Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1951 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1953

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0347416.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0347416.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0347416-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0347416-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0347416-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0347416-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0347416-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0347416-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0347416-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0347416.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1951
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDurmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1951
is herewith respectfully submitted.
LYLE WICKS,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
August, 1952. The Honourable Lyle Wicks,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Thirty-fourth Annual Report on the
work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1951.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
WILLIAM SANDS,
Deputy Minister of Labour.
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., August, 1952. DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
OFFICIALS,  1951
Honourable J. H. Cates, Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Miss M. Kennedy, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Iames Thomson, Deputy Minister of Labour, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
B. W. Dysart, Chief Administrative Officer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
R. D. Lemmax, Chief Factory Inspector, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Hamilton Crisford, Director of Apprenticeship, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
B. H. E. Goult, Chief Executive Officer, Conciliation Branch, Labour Relations Board,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
BRANCH OFFICES
411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
570 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
515 Columbia Street, Kamloops, B.C.
17 Bastion Street, Nanaimo, B.C.
P.O. Box 90, Prince George, B.C.
Burns Block, Nelson, B.C.
Capital News Building, Kelowna, B.C.
Court-house, Smithers, B.C.
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
(Headquarters:   Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
James Thomson, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Mrs. Rex Eaton, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
H. Douglas, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
G. A. Little, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
C. J. McDowell, Member, Victoria, B.C.
C. R. Margison, Secretary, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD
(Headquarters:   Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.)
D'Arcy J. Baldwin, Chairman, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Col. M. F. Macintosh, Member, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
G. Wilkinson, Member, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
H. Strange, Member, 570 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
F. W. Smelts, Member, 570 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
E. A. Jamieson, Secretary, 570 Seymour Street, Vancouver 2, B.C.
PROVINCIAL APPRENTICESHIP COMMITTEE
(Headquarters:   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
James Thomson, Member, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
H. Douglas, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
James Walker, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
John Tucker, Member, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Hamilton Crisford, Secretary, 411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.
TRADE-SCHOOL REGULATIONS OFFICERS
(Headquarters:   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver 3, B.C.)
Mrs. Rex Eaton Hamilton Crisford
PROVINCIAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS
George Bruce, Chairman, 846 Fourteenth Avenue East, Vancouver 10, B.C.
Chief William Scow, Member, Alert Bay, B.C.
Ernest Brewer, Member, Vernon, B.C.
Edward Bolton, Member, Port Essington, B.C.
Capt. Charles W. Cates, Member, 266 Fourth Street West, North Vancouver, B.C.
L. P. Guichon, Member, Quilchena, B.C.
T. R. Kelly, Secretary, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
RENTALS CONTROL OFFICE
(Headquarters:  779 Burrard Street, Vancouver 1, B.C.)
Stuart DeVitt, Rentals Officer.  SUMMARY OF CONTENTS
List of Acts Affecting Labour	
Report of Deputy Minister	
Statistics of Trades and Industries	
Employers'Returns	
Payroll	
Previous Provincial Payrolls	
Comparison of Payrolls	
Industrial Divisions	
Census Divisions	
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries	
Clerical Workers' Average Weekly Earnings-
Industrial Wage	
Firms with Large Payrolls	
Employment	
Statistical Tables	
Summary of All Tables	
"Hours of Work Act"	
Average Weekly Hours	
Statistics of Civic and Municipal Workers	
Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour-
Workmen's Compensation Act Amendment Act, 1952 "_.
Board of Industrial Relations	
Meetings and Delegations	
Orders and Regulations Made during 1951	
Statistics Covering Women and Girl Employees-
Summary of All Occupations-
Comparison of 1951 Earnings to Legal Minimum-
Statistical Summary—Hospital-workers (Female)	
Statistics for Male Employees	
Inspections and Wage Adjustments	
Court Cases	
Special Licences	
Conclusion	
Summary of Orders-
General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946).
List of Orders in Effect	
Page
Inside front cover
  9
  10
  10
  10
  10
  11
  12
  13
  15
  15
  16
  19
  19
  25
  38
  39
  40
  41
  43
  43
  44
  44
  45
  46
  51
  52
  52
  53
  55
  55
  57
  57
  58
  94
  94
Hours of Work Regulations  96
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act"—Report of Labour Relations Board
(British Columbia)  103
Table I.—Summary of Cases Dealt With  105
Table II.—Conciliation  106
Table III.—Boards of Conciliation, 1951  120
Table IV.—Summary of Disputes Commencing in 1951  151
Table V.—Analysis of Disputes in British Columbia, 1935-51  153
Chart Showing Percentage of Total Working-time Lost through Industrial
Disputes, 1937-51  154
Table VI.—Analysis of Time-loss by Industry in British Columbia, 1951  155
Legal Proceedings Involving the Labour Relations Board (British Columbia)  155 C 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "-
(British Columbia)—Continued
Summary of Prosecutions for 195L
-Report of Labour Relations Board
Synopsis Comparing Activities of Respective Provincial Labour Relations
Boards and the Canada Labour Relations Board	
Employers' and Employees' (Labour) Organizations	
Table VII.—Number of Labour Organizations Making Returns, etc	
Chart Showing Distribution of Trade-union Membership by Industrial Classifications, 1951	
Organizations of Employees	
Organizations of Employers	
Control of Employment of Children	
Inspection of Factories	
Factory Conditions	
Accident-prevention _
Freight and Passenger Elevators.-
New Elevator Installations	
Elevator Operators' Licences-
Industrial Homework	
Legislation	
Conclusion	
Apprenticeship Branch	
Trade-schools Regulation Branch	
Provincial Advisory Committee on Indian AffairS-
Outline of Operations of Rentals Control Branch _
Page
156
157
157
158
159
160
173
174
175
175
177
178
179
179
179
180
180
181
185
189
193 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1951
This Annual Report for the year 1951, the thirty-fourth in the history of the
Department, presents an outstanding record of progress in the continued approach to
industrial prosperity for British Columbia.
The impact of Canada's industrial and military preparedness programme felt in this
Province is reflected in the increasing development of our strategic resources, and the
further expansion of existing facilities for a greater volume of defence production.
In the struggle to maintain high levels of productivity without inflation, while
assuring fair wages with stability in real earnings, British Columbia continues to make a
full contribution toward the security and progress of the Dominion as a whole.
The steady rise in employment and earnings is pictured in the over-all Provincial
payroll, which was estimated at some $825,000,000 for 1951, as compared with a final
computed estimate of $718,202,028 recorded for 1950.
Hydro developments and heavy construction projects were responsible for increased
payrolls in the construction industry, and in spite of a decrease in the volume of residential
construction, industrial and engineering work increased to create an all-time high in this
section during the year.
With a strong world-wide demand continuing for pulp, paper, and wood products,
the lumber industry operated at a high level of activity in 1951, although some dislocation
in production schedules was caused by the long summer drought bringing enforced
shut-downs and resulting loss of employment in some instances.
Earnings continued to exceed previous levels, with further increases showing in all
twenty-five of the major industrial classifications noted in this Report.
The average weekly industrial wage figure for all male wage-earners included in the
coverage of the survey rose to $58.67, an increase of $6.79 over the preceding year.
All twenty-five of the tables relating to the various industrial classifications showed
increased payroll totals for 1951.
Greatest payroll increase again showed in the lumber industries, up a further
$34,000,000 from the 1950 figure. The construction industry was second in order of
greatest increase in payrolls, recording a gain of $19,500,000, while metal-trades
industries were up over $8,000,000. Ship-building and boat-building, pulp and paper
manufacturing, and food-products manufacturing followed in close succession, with
increases all in excess of $5,000,000. For others in order of increase, see " Comparison
of Payrolls " in Report data.
Industrial employment in the major British Columbia industries continued at record
levels during 1951, with increased totals apparent in seventeen of the twenty-five industrial classifications. Additional employment in heavy construction projects, the lumber
and mining industries, and such industries employing the greater bulk of the labour force
was sufficient to raise the 1951 summary total to further exceed the high mark established
for the peak period during the previous year. The high monthly employment figure for
wage-earners was recorded at 173,837 in September of 1951, as compared with a high of
165,933 noted in the same month of 1950.
Some levelling was noticeable in the downward trend of working-hours, which had,
with the exception of the war years, continued to decline generally during the past
two decades. While further slight decreases were noted in some sections, the longer
working-time reported by those industries employing large numbers of workers in heavy
construction and the completion of defence contracts was responsible for a fractional
increase in the over-all weekly average for 1951. The average weekly working-hours for
all wage-earners was recorded at 42.01 in 1951, advanced slightly from the all-time low
of 41.89 hours noted for an average week during the previous year. C 10 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Continuing in annual review of various factors in our economy, the statistical section
for 1951 presents a detailed picture of the year's progress in the industrial life of this
Province, a further forward step in the quest for new high standards of security, welfare,
and material benefit for the British Columbia worker.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 9,635
Coverage of the survey again increased over the previous year, a total of 9,635 firms
reporting in time for tabulation in the 1951 figures, as compared with 9,509 completing
returns in 1950, an increase of 126.
In dealing with the " number of firms reporting," it is customary to point out that
due to many firms filing returns in more than one industrial classification the above term
should be properly considered as referring to the actual number of reports tabulated.
As the success of the survey is largely dependent on the prompt return of complete
information by the firms reporting, it is gratifying to note that a high measure of
co-operation in this respect on the part of the employer continues to prove of
great assistance to our Department in the completion of this work.
PAYROLL
Representing the industrial payroll for 1951 the total amount of salaries and wages
reported by the 9,635 firms filing returns in time for classification in the tables was
$581,744,635. As this figure is a summarization only of industrial payrolls, it is not to
be considered as the over-all Provincial payroll until further additions have been made
to include other items of labour expenditure not covered in the original survey. The
accumulative total comprising the industrial summary, and the additional totals which
follow, shows an over-all estimated Provincial payroll of $825,000,000 for 1951, an
apparent increase of $106,797,972 over final estimates for 1950:—
Payrolls of 9,635 firms making returns to Department of Labour  _ $581,744,635
Returns received too late to be included in above summary  —          1,265,410
Transcontinental railways (ascertained payroll)  — -   —      39,475,215
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers covered by the survey but not filing
returns, and additional services not included in the tables; namely, Governmental
workers, wholesale and retail firms, and miscellaneous (estimated payroll) __   202,514,740
Total -       $825,000,000
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAYROLLS
Provincial payroll totals since 1928 have been estimated as follows:—
1928  - -  $183,097,781 1940     $188,325,766
1929  192,092,249 1941   239,525,459
1930  167,133,813 1942  321,981,489
1931      131,941,008 1943   394,953,031
1932      102,957,074 1944    388,100,000
1933    99,126,653 1945   383,700,000
1934 _.   113,567,953 1946    _   432,919,727
1935          125,812,140 1947    557,075,508
1936 _   -- —  142,349,591 1948  -— 639,995,979
1937          -  162,654,234 1949  -  671,980,815
1938 -    158,026,375 1950  — 718,202,0281
1939 -     -    _- - 165,683,460 1951  — 825,000,000=
1 1950 total revised since 1950 Report.
2 1951 preliminary total subect to revision.
Preliminary estimates of the over-all Provincial payroll for the current year are based
principally upon the increase or decrease shown in the total amount of labour costs
reported by all industrial firms submitting returns in the annual survey. In addition,
however, consideration is also given to the relative expansion or contraction noted in REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 11
supplementary sections of the total payroll, business and services, not included in the
coverage of the industrial survey.
On the basis of further information not available at the time of publication, the early
estimates are subject to revision from year to year, the revised figures appearing in later
issues of the Annual Report.
A percentage distribution of the industrial payroll by employment appears in the
following table, the segregations representing the proportion of the total amount expended
in the three main classifications of all workers covered by the survey:—
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
Per Cent
8.75
11.37
79.88
Per Cent
8.95
11.85
79.20
Per Cent
9.29
11.85
78.86
Per Cent
9.25
12.01
78.74
Per Cent
9.67
11.58
Wage-earners  	
78.75
Totals      	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
COMPARISON OF PAYROLLS
Continued upswing in living costs throughout 1951 created new demands for higher
wages in British Columbia industries. While prices and production showed a tendency to
level off during the last quarter, the continuous rise in employment and labour income
during the greater portion of the year placed payroll totals at new high levels in all major
industrial groups. All twenty-five of the industrial classifications included in the 1951
survey recorded payrolls substantially increased from the previous year.
Again in first place, and representing the greatest concentration of employment, the
lumber industries' total payroll reached a new high mark, increasing by $34,133,820
above the figure for the previous year. The construction industry was second highest in
order of greatest increase, showing a gain of $19,581,512, followed by metal trades, up
$8,486,367, and the ship-building and boat-building industry with an increase of
$5,821,243; pulp and paper manufacturing increased by $5,458,324, followed by food-
products manufacturing, up $5,412,450, and metal-mining with a gain of $4,332,803;
public utilities advanced by $4,128,572, while smelting and concentrating increased by
$3,867,601; coast shipping was ahead $2,917,914; miscellaneous trades and industries
gained $2,896,394; wood manufacturing (N.E.S.) increased by $2,126,711; cartage,
trucking, and warehousing was up $1,894,897; oil refining and distributing, up
$1,712,918; explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals, up $1,063,633; printing and publishing, $989,797; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers, $573,085; house
furnishings, $406,309; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, $369,958; builders' materials,
$353,099; garment-manufacturing, $272,956; paint-manufacturing, $192,715; jewellery
manufacturing and repair, $117,937; leather- and fur-goods manufacturing, $108,698;
and coal-mining, up $90,870. C 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
1949
1950
1951
Industry
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers	
Builders' materials	
40
125
484
23
138
2,193
38
667
117
132
37
191
103
1,701
1,583
157
628
70
16
160
8
72
5
115
217
$4,295,451.00
7,041,004.00
6,709,663.00
6,335,052.00
18,908,777.00
66,146,621.00
5,999,205.00
34,600,708.00
3,115,608.00
4,278,103.00
818,637.00
5,346,701.00
1,770,608.00
92,774,779.00
39,726,296.00
19,089,959.00
22,288,682.00
7,344,564.00
1,072,026.00
10,632,477.00
14,849,256.00
7,613,057.00
12,012,394.00
27,745,638.00
13,648,529.00
40
132
502
24
130
2,220
36
666
117
136
35
206
106
2,064
1,595
165
632
80
17
173
9
76
6
125
217
$4,509,956.00
7,865,030.00
7,641,555.00
5,827,952.00
20,331,036.00
64,625,768.00
6,013,237.00
35,935,919.00
3,473,225.00
4,328,336.00
808,373.00
5,587,279.00
1,736,657.00
114,216,615.00
46,052,578.00
20,653,111.00
23,175,863.00
8,138,948.00
1,162,516.00
11,471,596.00
16,016,015.00
7,005,757.00
13,325,619.00
29,971,906.00
14,559,205.00
39
125
491
23
132
2,004
36
617
112
132
35
197
99
2,396
1,695
160
668
83
16
179
12
80
5
116
183
$5,083,041.00
8,218,129.00
9,536,452.00
Coal-mining _	
5,918,822.00
23,248,950.00
Construction    	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals	
Food-products manufacturing	
84,207,280.00
7,076,870.00
41,348,369.00
3,746,181.00
House furnishings -	
4,734,645.00
926,310.00
5,957,237.00
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing
Lumber industries 	
1,845,355.00
148,350,435.00
54,538,945.00
Metal-mining  	
24,985,914.00
26,072,257.00
9,851,866.00
1,355,231.00
12,461,393.00
21,474,339.00
12,827,000.00
17,193,220.00
Street-railways, gas,  water, power, tele-
34,100,478.00
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.).	
16,685,916.00
9,020
$434,163,795.00
9,509
$474,434,052.00
9,635
$581,744,635.00
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS
For purposes of localizing and gauging the extent of industrial activity in various
sections of the Province, a segregation has been maintained to record the industrial payroll
totals under three main divisional headings, including Greater Vancouver, Rest of
Province, and Vancouver Island. A percentage breakdown is taken of the total industrial
payroll to show the proportion attributable to each sector. Application of these percentages to the Provincial over-all estimated payroll further shows the amount of total
labour income which may be allotted to each division.
The expansive influence of heavy construction projects in various parts of the
Province resulted in some shifting of the weight of labour force during 1951, the percentage breakdown showing 41.35 per cent of the industrial payroll attributable to the
Greater Vancouver area, compared with 42.93 per cent in 1950, while the percentage
representing the Rest of Province increased relatively from 38.69 per cent to 40.27
per cent in 1951. The Vancouver Island percentage remained unchanged at 18.38 per
cent.
Divisional totals resulting from the application of these percentages to the Provincial
over-all estimated payroll are shown in the following table, together with comparative data
for previous years:—
1947
1948                            1949
19501
19512
Greater Vancouver	
Rest of Province .
Vancouver Island	
$223,777,232.00
219,933,410.00
113,364,866.00
$269,374,308.00
244,286,465.00
126,335,206.00
$294,461,993.00
261,467,735.00
116,051,087.00
$308,324,130.00
277,872,365.00
132,005,533.00
$341,137,500.00
332,227,500.00
151,635,000.00
Totals	
$557,075,508.00
$639,995,979.00
$671,980,815.00
$718,202,028.00
$825,000,000.00
1 1950 total revised since publication of 1950 Report.
2 1951 preliminary total subject to revision. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 13
CENSUS DIVISIONS
While in the preceding section the over-all estimated Provincial payroll is segregated
into three divisional headings to give a general idea of the concentration in each section,
in the table to follow a further break-down of the firms reporting has been made to show
by regional area or census division the amount of industrial payroll (salaries and wages)
actually reported in each of the ten census areas shown on the accompanying map of
British Columbia.
The industrial totals do not of course represent the entire payroll of each census
division, since the industrial survey is not inclusive of such payroll sections as Governmental workers, railways, wholesale and retail firms, financial houses, professional and
service trades. The fluctuation occurring in the industrial totals, however, does reflect the
expansion and development taking place from year to year in each particular portion of
the Province.
In the following table the industrial payroll has been distributed according to the ten
census divisions for the years 1948 to 1951:—
British Columbia Industrial Payrolls by Statistical Areas for the
Comparative Years 1948 to 1951
Regional Area
Total Payrolls (Salaries and Wages)
1948
1949
1950
1951
No. 1 	
No. 2    	
No. 3 —  _	
No. 4 	
No. 5  	
No. 6	
$13,731,856
23,578,250
16,857,531
245,729,208
85,360,435
6,070,725
15,593,568
8,009,315
7,170,882
1,557,047
2,731,389
$14,196,272
25,465,483
17,162,800
268,168,929
69,824,047
6,709,107
13,991,506
7,109,097
7,793,375
2,586,330
1,156,849
$14,730,880
28,152,569
17,986,918
276,660,854
87,321,304
7,793,958
17,053,224
11,492,745
9,749,718
1,352,763
2,139,119
$16,925,795
33,803,674
21,563,865
326,844,763
106,834,119
10,905,394
No. 7      .
22,065,843
No. 8  	
18,808,909
No. 9	
19,560,533
No. 10.  	
Not specified 	
2,140,056
2,291,684
Totals _     . _
$426,390,206
$434,163,795
$474,434,052
$581,744,635 C 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
CENSUS
DIVISION REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS BY INDUSTRIES
C 15
Average weekly earnings for male wage-earners increased substantially in all
twenty-five of the industrial classifications included in the survey for 1951. There were
no decreases.
The weighted average figures representing the average individual earnings for male
wage-earners during one week of peak employment in each industry are shown in the
following table for the years 1944 to 1951:—
Average Weekly Earnings
in Each Industry (Male Wage-earners)
Industry
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
Breweries,   distilleries,   and   aerated-
$34.72
33.17
42.38
35.86
38.47
36.50
35.06
34.42
31.28
44.64
33.05
32.47
41.28
39.07
39.40
37.21
37.99
33.42
39.47
37.71
40.36
36.74
37.29
34.75
$33.73
34.12
42.11
36.54
37.50
40.43
35.62
36.11
31.39
41.38
31.34
31.63
41.24
38.41
39.99
35.31
38.71
33.42
41.63
37.88
39.96
41.19
37.21
34.70
$37.09
37.02
43.53
37.27
39.17
38.87
38.00
36.50
33.27
43.00
33.06
34.72
43.20
37.83
42.31
35.23
39.05
33.31
42.12
43.43
40.28
38.70
39.45
37.88
$41.25
40.50
39.55
45.54
38.84
43.08
44.30
40.09
37.03
35.02
40.90
33.51
32.77
47.28
39.90
47.98
37.41
43.80
35.56
43.70
48.10
47.10
45.55
45.04
39.32
$42.67
44.99
43.50
54.40
40.52
48.23
48.78
44.75
41.40
39.07
45.04
36.50
36.87
49.92
43.65
51.72
40.84
50.38
36.13
47.80
51.25
48.79
52.13
47.67
44.27
$44.67
48.11
46.41
52.68
44.21
50.97
49.33
46.47
43.03
42.41
43.93
41.36
38.75
51.40
45.63
53.51
42.22
53.90
37.21
50.74
54.10
53.37
51.73
51.15
44.07
$46.86
50.90
49.52
54.22
46.43
53.57
51.72
47.17
44.51
41.93
45.71
42.70
40.21
55.49
47.94
56.25
43.95
57.47
43.17
53.18
56.34
52.68
54.29
50.83
48.82
$51.42
Builders' materials	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing1
54.34
55.10
58.86
53.29
Construction  -	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals _
61.57
59.50
53.82
47.49
House furnishings 	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair. .   ..
46.78
54.88
47.57
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing	
44.18
61.89
53.77
Metal-mining   	
Miscellaneous trades and industries
63.58
48.14
63.88
47.31
58.87
Pulp and paper manufacturing 	
63.74
62 51
Smelting and concentrating 	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc  	
63.76
56.88
54.85
1 Previous yearly figures for cartage, trucking, and warehousing included with miscellaneous trades and industries.
The increases in the average weekly earnings for male wage-earners are as follows :-
Increases
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers 	
Builders' materials 	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing	
Coal-mining    	
Coast shipping   	
Construction   	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals .
Food-products manufacturing _ _
Garment-manufacturing   	
House furnishings
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing.
$4.56
3.44
5.58
4.64
6.86
8.00
7.78
6.65
2.98
4.85
9.17
4.87
3.97
Lumber industries .
Metal trades —	
Metal-mining
Miscellaneous trades and industries
Oil refining and distributing 	
Paint-manufacturing   	
Printing and publishing .
Pulp and paper manufacturing _
Ship-building and boat-building
Smelting and concentrating
Street-railways,  gas,  water,  power,  telephones, etc.    	
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)   	
$6.40
5.83
7.33
4.19
6.41
4.14
5.69
7.40
9.83
9.47
6.05
6.03
CLERICAL WORKERS' AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS
Clerical workers shared in the increased earnings generally apparent throughout the
industrial coverage of the survey. Increased average weekly earnings in this section were
noted without exception in all classifications of industry employing this type of worker.
Included in this section are clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, the greater earning
power of this latter group being in some measure responsible for higher averages noted in
some industries normally employing large numbers of skilled sales personnel. C 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
For male employees in clerical occupations the average figure representing weekly
earnings in all industries rose to $59.85 from $52.87 previously reported, while average
weekly earnings for all female clerical workers increased to $37.90, as compared with
$33.55 reported in 1950.
Representative average weekly earnings for clerks, stenographers, and sales-workers
(male and female) in the various industries are shown in the following table for the
comparative years 1950 and 1951:—
Industry
1950
Males
Females
1951
Males
Females
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers.
Builders' materials    	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing ..
Coal-mining. 	
Coast shipping 	
Construction. 	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals...
Food-products manufacturing	
Garment-manufacturing	
House furnishings...
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing. 	
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing_
Lumber industries  	
Metal trades 	
Metal-mining..
Miscellaneous trades and industries..
Oil refining and distributing	
Paint-manufacturing	
Printing and publishing .
Pulp and paper manufacturing...
Ship-building and boat-building..
Smelting and concentrating-
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc...
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)	
All industries-
$54.69
53.18
45.95
52.74
50.61
53.03
59.03
48.25
47.04
49.56
37.55
47.91
49.43
57.43
47.61
61.21
48.25
57.65
49.21
49.96
59.76
55.84
63.06
56.52
57.37
$34.53
32.93
28.65
27.83
35.70
32.02
31.81
32.66
34.83
31.38
28.05
28.72
31.61
35.94
31.86
37.84
32.39
40.72
33.98
32.43
38.01
33.88
37.02
35.46
37.96
$52.87
$33.55
$60.11
56.00
53.44
57.50
56.77
57.78
66.43
54.89
52.23
58.20
43.62
54.29
53.45
65.37
56.35
71.07
52.63
63.87
54.61
57.52
65.36
60.99
71.92
59.97
64.43
$59.85
$37.01
34.43
31.53
31.97
38.05
37.14
37.05
36.59
38.29
35.18
35.61
30.69
32.62
42.66
35.80
47.83
36.25
44.19
38.35
36.48
43.64
37.32
46.18
39.23
41.84
$37.90
INDUSTRIAL WAGE
Prices and living costs continued upward throughout 1951, forcing widespread
adjustments in the general level of wage rates in industry and business.
For workers in all industrial occupations weekly earnings reached the highest peak
yet recorded, the figure representing the average weekly earnings for all male wage-
earners rising to $58.67 in 1951, up $6.79 from the previous high of $51.88 set in 1950.
Average industrial weekly earnings from 1918 to 1951 are as follows:—
1918..
1919..
1920-
1921-
1922..
1923...
1924-
1925-
1926-
1927...
1928-
1929..
1930..
1931_
1932_
1933_
1934._
$27.97
29.11
31.51
27.62
27.29
28.05
28.39
27.82
27.99
28.29
28.96
29.20
28.64
26.17
23.62
22.30
23.57
1935...
1936...
1937...
1938-
1939-
1940..
1941.
1942-
1943...
1944...
1945-
1946-
1947...
1948-
1949-
1950-
1951-
$24.09
26.36
26.64
26.70
26.80
28.11
30.67
35.24
37.19
38.70
38.50
. 39.87
43.49
47.30
49.21
. 51.88
. 58.67 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 17
Showing the trend of average weekly earnings for all male wage-earners, the
following chart is based on the computed average weekly figure for each year 1918
to 1951:—
AVERAGE
WEEKL.
EARNINGS OF MALE
1918 — 1951
WAGE-
EARNERS
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
EARNINGS
YEAR
1918
1919
ma
J92I
1922
1923
[924
1925
1926
192?
1928
1929
1930
193!
1932
[933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1933
J939
1940
194.
19*2
1943
1944
1945
194-
1947
[943
1949
1950
1951
58.00
57.00
56.00
55.00
54.00
53.00
52.00
51.00
50.00
49.00
48.00
47.00
46.00
45.00
44.00
43.00
42.00
41.00
40.00
39.00
38.00
37.00
36.00
35.00
34.00
33.00
32.00
31.00
30.00
29.00
28.00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24.00
23.00
22.00
1
/
/
/
1
1
/
/
/
/
J
1
1
/
/'
/
/
/
/
f"
_./
/
/
/
/
/
/
i\
/
<\
/
/
1
/
/
/
\
—"*N
\
/
•~S
•'"
-•"
N
i
/
'
\
\
/
\
/.
\
v
(1951 figure—$58.67) C  1-
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Weekly
Wages
Percentage
of
Employees
Under   $15
$15 to 20
20 to 25 	
    2.34
.      1.60
.     2.52
25 to 30
30 to 35	
     4.53
  10.32
35 to 40	
     17.94
40 to 45
45 to 50
50 to 55	
   19.05
  13.78
. 11.56
55 to 60
60 to 65
65 to 70	
     5.98
     3.63
     1.92
70 and over	
    4.83
Under
$15	
     1.97
$15 to
20	
     1.20
20 to
25	
     1.93
25 to
30	
     2.70
30 to
35 	
     5.61
35 to
40	
  10.94
40 to
45.   	
  18.89
45 to
50	
  16.62
50 to
55	
  14.03
55 to
60	
     9.33
60 to
65	
     6.74
65 to
70    .
     3.40
70 and over.	
6.64
Under
$15	
     1.59
$15 to
20	
     1.03
20 to
25	
     1.69
25 to
30	
    2.58
30 to
35	
    4.43
35 to
40	
    7.68
40 to
45	
  16.24
45 to
50 	
  19.48
50 to
55	
  13.25
55 to
60	
  10.04
60 to
65	
     9.03
65 to
70	
    4.78
70 and over 	
8.18
Under
$15.	
     1.64
$15 to
20..    	
     0.92
20 to
25	
     1.65
25 to
30	
     2.00
30 to
35	
     3.96
35 to
40	
     5.85
40 to
45	
  10.57
45 to
50	
  14.36
50 to
55   	
  17.98
55 to
60	
  11.87
60 to
65	
     8.88
65 to
70	
     7.43
70 and over	
12.89
Under
$15	
     1.36
$15 to
20	
    0.67
20 to
25	
    0.88
25 to
30	
     1.25
30 to
35	
    2.22
35 to
40 	
     3.56
40 to
45 	
     5.60
45 to
50	
     8.69
50 to
55	
  11.18
55 to
60 —
  14.55
—               —               ro               ro               o*
Ol               o               oi               o               oi               o
J?                    _*                    -.                    _s°                    _5                    s.
co
—i
oo
co
CO
co
cn
i—»
co
o.
i—»
I
■
60 to 65  12.74
65 to 70  _ _    8.86
70 to 75    7.54
75 and over..  20.90
The above bar diagrams show the relative percentages of male wage-earners in the various wage classifications
from 1947 to 1951.
Although for 1951 the classifications were extended to show separately the next higher bracket $70 to $75
weekly, it is significant that the concentration continues to grow in the topmost wage group. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951 C 19
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAYROLLS
A concentration of the labour force in various industries may be noted in the
annual record of industrial firms reporting in the higher payroll brackets.
While the survey of large payrolls is restricted to an industrial coverage, and is
not inclusive of public authorities (Dominion, Provincial, or municipal), wholesale or
retail firms, transcontinental railways, or deep-sea shipping, it does, however, continue
to give a fair indication of the distribution of employment, and the relative growth and
importance of the various industries in the over-all picture of business activity within
this Province.
Industrial firms reporting payrolls in excess of $100,000 continued to increase from
the previous year, a total of 888 being recorded for 1951, as compared with 793
in 1950, an increase of 95.
The greatest number of firms reporting larger payrolls was again noted in the
lumber industry, a total of 251 firms in this classification showing payrolls of over
$100,000 in 1951, this total representing an increase of 34 above the previous year's
figure. In second place, the construction industry recorded 131 firms in the higher
payroll bracket, an increase of 24 over the 1950 total, followed by the metal trades
with 104, increased by 20, and food-products manufacturing with 90, an increase
of 12; miscellaneous trades and industries, with 51, was 1 above the previous year's
total; coast shipping, 32, decreased by 1; metal-mining, 30, an increase of 7; wood-
manufacturing (N.E.S.), 25, a drop of 2; printing and publishing, 22, unchanged;
builders' materials, 19, unchanged; public utilities, 18, a decrease of 2; laundries,
cleaning and dyeing, 15, increased by 2; ship-building and boat-building, 15, off 2;
cartage, trucking, and warehousing, 13, increased by 1; oil refining and distribution, 12,
up 1; breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers, 11, unchanged; pulp and
paper manufacturing, 10, increased by 1; coal-mining, 8, unchanged; garment-
manufacturing, 8, unchanged; house furnishings, 7, unchanged; explosives, fertilizers,
and chemicals, 6, unchanged from the previous year; leather- and fur-goods manufacturing, 4, a decrease of 1; smelting and concentrating, 3; paint-manufacturing, 2;
and jewellery-manufacturing, 1, all unchanged from the previous year.
Of the total 888 firms reporting in the higher payroll group, there were 75
recorded as showing payrolls in excess of $1,000,000, 11 of this group being reported
as over $5,000,000, 5 between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, 4 between $3,000,000
and $4,000,000, 12 between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and 43 between $1,000,000
and $2,000,000.
EMPLOYMENT
Employment levels in 1951 continued to exceed previous high records, the over-all
peak month of September setting a new mark in the upward trend noted during the
past few years. Set-backs, however, occurred during a portion of the year in some
industries greatly affected by the severe drought, although these were generally off-set
by heavy employment during the operating periods. While a high measure of activity
continued in the construction industry, considerable shifting of the labour in this section
was in evidence, with decreasing employment totals in residential construction giving
way to increased activity in the heavier construction projects, industrial expansion, and
governmental contracts.
Variations in the high and low monthly totals of employment in each industry are
noted in the following table, which shows the periods of maximum and minimum
employment during the last two years, together with similar totals for all industries.
Related charts following the table give the respective trends of employment as
reported in the clerical section, wage-earner group, and total employment summaries
for 1951 and previous years. C 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table Showing the Amount or Variation of Employment in Each Industry
in the Last Two Years1
1950
1951
Industry
o    >.
1 s.
-M
•o
°     A
SS 5.
°    A
■a    o
B-ttS
•2°
E S
X      O
■S   3
■°5
go.
%3
Pa
55 E§
§E
ZW
Sdwe
Zw
55 S§
SSwE
§E
ZW
52E§
Js
ZW
Breweries,   distilleries,  and aerated-
water manufacturers 	
Nov	
2,013
Feb	
1,466
Mar.   —
2,045
Nov..
1,504
Builders' materials    .
Sept	
Sept. and
3,225
Jan.
2,276
Aug	
2,687
Dec.
2,437
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing—
Oct —
3,249
Jan	
2,622
Sept,
3,388
Jan	
2,754
Coal-mining   	
Jan	
2,462
Sept.
2,042
Jan.   „
2,098
July	
1,959
Coast shipping    	
Aug	
8,027
Feb	
6,987
Dec	
8,056
Mar	
7,347
Construction ,. 	
Aug	
25,683
Jan	
16,707
Aug	
30,785
Jan	
18,944
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals...
Oct	
2,061
Jan	
1,896
Aug. .. .
2,142
Jan	
1,966
Food-products manufacturing  .
Sept	
20,988
Jan.
11,211
Sept	
21,265
Dec.
11,659
Garment-manufacturing _	
Mar..
1,847
July	
1,558
Mar	
1,914
Dec	
1,575
House furnishings _	
Oct	
2,060
June	
1,701
Feb	
1,931
Dec	
1,607
Jewellery manufacturing and repair.—
Dec	
432
Apr	
366
Nov...	
450
May	
365
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing 	
July
3,359
Feb	
2,964
July	
3,270
Jan.
2,941
Leather- and fur-goods manufacturing
May	
875
Feb	
782
Nov.	
836
Dec	
761
Lumber industries	
Sept.
44,745
Jan __
23,139
Oct	
47,444
Jan	
36,830
Metal trades - ...
Oct	
17,208
Jan	
14,386
July
17,695
Jan	
16,398
Metal-mining.               	
Nov	
6.840
Apr	
6,128
Nov	
7,654
Feb	
6,123
Miscellaneous trades and industries.—
Sept	
10,453
Jan._	
8,000
Sept.
10,012
Feb	
8,039
Oil refining and distributing
Nov	
2,772
Apr	
2,412
Nov	
3,089
Mar	
2,520
436
376
435
Dec	
395
3,760
4,859
3,661
3,828
Jan	
3,715
Pulp and paper manufacturing-    , „	
July.
Jan._... ....
4,374
Aug.
5,675
Jan-
5,114
Ship-building and boat-building	
Apr... .
2,837
Jan	
2,238
Oct	
3,976
Jan	
2,754
Smelting and concentrating	
July	
4.334
Mar	
4,167
Aug	
4,940
Jan	
4,608
Street-railways,   gas,   water,   power,
telephones, etc
July	
12,053
Jan	
11,372
June. .  .
12,603
Feb	
11,877
Oct.   „   .
5,805
5,027
July	
5,784
Dec.     ...
5,188
All industries 	
Sept.
188,058
Jan	
139,402
Sept	
197,725
Jan	
161,931
1 Industrial employment totals include clerical and sales staffs in addition to wage-earners, and are based on the
number of employees reported on the payrolls on the last day of each month or nearest working-date. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951 C 21
Employment of Clerical Workers in Industry, 1950 and 1951*
24,500
24,000
23,500
23,000
22,500
22,000
21,500
21,000
20,500
20,000
19,500
19,000
18,500
18,000
17,500
17,000
1,500
1,000
500
0
(1950
(1950)
1^
* Employment as at the last day of each month.    Figures include clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc., but not
salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff.
January
22,174
February _  22,314
March    22,433
April  22,691
Clerical Workers, 1951
(Male and Female)
May 	
June 	
July 	
August
23,212
23,626
23,969
24,083
September    23,888
October   23,921
November    23,943
December   23,786 C 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
January  „
February
March   __
April   —
AVERAGE MONTHLY NUMBER OF WAGE-EARNERS (Male and Female)
1929-31-32-39-41-43-45-49-50-51	
|jan.    |Fe-.  |Mar.  |Apr.   [May   | June   j July    | Aug.  |sept.  | Oct.   | Nov. | D
105, C
100, C
65. C
60, C
55, C
50. C
45, C
/
~^
^7
/
/
/
y
y
\
\
—  REFERENCE
Employment in —
1929 shown thus
1931
1932
1939
1941
1943
1945
1949
1950
1951
^
vv
.  C
• X •
\
1951
1950
1943
1929
1939
1951
139,757
142,150
145,968
154,700
May
June 	
July
August .
161,596
165,055
167,974
170,215
September
October 	
November
December
173,837
170,642
163,002
148,074 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1951
Total Employment in Industry, 1950 and 1951*
C 23
195,000
190,000
185,000
180,000
175,000
170,000
165,000
160,000
(1951)
(1950)
150,000
145,000
140,000
135,000
130,000
125,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
0
o,
<
staff.
* Employment as at the last day of each month.   Figures do not include salaried officials, executives, or managerial
January  _   161,931
February     164,464
March     168,401
April   — 177,391
Employment, 1951
(Male and Female)
May   184,808
June .- —. 188,681
July   191,943
August   - 194,298
September
197,725
October    194,563
November   186,945
December    171,860 C 24
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Number
Employed
MONTHLY VARIATION IN THE NUMBER OF WAGE-EARNERS,   CLERICAL WORKERS,
AND TOTAL EMPLOYMENT IN INDUSTRY,   1951*
260,
240,
220,
200,
190;
180,
K8;
150,
140,
130,
120,
110,
100,
90,
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
000
80,000
70,000
60,000
50,000
45,000
40,000
35,000
30,000
25,000
20,000
15,000
10,000
lota/ Employment -—
_^_3b^
 -
^T
^^^
"""■^n. Wage Earners
/c
lerical V
barkers
/
fe
a
%
a
I
3
>
O
1-3
.* Employment as at the last day of each month,
officials;  executives,  or managerial staff.
Figures do not include salaried REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 25
CONTENTS OF TABLES
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades
included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries, Distilleries, and Aerated-water Manufacturers.—Also is inclusive of wineries, and comprises firms in or
incidental to the manufacture, bottling, and distribution of
malt liquors, spirits, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and
carbonated water.
No. 2. Builders' Material, Producers of.—Includes manufacturers of brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and
firebrick; also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and
crushed rock.
No. 3. Cartage, Trucking, and Warehousing.—Comprises
firms engaged in the business of freight and baggage hauling,
moving, storage, packing, shipping,  and transfer services.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation
of coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Construction.—Here are grouped building trades,
painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, and sheet-
metal works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-
steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves,
dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing, and automatic
sprinklers. Firms making returns as building contractors,
constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces,
electrical contractors, hardwood- and sanitary-floor layers, and
bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Fertilizers, and Chemicals.—Includes all
firms engaged in the manufacture of these commodities.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacturing of.—This table includes bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries and dairies; fish, fruit, and vegetable canneries; packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces,
coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton
goods, shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies'
outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in
the manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery Manufacturing and Repair.—Includes the
repair, as well as the manufacturing of jewellery, watches, and
optical instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these
industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacturing of.—Comprises manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks,
and leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included
logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine black-
smithing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries, garages, vulcanizing, machine and pattern shops,
galvanizing and electroplating; also manufacturers of handsaws,
nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill machinery, and
repairs to same.
No. 16.  Metal-mining.—Includes  all  metalliferous  mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous enough to
warrant special categories, and others for which separate tables
are not at present maintained. They include manufacturers of
soap, paper boxes, bags, and containers, brooms and brushes,
tents, awnings, and other canvas goods, aircraft and aircraft
parts, motor and aerial transportation, ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil Refining and Distributing.—Includes also the
manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead cor-
roders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing,
lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building and Boat-building.—Comprises both
wooden- and steel-ship building and repairing, also construction
and repair of small craft and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting and Concentrating.—Comprises only firms
engaged in these industries.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Light, Power, Telephones, etc.—This group comprises generating and distribution
of light and power, manufacture of domestic and industrial
gases, operation of street-railways, waterworks, and telephones.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—-
Here are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior
finish, water-proof plywood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden pipes
and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets, coffins, and
undertakers' supplies.
Table No. 1
BREWERIES, DISTILLERIES, AND
AERATED-WATER MANUFACTURERS
Returns Covering 39 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers _
$523,504
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       671,569
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     3,887,968
Total
$5,083,041
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
J anuary 	
1,151
233
187
63
February- „
1,155
490
185
61
1,181
620
180
64
April 	
1,221
395
189
66
May	
1,262
398
188
68
June 	
1,305
370
195
68
July
1,374
382
201
66
August— _	
1,318
388
196
73
September	
1,243
401
192
68
October.	
1,163
534
184
68
November 	
798
454
185
67
December	
1,180
269
193
65
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 —
to $19.99
to 24.99
to 29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99.
to 74.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
7
14
2
18
66
77
71
332
386
262
170
33
28
21
2
4
6
156
203
295
15
2
2
16
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1
2
2
5
2
18
11
21
29
19
15
21
43
3
6
17
23
11
2
1 C 26                                                  DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 2
Table No. 3
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF
CARTAGE, TRUCKING, AND
WAREHOUSING
Returns Covering 125 Firms
Returns Covering 491 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers.. — $1,120,062
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $932,491
1,077,642
6,020,425
Clerks, stenographers,  salesmt
962,438
7,641,523
Total -    $8,218,129
Total          $9,536,452
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
2,137
9
249
144
January
2,331
25
248
150
February	
2,143
9
250
143
February      	
2,380
25
248
153
2,201
8
251
143
2,427
16
248
153
April   	
2,244
10
251
142
April	
2,638
11
250
160
May  ._	
2,219
9
252
143
May
2,735
10
253
180
2 181
9
249
147
2,824
15
252
178
July .  -.
2,243
9
251
151
July ..	
2,911
28
260
185
2,284
9
245
149
2,869
44
264
188
September     .
2,208
10
246
152
September	
2,896
45
268
179
October 	
2,165
9
250
155
October	
2,845
51
265
188
2,145
8
250
157
2,718
48
264
189
December 	
2,028
6
247
156
December
2,561
38
264
183
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $15 00
33
1
2
Under $15.00	
117
1
4
15
$15.00 to $19.99	
14
1
1
3
$15.00 to $19.99	
37
5
1
4
20.00 to   24.99	
25
3
7
20.00 to   24.99 —
32
2
5
13
25.00 to   29.99-
32
1
7
22
25.00 to   29.99	
47
	
4
34
30.00 to   34.99......
46
	
13
44
30.00 to   34.99.    -
84
5
13
67
35.00 to   39.99 —
71
1
15
33
35.00 to   39.99 —
138
42
16
33
40.00 to   44.99 —
228
4
17
16
40.00 to   44.99	
301
22
14
45.00 to   49.99	
501
17
6
45.00 to   49.99.	
353
	
20
6
50.00 to   54.99	
510
36
9
50.00 to   54.99	
534
28
2
55.00 to   59.99.	
340
27
55.00 to   59.99.	
408
	
36
1
60.00 to   64.99 —
225
33
60.00 to   64.99	
561
	
29
2
65.00 to   69.99	
220
28
.
65.00 to   69.99	
307
	
18
70,00 to   74.99
147
	
22
—
70.00 to   74.99	
191
13
75.00 and over
215
	
25
	
75.00 and over	
453
	
22 Table No. 4
REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1951
Table No. 5
C 27
COAL-MINING
Returns Covering 23 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents and managers
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc _.
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) -
Total      	
$364,127
105,243
5,449,452
$5,918,822
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
2,056
1
26
15
February	
2,040
1
26
15
2,062
1
26
15
2,018
25
15
May 	
1,970
25
15
June      -
1,988
25
15
July.   —   .         -
1,917
27
15
2,029
27
15
September.	
2,031
26
15
October ~
1,981
26
15
November 	
1,983
25
15
December	
2,047
25
15
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 —
to $19.99
to 24.99.
to 29.99
to 34.99.
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99.
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
3
2
53
56
568
831
376
63
151
148
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males   i Females
I
COAST SHIPPING
Returns Covering 132 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents and managers..
Clerks,   stenographers,   salesmen,   etc—
$1,870,049
1,472,835
Wage-earners,   (including   piece-workers)     19,906,066
Total
$23,248,950
Employment
Month
January	
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December...
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
7,144
6,825
6,748
6,831
7,263
7,189
7,334
7,319
6,902
7,390
7,018
7,384
Females    Males   I Females
I
71
69
73
78
86
110
144
150
127
96
99
109
373
374
376
381
384
392
399
408
406
402
403
404
146
150
150
154
160
162
172
177
167
161
161
159
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 —.
to $19.99.
to 24.99.
to 29.99
to 34.99.
to 39.99
to 44.99.
to 49.99
to 54.99.
to 59.99
to 64.99.
to 69.99
to 74.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
121
21
42
81
313
1,420
782
1,040
705
840
727
1,227
300
918
2
1
11
12
9
63
41
6
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
5
7
18
12
20
47
60
71
36
34
27
56
4
3
5
6
46
36
34
22
9
2 C 28
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 6
Table No. 7
CONSTRUCTION
EXPLOSIVES, FERTILIZERS, AND
CHEMICALS
Returns Covering 2,004 Firms
Returns Covering 36 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
$523,492
1,637,400
4,915,978
Clerks, stenographers,  salesms
7,372,940
9.479.479
Clerks,  stenographers, salesme
Total   	
  $84,207,280
Total        $7,076,870
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
16,616
103
1,449
776
January	
1,476
37
342
111
February ..    	
17,118
101
1,468
789
February 	
1,481
40
347
107
17,857
21,391
109
1,448
791
1,520
38
347
110
122
1,525
812
1,582
41
345
111
22,925
180
1,565
836
May - 	
1,574
46
398
113
June	
24,464
240
1,621
849
June 	
1,570
42
399
112
July
26,229
263
1,663
862
July     ..   -	
1,573
40
408
112
27,991
226
1,683
885
1,585
43
402
112
26,981
185
1,717
882
1,540
40
398
107
26,319
168
1,741
900
1,499
40
400
105
24,549
142
1,769
910
1,488
46
404
105
December
20,078
127
1,751
907
December. 	
1,494
42
406
101
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $15 00
253
36
46
36
Under $15.00	
8
3
$15.00 to $19.99	
173
30
9
28
$15.00 to $19.99	
14
11
20.00 to   24.99—
250
64
19
46
20.00 to   24.99	
13
3
1
5
25.00 to   29.99.	
336
76
28
92
25.00 to   29.99
25
11
2
10
30.00 to   34.99	
562
21
55
167
30.00 to   34.99	
41
11
7
33
35.00 to   39.99	
654
24
72
207
35.00 to   39.99     ..
74
12
9
28
40.00 to   44.99	
1,896
36
91
162
40.00 to   44.99  . „
77
1
20
20
45.00 to   49.99	
3,050
12
143
87
45.00 to   49.99„
80
21
10
50.00 to   54.99	
3,186
8
269
46
50.00 to   54.99
164
	
15
6
55.00 to   59.99	
3,614
6
177
22
55.00 to   59.99 .    .
216
22
4
60.00 to   64.99..	
3,266
13
168
18
60.00 to   64.99.   .
260
27
	
65.00 to   69.99
3,030
3
144
4
65.00 to   69.99..	
249
40
	
70.00 to   74.99	
2,898
1
106
1
70.00 to   74.99	
183
	
40
	
75.00 and over
10,723
1
437
7
75.00 and over.-
239
	
201
	 Table No. 8
REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
Table No. 9
C 29
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 617 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers,  superintendents,  and managers     $4,607,455
Clerks,  stenographers, salesmen, etc        5,076,386
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)    31,664,528
Total
$41,348,369
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
7,585
7,577
7,886
8,821
9,396
10,319
11,179
11,486
11,208
9,644
8,592
7,446
2,673
2,417
2,538
2,779
3,220
4,409
6,247
7,086
8,100
6,511
4,119
2,317
1,002
1,007
1,010
1,028
1,048
1,079
1,098
1,082
1,073
1,065
1,068
1,058
820
February   .
821
814
816
833
866
July
897
895
September
884
866
851
838
GARMENT-MAKING
Returns Covering 112 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers..      $548,849
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen,  etc       412,466
Wage-earners (including- piece-workers)    2,784,866
Total   $3,746,181
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
386
1,299
50
58
February	
389
1,340
55
63
March	
395
1,400
53
66
April.— —	
384
1,407
50
65
May 	
361
1,320
53
66
378
1,168
1,118
1,222
54
64
371
54
64
373
52
62
382
53
63
390
55
63
378
1,092
1,080
55
63
December	
378
54
63
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $15.00
465
747
3
13
Under $15.00 	
13
1
1
$15.00 to $19.99
171
405
5
9
$15.00 to $19.99
6
123
2
1
20.00 to   24.99 ....
198
1,217
5
47
20.00 to   24.99 _
20
291
1
1
25.00 to   29.99	
220
1,261
15
135
25.00 to   29.99 —
35
353
1
11
30.00 to   34.99 „
360
1,669
29
194
30.00 to   34.99	
33
280
2
14
35.00 to   39.99 „
567
1,984
69
215
35.00 to   39.99	
31
235
2
20
40.00 to   44.99	
1,263
1,263
109
166
40.00 to   44.99 -
60
135
6
11
45.00 to   49.99
1,747
817
186
86
45.00 to   49.99 —
54
62
4
4
50.00 to   54.99	
2,063
498
176
36
50.00 to   54.99	
56
29
8
3
55.00 to   59.99 —
1,820
365
121
13
55.00 to   59.99	
38
26
3
3
60.00 to   64.99-	
1,280
178
109
8
60.00 to   64.99	
33
22
7
1
65.00 to   69.99	
938
128
75
65.00 to   69.99	
22
10
3
70.00 to   74.99	
671
113
65
	
70.00 to   74.99-	
21
9
2
75.00 and over
1,921
111
132
1
75.00 and over
31
24
6
2 C 30
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 10
HOUSE FURNISHINGS—
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 132 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents and managers      $716,912
Clerks,  stenographers, salesmen, etc       464,756
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)     3,552,977
Total
$4,734,645
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
1,275
474
63
102
February 	
1,300
467
63
101
1,261
470
61
104
April-	
1,238
463
58
105
May.  	
1,181
441
57
99
June.       —   .
1,159
410
59
101
July _ ..
1,140
403
60
101
1,117
402
58
99
September	
1,128
399
58
99
October  _
1,090
393
60
95
November	
1,133
384
56
91
December  '—
1,077
381
57
92
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 _
to $19.99
to 24.99
to 29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
23
14
30
49
78
131
309
280
204
121
125
42
13
27
6
6
65
103
193
93
61
16
8
5
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
6
5
14
4
2
5
21
26
23
21
6
3
2
2
Table No. 11
JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING AND
REPAIR
Returns Covering 35 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers.
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)..
Total
$88,203
139,520
698,587
$926,310
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
193
114
12
65
195
109
12
68
192
107
12
65
April	
191
104
12
62
May   	
189
104
11
61
.Til-IB          .   _	
184
112
11
62
July  	
186
128
11
61
August. 	
188
122
9
61
September	
187
119
10
65
October	
193
124
9
69
November	
203
156
10
81
December	
198
154
10
74
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 —
to $19.99
to 24.99
to 29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
3
4
6
10
11
8
15
25
17
24
23
22
5
47
5
5
21
45
36
45
13
12
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
8
3
17
15
21
8
6
3
1
2
1
1 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 31
Table No. 12
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING
Returns Covering 197 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers,  superintendents,  and managers      $517,847
Clerks,  stenographers,  salesmen,  etc        688,371
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)     4,751,019
Total
$5,957,237
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
787
796
800
808
810
817
823
807
796
802
789
778
1,836
1,832
1,882
1,947
1,976
2,049
2,115
2,048
2,027
2,004
1,951
1,903
116
115
118
119
117
121
116
122
118
121
120
119
202
201
202
211
May.. _	
June	
July    .
210
213
216
August	
September	
October. .   	
November—	
218
212
220
222
218
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 —
to $19.99
to 24.99
to 29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
17
15
19
32
50
95
115
172
126
73
48
47
18
39
107
126
413
545
673
278
111
42
14
5
10
6
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
3
1
1
2
10
10
19
19
21
12
10
9
11
32
70
60
34
10
3
2
3
Table No. 13
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 99 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers -
Clerks, stenographers,  salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)..
Total   	
$266,312
367,611
1,211,432
$1,845,355
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
368
367
368
376
370
381
360
353
375
374
377
329
302
300
298
307
312
306
299
302
314
321
318
295
79
81
82
83
83
80
80
79
78
77
80
78
61
February	
60
63
April	
May 	
June 	
July 	
61
60
62
60
August _
62
60
October 	
November	
December	
62
61
59
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males    Females
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 -
to $19.99
to 24.99
to 29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99.
and over.
13
22
45
45
60
83
51
54
18
6
2
4
24
25
52
79
86
53
32
11
2
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
9
5
4
7
14
9
13
10
2
4
4
2
5
8
21
15
7
1
1 C 32
Table No. 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 15
LUMBER INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 2,396 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers.    $11,626,618
Clerks,  stenographers, salesmen,  etc        6,176,398
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     130,547,419
Total
$148,350,435
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
34,657
36,729
38,233
40,838
43,380
41,633
39,093
38,282
43,327
44,906
43,306
36,539
348
374
388
434
472
511
507
490
495
543
504
376
1,220
1,220
1,239
1,260
1,283
1,295
1,309
1,320
1,325
1,313
1,319
1,301
605
February   	
615
623
642
647
654
July	
672
672
681
682
684
679
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00	
to $19.99	
to   24.99	
to   29.99.	
to   34.99.—
to   39.99..	
to   44.99	
to   49.99	
to   54.99	
to   59.99	
to   64.99	
to   69.99	
to   74.99	
and over	
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females    Males    Females
347
194
246
297
459
821
1,449
3,323
5,427
9,752
8,593
4,585
4,144
13,348
22
12
29
39
72
140
98
44
72
82
32
27
9
29
9
4
9
6
18
20
46
73
73
90
113
108
94
611
25
9
20
51
96
134
143
98
59
34
30
11
10
37
METAL TRADES
Returns Covering 1,695 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $9,035,082
Clerks, stenographers,  salesmen, etc      9,851,661
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     35,652,202
Total
$54,538,945
Employment
Month
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December.-
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
12,358
12,538
12,700
12,973
13,218
13,393
13,462
13,360
13,094
12,940
13,037
12,737
Females
Males
426
2,101
453
2,130
434
2,135
472
2,129
483
2,157
488
2,159
502
2,143
495
2,141
486
2,126
471
2,146
494
2,138
485
2,083
1,513
1,525
1,548
1,548
1,553
1,588
1,588
1,573
1,564
1,587
1,590
1,540
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00—
to $19.99.
to 24.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
247
172
283
432
697
875
1,440
1,563
1,960
1,700
2,141
1,301
1,116
1,468
63
82
132
97
65
65
39
18
4
5
4
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
20
5
13
50
93
102
183
258
257
195
210
139
108
437
63
30
72
200
414
368
275
117
62
24
17
4
5
1 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 33
Table No. 16
METAL-MINING
Returns Covering 160 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers.     $1,571,938
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      2,661,720
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)    20,752,256
Total
$24,985,914
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
5,532
70
510
84
February 	
5,436
74
528
85
March	
5,475
75
558
88
April.	
5,436
76
560
92
May— 	
5,734
82
573
94
June	
5,850
88
598
100
July	
6,295
90
626
104
6,467
98
620
105
Septem ber	
6,431
109
626
105
6,631
6,774
6,620
112
119
116
640
652
654
108
109
December	
109
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00	
to $19.99	
to   24.99	
to   29.99	
to   34.99	
to   39.99..	
to   44.99	
to   49.99	
to   54.99	
to   59.99	
to   64.99	
to   69.99	
to   74.99 -
and over	
Wage-earners
Males    Females
60
26
34
56
82
12S
181
337
634
1,024
1,069
741
916
2,306
7
5
3
7
13
11
18
26
12
17
12
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
10
15
32
36
44
59
393
2
1
2
1
11
10
23
10
20
14
5
3
1
7
Table No. 17
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND
INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 668 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $4,279,585
Clerks,  stenographers, salesmen, etc      4,982,966
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers) —.    16,809,706
$26,072,257
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January _.	
5,173
1,016
987
906
February	
5,164
992
982
901
March—     .
5,318
1,001
996
916
April	
5,462
1,054
1,007
932
May	
5,620
1,079
1,019
948
6,064
1,209
1,017
983
July    .
6,329
1,203
1,021
989
August	
6,231
1,213
1,062
1,018
September	
5,970
2,017
1,008
1,017
October.	
5,499
1,069
1,006
1,027
5,355
1,052
1,007
1,007
December ~
5,462
1,052
1,017
1,017
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males     Females
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 ......
to $19.99.
to 24.99.
to 29.99.
to 34.99.
to 39.99.
to 44.99.
to 49.99.
to 54.99
to 59.99.
to 64.99.
to 69.99.
to 74.99.
and over.
255
103
136"
225
745
840
,023
,292
916
776
597
448
278
485
92
57
152
269
353
1,185
147
119
28
25
14
3
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males Females
12
32
69
88
108
141
122
90
94
60
49
147
23
32
63
150
245
238
148
101
32
17
21
12
4 C 34
Table No. 18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 19
OIL REFINING AND DISTRIBUTING
Returns Covering 83 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers   $1,076,401
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc     3,773,907
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) —    5,001,558
Total
$9,851,866
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
1,733
13
827
355
February 	
1, 504
10
832
353
March 	
1,333
10
832
345
April  . .
1,328
7
850
356
May  . .     	
1,371
10
863
370
June  	
1,466
28
874
386
July	
1,470
31
882
404
August	
1,479
32
890
405
September	
1,480
29
872
402
1,437
1,782
15
14
883
888
401
405
December	
1,763
18
908
388
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 -
to $19.99
to 24.99
to 29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
18
5
8
10
21
37
58
107
144
239
352
302
237
634
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
6
15
22
31
46
69
130
81
107
88
302
2
2
9
15
43
68
112
52
30
58
7
7
6
2
PAINT-MANUFACTURING
Returns Covering 16 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers.
Clerks,   stenographers,   salesmen,   etc	
Wage-earners (including piece-workers)..
Total
$ 280,141
471,812
603,278
$1,355,231
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
192
45
123
45
February	
202
44
123
50
March _	
200
43
123
51
205
46
126
56
May.   - 	
204
43
125
55
212
45
124
54
July	
207
45
125
49
August	
198
42
120
51
September 	
198
41
128
56
October	
194
40
131
56
November..    . 	
185
39
134
55
December   .
172
39
133
51
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 —
to $19.99
to 24.99
to 29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99.
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
and over.
Wage-earners
I
Males     Females
3
4
24
18
28
48
45
27
10
4
1
3
12
31
3
1
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1
4
9
8
13
11
15
19
17
11
6
15
7
14
18
7
6
3
2 Table No. 20
REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1951
Table No. 21
C 35
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING
Returns Covering 179 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers.     $1,593,727
Clerks,  stenographers, salesmen, etc       3,801,351
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)       7,066,315
Total
$12,461,393
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
2,000
2,035
2,031
2,013
2,036
2,056
2,014
1,980
2,010
2,018
2,033
2,021
356
343
375
356
349
368
362
371
366
367
372
381
784
800
803
789
878
799
825
842
873
827
821
824
575
586
March	
April _ -	
May  —
575
576
521
605
July    	
604
August	
599
558
586
November	
577
579
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 —.
to $19.99
to 24.99
to 29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99.
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
44
63
71
69
101
82
90
83
112
106
137
196
383
608
31
34
78
50
46
58
82
24
13
4
3
7
4
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
6
13
17
25
42
20
61
78
65
58
78
56
98
184
6
17
34
105
198
105
58
43
18
11
10
11
7
10
PULP AND PAPER—
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 12 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $2,107,339
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen,  etc.       2,451,143
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers) ___    16,915,857
Total
$21,474,339
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
4,472
4,490
4,533
4,529
4,746
4,949
4,978
4,988
4,856
4,831
4,809
4,789
143
161
153
151
146
148
151
148
144
165
161
166
311
308
309
316
321
323
323
333
328
331
330
330
188
February- 	
188
189
196
May  	
197
202
July    -
204
August. -
206
200
October. -	
November	
202
203
203
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males    Females
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00
99
to $19.99
13
to   24.99	
27
to   29.99 —
31
to   34.99	
14
to   39.99
17
to   44.99.	
39
to   49.99	
93
to   54.99	
291
to   59.99.	
1,296
to   64.99 -
504
to   69.99	
564
to   74.99 -
393
and over
1,586
1
1
11
11
46
29
26
12
3
3
7
7
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
3
1
4
7
2
10
15
17
24
27
40
57
127
2
14
30
24
38
53
22
12
7
4 C 36
Table No. 22
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 23
SHIP-BUILDING AND BOAT-BUILDING
Returns Covering 80 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents and managers —  $659,115
Clerks,  stenographers, salesmen, etc.- _        903,526
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers) —    11,264,359
Total .
$12,827,000
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
2,480
7
189
78
February	
2,666
7
190
74
March  .
3,043
8
198
81
April	
3,364
6
205
78
May	
3,431
6
209
82
June	
3,481
8
209
89
July	
3,364
10
213
97
3,545
9
217
92
September	
3,509
9
225
95
3,647
11
226
92
November 	
3,494
10
229
93
December	
3,471
9
231
93
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 —
to $19.99
to 24.99
to 29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
and over.
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
I I
Males    Females    Males    Females
61
35
55
40
56
74
96
154
404
308
794
510
605
1,055
6
5
4
15
15
5
12
18
17
4
70
3
10
28
26
13
9
4
4
SMELTING AND CONCENTRATING
Returns Covering 5 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers,  superintendents,  and managers.
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen etc.-	
$789,365
3,335,817
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers).     13,068,038
Total
$17,193,220
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks.
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
3,767
3,781
3,779
3,810
3,821
3,895
3,960
3,971
3,853
3,873
3,817
3,835
52
52
53
53
53
53
56
54
54
54
54
53
630
628
628
628
697
723
734
738
728
734
734
733
159
163
March-	
April 	
160
161
169
169
July    	
172
177
167
171
172
December	
174
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 —
to $19.99
to 24.99
to 29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99.
to 74.99.
and over.
Wage-earners
Males    Females
35
39
25
41
33
55
85
102
201
430
753
652
610
917
18
7
1
7
1
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
17
19
26
81
51
522
5
21
22
45
29
32
7
17
4
1
1 Table No. 24
REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
Table No. 25
C  37
STREET-RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns Covering 116 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers,  superintendents,  and managers     $2,398,108
Clerks,   stenographers,   salesmen,   etc.      7,515,163
Wage-earners   (including  piece-workers)     24,187,207
Total       $34,100,478
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
February. 	
6,274
6,162
6,243
6,422
6,446
6,519
6,400
6,440
6,356
6,319
6,293
6,197
2,996
2,965
3,027
3,068
3,143
3,165
3,173
3,161
3,112
3,210
3,270
3,212
1,339
1,344
1,337
1,346
1,378
1,388
1,402
1,402
1,381
1,366
1,376
1,376
1,419
1,406
1,430
1,421
May.     	
June..  	
July— -	
1,474
1,531
1,565
1,548
1,503
1,461
November	
1,431
1,441
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 —
to $19.99
to 24.99
to 29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99
to 54.99.
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99.
and over
Wage-earners
Males     Females
159
39
36
107
78
200
345
804
1,114
1,269
714
590
419
1,050
85
6
71
805
814
516
545
196
36
26
9
7
4
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
13
4
9
6
17
49
112
151
129
129
147
125
146
326
12
8
26
133
276
404
305
164
81
33
19
12
4
4
WOOD-MANUFACTURING  (N.E.S.)
Returns Covering 183 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $1,426,485
Clerks, stenographers,  salesmen, etc. —        996,877
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     14,262,554
Total
$16,685,916
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January- -	
February-	
4,230
4,260
4,302
4,417
4,575
4,626
4,657
4,609
4,374
4,346
4,315
4,143
735
742
753
773
791
801
799
791
760
733
725
719
189
190
188
189
186
186
191
194
193
191
191
192
128
130
129
132
135
134
July	
137
135
131
132
136
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males    Females
Under
$15.00
20.00
25.00
30.00
35.00
40.00
45.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00
70.00
75.00
$15.00 -
to $19.99
to 24.99
to 29.99
to 34.99
to 39.99
to 44.99
to 49.99.
to 54.99
to 59.99
to 64.99
to 69.99
to 74.99
and over.
117
48
59
86
100
126
290
382
840
1,319
775
281
200
378
13
7
12
12
36
51
41
112
259
222
25
5
1
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1
3
4
8
10
13
17
14
18
12
85
2
1
6
6
19
22
23
20
17
4
2
2 C 3c
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES
Returns Covering 9,635 Firms
Total Salary and Wage Payments During Twelve Months Ended
December 31st, 1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers.—
Clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, etc.
Wage-earners (including piece-workers) —
Returns received too late to be included in above summary. _   	
Transcontinental railways (ascertained payroll)  	
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers covered by the survey but not filing returns,
and additional services not included in the tables; namely, Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, and miscellaneous (estimated payroll)    _
$56,278,068
67,371,518
458,095,049
$1,265,410
39,475,215
$581,744,635
202,514,740
Total..
243,255,365
$825,000,000
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
13,406
8,768
13,506
8,808
13,558
8,875
13,721
8,970
14,123
9,089
14,232
9,394
14,422
9,547
14,506
9,577
14,456
9,432
14,449
9,472
14,508
9,435
14,448
9,338
January.—
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August -
September-
October	
November-
December—
126,373
128,733
132,088
140,540
146,837
148,903
149,869
151,269
153,335
152,496
147,371
134,727
13,384
13,417
13,880
14,160
14,759
16,152
18,105
18,946
20,502
18,146
15,631
13,347
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of Employment of Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Under $15	
$15 to $19.99...
20 to 24.99...
25 to 29.99...
30 to 34.99-
35 to 39.99-
40 to 44.99...
45 to 49.99...
50 to 54.99_.
55 to 59.99_
60 to 64.99-
65 to 69.99-
70 to 74.99._
75 and over—
Totals-.
2,511
1,228
1,633
2,305
4,102
6,586
10,354
16,061
20,658
26,887
23,551
16,380
13,930
38,624
184,810
1,295
891
2,572
3,913
4,686
5,232
2,760
1,599
1,052
839
332
205
157
180
25,713
129
62
103
214
437
540
914
1,298
1,453
1,346
1,327
1,194
1,084
4,175
14,276
229
162
409
1,133
2,102
2,130
1,672
942
501
271
169
76
44
76
9,916 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1951
C 39
"HOURS OF WORK ACT"
As an indicator of the general trend in industrial working-hours, the Board has
for some years shown a computed figure representing the average hours worked during
a single week by all industrial wage-earners reported in the annual survey.
The average figures computed for all employees in the wage-earner section are
shown in the following record for the years 1930 to 1951.
It may be noted that, with the exception of a slight increase during the war years,
a gradual decline had become apparent in the weekly hours reported over this period,
reaching a new low average of 41.89 in 1950. The 1951 record, however, shows some
levelling in the general downward trend, the average figure advancing slightly to 42.01
for the year under review.
1930.
1931 .
1932.
1933-
1934.
1935..
1936.
1937.
1938..
1939-
1940-
48.62
47.37
47.69
47.35
47.32
47.17
47.63
47.25
46.84
47.80
46.91
1941 -	
1947
  — 46.90
  48.12
1943   	
-   47.19
1944       	
               _     46.02
1945       	
 — 45.59
1946       	
    43.63
1947— 	
  -  42.24
1948 — 	
    42.21
1949       	
                         47.24
1950       -                                       .          41.89
1951   42.01
Since the year 1946, when an amendment to the " Hours of Work Act" reduced
the legal working-hours in industry from forty-eight to forty-four hours per week
(subject to certain exceptions), a record has been maintained to show the relative percentages of the total wage-earner group reported as working up to and including forty-
four hours weekly, and those in excess of the legal limit.
Comparative Figures, 1947 to 1951 (Wage-earners)
Year
Firms
Reporting
Wage-earners
Reported
44 Hours or
Less per
Week
In Excess of
44 Hours
1947.                    ..   	
8,410
8,736
9,020
9,509
9,635
159,300
165,411
161,945
169,342
178,909
Per Cent
80.63
81.59
81.86
83.06
82.24
Per Cent
19.37
1948                                              -	
18.41
1949    _
1950                   _        - - . .
18.14
16 94
1951 	
17.76
The 9,635 firms reporting in the Department of Labour industrial survey for 1951
submitted hours of work information covering some 178,909 wage-earners, male and
female.
Due principally to longer hours in those industries employing large numbers of
workers in heavy construction, the percentage of the total shown at forty-four hours
or less was recorded at 82.24 per cent, slightly under the 1950 high of 83.06 per cent.
In the section dealing with the weekly hours of clerical employees, a total of
24,189 workers was reported, this group being comprised of clerks, stenographers, and
salesmen, etc., but excluding officials and executive staff. C 40 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES
Under separate headings of " Wage-earners " and " Clerical Workers," the following
tables show by industry the comparative average weekly hours worked in each classification for 1951, and previous years:—
Average Weekly Hours of Work
Wage-earners
Industry
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
41.23
42.65
44.76
40.11
47.38
41.36
42.59
44.33
39.43
39.94
41.93
41.60
40.85
41.55
47.55
42.38
41.24
41.25
40.40
42.01
45.19
43.10
44.06
41.59
39.42
44.73
39.46
42.30
43.36
39.78
40.23
43.08
43.67
40.08
48.19
41.15
39.82
45.02
38.46
39.59
41.30
41.29
40.72
41.96
44.62
42.48
41.29
41.23
39.69
42.42
44.72
43.04
44.17
41.69
38.78
44.68
39.64
39.99
42.75
39.72
41.21
43.11
43.91
40.09
48.61
41.90
41.92
44.47
38.96
40.21
38.53
41.42
40.71
41.66
45.18
43.54
41.24
41.02
39.71
41.96
43.50
42.61
43.94
41.71
38.75
44.51
39.55
42.43
42.52
39.20
41.32
42.65
44.14
39.17
46.83
41.49
42.25
43.70
38.96
40.29
38.85
41.31
40.12
41.57
46.93
42.99
41.17
41.15
39.83
41.83
43.95
42.07
43.94
41.57
37.98
43.36
40.21
43.13
40.59
40.16
40.60
42.03
45.19
39.90
46.74
43.02
41.78
43.04
38.51
40.34
38.28
40.94
39.70
42.36
47.43
42.61
41.68
41.03
39.88
41.77
44.32
41.54
43.86
40.58
37.72
42.89
41.63
42.17
38.60
39.93
Lumber industries—
Logging __ _ 	
Shingle-mills _ —- _ __ 	
Metal-mining  _ „   	
Pulp and paper manufacturing .._     	
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc -	
Clerical Workers
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers	
39,33
40.25
39.58
39.61
41.06
39.69
40.48
42.60
39.62
39.83
36.71
43.44
40.49
42.89
40-55
42.07
40.66
38.31
41.23
42.96
40.59
39.20
38.40
37.35
38.80
39.98
42.36
39.80
38.96
38.92
40.09
41.38
39.77
40.84
38.86
40.02
42.53
37.30
39.65
37.36
43.23
39.76
41.94
38.85
41.46
40.42
39.04
40.97
43.34
40.60
38.46
37.75
37.74
39.67
40.23
41.38
39.21
38.80
40.32
38.20
41.73
39.89
40.27
38.81
39.40
41.82
38.79
39.77
38.65
42.74
39.91
42.02
38.31
40.85
40.69
40.72
40.89
42.91
40.98
37.43
37.52
37.18
40.58
38.93
41.25
38.19
38.38
38.81
38.05
39.93
39.50
39.78
37.69
41.27
41.79
38.48
38.97
38.20
42.65
37.59
41.12
41.84
39.82
39.43
39.61
40.47
42.85
41.54
37.64
37.68
36.58
39.35
39.80
42.54
35.19
38.03
38.51
38.05
39.78
39.18
39.93
38.37
39.79
40.52
38.99
39.17
37.62
42.16
38.30
41.50
38.21
40.37
39.33
39.02
39.95
43.80
39.38
37.17
38.74
37.24
37.86
38.63
41.60
35.59
37.30
Lumber industries—
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 41
STATISTICS OF CIVIC AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS
With specific reference to civic and municipal workers, the following section is
maintained from year to year on the basis of information submitted by the cities and
municipalities throughout the Province.
Although the employment and payroll data in this section has already, as a portion
of the total industrial payroll, been incorporated in the tables shown elsewhere in this
Report, it is however dealt with in this section as a separate survey.
Included in the coverage of the totals are workers engaged in public works, the
construction and maintenance of waterworks, generation and distribution of light and
power, and similar operations owned and operated by the city or municipality completing
the report.
A total of 140 civic and municipal administrations submitted returns for 1951,
reporting a payroll of $14,422,147, an increase of $675,752 over the total reported for
the previous year.
Comparative payroll totals for civic and municipal workers in each classification
covered by the survey are set out in the following table, for the years 1949, 1950, and
1951:—
1949
1950
1951
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Clerks, stenographers, etc -  	
Wage-earners    	
$1,118,725
1,337,143
10,617,702
$1,187,402
1,328,629
11,230,364
$1,320,966
1,510,146
11,591,035
Totals               	
$13,073,570
$13,746,395
$14,422,147
Employment in civic and municipal occupations continued at high levels during
1951, although the over-all totals did not exceed the record high mark established during
the peak year of 1950. While the monthly totals reported in the clerical employees'
section were generally higher than the previous year, the figures representing wage-
earners during the peak months were below the 1950 totals. For the high month of
July in 1951 a total of 5,798 employees were reported, as compared with 6,283 reported
for the top month of June in 1950, these totals being inclusive of workers in both the
wage-earners and clerical classifications.
Comparative monthly totals of civic and municipal workers employed during the
last two years are shown in the following table, which notes the separate totals for male
and female employees in the two main occupational classifications—wage-earners and
clerical workers:—
Employment Totals1 of Civic and Municipal Workers, 1950 and 1951
Month
1950
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks,
Stenographers, etc.
Males      Females
1951
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks,
Stenographers, etc.
Males     Females
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June —
July	
August.	
September..
October	
November .
December..
4,407
4,495
4,682
4,883
5,039
5,518
5,337
5,199
4,822
4,628
4,408
4,098
36
36
34
23
72
93
99
66
41
36
38
37
400
413
422
418
429
443
449
451
449
448
445
445
214
220
222
220
222
229
230
231
232
228
227
224
3,936
4,048
4,098
4,514
4,660
4,724
4,947
4,977
4,662
4,523
4,347
4,153
39
38
41
57
105
146
159
109
74
50
42
39
472
467
468
474
470
464
460
467
461
473
475
475
221
220
224
225
233
231
232
233
228
230
232
236
i Totals represent the number of employees on payroll on the last day of each month or nearest working-date. C 42
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The table following records for the comparative years 1949, 1950, and 1951 the
percentage distribution of male civic and municipal wage-earners in relation to their
weekly earnings.
Weekly Earnings
Percentage of Employees
1949
1950
1951
Under $15                                        	
1.39
0.91
1.38
1.92
5.02
13.72
33.18
25.44
7.15
5.54
2.62
0.65
1.08
1.60
0.57
2.42
2.46
4.65
12.90
22.24
28.76
12.44
5.83
2.96
1.62
1.55
1.46
$15 to $19.99                                           	
0.37
20 to   24.99                                                _ _	
0.58
25 to   29.99                  _	
1.16
30 to   34.99    	
2.29
35 to   39.99              _ _.
3.58
40 to   44.99                            _ . .    .
12.55
45 to   49.99 _ _        .-    .
28.31
50 to   54.99    - _    	
20.87
SS fn    59 99
12.55
60 to   64.99                                .                 	
7.40
65 to   69.99  _        	
3.15
5.73
Civic and municipal workers shared in the wage increases which were generally
apparent in industry and business throughout 1951.
Average weekly earnings for male wage-earners increased to $50.69 in 1951, as
compared with $44.82 recorded for this group in 1950 and $43.84 shown in 1949.
Increases were also noted in the clerical classification, the average weekly earnings
for males in this section increasing to $50.46 from the 1950 figure of $46.82, while the
average weekly amount earned by the female clerical workers advanced to $37.38 from
$32.93 previously shown.
Little change was evident in the working-hours of civic and municipal employees
during 1951. Although a fractional increase in the average weekly hours was noted in
the wage-earner section, a further slight decrease was reported in the weekly average for
clerical workers. Average weekly hours for wage-earners was computed at 41.07, as
against 40.89 set in 1950, while clerical employees were shown at 36.47 hours weekly,
compared with 36.73 reported for the previous year. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 43
SUMMARY OF NEW LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Spring Session, 1952)
" WORKMEN'S COMPENSATION ACT AMENDMENT ACT,  1952 "
Only one piece of legislation directly affecting labour was passed at the Spring
Session of the Legislature, 1952. This legislation, was an amendment to the " Workmen's
Compensation Act " and may be summarized as follows:—
The compensation of widows was increased from $50 to $75, and dependent
children's compensation was boosted from $12.50 monthly to $20 per month. Funeral
allowances were increased from $150 to $250.
As of April 1st, 1952, past cases of silicosis complicated by tuberculosis and
pneumoconiosis may be considered for compensation.
A further amendment removed the ceiling of $75,000 which had previously existed
to be spent in aiding injured workmen and getting them back to work and to assist in
lessening the handicap resulting from their injuries. C 44 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Members of the Board
1. James Thomson, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman to January,
1952    __ Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell-  1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
3. Fraudena Eaton    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
4. J. A. Ward Bell to September, 1951  411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
5. H. Douglas   411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
6. G. A. Little     411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Secretary
C. R. Margison    411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Head office    Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch office     411 Dunsmuir Street, Vancouver.
Regional offices  17 Bastion Street, Nanaimo.
Capital News Building, Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
560 Baker Street, Nelson.
515 Columbia Street, Kamloops.
Department of Labour, Prince George.
Department of Labour, Smithers.
The Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the eighteenth annual report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1951.
The Board of Industrial Relations was established in April, 1934, and was charged
with the duties and responsibilities formerly connected with the Minimum Wage Board,
the Board of Adjustment, and the Male Minimum Wage Board.
Statistical records have been maintained by the Department in connection with the
work of female employees for the past thirty-four years, so that although this is only the
eighteenth report of the Board of Industrial Relations, it is the thirty-fourth annual record
of the Department with respect to female employees.
MEETINGS AND DELEGATIONS
Early in 1951 the Board held a three-day session in Kelowna, B.C., for the purpose
of hearing representations with respect to the revision of the Minimum Wage Orders
applying to the transportation industry. In addition to the Kelowna meetings, the Board
held eight sessions in Victoria and forty-five sessions in Vancouver.
Numerous delegations appeared before the Board to make representations regarding
the revision of Minimum Wage Orders and regulations or for the purpose of requesting
certain concessions with respect to hours of work of the employees.
Public hearings were heard in connection with Orders Nos. 9 and 26 with respect
to the transportation industry and Order No. 52 with respect to the hotel and catering
industry.
Complementary to the hearing covering Order No. 52, representations were made
regarding the revision of Order No. 52a (1946) applying to the summer-resort hotels.
These public hearings were held in order to give parties affected by the orders an
opportunity to make further representations in connection with their revision, as the
Board had in previous years held similar hearings without completing the proposed
revision of these orders. The public hearing in Kelowna was particularly welcome to
representatives of the transportation industry in the Interior of the Province, as on
previous occasions the public hearings had been held in Vancouver and Victoria, and the
majority of the parties affected in the Interior had not had an opportunity to make verbal
submissions. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 45
Due to the forest closure, which had been imposed as a result of the fire-hazard in
the summer months, numerous applications were submitted from employers in the logging
and sawmill industries for permission to work overtime in order to overcome the loss of
production which had resulted from the closure, and much of the Board's time during the
latter part of the year was taken up with consideration of these requests. In many
instances the employer and the representatives of the employees made personal appearances before the Board in connetcion with these applications.
ORDERS AND REGULATIONS MADE DURING 1951
Resulting from representations and investigations, the Board made the following
Minimum Wage Orders and regulations during the year:—
Minimum Wage Orders
1. Male Minimum Wage Order No. 18 (1951).—This Order of the Board completely
revised the previous Minimum Wage Order with respect to stationary steam engineers.
The minimum wage for stationary steam engineers, with a few exceptions, was increased
from 60 cents to 90 cents per hour.
2. Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 25b (1951).—This Order of the
Board clarified the requirements in connection with obtaining overtime permits when
working in the manufacturing industry.
3. Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 2 (1951).—The Board completely
revised Order No. 2 (1946) with respect to apprentices, so that apprentices serving under
a contract of apprenticeship, pursuant to the provisions of the "Apprenticeship Act,"
would not require to be paid the minimum wage set out in any Order of the Board.
Previously the exemption had only applied to apprentices working under a contract of
apprenticeship. The minimum wage in such cases is established in the contract of
apprenticeship or in the permit granted by the Minister of Labour.
4. Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52 (1951).—Resulting from two
public hearings, one of which was held in 1950, the Board completely revised Order
No. 52 (1946) with respect to the hotel and catering industry. The Board eliminated
the minimum wage rates for learners and increased the minimum wage rate for employees
covered by the Order from $18 to $22 per week, and for employees working less than
forty hours per week from 45 cents to 55 cents per hour. In view of the increase in the
cost of supplying meals to employees, the Board revised that part of the Order establishing charges that could be made by the employer for meals and lodging. However, the
Board still maintained the right to specify the maximum charges or deductions which
might be made for board and lodging if it were known that employees were being charged
an excessive amount for these services. Because of the apparent discrimination, the
Board eliminated the section in the Order which forbade waitresses terminating their
shifts between 1.30 and 6 a.m.
5. The usual Order applying to the mercantile industry during the Christmas season
was made, which provided for the payment of overtime for hours worked pursuant to the
Christmas regulation and also waived the daily guarantee provision of Order No. 24
during the Christmas period.
Regulations
Regulation No. 29b, with respect to the mercantile industry. This regulation
superseded Regulation 29a and permitted employees in the mercantile industry in certain
sections of the Province to work three hours per day in excess of eight on either Friday
or Saturday of each week, provided their weekly hours of work did not exceed forty-four.
The previous regulation had permitted the employees to work additional hours only on
Saturday. C 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Regulation No. 37, with respect to the Christmas-tree industry. This regulation of
the Board added the Christmas-tree industry, which included all operations in or
incidental to the cutting, grading, bundling, tagging, and shipping of evergreen trees
to be used for decorative purposes, to the Schedule of the " Hours of Work Act."
The usual Christmas regulation applying to the mercantile industry permitted
employees to work four hours in excess of forty-four during the week preceding Christmas, provided the employee's hours of work did not exceed ten in any one day. This
gave employers in the industry an opportunity to work the employees two hours overtime
on any two days of the week preceding Christmas and differed from the usual practice
of specifically naming the two days of the week on which the additional hours might
be worked.
(Summaries of the above-mentioned Orders and regulations, together with other
existing and new Orders and regulations made prior to this Report going to press, may
be found in the Appendix to this section of the Report.)
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES
Presentation of statistics in summary form dealing with employment, earnings, and
hours worked by female workers in occupations and industries for which Minimum
Wage Orders have been set by the Board has proved an added feature of this Report
since the inception of the minimum-wage legislation.
The 1951 survey on which this section is based represents the greatest coverage
yet attained, a total of 8,306 firms reporting in time for classification in the tables, with
employment reaching a new high of 65,069 female workers. This total compares with
a previous high of 62,306 women and girl employees reported in 1950.
A comparative record covering the past five years is set out in the tables which
follow, giving tabulated information concerning employment, earnings, and hours worked
by female employees in various occupations and industries which come within the scope
of the legislation:—
Mercantile Industry (Female)
1951
1950
1949
1948
1947
1,830
12,570
$351,563.00
$27.97
37.24
1,733
11,946
$334,995.00
$28.04
41.60
1,814
12,044
$293,381.00
$24.36
38.65
1,753
12,054
$275,928.00
$22.89
37.27
1,747
11,493
$228,446.00
$19.88
36.48
Average weekly earnings  _	
Average hours worked per week— 	
Considerable increase in the number of firms filing returns and in the total
employment reported was noted in the mercantile section, a total of 1,830 firms
submitting information covering 12,570 female workers for 1951, as compared with
1,733 firms reporting a total of 11,946 women and girls for the previous year.
As the questionnaire is based on the period of greatest employment during the
year, some fluctuation occurs in the averages representing earnings and hours of work,
due to many large mercantile establishments filing returns covering the Christmas
period, with resulting longer or shorter hours and relatively higher or lower earnings,
depending on the position of the holiday in the reported week.
Earnings remained at the high level gained in 1950, the 1951 average of $27.97
being only a fraction below the previous year, with a shorter representative week
averaging 37.24 hours, as compared with a longer 41.60 hours noted in 1950. report of deputy minister, 1951
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries (Female)
C 47
1951
1950
1949
1948
1947
241
2,744
$80,075.00
$29.18
39.28
248
2,539
$69,432.00
$27.35
39.95
266
2,552
$64,001.00
$25.08
39.33
211
2,652
$58,367.00
$22.01
38.67
206
2,881
Total weekly earnings  	
Average weekly earnings 	
$57,784.00
$20.06
38 23
Some 2,744 female employees engaged in laundry, cleaning and dyeing occupations
were reported by firms completing returns in this type of business for 1951, this total
representing a considerable increase over the 1950 total of 2,539.
With a payroll of $80,075 reported for the week under review, average per capita
weekly earnings registered a further rise, increasing to $29.18, as compared with a
weekly average of $27.35 recorded in 1950.
Average working-time eased slightly from the previous year, showing at 39.28
hours for the week reported, as against 39.95 noted in this section for 1950.
Hotel and
Catering Industry (Female)
1951
1950
1949
1948
1947
1,335
10.458
1,297
10.541
1,295
10,450
$239,239.00
$22.89
38.24
1,266
10,865
$236,981.00
$21.81
38.50
1,222
10,879
$270,068.00 |    $252,163.00
S7S 87   1                K7 3 97
$216,965.00
$19.94
38.54
Average hours worked per week —	
38.49
38.01
A total of 1,335 firms reported in time for classification in the hotel and catering
section, and although this number was in excess of the firm count for 1950, the over-all
employment of females reported in occupations relating to this group was slightly lower
at 10,458 than the figure of 10,541 reported by this group during the previous year.
Hotel and catering occupations shared in the increased wages generally noted, the
total payroll of $270,068 which covered one representative week of 1951 giving average
individual earnings of $25.82 for each employee, as compared with $23.92 shown for
a similar period in 1950 and $22.89 noted in 1949.
Average working-hours for employees in the above occupations showed a fractional increase from the previous year, the 1951 average of 38.49 hours, however,
remaining close to the general level of weekly hours recorded in this classification
during the past five years.
Office Occupation (Female)
1951
1950
1949
1948
1947
3.501
18,511
$678,776.00
$36.67
38.41
3,333
17,059
$551,373.00
$32.32
38.43
3,468
17,137
$525,692.00
$30.68
38.65
3,405
15,721
$461,189.00
$29.34
38.47
3,349
Total number of employees..  — 	
Total weekly earnings  	
15,368
$423,571.00
$27 56
39.09
The office occupation continues to claim the highest totals of female employment,
with increase in this classification apparent not only in the number of firms reporting,
but also in the total number of office workers shown on the returns submitted. A total
of 3,501 firms reported in this section for 1951, showing female employees in office
occupations totalling 18,511, as compared with 17,059 listed by 3,333 firms filing
returns in this group for the previous year. C 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Earnings increased sharply in this occupation, the average weekly amount earned
by each worker rising to $36.67 for the period reported, as against a previous high
of $32.32 in this section during a similar week in 1950. Total amount of salaries and
wages paid to female office workers for one week in 1951 was reported at $678,776.
Average weekly hours remained almost unchanged at 38.41 for this group in 1951,
compared with 38.43 hours noted for the previous year.
Personal Service Occupations
(Female)
!
1951                    1950
I
1949
1948
1947
112
292
$9,710.00
$33.25
40.24
133
400
$11,857.00
$29.64
38.40
151
402
$10,637.00
$26.46
38.81
147
446
$10,942.00
$24.53
38.49
524
Total weekly earnings     	
$11,830.00
$22.58
39.48
Average hours worked per week	
The above classification is inclusive of female workers employed as beauty-parlor
operators, chiropodists, and those engaged in similar occupations of personal service.
Many firms in this business are owner-operated and employ no outside help, so that
the survey is necessarily restricted to only those establishments employing staff.
A downward trend in employment has been apparent in this occupation for some
years, and for 1951 the small sample of 112 firms reporting in time for tabulation
listed a total of 292 employees, considerably below the employment represented in
the figures shown for previous years.
For those remaining in personal service occupations, however, earnings continued
to increase, rising sharply in 1951 to $33.25 for an average week, from a figure of
$29.64 shown for average weekly earnings in 1950.
With fewer workers in this section, longer hours were evident for those employed,
the average weekly hours worked being computed at 40.24, increased from 38.40
recorded for the previous year.
Fishing Industry (Female)
1951
1950
1949
1948
1947
Number of firms reporting ...
Total number of employees .
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week..
31
2,108
31,425.00
$38.63
38.43
I
25
1,709
$59,554.00
$34.85
39.04
28
1,610
$52,832.00
$32.81
40.56
26
1,650
$49,987.00
$30.30
36.20
22
2,129
$58,775.00
$27.61
37.84
Employment and earnings of workers in fish canneries and processing plants are
affected by varying periods of seasonal activity which are common to the fishing industry.
During the period of greatest employment in 1951 the 31 plants reporting showed
a total of 2,108 female workers in occupations relating to this industry, a considerable
increase over the previous year, and closely approaching the peak employment figure
of 2,129 established for this section in 1947.
Further increases were noted in the earnings of female employees in this industry,
the average figure representing individual earning for one week setting a new high
at $38.63, increased from $34.85 shown for the previous year.
Average hours worked during the week of greatest employment showed a further
decline from the previous year, decreasing to 38.43 from 39.04 hours reported in 1950
and 40.56 recorded for 1949. report of deputy minister, 1951
Telephone and Telegraph Occupation (Female)
c 49
1951
1950
1947
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings 	
Average hours worked per week .
220
3,712
$130,116.00
$35.05
36.27
231
3,391
91,226.00
$26.90
38.92
203
2,999
1,043.00
$29.69
40.07
179
2,956
1,007.00
$28.42
40.58
154
2,679
$68,205.00
$25.46
40.08
In addition to firms engaged in the business of communications, this section is
inclusive of all establishments employing females in switchboard work and similar occupations relating to the telephone and telegraph classification. Continued expansion and
adjustment in the communications business to meet the increasing demand for service
has been reflected in the record of increasing employment, and fluctuating earnings and
hours shown in the above table.
The 220 firms reporting in this section for 1951 submitted information covering
some 3,712 female workers, this figure representing a further sharp increase from the
previous high of 3,391 established in 1950. Following a marked period of adjustment
in 1950, the general level of earnings for all employees continued to increase rapidly,
the average amount earned for the weekly period reviewed rising to a new high of
$35.05, well in advance of the previous top figure of $29.69 set in 1949.
A further decline was noted in the average weekly number of hours worked, the
average figure decreasing from 38.92 shown in 1950 to a new low average of 36.27
hours for the weekly period under review in 1951.
Manufacturing Industry (Female)
1948
1947
Number of firms reporting _
Total number of employees-
Total weekly earnings   	
Average weekly earnings-
Average hours worked per week .
796
8,462
$286,483.00
$33.86
38.28
769
8,308
$256,282.00
$30.85
38.32
778
7,938
$230,328.00
$29.02
38.50
772
8,567
$234,410.00
$27.36
37.89
794
8,983
$216,668.00
$24.12
38.19
Manufacturing industries continue to claim a fair share of the female workers in
this Province, the 796 firms reporting in this group for 1951 showing a total of 8,462
female employees in manufacturing occupations, increased from 8,308 listed for the
previous year. While employment in this classification had followed a general downward trend from the high figures shown for the war years, increased activity has become
apparent since 1949, with rising employment, increased earnings, and shorter hours
noted in this section.
With a total of $286,483 paid out in salaries and wages to female workers for
the week reviewed, the average per capita weekly earnings was computed at $33.86
for 1951, increased from $30.85 quoted for 1950.
A fractional decrease was again noted in the working-hours, the average for 1951
further declining to 38.28, from 38.32 hours shown for the average week in manufacturing
occupations during 1950.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female)
i
1951          1          1950
1
1949
1948
1947
80
5,485
$181,235.00
$33.04
41.32
72
5,791
$167,653.00
$28.95
41.89
82
6,120
$203,615.00
$33.27
45.79
71
5,950
$175,673.00
$29.52
43.59
85
5,940
$154,875.00
$26.07
40.20 C 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Employment of female workers in fruit and vegetable processing occupations has
declined somewhat from the record year of 1949, when a total of 6,120 female
employees were reported in this classification. Subsequent years have shown this
total decrease to 5,791 in 1950 and 5,485 reported for 1951.
Earnings in 1951, however, were almost up to the 1949 level despite a shorter
working-week than shown for the peak year. With the total payroll for female
employees reported at $181,235 for one week of 1951, average individual weekly
earnings was computed at $33.04, only slightly below the $33.27 high mark established
in 1949.
Fluctuations in the weekly hours worked by employees in the fruit and vegetable
section are not uncommon due to the seasonal nature of this industry. For 1951 the
average week was recorded at 41.32 hours, a further decrease from 41.89 noted in
1950 and down considerably from the 1949 peak week of 45.79 hours.
Transportation Industry (Female)
1951
1950
1949
1948
1947
Number of firms reporting _  .
53
139
$3,685.00
$26.51
42.84
40
103
$2,523.00
$24.50
42.27
41
101
$2,571.00
$25.46
42.50
49
124
$3,003.00
$24.22
41.99
27
66
$1,272.00
$19 27
40 74
A small group of female workers continues to appear in the transportation industry, this section including female employees engaged in occupations relating to the
business of delivery, trucking, and messenger work.
A total of 53 firms employing females in occupations of this nature reported for
the year 1951, giving details concerning the hours and earnings of some 139 female
employees.
The 1951 average figure representing individual weekly earnings for females in
this group increased to $26.51, to set the highest figure yet recorded for earnings in
this section.
Average working-time for the week reported increased slightly over a similar
period of greatest employment in 1950, the 1951 average figure increasing to 42.84
hours, compared with 42.27 hours shown for the week reviewed during the previous
year.
Public Places of Amusement (Female)
1951
1950
1949
1947
Number of firms reporting —
Total number of employees-
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings..
Average hours worked per week-
107
588
$10,950 I
$18.62
27.89
97
519
i,753.00
$16.87
27.60
94
521
$8,108.00
$15.56
26.50
105
543
$8,129.00
$14.97
26.69
92
500
$6,788.00
$13.58
25.47
Increases in employment and earnings were generally apparent for female workers
in occupations relating to this classification, the section including those employed as
theatre-ushers, check-room attendants, and similar occupations in connection with
swimming-pools, bowling-alleys, and other such public places of amusement.
With more firms reporting under this classification, the 1951 employment figure
climbed to 588, from 519 female employees shown for the previous year. Total
salaries and wages paid to this group for the weekly period under review was $10,950.
Although the weekly hours and earnings are relatively low in this occupation, due
to the part-time nature of the work, the  1951  average weekly individual earnings REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 51
increased noticeably to $18.62, from $16.87 reported for this group in 1950. The
figures submitted, however, should not be considered as representative of a full
week's work.
A fractional increase was noted in the hours worked, the 1951 average rising
slightly to 27.89 hours, as compared with 27.60 hours for a similar weekly period
in 1950.
Summary of All Occupations ("Female Minimum Wage Act ")
1951
1950
1949
1948
1947
8,306
65,069
$2,084,086.00
$32.03
38.26
7,978
62,306
$1,805,811.00
$28.98
39.30
8,220
61,874
$1,719,447.00
$27.79
39.32
7,984
61,528
$1,598,616.00
$25.98
38.61
7,850
61,442
$1,445,179.00
$23.52
38 33
Included in the above table are summary totals for 1951 representing returns
from 8,306 firms, reporting the actual employment of 65,069 female workers for one
week of greatest employment during the year.
The 1951 summary features the greatest coverage yet attained in this survey, with
a greater number of firms reporting in time for tabulation adding to the general
increases in reported employment of female workers. The over-all total of 65,069
female workers represents the highest figure yet recorded in the survey of females under
coverage of the " Female Minimum Wage Act."
Aggregate salaries and wages paid to female workers for one week of peak employment in 1951 climbed to $2,084,086, as compared with $1,805,811 paid out for a like
period in 1950.
For all occupations included in the coverage of the tables, the average weekly
figure representing individual earnings increased to $32.03, setting a new high mark
in the average for all females included in the survey, and representing an increase
of $3.05 from the 1950 figure of $28.98.
In effect during 1951 the legal minimum rates as set for females by the Orders
of the Board ranged from $17.60 in some industries to a high of $20.16 in one industry
for a full week's work. It is therefore apparent that the average weekly earnings of
female workers in this Province, as mentioned above, continues well in advance of the
highest minimum set by law.
Average working-time reported for the 65,069 female employees shown on the
returns during one week of 1951 was 38.26 hours, considerably decreased from the
figure of 39.30 hours recorded in the summary totals for female workers during the
previous year.
Only those workers in industries and occupations for which Minimum Wage
Orders have been set by the Board are included in the 65,069 female employees
mentioned in the above table. Summary totals are not inclusive of domestic workers,
farm-labourers, or fruit-pickers, these occupations being excluded from the coverage of
the provisions of the " Female Minimum Wage Act." Employees of banks and federal
workers are also excluded from the coverage of the Provincial legislation. C 52 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table Showing Comparative Relation of 1951 Earnings to Legal Minimum
Industry or Occupation
Number
of
Firms
Reporting
Number
of
Employees
Reported
Total
Weekly
Payroll
Legal
Minimum
Weekly
Wage for
Full-time
Employees
Actual
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Percentage
by Which
1951
Average
Earnings
Exceed
Legal
Minimum
Mercantile.	
Laundry  _
1,830
241
1,335
3,501
112
31
220
796
80
53
107
87306
12,570
2,744
10,458
18,511
292
2,108
3,712
8,462
5,485
139
588
$351,563
80,075
270,068
678,776
9,710
81,425
130,116
286,483
181,235
3,685
10,950
$18.00'
17.602
18.003
18.00*
20.003
19.205
20.166
17.602
17.602
(6)
18.003
$27.97
29.18
25.82
36.67
33.25
38.63
35.05
33.86
33.04
26.51
18.62'
55.39
65.80
43.44
Office  	
103.72
Personal service 	
Fishing 	
66.25
101.20
73.86
Manufacturing.     	
Fruit and vegetable 	
Transportation.	
92.39
87.73
C)
3.447
65,069
$2,084,086
$32.03
81.99
1 Thirty-nine to forty-four hours per week.
2 Forty-four hours per week.
3 Forty to forty-four hours per week.
4 Thirty-six to forty-four hours per week.
6 Forty-eight hours per week.
6 In the transportation industry, it is impracticable to set a weekly rate, owing to the variation of minimum wages
in the Order, depending on whether the work is done on foot, on bicycles, by motor-cycles, or other types of motor-
vehicles.
' Earnings represent partial week only.
The above table includes a summarization of each occupational classification covered
in the 1951 survey, and in addition to employment and payroll data shows the average
weekly earnings for individual workers in each group in relation to the legal minimum
wage established in each instance by the Board. The averages are further expressed in
terms of percentages in excess of the fixed rate. From the totals representing female
employees in all occupations, it may be observed that the figure of $32.03, representing
the average weekly earnings of females in all classifications, was 81.99 per cent in excess
of the lowest legal minimum shown in the table.
STATISTICAL SUMMARY—HOSPITAL-WORKERS (FEMALE)
A segregation of statistical data covering female workers in hospitals and nursing
homes was again maintained for the year 1951. Although nursing staffs are not included
in the survey, all other female employees, classified by occupation, are summarized in the
section to follow regarding employment, average weekly earnings, and hours worked
during a period of greatest employment for the year.
With the exception of those occupations peculiar to hospitals and similar institutions,
the totals appearing in the following table have already been incorporated with identical
groups in the main statistical section and the figures should, therefore, not be considered
as being in addition to the previous totals reported in the summary of female workers, but
rather here set aside for separate study in association with other hospital-workers:—
Occupational Classification
Number
Employed
Total
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Hours
547
1,852
613
5
72
25
1
663
148
8
$15,048.00
50,271.00
20,575.00
130.00
2,309.00
809.00
35.00
19,279.00
6,674.00
313.00
$27.51
27.14
33.56
26.00
32.07
32.36
35.00
29.08
45.09
39.13
40.0
41.1
39.4
Personal service — —     - -—	
32.0
37.7
Manufacturing _     	
41.2
44.0
Nurses' aides     -   — -
Technicians  (inclusive of X-ray and laboratory techni-
40.9
42.6
Physiotherapists   — — 	
41.3
All occupations  	
3,934
$115,443.00
$29.34
40.6 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 53
A total employment of 3,934 female workers was reported by the establishments
listed for inclusion in this section, the 109 reports including returns from public and
private hospitals, nursing and rest homes, solariums, homes for the aged and infirm, and
like institutions, but in each case omitting female employees engaged in the nursing
profession.
Laundry-workers within the hospital section numbered some 547, the average
weekly individual earnings in this group being recorded at $27.51. The greatest number
of female employees were noted in the housekeeping and catering occupations, this
classification showing a total employment of 1,852 female workers, whose average per
capita earnings were computed at $27.14 for the weekly period reviewed. Office-workers
totalled 613, this classification earning an average weekly salary of $33.56. A small
group of five personal-service workers earned an average weekly amount each of $26,
this amount, however, not representing a full-time working-week. In the telephone and
telegraph classification, female employees in switchboard occupations numbered 72, with
individual earnings in this group averaging $32.07 for the week under review. Twenty-
five workers in manufacturing occupations averaged $32.36 each for the week. Only one
female hospital employee was reported under a classification dealing with transportation
occupations, this worker receiving a salary of $35 for a forty-four-hour week. Representing the second largest group in the above table, the nurses' aides numbered 663, the
average week's earnings for an employee in this occupation being $29.08. Technicians
reported were inclusive of both X-ray and laboratory workers, this group totalling 148
employees, whose average weekly earnings were computed at $45.09. A group of eight
physiotherapists were reported as averaging $39.13 per week.
For the total 3,934 female employees reported in all hospital occupations exclusive
of nursing staff, average individual weekly earnings were $29.34, the average working-
week for all workers included in the survey being recorded at 40.6 hours.
STATISTICS FOR MALE EMPLOYEES
The selected occupations shown in the following tables provide a comparative study
of male workers in some of the more important occupational classifications within the
coverage of the " Male Minimum Wage Act," the totals being compiled on the basis of
reports covering one representative week during the period of greatest employment in
each year noted:—
Baking Industry (Male)
1951
1950
1949                        1948
1
178
1,481
$80,170.50
$54.13
181
1,333
$61,022.00
$45.78
1
195     I                       197
Total number of male wage-earners	
Total weekly earnings  	
1,386
$61,505.00
$44.38
40.49
1,302
$54,987.50
$42.23
Average hours worked per week 	
40.89
40.46
40.56
Construction (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings  	
Average weekly earnings —
Average hours worked per week	
2,004
33,891
$2,086,591.00
$61.57
43.02
2,220
30,651
$1,641,903.00
$53.57
41.49
2,193
33,157
$1,689,947.50
$50.97
41.90
2,078
32,315
$1,558,468.50
$48.23
41.15
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings
Average weekly earnings „	
Average hours worked per week -
93
3,088
$131,456.50
$42.57
46.33
97
3,009
$135,553.00
$45.05
47.98
97
2,744
$113,192.00
$41.25
47.21 C 54
department of labour
House Furnishings (Male)
1951
1948
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings
Average hours worked per week .
132
1,446
$67,648.50
$46.78
40.34
137
1,635
$63,878.50
$39.07
39.59
Logging (Male)
1,253
22,879
$1,526,249.50
$66.71
42.36
1,091
19,981
$1,197,147.50
$59.91
41.57
858
16,682
$935,977.00
$56.11
41.66
893
18 838
$1,026,033.00
$54.47
41 96
Painting and Paperhanging (Male)
Number of firms reporting*
207    |                     191
1,264    |                1,048
$75,623.00    |        $56,942.50
$59.83    |                $54.33
39.94    j                  40.11
!
193
1,179
$58,594.00
$49.70
40.09
192
1,151
$53,051.50
$46.09
Average hours worked per week       	
40.30
Plumbing and Heating Industry (Male)
Number of firms reporting , -
i
257    |                     266
1,635    |                 1,888
$96,184.00    ]      $101,114.50
$58.83    |                $53.56
40.48    j                  40.67
1
249
1,782
$91,174.50
$51.16
40.27
218
1,755
$84,799.50
$48.32
40.65
Sawmills (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings —	
Average weekly earnings —	
Average hours worked per week .
892
24,013
$1,392,725.00
$58.00
41.03
749
22,496
$1,171,475.50
$52.07
41.15
653
19,781
$944,062.00
$47.73
41.02
726
20,360
$932,133.00
$45.78
41.23
Sheet-metal Industry
(Male)
75
81
1,016
$52,193.50
$51.37
40.14
79
965
$46,477.50
$48.16
39.86
72
945
$54,839.00
$58.03
39.76
982
$45,485.50
$46.32
Average hours worked per week—  	
40.09
Shingle-mills (Male)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of male wage-earners..
Total weekly earnings.
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week .
58
3,059
$193,040.00
$63.11
39.88
59
3,330
$187,175.50
$56.21
39.83
47
2,151
$116,861.50
$54.33
39.71
62
3,455
$180,001.00
$52.10
39.69
Ship-building and Boat-building (Male)
80
4,247
$265,477.00
$62.51
41.63
76
72
82
Total number of male wage-earners	
2,980
$156,996.00
$52.68
3,739
$199,549.00
$53.37
6,144
$299,772.50
$48.79
40.21
39.55
39.64 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
WOOD-MANUFACTURING  (N.E.S.)   (MALE)
C 55
1951
1950
1949
1948
Number of firms reporting 	
183
5,001
$274,286.50
$54.85
39.93
217
5,067
$247,366.00
$48.82
40.16
217
5,295
$233,326.00
$44.07
39.20
189
5,087
$225,204.50
$44.27
39.72
INSPECTIONS AND WAGE ADJUSTMENTS
During the year 1951 the Inspectors of the Department made 15,676 investigations,
and through the efforts of the Department and co-operation of the employers, collections
made during 1951 amounted to $91,930.54. Department and private cars travelled
175,591 miles in connection with the legislation administered by this office.
As certain employees exercised their civil rights under the Male and Female
Minimum Wage Acts through the Courts without coming to the Board, it may be
presumed that the amount of money paid to employees as a result of legislation
administered by this Department is considerably in excess of that recorded in the
following table:—
Comparison of Inspections and
Wage Adjustments
1946
1947
1948
1949
~1
1950
1951
8,113
13
101
184
$7,615.52
129
249
$3,051.72
1
51
$573.05
13,912
17
240
477
$34,334.31
294
538
$10,923.81
949
5,362
$39,649.24
18,699
20
354
871
$45,658.00
175
491
$7,579.01
1,293
7,162
$56,152.54
17,437
20
586
1,642
$92,745.40
198
344
$6,995.38
865
3,295
$32,377.45
18,421
18
268
547
$25,544.49
132
208
$5,150.03
807
2,288
$22,865.09
15,676
Number of Inspectors1 	
" Male Minimum Wage Act"—
20
139
208
$8,981.31
" Female Minimum Wage Act"—
93
127
$3,575.67
"Annual Holidays Act"—
874
2,891
$27,049.21
$11,240.29
$84,907.36
$109,389.55
$132,118.23
$53,559.61
$39,606.19=
1 Average.
2 In addition to the adjustments made under the Minimum Wage and Holiday Acts, 483 firms paid 957 employees
$52,324.35 under the provisions of the "Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act." Total collections for 1951 were therefore $91,930.54.
COURT CASES
When employers fail to co-operate with the Department in the matter of compliance
with the provisions of the Orders and regulations of the Board, it is necessary to resort
to the Courts in order that the necessary compliance with the legislation will be obtained.
A summary of Court cases during the year 1951 follows:—
"Annual Holidays with Pay Act "
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
The Dog House Limited, 1601 West Broad
Failure to
pay holiday
pay
to
Fined $25; arrears ordered.
way, Vancouver
employee
Automic Auto Metal (J. Levy), 1555 West
Failure to
pay holiday
pay
to
Fined $25; arrears ordered.
Fourth Ave., Vancouver
employee
J. Levy, 1555 West Fourth Ave., Vancouver
Failure to
employee
pay holiday
pay
10
Fined $25; arrears ordered.
pay
to
employee C 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
"Annual Holidays with Pay Act "—Continued
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Don Huntley, Penticton..
J. J. Cameron, 917 Hornby St., Vancouver	
J. J. Cameron, 917 Hornby St., Vancouver	
J. J. Cameron, 917 Hornby St., Vancouver	
Robert Graf, Bull River	
Robert Graf, Bull River    	
Joncas Upholstering Co., 683 East Hastings
St., Vancouver
S. P. Pond, Nelson	
S. P. Pond, Nelson .
Failure to
employee
Failure  to
employee
Failure to
employee
Failure to
employee
Failure to
employee
Failure to
employee
Failure to
employee
Failure to
employee
Failure to
employee
pay holiday
pay holiday
pay holiday
pay holiday
pay holiday
pay holiday
pay holiday
pay holiday
pay holiday
pay to
pay to
pay to
pay to
pay to
pay to
pay to
pay to
pay to
Fined $25; arrears ordered.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $25; arrears ordered.
Fined $25; arrears ordered.
Withdrawn.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $25.
" Female Minimum Wage Act "
Crown Point Grill, Trail _	
Failure to  keep true and correct
records
Fined $10.
" Hours of Work Act "
The Dog House Limited, 1601 West Broad
Failure  to  post  schedule  of em
Fined $100.
way, Vancouver
ployees
The Dog House Limited, 1601 West Broad
Failure to keep proper records	
Fined $25.
way, Vancouver
Ogilvie Flour Mills Co. Ltd., 2001 Douglas
Employing an employee outside the
Fined $25.
St., Victoria
hours posted on the schedule
" Male Minimum Wage Act
The Dog House Limited, 1601 West Broadway, Vancouver
Trail Cafe, Trail	
Fleetline Cabs Ltd., Nelson .
Failure to pay minimum wage .
Failure to keep true and correct
records
Failure to keep  true  and correct
records
Fined $25.
Fined $10.
Fined $10.
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "
Roy Mathews, Salmon River	
J. Levy, 1555 West Fourth Ave., Vancouver.—
Automic Auto Metal  (J. Levy), 1555 West
Fourth Ave., Vancouver
Thomas Home, Lovatt St., Saanich - —
J. J. Cameron, 917 Hornby St., Vancouver	
J. J. Cameron, 917 Hornby St., Vancouver	
J. J. Cameron, 917 Hornby St., Vancouver	
Nick Parchoc, Willow River, County of Cariboo
Crystal Ice Co. (Wm. McBay), 317 Simcoe
St., Victoria
Crystal Ice Co. (Wm. McBay), 317 Simcoe
St., Victoria
Jack Peterson, Golden	
Robert Graf, Bull River-
Mrs. I. Watson, Golden-
Fred Hesser, 247 East First St., North Vancouver
Joncas Upholstering Co., 683 East Hastings
St., Vancouver
Harry Rebinsky, Blue River. 	
Herbert G. Heal, Telkwa	
F. R. Rotter, Salmo  -
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee_
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee .
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee.
Failure to pay wages to employee..
Failure to pay wages to employee..
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Failure to pay wages to employee-
Fined $25 and costs; arrears ordered.
Fined $25; arrears ordered.
Fined $25; arrears ordered.
Arrears ordered.
Fined $25.
Suspended sentence.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $25; arrears ordered.
Fined $25; arrears ordered.
Arrears ordered.
Fined $50; arrears ordered.
Fined $25; arrears ordered.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $25; arrears ordered.
Dismissed.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $25 and costs; arrears ordered.
Fined $50. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
SPECIAL LICENCES
C 57
Provision is made in the majority of the Orders of the Board for a graduated scale of
wages that apply to inexperienced employees for whose employment permits in writing
have been obtained from the Board. In the majority of cases there is a six months'
learning period for inexperienced employees, during which period they receive periodic
increases until at the expiration of the learning period they are qualified for the minimum
wage payable to experienced employees. The following table shows the number of
licences issued in the various lines of work in 1951, 1950, 1949, 1948, 1947, and 1946: —
1951
1950
1949
1948
1947
1946
1
65
8
21
44
32
3
7
8
105
27
27
60
66
2
6
1
3
6
47
22
41
40
136
2
10
17
81
66
61
190
2
6
34
245
173
231
357
21
Personal service    	
Hairdressing 	
Laundry 	
Mercantile-    	
Office   	
218
272
270
345
Practical nurse (students)  ,,.
Manufacturing  - 	
153
Automotive repair and gasoline service-station   .
—
Totals     	
181
308
297
427
1,067
1,258
During the year 1951, 327 part-time employment permits were issued.
CONCLUSION
It is with the greatest regret that the Board records the passing of two of its members.
J. A. Ward Bell passed away in the fall of 1951 and James Thomson, Chairman of the
Board and Deputy Minister of Labour, passed away early in 1952. The experience and
abilities of both these members have won for them the respect of the members of the
Board, the staff of the Department of Labour, and employers and employees throughout
industry in the Province of British Columbia. To fill the vacancy caused by the death of
Mr. Ward Bell, G. A. Little, supervisor, was appointed to the Board in the summer
of 1951.
Before concluding this report, the Board would like to express its appreciation to all
those persons who have assisted the Board in its work during the year, and extend to the
officials of the Department and the employers and employees of the Province its thanks
for their co-operation during the year 1951.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
Fraudena Eaton, Vice-Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
H. Douglas.
G. A. Little. C 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
APPENDIX
(Compiled May 31st, 1952)
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO "MALE MINIMUM
WAGE ACT " AND " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT "
APPRENTICES AND MINORS EMPLOYED PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS
OF THE "APPRENTICESHIP ACT"
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 2 (1951)
Effective December 20th, 1951
Minimum wages fixed by any Order of the Board shall not apply to apprentices indentured or to
minors employed pursuant to the provisions of the "Apprenticeship Act."
AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND GASOLINE SERVICE-STATION INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 6 (1952)
Effective April 24th, 1952
" Automotive repair and gasoline service-station industry " means all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, overhaul, painting, cleaning, washing, or reconditioning of any
vehicle powered by an internal-combustion engine, or any part thereof, and the business of operating
retail gasoline service-stations, gasoline-pumps, or outlets where gasoline is offered for sale at retail,
including services and undertakings incidental thereto.
"Automotive mechanic " means any employee doing the work usually done by journeymen, and
without restricting the generality of the foregoing, the work of mechanics, machinists, metal-men,
painters, electricians, radiator-men, battery-men, body-men, forgers, vulcanizers, trimmers, and
welders.
" Other employees " means all other employees, except automobile salesmen, office employees,
watchmen, janitors, and employees employed in the production line or assembly-line manufacture or
reconditioning of automobile parts for resale.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every employee in the automotive repair and
gasoline service-station industry, except automobile salesmen, office employees, watchmen, and janitors.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
90c.
55c.
40c.
45c.
50c.
55c.
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
44
Learners, parts departments—
(Permits required to employ learners at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act "
or  section  6  of  the   " Female  Minimum  Wage   Act "   for   whose
44
Overtime:   Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and
44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work overtime)
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Employees working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to section 5
or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act " until the employee has completed the
hours so established:
(6) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act" pursuant to the
provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 59
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(10) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(11) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(12) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
BAKING INDUSTRY*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 17 (1942)
Effective July 20th, 1942, Superseding Order No. 17
" Baking industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of bread, biscuits,
cakes, doughnuts, pies, and similar products.
Occupation
Bakers—
21 years of age and over 	
Under 18 years of age 	
18 years and under 19 years 	
19 years and under 20 years	
20 years and under 21 years 	
At least 85% of employees to get not less than.
Weekly Hours
44
44
44
44
44
44
Note.—(1) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Delivery salesmen (see Transportation Order).
(3) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
BARBERING
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 42 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946, Superseding Order No. 42
" Occupation of bartering " means the work of persons engaged in the shaving of the face or
cutting or trimming or singeing of the hair or beard for hire, gain, or hope of reward, or in connection
with any of the foregoing the shampooing or massaging or the treating of the head or face.
" Class A employees," those working from 40 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 40 hours.
Class A employees
Class B employees.
Employees classified under section 7 of
working under permit
Male Minimum Wage Act'
Rate
$25.00 a week
65c. per hour
(See note (2) re dally
guarantee.)
As prescribed in the
permit
Hours
40-44 per week.
Less than 40 per week.
Not more than 44 per
week.
Note.—(1) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent at
place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour
daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" section number referred to in this Order is as it appears in the " Revised Statutes
of British Columbia, 1948." C 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
BOX-MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 55 (1947)
Effective February 1st, 1947, Superseding Order No. 55 (1943)
" Box-manufacturing industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose
of making wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel staves and heads, kegs, casks, tierces, pails, and
other wooden containers.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the box-
manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining
their work.
Hourly Rate
Hours per Week
Rate payable to at least 80% of total employees  	
Rate payable to balance, 20% (inclusive of employees in respect of whom
a permit in writing has been obtained)
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act "
and section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose
employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day or 44
hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work such
overtime)
50c.
40c.
Rate as prescribed in
permit
One and one-half times
regular rate of pay.
44
44
44
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of Work
Act":
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of sections 5 and 11 of the "Hours of Work Act" until the employee has completed the hours
so established.
(2) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Every employer shall post and keep posted in a conspicuous place in his establishment:—
(a) Copy of this Order:
(6) A schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his
employees.
(4) Records of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English language of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" and " Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
BUS-DRIVERS*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 70
Effective March 18th, 1940, Superseding Order No. 31
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation
for more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public for which service a charge
is made.
Area
Hourly Rate
Hours
60c.
66c.
90c.
40 to 50.
Less than 40.
In excess of 9 hours in
any one day or 50
hours   in   any   one
week.
Note.—(1) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(2) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 61
BUS-DRIVERS
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 70a
Effective June 27th, 1940
Provides that the minimum wage mentioned in Order No. 70 shall apply to the time of a bus-
driver while on duty and waiting on call, and shall include all the time occupied by a bus-driver from
the time he reports at his employer's headquarters or garage for duty until he returns again to his
employer's headquarters or garage where he originally reported for duty; and shall include the time
occupied by a bus-driver in dead-heading from his employer's headquarters or garage to the place
where he is to take charge of the bus and vice versa; but the minimum wage shall not apply to
waiting time of a bus-driver when occupied on special trips, charter trips, excursions, and overloads.
BUS-DRIVERS*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 76
Effective September 28th, 1942
" Bus-driver " means every female employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating
accommodation for more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public, for which
service a charge is made.
Area
Hourly Rate
Hours
City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point Grey
which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the City of Vancouver;   the  City  of New Westminster;    the Corporation  of The
Township of Richmond;  the Municipality of the District of Burnaby;
Municipality of the District of West Vancouver;   the City of North
60c.
66c.
40 to 48.
Less than 40.
Note.—(1) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(2) Employees required by employer to wait on call shall be paid for waiting time.
(3) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Rest period of 24 consecutive hours from midnight to midnight in each calendar week shall be given to
employees.
(5) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
CARPENTRY TRADE
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 58 (1947)
Effective August 4th, 1947, Superseding Orders Nos. 58, 65, 66, 72, 73
" Carpentry trade " means and includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with
the construction and erection of any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling,
alteration, or repairing of any existing building or structure or part therof.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours Not
to Exceed
Employees in carpentry trade..
90c.
44
Note.—(1) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work, or employees covered by another
Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(3) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay after 8 hours per day and 44 hours per week.   Permits to be
obtained from the Board to work such overtime.
(5) Copy of Order to be posted.
(6) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(7) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(8) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. C 62
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
CHRISTMAS-TREE INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 68 (1947)
Effective May 15th, 1947, Superseding Order No. 68 (1943)
" Christmas-tree industry " means all operations in or incidental to the cutting, gathering, hauling,
and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Hourly Rate
Hours per Week
50c.
44
Note.—(1) This Order shall not apply to:—
(a) Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work:
(b) Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act" or section 6 of the " Female
Minimum Wage Act " for whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board:
(c) Employees whose employment is determined by the Board to come under the provisions of section 4 of
the " Hours of Work Act."
(2) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each of his employees to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English language of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of employees.
(6) Record to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the *' Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 12 (1940)
Effective November 28th, 1940, Superseding Order No. 12, Order No. 12k,
Order No. 12b, Order No. 45, Order No. 45k, and Order No. 48
" Construction industry " includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or demolition
of any building, railway, tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge,
viaduct, sewer, drain, well, telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork,
waterways, or other work of construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations
of any such work or structure.
Area
Hourly Rate,
21 Years and
Over
Hourly Rate,
Under 21 Years
Hours per
Week
The City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point
Grey which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the City
of Vancouver;   the City of Victoria;   the City of New Westminster;   the City of Nanaimo;   the City of Prince Rupert;   the
Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt;   the Municipality
of the District of Oak Bay;   the Municipality of the District of
Saanich;   Municipality of the District of West Vancouver;   the
Municipality of the District of Burnaby;   and the Municipality
54c.
48c.
42c.
36c.
44
44
Note.—(1) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 63
COOK- AND BUNK-HOUSE OCCUPATION
(In Unorganized Territory)
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 4 (1946)
Effective July 8th, 1946
" Cook- and bunk-house occupation" means any work performed by any male or female
employee in or incidental to operation of any kitchen, dining-room, cook-house, bunk-house, or
recreation-room operated in connection with any industrial undertaking in unorganized territory, and
without limiting the generality of the foregoing description means the work of cooks, dish-washers,
waiters, bunk-house and recreation-room attendants, and others employed in a similar capacity.
Hourly rate:   50c, except to employees working under permit under section 7 of " Male Minimum
Wage Act " or section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act," wage prescribed by permit.
Hours:   Unlimited.
Note.—(1) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) No charge or deductions for accidental breakages.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) This Order is not effective within the following cities, districts, and villages:—
Cities.—Alberni, Armstrong, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Duncan, Enderby, Fernie, Grand
Forks, Greenwood, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Merritt, Nanaimo, Nelson, New
Westminster, North Vancouver, Port Alberni, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Prince George, Prince
Rupert, Revelstoke, Rossland, Salmon Arm, Slocan, Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria.
Districts.—Burnaby, Chilliwhack, Coldstream, Coquitlam, Delta, Esquimalt, Fraser Mills, Glenmore, Kent,
Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui, Mission, North Cowichan, North Vancouver, Oak Bay, Peachland,
Penticton, Pitt Meadows, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen, Sumas, Summerland, Surrey,
Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages.—Abbotsford, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Chapman Camp, Comox, Cranberry Lake, Creston, Dawson
Creek, Gibsons Landing, Hope, Lake Cowichan, Lytton, McBride, Mission, New Denver, Oliver, Osoyoos,
Parksville, Pouce Coupe, Qualicum Beach, Quesnel, Silverton, Smithers, Stewart, Terrace, Torino,
Vanderhoof, Westview, Williams Lake.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." C 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
DRIVERS, SWAMPERS OR HELPERS IN THE TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY*
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 9 (1948)
Effective September 13th, 1948, Superseding Parts of Transportation Orders
" Transportation industry " means:—
(a) The  carrying  or  transporting  for  reward  by  motor-vehicle  of  any  goods,  wares,
merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods for the
purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place at which
such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates; and
(Z>) The carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer
therein, but shall not include the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise,
article, articles, or material by any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof,
or dealer therein, by any motor-vehicle of factory rating of 1,000 lb. or less.
This Order applies to every employer and every male and female employee in the transportation
industry, as defined herein, employed as drivers, swampers or helpers, except drivers of vehicles:—
(a) Designed, constructed, and used primarily for transportation therein of passengers; and
(b) Employed in the laundry, cleaning, and dyeing industries;  the delivery of milk, bread,
and non-alcoholic bottled beverages.
Hourly Rate
Drivers, swampers or helpers..
Overtime
Employees working in excess of 8V4 hours in any one day-
Employees working in excess of 11 hours per day	
Employees working in excess of 47 hours in any one week..
75c.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay for
the first IVi hours,
or part thereof.
Double the employee's
regular rate of pay.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
Note.—(1) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(3) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(5) Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(6) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime provisions.
(7) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's behalf shall
be in addition to above rates.
(8) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(9) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Orders Nos. 9a (1948) and 9b (1950). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 65
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 53 (1949)
Effective January 31st, 1949, Superseding Orders Nos. 53 and 54
Includes every male and female operator and starter.
37V5 to 44 Hours per Week
Less Than 37H Hours per Week
$18.00 per week.
50c. per hour.
(See note (5) re daily guarantee.)
Note.—(1) Full week's board of 21 meals, $4 per week.
(2) Individual meals, 20c. each.
(3) Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(4) Full week's lodging of 7 days, $2 per week.
(5) Employee reporting for work on the call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work,
with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate. Employee commencing work in response
to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at employee's regular rate of pay.
(6) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(9) Employees must be given 32 consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(10) Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted.
(11) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(12) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 18 (1951)
Effective September 24th, 1951, Superseding Order No. 18 (1942)
" Stationary steam engineer " means every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam plant
under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for, any
steam boiler or engine while under steam-pressure or in motion. " Special engineer " means holder
of a special or temporary certificate.   (See " Boiler and Pressure-vessel Act.")
Occupation
Engineer.	
Engineer, special, and engineer employed in a plant not requiring certificate of competency-
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act" for whose employment permits in writing have been issued
by the Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and
44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work overtime, except where work is performed pursuant to section 5, 6,
11 (3), or 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" as Regulations 4b
and 6 of the Board)
Hourly Rate
90c.
70c.
Rate    of    pay    prescribed in permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
(See note (2).)
Hours per Week
44
44
44
/'        J
Note.—(1) Order does not apply to janitor-engineers in apartment buildings to whom Order No. 43 (1950)
applies.
(2) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Engineers    etc.    working under  arrangements  with  respect  to  hours  of  work  established pursuant to
section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the " Hours of Work Act " until the engineers, etc., have
completed the hours so established, provided that the parties agree to set aside the payment of the overtime rate.
(6) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act" pursuant to the
provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
(3) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with a
guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.   Board may vary the daily guarantee provision.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. C 66 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 39 (1948)
Effective May 31st, 1948
" First-aid attendant " means every employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid attendant
who is in possession of an industrial first-aid certificate and is designated by his employer as the
first-aid attendant in charge, pursuant to the provisions of the " Workmen's Compensation Act" of
British Columbia.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
First-aid attendants         	
75c.
(See note (7) re
daily guarantee.)
Time   and  one-half of
the  employee's regular  rate of pay,  except  as provided for
in note (1) (a).
44
Overtime:   First-aid attendants working in excess of 8 hours in any one
day and 44 hours in week
t
Note.—(1) Overtime rates of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) First-aid attendants working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to
section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" until the first-aid attendant
has completed the hours so established:
(6) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act" pursuant to the
provisions of section 4 of the said Act:
(c) First-aid attendants while employed making shingle-bolts, or as emergency fire-fighters, or regularly
employed as boom-men or boat-men; and first-aid attendants covered by the Order of the Board establishing a minimum wage in the cook- and bunk-house occupation in unorganized territory.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employees reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any other occupation in which the first-aid attendant is employed
in addition to his first-aid duties, such first-aid attendant shall be paid the higher minimum wage so fixed.
(10) Actual expenses and transportation costs, in addition to the minimum wage, must be paid any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the office of a medical practitioner, hospital, or other destination.
(11) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(12) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
FISHING INDUSTRY*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 78
Effective May 3rd, 1943, Superseding Order in Effect since February 28th, 1920
" Fishing industry " means the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving,
canning, drying, curing, smoking, packing, labelling and reconditioning of containers, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use or for shipment any kind of fish or shell-fish.
Experienced employees.
Learners of any age	
Hourly Rate
40c.
for first  200 hours  of employment  in the industry;
40c. thereafter.
Note.—(1) Above rates do not apply to employees engaged in heading and filling.
(2) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age below 40c. per hour.
(3) Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(4) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(5) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 67
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 46 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946, Superseding Order No. 46 (1942)
" Fruit and vegetable industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose
of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable.
Hourly Rate
Daily Hours
June 1st to November 30th, Inclusive
Rate payable to at least 90% of female employees..
Rate payable to balance of female employees	
Overtime       	
December 1st to May 31st, Inclusive
Rate payable to at least 90% of female employees	
Rate payable to balance of female employees	
Overtime   (permits   required   to   work   overtime   during   this
period)
40c.
35c.
Time and one-half regular rate
Double regular rate	
40c.
35c.
Time and one-half regular rate
In excess of 9 to 11,
inclusive.
Over 11.
In  excess  of  8  daily
and 44 weekly.
Note.—(1) After 5 hours' continuous employment, employees shall have 1 hour free from duty, unless shorter
period approved by Board on request of at least 75% of employees.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted during period December 1st to May 31st.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Daily guarantee of three hours' pay at the employee's regular rate.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by Female Minimum Wage Order No. 46a (1950).
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 47 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946, Superseding Order No. 47 (1942)
" Fruit and vegetable industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose
of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable.
Hourly Rate
Daily Hours
June 1st to November 30th, Inclusive
Rate payable to at least 85% of male employees.-
Rate payable to balance of male employees	
Overtime    	
December 1st to May 31st, Inclusive
Rate payable to at least 85% of male employees 	
Rate payable to balance of male employees   .	
Overtime   (permits   required   to   work   overtime   during   this
period)
48c.
38c.
Time and one-half regular rate
Double regular rate	
48c.
38c.
Time and one-half regular rate
In excess of 9 to 11,
inclusive.
Over 11.
In  excess  of 8  daily
and 44 weekly.
Note.—(1) After 5 hours' continuous employment, employees shall have  1  hour free from duty, unless shorter
period approved by Board on request of at least 75% of employees.
(2) Order does not apply to employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work or
to persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined by section 4 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(3) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Copy of Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted during period December 1st to May 31st.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) Daily guarantee of three hours' pay at the employee's regular rate.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by Male Minimum Wage Orders Nos. 47a (1946) and 47b (1950). C 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
GRASS-DEHYDRATION INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 14 (1949)
Effective June 2nd, 1949
" Grass-dehydration industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose
of dehydrating or processing grasses, clovers, and alfalfa.
All  employees,  except those  classified under  section  7   of  the  " Male
Minimum  Wage  Act"  and  section  6   of  the   " Female  Minimum
Wage Act"
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act"
and section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act"
Overtime (permits required to work overtime during this period)—■
(a) April 1st to September 30th, inclusive	
(6) October 1st in each year to March 31st, inclusive, in the following year
Rate
60c. per hour.
(See note (1) re daily guarantee.)
The wage or rate of pay prescribed in the
permit.
Time and one-half the employee's regular
rate of pay for hours worked in excess ot
8 in the day and 48 in the week.
Time and one-half the employee's regular
rate of pay for hours worked in excess of
8 in the day and 44 in the week.
Note.—-(1) Employees reporting for work on the call of the employer to be paid for the entire period spent at the
place of work, with a guarantee of 2 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate if the employee does not commence work
and 4 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate if the employee commences work.
(2) Order does not apply to employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(3) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of
work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work
Act" until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(4) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(5) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 69
OCCUPATION OF HAIRDRESS1NG
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 27 (1947)
Effective May 12th, 1947, Superseding Order No. 27, Partially, etc.
" Occupation of hairdressing " means the work of persons engaged in cutting, dressing, dyeing,
tinting, curling, waving, permanent waving, cleansing, bleaching, or other work upon the hair of any
person, the removal of superfluous hair, and all work in connection with the giving of facials and
scalp treatments, manicuring, and other work in hairdressing as defined and interpreted in the " Hairdressers Act." It shall not include the work of any person the duties of whose occupation or profession require any act of hairdressing to be performed as incidental thereto, nor the work of barbers as
defined in the " Barbers Act."
" Class A employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of 40
hours or more.
" Class B employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of less
than 40 hours.
" Learner " means only a male or female employee of any age for whose employment a permit
in writing has been issued by the Board who becomes employed in the occupation of hairdressing at
a time when the employee has had less than six months' experience in that occupation.
Rate
Hours
Class A employees..
Class B employees...
$20.00 per week
50c. per hour
(See note (1) re
daily guarantee.)
40-44 per week.
Less than 40
per week.
Learners (Any Age)
Class A Employees
Class B Employees
$15.00 per week 1st 3 months.
17.50 per week 2nd 3 months.
37Vic. per hour 1st 3 months.
44c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
(Permits to be obtained from the Board for learners to be employed at above rates.)
Rate
Hours
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act"
or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose
employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 9 hours in one day and 44
hours in week
Wage-rate as set
out in permit
Time and one-half of
the regular rate of
pay.
40-44 per week.
Note.—(1) Employees if called to work by the employer shall be paid not less in any one day than an amount
equal to 2 hours' pay if called to work and not put to work, nor less than 4 hours' pay if put to work.
(2) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Employees to get one-half hour free from duty between the hours of 11 o'clock in the forenoon and 2 o'clock
in the afternoon, to commence not later than 1.30 p.m.
(4) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of employees to be posted.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" and " Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." C 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
HOSPITAL INSTITUTIONS
(As Defined by the British Columbia " Hospital Insurance Act ")
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 16 (1949)
Effective November 10th, 1949
That  for the purposes  of this  Order  the  following  expressions  shall  have  the  following
meanings:—
" Business of operating hospital institutions " means the work of male and female employees
employed in hospitals as defined in the British Columbia "Hospital Insurance Act":
" Class A employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of
40 hours or more:
" Class B employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of
less than 40 hours:
" Learner " means, only, a male or female employee of any age for whose employment a
permit in writing has been issued by the Board.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the business
of operating hospital institutions, except:—
(a) A graduate nurse who is in possession of a certificate showing that she has completed
a course of training in general nursing provided in a hospital and who is employed as
a nurse:
(b) A student-nurse in training in an approved school of nursing as denned by sections 22
and 23 of the " Registered Nurses Act" of British Columbia:
(c) Employees who hold professional positions or positions of supervision or management,
so long as the duties performed by them are of a professional, supervisory, or managerial character. The Board may determine whether or not the position held by any
person or the capacity in which he is employed is such as to bring him within the
scope of this exception:
(d) Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
Rate
Hours
Class A employees..
Class B employees—
$20.00 per week
50c. per hour
40-44
Daily guarantee of 4
hours at employee's
regular rate of pay.
Learners (Any Age)
Class A Employees
Class B Employees
$14.00 per week 1st 2 months.
16.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
18.00 per week 3rd 2 months.
20.00 per week thereafter.
35c. per hour 1st 2 months.
40c. per hour 2nd 2 months.
45c. per hour 3rd 2 months.
50c. per hour thereafter.
Daily guarantee of 4 hours at the employee's regular rate
of pay.
(Permits required for learners working at above rate.)
Hours
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act"
or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose
employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Not more than 44
per week.
Hours.—That, except as provided in section 5 and sections 11 (3) and 11 (4) of the " Hours of Work Act," the
hours of work of any employee shall not exceed 8 in the day and 44 in the week, except by written permission of
the Board.
Overtime.—Time and one-half of the employee's regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 8 in the day
and 44 in the week. This clause with respect to overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under
arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or section 11 (3) or
section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act," or section 6 (a) of this Order, until the employee has completed the
hours so established.
Provisions for Variance of Hours of Work.—The Board may, by written authorization, permit the limits of hours
of work contained in section 5 of this Order to be exceeded, provided the hours of work so authorized are not inconsistent with the " Hours of Work Act" and regulations thereunder. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 71
Where the Board is satisfied that extra working-hours are necessary to overcome emergent conditions that may
arise from time to time and that such extra working-hours are not inimical to the interests of the employees, it may,
by written authorization, permit the working-hours to exceed the limits prescribed in section 5 of this Order. The
minimum wage payable for hours worked pursuant to such written authorization shall be time and one-half the
employee's regular rate of pay.
Daily Guarantee.—An employee reporting for work on the call of an employer shall be paid the employee's regular
rate of pay for the entire period spent at the place of work in response to the call, with a minimum of 2 hours' pay at
the employee's regular rate if the employee does not commence work and 4 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate
if the employee commences work, unless by written permission the Board varies this provision with respect to the daily
guarantee.
Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is approved
by the Board in joint written application of employer and employee.
Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
Uniforms.—See Order No. 3.
Rest-rooms.—Toilet and washroom facilities to be provided for use of employees and suitable rooms for rest and
lunch for the use of employees.
Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
Copy of Order to be posted.
Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted. Record of wages and daily hours of employees
to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
Records to be produced to authorized officials.
"Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
Rest periods as per Order No. 11.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52 (1951)
Effective February 1st, 1952
" Hotel and catering industry " means the work of male and female employees employed in:—
(a) Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for which
a charge is made:
(b) Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses, dance-halls, cabarets, banquet-
halls, ice-cream parlours, soda-fountains, lunch-wagons, hospitals, sanatoriums, nursing
homes, clubs, dining-rooms, or kitchens in connection with industrial or commercial
establishments or office buildings or schools, or any similar place where food is cooked,
prepared, or served, for which a charge is made,—
whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or in connection
with any other business.
" Class A employees," those working from 40 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 40 hours.
Rate
Hours
Class A employees.
Class B employees..
Employees classified under section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act" or
section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act" working under permit
$22.00 per week
55c. per hour
(See note (6) re
daily guarantee.)
Wage set in
permit
40-44 per week.
Less than 40
per week.
Not more than 44
per week.
Note.—(1) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week except:—
(a) When authorized by the Board:
(b) In cases of emergency which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome:   Not more than 9 in the day or
44 in the week.
(2) Split shifts to be confined within 12 hours of commencing work.    ("Hours of Work Act " provision.)
(3) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day and 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5 or
11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
(4) Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by the Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
(5) Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment.
(6) Daily Guarantee.—Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for
entire period spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in
response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at employee's regular hourly rates.
(7) Board or Lodging.—Employee not required to partake of meals or make use of lodging as condition of
employment. If Board is of opinion employee is being charged too much for board and lodging, the Board may set
maximum charges.
(8) Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
(9) Uniforms.—See Order No. 3 (1946) relating to uniforms.
(10) Rest-rooms, Toilet and Wash-room Facilities.—To be provided by employers for use of employees.
. C 72 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
(11) Order does not apply to:—
(a) Graduate nurses with certificate of completed training:
(b) Student-nurses in training in approved school of nursing, as defined by sections 22 and 23 of " Registered
Nurses Act ":
(c) Students employed in a school where enrolled:
(d) Pages as far as wages are concerned:
(e) Employees covered by another specific Order of the Board.
(12) Copy of Order to be posted.
(13) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(14) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(15) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(16) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(17) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
RESORT HOTELS IN HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY IN UNORGANIZED
TERRITORY DURING THE SUMMER SEASON
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 54 (1952)
Effective June 1st to September 30th, Inclusive, Each Year
" Resort hotel" means any establishment in unorganized territory wherein meals or lodging are
furnished to the general public for which a charge is made.
" Summer season," that part of each year from June 1st to September 30th, inclusive.
Hours.—Not more than 10 in any one day nor 52 in any one week.
Overtime.—One and one-halt times regular rate of pay for all hours in excess of 44 in any one week.
Rest Period.—24 consecutive hours each calendar week, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by the Board on joint application of employer and employee.
Variation of Order No. 52 (1951).—All provisions of Order No. 52 (1951) apply except those relating to hours of
work and rest period.
Note.— (1) Order to be posted.
(2) Order not effective within the following cities, districts, and villages:—
Cities.—Alberni, Armstrong, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Duncan, Enderby, Fernie, Grand
Forks, Greenwood, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Merritt, Nanaimo, Nelson, New
Westminster, North Vancouver, Penticton, Port Alberni, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Prince George,
Prince Rupert, Revelstoke, Rossland, Salmon Arm, Slocan, Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria.
Districts.—Burnaby, Central Saanich, Chilliwhack, Coldstream, Coquitlam, Delta, Esquimau, Fraser Mills.
Glenmore, Kent, Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui, Mission, North Cowichan, North Vancouver, Oak Bay,
Peachland, Pitt Meadows, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen, Sumas, Summerland, Surrey,
Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages.—Abbotsford, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Campbell River, Castlegar, Chapman Camp, Comox, Cranberry
Lake, Creston, Dawson Creek, Fort St. John, Gibsons Landing, Harrison Hot Springs, Hope, Invermere,
Kinnaird, Lake Cowichan, Lillooet, Lytton, McBride, Marysville, Mission City, New Denver, North
Kamloops, Oliver, Osoyoos, Parksville, Pouce Coupe, Princeton, Qualicum Beach, Quesnel, Salmo, Silver-
ton, Smithers, Squamish, Stewart, Terrace, Tofino, Ucluelet, Vanderhoof, Westview, Williams Lake.
(3) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 73
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 51 (1947)
Effective February 1st, 1947, Superseding Order No. 51 (1937)
" Household-furniture manufacturing " means the manufacture of kitchen furniture, dining-room
furniture, bedroom furniture, living-room furniture, hall furniture, and other articles of household
furniture customarily manufactured in a furniture factory.
" Learner " means, only, a male or female employee of any age for whose employment a permit
in writing has been issued by the Board who becomes employed in the household-furniture manufacturing industry at a time when the employee has had less than 6 months' experience as an employee in
that industry.
This Order shall apply to every employer and every male and female employee in the household-
furniture manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically
defining their work.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
50c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
50c.
44
Rate payable to balance of employees—
Learners (any age), not inclusive of apprentices (under section 6 of
" Female Minimum Wage Act "  or section 7 of " Male
Minimum Wage Act ")—
44
Second 2 months   _	
44
44
Thereafter      	
44
(Permits to be obtained from the Board for employees working at learners' rates.)
Employees classified under section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act "
and section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
Overtime:   Employees working in excess of 8 hours in one day or 44
hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work such
overtime)
Wage   prescribed   in
permit
One and one-half
times   regular   rate
of pay.
44
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours
of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " until the employee has
completed the hours so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted in the establishment.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his employees.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." C 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
JANITOR AND JANITRESS IN APARTMENT BUILDINGS
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 43 (1950)
Effective January 1st, 1951, Superseding Orders Nos. 43 (1942) and 44 (1942)
1. "Janitor" means and includes every person employed as janitor, janitor-cleaner, janitor-
fireman, janitor-engineer, janitress, janitress-cleaner, janitress-fireman, and janitress-engineer in
apartment buildings.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, 50c. per hour.
3. (a)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings of 4 residential suites and under, 50c. per hour.
(b) In apartment buildings of 5 residential suites or more where single rooms, stores, or accommodation other than residential suites are provided in addition to suites, the minimum wage for every
janitor shall be as provided in clause (c) and in addition at the rate of 50c. per hour for all time
spent attending to the single rooms, stores, and other accommodation.
(c) In apartment buildings containing:-
5 residential suites, $35.10 per month;
6 residential suites, $39.00 per month;
7 residential suites, $42.90 per month;
8 residential suites, $46.80 per month;
9 residential suites, $50.70 per month;
10 residential suites, $54.60 per month;
11 residential suites, $58.50 per month;
12 residential suites, $62.40 per month;
13 residential suites, $66.30 per month;
14 residential suites, $70.20 per month;
15 residential suites, $74.36 per month;
16 residential suites, $78.65 per month;
17 residential suites, $82.94 per month;
18 residential suites, $87.23 per month;
19 residential suites, $91.52 per month;
20 residential suites, $95.81 per month;
21 residential suites, $100.10 per month;
22 residential suites, $104.39 per month;
23 residential suites, $107.25 per month;
24 residential suites, $110.11 per month;
25 residential suites, $112.97 per month;
26 residential suites, $ 115.83 per month;
27 residential suites, $118.69 per month
28 residential suites, $121.55 per month
29 residential suites, $124.41 per month
30 residential suites, $127.27 per month
31 residential suites, $130.13 per month
32 residential suites, $132.99 per month
33 residential suites, $135.85 per month
34 residential suites, $138.71 per month:
35 residential suites, $141.57 per month
36 residential suites, $144.43 per month
37 residential suites, $147.29 per month
38 residential suites, $150.15 per month
39 residential suites, $153.01 per month
40 residential suites, $155.87 per month
41 residential suites, $158.73 per month
42 residential suites, $161.59 per month
43 residential suites, $164.45 per month
44 residential suites, $167.31 per month
45 residential suites, $170.17 per month
46 residential suites, $173.03 per month
47 residential suites, $175.89 per month
over 47 residential suites, $178.75 per month.
(d) In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the payroll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (c).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the payroll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid at the rates fixed in clause (c).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid 50c. per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for 2 rooms and
bathroom, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed
$30 per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a) In any apartment building containing 20 residential suites and over, every janitor shall be
given 24 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(b) In any apartment building containing not more than 19 and not less than 12 residential
suites, every janitor shall be given 8 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
Note.—(1) In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building, the suite occupied by the
janitor shall not be included.
(2) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 75
JANITOR AND JANITRESS IN BUILDINGS OTHER THAN APARTMENT BUILDINGS
Effective January 1st, 1951, Superseding in part Orders Nos. 43 (1942) and 44 (1942)
" Janitor " means and includes every person employed as janitor, janitor-cleaner, janitor-fireman,
janitor-engineer, janitress, janitress-cleaner, janitress-fireman and janitress-engineer in buildings other
than apartment buildings.
Hourly Rate
Hours of Work
50c. per hour
Time and one-half the
employee's   regular
rate  for  all  hours
worked in excess of
8 in a day and 44
in the week.
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay does not apply to employees working under arrangements with respect to hours of
work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of " Hours of Work Act,"
or section 5 (a) of the Order, until the employee has completed the hours so established, provided the waiver of the
overtime is agreed to by the employer and the employees or their representatives.
(2) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the hours of work.
(3) Employee to be given 32 consecutive hours free from duty each week unless the Board approves of some other
arrangement.
(4) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(5) Copy of Order to be posted.
(6) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of employees to be posted.
(7) True and correct records of wages paid to and hours worked each day by employees to be kept.
(8) Records to be produced for inspection when requested.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
LAUNDRY, CLEANING AND DYEING INDUSTRIES*
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 74 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946, Superseding Order No. 74
" Learner" means an employee of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry,
working under permit from the Board.
-
Rate
Hours
40c. per hour
(See note (4) re
daily guarantee.)
31c. per hour
34c. per hour
37c. per hour
40c. per hour
!
Learners, any age—■
44 per week.
Second 2 months  ___  	
8 per day.
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act " or
section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act " working under permit
Wage set in permit
Not more than 44
per week.
Note.—(1) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by
section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(2) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5 or
11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
(3) Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by the Board on joint written application of employer and employee.    See also Order No. 11 (1949).
(4) Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent
at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour
daily guarantee, except on Saturday when 3-hour daily guarantee applies. Daily guarantee may be varied by written
permission of the Board.
(5) Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
(6) Copy of Order to be posted.
(7) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(8) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(9) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(10) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 74a (1948). C 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
LOGGING INDUSTRY*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 1 (1947)
Effective February 1st, 1947, Superseding Order No. 1 (1943)
" Logging industry " means all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie,
shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to hauling, driving,
fluming, rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles.
This Order shall apply to every employer and every male employee in the logging industry
except:—.
(a) Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically denning their work.
(b) Watchmen or caretakers employed in logging camps in which operations are suspended.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Male employees  	
According to official scale of measurement, and such rate or price shall
be paid pro rata, according to the hours worked, to each and every
person so engaged under a contract or agreement for making
shingle-bolts;   that is, felling, bucking, splitting, and piling	
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " in respect of whom permits in writing have been issued by
the Board	
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and
44 hours in week (permits must be obtained from the Board to
work such overtime)
60c.
$2.00 per cord.
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
44
Note.—(1)  Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of Work
Act."
Persons making shingle-bolts.
Employees engaged exclusively in the transportation of men and supplies.
Persons regularly employed as boom-men and boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
Persons engaged in operating light plants in logging camps (Order Id (1948)).
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the *' Hours of Work Act " until the employee has completed the hours
so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his employees
to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act "  section number referred to in this Order is as it appears in the  " Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
* As amended by Male Minimum Wage Order No. Id (1948). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 77
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY*
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 25 (1948)
Effective August 12th, 1948, Superseding Order No. 25 (1947)
" Manufacturing industry " means the work of employees engaged in the making, preparing,
altering, repairing, ornamenting, printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for
use or sale any article or commodity.
" Learner" means employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry
working under permit from the Board.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining
their work.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
40c.
31c.
34c.
•37c.
40c.
(See note (7) re
daily guarantee.)
44
Learners (any age)—                                               •
44
44
Third  2  months   _	
Thereafter    	
44
44
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose
employment permits in writing have been issued by the Board _
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work
overtime, except in case of accident or emergency repair work coming within the provisions of section 6 of the " Hours of Work Act *'
or Regulation 6 of the Board)
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.-
44
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours
of work established pursuant to section 5 or 11 of the "Hours of Work Act" until the employee has completed the
hours so established; or to persons exempted from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act " pursuant
to the provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his employees
to be posted in his establishment.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent at
place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour
daily guarantee at employee's regular rate of pay.    Board may vary daily guarantee provisions.
(8) Under certain conditions, Board may vary daily guarantee and overtime provisions.
(9) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(10) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Orders Nos. 25a (1950) and 25b (1951). C 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 24 (1949)*
Effective January 1st, 1950, Superseding Orders Nos. 24 (1946) and 59
" Mercantile industry " means the work carried on in establishments operated for the purpose of
wholesale and (or) retail trade.
" Class A employees," those working from 39 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 39 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry, working
under permit from the Board.
Hours
Class  A  employees
Class   B   employees..
Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery	
$18.00 a week
47c. an hour
(See note (3) re
daily guarantee.)
35c. an hour.
39-44 per week.
Less than 39 per week.
8 per day;   44 per
week.
Learners (Any Age)
Class A Employees
Class B Employees
$12.00 per week 1st 2 months.
14.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
16.00 per week 3rd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
32c. per hour 1st 2 months.
37c. per hour 2nd 2 months.
42c. per hour 3rd 2 months.
47c. per hour thereafter.
(See note (3) re daily guarantee.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Note.—(1) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day and 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by
section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act " and Regulations 29b, 16f, and 19.
(2) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day and 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5 or
11 (3) or 11 (4) of "Hours of Work Act" or under Regulations 29b, 16f, and 19 until he has completed hours so
established. Overtime rate of pay does not apply to persons exempt from provisions of section 3 of " Hours of Work
Act " pursuant to provisions of section 4 of the said Act. Under certain conditions, overtime rates may be varied
by the Board.
(3) Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly. Employee reporting for work on call of employer
and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay.
Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of
Class B employees. (Note.—Daily guarantee does not apply to bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively
on delivery.)
(4) Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by Board on joint written application of employer and employee.    (See also Order No. 11 (1949).)
(5) Bicycle-riders and Foot-messengers.—That in cases where a bicycle is provided by the employee all reasonable
costs to the said employee in connection therewith, while the bicycle is actually in use on his employer's behalf, shall
be in addition to the minimum wages fixed herein.
(6) Copy of Order to be posted.
(7) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted. Record of wages and daily hours of
employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all
employees.
(8) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(9) See Order No. 3 (1946) re uniforms.
(10) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 24a (1952). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 79
OFFICE OCCUPATION
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 34 (1948)
Effective September 13th, 1948, Superseding Order No. 34 (1946)
" Office occupation" means the work of females employed as stenographers; book-keepers;
typists; billing clerks; filing clerks; cashiers; cash-girls; checkers; invoicers; comptometer operators;
auditors; attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices, and the work of females
employed in all kinds of clerical work.
" Class A employees," those working from 36 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 36 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 4 months' experience in the industry, working
under permit from the Board.
Rate
Hours
Class A employees _
Class B employees—
$18.00 a week
50c. an hour
(See note (4) re
daily guarantee.)
36-44 per week.
Less than 36 per week.
Learners (Any Age)
Class A Employees
Class B Employees
$14.00 per week  1st 2 months.
16.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
40c. per hour  1st 2 months.
45c. per hour 2nd 2 months.
50c. per hour thereafter.
(See note (4) re daily guarantee.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Note.—(1) Order does not apply to employees who hold positions of supervision or management, so long as the
duties performed by them are of a supervisory or managerial character.
(2) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section
5 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(3) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week, or in excess of hours authorized by the Board.
(4) Reporting on Call.—Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at
place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour
daily guarantee at employee's regular rate.
(5) Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by Board on joint written application of employer and employee.    See also Order No. 11  (1949).
(6) Uniforms.—See Order No. 3 (1946).
(7) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the daily guarantee and overtime provisions.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 71
Effective June 1st, 1940
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Rate per Hour
City of Vancouver, including Point Grey, City of New Westminster, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, City of North Vancouver, District of North Vancouver  	
90c.
Note.—(1) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(3) All wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
: As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. C 80 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 75
Effective June 2nd, 1941
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging" means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Area
Rate per Hour
Land   Districts   of   Victoria,   Lake,   North   Saanich,   South   Saanich,   Esquimau,   Highland,
Metchosui, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew	
90c.
Note.—(1) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(3) All wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
PATROLMEN*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 69
Effective February 5th, 1940
" Private patrol agency " means every person who by contract or agreement undertakes to watch
or patrol the premises of more than one person for the purpose of guarding or protecting persons or
property against robbery, theft, burglary, or other hazards.
" Patrolman" means an employee (not covered by any other Order of the Board) employed by a
private patrol agency.
Hourly rate   42c.
Note.—(1) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(3) Where uniforms are required, these are to be furnished without cost to the employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.   See also Order No. 3.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 81
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 5 (1947)
Effective August 25th, 1947, Superseding Orders Nos. 27, 27k, 27b, 27d
" Personal service occupation" means the work of persons engaged in massaging and physiotherapy as defined in the " Physiotherapists' and Massage Practitioners' Act," chiropody, chiropractic,
osteopathy, electrical treatments, general and specialized therapeutics, and all work of a like nature.
Rate
Hours per Week
Class  A  employees .
Class  B   employees .
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose
employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
$20.00 per week
50c. per hour
(See note (1) re
daily guarantee.)
The wage or rate of
pay   prescribed   in
the permit.
40-44
Less than 40 hours
per week.
Note.—(1) If called to work and not put to work, employee shall be paid for not less than 2 hours at the
employee's regular rate of pay, and if put to work, for not less than 4 hours at employee's regular rate.
(2) Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 8 in a day or 44 in a
week, or hours authorized by the Board.
(3) This Order does not apply to:—
(a) Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work:
(b) A graduate nurse who is in possession of a certificate showing she has completed a course of training in
general nursing provided in a hospital and who is employed as a nurse:
(c) A student-nurse in training in an approved school of nursing as defined by sections 22 and 23 of the
" Registered Nurses Act " of British Columbia.
(4) Copy of Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) Regarding uniforms, see Order No. 3 (1946).
(9) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
pipe-fitters.
PLUMBING AND PIPE-FITTING TRADE
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 13 (1949)
Effective July 25th, 1949
1 Plumbing and pipe-fitting trade " means and includes all work usually done by plumbers and
Rate
Hours
Plumbers   and   pipe-fitters.
Employees  classified  under  section  7   of  the   " Male  Minimum   Wage
Act "
$1.00 per hour
(See note (4) re
daily guarantee.)
Rate of pay prescribed in the permit
8 per day;   44 per
week.
8 per day;   44 per
week.
Note.—(1) Order does not apply to:—
(a) Employees who are permanently employed on maintenance work, etc.; and
(6) Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(2) Overtime.—Time and one-half the employee's regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 8 in the
day and 44 in the week.    (Permits shall be obtained from the Board to work such overtime.)
(3) Overtime rate of pay does not apply to:—
(a) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act " pursuant to the
provisions of section 4 of the said Act:
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or section 11 (3) or section It (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" until the
employee has completed the hours so established.
(4) An employee reporting for work on the call of an employer shall be paid his regular rate of pay for the entire
period spent at the place of work in response to the call, with a minimum of 2 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate.
(5) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(6) Copy of Order and schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(7) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of t':e names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(8) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(9) See Order No. 2 (19461 re apprentices.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. C 82
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT, ETC.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 67 (1948)*
Effective September 13th, 1948, Superseding Public Places of Amusement Order
" Class A employee " means an employee whose working-week consists of 40 hours or more.
" Class B employee " means an employee whose working-week consists of less than 40 hours.
" Learner" means an employee for whose employment a permit in writing has been issued by
the Board.
This Order applies to all persons employed in or about the following places to which a charge for
admission or service is made to the public:—
(a) Indoor or outdoor theatres and dance-halls or dance-pavilions, music-halls, concert-
rooms, lecture-halls (excluding in every instance players and artists); and
(b) Shooting-galleries,  bowling-alleys,  billiard-parlours and pool-rooms,  ice-rinks,  roller-
rinks, amusement parks, golf-courses, sports grounds and arenas; and
(c) Swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions and dressing-rooms, bathing-beaches, steam baths;
and
(d) Veterinary hospitals and establishments or offices where general and special therapeutics
is performed:
(e) Parking-lots, auto camps, shoe-shine establishments, and boat liveries.
This Order does not apply to:—
(a) Employees included in any other Order of the Board:
(b) Persons employed as caddies on or about golf-courses:
(c) Persons employed exclusively as watchmen; and
(d) Motion-picture projectionists.
Rate
Weekly Hours
Class A  employees          „ „ ' 	
$18.00 a week
45c. per hour
(See note (7) re
dailv guarantee.)
40-44
Learners
Class A Employees
Class B Employees
$14.00 per week 1st 2 months.
16.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
35c. per hour during 1st 2 months.
40c. per hour during 2nd 2 months.
45c. per hour thereafter.
(See note (7) re daily guarantee.)
Hourly Rate
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act " or section 6 of the
" Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose employment permits in writing have been issued
by the Board-     	
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and 44 hours in week
(permits required from the Board to work overtime)
Rate as set in permit.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
Note.—fl) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Employees working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 6 (a) of this Order until the employee has completed the hours so established:
(b) Persons holding positions of supervision or management or employed in a confidential ca~>ac;ty, so long as
the duties performed by him are of a supervisory or managerial character. The Board may determine
whether or not the position held by any person or the capacity in which he is employed is such as to bring
him within the scope of this paragraph.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of emplover to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 3-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
O0)  Sec Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(11)  " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 67a (1950). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 83
RADIO-BROADCAST TECHNICIANS
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 8 (1948)
Effective September 13th, 1948
" Radio-broadcast technician" means any employee engaged in the installation, operation, or
maintenance of radio-broadcast equipment, including television, voice and facsimile, or any rebroad-
cast apparatus by means of which electricity is applied in the transmission or transference, production,
or reproduction of voice and sound, including records, transcriptions, wire or tape recording, and
vision, with or without ethereal aid, including the cutting or processing, or both the cutting and
processing, of records and transcription.
This Order applies to all radio-broadcast technicians and their employers, except operators of
record-playing or transmitting and receiving communications equipment in establishments other than
radio-broadcast stations.
Hourly Rate
.   Weekly Hours
80c.
(See note (7) re
daily guarantee.)
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose
emplovment permits in writing have been issued by the Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and
44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work overtime)
44
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Radio-broadcast technicians working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 (a) of this Order until the radio-broadcast technician has completed
the hours so established:
(b) Radio-broadcast technicians holding positions of supervision or management or employed in a confidential
capacity, so long as the duties performed by them are of a supervisory or managerial character. The
Board may determine whether or not the position held by any person or the capacity in which he is
employed is such as to bring him within the scope of this paragraph.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employees' regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 2 re apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act."
(10) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." C 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
RADIO TECHNICIANS
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 7 (1948)
Effective May 31st, 1948
" Radio technician" means any employee engaged in:—
(a) The designing, repairing, adjusting, and installing of radio and electronic equipment,
including home radio receivers, record-playing apparatus, public-address and audio-
amplifier systems, and industrial electronic equipment; and
(b) The designing, repairing, and maintenance of long- and short-wave and ultra-high frequency receiving and transmitting equipment.
This Order shall apply to all radio technicians and their employers, except persons employed as
radio technicians in radio-broadcast stations.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
80c.
(denote (7) re
daily guarantee.)
Rate  of pay prescribed  in permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose
employment permits in writing have been issued by the Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and
44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work overtime)
44
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Radio technicians working under arrangements with respect of hours of work established pursuant to section 5 or section 11  (3) or section 11  (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" until the radio technician has
completed the hours so established:
(£)  Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the "Hours of Work Act" pursuant to the
provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(10) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
REST PERIODS*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 11 (1949)
Effective March 28th, 1949
This Order applies to every employer and to every female employee in every industry, business,
trade, and occupation to which the " Female Minimum Wage Act" applies, except female licentiates
of pharmacy.
Every employer shall allow every female employee at least one-half hour period free from duty
after not more than five (5) consecutive hours' employment, provided that if an employee is given a
rest period of not less than ten (10) minutes within the five (5) consecutive hours' employment, the
time within which the one-half hour period free from duty shall be given may be exceeded by not
more than one (1) hour.
Copy of Order to be posted.
* As amended by Female Minimum Wage Order No. 11a (1950). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 85
SAWMILL INDUSTRY
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 50 (1947)
Effective February 1st, 1947, Superseding Order No. 50 (1943)
" Sawmill industry " means all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills, veneer-
mills, lath-mills, and (or) planing-mills.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male employee in the sawmill industry,
except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Rate payable to at least 90% of total  	
Rate payable to balance of employees (inclusive of employees in respect
of whom a permit has been obtained under section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act") not less than _ 	
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act" for whose employment permits in writing have been issued
by the Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day or
44 hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
such overtime)
50c.
40c.
Rate as set out in
permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
44
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—■
(a) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of Work
Act."
Persons regularly employed as boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
(6) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act" or Regulation No. 2 made under the said Act
until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of employees
to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of ages, names,
occupations, and residential adresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this Order are as they appear in the " Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." C 86
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
" Sheet-metal
tion with:—
(a)
SHEET-METAL TRADE
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 10 (1948)
Effective September 13th, 1948
trade" means  and  includes  all  work usually done  by journeymen  in  connec-
The fabrication or installation, or both the fabrication and installation, of gravity or
forced air heating, or conditioned-air installation; or
(£>) The fabrication or erection, or both the fabrication and erection, or installation of any
sheet-metal work in connection with any residential, commercial, or industrial building,
plant, or establishment, or ship, boat, or barge.
This Order applies to every employer and every employee in the sheet-metal trade,  except
employees employed in the production-line or assembly-line manufacture of sheet-metal products
for resale.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Employees in sheet-metal trade-
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act" for whose employment permits in writing have been issued
by the Board  	
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work
overtime)
$1.00
(See note (7) re
daily guarantee.)
Rate as set in permit.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act" pursuant to the
provisions of section 4 of the said Act:
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" until the employee has
completed the hours so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a cali, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" section number referred to in this Order is as it appears in the " Revised Statutes
of British Columbia, 1948." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 87
SHINGLE INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 62 (1947)
Effective February 1st, 1947, Superseding Order No. 62 (1943) and Order No. 77 (1943)
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacturing of wooden shingles
or shakes.
" Square" means a roofing square of four bundles of shingles, understood and accepted as a
standard by the industry, and according to specification N.R.C. 5—1936 issued by the National
Research Council of Canada.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the shingle
industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
Per Square
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Sawyers—
No. 1 shingles	
Lower grade than No. 1 shingles -
Packers, all grades -
30c.
24c.
18c.
Other employees not included in any other Order o!
the Board    	
50c.
50c.
50c.
50c.
44
44
44
44
(Employees packing or sawing shingles on any other basis than by the square shall be paid on the
same proportionate basis.)
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose
employment permits in writing have been issued by the Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and
44 hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
such overtime)
Rate as set out in
permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
Note.—(1)  Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the "Hours of Work
Act."
Persons regularly employed as boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " or Regulation No. 2 made under the said Act
until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his employees
to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, occupations, and
residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." c
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 20 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946, Superseding Order No. 20
" Ship-building industry" means all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration,
repair, demolition, painting, cleaning, preserving, reconditioning, putting on or taking off the ways,
or dry-docking of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Rate
Hours
Employees doing the work usually done by journeymen, and without restricting the generality of the foregoing, the work of shipwrights,
joiners, boat-builders, caulkers, painters, fitters, electricians, machinists, boilermakers, plumbers and steam-fitters, blacksmiths, sheet-metal
workers, welders, hoistmen, engineers, riggers, and asbestos-workers
Employees exclusive of the above-mentioned  	
When 90% of total number of employees (exclusive of indentured apprentices) are paid not less than the 90c. or 60c. per hour rate, the
balance may be paid „_  .   	
Employees classified under section 6 of the Act working under permits	
90c. per hour
60c. per hour
45c. per hour
Rate set in permit
'   8 per day.
I 44 per week.
\   8 per day.
I 44 per week.
'   8 per day.
I 44 per week.
'   8 per day.
1 44 per week.
Note.—(1) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by
section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(2) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5 or 11
of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
(3) Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Copy of Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 89
TAXICAB-DRIVERS AND TAXICAB-DISPATCHERS
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 33 (1950)
Effective December 18th, 1950, Superseding Orders Nos. 33 (1940) and 60
" Taxicab-driver " means every male and female person in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle
with seating accommodation for nine passengers or less than nine passengers, used for the conveyance
of the public, and which is driven or operated for hire.
" Taxicab-dispatcher " means every male and female person responsible for assigning work to
taxicab-drivers or directing their movement.
Rate
Taxicab-drivers and taxicab-dispatchers	
Overtime—
First 2 hours in excess of 8 in any one day-
Hours in excess of 10 in any one day	
Hours in excess of 48 in any one week, excluding overtime paid on daily basis-
55c. per hour.
Time and one-half of the
employee's regular rate.
Double the employee's
regular rate.
Time and one-half of the
employee's regular rate.
(1) Drivers and dispatchers shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay.
(3) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(4) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 79
Effective April 16th, 1945, Superseding Order Effective April 5th, 1920
" Telephone and telegraph occupation" means the work of all persons employed in connection
with the operating of the various instruments, switch-boards, and other mechanical appliances used in
connection with telephony and telegraphy.
Rate
Maximum Hours
Employees, any age—
For first 3 weeks...
For following month..
For following 2 months..
For following 3 months-
Thereafter  —
$1.80 per day
2.52 per day
2.76 per day
3.00 per day
3.36 per day
8 per day.
48 per week.
Note.—(1) Part-time employees' wages shall be prorated.
(2) Employees required to report for work to receive at least 3 hours' pay per day.
(3) In emergencies employees may work up to 56 hours per week, with one and one-half times their regular rate
of pay for hours in excess of 48.
(4) Where employees reside on employers' premises, an arrangement may be made for employees to answer
emergency calls between 10 p.m. and 8 a.m., subject to approval in writing by the Board.
(5) Working-hours shall be confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of work.
(6) Every employee shall have a rest period of 24 consecutive hours in each calendar week.
(7) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(8) Where hours of work in bona-fide trade-union agreements differ from those prescribed by the Order, the
Board may, in its discretion, exempt in writing the union and the employer from sections in the Order pertaining to
hours, to the extent mentioned in the exemption.
(9) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(10) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. C 90
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 26 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940, and Male
Minimum Wage Order No. 26a (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940
Superseding Order No. 26, Order No. 26b, and Order No. 26c
(This Order does not apply to employees covered by Order No. 9 (1948) of the Board.)
" Transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting
for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise,
article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or
delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public
vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier
of goods by rail, water, air, or road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some
destination other than the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours
Weekly Hours
(1) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 pounds net weight or over, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified in
section 7 hereof
Hourly rate	
(2) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than 2,000 pounds net weight, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, and operators of motor-cycles
with wheeled attachments, exclusive of those specified in section 7
hereof
Hourly rate  _ 	
(3) Operators of motor-cycles with not more than two wheels and without wheeled attachment
Hourly rate  	
(4) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery
or messenger work (e)
Hourly rate  	
(5) Swampers and helpers-
Hourly rate	
(6) Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than those covered by section
7 hereof
Hourly rate    	
Less than 40
54c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
36c.
Less than 40
24c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
54c.
(7) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of bread or in the
retail delivery of milk
Hourly rate, 48c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
40 and not more
than 50
42c.
40 and not more
than 48
30c.
40 and not more
than 48
20c.
40 and not more
than 50
42c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
Note.—(1) This Order does not apply to drivers, swampers, or helpers covered by Order No. 9  (1948)  of the
Board (see Order No. 26c (1948)).
(2) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's behalf shall
be in addition to above rates.
(3) Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(4) Milk-delivery men may work 15 hours in excess of 44 per week, provided not more than 10 hours are worked
in any one day, nor more than 350 hours over a period of 7 weeks.
(5) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 24 (1949).
(6) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 91
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 26b
Effective August 18th, 1941
(This Order does not apply to employees covered by Order No. 9 (1948) of the Board.)
" Transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting
for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise,
article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor
thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of
goods by rail, water, air, or road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some
destination other than the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
(1) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 pounds net weight or over, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified in
section 7 hereof
Hourly rate   	
(2) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than 2,000 pounds net weight, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified in
sections 3 and 7 hereof
Hourly rate   	
(3) Operators of motor-cycles with not more than two wheels and without wheeled attachment
Hourly rate   	
(4) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery
or messenger work
Hourly rate     _ 	
(5) Swampers and helpers
Hourly rate  	
(6) Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than those covered by section
7 hereof
Hourly rate       	
(7) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of bread or in the
retail delivery of milk
Hourly rate, 48c.
Weekly Hours
Less than 40
54c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
36c.
Less than 40
24c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
54c.
Weekly Hours
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
40 and not more
than 50
42c.
40 and not more
than 48
30c
40 and not more
than 48
20c.
40 and not more
than 50
42c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
Note.—(1) This Order does not apply to drivers, swampers or helpers covered by Order No. 9  (1948)  of the
Board (see Order No. 26c (1948)).
(2) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's be'.ialf shall
be in addition to above rates.
(3) Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(4) Milk-delivery employees may work 15 hours in excess of 44 per week, provided not more than 10 hours are
worked in any one day, nor more than 350 hours over a period of 7 weeks.
(5) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(6) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(7) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(8) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
: As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 26c (1948)
Effective September 13th, 1948
This Order amends Orders Nos. 26 (1940) and 26b by deleting from the application of those
Orders employees in the transportation industry to whom Order No. 9 (1948) applies. C 92
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
UNDERTAKING BUSINESS
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 15 (1949)
Effective February 5th, 1950
" Undertaking business" means work performed in the preparing of the dead for burial and
arranging for and conducting funerals, and, without restricting the generality of the foregoing, includes
the work of funeral attendants and funeral chauffeurs.
" Class A employee " means a male employee whose working-week consists of 40 hours or more.
" Class B employee " means a male employee whose working-week consists of less than 40 hours.
Rate
Hours
Class  A  employees-
Class  B   employees-
Employees classified under section 7 of the
Act "
' Male Minimum  Wage
$33.00 per week
80c. per hour
(See note (3) re
daily guarantee.)
Rate of pay prescribed in permit.
40-44 per week.
Less than 40 per
week.
Note.—(1) Order applies in the following areas: City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point
Grey, which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the City of Vancouver; the City of New Westminster; the
Municipality of the District of Burnaby; the Municipality of the District of West Vancouver; the City of North
Vancouver; the District of North Vancouver; the City of Victoria; the Municipality of the District of Oak Bay; the
Municipality of the District of Saanich;   the Municipality of the District of Esquimau.
(2) Order does not apply to (a) musicians and vocalists; (b) employees covered by another Order of the Board
specifically defining their work; (c) persons holding positions of supervision or management or employed in a confidential capacity, so long as the duties performed by them are of a supervisory or managerial character.
(3) Daily Guarantee.—A minimum of 2 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate if the employee does not commence work and 4 hours' pay at the regular rate if the employee commences work, unless varied by the Board.
(4) Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases different arrangements are
approved by the Board.
(5) Employees Residing on Premises.—The Board may approve an arrangement made between the employer and
the employee for the employee to answer emergency calls. Hours worked under such arrangement are not considered
as hours worked for the purposes of computing overtime, etc.
(6) Overtime.—Time and one-half of the employee's regular rate of pay for hours worked in excess of 8 in the
day and 44 in the week, except as provided in Notes 5 and 7.
(7) Board may vary the 8-hour-day and 44-hour-week provisions of the Order under certain circumstances.
(8) Split Shifts.—Working-hours of employees working on a split shift shall be confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of work. The time spent by the employee answering emergency calls referred to in
Note 5 is not considered time worked for the purposes of this provision.
(9) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(10) Copy of Order to be posted.
(11) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted. Record of wages and daily hours of
employees to be kept, together with register in the English language of names, ages, occupations, and residential
addresses of all employees.
(12) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(13) See Order No. 3 (1946) re uniforms.
(14) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 93
COST AND UPKEEP OF UNIFORMS
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 3 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946
1. Applies to every employer and to every male and female employee in every industry, business,
trade, and occupation to which the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts apply.
2. (1) Subject to the provisions of subsection (2), when an employee is required to wear a
uniform or special article of wearing-apparel, it shall be furnished, cleaned, laundered, or repaired
free of cost to employee by employer.
(2) Where employer and employee make written application to the Board, the Board may give
written approval to a different arrangement regarding uniforms.
WOOD-WORKING INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 49 (1947)
Effective February 1st, 1947, Superseding Order No. 49 (1943)
" Wood-working industry" means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of
manufacturing sash and doors, cabinets, show-cases, office and store furniture and fixtures, wood
furnishings, plywood, veneer products, and general mill-work products.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the woodworking industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining
their work.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Rate payable to at least 85% of total     	
Rate payable to balance of employees (inclusive of employees in respect
of whom a permit has been obtained under section 7 of " Male
Minimum Wage Act " or section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage
Act ")  not less than
Employees classified under section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
and section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day or
44 hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
such overtime)
50c.
40c.
Rate as set out in
permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
44
44
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of Work
Act."
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or 11 of the "Hours of Work Act" until the employee has completed the hours so
established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his employees.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, occupations, and
residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
Note.—The minimum wage rates provided in the Summary of Orders include the 20-percent increase provided in General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946) wherever it applies. C 94
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
GENERAL INTERIM MINIMUM WAGE ORDER (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946
1. That this Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in every
industry, business, trade, or occupation covered by the following orders, namely: —
Order
No.
Industry
Date of Order
Minimum
Wage
Act
17 (1942)
•55 (1943)
70
76
•58
•65
•66
•72
♦73
•68
12 (1940)
•53
•54
•18 (1942)
•39 (1940)
78
•51
•43 (1942)
»44 (1942)
* 1 (1943)
•25 (1942)
•24
•59
75
71
69
•27
•67
•50 (1943)
•62 (1943)
•77 (1943)
•33 (1940)
•60
79
t26 (1940)
t26B
•49 (1943)
Baking	
Box-manufacture   	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Saltspring Island)	
Bus-drivers   .	
Carpentry (Vancouver and District)	
Carpentry (Kootenay Area)	
Carpentry (Victoria and District)  	
Carpentry (Alberni) 	
Carpentry (Nanaimo)	
Christmas-trees  	
Construction 	
Elevator Operators	
Elevator Operators 	
Engineers, Stationary Steam .	
First-aid Attendants   _
Fishing - 	
Household Furniture	
Janitors        	
Janitresses       	
Logging—   	
Manufacturing     	
Mercantile  .	
Mercantile      	
Painters,  Decorators,   and  Paper-hangers   (southerly portion  of
Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers (Vancouver and District)	
Patrolmen	
Personal Service 	
Public Places of Amusement	
Sawmills - 	
Shingle  	
Shingle	
Taxicab-drivers	
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)	
Telephone and Telegraph	
Transportation- 	
Transportation  	
Wood-working „	
July 15, 1942	
July 14, 1943	
March 12, 1940	
September 21, 1942-
September 15, 1938-
June 23, 1939 	
August 16, 1939	
May 14, 1940	
May 14, 1940	
August 31, 1939	
November 26, 1940-
February 28, 1938
February 28, 1938	
September 9, 1942	
October 8, 1940	
April 14, 1943	
November 17, 1937—
September 9, 1942	
September 9, 1942	
July 14, 1943	
October 15, 1942	
May 29, 1935	
October 12, 1938	
April 22, 1941	
April 26, 1940	
January 19, 1940	
August 29, 1935	
August 31, 1939	
June 25, 1943	
July 23, 1943	
July 23, 1943	
October 8, 1940	
November 15, 1938	
March 13, 1945	
October 8, 1940	
August 12, 1941	
July 14, 1943	
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male,
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
2. That on and after the 1st day of July, 1946, all minimum wage-rates fixed by the orders of
the Board, as set out in section 1 of this Order, are hereby increased by adding thereto 20 per cent of
such minimum wage-rates.
3. That the orders as set out in section 1 of this Order are varied accordingly.
4. That this Order, made by the Board at Victoria, B.C., on the 25th day of June, 1946, and
published in The British Columbia Gazette on the 27th day of June, 1946, shall take effect on the 1st
day of July, 1946.
* Orders revised after July 1st, 1946.
t Orders Nos. 26 (1940) and 26b have been revised in part.
See Order No. 26c (1948) and Order No. 9 (1948).
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS
The following is a complete list of all Orders in effect at October 1st, 1951: —
Serial
No.
Industry
Date of
Order
Date
Gazetted
Date
Effective
Minimum
Wage Act
41
2 (1951)
6 (1952)
17 (1942)
42 (1946)
55 (1947)
76
Apprentices Indentured	
Apprentices Indentured	
Automotive Repair and Gasoline Service-
station
Baking
Barbering.
B ox-manufacturing
Bus-drivers (Vancouver and Vicinity)..
Feb. 3/37 _
Dec. 17/51
Apr. 17/52
July 15/42.
June 19/46
Jan.16/47-
Sept. 21/42
Feb.11/37
Dec. 27/51
Apr. 24/52.
July 16/42 -
June 27/46
Jan. 23/47.
Sept. 24/42
Feb. 11/37-
Dec. 27/51.
Apr. 24/52.
July 20/42-
July 1/46-
Feb.1/47 _
Sept. 28/42
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951 C 95
BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS—Continued
Serial
No.
Industry
Date of
Order
Date
Gazetted
Date
Effective
Minimum
Wage Act
70
70a
58 (1947)
68 (1947)
12 (1940)
4 (1946)
9 (1948)
9a (1948)
9b (1950)
53 (1949)
18 (1951)
39 (1948)
78
46 (1946)
46a (1950)
47 (1946)
47a (1946)
47b (1950)
14 (1949)
27 (1947)
16 (1949)
52 (1951)
54 (1952)
51 (1947)
43 (1950)
44 (1950)
74 (1946)
74a (1948)
1(1947)
Id (1948)
25 (1948)
25a (1950)
25b (1951)
24 (1949)
24a (1952)
34 (1948)
75
71
69
5 (1947)
13 (1949)
67 (1948)
67a (1950)
8 (1948)
7 (1948)
11 (1949)
11a (1950)
50 (1947)
10 (1948)
62 (1947)
20 (1946)
33 (1950)
79
26 (1940)
26a (1940)
26b
26c (1948)
15 (1949)
3 (1946)
49 (1947)
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Carpentry     	
Christmas-tree 	
Construction
Cook- and Bunk-house Occupation (in
Unorganized Territory)
Drivers, Swampers, or Helpers in Transportation Industry as defined
Drivers, Swampers, or Helpers in Transportation Industry as defined
Drivers, Swampers, or Helpers in Transportation Industry as defined
Elevator Operators
Engineers, Stationary Steam-
First-aid Attendants	
Fishing _
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable _ 	
Fruit and Vegetable	
Fruit and Vegetable	
General   Interim  Minimum  Wage   Order
(1946)
Grass Dehydration  	
Hairdressing
Hospital Institutions -
Hotel and Catering.
Hotel and Catering (Resort Hotels) (Unorganized Territory)
Household Furniture 	
Janitor and Janitress in Apartment Buildings
Janitor and Janitress in Buildings Other
than Apartment Buildings 	
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing	
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing	
Logging  	
Logging   	
Manufacturing	
Manufacturing 	
Manufacturing-  	
Mercantile	
Mercantile  	
Office Occupation _
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(Southerly Portion Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(Vancouver and District)
Patrolman     	
Personal Service-
Plumbing and Pipe-fitting	
Public Places of Amusement, etc.-
Public Places of Amusement, etc.-
Radio-broadcast Technicians	
Radio Technicians 	
Rest Periods   .—
Rest Periods	
Sawmills  	
Sheet-metal Trade _
Shingle	
Ship-building .
Taxicab Drivers and Dispatchers .
Telephone and Telegraph	
Transportation	
Transportation  	
Transportation 	
Transportation  	
Undertaking Business 	
Uniforms, Cost and Upkeep of-
Wood-working	
Mar. 12/40	
June 21/40 —
July 29/47
May 9/47	
Nov. 26/40	
June 26/46	
Aug. 3/48	
Dec. 3/48	
Aug. 8/50 -—
Jan.10/49	
Aug. 24/51	
May 20/48	
Apr. 14/43	
June 25/46 —
Nov. 24/50 -
June 25/46	
Apr. 18/47	
Nov. 24/50.	
June 25/46	
May 26/49	
May 2/47-	
Nov. 4/49	
Dec. 17/51 —
May 2/52	
Jan. 16/47	
Nov. 24/50	
Nov. 24/50—
June 25/46.	
Nov. 25/48—
Jan. 16/47—
June 4/48	
Aug. 3/48	
Nov. 24/50	
Aug. 24/51	
Nov. 4/49	
Apr. 17/52.	
Aug. 3/48	
Apr. 22/41—
Apr. 26/40 —.
Jan.19/40	
Aug. 15/47	
June 16/49	
Aug. 3/48	
May 11/50	
Aug. 3/48	
May 20/48.	
Feb.16/49	
Oct. 6/50	
Jan. 16/47.	
Aug. 3/48	
Jan. 16/47	
June 19/46.	
Nov. 13/50	
Mar. 13/45	
Oct. 8/40	
Nov. 26/40
Aug. 12/41	
Aug. 3/48	
Dec. 9/49	
June 19/46	
Jan. 16/47...	
Mar. 14/40...
June 27/40—
July 31/47	
May 15/47—
Nov. 28/40-
July 4/46..—
Aug. 12/48—
Dec. 9/48	
Aug. 17/50-
Jan. 20/49	
Aug. 30/51—
May 27/48	
Apr. 22/43....
June 27/46 _
Nov. 30/50 —
June 27/46 —
Apr. 24/47 -
Nov. 30/50 ...
June 27/46 —
June 2/49-	
May 8/47	
Nov. 10/49—
Jan. 3/52	
May 8/52	
Jan. 23/47—
Nov. 30/50 -
Dec. 7/50	
June 27/46 —
Dec. 2/48	
Jan. 23/47	
June 10/48 —
Aug. 12/48 —
Nov. 30/50...
Aug. 30/51—
Dec. 1/49	
Apr. 24/52	
Aug. 12/48—
Apr. 24/41—
May 2/40	
Jan. 25/40 —
Aug. 21/47—
June 23/49—
Aug. 12/48—
May 18/50—
Aug. 12/48—
May 27/48 —
Feb.24/49	
Oct. 12/50	
Jan. 23/47	
Aug. 12/48 —
Jan. 23/47	
June 27/46 —
Nov. 23/50-
Mar. 15/45—
Oct. 10/40
Nov. 28/40 -
Aug. 14/41 —
Aug. 12/48 —
Feb. 2/50 -
June 27/46—
Jan. 23/47	
Mar. 18/40—
June 27/40 _
Aug. 4/47—
May 15/47	
Nov. 28/40 —
July 8/46	
Sept. 13/48—
Dec. 9/48 -	
Aug. 17/50 —
Jan. 31/49—
Sept. 24/51	
May 31/48	
May 3/43	
July 1/46	
Feb. 1/51	
July 1/46	
Apr. 24/47-—
Feb.1/51	
July 1/46	
June 2/49	
May 12/47-	
Nov. 10/49	
Feb. 1/52	
June 1 to Sept
30 each year
Feb.1/47	
Jan.1/51	
Jan. 1/51	
July 1/46	
Dec. 2/48 —
Feb.1/47	
June 10/48	
Aug. 12/48 - -
Nov. 30/50	
Aug. 31/51	
Jan.1/50	
Apr. 24/52
Sept. 13/48—
June 2/41	
June 1/40	
Feb.5/40	
Aug. 25/47—
July 25/49.	
Sept. 13/48—
May 18/50	
Sept. 13/48 -
May 31/48	
Mar. 28/49—
Oct. 16/50.	
Feb.1/47	
Sept. 13/48 —
Feb. 1/47.	
July 1/46	
Dec. 18/50	
Apr. 16/45 —
Oct. 10/40.	
Nov. 28/40	
Aug. 18/41	
Sept. 13/48—
Feb.5/50	
July 1/46	
Feb. 1/47	
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and
Male and
Male and
Male.
Male.
Male and
Male and
Male and
Male and
Male and
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and
Male.
Male and
Male and
Male and
Male and
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and
Male.
Male and
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male and
Male.
Male and
Male and
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female. C 96 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO
" HOURS OF WORK ACT "
(And as Amended by Interim Amendments (1946), Effective July 1st, 1946)
Section 3.—■" Subject to the exceptions provided by or under this Act, the
working-hours of an employee in any industrial undertaking shall not exceed eight
in the day and forty-four in the week."
E IT KNOWN that the  Board of Industrial  Relations  has made the following regulations,
namely:—•
Note.—Regulation No. 1 cancelled by No. 30.   Cancellation effective October 31st, 1945.
B
Lumbering, Night Shift
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may work a total
of 44 hours each week in five nights, in lieu of 44 hours each week in six nights, but the number of
hours worked in any night must not exceed 9.
Logging
3. Persons employed in:—
(1) The logging industry in:—
(a) Booming operations; or
(b) Transporting logs by logging-railway, motor-truck, flume, horse, or river-driving; or
(c) Transporting workmen or supplies for purposes of the said industry;
(d) The occupation of boatman;
(e) The occupation of emergency fire-fighters:
Fish-canning
(2) Canning fish or manufacturing by-products from fish, but not those engaged in salting fish;
and in
Cook and Bunk Houses
(3) Cook and bunk houses in connection with any industrial undertaking in unorganized
territory,—
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed by section 3 of the said Act.
Engineers, Operators, Firemen, and Oilers or Greasers
4b. In all industrial undertakings which use steam, gasoline, or diesel engines, or electric energy
as motive power and which are operated with a single shift of engineers or operators, firemen, and
oilers or greasers, the engineers or operators, firemen, and oilers or greasers may work overtime to
the extent of one hour per day to perform preparatory or complementary work in addition to the
maximum hours of work prescribed by section 3, or established pursuant to section 5, 11 (3), or
11 (4) of the Act, with effect from the 13th day of January, 1949.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 11th day of January, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 13th, 1949.)
Note.—Regulation No. 5 cancelled by No. 5a, October 9th, 1947.
Emergency Repairs
6. While engaged upon repair work requiring immediate performance, persons employed in
shipyards, engineering-works, machine-shops, foundries, welding plants, sheet-metal works, belt-works,
saw-works, and plants of a like nature may work such hours in addition to the working-hours limited
by section 3 of the said Act as (but not more than) may be necessary to prevent serious loss to, or
interruption in the operation of, the industrial undertaking for which the repairs are being made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks
7. Persons employed in the manufacture of wooden boxes or wooden containers for shipment
or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables may work during the months of June, July, August, and
September in each year such hours in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as
may from time to time be necessary to fill urgent orders.
Note.—Regulation No. 8 cancelled by No. 8a, February 13th, 1936.
Note.—Regulation No. 9 cancelled by No. 9a, September 26th, 1940.
Seasonal Lithographing
10. During the months of May, June, July, August, September, and October in each year persons
employed in the lithographing industry may work such hours in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said Act as may from time to time be necessary to fill urgent orders. This exemption
shall only apply when sufficient competent help is not available. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951 C 97
Temporary Exemptions
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed by the Board by the granting of written temporary
exemption permits limiting by their terms the extent thereof, but only upon being satisfied by
application in writing, signed by the applicant or someone thereunto duly authorized, of the urgency
and necessity for the exception, that it is of a temporary nature, and that no other means of adequately
overcoming such temporary urgent condition is, or has been, reasonably available, and that the
additional working-hours applied for will not be more than will suffice for the extra pressure of work
requiring the same.
Overtime Record
12. Every employer shall keep a record in the manner required by subsection (1) of section 9
of the said Act of all additional hours worked in pursuance of section 6 of the said Act or in pursuance
of any regulation.
12a. Every employer shall furnish the Board with a copy of his payroll, or record in such form
prescribed by the Board, showing the hours worked and the nature of the work performed by his
employees in respect of section 6 of the Act, or Regulations Nos. 6 and 11 of the Board, not later than
15 days after such hours have been worked.    (Effective December 12th, 1940.)
13. Every employer shall notify, by means of the posting of notices in conspicuous places in
the works or other suitable place, where the same may readily be seen by all persons employed by
him, the hours at which work begins and ends, and, where work is carried on by shifts, the hours at
which each shift begins and ends; also such rest intervals accorded during the period of work as are
not reckoned as part of the working-hours; these hours shall be so fixed that the duration of the work
shall not exceed the limits prescribed by the " Hours of Work Act, 1934," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall not be changed except upon 24 hours' notice of such
change posted as hereinbefore specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption granted
by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12 of the Act or Regulation 11 above,
a like notice of the change in working-hours shall be posted, which notice shall also state the grounds
on which the exemption was granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia, this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th, 1934.   Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 14
Occupation of Barbering
The occupation of barbering is hereby added to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 24th day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd, 1934.   Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15
Mercantile Industry
The mercantile industry is hereby added to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 7th day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th, 1934.    Effective August 9th, 1934.)
Regulations Nos. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d Cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15e
Mercantile Industry
Note.—Regulation No. 15e cancelled by No. 29, September 30th, 1939.
4 C 98 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Regulations Nos. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, and 16e Cancelled by
REGULATION No. 16f
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores
1. Persons employed in drug-stores as registered apprentices, certified clerks, or licentiates of
pharmacy may work not more than 88 hours in any two successive weeks, but in no case shall the
hours of work of any such registered apprentice, certified clerk, or licentiate of pharmacy exceed 48
hours in any one week, or 9 hours in any one day.
2. Regulation No. 16e of the Board made and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of August,
1938, is hereby cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 6th, 1939.    Effective April 6th, 1939.)
REGULATION No. 17
Baking Industry
The baking industry, by which expression is meant all operations in or incidental to the manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or cakes, is hereby added to the Schedule of the said Act,
the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the 6th day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd, 1934.   Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 17c
Baking Industry
With effect from the 30th day of December, 1948, the working-hours of persons employed in the
baking industry as deliverymen may exceed 8 in the day and 44 in the week, but, subject to the exceptions provided by or under the said Act, in no case shall the weekly limit of hours of work prescribed
by section 3 of the said Act be exceeded by more than 4 hours.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 15th day of December, 1948.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, December 16th, 1948.)
REGULATION No. 18
Catering Industry
The catering industry, which includes all operations in or incidental to the preparation or to the
serving, or to both preparation and serving, of meals or refreshments where the meals or refreshments
are served or intended to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-house, dance-hall, cabaret, banquet-
hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunch-room, lunch-counter, ice-cream parlour, soda-fountain, or in any other
place where food is served and a charge is made for the same either directly or indirectly, whether
such charge is made against the persons who partake of the meals or refreshments or against some
other person, is hereby added to the Schedule to the said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the
9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on the 1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th, 1934.   Effective December 1st, 1934.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1951
REGULATION No. 19
C 99
Retail Florists
Persons employed in the establishments of retail florists may work such hours in addition to the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the said Act as (but only so many as) shall be necessary to
surmount extraordinary conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome: Provided that
the working-hours of such persons shall not exceed 88 hours on the average in any two successive
weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions the decision of the Board shall be final, and where the
Board is of the opinion that, under the provisions of this regulation, the working-hours limited by
section 3 of the Act are being unduly exceeded, the Board shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the employer's establishment from the provisions of this regulation for such period
of time as the Board considers advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th, 1934.    Effective November 15th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 20
Occupation of Elevator Operator
The occupation of elevator operator is hereby added to the Schedule to the said Act, the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by
Order in Council dated the 15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 28th day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 28th, 1935.    Effective February 28th, 1935.)
Regulations Nos. 21, 21b, 21c, 21d, 21e, 21f, 21g, 21h, 21j, and 21k Cancelled by
REGULATION No. 21M
Fruit and Vegetable Industry
The fruit and vegetable industry, which means all operations in establishments operated for the
purpose of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable, is hereby
exempt from the operation of the " Hours of Work Act" from June 1st to November 30th, inclusive,
in each year.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 27th, 1946.   Effective July 1st, 1946.)
REGULATION No. 22
Transportation Industry
The transportation industry, which includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or
transporting for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares,
merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the
carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of
any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private,
or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any
other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or road transport, for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery
terminates, is hereby added to the Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934," the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained
by Order in Council dated the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.   Effective June 20th, 1935.) C 100 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
REGULATION No. 23
Transportation Industry
1. That where used in this regulation the expression "transportation industry" includes all
operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means whatever, other
than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material the property
of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article,
articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or
on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or road
transport, for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place at
which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation industry, other than those employed as (a) operators
of motor-cycles, (b) bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of milk, are hereby permitted
to work 6 hours per week in excess of the hours prescribed by section 3 of the said " Hours of Work
Act, 1934," in accordance with the provisions of Order No. 26 of the said Board of Industrial Relations dated the 19th day of June, 1935, fixing minimum wages in the transportation industry: Provided that no such employee in the transportation industry shall work more than 10 hours in any
one day.
3. That employees in the transportation industry employed as drivers of vehicles in the retail
delivery of milk are hereby permitted to work 15 hours per week in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934 ": Provided that over a period of seven weeks no
such employee shall work more than 350 hours, nor more than 10 hours in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.   Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24
Occupation of Hotel Clerk
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes the work of all persons engaged as room clerks
(day or night), mail clerks, information clerks, cashiers, book-keepers, accountants, telephone
operators, and any other persons employed in clerical work in hotels, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said "Hours of Work Act, 1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the
20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 26th, 1935.   Effective September 26th, 1935.)
Note.—Regulation No. 26 cancelled by No. 30.   Cancellation effective October 31st, 1945.
Note.—Regulation Nos. 28 and 28a cancelled by No. 28b. Cancellation effective December
17th, 1950.
REGULATION No. 29b
Mercantile Industry
With effect from the 12th day of July, 1951, persons employed in the mercantile industry, which
includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade in the Province
of British Columbia, with the exception of the City of Vancouver, the City of North Vancouver, the
Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the District of Burnaby, the City
of Victoria, the Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt, the Municipality of the District of Oak
Bay, the Municipality of the District of Saanich, and the City of New Westminster, may work 3 hours
per day in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said Act on one day of each week, either
Friday or Saturday, and on the day preceding a statutory holiday when such statutory holiday occurs
on a Saturday, but the total hours worked in any one week shall not exceed 44.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 5th day of July, 1951.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, July 12th, 1951.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
REGULATION No. 30
C 101
Lumbering East of the Cascades
Be it known that, pursuant to and by virtue of the powers and authority vested in the Board of
Industrial Relations by the " Hours of Work Act," the said Board hereby cancels Regulation No. 1
of the Board, dated the 14th day of June, 1934, and Regulation No. 26 of the Board, dated the 23rd
day of March, 1938, such cancellation to be effective as and from the 31st day of October, 1945.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th day of September, 1945.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 27th, 1945.)
REGULATION No. 31
Occupation of Cemetery-workers
The occupation of cemetery-workers is hereby added to the Schedule to the " Hours of Work
Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated the 6th day of December, 1946.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 11th day of December, 1946.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 23rd, 1947.)
REGULATION No. 33
Occupations of Stationary Steam Engineer and Special Engineer
The occupation of stationary steam engineer, by which expression is meant every employee
engaged in the occupation of producing steam in a steam plant under the authority of a certificate
of competency, as defined by the " Boiler Inspection Act" of the Province of British Columbia, or
who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while under steam-pressure or in
motion, and the occupation of special engineer, by which expression is meant every employee operating under the authority of a special certificate or a temporary certificate, as defined by the said
" Boiler Inspection Act," are hereby added to the Schedule to the " Hours of Work Act," the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by
Order in Council dated the 10th day of October, 1947.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 21st day of October, 1947.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, October 23rd, 1947.)
REGULATION No. 34
Occupations of Bar-tender, Waiter, and Utility Man, within Premises Covered by Beer
Licences Issued Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 28 of the " Government Liquor
Act."
The occupations of bar-tender, waiter, and utility man, within premises covered by beer licences
issued pursuant to the provisions of section 28 of the " Government Liquor Act," are hereby added
to the Schedule of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to
such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the 16th day of
September, 1947.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 16th day of September, 1947.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 18th, 1947.)
PROVINCIAL LIBRARY
VICTORIA. B. C. C 102
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
REGULATION No. 34e
Occupations of Bar-tender, Waiter, and Utility Man, within Premises Covered by Beer
Licences Issued Pursuant to the Provisions of the " Government Liquor Act "
The working-hours of persons employed as bar-tenders, waiters, and utility men working on a
split shift, within premises covered by beer licences issued pursuant to the provisions of the " Government Liquor Act," shall be confined within 13 hours immediately following commencement of work.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 6th day of July, 1950.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, July 13th, 1950.)
REGULATION No. 35
Grass-dehydration Industry
Persons other than office employees employed in the grass-dehydration industry, which means
all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of dehydrating or processing grasses, clovers,
and alfalfa, are hereby exempt from the operation of the " Hours of Work Act" from April 1 st to
September 30th, inclusive, in each year.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 26th day of May, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 2nd, 1949.)
REGULATION No. 36
Logging Industry—Hostlers
That effective from the 21st day of July, 1949, the working-hours of persons employed as hostlers,
working on a split shift, in the logging industry shall be confined within 16 hours immediately following
commencement of work.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 18th day of July, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, July 21st, 1949.)
" HOURS OF WORK ACT," " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT," AND
"MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT"
The Board authorizes the following persons, namely:—
The Chairman of the Board of Industrial Relations,
The Chief Administrative Officer,
The Supervisor of the Vancouver office,
The Supervisor of Inspectors in the Interior,—
to issue temporary exemptions to industrial undertakings to deal with exceptional cases of pressure
of work, and to issue permission in writing allowing the working-hours of any employee in an industrial undertaking in such exceptional cases to exceed the limit of 8 hours a day or 44 hours a week.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 9th, 1947.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 103
REPORT OF LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD  (BRITISH COLUMBIA)
Head office	
Branch office -
Members of the Board
D'Arcy J. Baldwin, Chairman	
Lieut.-Col. Macgregor F. Macintosh_
F. W. Smelts, M.B.E 	
Harry Strange..
George A. Wilkinson-
Edward A. Jamieson..
Secretary
—Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
-570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
..Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
..Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
-570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
-570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
 Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
-570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
B. H. E. Goult-
N. deW. Lyons.
W. Fraser-
R. G. Clements.
Chief Executive Officer
Registrar
Senior Conciliation Officer
Assistant Registrar
.Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
-Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
..570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
..570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
The Honourable John H. Cates,
Minister of Labour,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the Fourth Annual Report of the Labour
Relations Board (British Columbia) for the year ended December 31st, 1951.
The main object of the "Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act" being the
maintenance and continuance of industrial peace in British Columbia, the Board has at
all times kept the objects of this legislation before it. The Board has consistently adhered
to the practice, established in 1948, of giving the fullest opportunity to all parties interested in appearing before it in person, and of making representations, to do so. That
full advantage has been taken of the opportunity thus presented is evidenced by the fact
that seventy-four delegations have appeared before the full Board, and that 770 delegations have appeared before Committees of the Board.
Fifty-four meetings of the full Board were held during the year.
The Board has, as occasion permitted, held Board or Committee meetings not only
in Vancouver and Victoria but at Nanaimo, Duncan, Sardis, Penticton, Prince George,
Williams Lake, Quesnel, Wells, Courtenay, Kamloops, and Osoyoos. Four hundred and
seventy-seven Committee meetings have been held.
Due to increased industrial activity throughout the Province, the year under review
has been extremely busy, both for the Board and its staff. There has been a sharp
increase in the number of disputes which have come before the Board; in the number of
Conciliation Officers instructed; Boards of Conciliation established; and representation
votes supervised.
During this period the Board has again devoted a great deal of time to the mediation
of industrial disputes where all other means had failed.
In 185 disputes in the wooden-ship building, food, fertilizer, hardware, brewing,
baking, building, transportation, building supplies, hotel, lumber, ice, and fuel industries,
last-minute settlements were reached through the good offices of the Board after a strike
vote had been taken. C 104 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Forty-nine strikes were brought to conclusion and a satisfactory agreement reached
in the following industries: Mining, transportation, veneer, furniture, oil, building, construction, paper converting, battery building, brewing, and automobile.
The Weekly Summary issued by the Board, which is descriptive of appointments of
Conciliation Officers, Conciliation Boards, and the issuance of certificates of bargaining
authority, continues to prove popular, and has a mailing list of 260. The distribution of
news releases to the press, a service begun in 1949, was continued during the year.
The Board has continued its practice of familiarizing the general public with the
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act," and in that and related connections its
members have addressed meetings of the following organizations during the year: Annual
Foremen's Conferences, Forest Industrial Relations, Vancouver, Victoria, Duncan,
Courtenay, Nanaimo, New Westminster; B.C. Personnel Association, Vancouver, Victoria; International Woodworkers of America, B.C. District Council No. 1, Victoria;
Federation of Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Unions Convention, Vernon, Penticton;
Okanagan District Trades and Labour Council, Kelowna; British Columbia Federation
of Labour Convention, Vancouver; Vancouver Island Joint Council of Workers, Nanaimo; Kiwanis Club, Victoria, Duncan; Canadian Manufacturers Association, Vancouver and Victoria; Business and Professional Women's Club, Victoria; Rotary Clubs,
Mission City and Chilliwack; Metal Trades Association of B.C., Vancouver; North
Okanagan Trades and Labour Council Picnic, Winfield; United Packinghouse Workers
of America, Osoyoos, Penticton; United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of
America, Local 2493, Williams Lake; Summer School, Victoria; Eleventh Annual Convention, United Cement, Lime and Gypsum Workers District Council No. 2, Seattle;
Victoria Building Industries Exchange Semi-annual Dinner, Victoria; Ninth Annual Convention of the Joint Council of Public Employees (B.C. Division), New Westminster;
Manufacturing and Converting Group of the Pulp and Paper Industry of B.C., Second
Labour-Management Safety Conference, Vancouver; Provincial Trades and Labour
Congress of Canada Convention, Penticton; Retail Merchants Association, Vancouver;
Gravel Pit and Quarry Workers' Union, Victoria; additionally, a radio address on
" Education " was given over station CKDA, Victoria.
During the year, the Board dealt with a total of 1.694 cases. There were 961 applications for certification, of which 727 were granted, 142 rejected, and 92 withdrawn.
Thirty-six others were being investigated at December 31st.
In addition, there were 173 strike votes supervised, 78 representation votes conducted, 357 Conciliation Officers instructed, 120 Conciliation Boards appointed, 4 permissions to prosecute granted, and 1 grievance procedure provided.
The 357 references to Conciliation Officers resulted in the settlement of 149 disputes.
In three instances, instructions to a Conciliation Officer were cancelled, and in two
instances negotiations were discontinued.   Four disputes in which a Conciliation Officer
was appointed were referred back to the parties for settlement.
One case was referred to an Arbitration Board in conformity with the grievance
procedure contained in the collective agreement between the parties.
One hundred and sixty-nine cases were referred to Boards of Conciliation, but only
120 Boards were appointed. This discrepancy is explained by the fact that eleven references did not result in the appointment of Conciliation Boards in 1951; forty-seven references resulted in the appointment of but fourteen Boards. Four Conciliation Boards
established in the year under review resulted from recommendations by Conciliation
Officers made in 1950. Four Boards were established without prior referral to Conciliation Officers, and in fourteen cases where Conciliation Officers recommended a Board of
Conciliation, disputes were settled by the parties before Boards were appointed. In one
instance where a Conciliation Officer recommended a Board of Conciliation, the reference
resulted in the appointment of two Boards. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 105
Summaries of (I) Cases Dealt with in 1951, (II) Conciliation, (III) Boards of
Conciliation, (IV) Industrial Disputes, (V) Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British
Columbia, 1935-51 (with graph), and (VI) Analysis of Disputes by Industries in British
Columbia, 1951, follows:—
Table I.—Summary of Cases Dealt with in 1951, Showing Comparison
for 1950
1950 1951
Number of applications dealt with      765 961
1950 1951
Certifications granted  540 727
Applications—
Rejected  117 142
Withdrawn   108 92
Representative votes conducted        45 78
Conciliation Officers appointed      241 357
Conciliation Boards established      HO1 1201
Prosecutions instituted by Board    	
Grievance procedures provided  3
Strike votes supervised      322
Permissions to prosecute granted  5
Industrial Inquiry Commissions appointed   	
1,491
1
173
4
1,694
i In 1950 there were twelve arbitral tribunals (see section 26, "Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act") and
two mediation committees (see section 27, " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act"). In 1951 there were eleven
arbitral tribunals and two mediation committees. C 106
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
o   u   u
tj TJ
tj .2 tj .2
u   fl   u, (tj Tj Tj TJ TJ
l. -    I- -    U    O    'J    (j
«ns i> :a sens
tf     W co co co co
h rt H * H  « "S
o —       o ~
tf
3 B "9
tj o
oj V< _:
H rt ™
t~ ■-  o
,<u a a
«     wtf
TJ
o
TJ
o
TJ
o
<!>
u
u
o
tf
tf
tf
25
O
<
z
o
y
m
SI
> bJS
^ a u
TJ   O   M
s i g
>i   "*    OJ
rt _ c
TJ   (3  H
o c a
3 c '-g
fl  3   CJ
Ifl   O
a) 5 >> oj
pp fe
3   .2
|    .5
£     S
r:   cfl
ES
3  u  3
S s »
s g C
S3
E < B §2-S
OJ  >i OJ ,2   3  O
3 8«
■Tl
b TJ  cj  oj
,2   C   00M
C   fl   O   fl
5 fefe
§"g"
.2 m
«   _ a
3   IH
-•ME
8 tf
c * 2
Cd TJ
•S S      o
feS
fe   5
> •- 3 c »
M   O   £   M
? S * •> «
sis
u $ ?
c<; -
s g 1
I ess
■2 5SS *
gs-gS
3 _ V 5
c e u o
|8|x
« »w   .
■     g •§ -5
u SS o O
""" > c
S    j|
i ss
e M
>>    HI*
Ed   c
0
o
e
1)
TJ
d
ca
to
o
w
3
^
-a
■8 B     ?
to —* on
P?
o o
fe fe£
cj   aj   cj
fl   Ml fl
>   fl   >
ca
Son
5   £
5 K*
.2 <u e
»i§
fl .3
O CA
CJ;   -    C
rrt    H    O
oj 3
^ |
In O    W)
O U   fl
•ag
el
3 "o
SB'S
§E.S
Q
3  3
B a
r3 ~ ^3 a
3 3 3 3
C C C C
fl fl fl fl
b    b
fl «
3 3
C C
fl ^
r\         0\O
(N
CM
<s
>>
1          fl   fl
fl
3
3         C   C
a
a
3         fl   fl
a
5    2
U. tL,
OJ TJ
> a
si
>tf
o
fl
u
0)   M   4>
>    OJ    >
o P o £
ss8|
fl o ea 3;
a
c
r
3
«
ffi
fl
>
p
3
«
fl
s
a
C
CJ _
C
c
0
o
i«
o
t
t
C
0
o
g
t
t
a
a
o
>
>
t-
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
£•9
^&o
U6 g
o
O OJ
CJ OJ
>. >-.
o o
ft D.
E 6
OJ OJ
00 CU
a a
TJ TJ
2
H
o
DO
c
B|*l
u s c ?
.5 S^ o
e « 3 ■£
womo
-,   OJ w •*
OJ g  %
O B  fl
JO —
CO
O
QW
» S
w is
Zi5
<   S    «
Cfl    QJ
E
3
< REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 107
0   u
m    co
o     o
" s "
■O O -o !
,22 3: «>
3 TJ
fl,H
tf tf W tf
|   O-o  O        TJ
» '£3  oj -m _; oj i
! .2  t -S ^  C J
tf
° « S w » o « r -
CO tf        CO CO CO c
TJ P
trt Tj TJ TJ
-—   OJ   Oj   OJ
o322
-.       oj oj aj
tf        CO CO CO
TJ TJ TJ13 TJ  u  cd
OJ   4>   OJ   OJ   OJ   l-> •«
2 £ JJ $3 +2 "Si "cj
oj oj oj oj oj 3
COCO CO COCO tf
as «
tf
fl-O H
■-   y  (-,
CO tf
.2-a
2 tj 2 TJ
*-    CJ w   oj
fl P cat p
S tl 2 "S
tf    tf    tf    tf
15 -s   «
3 -C  B  i" cn
'in*
& >
-E
8 &3
coil 00
fl ft «
fe  fe
3  ™
'  O  w
' cfl TJ
£  3
TJ TJ
a a
OJTJtD£>i«JOJ0J£
>■ c m,o fl totKiaO
flflfleTJflrtfli-
£ fel s^S
00
I   s
* „  3
-c °
■a§*
111
3-11
J 55 -a oj
; o a a
a i/To
3 c
. o a
g c 33 o
« o rt .c
8 s> I
8£§
alii
5"|
>. a"
rt O "
■p-a
S  3
» b
cflcfl>cncncflcnce.
OJCUOSJOJOJOJOJ
rj  00
rt rt (
co£i
■-..' <w i? 3 i_i
)ih ooooooooao.2 O 9
iftrtflrtflflc-Bft
fefefefefeS
&
J*
1       «
fl
)        TJ
s
£3
T3 o
B
o"S
ca
*•*)
TJ
&vrf
O
«*S
'go
3
o G
» 2
Cfl
00 oo
fl
fl fl
s c
•2 c
rt u
O..E
sSfSfe£££ffife£
O -<fr o> vo *■* e*l
<S ©       O       ©       Q       O
C* vo       in       O       O       «m
CS r-t VO OO
b   b &
fl        fl fl
S    5 5
.O        J3 J3
u . «-. vt
u<   n< b,
E    S
fl fl
X>
SJ
>!    >. S-, >.
v- i_ u i-   ...
fl fl fl fl  fl
3 3 3 3-
U U, l_ J_
O CD CJ 0J    OJ
tu U- &< U. fc
s   e
I- tl l-l
2SE
XJ Xi JO
OJ    OJ    3J
ti- H, tU
rH r-i m ro m <n
fl  fl fl  fl   fl  fl
S   S
II   I
S   S   S   S
t->       ft      H '
,z    >
t-1 (-.
0) oj
to   >
ii
•2>     !   B   3
t*  t   S  «  3
z z t -
O CU    OJ
B   3 £ 3  3
e o «. o "
3 G o fl
C^tf >
n   >>>   Z
^5
»S   B   g   B   E
w OJ rt 3  rt rt
B   B
rt rt
H     O
o
O  rt
.a o
P. >
>      >
a
E
CA   (fl    Cfl    Cfl
U   W   OJ   OJ      -
4>   OJ    OJ   OJ   «
>!>*>.>. 3
OOCOj
ft *E.ft & b
£ G g B |
cu  oj  oj   U  T
 (-■
fl
§ £
> > > >
%   S   S^   GuuDco
TJ
O   cfl
O  OJ
<M    CU
If
rt a
£ s »
ooo
Sc2U
Cfl
cfl 5>
cn cn  aj q aj _2
*i 2*8 ftiS fe
J= X
££0   CO?
co oo j 3 p T
ca cb
ooo
i-.   C   >   >   >   O
K £ b 0 "0 ^
Ifl    Cfl
OJ   OJ
OJ   OJ
O  0
ft ft
s p
H
OJ   OJ
$
o o
F=
> >
oo
D-
■<fr »n
«n C 108
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
OOOO
o   o
OOOOO
o
TJ
pa    cQ
O 0
TJ TJ
« «
o o
m m
o o
o
TJ
o
pq
o
pq
ooooooo o o
*JB*JB'4-'B'4-,B*JE*JB*Ja *"'  E "^   E
T3 o-o o-a o-a o-a o-a o-o o tj 2 tj o
Oj w   U '^   U 4-1   U ?   U w   O '^   U ? OJ "-£ OJ '■"
0J"3O'3lU*aQJ'—'0J_H0J—   QJ^^ 4> "3 a> ™
'S 'u ^ " « ** u « « .« u 'u « ° o "y © u
#    tf    tf    tf    tf    tf    tf tf tf
o
PQ
tf
o
TJ
o
m
o
*' B
TJ.2
o 3
tf
W
o
** a
■a o
cu £
t .2"
oj cl
tf
o
TJ
O
PQ
O
pq
o
TJ
O
TJ
O
PQ
o     -a p
o -C
o ia
OJ   u
tf
*-a*-a*Ja'4~'B+Ja
tj0tj2tj2tj2tj2
oj+j  o *j aj -*-> oj *-> oj+-^
oj"-1 0J75 oj '—l UH u »-; —
0JUOUflJUlUUCu"^
tf        pj        tf        tf        tf        CO
"<3
o
<
CJ
Z
o
i-l
o
3  O  CO
.•art    ±f A
o g     o8     og     o5
3fl        3fl        3fl        3  fl
•E-2    ||
3 rt       3 rt
, «      .ii. w      .ii. i
S  B
as -
&B"
a b     sb
B 3  «
' J2-A S-
• u 3    -
fi2
5* Ji
B o
B *^
£3
a o
S  3
•BS-j
OJ   A   '
. u   3
'•IS &
o3  B   u
. ?M
3  g
|1
u B
a fl
Sdjsd
B   B
o c
0 33
E3"E5ue3uB3
3   3  B S  B  B fl  C   B fl  B
C  M ^   O   M i-   C   M l~   C   bei-   O   &0 i-   G
S3        B  3
B  3        E  3
■ 3 "O    - '3 "O    *S
otto
rt >
t. O   &0
3        B
•5 _.;-;
-Ib'
OJ
fe fe fe fe
fe fe
'TJOJ^TJoJ^TJOJ^TJtutTJoj^TJo'?
)BcoOaMgaooOCtnoCMoc.cjo0
=  flrt?rtrt?rtrt?flfl?flrt?flflp
3.1=^ i
TJ     „ O   d
TJ   OJ   g   oj
E   00 O   00
T"|   fe   S   fe   5
•SE
11
o "i:
ft.™ b.
III
sis
TJ- ^H r-i
S   5   §   S   2   S   S
S   S   S   S   S   S
*     *     S     o     2
...sails
0J OJ 0J 0J OJ -m OJ
w   «   m   M   a   >   >
a
a
C
c
B
C
c
c
rt
3
tf
3
£
re
OJ
5
E
rt
OE fe
a
^
a
C
>
£
if
L
CA
1-
c/
tf
C
re
1
1      c
1
«
U
3         a
E
c
E
Jr
E
J            oj
0J
1
CL
C
OJ
•c
3
'5
B
2
w   0   fe REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C  109
o   o
o
o
OOOO
rt
o
PQ
o
E 'M
O tJ
pq    pq    pq    pq
TJ        tJTJTJTJTJ        TJTjfc,
OJ CU    OJ    CJ    OJ    OJ OJOJI-i
fl    :
33 tu 3
CO CO tf        tf        tf
as
i E |
E  TJ
CU   fl]
a tj
OJ OJ
e b
OJ cu
C TJ
OJ   OJ
b b
PS     PS
O TJ  5
tj o-o Otj 2tj.2tj.2
TJ
tf       CO
CJ
CO
K     ci     pS     pS     pS     w
:S  aj :3 ^3       w
O -o O
| g | 5
i 1
PS      w
S S
D. o
.2 *
r- JS CA Cfl CA
5 S ai o u
,2 3 oo oo oo
— r* fTt >T* »T*
cfl   O
O   U
!&B
re 5
.2 S |.!
'- K3 * » '
5 S
* E
B ^ ~   '
8 ° p j
*S«8
3 o
OJ    OJ    ►■«
00 CO 3
rt fl tj
5   fefefefefe
o >, b.
S3
■O  3  h
§ s 8
■>„!
feDO
>>   OJ
fl  00
ft rt
fe  <
E    2
-H i— U
3
B
B    31 ~
B        B        _   m   ,-r-
flj        oj        B  3  2
H     H     D     <
j. ra   »   n cs re
fe    fe    fe    fe
fl
fl
| |
« a 9
co.2, «
3  o  gj
— "> TJ
■si?
H to 2
<u w X
coy? c *-<  ^0
5   5 °s
i>       CO       £
? ft
o «
° 5
A rt
w* "
oj a
CO O
i O  oo
- 33 rt
fe   fe
OD VO VO © Tf
fl rt  fl fl fl
s  sssss
00 00 o
tNMcN
.C X X
ooo
1-H      Ul     1—
iii
ssssssss
C-4
c
<
C
p
<
t-
C
<
v-
t-
c
<
L,            C
<
t-       t-
ft       C
<       <
r-
£
p
<
E
C
<
April 12	
April 14	
OJ
3
0
o
rt
«
re
d
Van
OJ
3
O   O   O   O   fl
O   O   O   O ;3
?» > s
fijL
v- -a a
ZH>
SS4
a fe £
rt ™ aj
>    Z
a
|
-
c.
a
a
a
B
c
a
s
D
E
3
3
C
B
3
3
£
3
3
3
s
C
C
C
c
o
2   2   S   o   >
«   >
is
z
M
C5
?:
S
"o
i     E
« n
P r
1    *
CL
c
a
a
i
E
e
c
c
rt
a.
ti
Jf2    £
c
C
c
b
C
c
3
O   O   OJ   CU   ,
a
a
t
£
S3
|
'3
Sis
UK.H
ft»S
S     3
OUUUUUUUQHO
■-     rt    ^:
w    m    n
■3   *
a     o.     3.
E     1     5-
- OJ
OJ c
oo B
TJ A1 C 110
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
a a
S o
O     O
o   o
. o TJ
'    -4->     OJ
fl   J"
.*3  oj
1?   E **   !
TJ 2 TJ 9 TJ 2
*  "> '■ -   ■> 33 _j _j   oj *j _- _i
.   fl TJ TJ   C fl TJ TJ
t-irtt-rtuflTJTJTJurtUrtTJTJiHflTJTJ TJTJTJ
>_i ._^  vu .—   n .—   oj  <u  eu t- •"  >- —   cj  aj  t- —   cj   oj ajojoj
vj "rj »•—i Ti •*-< "ri 12 ii S ^ T5 *4~i T3 ii ii **-* "?i ii ii 5 s 8
fl   3   3   seeA   fl   «?«fl   »s «u «j
QC         OS         flfi         elimm QG         Of         rr\ rr\ Cc.         rr\ rr\ r*\ rr< rr\
-< •** -r u   u    U   ^ 5 CU    CJ   "J
tf      tf      tf      cococotf      tf      CO CO tf
tj cj r
CO tf
fl TJ ih
-- oj -
£3 l3 «
u £2 **-•
CO tf
a ** a
O TJ  O
33  oj V>
.2 u .5
o <£ "3
tf
TJ
0
TJ
O
TJ TJ
TJ
TJ TJ
OJ
tf
CJ
tf
cu
(U
(!)
S)
ai
CO CO
CO
CO CO
"C3
3
•S
a
z
o
H
z
1
w
ca
GC3
w £ +3
.5. oj *
TJ  pOTJ
rt rt S
<U TJ  OJ
oo a oo
ft  CA
&%
4    .2*2
£2 ,
tj a
i .2
« 33
Cfl   —I
CJ JD
00 3
(A CA CA C
OJ OJ OJ <
00 00 CO i
fl fl fl fl
ca cn ;
aj i>   ;
00 00 ;
rt « h
CA  .S   tA   tA  .3
E     i
33 Bi
s
B
|S
B   OJ
3 E
Cfl   <U
rt oj
£ oo
TJ
I
v- as
0 o
cfl A
II
ou - +J
rt       £• rt
rt fl £ fl  fl
CO CO W    W    CO U    W     U     U* U I.     CU   lt- ..     ..   _     ■•     CO
fe    fe    fe    I    fefefefe    fe    fefefe    fefe    fefe
fe   fea
OJ   OJ   OJ
00 CO  00
a. §
£ g
OJ    «
3"S
«j s
cfl   fl
9 oj
.2 eo
ra fl fl       :s       r; fl
fefefe   i55   Dfe
IS
"So
ft.B >
EQ£
W   "
tN VO ©       in O       i-i <
58
§§•=
*J
Tt
Tt
Tt
vr
or
oc
oe
00 o>
O"
r?
CJN © —
f
'St
V
vc
vc
j
i
|
1— 1-
•"Mr
r>
<   <   <
ft a ft a
<<<<
a a a
<<<
a a
<<
a a & a
<<<<
a a
<<
"C     TJ >» >>     >> >>
q,      c rt fl       rt rt
SS
s
J
«
fe
z
3 q.
:>z   z
rt rt 5
E  3 «
O O 'C
OUfc
rt rt
>>
o> H rt rt
pSH>>
rt >
Is
oj rt
rt       rt o -S
>      >U>
rt 3
oj
ft u
oj O
u u
a a
So?
O    tA
§5
3 ^<
co e  oj
• cj a
as 1
^ « «
«
u   b   u
OJ   >i
S &
o E
s s a £
Bf!»
B 3 £ rt
WP.ZP3
1U   tu    c
b a I
a o. o
o v
p,X
SIM
"5 Egg
«   OTJ   o
H"?        5
— OJ   OJ
— X M
n t< in
.gig
V   >
3 =
UUB<
Jaf§=55
PhUBJ     ?p
o  u O
> o a
UX REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 111
o    o
o   o
tj 2 tj 2 tj .2
_:. to 33 j> 33 ©-33 _.;
TJj-fl£M|-flTJ
53 oj 3  oj 3  OJ .*3 53
*3 °3 °3   1
co tf       tf       tf       CO
TJ 2 TJ 2
. <u *3 oj +-> _■
TJ   I-.   m i_   rt TJ
Oj   B .4 i- «   OJ
53  « 33 ,0J 35 --
o
to
cococo     co     co     cotf     W
**  B
tj .2
TJ Tj TJ   u   fl TJ
8J    QJ    to    l-i  •—    OJ
33 tj —3 (to 33 tj
to to  u 2       «
CO CO CO tf        CO
: 5 33 B33.3
3 to H cj
to 2
CO tf
.2 S
tf     O
&     &
* to to
fl
TJ
> 5 'O S o
5  * X £ X
Cfl    CA
to   to
oo oo
fefe  fe  fe  fe
to aj to
00  00 CD
fefefe
52-
ft      ft
a aj a oj
.2 M.2 oo.:
Cfl    fl    CA     fl    I
TJ   u
a oj
8-S
-c I
o^ S
|E
a£
fl fl
"a
3  E Jg
3,8 .
.   U   O
1   M M
i a «
fefe
E       ~
*E* £
■r > O A   u.
" b0_ to   *
to a;,a c im
w a o | *£,
E l5  ca to  co
•2 1 3 & 3
c t> o rt o
o a a
51?
E    ."K
e « °
o & _
[fa .2 e
-i "O  o
•a
rt tj
ft a
II
££
.   J*i  O  n
00 CO 2   CO  to
rt rt ca rt i
fefe   fe
.    W     W W LS
fefe       fe      fe
cj\ irs © ©
■■* O o
«s
^t
■>»
o
c
^
ot
22 s s s
>>>>>>
>*
>>
>> gj
rt rt rt
222   2   2   22   2   2   2
2222   2
to cj
a a
a 3
to
Sill .
': u 3
i  D. O,
.a 3
>    >
Z _
*   U    to   CA
u > >  oj
to 3 3 >. -
3   o  o   ■:  " ^ .3
o a a & » » S
o re rt to Q y, 2
g>>Z.S.S.u
> p<o- >
£     B
H>    Z
3   <U
•O        O'B    .
£ Q a a g a
ll|-»-ts§
ek §•« g,ga
> § B3 is 2 %
I a £ D f < a
z
2 E
to a ■
II
j
q
g
3
>
E
fe
£
«
3
>
3
>
3
6 3 3a
" a k =
z    >>    >    >
o
!
(A    to
I-I   ,
E 3,
HS    U    U    O
1
E
to
a
rt
CA    CA
C
a
a
to u
r
c/
Cfl         t-
u
>. >i rt
3  3ft      .5
•fit)
& E
rt „
CA    to
to ±6
and
ge-d
M„
0
O
ft
2 2 <3
ft
O
2 u £
£      03
<N «
*#
*+
rj-       n-
O
CA    CA     P
ti    Ih     1
„ u « C
2 o to a
<u a a g
£ 'oo '5b a
Q W WO
s
to §
E   ^
a ^ C 112
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
0    0
H
o
<u a
■S "
PS
<u a
PS
w a
o °
PS
to -"3
to   "
tf
TJ Tj   tn   rt   t_   i
to to fi .g R *•
53 rj to .-a tor
tf        CO
to —
to Q
tf
O     O
o o
** a ** a
TJ O TJ   0
—: _; u *3 to 33   ■
TJ TJ   i_ rt   Vh   fl TJ
tj Tj to J-j to .-3 a
~ — ^ o *a o *•
O        0
o   o
o      o o
** a     a
TJ .2 TJ .2 TJ
TJTJ   >_  ■£   1-flTJTJTjTJ   H
Oj     CJ     I-i   .—     L-   ■—     CJ     CJ     CU     CJ     —
tjtj <u :— g 33 a3 tj c ~ cj
V ®.S ° ,3 ° to to to to ,£}
co co Ps      Ps      CO CO CO CO cc
a
*J
0
TJ
o
to
tf
"<3
3
■ 5
O
H
i-i
w
a o
&1
o M
3  B"
rt a"
S a
I|
fl    >
— to
fl    CA
a rt
a.a
rt tj
u
E
to
a
re
re
ft
fl
ft
TJ
a
o
3
to
ca
CA
a§ |
CA   c —I
a S ss °
Wd- TJ   O
to ^a a a
rt "S o rt
ft 00
g a
3 *
3 a    3
o> B
>, so B
o S »
5        B
fep    D    feofe    fe
E
t-i
to
H
to to  to
oo oo oo
CU     _J;     ,:,    ,-      _IJ
rt rt fl a rt
fefefe   fe
£f0
a b
a «
3
"3
E  fe
»" 3
<u o
rt*
I    Cfl —     CA
'  to to 8  to
•   00 DO O   00
I   fl   fl
to oj .3 5.
00 00 ca   ^
■   3 —i
ca     .a
■3        n.
_i    CO    IO    CU    w   +-<    to v*    l>i    CO    *■  " .5 IO
H   fefefe   fe   fefefe£3   S   fe
1°
a"
■S so
aa S
t* <N ©        ©
rj> tM ©       O
rl        (S        ~
o ^ "
Bit
une 11	
une 13  ..
CO V
t) aj
B c
3 3
B         B
3       3
une 15	
rune 15	
Cune 15	
to  to to
a a a
3   3   3
3  3   3   3  3
B
<
z>
3  3   3
ooo
o u u
c a s
>>>
~ a> »
?> S
■i§fe
BBS
rt  fl to
z>z
tl
to
CJ
>
3
3
3
O
Q
0
E
3
E
re
re
re
2   >   >>>   >
to
to
to
cu
>
o
3
3
3
3
O
0
Q
0
E
E
E
3
cd
re
r*1
>>>>>
UE >
W5
a
s
•S     B
o
S     *    Jj
•5 i-i        B       V. i
O       UWHi
23        QJ       ^
to    Q    >
o
£13
b .5 a
rt   3   O
►jwa
0
Ul
TJ TJ
$
Oi)
0
rt
ri
1*
O
to
fl
rt
H Hco
m ■*
IO
t-
r*
r-
OJ
o 8C
fe    01 S   O           O!
1-   <U   B 3   B   K   in
U  g  g E — S ip
| S - .2 - o •§
« a -2S -S 3
E co « CJ m
fe  3        O
H    O REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 113
E
3
E
E
a
a
a
3
E
a
B
ri
E
c
E
i
E
C
E
o
O
0
o
c
o
o
o
C
0
O
o
0
c
C
c
C
C
O
O
O
O
0
U
O
O
U
O
O
U
O
O
U
O
0
O
0
O
4h
4-i
h*
tt-l
4>>
CM
u->
»M
(H
Lh
1-1
cm
t-
<4-
4-
<+-
<+-
(H
O
0
0
O
C
0
O
0
c
0
o
o
c
c
c
c
c
c
o
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
a
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
t-j
H
ko
U
u
Ih
u.
Ih
t-
t-
u
\-
to
fl
fl
re
fl
ct
a
Cl
Cl
re
fl
Cl
fl
«
re
rt
R
re
re
rt
O
c
c
o
C
a
C
O
C
C
O
G
c
c
c
c
c
C
o
m
OP
PQ
PQ
PS
PQ
PC
PQ
PC
PC
PQ
PQ
PC
PC
PC
pc
PC
PC
PQ
0
c
C
O
c
O
c
O
c
c
O
0
c
c
c
c
c
c
o
a *"
E                   *"
e         ** a
E **
a *•
a         *"
B *
a *"
B **
a w
a *~
a **
E *"
B *"
B **
B ~^
a** a
TJ
.2-a
O                    TJ
0          tj S
TJ
O TJ
O TJ
O              TJ
O TJ
O TJ
O tj
O tj
O tj
o TJ
O xJ
O -rj
O TJ
O TJ
o TJ o
—: *
33 cj
'£ _j __: _;  oj
"3 „j _;i » '■£
~i «
33 oj
33  cu
^o ~*     u
33 0.
33 to
33   to
33  to
33  o.
33 to
33  to
33 c
33 £
■>->  a.
w cu *->
TJ   i_
.2 E
rt TJ TJ TJ t-
2*^> s E 5
TJ   t-
_fl ^
.2 t
fl TJ         C
.2 E
.3 t
fl  £
fl ^
.2 E
3 E
33 a
.3 t
E3   C
.3 t
33   c-
.5 E
E3   0-
rt H _fl
n oj 3
X)  o.
TJ    4
33 is JS to 3
—j   0,
•3 c.
T-   1
•a *^      fc
33  a.
13     to
33    g
"3 *
—J    0,
33   *
s«
to OS
"    OJ
° to to cj «
CO CO CO tf
CO CO tf
S3
CO tf
u to
°"S
tj     a
CO      tf
"t
«t
"t
U"S
"t
utt
u to
o-t
«t
3"£
o^ o
tf
tf
PC
PC
tf
te
«
tf
tf
tf
pt
pt
PC
tf
^
a
&
o
_o
to
00
s
rt
K
3
TJ
«
«
41
a]
u
5
2
E
E
E
E
I
TJ
C
«
«
Sj
u
t
a;
to
to
>
>
>
>
>
-*
>> >
C
c
c
c
o
fe
>>
>> >
fl re
TJ
o
«
ft c
4
E
B
TJ
TJ
TJ
a
TJ
5
ft
i-i   i-
a
E
E
E
E
a
3  3
a
e
0
re
a
>
.c
O   to
> >    :
«
TJ
E
E
cr
1
C
c
to  to
CA    CA
E  E
O  O
B  B
33 33 "U
o  o B
fl  fl .3
O  O fi
ii is 0
to  to   >
fl
ft
X
>>      S
rt       c
ft      P
TJ
33         E
ST
E
o     o
a     a
*c    'C    *c
ooo
B        B        B
i-
c
1
1
3  3
TJ TJ
(-.     |H     O
TJ TJ TJ
CA
>
rt
X
o
"£    .2
rt
OJ
to
V
to
c/
aj
cr
to
CA
a
5
e
c/
to
fl
•-
to
|
tf
a a
a a
MM
u u
O  O
g | a
if 2 -^
ca ta g
to iu y
a a ?
e co s
g> ca««
TJ   *   C
S  B  C
E
a
E
c
*S       fl       fl       +.
3    2    *2     =
o      33      33       a
to        O        O        £
v>       X       X        n
to
E
to
E
a
E
to
(A           CO           M
>>     g>     b
TJ         Tj         TJ
0*0         0
XXX
>
to
>
0
c
a
C
flj
>
S
o
CA
3
O
X
<U   cU
•o-o o
to    to    cfl
00 00 2
a a 3
o
3
rt
rt ^
si*
to 3
<4-H     to    E
O   14    B
00
a
01
cc
«i-
C
i
E
.2
e
E
TJ
E
«
^       ^       to       to
s   |   3   i
3         3        iu        <H
rt       rt       °       °
tn       to        W3        6a
K      >i     x     >,
oo    a     ti     a
^    S    2    2
"-333
°     «     «     «
52         ca         cfl         co
s    „
•c °
3 Tl
H  E
%   *
*c
>
t-
3
C
ks
E
W    CA    CA    CA
CA    CA    CA*"
CA    CA
CA
a cu
i-
cr
Cfl
t-
i-
V
i-
V
cr
Cfl
a to cu o>
2  to 00 OJ
to to to
to    0>
0J
2 rt a
<u
V
a
u
<u
to
a
to
to
v
to
O  OJ
.2
00 00 CO
00 01
00 J3  Cl
■tw   M       *■*
oo      co      oo     -1-1
oo     *•
00        00        00
Sfe
c
rt  fl fl fl
rt  rt rt
fl rt
rt
o re
O O fl
fl
rt
rt
rt
«
rt
fl
cot£££
fefefe
fefe
fe
fe
ffi fe
<
fe
fe
fe
<
<
fe
<
fe
fe
fe
VD
P
v-'
w
co rt
w
CN Vi 0\ C
t oo o
"fr c
tr
©
©      v~
Br
©
rt
c
c
c
"4
Tj"
■tf
\D         *-<                O
o
*H  CZ
C*-
m      r*-
fN
vc
£
ir
t>
t-
o
(N
i-i
r-
■*
M-
Tt
VO
sc
r-
c
f
't
•^t
">*
■tf
<tf
•^
■<*
t-
r-
r-
r-
r-
VC
t-
r>
0\ f> ON i—
1-1 I-I I—1
Tl   »—
'T
fN
fN
tN
tN
CN
fN
fN
tN
fN
fN
f>
r-J
M
fN
>> >
>
.     >, >. >, >
>, >> >.
>,    >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>>        >,        >
^
>
■>
>»
3  3
E
3 3  3 3
3   3   3
3   3
3
"5
s
3
5
E
3
E
3
3
3
3
3
E
3
>-» "-)
H
>_,_,>_,►_
J-7.   ^  ^
K ■"
1-1
>"1         (-1
K
*—
Hi
I-i
>—
-i- TJ
-< S
.u       curt
o a -ft o o
TJ
cL rt cB oi fl
** <u tj ** a
1
t-i   i-i
t
>       s. .s J
I—    1-
L
b.
u
t-i
1-
t-
t.
u
t.
l-
u to
to
to
rttfg^<3.
C   to   to
to
to
to
to
to
U
V
to
B
C
to
OJ
> >
3  3
>
E
rt fl
fl
>
G
o >  >
ca   3   3
3
.2
fl          >
E        3
>
3
>
E
>
E
>
3
>
3
>
3
re
1
>
3
>
E
O  O
C
U.    1~
5
a O C
O
*        S
3         3
to       fl
C
C
C
G
O
C
V
c
C
c
o u
t
O   0
c
C
o > 2 fe Ph x
re  cj o
o
c
CJ
£
c
o
c
a
u
U
u
B   B
rt fl
_o t
%
c
re
X
> a e
r^ a re
c
fl
t
A
c
Cl
E
Cl
E
rt
E
A
z
t
1
E
re
E
re
E
>>
>
>>>>
> >PL,
>>
>
>
w   >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
«
>
>
>
CA
Jjlj
£
'
l-(
c
o
tf
I-
>        c/
?         I-
c
E
i
u
O
a.
c/
to.
CL
V
u
>1
o
o,
E
a
a
>
c
c
i
V
-      t-
0,
u
0
o
a
B
3
E
a
E
CA
CA
a-
>
1
1
c
to      ^£
00        >•
E 1
a
c/
t-
i
j*
t-
c
cr
a
B
<f
«-
a
c
0
Cl
c/
G
Cf
^0
.in
0
£
is
If
^E X
3.E
1           CA
t-
§
c
TJ         ^
c
a
5
"c
E
p
C
C
"c
'£
c
3
c
3
<
1-
s
CL
£
CJ
E
c
B
B
n
rt Z
S.E
fl .c
1a   ~
to £
tf 2
re
2
1
rt rt "a
oo co rt
X X  a
.a-a 3
J^JPh
.E E
a «■
.S *
i- a
PmCX
B
to
C
C
re
0
5    «
rt      c
• is?
fe    p.
SS E
t
J
£
ft.
t
CL
c
to.
ft
|
fl
|
PC
I
fl.
fl
c
i    "5
E
fe
e
t
-    e
a
"E
c
p-
c
t
s.
"c
ft
c
4
*C
\m
ft
"* v-
vc
r>coo\c
i-i (N m
■* ir
VC
t-
00          CJ>
c
fN
(♦■
*rt
IT
y;
t
oc
o
©
00 cc
oc
OC  00  CXI o
Os CT* CT\
o 0>
Oi
o
C"A          Os
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
r-
c
fN
(N
r.
fN
o
t>
tN
fN
tN C 114
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
o
u
u   u
o
o
CQ
PQ
o
0
**
E
4-1
E
TJ
O
TJ
Uh
O
o
tf
tf
o   o   o   o   o   o   o
PQ      PQ      PQ      PQ      PQ      PQ      PQ
TJ   O TJ   O        TJ
to +3 to 33 _j  to
b .s b .s t a
to TJ   to XJ 53   to
cj u to u 5 to
tf        tf        CO tf
2              TJ   O TJ   O 33
*- —: ^ w 4-. to 4-» .2
XJ   o xJ   o xj
O xj
o xJ   S TJ .2 TJ   2
a * « g as g a ■ o
co co tf     tf     Z
to G to Clto
tf    tf    tf
"to
tf
,3      ,°j      ^       to to  to
PC        Ph        PS        CO CO CO
0   u   u   u
13 O^ Otj Ot] O
4) Vj   4) '*.   Um   4) *3
t .3 fc .3 tl .3 E .3
4> a w a « a 4) 3
'jo'so'so'so
PS     PC     pS     PS
a
•S
K
z
2
H
U
z
o
u
3
oj  aj
o o
TJ TJ
to   OJ   to
E E E
E I E     I    -2
TJ TJ TJ
a a a
o
o
a
O
a
o
a
O
O
o
E
o
E
O
E
O
B
E
E
E
CO
(A
>,
>,
>>
>,
>.
>.
>.
a
rt
fl
re
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ
TJ TJ
TJ TJ TJ
TJ
u i-i
o o
>> >, >>
to.        IH        to,
ooo
3 3 3
u oj to
CO CO CO
CO
a      4-.-
I  I
■K B S
°b"
O  S-3
8 £i gj
*■  00
3  rt
to
00"-t   CO
fl O rt
a
o
'ca     !
CA   CA
•3  >.
II
SI
Jl
§ 8 8
4> S rt
£ fefe
CO     -     •■
a >?M
O 3 fe
H   CA   o
u a e
~.2 a
33 a o
CO  rt  cn
s-6 e
3 a a
rt CA rt CA
a- a tj ..
a 3 a a
■ rt a ? a
CA <JJ [fl to
O Ih JJ I-
- a a- a a.
J TJ   to TJ
■> a oo b
rt       rt       rt       fl       flfl       cortfl       fl       re  g  re        ~       fl       re       re       rt       co      <—< <— o       fl  fl fl
fe  fe  fe  fe  fefe  fefefe  fefefefefefefefefe  <Sx   fe  fe
rt rt rt  rt
fe   fe
I*
B£
w"
CA
o t* >
3- « O
ft.a >
l°-3
< *-:        CN tN ^
tN «^H ^
Is!
Ss-E
a©!
Q
r-
r-
r-
r>
r-
p-
r-
t-
C
c
C
c
C
C
C
C
r
r-
r
r>
(Nl   f>
rN rN rv
P"
t*-
rr
(T
C*
cr
C
cn fi c
r"
CA
c*-
m
>      &n >•. >
,      >
*      >
,        >
»       >
■.     >
,       >,>•.>
>        >
>
E
E
E
=
E
E
E
P
=
3
B
=
E
E
E
E
E
=
E
E
E
E
3
o
-I
§
«
to
3 1
a c.
>      >
3         E
to
E
0.
>
E
|
7
•■
u
OJ
3
I
c
'   1
'   t
E
0
111
UtolU
*     3
tZZ ™ 3 tu P W
S    >    m    U!    03    W
fe
s
3   3  3
OOO
ooo
#
EBB
u
z
u
>>>
z    >    >
4>
ag-o
CA
a
a
a a
a e a
a
o o c
fl.
a
«
u
u to
owe        y        i
33 33 33      "-3       >*
c
c
c
a
a
f
c
H  to  w
£ S &
o o
Ih    I-i
PUPh
*A1 \£3
(N (N
r>COO        ©
T-'   -H   rH fN
cN tN fN        fN
fl
bS
^&
ft
>M
E s4
o'CS
CQ
c^
©   s-H
<N
(N
fN tN
<s REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 115
■oca
3 S
8 S"
4}   4)
^tf
o   o
o   o
o
TJ
o
TJ
J TJ .2 TJ .2 TJ .2 TJ .2        TJ
j inrt inrtTJTJTJTJTJTjTjTJTjTJ m rt i-, a TJ u.
JtH-3iH>3toCJUU9JtotoUtotoiH<3iH.3iuiH
2   to ^3  ^ 33 9 ^"" ^3 ^ ^3 TJ ^^ **""* r~i ^j  to ra   ® 33 T3  ^
>Su!Su««"S«>u«Suu4i'su!§0'53
PS     PS     connnncofficnutfiPI     PS     co PS
pa    m
o     o
s " b *" B
O -a O tj  O
V.   4> ~   4> '*-    •
.3 t! .3 tS .3 1>
a ^a Bea
cj to:   u t-   u £1
O        O
P5       05
1] O-a O       ^3 O       >oO
4) '5   4> '5 _■   4) '£ _J   4) '£
S .3 S .3 ^ t .3 ^ t: .3
4>a 4>a^3 4»ac i; a
T3 o
h rt
sS
4)
"
4)  '
W
PS     PS     t»PS     tops
o     o
** B ** B
4> TS     •   4) ta   4) '5
usa 4) a w a
S U   4)   °   4)   °
PS     mpS     PS
B
■3 2
is?;
cA    CA
a a
o o
o o o o o o o
•u u
00 oo
rt a
rtrtrtrtrtrtrtrtrt
ooooooooo
>•&.!>>>:>;>>.:>
flflflflflflrtflrt
33333EB33
gaaaBBBBa
BBBBEBBB
Ortrtrtrtflflflflfl
■aTjTJTjTjaTJTJTJTJ
TJBEaaaBaaB
Cflflflflflrtrtrtrt
O     -.---^.-to-
5P 'lH 'lH "|h '|h *Ih "C *£» 'C "C
£333333333
Dooooooooo
•^cutotototototototo
ScACflCOCACflCflCACACA
tSeBBBBBBBB
OOOOOOOOO
^ a a a a a a a "a a
§333333333
•c a;     4?    '3     a
fefe fe fe fe
rertrererererecirere
fefefefefefefefefefe
TJ
■SB'S
a ca «
!fi
.a E
00*-*
00
oo a +■*
fl e3
rt
fl   3~
£S?
a tj
■2 5-
B        C  c
a  * «.a
- oi TJ
=  O  O  rt
M    ST-     S    CA    CA
oo .2 t? B oc
3   £<   £   £   <
re
i\l »   c   V   S3   *»
fe     feD     gfe
B        «
.a     I-.
E
D.
E ..
to oj
£«
Hfe
ST)
"1
©
m^trh-rtrtTfTr^-*-*^
SO
o o\
COCA CA CA CflCflCflCflCflCflCfltflCOCflCfl CA COCO
33 3 3 33333333333 3 33
0000 00 OO 0000000000000000000000 00 0000
33 3 3 33333333333 3 33
<< < < <<<<<<<<<<< < <<
Cfl    Ifl lfl    Cfl
3  3 3  3
M M bfl bfi
3  3 3  3
<< <<
Cfl cfl   cfl
3 3 3
3 3 3
< <<
to.     I-     !_
O  O
tI
" rt
>>   >   z
totoUtotototoOJto.
s->>>>>>->>fti-
33333333300C
«oooooooooO_g
ooooooooooTJ.ya
J^BBEBBEBBBaaG
tortrtrtrtflflflflrtflrty
:z>>>>>>>>>«   >
■gpj
o  fl
o   fl
>fe
>
a
.3
to to
a *u
II
B   £
fl   to
|H   TJ     K.
s si?
i a w a
i P. ^5 «
i S tj B fl
to>>2^
5-2"S!a
o i- 2 a o
■J W P. §
o
>>
E E
>    OO
p
to.
to
to*
to-
c
«
t-
to
to«:
Ih
C
CA
Cl
1
CA
CA
E
.5
to
c
y
E
C
c/
CA
E
c/
c/
E
E
cr
E
E
|
Cfl   tA
CA    CA
a a
Cfl
to
Ih
O
"8 "8   i   1   Kl€
O  0        O        O        2  fl  c:
fefe   £   £   uSS
C
re
S
to
«
JE J3 43 J- hE 7^
o o o o o O
rt  fl fl fl fl O
SSSSSfe
fN tN
OHcNm^iAVOtNCCOsO        »H
fNtNfNfNtNcNfNfNtNrNfN        CN
tN cn
CN fN
& *
nis  £  £
33 2 6
§l|
B v- -a
OOo
3 *5
<       fe
■3 =
O   oj
i e
a a
4J
ft 3
tH
O
ft
TJ
toT  oj  «   oj JJJ ^        <u
^Q     Hfe1 £     Q
Oo ^ tN
>Ai \o VO ȣ)
fN fN        fN fN
& « s 3
oo
VO VO
fN fN C 116
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
a
c
a
o
O
z
2
H
<
toi
jJ
o
z
o
1
a
pq
H
u   u
4> a
tf
u '3    § S § 3
xj .2
TJ TJ TJ Ih rt Tj
CU   (U    to   Ih  >3    OJ
3S 33* tJ **-' 'o t3
to oj cu *J «
CO CO CO tf        CO
PQ     pq     pq     pq     pq     pq
xj Oxj Oxj otjOtjOxjo
to Vi u 33 aj +3 aj +3 aj 33 cj "*j    ■   *
t5it!.Sw2tt2tlrftlStoto
to Sa E ra to .a to *a © !a to ™
to
' to
tf
to
' to
tf
u
o 33 33
jj        to  to
tf       CO CO
O        O
O       O
TJ o xj 2
to 33 o>. +3 _j   • _j
U   fl   tn   fl TJ TJ TJ
Ih  -3   Ih  .-1    to   to    CJ
o   o
<u 33 oj a
to u to (J
tf     tf
rt a     ;
xj o      ;
n  3 ^
-^
b 8 45 !
o -a *a -■
to .1 a ;
£-3
O.S a i
3 to
2 5
S3 c c
*j 3  .. cn
u a j? w
rt to  si  rt
> I * *
_ s i)a  -
rt   U  Oi
3." S2 3
I 8-| *
« >. a ^
.3    °
s"ls
sp a .2
«   <U   "
3 o
a o
>,"
S B
3 ■
fl  ca"
«&
xj "3
B33
fl O
00
& s
u ?
9 ^
a 5"
81
- o
to    OJ
P.--S a
to
oo     -a a
a a
v to
s i
<u u
n
E
fl
a a
■a to tj
E
C
X
c
E
c
E
a
a
t
TJ
§
a
TJ
TJ
E
a
a
&  £
c
o
^
o
oo      'i-
00         00
E
3
a
J*
s
F
M
M
C
c
*
a
c
£
*
E
a
CA
T
TJ
E
! a
B
fl
<   fe     afeoD
E E 8.3
to   i-  rt  E
S    4)  ^.  ^
fefefe«fefe5     5fefefe     fefeS     fe     fe
P
a,s
4> ctoTS
a 4> o
E..3 >
aos
sis
oj a ft
i m oo      i-i
r-t i-H  (N
©©- OJ
fl fo co ^
*j +j *j j-
CA   CA   CA a
3  3   3 to
co co oo a
3   3  3 g1
< < "< CO
to to  u to
6 B £ £
to  u  u <u
CO CO CO CO
X J3
£ £
ti,
ft
to
to
41   4)   4>
a a ^
ooo
w     OOO     O     O
1 tog
.J       ■> 33.B  3       >3>.l
!?     i> OO-o      S> o!> >
Z       Z >>>>       Z>Z>       E
O rt
a>
>   zz
E
E
3 « s
218
|ll
fe>>
a   3
SI""
cfl n u
.3 S-o
* P
O £  E
S u 3
•vts-
00 3-
rt o
H.Ui
12 5
„, l»^ o
sis*
u ? ° a
.—  3 ..   rt
WBi?i-l
O  cfl
to
rt g
- S
524
Sap
co
s   s   <
to   CJ •..   oj
O  3 — .X
i."3 |
to     - 4)   £
IS 1-8
fl    Ih to^.
HPQ      £
£
OntNm       Tj-icrivor-
fNfNfNfN        tN tN tN (N
p ft
ft
SO CA
a        to
to to       to
tot!       >>
go     o
> "?     ft
I- -i-i     a
to   B c
Ih    CA    OJ ^
cc£    5
to ^    Ih —
Q.TJ    fl    tA    ft
".a  ft ^  CA
fl  E   to   9  o
OCQQ    a
ON  ©  i-H
CO o. o,
fN fN fN REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 117
o
TJ
O
« 33
tf
PQ
• to -u __:
.3 H rt T4
to :3 -
tf     c
33^3 IS 5 = ^
CO CO i->       tf       CO
TJ TJ Tj   Ih   fl TJ
to   to   to   Ih ■—   to
33 £ +3 **-" 'cj Si
•o
o
u-i
tjo     tj°tjOtj2
to 33    *  sj «3   to •*-*  to-*-*-
S .31 b .3 fc .2 ts .3 ^
to .xJ •—i  to "3   to"3  toia—S
cJUto<D<DWto
tf      co tf      tf      tf      GO
CA _    CA
9 « 9
O  3  O
CA    CA CA S M     rV. CA
to  to to J2 to  52 to
00  00 CO ™ 00^ 00
— rt rt o rt  o rt
£ rt
rt xj
fl rt
C O to
a a j=
to TJ
"a ft
a o 2
o & -a
.3   P"  co
!m
ifi
,„ g«
t.        to        3  B
3     a      o -a
3 | » j
O   °  O .
•° 8 a '
Mr-   CJ
b n a
„-|
*  S:
i a £
' 8.3
rt^3
1   <4h    £     CA    r
ago oc
00 £
^     CA IH <U
ES    Ih to Ih
3 ft 00
cj: 7=
.2 o
to to to TJ 2
00 00 00 E E
J rt fl rt j-j
fefefe   fe   fe   feSfe   fe   fefeS   fe   fe     fefefefe   (to   fe   a
ft rt
fe
CO CA
to to
00 CO
fl rt
fc!
>
u
^
3
rt
cfl
P.
Cto
.a
a
3
to
qj
>,
B
O
a>
a
re
3
££ £ £ £
a a
) o fl
"to   O
r>
On "<t **
TT
>* M- Ov
HNtN
fN
fN tN fN
.O JO JD
XJ
jj
XXX
X
XXX
ooo
o
o
ooo
ooo
OOO
ooo
1    j
j
j
-j
fN
fN
VD
3           to
a a aa
X
JU
XJ
4         SEE
u
H
B
H
5         S>
to
to
to
u
u
aj
> > > >
ooo   o   o   ooo   o   ooo   o   o
l- Ih
to to
X X
a a
cu to
> >
o o
Ih Ih U
OJ to U
XXX
a    a    £
zzzz   zzzzzzzzz
33 a a
JC    fl    fl
>  3   3
X>>       >       Z>>
W W  g .fl
to  to  (A '5
O   o   >, O
.S .£ *o o
ft ft hJ>
to
z
3
c
3
S
C
CC
C
c
o
c
o
o
>      PS>
u
o
o
a
to £
fe to
ft >
a1 g
Cfl
■fl gt
.a .a tj
TJ
ftTJ "3
3
c
3   <-
o
CO    *
to  o
Is
g E
co to
Ih U
to to
M M
fl rt
£ £
rt   cj   rt cj   4J   4J .3
B. a> 3, aj ij g oo
%      % rt  rt B
Q     0 B.P.B
0.3
E n
P, Q, ft to
C to. M JM
rt rt O cci
OOffipQ
O      ftl
to to
u >>
to  O
&i
a, £
<u c
xj fl
fl   Ih
.a 3
ft rt
ca a
O   aj
KeS
o
c.
E
to IH
g      «
fj\   ©   T-I
o © ©
tN ci m
00  ON  ©  -"l
O   ©   -H   -H
tnntnm
vo t> C 118
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
CO        CO CO CO t
E Tj
.3 Ih
O fl
ca   o
8m
S 9
.2- a
CA  —    O
•h I »'•=
S E t.3
is g «ja
u o 4> °
«OPS
a u
.2 v.
!i
** E
■0.2
o
** a
T3   O
!l S.2
a to u —
««   z
ih .3
to a to
O CJ o
T3
3
•S
o
CJ
z
o
H
<J
Z
o
U
«
i-i
<
, u      .J, to
— .£    — .c
<ca~
33 33       ft
to >■ o  «
3 T3
a       rt  r-
«5 1=>      .   W to.
a"S§
■3 3 O
00 O   fj
a «>
to M oo
^ « £
">  e 33
■SaS
"•o ?.i
rt C w
fl o
u v & i
>i> 2.9
"  O  00 33
■-A3J
o e w
* I a
to   4>   O
I  4) g
S   co   O   fl
o, u rt
-    ft   CA
9  Q  to
:
to a:
d re
TJ TJ
to <u
d d
o o
TJ TJ
C   C
fl   fl
•    .
s a
a a
o o
XX
OO 00
.3.5
> >
33 33
O  O
O O    i
o o
to
i d a a   _
™     to     to     Cfl
12 a a 1
i «*   U .2
; j-  to  u Zj
J I oo ooS
. a rt fl cu
H* £
SE
aa
O 33
* ft El?
.u o
toS a
gl s
**    OJ (A
O   00 to"
s&f 1
9 o -
O   -H B    I
00 CO  00 OO  CO
fl rt rt fl fl
fefefefefe
§ g s i;
*i u  cj C "
fe      fe
) SO M
<       fe
3 g
o >
to rt
to to sz
to  S xl "rt  «
00 _0   O   oj   j
^rt "g 'co X $
rt ft
-J     J-      Cfl    to-      •■*     Ij      -J
feD        fe    fe
■3 ^
B &
a s
O O
•=a
>> 3
Cj 4>
CJ) bo
rt rt
fefe
as
3 mo
&~ >
gel
SlSt
•-« m —i tN fN
fN fN tN
X X X X> X
XXX
£ £ £ £ £
£ £ £
OOOOO
ooo
Z22ZZ
ZZ.Z
to to to
XXX
E £ £
u   u   cu
Z    Z    iZZZ
to to
X X)
£ £
4J   4)
o o
ZZ
agio
TJ
B
d
*l
E
PS >
§ = 3.2|
;
?
« £
CC
3  3  3
E
E
E
E
_
3 3
S *
C
O    O    O    O  T-
a a a a c
§*
BEE
C
c
C
E
E
_o
(X
cc
a
■-
cc
cc
s
c
CX
fl
rt
rt
>>>>*!     >>>
>    >    >p.>
>    >>    >
* S
1 TJ TJ   H —
ca b a g .2
£ rt fl to g
>   ft ft tn   O
in vo r- oo ov
fN (N fN fN fN
cn cn cn m cn
g CO
a     oi
TJ TJ TJ O
to cu to ^
00 CO 00 '
rt fl rt JJ
a   a
to a
to     to     to U W, to
pqpqpo     2     2     PQ
rt fi b
•3 B a to
« t- & to
O ccj to
vo r- oo
m t*i «n
►- rt
Stoi REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 119
Ci-
to u
g Mti " to
5 « •> K .P
■a a> o j.
g a a a
o S § °
^   Cfl   ifl
& •>. s
a-s s*
!  4>
cc
tta 49
tjtj a
to to tH
TJ  TJ    to
a     w a
o    xj 2
♦3 _• to 33
rt 5 £ 2
"* 33ta"33
33 TJ
O to
fl.fi
to to S u to,
CO CO tf        CO f
to TJ ^
to.    cj —
- 3Sj3
o o >■ ca
u to
>>xj a
a c o
a & * 3
u £tj-"
^   8 I   B
to ° -a a
33 XI  ft o
X  fl
a 33
£ «
to Ov
I- vo
rt
15
.a«
>. a
PS   4)
" fe,
!«fe
. -J E
1 e 2 s 4 g
! S 5 s rt .2
i §    .      T3  rt
' g tj o § 1
!^E§g
j   4>   "O   §U
s " -3 a 8 o
' H     2     -
2 a 'fl oa
« § g g | g 3 I.
W CO t
o
U
m
. o
B "
O -o
to 4)
_rt   to
a w
PS
M   8
a 4)
°"3
pS
a
o
a?;
3 u r
PS
to TJ
00 a
rt  rt
rj 3
o O
d X
- o
co  0J
&-E
5: to
2 .2
33
* ^
J   s
to  co m
to to £
00 00.2
co    ™    pj CO    Q
fefeu   fea
rn #H V m
K ca XI 00 K
to i_ ■*-> 3; to
M 3 ■% % 9
u a
M 33
ca ca H s
to to B E
OO 00 O   to
£ * a £
u
E
•0
0
O
ft
O   CO
X   <&
Z *
rt _
3*2
c £
fi
£
a
to
to
4>
E
to
to
<
H
H
<
© vo ©     *r> ©
vo 00 00
fN CN fN
to to  u
X) Xi X)
£ £ £
OOO
fcfcfc
Ih    U
to  to
X) X)
E £
QQ
totototo to oj o> to
X>X>X>X> X X X) X
££££ £ £ £ £
totototo to to to u
0000 o o o o
totototo to to oj <u
DQOQ O O Q Q
a ,„
« &!;
23 i
111
^ rt rt
PQ^>
a a
O o
o o
a a
d fl
>>
Ih   Ih
iw _  to to
jo 2 > >
3=   3   3  3
;  fl o o
tl a a a
n fl fl A
S,z>>
>   >
o
ZmS
s.3 E
I to 8
♦j  to o
tf MO
>. to
fl M
ft    Ih
■r  a,
to
,5
M
O
£ u
si 1
S-fe Ba
to  i_  a *T
f-f a §
to jjd w -3
ft o « ^
a a 33 o
rt i_ a d
OHft ft
ft
TJ
O
o
fe
Tf in vo
■* ^f **
cn cn cn
r~ 00
cr. cn
© «-i (N cn
in co 10 m
cn cn cn cn C 120
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Z
o
H
<
o
z
o
u
(to
o
co
Q
toS
<C
o
CQ
w
pa
<
■3 -a"
S  to
E. 3
cj PQ
O
(a ■
4J
a E
■- >« -2J
to o »
rt       *.
tie e
o S
jg a£
H
u
o -5 a u
d
rs ™«
to
u
,. TJ XJ
O
ted
por
vise
ttle
>
to
ft   to    Ih    «
to    Ih    (U    «
"B
8.| i||
ST55
£3
5   4J
a E
3
mployee
er   reje
Board;
vote; st
ment si
t»
pq
TJ  to
2 »
to
O  *J
rt o,
to
u *
«   co
^tj -a"
O m a>
" rt B
ft O 00
£« «
w
rtJ^BB _  <-  B  to  to c
•O-g   S3  to ^   c.   g>  O
|««\8 111- tl
^^^^ £      sjIC^-oo
EIh-j^-TJ p    h    r-  O  -j    ""
-3 a  to c a+jH^,
_._.fl£; a a ^     w to
"^Q'
A 4) a
■§*<
a a
*    *    Cfl"
. to >1
to a rt
E   rt tj
4) a a
Q rt "j; a E "a
S3 *
E   3
SEE    to-
Q 5 -
ill
.5H J
to >
a tj a
j-o *•
a as
5 S M » K fi g
S* o
to >. 3
Cj to ij
rt O  rt .
gists
9S-3-
S En
55   4> w
,§■§
e 5C E
3 £ B
B   cJD 5 "
2 a.a
Cfl
to
llso
to a
a 33
»   H *3 -2
to  <u
rt X!   U
1 *j o
• a 33
°s >,£ a ■
o S M g .
8 to * *
j g o » ;
rt a r-
4> *3 5
to   rt  o
S   >>
no*-
Su-l
« 5 •
£ 2 *s to 5
? a oj « >
%
to
o
fl
fl
to
to
n
o
x
■5
a
M
to
CU
cu
>
TJ
fl
*fi -5 12
"3 Q rt
rt M x;
ft M
« 3 u
to o >
X> S fl
—   rt X
* £x
c|1
to Q
to **  >,
o S TJ
£~ °
4) a 2
a ■»
! « £
i       aj
! tS* o a
i a- E
§8Jj|
u « H to
III?
S.no«-
s-o^m
1 e bH
ft *. 13 t.
rt o ^, a .
* = a
w ? .2
a to£
c I2
X)   fl  v> -*-* ^3
a»g
4> a. o
8 a E
a- M a
B  to a
O   4>   J3
ft* 1
IS to
i * jS   g   U
5 b5 a|
1 O  >. to
s|*^S.
ca ss a .a
o   fl xj)
co X   ■>   fl
>. ^
fl «c
Otf §
PQ    a
ft
to
s
3.B2&
O   H   3 TJ
—« (N
Ih   Cfl
O   >.
M  3 x>
fl   nj 33
fe«^
B   B
E   to
1-1   to
co   fl   O   O   >.
§ 1 « -2 3
^  B  sO  cu X-
fe<g5j2
<H (N      cn
0 2 rt
« 33
3  (St 33
rt ra o
O 3 w
c3|E
a
a
toi   r^
w a
&^
3 a
82
n a
u S
to.   M
E 3
>.CC
|p;B-;Sd<B
3 _;      Cto OT      pi
Bag
3 £ a
6!5«
E
o
a
o
>>a
= fe
«    .
«^ co     a     i-
■> uO^H^cflPST
jS   :M   -CJ 2   • W
to ci u   ^   ^ (!,'
'JS
ufefe
rt
PL,
1
O
Z
cfl -* Cl
cfl   to ^j-
rt  O
M^  O
23-
SI?
B to)
•to 2  „-
3 a S
i rt ._;
•s^is
T. 3 O
4> Tl
^  3 1"
CJ    E to
a. a 4)
S O   to
a 4)
.§ a
■a b <
toi"
toi 0
Sag.
to  2  O-Ej
a S o o
»^2
*-* tj *a
O «  rt
•-* a y
•s«
tf. U1j
* s 0
TJ   O
&-fi ^
"S !> to
£ '^
fl  oj
. E
V,M
wa"2
p-C
u. 0
s e
PS B
O   4)
co Evi
PL, ig CN
«a >°J
cLen
Ltd.
DepE
No,
a1" •
|tnZ
s
ft
in
O H
a S
«■£
•°l
BP»
.   to VI
2 E   •
^!5z
O _,   fl
cfl TJ   (j
fifio
^ rt *a
>> oj a REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 121
4j pq 3
I a
§ as 2
g-toa.g
Bis re
T3   to „.
t£
a"3      S   •
w oj       fl *o
13     8 §
£-      B«
r? .  to
a       TJ   rt   4)
to .. qj a. a
3   u  B       *
8 o .§ a to,
co  >  »~  O
pq
5 o >
ft   3.'^
I tog
St,"
« 5
HUe0
>-. to .3
O   «H   >
ft ^ M
B    ID    Ih
§&to
.2,3, a
H
■a w
a > to _*
B °3»
2 «a .
§ Js 8"
a a   >>
jD $3 35
ft^ +3
»_r M to
tj a ca
to y —
■2. a >
ft to Ih
to I-" to
O ft
X TJ 3
rt 3 cfl
£#■2
o ^ J3 to
& <-£ o
£   to P3 ,>
X
"cfl
"££ £
.3  fl  ^ _.
a B 3  to
a e o i-.
E5SS
i M ° ^ —
, i 2 b to
> tort
p rt 3
s.a
3
to
.a c
I-i
O
a
£ to
CO
o a
a
to
a
to
o
«j Xj
E
—
oo _
"in
— o
to TJ
"o
"A!
>> to
ttH   O
0 TJ
§ £
ft
3
O »H
i-
rt^
o   g
.£ >
u£
- o
+-   o
to
X
£
to
O   u
to TJ
E
<+H
o
cu >7
DJJ^H
o
I
rt  -
3_?«
E
3
fl to
>
tj 33
rt d
a H
E
to
> 3 0\ -S —
O "qj   to
Safe's
1*2
PQ a1 *>
O »toi
-to-3   O
to       rt E
to°   -§
O to    'i
|l|
S «  fl
TJ
"rt £*> "
„u
to        o
rt x **
>, -A ta
to  O
a o cu
~ to-°
o - a
CO oj
a S3   CUD
O  fl  -
X ""   H
■h   Ih   k
to     -a
a"«a
§toS
S3 II
a, t ■"
Sto°
OJ  IO    to
rtO\   o
c*h ^   £
O
a to
g   p.
toS°
' £0 fl  i
; d  to .
as
S2to5 c
a co o
fl       -h        O   fl        g
^ on  n
[1-*
1  «> 33    " w
o
m      xi a
o-,   u  3  ~
3h X>   M
1*3
eS,
to   4)   2
4) .E2 a
IN   S
B   4>   4)   2
■to   6E  >   to
a
to     rt
to £?<! a
* ft O   to
■3 to  co  3
2 S3 4) g
« a Mpj
H
4>   B   £1
u S3.2
S3 |. 3
ft ft a
r- £ 8
M   co
S u a
3 _r-  rt
CT33  X  rH
+-* IO
TJ   O — 2     •
£ ~ a     *P
rt
^"fl"
CA X)
to ->,
■-   £ to
O rt xj
to a  a-
S   MtoC°
ftStogig
m o -»" 3  -a.
rt g a
aj a a
Ih   a   to
o a cj
IH   —'      QJ
0
S a s
B.B!'
3   to   to i
to a to
J  3 &  ™ -E  u ^ to
*0   4)   cfl
1 S S : -3 :
to      „—^   4J
E i-i a S3
S«iSs
a 2 » -s
S3 "to
•2 E to.
a 3 o
ft to Q
5 b Sj 2
1  to   cfl
5     _
5  rt  rt
^».<aS|
•"to        X   o TJ
>. rt
d i< Q rt |
2>"
to to -
CO >,   CA
rt O H
to ^h to
K ft >•
B B5
.3 to  ft
jg IS a ■
_ a B a 3
8 to  H  rt  o
■a a g?^ a
' rt a; 3  g •-
rt fc > > ca
, co a, a s §
; a o
cj   cu  to
a ^o
s*e
fl  _  o
>   O  H
i>    -M   «*H
rt^ ft
* ■*->    CA
*J cu
B  to eo
Si ._3 fl
4>   to
4J   rt  I"
to 9 a
oo to to.
a -a to
a 'is °
Sftto
to  <a qj
o a u
4)   CO   43
" > E
toJa 8
3  to co
o- «
B   ft oj
'sa--
§-"
3    CA    to
*H   _,   ■-"    'O
to a) c- a>
>» o rt n
7 « cj h
aag3
O cN
^    <-H      CA
•|9*
a.a
O    Ih
rt  £
to    ft
«=■     S?^
?5^33^
d ** O
aS S" o
pq cA -a
., .a a
to" o a a "S .
to  cj to  w  E>
O  K  Q  o        M rj
M    jg    Ih  _0 .£,
°   *   >   flj TJ   £3
•fl  Ji   W
e -a a
... o c
on     a
TJ  ^
l.ig
s I a "I tj
:3 o « e
■" TJ o
£ p
B   to   to
i     4)   4>
111
T3   ft
•3  rt  o>
g       M
sr-s s
.aSto
3    3
d  rt
B  4>
a >,ft'
ft xi *
2,2 S3 .S3
« H na
STgo
Ih   +3  X>
>• >>*a .
•h >h a ■
rt rt  rt =
a 3 .£ ;
Ih    Ih    e '
X  X    3 f
to oj w F
eh „ ;
> 3 a -- j
! S tj oc
1 a cu in '
a.E
&"8
S  §  S to
' a £ 33 X?
I
i
fl
fe
o fi
° to
a £
to lH
*- 00
33 ^
TJ "«
e     aw
rt       a  to
~    -S-
o^fed
po'BWk
O    S3 toi
•to  >,-J
3   S  rt
III
b rt H
fl fti  o
PS fefe
O   4)
^^  CJ
life
to J>
ci^
d3B
»^-£
to a a
w-fefe
■-; S3 K
ua
m'to-toi^
S-to"w
33   IP  tj ^^
" 8
si h   d d fe
01  to  «  OJ
TJ to  >  B
o
G
rt
on
E
CA
u
Xj
">
3
0
to
K
uS
<
-i
w
TJ
•a
«
3
E
cn
rt
fl
6
TJ
"cfl
Z
toi
to
_H
>
a
o -c
o
O
>-J.
to
M
M
o
fl
o
3
O
Eh
E
u
HS
"-a a
-jj  +-   <g ON
Ih   "
to     *H
> to «h o
" T)   B
feTJ o a
3  G   O   °
g «a toi
§ 3 s s
.H to - cj
M toi to J4
• ° o
SUpqpi
■a tj -.
a a w
rt  rt
||Z
a u
to! .^  rt
c a
-a 2
a     J
00
uij a"
>.Hto)
fl
«    CA
fl      1^,
>
to    O,
a x?
, J
fi _y
WCDS3
b
rT „, "rt
° 5.
fiWH
toito-g
I toi
rt rt 2
to™"5
Q,   fl -
S   -   -
O  O   u
u.a&
^>ft,f
H
O  cfl "rt
O a ca
O    Ih
OJ    -«       to
£   fl x:
a oo
oSe
a 4>
a i-i .a
.2 TJ tort S n
to   3  O
CJ ^ .2
"So
a> Sz
P
TJ   c
6S
CO
•h a
5 5
«*H      fl   IT)
w   to CO
Ih
.. «Z
io.3
O J«i  ca
3fe-to
S-c S S
«H     to    _/■
e" E 3
Sill
ca a to-
E        O    .
sc«g
slH3
fe^gs
to-ssa
0
;C5S3 C 122
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
TJ   00
a d
a
to
O TJ
rt   rt
co  o
% QQ    •
>>       to
_9 to c
ft.fl.Sf
£ *• m
W
co   CO  C
•- B -to
rt £
a .fi 33
§§ •
!s*
tj       u
S o£
°.to a
ft~a
W
S
•5
Z
2
H
<3
to.
[J
CJ
Z
o
U
Cl,
O
V)
Q
P=S
5.
o
PQ
w
to)
pq
<
to HI _T       to a
O to to        g  o .
S S&    ° „
rt * rt       g 3
to TJ   3 to   0 ■
oil *
a cu u
2 w
4) a 2
TJ —
a cd j>
aa.£
e tj a
B 4> rt
o >. o
cj o a
S|2
co _ a
3 a
o a 9
E E "
■3   ^    »
a to tj
rt O 3
b s 2
3
•a rt to
S3 ^ ft
o o „
CD   ..   to »-i
J? E a
a ft"-.
a oo E - *- ^
aj to r: rt
Sh£°   ^
<< sr
oj a > 3 >>*
SK o
.5 2 .j
cu oo to
jfl a x
H~
d tj
g a a ■- u o
£ w
' o a
Nil
■ E o
. S2
■ to
, to     -
3   C Ih SO
>    8 00~
3  fl tj 'H
*   O to   Q.
>  rt to i
"*  Xi    Ih
; «
£•* oj 33 a ??
to JE   n   to
CO « _-
j.5o
£ 2
JD « w
O   to   oj
_ •—. to  >
tj - >»*5
egos
to  ^ "a a>
a aj a <u
a cu <u
3,   .> co
S  i>   to  to
2bj S3
*t ft
a<: 4>
TJ   ,,   S? »
«j   JJ  rt  c
to ^   ^ .2
J    4J    «  |
E'StjS
8to§l
to 3     -a
S o c <-»
Iftlto
O  «  3 33
c a o rt
ZS
'■■■ ' a"° c-
3^ g J| g
a co ■? -3 ton
o '3 fe o *a
ftE m co rt
o oj
« a <a fl o
to to *r
"3 *> 8 ,_-? to
■   P 33   to   2
" £  O +j TJ   O "O »A1
E    cA    Ih    01
« .*_> oj *a
3 fi a ca
S o
nl to fc
Cfl    (J    O
3'3fl
2a a
" § E
cu a 3
E o
cfl  o
■SOS 3_:
Bfcfc
O   O   4>
B toi   >
k « a fi £ *51
s S b .9 I to ;
m to g .3 oo
ca 3
i a
B   O E   in
to 3  fi ? to
Ih  rr-O       <S
H  Ih  V")   •
u cjs
a-H
! toffi
, a o
rt
° S3 E
ca .
E g&
•   B   «
to- a ft
tS E B
0 O o
D. o  tj
cj u
to   W   K
Ih   w   *^   h-
.a <u « i;
•u CA to    S
O fl to .3
d cu >-. fl
g S3.2 E
O a ft
<H «   Jjd
u g to
3 6     u a
i 33 iu   to  to
3 ft O  o  u
"flPP'
to -a « -3, a
x ^ -S a .2
to       cu £
*{««        3
3h  o TJ <h Xj
I ft*Si-1
I rt rt S3 g -j .
i u tj a S S
rt to
B i"
cfl   4> S
•3 8 1
ftbto--sfta2
9 a 3 « 2 E
rt -to to cA      ^ a
0   to to M   %  to
Sftrtgft|ft
4j    a >     t* ? _
O   Cfl to -to M UO
X to        »g   to   B O
to B TJ      (fl. 4,      m
S C 11      a*»
to .     0J)    fl.
5 E 11
co n ^ 2
•toS^to
■ o a
■ * a « on
■ Tj|^5
■ ll EI
2 § o*
otto, _!tj
c « a
S3 «
to 2 >)
to a 41 "a
o a
n a
,X   l-H   Xi     I
J _.       to
:S§ 2
sag 8
ft ° is
-to ^ _
to   .tj a
B  B  E  O
B  B  4J  g
u d a 3
TJ     TJ
to  •  0)
MS to
S^to
ft
<
<&
Q
.3
a.2
■5 3
fep
to
ca
rtTj"3
ft to E
E o n
a » M >,
.3 « _B to
a g -a s § 'f >
« o g 2 a § a
feS3 ItSS-K-S
hcn      cn ^- m
s s S
a
E
"toi »
to<Ci    4)
a 00 s
ill
u--
&- to
-. > 'c   a 3 ■§
.       ■      .  Cri    0    CJ    rt       '
<! »-I H-J
w
■r a a
r cu a
«3Z E
OS"
c^Sfe
ptSOc/j
'to
p. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 123
o
o
TJ
fl
a
(A
B
ft
E
4H
o
§&
1   O
ft
£•3
I-
W
!V TJ
to1 w
5a
ft 4)
E to
W
£ 5
,     OJ  to
3-S M
a s; -
-„•-£-!
. to cj a ,_, a
;so      »
2 s -to i-i a
IS-lsas
< X\   co  ca «t-i «_,
s g..a 2 - o
E   B.   to   rt   „
Su§bS|
5 fl fl a ^ **
to,0to«S
3 Qh   »      „£j
3   to   rt ^-^-) WH
a-Boio
3 rt  "* o       qj
& +-    _: u
3     fl S3     £
3S |S Si-0
o in „    fl  oj
,   C   M M   -
i a a x> •-, 'a*
i rt
■fl °*
Ih   CO
to
o   00
■4-1      fl
TJ*
'3 a
4J TJ .3
Cfl   'to
B-BTJ
toTJ TJ   J,,
S   2   3 5
o S3 aQ.
~o„-«
it to m a
^ «2 to.
Ho
... 4J ° ,
to   4)   CD   B
nr"   ,1  S
a O
-°s  ■; I
u  B -B
rt  o  E
e-21
a rt.
CO to,   to. to   -r   to
rt   „ a a1    CJ a
a.
O to
to   3   3  2 -i" S3  3
u
J >,3 to
I JU«B
o 3 tj •- to
ifl to a ■"
o a rt a TJ
S CJ   ftg 4)
- toi ., cj rt
co a B
CJ   41   S
toft E
•2 * .3 n 5 3
a to >,
E.&.B
. to 3 to
j ca oo to
,-s   fi
rj-'rt
TJ H
to a
TJ   O
a P
S   -H
I"
o £
O   fl
u o
gtol
•3   fl TJ
c 0 fl
>.  to to to.
rt 3 in to
ftO»to
to " >, a a jj
§ a h E A
0 to     o -a
g >, to   g
■3 5    E
slsto„
to tN
32 rt B  rt  o
d n  E n
a
ItoH
o
O
o
o.
H
to-
0
ft
to
E
to
£
CN
rt „
Ih    O
to   -M
8 S
oo .£
X
o
£ o>
to
to
«
a
<u
^ o
3
E
O
to '-,
aj
B
u
to
to
H
(>
Ih
O
s
Ih
to
fl
A
Ih
IT p
on
n <**
a
£
to
|
to
3
bo
a
oj
TJ fl
a
>
X «
■*-* 3
.  c
c>
rt
to
as
fl
o
0
3
£
•5
O X) i-i
E »J
* •-•a
4J  ■
a a a
ca oj a
fi o S
£ o W*H
to S ±) O
5 rt "PQ
O to fl
M U O
8 - O fi •-
33 fl S fi CS
«    „tB 0 iai
u
« a aa
3~
: o\ .3 tj a
ca o o
• h5
i   to   O
i 1 E
! 91
i a a „
: ", Q a to, a >
I &o
a a to
41    to
to    g    B
rt .2  ;
,  41   00
tS   to
to a
to 9   41
3 & jo
i ft H 8
J   ft Cfl   OJ
I  3 3 to
co §5
05 a I
v. E a
o a o
to R   U
H
a
co cn
fl      (H
o a
rt
o
_H    «j
« o
&
N
fl
= 1^
e a
c a a
•a a e
B        CJ
u u ti
to a   to
2 SS
-'I
41   "   g
^        to      A
Jjfi-g
J  g    . E  to    .£
g1 & toft.S 0
^e a "ft
to sa
5 fl B
S £
•3 TJ 0-3
rt    fl Ih    B
00   Ih O    (3
fl oo fl a
fl   to o "^i
■a
fl
cu ^s «
acc
CtH lfl
9 ■* £
«"2 §
a »1
rt £ •S
a ^ w
TJ A to to .j,
c to fi .a a '
rt   Ih  *^ ■*->   rt   ito
M a ^T rt St
Jis£a
a E ^ to rt i
e 1 j - s :
toSSI|!
ft o-. rt S3
O TJ to ^ I
"eSjjs;
•a S a fi     '
O       o fl   *■;
to -fi o £      *
a rt in o a '
2 £ tJ fl a"
to ih
TJ % S ■"
CO    Ih    <U    OJ
oo a & «
•a o a e «
41 tft  O   41 TJ
ft
<
^
ft
<
I
O 'g   & 3 -0
e i3 ™ a a
SSfewjS
i-H CN cn
:-Sfe
fe5 |
3
41
41   >,
K   B   i-
So .2
rt 3 E
fe&£
I—cn rn
ft
<
ft
<
ft
5 o>
<33feW
O        fti
^^X3
«'tols'B*
d    »i    h
rt 5 _i
BSO
MlSsi
S3S3U
U     M
|3l
rt       o
o^w
to x r\
EfeQ.
°   . >
0    toj>
p.'PS S3
5s§
._?> o
►J^PS
tffeo
S3S3U
a    2«
S3      u'S
a     v S
S    to>
LijCJB W
H'^SJfe
.S2 -i3 a
a ii
to cu
*  A u
t*H        El
O TJ m
a ^ oo
O cn
S&B^
S«-2o
ft m ca iti
ol"-
o° § s
CM    ^    Q
a o<toi
alz°
toll
is -
III
33 a tj
rt O C
u 5   rt
H rt
»tH   "O   ^J
°S SjJ
O      -3
i-j c«7
Ja fi & —
32 o a ■
u 33 co !=.
°to£toi
§i
rt
a? fl
ft
O xi        i?
a « „_, o
g  fl OC-1
0
to i
a o
*e o
Ph   w
TJ<
fl -
fl    CA
-£  to Q\
Its
3-21    •
OS * £
4!   u 'to
.EES
^to5
■to    41     „
o a a
a o
CJ
.tJ   O "I
"a  .
4i a a
aw.2
o  rt
°:e'S
= CJ
rt   S
Ih    <^ CU
O    _. >
•h  'C O  °
O  o to "i
U-- 8 o
H
Cfl    -TJ    to
a g a
^^S3 jo _]
t» to     S3
■2tj<:       »2o
tj S3
dfe
E     -
S TJ
a S a"
^5-1
«
.   cj
njji.
rjStoi SR
cfl to1 oo >in
3   co   E   co   g H
y   M  71   CO   B
to rt -^ ca a q
g>o£55z
B
TJ to
a co t~
CU    to  to
. a1?
2 to h
CSZ
b 2
to   O -J
9fe -
^§«-
o o rt
l- —•   O
j-  -M —
u C 124
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Ih
fi
o
to
ft
to
£
Ih
u
to
TJ
I-
to
60
£.3 TJ
o o a
ftSS
g a to
B
>, ° —
3 to'to-d
Eo " 3
B ftTJ e
»ct«o
a s ■- to
w  3 ^j   to
cu tj a rt
SS o
as**
W
"   B   >i
to    B    <-j
0 u i"
&S TJ
to cfl
Bee
P   41
j-tojo
H
13
S
■5
s
o
U
IT)
Z
o
o
z
o
u
o
<
o
03
w
toi
P9
<
i to       E to .2 to w to
5 2     a cj to     a Id
J  JL   41   41
i .9 a a
cja
tj.
.S -e
g o
J!*
n
2 5 £ 1 «
*•   to   fi
CA CO
"ito, l*H TJ
to   O -M   «   to
>, |-i   Ih TJ
o fi S ?i fi,
£ rt oj ft c
Uto to a §
aPu.to.
HEStS
Rtj 2-P
a 41 O      j3 in
U   a  "   =-> CJN
a cfl to .
41   41   O   41   to
•B   OJ 3
*  « |
O toi
to, ~
'.S  3  S
a a
u ft !
r. a-1
' a      o
O -3   to
a > >
ras-to
4J TJ   ,1.   I
to a'S '
cn 4J   ,
i to' 5f :
TJ ij
3 3 u J
CJ ,
e to- a
o >, *,
" . 3 _- '
oil o
- j 5
to  ca"
- ta
a P
a (*h
to cj ^ to
o u    _? a
• ® rt
Ho 2
u ftTJ e3
to "^ fl "C «
SofifSfi
rt O ? rt H
,0 rt
s a
a .a
to x-
i ^ to to
;.fi rt c
• > oj fl
>    to Ih Ih
I   Ih O OO
to      0
if:
o       cn
to •- S
to Cl
-   ft    :
8 <! S
u    a
to"*§
a.a 8
a > to
8 2Q
IS
so
fl 2 to. a
ill*
■a a to 2
'M   4J ^
a  S O   4)
.9 i a. a
E*E>
O        to  to
EA ^    fl
IH   TJ fi
to oj ^xj
>>TJ CN   ij
£ flw^
£ a IT *>
H S £ afl
o o
tf 8* o
O   M  K -
ltoft§
to   rt   c„  to
O to  cu
£B ga
'C aj u ^.
.2,J=uirt
rtH « a
a 5 °s e
|3&1
2 * '-3 a I
O +j  to  aj  w
*°Z*2
«*h   u   DO _  ■*->
«i|la
tolls!
o £ a u
to o s      „
to ft U   to
fi .*« rt S
to^ 5»C
cj a tj
S  3 ■
i  o  rt
oc
° •3 * £
4J   B to
* o ■ £_i
TJ °  co 'S.»
to   ,,   to fc   ~
« ii   U to   to
O   rt •" 5
b a § s -
a-
-   OJ   —
a £
ca    - to
fl    CA    >
— Ti^3 "to
§    e *
toSTJ 1
s « « a
a o a
we 2 K
5 " |
E « to II
B Sf ^ 3 x
1 I S 2 ?J
e * a a E
o
X
o
o
CO
Lto
to
fl
o
—
ft
a
o
tN
to
<
o
(A
CA
3
r-T
0
in
a fl o\
0
£
to
^
aj
a
^
>
On
tort
>
3
«■
E
o jS -■ „ 3
.2 b a
TJ     TJ
to i a
a 4i to
W    a
§
0
.9
Pfe
i   1>
!») 41
! to< TJ TJ   4J
3 .a < S -b s
feS-?joS3.9
feoa
ass
to Si
ft
.a £
!3 a
a cu
0      .,
ft
£
o
X
H - ". ^ ■->
oi<
CO • ci
TJ J w
--.      O o
oo M "3
B OTJ
O to   co
toi^to, I
a'U<ip1
PS     tot
CJtol rt
to'     '  to
« a a
o O (I,
= 1§
a to-*
H .« «• O
to!B2.B
cJwS
y! B
S3to;u'
a
Ti oo
to)
TJ cn
■*"* O to ^
rt 0 aj cn
TJ a E in
toto°M.
y.- z
Ba-
■«   a«
to ™  (j
§   -        2
S    to     to
5 S S a-
2d a.a
4i to
.to     a cu
i bO<
H
fl to q rt
oo to ii o
"rt 33 O'G
§ a s °
. O  ^ co _
M o a o
ojcflPSgs
WTJ-Ca2
Iflll
" EWUO
>
aq^TJ
><fe
•a r r -j
to TJ TJ =0
2 6 o I
Zooe
« oo ™W
P. E.9   .
a a. cu
« a.a
O PL, p. S
PQ
S S 3= o
Htoli-lU
to   cfl  O
Q§Q.
2 "<a p.
7^ to 41
o Tja
to
M
to
^
fl
E
s
2
u.
Ph
O
to
'a
fl XI
to
ft
co
CO
O
to
E
1
PQ
o
X
E
CO
•-0
C
E
to
o
E
fl
O
"to
t
0
in
o
H.ZZZ
U        TJ
fi ffi .a
to   . i
ttj
ttj a.
3toin:
to .fi j .
CO B "
£fl M ■
£  rt ca
w    CO
to, to  O
fe(2  r
■9*
2 a-i
E  S*
-M a to
°< Si   •
a °
o i51 Z
TJ
O TJ
o a
41   41 CB
a »<»
5   to   41
O  ° 'to
b to §
fi A>  *H
rt Q   O REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1951
C 125
w o    n a
8.   IjS"
8 s.- 2 i
>-*
8 3 = 8 o
ft S rt £b
CJ   c
SE
O   DO
*3 fi
co 5
■a 33
to d   •
co *■- TJ
> S 2
S S?S
a s
41 g
O *
TJ OJ
3 fl
rt cu
a 6
•as
co  B
ii a
a E?Jg
is 3 a
8| *
a o c
Hto-6
• "o -a
0\ CO   .
*H"fl.2
o 33
>• a o
31:
to fl ~4 '
> a to '
■s2s
CJ  to,    ?  J
J   4J  to
«a a
1   41   ^SJ
: a 4i     ;
to 2 fl •
t£  «  rt
•°.-6-
t? a:
,o a
, u-, cj
TJ   B   O ^
to    to    01   to
6*g
£ >> h
"•tog
2 ° •
#   Ih
j^tj
*3
»   2
3 fl
j   00 O   w
•E Es
oc*-
B   IP to,
rt O
§>.f
3 .3
to 2 ft
to to
o,J:
n I" oj E r
3 is > EI
to M i
S3
a a
S a oi
3 to  ■
41   to
to ft 3-
i **,» a <
& 37^
« o * x?
to       oi O^
fl oj      —i
"^ fl to    *
3-3 j- t-
° ""'  e **"*  >»
5 .2 8 5 5
? ■ S to o
5 sa B>.
j oo -o a
-■toi     E .M
qS a    a»«
B • 3 on u f s
B .to o r. i— oo a
B » o j5 S « t>
fl
to Es
£tJ
to oj
>.TJ
3 a
u a
to a
o
£?B
.2, a
aH
to TJ   E   41   A
U   to   B   •>   B
a a ° to 3
toi   u
SO _.- 11 TJ
S2§Qa
OT"a ii §
E -r to E E
laftSE
toli-l
5< 5 v. »-
■Ss"^
2     So*
°l-8 .
in*13 a „ -h
- fi n    2
■^ ft to i_ i-1
£ O  3
11       O
o-.aa
S  E   '
a ii
a a o
5  4J to,
"tog
to,
O   41
~ £ e
SOO
.£     a
oo a rt
o ™
j.3."
■9 a
ECU
- .-   M
o «8
CO
to
a
a
CA
K
fl a S w O
»- a
to oH to
-fi 2 fl
■t-i Ih ^
•a fi^
o fi w
w to to
"      Ih    ?
v- ft
O
lob
to       to
;•»«
41
41
.. 8"o
to to M
o0 n
9   to   «>
c-9a
I'SS
to   c;   00
V  41 S
3-
O cfl
to™5
O .     to
""V to
to* 42   41
a a "
2 9 B
S a a
4)  oo   00 .'.
■a a .a 5.
a 8 =_
5 oft„
„ a     e
1^ to  aj  oo
Sofi"
2>..art
■a   g
..eg S
Sal*
•sill
ft      tort
<u a >. >.
a iu is
tj § S •£
to CJ "£o
.a « to oo
yi to —i a
to Ih .a
TJ   u   to 3h
•° a S
2 a    •=„
to .2 o TJ e
■5 3 ■§ 1 a
S 3 s a a
a
fetto
a
a
*^.|jj    CO
>r \  O  Ih
s^a
w'Wtojta
S3 few"
5W|
a to m
a co rt
K O oo
•art io^,
^z'fcB
531-^ i-;
o o 8?
soap
tS  O toCxj'
J B^ .
.or
.02
■   rH
£ TJ U to, 0
-2 :j :
„r    H < a
a°tof<
H X    .
O
53'
W S
to) 1)1
E -':
"I to"   .5
|u«fe:
fi i2 °
■h   '-  Q  „    ,       O'rHll-lflj"'
Jfel  -&.2&^S"
li^toUECwoa
33      5   !fl
fe oo ooW •
fi fi     •■
- *3 G uT '
Ito^toC
to -t!    - rt *
S-H   r
a uCJ to
••■a .!-'
iOjM
:   3 e
•StolW
41 TJ
wtoi
00
B a
•a to
>, fl a   -
to&|S
oj     a-rt
Kyj  cfl  to
co       „_, <
I " °tol
Sft-oto
to   O    §   to
BCJa S
a jo
soij  8
S;53tj
so     a
TJ
SI'
§1.
ir, 3 r
.S3 tj   r
a tj
oo rt to
I55
a oo.a
3.9 a
K-s a
cJ2u
Ph  co    .
raw
TJ   41
ii-i  .53
-13 -9 1
SSi"<
"a a oo
to 3 a
00
oo 3
.9 to
to) •" 8 a hJ '•
cS|.'ii
.IS"*i
i >, t; .S a
u.anto
to
I u c
o .E
Kg"
sg.is
.  « O
CQffiU
n a hh w
t3a   .jacl,
-TJ A.   tj
toTj *i a a
a S t-i 4i -a
ai-1   .tt. a
C O   u   41
to'Su-gSS
B -to      a
i3 £ oo 2
o a .9 £ *S
a to
a a m
ai 5. a
•s - a
«
oopC
aw
M.to
•9-g o
S§ S
5350
3    id
j ooa X
to a % a
o-"tol
S E
if 3 E 'J
TJ toi O a
O PL, TJ 5.
iW co o«8
. ii c5
a >     °
S 3   ^J=
SpjiSS
K o.E'4
^|22r
ft £ 33 3
o"sSB
r oo • K
3.9Q rc5
-ia .3 .
°ffi3^u
U        to,        ,J
««.o'«
a.    a°   r
11 00 00 TJ
° 3 rt -to
to] -B B TJ toi
a o a
-' E U g  to
sis §e
to]P.SQB C  126
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
"8
as
•5
On
Z
o
H
to,
U
z
o
u
ft
o
«
D
Ph
<
O
PQ
ca
P
.9
?-9to
o
.>
-id
TJ
a
TJ
(A
£ e
a §
a E
S t3 46
o Mr
41   ft  41   ?
to   41   E
a K H
E u a w
3a £ a
«i"Sa
to   00.3
S -9 -,• ■*
s « o
«I a o
ii a rt to
to P B
e2«I
to tjjjtH rt
fl rt O 33
HJ3
rtl
— co rt
TJ £ O
TJ ih
a o ..
to rt *-«
3   Ih OS
a a r.
° 2
O fl      "
to 1-H
t-     lH
°   fl
tj ati
rt co fl
£ eS
P3 S^
«.8Jt.a
jfl  rt fl  to TJ
L-H &TJ
2g£2a
>>   CO rt    w
rt rt O .3
ft O »-i
■   CO   to
«_, .»,»-< to >
32p: S
rt u u      J-'
" .1 2 " tj
O to rt
a co *o
to rt 33
n to La n o
"111?
TjSx>
to a a
C<S  •-.    W
O to
a - a
•" oj a
" 2 I
to  O   E
a v
S So «
§1-1
a   e e
"togs
5        to   M
oS.S"
B 3 rt ii
«Bj:
3°      b
o-9wTJ
Ih   to   to   CO
g.9.41
,2 o. a °
Ito^g
U     ..to
41 a rt >•
a m 2 ■?
tomato.
Tj ^cfl   tA ^
CO   O
M
o 3 0
: 00 5
i S 2
S a
to   11
ft-" "o
|„-?|«
*. H - -a —
I. o v. a-
I--111
5-5
n E S
2 a S
ti 0.9
"Oljii
u 2a
!>Ǥ
0«.8to,
1ȣS
a   au
9 s S2C
gto&io
l