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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL Annual Report of the Inspector of Gaols… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1952

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Annual Report
of the
Inspector of Gaols
For the Year Ended
March 31st, 1951
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the Inspector of
Gaols for the year ended March 31st, 1951.
G. S. WISMER,
A ttorney-General.
A ttorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1952.  Report of the Inspector of Gaols, 1950-51
The Honourable G. S. Wismer, Q.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit the Annual Report covering the four Provincial
Gaols for the year ended March 31st, 1951. In submitting this Report, I would like to
draw attention to the fact that my appointment as Inspector of Gaols took effect March
1st, 1951, so that actually I held this position for one month of the fiscal year covered by
the Report attached hereto.
OAKALLA PRISON FARM
Warden J. Millman reports as follows: —
" I beg to submit herewith Gaol reports, men's and women's sections, for the fiscal
year ended March 31st, 1951. The annual returns for all prisoners received during the
year are being forwarded under separate cover. Also, please find enclosed statements
covering operation of the sheet-metal plant, laundry, shoemaker-shop, tailor-shop, paint-
shop, farm, women's gaol, a summary of Gaol punishments for the year, and a complete
inventory of live stock and equipment.
" The statements of revenue and expenditure, and the accompanying summarization
of the Bursar, indicate a continued improvement in our farm operations, the only set-back
being in poultry and egg production due to the fact that the flock contracted Newcastle
disease and had to be destroyed and later replaced. The picture in so far as the dairy and
piggery are concerned is indeed encouraging as compared with previous years, and the
various shops have maintained a fair over-all average.
" I regret to say that continued delays have prevented transfer of the sheet-metal
plant to the proposed new quarters in the still-vacant Quonset hut, but it is hoped that the
few remaining obstacles will soon be overcome and that I shall be able to announce the
transfer in my next report. The Quonset hut in question was put to good use for a few
months during the summer of 1950 for the housing of approximately 120 Doukhobor
prisoners awaiting transfer to the Penitentiary.
" Principal new construction for the year under review includes extensive alterations
to the Young Offenders' Unit; enlargement and alteration to the shoe-shop, effecting a
vast improvement; erection of two additional Quonset huts for anticipated arrival of more
Doukhobor prisoners, but never used; installation of sludge-drying beds for the Imhofr
tank, which has brought our sewage-disposal to maximum efficiency; and other minor
improvements and alterations.
" Unfortunately, we still lack our long-sought new heating plant, but I am given to
understand that construction of this has now been approved and that it will be proceeded
with before the end of 1951.
" Extension arms on the chain link fence surrounding a portion of the prison
property, with offset angle terminals and additional rows of barbed wire, were recommended by the Provincial Architect, and work on this was commenced, but is now being
held in abeyance due to the fact that it has been conclusively proven that without concertina wire the addition offers little or no additional hindrance to scaling the fence. Further
consideration will have to be given to this aspect of increasing the security of the prison.
" The Young Offenders' Unit was opened on February 26th, 1951, with a staff of
twenty-one and the transfer of twenty-one youths. The population is increased from time
to time as expansion of the training programme allows, and it is hoped that eventually
approximately 100 young offenders will share the benefits of this new departure.
" General improvements to the Gaol itself include complete rewiring of the institution, installation of fluorescent lighting in the central hall and all offices, repainting where
5 LL 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
required, more careful attention to the shrubs and lawns, and materially increased
quantities of flowers and plants, all of which add to the comfort, convenience, and outlook
of both staff and inmates, and present a pleasing appearance to the various visitors to the
Gaol.
" There are, unfortunately, very few figures available in connection with our libraries,
due to the change in Librarians and the long period (eight months) during which we were
without the services of a Librarian at all. There is no question, however, as to the continued popularity of this phase of the prison programme, and judging from the enthusiasm
of our new Librarian, I feel confident that the next Annual Report will include a highly
satisfactory showing of library statistics.
" General behaviour of inmates in both Men's and Women's Gaols, as indicated by
the attached summaries, has improved, in that there were fewer infractions, and infractions
for the most part were of a less serious nature. Health of inmates has maintained a very
fair average, and this can be attributed in no small degree to the excellent facilities now
available to combat sickness and disease. The Gaol is attended by the Gaol surgeon
three days weekly (or more often if required), by a psychiatrist whenever required, by a
doctor and nurses from the Venereal Disease Control Clinic twice weekly, and a dentist
once weekly. In addition, all new admissions are blood-tested for venereal disease and
X-rayed for possible tuberculosis or other pulmonary disorders. Inmates requiring minor
treatment or convalesence are housed in our own infirmary, and those requiring actual
hospitalization are transported to the Vancouver General Hospital. It will be seen that,
short of a full-time medical staff and a well-equipped hospital, everything possible is being
done to alleviate suffering, both physical and mental, and to curtail the spread of disease
amongst the prison population.
" The population remains high, particularly during the fall and winter months, and
we are still faced with the problem of overcrowding in the Men's Gaol, while the overflow
from the Women's Gaol is still being transferred to the Women's Gaol at Prince George
periodically.
" Activity in the Women's Gaol, as outlined in the Matron's report, shows a very
satisfactory picture. The long-awaited occupational-therapy programme, encompassing
several arts and crafts such as weaving, leatherwork, rug-making, needlecraft, quiltine,
shellwork, etc., is now well under way, and the excellent workmanship evidenced in the
finished products being turned out certifies the interest being taken by our female inmates
in these diverting and educational occupations. The matron supervising this work is
making excellent progress and is to be highly commended.
" In looking toward the ensuing fiscal year, I have pleasure in making the following
recommendations:—
" (1) That an addition be made to the administrative section of the main
building, as discussed with the Deputy Attorney-General and the Chief
Architect.
"(2) That provision be made for punishment cells under the administrative
section, replacing those in the wing, to eliminate the practice of unruly
prisoners undergoing punishment disturbing the remaining prisoners in
the wing.
"(3) That the infirmary be enlarged by extending an additional story over the
south wing of the main building.
"(4) That provision be made through expansion for increased segregation
facilities.
"(5) That the second story of the Women's Gaol be extended over the kitchen
to provide adequate workrooms for the occupational-therapy programme
in effect, and that adequate fluorescent lighting be installed. In the
meantime, the installation of fluorescent lighting in the present cramped
work section would be extremely beneficial. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1950-51 LL 7
"(6)  That the roof of the tailor-shop be replaced by a higher, flat roof to
provide additional work-space and more adequate ventilation.
"(7) That the prison acquire the 28 acres of municipally owned land adjoining
the northern boundary of the prison property.   This could be cleared and
drained, providing employment for prisoners, making a valuable addition
to the farm area and also reducing the hazard of escapes in that direction.
"(8)  That a fully equipped dental office be provided.   The dentist who is now
attending the Gaol weekly is doing an excellent job under trying conditions, at no cost to the Government, but he is seriously handicapped by
lack of equipment, and he can hardly be expected to supply his own under
this arrangement.
" In conclusion, may I once again commend the efforts of the Salvation Army, the
Roman Catholic chaplain, the John Howard Society, the Church of England ministry,
the Elizabeth Fry Society, and the Alcoholics Anonymous group toward the betterment,
both socially and spiritually, of our inmates in general."
Women's Section
Mrs. E. Inkster, R.N., Matron in Charge, reports as follows:—
" The female population shows a daily average of 56.772, a slight increase over the
previous year.
"A total of 61,589 meals was served. The usual extra rations were served at Easter,
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's.
"Edibles canned consisted of 174 quarts, mainly pickles; 10 gallons of sauerkraut;
and 10 gallons of dill pickles.
"Arts and Crafts.—Old material made up into quilts, two; rugs, twelve; slippers,
5 dozen pairs.   New material made up into three layettes.
"A new full-time programme of arts and crafts, which has been promoted and
fostered by the Elizabeth Fry Society, commenced March 12th. Initial supplies (to be
used under supervision of a matron, Miss Maybee) have been ordered to cover all
needlecrafts, rug-making, leathercraft, quilt-making, and dressmaking.
"Library
"Mr. K. Egilson commenced duties as Librarian on February 1st. Library
circulation has been high and, as usual, has filled a great need sufficiently. The value of
this extremely worth-while unit is hard to estimate.
"Sewing Repairs
"Men's Gaol.—Miscellaneous, 306 articles; socks, 20,633; hickory shirts, 1,791;
underwear, 4,720; jackets, 784; men's pants, 6,093; a total of 34,327 articles.
"Borstal School.—A total of 128 articles was mended.
"Women's Gaol.—Wearing-apparel and equipment made from new material, 164
articles; wearing-apparel and equipment made from old material, 906 articles; repairs
made to miscellaneous garments, 1,209 articles.
"Laundry
" During the year 21,969 articles were laundered.
"Health
" General health of the inmates was excellent. The Gaol physician made regular
visits. A doctor and nurse from the Provincial Venereal Disease Control Clinic made
weekly visits. There were eight inmates infected with syphilis and sixty with gonorrhoea.
These inmates were treated with penicillin and streptomycin.
"Hospital.—There were eight inmates hospitalized during the year. LL 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
"Recreation
" Miss Grace Walton, Provincial recreational instructress, has been giving weekly
instruction to the inmates in basketball, square dancing, badminton, ping-pong, etc. She
has had very favourable response from the inmates. Mrs. R. C. Weldon has been showing
the girls a movie, followed by a lecture, each month, under the auspices of the Women's
Christian Temperance Union.
"Church Services
" The attendance at the weekly church services is fair. The monthly services of the
John Howard Society have a favourable influence over the inmates.
"Major and Mrs. Wagner, of the Salvation Army, are doing valuable work in
rehabilitating inmates by boarding them at the receiving home.
" The Sisters of Service held weekly classes with girls who wished to attend, and the
response was very gratifying. The Sisters also help in rehabilitating many of the Roman
Catholic girls.
"Discipline
" Conduct for the past year has been fairly good in spite of overcrowding and the
very morbid increase in number of drug addicts. The percentage of drug addicts has
increased steadily during the year, and it is absolutely impossible to segregate the various
types of inmates.
"An increased number of prisoners with long sentences should be kept in single cells,
but our number of single cells is too small to make this possible.
"Summary
" It has been necessary to transfer a large number of inmates to the Provincial Gaol
at Prince George at various times during the year, but crowding is still a problem. Rooms
not intended for use as cells, such as the treatment-room, have to be used as cells.
" The new arts and crafts programme should aid in improving behaviour of inmates,
and already improvement has been noticed."
Youthful Offenders' Unit
Mr. T. A. Camm, Director in Charge, reports as follows:—
" The new building which was constructed immediately north of the main Gaol, and
which originally was to have been used as a shop building, was opened on February 26th,
1951, and is now being used as a Young Offenders' Unit. General overcrowding of the
Gaol, coupled with the large proportion of inmates between the ages of 16 and 23 who
were unsuitable for transfer to New Haven, led to the decision to use this building as a
segregated closed Borstal-type institution.
" Special equipment for vocational-training shops offering instruction in diesel, motor
•mechanics, and woodworking has been secured, and a relatively modern and up-to-date
training facility of this type has been set up in the basement. There is cell accommodation
for 100 inmates. Separate kitchen facilities have been provided and furnished with
modern cooking equipment. At the date of opening, twenty-one inmates in the age-group
16 to 23 were transferred from the main Gaol at Oakalla Prison Farm.
" The staff, consisting of the Director, Mr. T. A. Camm, formerly in charge of the
Star Class, Oakalla Prison Farm; Classification Officer, Mr. B. J. C. McCabe, who had
been transferred from the Provincial Probation Branch; Chief Custodial Officer, Mr.
J. W. Lane, formerly Chief Clerk at Oakalla; Vocational Officer,, Mr. W. McD. Holland;
and an Educational Officer, Mr. E. L. K. Cowan, and seventeen supervisors were
appointed. Part of the supervisory staff was selected from younger guards on the Oakalla
staff and the remainder from recent graduates of the University. All applicants have been
subjected to a screening test regarding their interest in people and their ability to deal with —^—■
REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1950-51 LL 9
behaviour problems. This screening process was carried out through the co-operation of
the University of British Columbia Counselling Service.
" The plan is that the Young Offenders' Unit will be a modern institution, with
particular emphasis on vocational and academic training and the development of an
individualized treatment and rehabilitative plan for each inmate. Stress is laid on staff-
training. The basis of the treatment process rests on the classification and selection of
inmates from the main population of Oakalla.
" There will be close co-operation with Probation Officers, the Provincial Psychiatric
Clinic and other social-agency staffs. Vocational, academic, social, and religious needs
of inmates will be met, and it is hoped that in this way the percentage of recidivism among
youthful offenders in this age-group will be substantially reduced."
NELSON GAOL
Warden A. Tulloch reports as follows:—
" The staff at present is made up as follows: Alex. Tulloch, Senior Guard (in charge
of Gaol); Andrew Niven, 1st Guard (office duties); Robert G. Thompson, 1st Guard
(general duties); John H. McGinn, 2nd Guard (general duties); Frank H. Doyle, 3rd
Guard (general duties); Donald J. Potosky, Probationary Guard (general duties).
" Population
"The population at the beginning of the year was 71. There were 591 inmates
received and 637 inmates discharged, leaving a total of 25 prisoners in the Gaol at the end
of the fiscal year. The peak of the inmate population was 141, and the low point 17.
The daily average for the period was 44.6, as against 34.7 for the previous year, an
increase of 10.1.
" Welfare and Recreation
" The inmates who are not working with the outside gang are allowed the freedom of
the cell blocks during the day, and, when weather permits, one hour in the exercise-yard
dailv except Saturdays and Sundays. Due to the Fire Marshal's report and to the crowded
condition in the Gaol, all individual locks were disposed of, thus giving the prisoners more
freedom during the night hours. A library is provided, and the radio is controlled from
the office by the guard on duty. There is a two-hour programme each evenins from 7 to
9 p.m., when the lights are turned out. On Saturday evenings the radio proarammes are
allowed for four hours, from 5 to 9 p.m., and on Sundays the radio is allowed from 12.30
to 9 p.m., so that the inmates have a varied programme, such as church services, popular
music, and news bulletins.
" Religious Services
" The Salvation Army continues to hold a service every Sunday morning from 10
to 11 a.m. Occasionally the Pentecostal Assembly has been meeting, with a good percentage of the inmates attending both these services. The Roman Catholic Church has
discontinued holding its service due to the decrease of members of that faith in the Gaol.
" Medical Care
" The general health of the prisoners in the past year has been very good, with no
hospital cases to report. We have been very fortunate, as there were few cases that
required segregation from the other inmates. These cases were attended by the Gaol
surgeon, Dr. F. M. Auld, either at his office or in the Gaol office. On January 22nd
provision was made by Dr. Auld to have all inmates undergo a chest X-ray at the local
hospital for early recognition of chest diseases, especially tuberculosis. This proved
successful, as we have had no cases of chest disease to date. However, facilities here for
handling these cases are extremely limited. LL 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
" Farm Work
" Due to the Doukhobors being housed in the Gaol annex and the erection of tents
by the Public Works Department for the overflow, the garden space was used for a
recreation centre for the Doukhobors. As a result of this, it was impossible to have
a garden this year, and the cost of provisions for the inmates increased considerably over
last year.
" Maintenance and Construction
" The only construction carried out this year at this institution was the erection of
wooden frames for the tents to house the Doukhobors when the Gaol annex became
overcrowded. These tents, three in number, were built on the space where the garden is
usually planted.
"All painted surfaces in the cell blocks were washed down after the Doukhobors
left, but no whitewashing was done during the year in other parts of the building due to
the overcrowded condition of this institution at the time the Doukhobors were housed here.
" General Remarks
" Since the new hot-water system was installed in the laundry in the early part of
the year, the facilities for supplying hot water in the Gaol and quarters are excellent, and
very little heat is required to provide this service. This new hot-water system makes
provision for sufficient hot water for baths, laundry, and the kitchen, and was particularly
useful when we were handling the peak of the Gaol population.
" Discipline
" The discipline in this institution has been very good during the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1951. There was only one breach, of a minor nature, of the prison
regulations reported by Warden R. S. Nelson during the entire year."
KAMLOOPS GAOL
Warden W. T. Teal, in making his report, states as follows:—
" Population
" The summary of annual statistics shows a marked increase in population over the
previous year; this increase has further taxed our limited facilities at this institution. To
relieve this condition, the Department was asked to approve and appropriate funds for
a small concrete cell block to be built adjacent to the west wing of the Gaol, to be used
exclusively by the police to hold persons arrested and taken into custody prior to committal
or sentence.
" Maintenance and Construction
" The general maintenance was done by prison labour. Painting in the women's cell
block was completed and the Gaol kitchen was redecorated at this time. The Gaol,
Provincial Home, Provincial offices, and Court-house lawns and grounds have been
maintained and improved by the prisoners under the supervision of Mr. A. Merridew
(Provincial Home gardener) and the writer.
" In May we commenced work on the cell block previously referred to in this report.
The prisoners worked on this project under the supervision of Constable J. D. H. Stewart
and the writer. This addition was completed and ready for use by September. We also
constructed 220 feet of concrete sidewalk and 1,500 feet of road curbing for the Provincial
Home. In the latter part of November, prisoners reconstructed a retaining-wall for the
Provincial Home which was approximately 300 feet in length. report of inspector of gaols, 1950-51 ll 11
" Farm and Gardens
" The prisoners were used on numerous occasions to assist the farmer with the
Provincial Home farm. The small garden we had for the Gaol was utilized fully, and we
were able to grow sufficient vegetables to last for six months.
" Medical Care
" The general health of the prison population was very good. We had no major
accidents or sickness during the year.
" Welfare and Recreation
" We have no facilities for any recreation at this Gaol. The library has been used
extensively by the prisoners and is appreciated by them.
" Religious Services
" The Gaol has no facilities which can be used by the various religious groups for
holding Sunday services. I have at all times made my office available for prisoners and
their spiritual advisers so that they could speak in private.
" Discipline
" Discipline has been well maintained throughout the year, and breaches of prison
rules were all of a minor nature and needed only a reprimand.
" I would draw your attention to the satisfactory manner that Constable J. D. H.
Stewart has carried out his duties and the firm, tactful way that he handles all prisoners
working under him.
" Summary
" I would, with your kind permission, again draw your attention to the Gaol and
the Gaol precincts. This building is inadequate and only suitable for a city lockup. The
increase in the population of the Interior of the Province calls for a modern institution,
this new institution to be detached and isolated from any community.
" The writer believes that a valley in the approximate area surrounding Vernon,
Kelowna, or Kamloops would be ideal for an institution of this type. The small amount of
precipitation and the abundance of sunshine would not only yield good crops, but would
be beneficial from a health standpoint for the prisoners."
PRINCE GEORGE GAOL
Men's Gaol
Warden W. Trant, who was appointed to the position of Warden at Prince George
Gaol on April 1st, 1951, reports as follows: —
" No major alterations were made in the Gaol during the fiscal year and there were
no escapes and the general behaviour of the inmates was good. Health of prisoners was
satisfactory throughout the year, and, as nearly as possible, all inmates were employed in
and around the premises."
Women's Gaol
Miss F. Zepik, Matron in Charge, submits the following report:—
"Co-operation (Inmates).—During the past year the co-operation seems to have
been quite good. There was one incident of escape. Two British Columbia Indian
inmates just wanted to go to the exhibition, so apparently walked quite boldly through
the town and were recaptured. To them it was like playing hookey from school. They
were taken to Court and sentenced.
"Another infraction of the rules got more newspaper space than gaol space. It was
a fight among several inmates who had made and consumed ' a brew.'   Loss of remission LL  12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
days has been partly earned back since then. There seems to be the general feeling
now that co-operation earns its own reward.
"Labour.—Time of work is not set rigidly. If work, as assigned, is done, and done
correctly, the rest of the inmate's time is her own. It is an incentive to work industriously
when the inmate knows that she may earn spare time in some private way. Much
handwork—knitting and sewing—is done in this way.
"Clinic.—All tests and treatments ordered by the Venereal Disease Control are
carried out by Dr. J. G. McKenzie, assisted by Matron Mrs. Taylor, R.N. All other
medical care and advice is taken care of by Dr. J. G. McKenzie. His co-operation in all
ways at all times is much appreciated.
"Church.—The Salvation Army is still with us. Other churches have given us up
in disappointment.
"Library.—Our books are being supplied by the Public Library Commission at
Prince George, and are exchanged every three months. Although small, our library is
good and well patronized.
"Entertainment.—On May 24th the girls had a sports day. The evening concert and
play were all local inside talent. Four movies, three by the Prince George Film Society
and one by the Shantymen's Mission, were shown for the girls during the year.
"Prince George Fall Fair.—In the fall of 1950 space was again given for a display
from ' The Girls Behind the Fence.' The cakes, preserves, fruit and vegetables, and the
handicraft work were among the best on display.
"Extra Work.—New articles are sewn and mending is done for the Prince George
Hospital. Laundry and some mending is done for the Men's Gaol. During the fall a lot
of preserving and canning is done and makes quite a menu change during the winter.
"Recreation.—Mostly recreation is the inmates' own effort. As soon as spring
comes and late into the fall, the girls spend as much time outside as possible. During the
inclement weather, exercises are sometimes done in the rotunda. This is also the girls'
dance-floor, and many evenings are spent listening to and dancing to their records, of
which they now have quite a collection.
"Staff.—Having been here a short time, it is not possible to say too much. 1 must
say that the co-operation has been good. They are all capable, and remuneration according to length of service has been deserved for some time.
"The Building.—The building, being all wood, will always be a fire-trap, but the
new wiring has made it safer. Everyone, staff and prisoners, is very fire-conscious.
The roof leaks in all the cells and in the two large wings, but we have been promised a
roof-repair job. The drains are also to be repaired. We still need more bath and lavatory
. accommodations, but can manage if the count stays under forty. It is realized many things
cannot be changed because the building, as originally planned, was not intended to be a
women's gaol.
"Summary.—As the writer has only been here since February 16th, 1951, there is
not much to add. During the last year there were changes in head matrons and wardens,
but the co-operation between them all, and the help given by the retiring personnel to the
ones taking over the positions is much appreciated, as it has enabled the work of the
institution to run smoothly at all times.
" To all concerned in the various work of the Department in Victoria, we extend our
thanks for their help at all times."
LIBRARIES
Mr. Konrad Egilson was appointed Librarian for Oakalla Prison Farm, Young
Offenders' Unit, and New Haven. He commenced his duties on March 1 st, 1951. Owing
to Mr. Eeilson's short tenure of office during the fiscal year, it was impossible for him to
prepare an adequate report on the libraries in the three institutions. The Gaols have been
without the services of a Librarian for most of the year, and consequently, while there
J REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1950-51 LL 13
have been a number of books circulated throughout the Gaols during the year, it is
impossible at this point to give any comparison with the preceding year. Mr. Egilson's
time during the past month has been taken up in getting the catalogue system back into
shape and also in ordering new books, both as additions to those in the library and also
as replacements to those which are in a bad state of repair.
The selection of Mr. Egilson to fill this position was after careful consideration, and
a decision was made after receipt of several applications and through the co-operation of
Mr. Morison, of the Public Library Commission. It is to be hoped that during the next
year library facilities in Oakalla Prison Farm will be extended, and than an adequate
library will be established in the Young Offenders' Unit, and that also the new incumbent
will have time to look over the facilities at the Gaols at Nelson, Kamloops, and Prince
George.
CONCLUSION
Statistical report covering the movement of the population, commitments, sex,
educational status, nationality, habits as to use of intoxicants and drugs, occupations of
prisoners, racial extraction, civil status, ages, creeds, duration of sentences, previous
convictions, offences for which prisoners were committed, employment of prisoners,
number of officers and employees, statement of revenue and expenditures, costs per canita
covering the four Provincial Gaols—Oakalla Prison Farm, Nelson, Kamloops, and Prince
Georae—are attached.
This Report should not be concluded without a few words of thanks to the many
agencies and persons who have given of their time and effort toward the social and spiritual
rehabilitation of inmates in our penal institutions; the Salvation Army, the ministers and
priests of the various denominations, staff of the John Howard and Elizabeth Fry Societies,
Probation Officers, and others who have had occasion to visit the institutions regularly or
have interested themselves from time to time in individual inmates should not be forgotten.
It is gratifying and encouraging to note the general interest that has been taken by
the public at laree and the support which has been given to all efforts that have been put
forth toward brinaing about a modern treatment programme for those who have entered
our Gaols. It is hoped that by another year it will be possible to report definite progress
along this line.
Our smaller Gaols in the Interior have also had the interest of numerous organizations
and individuals.   To these people, too, I wish to express thanks.
The wardens and executive officers of all our Gaols, the matrons and guards, are to
be commended for the loyalty with which they have carried out their duties, and the
interest they have shown by making suggestions for improvements to the institutions in
which they are employed.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
E. G. B. STEVENS,
Inspector of Gaols. LL  14
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDIX
ANNUAL REPORT ON GAOLS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st,  1951
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Totals
1
$698,097.57
647,065.15
$2.26
2.23
$0.59
.47
5,969
4,279
1
$37,198.45
29,974.85
$2.29
2.42
$0.60
.72
591
244
1
$15,313.65
11,922.65
$1.98
1.64
$0.53
.49
733
752
1
$58,304.63
56,539.30
$2.94
3.82
$0.62
.70
910
825
4
2. Total expenditure for gaol maintenance in B.C.—
Year ended March 31st, 1951.	
Year ended March 31st, 1950  ____	
3. Average total maintenance cost per day per prisoner-
Year ended March 31st, 1951 	
Year ended March 31st, 1950  	
$750,609.67
745,501.95
$2.37
2.52
Average dietary cost per day per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1951 	
Year ended March 31st, 1950 	
$0.59
.59
4. Number of prisoners committed—-
Year ended March 31st, 1951 ., ,	
Year ended March 31st, 1950  	
8,203
6,100
I. Movement of Population, Year Ended March 3 1st, 1951
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
On register, April 1st, 1950               	
853
71
15
36
975
Received—
4,910
6
5
3
854
191
140
12
10
429
733
123
112
672
3
5,173
130
By recapture.	
5
3
10
2,688
Insane  	
194
6,822
662
748
946
9,178
Discharged—
3,663
163
26
22
8
5
180
633
514
851
126
2
3
49
95
49
303
396
1
171
58
99
292
3
319
17
272
3
4,477
169
29
22
8
By death                   	
5
719
By release of Court order (including bail)
803
934
1,157
Totals   	
6,065
637
725
906
8,333
On register, March 31st, 1951	
757
25
23
40
845 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1950-51
II. Commitments
LL 15
1949-50
1950-51
Decrease
Increase
Murder 	
Manslaughter	
Crimes—■
Against the person.
Against property..
Against public morals and decency..
Against public order and peace.
Other offences not enumerated above .
Insanity 	
Number of prisoners sentenced	
Number of days' stay of prisoners	
Average number of prisoners per month	
Average number of prisoners per day	
Escapes
Escapes and recaptured.
Deaths in gaols	
14
6
244
1,531
143
3,753
572
30
6,087
309,290
25,788
849
4
4
10
242
1,637
494
3,316
393
25
6,860
333,034
27,814
914
10
7
9
437
179
5
106
351
773
23,744
2,026
65
6
3
1
III. Sex
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
4,500
410
274
43
1
734        |
82        |
737
173
6,245
708
Totals   -	
4,910
317
816        |
1
910
6,953
IV. Educational Status
348
3,023        j
1,434        I
105
|
153
96        ]
66
2
1
83
667
58         |
8        I
171
567
150
22
765
4,354
1,708
College or university   	
137
Totals                                        	
4,910        |
1
317        |
816        |
1
910
6,953
V. Nationality
(Place of Birth)
British-
3,746        |
536
22
1
267        |
11        1
-         1
1
780        j
27         |
          1
736
80
1
5,529
654
23
Totals     _. 	
4,304        |
278        |
807         |
817
6,206
Foreign—
1
152
360        |
22
72        |
!
6        1
32
1         1
-—        1
1
6
2        1
1         1
—        1
13
77
	
3
177
Europeans —   —	
471
24
75
606        |
39        |
9        1
93
747
4,910        |
1
317        |
1
816        |
1
910
6,953
VI.
Habits as to Use
OF
Intoxicants
|
610
1,206
3,094        1
45        |
114        |
158
1
V        1
23
786        |
54
189
667
716
1,532
Intemperate    -	
4,705
Totals                        - 	
4,910        |
1
317        |
1
816        |
1
910
6,953
VII. Habits as to
Use
of Drugs
4,497
413
1
1
1
317        |
-         1
!
815        |
1        1
870
40
6,499
Addicts    	
454
4,910
317        |
1
816        |
1
910
6,953 LL  16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VIII. Occupations
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
367
423
371
1,921
671
3
195
737
195
109
2
41
. 155
10
157
7
78
509
26
32
7
	
100
227
132
398
18
3
32
733
659
Domestic  —	
Labourers  ,. 	
622
2,983
725
38
234
737
195
Totals     	
4,910
317
816
910
6,953
IX. Racial
White     	
4,388
39
425
58
295
21
1
596
2
217
1
673
2
235
5,952
43
898
60
Totals   	
4,910
317
816
910
6,953
X. Civil State
2,940
1,088
173
709
1
153
161
3
........         |
520
174
55
67
496
285
24
103
4,109
1,708
255
879
Married     	
Widowed 	
Separated 	
Totals  ..  .         	
4,910
317         |
1
816
910
6,953
XL Ages
569
604
624
1,011
1,025
743
334
11
49
52
84
74
27
20
79
112
79
202
173
131
40
54
170
177
146
219
143
1
713
21 to 25	
935
25 to 30	
932
30 to 40 	
1,443
1,491
1,044
395
40 to 50       .                  	
50 to 60  	
Over 60	
Totals —      	
4,910
317
816
910
6,953
XII. Creeds
1,685
710
540
70
745
102
335
66
31
281
12
31
111
190
72
6
10
11
25
2
11
180
489
96
77
19
44
30
34
1
26
473
63
40
6
115
19
8
3
129
53
2,719
875
667
106
929
153
388
69
160
462
12
31
190
190
Church of England   	
Presbyterian   ._ 	
Methodist.  	
Baptist     	
Lutheran	
Doukhobor  	
Hebrew 	
Buddhist	
Others 	
None	
Totals  ....	
4,910
317
816
910
6,953 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1950-51
XIII. Duration of Sentence
LL  17
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
2,177
311
224
465
457
205
64
459
9
9
316
1
113
41
37
21
72
20
28
14
10
5
3
165
	
........
......
	
	
495
115
47
31
20
5
1
1
26
7
12
15
___
567
160
88
45
30
22
5
2
3,311
'   606
387
555
6 months and under 12 months	
517
238
73
627
Probation     	
35
16
Unfinished  	
328
1
Not guilty  	
128
41
78
Young Offenders' Unit 	
21
Totals   	
4,910
317
816
910
6,953
XIV. Previous Convictions
None   	
1                                                                        '	
1,894
708
401
252
200
164
135
105
109
93
71
57
51
42
35
37
28
19
37
24
54
23
43
17
186
38
87
245
32
14
11
5
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
479
88
57
33
25
21
19
18
7
13
8
4
2
2
2
3
5
3
6
2
5
3
4
2
5
507
141
110
33
36
19
15
17
8
5
5
5
2
2
3
1
........
1
3,125
969
2          	
582
3
329
4	
266
5                         	
206
6       -	
170
7                                                                         . .
140
8 	
125
9  	
111
10
85
11                      	
66
12 	
56
13                          	
48
14      	
40
15	
41
16       -	
17                                ...	
33
22
18	
43
20                                      	
26
21                                                    	
60
23                        	
27
24                                              	
47
26                              '   	
18
27 to 30                                 .   	
188
30 to 50                                      -	
43
60                                          	
87
Totals    	
4,910
317
816
910
6,953
61.425
22.71
40.10
57.04 LL 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
XV. Offences for Which Prisoners Were Committed and Sentenced during the Year
Commitments
Sentences
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
(a) Crimes against the person—
Oakalla _ 	
181
7
16
7
16
1
1
197
7
17
8
168
5
11
14
11
1
179
5
11
15
Totals	
211
18
229
198
12
210
(b) Crimes against property—
Oakalla 	
1,328
127
75
14
55
3
2
9
1,383
130
77
23
1,752
126
73
31
72
1
2
9
1,824
127
75
40
1,544
69
1,613
1,982
84
2,066
(c) Crimes against public morals and decency—
Oakalla                                  	
124
243
5
9
93
22
133
336
5
22
206
43
4
19
8
31
22
214
74
4
Prince George  „	
41
372
124
496
272
61
333
(d)  Crimes against public order and peace—
Oakalla	
2,287
472
590
8
317
108
79
140
2,604
580
669
148
2,356
267
666
573
328
44
78
2,684
311
744
573
3,357
644
4,001
3,862
450
4,312
(c)  Other offences not enumerated above—
Oakalla  	
580
11
48
13
10
593
11
48
10
373
6
36
18
2
391
6
38
Prince George  	
Totals  	
639
23
662
415
20
435
Grand totals of (a), (6), (c), (d),
and (e)  	
6,123
878
7,001
6,729
627
7,356
XVI. Employment of Prisoners
(Per Cent of Population)
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
0.817
27.942
1.182
1.560
6.085
10.956
2.031
49.427
23.00
18.00
59.00
27.00
5.00
2.00
39.00
17.00
10.00
9 00
Sick  	
1 00
Not employed _   	
90.00
100.000
100.00
100.00
100.00 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1950-51
XVII. Number of Officers and Employees on March 31st, 1951
LL 19
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Warden  _  _	
1
1
1
1
1
1
6
8
1
4
3
8
67
1
3
14
1
2
1
3
5
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Gaol Surgeon  _ __	
1
Assistant Deputy Warden and Bursar..—	
Chief Engineer   	
Assistant Chief Gaoler   	
Senior Guard _	
Clerks and stenographers	
Kitchen Steward- _ _    	
4
1
Assistant Matrons...  	
9
Matron—2nds	
Totals	
134
9          15                    16
1                       1
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for Year Ended March 3 1st, 1951
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
Expenditure
$930.19
100.34
260,393.71
5,096.15
4,039.82
8,470.71
37,254.52
7,169.98
25,995.68
164.62
15,847.88
10,031.36
63,709.60
181,228.76
26,403.39
16,611.80
65,238.14
927.23
$930.19
100.34
$18,039.70
300.18
$7,095.44
330.43
$34,410.82
339.41
319,939.67
6,066.17
4,039.82
Travelling expenses — ~	
62.52
1,868.03
685.10
159.20
8,533.23
811.74
336.43
1,250.98
4,127.97
41,185.27
Janitors' supplies    	
12,319.48
26,154.88
Upkeep of grounds  	
15.01
319.90
179.63
1,191.80
17,359.58
10,031.36
3,506.20
9,839.12
874.11
439.50
1,664.42
4,077.60
406.94
423.80
1,699.49
12,131.08
2,224.96
896.80
	
70,579.71
Provisions (keep of prisoners)  	
Medical attendance and hospital supplies .
37,276.56
29,909.40
18,371.90
65,238.14
681.46
84.57
103.21
1,796.47
Totals   	
$729,614.73
74,986.05
62,317.74
$37,646.92
$15,231.37
$57,519.63
$840,012.65
74,986.05
Public Works expenditures 	
217.93
2,475.28
785.00
65,795.95
$866,918.52
$37,864.85
$17,706.65
$58,304.63
$980,794.65
Revenue
$593.90
$593.90
$1,978.96
112,101.99
54,740.00
1,978.96
    	
112,101.99
72.50
$2,393.00
57,205.50
168,820.95
666.40
2,393.00
171,880.35
$698,097.57
$37,198.45
$15,313.65
$58,304.63
$750,609.67 LL 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
XIX. Summary of Revenue and Expenditure for Fiscal Years 1950 and 1951
Total Gross Expenditure
Total Revenue
1950
1951
1950
1951
Oakalla  ._	
$728,821.83
30,913.35
14,147.65
56,539.30
$866,918.52
37,864.85
17,706.65
58,304.63
$81,756.68
938.50
2,225.00
$168,820.95
666 40
2,393.00
Prince George  	
$830,422.13
84,920.18
$980,794.65
171,880.35
$84,920.18
$171,880.35
Net expenditure 	
$745,501.95
$750,609.67
XX. Average Cost of Each Prisoner and Miscellaneous
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Average
Dietary cost of each prisoner per diem 	
Keep of each prisoner (including salaries) and all expenses
$0.59
2.26
$0.60
2.29
$0.53
1.98
$0.62
2.94
$0.59
2 37
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952
495-352-3691

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