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Railway Department PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT Year Ended December 31st 1951 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1952

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 Railway Department
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
Year Ended December 31st
1951
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I have the honour to present herewith the Annual Report of the operations and
activities of the Railway Department for the year ended December 31st, 1951, with
Appendices.
H. R. BOWMAN,
Minister of Railways.
Victoria, B.C., February 18th, 1952.
PROVINCIAL LWRARt,
VICTORIA, B. C. Victoria, B.C., December 31st, 1951.
The Honourable H. R. Bowman,
Minister of Railways, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Thirty-fourth Annual Report of the Railway
Department, covering the year 1951, together with Appendices.
Your obedient servant,
R. E. SWANSON,
Chief Inspector. Report of the Railway Department
The Department has supervision of all railways subject to the Provincial Statutes.
The staff of the Department, as of December 31st, 1951, consisted of Chief Inspector,
three Inspectors, one draughtsman, a secretarial stenographer—grade 2, and a senior
clerk-stenographer.
The railways supervised by the Department include common carriers, industrial
railways, and electric interurban and street-railways.
The Civil Engineering Branch continued in charge of the records of the Department,
and co-operated with the Construction Department of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway
Company in assisting in right-of-way, land, and other matters.
During 1951 the Mechanical Branch inspected all industrial railways, including
logging and mining railways, in British Columbia. This comprised the inspection of all
rolling-stock, motive power, road-bed, bridges, and structures. The inspection also
covered operation of railway and dispatch systems. A follow-up inspection system, which
was put into effect in 1949, was continued throughout 1951, so that where an Inspector
made recommendations, the same Inspector made a subsequent inspection to see that
the work recommended had been carried out.
Due to progress and improvements in motive power, and especially in the field of
diesels, it was found necessary to make an intensive study of the manufacture and operation of diesel power, and it was decided subsequently to send the four Inspectors to the
diesel training schools of the several manufacturers.
Current duties, such as approval of location and construction plans, sanction and
filing of tariffs and operating conditions, have been attended to. Other activities are
described in the several sections of this Report.
COMMON CARRIERS
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway
The Railway Department continued in a consultant capacity for the benefit of the
existing railway.
Work to be done in 1952 is prescribed in a programme referred to in the Inspecting
Engineer's Report.
The Department assists the Operating Department in such matters as right-of-way,
improvements, replacements, and unusual undertakings.
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway Construction Department, being a separate entity
from the Operating Department, is closely allied to the Railway Department, and the
construction of the 82 miles from Quesnel to Prince George is nearing completion.
A report on this construction is included at the end of the Inspecting Engineers' Report.
Operation—General Manager's Report
The following remarks by the general manager are incorporated in this Report:—
Maintenance of Way.—We have been somewhat handicapped in our maintenance-
of-way work during the past year due to a shortage of labour and the tremendous difficulty
experienced in obtaining various materials, due principally to the demand for such
materials in other industries and for defence purposes. On this account we were not able
to fully complete some of the maintenance work that was anticipated, particularly in
regard to replacing bridges. The work delayed, however, will be completed early in the
year 1952. The shortage of ties has restricted our tie-renewal programme to a small
extent.   This will also be overcome during the present year.
5 II 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
We have been faced with two large undertakings in connection with maintenance,
one on the Fraser River at Mileage 123 to 125, in an endeavour to prevent erosion of the
banks at these points that is interfering with the right-of-way. The other undertaking is
in providing protection from erosion at Cayoosh Creek, where it has been threatening our
right-of-way and a portion of our land at Lillooet. Both of these jobs are under way at
the present time and should be completed in the early spring. They were extra work
caused by the high water of the last two or three years and were not anticipated at the
first of 1951.
From the standpoint of condition, the Pacific Great Eastern Railway shows a further
improvement accomplished during the year, and can now, as regards track conditions, be
compared favourably with other railroads of a similar class, apart from the light steel.
It is suggested that a programme be adopted for the next few years of replacing the
60-pound steel now in use on our main line with 85-pound steel. We have, as mentioned
in last year's Report, relaid 16 miles in the Cheakamus Canyon with 85-pound steel, and
it has been found to be most satisfactory and economical.
We have received many applications during the past year for sidings and spurs to take
care of new business originating, mostly lumber and lumber products, and owing to a
shortage of track material have not been able to comply with the requests. The material
is on order, and when received we will install these extra tracks, which will increase our
traffic.
Maintenance of Equipment.—We have kept our equipment in first-class condition
during the past year, but our business has increased to such an extent that it has been
impossible to secure new equipment to keep pace with the increase. We purchased during
the year six diesel locomotives that were to be delivered in February and March. Due to
strike conditions in the East we did not receive these until June and July. It was anticipated that this would permit us to use only diesel power, but with the increased traffic it
has been necessary to maintain and operate our steam-locomotives, as well as our diesels,
to handle the business. In addition to the diesel locomotives, we purchased a diesel
ditcher, which has been operating on the construction north of Quesnel and giving
satisfactory service. Apart from this, we were only able to secure some twenty rebuilt
flat cars during the year in the way of extra equipment, but an order is now in for twenty
rebuilt gondolas and twenty box cars, for delivery early in 1952.
We are continuing to work in our car-shops on remodelling and re-equipping cars to
bring them up to date and assist in taking care of our current business. During the year
we completed three baggage-cars and two coach-cabooses to be operated on the way-
freight trains, and provide restricted passenger accommodation on these trains. I may say
these are working out very satisfactorily.
The Powell River Company has commenced a shipment of logs from Quesnel and
Williams Lake to Squamish for pulp-wood. We could not handle the logs ourselves owing
to a shortage of log-cars, so the Powell River Company purchased fifty-eight cars, which
are now in this service. The Fleetwood Logging Company was anxious to move logs from
Creekside to Squamish, and as the same shortage of cars applied, they purchased thirty-six
log-cars of their own to handle this traffic, which should start to move in February or
March, 1952.
Operations.—We experienced considerable interference with traffic during the
months of January and February due to weather conditions, with snow, ice, slides, and
various blockades, but the weather conditions were not nearly as severe as during the
previous year. As a result Of this, our business showed a very gratifying increase during
these two months. In fact, for the entire year our freight business increased 23 per cent,
or 2,326 more paying loads handled during the year. This increase in business and the
use of diesel power has enabled us to keep our operating expenses low enough to absorb
a very large portion of the increased costs of material, which have been very considerable,
and the increased cost of wages, including the forty-hour week. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1951 II 7
Our passenger traffic during the year has remained the same as the previous year.
We still enjoy a large summer tourist business, but general traffic during the rest of the
year is very light, due to the length of time taken on account of the boat service between
Vancouver and Squamish and the advent of air transportation into the Cariboo country.
Our barge and tug facilities are still the bottle-neck in handling our business, and the
operation of this water service is becoming more expensive every year. During the year
we had to purchase a new barge, and I might say this barge has been used every day since
being put in service up to the present time. This is in addition to the existing barge. We
will have to rebuild the slip at Squamish during 1952, as the old slip is in a very worn-out
condition at the present time. Our oldest barge and our tug are also fast becoming worn
out and past the useful stage, and we will be faced with further expenditure in our water
equipment to take care of increased business.
We had an unfortunate accident occur on March 31st, when Trainman Moxon fell
under a tank-car which ran over his legs, and as a result of the shock he died.
During the past year we could have handled a larger amount of business, as there was
more traffic offered, but on account of our facilities, particularly the barge movement, and
shortage of proper equipment, we could not accept the business.
J. A. Kennedy,
General Manager.
Inspecting Engineer's Report
Inspections of the properties of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway have been made
pursuant to the terms of the " Railway Act," with special regard to maintenance of way
and structures. Items enumerated in subsection (2) of section 177 of the Act were
inspected, except rolling-stock and floating equipment.
The usual inspection trips were made by track-motor. Inspectors from the Railway
Department and maintenance-of-way officials conferred during and after these trips to
prepare a joint report of work accomplished in 1951 and recommended for the year 1952.
These reports comprise a detailed programme of betterments, reconstruction, and
maintenance work for the information of the Railway Department and guidance of the
Railway Company during the year 1952.
The 1951 activities have been outlined in the general manager's report. Temporary
repairs were made where shortage of material deferred certain bridge renewals.
Reconstruction of the telephone-line was completed.
Additional track-ties will be required to make up for short supplies in 1951. The
use of heavier rolling-stock demands good track, with a full complement of ties to carry
the increased loads.
The Railway Company's Construction Department built permanent bridges over
Cottonwood River and Canyon Creek, and also laid 72 miles of track. The industrial
Irackage has encouraged many new industries at the North Quesnel yard.
Subject to the accomplishment of the work to be done in 1952 and the observance of
all precautionary measures, especially adequate speed restrictions and safe loading of track
and structures, the railway is now in a fair condition for the operation of traffic.
C. R. Crysdale,
Inspecting Engineer. II  8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
LOCOMOTIVE CRANES
Inspection of boilers and safety appliances in shipyards and other industrial plants
continued where cranes and other mobile plants operate on tracks.
FOREST FIRE PROTECTION
Inspections for fire-prevention equipment were made on locomotives of all railways,
including those subject to the jurisdiction of the Board of Transport Commissioners for
Canada, this being a requirement of the Forest Service of the Department of Lands and
Forests.
EQUIPMENT INSPECTION BRANCH
Chief Inspector's Report
The industrial railways in British Columbia operated to full capacity in 1951, except
during the long forest closure in the summer. The common-carrier railways operated with
freight traffic considerably increased over previous years. Extensive repairs to existing
rolling-stock were made under the supervision of Department Inspectors.
All logging, mining, and small industrial railways were inspected during the year, and
in most cases follow-up inspections were made of road-bed, bridges, and rolling-stock in
order to assure safety in operation.
Rolling-stock, locomotives, and surface trackage in mining operations were inspected
and locomotives certified, with reports submitted to the companies and copies to the Chief
Inspector of Mines. With respect to the inspection of these operations, locomotive operators were examined and special permits issued. At Consolidated Mining & Smelting
Company of Canada, Limited, Trail and Kimberley, 101 permits to operate were issued.
The safety meetings instituted on the narrow-gauge operation at Trail were continued
during 1951, and it is gratifying to note no accidents were reported on this operation
during the year.
Locomotive boilers and pressure-vessels on all logging and mining railways were
inspected and certified during the year, and where necessary the Inspectors supervised
boiler repairs and replacements as well as repairs to motive power, rolling-stock, bridges,
and wharves. Several motor-driven rail-cars were redesigned and constructed during the
year under the Inspector's recommendations and supervision. All motor rail-cars used
for the transportation of workmen were inspected and certified in accordance with the
regulations.   This procedure has minimized rail-car accidents on logging-railways.
The radio-telephone communication system between dispatcher and train crews
installed in 1950 at the Enelewood operation of Canadian Forest Products Limited has
worked out exceedingly well, and collision hazard on that railway has been minimized.
We are given to understand the Comox Logging & Railway Company's operation at
Ladysmith is adopting the radio-telephone system to work in conjunction with the regular
dispatch system operated by dispatchers, who have been examined and certified by the
Department.
The common-carrier railways and the street-railways under Provincial jurisdiction
were inspected during the year. These railways were found to be in good condition, the
usual replacements and repairs having been carried out by the companies. The equipment
and rolling-stock were periodically inspected and the locomotives certified. During the
year several miles of street-railway were abandoned in Vancouver, this trackage having
been replaced by the use of trolley-buses. Where persons have been seriously injured by
street-cars or by other means on common-carrier railways, the rolling-stock or motive
power involved was impounded until inspected and released by Department Inspectors.
Where fatal accidents occurred, Inspectors made investigations and forwarded reports to
the Deputy Minister for the Minister's attention. Where necessary, corrective measures
were imposed upon the company to avoid the recurrence of such accidents. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1951 II 9
During the year inspections were made of grade crossings for approval, and in some
cases studies were made as to the advisability of automatic protection where railways cross
main highways on which automotive traffic has greatly increased, and as a result two
automatic warning devices are being installed on the Island Highway, Vancouver Island.
The dieselization programme on District IV of the British Columbia Electric Railway
between New Westminster and Chilliwack worked out so well that the overhead trolley-
wire system has now been entirely abandoned, and diesel-electrics are now handling the
entire traffic on that line.
Applications were received for approval of railways and ferry-slips to serve the Elk
Falls Paper Company, Duncan Bay, and the Howe Sound Pulp & Paper Company
Limited, Port Mellon. After approval the construction was inspected and approved for
operation. In both cases geared steam-locomotives were procured for motive power.
These locomotives were inspected and certified. The industrial railways serving the
Nanaimo Sulphate & Pulp Company, Nanaimo; The Columbia Cellulose Company, Prince
Rupert; and MacMillan & Bloedel Limited pulp-mill at Port Alberni were inspected and
close clearances approved where necessary.
Five hundred and twenty-three inspections covering fire-protective appliances of locomotives were made on the Canadian Pacific Railway, Canadian National Railways, and
Great Northern Railway in British Columbia. Reports of these inspections were forwarded
to the British Columbia Forest Service and the Board of Transport Commissioners at
Ottawa. Each Department Inspector is appointed by the Board of Transport Commissioners at Ottawa as a Board of Transport Fire Inspector so he may act with full authority
of the Board of Transport Commissioners on the transcontinental railways. Where defects
were found, the Inspectors ordered the locomotives out of service. Sixty-eight inspections
were made of fire-protective appliances on steam-locomotives operating on logging and
mining railways and Pacific Great Eastern Railway during the year. Fifty-nine reports of
these inspections were filed with the Forest Service.
During the year periodical inspections were made of rolling-stock and equipment on
the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. All boiler and pressure-vessels were inspected and
certified. Six additional diesel-electric locomotives of 1,600 horsepower each were procured during 1951, making a total of thirteen diesels now in operation. Several of the
steam-locomotives have now been laid up, and it was necessary to make special inspections
and issue extentions on existing steam motive power to keep it in operation until the
dieselization programme is completed on this railway.
On September 23rd, 1951, the boiler of a steam-locomotive exploded in the Quesnel
yards of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. One workman was injured. This accident
was investigated, and the cause of the explosion was found to be that the watchman had
allowed the water in the boiler to fall below the safe working level while a strong fire
continued to burn in the fire-box.
In company with C. R. Crysdale an inspection was made of the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway lines, and it can be reported that if the Operating Department continues to comply
with the programme of structural replacements, track repairs and diversions as recommended, the railway is now in a safe condition for continued operation, but, on the other
hand, if the maintenance and replacement programme as recommended were to be in any
way deferred, the future safety of the railway would certainly be sacrificed.
On the Quesnel-Prince George extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway,
inspections were made of operating conditions during construction. Two diesel locomotives and considerable rolling-stock have been procured by the contractors. This
equipment was inspected and approved and the operators examined and certified. A system of examination as to knowledge of the rules was inaugurated, and all necessary
personnel in the running trades on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway extension (under
construction) were examined. II 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Studies of dieselization of logging-railways were continued during 1951, and as a
result a 1,200-horsepower General Motors diesel-electric locomotive was demonstrated on
the Comox Logging & Railway Company's Ladysmith operation and the MacMillan &
Bloedel operations at Nanaimo Lakes and Copper Canyon. Inspectors were present
during two weeks of tests to observe performance and the effect of diesels on rails and
structures. It can be reported that diesel locomotives of conventional design, with the
proper weight on drivers, will prove very satisfactory on logging-railways and that substantial savings can be effected by their use. A geared steam-locomotive was converted to
diesel under the Department's supervision in Vancouver, and during 1951 was placed in
logging service at Englewood, where it is giving satisfactory results.
In order that operators of railways might obtain the maximum haulage from diesel
locomotives, the Department conducted a study during the year as to safe axle-loadings
where steel lighter than 85 pounds per yard is used. Information was obtained from most
authoritative sources in Canada and the United States and a report submitted, so that rail
loadings by diesel locomotives in British Columbia can be brought in line with rail loadings
elsewhere.
On March 25th, 1951, an accident occurred on the aerial tramway of Lifts Limited,
North Vancouver when the main cable or haulage-rope was forced from the upper bull-
wheel by a chair fouling in the upper guide-bars. Two passengers were injured. As a
result of this accident, extra vigilance was exercised on our part, resulting in an increased
number of inspections of the aerial tramways in the Vancouver district. In a number of
cases defective parts were removed and heat-treated at the Inspector's recommendations.
Rules and regulations governing aerial tramways were drafted, and the owners of aerial
tramways have co-operated with the Inspectors in every way possible with respect to safety
in operation.
The safety-first educational programme instituted by the Department in 1947 was
carried through 1951, as it is felt safe working practice by workmen is the cardinal rule in
accident-prevention. Safety lectures illustrated with safety films were conducted at
several of the operations. Although there were two fatal accidents on logging-railways
during 1951, it is felt the safety educational programme has a beneficial result. The two
fatal accidents can be attributed to thoughtless acts on the part of the workmen, as in both
cases the rules and regulations were violated. In one case a persecution was made under
the " Workmen's Compensation Act." In order to further the cause of safety, the
Operating Rules were redrafted, clarified, and brought up to date during 1951.
In the 1950 Annual Report it was suggested that in order to intensify the competitive
spirit for safety, a trophy be competed for by the various industrial companies. The
Workmen's Compensation Board reported an outstanding record by the Morrissey, Fernie
& Michel Railway, Fernie, for the year 1950, and a trophy was engraved and presented by
the Department. It is understood the Workmen's Compensation Board will notify us
which industrial company should receive the Department of Railways 1951 Safety Award.
Following is a report of the inspection work performed during the year 1951:—
Hydrostatic tests applied to boilers      156
Internal and external inspections of boilers          10
Internal-combustion locomotives inspected and certified        19
Internal-combustion locomotive cranes inspected and certified 6
Power-rail-cars inspected and certified        51
Diesel-electric locomotives inspected and certified        21
Electric locomotives inspected on narrow-gauge electric railways         12
Locomotives inspected other than hydrostatic tests      130
Number of cars inspected on industrial railways  1,340
Number of cars inspected on common-carrier railways      120 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1951 II 11
Number of miles of track inspected  1,110
Number of aerial tramways inspected in British Columbia 4
Number of aerial-tramway inspections conducted  14
Locomotive engineers examined and certified  6
Conductors examined and certified  4
Power-car operators examined and certified  6
Locomotive-crane engineers examined and certified •  6
Train-dispatchers examined and certified  3
Internal-combustion locomotive engineers examined and certified  2
Engineers examined  and certificates  issued,  Pacific  Great
Eastern Railway  9
Electric-locomotive operators examined and certified, Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd  101
Electric-locomotive operators examined and certified, Britannia Mining & Smelting Co., Ltd  4
B.C. Electric Railway street and interurban cars inspected  29
B.C. Electric Railway electric locomotives inspected and certified  :  13
Accidents investigated on B.C. Electric Railway  15
Fatal accidents on B.C. Electric Railway .. 2
Accidents investigated on logging-railways  7
Fatal accidents on logging-railways  2
Accidents investigated on Pacific Great Eastern Railway  3
Fatal accidents on Pacific Great Eastern Railway  1
Accidents investigated on aerial tramways  1
Accidents investigated on logging-truck roads  1
Appliance designs approved  1
New diesel-electric locomotives imported  6
Inspections made of fire-protective appliances on industrial
railways  59
Inspections made of fire-protective appliances on Pacific Great
Eastern Railway  9
Inspections made of fire-protective appliances on locomotives
of C.P.R., C.N.R., and G.N.R. for Board of Transport
Commissioners  523
Respectfully submitted.
R. E. Swanson,
Chief Inspector.
LIST OF APPENDICES
A list of Executive Council certificates issued is given in Appendix A.
Accidents on railways under Provincial jurisdiction are shown in Appendix B.
Industrial railways operating during the year are shown in Appendix C.
A list of locomotive cranes in industrial plants inspected by the Department is shown
in Appendix D.
A summary of the mileage of all railways operating in the Province is shown in
Appendix E. II 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDICES
APPENDIX A
Certificates Issued under the Provisions of the " Railway Act "
Certificate No.
Approving special rules and regulations for operation of aerial tramways, Lifts
Ltd.   773
Granting the Nanaimo Sulphate Pulp Ltd. exemption from standard clearances
on certain conditions  774
Granting H. R. MacMillan Export Co. Ltd. permission to construct a spur  775
Approving regulations for the operation of Hollyburn Aerial Trams Ltd.  776
Approving rules and regulations governing carriage of passengers and goods by
Grouse Mountain Resorts Ltd  777
Approving standard freight tariffs on the lines of the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway Co.   778
Approving standard freight tariffs on the line of the B.C. Electric Railway Co.,
Ltd.   779
Approving a bridge over Gordon River on the lines of the Western Forest
Industries Ltd .  780
Amending Rules and Regulations, Part II, governing General Operating Rules_ 781
Amending Rules and Regulations, Part II, and rescinding Certificate No. 781  782
Granting leave to Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co. to construct certain level
crossings over public roads  783
Granting Minister of Public Works leave to construct grade crossings over the
tracks of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.  784
Granting application of Columbia Cellulose Co. Ltd. for permission to construct a log-dump and trestle  785
Approving installation of flashing-light signals at Scott Road, District of Surrey 786
Approving  installation  of  flashing-light  signals   at  Bergstrom   Road,   King
George VI Highway „  787
Granting leave to the Village of Abbotsford to construct a level crossing at
Hazel Street, Abbotsford  788
Granting leave to the Minister of Public Works to construct and operate
Diamond Bridge, Cowichan-Newcastle District   789
Granting  leave  to  the  B.C.  Electric  Railway  Co.,  Ltd.,   to  issue  general
mortgage bonds and approving of the sale of same  790
Granting Minister of Public Works leave to construct highway crossing over
the tracks of the Alberni Pacific Lumber Co. railway  791 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1951
II 13
APPENDIX B
Accident Report, 1951
Class A1
Killed       Injured
Class B2
Killed       Injured
B.C. Electric Railway Co., Ltd.-
Passengers 	
Employees..
Other persons _
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.-
Passengers.-
Employees..
Other persons _
Industrial railways—■
Employees-
Other persons-
Locomotive cranes—Employees-
Totals 	
57
5
18
89
48
49
1 Class A: Accidents to persons resulting from movement of trains, locomotives, or cars.
2 Class B: Accidents arising from causes other than those resulting from movement of trains, locomotives, or cars. II 14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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d 2 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1951
II 15
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en II 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDIX D
List of Cranes and Other Auxiliary Motive Power in Industrial Plants
Inspected by Railway Department
Alaska Pine & Cellulose Ltd Crane No. D.R. 304.
Alberni Pacific Lumber Co. Ltd. (Sawmill) Crane No. 40929 B.C.
Alberta Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 42998 B.C.
Anderson Bros. Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 11905 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 302.
Arrowhead Wood Preservers Ltd Crane No. D.R. 293.
Crane No. D.R. 322.
Crane No. 22633 B.C.
Associated Foundry Ltd Crane No. 21532 B.C.
Baxter, J. H., & Co. Ltd Internal-combustion Crane No. 1.
Bloedel, Stewart & Welch Ltd.—
Sawmill  Crane No. 44666 B.C.
Pulp-mill  Gas Internal-combusion Locomotive No. 50.
Britannia Mining & Smelting Co. Ltd 6 narrow-gauge electric locomotives.
B.C. Cement Co. Ltd Crane No. 21439 B.C.
4 narrow-gauge gasoline locomotives.
B.C. Forest Products Ltd. (Sawmill) Crane No. D.R. 320.
Burrard Dry Dock Co. Ltd Crane No. 50514 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 292.
Gas Locomotive Crane No. 4.
Capital Iron & Metals Ltd Crane No. D.R. 295.
Crane No. D.R. 299.
Crane No. 44386 B.C.
Coast Quarries Ltd Crane No. D.R. 342.
Columbia Cellulose Co. Ltd Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1,
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.—
Kimberley  Crane No. 12772 B.C.
Electric Locomotive No. 1.
Electric Locomotive No. 2.
Trail 12 narrow-gauge electric locomotives.
Deeks Sand & Gravel Co. Ltd Gas-locomotive No. 1.
Dominion Bridge Co. Ltd Crane No. 44129 B.C.
Crane No. 44317 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 347.
Derrick Crane No. 19.
Dominion Tar & Chemical Co. Ltd Crane No. 44441 B.C.
Gas-switcher No. 1.
Crane No. D.R. 283.
Gas Locomotive Crane No. 6.
Esquimalt Dry-dock Crane No. 22582 B.C.
Portable Boiler No. D.R. 314.
Hamilton Bridge Co. Ltd Crane No. 12669 B.C.
Hillcrest Lumber Co. Ltd. (Sawmill). , Crane No. 40049 B.C.
Crane No. 44315 B.C.
Jamieson Construction Co. Ltd Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
King, M. B., Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 12430 B.C.
Lama Wood Products Ltd Gas internal-combustion locomotive crane.
Lions Gate Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 12370 B.C.
Lumby Timber Co. Ltd Crane No. D.R. 343.
Mayo Lumber Co. (1943) Ltd -Crane No. D.R. 321.
Nanaimo Sulphate & Pulp Ltd. (H. R. MacMillan) Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
Northern Construction Co. Ltd Crane No. 12321 B.C.
Osborn Bay Wharf Co. Ltd Crane No. 21526 B.C.
Point Hope Shipyard Crane No. D.R. 315.
Prince Rupert Drydock & Shipyard Crane No. D.R. 290.
Robertson & Hacket Sawmill * Crane No. 44584 B.C.
Crane No. 12545 B.C.
Sigalet & Co. Ltd Crane No. 21089 B.C.
Sooke Lake Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 22632 B.C.
Timber Preservers Ltd Crane No. 43807 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 288. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1951
II 17
APPENDIX D—Continued
List of Cranes and Other Auxiliary Motive Power in Industrial Plants
Inspected by Railway Department—Continued
Timberland Lumber Co. Ltd Crane No. 12368 B.C.
Victoria Machinery Depot Ltd Crane No. D.R. 291.
Crane No. D.R. 305.
Western Bridge & Steel Fabricators Ltd Crane No. D.R. 308.
Crane No. D.R. 309.
Yarrows Ltd.    Crane No. 376.
APPENDIX E
Mileage of All Railways Operating in the Province
Mainland
Main
Line
Sidings
Island
Main
Line
Sidings
Total
Main
Line
Sidings
Under the jurisdiction of the Board of Transport Com
missioners for Canada—
Canadian Pacific Railway	
Canadian National Railways 	
Great Northern Railway.
B.C. Electric Railway (leased)..
Totals	
Under the jurisdiction of the Provincial Government-
Pacific Great Eastern Railway 	
B.C. Electric Railway 	
Industrial railways—
Standard gauge-
Standard gauge, Queen Charlotte Islands .
Narrow gauge   _	
Totals  	
Grand totals..
1,858.23
1,342.00
140.77
42.80
510.67
345.77
37.62
21.67 |
210.77
90.17
42.84
23.76
| 2,069.00
I 1,432.17
|     140.77
42.80
553.51
358.03
37.62
21.67
3,383.80 |     915.73  [     300.94 |       66.60 | 3,684.74 |     970.83
355.51
128.33
24.28
7.00
38.17
41.75
25.07
13.53
15.00
355.51
128.33
549.78
7.00
47.42
525.50
121.28
30.09
9.25
3.75
41.75
25.07
134.81
15.00
33.84
553.29 j     125.44 |     534.75 |     125.03 | 1,088.04 ]     250.47
3,937.09 | 1,041.17
I
835.69 |     191.63 I 4,772.78 | 1,221.30
Total mileage of all railways in British Columbia, 5,994.08.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952
395-252-3393   

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