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DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL of the Public Health Branch Department of Health and Welfare ANNUAL… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1953]

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIVISION OF
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
of   the   Public   Health   Branch
Department of Health and Welfare
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year 1951
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952  Department of Health and Welfare,
Public Health Branch,
Victoria, B.C., May 15th, 1952.
The Honourable A. D. Turnbull,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to
December 31st, 1951.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT, M.D, D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health. Department of Health and Welfare,
Public Health Branch,
Division of Tuberculosis Control,
2647 Willow Street,
Vancouver, B.C., May 15th, 1952.
G. F. Amyot, Esq., M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to
December 31st, 1951.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. KINCADE, M.D.,
Director, Division of Tuberculosis Control. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Letter of Transmittal
Letter of Transmittal
List of Tables	
Page
3
.    4
.    7
List of Charts :  9
Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control  11
Introduction  13
(a) X-ray Programme  14
(b) Federal Health Grants  15
(c) Staff  16
(d) Nursing  16
(e) New Cases  17
(/)  Clinics and Institutions  17
(g)  Social Service r  18
(h) Conclusions  18
Statistical Section '.  21
(a) Clinics i  23
(b) New Cases Examined by Clinics  31
(c) General Summaries  37
(d) Institutions  41
(e) Tuberculin Testing i  56
(/)  Known Cases of Tuberculosis.,  59
(g)  Notifications of Tuberculosis ■.  64
(h)  Tuberculosis Mortality  76  INDEX
LIST OF TABLES
Clinics
Page
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent at Each Centre,
1951 _  24
Table 2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1951  26
Table 3.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1951  28
Table 4.—New Examinations and Re-examinations during the Years 1947 to 1951
(Excluding Indians)  29
Table 5.—Clinic Examinations by Diagnosis, 1951 (Excluding Indians)  31
Table 6.—New Cases Other than Negative Examined by Diagnostic Clinics, by
Diagnosis, Sex, and Age-groups, 1951 (Excluding Indians)  32
Table 7.—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Examined by Clinics, by Infection
and Condition, 1951  3 3
Table 8.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1942-51  34
General Summaries
Table 9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1951  37
Table 10.—Laboratory Report, 1951 ,  38
Table 11.—Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics, 1942-51  39
Table 12.—Dental Report, 1951  39
Table 13.—Eye, Ear," Nose, and Throat Report, 1951  40
Institutions—Summaries
Table 14.—Institutions—General Summary, 1951  41
Table 15.—Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) Given by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1942-51  41
Table 16.—Institutions—Patient Status, 1951  42
Table 17.—Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions in Each Age-
group, 1947-51  43
Table 18.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1951  44
Table 19.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1951  46
Table 20.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1951  47
Table 21.—First Admissions by Institution and Diagnosis, 1951  47
Table 22.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1947-51  48
Table 23.—First Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Time between Application and
Admission, 1951  50
Table 24.—Institutional Patient-days  of the  Division  of Tuberculosis  Control,
1942-51  50
Institutions—Discharges
Table 25.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1947-51  52
Table 26.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length
of Treatment during Previous Admissions, 1951  54
Table 27.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length
of Last Stay in Institution, 1951  54
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Home
Condition, 1951  55 D 8
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Tuberculin Testing
Page
Table 29.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Racial Origin and Age-groups, 1951  56
Table 30.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Type of Survey, 1951  57
Table 31.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Age-group and Diagnosis, 1951  58
Known Cases of Tuberculosis
Table 32.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1947-51  59
Table 33.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population
of British Columbia by Statistical Area, as at December 31st,
1947-51  59
Table 34.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1947-51  59
Table 35.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1951 (Excluding Indians)  60
Table 36.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1951 (Indians Only)  61
Table 37.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in British
Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1951 (Excluding Indians)  61
Table 38.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Present Condition,
and Age-group, 1951 (Excluding Indians)  63
Table 39.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-
Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1942-51  64
Notifications of Tuberculosis (Form T.B. 1)
Table 40.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, 1947-51  64
Table 41.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1947-51  65
Table 42.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, 1947-51  65
Table 43.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases of Tuberculosis among
the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian
Population, and the Indian Population, 1951  65
Table 44.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1951 (Excluding Indians)  66
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1951 (Indians Only)        68
Table 46.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1942-51  69
Table 47.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Racial Groups (Including Dead Cases Reported for the First
Time), 1951 r  71
Table 48.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1951  72
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1951 (Excluding Indians)  73
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1951 (Indians Only)     _J     74
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis and Year
of Arrival in British Columbia, 1951 (Excluding Indians)   75
Table 52.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis in
British Columbia, 1947-51 - 75 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 9
Tuberculosis Mortality
Page
Table 53.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1947-51  76
Table 54.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Other-
than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area,
1947-51  76
Table 55.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Indian
Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1947-51  77
Table 56.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and
Sex, 1951 (Excluding Indians)  77
Table 57.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and
Sex, 1951 (Indians Only)   78
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-group, 1951 (Excluding
Indians)         79
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1942-51 -  80
Table 60.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by Age-groups, 1947-51       83
Table 61.—Female  Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1947-51       83
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by
Age-groups, 1947-51   83
Table 63.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1947-51  84
Table 64.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1947-51     __   ...  85
Table 65.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by Length
of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1951  86
LIST OF CHARTS
Chart   1.—Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control   11
Chart   2.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics, 1942-51
(Excluding Indians)  30
Chart   3.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics, 1942-51
(Excluding Indians) . .1     31
Chart 4.—X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals,
1942-51 --...    .. ._ 35
Chart 5.—X-ray Examinations Made by Institutions, Diagnostic and Treatment
Clinics, Survey Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals,
1942-51  36
Chart   6.—Percentage Distribution of Admissions to Institutions by Age-groups,
1947-51         _____ 43
Chart   7.—Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1951  45
Chart   8.—First Admissions to Institutions by Institution and Diagnosis, 1951  48
Chart   9.—First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution),
1947-51        49
Chart 10.—Institutional  Patient-days  of  the  Division  of  Tuberculosis  Control,
1942-51 -  51 D 10 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE •
Page
Chart 11.—Percentage Distribution of Discharges from Institutions According to
Condition on Discharge, 1942-51  53
Chart 12.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in British
Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1951 (Excluding Indians)  62
Chart 13.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1942-51  70
Chart 14.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1951  72
Chart 15.—Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1942-51  81
Chart 16.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population and the
Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1951  82
Chart 17.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1947-51  84
Chart 18.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1947-51   85 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D  11
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DIAGNOSTIC AND
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L_  Report of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, 1951
G. F. Kincade, Director
INTRODUCTION
In 1951 a significant change in the administration of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control was the appointment of a full-time Director. Dr. W. H. Hatfield, who had been
part-time Director for sixteen years, resigned, and Dr. G. F. Kincade, formerly Medical
Superintendent, Willow Chest Centre, became full-time Director of the Division.
Dr. Hatfield will continue to act on a part-time basis in an advisory capacity to.the Deputy
Minister on matters relating to tuberculosis and other diseases of the chest.
Another major advance has been the construction of the new sanatorium in Vancouver. This has been named the Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital, in honour of G. S.
Pearson, M.L.A., formerly Minister of Health and Welfare, Minister of Labour, and
Provincial Secretary.
Started early in the spring of 1951, excellent progress has been made, and this institution, housing 264 beds, will be opened within a year from the beginning of construction.
This will provide modern sanatorium facilities for the treatment of tuberculosis cases, and,
being situated in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, it will provide beds in this
rapidly growing area where they are most needed.
Although the opening of these 264 beds will meet the present situation, it is apparent
that the construction of the total complement of 528 beds for this institution should be
continued as soon as possible. The present plan is that, after the Pearson Hospital is
opened, the tuberculosis patients housed in the Infectious Disease Hospital and St.
Joseph's Oriental Hospital will be transferred there. These patients, plus the present
Provincial waiting-list, will almost completely fill the 264 beds. With the construction
programme of the Vancouver General Hospital proceeding toward the erection of a large
acute hospital, this Division's tenure of the temporary building at the Willow Chest Centre
is seriously threatened, and it may be necessary to move from this building before next
summer. Recent alterations at Tranquille should compensate for the loss of these beds.
However, it will not be possible to occupy the extra beds at Tranquille until such time as
the proposed tunnel, elevator, and laundry have been completed.
At present we visualize the eventual bed facilities of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control as being 528 beds at the Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital, 400 beds at Tranquille
Sanatorium, the Willow Chest Centre reduced to approximately 115 beds for surgical and
diagnostic cases, and the facilities in Victoria providing approximately the same number
of beds as at present.
It was with considerable satisfaction that in 1950 we attained the lowest death rate
yet recorded in British Columbia. This rate of 21.7 for the other-than-Indian population
and 27.2 for the total population followed the trend of decline in other parts of the
country. Whatever its cause, it represents a reduction of approximately 50 per cent in
a five-year period and, in actual number, a reduction from 576 deaths to 310—this in
spite of an increase in population.
We are pleased to report that this low rate has been maintained in 1951, with 292
deaths in the total population, which gives a rate of 25.1 per 100,000. There were 212
deaths in the other-than-Indian population or 18.7 deaths per 100,000.
13 D  14 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
X-RAY PROGRAMME
During the past year we have been very much interested in the development of the
miniature X-ray programme throughout the Province, and have been endeavouring to
concentrate on hospital-admission X-rays as a case-finding method so that the programme
could be applied effectively.
In the reorganization of the X-ray programme utilizing miniature X-ray equipment
in hospitals, a very definite endeavour has been made to co-ordinate it entirely within the
community health services provided through the local health units. Thus the appointments and organization of the time schedules are the responsibility of local health services
which have co-ordinated the programme with each local hospital. All patients are
referred through the health unit, which assumes some responsibility for continuity of
referral and follow-up where necessary. In addition to the admission X-ray of all hospital
patients, arrangements are provided whereby some out-patients referred by the practising
physicians or the public health staff can be accommodated.
It has been disappointing to note that some hospitals are falling down very badly in
carrying out this programme, whereas others are most energetic in trying to obtain complete coverage of the patients admitted. In spite of the poor showing in some hospitals,
the work done has represented 40 per cent of the admissions X-rayed in the hospitals
where installations have been made, and it does represent 71,410 examinations in 1951.
While this does not reach the goal set and eventually hoped for in this work, it does represent a good contribution to the case-finding programme. It also shows a changing
emphasis in that fewer examinations will be done by the travelling clinics, while in the
geographical areas covered by these clinics there will be a greater number of people
X-rayed. This is the result desired, and the clinics will be freed from a great deal of
routine contact examinations, which were screened in the past, and will devote more time
to the important work of examining and advising known cases of tuberculosis or cases who
are referred because of suspicious X-rays. For example, in 1951 the Kootenay Travelling Clinic took 2,525 X-rays as compared with 3,427 in 1950. During 1951 there were
17,377 miniature films taken in general hospitals in the Kootenay area, making a total
of 19,902 films.
During 1950 there were 228,753 X-ray examinations in the clinics of the Division,
general hospitals, and health units.    During 1951 this increased to 278,734 films taken.
With thirty-four miniature X-ray machines operating in hospitals and health units
.outside the Division during the past year, there have been no new installations of photo-
roentgen equipment. At the present time we are preparing to install this type of equipment in the new Burnaby Hospital, in the University of British Columbia Health Service,
and at Mission Memorial Hospital. We are also considering withdrawal of the equipment
from one hospital, where it is not being used satisfactorily, and in another community the
transfer of the equipment from the hospital to the health unit, where it will serve the needs
of the community to greater advantage. Installations for other areas will be considered
as the communities expand and local conditions appear to justify its placement.
In the development of the hospital-admission X-ray programme, we have been
actively supported by the British Columbia Hospital Association and the British Columbia
Registered Nurses' Association.
During the past six months our mobile photoroentgen unit has been travelling
throughout the Interior of the Province and on Vancouver Island, visiting smaller communities where X-ray services were not available. This has been a difficult and costly
■enterprise, and at the present time we are not certain that the results warrant the continuation of this work in subsequent years. The 1951 schedule was completed early in December, and the results of the work will be critically analysed to see if it is justified. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D  15
The Division is watching with interest an experiment that is being carried out in
Chilliwack at the present time. Realizing that the mere presence of an X-ray machine in
a local community to provide free X-rays does not necessarily assure a good case-finding
programme in that community, the British Columbia Tuberculosis Society has gone forward with a plan to promote an educational campaign in Chilliwack as an experiment.
The idea behind this was that a properly qualified person would visit the community to
publicize the services that were available and to organize local groups to canvass citizens
so that a continuing community survey might be carried out. If successful at Chilliwack,
this could be applied throughout the Province, using local facilities.
FEDERAL HEALTH GRANTS
From the projects already submitted, it appears that the Tuberculosis Control Grant
will be totally expended for the present year if delivery of equipment is obtained before
the expiry date of the grant. The total tuberculosis grant for British Columbia in
1951-52 was $368,315, and this has all been allocated.
Certain new projects and extensions of previous projects have been set up during
the year. For example, the art-therapy project has been extended to the Victoria unit,
a pneumothorax clinic has been approved for Metropolitan Health Unit No. 1, a physiotherapist has been obtained for the Willow Chest Centre, a Department of Respiratory
Physiology is being set up in Vancouver, and a large amount of equipment has been
obtained for the Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital. Three nurses, one laboratory technician, one hospital administrator, and four physicians are receiving training under the
grants. The Medical Records Section has also been made possible from Federal health
grants.
The following is the list of projects in the tuberculosis-control field for the present
year:—
Continuing projects—
Occupational therapy.
X-ray pool—
Photoroentgen equipment for University of British Columbia Health
Service.
Burnaby Hospital.
Mission Memorial Hospital.
Medical library.
Home-care service.
Nursemaids for Vancouver Preventorium.
Rehabilitation.
Payment for admission X-rays.
Administration of streptomycin in homes.
Postgraduate training (short courses).
Nursing personnel—Three nurses at University of British Columbia.
Equipment for community survey work.
Staff and equipment—
Tranquille Sanatorium—
Two physicians.
Undelivered equipment from 1950-51.
Willow Chest Centre—
Bacteriologist.
Senior intern.
Assistant instructor of nursing.
Executive nurse, surgical.
Physician.
Art therapy. D 16 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Continuing projects—Continued
Staff and equipment—Continued
Willow Chest Centre—Continued
Planigraph.
Physiotherapist.
Out-patient Pneumothorax Clinic, Metropolitan Health Committee.
P.A.S. and streptomycin.
Additional graduate nurse, New Westminster.
Postgraduate training for two physicians.
Training in surgical nursing and techniques.
Additional stenographers—
New Westminster Clinic.
Kootenay Travelling Clinic.
Interior Travelling Clinic.
Postgraduate training for laboratory technician.
Hospital-administration training.
Expansion of education programme, T.B. nursing.
Art therapy, Victoria.
Equipment for new sanatorium.
New projects—
Postgraduate training for one physician.
Medical Records Section, Division of Tuberculosis Control.
STAFF
In reviewing the staffing of our clinics and institutions, it is pleasing to report that at
the present time the Division appears to be in a very good position. The medical staff
throughout the Division is at full strength, and it is a source of satisfaction to report that
well-trained medical men are being attached to the service. At the present time there are
five physicians under training leading to specialists' certification. It should be pointed
out that a pathology service is being developed at Tranquille, and in the Willow Chest
Centre a well-trained pulmonary physiologist is proving most valuable in the carrying-out
of respiratory function tests, mostly in connection with pre- and post-operative cases.
However, it is hoped that some attention can be paid to research in this field. It is possible, in the future, that the Division may be able to add others to the staff with special
interests, such as bacteriology.
NURSING
The nursing service gives a great deal of pride to the Division because it is recognized
that throughout the Division the nursing standards are of the highest order. Having
assembled an able group of nursing administrators, a sound programme of student and
graduate teaching is the basis of the nursing services in our clinics and institutions.
As a result of this, tuberculosis nursing has been elevated to the status of a specialty,
and the nurse takes an important place in the education and physical rehabilitation of
the patient. Although the stage has not yet been reached where there is an abundance
of nurses available, the Division is attracting a fair share of an excellent type of well-
trained nurses into the service.
During 1951 the nursing service was maintained to provide for a full complement
of patients in all of the institutions during the past year, and the staff in the stationary
clinics was stable.
Increased student quotas and expanded activities were evident in all sections of the
educational programme, for example:—
(1) Affiliation Course for Student Nurses.—(a) Three hundred and twenty-
five students affiliated at the Vancouver centre, an increase of seventy over TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951 D  17
1950. The Jericho Beach unit and New Westminster Stationary Clinic
were used for placement of students in addition to the Willow Chest
Centre.
(b)  Seventy-four students affiliated in Victoria.    Students from the
two Victoria schools started in November to come to Vancouver for the
lecture series in the first week of the course, thus providing a uniform content of instruction for all students prior to placement on the wards.
(2)  Supervised Experience for Practical Nurse Students from the Vocational
School.—Fifty-five students completed one month each of ward experience
at the Jericho Beach unit, an increase of fifteen over last year.
Indications are favourable that progress will be made this coming year toward
implementation of the objectives outlined in the study on staff quotas and nursing-care
requirements, completed for the three main institutions more than a year ago.    Organization of the ward routine to the team nursing plan is suggested as a basic factor in
providing more personalized care for the patients.
Two objectives urged for the coming year in both the service and educational
fields are directed toward the same target—better nursing care for the patient through
implementation of a team nursing plan on the wards and better experience in nursing
practice for the students.
NEW CASES
The number of new cases discovered during the year amounted to 1,688, which is
a slight decrease from last year's figure. This, broken down into racial groups, shows the
following:   Indians, 356; other than Indians, 1,332; and into age-groups:—
0- 4_
Indians
  54
Other than Indians
0- 4	
5- 9	
10-14 :	
5?
5- 9
  65
74
10-14_
  46
26
15-19 _
___._ 46
15-19	
20-24	
25-29	
30-39 ;	
40-49	
50-59	
60-69 „__
70-79	
80 and over	
Not stated	
39
20-24
__ 26
104
25-29__
  32
173
30-39__
  23
771
40-49._
  16
204
50-59.
  23
192
60-69
.  10
191
70-79_
_„_ 13
86
80 and over	
Not stated	
2
16
4
The sources of reporting of new cases during the year were as follows: —
Stationary clinics:   Tranquille, 13;  Vancouver, 513;  Victoria, 79;  and New
Westminster, 114.
Travelling clinics:   Interior, 64;  Coast, 72;  Island, 33;  and Kootenay, 119.
Reported from outside the Division of Tuberculosis Control, 681.
CLINICS AND INSTITUTIONS
With the major efforts being the construction of the Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital
in Vancouver and the renovation of the Tranquille Sanatorium, there have been few
physical changes other than those within the institutions. The Kootenay Travelling
Clinic in Nelson found it necessary to change its location from the Kootenay Lake
General Hospital to a down-town location in that city, and new quarters have been
obtained.   This is proving to be a more satisfactory situation than before. D 18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The staff situation has been relatively stable over the year, but it is anticipated
there will be a great many transfers in all units within the Division in staffing the new
sanatorium. In making the key appointments, the Medical Superintendent of Tranquille
is being transferred to the Pearson Tuberculosis Hospital, while he is being replaced at
Tranquille by the transfer of the Medical Superintendent of the Victoria unit. To facilitate the handling of the problem of transfers and new appointments, a personnel assistant
has been appointed to the central office of the Division. This should provide a more
direct line of communication to the Civil Service Commission and expedite the handling
of personnel problems.
Aside from the Kootenay Travelling Clinic in Nelson, which is becoming more and
more a stationary clinic, and the work in the Fraser Valley, which is carried out by the
New Westminster Stationary Clinic, all the travelling clinics are being operated from
the sanatoria, with headquarters in the Victoria unit, Willow Chest Centre, and Tranquille Sanatorium. Various members of the medical staff of these institutions take
responsibility for covering the medical services provided by these clinics.
There have been no significant changes in the medical or surgical treatment in the
institutions during the year.
In the preventive programme, B.C.G. vaccination is being carried out in selected
groups. This vaccination is urged for hospital employees and for contacts of known cases
of tuberculosis. However, it has not been considered advisable to extend the programme
to other groups, such as young adults, until such time as the programme is considered
to be effectively applied in the contact group.
SOCIAL SERVICE
Staff changes continued to hamper the work of the Social Service Section during the
year. At the Willow Chest Centre the situation was relieved by two former social workers
returning to the staff, but at Tranquille the social-work programme had to be curtailed
because no replacement could be found for the social worker who resigned in July. With
the exception of Tranquille, case-loads for the workers have remained about the same
as the previous year, with an average case-load of ninety-five per worker in the Willow
Chest Centre, ninety-nine in the Jericho Beach unit, and ninety-six in the Victoria unit.
At Tranquille the case-load averaged 165 per month. In September the Provincial
supervisor joined the Royal Canadian Air Force as senior administrative officer in the
welfare field, and the case-work supervisor at the Division of Venereal Disease Control
was transferred to the Division of Tuberculosis Control. As part of the reorganization
of the Tuberculosis Social Service Section at this time, the senior case-worker at the
Willow Chest Centre was promoted to case-work supervisor for the Vancouver area.
The programme for providing home-maker service on a selective basis to tuberculous
patients and their families in the Vancouver metropolitan area has continued during the
year under the joint administration of the Metropolitan Health Committee and the
Family Welfare Bureau of Vancouver. At the end of the year ten families were in receipt
of full-time supervised home-maker service and fourteen families were receiving part-
time help from this source. Because the programme was inaugurated as a demonstration
project, financed from Federal health grants, the evaluation of the service should yield
some significant information about the specific contribution which a properly organized
home-maker service can make to the tuberculosis-control programme.
Although the basic Social Allowance rate was increased inl951by$5a month, the
problem of convalescent care for the tuberculous patient without resources remains
chronic. Even with the dietary extras which may be added to the basic Social Allowance
granted to a person who is unable to support himself because of tuberculosis, the Social
Allowance budget falls below requirements. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951 D  19
CONCLUSIONS
Having been faced for many years by an acute shortage of beds for the treatment
of tuberculosis, the day is rapidly approaching when this problem will be met and
eventually overcome. Having then provided for those cases which have pulmonary
tuberculosis, the problem of the non-pulmonary tuberculosis cases will require serious
consideration, when sanatorium facilities are adequate to permit their acceptance. It is
generally agreed that all forms of tuberculosis, including idiopathic pleurisy with effusion,
should be treated in a sanatorium, and this practice is followed in most centres throughout
the country.
Effective legislation to control recalcitrant patients would be of considerable benefit
to the tuberculosis programme in British Columbia. Under present regulations an
infectious case of tuberculosis may be placed in a sanatorium, but there are no regulations
that will force him to remain there. The lack of adequate authority to deal with the
careless and unco-operative case is a real handicap in preventing the dissemination of
tuberculosis.
The care of the child with tuberculosis is a problem still being met by services
outside the Division of Tuberculosis Control. Acute phases of the disease in children
are being taken care of in general hospitals, while the Vancouver Preventorium is meeting
a most essential need in caring for the sub-acute and chronic cases amongst children.
This voluntary group is presently considering plans for the expansion of its facilities that
will approximately double the present capacity of the preventorium so as to provide
modern medical and nursing care for the more active forms of the disease in children.
These services are urgently needed, and the board of directors of the preventorium
deserve great credit for their continued assistance to the campaign against tuberculosis
in this Province.
The British Columbia Tuberculosis Society, which has long played a leading part in
tuberculosis work, continues to contribute greatly to augment the services provided
through official agencies. Taking a leading part in educational activities and creating
interest in tuberculosis work in a large number of communities in the Province through
Christmas Seal Committees, the society has also made large monetary contributions to
the Christmas Seal Auditorium in Vancouver and in providing a new radio installation
for the patients at Tranquille Sanatorium. This assistance has been much appreciated
and most valuable.
The work of the Division has been greatly facilitated by the close co-operation and
cordial relations with other agencies of the Government.  STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
for the Year January 1st to
December 31st, 1951  TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
CLINICS
Map of British Columbia Showing Statistical Publication Areas
D 23
Province of British Columbia—
Population, 1,165,210.
Area, 366,255 square miles.
Travelling clinics—
Kootenay Clinic (Nelson)—Statistical Areas 1 and 2.
Interior Clinic (Kamloops)—Statistical Areas 3, 6, 8, 10c, lOd.
Coast Clinic (Vancouver)—Statistical Areas 4, 7, 9c, 9d, 9e.
Island Clinic (Victoria)—Statistical Area 5.
Survey Clinic. D 24
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent
at Each Centre, 1951
Travelling Clinics
Interior
Centre Visited Days
Allenby        2
Armstrong
Burns Lake _
Copper Mountain
Dawson Creek .	
Enderby 	
Fort St. John	
  3
  4
  3
  3
  3
  2
Kamloops   19
Kelowna   15
Merritt   2
McBride  1
Nickel Plate Mine  2
Oliver   4
Centre Visited Days
Penticton   9
Prince George   11
Princeton   4
Quesnel   7
Revelstoke   6
Salmon Arm  7
Smithers    2
Summerland   2
Vanderhoof   4
Vernon  15
Wells  4
Williams Lake  5
Total (25 centres)  139
Coast
Centre Visited
Hazelton 	
Marpole 	
Ocean Falls 	
Powell River _____
Days
1
3
1
10
Centre Visited
Prince Rupert __
Squamish 	
Terrace 	
Total (7 centres).
Fraser Valley
Centre Visited Days Centre Visited
Abbotsford   10                Lillooet 	
Allco   1               Lytton 	
Ashcroft   .  2                Mission 	
Bridge River  1
Chilliwack   23
Days
24
8
10
57
Days
2
2
Total (8 centres)     49
Vancouver Island
Centre Visited
Campbell River
Chemainus  	
Days
  8 V4
  61/2
Comox   13
Cumberland    6
Duncan   26V_>
Ladysmith    12
Centre Visited
Lake Cowichan ..
Mount St. Mary..
Days
7
3
Nanaimo    42
Port Alberni and Alberni  26i/i
Qualicum   4
Total (11 centres)  155
Kootenay
Centre Visited
Ainsworth 	
Castlegar 	
Cranbrook 	
Creston 	
Emerald Mine ..
Fernie 	
Golden 	
Grand Forks —
Greenwood 	
Hudson Bay Mine.
Invermere 	
Days
3
6
11
11
5
11
2
8
2
1
2
Centre Visited
Kaslo   	
Kimberley 	
Michel 	
Days
  2
  11
  5
Nakusp    6
Nelson   48
New Denver :  3
Remac    3
Rossland   9
Salmo   3
Trail   16
Total (21 centres)  168 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 25
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent
at Each Centre, 1951—Continued
Mobile Survey Unit
Vancouver Island
Centre Visited Days
Bloedel Camp        3
James Island        1
Jordan River       1
Mansons Landing       2
Port Renfrew      3
Centre Visited
Salmon River ___
Saltspring Island
Days
3
2
Victoria      19
Whaletown        3
Total (9 centres)     37
Coast and Fraser Valley
Centre Visited
Abbotsford 	
Arnold 	
Days
Britannia Beach       2
Clearbrook        4
Coquitlam        2
Centre Visited Days
New Westminster  14
Powell River  1  7
Squamish   2
Woodfibre   2
Total (9 centres)  42
Interior
Centre Visited
Burns Lake	
Fort St. James _
Grassy Plains	
100-Mile House
Lavington 	
Lillooet 	
Lumby 	
Days
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
Centre Visited
Nechako Dam ..
Quesnel
Vanderhoof ._
Wells 	
Williams Lake
Days
1
3
2
1
3
Total (12 centres)     20
Kootenay
Centre Visited
Canal Flats	
Castlegar 	
Edgewater  	
Elko 	
Field 	
Galloway Mill __.
Golden 	
Grand Forks ____.
Greenwood 	
Invermere 	
Kaslo 	
Kitchener  	
Days
Centre Visited
Michel 	
Nakusp 	
Natal  	
New Denver .
Salmo 	
Slocan City .__
South Slocan
Wardner 	
Whatshan  	
Wynndel 	
Yahk 	
Days
11/2
2
11/2
1
3
1
4
1
1
1
1
Total (23 centres)     46 D 26
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
During 1951 patient-visits to diagnostic and treatment clinics totalled 44,962. This
is a decrease of 1,883 from the 1950 total. There was also a decrease in the number of
visits to travelling clinics, from 13,360 to 11,074 visits. A total of 1,007 new cases
of tuberculosis was diagnosed by the Division out of 1,688 new cases found by all
agencies. Of those examined, 22.5 per cent were in the 30-39 age-group, 18.8 in the
20-29 age-group, and 16.3 per cent in the 40-49 age-group. There were 11,951
tuberculin tests and 704 B.C.G. vaccinations given in the clinics of the Division.
Table 2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1951
Item
ZB
o
H
Total patient-visits ,	
Total cases examined-
X-ray	
Physical-
Specialist consultation..
Type of case -
New cases	
Re-examinations .
Reason for examination	
Referred from survey-
Symptoms..
Routine check...
Age-groups examined-
0-4
M.
5 9            	
F.
 M.
10-14. _	
F.
   M.
15 19 -.-      -
F.
  M.
20 24            	
F.
 M.
25 29          	
F.
  M.
30-39            	
F.
  M.
40 49
F.
  .. M.
50-59  .       	
F.
 M.
60 69          	
F.
   M.
70 and over 	
F.
  M.
Racial origins..
White	
Indian	
Breed	
Chinese.—.
Japanese-
Other	
Usual occupations-
Clerks. 	
Fishermen _ _	
Hospital-workers..
Housewives	
Labourers—
Common	
Skilled	
Loggers 	
Miners—
Coal ___ -
Hard-rock	
Nurses—
Graduate	
Student	
Teachers	
Other professional-
27,560
17,864
4,763
63
17,864
4,683
13,181
17,864
865
2,152
14,847
17,864
171
187
372
279
261
271
234
241
592
860
946
1,248
1,839
2,351
1,788
1,237
1,441
760
1,398
560
605
223
17,864
16,973
45
29
671
88
58
17,864
2,238
120
221
4,204
2,420
1,590
259
19
715
436
150
130
336
1,804
1,804
629
1,804
524
1,280
1,804
248
1,556
1,804
8
9
9
9
6
14
49
100
97
208
123
152
187
261
169
144
108
78
42
22
9
1,804
1,785
1
16
2
1,804
187
574
270
144
143
4
147
2
11
36
6,251
6,251
6,251
2,242
4,009
6,251
686
820
4,745
6,251
268
232
246
206
116
91
112
137
125
254
208
410
576
797
439
419
410
299
442
171
212
81
6,251
5,983
245
1
22
6,251
542
11
102
1,627
749
477
20
116
50
38
220
3,273
3,273
18
3,273
846
2,427
3,273
164
682
2,427
3,273
163
184
105
112
27
59
24
58
70
136
140
194
290
377
256
243
239
107
231
109
113
36
3,273
3,241
8
7
14
3
| 3,273
93
26
29
892
583
104
12
2
7
46
33
14
39
2,340 2,525
2,340 I 2,525
2,770 3,439 49,962
2,340
613
1,727
2,340
21
147
2,172
2,340
27
39
89
62
86
82
56
65
34
99
65
136
191
282
186
165
164
91
207
65
128
21
2,340
2,297
3
18
18
4
2,340
102
9
79
667
2,525
1,131
1,394
2,525
247
62
2,216
2,525
20
13
41
38
32
37
55
48
97
87
101
114
272
254
325
197
221
113
179
78
128
75
2,525
2,471
186 [ 519
109 | 162
24 I   9
49
276
39
9
13
24
2,770 | 3,439
9
45
2,525
145
35
698
2,770
1,059
1,711
2,770
34
2,736
2,770
29
30
84
92
97
121
63
132
46
148
94
210
225
401
231
189
167
110
137
79
66
19
2,770
2,603
10
30
25
102
2,770
| 138
j 3,439
313
3,126
3,439
37
927
47
43
67
313
3,126
3,439
23
20
69
72
56
88
73
115
52
168
114
227
281
558
285
310
230
157
227
86
160
68
3,439
3,296
104
39
3,439
123
4
38
1,256
298   152
324  311
32 | 141
40
2
40
33
30
| 40,266
I 5,410
63
| 40,266
11.411
28,855
40,266
2,017
4,424
33,825
40,266
709
714
1,015
870
681
763
666
896
1,113
1,960
1,791
2,691
3,861
5,281
3,679
2,904
2,980
1,715
2,863
1,170
1,421
523
40,266
38,649
66
84
1,087
259
121
40,266
3,568
170
1,115
10,541
5,051
3,220
501
114
1,001
895
246
303
789 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951 D 27
Table 2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1951—Continued
Item
u
>
3
O
u
S
d
>
£
3
cr
c
CJ
1-4
H
d
'n
o
(J
>
ze
d
O
u
rt
a
<u
O
O
o
u
a
T3
C
d
"rt
O
H
Usual occupations—Continued
Students—
7
165
1,432
3,422
9,756
1,791
207
294
11
10,163
6,551
1,528
513
481
131
10
89
24
7
1
350
33
193
88
36
32
4
3
5
1
9
4
1
2
3
1,015
232
7
24
16
8
409
21
170
128
6
7,964
12
3
54
216
619
31
598
353
31
13
13
1
1
12
10
2
18
4
10
	
4
420
10
3
682
1,604
6
1,879
3
389
1
307
23
2,048
3,847
160
79
75
27
16
10
1
48
3
30
11
4
	
4
1
1
1
1
81
17
1
46
2
15
2
1,921
87
10
128
1,168
993
156
9
15
1,180
1,075
196
114
108
25
3
13
5
1
3
83
1
58
17
2
5
6
1
1
2
1
1
82
17
2
1
3
30
4
20
5
1
1,939
19
4
319
738
67
2,239
220
72
68
12
3
8
1
56
16
31
4
3
2
4
1
1
1  |
1 |
148 |
35 |
3  |
1
2 1
36 |
3 1
25  |
43  |
5  I
767  |
2
1
185
359
28
2
63
29
125
25
778
260
119
117
26
18
5
3
91
5
69
9
5
3
2
1
1
141
31
11
24
4
40
13
5
13
1
815
473
380
66
2,321
108
64
62
13
4
8
1
49
4
35
7
3
2
1
1
44
9
1
17
2
15
722
1
2
339
927
15
1,875
53
33
31
12
10
2
19
13
5
1
2
1
1
20
4
16
958
138
188
3,612
8,814
Treatments and tests—
Pneumothorax—
6
Refill                        . 	
13,275
Oleothorax—
Refill                               	
Pneumoperitoneum—
3
Refill                                  	
2,336
210
B.C G                                     —
704
49
14,018
11,951
173
X-rays referred to the Division—
7,213
2,556
1,007
955
New cases found (tuberculous and non-tuberculous)
Change of diagnosis, non-tuberculous to tuber-
247
47
12
5
708
62
439
143
54
10
Other tuberculosis of respiratory system.
Tuberculosis, non-pulmonary  	
Intestines and peritoneum 	
52
4.
4
9
Skin                           	
2
13
11
1
4
4
1,549
Pleurisy   —	
345
13
38
Silicosis	
49
12
588
Other non-pulmonary 	
45
220
239
Change   of   diagnosis,   tuberculous   to   non-
15
Previously known cases re-examined	
15,506 D 28
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Survey clinic examinations in 1951 totaled 232,107. This was a 72-per-cent
increase over the figure for 1950. Examinations in general hospitals contributed to
30.7 per cent of the total, and the total for these hospitals is shown separately this year
for the first time. There was a 137-per-cent increase in the number of referrals for all
survey clinics and a 71.5-per-cent increase in the number of new cases found. It will
be seen below that a considerable proportion of the referrals and new cases found may be
attributed to the examinations by the general hospitals. The number referred by mobile
clinics was considerably higher this year, being 1,503 as compared to 634 in 1950.
An increase from 87 last year to 160 in 1951 was registered in the number of new cases
discovered by mobile clinics.
Table 3.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1951
Clinics
Mobile
Stationary
Metropolitan
General1
Hospitals
Item
Vancouver
Victoria
New
Westminster
Provincial
Metropolitan
Total
34,724
1,174
109
8,366
423
3
9,309
177
41
7
1
7
19
4
1
1
1
26,434
686
43
2
1
6
24
4
57,509
404
54
11
5
15
9
7
5
1
1
24,355
413
63
1
17
8
11
6
7
5
71,410
2,839
157
3
17
7
22
61
21
2
11
4
6
1
1
1
232,107
6,116
470
4
New tuberculous cases	
Minimal—
20
9
14
19
24
2
2
1
13
74
Quiescent  ,    	
Apparently arrested 	
1
1
32
76
139
Moderately advanced—■
67
Quiescent- 	
Apparently arrested 	
15
15
	
1
5
1
6
8
Far advanced—
31
Quiescent 	
1
5
1
6
1
64
4
5
12
16
9
4
6
1
1
2
2
1
25
3
4
1
1
63
71
344
11
6
6
67
152
7
12
29
23
12
2
8
7
2
217
169
223
69,382
773
145
571
15
Minimal—
2
12
32
2
2
25
21
1
2
10
4
15
1
4
9
2
14
120
1
1
231
Moderately advanced—
	
19
1
9
4
1
19
3
1
57
34
Far advanced—
14
4
1
1
2
2
2
13
12
2
7
40
33
24,033
80
35
4
Cardiac disease  	
24
101
73
34,109
198
85
7
8
10
8,297
20
21
1
11
8
9,188
40
16
35
27
63
26,072
102
29
4
36
18
57,185
110
31
295
392
428
Negative   	
228,266
1,323
362
1 Excludes St. Joseph's and Royal Jubilee Hospitals, Victoria. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 29
There was a decrease in the total number of clinic examinations, there being 96,445
in 1950 and 92,665 in 1951. This year 63,439 were re-examined, an increase of 6,707
over those completed in 1950. New examinations showed a decline from 39,713 in 1950
to 29,226 in 1951. During 1951 there were 11,074 examinations conducted by travelling
clinics; this was a decrease of 2,286 from the 1950 total of 13,360 examinations.
Table 4.—New Examinations and Re-examinations during the Years
1947 to 1951
(Excluding Indians.)
Total Examined
New Examinations
Old Examinations
Year
Total
Stationary1 -
Travelling2
Total
Stationary
Travelling
Total
Stationary
Travelling
1947 _	
1948 	
1949       	
79,447
95,237
97,631
96,445
92,665
65,250
81,708
84,042
83,085
81,591
14,197
13,529
13,589
13,360
11,074
37,900
42,800
43,318
39,713
29,226
31,991
36,564
37,553
35,816
26,110
5,909
6,236
5,765
3,897
3,116
41,547
52,437
54,313
56,732
63,439
33,259
45,144
46,489
47,269
55,481
8,288
7,293
7,824
1950 	
1951	
9,463
7,958
1 Includes stationary diagnostic and stationary survey.
2 Does not include mobile buses.
Source:   Daily Report of Clinics, Form T.B. 71, and Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. D 30
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 2.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics,
1942-51
No.  of Cases
(in 000's)
100 r
(Excluding Indians.)
t^^^
/
/
/
	
	
/
/
-?_/
£*
>
r
	
*--«.
V
\
\
\
/              4
/
m. „. •
/
\
\
— t» r-'
/
/
.- —
/
«•-•
1942 1943 1944 1945 1946        1947 1948 1949 19-0 1951 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 31
Chart 3.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics,
1942-51
(Excluding Indians.)
Total
Examinations
:--.=---
«
^        >Jew Exa
Re-exarr
minations
.-"-"*—
-~l
~~~"
*-■*?.=.
New cases of pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed in clinics contributed 3.2 per cent
of all cases diagnosed, an increase of 1.3 per cent over the percentage for 1950. Cases
found normal decreased slightly from the previous year's figure.
NEW CASES EXAMINED BY CLINICS
Table 5.—Clinic Examinations by Diagnosis, 1951
(Excluding Indians.)
Diagnosis
Number
Per Cent
of
of Cases
Cases
Examined
941
3.2
15
0.1
51
0.2
1,034
3.5
516
1.8
26,669
91.2
Pulmonary tuberculosis  	
Tuberculous pleurisy and other .tuberculosis of respiratory system..
Non-pulmonary tuberculosis _..  .	
Other pulmonary diagnoses-
Other (other non-pulmonary diagnoses, undiagnosed and suspect)..
Normal 	
Total new cases examined-
100.0
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. D 32
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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0 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 33
The registration of new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in 1951 showed a slight
increase over the figure of 921 for 1950. Of the new cases found, 483 or 51.4 per cent
were classed as active or quiescent pulmonary tuberculosis, which is an increase over the
1950 percentage of 48.2.   Of the cases diagnosed, 63.9 per cent had minimal tuberculosis.
Table 7.—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Examined by Clinics,
by Infection and Condition, 1951
Infection and Condition
Vancouver
Tranquille
Victoria
New
Westminster
Coast
Kootenay
Interior
Vancouver
Island
Total
Primary	
Apparently cured	
Arrested 	
Apparently arrested..
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved—.
Active not stated	
Condition not stated
Minimal	
Apparently cured	
Arrested	
Apparently arrested.
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved __
Active not stated	
Condition not stated
Moderately advanced..
Apparently cured	
Arrested	
Apparently arrested.
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved...
Active not stated	
Condition not stated
Far advanced	
Apparently cured _____
Arrested 	
Apparently arrested
Quiescent 	
Active improved	
Active unimproved._
Active not stated	
Condition not stated
Total pulmonary	
Apparently cured _....
Arrested  	
Apparently arrested
Quiescent.- 	
Active improved	
Active unimproved.._
Active not stated	
Condition not stated
43
2
2
10
18
11
282
53
20
61
41
98
9
112
2
4
9
17
1
77
2
43
37
480
55
26
74
72
1
230
22
1
10
2
2
2
1
2
1
2
13
2
2
2
1
4
46
2
12
6
22
21
2
3
11
75
2
14
10
37
1
71
40
15
1
1
10
4
22
4
3
1
100
45
18
2
2
25
19
1
4
6
4
39
19
4
5
3
65
19
6
9
10
1
87
50
4
16
1
3
13
14
1
114
54
4
18
1
3
30
2
43
12
12
11
1
2
3
23
2
1
3
13
62 31
12 2
14      | 1
14
3
4
15
83
3
3
7
18
7
25
20
601
180
70
103
83
7
138
20
190
7
12
19
33
1
109
9
66
1
2
6
56
1
940
191
85 .
131
140
15
328
50
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. D 34
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The total number of X-ray examinations increased from 228,753 in 1950 to 278,734
in 1951. This indicates that one out of every four persons in British Columbia (excluding
Indians) had an X-ray. X-rays taken in general hospitals increased from 45,210 in 1950
to 71,410 in 1951, while slight decreases occurred in both stationary and travelling clinics.
Mobile-unit X-rays, which showed a considerable decline in 1950, numbered 108,298
in 1951.
Table 8.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and
General-hospital Units, 1942-51.
Institutions
Stationary
Travelling
Mobile
Stationary
Metropolitan
General-
hospital
Units
Year
Diagnostic
Survey
Diagnostic
Survey
Provincial
Metropolitan
Total
1942   	
3,692
4.121
20,135
24.199
12,323
13,329
12,124
12,613
11,289
12,996
13,399
13,508
13,360
11,074
2,914
764
763
1,063
91
36,150
1943  	
4.374
55,868i
89,779i
99,103i
155,6741
127-0811
140,7221
80,686'
26,434
	
46,023
1944     	
3.881     1   14.315   1  26173
115,275
1945 	
3,858
6,667
5,196
6,111
6,432
6,412
6,361
11,075
16,781
20,986
24,144
27,695
28,500
29,192
28,850
45,810
44,196
57,428
56,374
54,585
52,399
	
146,939
1946  ...
180,413
1947	
240,111
1948    _      -              ■
228,254
1949
244,731
1950
i   _ts7in
228,753
278,734
1951 	
57,509
24,355
71,410
1 No breakdown available for mobile units prior to 1951.
Source:  X-ray Ledger T.B. 73 and Clinic Ledgers T.B. 71 and T.B. 41. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 35
Chart 4.—X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals,
1942-51.
No. of X-Ray
(in 000's)
275
Sjfe
4y
_.	
 i
/-,_ „.
/
	
±4
4'
^-*
,'
	
4*
/
*
*
^
tics
Institutions
194Z        1943        1944        1945        1946 1947        1948        1949 1950        1951 D 36
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 5.—X-ray Examinations Made by Institutions, Diagnostic and Treatment
Clinics, Survey Clinics, Mobile Units, and General Hospitals, 1942-51
1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951 D 37
GENERAL SUMMARIES
Table 9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1951
Vancouver
Tranquille
Victoria
St.
Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital
New Westminster
Jericho
Beach
Total
X-rays taken  	
Chest X-rays—
Flat—
24,064
1,994
17,966
585
42
28
339
279
414
1,551
5
5
89
34
14
45
14
4,041
10,167
197
152
17
194
222
21
54
4,243
1,985
1,849
4
3
59
128
11
2
49
35
23
16
5,618
609
66
4
7
2
7,122
433
6,139
14
16
273
20
39
7
91
2
2
19
20
1
1
1,504
2,250
4
43
1
1
253
198
55
998
51
3,448
3,361
2
17
1,180
68
708
435
216
2
1
5
1
12
1
26
2
7
972
39,838
5,045
29,586
V.D. Division   	
Stereoscopic—
599
64
307
Planograph—
423
319
Other chest—
561
1,671
9
Gastro-intestinal—
7
Bones and joints—
183
91
V.D. Division	
Other—
14
76
31
Fluoroscope—
13,133
14,257
201
218
21
V.D. Division __ __
Electrocardiogram—
In-patient	
194
Indian Department examinations...
Lipiodol injection—
333
29
57
Source:   X-ray Ledger T.B. 73.
L D 38
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 10.—Laboratory Report, 1951
Vancouver
Tranquille
Victoria
St.
Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital
New Westminster
Jericho
Beach
Total
Sputum tests—
Routine—
7.584
3,581
1
340
646
1,127
15,726
1,743
542
7
467
134
5
566
133
3
481
103
3
447
835
310
65
2,140
355
39
14
170
11
213
741
467
192
71
135
2,872
364
373
20
409
165
1,574
325
750
227
556
79
574
75
572
75
249
691
338
117
3,367
107
13
74
25
404
3
838
6
1,026
1,554
1,363
1
42
106
1
263
2,213
1
260
44
216
40
196
41
198
45
7
15
58
5
255
12
1
~2
268
583
8
19
4
311
3
15
42
144
19
142
19
50
53
48
21
43
59
1
27
1,800
717
388
40
83
55
79
5
84
6
86
6
50
32
64
23
430
24
1
9
2,582
8,950
6,468
366
Concentrated—■
Stomach washings—
797
799
Guinea-pig inoculation—
410
165
Blood tests—
Sedimentations—
3,496
Out-patient 	
V.D. Division	
Haemoglobin—
20,123
1
2,978
887
V.D. Division  	
Red-blood count—
7
1,368
258
V.D. Division 	
White-blood count—
5
1,473
255
V.D. Division	
Differential—
3
1,385
Out-patient  _	
V.D. Division..- 	
229
3
774
V.D. Division 	
1,573
V.D. Division  	
Kahn—
In-patient	
813
210
Urinalysis—
Routine—
6,251
498
V.D. Division 	
Quantitative—
53
14
V.D. Division  	
244
36
621
Cultures—
Sputum—
1,012
Out-patient  	
Other-
In-patient  	
1,050
1,038
96
1,174
Source: Daily Laboratory Ledger T.B. 72. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 39
During 1951 the total number of bronchoscopies increased from 652 in 1950 to 723.
Both the Vancouver and Victoria clinics accounted for the increases.
Table 11.—
-Number of
Bronchoscopies
by Institutions
and Clinics
, 1942-51
Total
Institutions
Clinics
Year
Total
Tranquille
Vancouver
Victoria
Total
Tranquille
Vancouver
Victoria
Total
Tranquille
Vancouver
Victoria
1942 .   .    	
1943 ___ 	
1944
206
184
243
285
353
452
700
683
652
721
18
26
31
9
3
72
258
210
146
145
188
157
204
274
334
366
415
437
485
539
1
8
2
16
14
27
36
21
37
148
117
143
127
174
297
552
554
486
513
18
26
30
9
3
72
252
210
146
145
130
90
108
117
160
211
273
308
319
332
1
5
1
11
14
27
36
21
36
58
67
100
158
179
155
148
129
166
208
1
6
58
67
96
157
174
155
142
129
166
207
3
1945 .__ 	
1946	
1947	
1948
1
5
1949 	
1950 	
195U 	
1
i Does not include two bronchoscopies done in the Kootenay Travelling Clinic.
Source: Institutional Ledger T.B. 70 and Clinic Ledger T.B. 71.
Table 12.—Dental Report, 1951
i Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source: Ledger T.B. 74.
Vancouver1
Tranquille
Victoria
Jericho Beach
Total
Patient-visits—
1,299
436
200
45
62
15
456
114
591
316
82
20
3
6
371
175
4,325
83
1,538
4
94
3
673
5
922
558
1
596
3,850
453
35
164
5
11
1
60
2
228
15
59
58
112
2
852
40
323
67
27
87
67
15
2
199
709
3,613
475
Examinations—
525
50
Consultations—
103
16
Extractions—
1,276
121
Fillings, including cement bases—
1,808
331
Prophylactic treatment—
714
21
Surgical removal, impacted teeth—
63
6
Denture fittings—
1,278
177
X-rays 	
Other
9,736
123 D 40
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 13.—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report, 1951
Vancouver        Tranquille
Victoria
Total
Patient-visits—
In-patient-
Eye
Out-patient	
Examinations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Prescriptions—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Refractions—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Other treatments—
In-patient.	
Out-patient	
Consultations—
In-patient	
Out-patient .
N/UL-JjailClll.—
Ear, nose, and throat-
Examinations—
In-patient	
Out-patient._.
Treatments—
In-patient	
Out-patient—
Consultations—
In-patient	
Out-patient.
Surgical procedures
239
42
157
5
78
107
1
3
87
36
19
12
10
2
198
2
35
26
93
22
445
44
291
5
145
190
46
Source: Ledger T.B. 75. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
INSTITUTIONS
D 41
The number of patient-days in tuberculosis institutions remained substantially the
same as in 1950. It is interesting to note that there was a considerable decrease in the
number of refills both for pneumothorax and pneumoperitoneum.
Table 14.—
Institutions—General Summary, 1951
Item
Vancouver
Tranquille
Victoria
St. Joseph's
Or'ental
Hospital
Jericho
Beach
Total
78,380
328
343
68
1,890
117,197
353
344
R9
3,622
27,151
132
139
24
637
18,204
60
58
13
382
33,028
55
58
7
238
273,960
Admissions	
Discharges    	
Treatments—
Pneumothoraces—
928
942
201
Refill        	
Oleothorax—
6,769
___
Refill
Pneumoperitoneum—
44
1,487
133
75
58
20
1
1
3
36
1
27
3
332
80
541
163
10
43
2
49
58
39
10
2
1
10
598
46
7
438
15
15
773
7
78
Refill  	
3,345
259
Thoracoplasties—
Stage 1    -
114
Stage 2
68
Stage 3    	
22
2
I
3
Phrenic—
1
37
	
1
54
11
145
14
36
29
3
2
1
95
14
296
-
4
2
5
513
405
59
10
8
544
228
23
56
Source:   Clinic Ledgers T.B. 71 and T.B. 41 and Institutional Ledger T.B. 70;   Admission Form T.B. 78 and Discharge Form T.B. 79.
Table 15.—Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) Given by
Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1942-51
Total
Initial
Refill
Year
Total
Initial
Institutions
Stationary
Clinics
Traveling
Clinics
Total
Refill
Institutions
Stationary
Clinics
Traveling
Clinics
1942
12,766
14,937
16,828
17,121
21,883
21,919
21,788
22,393
21,139
20,251
299
401
344
327
413
354
339
334
286
207
295    !             4
392    1              5
337                   2
325    |              1
397    [              5
350    ''              1
336    j              2
328    i              5
279    |              7
201     !               6
12,467
14,536
16,484
16.794
21,470
21,565
21,449
22,059
20,853
20,044
7,293
9,132
10,375
9,678
12,347
12,698
12,745
11,066
9,174
6,769
5,092
5,255
5,841
6,892
8,799
8,616
8,617
10,873
11,649
13,247
82
1943  _______
1944 _____ ______	
1945 _  	
1946 ____ 	
1947           	
4
5
1
11
3
1
1
149
268
224
324
251
1948  .......	
1949        -_    ...
87
120
1950
30
1951
28
Source: Clinic Ledgers T.B. 71 and T.B. 41 and Institutional Ledger T.B. 70. D 42
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 16.—Institutions—Patient Status
(As of December 31st, 1951.)
Item
Cases on pneumothorax—
In-patients _
Out-patients-.
Status of patients in residence—
Patients in residence, December 31st, 1951...
Cases with effusion with pneumothorax	
Cases with effusion without pneumothorax __
Cases of tuberculous empyema with pneumothorax :	
Cases   of   tuberculous   empyema   without
pneumothorax-
Cases with positive sputum with collapse
therapy.
Cases  with  positive  sputum  without collapse therapy.
Cases with negative sputum with collapse
therapy  —	
Cases with negative sputum without collapse therapy.
Cases receiving occupational therapy-
Cases supervised by teacher	
Total
Number
187
365
Per
Cent
100.0
100.0
Number
736
2
3
132
343
106
151
358
155
Tranquille
Number
75
17
Per
Cent
40.1
4.7
Number
310
40
167
35
68
140
65
Vancouver1
Number
Per
Cent
63
276
33.7
75.6
Number
260
2
3
59
81
56
62
147
52
Victoria
Number
Per
Cent
27
72
14.4
19.7
Number
77
15
34
15
46
35
Jericho Beach
Number
Per
Cent
22
11.8
Number
89
18
61
7
6
25
3
i Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source: Clinic Ledgers T.B. 41 and T.B. 71 and Institutional Ledger T.B. 70.
Admissions to the five institutions totalled 928 in 1951. Although the greatest
number of admissions occurred in the 20-29 and 30-39 age-groups, it is interesting to
note that there was an increase in admissions in the age-groups over 40 years of age.
Table 17.—Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions
in Each Age-group, 1947-51
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
Age-group
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
0- 9                        -_
1
53
333
241
120
82
51
17
0.1
5.9
37.1
26.8
13.4
9.1
5.7
1.9
	
56
287
214
115
68
49
22
3
6.9
35.2
26.3
14.1
8.4
6.0
2.7
0.4
2
56
328
243
157
89
70
25
3
0.2
5.8
33.7
25.0
16.1
9.1
7.2
2.6
0.3
18
61
312
224
131
87
70
25
1.9
6.6
33.7
24.1
14.1
9.4
7.5
2.7
5
42
262
241
151
109
82
36
0.6
10 19       _             	
4.5
20 29
28.2
30-39                      	
26.0
40-49
16.3
50-59     	
11.7
60 69                       	
8.8
70 and over_ 	
Not stated _ 	
3.9
898    1  100.0
814
100.0
973
100.0
928
100.0
928    1 100.0
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78.  D 44
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The largest group entering sanatoria in 1951 were those with moderately advanced
chest lesions, which comprised 43.3 .per cent of total admissions. Of the 143 admissions
for males in the far advanced stage, 74 per cent were over 40 years of age, while 55 or
75.8 per cent of the admissions for females in the same stage of infection were under
40 years of age. Substantially the same distribution occurred in both the minimal and
moderately advanced stages.
Table 18.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1951
Age-group
Diagnosis
u   OJ
d u
£•5
a .ait
!_.«
p3a
ha. o
OQ
0- 4  	
 _._M.
5- 9  '	
F.
 __„M.
10-14   '	
F.
 M.
15-19 	
F.
 M.
20-24	
F.
 M.
25-29 	
F.
 ____.M.
30-39                  "	
F.
 ___M.
40-49 	
F.
  M.
50-59 _ _   _    	
F.
  ___M.
60 69
F.
M.
F.
    M.
F.
 M.
Totals
F.
M.
Grand totals 	
F.
1 I
2
11    I
1    I
3
2
18
16
36
17
34
24
49
33
9
24
2
12
2
6
134
154
2
6
7
21
36
23
39
39
64
40
22
42
12
31
4
12
1
215
187
402
6
7
7
13
22
30
34
9
29
30
3
13
4
143
66
209
1
5
11
25
43
84
47
152
109
42
95
14
73
9
31
5
502
426
3
2
6
36
127
135
241
151
109
82
36
928
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. Chart 7.—Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1951
0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180
Age Group
10-19 yrs
20-29 yrs.
30-39 yrs
40-49 yrs.
50-59 yrs.
70 yrs.  &
I Minimal
60-69 yrs. | ■ Moderately Advanced
I Far Advanced D 46 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 19.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1951
Diagnosis
Racial Origin
Primary
Minimal
Moderately
Advanced
Far
Advanced
Tbc.
Pleurisy
with
Effusion
Tbc.
Pleurisy
without
Effusion
Other
Diagnoses
Total
.._____ M.
5
9
79
80
122
86
71
33
2
1
277
F.
211
T.
14
159
208
104
2
1
488
European races  ___	
 M.
1
32
56
42
1
132
F.
1
39
61
19
1
1
2
124
T.
2
71
117
61
1
1
3
256
Chinese   	
 M.
9
9
12
1
11
32
F.
10
T.
18
13
11
42
Japanese  — 	
.......M.
5
1
5
11
F.
6
8
4
18
T.
11
9
9
29
Hindu   	
M.
F.
1
1
1
3
T.
	
1
1
1
3
Half-breed and Indian	
.   - M.
2
4
2
8
F.
3
14
3
	
	
20
T.
5
18
5
28
... M.
2
5
18
9
1
35
F.
1
17
16
6
1
41
T.
3
22
34
15
2
76
Other   	
M.
F.
1
1
1
2
1
4
2
T.
_ ____ M.
1
2
3
6
Totals 	
8
134
215
143
2
502
F.
11
154
187
66
3
1
4
426
Grand totals	
19
288
402
209
3
1
6
928
i Includes United States.
Source:  Institutions. Admissions, T.B. 78. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951 D 47
Table 20.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1951
Diagnosis
Type of Case
Primary
Minimal
Moderately
Advanced
Far
Advanced
Tbc.
Pleurisy
with
Effusion
Tbc.
Pleurisy
without
Effusion
Other
Diagnoses
Total
by Sex
Total
New case M.
F.
Review  M.
F.
Readmission   M.
F.
4
7
3
3
1
1
100
103
5
15
29
36
129
85
14
26
72
76
84
22
3
3
56
41
2
1
1
1
3
1
1
318
223
26
48
158
155
541
74
313
Totals    M.
F.
8
11
134
154
215
187
143
66
3
1
2
4
502
426
Grand totals
19
288
402
209
3
1
6
928
Source: Institutions, Admissions, T.B. 78.
During 1951 there were 541 first admissions, of which 47.1 per cent were admitted
to Tranquille, 35.5 per cent to Vancouver, and 11.1 per cent to Victoria.
Table 21.
—First Admissions by Institution and Diagnosis, 1951
Total
Institution
Diagnosis
Tranquille
Vancouver1
Victoria
Jericho Beach
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Num-       Per
her         Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary  	
11
203
214
106
3
4
2.0
37.5
39.6
19.6
0.6
0.7
7
104
90
48
3
3
2.7
40.8
35.3
18.8
1.2
1.2
3    ]        1.6
67    |      34.9
90          46.9
31    |      16.1
•       -    1     	
1             0.5
1
25
23
11
1.7
41.7
38.3
18.3
7
11
16
20.5
32.4
47.1
Tuberculous pleurisy 	
Totals  	
541
100.0
255
100.0
192    |    100.0
1
60
100.0
34
100.0
i Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78.
Table 22.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1947-51
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary—	
Minimal— 	
5
137
241
145
6
0.9
25.1
44.1
26.6
1.1
3
148
226
98
0.6
30.5
46.5
20.2
1
174
242
117
6
0.2
31.8
44.2
21.4
1.1
3
199
208
107
3
6
0.6
37.8
39.6
20.3
0.6
1.1
11
203
214
106
3
4
2.0
37.5
39.6
19.6
4    1        0.8
7    |        1.4
0.6
12    |       2.2
7    [        1.3
0.7
Totals   	
546    1    100.0
486    1    100.0
547    1    100.0
526    1    100.0
541
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. d 48 department of health and welfare
Chart 8.—First Admissions to Institutions by Institution and Diagnosis, 1951
No.   of First
Admissions
300
250
200
150
100
TOTAL
minimal
mod. adv.
far adv.
other diag.
tranquille
VANCOUVER
VICTORIA TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 49
Chart 9.—First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis
(Percentage Distribution), 1947-51
^va»«i^i
— m
*
/
/
V         **
^^j
s
/
m—m    ^__««   m
^^^  i
X\
,«%££>
a^^^
1942        1943 1944        1945 1946        1947 1948 1949        1950 D 50
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Of the 106 cases of far advanced tuberculosis, 67 or 63.2 per cent were admitted
within one month of application, while of those with moderately advanced tuberculosis,
64 per cent were admitted to sanatoria within two months of application.
Table 23.—First Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Time
between Application and Admission, 1951
Length of Time between Application and Admission
Diagnosis
zs
us:
u 3
■° £
c3
2%
05
C
tN O
a
cn 0
ca
.a
c
** o
(.2
X
a
in O
4S
\C o
i/->S
X
c
tj- 0
NO<5
X
c
oo O
ciS
c
On O
oiS
a.__-
OS
Sea
"ca
o
Primary  	
M.
F.
5
1
2
1
1
1
_-_
—
4
7
11
 M.
6
10
16
45
20
32
34
9
16
5
5
2
1
1
....
1
100
103
F.
203
 M.
8
7
33
41
25
23
27
9
23
2
8
3
4
1
129
85
F.
214
•.     -M.
9
5
43
10-
10
5
12
1
8
1
1
1
—
—
84
22
F.
106
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion 	
M.
F.
2
—
--
2
2
Tuberculous pleurisv without effusion	
M.
F.
1
—
1
1
Other diagnoses  	
M.
F.
 M.
1
1
1
1
—
—
1
3
4
Totals  	
24
92
56
75
48
14
5
1
1
2
318
F.
23
104
61
21
8
6
—
223
47
196
117
96
56
20
5
1
1
2
541
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78.
Table 24.—Institutional Patient-days of the Division of
Tuberculosis Control, 1942-51
1 As the Jericho Beach unit opened in July, 1947, this figure is for part of the year only.
Source: Institutional Summary, 1951.
Year
Total
Tranquille
Vancouver
Victoria
Jericho Beach
1942
223,331
230,561
222,822
226,994
244,264
269,495
305,169
266,894
273,972
273,960
116,823
123,280
122,298
117,866
121,197
118,545
115,819
114,610
116,932
117,197
81,441
79,935
75,562
83,111
96,503
110,584
128,825
92,664
96,695
96,584
25,067
27,346
24,962
26,017
26,564
26,559
27,463
26,993
27,348
27,151
1943                                               	
1944                                               	
1945	
1946                                                     .    .
	
1947                                                    	
13.8071
1948  	
1949	
33,062
32,627
1950
32,987
1951                                                   	
33,028 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 51
Days
(in 000's)
Chart 10.—Institutional Patient-days of the Division of
Tuberculosis Control, 1942-51
Total
Tranqu1^     r
*
0* ~*
+      m
■" mmm
mmam     rnmmrn
--"
>* -
+*
\
 """
■__________■   ■__»  ■_■>
MB   ^^^
«»*^
Victoria
'
N             Jericho
Beach
	
*
i
1942 1943 1944 1945
1946        1947
1948        1949 1950 1951 D 52
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 25.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition
on Discharge, 1947-51
Condition
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Arrested	
Apparently arrested	
Quiescent	
28
125
265
79
89
195
29
3.5
15.4
32.7
9.8
11.0
24.0
3.6
20
112
313
106
86
148
31
2.5
13.7
38.4
13.0
10.5
18.1
3.8
26
151
377
114
131
149
33
2.7
15.4
38.4
11.6
13.3
15.2
3.4
23
135
385
125
118
99
18
2.5
15.0
42.6
13.8
13.1
11.0
2.0
19
147
396
121
121
102
36
2.0
15.6
42.0
12.9
Active unimproved
Dead 	
12.9
10.8
Other diagnoses	
3.8
Totals  .
810
100.0
816
100.0
981
100.0
903
100.0
942
100.0
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 53
Chart 11.—Percentage Distribution of Discharges from Institutions
According to Condition on Discharge, 1942-51
•
*m>     —
>
/
/
m ^»  ^—
/
/
/
"--
^_-p   *
/
\
/
\
\
&
Improved
.4*
4*
4*
r
\
\
\             j
__,      \
*'^
N?*^**5^
\    /
><
«*»   ^
v^
i^^^^ted
—
1942 1943
1945        1946 1947 194
1949 1950 D 54
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
During 1951 there were 942 discharges from institutions. This is an increase of 39
over the 1950 discharges. Of those discharged, 42 per cent were quiescent, 15.6 per cent
were apparently arrested, 12.8 per cent were active improved, 12.8 per cent were active
unimproved, and 10.8 per cent were deaths.
Table 26.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and
Length of Treatment during Previous Admissions, 1951
irge
Length of Treatment during Previous Admissions
Condition on Disch
Not
Under 1
1-4
4-8
8-12
1-2
2-3
3-5
Over 5
Admit
Total
Total
Month
Months
Months
Months
Years
Years
Years
Years
ted
by Sex
Before
Apparently cured 	
__M.
F.
1
1
1
2
3
2
5
Arrested 	
„..M.
1
1
1
1
1
8
13
F.
1
	
1
4
6
19
Apparently arrested .
...M.
2
10
4
6
2
2
1
51
78
F.
3
6
4
7
5
3
41
69
147.
Quiescent   	
__..M.
4
11
12
10
21
7
8
3
95
171
F.
2
6
25
17
23
7
6
1
138
225
396
___.M.
3
3
5
4
5
3
1
1
5
4
3
......
2
26
56
43
78
F.
121
Active unimproved
___.M.
3
5
4
5
11
7
1
34
70
F.
1
4
1
2
10
8
1
24
51
121
Dead  	
M.
2
5
1
2
2
9
6
3
5
4
1
2
1
46
13
73
29
F.
102
Non-pulmonary 	
M
2
3
2
3
F.
5
M.
	
	
3
1
3
1
F.
4
Undiagnosed	
„..M.
2
1
1
1
3
8
F.
_.M.
2
1
2
1
.__.__
8
14
22
Totals   	
8
26
37
26
50
25
15
9
268
464
F.
6
20
38
28
53
32
"
2
288
478
14
46
75
54
103
57
26
11
556
942
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79.
Table 27.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and
Length of Last Stay in Institution, 1951
Condition on Discharge
Length of Last Stay in Institution
Under 1
Month
1-4
Months
4-8
Months
8-12
Months
1-2
Years
2-3
Years
3-5
Years
Over 5
Years
Not
Stated
Total
by Sex
Total
Quiescent
Apparently cured  M.
F.
Arrested  _ _. M.
F.
Apparently arrested —M.
F.
_M.
F.
Active improved  M.
F.
Active unimproved  M.
F.
Dead   ____    _ M.
F.
__M.
F.
Non-tuberculous M.
F.
Undiagnosed     M.
F.
Non-pulmonary
Totals
10
15
15
32
5
3
10
16
14
7
63
78
2
2
8
6
33
43
9
14
28
9
14
3
2
2
3
2
6
101
85
Grand totals _
141
186
5
1
26
7
49
52
13
19
15
10
12
2
121
95
2
15
17
25
48
9
16
4
4
7
4
1
1
14
20
35
42
4
22
9
9
13
6
61
91
78
101
20
19
11
7
216
152
39
10
3
2
13
6
78
69
171
225
43
78
70
51
73
29
2
3
3
1
8
14
464
478
19
147
396
121
102
942
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 55
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge,
Sex, and Home Condition, 1951
Condition on Discharge
Active
Inactive
3
O
3
Home Condition
d
a
T3
X
>
+_
£
O
w
•o
DT)
c
C
o
o,
£
T>
T
3
C
d
"rt
E
s
a
__. u
£-3
u
D
O
<
<<
<CU
Q
Z
Z
5
H
H
Satisfactory  	
.. M.
30
52
158
12
74
3
2
3
6
340
F.
73
35
220
6
68
2
3
1
12
420
760
Unsatisfactory  	
M.
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9
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11
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3
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31
16
47
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M
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5
6
1
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73
2
93
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3
5
2
1
29
2
42
135
Totals 	
43
70
171
13
78
3
73    |      2
3
8
464
F.
78
51
225
6
69
2
29    |      3
1
14
478
121
121
396
19
147
5
102    1      5
4
22
942
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79. D 56
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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!____( TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 59
KNOWN CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS
During 1950 an exhaustive check was made of the register of known cases of tuberculosis. Every case appearing in the known-case register was actually verified against the
current records of the public health staff in the field. All possible means were employed
in attempting to locate cases which had become unknown. At the conclusion of this
extensive checking project, 1,411 cases could not be located, and these cases have been
deleted from our known-case register.
Table 32.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1947-51
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
250
743
739
8,802
2,230
795
302
513
596
63
375
287
768
767
9,399
2,447
832
364
662
719
79
488
313
802
871
10,038
2,641
908
404
822
896
141
647
315
807
913
10,337
2,742
930
430
854
975
153
972
336
Area No. 2 	
Area No. 3  	
821
889
10,371
2,768
949
472
942
1,001
160
Area No. 10   	
Totals          	
15,408
16,812
18,483
19,428
18,709
Table 33.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1947-51
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
205
739
687
8,385
1,867
516
157
237
231
48
358
239
764
714
8,978
2,018
546
179
285
274
57
474
260
798
799
9,607
2,152
573
179
330
327
76
637
264
802
827
9,887
2,183
584
190
335
374
77
915
275
816
789
9,872
2,167
548
Area No. 5  	
A rea No. 7  _ 	
200
355
Area No. 9  	
304
Not stated 	
13,430
14,528
15,738
16,438
15,404
Table 34.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, as at December 3 1st, 1947-51
19471
19481
1
19491  |    1950i
1
19511
45
4
52
417
363
279
145
276
365
15
17
48
4
53
421
429
286
185
377
445
22
14
53
4
72
431
489
335
225
492
569
65
10
51
5
86
450
559
346
240
519
601
76
57
61
6
100
499
601
401
271
587
697
82
Area No. 4     -__	
Area No. 5 —_	
Area No. 9   _ -	
Totals 	
1,978
2,284
2,745
2,990
3,305
1 These figures include:   1947, 141 Indians of white status;   1948, 84 Indians of white status;
white status;   1950, 160 Indians of white status;   1951, 127 Indians of white status.
1949, 93 Indians of D 60
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 35.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1951
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Area No. 1  	
142
1
25
34
2
23
57
433
9
21
10
3
107
33
25
25
15
4
7
80
94
393
11
3
4
22
4
91
13
9
3
49
3
20
55
106
5,470
21
231
40
60
247
22
3
19
10
14
69
64
19
16
16
318
141
23
6
17
9
72
6
4
133
2
38
25
22
46
383
8
24
6
4
96
29
18
44
4
4
5
66
75
396
9
4
2
25
5
90
16
11
3
56
1
18
71
85
4,402
30
234
55
82
186
28
4
11
7
9
41
35
13
28
15
285
116
11
7
20
12
73
4
3
275
3
63
59
2
45
103
816
17
45
16
7
203
62
43
69
19
8
12
146
169
789
20
3
8
2
47
9
181
29
20
6
105
4
38
126
191
9,872
51
465
95
.    142
433
50
7
30
17
23
110
99
32
44
31
603
257
34
13
37
21
145
10
7
Area No. 4—Continued
Surrey 	
Vancouver	
175
3,687
65
96
1,187
18
6
7
1
7
19
13
29
41
20
8
85
14
73
6
49
6
178
3
389
215
286
106
6
8
6
20
14
126
111
1
11
99
191
10
6
43
25
4
8
12
83
181
121
3
20
37
34
12
3
4
15
138
2,819
56
80
980
32
7
11
3
6
17
16
38
39
24
11
71
17
45
3
50
3
125
2
292
168
262
109
5
2
9
19
19
3
96
89
2
6
81
164
11
6
34
21
17
8
13
54
123
78
1
19
25
44
19
5
2
18
313
6,506
121
176
Area No. 5 	
Alberni  .„
Alert Bay	
2,167
50
13
18
4
Kaslo	
Kinn aird _ 	
Nelson   	
Comox  _
Courtenay 	
Cumberland-  _	
Duncan '  	
Esquimalt 	
13
36
29
67
80
44
19
156
31
Trail - 	
Oak Bay	
118
9
99
9
303
Enderby   	
5
681
383
Greenwood  	
Kelowna 	
Oliver _	
Osoyoos  	
Area No. 6 	
Kamloops	
Lillooet   	
Lytton	
Merritt 	
548
215
11
2
17
25
Spallumcheen  _
Salmon Arm City.	
39
17
Unorganized parts	
222
Area No. 7 	
200
3
Abbotsford  	
Westview	
17
180
Chilliwack City
Area No. 8 	
355
21
McBride  	
Prince George	
12
Delta
77
Quesnel	
Smithers —	
Vanderhoof  	
46
21
16
Kent
25
Unorganized parts  	
137
Maple Ridge - 	
Matsqui	
304
Prince Rupert	
Stewart 	
199
4
Terrace	
39
Unorganized parts	
62
Area No. 10	
78
31
Fort St. John	
8
6
Unorganized parts	
33
Totals for Province	
8,428
6,976
15,404
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 61
Table 36.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1951
(Indians only.1)
1 These figures include 127 Indians of white status.
Source:  Case Examination, Form T.B. 1.
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Area No. 1	
31
8
23
6
4
1
1
58
11
1
1
10
13
22
241
2
11
28
2
4
3
2
38
4
3
3
2
26
2
3
3
3
23
1
78
280
22
35
3
30
10
20
42
9
1
1
6
6
19
258
6
19
7
1
2
5
38
6
5
1
1
3
40
6
2
1
5
1
21
2
86
321
18
38
3
61
18
43
6
4
1
1
100
20
2
2
16
19
41
499
2
17
47
9
5
5
7
76
10
8
1
4
5
66
8
5
4
8
1
44
3
164
601
40
73
6
Area No. 5—Continued
6
3
21
4
3
1
6
6
7
10
4
1
148
194
17
9
18
4
8
1
137
127
127
272
1
1
3
12
255
335
10
1
324
46
6
40
2
3
23
3
10
11
1
9
10
1
189
207
21
11
20
13
10
132
144
144
315
4
3
11
297"
362
12
3
347
36
3
33
8
6
Duncan 	
Esquimalt — 	
Ladysmith 	
Lake Cowichan____	
Nanaimo .   	
44
Creston	
New Denver	
4
3
4
Area No. 3  _ _
16
17
•   8
Saanich	
Tofino _ -	
Victoria — __
19
Penticton __	
14
2
337
Area No. 4    ___	
Area No. 6_ 	
Kamloops 	
401
38
Chilliwack City.
20
Lytton _ _	
Merritt- _ 	
38
17
Delta.	
18
1
269
Kent    __ 	
Langley	
Maple Ridge	
Area No. 7 	
271
271
Area No. 8 _ 	
587
4
1
Quesnel  	
Vanderhoof	
4
3
23
552
Squamish   _.	
Area No. 9 ____ —	
697
22
4
671
82
Fort St. John 	
9
73
Alberni.____   _....
1,590
1,715
3,305
Table 37.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis
in British Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1951
(Excluding Indians.)
Population
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Total
Total     	
83.3
77.0
90.0
283.9
300.4
267.1
361.1
363.0
359.2
411.5
381.4
440.8
882.5
751.3
1,005.3
1,603.9
1,445.1
1,750.3
2,138.5
1,918.3
2,352.5
2,185.2
2,257.4
2,106.5
1,882.4
2,304.5
1,402.0
•
1,924.1
2,448.9
1,259.6
1,594.5
1,991.6
1,069.1
1,304.0
1,693.8
849.8
1,337.9
Male	
Female	
1,427.5
1,243.7 D 62
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 12.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in
British Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1951
(Excluding Indians.)
RATE MALE
2,500   2,000   1,500   1,000    500
AGE-GROUP
0 0
FEMALE RATE
500 1,000        1,500 2,000        2,500
•
1
■
■
■
...
,.,
•'■"
15-19
1
■
■
20-24
25-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
■
a^^^m^MBHBBwwPP^H^^Py        70 & Over        '^TgsjffljgjjBal^
2,500 2,000        1,500 1,000 500
500 1,000        1,500 2,000        2,500 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 63
The majority of the other-than-Indian known cases were found in the minimal
stage, where 54.0 per cent of all cases were registered. This was followed by the
moderately advanced group (24.3 per cent), the far advanced group (7.9 per cent), and
the non-pulmonary group (7.6 per cent). For the minimal cases the largest group was
in the apparently cured and arrested conditions, 36.2 per cent and 31.8 per cent respectively. For the moderately advanced cases, the largest number were in arrested condition,
29.3 per cent, while for the far advanced stage the largest group was in an active
unimproved condition, 29.2 per cent, and arrested, 19.2 per cent.
Table 38.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Present
Condition, and Age-group, 1951
(Excluding Indians.)
Diagnosis
Primary  —
Apparently cured-
Arrested-
Apparently arrested-
Quiescent-
Active improved	
Active unimproved	
Active not stated	
Condition not stated-
Minimal-
Apparently cured.
Arrested ..
Apparently arrested-
Quiescent-
Active improved	
Active unimproved-
Active not stated	
Condition not stated-
Moderately advanced—
Apparently cured	
Arrested _
Apparently arrested—
Quiescent __	
Active improved	
Active unimproved-—
Active not stated	
Condition not stated _
Far advanced-
Apparently cured ..
Arrested 	
Apparently arrested	
Quiescent 	
Active improved- —
Active unimproved	
Active not stated 	
Condition not stated	
Pulmonary tuberculosis
(type not stated)
Pleurisy with effusion	
Pleurisy without effusion-—
Far advanced tuberculosis
with silicosis —
Non-pulmonary—	
Totals-
Age-group
196
21
54
40
30
7
17
27
11
37
162
22
54
20
17
3
25
21
22
5
5
2
60
254 [ 263
70
12
33
9
4
2
2
100
6
21
20
16
2
21
1
13
44
7
7
8
1
15
"6 \
15
1 I
11
351
42
93
76
63
17
46
1
13
195
1
29
49
51
5
48
2
10
48
3
2
9
1
2
10
1
5
3
17
2
1
4
4
3
2
2
2
4
15
1
2
1
61 | 87
298 | 761
I
50
3
27
4
10
792
177
279
160
75
16
60
1
24
368
17
85
110
70
19
61
5
104
2
14
18
22
6
35
1
6
4
23
5
146
39
9
8
3
1
1
1,492
17
2,113
696
685
351
153
71
88
1
68
966
88
288
222
187
41
117
1
22
316
38
57
50
57
27
79
1
7
11
31
7
254
3,737
4
1,705
719
528
221
88
44
50
1
54
740
114
242
125
109
29
96
25
291
36
61
43
46
10
82
13
13
15
6
1
210
2,989
1
1,312
544
455
135
61
23
45
1
48
571
87
171
102
90
21
78
3
19
186
28
43
15
29
8
55
24
10
1
6
124
2,242
1
2
1,233
533
382
135
57
40
35
1
50
522
61
168
73
93
17
22
150
11
34
13
28
24
6
2
7
92
2,042
509
225
155
57
27
6
15
1
23
244
30
80
29
40
6
41
1
17
74
7
20
9
9
2
25
4
39
887
118
48
33
20
5
1
2
9
51
5
20
6
O d
zx
1
28 | 31
216  128
688
87
223
107
62
25
66
117
8,327
3,011
2,648
1,196
551
223
369
10
319
3,741
404
1,097
730
659
142
559
10
140
1,223
126
235
160
205
68
357
5
67
96
109
25
19
1,176
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. D 64
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 39. — Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-
than-Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1942-51.
Year
Total
Known
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Other than Indians
Known
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Indians
Known
Cases1
Deaths2
1942..
1943_.
1944..
1945„
1946-
1947__
1948„
1949-
1950.
1951-
8,511
10,260
11,469
13,116
14,069
15,408
16,812
18,483
19,428
18,709
558
613
517
525
576
536
442
406
313
292
15.2
16.7
22.2
25.0:
24.4
28.7
38.0
45.5
62.1
64.1
7,597
8,914
9,861
11,212
12,254
13,430
14,528
15,738
16,438
15,404
388
405
346
363
369
362
286
295
239
212
I
19.6:1
22.0:1
28.5:1
30.9:1
33.2:1
37.1:1
50.8:1
53.3:1
68.8:1
72.7:1
914
1,346
1,608
1,904
1,815
1,978
2,284
2,745
2,990
3,305
170
208
171
162
207
174
156
111
74
80
5.4
6.5
9.4
11.8
8.8
11.4
14.6
24.7:
40.4
41.3
1 These figures include:   1947, 141 Indians of white status;   1948, 84 Indians of white status;   1949, 93 Indians of
white status;   1950, 160 Indians of white status;   1951, 127 Indians of white status.
2 These figures include deaths of:   1947, 9 Indians of white status;   1948, 12 Indians of white status;   1949, 8 Indians
of white status;   1950, 4 Indians of white status;   1951, 10 Indians of white status.
NOTIFICATIONS OF TUBERCULOSIS
There were 1,688 new cases of tuberculosis this year, compared with 1,699 in 1950.
There was a slight decline in the Indian new cases, there being 356 in 1951 compared
to 383 in 1950. New cases for Chinese and lapanese racial groups showed slight
increases this year.
Table 40.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1947-51
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
43
44
39
27
48
163
78
62
71
94
192
71
125
83
80
1,087
988
1,019
889
852
416
382
298
259
198
168
93
95
69
71
71
74
69
41
56
175
179
210
88
133
201
139
191
120
121
34
35
75
34
17
10
7
1
3
5
56
18
18
15
13
2,616
2,108
2,202
1,699
1,688
Area No. 1 _
Area No. 2 —
Area No. 3	
Area No. 4_
Area No. 5.—
Area No. 6—
Area No. 7 _._.__-.
Area No. 8~
Area No. 9 —
Area No. 10...
Not stated ___
Ex-Province-
Totals- TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 65
Table 41.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1947-51
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
Area No. 1 __   	
34
40
30
27
38
Area No. 2    	
162
78
61
71
94
Area No. 3  _  	
171
58
102
64
67
Area No. 4	
989
913
988
853
816
Area No. 5 	
327
276
219
144
151
Area No. 6	
83
50
41
27
29
Area No. 7        	
30
24
19
18
19
Area No. 8	
50
50
62
35
58
Area No. 9 	
45
36
57
54
36
Area No. 10 _ __ _ _	
16
14
27
15
6
10
3
1
3
5
54
13
17
15
13
Totals —
1,971
1,555
1,624
1,326
1,332
Table 42.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1947-51
19471
19481
19491
19501
195l1
Area No. 1 	
9
1
21
98
89
85
41
125
156
18
2
4
13
75
106
43
50
129
103
21
4
5
9
1
23
31
79
54
50
148
134
48
1
19
36
115
42
23
53
66
19
10
13
Area No. 4 	
36
47
Area No. 6 	
Area No. 7— 	
42
37
75
Area No. 9 —       	
Area No. 10  	
85
11
645
553
578
373
356
1 Includes notifications of:   1947, 21 Indians of white status;   1948, 27 Indians of white status;
white status;   1950, 10 Indians of white status;   1951, 21 Indians of white status.
1949, 34 Indians of
Table 43.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases of Tuberculosis
among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian
Population, and the Indian Population, 1951.
Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Total	
Other-than-Indian	
1.75
1.40
24.94
1.58
1.58
1.04
0.88
12.28
1.33
1.28
13.28
0.93
0.73
8.98
1.72
0.78
9.84
3.09
1.19
17.49
3.34
1.66
15.05
5.86
2.25
18.26
1.20
0.44
21.70
1.46
1.18
13.68 D 66 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 44.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1951
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence
Alive
Dead
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Area No. la    —_	
4
1
3
7
4
3
9
5
4
1
1
23
1
5
3
8
6
29
3
13
5
1
7
21
1
9
7
4
4
1
2
1
3
3
84
2
2
9
17
1
3
1
4
2
1
1
26
3
1
9
2
362
27
1
11
3
8
1
306
1
4
4
4
6
2
3
1
6
3
3
2
2
17
1
8
1
3
4
22
4
11
2
5
18
8
7
3
11
2
8
1
6
4
2
74
2
5
9
5
1
2
2
2
2
1
19
1
19
4
248
23
8
1
6
204
5
1
8
1
7
13
6
6
1
15
8
7
3
3
40
2
13
4
11
10
51
7
24
7
1
12
39
1
17
14
7
15
2
1
10
2
9
2
158
4
7
18
22
2
5
1
6
4
1
3
1
45
4
1
28
6
610
50
1
19
4
14
1
510
6
5
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
7
3
1
2
1
30
1
1
2
26
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
8
8
1
1
Unorganized parts     —
1
1
Area No. 2a          	
Castlegar.   —__  	
Rossland      	
Trail                    —	
Area No. 3a  — — _ _
3
Kelowna   — —	
Vernon     ___   	
1
2
Oliver        	
Osoyoos   — 	
1
Grand Forks     	
1
10
Chilliwack City                      ■
1
3
Delta    _ 	
Hope     —    	
Langley    — __
Maple Ridge   	
Matsqui      	
Mission City          —
2
1
2
1
38
1
1
2
34 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 67
Table 44.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1951—Continued
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence
Alive
Dead
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
56
4
2
1
1
6
3
9
23
7
1
1
12
5
7
4
1
3
2
2
3
1
2
8
6
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
7
1
1
7
3
4
10
9
1
3
2
1
7
2
4
1
2
2
3
2
1
1
1
1
53
1
2
3
3
9
1
2
12
18
2
1
1
1
1
13
3
2
3
2
3
1
1
1
1
7
3
4
6
2
1
3
1
1
3
1
2
6
5
1
4
3
1
10
4
4
2
4
4
6
2
3
1
1
1
109
1
6
5
1
4
15
1
5
21
41
9
2
2
13
5
8
17
4
2
3
5
3
3
3
1
1
10
3
1
6
14
8
2
4
10
4
6
16
14
2
7
5
2
17
6
8
3
6
6
9
4
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
5
Ladysmith __ _ __ ._.	
Nanaimo  ___ _ _ -
1
Oak Bay	
4
Unorganized parts  	
1
1
]
Cumberland.  _ __ 	
1
Kamloops  _ — _,_„
Unorganized parts —  	
1
1
1
Area No. 8b ,  , .,.,	
Area No. 8d ..,,  ___	
Quesnel   — _— __	
Williams Lake _ —	
1
1
Area No. 8e  _	
Area No. 8f	
Area No. 9b   	 D 68
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 44.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1951—Continued
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence
Alive
Dead
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
22
16
6
1
1
3
10
4
6
1
1
4
4
2
32
20
12
1
1
1
1
4
4
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
Terrace 	
Unorganized parts..	
Area No. 10c—- ..—      -
Area No. lOd •	
1
Unorganized parts  __ _	
1
703
549
1,252
49
18
67
10
3
13
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1951
(Indians only.1)
Place of Residence
Alive
Male
Female Total
Dead
Male
Female Total
Area No. la 	
Unorganized parts_.
Area No. lb	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. lc 	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 3a 	
Enderby  -
Vernon 	
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 3b  _.	
Unorganized parts
Area No. 3c 	
Unorganized parts __.
Area No. 4a  _—
Chilliwhack District.
Kent.. 	
Maple Ridge 	
New Westminster	
Sumas	
Surrey-
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 4b 	
North Vancouver City-
Richmond	
Squamish  -—
Vancouver	
West Vancouver	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 5a	
Central Saanich _
Duncan 	
Nanaimo ___	
North Cowichan..
Victoria	
Unorganized parts .
Area No. 5b   	
Unorganized parts _
Area No. 5d	
Unorganized parts_
Area No. 5e	
Unorganized parts .
4
18
3
1
1
13
3
3
1
1
3
3
12
2
1
1
3
1
4
11
1       I
1
1
1
6
1
2
3
3
3
2
2
10
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
21
5
1
1
5
1
8
29
3
1
1
1
1
22
3
3
2
2
4
4
i Includes notifications of 21 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 69
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1951—Continued
(Indians only.1)
Place of Residence
Alive
Male
Female
Total
Male
Dead
Female Total
Area No. 5f__
Alert Bay..
Unorganized parts_
Area No. 6b—_	
Salmon Arm District „
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 6c 	
Kamloops _
Lytton	
Merritt	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 6d 	
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 6e 	
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 6f 	
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 7a 	
Unorganized parts _
Area No. 7b  	
Unorganized parts _
Area No. 8a	
Unorganized parts _
Area No. 8c —_	
Unorganized parts .
Area No. 8d 	
Quesnel—	
Williams Lake	
Area No. 8e 	
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 8f 	
Unorganized parts .
Area No. 8g._	
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 9a  	
Unorganized parts__
Area No. 9b  —	
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 9c  _
Unorganized parts .
Area No. 9d	
Prince Rupert.
Terrace  	
Unorganized parts _
Area No. 9e    	
Unorganized parts _
Area No. 9f	
Unorganized parts _
Area No. 10b	
Unorganized parts .
Area No. 10c 	
Fort St. John  	
Unorganized parts 	
Totals for Province _
1
1
11
11
21
3
1
17
12
12
1
1
4
2
2
6
6
1
1
2
2
18
18
1
1
1
1
7
7
1
1
10
10
5
5
14
14
1
1
2
2
5
5
16
1
1
14
10
10
2
2
2
2
2
161
9
4
5
6
1
5
17
1
8
3
5
11
11
2
2
3
3
26
26
9
9
1
1
14
14
4
1
3
15
15
7
7
23
23
1
1
3
3
16
16
37
4
2
31
22
22
3
3
2
2
6
1
5
326
12
30
1 Includes notifications of 21 Indians of white status.
Table 46.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1942-51
Racial Origin
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
Total 	
1,451
1,688
2,153
2,079
2,373
2,616
2,108
2,202
1,699
1,688
White _____	
1,016
1,163
1,446
1,519
1,973
1,864
1,448
1,491
1,210
1,209
Indian1— —
327
419
558
417
256
645
553
612
383
356
Chinese 	
59
62
108
111
120
81
88
78
86
100
Japanese	
49
44
41
32
24
26
19
21
20
23
l Includes notifications of:   1947, 21 Indians of white status;   1948, 27 Indians of white status;   1949, 34 Indians of
white status;  1950, 10 Indians of white status; 1951, 21 Indians of white status. D 70
department of health and welfare
Chart 13.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1942-51
No. o£ Cases
4000.
^ota^^^
«^S
y
^
«*
V
/
*"^
\
-*
S
'
V
\_
/
\
S*
y
N
• Indian
/
^^^*    •
^
/
y
Cbingg^^
*%
/
N
^^^
•
N
__. «• ^•
* ^^^
^ "^
/
/
"'"-»»
* * *•
^ Japanese
H*
1000
900
700
600
1942        1943        1944        1945
1946        1947
1949        1950 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 71
In the total population the highest percentage of new cases occurred in the 30—39
age-group (17.4 per cent). In this age-group it was also highest for the white population
(21.2 per cent). Among Indians the highest percentage again occurred in the 5-9 age-
group (18.2 per cent), and in the Japanese and Chinese racial groups it was highest in
the 60-69 age-group, 21.7 per cent and 29.0 per cent respectively.
Table 47.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Racial Groups (Including Dead Cases Reported for the First
Time), 1951.
White
Chinese
Jap
anese
Indian*
Total
Age and Sex
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
M
22
25
3.3
4.6
2
3
2.4
16.6
32
22
17.5
12.7
56
50
5.9
F.
6.7
T.
47
3.9
5
5.0
54
15.2
106
6.3
M
11
9
1.6
1.7
2
1
2.4
5.6
1
10.0
35
30
19.1
17.3
48
41
5.1
F.
5.5
T.
20
1.7
3
3.0
1
4.4
65
18.2
89
5.3
M,
8
15
1.2
2.8
1
1
1.2
5.6
1
10.0
20
26
10.9
15.0
29
43
3.1
F.
5.8
T.
23
1.9
2
2.0
1
4.4
46
12.9
72
4.3
15-19 years 	
M.
11
1.6
2
2.4
1
7.7
23
12.6
37
3.9
F.
23
4.2
1
5.6
1
10.0
23
13.3
48
6.5
T.
34
2.8
3
3.0
2
8.6
46
12.9
85
5.0
20-24 years	
M
48
52
7.2
9.6
3
3.7
1
10.0
10
16
5.5
9.3
61
69
6.5
F.
9.3
T.
100
8.3
3
3.0
1
4.4
26
7.3
130
7.7
25-29 years .—	
. M.
43
71
6.5
13.1
4
2
4.9
11.1
1
2
7.7
20.0
10
22
5.5
12.7
58
97
6.1
F.
13.1
T.
114
9.4
6
6.0
3
13.1
32
9.0
155
9.2
30-39 years	
. M.
116
140
17.4
25.8
6
5
7.3
27.7
3
1
23.1
10.0
9
14
4.9
8.1
134
160
14.2
F.
21.5
T.
256
21.2
11
11.0
4
17.4
23
6.5
294
17.4
M.
121
75
18.1
13.8
5
1
6.1
5.6
1
1
7.7
10.0
9
7
4.9
4.0
136
84
14.4
F.
11.3
T.
196
16.2
6
6.0
2
8.6
16
4.5
220
13.0
-M.
115
56
17.3
10.3
17
3
20.8
16.6
1
10.0
18
5
9.8
2.9
150
65
15.9
F.
8.7
T.
171
14.1
20
20.0
1
4.4
23
6.5
215
12.7
M.
108
49
16.2
9.1
28
1
34.2
5.6
4
1
30.7
10.0
4
6
2.2
3.5
144
57
15.2
F.
7.7
T.
157
13.0
29
29.0
5
21.7
10
2.8
201
11.9
70-79 years __ 	
.M.
53
20
7.9
3.7
11
13.4
2
15.4
11
2
6.0
1.2
77
22
8.1
F.
3.0
T.
73
6.0
11
11.0
2
8.6
13
3.6
99
5.9
80 years and over
M.
F.
8
6
1.2
1.1
1
1.2
1
7.7
2
1.1
12
6
1.3
0.8
T.
14
1.2
1
1.0
1
4.4
2
0.6
18
1.1
Not stated  —
M.
F.
3
1
0.5
0.2
3
1
0.3
0.1
T.
_M.
4
0.3
^100.0 ~~
4
0.2
Totals	
667
100.0
82
13
100.0
183
100.0
945
100.0
F.
s
542
100.0
18
100.0
10
100.0
173
100.0
743
100.0
Grand tota
1,209
100.0
100
100.0
23
100.0
356
100.0
1,688
100.0
i Includes notifications of 21 Indians of white status.
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. D 72
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The situation regarding diagnosis of notifications of tuberculosis is substantially
unchanged from that noted last year. However, it is worth noting that there was an
increase in the number of cases diagnosed as primary and the number of cases reported
at death from pulmonary tuberculosis. Among Indians there was a decrease in the cases
diagnosed with far advanced tuberculosis.
Chart 14.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia
by Diagnosis, 1951
INDIANS ONLY
Nor
STA T£0 ■
0.3%
EXCLUDING INDIANS
££A0 MOM-POt-MONAXY'^r-
o.a%
n/££ACUi-OUS
PlEt/fi/SY   /,3% TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 73
Table 48.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia
by Diagnosis, 1951
Diagnosis
Excluding Indians
Number Per Cent
Indians Only
Number
Per Cent
Primary— 	
Minimal 	
Moderately advanced-
Far advanced	
Dead, pulmonary.— 	
Tuberculous pleurisy	
Dead, tuberculous pleurisy..
Non-pulmonary_
Dead, non-pulmonary-
Not stated 	
Total-
93
681
260
103
57
17
95
10
16
1,332
7.0
51.1
19.5
7.7
4.3
1.3
7.1
0.8
1.2
100.0
114
76
51
27
19
21
36
11
1
^56~
32.0
21.4
14.3
7.6
5.3
5.9
10.1
3.1
0.3
100.0 D 74
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1951
(Excluding Indians.)
Diagnosis on Notification
Age-group
7 s
6>
V d
o s
Z£
Pulmonary—
Primary
Minimal
Moderately advanced
Far advanced  	
Far advanced with silicosis
Type not stated —	
Dead1   _  	
Total pulmonary   	
Tuberculous pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion
Dead1   __ _ _ 	
Total tuberculous pleurisy .
Non-pulmonary—■
Meninges 	
Intestines and peritoneum
Vertebral column   —
Bones and joints	
Skin  --   	
Lymphatic system    	
Genito-urinary system
Miliary   — —	
Other respiratory system
Other non-pulmonary   —
Dead1   _ 	
Total non-pulmonary
Total notifications
_M.
F.
_M.
F.
_.M.
F.
..M.
F.
M.
F.
_M.
F.
.M.
F.
-M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
M.
F.
_M.
F.
_M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
..M.
F.
,M.
F.
.M.
F.
_M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
_M.
F.
.M.
F.
.M.
F.
„M.
F.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
20|     12
23 j    10
II	
31
31
6
9| 14
17 j 25
26     39
51
53
104
110
135
245
1
2
22
125
146
271
115
68
183
127
77
204
1|
1
72
39
25
5
17
2
123
48
171
132
60
192
137
47
184
2|
21
140
51
191
661
201
86
1 Dead on notification.
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1.
41
52
363
318
155
105
82
21
15
1
46
11
702
508
1.210
9
8
17
5
3
2
6
7
2
7
7
1
3
8
14
16
8
1
1
1
3
3
7
54
105
762
570
1,332 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1951
D 75
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1951
(Indians only.1)
Diagnosis on Notification
Age-group
A>
cs
ON  £
7 rt
■* 8
CNr*
2 £
T3
■o
>
So
ZSi
*_£!      s
Pulmonary—
Primary
Minimal
Moderately advanced
Far advanced 	
Far advanced with silicosis
Type not stated „ 	
Dead2 ._	
Total pulmonary
Tuberculous pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion-
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion.
Dead3 _    	
Total tuberculous pleurisy-	
Non-pulmonary—
Meninges 	
Intestines and peritoneum
Vertebral column __ —
Bones and joints  	
Skin  	
Lymphatic system
Genito-urinary system
Miliary _	
Other respiratory system
Other non-pulmonary 	
Dead 2   	
Total non-pulmonary
Total notifications
-M.
F.
-M.
F.
-M.
F.
..M.
F.
_M.
F.
...M.
F.
-M.
F.
-M.
F.
T.
-M.
F.
__M.
F.
__M.
F.
_M.
F.
T.
-M.
F.
__M.
F.
_.M.
F.
.M.
F.
„M.
F.
-M.
F.
__M.
F.
_.M.
F.
__M.
F.
„M.
F.
-M.
F.
..M.
F.
T.
..M.
F.
T.
18|    25|
14|    26|
 I I
H I
21 1
-I- I-
■I  -
31      3|.
II      1|-
23|    30|    11
16|    27|    24
39|    57|    35
31 ■
31-
71
6|
41
5|
2|
3f
I        I        I
I        I        I
I        I        1
_|—|.—|
31
5|
21
H
21
I 1 1
..| 1.
11
-I - I-
1
18|
181
36|
8 9| 7] 14[ 4
181 121 7| 4 5
261    21[    14|    18|      9
3L
1|-
4|
1|_
H-
-] I-
~2
2
I  1— -I
10|
21-
121
I I
■I      H
-1       11-
H
I I
I
J 1-
-| |-
-1 I—-I-
-I- 1-
-■ I-
-I I-
I       3|      4|
1|
21
3|
2| 1	
31      H _
51      1| I
I I-
-I I-
I        I        1
.| 1-
.1 1.
-I -I-
-1-
-I 1-
.1— ,|.
i!	
i|_—
-| l
-I i|
-|     l
II       3
-I I—I
-I l-
..I-.-I..
31
2|
5
-I- 1-
_l—j—|
. i—i
-i	
i|   i
21 -—
-I |-
-I-
-I—__| 1-
-I I 1-
_|       1|„
-I I-
'I-—I 1-
41-
31
7|
H
51
35| 20|
30[ 26|
65j 461
I
231
23|
461
I
101 9| 9| 18| 4
22| 14| 7| 5[ 6
32| 23| 16| 23) 10
I I I 1
HI
21.
13
I        I
54
60
34
42
26
25
17
10
12
7
_|    144
-I    144
I   288
-I I-
-I I —I -
-1 11
-1 10
-|     21
I I
28
19
47
183
|   173
|   356
1 Includes notifications of 21 Indians of white status.
2 Dead on notification.
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. D 76
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis
and Year of Arrival in British Columbia, 1951
(Excluding Indians.)
Diagnosis on Notification
Prior
to
1939
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
Not
Stated
Total
Primary    	
Minimal 	
11
264
106
54
6
3
4
34
26
1
5
6
1
1
1
....
1
8
3
1
1
2
7
5
1
1
4
3
11
7
3
-
1
1
-
1
3
7
3
1
2
1
4
15
4
1
2
1
1
9
7
__
1
—
3
4
19
4
4
6
8
17
9
4
1
4
5
24
12
1
5
10
24
9
3
1
3
3
26
15
4
2
7
2
3
44
22
10
-
-
2
-
34
201
48
16
3
9
1
20
30
93
681
260
103
Far advanced with silicosis	
16
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion	
Tuberculous pleurisy without
effusion 	
Other tuberculosis of respira-
16
1
4
93
Dead	
65
Totals	
508
17
14
20
27
17
27
23
37
43
47
50
59
81
362
1,332
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1.
Table 52.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
in British Columbia, 1947-51
Total
Other than Indians
Indians
Year
New
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
New
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
New
Cases1
Deaths2
Ratio
1947                              	
2,560
2,090
2,184
1,699
1,688
536
442
406
313
292
4.8
4.7
5.4
5.4
5.8
1
1
1
1
1
1,917
1,542
1,607
1,326
1,332
362
5.3:1
643
548
577
373
356
174
156
111
74
80
3.7
3.5
5.2
5.0
4.5
1
1948                             	
286      1    5.4:1
1
1949____   	
1950_ 	
1951   _
295
239
212
4.1:1
5.5:1
6.3:1
1
1
1
i Includes notifications of: 1947, 21 Indians of white status; 1948, 27 Indians of white status; 1949, 34 Indians of
white status;  1950, 10 Indians of white status;  1951, 21 Indians of white status.
2 Includes deaths of: 1947, 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 7 Indians of white
status; 1950, 4 Indians of white status; 1951, 10 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
TUBERCULOSIS MORTALITY
D 77
Table 53.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1947-51
Total Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality—
1947-   ___.
9
22
30
249
65
35
18
56
35
17
536
1948 _ 	
9
10
20
184
72
30
12
58
33
14
442
1949___ _ _	
2
11
24
207
61
20
12
40
19
10
406
1950 	
4
11
13
162
44
18
4
33
18
6
313i
1951    	
3
9
10
138
42
12
10
30
23
11
2882
Mortality rate per 100,000 popula
tion—
1947    ___.
35.6
41.3
42.3
41.9
34.6
100.1
123.1
185.0
159.6
153.6
51.3
1948-	
37.0
18.9
30.3
29.1
38.5
74.9
85.9
183.3
158.4
107.8
40.9
1949 ___   —
8.3
20.4
33.0
31.7
32.5
52.9
81.7
122.9
86.7
75.4
36.4
1950 _  	
16.2
19.9
17.5
24.3
22.8
46.5
26.6
99.3
80.3
44.3
27.5
1951  _	
10.9
15.0
12.9
21.3
19.5
28.7
54.8
74.5
110.3
76.4
24.8
1 Excludes death of 1 ex-Province resident.
2 Excludes deaths of 3 ex-Province residents and 1 area-not-stated resident.
1950 figures subject to revision; preliminary figures for 1951.
Table 54.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area,
1947-51.
Other-than-Indian Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality—
1947 _  	
1948 	
6
7
1
3
2
24.1
29.3
4.2
12.4
7.4
22
9
11
11
9
41.4
17.0
20.4
20.0
15.0
21
15
12
12
8
30.1
23.1
16.8
16.4
10.5
229
174
196
160
129
38.8
27.7
30.2
24.1
20.0
49
51
40
32
33
26.8
28.0
21.7
17.0
15.8
13
11
13
5
7
42.4
30.9
38.9
14.6
18.9
2
4
1
5
16.5
31.3
7.6
31.7
9
7
6
9
6
34.8
25.9
21.7
31.8
17.2
5
7
6
5
8
30.7
46.8
37.6
30.7
50.8
8
3
6
1
1
77.3
24.5
48.2
7.8
7.2
362
286
1949                            	
295
1950 _____  	
1951   	
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1947  —
2391
208 2
35.6
1948                            	
27.1
1949
27.2
1950 ._            	
21.5
1951 	
18.4
i Excludes death of 1 ex-Province resident.
2 Excludes deaths of 3 ex-Province residents and 1 area-not-stated resident.
1950 figures subject to revision; preliminary figures for 1951. D 78
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 55.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1947-51
Indian Population
Area
1
Mortality—
19471  _	
19481  _ __ 	
19491 - ____	
19501  - __._-.
19511. _ _ _ __.
Mortality rate per 100,000 popula
tion—
1947 __ _ 	
1948 ___ -  	
1949— ___	
1950 _	
1951          _    	
835.7
540.5
266.7
245.1
228.3
Area
2
1315.7
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
9
5
12
3
2
797.2
426.6
| 944.9
| 244.3
1  175.0
20
10
11
2
9
536.4
275.3
301.8
54.0
302.2
16
21
21
12
9
320.3
405.9
400.8
228.4
157.4
22
19
7
13
5
508.1
| 428.1
I 157.3
j 286.7
I  105.9
Area
7
18
10
Area
47
51
34
Area
9
Ar<*a
10
Total
3
24
5
24
1010.1
1062.6
541.7
1092.7
422.2
702.5
155.0
484.8
216.5
440.9
30
26
13
13
15
531.6
443.4
217.8
212.5
294.1
9
11
4
3
10
1262.3
1547.1
490.8
380.7
1801.8
174
156
111
1 74
| 80
644.4
557.1
388.4
1 255.2
j 280.7
i Includes deaths of:   1947, 9 Indians of white status;   1948, 12 Indians of white status;   1949, 8 Indians of white
status;  1950, 4 Indians of white status;  1951, 10 Indians of white status.
1950 figures subject to revision; preliminary figures for 1951.
Table 56.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1951
(Excluding Indians.)
Source: Death registrations, 1951 (preliminary figures).
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
16
76
71
21
2
2
3
2
2
1
1
3
2
1
2
1
1
9
1
1
"     1
2
1
1
1
1
28
i
26
1
6
2
2
1
1
1
1
7
2
3
1
1
7
4
1
2
1
1
25
1
1
3
1
3
3
2
4
1
5
104
97
27
2
2
3
Area No. 5a—Continued
Victoria  __	
11
3
2
1
1
3
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
5
4
1
1
1
1
6
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
3
Cranbrook-— — _ —
17
3
Revelstoke	
Area No. 5c	
3
2
1
Area No. 5d—	
Cumberland  _	
3
Creston ■   —	
1
2
Area No. 6a —	
1
1
Area No. 6b 	
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
Harrison Hot Springs _	
Langley - -
Area No. 7c _ _	
4
2
Westview ,. _	
1
1
3
Prince George  _  	
2
Surrey 	
1
Area No. 8d  -
3
Area No. 4b _	
Quesnel __ _	
2
1
Area No. 9d _	
8
7
Richmond -	
1
Area No. lOd   ..___ _	
1
1
1
Area No. 5a _  	
Duncan	
Nanaimo -	
150
59
209
2
1
3 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 79
Table 57.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1951
(Indians only.1)
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Area No. lb 	
Unorganized parts __	
Area No. 3a _	
1
1
5
1
1
3
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
I
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
6
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
6
6
1
1
2
2
4
4
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
Area No. 8c	
2
2
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
2
2
1
1
3
3
1
1
4
4
2
1
1
8
8
1
1
1
5
1
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
3
6
6
Area No. 8d	
Quesnel	
3
1
1
1
11
Maple Ridge	
11
Area No. 8f          	
1
Area No. 4b_ 	
B urns Lake .	
1
2
2
Area No. 9b	
1
1
Area No. 9c	
1
1
Area No. 9d	
9
1
Unorganized parts	
8
Area No. 9e	
4
4
Area No. 10a	
2
2
Area No. 7a 	
Area No. 10b	
1
1
Area No. 10c 	
6
6
Area No. lOd        _
1
1
Area No. 8a  	
39
41
80
i Includes 10 Indians of white status.
Source: Death registrations, 1951 (preliminary figures). D 80
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-group, 1951
Excluding Indians
Age-group
*. Y* rt
O.SC
. Q, u
CB g|l
HS
■ c c ^
Hi So.
« 8"
O in 0]
ffl S-S
•On
HtnS
R cfl
►Jen
■sq
£S
o u c
m n
s ^
P35 £J
HO
aw
h'00
~ rt*_i
Under 1 year..
1— 4 years ___.
5- 9 years _„_
10-14 years —
15-19 years	
20-24 years —
25-29 years —
30-39 years —
40-49 years	
50-59 years —
60-69 years
70-79 years
80 years and over	
Totals	
1
3
12
10
37
26
29
57
30
4
2
10
9
34
26
26
52
28
4
212
192
Indians Only1
Under 1 year	
1-4 years	
5- 9 years	
10-14 years	
15-19 years —
20-24 years	
25-29 years _ 	
30-39 years	
40-49 years	
50-59 years	
60-69 years-	
70-79 years	
80 years and over
Not stated —	
Totals ...
5
11
6
5
15
10
4
3
5
5
3
5
2
1
80
1
4
3
4
13
9
4
3
3
3
2
5
2
56
1 Includes deaths of 10 Indians of white status.
Source: Death registrations, 1951 (preliminary figures). TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 81
A further decline in tuberculosis mortality occurred in British Columbia during
1951. The combined death rate for the total population for 1951 was 25.1, as compared
with 27.5 in 1950. In the white population the death rate declined from 21.6 in 1950 to
18.7 in 1951, while for Indians the death rate increased from 255.2 in 1950 to 280.7 in
1951. The death rate for the other-than-Indian population, excluding Chinese and
lapanese, declined from 19.2 in 1950 to 15.9 in 1951.
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1942-51.
Total Province
Indians
Excluding Indians
Year
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
1942 __
1943_	
1944           	
558
613
517
525
576
536
442
406
313
292
870,000
900,000
932,000
949,000
1,003,000
1,044,000
1,082,000
1,114,000
1,138,000
1,165,210
64.1
68.1
55.5
55.3
57.4
51.3
40.9
36.4
27.5
25.1
170
208
169
173
207
1741
1561
llU
741
801
24,080
24,522
25,139
25,758
26,400
27,000
28,000
28,500
29,000
28,500
705.9
848.2
672.2
671.6
784.1
644.4
557.1
389.5
255.2
280.7
388
405
348
352
369
362
286
845,920
875,478
906,861
923,242
976,600
1,017,000
1.054.000
45.9
46.3
38.4
1945	
1946 	
1947 	
1948	
38.1
37.8
35.6
27.1
1949—        	
295     1   1.085.500
27.2
1950                        	
239
212
1,109,000
1,136,710
21.6
1951	
18.7
Chinese
■    Japanese
Excluding Indians and
Orientals
Year
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
1942 _. 	
44
36
41
40
44
40
33
22
24
31
17,767
16,915
16,063
15,848
15,600
15,400
15,200
14,900
15.000
15,000
247.6
212.8
255.2
252.4
282.1
259.7
217.1
147.7
160.0
206.7
24
24
10
16
13
12
8
5
6
4
19,100
16,103
15,610
14,695
7,000
7,000
7,000
7,500
8,000
8,000
125.6
149.0
64.1
108.9
185.7
171.4
114.3
66.7
75.0
50.0
320
345
297
296
312
310
245
268
209
177
809,053
842,460
875,188
892,699
954,000
994,600
1,031,800
1,063,100
1,086,000
1,113,710
39.6
1943..            	
41.0
1944   	
1945 	
1946  	
1947 _
33.9
33.2
32.7
31.2
1948 	
1949  —
1950  	
1951  	
23.8
25.2
19.2
15.9
1 Includes deaths of: 1947, 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 8 Indians of white
status;  1950, 4 Indians of white status;  1951, 10 Indians of white status.
Note.—"Indian deaths" includes all deaths of persons of Indian racial origin, whether they were Indians under the
meaning of the "Indian Act" or not, except in 1943 to 1951 deaths, where the term applies only to deaths of Indians
under the meaning of the "Indian Act."
Source: Mortality—Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1942 to 1950, inclusive (1951 death registrations preliminary
only).
Estimated population (1941 and 1951 census figures): Federal Bureau of Statistics estimates of total population for
intervening years.   Division of Vital Statistics estimates of Indian, Chinese, and Japanese populations. D 82
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 15.—Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals, 1942-51.
RATE
1,000
900
J^
*^
<*
Chinese
.^
^-*
>S
\
i
**
y
V
\
/
/
/
*■«■
\
\
\
\
\
\
\_
	
•
•
•
\
/
\
\
/
>
V
4
V
\
/
\
\
v^    \
/
\
*r
\
\
"•"•^taj
\
\
	
*
s*^
- — -__«.
Excluding Inch
and Orientals
ins       ^^^* m
Excluding
.Indians
V
^ » *
**.w
N
>
800
700
100
90
,1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1946 1949
1950 1951 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 83
The percentage of other-than-Indian deaths occurring in tuberculosis institutions
showed a slight increase over last year, increasing from 33.1 per cent in 1950 to 39.2 per
cent in 1951. Deaths during 1951 occurring in mental institutions, general hospitals, and
in homes decreased slightly from the 1950 figures. Among Indians the percentage of
deaths in hospitals increased from 20.3 per cent in 1950 to 22.5 per cent in 1951, while
deaths in homes increased from 27.5'per cent in 1950 to 30.0 per cent in 1951. There
was a slight decrease in deaths during 1951 in tuberculosis institutions from the 1950
percentages.
Chart 16.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population and
the Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1951
INDIANS ONLY D 84
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 60.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1947-51
Year
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
1947 	
1948  	
1949	
27
17
17
10
11
10
12
9
6
5
7
5
5
2
2
16
11
12
5
7
21
21
13
8
8
27
15
6
8
6
38
29
25
17
18
45
42
34
21
20
50
52
45
30
30
62
43
56
49
56
26
27
24
28
24
3
6
7
1950 	
1951  __.._	
5
3
1950 figures subject to revision; preliminary figures for 1951.
Source: Annual Reports of Vital Statistics.
Table 61.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of
British Columbia by Age-groups, 1947-51
Year
0-4
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
80 and
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Over
1947  	
21
9
11
26
31
25
37
19
7
7
9
2
1948.. 	
12
12
8
17
22
18
25
16
13
13
4
2
1949 —
11
5
8
8
16
20
36
15
19
11
4
1950 	
13
6
2
6
11
14
21
23
11
13
1
3
1951 - 	
8
1
4
11
14
8
22
11
4
4
11
3
1950 figures subject to revision; 1951 figures preliminary only.
Source: Annual Reports of Vital Statistics.
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1947-51
Year
0-4
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-39
40-49
50-59
60-69
70-79
80 and
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Years
Over
1947 _. 	
48
19
18
42
52
52
75
64
57
69
35
5
1948   _
29
24
13
28
43
33
54
58
65
56
31
8
1949 	
28
14
13
20
29
26
61
49
64
67
28
7
1950   	
23
12
4
11
19
22
38
44
41
62
29
8
1951.   	
19
6
6
18
22
14
40
31
34
60
35
6
1950 figures subject to revision; 1951 figures preliminary only.
Source: Annual Reports of Vital Statistics. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 85
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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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< TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1951
D 87
Table 65.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by
Length of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1951
Length of Residence in British Columbia
Place of Death
Cfl
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5
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::::
::::
1
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10
24
6
5
2
2
20
33
Totals  , _
i
___.
1
2
4
3
3
132
48
18
212
Source: Death registrations, 1951.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952
395-552-5599 

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