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Provincial Game Commission REPORT For the Year Ended December 31st 1951 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1953

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
• •
Provincial Game Commission
REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1951
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game
Commission for the year ended December 31st, 1951.
G. S. WISMER,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-G ener al's Department,
Victoria, B.C., May, 1952. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., May 26th, 1952.
Honourable G. S. Wismer, Q.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended
December 31st, 1951.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
JAMES G. CUNNINGHAM,
Game Commissioners. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Reports—
Game Commission     7
Officer Commanding " A " Division  11
Officer Commanding "B" Division  14
Officer Commanding "C" Division  18
Officer Commanding " D " Division  24
Officer Commanding "E" Division  30
Report of the Division of Biology—Game Management and Research Branch,
Chief Game Biologist James Hatter  33
Report of the Division of Biology—Fisheries Research Branch, Chief Fisheries
Biologist Dr. P. A. Larkin  42
Report of Predator-control Branch—Supervisor of Predator-control W. W. Mair 46
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-51, Inclusive  50
Summary of Total Revenue Derived from Sale of Various Licences, Collections,
etc., during Year 1951  50
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences  51
Revenue—Sale of Deer, Moose-Elk, Goat, and Pheasant (Game) Tags  52
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences  53
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Outfitters' Licences  54
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Anglers' Licences  55
Revenue—Sale  of Fur-traders',  Taxidermists',  and Tanners' Licences  and
Royalty on Fur  56
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-51, Inclusive  57
Comparative Statement Showing Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on Which Royalty
Has Been Collected, 1921-51, Inclusive  58
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on Which Royalty Was
Collected during Year 1951  59
List of Confiscated Fur, 1951, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur  60
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1951, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated
Firearms  61
Bounties Paid, 1951  62
Comparative Statement of Bounties Paid from 1922 to 1951, Inclusive  63
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees Paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1951  64
Prosecutions, 1951  65
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1951 :  67
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1951  68
Statement of Vermin Destroyed by Game Wardens, 1951  81
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1951  82
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1951  83
Statement—Miscellaneous Receipts  8 3
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1951  84
Personnel of Game Commission as at December 31st, 1951  93  Report of the Provincial Game Commission, 1951
It is with considerable pleasure that we are in a position to advise that this Report
covers the most successful year in the history of the Department, not only in regard to
revenue, but also in improvements in the general game situation throughout British
Columbia. Increased revenue naturally means an increase in the number of licences
issued over previous years, and consequently also means a heavier demand upon our
wild-life resources.
The total revenue, including fines imposed for violations of the Game and other
Acts and regulations, amounted to $930,720.65, representing an increase of $129,871.50
over the previous year. It might be mentioned that this increase was due principally
to the issuance of 23,829 more angling and hunting licences, the sale of more game tags,
and the collection of additional fur royalties and trophy fees. Particulars covering the
sale of hunting and angling licences are set out hereunder:—
Kind of Licence Number Issued        Revenue Received
Non-resident anglers' licences  27,953 $165,859.00
Non-resident firearms (hunting) licences 3,441 84,650.00
Resident anglers' licences  87,055 87,055.00
Resident firearms (hunting) licences  81,592 318,946.00
Totals  200,041        $656,510.00
The foregoing figures, as previously stated, cover an additional 23,829 hunting and
angling licences over the previous year, and $102,602.50 enlarged licence revenue over
1950. Non-resident hunters obtained 2,549 big-game trophies, or 448 more trophies
over the previous year, with an increase of $25,510 in payment of trophy fees. The total
amount paid as trophy fees by these non-resident hunters was $113,655, and was paid on
the following big-game animals:—
Bear (grizzly)   112 Mountain-goat       198
Bear (black or brown)  164 Mountain-sheep      101
Caribou     75 Moose   1,389
Deer (Coast)        4 Wapiti (elk)       114
Deer (mule or white-tailed) 392
Increased revenue naturally means heavier pressure on our wild-life resources, but
your Commission is of the opinion that our game resources are in a very healthy
condition. We must, however, emphasize the fact that in order to keep our game
populations intact, we must thoroughly understand wild-life conditions in every section
of the Province, not only from an administrative and scientific standpoint, but from the
standpoint of the sportsmen as well. In our scientific approach to our work in managing
the wild-life resources of the Province, we feel that we have made considerable progress.
Many problems are being scientifically investigated, and conclusive findings or reports
are being submitted. These reports are constantly before us and are given very careful
consideration, and recommendations submitted are acted upon as needs arise and in
keeping with Departmental policy.
During the year under review our Scientific Branch has grown and has been
confronted with many problems that have arisen, and that are still before us. Many of
these problems were not anticipated, and consequently our appropriation for scientific
investigation had to be overexpended. These problems were principally created through
enlarged activity on the part of industry and due to the need of our having to investigate
approximately 600 applications for water rights.   Investigations were necessary on the
7 E 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
activities of the British Columbia Electric Railway Company at Jones Lake; the projects
of the British Columbia Power Commission at Buttle Lake, Clowhom Falls, and other
places; the project of the Aluminum Company of Canada Limited in the Tweedsmuir
Park area; the project of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company in respect
to the Pend d'Orielle River; the Okanagan flood-control project on Okanagan River and
Lake; the Libby Dam project; the development of the Puget Sound Power and Light
Company on the Skagit River; the Nanaimo Lakes project of the H. R. MacMillan
Export Company Limited; and several other projects entailing considerable time and
expenditures which had not been provided for in our appropriation.
It is deemed necessary at this time to mention that the projects referred to were of
such importance that immediate investigations were imperative, and while the cost of
carrying out these investigations has been borne by the Department, with one exception,
it is felt that there should be some provision whereby companies or individuals responsible
for such investigations should furnish the necessary moneys to carry them out. In this
regard, we feel that it is only right to mention that the Consolidated Mining and Smelting
Company Limited has been most generous in providing financial assistance to enable us
to carry out investigations in respect to their development work. During the hearing
before the Comptroller of Water Rights on the application of the British Columbia Power
Commission for permission to dam Buttle Lake, assurance was given that financial
assistance would be forthcoming for the necessary alterations to the Puntledge Park
Trout Hatchery on Vancouver Island, and that a substantial sum of money would be
provided for maintaining the fisheries of Buttle Lake.
The investigations referred to have been under the capable supervision of Chief
Fisheries Biologist Dr. P. A. Larkin and Chief Game Biologist James Hatter, and we
have also been indebted to our honourary scientific advisers, Drs. W. A. Clemens and
Ian McTaggart Cowan, of the Department of Zoology, University of British Columbia,
for their valuable assistance and untiring efforts.
Our Predator-control Branch, under the supervision of W. Winston Mair, has just
completed a most successful year in which a campaign was waged on predatory animals
throughout the Central Interior and southern portions of the Province. The results
obtained have demonstrated beyond doubt what can be accomplished by the careful use
of the poison known as " 1080 " in the control of coyotes, wolves, and bears. Claims for
bounty on coyotes throughout the Province, no doubt as a result of this predator-control
campaign, dropped from 9,822 for 1950 to 5,202 in 1951. Our records indicate that the
principal decrease in bounty payments was in the areas covered by the campaign referred
to. Elsewhere in this Report will be found a review by W. Winston Mair, Supervisor of
Predator-control, in which is outlined the activities of the Predator-control Branch, and
information as to the general predator situation throughout the Province.
We again operated a game-checking station at Cache Creek, and information and
results obtained provided us with very valuable scientific data and enabled us to supply
very valuable information to sportsmen passing through this station to their respective
hunting territories. The checking-station also was a means of providing more adequate
enforcement of the " Game Act," and last, but not least, we were able to offer protection
to the cattlemen of the Interior by checking on the transport of illegally taken domestic
meat.
One hundred and twenty-one convictions were recorded through this station covering violations of the Game and other Acts, and the Game and Sport-fishery Regulations.
A considerable amount of revenue and a saving in commission payments covering the
collection of this revenue was also due to the operations of this checking-station.
It is of interest to note that the following trophies were cleared through the Cache
Creek Checking-station:— REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 9
Bear (grizzly)   19 Moose   2,270
Bear (black or brown) 137 Mountain-goat   40
Deer  1,735 Mountain-sheep   9
Caribou  2 Wapiti (Elk)   2
Ducks  5,790 Grouse   11,876
Geese       368 Pheasants   77
Cougar   3 Coyotes   50
Game fish   10,298
A total of 12,132 hunters and fishermen were checked through this station, and
this total was made up of 9,809 residents and 2,242 non-residents.
Revenue was collected through this station as follows:—
Non-resident big-game trophies   $68,800.00
Premium on United States funds       1,781.68
Fines        1,375.00
Court costs  363.00
Total   $72,319.68
The organized sportsmen of the Province have been very active in the interests of
our wild life, and it was largely through their efforts in acquainting their local legislative
representatives with their problems and the necessity of complete recognition of the
value of our fish and game resources that an amendment to section 82 of the " Game
Act" was introduced and approved during the 1951 Session of the Legislature. This
amendment provides that 75 per cent of the revenue of the Department each year can
be used in our game-management work, and 25 per cent turned over to the Government
as a return from a natural resource. If any portion of the 75 per cent referred to is
unexpended, then such unexpended portion is placed in a conservation fund for future
use of the Department. We could refer to this amendment as being a " new deal" for
game management in British Columbia, and it is felt that over a period of years it will
provide the means of building up a financial reserve that will enable the Department to
undertake and carry out all major wild-life investigations.
Along with the amendment referred to, a resolution from the organized sportsmen
requesting increased fees for various licences under the " Game Act" was approved,
and this will enable us—even though the cost of our administration has risen greatly—
to meet the ever-increasing pressure on our wild-life resources.
Carrying out our usual policy, another Provincial Game Convention was convened
with the approval of the Minister in charge of the Department, the Honourable the
Attorney-General. This Convention, which was held in Vancouver in the latter part of
April, was very successful, and these annual gatherings have been the means of creating
better feeling and relations between the organized sportsmen and the Department, as
well as other organizations, such as trappers, cattlemen, farmers, etc.
UPLAND GAME BIRDS
In 1951 the pheasant situation improved, due principally to a mild winter followed
by a favourable hatching season. Conditions on the Lower Mainland showed a noticeable improvement over the previous two years. Pheasant populations in the Interior,
while showing an improvement, have not advanced to the point where we can relax on
bag-limits or length of season. We have received many and varied opinions as to the
reasons for the decrease in the number of pheasants in the Interior sections of the Province, and our game biologists are continuing their investigations in this regard.
Grouse populations were good and came up to the expectations expressed in our
last Annual Report. E 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS
The months of January and February provided the finest brant-hunting experienced
on the Coast for some considerable time. There was a great demand for available
hunting-sites in the Boundary Bay district where, owing to the size of the area, strong
supervision and regulations are required. We were in receipt of, and favourably acted
upon, a request for more strict regulations.
The number of ducks exceeded expectations, and taking the Province as a whole,
wild-fowl conditions were much better than for some years. There was, however, some
disappointment in the duck-crop in the Cariboo regions, but this was purely a local
situation. The split open seasons of the past were discarded, and, as a result, sportsmen
were favoured with a sixty-day continuous open season instead of a forty-five-day open
season when the split seasons were allowed. Sportsmen, however, are not unanimous on
the question of a straight or split season, and this subject, no doubt, will be fully aired this
coming spring. Some dissatisfaction was expressed in the Interior in regard to the open
seasons allowed, especially throughout the Okanagan. A further effort will be made in
the coming year to impress upon the Canadian Wildlife Service at Ottawa the necessity
of more fully agreeing and favourably acting upon our problems and recommendations.
BIG GAME
Big-game populations throughout the Province showed improvement over the previous year due, no doubt, to the fact that the past two winters have been favourable. Our
predator-control programme has also, no doubt, been responsible for improvement in
respect to deer. The moose is still the drawing-card, and from our investigations they
are becoming more plentiful in the Cariboo section, and in some instances our biologists
feel that a heavier kill would be beneficial to our moose populations. Moose are becoming more plentiful south of the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway in the vicinity
of the height of land lying between the Okanagan and Merritt districts. This area has
been investigated, but we do not, however, propose to recommend any open season for
the hunting of moose in this area.
Big-game trophies taken by non-resident sportsmen during the year numbered
2,549, representing an increase of 448 more trophies over the previous year. Some
concern has been expressed by our own sportsmen that our big-game populations are
being depleted. An examination of our records, however, indicates that the ratio of
success from a non-resident hunter's point of view is exactly the same as it was eighteen
years ago, 73.7 per cent, in spite of an over-all increase in non-resident hunting licences
of 2,877 per cent.
GAME-LAWS ENFORCEMENT
With increased hunting pressure there has been a corresponding increase in violations of the law. A detailed statement of the prosecutions conducted during the year will
be found elsewhere in this Report. Examination of this statement will show an increase
in the total prosecutions from 1,359 in 1950 to 1,489 in 1951, with a corresponding
increase in fines from $22,923 to $24,087.50. As in former years, the principal violations have been for hunting or angling without licences and carrying loaded firearms in
or discharging same from automobiles.
We are very pleased indeed with the support we have received, and still are receiving,
from our Magistrates in regard not only to this latter offence, but for other violations.
In spite of our activities over the past years, we are still confronted with that despicable offence of pit-lamping or hunting deer at night, and during the year there were nine
successful prosecutions conducted. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951 E 11
GAME-FISH CULTURE
The importance of our Game-fish Culture Branch, and the necessity of further
expansion in its activities, is becoming more and more apparent. Approximately 15,000
additional angling licences were issued over the past year, and out of a total of 200,041
hunting and angling licences, 115,008 were for fishing, this number comprising 87,055
resident and 27,953 non-resident angling licences.
During the year a great number of unforeseen problems arose through inroads by
industry and demand for water power, coupled with increased pollution of fishable waters.
The proposed trout-hatchery mentioned in our last Report—to be constructed in the
vicinity of Loon Lake—was completed in plenty of time to produce trout for the necessary
stocking of many lakes in the Lillooet and Cariboo Districts. While there is a growing
demand for additional hatcheries in the Shuswap Lake region and in the northern sections
of the Province, it is felt that construction of such hatcheries should be delayed pending
completion of investigations now in progress or contemplated by our Game-fish Cultural
Scientific Branch.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
As in former years, it has been our distinct pleasure and privilege to attend many
meetings of the Cattlemen's Associations and Farmers' Institutes and Game Associations
in different sections of the Province, and we wish at this time to thank these organizations
for their splendid co-operation, and, coupled with this, we fully appreciate the co-operation
extended by all Provincial and Federal Government departments. The co-operation of
our own personnel in all branches of the Department has been excellent, and it is a great
pleasure to us to advise that every employee of the Department is fully conscious of the
need of constant supervision of our wild-life resources.
"A" DIVISION (VANCOUVER ISLAND, THE GULF ISLANDS, AND THE
MAINLAND COAST FROM TOBA INLET NORTH TO CAPE CAUTION,
INCLUDING THE ISLANDS ADJACENT TO THE EAST COAST OF VANCOUVER ISLAND NORTH OF CAMPBELL RIVER).
By G. C. Stevenson, Officer Commanding
I have the honour to submit my annual report covering game and fish conditions in
"A" Division for the year ended December 31st, 1951.
Big Game
Elk.—Little change is noted in the numbers of these animals from last year, and the
various herds scattered throughout Vancouver Island are holding their own. A well-
known trapper reported seeing seven cow elk, all with calves, at the headwaters of the
Salmon River. These calves were observed during the month of July, and would indicate
the calf survival is improving. Heretofore, the scarcity of elk calves has puzzled
observers, and many reasons have been advanced. As the Commission is in the process
of conducting a biological survey of the elk, many, so far obscure, reasons will, no doubt,
come to light.
Deer.—Owing to a fairly mild winter the survival rate of yearlings and under was
fairly good and a definite increase in deer population was noticeable in the southern part
of Vancouver Island. In the Sayward area these animals were not plentiful, but all
appeared to be in exceptionally good condition, even those observed late in November
in the vicinity of Brown's Bay were remarkably fat. Due to the forest closure, deer-
hunting did not commence until October 1st, and comparatively few animals were taken
until the latter part of the month and the two weeks in November. Though deer are still
plentiful, the hunting of these animals is not the simple matter it was in the past, and skill
and perseverance are now called for in order to achieve success. E 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Black Bear.—These animals are numerous throughout the Island, and some exceptionally large specimens are to be encountered in the mountains west of Courtenay.
Grizzly Bear.—These bear are plentiful at the head of Toba and Knight Inlets.
Some are also reported in the Loughborough Inlet region. One grizzly was taken on the
Klinaklini River flats, at the head of Knight Inlet, this year, which is considered a
world record.
Fur-bearing Animals
All fur-bearers, with the possible exception of muskrats, are plentiful in this Division.
The increase in the beaver population is very noticeable, and often necessitates control
measures in order to safeguard agricultural land. Racoon have made an exceptional
increase in spite of a year-round open season. Market values for racoon-pelts are to a
large measure responsible for trappers ignoring them, thereby leaving them to multiply.
Upland Game Birds
Blue Grouse.—These birds have shown no sign of decreasing up to now, in spite of
the heavy hunting pressure. During the past season the harvest of these birds did not
attain the same percentage as the previous year, but this could be accounted for by the
fact that the opening season was interrupted by a forest closure, and also by the fact that
many of the birds had commenced to move from the breeding-grounds by the time the
season opened. It is thought the extreme dryness prevailing at the time could have caused
this movement. The Commission is conducting'a very interesting study of blue grouse,
through their biological staff, which will no doubt reveal many peculiar traits of these
birds.
Willow Grouse.—These birds show a marked improvement in numbers and have
definitely benefited by the protection they have been afforded in recent years.
Pheasants.—These birds continue to be a problem in most parts of the Island. On
the one hand we have sportsmen clamouring for more and more pheasants, and on
the other hand we have farmers strenuously objecting to the release of the birds on their
property. During the past year members of Game Associations in and around the Saanich
area worked very harmoniously with the local farmers, and in consequence the Commission was able to release a large number of pheasants, but in other parts of the Island, with
the possible exception of the Comox-Courtenay area, the reception of pheasants by the
farmers is not so cordial. Much of this attitude is due to the sportsmen themselves, who
seldom consider the farmer or his property. Members of Game Associations must make
a very definite effort to work with the agricultural interests before the pheasant population can be appreciably increased. Nevertheless, there is a very substantial number of
pheasants to be found on the Island, and although a considerable section of the birds may
be in areas where hunting is prohibited, they, none the less, provide a definite and protected breeding stock.
Migratory Game Birds
There has been a plentiful supply of ducks and geese throughout this Division, and
sportsmen enjoyed some good duck-shooting on the Island; Tofino, on the west coast,
continues to attract very large numbers of wild fowl, and exceptional goose-shooting can
be found there. Black brant made their appearance in large numbers all along the east
coast of Vancouver Island, and hunters had very excellent sport.
Predator-control
There were 275 cougar and 3 wolves destroyed in this Division during the past year.
Of these, 33 were accounted for by Departmental hunters and Game Wardens. A condition exists in this Division, as regards the cougar, which at times is difficult to cope with.
This situation arises from the fact that there have been two attacks on humans by cougar
in recent years; one was fatal, and the other required prolonged hospital treatment.   In REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951 E 13
consequence of these attacks, this Department cannot ignore calls for assistance by people
living in remote areas, who fear for themselves and their children. Departmental hunters
who have been allotted tasks of ridding certain defined areas of cougar have to be taken
from their work and sent to answer these calls, very often at considerable cost of time and
money. Furthermore, these calls cannot be ignored for fear of responsibility should a
resident be killed or injured. Some criticism has been levied by the uninformed regarding
the number of cougars killed by Departmental hunters, but they fail to take into consideration the time spent in answering calls by residents from all parts of the Island.
Many hawks, owls, crows, ravens, racoons, and stray cats have been destroyed by
Game Wardens of this Division during the course of their regular patrols. A number of
dogs actually found in the act of running deer have also been destroyed.
Game Protection
There were 205 informations laid under the " Game Act" and Fisheries Regulations
for various infractions.
Game Propagation
Releases of pheasants were made in the Saanich, Metchosin, Alberni, Nanaimo, and
the Courtenay-Comox areas during the year. These liberations were made with the
assistance of members of the Game Associations in whose areas the birds were released.
Game Reserves
Reserves are maintained at Shaw Creek, Strathcona Park, Bald Mountain, Elk Lake,
Elk Falls, and China Creek.   There are also a number of lesser reserves throughout the
Island.
Fur Trade
A considerable number of farm-raised pelts move through, this Division, but most
of the wild fur is shipped direct to Vancouver, as there is practically no trading in raw
furs in Victoria.
Registration of Trap-lines
The system of trap-line registration continues to be an outstanding success in this
Province, and amendments and adjustments have been made from time to time that have
now made the system a model in Canada.   Practically no difficulty is encountered with any
of the trappers, and they themselves jealously guard their rights and privileges under the
registration system.   Fur-bearers continue to be abundant, but the squirrel and marten
population will have to be watched if forest-management schemes continue to use poison
for the destruction of mice on any large scale, as marten practically live on mice and
squirrels.
Registration of Guides
This Division does not possess many guides, and the few there are centre around the
Campbell River and Cowichan Districts.
Special Patrols
One special patrol was made by Game Warden W. S. Webb, of Alberni, who covered
a large section on the west coast of the Island, calling in at many remote settlements
seldom visited owing to transportation difficulties.
Hunting Accidents
•
January 1st, 1951, William Morgan, of 1330 Slater Street, Victoria, B.C., accidentally shot himself with a .22 rifle in the foot.   Not serious.
October 1st, 1951, Howard Eckhart, of Duncan, V.I., accidentally shot by companion in mistake for deer.   Fatal. E 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Game-fish Culture
A total of 340,500 Kamloops-trout fingerlings were reared at the Department's
hatchery at Puntledge Park during the year. These were planted in lakes throughout the
Division, according to the food content of the lake in question and the intensity with
which it was fished. Several rivers also received a planting. A detailed statement of
restockings will be found elsewhere in the Annual Report.
Summary and General Remarks
Owing to a forest closure due to fire-hazard, hunting of blue grouse and deer was
delayed during the early part of the season, but the general harvest of game has been
good. Ducks and geese were in good numbers, and during the early part of the year
brant-shooting was excellent.
The rapid expansion of industry and logging is penetrating deeper into game habitat
every year, but present regulations and administration is maintaining a sound and well-
balanced conservation policy.
This Division has received excellent co-operation from the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police in regard to road checks for game. May I take this opportunity of expressing my
thanks and appreciation to the Officer Commanding Victoria Subdivision, Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
To the personnel of "A" Game Division I extend my sincere appreciation for the
excellent manner in which they have at all times carried out their duties and maintained
cordial relationship with the public.
" B " DIVISION (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS)
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding
I beg to submit herewith my annual report for the year ended December 31st, 1951.
Big Game
Wapiti (Elk).—This animal is the chief attraction in the East Kootenay, where a
quite heavy bag was taken throughout the district from Golden to the border. They
continue to extend their range and, together with the planting at the head of Kootenay
Lake, it may soon be possible to have a further open season in the West Kootenay to
supplement the short three-day season in the Creston area.
The small stand of elk in the Princeton area appears to be holding its own; also
near Naramata on the east side of Okanagan Lake they are extending their range and
show promise of a slight over-all strengthening of their numbers in spite of the open
seasons and the taking of a fair number of bulls.
• Moose.—The month's open season (October) in the East Kootenay was satisfactory. Setting the season back two weeks had a beneficial effect, as they were to some
extent distributed from the sloughs and ponds. The later season is approved by the
majority of hunters, and should hunting pressure increase, it might profitably set it
back even further.
Mountain-sheep.—While these animals have not yet recovered their former numbers, they are showing signs of a healthy increase, and the month's open season has
done no harm. The number of sheep taken throughout the district is very small and
mostly secured by non-resident hunters.
The situation of the small bands on the Ashnola River in the vicinity of Okanagan
Falls has not altered, although these animals have been the object of continued scientific
investigation.
Mountain-goat.—Goat are well distributed throughout the Division but are not
plentiful, except in some sections of the East Kootenay where it appears there has been REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951 E 15
a decline in their over-all numbers. They continue to increase noticeably in the West
Kootenay-Boundary-Similkameen area. As these animals have become increasingly
popular of late years, a reduction of the bag-limit was a step in the right direction.
Caribou.—Mostly present in the Selkirk Mountains from the east side of Arrow
Lake to the west side of Kootenay Lake, but perhaps more plentiful at the northern end
of both lakes. The reported kill was light, but sufficient to indicate that these animals
are maintaining their numbers.
Deer (Mule).—Plentiful throughout the Division, and the one-buck bag-limit this
year met with general approval, except in a few localities. More hunters and a depleted
(compared to a few years ago) deer population made the reduced bag necessary.
White-tailed Deer.—Well distributed except in the Boundary-Similkameen District.
Elsewhere they are not as plentiful as in former years.
Grizzly Bear.—Found throughout the Division, with possibly more animals in the
Kootenays, particularly the West Kootenay. The prohibition of sale of grizzly-hides
might be advisable and tend to discourage local hunting with a view to selling the skin.
These animals are a potent attraction for non-resident hunters.
Black Bear.—Plentiful throughout the Division and the occasion of some complaints from farmers and fruit-growers during the year. These complaints were attended
to with good results by the Predator Animal staff and the local Game Wardens.
Fur-bearing Animals
The price of furs has increased somewhat, but with prevailing high wages there is
little incentive to trap; unless a trapper has a very good line, he can make more in
industry. However, the present low trend of fur prices will contribute to the replenishment of trap-fines.
Upland Game Birds
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—Willow grouse were generally well distributed throughout the Division, with good numbers observed after the close of the season.
Franklin's Grouse.—Not as plentiful as the ruffed grouse, but are well distributed.
More numerous in East Kootenay than elsewhere.
Blue Grouse.—Very plentiful in the East and West Kootenays and reasonably so
in the remainder of the Division. The reported apparent scarcity of these birds is not
always borne out by facts. Some observers are too prone to decry the lack of blue
grouse when these birds are really on their early-autumn range, which is at timber-line.
Sharp-tailed Grouse.—A short open season on these birds in the East Kootenay
does not seem to have affected their stand. However, they are local in the area from
Cranbrook to Windermere. Their decline and near elimination in the Lower Okanagan-
Similkameen has not altered in recent years, and it is doubtful if they will ever come
back due to the encroachment of agriculture.
Pheasants.—There was no open season in the Creston district, and short ones in
the Similkameen and Grand Forks areas. These birds seem to be recovering something
of their former numbers after the recent unaccountable decline.
The same remarks apply to Hungarian partridge, while quail in the Similkameen-
Okanagan seemed to be in good numbers as compared to other years.
Migratory Game Birds
Spring and early summer conditions were good, and the season could be considered
a normal one for young broods. A resident population of perhaps 1,000 ducks, of
which mallards, lesser scaups, and redheads are in the majority, winter in the vicinity
of Nelson and are fed during the severe weather. Presumably a number of these birds
have lost their migrating urge. E 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Creston, the Duncan Lake area, and the Columbia River sloughs from Canal Flats
as far as Golden are the chief nesting areas, although every small lake in the Division
seems to support at least one flock of water-fowl. The bag taken by hunters in this part
of the Province is only a tithe of the water-fowl that are raised here.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds
The following vermin were destroyed by game personnel during the year: 56
cougars, 42 coyotes, 4 bobcats, 3 bears, 29 hawks, 260 crows, 26 domestic ownerless
dogs, 58 wild house cats, 14 owls, 49 ravens, 15 eagles, 56 magpies, 21 magpie-eggs, 27
mergansers, 4 rattlesnakes.
This does not include the results of hunting done by Predatory Animal Hunters
Haskell and Morigeau, whose activities will no doubt be summarized by the Supervisor
of Predator-control.
However, I think I should mention that all ranks have been active in combating
predators, and that the Game Wardens have co-operated in distributing coyote baits prepared by Predatory-animal Hunter Haskell. This work involves considerable detail, particularly around the settled areas, and a great deal of co-operation with resident farmers.
We have been very free during the past year of complaints, although there were one or
two instances where dogs apparently had access to these baits. As these dogs were some
miles from home, it is not felt that the Department was culpable.
Reports of coyotes being thinned down by the use of poison baits has been very
encouraging, and the steady inroads made on the cougar population as well should be of
great benefit to the game.
Game Protection
There were 177 prosecutions under the "Game Act" or Special Fisheries Regulations during the year.
Game Propagation
No plantings of game birds were made during the year. It is to be hoped that sufficient information will soon be collected on the pheasants in this part of the Interior to
enable a programme of restocking in an effort to establish the former good stands of these
birds in the Lower Okanagan-Similkameen, Grand Forks, and Creston areas. We can
concede that our plantings in other localities have not been as successful as we hoped,
but we did have good shooting in the areas mentioned above, and it is to be hoped that
they may again be brought back to their former high productive level.
Game Reserves
The Elk River Reserve, comprising the upper watershed of the Elk and Bull Rivers,
also White River, is the most important one, as it is situated in the heart of the big-game
country.
Game-bird sanctuaries at Nelson and Vaseaux Lake, south of Penticton, are also
beneficial, and their establishment continues to meet with general approval.
Deer sanctuaries exist at Elko, Canal Flats, and the Kettle River. These are located
on winter yarding-grounds and serve as a haven should unusual conditions occur during
the open season when deer might be too easily taken.
Fur Trade
Most of the fur of this Division is handled by local resident fur-traders or sent to
traders in Vancouver.   Very little fur is exported locally from the Province by trappers.
Registration of Trap-lines
This is a good system, and there would seem to be no criticism of its operations, as
the trappers who hold the lines are satisfied. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 17
Registration of Guides
We now appear to have reasonably satisfactory arrangements for guides, and much
of the dissatisfaction of former years with regard to guiding territory seems to have disappeared. Guides have realized the value of control, and we only have to suggest that
we revert to the old system of uncontrolled guiding to have an almost unanimous protest
against such a course.
Special Patrols
We have none under the particular heading other than routine patrols which have
been made during the year on horseback, on foot, and with rowboats in the course of
general duties. A great many patrols have been made on foot during the winter by the
personnel hunting cougars or other predators, and considerable information is available
on winter conditions for game as a result of this particular activity.
Hunting Accidents
P. Kazakoff, of Nelson, B.C., accidentally shot himself in the toe with a 30.30 rifle.
Tuno Green, of Oliver, B.C., also did the same with a .22. A .22 in the hands of his
12-year-old stepsister, who stumbled, also wounded James Whaley, of Rossland, B.C.
None of the above wounds was serious.
Norman Pratt, of Palliser, B.C., died from natural causes while hunting in the mountains near home. Vern Weber, of Lodi, Calif., died as a result of being thrown from a
saddle-horse while hunting in the Fernie district.
Ray Olson, of Marysville, B.C., was drowned in Horsethief Creek, Windermere,
while on a fishing-trip. An overhead-cable car sagged into the swift water and threw him
and a companion into the stream. His companion swam to shore but Olson was not
seen again.
Summary and General Remarks
We are still suffering from a cycle of hard winters, although the past one, 1950-51,
was average, and the present one, 1951-52, at this date, January 31st, gives promise of
being also average. We still have not recovered the game stands that we had prior to the
winter of 1946-47, but it seems reasonable to expect that, given a fair break in the winter
seasons, we can again expect an increase in our game herds.
We can take some credit in meeting the situation as we have during the past five
years. We have curtailed our big-game bag-limits very drastically, and this has been done
with the approval of the organized sportsmen. We have been most assiduous in controlling predators in this Division, and no doubt this also has had some bearing on our
game stands.
Nevertheless, we are faced with the spectre of an ever-increasing number of hunters
who pour into the very accessible game district during the hunting season. So far this
has not been too much of a problem, but it is increasing every fall.
An example was in the very good area in the vicinity of Wardner, or roughly between
Wardner and Elko in the vicinity of the junction of the Bull and Kootenay Rivers. In
this easily accessible area, bisected by the main highway and traversed by local roads in
many directions, an estimated several hundred elk were killed. During the months of
October and November this area was continuously hunted by an energetic and active
array of hunters, the majority of whom seemed to be successful.
The number of elk was rather surprising, although we have known for a long time
that these animals were increasing in that vicinity. But what we did not anticipate was
that they would be present in such large numbers so early in the season, as they usually
wait for the snow to bring them out of the mountains. It is very fortunate that we did
not allow an open season on female elk, as some people had suggested, because it would
have had the effect of eliminating breeding stock. E 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The moose season of one month was fairly satisfactory, but we had some opposition
when opening a two weeks' season in the Cranbrook area. This was from local residents
who refused to admit that moose have increased to the point where a number of mature
bulls could be taken. We did not agree with the view-point, and the few animals taken
bear out our contention that a small bag would do no harm.
The reduction of the deer season met with general approval, although it was noted
that more youths and women who accompanied their husbands hunting took out deer
licences than was formerly the case. Not so many deer were bagged as in other years in
the Kootenays because the weather conditions were good, and at the close of the season
on November 30th the snowfall had not been sufficient to force them to the lower level.
The bag in the Similkameen-Okanagan was normal.
An extended buck and doe season for two weeks was permitted in a portion of the
Nelson-Creston district and was generally satisfactory. The weather at the close of the
season was still good, and no undue bag of either sex was noted.
In previous Reports I have mentioned the fact that the halcyon days of yesterday
where game was concerned in this part of British Columbia appear to be over. Through
the courtesy of .the District Forester, the writer was privileged to inspect two remote
lakes—one in the Selkirks and one in the Rockies—during the summer. The information
as to the success of the trout planting of these lakes was very gratifying, but the easy
method of reaching a game area was even more revealing. There is no doubt that the
time will soon be with us when some of the big-game hunting in this area will be done
using aeroplanes for transportation, and we should, if possible, continue to keep our
regulations up to date where aeroplanes are concerned in the game field. At present
remote lakes are being fished by aeroplane parties with apparent satisfaction.
One of the matters that has given us considerable concern is the energetic way in
which roads are being made into hitherto inaccessible timber lands. This has the effect
of making it easy for everyone to get into a really good game country early in the year.
Hitherto, we did not expect too large a take of the big-game animals—elk, sheep, or
goats—until winter conditions had forced them to lower altitudes near the end of the
season. We do not have enough big-game animals for everybody, and in lieu of a system
of rationing them, it seems we will be obliged to close or restrict certain districts for these
animals, possibly with a year-to-year rotation.
It should be remembered that the very good game country is definitely limited
because a great deal of the Kootenays is heavily wooded and does not support much
game. In this connection we can view with interest the proposed developments of the
pulp and paper corporations as well as the forest management licences shortly to be put
into effect in this area. This will no doubt result in a great deal of the present heavily
timbered areas being cleared, and the resultant browse and open spaces should provide a
great deal of new pasturage for the deer animals.
If our experience in the past in other parts of the Province can be repeated in the
Kootenays, then we can look forward to better deer-hunting in the West Kootenay area.
In closing, the usual cordial co-operation was received during the year from the
organized sportsmen and the usual Government departments. I should like specifically
to thank the District Forester at Nelson and his field staff for a great deal of extra-
curricula help and advice rendered to this Department.
"C" DIVISION (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO,
CHILCOTIN, AND SQUAMISH DISTRICTS)
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in
" C " Game Division during the year ended December 31st, 1951. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 19
Big Game
Moose.—In the Goldstream area of the Revelstoke district moose are increasing.
They are wintering as far south as Five Mile Creek, which is about 30 miles north of
Revelstoke. It is estimated that there are probably 200 moose in this Detachment at
the present time.
In the Big Creek area of the Lillooet Detachment, also Bridge River valley, there
has been a noticeable increase in moose. The same situation applies to Upper Hat
Creek and Lytton districts. Information received from trappers and guides in the
Quesnel area indicates that moose wintered well and had a good calf-crop. Predators
did not affect big game to any noticeable extent.
It is estimated that a total of 250 to 300 bulls were killed in the Kamloops area
during the past hunting season. Guides report a very strong influx of moose, mostly
from the north-west, in the Puntchesakut and Tibbies Lakes area. The drying-up of
sloughs and pot-holes, due to a record dry summer, forced moose to lower levels where
water could be found. Heavy browsing over a large area is evident in the Quesnel
district.
The Clinton Detachment reports a large increase in moose but with a steadily
decreasing food-supply. Overbrowsing is reported all through the Cariboo. The numbers of this species taken by hunters in the Wells area have doubled in the last three
years.
In the Kamloops area a good calf-crop was reported; in fact, it could be safely
said that this applied to the Division as a whole. Winter conditions were more favourable
during 1950-51. The kill of moose in the Kamloops district is not high, due largely to
the unsuitable terrain and lack of accessibility.
Moose were seen at the Princeton airport during the summer, also around Burns
Hill. There is a slow southward movement of these animals. In the Upper Deep Creek
area of the Peachland district, also Beaver and Postill Lakes east and north of Kelowna,
the presence of moose is reported, and an increase is indicated.
Caribou.—Revelstoke Detachment reports caribou as plentiful, but a very poor
season was reported due to lateness of the fall, as the caribou did not start moving to
their winter quarters until after the season was closed. In all other Detachments a
general scarcity is reported.
Elk.—Around Chute Lake, south-east of Kelowna, this species is increasing. Little
hunting is done due to rugged terrain. In the Big Gun Lake area a few are reported.
At the head of Adams Lake, little hunting of elk is done as the area is not easily
accessible.
Mountain-sheep.—In the Lillooet district an increase in lambs is reported.
In the Churn Creek basin a closed area should be declared, especially where sheep
winter. There are too many guides and assistants operating in the Churn Creek basin.
It would take a fair portion of a Warden's time to keep track of the numerous hunting
parties operating in the wintering-grounds of mountain-sheep.
In the Squilax area about the only protection from deep snow, which was again
evident at the end of 1951, that sheep can obtain is to descend to the railway-track of
the Canadian Pacific Railway and Trans-Canada Highway. JHere a few are killed, and
if the snow is soft and deep on the high range, bobcats add to the toll of mountain-sheep.
In the Squam Bay region of Adams Lake very few sheep are found. This habitat
appears unsuitable for mountain-sheep, and no increase is indicated.
Grizzlies.—Numerous at the head of Texas Creek, McGillivray Pass, White Cap
Mountain in the Lillooet district, and also in the Revelstoke area. The main areas are
Jordon River, Albert Canyon, Cambourne, and Ferguson. One guide saw twenty-seven
bears, most of which were grizzlies, in the Revelstoke district. A few grizzlies are
reported in the Park Mountain, Viddler Mountain, Sitkum Creek, and the Cherry Creek
basin areas. E 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Black Bear.—There is no definite region where one can depend on the presence of
black bear. They are widespread and are more of a nuisance than an asset. Damage
by black bear on stock-raising ranges has been comparatively negligible to that of
previous years.
Mountain-goat.—This species is found on numerous ranges, one of which is the
Shuswap-Columbia River divide east of Sugar Lake. A small band of four were seen
on the rocks at Echo Lake, Creighton Valley, having presumably come from the Harris
Creek plateau. These were the first goats to be seen in this area for twenty years,
according to early residents. Big-game resources of the North Okanagan are seldom
exploited; in fact, many residents are not yet aware of what they have in big game on
adjacent ranges.
The same situation applies to Revelstoke, except that the ranges are not so easily
reached.   Mountain-goats are definitely on the increase in all regions.
Cayoose and Tommy Creek areas of the Lillooet district have considerable numbers
of mountain-goats.
Deer.—In all districts favourable reports on the deer situation came to hand. A
few reports of disease of a minor but common nature were brought to our attention.
The season was indeed a highly successful one. Deer moved down to lower levels
out of deep snow during the latter part of the season. In one cold-storage plant, 250
deer were placed in cold storage during the 1950 open season. In the same plant, 456
deer were stored during the 1951 open season.
Fur-bearing Animals
Beaver.—The issuance of beaver-seals has had a good effect on the conservation of
this fur-bearer. I am afraid, however, without an intimate knowledge of what each
trapper has, Wardens may be handicapped, if prices for beavers should ever increase, in
knowing just how many tags to issue. The system as described for beaver conservation
in my previous annual report is working out satisfactory. No trapper is issued with
more seals than would amount to 25 per cent of his beaver population, etc. Many
trappers returned some unused seals. In the Kamloops area twenty-nine trappers took
197 beavers.
Reports of beaver increase usually bring a number of complaints of damage to
agricultural properties.   These complaints were satisfactorily settled.
Prices for all fur-bearers were low, and little serious trapping was carried out as
most trappers are engaged in other pursuits of a more remunerative nature. One cannot
expect trappers to remain on a trap-line long when poor prices prevail for most furs.
In the southern portion of the Kamloops Detachment, beaver and marten were
taken in greater numbers than during the previous season. A total of 1,222 beavers
was taken by trappers during the 1950-51 season over the entire Division.
Upland Game Birds
Pheasants are making a very satisfactory come-back everywhere from the population of last winter. In the Kamloops area a spot count in September showed a cock-to-
hen ratio of 1:2. A road check of the Tranquille and Westsyde areas gave a total of
33 cocks, 27 of which were juvenile birds. The total bag for the season was not large,
but a check-up on pheasants after the season revealed a greater number than was at first
expected. With good dogs, many hunters freely admitted that more birds could have
been taken.
The kill of grouse passing through Cache Creek Checking-station compared favourably with the previous years, except for an increase in blue grouse. The ratio of blue
grouse killed still does not compare with the willows and Franklins taken. The 12,132
hunters passing through Cache Creek took 8,085 upland game birds.    A decline in REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951 E 21
willows and Franklins was noted in the Wells area, fewer birds being taken. In all
Detachments, reports indicate grouse of all kinds are still as numerous as ever.
Actually, in the Cariboo, if we judge by the numbers visiting that region—namely,
9,000 hunters during the 1950 season and at least 12,132 during 1951—the grouse-kill
for 1951 would not be as great as the 1950 kill. This may indicate a decline in the grouse
cycle.
Hungarian partridges are not prolific producers and never seem to remain in any
one area. Reports of numbers are not good and are therefore not in the same category
as other game birds. Prairie-chicken are another species of a very uncertain nature.
Reports to hand are far from encouraging.
Migratory Game Birds
Roughly 1,000 mallards spent the winter on the South Thompson River. The
winter .1950-51 was not as severe as the previous one. Water-fowl did not suffer and
feeding was unnecessary. Hunters at Vernon enjoyed a good duck-hunting season on
many of the lakes which did not go dry. All species of ducks around Quesnel had a
very successful hatch. A flock of from 50 to 75 pelicans nested in the area of Bataunis
Lake. These non-game birds were observed by Forestry Officers while on an air patrol.
Over 200 swans appeared in the Bridge River valley last fall, and about the same number
appeared on the South Thompson River where they spent the Winter.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds
A considerable decrease in the number of coyotes is reported, especially where the
1080 poison has been used on range lands. Dangerous as it is, the widespread use of
this poison is not advisable, except in trained hands. Wolves are still a factor around
Wells Gray Park and also the Mad River country and Douglas Lake. The travel route
of one or two wolf-packs extends from along the north shore of Canim Lake east to and
along Mahood Lake to the Clearwater and Murtle Rivers, thence to Stevens Lake and
south-south-east to the headwaters of Mad River. Wolves are scarce around Wells and
Bowron Lake. The following predators were killed by nine Game Wardens and two
predatory-animal hunters: Bears, 27; bobcats, 7; cats, 202; cougars, 14; coyotes, 296;
dogs, 55; red foxes, 2; ground-hogs, 154; skunks, 2; wolves, 9; crows, 1,046; eagles,
37; hawks, 156; magpies, 560; mergansers, 21; horned or snowy owls, 59; ravens,
142.    Of this total, one predatory-animal hunter destroyed 137 coyotes.
Game Protection
There were 484 prosecutions launched in " C " Game Division during the year.
Another winter count should be taken of mountain-sheep at Shorts Point. There
is a report that it is the intention of the owner at the Fintry Ranch, who holds some
winter range on Shorts Creek, to run live stock over this portion and contemplates extending his operations over mountain-sheep range. Further inquiries on the proposed extension of grazing rights are being made.
Game Propagation
Forty-four pheasants were liberated at Kamloops, and were purchased locally.
Pheasants were not brought in from coastal areas this year because of the possibility of
disease-infected stock. The count of pheasants taken after the winter season gave fair
indication of a normal breeding stock for the following year.
Thirteen beavers were taken from the Bowron Lake Reserve for distribution over
the Province. Chukar partridges were released by the Department east of Kamloops,
and a few have been seen from time to time. E 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Game Reserves
The game reserve for water-fowl opposite the City of Kamloops has provided a
great deal of genuine pleasure for the residents of this city. Over 60 whistling swans
and 200 lesser Canada geese were observed there in November. It is becoming a famous
resting-place for water-fowl during the spring migration and hunting season. From
1,500 to 2,000 ducks, also geese and swans, were seen at times near the Thompson River
junction at Kamloops. An effort to extend the sanctuary along several miles of a navigable river has not met with any success, as the feeling prevails that it would interfere
with the enjoyment of hunters.
The following reserves are noted: Bowron Lake near Wells provides limited numbers of beavers for distribution on various trap-lines and irrigation projects; Yalakom
Reserve protects mountain-sheep.
Wells Gray Park, now under Forest Service jurisdiction, has a programme of road
and trail development and game protection, and is also engaged in a stock-taking of its
game resources. The work of assisting trappers and guides is also being given serious
consideration.
Minnie Lake sanctuary in the Douglas Lake country is another area which is
becoming more important. For the first time, several hundred whistling swans rested
there on their way south. One flock of 50 swans stayed around Nicola Lake until the
freeze-up before leaving for the south.
Fur Trade
The bulk of the fur trade is carried on in Vancouver, and all fur is forwarded there
through agents in the Interior. The winter of 1950-51 has not, up to the end of the
year, produced much in the way of fur due to heavy snowfall and other factors.
Registration of Trap-lines
The system, now long established, is trouble-free and highly satisfactory. When the
revised maps are completed, the entire system of geographical descriptions will have to
be finalized.
Registration of Guides
The system now to a large extent in use at present, and which seems to be the most
satisfactory, is the creation of areas of moderate size for the use of approximately six
guides in close proximity to each other. In a block containing a small number of guides
and assistants, greater respect for the area over which the guide has hunted in past years
is invariably attained. A few guides have dropped their activities up to the present, and
there is some indication that their numbers in overcrowded areas will naturally decrease
during the next few years. A start toward the creation of small blocks containing a
limited number of guides and assistants is now under way in the two or three detachments
which have individual areas.
There is no guarantee that hunting rights within an individual area will be maintained for a single guide. Greater security for the guide and his investment is safer within
blocks of moderate size.
There are 332 guides and 139 assistants in "C" Game Division. In the past the
bottle-neck in the business of guiding lay mainly in the failure of the guides in a large
number of cases to send in their return of the bag taken by the hunter. Continual scrutiny
by the Wardens covering the activities of guides was necessary. A considerable improvement was noted in obtaining guides' returns from those who operated in the Cariboo. In
other areas where no permanent road check was maintained, the returns from the guide
could not be back-checked. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 23
Special Patrols
A special patrol was made by Game Warden E. D. Cameron to the headwaters of
Sitkum Creek, checking beaver and other game on the trap-line of a local trapper.
Hunting Accidents
There were reports of five hunting accidents during the 1951 season.
In the Quesnel Detachment one hunting accident occurred involving O. A. Rye, who
was wounded in the foot; also H. Hilderbrand received a wound in the calf of the leg,
and G. Rogers died due to exposure when rescue-boat overturned.
Lillooet reports that J. T. Monoghan accidentally received a wounded foot by his
companion. W. Whitney, a 16-year-old boy, died from exposure after being lost in the
mountains for several days near Lillooet.
In the Kamloops area Father Edward Francis Swoboda, on October 7th, received
wounds in the right shoulder and back, but there were no serious effects suffered. On
October 8th James Patrick Langston was wounded in the left foot and later had to have
part of it amputated. On October 27th Fredrick Casimer was found dead in the
Jamieson Creek area. He suffered from a weak heart. Robert Hugh Todd was wounded
in the left arm.
Cache Creek Checking-station
The number of hunters checked was as follows: Resident, 9,890; non-resident,
2,242.
The game checked consisted of the following: Black bear, 129; grizzly bear, 19;
caribou, 2; deer, 1,733; elk (wapiti), 2; mountain-goat, 40; moose, 2,230; mountain-
sheep, 9; migratory game birds, 6,158; upland game birds, 8,085.
Summary and General Remarks
The great invasion of over 12,100 hunters into the Cariboo marked a new epoch in
big-game hunting. The motive for this influx of hunters was the abnormally high price
of meat on the British Columbia and foreign markets. In contrast to the influx of 9,000
hunters of the previous year, the increase this year was notable indeed. Just what is in
store for the Cariboo region during 1952 is difficult to determine. If the high price of
meat continues, it would be safe to predict a further increase in the number of hunters in
the Cariboo in 1952.
One does not realize the vast extent of the Cariboo region until viewed from the air.
A total of 2,230 moose taken from an area the size of the Cariboo could not be described
as a strain on the big-game resources. With judiciously chosen seasons of moderate
length based on the findings of biologists in the field on this and other factors, and barring
natural catastrophies, this asset should prevail and furnish food and enjoyment to an even
greater number of hunters for many years to come.
The harvesting of grouse while at their peak produced greater numbers, but this was
due to the increased number of hunters. The blue-grouse harvest was double that of the
previous year.
There was no harvest of game that would create alarm in the minds of biologists.
It is true that the pheasant situation was a controversial problem, but it is one capable of
reasonably quick recovery. More important to the propagation of the pheasant population is the question of cover. In fact, with adequate cover, on which we should concentrate more, the predator problem could be relegated to second place within the scope of
sound game management.
Fur-bearers were not harvested as heavily as in former years, due to poor prices and
poor conditions. E 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
One of the most urgent requirements within this Division is the need for more personnel in the field. With a 41-per-cent increase in population, exclusive of non-resident
hunters, Wardens were swamped with correspondence and requests for information,
which forced them to spend much of their very limited time on the roads instead of visiting hunters' camps, which should also be done as a part of their already strenuous duties.
It is quite clear under those circumstances that additional help is required where the
concentration of hunters is greatest. Even in the Interior cities temporary assistance is
needed, and additional equipment, especially in the form of jeeps, is an urgent necessity.
The abnormally high percentage of prosecutions on the field may mean:—
(1) A lack of education on the part of the hunter through failure to study the
regulations.
(2) Carelessness. This was evident in the large number of hunters who left
loaded firearms in their vehicles. Seventy per cent of the prosecutions
obtained at the Cache Creek Checking-station were due to this careless
habit.
A change for the better should take place in the case of non-resident hunters coming
into the Province with firearms and no licence.
From the view-point of obtaining a meat-supply, the opportunity prevailed everywhere, especially for city hunters who were wise enough to have a guide. A breakdown
of statistics would give a truer picture of the situation as prepared by the biologists.
In conclusion, our thanks are due to our biologists, the Forest Service personnel
under Colonel Parlow, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the loyal co-operation at all
hours of Wardens in the field, at times under very trying circumstances, members of Game
Associations, and Water Rights Branch and Department of Public Works officials for
their splendid assistance rendered during the year.
"D" DIVISION (PRINCE GEORGE, McBRIDE, VANDERHOOF, BURNS LAKE,
SMITHERS, PRINCE RUPERT, POUCE COUPE, FORT ST. JOHN, FORT
NELSON, AND LOWER POST DETACHMENTS).
By W. A. H. Gill, Officer Commanding
Big-game Animals
Moose.—These game animals are still very plentiful throughout this Division from
Fort St. John south. A percentage of them are infected with tapeworms, but due to the
excellent food available to the moose in most of the Division, together with favourable
winter conditions, this parasite has not reduced their numbers. During the spring of
1951 very few ticks were present on moose examined.
Far more moose were taken by sportsmen in 1951 than in previous years, and from
observations I am certain that these animals are still more plentiful than they were
previously.
Cyanide of potassium poison baits for wolves were set out on numerous lakes within
a radius of 100 air miles from Prince George, and in the Atlin and Cassiar Districts, with
very good results, as moose are showing a marked increase in all of the areas where
poison was placed.
A considerable number of aeroplane flights were made in carrying out this poison
programme, and private owners of aircraft who supplied this transportation at their own
expense are entitled to a great deal of credit for assisting in maintaining our moose-crop.
Deer.—Except on the Queen Charlotte Islands, these animals are not plentiful in
this Division.
A slight increase in the number of deer is noted in the Burns Lake, Prince George,
and Vanderhoof areas, but in the McBride area a decrease has been observed. However,
with the Predatory-animal Branch being active with cyanide guns and 1080 poison REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 25
stations, it is felt that the destruction of coyotes and bear will soon be responsible for an
increase in the deer population, as large numbers of these game animals are taken by
predators each year.
Caribou.—In the area south of the Canadian National Railway (Jasper to Prince
Rupert line) these animals are still very scarce. They are increasing slowly in the
McBride, Woodpecker, and Herrick Creek areas.
The only large bands of caribou left are in the areas near Cold Fish Lake and the
area between Fort St. John and Fort Nelson.
Black and Brown Bear.—These animals are still far too plentiful. Their numbers
were greatly reduced during the spring of 1951 by the Predatory-animal Branch, by the
use of cyanide guns and snares. A great number of complaints from farmers were answered, and in practically every instance the bears were destroyed.
Grizzly Bear.—These game animals are very plentiful, and I believe more tourists
should be encouraged to carry out spring grizzly-hunts. At present very few sportsmen
hunt grizzlies in this Division.
Mountain-sheep.—A good number of mountain-sheep still range north of the 56th
parallel of north latitude, with the exception of the Ovis dall (white sheep), which are
becoming very scarce in British Columbia.
Mountain-goat.—Although they are fairly plentiful throughout the Division, these
game animals are not hunted to any extent.
Elk (Wapiti).—Elk are very scarce in " D " Division; however, there is a fair-sized
herd south of Pouce Coupe, and from reports received they are steadily increasing.
Fur-bearing Animals
Marten.—Good reports have been received from trappers, who state that marten are
steadily increasing. Due to the low fur prices, trappers are not trapping as heavily as
when the fur market was good.
Beaver.—These fur-bearers are very plentiful throughout the whole Division on
nearly all white trappers' lines.
The Indian trap-lines are in very poor condition, due to the Indian's practice of
taking all the beaver he possibly can. As these animals live in colonies, the Indian usually camps right in the beaver country and carries on heavy trapping till the season closes.
Fox.—Although very plentiful, a No. 1 fox-pelt is only worth about $3, and trappers endeavour to keep them out of their traps, as it is not worth the trouble to skin them.
Mink.—An average catch of mink was made. Possibly these animals were trapped
harder than any other fur-bearing animal, with the exception of beaver, due to the satisfactory price being paid for mink-pelts at the start of the season.
These fur-bearers are found only in portions of the Division. They are far more
plentiful along the coast than in the Interior.
Fisher.—These animals are showing a marked increase and are still the most
valuable pelt.
Lynx.—From reports received and observations made, this fur-bearer has shown
the greatest increase of all our fur-bearers. However, due to the very low market they
are not being taken in large numbers.
All other fur-bearers are holding their own. Squirrels are still being trapped quite
heavily, as prices are good.
Upland Game Birds
Pheasants.—These game birds were released in the Vanderhoof area, and encouraging reports have been received, as a considerable number of birds have been seen around
straw-stacks. The Vanderhoof Rod and Gun Club has commenced an active drive to
exterminate the large numbers of owls and hawks, which have been killing the pheasants.
A reward of 50 cents will be paid for each harmful hawk or owl brought in.   Coloured E 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
pictures of the hawks and owls on which a bounty is being paid are on display, so that
as few as possible of the harmless varieties will be destroyed.
In regard to the pheasants in the Peace River District, I feel that they will never
increase in this area to any extent, and, therefore, I would not recommend the release of
any more birds in the area unless scientific advice was obtained recommending same.
Willow Grouse.—Willow grouse were plentiful in 1951, and if nothing unforeseen
takes place they should be plentiful again in 1952. Due to the fact that these birds have
reached such large numbers, a sudden decline may be expected at any time.
Blue Grouse.—These birds are very scarce in this Division and are hardly known
by the local sportsmen.
Franklin's Grouse.—In 1949 the Franklin's grouse decreased greatly and have
shown no upward trend to date.
Prairie-chicken (Sharp-tailed).—These birds are steadily increasing in the Smithers,.
Burns Lake, Vanderhoof, and Prince George areas, but have decreased to some extent in
the Fort St. John and Dawson Creek districts.
Migratory Game Birds
Ducks and Geese.—These migratory birds were in approximately the same numbers
as in past years. Certain areas have very poor duck and goose shooting, while in other
parts of the Division the shooting has been fairly good. The early freeze-up drove a lot
of the birds south; however, this condition did not last and good shooting was obtainable
in the larger lakes and rivers at the close of the season when the northern birds came in.
Ducks appear to be increasing in the Fort St. John, Dawson Creek, and Smithers
areas. This is believed due to the northern birds having located good feeding conditions
in the grain-fields. It has only been a few years since the ducks first started landing on
the Vanderhoof grain-fields, but the duck population stopping over in the area has been
increasing ever since. I believe that similar results will follow in the Fort St. John, Dawson Creek, and Smithers districts.
From reports received, it would indicate that a considerable decrease was noted in
the number of migratory game birds in the Prince Rupert area.
Destruction of Vermin
In 1950, 301 wolves were destroyed, with no cost to the Department other than for
poison used and personnel's time. During 1951 only 78 wolves were destroyed with the
use of aircraft; 13 of these were killed by use of aircraft hired at a cost of $500 plus the
cost of the poison and personnel's time of two days. The remaining 65 wolves were killed
by use of private aircraft, with no expense except the cost of the poison and one Game
Warden's wages for six days.
It is felt that the only satisfactory way to reduce this major predator is by use of a
Departmental aircraft, as this area is so vast that to cover same by any other means than
by aircraft is impossible.
I might say that the trappers were very nervous about the use of poison for the
destruction of wolves, but after discussing our method with them they are now keen to
assist us and have even requested us to set out our poison baits within their registered
trap-lines. I am certain that by maintaining their confidence and by the use of proper
equipment we can reduce the wolf population to a satisfactory balance in a short time.
I feel that several flights should be carried out in the Atlin and Cassiar Districts this
winter for the purpose of dropping poison baits to reduce the large wolf population.
Coyotes.—These predators have caused considerable losses to sheepmen and poul-
trymen in the Pouce Coupe, Smithers, Burns Lake, Vanderhoof, McBride, and Prince
George districts. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 27
Our predatory-animal hunter at Prince George has destroyed a noticeable number
of these predators, and it is felt that with the use of 1080 poison and cyanide guns he will
be able to reduce these predators to a satisfactory balance.
If predator-hunters can be stationed at Smithers and Pouce Coupe, I feel certain
that within a short time they also will be able to reduce the numbers of coyotes sufficiently
in these Detachments.
W. W. Mair, Supervisor of Predator-hunters, will visit this area in January, 1952,
for the purpose of instructing the personnel of "D " Division in the use of 1080 poison.
Baits of 1080 poison will be set out at Pouce Coupe, Fort St. John, Fort Nelson, Smithers,
Burns Lake, Vanderhoof, McBride, and Prince George at that time.
Cougars.—These predators continue to increase slightly, but due to the severe winters I do not believe they will ever increase to numbers that would warrant a concentrated
drive against them.
Magpies.—Reports indicate that magpies are increasing slightly and continue to
move farther north.
Eagles.—Trappers are reporting that these birds continue to take a heavy toll of
muskrats. A considerable number have been destroyed when they pick up the poison
baits set out for wolves, but they are still very plentiful and no doubt destroy a great
number of ducks, young geese, and swans. I have personally witnessed them destroying
the adult birds.
Game Protection
As previously mentioned, a Department-owned aircraft, in my opinion, would be
the greatest asset in game protection. Private aircraft could be checked in remote areas,
and it would also be useful in setting out wolf poison in localities where wolves are making
heavy inroads into our caribou herds.
Now that the Aluminum Company is established at Kitimat, a game detachment is
necessary at Terrace.
Due to the road being completed this year from the Alaska Highway to Atlin, I feel
that a game detachment should be opened at Atlin. This detachment would take in the
Haines Cut-off area, which should be patrolled far more often than it is now possible to
do from the Lower Post or Fort Nelson Detachment.
A new detachment was opened at McBride this year. Game Warden Hicks is
carrying out his duties in a very satisfactory manner.
Far more game protection has been enforced in the Queen Charlotte Islands and
along the coast due to the active work of Game Warden Jamieson.
A noticeable increase in the number of prosecutions was recorded during 1951. To
a great extent, this is due to the large increase in population moving into this Division.
Game Propagation
Pheasants.—Seventy adult birds were released in the Vanderhoof area in the late
spring.
The Vanderhoof Rod and Gun Club has commenced a concentrated drive against
hawks and owls, as it is believed that their depredations are mainly responsible for the
failure of the pheasants liberated to have increased satisfactorily. Birds that have not
been destroyed seem to do well throughout the winters.
Beaver.—A few of these animals were released on the trap-lines of Allen Fletcher,
of Smithers, and Sam L. Miller, of Prince George. They have established their homes
and appear to be doing very well. The beaver released earlier on Allen Fletcher's, Alfred
Harrison's, and Jack Gray's trap-lines have established their homes, and all have been
responsible for starting at least two new colonies each.
No information is available regarding the beaver released on the Queen Charlotte
Islands. E 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Game Reserves
There are only three small game reserves in this Division. These are located around
towns and are more for the protection of the public than for game.
The Nechako Bird Sanctuary is still operating very satisfactorily. The numbers of
ducks and geese using this resting-place are increasing every year. There is some doubt
as to what effect the Aluminum Company's operations will have on this sanctuary; I do
not think that it will curtail in any way the numbers of birds resting on this reserve. It is
quite possible that it will increase the growth of feed in the sanctuary.
Fur Trade
The fur-catch appeared to be slightly less this year. Due to the poor fur market the
trappers found that they could make more by working for wages than by trapping.
Registration of Trap-lines
Game Warden McCabe, of Fort Nelson, has been very active in this work and now
has many of the trap-lines, not previously registered, completed. In remote areas in this
Division no suitable maps are available, and this makes registration of trap-lines very
difficult.
The registration of trap-lines has proven its worth. Very few complaints are received
once all the lines in an area have been properly registered. I might add that the registered trap-line has been the major factor in building up our beaver population to where
it is now.
Registration of Guides
Since registering guiding areas, we have not received any complaints in regard to
guides infringing on other guides' territories. We have been fortunate in this Division,
as only a very limited number of guides were operating before this regulation came into
effect; therefore we can eliminate any tendencies toward overcrowding.
Special Patrols
Three of these patrols were carried out by Game Warden McCabe, of Fort Nelson.
One was to Fort Liard with Game Warden Villeneuve in connection with the registration
of trap-lines. This patrol took eight days, and a distance of 1,010 miles was travelled by
river-boat.
The second trip was to Haines Cut-off in the company of Game Warden Stewart, of
Lower Post. This was taken in September for the purpose of checking hunters and
guides. The time taken was ten days. A distance of 1,372 miles was covered by car and
34 miles on foot.   During this patrol three prosecutions were carried out.
In October, McCabe made a special patrol to Atlin to assist the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police in reregistering trap-lines on the new maps supplied. This was necessary
as all old maps had been lost in the fire when the Atlin Detachment burned. Fifteen days
was the time taken for this patrol. Distance travelled was 1,445 miles by car, 2 miles by
boat, and 6 miles on foot.
Hunting Accidents
I am pleased to report a decline in the number of hunting accidents, as only two
accidents occurred in this Division during the year as compared to five accidents the
previous year.   These were as follows:—
Benjamin Kelly, of Queen Charlotte City, B.C., was fatally wounded when the shotgun which he was using as a club to kill a wounded pheasant, discharged, causing a wound
in his abdomen. He received immediate attention but died shortly after the accident
occurred REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 29
Wilfred Calahasen, of Arras, B.C., was fatally wounded by his son, Clifford Cala-
hasen, while they were out moose-hunting. Mr. Calahasen was shot through the chest
with a 30.30 calibre rifle and died ten minutes later.
Game-fish Culture
One hundred and fifty thousand eyed Kamloops trout eggs were supplied to the
Prince George Rod and Gun Club. These were hatched in the local hatchery and the fry
planted as follows: Bednesti Lake, 20,000; Cluculz Lake, 55,000; Hart Lake, 10,000;
Ness Lake, 10,000; Summit Lake, 10,000; Nadsilnich Lake, 30,000. Fifty thousand
kokanee eggs were also planted in Cluculz Lake Creek.
Seventy thousand eyed Kamloops trout eggs were supplied to the Bulkley Valley
Rod and Gun Club and hatched in its local hatchery. The fry were distributed as
follows: AldrichLake, 10,000; Kathlyn Lake, 5,000; McLure Lake, 10,000; Irrigation
Lake, 5,000; Round Lake, 20,000; Seymour Lake, 5,000; Johnson Lake, 5,000.
Sixty thousand eyed Kamloops trout eggs were supplied to the North Peace Rod and
Gun Club and hatched in its hatching-tank. Fifty thousand fry were distributed to
Charlie Lake.
Sixty thousand eyed Kamloops trout eggs were supplied to Game Warden Tate at
Pouce Coupe.   These eggs were all planted in streams in the vicinity of Dawson Creek.
Coarse-fish traps were again operated in both streams in and out of Nadsilnich
(West) Lake, and approximately 6 tons of coarse fish were removed. Fish-tox was also
used in the inlet creek with very good results. From records kept, it is noted that the
size and number of trout in this lake have increased greatly. Coarse-fish traps were also
installed in the inlet and outlet creeks of Cluculz Lake, and several tons of coarse fish
were removed.
Fish-tox was used in all four creeks running in and out of Cluculz Lake at intervals,
under the supervision of Dr. P. A. Larkin, Chief Fisheries Biologist, with very good
results.
Another coarse-fish trap was installed at Stony Creek near Vanderhoof, and
approximately 5 tons of coarse fish were removed.
I wish to thank the Prince George, Vanderhoof, Bulkley Valley, Fort St. John, and
Dawson Creek Rod and Gun Clubs for their assistance in fish-culture. These clubs were
very active and willing to assist whenever possible. A great deal of assistance was also
rendered by Dr. P. A. Larkin and his student, Gerald Berry.
Summary and General Remarks on Game and Fish
From personal observation and reliable information the 1951 moose-crop was very
good. A far greater number of moose was taken than in previous years, and I feel certain
that there are far more moose left than there have been for a number of years. In the
spring an exceptionally large number of cows were seen with two calves.
Deer are still fairly scarce in this Division in the Interior.
Caribou are believed to be increasing very slightly, and the same regulations should
be maintained until a more substantial increase is evident.
I feel that the game and fish in this Division are in a very satisfactory state. The
biggest hindrance to our game at the present time is the timber-wolf. If the Department
could secure an aircraft for continuous operation against these predators during the winter
months, I am certain it would be the main factor in rebuilding our caribou and sheep
populations, which have been sadly depleted by these predators.
In closing, I wish to thank all Rod and Gun Club members, Game Wardens, clerks,
and police officers, and owners of private aircraft, who assisted in more efficient game
conservation in this Division. E 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
" E " DIVISION (MAINLAND COAST NORTH TO TOBA INLET AND
LOWER MAINLAND AS FAR INLAND AS NORTH BEND)
By R. E. Allan, Officer Commanding
I beg to submit herewith my annual report covering game conditions in " E " Game
Division for the year ended December 31st, 1951.
Big Game
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—Fairly intensive hunting of these animals during the
immediate past open season does not appear to have resulted in any noticeable change in
their number within this Division. Game Wardens Urquhart and Hughes, of Coquitlam
and Cloverdale districts respectively, again report deer to be on the increase. In the
latter district, complaints continue to be received from time to time of their doing damage
to fruit-trees and growing crops. The establishment of the car-ferry service between
Horseshoe Bay and Gibsons Landing has resulted in a heavy influx of deer-hunters on to
the large area of the Seechelt Peninsula, where good hunting was obtainable.
Elk ( Wapiti).—Corporal Game Warden L. R. Lane, in charge of the Department's
patrol vessel " P.M.L. 3," reports that he did not make a successful count of the elk herd
in the McNab Creek area due to the heavy growth of timber and underbrush.
Black or Brown Bear.—These animals are plentiful throughout the Division.
However, as fewer complaints of their doing damage were received, it would appear that
they are being satisfactorily controlled. The most serious complaint received was from
the Gibsons Landing district, where a large male killed two hogs.
Grizzly Bear.—Can be found in most of the up-coast inlets, particularly in Knights,
Kingcome, Rivers, and Kwatna Inlets, where they are reported to be plentiful.
Mountain-goat.—The not easily accessible habitat of this animal has resulted in no
serious inroads into their numbers in this Division. Favoured hunting areas are in the
Powell Lake, Coquitlam, Mission, and Chilliwack districts.
Fur-bearing Animals
Seasonal trap-line returns do not vary a great deal, which would indicate that most
trap-lines are being " farmed " and not overtrapped. Racoon and red fox continue to be
bothersome and at times destructive predators throughout the Fraser Valley.
Upland Game Birds
Grouse (Blue and Willow or Ruffed).—In many areas of this Division, due to
logging and change of habitat, blue grouse are being replaced by willow. Reports from
Wardens indicate that the latter are on the increase in most districts. Not as many blue
grouse were taken last year, due to this and the forest closure which prohibited travel
in the woods at a time when these birds were more readily available.
California Quail and European Partridge.—These birds do not appear to be
establishing themselves in this Division.
Pheasants.—The past open season on these birds compared very favourably with
the good hunting which was enjoyed in the year 1948 and was due, to a great extent
I believe, to the liberal release of hens in the early spring and ideal nesting weather which
followed. As was usual, the bulk of the pheasant-crop was harvested during the first few
days of the open season. From then up to the end of the season they were in dense brush
and very difficult to hunt even with good dogs. Severe winter weather, which commenced
early in December, and subsequent feeding of these birds, enabled us to make a survey,
which indicated that a fair number should be on hand for the 1952 breeding season. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951 E 31
Migratory Game Birds
Ducks and Geese (Canada).—In the Fraser Valley and Delta the opening day on
ducks and geese was very good, and numerous full bags were obtained with little
difficulty. However, from that day and on to the end of the season, shooting was very
spotty. Fields remained dry throughout the entire season, and the birds on most days
rested well offshore. Officers in charge of Departmental patrol vessels plying the inside
passages between Vancouver and Queen Charlotte Sound report sea-ducks as being
plentiful.
Black Brant.—Showed up in large numbers in the Boundary Bay area early in
February, and shooting was the best that had been had in many years. Following some
considerable friction between hunters over the limited number of suitable places from
which to shoot, stricter regulations were imposed upon sportsmen desirous of hunting
in the Beach Grove area of Boundary Bay. It is anticipated that these added restrictions
will enable a greater number of hunters to participate in the shooting of these birds at
that place.
Snow Geese.—These were very plentiful over the delta foreshores during the open
season on ducks but were almost non-existent when their season opened on December
22nd. They remained scarce, and to this date, very few of these birds have been seen in
this Division. A report received and confirmed by Game Warden W. H. Cameron, of
Ladner, indicates that approximately 40,000 snow geese are presently wintering a few
miles from Boundary Bay and in the State of Washington. The present closed season
on them down there is undoubtedly responsible for their poor showing here.
Band-tailed Pigeons.—These were fairly plentiful, although not many were taken
due to the forest closure and prohibited travel in the woods during the greater part of the
short open season.
Vermin
The recent appointment of a full-time predatory-animal hunter for the Lower
Mainland will be of considerable assistance to the Game Wardens of that area in their
endeavours to control vermin in their respective districts. Fewer complaints of cougar
were received during the year.
Game Protection
A total of 397 prosecutions under the " Game Act," Special Fishery Regulations,
and the " Migratory Game Bird Act " were conducted by officers in this Division during
the past year. Following the re-establishment of a game detachment at Powell River and
our repossessing the Departmental launch " P.G.D. 2 " from the Royal Canadian Mounted
Police, I am pleased to report that adequate game protection is now being given to the
up-coast portion of this Division.
Game Propagation
As in previous years, a considerable amount of time was devoted by Game Wardens
in the Lower Mainland area in connection with the picking-up and releasing of farm-
raised pheasants. This was a particularly difficult task during the past summer, as many
of the suitable areas to be planted lacked fresh water following an abnormal lengthy
drought.
Game Reserves
The several game reserves within this Division continue to be beneficial as resting-
grounds for wild fowl.
Fur Trade
Retail sales are reported to have dropped 40 to 50 per cent during the year due, as
most local fur-buyers will agree, to a consumer resistance to dressed furs, which are E 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
beyond the reach of the majority.   Prices paid to the trapper for his raw pelts, and which
are listed hereunder, show this general trend in the market:—
Type
Beaver 	
Muskrat _
Otter 	
Fisher	
Cross fox -
Red fox	
Marten 	
Weasel 	
Wild mink
Lynx 	
Racoon 	
Squirrel 	
Wolverine -
1949
1950
$24.50
$18.00
2.10
2.40
26.50
25.00
55.00
39.00
3.00
2.25
2.75
1.50
24.80
20.00
2.20
1.90
29.50
23.00
14.60
7.50
1.25
1.25
.65
.65
35.00
25.00
Registration of Trap-lines
This system continues to function smoothly and is, I believe, largely responsible
for the consistent returns from the many trap-lines in this Division.
Registration of Guides
There are very few registered in " E " Game Division, and I have nothing further
to report on this subject.
Special Patrols
No special patrols were made during the year.
Hunting Accidents
William Bezubiak, of 245 Glen Drive, Vancouver, B.C., while hunting ducks during
the night flight of December 18th, 1951, received two shotgun pellets above the left eye.
Person responsible not known.   Not serious.
On November 4th, 1951, Jack Kuzma, of Englewood, B.C., was accidentally shot
to death by one John D. Murray of the same address. The deceased, wearing khaki
coloured clothing, was mistaken for a deer. The firearms licence of Mr. Murray has
been cancelled.
Charles Warris, of Powell River, B.C., while hunting crows with one Donald
McQuarrie, of the same address, on November 12th, 1951, was hit by three shotgun
pellets discharged by a gun in the hands of the latter. Not serious. Firearms licence of
Mr. McQuarrie has been cancelled.
Game-fish Culture
Smiths Falls Hatchery at Cultus Lake operated over the year with usual good
success. A total of 369,600 Kamloops trout fingerlings were reared and liberated in
many of the Lower Mainland lakes and streams. These fingerlings were not as large as
they were in some years, owing to a crowded condition which occurred in hatchery
troughs and rearing-ponds. This situation was remedied by the construction of an
additional battery of five concrete ponds. The siphon arrangement at the intake to the
hatchery water-supply is not good. Several water failures occurred during the night, but
the alertness of Fishery Officer F. Pells prevented the loss of fish.
At the present time there is a total of 800 Kamloops trout on hand as brood stock
at this hatchery, and it is anticipated that a large number of these will mature this coming REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951 E 33
spring. The eggs to be collected should augment to some considerable degree the usual
supply received from the Interior collecting-stations. This egg-supply will be further
augmented by the collection of eggs from a small run of Kamloops trout which occurs
in the hatchery creek. Fish from these local eggs continue to be less susceptible to normal
hatchery losses, and their growth exceeds that of Interior stock.
On January 1st, 1952, the cut-throat trout brood stock numbered 992 fish, a loss of
2 fish over the year. It is hoped that a large number will reach maturity this coming
spring.
Fishing in the many lakes and streams in this Division has been very good during the
past year, unquestionably as a direct result of the yearly plantings of hatchery-reared fish.
Chief Fisheries Biologist Dr. P. A. Larkin and his staff commenced a survey of the
important fishing-waters of the Lower Mainland during the year in review, and, as you
are aware, his findings will be covered in his report to you.
Summary
In conclusion, I wish to bring to your attention the valuable assistance rendered to
this Division by the Game Associations, Forest Service, Public Works Department, the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in particular to the assistance and co-operation of
Jack Pilling, of radio station CHWK of Chilliwack, who devoted some considerable
broadcast time to fish and game matters. I also wish to express my thanks and appreciation to the Game Wardens and Fishery Officers for the usual efficient and courteous
manner in which they performed their many and varied duties.
SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES OF THE GAME MANAGEMENT
AND RESEARCH BRANCH
By James Hatter, Chief Game Biologist
Introduction
The most encouraging feature of the year 1951 was the appointment of two Game
Management Biologists to permanent field positions. P. W. Martin was stationed at
Kamloops and D. J. Robinson at Nanaimo. The district in which Mr. Martin operates
is exceptionally large, including all the Interior west of the Monashee Mountains and
south of Prince George to the International Boundary. It is hoped that eventually this
large district will become subdivided with the future appointment of additional Game
Management Biologists. The Vancouver Island unit is much smaller and more compact,
with the important hunting districts more accessible than those of the Interior. The
variety of game species is not as great as found in the Interior, and hence the problems
are fewer.
Development of the Game Management and Research Branch tends toward decentralization in its organization. Game problems in British Columbia are best handled by
resident biologists assigned to districts. This is considered preferable to a central organization in which all activities extend from the office of the Game Commission in Vancouver. Appointments have been made on the basis of regional hunting pressure, and
it is anticipated that those in the future will be made in a similar manner. As yet no
appointment has been made to " B " Division, embracing the important districts of the
East and West Kootenays.
E. W. Taylor, Game Management Biologist on the Lower Mainland Coast, has this
year undertaken to obtain management information on elk and deer in the Princeton
area, thus relieving P. W. Martin in the larger Interior district.
Seasonal work, largely by graduate students from the University, was again sponsored by the Branch and will be reported on in a further section of this report. E 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Objectives of the Game Management and Research Branch
A restatement of the objectives of this newly formed Branch is made at this time
in order that the purpose of the activities listed may be better understood. Briefly, the
major purpose of the Branch is to obtain basic factual information by which a maximum
sustained crop of game may be harvested each year. The wise use of game resources
must be based on information of this type. Hunting pressure in British Columbia, while
low in comparison to many States to the south, has now reached a point where a factual
approach to management is imperative. If we are to derive full benefit from our wild-life
resources on a sustained basis, we must have the necessary information to achieve this
end. There can be no substitute for pertinent quantitative data obtained with full recognition of our responsibilities.
It is our primary purpose to manage properly the wild-life stocks presently at our
disposal. Attempts to increase certain species of big game through possible habitat
development, such as controlled burning, is secondary to the problem of using what we
now have to the full extent permissible. Not until such time as this is realized and hunting
pressure increases over present levels can we concern ourselves with practices to improve
the numerical status of such species as deer, moose, elk, and grouse. Over large areas,
these species in particular are not being harvested to the extent permissible or, in some
cases, even desirable from a biological standpoint. Other species of game, such as bighorn sheep, caribou, grizzly bear, and water-fowl, on the other hand, appear in many
areas to be subjected to hunting pressure as great as may be tolerated in a sustained-yield
.programme of management. In the case of bighorn sheep, the Management and Research
Branch is emphasizing inquiry into the causes for a declining status, which does not
appear to be primarily the result of hunting pressure. Parasites and disease, live-stock
competition, predation, and depleted winter ranges are promising fields of inquiry. They
are being investigated in hopes that corrective measures may be undertaken to relieve
their influence should they constitute important limiting factors. At the same time any
trends in hunting pressure will be recorded and weighed in the balance along with other
factors involved.
Habitat development for water-fowl is desirable, but our present activities must of
necessity centre about surveys. These are designed to point the way and provide basic
information for future action should facilities be placed at our disposal for a more
energetic programme of water-fowl management than is possible at the present time.
Tools at one's disposal in game management form the backbone of this applied
biological science. They consist, for the most part, of life-history data, plant and animal
ecology, census methods, range surveys, the annual harvest, knowledge of parasites and
disease, and training in interpretation of observations and facts into a sound management
programme.
An outline of activities of the Branch is presented under the headings " Management," " Research," " Surveys and Special Investigations," " Conferences and Public
Relations."   Results of certain phases of the work will be summarized briefly.
Management
Pheasants
Ladner Delta.—Pheasant sex ratios, crowing counts, and the relative density of
the breeding population was again determined on the Ladner Delta during the spring
months. Brood counts and relative densities were obtained on several occasions during
the production period. Final brood counts and population densities were determined
in August and September. At this time a pre-hunt estimate of hunting success was
made. In December, winter counts were made on the Delta for relative abundance.
Details of the work were compiled in a report submitted by E. W. Taylor on October REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951
E 35
17th,  1951, and entitled "Report on the Delta Pheasant Population—Spring and
Summer, 1951."
The winter carry-over of cock pheasants was higher in 1951 than in the three
preceding years.
Table I.—Cock-pheasant Density, May, 1948, 1949, 1950, and 1951, Based on Counts
of Crowing Territories in Delta Municipality
Year
Acres Covered
Number of
Cock
Territories
Estimated
Number of
Cocks per
Square Mile
1948                                     - -	
8,640
7,570
7,570
7,570
167
168
138
198
12.3
1949...	
14.2
1950
11.8
1951 	
16.7
This may be a reflection of reduced hunting pressure due to hunter response to the
poor season of 1950. With the exception of a few weeks in late February and March, the
winter weather was milder and probably more favourable to the birds than was the case
in 1949 and 1950.
The total spring pheasant population was down from that of all preceding years of
study. While cocks were higher in numbers than in any previous year since 1948, hens
were lower. A large influx of snowy owls, the first in several years, occurred during the
winter months. On two occasions, individuals of this species were seen to attack hen
pheasants, but in neither instance were these attacks successful. The remains of hen
pheasants eaten by snowy owls were found, but whether these birds had been killed by
owls or merely scavenged was not known.
Table II.—Estimate of Breeding-population Size of the Pheasant in Delta Municipality,
Comparative for the Month of May, 1948 to 1951, Inclusive
1948
1949
1950
1951
Crowing cocks per square mile-.
Sex ratio (hens per cock)-.
Approximate breeding area (square miles) _
Estimated cock population	
Estimated hen population...
Estimated potential breeding population..
12.3
5:4
39.0
479.7
2,590.4
3,070.1
14.2
4:3
39.0
553.8
2,481.3
11.8
5:3
39.0
460.2
2,439.0
16.7
3:1
39.0
651.3
2,019.0
3,035.1    |    2,899.2    |    2,670.3
There appeared to be little difference in the progress of broods of 1951 and that of
the broods of 1950. One conspicuous fact noted this year, however, was that the survival
of early hatched chicks seemed quite high.
Table III,
—Brood Size
Year
Average
dumber of Chicks for the Months of—
May
June
July
August
1948 -  	
1949      .
1950      _      	
1951  	
9.4
6.6
7.1
6.2
6.4
5.0
4.5
5.2
5.2
5.3
3.8
4.7
4.6
As was the case in 1950, pheasant productivity was good. Unlike the situation in
1950, however, there was a well-maintained level of survival from August to October
15th, 1951.   The exceptionally dry, warm spring and summer is believed to have been E 36
BRITISH COLUMBIA
favourable to the development of the young birds. Crops generally matured earlier than
is customary on the area. Grain seemed more abundant in acreage and provided a large
area of undisturbed cover.
Table IV.—Percentage of Hens Rearing Broods
Percentage of Hens Rearing Broods in the Months of—
Year
June
July
August
1948                                             - -   -	
6.9
6.6
9.0
47.9
52.9
71.6
81.5
1940
80.1
1950
87.0
1951
85.1
From Table V it may be seen that the productivity estimates as computed from data
collected until August of each year show productivity in 1951 to be lower than in 1950.
While the figure for the latter year may have been valid for conditions existing in August,
it was obvious during the hunting season that a marked decline in population density
had occurred in the period August to October, 1950.
The index in October, 1951, of 14.0 birds per mile was only 0.4 birds per mile less
than the figure obtained by roadside counts in July. From the same index it was also
indicated that the 1951 Delta pheasant-crop approached in size that of 1948.
Table V.— Productivity Estimate
1948
1949
1950
1951
Estimated number of cocks in spring..
Estimated number of hens In spring _
Estimated percentage of hens rearing young	
Estimated number o*breeding hens successful-
Average brood size (August)	
Calculated juvenile fall increment	
479.7
2,590.4
81.5
2,111.1
5.3
11,188.8
553.8
2,481.3
80.1
1,987.5
3.8
7,522.5
460.2
2,439.0
87.0
2,121.9
4.7
9,973.4
651.3
2,055.3
85.1
1,718.1
4.6
7,903.1
1 Data on hen losses due to mowing and other factors were not obtained in 1951.    Figures for previous years arc
adjusted on this basis.
Table VI.-
—Pheasant Density, Delta,
as Determined by Roadside Census
Year and Month
Number of
Census Miles
Number of
Birds Counted
Birds per
Roadside Mile
1948—October   -- -         _   -	
1949    October                                             	
27.8
8.8
30.2
16.0
67.9
26.7
25.8
446
107
322
82
978
359
363
16.0
12.1
1950—
10.6
October... — .
1951—
5.1
14.4
13.4
14 0
The pre-hunt estimates of increased density of pheasants on the Delta in 1951 over
1950 were confirmed during the opening week-end when hunter success was considerably
higher.
Lower Mainland, Vancouver Island, and Interior.—In addition to work on the
Ladner Delta, crowing counts were made in the following districts: Surrey, Langley,
Lulu Island, Pitt Meadows, Matsqui, Summerland, Vernon, Armstrong, Salmon Arm,
Canoe, Kamloops, Kelowna, Oliver, and Osoyoos. Much of these data were used in
making recommendations at the Kelowna pheasant meeting on July 10th. A request
for a closed season by local Gun Clubs was not supported by the data on hand. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951
E 37
E. W. Taylor obtained preliminary data on pheasant range and habitat conditions
in the following areas: Vernon, Lumby, Lavington, Armstrong, Enderby, Salmon Arm,
Kamloops, and Oliver. Other range and habitat data were collected in the following
areas: Princeton, Keremeos, Oliver-Osoyoos, Grand Forks, Creston, Kelowna, Penticton, Summerland, Ashcroft, Lillooet, and Merritt. A similar range survey was made on
Vancouver Island. Victoria-Saanich, Cowichan-Duncan, Nanaimo, Courtenay, Comox,
Denman Island, and Campbell River were visited. This time-consuming work is yet to
be concluded, and to date no report has been submitted.
Investigation of a proposed site for a pheasant-farm at Vernon was made on May
12th. J. G. Cunningham, E. W. Taylor, J. Hatter, and members of the Vernon club
were present.
Throughout the year numerous other inquiries and items of work pertaining to
pheasants were undertaken.   These are listed below:—
(1) Recommendations were submitted for establishment of experimental winter food-plots by A. C. Taylor on his property at Jardine. Several follow-
up checks were made.
(2) A meeting was attended at Kelowna with North and South Okanagan
clubs to discuss the pheasant season.
(3) Pinioning and release of experimental pheasants on the property of A. C.
Taylor was carried out.
(4) Banded pheasants were released on Ladner Delta.
(5) A canvass of Jardine residents in Langley Municipality was made to
ascertain their reaction to a proposed closure of the area for study
purposes.   A report was submitted September 14th, 1951.
(6) Pre-hunt counts in the Interior and on the Ladner Delta were carried out,
and winter counts for relative abundance were also conducted on the
Delta.
(7) Road checks on the Ladner Delta were continued as in previous years.
(8) A report was prepared by E. W. Taylor on " Pheasant Harvest Data Compiled from B.C. Game Club Postcard Returns in 1950." It was submitted
April, 1951.
(9) The preparation and distribution of a special hunter-return card for
pheasants was undertaken. Analysis of returns was commenced in March,
1951, and cannot be reported on at this time.
(10) Pheasant possibilities on Galiano Island were investigated.   A preliminary
report was submitted December 24th, 1951.
(11) A study of returns from pheasant releases in the Alberni Valley was
undertaken following the open season.   A report is in progress.
Blue Grouse
Vancouver Island.—Checking-stations were again established at Campbell River
and in the Cowichan Valley during the first week-end of the blue-grouse season.
Brood counts were taken during the course of the production period and appear in
Table VII. The prevailing forest closure during the summer of 1951 seriously curtailed
field activities in this connection.
Table VII.—Brood Size for Major Blue-grouse Districts on Vancouver
Island, June 3rd to August 29th
Area
Number of
Females
Number of
Juveniles
Minimum
Brood Size
Remarks
2
5
12
43
16
18
47
132
8.0
3.6
3.9
3.1
Young broods. E 38
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Census areas were set up for future coverage to provide the means for relative
counts. The marked decline of birds on the logged-off areas with the approach of fall
is demonstrated in Table VIII.
Table VIII.—Comparison of Blue Grouse Observed per Hour between the Periods
May 15th to August 30th and September 6th to November 20th
Area
Number of Birds
Hours
n Field
Birds per Hour
May-Aug.
Sept.-Nov.
May-Aug.
SepL-Nov.
May-Aug.
Sept.-Nov.
Sooke      	
24
30
44
121
2
7
12
1
14.00
6.50
22.50
18.25
10.00
23.50
37.75
16.75
1.7
4.6
1.9
6.6
0.20
0 30
0.32
0 06
The marked decrease of birds on the logging-slashes after the first week of September illustrates the need of an early blue-grouse season if a sizeable harvest is to be
realized. Altitudinal migration is the major controlling factor in the annual take.
Forest closures in 1951 seriously curtailed hunting early in the season. By the time the
closure was lifted, a large majority of the birds were on their wintering grounds.
Interior.-—Generally speaking, blue grouse were unusually abundant in the Interior.
Their upward population trends have seemingly followed the same pattern as the ruffed
grouse, with both species at or near the " cyclic " peak in numbers.
No directed effort toward a study of blue-grouse production could be undertaken
due to other duties and problems attending the late establishment of the Game Management Biologist at Kamloops. Nine broods encountered during the summer averaged
4.3 birds per brood.
Ruffed Grouse
Vancouver Island.—Ruffed grouse on Vancouver Island were more abundant in
1951 than usual. Unfortunately, few hunters seek this bird, and in many areas the
surplus supply of birds in the fall remains unharvested. A major contributing factor to
the low hunting pressure rests in the fact that by the time the ruffed-grouse season opens
in October, the blue grouse have vacated the areas inhabited by the former species.
The small bag-limit of two birds per day and the short season in effect is not sufficient
to attract other than the local resident into the field.
To realize a better harvest, it is highly desirable that the season on ruffed grouse
open much earlier than at present and that a combination ruffed- and blue-grouse bag
be permitted. The small size of some broods in September would not in itself seem to
justify a late opening date.
The lack of an altitudinal migration common to blue grouse is demonstrated for
ruffed grouse in Table IX. It will be noted that there may be an increase in the number
of birds observed per hour in the fall over the number seen during the summer. This
is partially due, of course, to better visibility after the leaves fall. A reverse situation
exists for blue grouse after the summer and fall migration takes place.   (See Table VIII.)
Table IX.—Comparison of Ruffed Grouse Seen per Hour between May 15th
to August 30th and September 6th to November 20th
Number of Birds
Hours in Field
Birds per Hour
May-Aug.
Sept.-Nov.
May-Aug.
Sept.-Nov.
May-Aug.
Sept.-Nov.
Sooke 	
1
13
1
8
18
14
5
5
14.0
7.5
21.5
21.0
10.00
26.50
46.75
16.75
1.50
0.13
0.60
0.05
0.80
0.67
0.30
0.30
Nanaimo  	
3.30 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951
E 39
Interior.—A number of drumming counts were made in several areas in the Interior.
Cock densities of the following magnitude were recorded from two-minute roadside
counts: Kamloops district, Paul Lake to Lloyds Creek, 1.8 per mile; Vidette mine, 1.2
per mile; Aspen Grove, Loon Lake to main highway, 1.2 per mile. Brood counts
during the summer averaged 5.2 birds per covey.
To determine the influence of hunting pressure on the roadside abundance of birds
in the Bridge Lake district, counts were made during the shooting season, which began
on September 15th and ended October 31st.   Snowfall prevented a post-season count.
Table X.—Roadside Density of Ruffed Grouse during the Shooting Season,
Bridge Lake District
Sept. 24, 25
Sept. 28
Oct. 4, 5
Oct. 13
Birds per mile	
Grouse per covey-
Miles per covey__-
0.21
2.60
11.70
0.23
3.20
14.00
0.17
1.60
9.40
0.19
1.70
8.90
Roadside density based on birds per linear mile decreased only 9.5 per cent between
September 25th and October 13th.   This demonstrates the need for a longer season and
more liberal bag-limit during years of peak populations.   Hunting pressure on this species
is noticeably light for most districts of the Province.   Hunting is largely confined to the
roadside, and its magnitude in a given district is directly dependent upon the number of
roads present.
Chukar Partridge
Releases of chukar partridges were made near Walhachin, Kamloops, and in the
Vaseaux Lake area. Reports relating to these releases were submitted in August and
September.
Several checks of the release sites were made, but to date no birds have been
positively identified from the introductions.
Hungarian Partridge
A cursory survey of the Fraser Valley was made prior to the release of Hungarians
owned by the Lower Mainland Partridge Committee. A release was made at Agassiz on
August 25th and a report submitted on August 30th, 1951.
It is not the policy of the Game Management Branch to encourage the release of
Hungarian partridges in British Columbia, particularly on the Lower Mainland. Habitat
conditions are seldom suitable for the maintenance of a shootable population.
Fur-bearing Animals
Beaver.—The Management Branch assisted in the trapping of nuisance beaver in the
Abbotsford area. Problems of this nature which arise in the future will probably be
undertaken by the Predator-control Branch.
Two beaver surveys were made in the Penticton area with a view to encouraging
beaver on the adjacent watershed for the purpose of conserving water. Two reports
were submitted dealing with these cursory surveys.
Recommendations were submitted by the Game Management Biologist on Vancouver Island relative to control of nuisance beaver in the Alberni area. A report was
submitted on December 29th.
An investigation of Piers Island was made at the request of the Game Commission.
A report relative to the establishment of beaver on this island was submitted on
September 24th.
A survey of the success of beaver introductions on Queen Charlotte Islands in 1949
was undertaken by Dr. I. McT. Cowan. A report was submitted dealing with this
subject, together with general comments on the status of deer and elk.   The release in E 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
1949 resulted in the establishment of beaver which appear to be thriving in the new
locality.
Big Game
Big-game studies are mainly a function of the winter months, when the animals are
present on their winter range. At this time, herd reduction through exposure to a series
of limiting factors is most important and largely determines the effective reproduction
of a given species.
At the time of writing, winter studies are in progress, and, therefore, the results of
these are not available for the present report. Mention will be made of necessity only
to big-game work carried out during the late spring, summer, and fall months.
Moose.—Permanent study-plots were established in the Bridge Lake district for the
purpose of determining trends in range use and survival of browse. This affords an index
to population level and hence is essential to management.
Observations in July showed the following extent of forage use during the preceding
winter: Number of study-plots, 25; willow-stems per plot, 139; number of browsed
twigs, 536; number of unbrowsed twigs, 176.
Seventy-five per cent of the previous year's growth of twigs was utilized during the
winter months by moose. On the basis of the plots studied, this figure is indicative of
excessive use of the range.
An additional number of study-plots will be established in 1952.
Near Vidette Lake 100 willow-bushes were picked at random, and the number of
twigs remaining from the previous year's growth were counted on each bush. Sixty-three
per cent of these had no twigs left and 19 per cent bore only one twig. In areas where
the palatable vegetation is used to this extent, there is urgent need of herd reduction
through the removal of antlerless animals. Starvation, damaged range, and low reproductive gain are the undesirable results following such heavy use of the food-supply.
Another crash in the moose population is imminent in the Cariboo and Chilcotin unless
remedial action is undertaken to reduce the population size.
Bighorn Sheep.—Although no detailed information is on hand for the bighorn sheep
at Squilax or Adams Lake, several attempts were made to obtain a population count in
these areas. Initial activities were directed mainly toward familiarization of the areas
inhabited. It is doubtful if more intensive work on these isolated bands of sheep can be
undertaken without additional field help.
Population counts and range studies in the Ashnola district were continued by
Dr. I. McT. Cowan. Further inquiries as to the interrelationship of bighorns and
domestic live stock were carried out by the regional biologist at Kamloops and a member
of the British Columbia Forest Service.   Reports were submitted in September.
The Vaseaux Lake band of sheep was visited by Dr. Cowan, and a report of findings
and recommendations submitted. Studies in this area will be continued by Dr. Cowan
and the regional biologist at Kamloops.
Elk.—Two cursory surveys were made at the request of the Game Commission
relative to the proposed liberation of elk near Prince George and in the Castlegar area.
An attempt to appraise the status of the Princeton elk herd was made in May with
rather indifferent success.
Deer.—No details are present at the time of writing on winter studies being carried
out on Vancouver Island and in the Interior. These will be embodied in a report at
a later date. Summer work by the regional biologists has consisted of preliminary surveys
and location of important winter ranges.
Water-fowl
Other than quarterly presentation of the bi-monthly water-fowl estimates to the
Pacific Flyway Committee and assistance in the breeding-ground survey, it has not been
possible for the Management Branch to participate actively in water-fowl management. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 41
Breeding-ground counts were made in May and June in co-operation with the
Canadian Wildlife Service.
The Tofino area on Vancouver Island was visited, and recommendations put forth
to ensure future public access to this important hunting area.
Water-fowl counts were made during three succeeding trips to Tofino. At the end
of October the following species and numbers of water-fowl were counted on one portion
of the Tofino mud-flats, approximately 2V% miles long: Western Canada goose, 2,300-
2,400; widgeon, 6,800-7,500; green-winged teal, 2,500±500; pintail, 1,800-2,200;
mallard, 600-800; buffle-head, 900-1,000; white-winged scoter, 250-300; scaup, 45;
shoveller, 10; approximate total, 16,000.
The above concentrations represent only a portion of the water-fowl using this area
in October. Other large concentrations which could not be counted exist farther up the
inlet. Another count in the third week of November revealed a drop in the number of
mallards, otherwise the duck population appeared unchanged. Only 500 to 600 geese
were seen, in contrast to the 2,400 present in October.
Little or nothing is known of goose movements on the west coast of Vancouver
Island and the Mainland. The Tofino area cannot be adequately censused by means
other than the use of aircraft. Such an aerial count should be carried out to provide fall
migration data.
Research
Pheasants
Certain activities of the Branch fall clearly within the meaning of research. In other
cases the dividing-line between management duties and research is difficult to establish.
Work is in progress dealing with climatic features of pheasant range in British
Columbia.
Research on the effect of insecticide sprays and study of pheasant ecology in the
Summerland area was continued during the summer of 1951. An outline report of
findings was submitted in November.
Moose
The effect of experimental burning on moose and deer winter range in the Kamloops
area is a long-term study currently in progress.
Information on sex and age ratios in the moose populations of the Cariboo District
is currently being sought through the use of report forms distributed to big-game guides.
Water-fowl
A trap for banding diving ducks was described and presented for publication in the
Journal of Wildlife Management by I. McT. Cowan and J. Hatter.
Surveys and Special Investigations
Pheasants
A survey of Paisley Island was made to determine the suitability of this area for
insular experiments on pheasants.   It was considered unsuitable.
A pheasant census and habitat study was carried out on Kirkland Island and a report
submitted in December.   Further work is in progress.
Eliza Island, off the coast of Washington, was visited during the annual removal
of experimental birds, and study made of experiments in progress by the States of
Washington and Oregon.
Blue Grouse
Texada Island was surveyed to determine the abundance of blue grouse following
earlier introductions of this bird to the island.    A report was submitted in October. E 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Grouse are well distributed over the island but have not reached numbers deemed suitable
for an open season.
Elk
A cursory survey of the Buttle Lake and Upper Campbell Lake elk herds was made
to determine the probable effect of damming either of these lakes.
Tweedsmuir Park Survey
Two weeks were spent in the Tweedsmuir Park area studying the probable effect
of flooding by the Aluminum Company of Canada on wild life of the district. A report
was submitted in February, 1952.
Bighorn Sheep
Further study of sheep winter range and live-stock competition in Churn Creek
basin was undertaken, and a detailed report was submitted in January, 1952.
Another census of the Chilcotin River band of California bighorn sheep was carried
out.   A report was submitted in October.
Water-fowl
Duck-banding operations between July 1st and September 10th were continued for
the fourth consecutive year in the Interior districts of the Province.
Deer
An area adjacent to Williams Lake was inspected with a view toward setting up
a mule-deer sanctuary in a heavily hunted section of the district. This survey was
requested by the Williams Lake Rod and Gun Club. A report was submitted favouring
a small closed area between the Fraser River and the Cariboo Highway.
Conferences and Public Relations
Numerous meetings of Game Associations were attended throughout the year.
At most of these, papers or talks were presented.
A large number of routine reports have been prepared, and others are in process
of preparation at the time of writing. Work of this type, while essential, greatly reduces
the time one has available for field work and preparation of research papers. In this
connection there is a most apparent danger of routine-report writing by the Chief Game
Biologist seriously curtailing the more important task of supervising workers in the field.
ACKNOWLEDGM ENTS
The Game Management and Research Branch extends its appreciation and thanks
to all persons, within the Game Department and without, who have assisted and
co-operated in various phases of its activity.
FISHERIES RESEARCH OF THE GAME DEPARTMENT FOR 1951
By Dr. P. A. Larkin, Chief Fisheries Biologist
The developments of the past year can best be revised by going back a few years
to the time when the Game Commission saw fit to obtain some biologists. At that time,
in 1948, the thought in the minds of the Commission was that biologists should be hired
to investigate the fish and the game animals of British Columbia with the object of
indicating new ways of solving acute and chronic problems. The emphasis was on
research, and in its first two years of operation the Fisheries Research Group of the
Game Department concentrated on lake and stream surveys, steelhead investigations,
studies of the Kamloops trout, lake shiners and other fish, and associated research
biological problems.   In 1950 we looked forward optimistically to seeing the day when REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951 E 43
these investigations would be summarized and acted upon. There was a limited amount
of investigation of industrial developments and a sufficient number of hatchery problems
and minor fisheries problems to keep the staff active.
By the spring of 1950 the industrial boom was moving into high gear, the extensive
Public Works programme of road improvements was shortening the travelling-time from
the centres of population to the hinterland lakes, and the " biggest ever " influx of
American fishermen had begun.
Almost overnight, it seemed, the Department was required to accelerate all aspects
of its fish-cultural programme, both practical and scientific. Between April of 1950 and
April of 1951 came many major industrial projects that posed problems to sport-fisheries
and which demanded attention—the Alcan project in Tweedsmuir Park was mooted, the
Greater Vancouver Water District planned a dam for the Capilano River, the Okanagan
flood-control project seemed ready to begin, the B.C. Electric announced plans for its
Jones Lake development—these and a host of minor projects began to eat into the
man-hours and money that were budgeted for much needed research and survey. But, at
the same time, the mushrooming resort business and the great increase in sport-fishing
could not be ignored. So for the year 1951-52 a programme of research and investigation
was planned that would be commensurate with the growing significance of sport-fishing
as big business, and which would meet the need for investigation of industrial development.
With a look to the future it was decided that an attempt should be made to squeeze
the five-year lake- and stream-survey programme into four years, and in 1951, the third
year of the five, a record of fifty-four lakes was placed on the list for investigation.
These plans grew out of a major change in the Department that was incipient prior
to the spring of 1951. The Department was referring many of its practical problems
and all of the major industrial problems to its scientific branch for their comment and
criticism. Quite obviously, if any expansion was to come, to cope with the increasing
problems of protecting fish, it was to be in the scientific branch, where the work was
being done. In other words, the scientific branch was going to do not only survey and
research, but was going to be responsible for carrying out recommendations arising from
these investigations, was going to adjudicate on practical problems such as regulations
and hatchery activities, and was going to fill the breach if and when major industrial
projects got under way.
The budget was boosted to $35,000, another man was added to the permanent
staff, and in April of 1951 we looked to a programme of work that would keep us even
with, or perhaps even ahead of, the bubbling sport-fishing boom.
For the first few months of the past year everything went well. By September the
lake-survey crews looked back on a highly successful season. Fire closures had prevented
some surveys, and very low stream-levels reduced the value of others, but all except nine
of the original list of fifty-four had been studied and thirty-one additional lakes had been
surveyed. The summer's total of seventy-six was more than had been accomplished
in the two previous years together, although, on the average, the lakes were smaller and
more quickly surveyed.
The lakes and streams investigated were divided as follows: Vancouver Island, 18;
Lower Mainland, 35; Southern Okanagan, 23.
The analysis of the material collected proceeded slowly during the winter months
and is still far from its final refinement, but some major points of interest and value have
already become evident. There is good reason to believe that the stocking of cut-throat
trout in many Vancouver Island and Lower Mainland lakes would be preferable to the
stocking of Kamloops trout from the Interior. A preliminary reconnaissance of cut-throat
collecting-stations has been made. Through the foresight and diligence of Fishery
Officer Pells, of Smiths Falls Hatchery, in raising a cut-throat brood stock, 300,000
cut-throat eggs are available for rearing this year.   One hundred thousand will be raised E 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
at the Puntledge Park Hatchery on Vancouver Island and 200,000 at the Smiths Falls
Hatchery.
Analysis of water from Vancouver Island and Lower Mainland lakes has suggested
that low mineral content may be the primary reason for low productivity of coastal
waters. Interior lakes generally have from two to ten times the mineral content of coastal
lakes. This bodes ill for the immediate prospect of making extensive improvements
in these areas, because scientific knowledge of lake fertilization is still in an early stage,
and much of the work that has been done in trying to raise yield by increasing the mineral
content of natural waters has given negative or discouraging results.
The survey findings for 1951, together with those for 1949 and 1950, were consulted
in the compilation of the distribution lists for the coming season. Thus each season
more and more of the lakes that are stocked annually have had new stocking schedules,
the effects of which will be closely scrutinized and evaluated.
The third year of lake survey was a marked success and has opened up many new
fields for investigation, has indicated some new avenues of management, and has fully
justified its expense.
Our research programme has continued along some old paths and along a few new
ones suggested by studies in 1949 and 1950. Stuart Smith recently completed a fascinating study on growth rates of Kamloops trout, particularly as they were effected in
Paul Lake by the selective action of the fishery and by the explosive increase of the lake
shiner in recent years. Mr. Smith noted major changes in the trout population of this
much studied lake, and his findings will have very extensive and important application
to our stocking policy for lakes that contain shiners.
David Scott made an intensive investigation of factors affecting egg size and numbers
of eggs in Kamloops trout, and this study will be continued.
Dr. Edgar Black and Mrs. Black continued their work on the temperature and
oxygen tolerance of fish which occur in British Columbia. This work was sponsored
by the National Research Council, and the Game Department assisted by providing
accommodation for the work and fish for the experiments. These studies emphasized
the close correspondence between temperature and oxygen tolerances of fish, and conditions of temperature and oxygen in lakes where summer or winter kill occurs. With an
understanding of the causes of this common phenomenon in British Columbia, we are
in a position to suggest ways in which it may be overcome.
Dr. Clemens, Mr. McMynn, and the writer have been compiling an extensive series
of stomach-content analysis of trout with a view to reviewing the food habits of our
common sport species.
Experiments on the effects of various hatchery diets on survival of fish when planted
were continued and should be finalized in the coming season.
I. Barrett conducted some vital studies on the physiology of Kamloops trout, with
special reference to the effects of starvation on the general vigour of fish and their
tolerances to high temperature and low oxygen. These studies will have a valuable
application to the problem of getting the best results in stocking. These studies should
indicate principles of handling fish, which, together with a consideration of the biology of
the water to be stocked, would ensure maximum survival and maximum return to anglers.
Steelhead studies were continued under F. P. Maher and have been largely sabotaged
by the vagaries of nature as embodied in the Chilliwack River. Mr. Maher's studies will
be continued in 1952.
Several other minor research projects were left almost in a state of abeyance until
more time can be spent on them.
Experiments were conducted on the use of fish-tox in streams. Various streams
were poisoned experimentally, to determine, under field conditions, the best dosage for
killing coarse fish and to evaluate the relative cost of poisoning as contrasted with the REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 45
operation of coarse-fish traps. Results of this work were positive, encouraging, and
in most instances nothing short of spectacular. Doses of 5 ppm. applied for fifteen
minutes were best in most situations. Best results were obtained when applications
were made at intervals ranging from one-quarter to half a mile, depending on stream conditions. In one trial in a creek tributary to Cluculz Lake near Prince.George, approximately 4 tons of suckers were killed with 16 pounds of fish-tox. In another trial 2 tons
of suckers were killed with 14 pounds of fish-tox. Fish-tox costs 30 cents a pound.
At this rate then 4 tons of fish were killed for $4.80 in the first trial; 2 tons for $4.20 in
the second. The economy of the use of poison in streams is obvious. The drawbacks
are equally obvious ten days after poisoning, when the fish decompose. Disposal of
the dead fish is a major problem associated with coarse-fish poisoning.
The results of the poisoning of two lakes in the One Mile chain in 1947 have been
collated, and it has been noted that the poisoning of the two lakes did not produce
equally satisfactory results in the first four years after poisoning. The reasons for this
have tied in closely with observations on marginal lakes for trout, and the important
point has emerged that it is imperative to be sure of the suitability of a body of water
for trout before poisoning is entertained. The absence or sparsity of trout in a lake
may not be primarily caused by the presence of coarse fish. Unless the harmful effect
of coarse fish on trout is quite clear in a particular body of water, then poisoning may
have questionable value. Since poisoning is only economically feasible for small lakes
in which suitability for trout may often be in doubt, the results of this study have served
the valuable purpose of emphasizing the need for a cautious poisoning programme.
The survey and research activities of the scientific group were constructive and
encouraging in 1951. However, the last twelve months have been characterized also
by a preoccupation with increasing the scope of the work of the group to include the
problems attending industrial expansion in British Columbia. In 1951-52 twelve major
investigations of this type were conducted, and roughly fifty smaller projects were
briefly investigated. The progress to be reported on these projects is encouraging, and
extensive concessions have been gained for protection of sport-fisheries. Few of these
investigations were planned in budgeting for the year, and all were done by overexpend-
ing funds and overtaxing the staff. Was it worth the extra expense and extra effort?
It would be premature and unwise to review all progress so far and to speculate on the
eventual return from the investment. Further, the active co-operation and, for some
projects, the initiative of the Dominion Department of Fisheries have greatly enhanced
our representations for sport-fish interests. But we might make a lump estimate of
moneys conceded or expended for protection of fish as a result of these investigations,
and it would far exceed the cost of the work. At the present time, with many negotiations in early stages, the return on the cost of the work is already in the ratio of about
20 to 1; for every dollar spent in investigation, twenty dollars have been spent or
promised for protection of sport-fish.
Associated with British Columbia's current boom, there has been a stepping-up of
activity in almost all types of resource use. More mines are starting or reopening
operations, and each has an associated pollution problem, sometimes only minor; new
agricultural areas are being developed, and for many the problems of reconciling irrigation with fish protection must be faced; new forestry regulations have encouraged large-
scale logging for pulp, and each pulp-mill needs water for operation and may pose
a problem of pollution; more people in the Province means more sport-fishermen and
more problems of maintaining stocks. This heightened activity has meant more work
for everybody in the Department, administrators, Game Wardens, and scientists.
Carrying this extra load on the programme of research and survey has precipitated
the major reorganization of fisheries work in the Department that has recently taken
place.   It involves a 60-per-cent increase in the budget for scientific-work, the employ- E 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ment of seven new men, all university-trained, six of them fisheries specialists.    Five
are added to the scientific staff and two to the hatchery staff.
All of the fisheries work of the Department, practical and scientific, will in future
be integrated into one unit, for which there will be one budget and a central co-ordinating
authority. The fisheries work is subdivided into four divisions, each with a biological
staff, as follows:—
First, the Protection Division, concerned with the investigation of all water-
licence applications and all pollutions which threaten fisheries interests.
Headed by Mr. McMynn, assisted by Mr. Vernon.
Second, the Management Division, concerned with the assessment of the
monetary value of sport-fisheries, the statistics of the annual catch, and
the improvement of lakes and streams. Headed by Mr. Smith, assisted
by Mr. Stringer.
Third, the Research and Survey Division, headed by Mr. Lindsey and Mr.
Northcote.
Fourth, the Hatchery Division, directed by divisional offices and with two
biologists attached—Mr. Barrett and Mr. Hum.
It is to be hoped that with this major increase in the size of our budget and our
staff, and with this reorganization, we may be able to cope with the problems of the
coming year.
In concluding the resume of the year's activities, I would like to stress that the
encouragement and criticism of the Commissioners and their scientific advisers, Dr.
Clemens and Dr. Cowan, have been of great value to us.
PREDATOR-CONTROL BRANCH
W. W. Mair, Supervisor of Predator-control
Throughout the past year the major portion of our effort has, very naturally, been
expended in routine control operations. These have included work done in pursuance
of our policy of control on a regional basis and the answering of direct complaints. The
latter have been in connection with threat to human life (from cougars), threat to domestic
live stock and poultry, and threat to our fur and game. Operations as a result of threat
to human life have in the main been most costly, since most of the complaints have been
from remote areas of Vancouver Island or the coastal Mainland and have necessitated
costly aeroplane flights. They have on occasion required lengthy hunt patrols, sometimes
of a month's duration. The past year's costs in this respect have amply demonstrated
the need for some form of registered cougar-hunter system.
During the year, reports of cougars have increased somewhat over 1950. Main
increase has been from the areas already noted. However, we anticipated some increase
in cougar reports, as it was known that cougars have been extending their range northward year by year. Bounties have been slightly up, with 488 claimed for this year,
compared to 395 for 1950. Departmental personnel, including permanent hunters, have
been active in hunting these animals. During the year they have accounted for 117
cougars.
Administrative groundwork has been laid for the implementation of a registered
(bonus) cougar-hunter system, pursuant to the ideas expressed at the 1950 Game
Convention. The system will be implemented on Vancouver Island early next year, and
it is hoped that it will develop a hard corps of professional cougar-hunters who will be
able to take much of the burden of answering cougar complaints off the shoulders of the
Department. This will permit our own personnel to carry out organized area hunting as
dictated by game and agricultural needs, plus, of course, emergency complaint hunting
as required. The success or failure of this system will largely rest with the hunters
registered, and with the public generally in their support of this programme. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951 E 47
Foxes have increasingly demanded our attention, and this past year we have taken
on the predator staff W- J- Hillen, an experienced hunter from the Interior. He has found
the coastal conditions somewhat difficult due to uncertainty of weather, but in the four-
month period employed has taken 17 foxes. It is anticipated that he will soon have the
most critical situation under control. It has not yet been possible to carry out much
work on the foxes on Vancouver Island, but some plans have been laid this year for
implementation in 1952.
Bears proved to be a major problem during the summer throughout the Interior
from the north line of the Canadian National Railways south to the International
Boundary. This was no doubt due to the general shortage of wild berries. Innumerable
complaints were answered, and in all 91 bears were killed—by rifle, trap, snare, cyanide
gun, and by poison. In the Kelowna area alone, one operation, carried on throughout
the summer, cost $3,232.97. Fourteen bears were definitely killed, and seven others are
considered certain kills as extremely deadly poison baits were taken. Stockmen's losses
dropped from 58 head in 1949 and 95 head in 1950 (their own figures and probably
includes sheep) to 7 (possibly 9) in 1951. Thus the operation was successful in view
of present-day meat prices. Valuable techniques were learned during the summer for
future operations.
The 1080 poison programme has apparently been most successful and has been
enlarged in scope this winter (1951-52). Coyote bounties dropped in most Agencies
where stations have been located, and over the Province generally there has been a drop
from 9,824 in 1950 to 5,200 in 1951. Our own personnel killed 546 coyotes during the
year by trap, rifle, coyote-getter, etc. It is not possible to determine the kill by 1080, but
it is estimated to be in the neighbourhood of 4,000 to 6,000 coyotes. Operations have
been extended this winter to include the Peace River Block, along the Canadian National
Railways from McBride to Smithers Detachments, and extended areas in the Chilcotin
and Ashcroft districts. All areas baited last winter have been rebaited, although some
specific station locations have been changed. At time of writing, all reports are not
complete, so final number of stations is not available, but the total will be much greater
than for last winter (153).   Already over 200 have been recorded.
Our wolf-control programme suffered somewhat last winter due to the emphasis
placed on coyote work. However, 107 wolves were taken by our personnel, 14 of them
in the Cariboo. One major aeroplane flight from Lower Post through to Cold Fish Lake
accounted for 30 wolves known dead and probably many more. Bad weather and
deep snow prevented further check. Plans have been formulated for further aeroplane
activities during March and April of 1952; these will be the largest operations of this
type carried out to date.
Further to the wolf problem, a preliminary check was made in the Atlin and
Telegraph Creek areas to determine at least the general public opinion prevailing in this
matter, and to question guides and trappers. The general opinion was given that Dall
sheep and caribou are still slowly decreasing in numbers, with the wolf the main offender.
Plans have been initiated for a field investigation next year. As a result of talks held at
Prince Rupert, it is also planned to investigate cougar and wolf predation in the Gardner
Canal area next March or April.
A limited number of poison permits have been issued to trappers and farmers, etc.,
for protection of their own trap-lines or private property. Certain applications have
been refused where applicants were considered unreliable, or where our own operations
would cover the situation. The intention is to continue to limit such permits to areas
beyond the scope of our present physical means, or until such time as education and
awareness of the dangers in poison use are sufficiently adequate to permit expansion of
public participation in our poison programme. That our operations have been successful
so far has been demonstrated by the constantly increasing confidence of the trappers, in
particular, in our poison programme. E 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The poisoning of coyotes in the Ashnola area may be considered a separate project,
though still an integral part of the 1080 programme. According to Dr. I. McT. Cowan,
the spring count of California bighorn lambs this year showed most gratifying increase
over the previous year. At his request we have continued the programme in that area.
Baits have been placed in the Vaseaux Lake area to protect that band of California
bighorn sheep.
The mouse-poisoning operations of MacMillan & Bloedel on Vancouver Island
were observed in company with D. J. Robinson, regional biologist of the Department for
that area. The operations were well carried out, and it was considered that no harm
will ensue to beneficial wild life. It must be accepted that this type of operation will
become widespread in the logging industry; thus the Department can only ensure that
the utmost precautions are taken to protect wild life. During the summer J. Bendell,
a graduate student at University of British Columbia, carried out some studies on the
lethality of 1080 poison to mice. Interesting facts were noted, but the Sayward area
fires prevented any adequate observations or definite conclusions. Mr. Robinson will
probably carry out any further tests. E. H. Samann, Assistant Supervisor of Predator-
control, at Kamloops, carried out comparative mouse-trapping for the second year, to
determine effect of coyote-control upon mouse populations. So far no significant
differences have been noted.
Equipment has been improved during the year, and plans have been laid for further
advances in the future. New-style jackets were issued to all Predator-control personnel,
to foster greater public awareness of our work and to assist personnel in receiving public
co-operation. A flash was designed by D. A. Smith, a commercial artist of Winnipeg, on
a pattern outlined by our Supervisor. This identifying flash is worn on the left upper
arm of the jacket.
The major plans for 1952 have been discussed briefly at appropriate points
throughout this report. They are herewith summarized, to give some idea of the broad
framework of our coming operations.
(1) Establishment of a registered cougar-hunter system, eventually to include
at least one hunter for every major cougar-complaint area. Purpose is to
increase probability of killing complaint cougars, to cut down excessive
travelling costs answering complaints, and to free permanent predatory-
animal hunters for more long-range control work.
(2) To institute limited cougar-tagging on Vancouver Island, to enable us to
determine cougar movements, seasonal or otherwise. This information
will be most valuable for future planning, as well as from the scientific
view-point.
(3) Investigation will be made of the wolf situation developing in the Nanaimo
area.   Poisoning operations already under way.
(4) Fox traps and getters have been supplied to the predatory-animal hunter
at Merville, and an effort will be made to bring the fox problem around
Sayward area under control.
(5) To continue the 1080 poison programme, expanding it where required.
Where coyotes are considered controlled to a level concomitant with good
management, or where complaint of depredations cease, operations will
be limited or completely suspended until further required.
(6) It is planned to carry out some further bear-control in the Kelowna area.
Such further work will depend upon the situation as it develops. Coyote-
getters will probably be used primarily.
(7) Mouse-trapping experiment in the Kamloops area will be continued one
more year. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 49
(8) Experiments will be carried out regarding lethality of cyanide, and possibility of secondary poisoning.
(9) Wolf-poisoning from the air will be carried out in February and March.
It is expected to spend about $500 in the Peace River Block, Azouzetta
Lake, and possibly Porcupine Lake, etc., and about $1,500 in the Cold
Fish Lake and Telegraph Creek-Atlin areas.
(10) Recommended employment of a temporary predatory-animal hunter during February and March in Dawson Creek area to hunt wolves (Pine
River area), a temporary predatory-animal hunter at Smithers to hunt
wolves and coyotes (February and March at least), and a temporary
predatory-animal hunter for one month in Prince Rupert area to hunt
wolves. Further intended to poison wolves in Kitsumgallum Lake area
if situation requires it.
(11) Plan an investigation lasting thirty days or more of Dall sheep and caribou
somewhere in Telegraph Creek country. Suggested survey representative
areas that might give some basis for more general conclusions regarding
whole Cassiar.
(12) Plan investigation of Gardner Canal and Kitimat area, probably March
or April, for the purpose of determining cougar and wolf situation, particularly with respect to goat. This investigation might be made instead
of extending Cassiar trip beyond the month.
(13) To institute limited wolf-tagging in one area of " D " Division to determine
wolf movements, of vital interest to future control plans.
(14) It is hoped to plan the work so that Predator-control staff can take over
live-trapping of beaver, and any other activities of a similar nature; for
example, nuisance trapping or shooting. It is believed this will not interfere with present work, but will provide a wider range of interest for the
hunters.
In conclusion, our operations have been more widespread than in 1950 and have
demanded greater effort on the part of all Predator-control personnel. Three part-time
employees have been engaged—two on wolf-control and one on cougar-control. Three
hundred and four complaints were received and dealt with by the Branch, at the expense
of countless hours of hard work, often under adverse conditions. It is desired here to
express thanks and appreciation for the effort and interest displayed by all members of
the staff. E 50
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS
Comparative Statistics, 1913 to 1951, Inclusive
Calendar Year
Prosecutions
Informations
Laid
Convictions
Cases
Dismissed
Firearms
Confiscated
Fines
Imposed
Revenue
Derived from
Sale of Game
Licences
and Fees
Revenue
Derived from
Fur Trade
1913..
1914-
1915 _
1916_
1917-
1918..
1919..
1920-
1921_
1922-
1923-
1924_
1925-
1926-
1927-.
1928__
1929.
1930.
1931 .
1932 ..
1933...
1934.
1935..
1936...
1937-
1938__
1939-
1940 ...
1941__
1942 .
1943__
1944.
1945..
1946 _
1947..
1948_
1949...
1950.
1951-
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
538
498
477
454
451
585
613
547
440
446
409
356
379
652
819
895
1,142
1,115
1,359
1,489
Totals.
20,423
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
438
436
552
574
526
419
430
392
342
372
632
798
878
1,117
1,099
1,337
1,468
7
21
21
17
14
17
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
24
23
16
15
33
39
21
21
16
17
14
7
20
21
17
25
16
22
21
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
4
19
14
20
42
21
18
9
27
18
8
30
39
56
74
86
69
83
19,444
959
1,234
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,758.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
5,227.82
4,399.50
3,965.00
5,332.50
5,729.50
4,776.50
5,197.00
4,977.50
5,079.50
5,554.50
5,570.50
8,381.50
10,921.00
11,837.50
17,537.00
18,148.50
22,923.00
24,087.50
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
148,689.64
157,647.30
177,771.33
192,024.07
193,170.53
188,605.20
213,267.67
205,451.71
207,661.72
238,902.36
352,228.85
502,555.25
597,529.30
610,383.56
656,997.38
706,591.06
830,178.59
$5,291.39
24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
46,091.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
52,196.50
53.697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
63,125.30
68,475.07
58,354.03
70,363.23
104,250.95
107,357.72
99,344.14
73,392.08
61,543.26
71,335.44
76,454.56
$293,920.57
$8,792,652.12 | $1,889,457.95
Summary of Total Revenue Derived from Sale of Various Licences,
Collections, etc., January 1st to December 3 1st, 1951
Revenue derived from—
Sale of resident firearms licences	
Sale of deer, moose-elk, goat, and pheasant tags	
Sale of resident anglers', guides', and prospectors' firearms licences	
Sale of non-resident firearms licences and outfitters'
licences	
Sale of non-resident anglers' licences.
Sale of fur-traders', taxidermists', and tanners' licences,
and royalty on fur	
Sale of confiscated and surrendered fur	
Sale of confiscated firearms	
Sale of big-game trophy fees from non-residents	
Prosecutions—fines imposed under the "Game Act"
Miscellaneous revenue	
Total	
$314,774.50
52,197.50
96,911.00
84,615.00
165,789.00
76,454.56
323.40
331.99
113,655.00
24,087.50
1,581.20
$930,720.65 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951
E 51
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o\"cs"Tt E 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Revenue Derived from the Sale of Moose-Elk, Deer, Goat, and Pheasant Tags,
January 1st to December 31st, 1951
Government
Agency
Moose-Elk Tags
Deer Tags
Goat Tags
Pheasant Tags
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
49
90
41
92
785
902
1,889
249
40
779
667
18
8
1,104
21
363
75
50
98
187
9
3,871
306
382
1,550
12
1,971
582
108
747
115
206
232
392
2,209
518
146
652
$49.00
90.00
41.00
92.00
785.00
902.00
1,889.00
249.00
2,361
254
180
626
1,200
2,873
1,020
4,988
2,095
1,207
958
398
396
2,999
202
1,821
451
438
3,167
1,504
425
10,226
952
2,216
1,923
811
1,946
2,144
1,101
1,272
315
1,873
1,001
424
8,039
2,432
5,689
1,249
$590.25
63.50
7
15
13
684
45
4
222
322
3
48
39
68
4
4
93
59
142
16
6
137
10
85
176
7
44
52
12
85
113
18
4
35
181
22
424
326
~79
12
439
982
31
381
6,816
154
492
47
62
$90.50
11.00
$729.75
Ashcroft	
Atlin—   . -	
$7.00
171.50
41.00
45.00
156.50
300.00
718.25
255.00
1,247.00
523.75
301.75
239.50
99.50
99.00
749.-75
50.50
455.25
112.75
109.50
791.75
376.00
106.25
2,556.50
238.00
554.00
480.75
202.75
486.50
536.00
275.25
318.00
78.75
468.25
250.25
106.00
2,009.75
608.00
1,422.25
312.25
137.00
15.00
13.00
684.00
45.00
4.00
956.50
1,215.00
3,291.25
549.00
212.00
163.00
1,463.00
40.00
779.00
667.00
18.00
8.00
1,104.00
21.00
363.00
75.00
50.00
98.00
187.00
9.00
3,871.00
306.00
382.00
1,550.00
12.00
1,971.00
582.00
108.00
747.00
115.00
206.00
232.00
392.00
2,209.00
518.00
146.00
652.00
726.75
222.00
322.00
3.00
1,302.75
Golden 	
39.50
6.00
219.50
1,228.50
160 00
113.00
Kamloops •
48.00
39.00
2,121.25
110.50
Kelowna.   ...
491.00
1,309.25
68.00
4.00
4.00
93.00
59.00
142.00
16.00
6.00
137.00
10.00
85.00
176.00
7.00
255.75
Merritt          	
Nanaimo
Nelson-    ...
New Denver     .
15.50
190.50
179.00
1,084.25
656.00
174.25
New Westminster-—
3,408.00
77.00
246.00
9,977.50
637 00
1,188.00
2,167.75
224.75
Pouce Coupe-
2,542.50
Prince Rupert	
Princeton	
23.50
31.00
1,317.50
421.25
1,065.00
252.25
Revelstoke	
44.00
52.00
12.00
85.00
113.00
18.00
4.00
35.00
29
32
241
5,595
1,120
1,208
10
14.50
16.00
120.50
583 00
2,797.50
560.00
604.00
5.00
7,129.25
1,704.00
2,176.25
Vernon	
Victoria 	
Totals
21,515
$21,515.00
73,176
$18,294.00
2,572
$2,572.00
18,683
$9,341.50
$51,722.50
38.00
Less refunds-
Total	
$51,684.50
Pheasant Tags1
$18.00
105.00
2.00
357.00
3.00
21.00
7.00
*
513.00
Total-
$52,197.50
i Sold in 1950 but accounted for in 1951. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951
E 53
Revenue Derived from Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and
Prospectors' Firearms Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1951
Anglers
Guides
Free
Farmers
Prospectors
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
1,717
343
33
208
1,228
1,059
2,928
1,132
3,256
1,419
1,420
825
501
349
3,858
330
3,030
621
740
2,796
3,326
658
15,632
698
2,818
1,296
1,042
2,041
1,788
1,611
1,008
593
2,678
1,610
570
14,346
2,510
4,151
786
$1,717.00
343.00
33.00
208.00
1,228.00
1,059.00
2,928.00
1,132.00
3,256.00
1,419.00
1,420.00
825.00
501.00
349.00
3,858.00
330.00
3,030.00
621.00
740.00
2,796.00
3,326.00
658.00
15,632.00
698.00
2,818.00
1,296.00
1,042.00
2,041.00
1,788.00
1,611.00
1,008.00
593.00
2,678.00
1,610.00
570.00
1
5
4
78
180
20
7
11
1
49
67
11
91
1
15
8
_ _
7
90
52 "■
14
7
37
10
9
13
8
1
5
2
196
$10.00
7
11
34
7
28
17
30
48
3
20
14
17
77
7
59
9
2
54
34
10
112
2
11
46
11
49
11
1
38
7
10
66
36
48
136
52
23
2
■  8
2
30
29
5
32
10
6
6
8
10
16
22
13
37
3
5
33
10
33
2
8
29
1
38
31
21
40
10
17
3
21
1
3
139
31
14
24
$1,727.00
343.00
Atlin    —
55.00
50.00
725.00
1,950.00
160.00
65.00
105.00
15.00
480.00
710.00
105.00
850.00
10.00
88.00
■  -
258.00
1,953.00
3,009.00
3,088.00-
1,197.00
Clinton 	
Cumberland	
-
3,361.00
1,434.00
1,900.00
	
1,535.00
606.00
$1.00
349.00
4,709.00
340.00
4.00
1.00
3,034.00
125.00
747.00
740.00
Nanaimo-   .       —   -   .
2,796.00
80.00
2.00
~ iToo
3,406.00
6,58.00
15,674.00
698.00
40.00
Penticton  — —	
Pouce Coupe 	
60.00
795.00
2,879.00
2,091.00
1,042.00
485.00
145.00
65.00
390.00
125.00
1.00
1.00
2,527.00
1,934.00
1,676.00
Quesnel          	
2.00  ,
1,400.00
718.00
2,678.00
65.00
140.00
	
1,675.00
810.00
1.00
1.00
85.00
10.00
45.00
20.00
1,870.00
85.00
Vancouver	
14,346.00
2,510.00
4,151.00
786.00
1.00
14,357.00
2,555.00
Victoria.__	
Williams Lake-
1.00
5.00
4,172.00
2,661.00
Totals. .    -	
87,055
$87,055.00
1,003
$9,835.00
1,147
753
$21.00
$96,911.00 E 54
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Revenue Derived from Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Outfitters'
Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1951
Government Agency
General
Firearms
Licences
General
Firearms
Licences
(Alternative)
General
Firearms
Licences
(Special)
Ordinary
Firearms
Licences
Outfitters'
Licences
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No. ] Amount
1
1
5
19
67
187
32
13
1
112
65
3
10
83
3
26
3
5
6
1,898
283
58
124
39
34
6
5
7
1
6
2
176
17
10
20
$25.00
25.00
125.00
475.00
1,675.00
4,675.00
800.00
325.00
25.00
2,800.00
1,625.00
75.00
250.00
2,075.00
75.00
650.00
75.00
4
1
1
6
1
3
2
14
4
2
2
1
1
2
17
7
1
2
1
1
~2
2
"I
~3
~4
2
1
~2
10
1
1
11
1
1
3
$25.00
Atlin
	
$15.00
$9.00
49.00
125.00
90.00
15.00
45.00
	
565.00
1,690.00
	
	
4,720.00
800.00
325.00
30.00
210.00
60.00
55.00
$50.00
50.00
3,060.00
12.00
1,747.00
75.00
	
250.00
30.00
6.00
2,111.00
75.00
30.00
	
680.00
75.00
3.00
6.00
3.00
125.00
150.00
47,450.00
7,075.00
1,450.00
3,100.00
975.00
850.00
150.00
125.00
175.00
25.00
150.00
50.00
4,400.00
425.00
250.00
500.00
15.00
15.00
30.00
255.00
105.00
15.00
30.00
15.00
15.66
30.00
140.00
165.00
$200.00
	
47,656.00
7,075.00
1,480.00
30.00
3.00
3.00
150.00
3,535.00
1,083.00
868.00
180.00
	
140.00
175.00
15.00
	
25.00
180.00
	
50.00
50.00
30.00
33.00
4,513.00
425.00
	
250.00
15.00
515.00
Totals
3,328
$83,200.00
5
$250.00
73
$1,095.00
35
$105.00
5
$250.00
$84,900.00
285.00
Less refunds
Total
—
—
	
—
	
—
	
$84,615.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951 E 55
Revenue Derived from the Sale of Non-resident Anglers' Licences,
January 1st to December 31st, 1951
Government Agency
Anglers' Licences
(Other than Canadian)
Anglers' Licences
(Canadian)
Anglers' Licences
(Minor)
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
106
26
14
8
90
339
600
664
554
57
135
114
369
39
902
82
1,483
14
106
113
778
6
10,232
1,748
472
192
58
50
39
125
14
61
231
869
25
628
308
228
87
$742.00
182.00
98.00
56.00
630.00
2,373.00
4,200.00
4,648.00
3,878.00
399.00
945.00
798.00
2,583.00
273.00
6,314.00
574.00
10,381.00
98.00
742.00
791.00
5,446.00
42.00
71,624.00
12,236.00
3,304.00
1,344.00
406.00
350.00
273.00
875.00
98.00
427.00
1,617.00
6,083.00
175.00
4,396.00
2,156.00
1,596.00
609.00
6
2
4
$21.00
7.00
14.00
6
6
$6.00
6.00
$769.00
Ashcroft  	
Atlin
195.00
112.00
56.00
35
13
125
81
33
8
770
367
3
4
81
8
35
2
2
17
99
12
68
7
51
357
2
21
10
3
16
24
14
61
4
41
31
26
1
122.50
45.50
437.50
283.50
115.50
28.00
2,695.00
1,284.50
10.50
14.00
283.50
28.00
122.50
7.00
7.00
59.50
346.50
42.00
238.00
24.50
178.50
1,249.50
7.00
73.50
35.00
10.50
56.00
84.00
49.00
213.50
14.00
143.50
108.50
91.00
3.50
11
78
80
83
76
2
38
64
41
8
153
16
221
3
14
8
46
2
1,852
277
82
55
11.00
78.00
80.00
83.00
76.00
2.00
38.00
64.00
41.00
8.00
153.00
16.00
221.00
3.00
14.00
8.00
46.00
2.00
1,852.00
277.00
82.00
55.00
763.50
2,496.50
4,717.50
Creston 	
5,014.50
4,069.50
429.00
Fernie   . 	
Golden  	
3,678.00
2,146.50
2,634.50
Greenwood 	
Kamloops 	
Kaslo-    	
295.00
6,750.50
618.00
10,724.50
108.00
763.00
858.50
5,838.50
86.00
73,714.00
01iver_ 	
Penticton   	
12,537.50
3,564.50
2,648.50
413.00
14
4
18
3
14
37
91
1
51
53
28
7
14.00
4.00
18.00
3.00
14.00
37.00
91.00
1.00
51.00
53.00
28.00
7.00
437.50
312.00
903.50
157.00
Revelstoke 	
Rossland  	
525.00
1,703.00
6,387.50
Smithers                   	
Vancouver 	
190.00
4,590.50
2,317.50
1,715.00
Williams Lake    _ _.
619.50
Totals	
21,966
$153,762.00
2,444
$8,554.00
3,543
$3,543.00
$165,859.00
70.00
Total-
$165,789.00 E 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1951, Inclusive
E 57
Year
Fur Royalty
or Tax
Fur-traders',
Tanners', and
Taxidermists'
Licences
Total
1921                                                         	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
47,257.48
39,423.87
44,238.00
62,745.33
56,755.30
63,176.07
52,122.03
63,412.23
93,793.40
98,766.72
92,637.14
66,939.08
56,563.26
65,205.44
70,799.56
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00'
6,440.00
5,540.00
4,949.00
5,721.00
6,370.00
5,299.00
6,232.00
6,951.00
10,559.00
8,591.00
6,707.00
6,453.00
4,980.00
6,255.00
5,655.00
$30,790.80
1922        	
57,458.89
1923 " ' _ ..
67,524.18
1924   _	
62,446.68
1925. •   _ 	
56,287.78
1926
62,535.13
1927                       .     	
71,324.96
1928            	
58,823.07
1929    .   .         .   ■ "      	
47,329.89
1930       ...         -                   _   -	
45,161.11
1931                           	
45,981.08
1932  .......                         	
40,363.79
1933 	
44,167.48
1934       	
47,102.81
1935     	
49,831.95
52,196.50
1936    	
1937    _____       __ _	
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
63,125.30
68,475.07
58,354.03
70,363.23
104,352.40
107,357.72
99,344.14
73,392.08
61,543.26
71,460.44
76,454.56
1938
1939 _.  _     .
1940 _                          	
1941                         	
1942 	
1943  .__...
1944   ■ _ _ '
1945   _               	
1946  _ _ _.
1947 _	
1948  	
1949
1950 _ _	
1951
Totals	
$1,716,426.01    |      $193,437.00
$1,909,863.01 E 58
-
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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Cfl E 60
BRITISH COLUMBIA
List of Fur Confiscated under " Game Act,'
December 31st, 1951
January 1st to
Date of
Confiscation
Confiscated from—
Confiscated at—
Kind of Fur Confiscated
9	
9.	
30. 	
30 _ ...
Feb.
5.  .
13	
21 	
Mar
2 	
30	
Apr.
17	
19	
19	
4. . . ..
21   .
22	
7	
20	
20	
20..  _ .
26.	
26 _- _ .._
Aug.
13	
15  	
20
22	
William Quass	
Morris Lundgrin..
Steve Szabo	
Hugh Cox__
Ian MacKay.. 	
M. L. Postnikoff	
John Brixton	
L. Tereshek	
Edward Larson	
Accidentally trapped, surrendered by Melton Z.
Beam  	
Walter Antifaev..
H. L. Clarke	
D. Toodick	
Accidentally   trapped,
Helge C. From	
Thomas J. Butcher	
George Mclnroy	
Glen Maw 	
FredKriese 	
A. Corsi	
Victor Magnos.	
Mrs. Don. Smith..
A. Hagfors	
Warren Poff	
L. Farewell	
John Frozek	
Totals..
Hope	
Hope	
Abbotsford._
Lumby	
Agassiz	
Appledale.
Okanagan Centre..
Giscome	
Bella Bella	
Creston 	
West Summerland..
West Summerland..
Fort McLeod	
Westbridge.
Sointula	
Kelowna	
Armstrong-
Vernon	
Copper Mountain _
Oliver	
Oliver	
Stewart	
Powell River _
Chilliwack	
Nicola	
10
4
25
1    I    37
30
Note.—The sum of $323.40 was received during 1951 from the sale of confiscated and surrendered fur. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951
E 61
List of Firearms Confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1951
Date of
Confiscation
Confiscated from—
Confiscated at-
Kind of Firearms
Confiscated
Rifles        Shotguns
9
9
9      ....
9
10      	
10
10   	
30    	
Feb.
5   	
13      ....
13    	
13
"
21    	
21      	
21   	
22    	
5	
22     -
"
22   	
30      - .
Apr.
2    	
13      	
18   	
17    ... 	
1     	
7
7     	
7      	
12   	
July
9    	
17
"
17    	
"
17     -
27   	
27    --
27 	
May
31   	
15 	
15     	
"
15
15	
23 	
"
24   	
24       ....
"
24   	
24
24 .  _  	
Oct.
23   	
23    	
93
26
6      - .
8
"
8      - -
"
8   -----
8
"
8   	
",
8      	
"
8   	
8   	
8   ..
20      	
20     	
"
23
"
23    	
27   	
4   	
4   	
4 .. 	
4 -	
C. Nicholson	
G. Nicholson	
Edward Davis.	
Edward Oswald-
W. Archer	
L. Greenman _
M. Watrich	
Wm. Freisen	
G. Bennett	
W. R. Calder--
M. Labrie	
D. Hillier	
A. A. Frankland _
Wm. Ujiye	
M. Melnichuk	
G. Dayneault	
Geo. Stertz	
Francis Pargeter-
Frank Miller	
W. Wallinger	
Ronald Govier	
Arthur White	
R. E. Brooks	
R. B. Trauger	
Alfred Hadley	
Ronald Small	
Charles Chapman-
Kenneth Rumley-
Raymond Hudson .
David Miller	
C. A. Kohlhauses...
A. W. Bowes	
F. W. Aspin	
E. C. Schuss	
S. Nestoruk	
V. Corbett	
G. Hay_
B. Priest	
W. Foresythe..
H. Larsonbe	
D. Goudie	
R. Vowles	
Edwin Geisler	
B. D. DeHart	
E. J. Emperiale..
F. Omstead 	
J. Turner	
F. Anderson 	
Donald Morphet—
Norman Olson	
Raymond Foisy.	
Wm. Harper	
Wm. Kirkpatrick-
Jack Currie	
Roger Kerr_
Fred McLaughlin-
Ronnie Saunders.-
R. J. Baycroft	
Harry Kjersen	
Ralph Robertson -
Oscar Robertson _
Geo. Sidback	
Wm. Duff 	
Murray Bamford-
Barrie Deakin	
Geo. F. Hadgins-
Donald Zink	
Peter Hasbon	
Joseph LeFleur—.
Walter Scott	
J. H. Berg	
Carried forward-
Hope -
Hope  -
Hope	
Hammond	
Burnaby	
Canal Flats	
Cranbrook.	
Sardis	
Westham Island-
Fort Nelson	
Victoria	
Victoria _
Victoria.	
Vernon	
Vernon	
Lumby „_
Surrey	
Deer Park	
Victoria	
Cloverdale	
Burnaby	
Chilliwack	
North Vancouver-
Fort Nelson	
Victoria	
Vancouver—	
Burnaby	
Burnaby	
Burnaby	
Victoria- 	
Summerland	
Lulu Island	
Lulu Island	
Lulu Island	
Langley 	
Langley 	
Langley-	
Chilliwack	
Rutland	
Rutland- __	
Sooke 	
Sooke	
Haney	
Port Coquitlam....
Maillardville.	
Haney. —
Maillardville	
Haney	
Vancouver	
Vancouver	
Mission	
Victoria	
Haney 	
Sardis	
Rosedale	
Rosedale	
Burnaby	
Innisfail, Alta	
New Westminster.
New Westminster
New Westminster.
New Westminster
Vancouver	
Burnaby	
Chilliwack	
London, Ont	
Sardis 	
Shelby	
Dewey	
Ferndale 	
Vancouver	
63 E 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA
List of Firearms Confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1951—Continued
Date of
Confiscated from—
Confiscated at—
Kind of Firearms
Confiscated
Rifles
Shotguns
63
1
9
D
ec.    4       „
5
Sidney              	
1
6        ...
',      6_ " ~~       ~~~
,     13       -
,     13 _
W. G. Burkholder.	
G. R. Reilly
Port Crawford
1
P. N. Plotnikoff           _  _
i     27
Parke Davis
,     29 '   _ .
,     29	
Carl Moffott            ..
29
C. F„ Saunders
Massett	
1
Totals 	
71          I         12
Note.—The sum of $331.99 was received during 1951 from the sale of confiscated firearms.
Bounties Paid during the Year Ended December 31st, 1951
Government Agency
Wolves
Cougar,
$20
Coyote,
$4
Amount
$40
$25
131
2
3
—__
"T
153
186
56
~43
59
~i
~ 8
~is
~~3
33
50
3
22
25
93
46
3
16
12
31
3
4
4
2
26
18
4
4
- j
3
8
5
7
1
1
1
6
10
19
20
34
12
8
453
526
234
127
85
86
455
12
117
60
451
"m
23
177
200
327
17
99
142
21
49
56
56
2
44
48
1
172
1,010
$1,000.00
Atlin
48.00
72.00
5,147.00
2,864.00
1,436.00
1,860.00
920.00
568.00
Oolripn
710.00
584.00
3,115.00
Kaslo 	
108.00
548.00
440.00
Merritt             	
1,844.00
595.00
888.00
197.00
788.00
4,625.00
140.00
6,018.00
1,628.00
496.00
2,028.00
104.00
216.00
Smithers - —	
1,319.00
344.00
8.00
1,651.00
392.00
384.00
1,088.00
6,960.00
Totals
637
116
488
5,202
$51,133.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 63
Comparative Statement of Bounties Paid from 1922 to 1951, Inclusive
Calendar Year
Wolves
Cougars
Coyotes
Crows
Magpies
Eagles
Owls
Amount
1922_ _ _.
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
1,659
1,002
1,039
1,017
1,321
1,202
932
1,102
1,156
1,180
991
753
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
366
285
196
261
265
301
472
461
519
725
524
395
488
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
1,971
2,038
1,924
1,546
1,221
1,259
5,506
2,720
2,976
3,911
6,847
9,822
5,202
53,443
172
5,770
10,046
2,246
70
2,487
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
1923  _ —       _
1924  	
1925	
14,840.00
20,398.40
24,397.00
1926  — .
1927	
	
1,025
1,389
403
1
41,077.00
65,377.95
1928 _    .   .
	
50,709.25
1929 _	
1930
42,122.00
36,090.25
1931    -
3,427
42,036.15
1932       _	
....
80.00
1933 _	
1934        .
1935	
1936    -
6,285.00
6,825.00
12,374.00
20,350.00
1937   ._
19,540.00
1938	
21,018.00
1939  .   _	
=
26,399.00
1940    _   _
23,131.00
1941    	
	
16,868.00
1942    ...
17,397.00
1943 	
16,587.00
1944
20,243.00
1945	
46,627.00
1946
	
22,392.00
36,386.00
1947
1948   -
58,344.00
1949  	
1950
70,501.00
73,688.00
1951
	
51,133.00
Totals
20,992
11,900
113,717
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$963,710.80 E 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Big-game Trophy Fees Paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1951
Species
Government Agency
N
0
u
CS
Si
m
M
u
d a
Si
Sm
si u
mo
3
O
d
o
VI
d
o
U
u
si
Si
Q
Ih
£ s
.si
^.t_
oS
g
'5
o d
|S| W)
.5
*«
9 o.
C a)
yx
<l   CO
o
o
3
'5
d
Amount
Alberni _	
Atlin -    ,
2
4
15
8
20
11
2
1
22
8
5
1
3
4
4
1
1
12
55
5
"l3
17
2
3
8
32
7
2.
1
1
1
2
3
l
l
43
9
8
13
1
" 1
1
—-
—
250
22
1
18
18
3
2
4
12
32
2
2
2
1
~~5
18
3
"   5
15
31
1
27
36
3
3
40
13
6
3
5
1
6
4
6
11
8
1
1
46
8
8
7
1
5
3
36
1,018
10
14
27
7
10
21
40
38
79
3
5
1
1
5
66
36
48
30
$15.00
420.00
Barkerville  	
180.00
2,545.00
Clinton. 	
Cranbrook 	
68,975.00
4,690.00
50.00
5,810.00
Golden 	
Greenwood. _	
Kamloops   	
5,205.00
75.00
635.00
890.00
1,605.00
3,200.00
6,040.00
5,805.00
780.00
Princeton -	
Quesnel    - -	
50.00
330.00
55.00
Smithers , 	
285.00
720.00
Vancouver       ,-.
Vernon.  	
Victoria	
675.00
50.00
15.00
4,555.00
Totals	
112
164
75
4
392
198
101
1,389
114
$113,655.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951
E 65
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1951
Description of Offence
Divisions {See Foot-note)
'A"
C"
a
o
0
q2
H. d
>Hh4
O a,
4
-—i rt
fc-"w
Fines or
Penalties
Imposed
Game Animals
Allowing dogs to run or hunt deer-
Exceeding bag-limit on game animals-
Keeping game animals in captivity-
Killing, hunting, or possession of game animals of female
sex	
Killing or possession of game animals under one year of
age
Killing, hunting, or possession of game animals during
close season
Possession of members of deer family from which evidence (sex) removed_
Possession of untagged moose or deer	
Possession of big-game animals on premises of logging
camp
Pit-lamping or hunting game at night-
Selling or buying game illegally	
Trapping moose	
Firearms
Carrying firearms or hunting on game reserve	
Carrying loaded firearms or discharging same from automobile   	
Carrying or possession of unplugged shotgun .
Discharging firearms on or across highway-
Minors carrying firearms unaccompanied by an adult..
Fur Trade and Trapping
Allowing traps to remain set after close of season	
Baiting traps with game birds..
Exporting fur without a permit	
Failing to operate trap-line within required time 	
Fur-trader  buying  without  licence  or  failing to  keep
records 	
Interfering or trapping on another person's trap-line..
Possession of untagged beaver-pelts-
Possession or taking fur during close season	
Trapping or carrying traps without a licence	
Trapping on other than his own trapping area-
Trapping using an assistant without a permit	
Trading in pelts without a licence	
Licences
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence-
Non-resident angling without a licence	
Resident carrying firearms without a licence	
Resident angling without a licence	
Migratory Game Birds
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours...
Hunting migratory game birds from power-boat	
Hunting migratory game birds with a rifle-
Hunting or possession of migratory game birds during
close season- 	
Hunting or killing swans-
Upland Game Birds
Allowing dogs to hunt game birds during prohibited time
Exceeding bag or possession limit-
Hunting upland game birds during prohibited hours	
Hunting, killing, or possession of upland game birds
during close season	
Killing pheasants with a rifle_
Possession of upland game birds with plumage removed ,
Possession of untagged pheasants  	
Possession of or killing hen pheasants	
Selling game birds  	
22
9
16
1
4
41
47
6
1
20
24
5
3
20
24
14
5
6
15
2
10
2
2
123
5
7
19
86
69
44
34
12
21
1
103
58
50
1
I      4
2
4
1
22
1
3
2
2
2
3
18
14
54
5
21
4
7
2
1
221
18
10
36
18
51
295
222
7
4
3
52
1
2
2
3
18
14
54
5
22
6
9
2
1
223
19
11
36
2
1
2
1
7
17
3
7
16
4
3
11
19
51
298
222
59
2
5
7
4
3
52
1
$20.00
50.00
85.00
1,190.00
360.00
1,485.00
160.00
320.00
255.00
1,700.00
200.00
10.00
10.00
2,906.00
205.00
90.00
194.00
5.00
10.00
35.00
10.00
170.00
375.00
220.00
135.00
420.00
40.00
20.00
300.00
760.00
452.50
3,070.00
2,227.50
680.00
100.00
55.00
445.00
165.00
75.00
450.00
30.00
1,155.00
10.00
115.00
50.00
10.00 E 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1951—Continued
Divisions (See Foot-note)
Cfl
"3
cfl
5
c
o
t>
c
o
U
4
He
Description of Offence
"A"
"B"
"C"
"D"
"E"
Fines or
Penalties
Imposed
Special Fishery Regulations
Angling for or possession of trout during close season
2
3
1
4
3
1
2
1
1
1
6
2
14
3
1
2
1
4
1
5
	
5
7
7
1
1
10
3
1
6
9
1
3
1
1
6
21
1
4
2
6
3
6
13
1
1
6
1
i
i
.—
i
32
1
8
9
5
28
4
7
1
1
10
10
5
1
19
10
4
8
1
22
1
2
1
17
1
9
1
3
4
32
1
8
9
5
28
4
7
1
1
10
10
5
1
20
10
4
9
1
22
1
2
1
17
9
1
4
4
$287.50
100.00
120.00
Jigging or molesting trout or salmon on spawning-grounds
Possession or use of salmon-roe in prohibited area.
225.00
45.00
300.00
20.00
Taking or netting kokanee without a licence —   	
Transporting trout from one lake to another without a
70.00
75.00
Taking trout other than by angling  	
Taking kokanee during close season        -   	
Using more than one rod while angling, etc.— -	
75.00
100.00
95.00
50.00
Miscellaneous
15.00
Furnishing false information, etc  	
285.00
100.00
Guide failing to complete the form on the reverse side
4 | —.
6  |      2
1        ...
40.00
Guiding without a licence   	
310.00
50.00
Hunting in closed area  	
Hunting game birds with use of nydar sight	
3
1
10
1
2
4
1
6
2
225.00
10.00
20.00
100.00
Non-resident hunting big game without a guide	
Obstructing a Game Warden in the course of his duties
Trespassing on enclosed land or game farm 	
Using another person's licence or loaning same	
Using metal-cased bullet while hunting big game	
Using rim-fire shells hunting big game  	
250.00
10.00
140.00
50.00
30.00
60.00
Totals     _                 	
205
177
484  1  226
397
21
1,468
1,489
$24,087.50
Gaol Sentences «,
Killing or possession of big game during close season—2, total of five months.
Interfering with a registered trap-line—3, total of seven months.
Possession of migratory birds during close season—1, thirty days.
Hunting deer at night—1, two months.
Note.—"A" Division:   Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland.    "B" Division:
areas.    "C"  Division:   Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan,  Cariboo,  and Lillooet areas.     "D"
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas.    "E" Division: Vancouver
land areas.
Kootenay and Boundary
Division:   Atlin,  Skeena,
Coast, and Lower Main- REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951
E 67
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Z E 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Summary of Game-fish Culture Distributions, Showing Eggs, Fry,
and Fingerlings, 1951
Kind of Game Fish
Eggs
Fry
Fingerlings
Cut-throat trout  	
514,760
256,653
92,000
3,363,227
10,000
163,853
1,665,895
3,238,646
1,467,000
45,989
Totals __.. _	
5,220,406
3,721,880
1,875,737
Summary of Game-fish Eggs, Fry, and Fingerlings at Departmental
Hatcheries, December 31st, 1951
Hatchery
Cut-throat
Eggs or Fry
Eastern Brook
Eggs or Fry
Kamloops
Fingerlings
or Fry
Kokanee
Eggs or Fry
222,100
220,459
87,250
201,500
34,732
77,090
993
Smiths Falls __   	
Summerland 	
3,365
Totals   	
993
225,465
543,941
77,090
Eggs 	
Fry	
Fingerlings
Summary
Total distributions
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1951
Total	
5,220,406
3,721,880
1,875,737
10,818,023
847,489
11,665,512 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951
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Cariboo District—Continued
Loon Creek Hatchery—Continued
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0
H REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 81
Statement of Vermin Destroyed by Game Wardens during the Year 1951
Kind of Animals or Birds Destroyed
Game Divisions
■A"      "B"
"     '< P."
Total
Animals
Bears	
Bobcats..
Cats (wild)..
Cougars	
Coyotes	
Dogs (wild).
Foxes	
Ground-hogS-
Otters	
Racoons	
Skunks 	
Wolves	
Birds
Crows..
Eagles..
Hawks	
Horned or snowy owls.
Magpies	
Mergansers	
Ravens	
Starlings	
83
40
61
40
59
15
2
3
25
3
2
56
60
40
26
"ii
238
20
29
12
54
25
52
40
7
202
14
316
56
2
150
2
14
1,087
38
159
59
580
22
164
44
1
39
187
10
3
1
1
1
93
188
24
33
27
22
1
99
3
2
240
3
3
24
26
3
36
15
712
21
64
9
5
56
41
7
91
12
620
117
546
177
31
207
78
18
107
2,284
107
300
109
661
107
381
7 E 82 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Summary of Liberation of Game Birds, 1951
Area Pheasants
Vancouver Island—
Alberni .  300
Courtenay   1,159
Ladysmith  21
Nanaimo-Parksville   .   972
Victoria (North and South Saanich)  1,809
Total      4,261
Lower Mainland—
Agassiz  761
Chilliwack   2,210
Delta   1,118
Lulu Island  262
Langley   150
Matsqui   790
Mission (Hatzic)   2,731
Pitt Meadows  2,400
Sumas Prairie  1,994
Surrey   1,497
Total   13,913
Interior—
Kamloops    90
Vanderhoof  72
Okanagan  25
Total          187
District Summary
Vancouver Island _'_  4,261
Lower Mainland  13,913
Interior  187
Total  :  18,361
During the year 52 California quail were purchased and liberated in the South
Saanich District. Two hundred and seventy-one Chukar partridge were purchased, and
of these, 52 were liberated in the Kamloops district, 139 in the Oliver district, and 80 in
the Savona district.
Note.—Total cost covering purchase of all game birds listed was $33,253.20. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951                         E 83
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1951
Number and Kind oj Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1951
Pheasants      4.680
Quail	
56
Partridge   _
117
Pheasants .
Number and Kind oj Birds Raised, 1951
_ 21,421
Partridge _
490
Pheasants .
Number and Kind oj Birds Purchased, 1951
449
Pheasants .
Number and Kind oj Birds Sold, 1951
"   19,798
Quail	
54
Partridge
282
Pheasants
Number and Kind oj Birds Killed, 1951
'     2,412
Number and Kind oj Birds on Hand, December 31st,
Pheasants   _ 	
1951
-    4,340
Quail 	
2
Partridge ...
325
Note.—During
ince, but during
the year 1951 there were 128 licensed game-bird farmers in the
the year 1951 thirty-six of these farmers discontinued business.
sold to licensed game-bird farmers during the year 1951 amounted to $213.10 (2,131
bands at 10 cents each).
Miscellaneous Revenue, 1951
Sale oj Lists oj Various Licence-holders, etc.
54 Game Convention minutes at 75 cents per copy  $40.50
2,131 game-bird bands at 10 cents each  213.10
288 trap-line registration fees  720.00
1,376 game maps at 10 cents each  137.60
Proceeds, sale of trout eggs  78.00
Proceeds, export of live fur-bearing animals  145.00
Proceeds, permits to export game meat  120.00
Proceeds, fee for tagging deer and moose hides ■_  122.50
Proceeds, sale of three fur-traders' lists  4.50
Total  $1,581.20 E 84
BRITISH COLUMBIA
LIST OF GUIDES AND NON-RESIDENT OUTFITTERS, 1951
Definition of Guide Licence Classifications
A First-class Guide shall be one who has acted as a guide in the Province for a period
of at least three years in the ten years immediately preceding his application for a guide's
licence and who has suitable equipment for outfitting any person desiring to hunt game.
A Second-class Guide shall be one who has acted as a guide in the Province for a
period of at least three years in the ten years immediately preceding his application for
a guide's licence, but who cannot qualify as a First-class Guide.
An Assistant Guide shall be one who cannot qualify as either a First-class or Second-
class Guide, and shall be entitled to act as a guide in the hunting of game birds or in
angling for trout, and after securing a permit so to do from the Game Commission, when
employed by or under the supervision of a First- or Second-class Guide, to guide big-
game hunters.
Lower Mainland Coast and Fraser Valley, Vancouver Island, and Coastal
Mainland to Prince Rupert
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Alsdorf, William, Campbell River  2nd
Brimacombe, Herbert, Stuart Island  2nd
Brynildsen, Gus Alger, Bella Coola  2nd
Dick, Gilbert Lyle, Massett, Q.C.I  2nd
Flesher, Eric Reed, Phillips Arm  2nd
Gilbert, Walter, P.O. Box 290, Chilliwack.- 2nd
Hancock, Arthur C, Lake Cowichan    1st
Hancock, Joseph A., Lake Cowichan    1st
Johnson, Oskar, Allison Harbour    1st
Leith, Robert E., Pender Harbour.  2nd
Lindsay, George, Massett, Q.C.I  2nd
Mack, Clayton, Bella Coola    1st
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Marshall, Donald, Campbell River  2nd
Nichols, Caesar K., Sayward  2nd
Nygaard, Martin, Bella Coola  1st
Palliser, William, Box 466, Lake Cowichan 2nd
Parkin, Alvin, Campbell River  2nd
Robertson, George R., 2329 Blanshard St.,
Victoria  _  2nd
Skuce, Herbert, Ocean Falls  2nd
Stanton, James R., Minstrel Island  1st
Wells, Gordon, Sardis  1st
Wells, Ray, Cultus Lake  1st
Wilson, Jack, Port Alberni  2nd
Revelstoke-Sicamous-Salmon Arm-Vernon Districts
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Armstrong, Melvin, Sorrento  2nd
Cullis, H„ Taft  2nd
Daney, Selden M., Ferguson     1st
DeSimone, Samuel H, Revelstoke     1st
Durrand, W. D., Revelstoke  2nd
Engler, John, Lumby  2nd
Gardiner, Robert, Albas    1st
Hanson, Chas. E., Cherryville  2nd
Class of
Licence
1st
Name and Address of Guide
Laforme, George W., Revelstoke.	
Mobley, Charles W., Tappen  2nd
Mobley, Howard, Salmon Arm     1st
Nelson, Eric A., Revelstoke     1st
Potts, Bill, Sorrento  2nd
Small, Roy G., Trout Lake   1st
Softing, Berger, Lumby  2nd
Werner, Carl, R.R. 1, Lumby  2nd
Cassiar District (Telegraph Creek-Atlin District)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Asp, Phillip, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Carlick, Thomas D., Telegraph Creek  2nd
Carlick, Walter, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Clever, Gene B., Bennett  2nd
Dennis, Alex, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Dennis, John Creyke, Telegraph Creek    1st
Dennis, Thomas, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Frank, Benny, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Frank, Edward, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Gleason, Henry, Telegraph Creek    1st
Jack, Alex, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Jackson, Richard, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Johnson, Harry, Atlin  2nd
Nyman, Robert, Atlin  2nd
Pedersen, Herman M., Atlin  2nd
Tashoots, Frank Pete, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Tashoots, Jack Pete, Telegraph Creek  2nd
West Kootenay (Including Creston-Nelson-Slocan-Kootenay-Arrow
and Trout Lakes Districts)
Name and Address of Guide
Cummings, Arnold, Boswell	
Currie, Haskett S., Ainsworth	
Drummond, James, Burton  2nd
Class of
Licence
.... 2nd
_ 2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Flick, Charles, Edgewood	
Hallgren, Sven, Ainsworth—
Koch, Charles A., Sanca	
Class of
Licence
_ 2nd
_ 1st
.- 2nd REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951
E 85
West Kootenay (Including Creston-Nelson-Slocan-Kootenay-Arrow
and Trout Lakes Districts)—Continued
Name and Address of Guide
MacNicol, J. W., Johnson's Landing..
Newbrand, Emil, Box 109, Nakusp	
Oliver, George J., Gray Creek	
O'Neil, Richard, Sirdar	
Class of
Licence
_. 2nd
_ 2nd
__ 2nd
_ 2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Robson, L.A., Box 104, Nakusp-
Rodgers, Floyd C, Creston..
Class of
Licence
.... 2nd
....    1st
Schwartzenhauer, Carl, Deer Park  2nd
Grand Forks-Greenwood (Including Kettle Valley)
Name and Address of Guide
Anschetz, Chris, Rock Creek..
Class of
Licence
_ 2nd
Armstrong, Allan Carew, Keremeos  2nd
Bohnet, James, Rock Creek..
Bradshaw, Geo. A., Westbridge	
Carey, Bertram C, Rock Creek...
Carey, Joe F., Westbridge	
Clark, Herbert Gerald, Keremeos..
From, Helge, Westbridge	
From, Oliver, Westbridge	
Gold, Robie Booth, Osprey Lake ...
2nd
2nd
2nd
2nd
1st
2nd
2nd
2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Haddrell, George H, West Summerland-—   1st
Hall, D. E., Westbridge  2nd
Lewis, James William, Princeton    1st
Lutner, E. C, Beaverdell  2nd
McLean, Gordon A., Okanagan Falls  2nd
Manion, William Bartlett, Tulameen  2nd
Smith, Howard J., Westbridge  2nd
Tower, Stanley, Princeton  2nd
Wright, Brian (Pat), Princeton  2nd
Kamloops District (Including Savona-Bonaparte Lake-Clearwater-Vavenby)
Name and Address of Guide
Archibald, D. A., Clearwater__
Class of
Licence
._.__ 2nd
Blackman, William, Valemount  2nd
Name and Address of Guide
LaFave, John, Louis Creek..
Class of
Licence
1st
Boule, James, Savona_
Brousseau, Clifford, Savona—
Burdett, George, Savona	
Burdett, Loretta, Savona	
Cahoon, Charles, CIearwater__
Carter, Cecil, Black Pool	
Clearwater, Ralph, Westsyde..
Cochran, Marvin, Darfield-.
1st
1st
1st
2nd
2nd
2nd
2nd
2nd
Comeau, William Rufus, Savona    1st
Cooper, Norman T., Savona  2nd
Cooper, Phillip, Westsyde    1st
Dunlop, William, Barriere  2nd
Ellis, Douglas K., Kamloops  2nd
Farquharson, James, Kamloops  2nd
2nd
1st
1st
2nd
1st
2nd
Latremouille, Joseph, Little Fort    1st
Lean, Theodore, Clearwater    1st
Lloyd, William, Red Lake  2nd
Loveway, Thomas, Little Fort  2nd
Ludtke, Lawrence, Clearwater    1st
McDiarmid, Garfield, Clearwater    1st
McGarigle, W. J., Little Fort  2nd
Marriott, Robert, Heffley Creek  2nd
Mason, Allan, 2544 Columbia St., Vancouver   2nd
Miller, Robert, Blue River    1st
Morton, Alfred, McLure    1st
Murray, George E., Savona    1st
Neighbour, Hersch, Tete Jaune    1st
Fennell, A. C, Chu Chua...
Gourlay, James, Barriere _
Grant, Gordon, McLure..
Hagen, Harry, Barriere	
Helset, Ted, Clearwater-
Hogue, Henry, Clearwater	
Hoover, Eldred, General Delivery,
loops
Kam-
Humphrey, A. C, Knutsford-
Johnson, Jack, Savona..
Kipling, John, R.R. 1, Heffley Creek..
Korsvick, George, Valemount	
LaFave, George, Louis Creek	
1st
2nd
2nd
2nd
2nd
2nd
Nelson, Gerald, Black Pines _
Palmer, William F., Darfield_
Perry, Samuel, Kamloops	
Petell, Seymour, Savona	
Rainer, Karl, Darfield	
Sand, Martin, Vavenby	
Scott, Duncan, Barriere	
Small, Reg., Clearwater..
Thacker, George, Walhachin ____
Turner, John, Criss Creek	
Tuson, Clifford, Copper Creek _
Welland, John, Red Lake	
Whittaker, John, Lac la Jeune...
.__ 2nd
_ 2nd
... 2nd
... 2nd
... 2nd
.__ 2nd
- 1st
_ 2nd
.__ 2nd
.__ 2nd
- 1st
_ 2nd
... 2nd
Peace River (Including Fort Nelson, Fort St. John, Lower Post,
and Pouce Coupe)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Beattie (Sr.), Robert, Hudson Hope  2nd
Beattie, Robert, Gold Bar _. 2nd
Belcourt, Clarence, Big Slough (Mt. Valley
P.O., Alta.)   2nd
Brown, Wesley J., Mile 175, Fort St. John 1st
Calliou, John, Kelly Lake (Goodfare P.O.,
Alta.)   2nd
Callison, Dennis W., Fort Nelson    1st
Callison, E. O., Mile 422, Alaska Highway 1st
Cameron, Patrick, Moberly Lake    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Courvoisier, Henry C, Fort Nelson..
Dahl, Joel O., Fort Nelson	
Davidson, John O., Lower Post	
Dhenin, Rene G., Fort St. John	
Durney, Milo, East Pine	
Edzerza, George, Lower Post	
Elden, Otto, Little Prairie..,.	
Forfar, E. C., Lower Post	
Garbitt, Theophile S., Moberly Lake..
Gibson, Harry, Dawson Creek	
Class of
Licence
.__-    1st
_ 1st
  1st
.-__ 1st
_.__ 1st
___. 1st
_ 2nd
_ 2nd
_ 1st
_- 2nd E 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Peace River (Including Fort Nelson, Fort St. John, Lower Post,
and Pouce Coupe)—Continued
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Gladu, Isadore,  Kelly Lake  (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.)   2nd
Golata, Francis W., Dawson Creek     1st
Hambler, Albert, Kelly Lake  (Goodfare,
P.O., Alta.)   2nd
Hambler, Joseph, Kelly Lake  (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.)     1st
Haralson, Lome M., Fort Nelson    1st
Horseman, Narcisse, Kelly Lake (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.)     1st
Johnston, Freddie, Teslin Lake, Y.T.  2nd
Kruger, William, Hudson Hope  2nd
Larson, Albin, Fort Nelson     1st
Letendre,   James,   Kelly  Lake   (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.)   2nd
Letendre,  Roland,  Kelly Lake  (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.)   2nd
Longhurst, William J., Mile 147, Fort St.
John    1 st
McDonald, Charlie, Fort Nelson  2nd
MacLean, Arthur J., Fort St. John     1st
McLean, William, Little Prairie     1st
Millar, William E., Fort St. John  2nd
Mould, Thomas L, Fort Nelson     1st
Paquette, Morris, Moberly Lake    1st
Peck, Donald R., Mile 200, Fort St. John _   1st
Powell, Gary L, Hudson Hope  2nd
Ross, James A., Mile 147, Fort St. John    1st
Rutledge, Leo., Hudson Hope    1st
Simpson, William H, Fort St. John  2nd
Suprenant,   John,   Kelly  Lake   (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.)   2nd
Varley, Jim, Coal River  2nd
Wanyandie, Paul, Big Slough (Mt. Valley
P.O., Alta.)   2nd
Warn, William, Groundbirch  2nd
Young, Andrew, Box 871, Dawson Creek. 2nd
Young, Louis, Dawson Creek  2nd
Prince George District "A" (Prince George East to Jasper)
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Bricker, William, South Fort George    1st
Brooks, George, South Fort George    1st
Buchanan, Edward G., South Fort George 2nd
Carr, Stan J., Tete Jaune     1st
Corless (Jr.), Richard F., Prince George    1st
Crate Lloyd, Lucerne  2nd
Dale, Joseph T., Woodpecker  2nd
Gaugh, Allen H, Prince George     1st
Gray, Jack, Prince George  2nd
Hansen, Anund, Hansard    1st
Hansen (Jr.), Anund, Hansard  2nd
Hargreaves, Roy F., Mount Robson     1st
Hale, Stan, Dome Creek  2nd
Henry, Walter L, Prince George     1st
Name and Address of Guide
Hobe, Henry, Hansard .
Class of
Licence
.___ 2nd
Hooker, James B., Dome Creek     1st
Jensen, Arne, Dome Creek  2nd
Jensen, Ernest H., Dome Creek    1st
Lonsdale, Freeman E., McBride  2nd
Miller, Delmer N., Prince George    1st
Mintz, Arthur J., Tete Jaune  2nd
Monroe, Everett A., McBride  2nd
Sande, W. J., Sinclair Mills     1st
Shovar, Dorrell T., McBride  2nd
Simmons, Herbert, Prince George  2nd
Vansomer, James R., Prince George  2nd
Witter, Henry L., Prince George  2nd
Zlotucha, Antoni, Prince George  2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Prince George District " B " (West from Prince George to Terrace, Including
Fort McLeod and Fort Grahame)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Henson, Frank, Manilla     1st
Hipp, Anthony J., Terrace  2nd
Hobson (Jr.), R. P., Vanderhoof  2nd
Johnson, George M., Vanderhoof  2nd
Johnson, Howard T., South Fort George.... 2nd
Johnson, John H., Isle Pierre  2nd
Johnson, John Kornelius, Fort St. James.   1st
Knox, John, Ootsa Lake .    1st
Kohse, Louis, Vanderhoof   2nd
Lee, John Thomas, Hazelton     1st
Leon, Paddy, Topley  2nd
Lord, Walter H., Tchesinkut Lake  2nd
Loss, Helmer F., Topley  2nd
McConachie, H. R., Fort St. James    1st
McNeill, Clifford, Ootsa Lake    1st
McNeill, John W., Ootsa Lake     1st
Meier, John, Hulatt   2nd
Menard, Gerard, Nithi River  2nd
Moran, Thomas E., Vanderhoof  2nd
Morgan, James E., Ootsa Lake     1st
Munger, Francis W. R., Houston  2nd
Murray, Ronald A., Fort St. James  2nd
Nelson, George Wm., Vanderhoof    1st
Nelson, J. N., Clemretta   2nd
Beaver, Albert E., Ootsa Lake  2nd
Bennett, Vernon, Southbank  2nd
Benson, Allen,  Hazelton     1st
Berghammer, Joe, Fort Grahame  2nd
Braaten, Edwin, Southbank  2nd
Brown, John S., Burns Lake  2nd
Campbell, Theodore Blair, Hazelton  2nd
Cook, Ted, Vanderhoof     1st
Craker, Ronald J., North Bulkley  2nd
Davidson, Charlie B., Vanderhoof    1st
Donald, Jimmy, Burns Lake  2nd
Evans, William Robert, Vanderhoof  2nd
Fletcher, Allen Eugene, Smithers  2nd
Foote, Charles H., Fraser Lake  2nd
Gardiner, William C, Smithers    1st
George, Thomas Seymour, Telkwa  2nd
Gilliland, Donald Wallace, Germansen
Landing  .  2nd
Grainger, Barry, Noralee  2nd
Harding, Clifford R., Fort St. James  2nd
Harrison, Bryan R., Wistaria     1st
Harrison, Robt. Owen, Wistaria    1st
Haugen, Karl, Germansen Landing  2nd
Henry, Stanley B., Ootsa Lake    1st REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951
E 87
Prince George District " B " (West from Prince George to Terrace, Including
Fort McLeod and Fort Grahame)—Continued
Name and Address of Guide
Pease, Clarence A., Nithi River-
Plowman, Clarence, Endako	
Prince, Alex, Fort St. James—
Prince, Dixon, Fort St. James....
Prince
Rehill,
Class of
Licence
.._.. 1st
.... 2nd
.... 2nd
.... 2nd
Teddy, Fort St. James  2nd
Manlie, Ootsa Lake    1st
Seyfarth, Joe, Fort St. James  2nd
Shea, James Bartholemew, Telkwa    1st
Smith, Craig H., Fort St. James     1st
Cariboo District "A" (100-Mile House South to Ashcroft, Including Lillooet)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Smith, George A., Vanderhoof  2nd
Stevenson, D. G. H., Burns Lake  2nd
Vantine, Edward, Ootsa Lake    1st
Vanzantine, James H, Francois Lake  2nd
Walker, Thomas A., Fort St. James     1st
Wheeler, Wm. A., Burns Lake  2nd
Wiley, Alvin John, Southbank  2nd
Winsor, Wm. J., Isle Pierre  2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Baker, James A., Ashcroft  2nd
Baker, R. M., 70-Mile House    1st
Barker, A. S., Fawn P.O  2nd
Bishop, James, Clinton    1st
Bissette, Arthur, Ashcroft  2nd
Bones, Alex,  Clinton    1st
Bones, Peter, Clinton    1st
Bones, Theresa, Clinton  2nd
Brooke, H. A., Cache Creek  2nd
Camille, Francis, 83-Mile House  2nd
Chabara, Anna, 70-Mile House  2nd
Christy, Frank, Moha  2nd
Christy, Thomas, Moha  2nd
Cleveland, J. G., Bridge Lake    1st
Cleveland, L. C, Bridge Lake    1st
Cleveland, R. C, Bridge Lake    1st
Coldwell, H. W., Jesmond    1st
Cunningham, C. B., Bralorne     1st
Dean, J. C, R.R. 1, Fawn  2nd
Dougherty, Charles A., Clinton    1st
Dougherty, E. C, Clinton    1st
Dyer, Guy H, 70-Mile House  2nd
Eden, Don D., 70-Mile House  2nd
Eden, R. B., 70-Mile House  2nd
Faessler, Charles T., Fawn P.O    1st
Fenton, Walter, Big Bar Creek    1st
Flaherty, R. J., 93-Mile House    1st
Forde, H. D. W., Clinton  2nd
Fowler, Norman A., Clinton  2nd
Gaines, Clinton, Fawn P.O  2nd
Gammie, Bert, 70-Mile House    1st
George, Henry, Cache Creek  2nd
Graf, Joe, Fawn P.O  2nd
Graf, Mike, Fawn P.O    1st
Grice, Percy, 70-Mile House  2nd
Grinder, Bert, Clinton  2nd
Grinder, Isidore, Clinton    1st
Grinder, J., Jesmond    1st
Grinder, Mrs. L., Clinton  2nd
Grinder, Walter, Big Bar Creek    1st
Grypuik, S., Cache Creek  2nd
Hall, M., R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
Hannah, L. B., Clinton  2nd
Hansen, John F., Bridge Lake    1st
Hansen, Wesley B., Bridge Lake  2nd
Hendricks, Ike, Ashcroft  2nd
Higginbottom, Alfred, Jesmond    1st
Higgins, Cecil, Fawn P.O    1st
Higgins, Ed., Fawn P.O    1st
Higgins, Marion, Bridge Lake    1st
Higgins, Ronald, R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
Hodges, E. W., Fawn P.O     1st
Horn, Walter A., 70-Mile House  2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Houseman, J. J., 100-Mile House     1st
Huckvale, James, Fawn P.O    1st
Hunter, M, Ashcroft  2nd
Johnson, Claude, Bridge Lake    1st
Johnson, J. A., 100-Mile House  2nd
Johnson, Zale A., Bridge Lake     1st
King, C. Jack, R.R. 1, Fawn  2nd
King, Gordon, R.R. 1. Fawn  2nd
Knauf, H. G., Fawn P.O     1st
Krebs, Len., 100-Mile House    1st
Louis, Freddie, Canoe Creek (Jesmond)...    1st
Langley, A. L., 70-Mile House  2nd
Larson, Jack O., Bridge Lake     1st
Larson, Karel J., Fawn P.O  2nd
Larson, L. L., Fawn P.O  .   1st
Leavitt (Jr.), F. W., Fawn P.O    1st
Lebourdais, Joe, Clinton  2nd
Lehman, Bert, Lillooet  2nd
Levick, John S., Fawn P.O     1st
Loring, Edwin, Clinton    1st
Louie, Freddie, Canoe Creek    1st
Louis, Garvey, Jesmond  2nd
Louis, Victor, Canoe Creek  2nd
MacLean, D., Fawn   2nd
McMahon, Jesse C, 70-Mile House    1st
McNeil, B. S., Fawn P.O    1st
McNeil, H. M., Fawn P.O     1st
Mackie, James, R.R.  1, Fawn     1st
Madden, E. E., Cache Creek  2nd
Mathewson, A. E., Ashcroft  2nd
Matier, J. H, Clinton     1st
Mobbs, B. H, 70-Mile House  2nd
Mooring, Alex, Fawn P.O    1st
Nath, Carl J., Fawn P.O  2nd
Nordgren, Jonas, Fawn P.O  2nd
O'Keefe, Wm,, Shalalth    1st
Olafson, H. L, R.R. 1, Fawn  2nd
Oleman, Patrick, Shalalth  2nd'
Osterlund, Ed., Moha  2nd
Parent, S. L, Fawn P.O  2nd
Park, Arlie H., 70-Mile House  2nd
Park, Jack, 70-Mile House    1st
Parkes, L. G., 70-Mile House  2nd
Perault, J., Jesmond  2nd
Petrie, Donald, Bridge Lake    1st
Pierro, Johnny, Cache Creek  2nd
Pigeon, A., Clinton  2nd
Pigeon, C. L., Clinton    1st
..    1st
    1st
.    1st
.....__    1st
.  2nd
Pigeon, J. R., Clinton	
Pollard, J. H, Clinton	
Powell, H. L, R.R. 1, Fawn	
Powell, T. G., R.R. 1, Fawn	
Reinertson, R. J., 70-Mile House . E 88
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cariboo District "A" (100-Mile House South to Ashcroft,
Including Lillooet)—Continued
Name and Address of Guide
Roberts, R. V., Fawn P.O.
Class of
Licence
....   1st
Scheepbower, Jacob A., 70-Mile House  2nd
Scheepbower, John C, 70-Mile House  2nd
Scheepbower, William, 70-Mile House  2nd
Scott, Doug., 100-Mile House    1st
Sedman, John E., R.R. 1, Fawn  2nd
Siebert, John, Jesmond  2nd
Singleton, Fred, Fawn P.O  2nd
Thomason, D. M., Bridge Lake    1st
Thorsteinson, Charles, 93-Mile House  2nd
Umphrey, S. T., Fawn P.O  2nd
VanHorlick, Buster, Clinton  2nd
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Vecqueray, R. J., Clinton     1st
Vecqueray, Ted, Clinton  2nd
Walsh, F. C, 70-Mile House  2nd
Watt, James D., Clinton  2nd
Watt, Lloyd, Ashcroft  2nd
Whitley, W. P., 70-Mile House  2nd
Wilkinson, T. H, Fawn P.O  2nd
Winteringham, Frank, R.R. 1, Fawn  2nd
Womack, C. B., Fawn P.O    1st
Wrigley, E. W., 70-Mile House  2nd
Young, William, Clinton  2nd
Cariboo District " B " (100-Mile House to Williams Lake and Marguerite and
East of Fraser River)
Class of
Licence
.- 2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Abram, A. E., Lac la Hache	
Archie, George, Buffalo Creek    1st
Archie, Jacob, Canim Lake    1st
Archie, Sam, Buffalo Creek  2nd
Ash, Chris, Big Lake  2nd
Asserlind, H. C. F., Keithley Creek  2nd
Atkin, Daniel, Horsefly.  2nd
Barrett, Stan, Horsefly  2nd
Bayne, Dr. A., Canim Lake  2nd
Bob, Edward, Canim Lake    1st
Bothwick, Hector, Forest Grove  2nd
Bowe, Alfred, Williams Lake  2nd
Charlie, Jimmy, Forest Grove  2nd
Christopher, David, Canim Lake  2nd
Christopher, Peter, Canim Lake  2nd
Curtis, Rae, Williams Lake  2nd
Daniels, George, Canim Lake  2nd
Decker, English, Forest Grove  2nd
Dick, Mathew, Alkali Lake  2nd
Dingwall, William, Wright Station  2nd
Dixon, Morris, Lac la Hache  2nd
Eagle, C. B., Lac la Hache    1st
Gibbons, M. L., Horsefly    1st
Goetgen, C. E., Horsefly    1st
Graham, John, Horsefly  2nd
Graham, W. James, Horsefly  2nd
Greenlee, E. L., Canim Lake    1st
Gunn, John, Horsefly..
Haller, August, Lac la Hache..
Hamilton, G., Williams Lake ...
Hamilton, H. M., Lac la Hache..
Hamilton, Pete, Williams Lake.
1st
2nd
2nd
1st
2nd
Hamilton, R. M., Williams Lake  2nd
Hamilton, Theodore, Lac la Hache    1st
Hamilton, Tom, Williams Lake  2nd
Hinsche, Frederick, 150-Mile House  2nd
Hockley, George, Horsefly    1st
Hooker, F. C, Horsefly    1st
Hooker, Percy F., Horsefly  2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Hooker, S. B., Horsefly..
Class of
Licence
....    1st
Hubbard, 1. H., Horsefly  1st
Jacobson, John, Big Lake  2nd
Jefferson, Jesse, Big Lake  2nd
Jenner, Ernest, Horsefly  1st
Johnson, Floyd, 150-Mile House  2nd
Jones, Frederick E., Horsefly  1st
Jones, Lawrence, Horsefly  2nd
Junek, Adolph, Horsefly  2nd
Lord, Ed., Buffalo Creek  2nd
McBurney, Aubrey, Keithley Creek  2nd
McDougall, Robert, Big Lake  1st
Mitchell, Sam, Williams Lake  2nd
Morgan, Dallas, Likely    1st
Morris, D. L., Forest Grove    1st
Nicol, A., Horsefly    1st
Nicol, Shelley, Horsefly    1st
Oak, E., Horsefly  2nd
Paxton, H. E., Macalister  2nd
Petrowitz, Arthur, 150-Mile House  1st
Pinkney, Robert, Canim Lake  1st
Pulver, George, Williams Lake   1st
Racher, W. J., Horsefly  1st
Robertson, Kenneth, Miocene  2nd
Roper, Alf., Forest Grove  1st
Sharp, William, Ochiltree  2nd
Thygesen, Julius, Horsefly  1st
Vaness, John, Horsefly  1st
Walters, Glenn Henry, Horsefly  1st
Walters, Leonard, Horsefly    1st
Webster, Alister, Horsefly  2nd
Westwick, Burton, Williams Lake  1st
Westwick, Lawrence, 150-Mile House  2nd
Wiggins, H. W., Miocene  2nd
Williams, Aubrey, Horsefly  1st
Williams, Mrs. Thelma, Horsefly  2nd
Wotzke, Herb., Williams Lake  2nd
Wynstra, Jack, Horsefly  2nd
Cariboo District " C
Name and Address of Guide
Allan, George H, Quesnel	
Armstrong, Wilfred, Quesnel	
Cochran, James Dean, Barkerville
Coldwell, Harry B., Punchaw	
Ellison, Ray, Quesnel	
(Quesnel-Barkerville from Marguerite North)
Class of Class of
Licence Name and Address of Guide                             Licence
    1st Forster, Herbert TJ., Quesnel    1st
  2nd Harrington, George A., Quesnel    1st
    1st Heaton, William Frank, Narcosli Creek    1st
  2nd Hortness, Sigurd, Cinema .  2nd
 2nd Knudson, Leonard E., Quesnel  2nd REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951
E 89
Cariboo District " C " (Quesnel-Barkerville from Marguerite
North ) —Continued
Name and Address of Guide
Laurent, Louie, Nazko	
Lavington, Arthur C, Nazko	
Lavington, Harold A., Quesnel	
Lovie, George C, Batnuni Lake_.
McKenzie, James, Cinema .
Class of
Licence
.... 2nd
..... 1st
.... 1st
.... 2nd
.... 1st
Name and Address of Guide
Orr, William M., Chilliwack _
Paley, Robert G., Quesnel..
Class of
Licence
.... 2nd
.....    1st
McKitrick, Roy Douglas, Wells .    1st
McKort, Clarence C, Alexandria     1st
Martin, George, Bowron Lake  2nd
Miller, Isaac Edward, Punchaw    1st
Moffat, Ronald H, Alexandria     1st
O'Leary, Arthur, Quesnel    1st
Quanstrom, Carl, Quesnel  2nd
Quanstrom, Harry, Quesnel    1st
Quanstrom, Julius, Quesnel  2nd
Rawling, Arden L., Quesnel  2nd
Rogers, Alfred, Moose Heights  2nd
Sorum, Erick, Quesnel  2nd
Tibbies, Fred, Quesnel    1st
Williams, Byron, Bowron Lake  2nd
Cariboo District " D " (Chilcotin District, Cariboo West of Fraser River)
Name and Address of Guide
Class of
Licence
Name and Address of Guide
Blatchford, John A., Alexis Creek    1st
Bliss, Bill, Alexis Creek    1st
Bobb, E. R., Marguerite  2nd
Brebner, R. W., Alexis Creek  2nd
Bryant, Alfred, Anahim Lake    1st
Bullion, Jimmy, Hanceville  2nd
Butler, Leonard, Tatla Lake  2nd
Capoose, Oggie, Anahim Lake  2nd
Cheta, George, Alexis Creek  2nd
Cheta, Johnnie, Alexis Creek  2nd
Church, Dick, Big Creek    1st
Collier, Eric, Meldrum Creek  2nd
Dester, Baptiste, Kleena Kleene    1st
Dorsey, Lester, Anahim Lake    1st
Edwards, Ralph A., Hagensborg  2nd
Elkins, Joe, Alexis Creek  2nd
Elkins, Thomas, Alexis Creek    1st
Erickson, Carl B., Anahim Lake  2nd
Haines, Harry K., Tatlayoko    1st
Hance, Grover, Hanceville    1st
1st
1st
1st
1st
1st
1st
2nd
2nd
2nd
1st
1st
2nd
Class of
Licence
.... 2nd
.... 2nd
...._ 1st
.... 1st
—_ 2nd
.... 2nd
..... 1st
.... 2nd
.._ 2nd
    1st
Hansen, Fred, Kleena Kleene..
Haynes, R. W. G., Tatlayoko	
Henderson, John, Tatlayoko.—.
Henry, Cecil, Big Creek-
Henry, Eagle Lake, Tatlayoko..
Holte, Andrew, Anahim Lake.
Holte, Tommy, Anahim Lake..
Holtey, Lewis, Anahim Lake....
Hudson, E. R., Kleena Kleene..
Hugo, A. M., Hanceville__
Kelley, James A., Soda Creek	
Knoll, Alvis N., Chezacut	
LaLievre, Lind, Penticton	
McKill, Clarence, Kleena Kleene	
Mack, Maxine, Alexis Creek	
Maindley, John, Alexis Creek	
Maxted, William, Big Creek '.	
Moore, K. B., Tatlayoko	
Mullins, B. A., Tatla Lake	
Mulvahill, R., Redstone	
Mulvahill, William, Redstone  2nd
Nicholson, Donald R., Tatla Lake  2nd
Nicholson, Terence, Tatla Lake  2nd
Paxton, Alex, Alexis Creek    1st
Paxton, Ann, Alexis Creek  2nd
Petal, Henry, Alexis Creek  2nd
Phillips, Floyd, Anahim Lake    1st
Rafferty, A .T., Riske Creek  2nd
Reynolds, A. J., Big Bar Creek    1st
Reynolds, H. D., Big Bar Creek    1st
Robson, Bert, Atnarko  2nd
Rosette, Augustine, Gang Ranch    1st
Ross, Eddie, Redstone  2nd
Ross, Peter, Redstone  2nd
Scheek, Edward, Tatlayoko  2nd
Squinas, Thomas, Anahim Lake
Stephenson, Donald, Alexis Creek_
Sulin, Willy, Anahim Lake-
Hutchinson, William, Big Creek-
Jack, Johnny, Alexis Creek-
Johnson, William, Riske Creek    1st
Johnston, Vic, Riske Creek  2nd
1st
2nd
2nd
1st
1st
1st
Witte, Frank, Big Creek...     1st
Woods, Bill, Hanceville    1st
Weir (Sr.), Donald J., Alexis Creek-
Wilson, David F., Tatla Lake	
Witte, Duane, Big Creek	
East Kootenay District "A" (Cranbrook-Invermere-Golden Districts)
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Anderson, Dixon, Windermere    1st
Belcher, Walter L., Canal Flats  2nd
Bjorn, Henry Manning, Fort Steele  2nd
Bower, Glen, Edgewater  2nd
Brewer, Carl, Invermere  2nd
Canning, Lester, Skookumchuck  2nd
Capilo,  Louie,  Shuswap  Reserve, Athal-
mere     1st
Cooper, Albert, Windermere  2nd
Dobbie, Alexander J., Invermere  2nd
Drysdale, Alistair James, Skookumchuck  2nd
DuBois, Vaughn, Windermere    1st
Class of
Name and Address of Guide Licence
Feuz, Walter, Golden    1st
Fisher, Tony, Fairmont  2nd
Goodwin, Cecil, Invermere  2nd
Goodwin, Ell wood, Edgewater    1st
Gould, Percy, Canal Flats    1st
Hansen, Trygvert, Wilmer  2nd
Harrison, William O., Edgewater    1st
Hogan, Charles R., Harrogate    1st
Hogan, Charles M., Harrogate    1st
Jimmie, Joe, Windermere  2nd
Kain, Isidore, Wilmer  2nd
Keer, Eugene Warren, Marysville  2nd E 90
BRITISH COLUMBIA
East Kootenay District "A" (Cranbrook-Invermere-Golden
Districts ) —Continued
Name and Address of Guide
King, Norman F., Golden..
Class of
Licence
.....    1st
Lindborg, Axel, Golden    1st
Lum, Peter, Fort Steele  2nd
McClain, J. I., Spillimacheen     1st
Mcintosh, Ewen, Athalmere  2nd
McKay, Gordon, Invermere     1st
McKay, James, Invermere  2nd
Mitchell, Robert, Brisco  2nd
Nicholas, Dominic, Fairmont    1st
Nicol, Arthur Henry, Fort Steele    1st
Nixon, W. L., Invermere .  2nd
Nixon, Walter, Invermere     1st
Phillips, E. C, Invermere     1st
Pommier, Emile, Skookumchuck  2nd
Rad, Gordon, Invermere    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Richter, Frank, Invermere...
Class of
Licence
.____   1st
Romane, William, Golden    1st
Seward, Arvid, Golden .     1st
Sheek, Wesley P., Spillimacheen    1st
Sykes, Harry, Spillimacheen    1st
Tegart, George, Edgewater    1st
Tegart, Hiram W., Brisco    1st
Tegart, James, Brisco    1st
Thomas, Orville, Golden  2nd
Thomas, Robert, Parson    1st
Thompson, Jack, Edgewater  2nd
Thompson, James, Edgewater    1st
Thompson, Lioel, Edgewater     1st
Wieden, Frederick, Wilmer  2nd
White, James Freeman, Fort Steele    1st
East Kootenay District " B " (Cranbrook East to Crowsnest, Including
Fernie and Natal)
Name and Address of Guide
Arbuckle, John, Fernie..
Ashman, Levi, Waterton Park, Alta...
Baher, M. C, Natal-
Class of
Licence
.... 2nd
.... 2nd
....   1st
Baher, Mathias, Natal    1st
Barnes, Alfred, Fernie    1st
Barnes, James Norman, Fernie     1st
Cutts, Jack, Fernie  2nd
Dvorak, Frank, Fernie     1st
Dvorak, Wenzel, Fernie  2nd
Eftoda, Gordon, Natal     1st
Gorrie (Sr.), Meth, Flagstone    1st
Gravelle, Nick, Flagstone  2nd
Hicks, Frank, Fernie     1st
Hicks, Phillip, Fernie    1st
Holley, Thomas, Michel  2nd
Kubinic, Pete, Fernie  2nd
McFarlane, Kenneth, Natal  2nd
Name and Address of Guide
McGinnis, Earl, Natal	
McQuire, Albert, Flagstone.
Class of
Licence
    1st
  2nd
Pelton, Robert Benjamin, Cranbrook  2nd
Phillips, Frank,   1551  St. Andrew's Ave.,
North Vancouver      1st
Porco, Albert, Natal    1st
Porco, Ralph, Natal    1st
Riddell, Harry Scott, Wardner  2nd
Rosicky, Anton, Wardner     1st
Rothel, Malcolm, Natal    1st
Siple, Alfred, Jaffray    1st
Travis Frank, Natal  2nd
Volpatti, Benjamin J., Natal    1st
Washburn,  Lenox,  Flathead   (P.O.,  Trail
Creek, Mont., U.S.A.)     1st
Wise, Charles, Flathead (P.O., Trail Creek,
Mont., U.S.A.)   2nd
Non-resident Outfitters
Harrison, George H., Banff, Alta.
McCullough, Henry, Wembley, Alta.
Ray, Jack, Hinton Trail, Alta.
Russell, Andy, Twin Butte, Alta.
Sunderman, Kelly, Hythe, Alta.
ASSISTANT GUIDES
Vancouver Island
Durrant, Kenneth S., Campbell River.
Lewis, William, Roberts Lake.
Vanstone, Frederick J., Campbell River.
Revelstoke-Salmon Arm and Okanagan Districts
Engler, Jacob, Lumby.
Hurstfield, F. N., Chase.
McEwen, Harvey, Sicamous.
Martin, Pete, Sicamous.
Moffatt, John Bruce, Sorrento.
Wallis, Edward H, Revelstoke.
Woods, Robert Charles, Sicamous.
Young, A. H., Sicamous.
Grand Forks-Greenwood
Cawston, Richard Hamilton, Cawston.
Gold, Robin Birch, Osprey Lake.
Lawrence, George V., Hedley.
Nesbitt, Harry, Princeton.
Reser, Everett Eugene, Westbridge. r
REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951
E 91
Kamloops District
Bagg, Maurice, Savona.
Bagg, Melvin, Savona.
Blair, P., Little Fort.
Boyko, John, Savona.
Brown, Starr A., Little Fort.
Charter, Gilbert, 42 Valley View, Kamloops.
Christian, J. W., Pinantan.
Clearwaters, Dale, Westsyde.
Cochran, Glen Ford, Darfield.
Comeau, Gordon, Savona.
Evans, Jack, R.R. 1, Clearwater.
Hansen, Howard, Little Fort.
Harrop, Frank, R.R. 1, Kamloops.
Johnson, Cyril, Penticton.
Johnson, Ralph T., Savona.
Jules, Hyacinth, Savona.
Jules, Johnny, Savona.
Lloyd, Mrs. Wm., Red Lake.
McAbee, Cyril, Walhachin.
McDiarmid, Bill, Lac le Jeune.
McDougall, Harold, Darfield.
McKinnon (Jr.), Joe, Kamloops.
McLean, Clifford, McClure.
Marsden, Gladstone, Savona.
Mathews, Maurice, 770 Pleasant St., Kamloops.
Nielsen, Ryan Rendel, Pinantan.
Petersen, Ross, Savona.
Radomske, Albert, Criss Creek.
Richmond, Stuart Lee, Kamloops.
Rolston, Dave, Penticton.
Shook, Charles, Clearwater.
Wagner, Martin, Kamloops.
Wharton, Francis, Little Fort.
Woodward, E. J., Little Fort.
Peace River
Anderson, Edward, Dawson Creek.
Beattie,' Donald, Hudson Hope.
Beattie, Robert Hallam, Hudson Hope.
Belcourt,   Maglorie,   Big   Slough   (Mt.   Valley
P.O., Alta.).
Cage, James Wilson, Rose Prairie.
Calliou, Pete, Mile 147, Fort St. John.
Callison, John F., Fort Nelson.
Cameron, Ralph, Moberly Lake.
Campbell, Alfred, Kelly Lake (Goodfare P.O.,
Alta.).
Cardinal, Alex, Moberly Lake.
Cardinal, Joseph H, Mile 147, Fort St. John.
Cooke, Frank Edward, Fellers Heights.
Courtepatte,   Alfred,   Kelly   Lake   (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.).
Desjarlais, Joseph, Moberly Lake.
Desjarlais, Louis, Moberly Lake.
Ferguson, Fraser, Kelly Lake (Goodfare P.O.,
Alta.).
Fleet, Delbert J., Fort St. John.
Fox, Sammy, Mile 147, Fort St. John.
Gauthier, Eugene, Kelly Lake (Goodfare P.O.,
Alta.).
Gauthier, John, Moberly Lake.
Gauthier,   Lawrence,   Kelly   Lake    (Goodfare
P.O., Alta.).
Gray, George D., Kelly Lake (Goodfare P.O..
Alta.).
Hambler, George, Kelly Lake (Goodfare P.O..
Alta.).
Higgins, Robert B., Farrell Creek.
Holly, James, Mile 147, Fort St. John.
Jackson, Bobbie, Teslin Lake Indian Band.
Johnson, Alvin, Little Prairie.
Johnston, Billie, Teslin Lake Indian Band.
McGarvey, George, Hudson Hope.
McLeod, Rene Bruce, Fort St. John.
Mitchell, Gabriel, Moberly Lake.
Monias, Jim, Moberly Lake.
Mykoose, Joe, Moberly Lake.
Napoleon, Felix, Moberly Lake.
Paquette, Marvin, Moberly Lake.
Peck, O. Keith, Hudson Hope.
Powell, Jack Kenneth, Fort St. John.
Schobert, Arthur, Taylor.
Sheffield, Garth C. A., Taylor.
Southwick, T. O., Muncho Lake.
Torkelson, Gordon G., Doe River.
Trea, Joseph, Taylor.
Watson, Gordon E., Fort St. John.
Watson, James H., Fort St. John.
Cassiar (Telegraph Creek-Atlin)
Mutts, Alex, Telegraph Creek.
Quock, Charles, Telegraph Creek.
Reed, Paul, Telegraph Creek.
Prince George District "A"
Cannon, Walter L., Sinclair Mills.
Gaugh, Gordon A., Prince George.
Henry, Mack G, Prince George.
Kay, Robert, Prince George.
Langstaff, James E., McBride.
Mahon, Mike J., Prince George.
Marsh, Henry, McBride.
Miller, Amos, Prince George.
Olson, John V., Prince George.
Sait, Frederick F., McBride.
Wade, Gordon, South Fort George.
Witter, Henry L., Prince George.
Zlot, Martha, Prince George.
Prince George District " B "
Andros, R. G., Vanderhoof.
Aslin, Lawrence, Ootsa Lake.
Averill, Mervel, Vanderhoof.
Chingy, Harry, Fort McLeod.
Christie, Ellis D., Burns Lake.
Cornell, Jim, Fort St. James.
Cowan (Jr.), Hugh S., Clemretta.
Easter, Calvin Bruce, Fort St. James.
Foote, Charles W., Fort Fraser.
Green, Efner R., Telkwa. E 92
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Harrison, Alford J., Wistaria.
Hindmarch, Floyd Ellis, Vanderhoof.
Horr, Rosswell, Marilla.
Hughes, Rolland I., Vanderhoof.
Isadore, Jimmy, Fort McLeod.
James, Patrick, Ootsa Lake.
Johnson, Peter Ivor, Fort St. James.
Loper, Howard Ambrose, Vanderhoof.
Lord, Roy, Tchesinkut.
Lord, Samuel V., Tchesinkut Lake.
Love, Walter John, Hazelton.
Luck, William F. S., Fort St. James.
Mattess, August, Fort St. James.
Melville, Kennedy, Fort McLeod.
Murray, Ronald W., Fort St. James.
Plowman, Enid Alice, Endako.
Plowman, Gerald Edward, Endako.
Sam, Duncan, Fort St. James.
Short, Fay W., Colleymount P.O.
Skog, Martin, Vanderhoof.
Toodick, Mack, Fort McLeod.
Tourond, Pete, Noralee.
Vantine, Douglas Lee, Ootsa Lake.
Vantine, James H., Ootsa Lake.
Wheeler, William G., Burns Lake.
Witter, Wilbert H., Fort McLeod.
Cariboo District "A" (100-Mile House South to Ashcroft, Including Lillooet)
Abbs, R., Fawn P.O.
Alexander, Richard, Shalalth.
Begg, Chester, 70-Mile House.
Bissette, Norman, Ashcroft.
Black, John P., Bridge Lake.
Bryson, Robert C, Shalalth.
Chapel, Tom, Clinton.
Colin, A., 100-Mile House.
Dahlgren, C, Bridge Lake.
Dougall, Ninian, Bridge Lake.
Duncan, Pete, Clinton.
Fenton, Henry, Big Bar.
Flaherty, R. W., 93-Mile House.
Gaelick, William, R.R. 1, Fawn.
Gallant, Hubert, Mahood Lake.
Gammon, Albert, Pavilion.
Hadvick, Algot, 70-Mile House.
Haywood-Farmer, Frank, 70-Mile House.
Higgins, Elmer, Bridge Lake.
Higgins, K. E., Fawn P.O.
Johnson, Wayne C, Bridge Lake.
Kelley, C. E., Fawn P.O.
Kent, W. R., Lytton.
Knauf, E., Fawn P.O.
Krinke, Paul, Bridge River.
Long, H. C, Fawn P.O.
McMillan, J. A., Fawn P.O.
Perault, C, Jesmond.
Peters, Benjamin, Shalalth.
Pierro, Alex, Cache Creek.
Pigeon, Norman, Clinton.
Reinertson, Jacob, 70-Mile House.
Scotton, Norman, Jesmond.
Schwartz, Thomas, Bralorne.
Seymour, Jimmy, Canoe Creek.
Sharpe, Cecil, Clinton.
Shulldes, Bruce, Clinton.
Taylor, Ernest, Fawn P.O.
Vecqueray, Philip, Clinton.
Watkins, A., Cache Creek.
Cariboo District " B "
Colin, Grover, Lac la Hache.
Dick, Willard, Alkali Lake.
Ogden, Lawrence, Lac la Hache.
Ogden, Peter, Lac la Hache.
Williams, E., Canim Lake.
Cariboo District " C "
Anderson, Alvin P., Quesnel.
Coldwell, Reginald, Punchaw.
Erdman, Richard, Quesnel.
Leake, Clarence, Nazko.
McKenzie, Albert Henry, Cinema.
Merz, W. C, Quesnel.
Moore, William Stanley, Quesnel.
Paley, Wayne, Quesnel.
Reeve, Alfred F., Quesnel.
Wilkinson, Hugh J., Punchaw.
Cariboo District " D "
Aitken, G., Anahim Lake.
Alphones, Raymond, Alexis Creek.
Babtiste, Johnny, Riske Creek.
Betal, Dave, Alexis Creek.
Betal, Tony, Alexis Creek.
Blatchford, Bob, Alexis Creek.
Bliss, Jack, Alexis Creek.
Bonner, James, Big Creek.
Boyd, John G., Hanceville.
Brebner, R. L., Alexis Creek.
Bullion, Sammy, Alexis Creek.
Butler, Lee, Tatla Lake.
Cahoose, Gus, Anahim Lake.
Castleman, John, Big Creek.
Charlie, A., Gang Ranch.
Chell, Otto, Alexis Creek.
Clayton, John, Anahim Lake.
Collier, Veasy, Meldrum Creek.
Dorsey, Dave, Anahim Lake.
Ekks, Donald, Kleena Kleene.
Elkins, Marvin, Alexis Creek.
French, Robert, Redstone.
Garner, Thomas, Alexis Creek.
George, Willie, Alexis Creek.
Grambush, Donald, Anahim Lake.
Gregg, Frank, Kleena Kleene.
Guilt, Johnny, Hanceville.
Harrington, R. S., Anahim Lake.
Harry, Sammy, Alexis Creek.
Heikert, Don, Big Creek.
Holte, James R., Anahim Lake.
Jasper, Delmar, Riske Creek. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1951
E 93
Cariboo District " D "—Continued
Johnny, Eugene, Riske Creek.
Johnny, Joseph, Riske Creek.
Keefe, Dave, Marguerite.
Lulua, Felix, Alexis Creek.
Lulua, Tommy, Alexis Creek.
McCue, Barry, Alexis Creek.
Matheson, Alex G., Tatla Lake.
Meldrum, Irvin, Redstone.
Meyers, Tommy, Hanceville.
Myers, George, Hanceville.
Myers, Tony, Big Creek.
Moore, Gerry, Tatlayoko.
Paxter, Andy, Hanceville.
Quilt, Charley, Hanceville.
Quilt, Dick, Hanceville.
Quilt, Francis, Hanceville.
Quilt, Jack, Hanceville.
Quilt, Louis, Big Creek.
Quilt, M., Hanceville.
Reid, A. E., Big Creek.
Riley, Bill, Hanceville.
Roberts, Bert, Williams Lake.
Robertson, Johnny, Anahim Lake.
Rosette, Raymond, Gang Ranch.
Russel, Freeman, Big Creek.
Sammy, Eugene, Alexis Creek.
Seymour, Alex, Gang Ranch.
Sill, Frank, Anahim Lake.
Sing, Isaac, Anahim Lake.
Timmothy, Dominic, Kleena Kleene.
Timmothy, Isador, Kleena Kleene.
Turner, George, Kleena Kleene.
Turner, Timothy, Kleena Kleene.
Ulm, Roy C, Soda Creek.
Watson, Arthur, Alexis Creek.
Watson, Gordon, Alexis Creek.
Watt, Bruce, Big Creek.
Weir (Jr)., Donald, Alexis Creek.
Whitey, Ed., Hanceville.
Wilson, G. W., Anahim Lake.
East Kootenay District "A" (Cranbrook-Invermere-Golden Districts)
Alexander, Michael, Spillimacheen.
Alton, William, Parson.
Beauchene, Henry Joseph, Cranbrook.
Buckman, Alan, Fort Steele.
Calcutt, Maurice, Radium Hot Springs.
Cloarec, Leon J., Cranbrook.
Ellis, C, Skookumchuck.
Goodwin, Dave, Invermere.
Goodwin, Lester, Invermere.
Grainger, Clifford Carl, Fort Steele.
Hynes, Ben, Harrogate.
Joseph, Camille, Fairmont.
King, Ronnie, Golden.
Kohorst, Charles, Edgewater.
Morrison, Robert, Athalmere.
Pommier, John, Skookumchuck.
Pommier, Louis Emil, Cranbrook.
Rauch, Harold, McMurdo.
Schiesser, Frederick, Golden.
Seward, Roy, Golden.
Shibley, J. B., Cranbrook.
Smith, Mrs. Josephine, Fort Steele.
Tegart, R. M., Brisco.
Tennes, Moses, Athalmere.
Thomas, Mrs. Mildred, Parson.
Thornton, George, Invermere.
Thouret, Edward H., Radium Hot Springs.
East Kootenay District
B " (Cranbrook East to Crowsnest, Including
Fernie and Natal)
Baher, Fred, Natal.
Cunliffe, James, Galloway.
Cunliffe, Tom, Fernie.
Eberlein, Vernon Kent, Cranbrook.
Fontana, Peter Louis, Michel.
Fristel, Emil, Natal.
Gravelle, Alex, Flagstone.
Hammer, Andy, Wardner.
Herman, John, 2819 Alder St., Vancouver.
Holley, Thomas Wm., R.R. 9, New Westminster.
Kaisner, Gerald, Natal.
Kubinec, John, Fernie.
West Kootenay District (Including Creston-Nelson-Slocan-Kootenay-Arrow
and Trout Lakes Districts)
Logan, Doris May, Wardner.
McKenzie, F., Fernie.
Matevic, Louis, Natal.
Nolan, Wallace, Natal.
Phillips, George, Flagstone.
Porco, Jennie, Natal.
Rosicky, Andrew, Wardner.
Sharpe, Gerald, General Delivery, Oliver.
Venzi, Guy, Box 138, Michel.
Witing, Renal, Natal.
Wojtula, Archie, Natal.
Brett, Artley, Arrow Creek.
Cummings, Ray, Boswell.
Lequime, J. G., Balfour.
PERSONNEL OF GAME COMMISSION AS AT DECEMBER 31st, 1951
Attorney-General (Minister) Hon. Gordon S. Wismer, K.C Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Frank R. Butler Vancouver.
James G. Cunningham Vancouver.
Scientific Branch
Scientific Advisers Dr. W. A. Clemens Vancouver.
Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan Vancouver.
Game Biologist J. Hatter Vancouver. E 94 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Scientific Branch—Continued
Assistant Game Biologist E. Taylor Vancouver.
Regional Game Biologist P. W. Martin Kamloops.
Regional Game Biologist D. J. Robinson Nanaimo.
Fisheries Biologist Dr. P. A. Larkin Vancouver.
Fisheries Management Biologist S. Smith Vancouver.
Special Projects Biologist R. G. McMynn Vancouver.
Technical IJatchery Officer D. R. Hum Vancouver.
Supervisor of Predator-control W. W. Mair Vancouver.
Assistant Supervisor of Predator-control... E. Samann Kamloops.
Headquarters
Chief Clerk H. D. Simpson Vancouver.
Intermediate Clerk Miss I. Lawson Vancouver.
Intermediate Clerk J. McLellan Vancouver.
Clerk W. Fowkes Vancouver.
Secretarial Stenographer Miss J. Smith . Vancouver.
Clerk-Stenographer Mrs. M. Drinkwater Vancouver.
Clerk-Stenographer Miss E. P. Golder Vancouver.
Clerk-Stenographer Mrs. E. Hudson Vancouver.
Clerk-Stenographer Miss R. McKay Vancouver.
Clerk-Stenographer Mrs. J. Markham Vancouver.
Game-fish Culture Branch
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson ....Nelson.
Fishery Officer E. Hunter Nelson.
Hatchery Officer J. Phelps Nelson.
Fishery Officer F. Pells Cultus Lake.
Fishery Officer F. H. Martin Cultus Lake.
Hatchery Officer C. O. Mellor Cultus Lake.
Hatchery Officer J. D. S. Inverarity Courtenay.
Hatchery Officer I. C. Inglis Courtenay.
Fishery Officer R. A. McRae Kaslo.
Fishery Officer A. Higgs Summerland.
Hatchery Officer A. S. Frisby Summerland.
"A" Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Lower Mainland)
Inspector G. C. Stevenson Victoria.
Intermediate Clerk D. Keirs Victoria.
Game Warden J. W. Jones T Victoria.
Game Warden R. W. Sinclair Victoria.
Game Warden W.S.Webb Alberni.
Game Warden R. S. Hayes Campbell River.
Game Warden C. E. Estlin Courtenay.
Corporal Game Warden O. Mottishaw Duncan.
Game Warden F. P. Weir Duncan.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo.
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts)
Inspector C. F. Kearns Nelson.
Clerk-Stenographer Mrs. E. H. Edgar Nelson.
Game Warden R. A. Rutherglen Nelson.
Game Warden P. D. Ewart Castlegar.
Game Warden J. W. Bayley Cranbrook.
Game Warden B. Rauch Cranbrook.
Game Warden G. A. Lines Creston.
Game Warden J. J. Osman Fernie.
Game Warden N. Cameron Golden.
Corporal Game Warden A. F. Sinclair Grand Forks.
Game Warden J. V. Mackill .... Invermere.
Game Warden A. Monks Penticton.
Game Warden A. F.-Gill Princeton. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1951 E 95
" C " Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts)
Inspector R. M. Robertson Kamloops.
Clerk-Stenographer Miss M. Duck Kamloops.
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Kamloops.
Game Warden H. Tyler Kamloops.
Game Warden W. T. Ward Kamloops.
Game Warden K. R. Walmsley Alexis Creek.
Game Warden _ . W. I. Fenton Clinton.
Game Warden D. D. Ellis Kelowna.
Game Warden R. S. Welsman Lillooet.
Game Warden E. M. Martin Merritt.
Game Warden H. J. Lorance Quesnel.
Game Warden E. D. Cameron Revelstoke.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden . R. Farquharson Vernon.
Game Warden E. Holmes Wells.
Game Warden L. Jobin Williams Lake.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and
Yukon Boundary Districts)
Inspector W. A. H. Gill Prince George.
Clerk R. J. Guay Prince George.
Stenographer Mrs. F. A. Hootz Prince George.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Prince George.
.L. I. Olson Prince George.
_ W. H. Richmond Burns Lake.
.J. A. McCabe Fort Nelson.
_.B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
.J. D. Williams Fort St. John.
.J. W. Stewart Lower Post.
_ J. M. Hicks McBride.
_R. W. C. Tate Pouce Coupe.
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Game Warden
Corporal Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Clerk-Stenographer Miss D. Ardern Prince Rupert.
Game Warden H. O. Jamieson Prince Rupert.
Game Warden L. J. Cox Smithers.
Game Warden L. G. Smith Vanderhoof.
" E " Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley District)
Inspector R. E. Allan Vancouver.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Corporal Game Warden L. R. C. Lane Vancouver.
Game Warden R. K. Leighton Vancouver.
Game Warden F. R. Lobb Vancouver.
Game Warden H. D. Mulligan Vancouver.
Game Warden H. L. Rose Vancouver.
Corporal Game Warden W. J. Mason Alert Bay.
Game Warden D. A. MacKinlay Alert Bay.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden H. P. Hughes Cloverdale.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden P. M. Cliffe Mission.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam.
Game Warden B. E. Wilson Powell River.
Predatory-animal Hunters
Chief Predatory-animal Hunter J. Dewar Extension.
Predatory-animal Hunter A. W. Hames Extension.
Predatory-animal Hunter W. J. Hillen Abbotsford.
Predatory-animal Hunter G. Haskell Cranbrook.
Predatory-animal Hunter M. Morigeau Fairmont.
Predatory-animal Hunter C. G. Ellis Kamloops.
Predatory-animal Hunter M. W. Warren 1 Prince George.
Predatory-animal Hunter M. Mortensen Williams Lake. victoria, b.g
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952
1,220-552-5567

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