The rates for all classes of service, as in effect at March 31st, 1952, are listed for all
power districts in the following tables. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52
A. Residential Service Rates
h 49
Available for residence lighting, heating, cooking, and single-phase motors individually rated at 2 horse-power or less used for domestic purposes.
Power District and Rate Zone
Monthly
Minimum
per Kw of
Demand
Block I
(First 20 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block II
(Next 60 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block III
(Balance of
Monthly
Consumption)
Alberni (Zone 1) _
(Zone 2)..
Alert Bay	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River (Zone 1)_.
„     (Zone 2)..
Clinton	
Comox Valley (Zone 1) _.
(Zone2)_.
Dawson Creek.
Fort St. James.
Golden	
Hazelton _
Houston..
Kamloops (Zone 1)_
(Zone2)_.
Lake Cowichan	
Lake Windermere.	
Merritt  	
Nakusp  	
Nanaimo-Duncan (Zone 1) _.
(Zone 2)_.
(Zone 3)..
North Okanagan (Zone 1)___
(Zone 2)...
Peachland-Westbank—_	
Queen Charlotte 	
Quesnel (Zone 1)..
(Zone2)_.
Sechelt 	
Smithers	
Terrace	
Ucluelet-Tofino-
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake (Zone 1)~
„     (Zone 2)..
.55
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
3.33
1.00
1.00
1.001
1.00
(E)
1.00
1.00
3.00
.55
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.002
.55
1.00
1.00
.55
1.003
1.004
(5)
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
(«)
1.00
1.00
1.00
Cents per Kwh
7
8
12
12
10
10
12
8
10
10
12
12
12
12
10
12
12
12
7
8
10
7
8
10
12
10
12
12
10
12
12
12
10
12
Cents per Kwh
2
2
2Vi
2*4
2
2Vz
VA
2
2
2V2
2*4
2'/2
VA
2>/2
VA
2Vi
VA
VA
VA
2>/2
2
2
2«/2
2Vi
2'/2
VA
2Vz
21/2
2Vi
2¥z
VA
VA
2Y2
2Vi
2V_t
VA
Cents per Kwh
1 $5.50 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in that area between Royston and
Mud Bay.
2 $5 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in Needles-Edgewood-Fauquier only.
3 $5 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in Falkland-Westwold-Monte Lake only.
* $5.50 per month or $2 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in the Lakeview Heights Subdivision
(V.L.A.) only.
5 $5 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater.
0 $6 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater.
Note.—Minimum billing demand, 2 kw.
Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent.
A residential service is deemed to have a minimum demand of 2 kw; if a range
is installed or if the measured demand is 2.5 kw but does not exceed 8 kw, the billing
demand is 3 kw; if the measured demand exceeds 8 kw, the billing demand shall be such
metered demand less 5 kw. H 50
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
B. Commercial Service Rates
Available for lighting and other electrical equipment in all premises excepting single
and duplex residences at 115/230 volts, or, where available and where the contract
demand is not less than 25 kw, three-phase four-wire 115/208 volts.
Power District and Rate Zone
Monthly
Minimum
per Kw of
Demand
Block 1
(First 30 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)  '
Block 11
(Next 60 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block HI
(Balance of
Monthly
Consumption)
Alberni (Zones 1 and 2)  _	
$
1.00
1.00
1.00
l.OOi
1.00
1.00=
1.00
(E)
1.00
1.00
3.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00s
1.00
1.00
1.001
1.00
(5)
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
(°)
1.00
1.00
Cents per Kwh
8
12
12
10
12
s
12
12
12
12
12
9
10
10
12
12
12
8
10
8
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
Cents per Kwh
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
5
5
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
Cents per Kwh
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
Clinton   __	
1/2
1/2
1/2
Fort St. James __  	
Golden.  	
Hazelton    	
Houston    	
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
11/2
„         (Zone 2) 	
l!/2
1/2
Lake Windermere _    __
1/2
1/2
1/2
1/2
(Zone 3) ...
1/2
North Okanagan (Zones 1 and 2)	
1
1/2
1/2
1/2
Sechelt   •            	
1/2
Smithers -  	
Terrace 	
1/2
1/2
1/2
Vanderhoof 	
Williams Lake (Zones 1 and2)__    	
1/2
1/2
1 $3.33 per kw of billing demand in Zone 2 only.
2 $5.50 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in that area between Royston and
Mud Bay.
3 $5 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in Needles-Edgewood-Fauquier only.
4 $5 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater, in Falkland-Westwold-Monte Lake only.
0 $5 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater.
e $6 per month or $1 per kw of billing demand, whichever is the greater.
Note.—Minimum billing demand, 2 kw.
Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent.
A commercial service is deemed to have a minimum demand of 2 kw. Where the
measured demand exceeds 5 kw, the billing demand is 75 per cent of such measured
demand. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52
C. Power Service Rates
h 51
Available for motors and other electrical equipment, excluding lighting and space
heating, at available phases and voltages.
Power Districts (All Zones)
Monthly Service Charge
per Kw of
Demand
Block I
(First 50 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block II
(Next 50 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block III
(Balance of
Monthly
Consumption)
Alberni  _...
Alert Bay	
Burns Lake	
Campbell Riven-
Clinton*-....	
Comox Valley.	
Dawson Creek —
Fort St. James*.
Golden 	
Hazelton*	
Houston*	
Kamloops 	
Lake Cowichan	
Lake Windermere..
Merritt 	
Nakusp 	
Nanaimo-Duncan	
North Okanagan	
Peachland-Westbank-
Queen Charlotte*	
Quesnel-
Sechelt...
Smithers	
Terrace 	
Ucluelet-Tofino _
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake.
$
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
Cents per Kwh
3
3
3
3
5
3
3
5
3
5
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Cents per Kwh
11/2
2
2
11/2
3
11/2
2
3
.    2
3
3
VA
11/2
2
2
2
11/2
11/2
11/2
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Cents per Kwh
1/2
Vi
Vi
Note.—Minimum contract demand, 5 kw.
Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent in all districts except those marked with an asterisk (*).
Monthly minimum bill is $1 per kw of billing demand. H 52
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
D. Primary-power Service Rates
Available for establishments requiring power at the primary voltage of the distribution system and at a single point of delivery.
Power Districts (All Zones)
Monthly Service Charge
per Kw of
Demand
Block I
(First 50 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block II
(Next 50 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand)
Block III
(Balance of
Monthly
Consumption)
Alberni	
Alert Bay	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River2
Clinton1	
Comox Valley—.
Dawson Creek...
Fort St. James1-
Golden	
Hazelton1 	
Houston1	
Kamloops	
Lake Cowichan	
Lake Windermere_
Merritt 	
Nakusp  	
Nanaimo-Duncan3	
North Okanagan	
Peachland-Westbank.
Queen Charlotte1	
Quesnel	
Sechelt—_
Smithers.
Terrace.—
Ucluelet-Tofino1..
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake _
Cents
50
85
85
50
50
85
85
50
50
85
85
85
50
50
50
85
85
85
85
85
85
Cents per Kwh
VA
3
3
2!/2
Cents per Kwh
VA
2
2
VA
21/2
3
VA
2
21/2
2V4
3
3
3
2!/2
VA
21/2
VA
11/2
2
2
2
11/2
V/t.
VA
Cents per Kwh
1/2
1
1
1/2
Vi
1
Vi.
1/2
1
1
1
1/2
1/2
1/2
1 Owing to limitations of generation or transmission equipment, primary-power service is not available in these
power districts.
2 Owing to limitations of transmission equipment, primary-power service is not available in Zone 2.
3 Owing to limitations of transmission equipment, primary-power service is not available in Zone 3.
Note.—Minimum contract demand, 67 kw.
Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent.
Monthly minimum bill is $1 per kw of billing demand. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52
H 53
E. Street-lighting Service Rates
Street-lights
The uniform street-lighting schedule is now available in all power districts served by
the Commission, although a few contracts relating to older-type installations are still in
force in some areas.
Two types of street-lighting service are available:—
(a) Overhead.—Under which the Commission installs, owns, operates, and
maintains overhead street-lighting equipment and supplies energy for the
operation of lights daily from one hour after sunset until one hour before
sunrise. The customer municipality pays the actual cost of materials for
renewal of lamps and glassware.
(b) Ornamental.—Under which the street-lighting equipment is owned by and
maintained at the expense of the customer municipality. The Commission supplies energy for the operation daily from one hour after sunset
until one hour before sunrise.
The schedule of charges under each of these types of service for various lamp
capacities is as follows:—
System of Wiring
Capacity Rating of Lamp
Net Rate per Lamp per Month
Overhead
Ornamental
$1.50
$0.75
2.00
1.25
2.50
1.75
3.50
2.75
6.00
5.25
1.30
.55
1.75
1.00
2.10
1.35
2.60
1.85
Multiple..
Series-
100 watts _
200 watts..
300 watts..
500 watts..
1,000 watts..
100 candle-power _
250 candle-power _
400 candle-power_
600 candle-power-
Note.—The Commission will expend not over $100 per street-lamp.    Any excess over $100 per lamp shall be paid
for by the contracting customer.
Traffic-lights
Energy charges for traffic-lights are as follows:—
Two-colour centre-suspension type, $3 per month per lantern.
Three-colour corner set of four lanterns, $8.50 per month per set.
Decorative Lighting
During the year an energy charge of 2 cents per kwh, based on the estimated use of
lighting for decorative purposes, was also established.
F. Irrigation Service Rates
Available for motor-driven pumps used for irrigation purposes, including testing of
pipe-lines, from April 1st to October 31st, in all power districts, served wholly from
hydro-electric sources.
Rate:—
$5 per month per horse-power of maximum demand for minimum period of
three consecutive months.
17 cents per day per horse-power of maximum demand for all use in excess of
the minimum contract period.
Note.—Minimum contract period, three consecutive months.   Discount for prompt
payment, 10 per cent. H 54 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
V. SURVEYS AND INVESTIGATIONS
1. POWER PROJECTS
Some preliminary surveys and investigations in regard to development of water-
storage on Campbell River were undertaken in connection with the Commission's
application to the Water Comptroller for authority to proceed with construction of a
storage-reservoir on Buttle Lake. More complete investigations necessary for the final
design of a storage-dam were deferred pending issuance of the Water Comptroller's
decision and subsequent authorization by the Lieutenant-Governor in Council of the
undertaking.
During the year ended March 31st, 1948, preliminary surveys were made of a
power-site on Spillimacheen River in the Columbia Valley. It was considered that this
power-site might be suitable for supplying the area lying in the valley between Golden
and Lake Windermere. In view of the rapid growth of the Commission's load now
served by the diesel-electric generating plant in the Lake Windermere area and development of certain mining load in the valley, and because equipment from the dismantled
Barriere plant was available, it was considered opportune to proceed further with the
Spillimacheen surveys and to include diamond-drilling to establish foundations. Detailed
plans and estimates were also prepared, so that development of power at this site may
be recommended as soon as the load is large enough to warrant the necessary investment.
A review was also made of other hydro-electric sites in the valley, including that on
Horsethief Creek, surveys covering which have recently been made available by the
Water Rights Branch of the Department of Lands and Forests.
Toward the later part of the year a survey was made of the power possibilities of
Kokish River, which enters the sea at Beaver Cove on Vancouver Island near Alert Bay.
The results of these surveys are not yet available, but preliminary indications are that a
small hydro-electric development serving the local area, including Alert Bay and Sointula,
may be feasible.
A study was made for a small hydro-electric development situated on Spius Creek
near Merritt, this being based on recent surveys carried out by the Water Rights Branch.
Development of this power-site was found to be uneconomic under present circumstances.
Studies were also made, based on surveys made by the Water Rights Branch,
covering development of a local hydro-electric site to supersede the present diesel plant
at Terrace, where the load is increasing rapidly. Final conclusions on this subject were
not available by the end of the year.
2. TRANSMISSION PROJECTS
On the Vancouver Island system, preliminary design was carried out and land
surveys commenced for an extension of the 132-kv transmission-line from Nanaimo to
Harmac. Design work was commenced on the installation of two 5,000-horsepower
motors at Puntledge.
Consideration was given to conditions on Vancouver Island's 60-kv transmission
system; detailed work was started on a 60-kv substation at Duncan; and design and
land surveys were commenced on an extension of the 60-kv system from Nanaimo to
Parksville.
Planning and field work continued as to the completion of a second 63-kv circuit
from Vernon to Kamloops via Salmon Arm.
Further preliminary consideration was given to the transmission of power from
Whatshan to Nakusp and New Denver.
A transmission-line route was investigated and preliminary engineering carried out
in the Spillimacheen-Golden-Invermere area. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52 H 55
3. DISTRIBUTION PROJECTS
Detailed surveys of Fort St. James and Queen Charlotte to Skidegate Mission were
completed. Distribution systems were designed for these two areas and will be constructed during the summer of 1952.
Detailed surveys and plans were completed for Quadra Island distribution.
Preliminary surveys were made and estimates prepared in respect to a possible
distribution system based on hydro-electric development on Kokish River near Alert Bay.
Planning was continued regarding the distribution systems generally, with particular
attention to long-range requirements. H 56 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
VI. FINANCIAL
During the year the accounting and billing procedures were centralized at Victoria
and the previous manual accounting methods were brought up to date with the installation of a " punched card " accounting section. This improvement was made possible by
the availability of space in the new administration building in Victoria.
In the past year, revenue increased by 20 per cent, while expenses showed a less
marked increase. The net credit to stabilization reserve was $268,980.47, being
$116,567.31 greater than in the previous year, despite the fact that lower rates had been
introduced in two of the larger power districts. The accumulated stabilization reserve
is now $1,254,025.94, and all reserves total over $5,419,318.51.
Capital plant expansion continued, with over $6,000,000 being spent on the construction and acquisition of plant. Funds for this expansion were obtained by a bond
issue of the Commission and by a fully repayable advance made by the Government of
the Province of British Columbia to the Commission under section 46 of the " Electric
Power Act."
The following statements show in more detail the financial position of the undertaking at March 31st, 1952, and the results of the financial operation for the year ended
on that date:—
Statement 1.—Balance-sheet.
Statement 2.—Financial Summary—Revenue and Expenses.
Statement3.—Power Distribution—All Districts:   Summary of Revenue and
Expenses.
•    Statement 4.—Power Distribution by Districts:
(a) Revenue and Expenditure.
(b) Stabilization Reserve.
Statement 5.—Plant and Related Reserves.
Statement 6.—Construction Work in Progress.
Statement 7.—Maintenance and Renewals Reserve.
Comments are made hereunder relating to certain of the statements to draw attention to main features, and to explain other items.
BALANCE-SHEET
Plant
The Commission's work-authorization system presently provides for the close-out
of blanket work authorizations for system additions and improvements at March 31st
annually. For this reason mainly the amount of plant transferred from work in progress
to plant in operation at March 31st is considerable. The amount thus transferred at
March 31st, 1952, was $2,886,556.30. Specific work authorizations are closed out
throughout the year as plant becomes operative.
A further substantial increase will be noted in retired-plant balances. This account
represents the residual book value of certain plant which has been disposed of and the
book value of other plant which has become obsolete. These costs in a major degree
relate to plant taken over in the original expropriations and acquisitions. The major
increase in this balance in the year ended March 31st, 1952, is represented by costs of
the Barriere hydro plant, which plant has been supplanted by the Whatshan hydro
generation and transmission system.
Full provision for interest and sinking fund on plant values, shown under the headings of " Retired Plant Balances " and " Plant Acquisition Adjustments," is being made
by a charge to operations. Plant in operation and inactive plant carry the same provision for interest and sinking fund, together with an additional provision for maintenance
and renewals. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52 H 57
Current Assets
The reserve for bad debts, which amounted to $14,082.76 at March 31st, has been
subtracted from the total of accounts receivable. Accounts written off at March 31st,
1952, as being uncollectable totalled $4,284.85, less than one-eighth of 1 per cent of
total revenue.
Included in "Accounts Receivable—Other" is the amount of $13,973.89, representing accounts which are over ninety days old.
The inventory value at March 31st, 1952, is slightly over that of the previous year-
end and has been verified by physical inventories taken at all stores' locations at March
31st, 1952.
Deferred Charges
Organization expense was written down by $18,216.36 in the past year, while the
amortization of bond discount on both Provincial advances under section 46 and of
Commission issues under section 53 of the " Electric Power Act" continued according
to the term of each issue involved.
Sinking Fund
The full requirement of all sinking funds is on deposit with the Minister of Finance.
In addition, a further $119,843 has been accumulated as a sinking fund surplus and has
been earmarked for deposit with the Minister of Finance.
No advantage has been taken of deferments previously authorized.
Long-term Liabilities
The Commission received the amount of $9,832,540.25, being the proceeds of a
Provincial Government twenty-five-year 3ys-per-cent issue made in the United States
under section 46 of the " Electric Power Act." Out of the proceeds, the Commission
repaid bank notes to a total of $9,650,000 which had been previously issued for funds
for the capital purposes of the Commission. The Commission, as with all previous
Government advances, will meet the full costs of this issue by providing a sinking fund to
be held by the Minister of Finance for the retirement of the debt at the end of its twenty-
five-year term.
Additional funds were obtained by a $3,000,000 Commission bond issue at 3%
per cent. This was a sinking fund bond with a forty-year-term. The proceeds of this
issue were also used to retire earlier bank notes issued for capital purposes. The interest
on and principal of this issue were fully guaranteed by the Province of British Columbia.
This guarantee pertains to all Commission borrowings, whether on a long-term or on a
temporary basis.
All interest costs had been met in full at March 31st, 1952.
The borrowing limitation of the Commission under section 53a of the "Electric
Power Act" presently stands at $60,000,000.
Current Liabilities
Commission notes to a total of $2,000,000 were outstanding at the bank at March
31st, 1952.   Full provision had been made at that time for the interest on this debt.
Reserves
The Maintenance and Renewals Reserve increased by $309,842.35 in the past year
after providing for plant retirements amounting to $228,479.67.
There had been set aside the amount of $80,853.32 at March 31st for payment to
municipalities according to section 62 of the " Electric Power Act." This figure represents 3 per cent of the gross revenue of the Commission derived from organized areas and
is payable to the municipalities in lieu of certain taxes.   The Commission pays municipal H 58 "ELECTRIC POWER ACT"
and school taxes on land in addition to aforementioned tax. The amount set aside this
year is about 13 per cent greater than the amount of last year. In addition to these taxes,
the Commission also sets aside 3 per cent of gross revenue in unorganized areas, which
sum may be used at the discretion of the Commission to provide street-lighting in these
areas.   This latter amount is shown under the heading " Reserves."
A further satisfactory increase is that noted in the Contingency Reserve of approximately $98,000.
Stabilization Reserve
This reserve was increased by $268,980.47 in the past year, representing the surplus
from operation as detailed in Statements 2, 3, and 4.
OPERATING STATEMENTS
Statements 2, 3, and 4 provide the details of the operating picture.
An examination of Statement 4 shows that, of the twenty-five power districts, all but
four operated at a surplus. In the preceding year ten of the twenty-five power districts
had operated with losses. It may be noted that all power districts but five have accumulated Stabilization Reserve credit balances.
Statements 5, 6, and 7 give details of work in progress values, plant values, and of
reserves related to such values.
EMPLOYEES' SUPERANNUATION
The balance of the employer-employee contributory superannuation fund was
$803,272.34 at March 31st, 1952, according to the records of the Superannuation Commissioner, appointed as administrator of the fund. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52 H 59
AUDITORS' REPORT
We have examined the balance-sheet of the British Columbia Power Commission as
at March 31, 1952, and the attached statement of combined operations for the year ended
on that date, and have obtained all the information and explanations we have required.
In connection therewith we examined or tested accounting records of the Commission and
other supporting evidence but we did not make a detailed audit of the transactions.
We report that, in our opinion, the attached balance-sheet and related statement of
combined operations have been drawn up so as to exhibit a true and correct view of the
state of the affairs of the British Columbia Power Commission as at March 31, 1952, and
the results of its operations for the year ended on that date according to the best of
our information and the explanations given to us and as shown by the books of the
Commission.
ISMAY, BOISTON, DUNN & CO.,
Chartered Accountants.
Victoria, B.C.,
June 12th, 1952. H 60 "ELECTRIC POWER ACT"
BALANCE-SHEET AS
Assets
Capital assets—
Plant and equipment in operation at values estimated by the Commission at dates
of acquisition plus additions at cost (Statement 5)—
Generation   $24,748,126.68
Transmission         8,206,877.83
Distribution       11,102,352.88
General       1,257,417.27
$45,314,774.66
Construction work in progress (Statement 6)—
Generation   $2,354,477.54
Transmission       1,357,762.66
Distribution          208,202.14
General   927.56
       3,921,369.90
Inactive plant (Statement 5)  486,421.72
Total plant and equipment  $49,722,566.28
Surveys and investigations  103,342.78
Plant-acquisition adjustments (Statement 5)        1,509,267.10
Retired-plant balances (Statement 5)         666,653.85
$52,001,830.01
Current assets—
Cash on hand and in banks      $281,133.26
Accounts receivable, less reserves—
Light and power  $376,192.51
Other  .--_.      39,125.50
■        415,318.01
Construction and operating materials and supplies     1,132,731.53
Unexpired insurance and other prepaid charges  78,271.24
1,907,454.04
Deferred charges, less amounts written off—
Organization and preliminary expense        $93,125.83
Bond discount         472,607.81
565,733.64
Sinking fund for retirement of long-term liabilities—■
On deposit with Minister of Finance  $1,943,093.42
In bank pending deposit with Minister of Finance        119,843.00
2,062,936.42
$56,537,954.11 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52 H 61
AT MARCH 3 1st, 1952 Statement 1
Liabilities
Long-term liabilities—
The Government of the Province of British Columbia—
General advances   $31,724,890.25
Bond discount—general advances  252,254.74
  $31,977,144.99
" Central Interior Development Act "  60,000.00
 $32,037,144.99
Bonds payable—
3 per cent, due 1967     $7,000,000.00
3 per cent, due 1968      6,000,000.00
3% per cent, due 1991       3,000,000.00
     16,000,000.00
Deferred agreement payable—purchased plant         226,099.83
$48,263,244.82
Current liabilities—■
Notes payable—bank  $2,000,000.00
Accounts payable and accrued charges  462,312.99
Accrued interest on borrowings  186,420.35
Gross revenue taxes, municipal areas  80,853.32
Contractors' deposits and balances payable  54,274.65
Customers' deposits   71,529.47
2,855,390.78
Reserves—
Maintenance and renewals (Statement 5)  $1,335,999.01
Gross revenue assessments, unorganized areas  165,996.01
Contributions in aid of construction  28,832.85
Contingencies   571,528.28
2,102,356.15
Stabilization reserve—
Balance, April 1st, 1951        $985,045.47
Surplus from operations, year to March 31st, 1952 (Statement 2)        268,980.47
1,254,025.94
Sinking fund reserve (Statement 5)      2,062,936.42
$56,537,954.11 H 62 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
Statement 2
COMBINED OPERATIONS:   FINANCIAL SUMMARY—REVENUE AND EXPENSES—
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st,  1952
Revenue—
Power districts— Total
Electrical-energy sales   $4,064,867.18
Miscellaneous revenue         66,281.94
$4,131,149.12
Special-contract sales and related revenues        764,080.70
$4,895,229.82
EXPENSES— Operating Costs
Direct— Generation       Transmission        Distribution
Labour    $302,465.08    $36,676.04     $233,141.88 $572,283.00
Fuel         439,066.83   439,066.83
Other operating expenses  91,614.01      14,694.00         83,820.26 190,128.27
Customer accounting             267,180.44 267,180.44
Gross revenue, 3% assessment......           121,983.57 121,983.57
Administration   and   general
expenses   .  56,187.88        7,764.87       130,503.84 194,456.59
Purchased power          47,147.22       47,147.22
$936,481.02    $59,134.91     $836,629.99 $1,832,245.92
Interest on investment in operated
plant         673,299.01    211,937.23       292,739.12    1,177,975.36
51,609,780.03 $271,072.14 $1,129,369.11  $3,010,221.28
Operating Surplus (excluding provision for reserves)  $1,885,008.54
Provision for reserves—
Maintenance and renewals      $321,325.17 $155,641.04 $401,118.29 $878,084.50
Sinking fund          371,281.43    116,869.93 161,427.48 649,578.84
Contingencies    88,364.73 88,364.73
$692,606.60 $272,510.97     $650,910.50 $1,616,028.07
Net Operating Surplus, year ended March 31st, 1952 (transferred to stabilization
reserve)       $268,980.47 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52 H 63
Statement 3
POWER DISTRIBUTION—ALL DISTRICTS:    SUMMARY  OF  REVENUE  AND  EXPENSES
FOR THE TWELVE-MONTH PERIOD ENDED MARCH 31st,  1952
Revenue—
Electrical-energy sales   $4,064,867.18
Miscellaneous revenue   66,281.94
Total power-district revenue  $4,131,149.12
Expenses (detailed on Statement 2)—
Cost of power—
Direct expenses—
Generation   $ 1,609,780.03
Transmission          271,072.14
 $1,880,852.17
Provision for reserves—
Generation       $692,606.60
Transmission          272,510.97
 965,117.57
$2,845,969.74
Less special-contract sales and related revenues        764,080.70
Cost of power delivered to distribution systems  $2,081,889.04
Distribution services—
Direct expenses—
Operating and administrative      $836,629.99
Interest on distribution plant        292,739.12
Provision for reserves—
Maintenance and renewals  $401,118.29
Sinking fund   161,427.48
Contingencies    88,364.73
51,129,369.11
650,910.50
Total distribution services „     1,780,279.61
Total expenses   $3,862,168.65
Net Operating Surplus (transferred to stabilization reserve)      $268,980.47 H 64
; ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
British Columbia Power commission!
DISTRIBUTION    OF   REVENUE   BY   FUNCTIONS
FUNCTION                                                  1950-51
195 1 -52
Generation                                             $   1,337,043.83
# 2,255,233.41
Transmission                                                 333,0 84.47
543,583. II
Distribution                                                  1,4 16, 242.32
1,780, 273. 61
Power   Purchased                                          99,351.41
47, 147-22
/Vet   Surplus                                                      152,413.16
268,380.47
Total                                $4064,641.73
$ 4,835,223.82
Generation                             X                 M
Generation                              ^
492%                                  \        m
46-1 %                                       \
I     Surplus
                                                                                  1       1     Surplus
pj^gr^"^      \      Transmission       I      1 -—l^rpSjpji?
^             X.     say.     J   y^fPT
y                 n.           Transmission        3
Distribution              N^           /             m
Distribution          N.                 #
3^a%                    jf             \
5S3%                       \f
I950-5I
1951-52 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52 H 65
BRITISH  COLUMBIA POWER   COMMISSION
DISPOSITION
OF   REVENUE
Fixed  Charges-
1950-51
1951 -52
Maintenance & Renewals
$
713,004.50
#   S73. 084 .50
Interest
964,366 . 76
1,17 7, 375.36
Sinking Fund
432.463 .33
649, 578 .84
Contingencies
77, 009.64
88, 364.73
Total
$
7.237.464.25
$2,794,003.43
Salaries, Wages & Welfare
$
788.463 .36
$   87I.O/4. 14
Materials. Fuel 8> Lube.
432,950 .57
507,866.73
Other Expenses
237,032 .94
Z72.3I6.6I
Taxes
-
116,460. /O
133, 901,22
Purchased Power
99,85/ .41
47,147.22
Net Surplus
152.413 . I£
268,980 .47
Total
$ 4.064.641 .79
$4,895,229.82
f     yr     \    Maintenance     ^v'o^.
"fixed  C/,ol>^
Maintenance      /+^ 'o^W
A   /              \             *
>. -V^L
*       / v\
M      /                    \    renewals
Renewals    /           \    X
If                            \    '7'5%    /
/Sinking\
\       I7-9V. /    Sir>king\    \
I    I       Interest      \             /
Fund         \
t    I       Interest
/        Fund          \     *
■     /              pa -r*s          \         /   11-3/*             -I
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1 1                  \/L-—s&t^h'A
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/   13-37.      ^Ji    \
wp'5^% /i \ *
I950-5I
lories. Wages
Welfare
19-4%        J
//ffi j,  \   Salaries, Wages   1
/jfe A}      \    *  Welfare           1
lit j vj-                   \                       _X
195
-52 H 66
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT '
POWER DISTRIBUTION
(a) Summary of Revenue and Expenditure for the
(b) Accumulated Stabilization
Alberni
Alert Bay
Burns Lake
Campbell
River
Clinton
Revenue-
$200,151.95
98,171.61
222.57
8,887.79
$23,948.49
14,091.68
$17,219.56
16,882.28
$58,810.50
36,259.51
$323 62
436.22
Seasonal       	
Power ____           	
Irrigation power   — 	
5,243.46
8,009.69
7,999.06
12,669.62
1,344.00
32.78
Primary power 	
30,843.74
8,662.21
1,664.00
962.05
Sub-total	
$346,939.87
5,873.77
$44,947.63
629.12
$43,073.58
1,071.91
$117,082.69
2,347.31
$792.62
$352,813.64
$45,576.75
$44,145.49
$119,430.00
$792 62
Expenses—
Allocated cost of power production   	
Distribution expenses, direct—
$190,885.51
57,748.42
20,463.92
$22,484.09
10,956.93
2,696.52
$21,860.45
9,301.57
2,740.19
$67,378.63
16,236.42
9,856.44
$361.10
298.62
7.12
$269,097.85
$36,137.54
$33,902.21
$93,471.49
$666.84
Operating surplus before provision for distribution
$83,715.79
$9,439.21
$10,243.28
$25,958.51
$125.78
Provision for distribution reserves—
$36,255.41
11,235.88
7,588.56
$4,347.72
1,483.88
827.04
$3,010.36
1,512.48
672.36
$9,396.44
5,453.11
1,921.20
$11.72
3.57
$55,079.85
$6,658.64
$5,195.20
$16,770.75
$15.29
Surplus for year ended March 31st, 1952  	
Stabilization reserve, April 1st, 1951    .    	
$28,635.94
34,826.85
$2,780.57
27,158.14
$5,048.08
13,300.48
$9,187.76
18,019.49
$110.49
Accumulated stabilization reserve, March 31st, 1952-
$63,462.79
$29,938.71
$18,348.56
$27,207.25
$110.49
Customers, March 31st, 1952—
3,615
518
56
2
374
88
10
3
338
104
10
2
1,081
230
18
2
66
Commercial __ __	
Power      — 	
Street-lighting _      	
37
2
4,191
475
454
1,331
105
Kwh, year ended March 31st, 1952—
7,963,080
4,417,944
2,716,845
217,684
673,231
503,667
300,363
68,631
423,878
591,829
296,945
23,481
1,832,349
1,611,396
990,851
44,200
5,898
11,148
748
Street-lighting.— 	
15,315,553
1,545,892
1,336,133
4,478,796
17,794 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52
H 67
BY DISTRICTS
Twelve-month Period Ended March 31st, 1952, and
Reserve as at That Date
Statement 4
Comox
Valley
Dawson
Creek
Golden
Hazelton
Hope
Houston
Kamloops
Lake
Cowichan
Lake
Windermere
$133,371.58
57,567.79
$62,978.65
53,875.31
126.10
14,520.05
$11,581.88
9,979.59
728.54
682.29
$8,656.34
6,776.09
2,650.55
$7,785.53 |    $5,397.75
7,412.33  j      2,851.20
$202,195.05
187,839.43
$24,872.10
12,480.61
$17,015.30
12,570.49
708.30
14,421.46
3,303.09 |         144.69
88,499.43
19,699.65
17,875.22
9,997.53
88.65
3,080.97
133.20
9,963.21
2,217.76
1,372.04
213.12
3,027.60
521.57
1,980.90
7,048.34
462.25 |         408.57
269.92
300.00
$212,542.37 | $143,681.08
4,309.06 |        4,693.14
$24,344.34
461.85
$18,545.23  | $19,122.64 |    $8,663.56
157.83 1        434.11 j         192.32
$526,106.31
4,607.86
$40,990.53
812.49
$35,655.96
571.52
$216,851.43  | $148,374.22
$24,806.19
$18,703.06  | $19,556.75 |    $8,855.88
$530,714.17 | $41,803.02 |    $36,227.48
$91,325.95 1    $64,508.15
1
51,005.62 |      30,298.98
17,231.12 |        6,985.93
$10,030.10
8,203.16
1,803.60
$6,944.36
4,200.53
1,721.77
$9,730.55 |    $3,789.36
4,197.31  |      1,745.28
1,007.06            760.21
$252,153.78
86,690.04
27,904.22
$14,165.10
7,614.54
2,453.28
$18,942.66
8,856.00
5,171.78
$159,562.69 | $101,793.06
$20,036.86
$12,866.66 | $14,934.92 j    $6,294.85
$366,748.04 | $24,232.92 |    $32,970.44
$57,288.74
$46,581.16
$4,769.33
$5,836.40
$4,621.83  |    $2,561.03
1
$163,966.13 | $17,570.10
$3,257.04
$25,899.40 1    $10,363.39
9,484.60 1       3,826.29
5,273.76 |       2,956.20
$1,876.95
993.77
555.24
$1,903.48
952.65
362.64
$1,155.37 |       $879.31
550.92 1        420.86
367.68  |          119.64
$49,469.90
15,367.54
12,927.60
$4,363.58
1,343.64
750.72
$5,745.79
2,873.38
583.92
$40,657.76 |    $17,145.88
$3,425.96
$3,218.77 |    $2,073.97 |    $1,419.81
$77,765.04 |    $6,457.94 |      $9,203.09
$16,630.98
82,179.03
$29,435.28
75,736.76
$1,343.37
14,503.72
$2,617.63 j    $2,547.86 |    $1,141.22
—6.82       11,383.64 |         551.14
$86,201.09
336,695.39
$11,112.16 [  —$5,946.05
12,084.53  j    —4,707.27
$98,810.01  | $105,172.04
$15,847.09
$2,610.81  | $13,931.50 |    $1,692.36
$422,896.48 | $23,196.69 |—$10,653.32
2,663
402
47
4
1,208
310
49
2
211
61
5
1
161
50
1
2
82
15
1
1
3,709
821
145
3
509
80
3
1
313
87
6
1
3,116        |       1,569
278
214        [         ______        |           99
4,678                  593                    407
4,061,701
2,441,895
553,337
205,285
1,382,433
1,683,201
1,165,089
66,363
294,922
315,991
22,058
41,089
212,376
169,501
132,170
8,023
209,913
262,143
137,145
16,050
123,651
83,031
2,140
9,000
6,735,688
4,769,416
6,859,516
397,717
499,190
331,332
149,912
14,900
456,291
377,856
211,190
11,940
7,262,218
4,297,086
674,060
522,070
625,251
217,822
18,762,337
995,334
1,057,277 H 68
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT'
POWER DISTRIBUTION
(a) Summary of Revenue and Expenditure for the
(b) Accumulated Stabilization
Lillooet
Merritt
Nakusp
Nanaimo-
Duncan
North
Okanagan
Revenue—
Residential  	
$2,596.75
2,281.86
$18,190.68
11,975.47
22.72
4,440.88
$17,499.74
7,898.01
$631,674.54
303,459.89
960.27
52,685.25
67.50
128,395.14
24,027.65
$403,901.89
185 266 79
Power...	
486.81
707.47
154,189.45
10,028.18
23,973.41
17,629.80
163.08
2,845.38
426.71
Sub-total
$5,528.50
69.39
$37,475.13
556.31
$26,531.93
530.80
$1,141,270.24
20,224.75
$794,989.52
9^)63.02
$5,597.89 | $38,031.44
$27,062.73
$1,161,494,99 | $804,052.54
Expenses—
$1,823.47
1,838.80
321.72
$13,843.44
9,844.62
2,966.27
$8,442.47
9,675.86
2,525.79
$617,669.28
232,357.09
88,370.68
$428,933.10
Distribution expenses, direct—
180,780.44
65,694.66
$3,983.99 | $26,654.33
$20,644.12
$938,397.05 | $675,408.20
Operating surplus before provision for distribution
$1,613.90
$11,377.11
$6,418.61
$223,097.94
$128,644.34
Provision for distribution reserves—
$352.76
176.56
130.41
$3,475.20
1,633.94
217.56
$2,510.32
1,391.35
590.76
$131,521.31 1    $69,178.22
48,735.93 |      36,305.38
25,191.48 |      18,666.96
$659.73
$5,326.70
$4,492.43
$205,448.72 | $124,150.56
Surplus for year ended March 31st, 1952.	
Stabilization reserve, April 1st, 1951 —	
$954.17
1,604.04
$6,050.41
2,726.92
$1,926.18
—2,123.25
$17,649.22 |      $4,493.78
—70,965.56 |    268,919.47
Accumulated stabilization reserve, March 31st, 1952—
$2,558.21
$8,777.33
—$197.07
$6,683.86 | $273,413.25
Customers, March 31st, 1952—
Residential   _	
Commercial    —	
397
81
7
1
410
85
9
2
11,886
1,787
150
14
7,067
1,125
222
Street-lighting	
8
......
486
506
13,837        |       8,422
Kwh, year ended March 31st, 1952—
30,829
68,068
20,979
4,820
293,263
322,835
238,704
93,329
394,212
230,500
18,279
8,827
23,504,327
13,045,396
13,149,065
851,661
12,712,482
5,400,563
10,126,748
Street-lighting... —	
578,984
124,696
948,131
651,818
50,550,449
28,818,777 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1951-52
H 69
BY DISTRICTS—Continued
Twelve-month Period Ended March 3 1st, 1952, and
Reserve as at That Date—Continued
Statement 4—Continued
Peachland-
Westbank
Quesnel
Sechelt
Smithers
Terrace
Tofino-
Ucluelet
Vanderhoof
Williams
Lake
Totals
$22,501.99
9,435.23
$44,331.12
38,307.61
343.36
13,499.39
	
$54,350.75
15,401.04
1,221.55
5,050.57
	
$33,811.51
21,706.23
302.78
11,292.55
$30,837.65
21,401.10
$8,853.03
3,721.53
3,104.75
$14,519.85
13,464.30
$20,767.80
23,017.00
38.44
6,598.81
$2,078,145.60
1,174,530.20
4,674.63
8,917.15
2,363.86
4,616.13
4,138.48
427,291.65
32,159.19
699.93
19,347.30 |         229.62
1,582.00         1,036.25
7,081.35
1,331.98
3,992.26
260,425.62
860.54
564.84
244.76
696.00
1,001.06
87,640.29
$44,778.70
403.66
$117,410.78
2,184.94
$77,289.78
1,332.94
$75,526.40
2,629.20
$61,411.98
1,473.58
$15,924.07
651.21
$32,818.63
592.50
$51,423.11
407.35
$4,064,867.18
66,281.94
$45,182.36
$119,595.72 | $78,622.72
$78,155.60 | $62,885.56
$16,575.28
$33,411.13
$51,830.46 | $4,131,149.12
$20,913.36
11,077.93
4,695.94
1
$68,443.86 | $29,253.17
1
17,229.04 |    21,939.56
4,974.84 j      7,697.01
$38,582.83
15,066.51
5,331.70
$27,256.96
14,277.84
2,420.79
$8,472.14
6,063.04
2,080.61
$18,242.27
9,165.71
2,543.65
$25,452.90
9,960.13
2,312.30
$2,081,889.04
836,629.99
292,739.12
$36,687.23  | $90,647.74 | $58,889.74
$58,981.04 | $43,955.59
$16,615.79
$29,951.63  1 $37,725.33  | $3,211,258.15
$8,495.13
$28,947.98
$19,732.98
$19,174.56
$18,929.97
-$40.51
$3,459.50
$14,105.13
$919,890.97
I                        i
$5,325.48  J    $5,484.65  j $12,292.99
2,600.46 |      2,733.22         4,242.47
999.00 j      1,955.16  |      1,602.00
1
$5,860.73  |    $2,852.08
2,949.41  j      1,322.38
1,536.96           992.76
$2,363.30
1,156.20
$2,649.01       $2,573.42
1,406.97         1,270.64
542.40 ]      1,032.72
$401,118.29
161,427.48
88,364.73
$8,924.94 | $10,173.03  | $18,137.46
$10,347.10 1    $5,167.22
$3,519.50
$4,598.38 |    $4,876.78
$650,910.50
—$429.81  | $18,774.95  |    $1,595.52
-20,738.71       50,053.41  |      7,451.93
$8,827.46
18,993.35
$13,762.75
11,354.99
-$3,560.01
—$1,138.88 |    $9,228.35  |     $268,980.47
808.13 j    35,235.47          985,045.47
— $21,168.52  | $68,828.36 |    $9,047.45
$27,820.81  | $25,117.74
—$3,560.01
—$330.75 | $44,463.82 | $1,254,025.94
407
75
23
2
823
187
29
3
1,155
139
15
3
516
125
22
2
519
138
17
1
164
43
2
1
219
79
10
2
300
112
17
1
38,193
6,779
876
64
507        |      1,042               1,312
665
675
210
310                430                45,912
591,971
215,682
711,198
36,290
1,115,355
1,237,776
1,858,511
41,556
1,001,136
557,216
149,719
36,106
1,183,651
763,395
691,151
52,200
820,306
754,939
550,384
18,712
187,334
120,262
204,447
9,464
427,588
593,061
136,364
28,130
663,830
747,488
266,962
32,473
67,800,885
41,627,531
41,660,820
2,916,915
1,555,141
4,253,198 |    1,744,177
1
2,690,397
2,144,341
521,507
1,185,143 |    1,710,753
1
154,006,151 H 70
; ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
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J3 rs -O REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52
H 71
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Statement 6
STATEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION WORK IN PROGRESS
AS AT MARCH 31st,  1952
Generation Plant
Alert Bay  $34,124.35
Clinton   8,390.06
Clowhom    852,051.50
Comox Valley   80,925.41
Dawson Creek   117,824.92
Fort St. James   244.15
Hazelton   4,087.63
Houston  •  14,722.51
John Hart  1,091,836.84
Merritt    30,380.03
Queen Charlotte   11,901.10
Quesnel   16,429.48
Sechelt     4,736.96
Shuswap Falls   970.09
Smithers  25,733.19
Terrace   26,424.95
Tofino-Ucluelet    489.73
Vanderhoof    6,593.65
Preliminary charges, surveys, and investigations, including sundry
maintenance   26,610.99
Total     $2,354,477.54
Transmission Plant
Vancouver Island system   $619,508.71
Interior system   208,582.78
Sechelt transmission system   529,671.17
Total     $1,357,762.66
Distribution Plant
Campbell River   $69,875.32
Comox Valley  8,218.64
Dawson Creek  12,238.70
Fort St. James   22.14
Kamloops  L  67,071.03
Lake Cowichan   3.12
Nakusp   377.91
Nanaimo-Duncan   33,883.09
North Okanagan   10,033.42
Peachland-Westbank   272.35
Queen Charlotte  766.15
Quesnel   1,157.06
Sechelt    123.06
Terrace   260.50
Meter Department, coastal region   844.79
Preliminary charges, surveys, and investigations, including sundry
maintenance   3,054.8 6
Total        $208,202.14 H 74 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT "
Statement 6—Continued
STATEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION WORK IN PROGRESS
AS AT MARCH 31st,  1952—Continued
General Plant
Head office   $927.56
Summary
Generation plant   $2,354,477.54
Transmission plant      1,357,762.66
Distribution plant         208,202.14
General plant .:  927.56
Total   $3,921,369.90 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION,  1951-52
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