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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Thirty-eighth and Thirty-ninth Reports of the Medical Inspection of Schools… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1952]

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Thirty-eighth and Thirty-ninth Reports
of the
Medical Inspection of Schools
For the Years Ended June 30ch
1949 and 1950
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952  Department of Health and Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., February 1st, 1952.
To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Reports of the Medical Inspection of
Schools for the years ended June 30th, 1949 and 1950.
A. D. TURNBULL,
Minister of Health and Welfare. Department of Health and Welfare,
Victoria, B.C., February 1st, 1952.
The Honourable A. D. Turnbull,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Thirty-eighth and Thirty-ninth Reports of the
Medical Inspection of Schools for the years ended June 30th, 1949 and 1950.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT, M.D., D.P.H,
Deputy Minister of Health. REPORT OF SCHOOL HEALTH SERVICES
This Report, covering the academic years ended June 30th, 1949, and June 30th,
1950, provides an accounting of the school health services in the schools throughout
British Columbia during that period.
CHANGING TRENDS IN ADMINISTRATION
School health services are concerned with the medical and preventive health features
affecting the growth and development of the school-child. While attention is focused upon
the mental, emotional, physical, nutritional, and immunization status of the pupil, the
influence of the school environment is taken into consideration to ensure that such factors
as heating, lighting, ventilation, and sanitation conform to the requirements of healthful
living.
It must again be recorded that concentration toward ideal school health accomplishes
little unless similar healthful influences prevail throughout the community. More and
more district School Boards, inclined to that view and aware of the advantages of consolidation of health services, are transferring the administration of school health services
to Union Boards of Health, to be administered by the health unit staff as an integral part
of the total community health service instead of something apart. During 1948-49 six
school districts—namely, No. 33 (Chilliwack), No. 76 (Agassiz), No. 71 (Courtenay),
No. 72 (Campbell River), No. 75 (Mission), and No. 42 (Haney)—joined Union Boards
of Health, while in 1949-50 seven more—No. 40 (New Westminster), No. 41 (Coquitlam), No. 9 (Castlegar), No. 11 (Trail-Rossland), No. 17 (Princeton), No. 18
(Keremeos), and No. 64 (Ganges)—adapted themselves to unit administration. As at
June 30th, 1950, therefore, school health services for fifty-one of the seventy-six school
districts were provided through health units, while a majority of the remaining twenty-five
school districts are seeking similar privileges. It probably should be noted that there are
only nine school districts in the Province that do not have public health nursing services,
which has always been basic to attainment of health unit status.
METHODS OF EXAMINATION
The inquiries into the best methods of assessing the physical status of school pupils
have been continuous through the period covered by this Report. With the increase in
the school population and development of greater numbers of schools, it becomes fairly
apparent that it is impossible for any school physician to give a thorough physical examination to every pupil. In any case it certainly seems to have been proven over the years that
in terms of defects found and remedial attention provided, an annual physical examination
for every pupil cannot be substantiated. Experience has shown that a thorough physical
examination three or four times during the entire school-life, with a screening of the pupils
during the intervening years, permits concentration of medical attention on the physically
inferior, most in need of medical attention. For these reasons it has been common
practice through school health services to confine routine physical examinations to Grades
I, IV, VII, and X, with screening selection of the intervening grades. This is reflected in
the statistical analysis of the school medical examination, revealing 76.0 per cent of the
pupils in these grades examined in 1948-49 and 73.2 per cent in the following year,
1949-50.
The study mentioned in previous Reports into the usefulness of the Wetzel Grid was
completed and the results published in a special report entitled " Report of the Wetzel
Grid Study."   In summary, the report states:— NN 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
It has been seen that the Wetzel Grid screens into an unsatisfactory group approximately 15
per cent for whom no malady can be detected on clinical examination. It does not, however,
screen all pathology into this group since it has been shown that 4.6 per cent of the entire group
of school children studied were screened into the satisfactory category, notwithstanding the fact
that they had significant pathological defects. It remains, therefore, to the second integral part of
the Grid technique, the clinical appraisal, to diagnose pathology and causes of deviations.
The qualitative screening by the Grid is, therefore, only a useful adjunct to school health
services. It will not materially reduce the work of the examiner, but it will tend to concentrate
this work on those children whose condition demands closer supervision. It definitely creates
interest in a procedure which otherwise tends to become monotonous and mechanical.
The public health nurses, teachers, parents, and pupils also are appreciative of the Grid as a
graphic record and educational aid.
In this study, it was shown that approximately 67 per cent of children follow a growth pattern
which, according to the Grid, is a normal one. Admittedly, the grid misses some cases and
admittedly it is not a diagnostic instrument. It is felt, however, that the introduction of this
system into a school health service would, while demanding additional clerical time, provide better
use of professional time. It would arouse a greater interest in social factors and environmental
influences as affecting the health of children, and finally, should create improved school health
services, which is the ultimate goal.
On the basis of this report, a decision has been made to continue the use of the Wetzel
Grid as a screening tool in the sixty schools of the six school districts served by the Central
Vancouver Island Health Unit. A further introduction of its use is proposed in other
school health services throughout the Province, commencing with Grade I pupils each
year, thereby gradually extending it throughout all grades in a school. This move should
promote an additional advancement in the school health services in line with the avowed
policy toward an ideal school health service.
PREVENTIVE DENTAL SERVICES
Early in 1949 it was at last possible to establish a Division of Preventive Dentistry.
During the period under report, plans for the introduction of preventive services to be
provided by full-time dentists in local health units were formulated in co-operation with,
and with the approval of, the British Columbia Dental Association. However, by June
30th, 1950, it was not possible to recruit dentists to fill these appointments. As an interim
measure, arrangements were made and successfully implemented in many rural communities throughout the Province whereby private dental practitioners conducted clinics
for the younger children on one or two days a week in their own offices. Grants representing 50 per cent of the total cost of dental treatment were made by the Department of
Health to local committees organizing such clinics.
In addition, during this period were also formulated plans to endeavour to attract
dentists to provide dental services to the smaller rural communities of the Province.
A system of grants-in-aid was authorized to endeavour to attract dentists to reside in communities in which no resident dentist is available, as was also the provision of dental
equipment on loan to communities where a dentist would agree to visit periodically.
In an endeavour to stress the possibilities of the prevention of the vast majority of
dental disease, further educational material—that is, booklets, pamphlets, posters, films,
and film-strips—has been made available to schools through the local public health
personnel. In particular, a booklet entitled " Your Teeth—How to Save Them " was
made available to all schools, and on the instruction of the Department of Education was
adopted as the official text for teaching dental health.
At last a start has been made to endeavour to solve the problem of dental ill-health
amongst rural school-children. It is now confidently expected that it will be possible to
report considerable progress in this field in future years.
NUTRITION SERVICES
Education as to the wise selection of food is a vital part of the school health
programme, since food has an important bearing on the child's growth, development, and MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS, 1949-50 NN 7
general well-being. Since the fall of 1949 the nutrition consultants have assisted teachers
and public health personnel in studying the pattern of foods eaten by school-children.
This information is then used as the basis for developing a programme with specific
emphasis on the important foods that are neglected in the children's daily meals. The
studies are carried out under the supervision of the teacher and public health nurse as a
school health project. The children record all the foods they eat over a three-day period,
and the records are analysed according to food-groups. Food-studies have been conducted
in areas of the Kootenays, Vancouver Island, Vancouver, and Northern British Columbia.
In each area the three major deficiencies in children's diets have been milk, Vitamin D
preparation, and foods rich in Vitamin C. These foods are essential for best growth and
development and good health. In addition, the studies have revealed that many children
eat excessive amounts of sweet foods, such as candy, soft drinks, and cake. Not only are
these foods expensive, since they contain little food value, but they also dull the appetite
and help to promote tooth decay. In view of these findings it has been recommended that
the follow-up programme in each area give special emphasis to the four major problems.
To assist in these programmes, the Nutrition Service has prepared pamphlets dealing with
each of the four topics, and supplied visual aid and outlines for use in schools. Where
studies have been made, public health personnel have reported an increased interest in
improving food-habits by children and parents alike.
A new project introduced during the fall of 1950 has been that of rat-feeding experiments in schools. One group of rats is fed on a poor lunch, often typical of that eaten by
many of the children, while the second group is fed a recommended adequate lunch. The
children are able to observe the effects of the two contrasting diets on the weight and
generally healthy appearance of the rats over a period of several weeks. The experiments
illustrate vividly the importance of food on both appearance and disposition, and are
effective in encouraging improved food-habits among the children.
The nutrition consultant and public health personnel have continued to assist teachers
and Parent-Teacher Associations in planning and operating school-lunch programmes
most efficiently. Food-studies have often indicated where improvement can be made in
school-lunch menus, and rat-feeding experiments have emphasized the value of a well-
planned lunch.
HEALTH EDUCATION
During the two school-years under review a major step in the improvement of health-
teaching in schools was undertaken with the completion of the Effective Living Course for
junior and senior high schools. The implementation of this course, which includes
material on guidance, safety, home and family living, and alcohol education, as well as
personal and community health, should do much to improve the quality of school health
education in this Province. The curriculum was planned to help students to help themselves by providing them with a necessary background of scientific knowledge on which to
build by developing an inquiring attitude and by linking health improvement with basic
interests of adolescence. A representative of the Health Education Division assisted
materially in the preparation of the health sections of this course. One month during the
summer of 1949 was devoted to the preparation of certain units, and a curriculum
workshop on this course was attended during the previous summer.
Throughout the past two years local public health services have continued to assist
health-teachers through the provision of information, printed material, and films.
Meetings of public health and teaching staffs on the local level have been a most
satisfactory method of furthering greater understanding of their respective functions and
responsibilities and of ensuring close co-operation in the development of sound school
health programmes. NN 8
BRITISH COLUMBIA
SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT REPORT, 1949-50
With three years' use of the detailed method of reporting on school environment,
School Boards have been able to apply better methods, procedures, and practices in the
considerable amount of school building and renovations carried out in the past two years.
New schools have been required by increased enrolment, the establishment of new subdivisions, and the shifting population in the larger centres. Substantial progress has been
made in the betterment of existing accommodations and all phases of environmental
efficiency.
Electrification of many areas has made possible artificial lighting and the use of
pressure-tanks and water-supplies and the installation of modern conveniences in rural
schools. One School Board decided no further buildings would be erected with outdoor
toilets nor would they install stove heaters in the established rural areas. In one locality,
in the reconstruction programme the British Columbia Chapter of Illuminating Engineering Society conducted a model lighting experiment where two classrooms were connected
to model lighting areas—one room with fluorescent lighting and the other with
incandescent fixtures.
Portable schools, capable of being moved at will, have been erected in communities
where settlement has not yet been stabilized, and has enabled School Boards to provide
education facilities in small communities that have sprung up around sawmills and logging
operations. This year saw the expansion of dormitory facilities in secondary schools in
two areas.
For areas not served by full-time health services, many inquiries were answered for
details as to installation of sewage-disposal systems, water-supplies, and lighting
arrangements.
HEALTH OF THE SCHOOL-CHILD
As in previous years, the physical examinations of school-children have revealed the
vast majority of them to be in good physical condition clinically. As a matter of fact, the
trend noted in the last medical inspection of schools toward a consistently improved status
among the pupils has been maintained year by year, although very slightly in the last year.
Table I.—Physical Status of Pupils Examined, Showing Percentage
in Each Group, 1943-44 to 1949-50
Academic Group
Percentage
of Pupils,
A Group1
Percentage
of Pupils.
B Group2
Percentage
of Pupils.
C Group3
1943_44._ __._ '           ..
86.6
88.3
90.4
91.1
91.7
93.3
93.4
11.4
11.0
9.0
8.3
7.8
6.4
6.5
2.0
1944-45    	
0.7
1945-46   	
0.6
1946-47	
0.6
1947-48 	
0.5
1948-49      ...	
0.3
1949-50.	
0.1
1 A Group: A, Ad, Ae, and Ade categories.
2 B Group: Bd, Be, and Bde categories.
3 C Group: Cd, Ce, and Cde categories.
So many features affect physical status it is difficult to determine any definite reason
for such a trend. It is, however, significant that improved physical health is one of
the major goals of all public health services, and that this improved physical status
among school pupils has paralleled a transition of school health services from its former
partial service to integration with community health services administered through health
units.
In addition to the excellent physical status of the average British Columbia school-
child, the majority of pupils (more than 70 per cent in each group) are immunized against MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS,  1949-50 NN 9
such major communicable diseases as diphtheria and smallpox, maintaining their immunity status throughout their school-life. This bespeaks a satisfactory trend in the
immunity status of that population group, but the fact that cases of diphtheria were
recorded in both years (rates of 1.1 cases per 100,000 population in 1949 and 5.5 in 1950)
emphasizes that immunization of the total school population would be most desirable.
A significantly smaller proportion of the school population are immunized against
scarlet fever, whooping-cough, and typhoid fever. This is understandable, as administration of scarlet fever toxin and typhoid fever vaccine is governed by the vagaries of disease
incidence, particularly since the immunity so conferred is less permanent. In the case of
whooping-cough, concentration of protection toward this disease is emphasized in the
early infant and pre-school years, in which population group the disease is more serious
and often fatal. Consequently, as the child becomes older there is less need for immunity
protection to pertussis, and this is reflected in the gradually decreasing immunity status to
this disease in the higher grades.
■ The third factor reflecting the health of the school-child is the communicable-disease
incidence, the majority of which are childhood infections. In the 1948-49-50 period
there were major increases in chicken-pox, measles, mumps, and rubella, with definite
upward trends in scarlet fever, septic sore throat, and rheumatic fever. Many of these
infections recur with a cyclic epidemic periodicity as new susceptible groups enter the
school, and as the period under consideration ended, evidence was at hand indicating that
the peak incidence had passed and that future incidence would likely be downward toward
a cessation of the present cycle. This seemed particularly evident in chicken-pox and
measles.
Table II.—Communicable-disease Incidence
(Rate per 100,000 population.)
1949 1950
Conjunctivitis      25.8 24.6
Chicken-pox  661.6 439.5
Diphtheria       1.1 5.5
Influenza        4.2 40.4
Measles  a  966.3 498.3
Mumps  387.3 758.7
Poliomyelitis     20.2 6.4
Rheumatic fever        1.7 2.9
Rubella  '_.    50.9 697.3
Scarlet fever     44.1 76.5
Septic sore throat       9.2 16.1
Tick paralysis       0.2 0.1
Pertussis     19.2 152.9
Poliomyelitis showed a moderate incidence during 1948-49 with a rate of 20.2 per
100,000 population, but was definitely improved in 1949-50, when the rate was only
6.4 per 100,000 population. Diphtheria, already mentioned, had a minor incidence
somewhat lower than in previous years.
In general, the health of the school-child during the 1948-49-50 period was better
than in past years. Although an average number of minor communicable diseases was
recorded, the incidence of major infections was absent or insignificant, while the immunity
status on the whole was satisfactory and the physical status excellent. NN 10                                                     BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICS
During 1948-49 there were 137,536 children enrolled in the grades examined, which
had decreased to 128,724 children in 1949-50.    Of this number, 39.8 per cent were
examined in that first year and 35.0 per cent in the second.   This indication of the per
centage examined is admittedly low, but is explained upon the basis that medical
examinations are concentrated in Grades I, IV, VII, and X.   Indeed, study of the results
of the medical examinations by grades reveals a much more reassuring situation in the
fact that 85.0 per cent and 92.2 per cent of the Grade I were examined in consecutive
years, with lesser but corresponding majorities in the selected subsequent years.    The
results are presented in detail in the various statistical tables.
Table III.—Physical Status of Total Pupils Examined in the Schools
for the Years Ended June 30th, 1946 to 1950
1                   1                   1
1945-46        1946-47   I    1947-48        1948-49
f                    1                     1
1949-50
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined	
88,588
106,311
121,542
137,536
128,724
Total pupils examined...    	
39,131
47,671
43,662
54,682
45,049
44.2
44.8
35.9
39.8
35.0
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A	
38.8
48.3
36.7
51.8
39.5
49.6
42.2
48.9
38.8
Ad        .
52.5
Ae	
0.9
2.4
0.9
1.7
0.9
1.7
0.8
1.4
0.6
Ade.  	
1.3
Bd. 	
7.6
0.3
6.7
0.3
6.7
0.2
5.6
0.2
5.6
Be    	
0.1
Bde.  	
1.1
1.3
0.9
0.6
0.8
Cd     	
0.5
0.4
0.3
0.1
0.1
Ce 	
0.1
Cde  	
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.1
Table IV.—Physical Status of Total Pupils Examined in Grades I, IV, VII, and X
for the Years Ended June 30th, 1946 to 1950
1945^16
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49
1949-50
61,974
72,612
76,624
50,519
41,688
44,809
53,642
53,244
38,377
30 515
72.3
73.9
69.5
76.0
73.2
Physical status—percentage of pupils examined—
A   	
33.6
34.9
37.6
40.6
38.7
Ad	
53.1
53.1
52.4
50.7
53.3
Ae  	
0.7
0.9
0.7
0.7
0.6
Ade	
2.0
1.7
1.4
1.3
1.0
Bd.    —	
8.3
6.9
6.6
5.8
5.6
Be  	
0.4
0.4
0.1
0.1
0.1
Bde  	
1.2
1.4
0.6
0.5
0.5
Cd   .. -  	
0.4
0.4
0.2
0.1
0.1
Ce   ..  	
0.01
0.02
0.01
0.01
0.01
Cde  .  ..                 	
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.1
0.01 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS,  1949-50
NN 11
Table V.—Summary of Physical Status of Pupils Examined, According to
School Grades, 1948-49
..
Examined
via Grades
Total Pupils,
All Schools
Grade I
Grades II-VI
Grades VII-IX
Grades X-XIII
Total pupils enrolled in grades
examined 	
137,536
17,735
70,274
31,225
18,302
54,682
16,346
19,638
11,987
6,711
Percentage of enrolled pupils
examined 	
39.8
92.2
27.9
38.4
36.7
Physical status—percentage of
pupils examined—
A 	
42.2
34.6
44.1
45.0
49.8
Ad  	
48.9
55.5
46.3
46.4
44.8
Ae 	
0.8
0.7
0.9
0.9
0.2
Ade- ......	
1.4
1.1
1.9
1.6
0.7
Bd..  	
5.6
7.2
5.4
5.1
3.9
Be  . .	
0.2
0.6
0.2
0.5
0.2
0.8
0.1
0.6
0.1
Bde	
0.3
Cd  .	
0.1
0.1
0.2
0.2
0.1
Ce	
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
Cde	
Table VI.—Physical Status of Total Pupils Examined, According to
School Grades, 1949-50
All
Schools
Grade
1
II
III
IV
V
VI
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined....
128,724
45,049
35.0
38.9
52.5
0.8
1.2
5.6
0.1
0.8
0.1
16,796
14,280
85.0
32.5
57.9
0.9
1.1
6.7
0.1
0.7
0.1
15,080
2,430
16.1
32.6
56.2
1.2
1.6
6.9
0.2
1.2
0.1
14,057
2,036
14.5
39.6
50.2
1.1
1.8
6.0
1.1
0.2
12,986
6,216
47.9
43.4
48.5
0.7
1.4
5.1
0.1
0.7
0.1
12,050
1,465
12.2
36.2
53.7
1.3
1.3
5.3
0.5
1.5
0.1
0.1
11,444
1,428
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined
Physical status—percentage of pupils
examined—
A       _
12.5
47.2
Ad	
43.8
Ae ....	
ArlR
0.9
1.2
Bd.  	
5.5
Be                           	
0.3
Bde               	
1.0
Cd   	
Ce              .    -	
0.1
Cde       - 	
Grade
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
Total pupils enrolled in grades examined....
Total pupils examined 	
Percentage of pupils enrolled examined
Physical status—percentage of pupils
examined—
A..                       	
11,114
8,730
78.5
40.1
52.1
0.6
1.5
4.9
0.1
0.7
9,682
1,123
11.6
40.3
50.4
0.4
2.5
5.6
0.1
0.4
0.3
9,369
1,000
10.7
47.0
43.6
0.8
2.2
5.3
0.2
0.8
0.1
6,933
5,574
80.4
44.6
49.3
0.4
0.6
4.4
0.1
0.5
0.1
4,831
389
8.1
53.4
41.6
0.3
0.5
3.9
0.3
3,903
358
9.2
56.1
36.6
6.4
0.3
0.3
0.3
479
20
4.2
80.0
Ad   	
15.0
Ae  ...    	
Ade   	
Bd
5.0
Be	
Bde       	
Cd	
Ce               	
Cde                             	 NN  12
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table VII.—Physical Status of School Personnel, Organized and
Unorganized Territory, 1948-49
Total
Organized
Unorganized
3,929
253
6.4
93.7
4.0
2.0
0.3
3,465
221
6.4
96.8
0.9
1.8
0.5
464
32
6.9
Physical status—percentage of personnel examined—
A.    	
71.9
Ad      	
25.0
B      . 	
3.1
Bd  	
C        	
Cd...	
Table VIII.—Physical Status of School Personnel, Organized and
Unorganized Territory, 1949-50
Total
Organized
Unorganized
Total personnel employed in grades examined	
4,639
285
61.4
91.9
6.7
0.4
1.0
3,161
185
58.5
100.0
........
1,478
100
6.7
Physical status—percentage of personnel examined—
A      .  	
Ad -                         	
77.0
19.0
n  „	
Bd    _	
C	
1.0
3.0
Cd   	
Table IX.—Immunization Status of Total Pupils Enrolled, According
to School Grades, 1948-49
Total Pupils
Enrolled
by Grades
Percentage Immunized
Diphtheria
Scarlet
Fever
Smallpox
Pertussis
Typhoid
137,536
17,735
16,022
14,832
13,758
13,058
12,604
11,614
10,434
9,177
7,412
5,399
4,284
1,207
76.5
77.1
78.3
77.7
79.0
78.4
78.0
75.4
75.3
74.2
71.4
72.2
70.4
72.4
23.4
17.1
20.0
22.7
24.9
26.9
27.0
27.3
26.8
23.4
22.1
24.1
21.4
19.1
76.4
72.4
74.6
76.0
77.5
79.1
79.0
77.4
77.4
76.6
75.1
77.5
75.8
75.6
20.9
41.2
36.0
28.5
22.2
17.6
13.7
11.8
9.9
8.0
6.6
6.1
6.5
7.3
18.0
Grade I      _.   .
12.8
Grade II	
Oradp. ITT
16.3
17 4
Grade IV.	
18.3
Grade V  	
19.0
Grade VI  _     	
20 0
Grade VII 	
20 0
Grade VIII	
20 4
Grade IX	
19 8
Grade X 	
18 3
Grade XI   	
Grade XII..	
20.7
19 1
Grade XIII            	
15 0 MEDICAL INSPECTION OF SCHOOLS,  1949-50
NN 13
Table X.—Immunization Status of Total Pupils Enrolled, According
to School Grades, 1949-50
Total Pupils
Enrolled
by Grades
Percentage Immunized
Diphtheria
Scarlet
Fever
Smallpox
Pertussis
Typhoid
128,724
16,796
15,080
14,057
12,986
12,050
11,444
11,114
9,682
9,369
6,933
4,831
3,903
479
78.7
77.8
80.7
81.4
81.7
77.6
84.0
79.4
77.3
68.1
75.5
77.8
76.9
73.1
19.3
11.6
14.2
17.4
18.9
20.2
22.3
21.2
21.7
22.5
25.7
26.3
26.0
37.8
74.2
67.7
73.0
75.0
76.7
77.7
79.2
74.1
74.8
69.2
73.9
77.6
76.4
76.4
24.4
46.3
41.3
36.0
29.0
21.6
18.3
12.3
9.8
7.6
6.7
5.0
4.7
3.3
20.6
Grade I  .	
Grade II	
Grade III 	
Grade IV. 	
15.2
16.7
19.0
21.6
Grade V..   .	
22.7
Grade VI  	
22.3
Grade VII .	
24.4
Grade VIII 	
23.4
Grade IX  _
20.2
Grade X.  _
23.2
Grade XI 	
22.4
Grade XII  	
Grade XIII  .    - 	
23.1
38.8
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952
745^52-3947   

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