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DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY Mental Health Services PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1952

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
Mental Health Services
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31st
1951
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiaxmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1951  To His Honour C. Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the Director
of Provincial Mental Health Services for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1951.
WM. T. STRAITH,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
November 24th, 1951.  The Honourable W. T. Straith, K.C.,
Provincial Secretary,
Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—It is with a mixture of pride and humility that I transmit the Annual Report
of the Director of Provincial Mental Health Services for the fiscal year ended March 31st,
1951; pride, at being a member of the team administering our Mental Health Services,
extending from you, sir, to the last-joined student nurse; humility, because of the
realization of achievement and the magnitude of the challenge of the future.
January 1st, 1951, was an epoch, this being the date upon which the "Clinics of
Psychological Medicine Act " was proclaimed. Prior to that date, no patient, other than
a few who came voluntarily, could be received in the mental hospitals until his mental
illness had become so serious that for his own safety, and for the protection of the
community, he had to be removed from the community by a combination of medical and
judicial processes.   Often it was too late for effective treatment.
On January 1st, 1951, for the first time, it became possible to receive patients at an
earlier stage of their illness. Although it is early yet to make any prediction, the results
that are being attained are sufficiently encouraging to warrant our recommending to you
that we temporarily put " on ice " our plans for a second large mental hospital for long-
term psychotic patients—plans which had materially developed. Rather do we hope,
using time as our ally, to effect a levelling-off, and eventually a reduction, of our psychotic
population in spite of the growth of the population of the Province. Also, by means of
extending accommodation for the defective and ageing groups, we should be able to
alleviate more rapidly the grievous overcrowding that has existed for so many years in
our mental hospitals.
By reaching further into the community, by day hospitals and out-patient clinics,
where the expense of domiciliary care and personal services will be negligible, we are
confident that long-term hospital care can in many cases be obviated. Observation
centres for maladjusted children and better Child Guidance facilities are urgent necessities.
The simplest statistics of mental illness are sobering. Mental illness is by far the
greatest single cause of the hospitalization of the people. At any given moment, 5 out
of every 1,000 are in a mental hospital. On March 31st, 1951, 6,028 citizens were in
the general hospitals of British Columbia; on that same date, 5,394 were in our mental
hospitals, with nearly 200 defectives and seniles on the waiting list. It is tragic to realize
that a goodly percentage need not have been there if earlier treatment facilities had been
available years ago. Nearly one-quarter of the Province's entire Civil Service is engaged
in the care and treatment of the mentally ill, and our task is the around-the-clock
administration of a community greater in population than every man, woman, and child
in a city the size of Nanaimo or Nelson.
It is, perhaps, not generally realized that our mental hospitals furnish medical,
surgical, psychiatric, psychological, radiological, pathological, neurological, and social
services for our patients, and, in addition, provide food, fuel, clothing, shelter, drugs and
medicines, occupational therapy, recreational therapy, spiritual and funeral services, and
rehabilitation, besides concomitant services, such as dental, eye, ear, nose, and throat,
hydrotherapy, cardiograph, optical, etc.
Moreover, our mental hospitals are recognized training centres for psychiatrists
and psychiatric nurses, and afford educational facilities in many other fields, many being
in close alliance with the University of British Columbia, at which centre a research unit
has been established.
The need invariably exceeds the budget; the deficit is offset by the magnificent
esprit de corps that permeates the whole of the Mental Health Services—a spirit, sir,
that you have done much to foster by your regular visits to the various units—and by an
intensely human understanding on the part of those who minister to the needs of the
patients in the whole field of endeavour. O 6 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
It is imperative that the accent be more and more on prevention and early treatment
of mental illness. Without facilities for these, a complete new 500-1,000-bed mental
hospital would be required every year, and the drain on the budgetary resources of the
Province would grow indefinitely.
Accordingly, sir, I commend the human document that is this Report to all who have
the interests of humanity at heart. We need all the help and encouragement that can be
made available.
Respectfully submitted.
R. A. PENNINGTON,
Deputy Provincial Secretary.
Deputy Provincial Secretary's Office,
November 23rd, 1951. TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART I.—MEDICAL
Page
Officers and Staff, List of  11
Report—Director of Mental Health Services  15
Report of Crease Clinic—Dr. Davidson  23
Reports of Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale—
Report by Dr. Ryan  24
Treatment Services—Dr. Davidson _•_  25
Department of Occupational Therapy—
(a) Women's Division—Mrs. Draper  27
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Hall  29
Department of Recreational Therapy—Mr. Brown  31
Audio-Visual Department—Mr. Walker  32
Library Report—Mrs. Fraser  3 4
Department of Physical Medicine—Dr. Davidson  35
Dental Department—Dr. Gosse  36
Optical Report—Mr. Woodbridge  36
Beauty-parlour Report—Mrs. Townsend  36
Department of Dietetics—Miss Allman  37
Department of Neurology—Dr. Fister  38
Laboratory Report—Dr. Nicolson  39
Department of Radiology—Dr. Jackson  42
Department of Psychology—Mr. Watson  43
Department of Social Service—Miss Carroll  44
Department of Nursing Service—
(a) Women's Division—Miss Parsons  48
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Creber  50
Department of Nursing Education—
(a) Women's Division—Miss Pullan  50
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Pritchard  51
Department  of Rehabilitation—
(a) Women's Division—Dr. McNair  51
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Addison  52
Reports of The Woodlands School—
Report by Dr. Sauriol .  54
Educational Department—Mrs. Cunningham  57
Department of Occupational Therapy—
(a) Girls' Division—Miss Morrison  59
(b) Boys' Division—Mr. Mercer  60
Department of Recreational Therapy—Mr. Lynes  61
Department of Dentistry—Drs. Kenny and Mathison  62
Department of Dietetics—Mrs. Marr  62
Department of Radiology—Mr. Barteluk  63
Department of Nursing Service—
(a) Women's Division—Miss Sanders  64
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Elliot  64
Department of Nursing Education—
(a) Women's Division—Miss Johnstone  65
(b) Men's Division—Mr. Palm  66 O 8 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Reports of Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz— page
Report by Dr. d'Easum  67
Department of Occupational Therapy—Mr. Helander  69
Report of Tailor and Shoe Shops—Mr. Campbell  69
Department of Recreational Therapy—Mr. Lowndes  70
Dental Report—Dr. James  71
Department of Nursing Service—Mr. McLeod  71
Department of Nursing Education—Mr. Lowndes  72
Reports of Homes for the Aged—
Report by Dr. Caunt     75
Tables on Movement of Population     76
Reports of Child Guidance Clinics—Dr. Byrne     78
Social Service to Child Guidance Clinics—Miss Carroll     86
Report of Research Division—Dr. Gibson     88
Medical Statistical Tables, Mental Hospitals—•
1. Movement of Population  89
2. Summary of Operations since Inception  90
3. Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths  92
4. Districts from Which Patients Were Admitted  92
5. Number of Attacks at Time of Admission  94
6. Reported Duration of Attack Prior to Admission  94
7. Reported Cause of Attack in Patients Admitted  94
8. Probation, Number Discharged on  95
9. Discharges, Alleged Duration of Illness Prior to Admission in Those
Discharged  95
10. Deaths, Cause of, and Length of Time in Hospital  96
11. Psychoses of First Admissions  100
12. Psychoses of Readmissions  101
13. Age-groups of First Admissions by Psychoses .  102
14. Age-groups of Readmissions by Psychoses  103
15. Economic Status of First Admissions by Psychoses  104
16. Use of Alcohol of First Admissions by Psychoses .  104
17. Conjugal Conditions of First Admissions by Psychoses .  105
18. Conjugal Conditions of Readmissions by Psychoses  106
19. Education of First Admissions by Psychoses  107
20. Nativity of First Admissions by Age-groups  108
21. Country of Birth of First Admissions  108
22. Citizenship of First Admissions  109
23. Religion of First Admissions  109
24. Age-groups of First Admissions  109
25. Age-groups of Readmissions  110
26. Previous Occupations of First Admissions  111
27. Method of Commitment of First Admissions  112
28. Method of Commitment of Readmissions  112
29. Rural-Urban Status of First Admissions by Psychoses  112
30. Age-groups of Discharged Patients by Psychoses  113
31. Duration of Last Hospital Residence of Discharged Patients by Psychoses 114
32. Conditions of Patients on Discharge by Psychoses  115
33. Age-groups of Patients Who Died  115
34. Age-groups of Patients at Time of Death by Psychoses  116 TABLE OF CONTENTS O 9
Medical Statistical Tables, Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine— pAGE
• 1. Movement of Population...   117
2. Summary of Operations since Inception  118
3. Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths  119
4. Districts from Which Patients Were Admitted  119
5. Number of Attacks at Time of Admission  120
6. Alleged Duration of Attack Prior to Admission  120
7. Alleged Cause of Attack in Patients Admitted  120
8. Number Discharged and Results  121
9. Reported  Duration  of Mental  Illness  Prior  to  Admission  in  Those
Discharged   121
10. Psychoses of First Admissions  122
11. Age-groups of First Admissions by Psychoses  123
12. Economic Status of First Admissions by Psychoses  124
13. Conjugal Condition of First Admissions by Psychoses  125
14. Education of First Admissions by Psychoses  126
15. Nativity of First Admissions by Age-groups  127
16. Country of Birth of First Admissions  127
17. Citizenship of First Admissions  128
18. Religion of First Admissions  128
19. Age-groups of First Admissions  128
20. Previous Occupations of First Admissions  129
21. Method of Commitment of First Admissions  129
22. Rural-Urban Status of First Admissions by Psychoses  130
23. Age-groups of Discharged Patients by Psychoses  131
24. Duration of Last Hospital Residence of Discharged Patients by Psychoses 132
25. Conditions of Patients on Discharge by Psychoses  132
26. Readmissions  133
PART II.—FINANCIAL
Report—Business Manager  135
Expense Statement, Psychopathic Department  137
Expense Statement, Headquarters  137
Financial Tables—
Mental Hospitals—
A. Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost for Past Ten
Years  13 8
B   )
r,\ [ Yearly Gross Expenditure, Analysis of, for the Past Ten Years  139
C. Summary of Gross and Net per Capita Cost in All Hospitals  140
D. Expense Statement, New Westminster  141
E. Expense Statement, Essondale  142
F. Expense Statement, Saanich  143
Revenue, Table of, for Past Ten Years  144
Expenditures under Dominion Mental-health Grants  144
Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine—Summary of Costs, per Capita, and
Population  145
Homes for the Aged—
Port Coquitlam—
Summary of Costs, per Capita, and Population  146
Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost since Inception 146 O 10 TABLE OF CONTENTS
Financial Tables—Continued
Homes for the Aged—Continued
Vernon— Page
Summary of Costs, per Capita, and Population  147
Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost since Inception 147
Terrace—Summary of Costs, per Capita, and Population  148
Summary of Gross and Net per Capita Cost in All Three Institutions  148
PART III.—COLONY FARM
General Financial Report—Business Manager  149
Profit and Loss Account  149
Dairy and Herds Department—Profit and Loss Account  150
Work-horse Department—Profit and Loss Account  150
Hog Department—Profit and Loss Account  151
Cannery—Profit and Loss Account  152
Orchard and Truck-garden—Profit and Loss Account  152
Field Crops and Pasturage—Profit and Loss Account  153
Tractors—Profit and Loss Account .  153
Trucks—Profit and Loss Account  153
Maintenance and Administration, General  154
Miscellaneous Statements, Inventories, etc.—
Produce Supplied to Essondale  154
Produce Supplied to New Westminster  155
Accounts Receivable  155
Remittances to Treasury  155
Summary of Equipment Inventories  155
Orchard and Truck-garden Inventory  155 DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
Hon. William T. Straith, K.C., B.A., LL.B., Provincial Secretary.
R. A. Pennington, O.B.E., Deputy Provincial Secretary.
A. M. Gee, M.D., CM., Director of Mental Health Services.
E. J. Ryan, M.D., CM., Senior Medical Superintendent.
A. L. Swanson, B.A., M.D., CM., M.H.A., Deputy Medical Superintendent.
Frederick A. Matheson, Business Manager.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL AND
CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE, ESSONDALE
A. E. Davidson, B.A., M.D., Clinical
Director.
B. F. Bryson, B.A., M.D., CM., Assistant Clinical Director (Men's Division).
F. E. McNair, B.A., M.D., CM., Assistant Clinical Director (Women's Division).
J. M. Jackson, M.D., Director of Radiology.
G. A. Nicolson, B.A., M.D., Director of
Laboratories.
W. P. Fister, M.D., M.R.CP.(Edin.),
F.R.CP.(Can-), Director of Neurology.
L. I. M. Coleman, B.Sc, M.D., CM.
P. D. Croft, B.Sc, M.D., CM.
C. E. Derkson, M.D., CM.
W. J. S. Edington, B.Sc, M.D.
E. Gens, M.D., CM.
R. H. Lawler, M.D.
H. T. Lowe, B.Sc, M.D., CM.
B. W. Murphy, M.B., Ch.B.(N.Z.).
N. L. Richardson, M.D., CM.
A. J. Shulman, M.D., CM.
J. W. Warne, B.A., M.D.
J. R. Gosse, D.D.S.
C B. Watson, M.A., Administrative
Assistant.
W. R. Brown, Director of Recreation.
K. Woolcock, Pharmacist.
W. Creber, Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
W. Pritchard, Head Male Instructor.
Miss M. Parsons, R.N., Director of
Nursing.
Miss E. M. Pullan, R.N., B.A.Sc, Instructress of Nursing.
Miss A. K. Carroll, B.A., M.S.W.,
Supervisor, Social Service.
Miss M. Allman, B.H.E., Dietitian.
Mrs. K. Draper, B.A., O.T.Reg., Supervisor, Occupational Therapy (Women's
Division).
R. T. Hall, Supervisor, Occupational
Therapy (Men's Division).
Mrs. H. Fraser, B.A., B.L.Sc, Librarian.
Mrs. I. H. Wedge, Branch Secretary.
Miss A. D. Dingle, Senior Stenographer.
G. H. Stephenson, M.D.
Consultant Staff:
F. A. Turnbull, B.A., M.D., Neurosurgery.
L. S. Chipperfield, B.Sc, M.D., General Surgery.
Business:
J. F. Anderson, Asst. Business Manager
L. Fox, Paymaster.
G. A. Grieve, Cost Accountant.
Rev. John F. O'Neil, Protestant.
T. Lamb, Foreman of Works.
J. Wilson, Chief Engineer.
W. P. Dodgshon, Outside Overseer.
T. Harrison, Electrician.
G. Matthews, Plumber.
J. C. Purse, Head Tailor.
W. Gueho, Cashier.
W. Headridge, Steward.
Miss A. Makita, Business Stenographer.
Chaplains:
Rev. Father J. P. Kane, Roman Catholic.
Trades:
D. Anderson, Laundryman.
A. L. Blair, Barber.
W. A. Wardle, Chief Cook.
J. C Merrick, Baker.
H. Young, Chief Painter.
11 O 12
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1950-51
Colony Farm:
John A. Hay, Superintendent.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL,
NEW WESTMINSTER
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., CM., F.A.P.A.,
F.A.A.M.D., Medical Superintendent.
C. E. Benwell, M.D., Deputy Medical
Superintendent.
R. D. S. Herrick, M.D., D.P.H., D.P.M.
A. P. Gould, M.D., CM.
Drs. Kenny and Matheson, Visiting
Dentists.
W. O. Booth, Clerk.
Miss V. M. Sanders, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses.
Mrs. M. E. Marr, B.H.E., Dietitian.
P. Barteluk, X-ray Technician.
Miss E. A. Johnstone, R.N., Instructress
of Nursing.
Mrs. A. Cunningham, School Principal.
H. Mercer, Industrial Arts Instructor.
J. Lynes, Recreational Instructor.
Miss M. E. Morison, Occupational Therapist.
Miss M. G. Coulson, Clerk-Stenographer.
J. Elliot, Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
R. Palm, Instructor of Male Psychiatric
Nursing.
Business:
A. Fraser, Steward.
Chaplains:
Rev. P. C McCrae, Protestant.
C. M. Doyle, Foreman of Works.
C. Hauck, Chief Engineer.
W. Mercer, Head Carpenter.
C. Stapleton, Head Gardener.
L. S. Davies, Electrician.
G. Coulson, Laundryman.
Rev. Father D. J. McIntosh, Roman
Catholic.
Trades:
H. W. Brownjohn, Plumber.
J. McMillan, Shoemaker.
L. Arnold, Barber.
J. Fraser, Head Painter.
W. Jenkins, Head Cook.
V. G. Copp, Baker.
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ
L. G. C. d'Easum, M.D., Medical Superintendent.
S. Inrig, Deputy Business Manager. P. McLeod, Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
HOMES FOR THE AGED
T. G. Caunt, M.D., Medical Superintendent.
G. A. MacKinnon, M.D., CM., Medical        W. E. Skillicorn, Supervisor, Terrace.
Superintendent, Vernon.
CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
U. P. Byrne, M.D., D.P.H., D.I.H., Director.
G. M. Kirkpatrick, B.A., M.D. R. G. E. Richmond, M.D., M.R.CS.(Lon-
don).
RESEARCH DIVISION
W. C. Gibson, B.A., M.Sc, M.D., CM., D.Phil. (Oxon.).  §
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14 REPORT OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
For the Twelve Months Ended March 31st, 1951
PART I.—MEDICAL
REPORT OF DIRECTOR OF MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES
Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine,
Essondale, B.C., September 21st, 1951.
R. A. Pennington, Esq., O.B.E.,
Deputy Provincial Secretary,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit for your consideration the Seventy-ninth Annual
Report of the Provincial Mental Health Services of British Columbia.
It will be noted that there has been considerable change in the format of the Report
to bring it in line with certain changes in organization which have occurred during the
fiscal year under review.
ORGANIZATION
As from April 1st, 1950, the various Provincial Mental Health activities were
amalgamated as the Provincial Mental Health Services. The different divisions have been
set forth as a frontispiece. An organizational chart is also set forth as a frontispiece
showing the organization of the services as approved by the Minister. The internal
organization has been greatly strengthened by the formation of a Hospital Council. The
basic membership of this Council is made up from the senior administrative heads of the
various divisions. A secondary membership is composed of the various departmental
heads who are invited to participate in meetings involving their different departments.
The administrative management also has been greatly strengthened by the appointment of a Medical Superintendent and a Deputy Superintendent at The Woodlands
School, a Medical Superintendent at the Colquitz branch of the Mental Hospitals, and
a Medical Superintendent in charge of the three branches of the Homes for the Aged.
Dr. E. J. Ryan still functions as Medical Superintendent at Essondale and, as Senior
Superintendent, has jurisdiction over these four divisions of the Mental Health Services.
A Director of Child Guidance Clinics has been appointed, having supervision over all of
these activities.   A Research Division has been created with a Director in charge.
Within the Essondale area, further organization has taken place with the appointment
of a Clinical Director and two Assistant Clinical Directors supervising all treatment
activities. Departments of Radiology, Pathology, and Neurology have been organized,
and Directors of these departments have been appointed.
During the year, permission was granted to rename the New Westminster Mental
Hospital as ''The Woodlands School." The Woodlands School is a school for mentally
defective patients, and the change in name has been very favourably received by the
public, the patients, and the staff. It is hoped that during the coming year we will be
able to admit suitable patients directly to this unit under appropriate legislation without
their prior admission to the Mental Hospital at Essondale.
15 O 16
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
A good many changes have taken place in the organization of our nursing personnel.
By Order in Council, the term " attendant " was deleted from the Civil Service structure
and the terms " psychiatric nurse, male and female," substituted. Certain radical changes
are contemplated in our nursing educational system, with the creation of a new position
to be known as " psychiatric aide." It is our constant endeavour to increase the calibre
and education of our staff engaged with us in the treatment of the mentally ill. The
formation of the British Columbia Psychiatric Nurses' Association will do much to raise
the standards of personnel and training. The Act passed at the recent session of the
Legislative Assembly governing the practice of psychiatric nursing will be of great future
benefit in elevating psychiatric nursing care.
A further change to be noted in this Annual Report is with reference to our statistical
tables. An effort has been made to correlate our statistics with those of the Dominion
Bureau. It is felt that these new tables will do away with a great many discrepancies
of our former statistics.
ADMISSIONS AND DISCHARGES
The following table gives a brief summary of the intake and separations occurring
within the entire Mental Health Services, including the Crease Clinic which was in
operation for three months during the fiscal year, the Provincial Mental Hospitals at
Essondale and Colquitz, The Woodlands School at New Westminster, together with the
three units of the Home for the Aged at Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and Terrace.
Table No. I.—Mental Health Services, April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Male
Female
Total
Intake
483
216
129
105
46
5
564
42
69
95
54
3
1,047
198
200
100
8
Returned from escape.                                                                                              ........
Totals— _ _	
984
827
1,811
Separations
384
232
20
253
223
329
9
126
607
561
29
379
Totals	
889
687
1,576
Summary
Separations 	
1 576
Net Increase  _	
--..      235
Previous Annual Reports have shown a marked increase in the number of admissions, particularly over the past four years.   This is due to several factors:—
(1) The increase in the population of the Province.
(2) An increase in the aged population of the Province and life expectancy.
(3) Improved and increased facilities for the care of the aged psychotic patient.
(4) Improved community relationships and a widening of the horizon of
psychiatry, resulting in a greater number of voluntary admissions.
(5) The opening of the Crease Clinic.
The following table confirms these observations:— DIRECTOR'S REPORT
Table No. II.—Mental Health Services
O 17
Year
Total
Admissions
Admissions
Over 65 Years
Admissions
Under 15 Years
Voluntary
Admissions
Population
Increase
Index of
Increase1
1945 46
834
880
1,111
1,260
1,415
1,811
206
207
225
270
230
262
49
52
69
63
72
148
33
40
91
165
297
504
147
140
316
354
306
235
17 62
1946-47	
1947 48
15.91
28 44
1948-49	
1949-50	
1950-51	
28.09
21.62
12.98
1 Percentage ratio of increase in population to admissions.
The above table indicates that, in spite of the great increase in patients admitted, our
index of increase has been diminishing; this is also in spite of the heavy increase in
admissions over 65 years of age and under 15 years of age—both long-term treatment
groups with poor outlook in so far as recovery or improvement is concerned. This would
indicate that our future expansion should be in these two areas—namely, the provision
of further buildings in the Homes for the Aged division and in the School for Mental
Defectives. It is felt that, with adequate expansion to meet the needs of these two
divisions of the Mental Health Services, the heavy expense of creating a new mental-
hospital site may be obviated for some years.
GENERAL COMMENTS
The year has been one in which considerable progress has been made. Probably the
most outstanding event was the opening of the Crease Clinic for the reception and treatment of patients. Prior to this, the Admitting Building of the Mental Hospital was vacated
on April 3rd, 1950, and the patients were temporarily moved to four wards in the Crease
Clinic in order to allow complete renovation of the Admitting Building. On completion
of this work, these patients were returned. The Act governing the Crease Clinic was
proclaimed effective on January 1st, 1951, and the first patients were received on that
date. A separate report on the operation of the Clinic is included, covering the three-
month period in the fiscal year under review.
I am pleased to report that the new 100-bed unit at The Woodlands School was
occupied on April 1st, 1950. The lower floor of this building is devoted to small children
and infants requiring crib care. The upper floor houses an older group of children. The
opening of this building has made it possible for us to admit a great many children under
6 years of age who have been on the waiting list for some time. Reference to Table
No. II shows that 148 patients under 15 years of age were admitted.
The work of conversion of the former military hospital at Terrace was completed
during the year, and on October 3rd, 1950, a group of 153 elderly patients was moved
to Terrace by special train. This move increased our facilities for the treatment and care
of our elderly psychotic male patients, and allowed us to admit a further group from the
waiting list. Table No. II indicates that 262 patients over 65 years of age were admitted,
while Table No. I classified 198 of these as suffering from senile dementia.
Structural changes were completed in the Administrative Building at The Woodlands
School to allow the installation of a small modern Radiology Department.
Structural changes were completed in the West Lawn Building at Essondale to allow
the installation of a complete new dental suite. This suite is completely equipped with
three chair units and X-ray under Federal grants. This has greatly improved the dental
treatment facilities available to our patients.
Construction was started on the Recreation Hall at Essondale on May 29th, 1950.
This building has been very badly needed for a number of years and will be the future
centre of the Recreational Department.    The building provides a large gymnasium, O 18 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
auditorium, small cafeteria and dining-room, bowling-alleys, and office space for the
Recreational and Audio-Visual Departments. In addition to the recreational activities,
the auditorium will be used for motion-picture entertainments and church services. The
building will also add much to the social and recreational life of our staff. Mr. Pennington, our Deputy Provincial Secretary, has kindly consented to allow his name to be
associated with this building, and the centre is officially known as " Pennington Hall."
It is very fitting that this cognizance should be given to Mr. Pennington, to whom we owe
so much for the great personal interest that he has shown in our endeavours, and the
invaluable assistance which he renders.
In January, 1951, a contract was awarded for the construction of three additional
100-bed units at The Woodlands School. These buildings are progressing very rapidly
and should be ready for occupancy early in 1952. With the addition of these buildings,
we will be able to better classify our patients and remove a good many of the mentally
defective group from Essondale to the School. We will also be able to admit again many
of the younger group for whom application has been made to our waiting list. With the
opening of these buildings, it is planned to have the necessary legislation governing the
operation of the School whereby patients may be admitted directly without first being
admitted to the Mental Hospital at Essondale.
Pursuant to our policy of adopting a more modern nomenclature, we have renamed
the three main buildings at Essondale. The former Male Building is now known as
" West Lawn Building," the former Acute Building as " Centre Lawn Building," and the
former Women's Building as " East Lawn Building." Appropriate road-signs have been
erected designating these buildings. At The Woodlands School the various cottages have
been named appropriately after the trees in the parked areas.
During the year the staff at the Mental Hospital co-operated with the National Film
Board in the production of a film on mental illness, known as " Breakdown." The costs
of production were borne through Federal health grants. It was considered no small
honour that the Federal Department of Health and Welfare chose the Crease Clinic as the
setting for this film.
Outstanding honour was paid to the Mental Health Services of this Province by the
American Psychiatric Association in the presentation of an achievement award to the
Crease Clinic. Only three such awards were presented throughout the year, signifying
an outstanding contribution to the treatment of the mentally ill.
The annual graduating exercises for psychiatric nurses were held on April 20th,
1950. The ceremony this year was held in the New Westminster Junior High School
auditorium. Mr. Pennington acted as chairman, and Mrs. Rex Eaton gave the address
to the graduating class. Thirty-one students completed their course of training and
received diplomas and pins.
Demands on the professional staff for teaching purposes have increased a great deal
during the year. We have continued to give clinical demonstrations and lectures to the
following University departments: (1) The Department of Psychology, (2) The School
of Education, (3) The School of Nursing, and (4) The School of Social Work.
In addition to this, the following appointments from our staff were made to be
part-time University staff: Dr. W. C. Gibson, Research Clinical Associate Professor of
Neurology; Dr. W. P. Fister, Clinical Demonstrator in Neuroanatomy; Dr. G. A. Nicol-
son, Demonstrator, Department of Pathology; Dr. R. G. E. Richmond, Lecturer, School
of Social Work; and Miss A. K. Carroll, Lecturer, School of Social Work.
An in-service postgraduate training course in psychiatric social work was initiated
in October. This course is jointly sponsored by the School of Social Work of the
University of British Columbia and the Mental Health Services. It is being financed by
Federal mental-health grants.   Ten students enrolled in the class. DIRECTOR'S REPORT O 19
MENTAL-HEALTH GRANTS
The Government of Canada, through the Department of National Health and Welfare, continued the mental-health grant in the year 1950-51. The Province of British
Columbia submitted projects for equipment, professional training, research, community
mental-health programmes, and increased personnel for active-treatment services. A total
of $309,307.48 was expended in 1950-51.
Professional Training
Dr. W. E. Powles completed a one-year postgraduate course in psychiatry at the
Allan Memorial Institute of Psychiatry, Montreal, in June, 1950.
Miss M. A. Cunliffe completed a one-year postgraduate course in psychiatric social
work at Smith College,'North Hampton, Mass., in August, 1950.
J. W. Borthwick completed a one-year postgraduate course in clinical psychology
at the University of Washington in August, 1950.
Miss N. L. Grantham completed a one-year postgraduate course in supervision in
psychiatric nursing at McGill University in June, 1950.
Dr. N. L. Richardson completed a six-month postgraduate course in neurology at
the Vancouver General Hospital in June, 1950.
Miss B. J. Mitchell commenced a one-year course in teaching and supervision in
nursing at the University of British Columbia in September, 1950.
Miss A. J. Elart commenced a one-year postgraduate course in clinical psychology
at San Jose State College in September, 1950.
Miss D. R. Begg commenced a one-year postgraduate course in psychiatric social
work at McGill University in September, 1950.
Additional professional training in the mental-health field has been made available
by grants to the University of British Columbia for the training of psychiatric social
workers and clinical psychologists. There was also a grant to the Department of Education Summer School to provide a course for teachers on " Teaching Methods for
Exceptional Children."
Bursaries were granted to two public-school teachers to enable them to attend the
course in Mental Hygiene for Teachers at the University of Toronto. Upon completion
of the course, these teachers were appointed Mental Health Co-ordinators in their
respective school systems.
Equipment and Supplies
The basic equipment for the Neurophysiological Research Colony at the University
of British Columbia was authorized this year, and the greater part of it was delivered.
Equipment and supplies for the Men's and Women's Occupational Therapy Departments at the Crease Clinic and Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, were approved
and delivered.
Basic training and recreational supplies for the mentally defective patients of The
Woodlands School, New Westminster, were made available.
A Department of Radiology was established at The Woodlands School, the necessary equipment being made available from the mental-health grant.
A beauty-parlour was established in the Crease Clinic, the equipment being provided by the mental-health grant.
Community Mental-health Programmes
The mental-hygiene programmes of Greater Victoria and the Metropolitan Health
Committee of Greater Vancouver continued to receive support from the mental-health
grant. This assistance has provided for an increase in the professional personnel of
these services. O 20    ■ MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Assistance has also been continued to the Epilepsy Clinic at the Vancouver General Hospital.
An important contribution to public education with respect to mental illness was
the production of the film " Breakdown." This film was produced by the National
Film Board in co-operation with the Provincial Mental Health Services. The funds for
this production were made available from the mental-health grant, each Province being
assessed in proportion to its share of the mental-health grant.
Staff Increases
The appointment of a Consultant in Neurosurgery to the Provincial Mental Health
Services was authorized, the salary being paid from the mental-health grant.
The inauguration of a Rehabilitation Department was also approved, the salary
and expenses of the Rehabilitation Officer being paid from the mental-health grant.
There was continued support to provide for additional physicians, psychologists,
laboratory technicians, occupational therapists, and psychiatric nurses.
STAFF CHANGES
The maintenance of a senior well-trained staff still presents a serious problem.
The attrition rate in the women's nursing division is very high. An effort will be made
next year to conserve teaching-time in the Nursing Education Department by instituting
certain changes in staff structure and education.
A problem still exists with reference to obtaining medical personnel. The Royal
College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada has recently taken over the examination
and certification of specialists. The College has specified that no psychiatrist in training may take all postgraduate training in any one centre, and strongly recommends that
no candidate for the specialty take more than one year's training at any one mental
hospital. As a result of this radical change in policy, our medical residents now join
our staff for a postgraduate experience of one to two years and then leave for experience
elsewhere. It is hoped that in future years some of these physicians will return to us
after having completed their specialty training. In the meantime it is impossible to
obtain qualified psychiatrists, and we must in the future expect a rapid turnover in our
resident medical staff.
It is with sincere regret that I have to report the death of Corporal T. R. Baker
who, as a member of the British Columbia Provincial Police, had been attached to
Essondale for some years.
I also regretfully note the death of W. Dobbie, Chief Psychiatric Nurse at The
Woodlands School.    Mr. Dobbie had been in service at the School since 1927.
T. A. Morris terminated a long service, by resignation, on April 30th, 1950. Mr.
Morris had for some time suffered ill-health due to war service and injury. Mr. Morris
served in many capacities, and at the time of resignation was Deputy Business Manager
at Colquitz.
F. Gillard retired from service at The Woodlands School, May 31st, 1950.
J. S. Humphries retired from the nursing staff at Colquitz, January 31st, 1951.
Dr. T. D. Stout, Resident Physician, resigned December 31st, 1950.
Dr. J. R. Gosse, Dental Surgeon, resigned March 10th, 1951.
Dr. R. H. Lawler joined the medical staff January 1st, 1951.
Miss Josephine Kilburn (Welfare Department) retired as Chief Supervisor of Social
Service, December 31st, 1950.
FUTURE POLICY
Future policy should be directed toward two aims: (1) Increased early active treatment to prevent patients entering into the long-term treatment mental-hospital area, and
(2) to alleviate the present overcrowding existing in the long-term mental-hospital area. DIRECTOR'S REPORT O 21
Continued expansion must be made for the ever-increasing load which we are being
called upon to meet in reference to the care and education of the mentally deficient
group. It is hoped that the Infectious Building presently planned may be called for
tender at the earliest opportunity, and that with its construction no further major buildings will be required in the Mental Hospital proper. An analysis of the Mental Hospital
population shows that approximately 100 patients will reach the age of 65 years
annually for the next seven years. Some relief in overcrowding may thus be obtained
by expansion of the Home for the Aged accommodation and the transferral of these
patients from the Mental Hospital to the Home for the Aged. An additional 300 beds
may be made available in the Mental Hospital by expansion of The Woodlands School
in New Westminster and the transferral of 300 mentally deficient patients to The Woodlands School. In this manner it is felt that the heavy expense involved in building an
entirely new Mental Hospital service may be obviated for the next few years.
It is therefore recommended that the future programme of the Mental Health Services should be as follows:—
(1) Construction of adequate facilities to house the Child Guidance Clinic
activities. The present two houses being used for this purpose are
entirely inadequate and overcrowded. Further expansion is impossible,
and we are now refusing services due to lack of space in which to operate.
This would necessitate construction of a unit to house approximately
sixty offices.    It should be located in conjunction with—
(2) A Day Hospital where all active-treatment and teaching facilities would
be available on an out-patient basis. This unit should be located adjacent to Vancouver. It should contain only ten to twelve beds for
emergency overnight care. It is felt that with such a treatment programme a great deal could be accomplished toward reducing the admission rate to the Mental Hospital and long-term care. In addition, the
Day Hospital would act as a screen to the Crease Clinic and be able to
treat many patients without admission to either institution.
(3) In this same area should be constructed a Children's Observation Home
for the in-residence observation and training of a small group of normal
children showing behaviour problems. This Home would operate in
conjunction with the Child Guidance Clinic It should have a capacity
of twenty-five children.
The construction of the above three units need not involve heavy
expenditure of money in comparison with the construction of Mental
Hospital buildings.
(4) Further expansion is required in the Homes for the Aged to provide for
the maturing group in the Mental Hospital and thereby create vacancies
in the Mental Hospital wards, as well as care for those elderly persons
seeking admission to the Homes for the Aged.
(5) Further expansion is required in The Woodlands School to care for those
mentally deficient patients now in the Mental Hospital, thereby creating
further vacancies in the Mental Hospital wards and in an effort to care
for the heavy admission of these patients. There are at the present time
125 applications on a waiting list for admission of children under 6 years
of age.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
One cannot but feel humbled in expressing thanks to the many Governmental departments, agencies, and individuals on whom the success of our work depends. I would
like to express thanks to our Minister, the Honourable W. T. Straith, who, as Provincial 0 22 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Secretary, is responsible for the administration of the Mental Health Services and the
interpretation of our needs to the Cabinet. In this day when we are assuming more
and more the aspects of an educational institution, it is very fitting that we should be
associated with a Minister who combines the portfolios of the Provincial Secretary and
Minister of Education.
To you, Mr. Pennington, has fallen a greater burden this year due to the many
changes in organization, expanded services, increased personnel, and rising costs. I am
deeply appreciative of the debt that the services owe to you personally, and can only
express my sincere satisfaction in being closely associated with you.
Other departments closely associated with us—the Department of Health and Welfare, the Department of Public Works, the Civil Service Commission, the Department of
the Attorney-General—have all been most co-operative and helpful.    Particularly, may
1 draw to your attention the great assistance given by Dr. G. R. F. Elliot, Assistant
Provincial Health Officer; Miss Amy Leigh, Deputy Director of Welfare; and Dr.
Arthur Hakstian, Director of the New Westminster Unit, Division of Tuberculosis
Control.
The returned soldiers' organizations, and particularly the Women's Auxiliaries of
the Canadian Legion, have done much in providing added comforts, reading material,
and entertainments for our veteran group of patients.
Within our own establishment control, I would comment on the splendid spirit of
co-operation and esprit de corps that exists in all departments. This is particularly
essential in a treatment setting where environment and atmosphere play such an important role in the therapy of our patient population. I would like to mention favourably
the various associations in our personnel group and the valuable contribution which they
make to the over-all programme.
In closing the report, I would like to draw your attention to the superintendents
of the different divisions of the Mental Health Services, and the reports of their departments. Dr. E. J. Ryan, as Senior Superintendent, carries a great deal of responsibility
and renders particular service in all matters relating to nursing personnel. Dr. L. E.
Sauriol, as Medical Superintendent of The Woodlands School, has been particularly
occupied this year with a rapidly expanding programme. Many changes have been
made to elevate the standard of training and patient-care. Dr. L. G. C. d'Easum
continues to function in a dual capacity as Medical Superintendent of the Colquitz
Division and psychiatrist to the Child Guidance Clinic on Vancouver Island. A great
deal of credit is due to the management of the Colquitz Branch, inasmuch as this very
difficult unit is able to operate as smoothly as it does.
Our Geriatrics Division, under Dr. T. G. Caunt's jurisdiction, is developing rapidly.
The demands for admission to this section are still in excess of our accommodation.
The responsibility which devolves on Dr.. Caunt in the selection of those patients
requiring urgent admission is very great.
Special commendation is due to our Business Manager, F. A. Matheson, and his
capable staff in the business administration of our vast organization.
Finally, my personal thanks to C. B. Watson, my Administrative Assistant, who
cares for all non-medical administrative details, and Mrs. Wedge, my secretary.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. M. Gee, M.D.,
Director of Mental Health Services. REPORT OF CREASE CLINIC O 23
REPORT OF CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL
MEDICINE
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine
from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951.
The Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine opened its doors for the reception of
nervous and mentally ill patients on January 1st, 1951, with a Proclamation of the
" Clinics of Psychological Medicine Act." With this event, many of our dreams and
plans are finally realized and another step forward has been made in the treatment of
the mentally ill in the Province of British Columbia.
The purpose of the Crease Clinic is to provide complete diagnostic and treatment
facilities for the early cases of mental illness. To enable this, the new Clinic Act
provides for admission by voluntary application or by medical certification of two
physicians without any further legal documents. A period of four months is the maximum period of time any patient may remain in the Clinic; thus any diagnosis and
treatment must be carried out in a comparatively short period of time.
The Clinic is furnished attractively, providing a comfortable environment for the
relaxation and treatment facilities that the patient receives. Adequate facilities are
provided in the Clinic to enable a thorough diagnosis of all medical and psychiatric
conditions; these include clinical laboratory, X-ray facilities, neurological consultation
services, and complete facilities for psychological testing. Every medical aid also is
provided to enable the best in psychiatric therapy, including physiotherapy, hydrotherapy, occupational and recreational therapy facilities, etc. These facilities are auxiliary
aids and assist in the other more specific forms of psychiatric therapy. All necessary
facilities, including electroshock, electronarcosis, coma insulin, etc., are available in the
new Clinic.
The Crease Clinic has only functioned actively during the past three months of the
fiscal year 1950-51—namely, in the months of January, February, and March. During
these months some 264 patients were admitted to the Clinic for diagnosis and treatment.
Of these, 54 patients receiving active therapy in the Mental Hospital were transferred
by Order in Council to the Clinic for further treatment on January 1 st. It is interesting
to note that of this total of 264 patients, some 91 patients sought help in the Clinic
voluntarily. The three-month period of operation provides much too short a time to
draw any conclusions concerning the effectiveness of the new project. One can only
anticipate that this new institution will provide an important service in the early treatment of mental illness.
Respectfully submitted.
A. E. Davidson, M.D.,
Clinical Director. O 24 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
REPORTS OF PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
REPORT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—In reference to the above department, at the beginning of the year we had
the following number of patients in Hospital: Men, 1,968; women, 1,649; a total
of 3,617.
The number of patients admitted to the Hospital during the year was as follows:
Men, 844; women, 655; a total of 1,499.
The number of discharges, deaths, etc., is included in your statistical report.
We finished the year with the following number of patients in Hospital: Men,
1,827; women, 1,638; a total of 3,465.
During the first nine months of the year the Crease Clinic was used as a receiving
ward for the Mental Hospital. During this period of time we were able to renovate
the wards in the Centre Lawn Building, and we were ready to receive patients in this
building for the Mental Hospital in January, 1951.
The big movement during the year was the transfer by special train of 130 men
patients from the Mental Hospital at Essondale and 23 men patients from the Home
for the Aged at Port Coquitlam to the Home for the Aged at Terrace. This move was
made without any complications. As a result of this move, we have been able to
accept senile cases in the Mental Hospital and shortly afterwards have been able to
transfer them to the Home for the Aged at Port Coquitlam. As a further result, we
have not been forced to refuse any applications for this type of patient since January,
1950. This move also gave us vacancies on the men's side of the Mental Hospital.
It did not, however, help us in any way on the women's side.
Active treatment for psychotic patients has been intensified, and we are now using
electroshock therapy, electronarcosis, somnolent insulin, coma insulin, and lobotomies.
The number of cases treated in the various groups would be in Dr. Davidson's report
on treatments.
It is to be noted that there is an increasing demand for accommodation of women
seniles, for whom we have no beds at the present time.
Also as a result of the move to Terrace, we were able to transfer a number of
older, retarded cases from The Woodlands School at New Westminster to the Provincial
Mental Hospital at Essondale. We were then able to transfer the young mentally
deficients who had been admitted to the Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale to
The Woodlands School at New Westminster.
There are plans for a new Tubercular Building, but no definite move has been made
along this line.
It is to be noted that there was an increase in the number of toxic alcoholic men
patients admitted during the year. We are also beginning to see an increase in the
admissions of toxic alcoholic women patients.
At the present time there are two definite needs—that is, an increased demand for
accommodation of senile women and mentally retarded children, many of whom are
babies under the age of 6 months.
It should be borne in mind that with the increasing accommodation for patients
there should be a definite increase in accommodation for staff.
I feel that the number of admissions will gradually increase with the increase in
population of the Province. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE O 25
I would like to see the time when senile cases may be admitted direct to the Home
for the Aged and mentally retarded cases may be admitted direct to The Woodlands
School, without having to pass through the Provincial Mental Hospital at Essondale.
There has been considerable change in the staff during the past year, and many of
the older members will be leaving the service in the next two years.
Respectfully submitted.
E. J. Ryan, M.D.,
Senior Medical Superintendent.
TREATMENT SERVICES
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the Treatment Services in the Mental Health
Services, Essondale.
Because of the very nature of psychiatric therapy it is very difficult to paint in
words a true picture of the actual amount of therapy carried out in the Mental Health
Services at Essondale. An indication of the amount of treatment necessary, both
medical and psychiatric, is indicated by the number of patients actually resident in
hospital. Some 3,465 patients were resident in the Mental Hospital proper at the end
of the fiscal year. During the year 1950-51, 1,499 patients were admitted to the Mental
Hospital and 264 were admitted to the Clinic, making a total of 1,763 new admissions.
These figures give some indication of the amount of treatment necessary in the handling
and care of this large number of patients.
In the treatment of mental disorders it is also generally recognized that the combined
efforts of various individuals from different departments are necessary. Successful
therapy must be carried on by the psychiatric team, which consists of psychiatrist,
psychiatric nurse, social service worker, occupational therapist, recreational therapist,
and psychologist. Reports from these various departments will be noted elsewhere in
the Annual Report.
The main therapeutic weapon in the treatment of psychiatric disorders still remains
psychotherapy in all its various forms. This consists of frequent interviews, leading
to the patient having a better understanding of his problems and also helping to establish
adequate interpersonal relationships between the physician and the patient. It is
recognized that this is extremely time-consuming, but as a result of the increased number
of physicians on our staff it has been possible to provide a great deal more active
psychiatric therapy. Besides individual psychotherapy, many patients have also received
considerable help through group psychotherapy, which consists of various small groups
being seen frequently and regularly by a physician in charge of such a group. In addition to the various forms of psychotherapy, we still use, where indicated, the varied
forms of physical therapy. It is much easier to record statistically the quantity of
physical therapy carried on in an institution.
(a) Coma Insulin.—Coma insulin has been used extensively in our Hospital during
the past year. Treatment facilities in this field have been extended with the opening
of the present Clinic, so that at the present time we have fifty-two beds devoted to
treatment with coma insulin. This treatment still is most effective in treating a large
number of the schizophrenic type of mental disorders. O 26 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Results                                                                                            Total Per Cent
Recovered      39 16.81
Much improved      21 9.05
Improved  ..    92 39.66
Unimproved      80 34.48
Totals    232 100.00
Disposal—
Discharged   101 43.34
Discharged later  66 28.33
Transferred to lobotomy  15 6.44
Remaining in hospital  48 20.60
Died later  3 1.29
Totals   233 100.00
(b) Convulsive Shock Therapy.—Electroshock therapy continues to be a most
effective weapon in the treatment of affective disturbances consisting of manic and
depressed attacks. We have been using it in the Hospital both as an active therapy
on the admission and active-treatment wards, and also in the prolonged-treatment wards
for the relief of acute symptoms in longer-term patients.
Results  Total Per Cent
Recovered      72 18.75
Much improved      57 14.84
Improved   149 38.81
Unimproved   106 27.60
Totals  384 100.00
Disposal—
Discharged   137 35.68
Discharged later  24 6.25
Transferred to insulin  56 14.58
Transferred to lobotomy  12 3.13
Died later  4 1.04
Remaining in hospital  151 39.32
Totals   384 100.00
(c) Electronarcosis.—Electronarcosis is a new form of electrical therapy that has
been used frequently during the past year with gratifying results. This is a form of
therapy wherein a state of coma is induced by means of electricity. This type of treatment is used frequently in cases with reasonably good prognosis who have failed to
respond to other forms of treatment.
Results                                                                                            Total Per Cent
Recovered      5 7.46
Much improved   18 26.86
Improved   21 31.35
Unimproved   23 34.33
Totals   67 100.00
Disposal—
Discharged   22 32.84
Remaining in hospital  45 67.16
Totals   67 100.00 REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
O 27
(d) Lobotomy.—This type of operative procedure continues to be used in selective cases with very satisfying results. We always consider this operation as a measure
of last resort and only operate when other types of therapy have failed to obtain satisfying improvement. This operation is used in two groups of patients: (1) Those where
we aim to obtain satisfying relief of symptoms with eventual rehabilitation of the patient,
and (2) certain patients who are very disturbed and troublesome over a prolonged
period of time obtain a marked improvement in their ability to adjust to ordinary hospital
routine.
Patients Operated on for the Relief of Symptoms
Result
Disposal
Diagnosis
Number of
Patients
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
Discharged
Remaining
in Hospital
1
19
4
1
10
3
6
1
3
1
10
3
9
Miscellaneous	
1
Totals  	
24                      14
1
7
3
14
10
Patients Operated on j
for Improved Hospital Adjustment
i
14
4
1
2
8
4
1
10
Miscellaneous  	
15           I            4
3
8
4
11
Total Patients Operated On
Manic depressive 	
Schizophrenia	
Miscellaneous  	
2
33
4
1
14
3
1
8
1
0
11
1
14
3
1
19
1
Totals   -—	
39
18
10
11
18
21
Respectfully submitted.
A. E. Davidson, M.D.,
Clinical Director.
DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Women's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—In spite of the acute shortage of trained occupational therapists in Canada,
our Department maintained its full staff of nine. There were four resignations during
the year, and I feel that great credit is due to members of the staff for their help in obtaining personnel to fill these vacancies. During the year four first-year students and one
third-year student from the University of Toronto received training in the Department.
The year seems to be characterized by the opening of new departments or the
renovating of old ones. On April 1st one room of the Crease Clinic was opened to
patients, but until the fall the Department was without cupboards or adequate space O 28 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
for a proper treatment programme. At that time the three rooms of the Department
were thoroughly equipped with well-designed cupboards, and the balance of the equipment purchased through Federal health grants was put to use.
On June 1st a small workshop was opened at the Home for the Aged, with one
therapist doing full-time work there. In December this programme had be be curtailed
to a visit two mornings a week only.
The workshop at the Centre Lawn Building was reopened on December 15th after
being completely renovated.
Furniture at the East Lawn Building workshop has been painted by staff and patients,
and this has brightened that very large department. It was with regret that the ward
programme at the East Lawn Building had to be discontinued in December. The reason
for this was that the additional workshop, the Centre Lawn, had to be staffed with the
existing number of therapists. In order to carry on a ward programme, I feel we need
one more therapist. At the present time, patients unable to come to the workshop are
dependent on the occasional visit from a therapist or an interested charge nurse who
comes to the workshop for supplies.
During the year the average number of patients registered for treatment was 486.
Number of patients admitted for treatment during the year was 1,210; patients discontinued, transferred, or discharged, 1,104. Total number of treatments given during the
year was 90,489. Total number of hours workshop was available to patients amounted
to 9,803. In addition to the regular handicrafts, gardening and sketching classes have
been held during the summer. Finger-painting is participated in by both men and
women patients at the Crease Clinic, and pottery in the Men's Department at the Clinic
by both groups of patients. Special projects have included making dogwood favours for
the Social Service Convention on June 12th, the making of several hundred Christmas
toys for The Woodlands School and the Canadian Legion, a Christmas sale of work
which realized $857.09, participating in the movie " Breakdown," lectures to affiliating
nurses and student nurses, assisting at sports day, looking after special decorations and
floral arrangements, and organizing several parties in our Department for the patients.
A display of handicrafts was presented on August 3rd at the Annual Flower Show,
Port Coquitlam, when three therapists judged the needlework and sewing exhibits. Also
a display of work was shown at the Nurses' Exposition, Vancouver General Hospital,
January 24th.
From September until March we were without a school-teacher. The school programme has now been enlarged to include ten boys from D 1 in addition to fifteen girls
from H 1, and classes are held in the mornings in the schoolroom on H 1. Two afternoons a week instruction is given at the Clinic to non-English-speaking patients, and the
remaining three afternoons are used for correspondence courses for adult patients.
We wish to thank the medical staff, the nursing staff, and other personnel who have
given so freely of their time and counsel during the year.
Respectfully submitted. _, _
r Kathleen Draper,
Director, Occupational Therapy Department
(Women's Division). reports of mental hospital, essondale o 29
Men's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the annual report of the Male Industrial
Therapy, Trades and Occupational Therapy Departments, from April 1st, 1950, to March
31st, 1951.
The Industrial Therapy and Trades consist of the following departments: Cabinet
and Woodworking Department, Upholstering Department, Tailoring Department, Copper-
shop, Metal Machine-shop, Shoe-shop, and Canvas, Weaving, and Basketry Department.
The Cabinet-shop has had a busy and successful year in the making of new cabinets
and repairs and renovation of all types of furniture. This work is very extensive. This
Department works in close co-operation with the Upholstering Department, as all frames
of upholstered furniture are required to be renovated before being reupholstered. This
entails a great deal of work. There are also tables, benches, and chairs of all types
repaired in the Department. I might state that we handled over 5,000 pieces of furniture
during the year 1950-51.    The average number of patients per day was ten.
The Upholstering Department also had a very busy year, both in the upholstering
of a great quantity of furniture for the wards and the manufacturing of cushions, blinds,
and carpets for the Hospital. We undertook the task of the thorough renovation of all
the furniture of Nurses' Homes Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 5. This has added greatly to the comfort of the nurses. A total of 508 pieces was upholstered during the year. The average
number of patients per day was seven.
The Tailor-shop has facilities to train young women in addition to the regular work.
We organize courses of individual instruction, teaching power-machine operating and
tailoring.    As a result, fourteen patients have been successfully rehabilitated.    Work
accomplished during the year was as follows:—
Tailored clothing:—
106 suits tailored to measure.
146 tweed suits tailored to measure.
4 overcoats tailored to measure.
186 drill pants tailored to measure.
Repairs and alterations:—
3,858 overalls and coveralls.
1,695 cloth pants.
817 coats.
321 vests.
11 overcoats.
Average number of patients per pay was seventeen.
The Copper-shop has proven to be a very valuable and interesting asset to our
organization. Here the patients may work in copper, aluminium, and stainless steel,
and produce countless valuable and useful articles for the use of the Hospital. Both
acetylene and electric welding are employed in the manufacturing of the different articles.
This branch of work appeals greatly to the patients, as they may express themselves in
creating different designs in hand-wrought copper or aluminium and, in turn, has aided
the rehabilitation of several of our patients. The average number of patients per day
was fifteen.
A great deal of maintenance repairs for the Department of Public Works is accomplished in our Metal Machine-shop. This also creates practical work for the patients
whom we are endeavouring to rehabilitate. Here we manufacture a great number of
articles to be used in the Occupational Therapy Departments. Average number of
patients per day was seven. O 30 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
The Shoe Department has been operated successfully during the year, carrying on
extensive repair work and making considerable new stock, as well as special footwear
for deformed and crippled patients who require special attention of this kind. We also
make a special effort in teaching shoe-making, as this is a well-equipped shop, and here
again our aim is rehabilitation.   Average number of patients per day was sixteen.
In the Canvas, Weaving, and Basketry Department are manufactured canvas goods
of all types, rubber envelopes, rubber pillow-slips, mattresses of all sizes, laundry-bags,
etc. There is a vast amount of these articles produced in this Department for the comfort
of the patients.
In addition, we repair all canvas articles for the Hospital, and a great quantity of
basketry and weaving is accomplished.   Average number of patients per day was nineteen.
Male Occupational Therapy Department, Consisting of D 5, Crease Clinic
Occupational Therapy, and Colony Farm Veterans' Occupational Therapy
D 5.—The activities consist of weaving, woodworking, clay-modelling, raffia work,
and bookbinding. There is a considerable amount of printing done on a hand-operated
printing-press. Approximately 50,000 copies of some twenty-five to thirty varieties of
forms and cards were printed during the year. The average number of patients per day
was sixteen.
Crease Clinic.—The Occupational Therapy Shop in the Crease Clinic was opened
on November 21st, 1950, receiving twelve patients daily and increased to twenty-nine
patients at the end of that month. The average number of patients on treatment roll per
month for the five-month period was forty-five. The highest treatment-month, March,
1951, was seventy-three patients. The number of patients admitted for treatment during
the five-month period was 122 patients. Number transferred, fifteen, and number discharged, thirty-seven. We are teaching all the home crafts in this well-equipped and
efficient department, and feel that it is a credit to our institution.
Colony Farm Veterans' Occupational Therapy Department.—This Department consists wholly of veterans of World Wars I and II, and is organized to furnish them with
an outlet for their expression. Here we endeavour to teach more along the lines of
hobby crafts. During the past year the veterans worked on a very interesting and worthwhile project in manufacturing wooden toys out of salvaged materials for the needy
children at Christmas-time. The No. 2 Post of the Canadian Legion received 200 of
these toys, to be given to the veterans' children at their annual Christmas-tree entertainment at the Canadian Legion, New Westminster. Also, 175 toys were sent to The Woodlands School for distribution at Christmas-time. I feel that the patients derived a great
deal of pleasure and satisfaction from this undertaking of helping the children of their
fellow comrades.   Average number of patients per day was seventeen.
Respectfully submitted.
R. T. Hall,
Supervisor of Industrial Therapy, Trades
and Occupational Therapy. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE O 31
DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL THERAPY
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit to you the following report showing programme and attendance
figures of the activities promoted by the Recreational Department for April 1st, 1950, to
March 31st, 1951.
Number of Total
Type of Activity                                                                              Programmes Attendance
Bingo gatherings       4 787
Swimming   116 3,372
Dances—
Indoor—
Provincial Mental Hospital     29 9,775
Crease Clinic     31 1,755
Outdoor       7 2,525
Inter-ward cribbage and checker contests     27 324
Crossword, cryptogram, and puzzle contests     52 (*)
Physical-education periods—
Indoor .     28 566
Outdoor ...     64 1,058
Bridge Club meetings       3 188
Picnics      13 349
Music-appreciation hours     17 1,275
Variety parties and special programmes     11 3,401
" Leader-group " training periods     61 732
Free-time Crease Clinic recreation periods  168 3,780
Third annual field-day       3 1,600
Staff recreation—
Square Dance Club     40 1,708
Badminton      46 699
Swimming, diving, and life-saving classes....    74 1,178
Totals  794 35,072
Unestimated.
Following are special or progressive inaugurated events to our programme during
the year, and additional remarks:—
(1) On February 1st, 1951, a Bridge Club was organized for the benefit of
those who could play the game well without instruction and assistance.
This club, although meeting only a few times before the end of the season,
proved very popular and should help a lot in the socializing part of our
programme.
(2) Our third annual field and sports day was held on September 8th, and this
year the entries for the different events were so numerous that it was
necessary to hold trial and elimination events for two days prior to the
meet.
(3) The free-time periods for Crease Clinic residents proved very popular and
were well attended. These periods were available to residents of East
3 and 4 and West 3 and 4 whenever the recreation staff was conducting
a programme elsewhere. The residents would have full use of all play
equipment in the East and West Recreation Rooms and would be assisted
and supervised by their own nurses. O 32 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
(4) On October 8th, 1950, full use of our new Multigraph machine was made,
and our new four-page " Leader " weekly bulletin of activities in colour
was inaugurated.
(5) On June 27th, 1950, full advantage was taken of the new bus for residents
in transportation to dances, swimming-pool, and beach.
(6) On November 30th, 1950, an all-day white-elephant auction programme
was organized and promoted, with very successful results, for the benefit
of the " Nurses' Annual" committee.
(7) On January 31st, 1951, a display of professional table-tennis technique
was given by British Columbia and Pacific Northwest Champions A. Bar-
ran and J. Edwards.
(8) The organized swimming, diving, and life-saving classes for staff residents,
formed in 1949, proved a very popular activity and progressed right up to
the end of the season, when all beginners took their deep-water tests.
In closing, I would again like to express my thanks for the co-operation and
assistance given by the many staff personnel and departments in the promotion of our
various play activities.
Respectfully submitted.
W. R. Brown,
Director of Recreational Therapy.
AUDIO-VISUAL DEPARTMENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith is a report covering the activities of the Audio-Visual
Department during the fiscal year April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951.
It can be seen from the tables that the increase in activities over last year affects all
phases of this Department. Each year, too, new applications are found for this Department toward the Mental Health Services.
It is fortunate that Pennington Hall will soon be ready for occupation, since 35-mm.
movies in the present location are becoming prohibitive through such large attendance.
This condition is also very apparent at The Woodlands School.
Much keener interest has been shown in our educational 16-mm. film library, not
only from our own and affiliate institutions, but from many other organizations. During
the training period an average of four films each week was shipped from this film library.
In motion-pictures as a whole, both recreational and educational, as many as thirty
movies in one week have been projected by the Audio-Visual staff during the height of
the season. It will be difficult to cope with further increases in this regard and still
maintain the films and equipment in good condition without increased facilities. The
present pace has been met, to some extent, by standardizing machines, stream-lining the
accessories, constructing equipment to suit the application, and by co-ordinating the
activities for the coming week in the form of an operator's schedule.
Photography has assisted the hospital in many ways, even to the extent of making
many duplicates of instructions on care and use of equipment to be used by the staff.
Many pictures, showing progress of various stages of construction of new buildings in this
area, have been forwarded to the Chief Architect in Victoria at his request. Colour
photography is increasing for clinical and pathological uses, and it will only be a matter REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE O 33
of time before it will be more economical and convenient for us to process our own
colour transparencies.
To facilitate the technique of clinical photography, a number of other photographers
involved in the same line of work, and myself, have formed a Medical Photographers'
Association.   Many mutual benefits have already been derived from this affiliation.
Assistance was given to the National Film Board in the film production "Breakdown." Some of the actual sounds on this film were recorded on the Audio-Visual
Department's equipment and sent to New York for processing on to film.
In general, I feel the past year has been quite successful, but not without some
disappointments. Much thankful assistance has been received from other departments
of the Hospital, especially that of Mr. Nolan and his staff, who have enabled us to keep
things running on schedule.
Recreational Motion-pictures
No. of Shows Attendance
35-mm. presentations at Essondale  192 44,492
35-mm. presentations at Woodlands School  62 13,468
16-mm. presentations at Essondale, Home for the
Aged, and Colony Farm  476 45,432
Total attendance  100,392
Increase in total attendance    51%
16-mm. Films Shipped to Other Institutions
Colquitz  .  104
Woodlands School  98
Home for the Aged, Vernon  50
Provincial Home, Kamloops  50
Girls' Industrial School  52
Boys' Industrial School  52
Allco Infirmary, Haney  52
Total  458
The 16-mm. projection equipment was loaned out 231 times, an increase of 23
per cent.
Educational Motion-pictures
No. of Shows Attendance
16-mm. presentations  146 4,228
Increase in total attendance  46%
16-mm. films loaned  208 5,020
Increase in total attendance  112%
16-mm. presentations conducted away from Hospital by Audio-Visual staff      7 	 O 34 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Photography
4x5 negatives exposed, black and white  454
4x5 negatives exposed, colour  7
8x10 prints produced  1,154
5x7 prints produced  65
11 x 14 prints produced  8
4x5 prints produced  9
6 x 434 prints produced  39
35-mm. negatives exposed  42
2x2 transparencies produced  39
3% x 4 transparencies produced .  96
Photostatic copies  7
16-mm. motion-picture film exposed (feet)  645
Records and Recordings
Domestic records loaned out  463
Minutes of recorded material for clinical and miscellaneous
purposes  345
Hours of music played in either dining-rooms or on lawns  125
Respectfully submitted.
G. H. Walker,
Director, Audio-Visual Department.
LIBRARY REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith is a report of the medical and patients' libraries for the
fiscal year ended March 31st, 1951. Miss Jean Irving, Librarian, resigned in June,
1950, and the vacancy was filled in October by Mrs. Helen Fraser, B.A., B.L.Sc. Miss
Anne Ruzicka is assistant to the Librarian.
The patients' library, with its bright and cheerful atmosphere, is well used and
affords the patients many hours of pleasant and profitable relaxation. The books have
been reshelved according to type, and the shelves lettered so that readers may browse
more conveniently in the sections which interest them most.
A magazine-rack containing the daily newspapers and current subscriptions to ten
timely periodicals is a popular addition to the book collection. Book reviews and
classical-music recordings on alternate Monday afternoons have been so enthusiastically
received that extra chairs must be brought to accommodate the attendance, which
averages fifty.
Book service to the wards continues, and magazines collected from the staff and
other interested parties are also sent regularly. The libraries at Vista and at the Home
for the Aged, Vernon, are also stocked from the main library in the Crease Clinic.
A portion of the Federal mental-health grant has again been made available to the
medical library for the purchase of basic works in psychiatry and medicine, thus aiding
in keeping the collection abreast of current progress. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
Patients' Library
O 35
Book collection  ...
New books added
Donations  	
Book losses
3,804
183
65
4,052
86
3,966
Current subscriptions .  10
Number of books circulated   11,348
Medical Library
Book collection     1,144
New books        216
Journals (medical and psychiatric)	
Journals (technical, other departments)
Journals (bound volumes) 	
Books borrowed on inter-library loan
Books lent on inter-library loan	
Number of books circulated	
Respectfully submitted.
1,360
66
42
108
102
48
5
1,249
(Mrs.) H. M. Fraser,
Librarian.
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL MEDICINE
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of the treatments given in the Physiotherapy Department of the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951:—
Male
Female
Total
1,501
605
116
8
497
197
523
19
308
2,188
21
1,830
887
698
12
1,144
704
707
43
128
1,631
530
84
3,331
1,492
814
Steam or hot-air bath..... 	
20
1,641
901
Sprays, douches, etc     —	
Sitz bath	
1,230
62
436
Massage and remedial exercises  	
3,819
551
84
5,983
637
8,398
409
14,381
1,046
Respectfully submitted.
A. E. Davidson, M.D.,
Clinical Director. O 36 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
DENTAL REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is the annual report of the Dental Department of the Provincial
Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C., for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1951:—
Examinations  r  943
Extractions   2,470
Fillings   457
Prophylaxis   191
Treatments  1  100
X-rays   245
General anaesthetic cases  41
Dentures made  159
Dentures relined  18
Bridge repairs  6
Respectfully submitted,
J. R. Gosse, D.D.S.
OPTICAL REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the optical work done at the Provincial Mental
Hospital, Essondale, B.C., for the fiscal year April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951:—
Refractions   237
Repairs sent to J. S. Hudson Optical Supplies  225
Minor repairs and adjustments  179
Respectfully submitted.
H. H. Woodbridge,
Optometrist.
BEAUTY-PARLOUR REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is a report of the appointments made in the Beauty-parlor
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951, covering the Mental Hospital and the Crease
Clinic:—
Shampoos  4,496
Finger-waves   4,437
Permanents       490
Marcels  _■_        64
Shaves       425
Oil and scalp treatments      829
Manicures      985
Hair-cuts   4,764
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) M. Townsend. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE O 37
DEPARTMENT OF DIETETICS
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit a report of the work of the Dietary Department during the
year April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951. This report will cover the units of the
Department in the Crease Clinic, the Home for the Aged at Coquitlam, the Colony
Farm, and the Mental Hospital at Essondale.
In the summer and early autumn months the supply of fresh vegetables and fruits
was good. More fresh vegetables were purchased during the winter than in past years,
which made it possible to improve the patients' meals in respect to vitamins. Testing
of products was carried on during the year to help obtain the most satisfactory products
possible. A continuous programme to improve the variety of patients' meals was
carried on throughout the year. Special arrangements were made during the Christmas
holiday season to provide catering for patients' parties and appropriate festive menus
for Christmas and New Year's Days. Other holidays such as Easter and Thanksgiving
were observed with special menu items.
Equipment in kitchens has been improved. Replacement and relocation of the
steam equipment were done in the Centre Lawn kitchen. A dish-machine installation
and new urns were provided for Ward C 4, and a large mixer was replaced in the East
Lawn kitchen. The Clinic kitchen was provided with a badly needed dish-machine
installation and a meat-slicer. Some large electrical equipment was purchased, and
with that already on hand we now have all the equipment needed to switch over the
West Lawn, Centre Lawn, and Home for the Aged kitchens from coal to electricity.
The number of special diets required is increasing continuously, with an average
of approximately 130 diets per day throughout the various units of the Hospital. The
need for adequate central diet-kitchens is acute in the East Lawn, Centre Lawn, and
Clinic buildings, in order to provide properly prepared and supervised special diets to
the patients requiring them.
Throughout the year the collection of meal tickets from the staff presented a
problem. Meals are served in so many places where it is impossible to supervise and
control the collection of tickets that the loss is considerable. It is particularly bad on
night shift. Despite continuing efforts, it has been proven that the meal-ticket system
cannot be made to function effectively.
A change in personnel policy has been in effect since the inception of the cooks'
training programme. Prior to April 1st, 1950, all kitchen-helpers, who were then on
staff and who applied, were given the opportunity to write examinations in the cooks'
training-school, thereby being classified for entrance into the school. Seven kitchen-
helpers successfully passed the examination for the final year of the course, and the
others were placed in the appropriate year for training. It was not possible, because
of the arrival of patients in the Crease Clinic building and the shortage of staff, to begin
classes until October 1st, 1950. However, after April 1st, all promotions to cooks'
positions were in the order of merit from those men who had successfully passed the
qualifying examinations. The effect of this policy has been remarkable; the attitude
and initiative of the men involved have improved tremendously. It has been possible
for men who were well skilled and capable, but junior in service here, to be promoted
ahead of men who were senior in service. This has not created resentment, but, rather,
promoted healthy ambitious competition and a higher standard of work by the men
involved. It is accepted as a fair and just system, and the result has been to inspire
initiative amongst the men, which has given a higher standard of work generally.
A number of special events were catered for during the year, with a great deal of
the work being done by the Crease Clinic kitchen.    These events included the graduation O 38 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
reception, the graduation breakfast, a banquet for the Neuro-psychiatric Division of
the Vancouver Medical Association, a farewell tea for Miss Kilburn (head of the Social
Service Department), the annual staff party at Christmas, and various smaller gatherings
such as annual meetings of the Occupational Therapy Association, the Physiotherapy
Association, etc., and various bands who have come to entertain patients.
The year ended March 31st, 1951, with the following staff in the Dietary Department: Three Dietitians, one Chief Cook and one Deputy Chief Cook, two Cooks—
Grade IV, seven Cooks—Grade III, thirteen Cooks—Grade II, fourteen Cooks—Grade
I, twenty-two Kitchen-helpers, and eleven Dining-room Orderlies.
I should like to mention the very fine co-operation of the other departments in the
Hospital, whose assistance is greatly appreciated by the staff of the Dietary Department.
This report for the fiscal year of April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951, is respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Mary B. Allman,
Chief Dietitian.
DEPARTMENT OF NEUROLOGY
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Within the past fiscal year a Department of Neurology was established within
the framework of the Crease Clinic. Its scope and sphere of work, however, extended
beyond it and comprised the whole Provincial Mental Health Services. Its function was
a consultative one, and its purpose aimed at providing all those facilities which a refined
modern diagnostic apparatus utilizes in the elucidation of organic psychiatric and neurological disturbances. Thus a Sub-department of Electroencephalography was created,
which came under the immediate direction of the Neurologist who was responsible for
the training of the technical staff, the supervision of the recording, and, of course, the
interpretation of the records. A further diagnostic procedure, that of pneumoencephalography, was established in conjunction with the Department of Radiology. With the
construction of a convenient mobile chair by our own technical staff, this vital examination was carried out with facility and expediency so that the patients were subjected to
a minimum of discomfort.
In addition to the current daily tasks of consultation with the staff physicians,
a survey of all resident patients with a history of cerebral seizures was undertaken, and
is still in the process of being carried out.
The over-all function of the Neurologist was to integrate the various clinical and
laboratory data necessary for the diagnostic assessment of the patient. Furthermore,
he had to act as a liaison officer with the Neurosurgeon in those instances in which surgical
measures seemed indicated.
Although not directly related to his clinical duties, the Neurologist attended in an
advisory capacity at the epileptic out-patients' clinic at the Vancouver General Hospital REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE O 39
and became attached as a demonstrator in neuro-anatomy to the Faculty of Medicine of
the University of British Columbia.
In the period from April 22nd, 1950, to March 31st, 1951, there were 540 electroencephalograms and 89 pneumoencephalograms.
Respectfully submitted.
W. P. Fister, M.D.,
Director of Neurology.
LABORATORY REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the laboratories at Essondale from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951:—
Blood—
Kahn, negative  2,015
Kahn, positive   79
Kahn, quantitative  53
Red-blood count  2,279
White-blood count  2,237
Haemoglobin  245
Mean cell diameter ._ 1
Sedimentation rate  912
Bleeding time  51
Coagulation time  57
Platelet count .. 7
Reticulocyte count  22
Prothrombin time  50
Culture  7
Widal   4
Agglutination for B. abortus .  4
Paul Bunnell  3
Glucose   588
Glucose tolerance curve  17
Amylase   1
Non-protein nitrogen _'.  130
Uric acid  2
Urea nitrogen  3
Creatinine   5
Creatine tolerance  1
Cholesterol  38
Barbiturate .  9
Bromide  .  32
Chloride   9
Calcium  1
Sodium  24
Potassium   40
Alkaline phosphatase  3
Acid phosphatase  1 O 40 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Blood—Continued
Icterus index  26
Van den Bergh  24
Total protein  22
Albumin-globulin ratio  19
Hanger flocculation  15
Thymol turbidity  14
Bromsulphalein   2
Hippuric acid  1
Carbon monoxide  2
C02 combining power  2
Alcohol   2
Absorption spectrum  2
Cerebrospinal fluid—
Kahn, negative  114
Kahn, positive  37
Kahn, quantitative  28
Colloidal gold  178
Cell count  249
Total protein  179
Glucose   2
Chloride  6
T.B.   4
Absorption spectrum  54
Urine—
Routine   9,702
Acetone  3,826
Quantitative   429
Bromide   1,373
Benzidene   902
Quantitative albumin   137
Bile   14
Urobilinogen   24
Barbiturate  5
Alcohol   1
Calcium   1
Chloride   1
Urea  1
Creatine   2
Creatinine   1
Phenylpyruvic acid  12
Phenolsulfonphthalein   1
Diastase   2
Preg-test  15
Friedman   18
17-ketosteroids   7
2-hourly   5
T.B. (24-hour specimen)  12
Smears—
Miscellaneous   165
G.C.  46
T.B.   54 REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE O 41
Smears—Continued
Vincent's angina  7
Malaria   1
Diphtheria  3,338
Dark field  2
Fontana  1
Cultures—
Miscellaneous   194
Diphtheria   3,342
Typhoid   940
Dysentery  395
Water  18
T.B  5
Fasces—
Parasites ,  32
Occult blood  17
Bile   1
T.B  3
Sputum for T.B  506
Sputum—24-hour specimen  18
Gastric analysis  4
Gastric contents for T.B  38
Gastric contents for barbiturate  1
Injections—
Typhoid vaccine  847
Diphtheria toxoid ....  249
Scarlet-fever toxin  94
Skin tests—
Tuberculin   300
Brucellergen  1
Schick  7  300
Vaccination for smallpox  97
B.M.R.   117
E.K.G.  .  165
Rumpel-Leed test  1
Ascitic fluid routine  2
Pleural fluid routine  2
Diphtheria virulence test  1
Fluid for cancer cells  6
Biopsies   14
Autopsies   110
Animal autopsies  40
Sections  2,843
Soap analysis  18
Water analysis   1
Alcohol analysis  1
Oil identification  1
Total  40,741
Respectfully submitted.
G. A. Nicolson, M.D.,
Pathologist. O 42 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the Department of
Radiology:—
Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine,
January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Number of films taken .  565
Number of patients X-rayed	
.... 402
Chests                ...      . ...     	
Patients
._           205
Films
217
Extremities .	
       3
9
Barium enemas
1
12
Spines .
163
197
Skulls .                        _._..
14
43
Ribs ....        .   .....        	
._             1
1
Abdomens              	
..            2
3
Pelvis _     _ _       _ _ ...
       1
4
Sinuses .                	
_.             2
8
Gall-bladder
1
7
Pneumoencephalograms
9
64
Totals	
  402
565
Provincial Mental Hospital, April 1st, 1950,
to March 31st, 1951
Number of films taken  17,050
Number of patients X-rayed  12,440
Patients Films
Chests   10,137 10,345
Extremities        599 1,737
Barium meals          51 840
Barium enemas          26 324
Spines .     1,009 1,426
Skulls         244 729
Noses          13 44
Ribs           41 113
Shoulders           49 139
Abdomens         61 109
Teeth           10 35
Pelvis           29 36
Jaws          11 43
Sinuses           34 140
Mastoids  :            5 19
Gall-bladders           11 58
Intravenous pyelograms ■_          18 106
Cholangiogram            1 6
Pneumoencephalograms          80 750
Heart examinations .            6 27 REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE O 43
Soft tissue—
Cheek	
Patients
                 1
Films
2
Neck  .   ._   __
_..                     1
2
(Esophagus 	
            2
15
Buttock	
 •            1
5
Totals	
  12,440
17,050
ectfully submitted.
J. M. Jackson
Director
M.D.,
of Radiology
DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of work performed for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1951, at the Provincial Mental Hospital and Crease Clinic of Psychological
Medicine:—      Test Number
Arthur Point Scale  5
Benjamin Proverbs  23
Bender Gestalt  9
California Test of Personality  3
Differential Aptitude Test  3
Draw-A-Person Test .  2
Eisenson Aphasia  1
General Clerical  2
Hanfmann-Kasanin   3
H-T-P Test  2
Incomplete Sentence   6
Kent E.G.Y  3
Kent Rosanoff  10
Kuder Preference Record  4
Lee-Thorpe Occupational Interest  8
McQuarrie Test of Mechanical Ability  3
Manson Evaluation  1
Mechanical Comprehension  3
Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory  51
N.I.I.P. Clerical Test  2
Occupational Preference Inventory  1
Otis Employment  2
Otis Self-administering  2
Porteus Maze Performance Scale  112
Practical Judgment  1
Progressive Matrices   30
Rapport Word Association  1
Rohde & Hildreth Sentence Completion  3
Rorschach   51
Shaefer Word Association   3
Shipley Hartford Retreat Scale   103 O 44 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Test Number
Stanford Binet Form L  22
Stanford Binet Form M  7
Stanford Scientific Aptitude  1
Thematic Apperception Test  64
Wechsler-Bellevue Intelligence Scale .  185
Wechsler Memory Scale  47
Total       779
Psychiatric Nursing Staff (Women)
California Test of Personality  237
Kuder Preference Record  237
Modified Alpha Form 9  237
Total       711
Grand total  1,490
Respectfully submitted.
C. B. Watson, M.A.,
Senior Psychologist.
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT, PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITAL
AND HOMES FOR THE AGED
The report on the activity of the Social Service Department during the past fiscal
year is presented under the following headings:—
I. The Function of the Social Worker in the Provincial Mental Hospital
Setting.
II. Review of the Past Year's Work of the Social Service Department.
III. Future Plans for Improving the Quality of Social Services to Patients.
I. The Function of the Social Worker in the Provincial Mental Hospital
The function of the psychiatric social worker is to contribute his knowledge and
case-work skill in such a way that it is purposefully related to psychiatry, the total treatment programme of the hospital, hospital organization and administration, and to the
contributions of all other professions and departments in the Hospital. Through such
co-operation and integration of knowledge and skills, the patient is treated medically,
socially, and vocationally according to his unique individuality and needs. The goal of
this integrated treatment approach is the return of the patient to community life.
In the Provincial Mental Hospital setting, case-work services are made available
at the point of the patient's admission through the intake and reception process. In
many cases continuity of case-work services is maintained throughout the patient's
treatment. However, as the Social Service Department is presently operating, case-work
services are most frequently brought to the patient just before and following his discharge
from hospital.
The Social Service Department has always been very active in the educational and
training programme, together with all other departments of the Hospital. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE O 45
II. Review of the Past Year's Work of the Social Service Department,
April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Number of New Cases Referred to Social Service Department
In Vancouver  745
Out of Vancouver (University of B.C. carried 67)  770
Total number of patient referrals  1,515
Percentage increase over last year's referrals     7.12
Disposition
Discharged on probation—
In Vancouver  284
Out of Vancouver  298
Total number of probationary discharges      582
Percentage increase over last year's figure  17.30
Report of Social Service Work Carried Out by Members of the Social
Service Department at Essondale
Initial interviews to obtain social histories  4,118
Subsequent case-work interviews with patients, families, doctors, and other social agencies during
hospitalization of patients  1,533
Case-work interviews for the purpose of rehabilitation,
including follow-up case-work services for patients
discharged on probation  2,570
Total number of case-work interviews  8,221
Percentage increase of case-work services over last
year's figure :  20.54
Out-of-town Supervisory Service by Mail
Letters to the Provincial field staff requesting social
histories and probation visits and of a general
supervisory nature  2,651
Letters to other social agencies in and out of British
Columbia       842
Total number of case-work services  3,493
Percentage increase of services over last year's figure 10.20
Social histories, probation and other reports, and letters
of a general consultative nature received from
Provincial field staff  1,750
Correspondence received from other social agencies in
and out of British Columbia      470
  2,220
Orientation Periods
Public health nurses     20
In-service trainees .     12
Field service staff       5 O 46 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Special Assignments
Ward rounds and medical-staff clinics attended by members of
the Social Service Department _._ 144
(This indicates 87-per-cent increase in participation
of social services in this area.)
Teaching clinics held at the Hospital for Social Service students
from University of B.C. :       5
Applications taken for old-age pension for patients resident in
Provincial Homes for the Aged  220
Other special assignments, including conferences with other
social agencies, lectures to nurses, in-service training
groups, and community groups  213
Reports on rehabilitation of special cases in Vancouver  462
Vista Rehabilitation Home—
Special summaries .     48
Visits      63
Detailed analysis of the Social Service Department's activities during the fiscal year
indicates that 1,515 patients were referred to the Department for services. Patient
referrals show a percentage increase of 7.12 over last year.
One of the initial services to patients and relatives is the intake study and evaluation
of the patient and his illness. This process also involves interpretation of hospital
facilities to patients and their families, as well as assistance to families who have problems
arising out of the patient's admission, such as feelings about having a mentally ill relative
or fear of the hospitalization and the treatment. During the fiscal year 4,118 intake
interviews of an assistance nature were given by social workers to relatives.
Social Welfare Branch field service has always extended valuable assistance to the
Hospital in providing intake studies of the patients admitted from outside the Greater
Vancouver area, as well as in extending continuing case-work services of a helping and
interpretive nature to relatives. During the fiscal year 2,220 reports of an intake, continuing, and consultative nature were received by the Social Service Department of the
Provincial Mental Hospital from the field services.
During the fiscal year 1,533 interviews were given to patients during hospitalization.
Continuing case-work services during the patient's hospitalization include frequent conferring between the social worker and the patient's psychiatrist. Frequently community
resources such as family, child, and assistance-giving agencies are contacted by the social
worker in an effort to assist the patients' families. During the fiscal year 3,493 letters
of a referral and consultative nature were written by the social workers, to the end of
bringing these valuable and extensive community resources to the assistance of patients
and families.
For statistical purposes the Social Service Department's activities in the rehabilitation of patients have been accounted for separately. However, the social worker sees
rehabilitation as well as intake study and treatment as a continuing process. During the
fiscal year the social workers gave 2,570 interviews of a helping and service nature to
patients on probation from hospital. Case-work services to patients and families show
a percentage increase of 20.54 over the last fiscal year.
In the Provincial Mental Hospital the intake study, diagnosis, formulation of a
treatment plan, continuing treatment, and rehabilitation services involve all Hospital
departments and all professional disciplines within the Hospital. The social worker
contributes his skill in a " total push relationship " with other professions.
The Vista Rehabilitation Home has continued to give valuable service in the
rehabilitation of women patients who do not have adequate family resources to help at REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE O 47
the point of their discharge from hospital. The Social Service Department works with
the Vista Home and during the fiscal year made some sixty-three supervisory visits.
The Social Service Department, together with other Hospital departments, has been
active in the Hospital's teaching and training programme and during the fiscal year participated in the nursing training programme within the Hospital itself. A lecture course
was given in which the public and voluntary social welfare services of the Province were
described, the skill and function of the psychiatric social worker in the hospital setting
was outlined, and a study of the socio-emotional factors in mental illness undertaken.
The primary educational responsibility of the Social Service Department is toward
social-work students. During the fiscal year ten students from the University of British
Columbia School of Social Work worked with us in the Department, taking their psychiatric social-work sequence. The students and their supervisors have made an outstanding
contribution to the services of the Social Work Department and those of the Hospital in
their services to patients and families. The values of such a student-training project are
seen in the general pooling of knowledge and experience, which both enhances quality
and quantity of services to patients and benefits organizational and administrative
planning.
Through participation in the Hospital ward rounds and teaching clinics, the social
worker makes his contribution to over-all staff development. The sharing of knowledge
in the ward rounds and teaching clinics is a source of valuable learning to the social
worker. During the fiscal year the social workers' participation in ward rounds showed
an increase of 87 per cent over the last fiscal year.
Report of the Psychiatric Social Workers' Participation in the Crease Clinic of
Psychological Medicine, January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951.—The opening of the
Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine on January 1st, 1951, extended the area of
responsibility of the Social Service Department and presented a real challenge to the
Department in assessing the adequacy of its organization, administration, quality of
services, and standard of professional skill.
Number of New Cases Referred to Social Service Department
In Vancouver     84
Out of Vancouver (University of B.C. carried 21)  102   -
  186
Report of Social Service Work Carried Out by Members of the
Social Service Department at Essondale
Initial interviews to obtain social histories  684
Subsequent case-work interviews with patients, families, doctors,
and other social agencies during hospitalization of patients 256
Case-work interviews for the purpose of rehabilitation, including follow-up case-work services for patients discharged on
probation  137
Out-of-town Supervisory Service by Mail
Letters to the Provincial field staff requesting social histories and of a general supervisory nature  140
Letters to other social agencies in and out of British
Columbia     23
  163
Social histories, reports, and letters of a general consultative nature received from Provincial field staff ...    58
Correspondence received from other social agencies in and
out of British Columbia     15
     73
PROVINCIAL LIBRAS®,
VICTORIA., B. C O 48 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Special Assignments
Special assignments, including conferences with other social
agencies      4
III. Future Plans for Improving the Quality of Social Services to Patients
These include the development of more adequate case-work services to patients
during the period of hospitalization. In the past the service emphasis of the Department
has been almost entirely focused on out-patient work, such as work with the families and
work with the patients as they were about to be discharged, with continuing services
during the patients' probationary experience. The Department has done excellent work
in the aforementioned areas in the past. The future points to a real necessity for the
development of continuing case-work services to the patient while he is in hospital. As
the Department enters this phase in the development of its services, it is aware of two
necessary essentials: (1) An adequate, well-trained, and experienced staff which is
aware of its function and can bring its skill into a purposeful, productive relationship
with other skills and thus have a place and a contribution to make in the treatment of
the patient; (2) adequate supervision along with staff-training projects of an in-service
nature must be developed if the skills of the staff are to grow. During the next fiscal
year the Social Service Department of the Provincial Mental Hospital will begin to
develop more extensive services to patients in hospital, to assess and revise the Department's organization and administration, and to undertake more vitally staff development.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Alice K. Carroll,
Provincial Supervisor, Psychiatric Social Work.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICE
Women's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully beg to submit the report of the Department of Nursing for the
fiscal year ended March 31st, 1951.
This year ended with the following personnel: Registered nurses, 22; psychiatric
graduates, 80; psychiatric students, 341; psychiatric aides, 18; a total nursing staff of
461.   Resignations for the year numbered 261, and new appointments 398.
During this year, our staff has increased in numbers by 87. This increase was
necessary due to the opening of the Crease Clinic and to allow for students to be released
from ward duties for classes on the " block system " of instruction.
Resignations numbering 261 are 76 more than the previous year, and reasons given
for same are as follows: 37 to be married, 48 change of position, 28 ill-health, 28 felt
unsuited to this work, 34 required at home, 10 leaving the Province, 15 to enter general
training, 44 to further education, and 17 services terminated.
During this past year there was centralization of the activities of the Schools of
Nursing. Heretofore, there were separate schools at Essondale and a school at New
Westminster. However, it was considered advantageous to provide more uniform
instruction and to utilize the services of the instructors in both schools.
The " block system " method was used for class assignment, and this programme
has been conducted on a co-educational basis as far as possible.    During the year REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE O 49
447 students have received instruction at various levels of the Psychiatric Nursing
Diploma Course. Of these, 257 were women students and 190 were men students.
Fifty-four of the group of women and forty-three of the group of men were from The
Woodlands School.
Apart from the above teaching programme, the two months' affiliation was given to
four degree students, thirty-nine from Vancouver General Hospital, six from the Royal
Columbian Hospital, and one from the Royal Inland Hospital. The six months' postgraduate course was given to 3 students. Twenty-eight public health nurses also received
a period of orientation.
For the first time our graduation exercises were held in the Junior High School
Auditorium, New Westminster. We were favoured this year by the presence of
the Honourable W. T. Straith, Provincial Secretary and Minister of Education. The
class comprised seven women and five men from The Woodlands School, five men from
Colquitz, and forty-seven women and twenty-two men from Essondale.
Some changes have taken place within the Department: Miss N. Grantham
returned from McGill University and has spent this year supervising the women's service
in Centre Lawn Building. Her years of experience make her a valuable member in her
new capacity.
This year the Department of Nursing, University of British Columbia, utilized this
School as a practice-teaching field for students attaining their degree in nursing. Miss
B. Mitchell, one of the two students practising here, returns to our teaching department.
She will be a very valuable addition to our staff.
Miss Lucia Whitehead resigned from our Vernon unit to be married. We regretted
the loss of Miss Whitehead, but were indeed fortunate in securing the service of Miss
Elizabeth Clark, R.N., as Superintendent of Nurses.
Psychiatric aides were introduced into our service this year. With this new group,
we hope to augment our staff needs and also to minimize somewhat our attrition rate.
This group should be very valuable, as there are many duties which they can perform. At
this time their instruction is in-service training.
We have experienced much illness amongst our staff. We are pleased with our
Nurses' Infirmary, with its adequate facilities and pleasant surroundings. We are fortunate to have the service of Dr. Gens, who replaced Dr. Coleman.
The nursing staff is looking forward greatly to the opening of Pennington Hall, where
more recreational facilities will be available.
This has been an exceedingly busy year. The repetition of class instruction to cover
large groups of students placed a heavy load on our teaching staff. It has also been a busy
and trying year for administrative staff. The many resignations make it difficult to complete our requirements and stabilize our staff. Each new member required considerable
time to adjust and to become a useful staff employee. The patience, tolerance, and
guidance of senior nurses is very commendable. Fortunately, a stimulus and a challenge
are created as we see good results with the newer therapies and facilities. We deeply
appreciate the very fine assistance and co-operation from all departments.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Mona E. Parsons,
Director of Nursing. O 50 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Men's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the report of the Department of Male Psychiatric Nursing
for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1951. This year ended with the following personnel: Psychiatric graduates, 188; psychiatric male nurses in training, 153; and nurses'
aides, 23.
Twenty male psychiatric nurses completed the three-year course and received their
certificates.   One has since resigned to go into business.
There were nine resignations for the year, and nine were superannuated.   Transfers
.totalled nine, as follows:  Public works, one; office staff, one; store, one; Terrace, four;
Colquitz, one; and Vernon, one.   Two died during the year.
We feel that considerable progress has been made this year in the nursing division,
as evidenced by the graduation of twenty men from the three-year course in psychiatric
nursing last spring. Close co-operation has prevailed between the nursing staffs and the
doctors, instructors, and other departments, and we wish to express appreciation to all
for their assistance during the past year.
Respectfully submitted.
W. Creber,
Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION
Women's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—During this past year there was centralization of the activities of the School
of Psychiatric Nursing of the Essondale and the New Westminster units. Heretofore,
there were separate schools at these units, but owing to various problems, mainly lack of
instructors-at both units, it was considered advantageous to give instruction in one area—
namely, Essondale. The advantages derived from this plan were that the students in both
schools derived uniform instruction and that the efforts of the instructors had more far-
reaching results.
The " block system " method was used for class instruction throughout the whole
programme, and the majority of the courses were given on the co-educational basis.
During the year 447 students received instruction at various levels of the three-year
diploma programme of psychiatric nursing. Of these, 257 were women students and 190
were men students. The number who graduated from this total group was 47 women and
22 men from the Essondale unit, and 7 women and 5 men from the New Westminster
unit.
A two-month course in psychiatric nursing was given to four groups concurrently
with the diploma course to thirty-nine affiliate students from the Vancouver General
Hospital, six from the Royal Columbian Hospital, and four from the University of British
Columbia Schools of Nursing.
A two-day orientation period was given to twenty-eight public health nursing students
from the University of British Columbia School of Nursing, over a period of several
weeks in January. Experience in classroom and clinical teaching was provided for two
students in the teaching and supervision course of the University School of Nursing. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE O 51
From every aspect this has been an exceedingly busy year for the School of Psychiatric Nursing. However, its staff members have offered all possible support and have made
it a successful year. Moreover, we have received invaluable assistance and the utmost
co-operation from the medical, psychological, dietary, occupational therapy, audio-visual,
and recreational therapy departments in their contribution toward the effecting of the
total programme. To them all, we express our thanks and deep appreciation.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Edith M. Pullan, R.N.,
Instructress of Nurses.
Men's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Thirty-two nurses in the men's division completed a comprehensive three-year
course of instruction and received their diplomas in psychiatric nursing at the annual
graduation exercises. This represents the largest class of male graduates in the history
of the Provincial Mental Health Services. These young men will remain in the service
for many years to further contribute to a higher standard of psychiatric nursing care.
It is gratifying to note the interest and change in attitude on the part of the male
nursing personnel as a result of the training received and the recognition of the psychiatric
nurse as an essential member in the treatment programme.
With a staff of three instructors, the men's division assists with the teaching programme and attempts to provide on-the-ward supervision for students and graduates
within a vast hospital structure. The psychiatric nursing instructors are to be commended
on the excellent manner in which they have executed their many duties. The co-operation
received is much appreciated.
Respectfully submitted.
W. L. Pritchard, Psych.N.,
Head Male Nursing Instructor.
DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITATION
Women's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is a report on the work at The Vista Rehabilitation Home for
the fiscal year April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951.
The Vista Rehabilitation Home is at the service of those women who are discharged
from the Mental Hospital and the Crease Clinic who have no resources of family, friends,
accommodation, or finances to see them through the initial period after discharge when
job-hunting is done and living-quarters found.
In the fiscal year just ended forty-three patients were discharged on leave to Vista
from the hospital services. Of these, thirty-seven were rehabilitated. Since 373 women
were discharged during that period from the Hospital and Clinic to the community, thirty-
seven patients represents about 10 per cent of the total. O 52 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Patients
Intake   43
Separations—
Discharged   3 7
Returned to hospital  6
Community placement  17
Job and community placement  20
Total patient-days  1,562
Time in residence is variable. In several instances patients have been domiciled at
Vista for refresher courses in town before resuming employment.
This group has been asked to secure private accommodation as soon as employed
and earning. Patients who have been long-term hospital residents usually require a
proportionately longer time in Vista before discharge arrangements can be worked out.
Mrs. Roth has continued to serve conscientiously as Supervisor and has been responsible
for the job placements. Preliminary interviews and assessments of patients are undertaken by Miss Carroll, Provincial Supervisor, Psychiatric Social Work; and her staff, in
co-operation with the patient's attending doctors and the social workers, continue their
supervision after patients leave Vista where possible.
Regular supervisory visits are made by myself.
Respectfully submitted.
F. E. McNair, M.D.,
Assistant Clinical Director.
Men's Division
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the rehabilitation report for the fiscal year April 1st, 1950,
to March 31st, 1951.
Attached herewith is a consolidated summary which outlines the referrals made
monthly, with a breakdown of the types of patients referred. The actual number of cases
rehabilitated is broken down into " fully rehabilitated " and cases that required some
assistance in placement. This last category is of an intangible nature and, therefore, kept
separate from the cases followed through and considered fully rehabilitated from a
statistical point of view. It is actually very difficult to give a full and true picture of the
work carried out by this department in so many figures. For example, the time-
consuming job of interviewing employers on behalf of the patients constitutes a major
portion of the work. This is not shown on the statistical report. Suffice it to say that
total interviews are recorded as 1,057.
Throughout the year many new contacts have been made with employers and
organizations who have a common interest. This department has a working relationship
and membership in the following groups: The B.C. Rehabilitation Association, The
National Vocational Guidance Association, the Council for the Guidance of the Handicapped, the Vancouver Health League, etc., all of which promotes the need for teamwork
with existing referral agencies and organizations.
The Vancouver Y.M.C.A. and the Salvation Army Hostel have been used by this
department as in-town boarding-home care for certain carefully selected patients. This
has been used sparingly, but is considered most useful in certain cases where placement
is desired before the patient is discharged from the Hospital.
In submitting this report, I wish to thank the whole hospital staff, for their help,
advice, interest, and co-operation in the work of this department. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOSPITAL, ESSONDALE
O 53
Summary of Referrals, by Month
Schizophrenics	
Manic depressives .
Psychopaths	
Alcoholics	
Psychoneurotics
Epileptics.
Mental defectives
Drug addicts...	
G.P.I.'s.
Involutional 	
Reactive depressions.
Paranoid states.
Totals (monthly referrals).
Closed (after initial interview).	
Resumed treatment.
Cases assisted in varying degrees on a casework and referral basis  —
Fully rehabilitated 	
20
1  I      1
5
11
22 [    16
Respectfully submitted.
ii
l
7
4
1
1
25
36
—2
5
20
18 | 19
26
12
11
14
109
4
9
66
21
16
2
2
8
1
4
1
11
11 1 23 | 16 | 243
10
14
31
76
122
J. D. Addison,
Rehabilitation Officer.
Recreation and school building at The Woodlands School. O 54 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL, NEW
WESTMINSTER
REPORT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—It is with pleasure that I submit the report of The Woodlands School, formerly
Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster, B.C., tor the fiscal year April 1st, 1950,
to March 31st, 1951. The reports of various departments are included. The Woodlands
School is the residential training-school for the mentally deficient in the Province of
British Columbia.
The supervision of Ward R by the male psychiatric nursing staff has been a success.
The young boys on R had, in previous years, been under the care of the women nurses.
Cedar Cottage, the new fire-proof building which was occupied in February, 1950,
has almost all the cribs and beds in use.
Contractors completed the X-ray room. Equipment was received from Essondale.
More equipment was received through Federal grants to complete our X-ray department.
An X-ray technician, Peter Barteluk, came on duty August 29th, 1950. This department
was greatly needed, for the many reasons I have given previously.
Two driers and two presses were installed in the laundry. The laundry is old and
is working over capacity. Some of the equipment is obsolete. With the increase of
population at The Woodlands School, the laundry personnel are working at a great
disadvantage in cramped quarters. This will be made worse when the three new buildings
and also the 100-bed nurses' home are completed. The laundry building should be
torn down.
Although the contract has not been given for the new 100-bed nurses' home at this
time, this will be done during the next fiscal year.
The cafeteria that has been used for the last six years by sixty adult patient-pupils
is being remodelled for a staff cafeteria and should be ready to be used for this purpose
in the early summer of 1951.
A large refrigerator for babies' formulae was received and placed on Ward 1 in
Cedar Cottage. This was absolutely necessary on account of the great increase of babies
admitted since the opening of this building. Two stretcher carriages were also received.
One crib gatch-bed and two adult gatch-beds were received.
The fourth annual gymnastic display was given Thursday evening, April 6th, 1950.
This was attended by relatives and interested visitors. On the afternoons of April 4th
and 5th this programme was rehearsed for the benefit of all the other pupils who did
not participate.
The usual Christmas concert had to be cancelled owing to quarantine.
In February, 1951, permission was granted for the Provincial Mental Hospital,
New Westminster, to be renamed The Woodlands School, New Westminster. As this
is a training-school for the intellectually retarded and has been for several years, the
title " Provincial Mental Hospital" was rather misleading, as it did not fit in with the
function of The Woodlands School as an educational and training school.
We have had very good service from the psychiatric social workers at Essondale,
but it is hoped by the fall of the next fiscal year that we shall have a Social Service
Department here at The Woodlands School. Recent years have indicated the great need
for social service workers at our hospital school, and this need will be intensified with REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL O 55
our expansion programme that is taking place now and in the future, when admissions
will take place directly to The Woodlands School, New Westminster, instead of as at
present, the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale. This has been recommended before
and will no doubt be placed in the Statute books at the next sitting of the Legislature,
so that admissions to The Woodlands School will take place sometime in 1952 when
the new buildings are completed and occupied. I have in the past also recommended a
Mental Deficiency Act, which also will be placed in the Statute books during the next
session of Parliament.
I have continued to give psychiatric clinics to outside groups in our hospital school
as in the past number of years, and have also given twenty clinical lectures and demonstrations on mental deficiency to our own nursing staff and teachers. This was completed
in April, 1950. In previous years I had given a course of approximately twenty hours
of lectures in psychiatry. Beginning in October, 1950, the psychiatric clinics to various
outside groups were given as in the past by visiting the school and some buildings, by
general remarks as to the aims and activities of our residential training-school by myself,
but Dr. Gould gave clinical demonstrations under my supervision. By the summer of
1951 it is my opinion that Dr. Gould will be able to carry on the clinical demonstrations
without my direct supervision. As Medical Superintendent I shall continue to welcome
the various groups with general remarks and will then turn the groups over to Dr. Gould
for the clinic and visit to the school and other buildings. In the spring of 1951 Dr. Gould
gave twenty hours of lectures and demonstrations on mental deficiency in an accelerated
course for the " block system " of teaching the psychiatric nurses. This course was
repeated by her for another " block " of nursing students.
Six of our school-teachers took in the Summer School in Victoria, July 3rd, 1950,
for five weeks. This course covered the field of exceptional children (retarded) and a
psychological approach in reference to the teaching of the mentally retarded. Dr. Doll
conducted the course in regards to the exceptional children. The teachers also took
other subjects.
In September, 1950, we added two academic school-teachers to our teaching staff.
This necessitated some rearrangements.
The " block system " of teaching our male and female psychiatric nurses, which
began in October, 1950, was centralized at Essondale. This is a new arrangement for
New Westminster. Some of our staff here continued to do some teaching to these groups.
Dr. Gould, as indicated before, taught the subject of mental deficiency. This twenty-hour
course was duplicated.
The nurses had a most strenuous year. Cedar Cottage had just recently been
opened when we had measles, chicken-pox, and mumps. On December 6th, 1950, one
of our 12-year-old girls had clinical diphtheria; she recovered uneventfully. Two female
nurses also developed clinical diphtheria, with an uneventful recovery. Many of our
smaller pupils who had been transferred from Essondale in the last year, and many before
that, had been given diphtheria toxoid by our medical staff here. This simplified matters,
but for several months thereafter we had positive diphtheria cultures of nose or throat,
or both, without clinical diphtheria, sporadically in some of the nurses and the pupils.
At first there was limited quarantine, and finally on December 13th we quarantined The
Woodlands School. The usual visits of our pupils to their homes were cancelled. No
visitors were allowed, unless in the event of serious illness. I wish to take this opportunity to thank Dr. Nicolson, pathologist at Essondale; Miss Kerr, in charge of the
Provincial Laboratory in Vancouver; and Dr. Wylde, City Health Officer for New
Westminster, for their whole-hearted support in this epidemic. Without their continued
support in doing cultures for us at different times, we would have had a more difficult
time. The school classes were discontinued for a short period of time. The teachers
were kept busy at various other duties. The school activities were begun in a limited
way on January 22nd with pupils from the wards that had negative cultures.   The regular O 56 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
gymnasium classes were resumed in the latter part of January. Although the Christmas
concert had to be cancelled, we planned on the annual gymnasium display after Easter.
Some of the older pupils who are entitled to go into the City of New Westminster were
allowed to resume these walks on February 17th, 1951. It is hoped that the quarantine
will be definitely lifted in all buildings by early summer.
By March 31st, 1951, we had a pupil population of 790 plus 9 on probation, making
a total on our books of 799. There were no transfers from Essondale recently, due to
the quarantine in some of our smaller wards.
Cedar Cottage, which was occupied in February, as stated before, considerably
reduced for a time the number on the waiting list of children under 6 years of age, but
now the cribs are almost all filled. The waiting list is again going up. We should be in
a position where we can accept all children under age who are mentally defective and are,
for various reasons, problems in the home. As stated before, the present way of life in
our urban population of congested houses, apartment dwellings, and the dangerous
highways even in rural areas does not lend itself to keeping the child, who may be in a
lower level of intelligence, at home. The trend all over the world is to accept children
under 6 and have accommodation for them. Our present building programme will, for
a short time, take care of this situation. I would again repeat my recommendations of
last year", that as soon as the three buildings are completed, we immediately plan on
erecting others for 300 pupils.
Many of our patient population become physically ill as in any other community,
and accommodation should be obtained for infectious and T.B. isolation. All additional
buildings should be considered for early action. The Province of British Columbia is
growing by leaps and bounds, and with the increase of general communities one must
expect a proportional admission of mentally defectives in our training-school.
The present shops building has the auditorium, old carpenter-shop, plasterer's supplies, shoe-shop, female occupational therapy, and the linen manufacturing department,
and also the barber-supplies. I would again bring to your attention that the shops
building is obsolete. In my opinion this is a fire-hazard and, instead of being occupied
as above noted, should be vacated and replaced by a new vocational building. The
present shoe-shop quarters are too small and the equipment is obsolete. In a training-
school for the intellectually deficient a shoe-shop is an important industrial project. For
this reason, I would recommend new equipment. This department could be included
in the vocational building.   An auditorium would have to be considered.
The vocational building is important, inasmuch that the pupils are happy in being
able to do certain things and it helps toward the rehabilitation of those who are capable
of being socialized and returned to the community. For those who are unable to return
to the community due to their limited intelligence or for other reasons, they are much
happier and contented in a setting like a vocational building.
It is hoped that we shall soon have a clinical psychologist at The Woodlands School.
There has been a vacancy here in this department for almost three years. It is essential
that a school of this nature have a psychological department.
Our general aim is to educate, train, and socialize those under our care at The
Woodlands School, and to have them healthy, happy, and contented, and also to educate
the interested public and various outside groups by allowing visits here and by also giving
clinics to those who request same.
I wish to express my thanks to all the members of our hospital school staff for their
conscientious work, their interest in our pupils and parents, as well as friends of the
pupils, and the loyalty they have shown The Woodlands School, a division of the Mental
Health Services.
I wish to acknowledge to you, Sir, your prompt attention in matters that I have
submitted on behalf of this school and encouragement in my plans of expansion. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL O 57
May I ask that you convey to the Provincial Secretary and his Deputy Minister
appreciation of the consideration I have been given as Medical Superintendent.   Their
approval has made possible erection of more buildings during the coming fiscal year.
Respectfully submitted.
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., CM.,
Medical Superintendent.
EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENT
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—The New Westminster Hospital-School, for many years a residential school
with hospital facilities, was renamed The Woodlands School in February, 1951.
Several staff changes have taken place during this period. Mrs. Scharff and Mrs.
Rhodes were hired in September. This brings the total number of academic teachers to
eight, including the school principal.
Six academic teachers were given postgraduate courses at Victoria Summer School,
July 3rd to August 4th. The work covered dealt with the teaching and better understanding of mentally retarded children.
'   Generally speaking, the pupils enrolled in academic classes have shown improvement
in both social and academic development.   No corporal punishment is administered.
Two large, bright, lower-floor rooms in Cedar Cottage, opened in February, 1950,
were converted into playrooms to facilitate the teaching of the increased number of little
children who require guidance and training. The morning play classes, conducted by
Mrs. Scharff and Mrs. Rhodes, have an enrolment of 56 pupils. These little children
learn good behaviour and how to converse. The playrooms are well equipped with
sturdily built mobile toys, and the children derive a great deal of pleasure from their
classes.   From the playroom classes they progress to the school kindergarten.
In the afternoon (1 to 2 p.m.) Mrs. Rhodes takes a basic handwork class with low-
level girls at the school. They learn the simplest of outline stitches and look forward to
coming to school; only three out of the fifteen who attend class go to other academic
classes. They work quietly and frequently listen to a radio programme as they sew.
Between 2 and 4 p.m. Mrs. Rhodes takes a class of senior girls from Ward 2 in a handwork class at the playroom in Cedar Cottage. It gives them a change in their environment and an added interest in life.
Mrs. Scharff has taught four domestic-science classes in the afternoons since September. Before that, they were given by Miss Farr. On Fridays classes start at 9 a.m.
and last through until 2 p.m. The girls prepare and cook a meal and are allowed to
invite a guest. These classes are a highlight in the lives of the girls who attend, and they
eagerly look forward from one class to the next.
There has been some rearrangement of classes at the school since the opening of
the playrooms in Cedar Cottage. The kindergarten-class teacher, Mrs. Ellis, now teaches
two kindergarten classes—one in the morning from 9 to 11 and the other in the afternoon
from 1 to 2—instead of teaching one kindergarten in the morning and a play class in
the afternoon.
In this room the children learn to sit quietly; do cutting and pasting; develop a
number sense; recognize their printed names on the blackboard; distinguish between
certain letters of the alphabet; take part in a few class games; and develop music
appreciation.   Between 2 and 4 p.m. Mrs. Ellis now has a junior handwork class.   Some O 58 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
of the girls present do very nice work. The morning junior academic group programme
remains the same. Their teacher, Miss Farr, now teaches a senior group of higher-level
girls in Cedar Cottage. They take work up to Grade VII level and are very interested
in getting ahead academically. Between 3 and 4 p.m. Miss Farr takes a play group of
junior boys who do not attend any other school classes. They play with the horses,
merry-go-rounds, and blocks, and derive much pleasure from going to school.
Mrs. Siddall's non-academic class now consists of two groups of teen-age pupils
who take music, singing, handwork, and some preprimer material. This class is very
well behaved and is making good progress. Mrs. Siddall continues to give acoustic
lessons to a little deaf boy, and once a week, on Fridays from 3 to 4 p.m., she teaches
an adult lady who works in the sewing-room. She enjoys the extra attention she receives
by attending these classes. Mrs. Siddall has given several acoustic demonstrations, with
the 5-year-old boy as a subject, at clinics held in the hospital and school.
The senior room, under direction of Miss MacLean, is continuing to make progress.
Academic work is given in the mornings up to a Grade VII level. There is writing
practice for senior boys (1 to 2 p.m.) and a senior handwork class (2 to 4 p.m.). The
girls in this class do very neat work and may later be placed in the Occupational Building.
Mrs. Davy continues to visit the ward classes in the mornings. She has two daily
one-hour kindergarten classes (1 to 3) in the afternoon. From 3 to 4 p.m. she takes a
special arts class with a group of senior schoolboys.
On each festive occasion during the year, parties are held. Hallowe'en and Valentine parties were held in the afternoon at the school gymnasium for the small children, and
in the evening the older patients from the school and industrial units of the hospital
celebrated by having a dance.
The usual Christmas concert at the school was postponed because of illness and
quarantine. This was a great disappointment to pupils and staff alike. However, the
children had been well rehearsed for their parts and received certain benefits from their
training.
On April 6th a gym display was held for parents and friends of patients taking part.
It was the first display Mr. Lynes had put on without a pianist. Records were used for
dances and routines, and the results were very creditable.
During the summer two picnics were held. The juniors had theirs in May on our
new playground, which is well equipped with swings, teeter-totters, and a spacious
cement sand-box. Many of the wards enjoy the privilege of bringing ward patients up
for play.   The seniors had their picnic at Queens Park in August.
On May Day, which is New Westminster's traditional day of festivities, a number
of our pupils attended the ceremony in company of school-teachers and male and female
nurses. Any pupils who were unable to attend the ceremony were allowed to witness
the parade from the hospital-school grounds.
On several occasions school staff took small groups of pupils to visit places of
interest. These included a trip to CKNW. This group returned with a large radio.
Two trips were made to Fraser Mills and another to Stanley Park.
Many new improvements have been added to the school and Cedar Cottage.
Cupboards with locks were built for the junior and senior academic rooms and the west
playroom of Cedar Cottage. A gay canopied store was built for the non-academic
rooms. This is a great improvement from the previous store facilities. It is felt that
the actual handling of money and the opportunity to make purchases will prove helpful
in teaching the children how to make change and also give added interest to learning
number facts.
The junior academic classroom is used for four different classes of various ages and
sizes during the day. To make the tables comfortable for everyone, lifts were made to
place under the legs of small tables, to raise the height for bigger children. These lifts
can be removed for smaller children. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL O 59
The girls' clothes-cupboard was extended to take in the old store in the hall.
At the time of writing, the total academic enrolment is 200 pupils. The total
number of academic and handwork classes is twenty-two. This does not include recreational and manual-training classes. Some of the classes consist of individual pupils, but
as a rule the enrolment for academic and play classes ranges between twelve and sixteen,
so that much individual attention can be given while handwork classes have an enrolment
ranging between six and sixteen.
A large number of visitors, including nurses, university students, and parents of
mentally retarded children, visited the school during the year.
It is the belief of the school staff that the school is very important in the lives of
our pupils.   I respectfully submit this report and look forward to 1951 with anticipation.
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) Margaret A. Cunningham,
School Principal.
DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Girls' Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—In keeping with the general theme of The Woodlands School, it is the aim of
the Occupational Therapy Department to offer training in handicrafts for each individual
pupil according to her own limited capacity, and to develop each personal aptitude to its
fullest extent. Suitable crafts must be chosen with the pupils' interests and capabilities
in mind.
The chronological ages of the girls in this department range from 18 to 54 years,
while the basic mental ages range from 3 to 12 years. Consequently, the crafts done by
this department vary in skill from the most elementary to the more complicated craft
work.
Some of the girls are only able to do simple embroidery, plain knitting, and the
washing and ironing of finished articles, while others can be taught more skilled work in
the basic crafts, such as cutwork, knitted articles, crochet doilies, and table-cloths,
Other handicrafts that the girls are able to do are hemstitching, smocking, cross-
stitch on monkscloth, cross-stitch pictures, Swedish darning on huck towelling, shellcraft,
and the making of felt-covered knitting-boxes. They also do simple weaving, such as
belts, scarves, bags, and cotton place-mats. The leatherwork is also confined to simple
articles, such as change-purses, belts, and wallets, but the more advanced girls are able to
make fleece-lined moccasin slippers. In the sewing line they make fancy aprons, baby
jackets, bibs, pot-holders, and sew the hems of the finished work. The making of hooked
rugs is a most successful project, as it is easy to learn and the completed article gives the
pupil the feeling of a big accomplishment.
Wheelchair cases and girls working in other departments who like to do needlework
but are unable to attend occupational classes are provided with ward work to do in their
spare time.
In addition to the handicrafts, the girls also do work that is beneficial to the institution as well as to themselves. They make blanket slippers and embroidered runners for
the wards, Christmas decorations for the staff dining-rooms, and stuffed toys for the
small children. O 60 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Something new introduced this past year with a great deal of success is a mending
class. The purpose of this mending class is to teach the girls to take care of their own
clothes and to encourage pride in their personal appearance, making them as self-
sufficient as possible so that they will not be a burden on the other departments of the
School.
Occupational therapy for the mentally retarded is used for rehabilitation purposes
and for the training of each individual so that she may best know how to use and develop
her own abilities to their best advantage, no matter how limited they may be, and to
help make each life a little happier and more worth while.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Elizabeth M. Morrison,
Occupational Therapist.
Boys' Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I hereby submit a report for the above department covering the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1951.
New equipment introduced into the shop consisted of a drill-press and accessories,
a power hand-grinder, and various hand-tools of excellent quality. Many good books
and periodicals were supplied, which have proved of great value to both pupils and
instructor. The foregoing articles were made available through Federal Government
grants. Maintenance of all shop equipment has been kept to an absolute minimum,
through co-operation of the boys and instructor. No repairs were necessary, and
breakages were of a minor nature. All tools were in first-class condition at the year's
end. An ample supply of various lumbers and shop materials was purchased, and the
resulting projects reflected the economy of good supplies. An effort was made to
utilize the wood from trees cut when a new unit was built. Much patience and labour
are now bearing fruit in excellent finished projects.
Numerous small articles of furniture, etc, were executed for the school, wards,
and other departments, and identified as to origin. Favourable comment resulted.
Work such as scenery, properties, etc., was done for the various school concerts.
Completed projects were displayed in the shop for the inspection and appraisal of
visitors.
Instruction has been carried out as demonstration and supervision. Units have
been small and concrete. Drawing and reading have been kept to a minimum. All
work has been adapted to the ability and aptitude of the individual.
The boys, on the whole, have been good in their progress. Some have reached
the limit of their capacities, while others continue to learn and appreciate. Discipline
has presented a very minor problem, as the boys value the opportunities presented to
them in this particular field.
The course of the year has brought many distinguished visitors. They have
included Government leaders and officials, doctors, nurses, and parents of our pupils,
as well as social workers and teachers. Comments were gratifying, and appreciation
of the accomplishments seemed genuine, especially so in the case of those in work allied
to ours.
The staff throughout the whole School has been most co-operative. Every request
for assistance, advice, or material has been willingly gratified. Encouragement and
solutions to various problems have come from the doctors when they were most needed. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL O 61
Visits to the shop by them have been frequent and friendly.    Advice has been constructive and beneficial.
Some lectures were given during the year to male and female nurses-in-training.
The purpose of these was to acquaint the nurses with the shop, its aims, methods, and
results.
Fire-alarms were rung without warning, and pupils were trained to evacuate the
building quietly and quickly. The best time made was thirty seconds from the first
gong until the boys were clear of the building. All the elements of fire protection have
been fully observed in the shop.
Shop safety has been stressed continuously, and the results have been excellent.
No accidents of any kind occurred in the year.
Two great difficulties have presented themselves in the operation of the shop.
The first concerns the storage of lumber, for which there is insufficient space of a suitable
nature. The second deals with the finishing of projects. Operational dust makes it
impossible to achieve first-class results in this direction.
My personal reaction to the shop and its accomplishments of the year is fair.
I feel the work really worth while to the boys and School as a whole. The co-operation,
encouragement, advice, equipment, and materials compensate for the problems and
disappointments I have encountered. Each day has presented a new, challenge, and
these have been accepted as such, resulting, at the end of the year, in a personal sense
of achievement and progress.
Respectfully submitted.
Harold Mercer,
Industrial Arts Instructor.
DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL THERAPY
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit my annual report from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st,
1951.
Group therapy in recreation has accomplished a great deal in the socialization
of our pupils. They have learned to get along with others in their socials and organized
play. In group therapy they have gained confidence, which has given them initiative.
The rate of development has been gradual and in ratio to their potentialities. The
training is designed not just to make the pupil obedient and compliant, but rather to
help him to learn to regulate his own behaviour in conformity with the requirements
of the group to which he belongs.
We have obtained a complete line of gymnasium and playground equipment,
which has added to recreation activities. With further plans for expansion of a senior
playground with swimming-pool and tennis-court, we will have ample area for our
increasing population. All classes have a minimum of four periods a week, and during
the fall and winter months dances are held once a week. An innovation has been
recorded music for exercises and dances. Suitable dances with their recordings have
been obtained for the coming season, and it is planned to continue with a leader-group
for instructional purposes. Mr. Brown, the Recreation Director at Essondale, brought
his leader-group to our school on a number of occasions, and the exchange of ideas was
mutually beneficial.
There is an enrolment of 165 in the tiny tots', ward boys', junior boys', junior
girls', ladies', and men's classes.    Progress has been most encouraging, which has shown O 62 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
in their annual gymnasium display.   Flying-rings and a high bar have been added to
the equipment, which will add variety to indoor activities.
The children look forward to their outings at Queens Park, where they have their
annual picnic. Groups are also taken to beaches for swimming, and some are learning
to swim. During the season special dances are held, with games played and refreshments
served.    The pupils are encouraged to make their own costumes and decorate the hall.
Every Monday afternoon the girls' side go to a 35-mm. show in the auditorium.
In the evening the boys' side have their show. The 16-mm. show is taken to the girls'
wards on Monday for bed patients and the infirm. Friday afternoon the boys see the
16-mm. show.
Respectfully submitted.
J. A. Lynes,
Recreation Director.
DENTAL REPORT
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—We beg to submit herewith the annual report for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1951, of dental work done at The Woodlands School:—
Extractions   257
Examinations  ..  124
Cleanings      57
Fillings  .     67
Denture repairs       5
Complete dentures  . ,       5
Total patients examined  425
Respectfully submitted.
Kenny & Mathisen, D.D.S.
DEPARTMENT OF DIETETICS
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.',
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—The report of the activities of this Department during the period of April
1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951 is as follows:—
1. We worked to improve the standard of patients' meals.
(a) During this period a special children's menu was prepared daily for the
children who are patients here.
(b) An endeavour was made to improve both the quality and the variety
of the patients' meals.
The increase in the wholesale cost index for animal foods is 57.1 points or 23.8
per cent.
The increase in the wholesale cost index for vegetable foods is 39.7 points or
19.6 per cent.
The animal foods served per patient meal have increased in cost by 7 cents or 116.6
per cent. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL O 63
The vegetable foods served per patient meal have decreased by 2 cents or 22.22 per
cent.
The total cost per patient meal has increased by 33V3 per cent.
The animal foods served per staff meal have increased by 13 cents or 76.4 per cent.
The vegetable foods served per staff meal have decreased by 1 cent or 7.7 per cent.
The total cost per staff meal has increased by 30 per cent.
We have therefore met with some success in elevating the standard of the patient
meals while still maintaining the standard of the staff meals.
2. Our second effort was to make a contribution in the efficient remodelling of the
existing cafeteria at The Woodlands School for conversion into a staff cafeteria. This
planning was done in readiness for its completion after the period April, 1950, to
April, 1951. PT;
3. This Department also participates in the instruction of psychiatric nurses in
training. A series of twelve lectures on nutrition was offered at Essondale by The
Woodlands School dietitian to the amalgamated classes of The Woodlands School and
Essondale first-year students.
This, Sir, briefly covers the activities of this Department during the period April,
1950, to April, 1951.
Respectfully submitted.
(Mrs.) M. E. Marr,
Dietitian.
DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I wish to make the following report regarding the Radiological Department
in The Woodlands School:—
Early in the year of 1950 a large room on the second floor of the Administration
Building was converted into the Radiological Department. This included a large ventilated darkroom, a diagnostic room with lead-lined walls, two large windows with fight-
proof shades, and a large control-booth, lead-lined with two large lead glass windows for
the safety of the technician.
In April a 200-ma. diagnostic radiographic unit with rotating anode was installed.
Since then all patients and staff no longer had to make the long trip to Essondale for
their X-rays, as they had to in the past, but were radiographed here in our modern
department. In October a new photo-roentgen unit was installed for radiographs of the
chest on 4- by 5-inch film.
All work is being done here, with the exception of gastric intestinal series,
pneumoencephalograms, and similar work which we are unable to carry out due to lack
of equipment. However, for the very few patients who require this type of radiographic
work, this is being done for them in the Radiographic Department of the Crease Clinic.
During the past year all patients and staff have had at least one radiograph of their
chest done. Patients and staff who handle food have a film taken of their chests once
every four months. Staff who are in close contact with tuberculous patients have films
taken of their chests once every three months. This entails a great deal of stenographic
work in order that records be kept of when a person was last radiographed and when they
are to have their next film of their chest. O 64 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Besides the above routine work there is a great deal of urgent work, such as
radiographs of bones for possible fractures and chest for pneumonia, etc., which has
been done.
Respectfully submitted.
Peter C. Barteluk,
Radiological Technician.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICE
Women's Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the report of the Department of Nursing for the fiscal
year April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951.
Personnel at the end of year included the following: Registered nurses, 4; psychiatric graduates, 20; psychiatric nurses in training, 140; psychiatric aides, 1; home
supervisors, 6; new appointments, 58; resignations for year, 56. Reasons for resignations included failure to pass examinations, to be married, to continue education, unsuitable, change of occupation, ill-health, and to enter general training.
This year our students were included in the " block system " of education at
Essondale, commuting each day in a bus provided by the Hospital transportation service.
Five new appointments were necessary to allow ten students to be included in each block.
Miss Johnstone, Instructress of Nurses, spent one day each week here, to follow up
classroom instruction.
Mrs. K. McKinnon, R.N., was appointed Head Nurse of Unit 1 in July, 1950, and
her services have been much appreciated, especially during the diphtheria epidemic,
which added extra demands on all members of the staff for several months.
More recreational facilities were added to our patient recreational programme and
were enjoyed by patients and staff.
To all those doctors, nurses, and heads of all departments who have helped in every
way during a very busy and expanding year, we are very grateful.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Violet M. Sanders, R.N.,
Superintendent of Nurses.
Men's Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—In this annual report covering the year April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951,
it gives me much pleasure to note the change of title given our staff from attendant to
psychiatric male nurse. This change of name in itself may seem very insignificant, but
the moral uplift and the desire it has created throughout our staff to further their education
in caring for and training the mentally deficient child, and to accredit themselves with
being reclassified as nursing staff, has been manifest at this early date and has far-reaching
possibilities for the future. REPORTS OF THE WOODLANDS SCHOOL     ' O 65
The transferring of psychotic patients from this School in exchange for mental
defectives has been more rapid of late, and as I feel the basic training given our pupils
on the ward is a prime factor in their adaptability to the various departments within this
School, we have made a concentrated endeavour to produce satisfactory results.
This year group parole has been tried out with a small number of boys who were
granted off-the-grounds parole, and this has proven very satisfactory, and we have plans
to extend this to a larger group of boys plus group parole within the grounds for some
of the pupils who have not been allowed out on our present parole system.
By concentrated attention to our more disturbed patients, we have been very
successful in the abolishment of mechanical restraint, the only form of restraint being
used is of a nominal nature to keep low-grade defective children from removing dressings
or sutures, or to keep epileptics from falling, and then only for short periods when the
staff are busy with ward routine.
Due to the loss of most of our adult population, a concentrated endeavour has been
made to train all our more competent pupils for some useful task on the wards, and this
has been very successful as our wards have been kept up to a high standard, and, in
addition, many of the older boys are helping with outside maintenance work.
The Psychiatric Nursing Course given the male staff has instituted a good standard
of nursing technique and has aroused a keen interest in improving the methods employed
at this School in the training of mentally defective children.
On several occasions we have had group discussion by myself, the Deputy Chiefs,
Charge and Deputy Charge Nurses, and have discussed methods we could employ to
improve ward training of mental defectives, and have also dealt with the problem of
proper selection of junior staff and their probationary training.
We have enjoyed regular attendance at the weekly clinics given by the medical staff
at the School, and have been invited to take part in open discussion. This, I feel, has
been very beneficial in our educational programme.
Besides our regular duties, this Department has taken care of innumerable minor
matters not related to our duties, and through staff shortage in the female nursing
department we were obliged to take over a ward of junior boys, and lacking experience in
handling infants, the male nurses caring for these children have shown very good results.
Respectfully submitted.
J. G. Elliot,
Chief Psychiatric Male Nurse.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING EDUCATION
Women's Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the report of the Department of Nursing Education for
the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1951.
The " block system " of classes was placed in effect October 9th, 1950. Students
from this School commuted daily to Essondale for the majority of their classes. The
remaining lectures were given here by the medical and teaching personnel. As this is the
first year of the new programme, it is difficult to ascertain just how valuable it will be, but
it has already proven superior in many respects. It has, however, entailed a good deal
more extra work for the teaching and administration personnel. O 66 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
With centralization of teaching at Essondale, clinical supervision for the students
has been carried out on the wards one day weekly. This supervision brings about better
correlation of classroom and ward work. It has also been possible to present some
orientation lectures to new nursing staff.
Special clinical demonstrations and lectures were provided by the medical staff for
general-hospital affiliation students, University of British Columbia degree students, and
public health nurses.
This year seven students completed the three-year course in psychiatric nursing.
To all those doctors, nurses, and heads of departments who have helped so greatly
with the nursing educational programme, we are extremely grateful.
Respectfully submitted.
(Miss) Edith A. Johnstone,
Instructress of Nurses.
Men's Division
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., F.A.P.A., F.A.A.M.D.,
Medical Superintendent, The Woodlands School,
New Westminster, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the report of the Department of Nursing Education for
the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1951.
The " block system " of classes was placed in effect on October 9th, 1950. The
three-year course was designed to be quite similar in content and lecture hours to the one
presented at Essondale. It was drawn up, though, to emphasize care to the mentally
deficient patient rather than the mentally ill patient. Students from The Woodlands
School commuted daily to Essondale for the majority of their classes. Their remaining
classes were given here by the medical and teaching personnel. As this is the first year
of the programme, it is difficult to ascertain just how valuable it will be, but it has already
proven superior in many respects. It has relieved the waiting list of junior staff members
that were able to receive their courses earlier than on the former programme. It has,
however, entailed a good deal more work for the teaching and administration personnel.
With centralization of teaching at Essondale, clinical supervision for the students has
been carried out on the wards to a certain degree, as I was only at Essondale during my
lecture hours, the remaining time spent at The Woodlands School. This supervision
brings about better care of clinical and ward work. It has also been possible to present
some orientation lectures to new nursing staff.
Students and graduates have also had the opportunity of attending, on the rotation
scheme, weekly clinics held by the medical staff to further their knowledge of the various
classifications of our patients and a better understanding. This has proven itself
important in various ways.
This year five nurses completed the three-year course in psychiatric nursing.
To all those doctors, nurses, and heads of all departments who have helped in no
small measure with the nursing service and educational programme, we are extremely
grateful. Without their help and co-operation the accomplishments of the past year could
not have been achieved.
Respectfully submitted.
R. M. Palm,
Instructor of Male Nurses. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ O 67
REPORTS OF PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ
REPORT OF MEDICAL SUPERINTENDENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit herewith the annual report for the year April 1st, 1950,
to March 31st, 1951, as requested.
On looking back over the events of the past fiscal year, nothing of an unusual or
remarkable nature appears to have occurred at this institution. Probably the most noteworthy change, occurring early in the year, was the resignation, due to ill-health, of our
capable and popular Deputy Business Manager, T. A. Morris. His resignation was
effective April 30th, 1950, and S. A. Inrig was appointed as Deputy Business Manager,
effective June 1st, 1950.
During the month of June a change of nursing hours was put into effect and has
worked satisfactorily. The new routine allows us to provide the patients with better
services—greater time between meals, longer periods in the recreational courts, etc.—
and also appears to be popular with the staff.
The Maintenance and Repair Department was active throughout the year, the main
project being the tearing down of the old and the erection of a new airing-court. This
project became too heavy for the patients and maintenance crew to handle and was
finally handed over to a contracting firm. A new ceiling was built on the West Ward,
and this has aided greatly in helping keep the ward at a proper temperature. During
the summer months a new fire-escape was erected on recommendation of the Fire
Marshal.
There were comparatively few changes in staff personnel (see attached report by
P. T. McLeod). For a time we had difficulty having various promotions made permanent, but this has now been straightened out and things are running quite smoothly.
At the beginning of the year our patient-count was 291 and at the end of the year
283. There occurred the occasional sporadic illnesses, some of minor nature, others
more serious, but there were no epidemics of any nature, and the health of the patients
on the whole was good. Dr. G. Hall continued to make weekly visits and prescribed
for any ailing. The Tuberculosis Clinic in Victoria has been most co-operative in
checking and rechecking any patients whose annual chest film showed a suspicious
lesion.    There are no patients here at the present time who show definite active lesions.
Our dental equipment has proven quite inadequate, and the visiting dentist, Dr.
T. W. James, feels it is impossible to give satisfactory services. We are most anxious
for the new equipment to arrive.
Throughout the year the training-school classes went ahead according to schedule,
and benefit of the classes can be seen in the improved work of those taking the course.
We were fortunate in having a number of good concert parties visit during the
year to entertain the patients. Each concert was well attended and much appreciated.
The recreational activities have been gradually increased under the leadership of Mr.
Lowndes, and now include tennis, volley ball, badminton, as well as indoor games such as
bridge, cribbage, bingo, checkers, etc. Twice weekly, also, we have moving-picture shows.
The majority are a good type and eagerly looked forward to by the patients.
The spiritual side has not been neglected, and various denominations visit the
institution regularly to hold service.
Enclosed herewith are separate reports, and in more detail, from the different
departments.
Respectfully submitted. L Q Q d,Easum> mjj
Medical Superintendent. O 68
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Main building, Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ O 69
DEPARTMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—During the year April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951, the Occupational
Therapy Department had an average of seventeen patients occupied daily. Two of
these patients were occupied at cabinetwork, which was their trade before being committed to hospital, but who, nevertheless, needed supervision. Other patients received
instruction in art metalwork, glove-making, shellwork, weaving, plastics, leatherwork,
and woodwork. From time to time some of these patients were occupied at maintenance work and industrial therapy.
Articles made by the patients were either taken by the patients themselves after
paying for cost of materials used or disposed of by sale. By this system we eliminate
the necessity of the institution paying out large sums for materials, as we buy materials
as needed and pay cash for them.
During the year there were two Assistant Instructors of Trades and Maintenance-
men and one utility man, besides myself, employed in the Occupational Therapy Department. The utility man's duties were to paint, redecorate, wash windows, and do odd
jobs around the institution under my supervision.
The Occupational Therapy Shop is kept open until 9 p.m. during week nights, and
my two assistants alternate shifts so that one of them is on duty from 5 to 9 p.m. The
patients that are out in the shop at this time spend their time reading, playing some
musical instrument, or working at their own particular craft, and they enjoy very much
the opportunity of getting off the wards for this period. This system has been very
satisfactory, too.
In addition to instructing and supervising patients in the shop, the Occupational
Therapy Department does the maintenance work of all the buildings, erects new buildings, and repairs and makes new furniture.
Respectfully submitted.
H. Helander,
Instructor of Trades and Maintenance-man.
TAILOR AND SHOE SHOPS
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a resume of activities in the Tailor and Shoe Shops for the year
April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951. During the year four patients were employed in
the Tailor-shop and one in the Shoe-shop.
Tailor-shop.—Garments repaired as per ward repair lists, 6,830.
Shoe-shop.—Shoes repaired and maintained as required.
Both shops are in good condition now as far as machines, etc., are concerned, and
only minor tools will be required from now on. I might add, however, that the lighting
in the shop is very poor, especially for close work at the sewing-machines.
Respectfully submitted.
G. Campbell,
Foreman, Tailor-shop. O 70 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
DEPARTMENT OF RECREATIONAL THERAPY
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—Recreational activities at this institution from April, 1950, to March, 1951,
included bridge games, chess, cribbage, volley-ball, paddle-tennis, table-tennis, bingo
parties, lawn-tennis, lawn-bowls, badminton, and croquet, and in detail were arranged
as follows:—
During April bridge games were enjoyed each Thursday evening by an average of
sixteen patients per night. Small prizes, such as tobacco, pipes, candy, etc., are given
for the high and low scores.
May saw an expansion to include walking parties, catch and volley ball, the airing-
court being used for the latter activity. Chess was also encouraged by a tournament
between the wards.
In June, after years of inactivity, the outside tennis-courts were put to use. Badminton was also played outdoors but was found to be not too successful outside because
of wind. However, the tennis-court was used a great deal, with patient and staff participation excellent.   Walking parties were also a feature when staff was available.
The tennis enthusiasm was maintained during July and, in addition, the miniature
golf-course was the preference of certain patients.
August and September were similar, but included a swimming party which was
much enjoyed by the participants.
In October the main dining-room was readied and used for volley-ball, badminton,
and paddle-tennis, and all wards were supplied with cribbage boards, checker and
chess sets.
In November we initiated bingo parties, with the greatest number of patients yet to
participate in organized recreation present. Table-tennis, bridge, and chess were also
enjoyed at the evening sessions on the West Ward.
In addition to a continuation of the aforementioned activities, an excellent concert
by the Eagles concert party was a highlight of December.
January, February, and March maintained the previous schedule, and with the
advent of spring it was possible to reintroduce walking parties.
In summary, we devote Thursday evenings to an organized type of recreation, the
weather being the deciding factor. The bingo games held once a month are avidly
awaited by most patients. For prizes we give candy, cookies, tobacco, papers, pipes,
and jam—all articles which can be obtained from the stores. The balance of indoor
activity is chess, bridge, badminton, and volley-ball. The number of patients participating fluctuates a little, according to the staff interest and participation.
In addition to the regular Thursday evening periods, I devote to recreation the
time available from the teaching schedule, which averages about two days per month as
well as two or three afternoons occasionally during the month. Equipment is checked
and readied for use, the courts are checked and even marked and maintained personally,
if necessary. A football has been provided for the airing-court and is in constant use,
as are the softballs and softball gloves.
For the amount of outlay, I am of the opinion that the recreational activities are
paying big dividends.   The staff-patient relationship being developed is remarkable and,
with more supplies and determined effort on the part of all ward staff, could show an
even more marked improvement.    The number and type of patients we have here
restrict our activities somewhat, but the response so far has been gratifying, and I see
no reason why gradual expansion and interest cannot be expected when our new court
is completed.
Respectfully submitted. _ _
J. Lowndes. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ O 71
DENTAL REPORT
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—Please find summary of the dental work completed for the patients at the
Colquitz Mental Hospital from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951.
It has become impossible to do difficult extracting or fillings at the Hospital due
to the lack of supplies and equipment. We have been forced to do these operations in
our office of late. This is very unsatisfactory from our point of view. I am looking
forward to the arrival of supplies ordered earlier this year.
Work at the office consisted of seven dentures, four extractions, and six repairs.
At the Mental Hospital, in eleven half-day visits, there were sixty-two extractions
and fifteen fillings completed.
Respectfully submitted.
T. W. James, D.D.S.
DEPARTMENT OF NURSING SERVICE
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—There are 299 beds at the Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz, which provide
accommodation for 292 resident patients, 6 hospital beds, and 1 spare room for emergency purposes.
After almost two months of negotiations with the nursing staff, the following hours
of duty went into effect on June 1st, 1950: Morning shift (fourteen nurses), 7 a.m. to
3 p.m.; afternoon shift (six nurses), 3 to 11 p.m. and (eight nurses) 1.10 to 9.10 p.m.;
night shift (seven nurses), 11 p.m. to 7 a.m.
The group of eight student nurses on the afternoon shift who report for duty at
1.10 p.m. attend classes of instruction between the hours of 1.10 and 3 p.m. This
schedule permits them to do so without sacrifice of ward coverage and also provides
extra staff during the week-ends and on public holidays when they are needed most,
thus permitting a greater number of patients to visit with their friends and engage in
recreational activities under supervision on the lawns. This schedule also allows us to
have our night posts covered by 9.10 p.m., as all surplus staff are relieved from duty by
that time and the whole institution has quieted down.
With the exception of two patients who are handed over for outside work on the
farm at 5 a.m. and seven who are handed over for kitchen work at 5.30 a.m., the
patients' day commences at 7 a.m., when they rise, and their day terminates at 9 p.m.—
bed-time for all patients. Previously the patients' day commenced at 6.15 a.m. Mealtimes for patients in the ward dining-rooms are as follows: Breakfast, 7.20 to 7.50
a.m.; dinner, 12 noon to 12.30 p.m.; supper, 5 to 5.30 p.m.
During the year 1950-51, we had a daily average of thirty-five patients on parole
in the grounds, with a daily average of approximately ninety engaged in some form of
useful occupation in the various departments, together with approximately fifty engaged
in ward routine activities.
The recreation-courts were in use from April 18th, 1950, to October 2nd, 1950,
and, when weather permitted, the patients were out from 1 to 4 p.m. and 6.30 to 8.30
p.m. daily. O 72 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Bi-weekly picture shows were held in the main dining-room, the average attendance
being 135. Service clubs, including the Fraternal Order of Eagles, from Victoria who
entertained the patients during the Christmas season, provided entertainment on several
occasions during the winter months.
The Salvation Army held service in the morning on the first and third Sunday of
each month, and on several occasions brought their band along with them. They also
provided Christmas packages, which they handed to each patient personally. The Church
of England minister held service in the afternoons on the second and fourth Sunday of
each month. Roman Catholic patients were visited, and mass was held by the priest
during each month.
The Red Cross Society, the Britannia Branch of the Canadian Legion, and the
Women's Auxiliary to the Britannia Branch provided comforts for returned service
patients monthly.   Other organizations also supplied comforts at times.
During the year April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951, five members of the nursing
staff left the service for the following reasons: Two retired on superannuation, one
resigned to go to Scotland, one resigned because unsuited to this type of work, and
one died.
Respectfully submitted.
P. T.' McLeod,
Chief Psychiatric Nurse.
TRAINING-SCHOOL
Dr. L. G. C d'Easum,
Medical Superintendent, Provincial Mental Home,
Colquitz, B.C.
Sir,—April, 1950, saw Class C with five students receiving second-year classes and
Class B receiving first-year instruction. Due to the limited number of staff able to
leave the wards at any one time, Class B with twelve students was split up into three
groups of four each, which necessitated each lecture being repeated three times. Lecture
periods at this time were 9.45 to 10.45 a.m., 1.10 to 2.10 p.m., and 3.10 to 4.10 p.m.,
daily except Saturday, when ward routine does not allow morning lectures.
From April 17th to 22nd I accompanied.R. Sim on a week's tour of the Essondale
and New Westminster institutions. Mr. Sim was awarded a general proficiency medal
at the graduation ceremony held in New Westminster during our stay.
May was a continuation of the preceding.month, finishing the term for these two
classes in their respective year's instruction. All students were successful in passing
their examinations.
In June lectures were resumed for Class A in their second year and Class D began
their first year. A change of ward routine and shift hours made it possible to now take
eight students at one time. This obviated the necessity of repeating the same lecture to
several groups from one class.
July was a continuation, examinations being held as subjects were finished, which
policy has worked well since its inception. During August lectures were suspended, as
my annual vacation period was from July 31st to August 20th, inclusive.
The months of September, October, and November were devoted to classroom
instruction, finishing the second year for Class A and the first year for Class D.
From December 1st to 15th postgraduate lectures were given to all nurses in
receipt of certification. Each lecture was repeated twice to permit all to attend. These
lectures were very well received, the night staff attending on their own time. An attempt
will be made to repeat whenever the opportunity can be made. REPORTS OF MENTAL HOME, COLQUITZ O 73
After December 15th classes again resumed for Class C in their third and final
year and for Class B in their second year. Because there were still eleven members in
Class B, we had to make two groups and repeat lectures again. This group was reduced
by the resignation of Mr. Paul.
These classes continued through January, February, and March, 1951, at which
time Class C was almost ready for graduation and Class B was over half-way through
the term. Class B then numbered nine, being depleted by the death of Mr. Tuttle and
the resignation of J. Armitage. Lecture periods this term were 1.10 to 2 p.m., 2.10 to
3 p.m., and 3.10 to 4 p.m.
A total of 434 hours was devoted to academic lectures, examinations, and general
discussion periods during the twelve-month period. The majority of the students are
very attentive, and I believe the results of the training programme are beginning to be
felt on the ward level.
Emanating from the discussion periods, I feel that a programme of staff conferences
in respect to patients' case-histories and possibility of treatment would do much to
maintain and arouse further interest.
In conjunction with the lecture periods, I spend considerable time on the wards
observing attitudes and the carrying-out of procedures taught in classes. Whenever
possible, we use physical illness to demonstrate bedside technique; hypodermic injections, dressings, and nasal gavage are examples of the direct method of instruction,
which, of course, is limited in scope due to our small size.
The possible number of students (sixteen) who will have completed their three-
year course before next graduation time will make it impossible for all to attend the
ceremonies. In this regard, I am still of the opinion that one student should be chosen
from those graduating to represent the class. The selection should be based on several
factors—namely, class record, demonstrated ability, and proficiency—and could be
picked by a panel of the Superintendent, the Chief Nurse, and the Instructor, the winning student to have at least two weeks at Essondale and Woodlands coinciding with
graduation time. .    .   .        ;   •   •
If possible, I feel an interchange of staff between Colquitz and the main institution,
starting from the Chief Nurse, would broaden the understanding -of our nursing staff
considerably. I find, while instructing, that the staff members here are inclined to judge
my remarks by conditions as they exist here, which, it mustrbe admitted,*arera far cry
from those at an active-treatment centre'with all diagnostic facilities available. 7. 7
: .     Respectfully submitted. .'••., ,.      \
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V      ;.; •.- - s v - -' ;       v »  *:*        /   _,-.-■ -i   Instructor. O 74
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Home for the Aged, Terrace. REPORTS OF HOMES FOR THE AGED O 75
REPORTS OF HOMES FOR THE AGED, PORT COQUITLAM,
VERNON, AND TERRACE
REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the fifteenth annual report covering the
Homes for the Aged, Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and Terrace, for the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1951.
The general health of the patients in these Homes has been well maintained throughout the year, there being only one period when influenza reached almost epidemic proportions in the three Homes during February and March. Most of these cases responded
satisfactorily to treatment.
There continues to be a great demand for the service provided by this branch of the
Mental Health Services. We have been able this year to admit all the aged psychotic men
requiring this type of care. We have not, however, been able to keep up with the demand
for the admission of aged psychotic women.
Admissions to the Home for the Aged, Port Coquitlam, show 104 men and 43
women patients, making a total of 147. At Vernon, 12 men and 7 women, making
a total of 19 patients, were admitted locally from the surrounding district. On November
23rd a further 6 men and 5 women were transferred to the Vernon Home from Port
Coquitlam.
During the year the remodelling of the military H-type hospital at Terrace was
continuing. In August Mr. Skillicorn, our Supervisor of this Home, with a portion of
the staff, arrived at Terrace as an advance party and completed arrangements prior to
the arrival of the men patients. On October 3rd a special C.N.R. train was made up in
Vancouver. This contained 130 men patients discharged from Essondale and a further
23 men patients transferred from the Port Coquitlam Home. Dr. E. J. Ryan, Senior
Medical Superintendent, and Dr. T. G. Caunt, Superintendent, Homes for the Aged,
were in charge of this train, with 23 other male staff members. The train arrived on the
morning of October 5th, with all patients in excellent health. The Home was in good
condition, warm, and dining arrangements were ready on our arrival. A few days later
one man was admitted directly to the Terrace Home from the local area.
The total count for the three Homes at the end of the fiscal year was 756—434 men
and 322 women patients.
During the year there were eleven discharges in full—six men, one of them being
repatriated to England and one to Norway. The other men and five women were
rehabilitated to their own homes or with friends.
There were 118 men and 41 women deaths. It is to be noted that there are more
deaths among the men than among the women patients.
At the Port Coquitlam Home the Department of Public Works has kept the buildings
in good condition, renewing and repairing as required; the Nurses' Home and the offices
have been repainted. The new 100-bed women's unit is progressing satisfactorily. All
the concrete for the two floors has been poured. More accommodation for nurses will be
required when this unit is completed. During March, due to the unusual deep snow,
transportation about the grounds was a problem. The Public Works Department was
very helpful in keeping the roads open.
The Vernon Home is functioning very satisfactorily under Dr. A. G. MacKinnon
and Miss E. C. Clark, R.N.    I visited the Vernon Home on August 19th, at the time of O 76
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
the visit of the Honourable Mr. Turnbull.   The most pressing problem at Vernon is the
necessity for further accommodation for nurses.
All departments at the Terrace Home for the Aged have functioned satisfactorily
under W. E. Skillicorn, Supervisor. Patients are very well cared for medically by Dr. G.
May, of Terrace, who makes periodic visits and is called at any time when required.
There is also a registered nurse on our Terrace staff to assist him. Due to the isolated
location of this Home, large stocks of food, clothing, coal, and other supplies were kept
on hand in case of emergency. The Public Works Department was most co-operative
and helpful in keeping the roads open during the winter-time.
The greatest problem in Terrace is maintaining an adequate attending staff and
providing them with accommodation. There have been several resignations due to higher
wages offered locally.
The problem of caring for the psychotic aged is becoming a greater one each year
owing to the vast increase of aged persons within the Province, partly due to their longer
life expectancy, advances in medicine, aged people retiring to this Province, changes in
social attitudes toward the care of the aged at home, difficulties in housing, and economic
reasons. It would appear that the demand for accommodation will greatly increase as
time goes on.   This will be especially noticeable in the case of elderly women.
A detailed report of movements of population follows.
I would like to take this opportunity to express my appreciation of the co-operation
and faithful efforts of all our staff, without whose assistance this care would not be
possible.
Respectfully submitted.
T. G. Caunt, M.D.,
Superintendent, Homes for the Aged.
TABLES ON MOVEMENT OF POPULATION
Table No. 1.—Movement of Patient Population, Provincial Homes for the
Aged, Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and Terrace, April 1st, 1950, to March
31st, 1951   .
-
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
.   Total
In residence, Port Coquitlam, March 31st, 1950	
In residence, Vernon, March 31st, 1950 	
168
143
223
95
391
238
311
248
318
50
629
248
50
298
298
Total under treatment, 1950-51
559
368 '
927
156
128
150
229 .
93
'385
221
150
434
322
Grand total in residence, Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and
Terrace, March 31st, 1951 ...'. ~ ~	
756 REPORTS OF HOMES FOR THE AGED
O 77
Table No. 2.—Movement of Patient Population, Home for the Aged,
Port Coquitlam, April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
In residence, Port Coquitlam, March 31st, 1950 	
168
104
223
43
1
391
147
1
272
116
267
38
539
Separations, 1950-51—
6
6
23
81-
4
5
29
10
11
23
110
154
156
229
385
Table No. 3.—Movement of Patient Population, Home for the Aged,
Vernon, April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
143
12
6
95
7
5
238
19
11
161
33
107
14
Admissions, Vernon __ _	
268
Separations, 1950-51—
33
1
1
12
1
1
45
Transferred to Port Coquitlam	
47
128
93
221
Table No. 4.—Movement of Patient Population, Home for the Aged,
Terrace, April 1st, 1950, to March 3 1st, 1951
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
In residence, Terrace, March 31st, 1950.  	
Admissions, Terrace, October 5th, 1950 " 	
Transferred from Port Coquitlam, October 5th, 1950	
131
23
lii
23
154
4
154
4
4
4
150
150 O 78 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
REPORT OF DIRECTOR
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith are consolidated summaries of the work done in the Child
Guidance Clinics throughout the Province from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951.
These tables are based on the complete examination or re-examination of each case.
Partial examinations are shown in the reports of psychiatric interviews, psychological
examinations, etc.
Table No. 1 is a summary of the general activities of the Clinics. It shows a
significant increase in the various activities compared to the previous year. A clinic was
held for the first time in Quesnel. All other places listed have been visited on previous
occasions.
Table No. 2 is self-explanatory. There has been a marked increase in the number
of new cases seen, with a decrease in the number of repeat cases. The total number seen
exceeds the previous year by forty-three.
Table No. 3 reveals an interesting and anticipated trend in the source of cases.
Cases from social agencies no longer make up the greatest proportion. They have been
replaced by referrals from medical and health agencies, schools, and professional and
private referrals.   This trend throws a greater burden on the staff of the Clinic.
Table No. 4 is for purposes of record and comparison with clinics elsewhere. Apart
from the problems related to adoptions, it does not reveal any significant alterations in
trends, but shows clearly the presenting symptom that caused referral. The increase
in number of cases of cerebral palsy may be explained by the fact that the Clinic examines
and assesses these cases for the Children's Hospital and the Western Society for Physical
Rehabilitation.
Table No. 5, an analysis of age-groups and intelligence, again shows that the
majority of cases seen at the Clinics are in the pre-adolescent age-group, with average or
better than average intelligence. These children are pliable and prone to be affected by
external influences. It follows from this that the majority of cases seen should be
amenable to appropriate treatment.
Table No. 6, a summary of the work of the Psychological Department in the Clinics,
reveals trends in psychological testing and treatment. The niarked increase in reading
tuition is worthy of note.
There have been several outstanding developments during the fiscal year. These
include the appointment of a member of the medical staff of the Hospital Service to the
Child Guidance Clinic staff for training and orientation in child-guidance techniques, the
establishment of group therapy under psychiatric supervision at the Provincial Industrial
Schools, the establishment of regular out-patient clinics at the Children's Hospital, and
the ready availability of electroencephalographic examination through the Crease Clinic.
The Child Guidance Clinic's paramount function is its contribution to the total
mental-health needs of the community. It is both a social and health agency and therefore
occupies a unique mediative and co-ordinative role in furthering the concept of integrated
community activity in behalf of the welfare of the individual.
There is a relentless pressure for the individual treatment of more and more cases.
While this is one of our primary aims, it is not our only aim. It would lead to disregard
of community education for prevention and of the use of re-referral treatment resources
within the community.   As our present staff cannot cope with the pressure of needed REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
O 79
individual treatments by individually directed efforts as therapists, we must allot adequate
time to mental-health education through the professional and non-professional channels
open to us. This involves an expansion of our training programme, which is contingent
upon the provision of adequate facilities. The education of non-professional groups in
the principles and practices of mental hygiene is being facilitated by an increasingly
adequate film library.
While the Clinic appreciates its role in the treatment of the individual case and in the
demands for training of personnel, it feels that its paramount function is its contribution
to the total mental-health needs of the community. At the present time two of the most
obvious gaps in resources are the lack of an observation and treatment centre for
emotionally disturbed children and adequate provision for adult psychiatric out-patient
service with accompanying day-ward care.
Table No. 1.—Summary of Clinics' Activity, April 1st, 1950, to
March 31st, 1951
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23
76
22
79
6
141
337
Physicals ...    ~ 	
Urinalysis 	
905
702
262
969
Consulting conferences	
370
1,940
Table No. 2.—Number, Sex, and Status of All Cases Examined at Child
Guidance Clinic, April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
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New cases   	
619
11
3
6
10
11
7
3
6
4
4
21
14
16
16
6
3
11
14
8
64
857
Males—
Adults 	
Children 	
Females—;
Adults     ..          	
62
335
9
213
5
6
1
2
5
1
5
5
7
4
5
2
1
2
5
__
3
1
3
1
1
15
5
9
5
7
1
8
11
5
2
4
1
2
1
6
4
1
7
6
6
2
1
35
2
26
66
474
12
Children  .. 	
305
Repeat cases—	
165|    1|_|    2|    2
,-|    1|      |    2|    1
7|    2|    1|    3|    1
.     |    5|-   2|    1| 19|   215
Males—
Adults	
21
101
2
41
1
	
2
2
—
1
	
1
1
1
--
6
1
1
2
1
1
—-
5
1
1
1
2
6
1
10
23
Children	
Females—■
Adults	
Children 	
131
4
57
Total cases 	
784
12
3
8
12
11
8
3
8
5
4
28| 16| 17| 19
1      1      1
7
3
16
16
9
83
1,072 O 80
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 3.—Sources of All Cases Referred to Child Guidance Clinic,
April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Agency or Source
Number
of Cases
Total
Percentage
Distribution
1. Social agencies..
Social Welfare Branch-
Children's Aid Society-
Catholic Children's Aid Society  _
Family Welfare and Children's Aid Society-
Family Welfare Bureau.
City Social Service Department, Vancouver..
City Welfare Office, Victoria	
2. Institutions .
Fairbridge Farm School.
Young Offenders' Unit (Closed Borstal)..
3. Medical and health agencies-
Health Branch 	
Children's Hospital .	
School for Spastics at Rehabilitation Centre-
Provincial Mental Hospital.
Tuberculosis Division, Social Service Department-
Mental Health Clinic, Vancouver   _~
Child Health Centre	
Crease Clinic  	
Shaughnessy Hospital	
Royal Columbian Hospital-
V.D. Clinic  	
Indian Health Services..
4. Schools _
Public-
Principals and teachers._	
Mental-health co-ordinator	
School counsellor. 	
Other-
Boys' Industrial School	
Girls' Industrial School	
School for the Deaf and the Blind_
Kindergarten and nursery schools...
5. Juvenile Court.
Provincial Probation Officer..
6. Adult Court-
Adult Probation Officer-
Borstal 	
7. Private physicians..
8. Parents, relatives, friends, self„
9. Other :_  	
Social worker..
Speech therapist-
Community Chest organization	
University Extension Department-
Totals    ___..
226
224
37
16
8
5
2
58
29
20
3
3
3
2
12
9
1
85
23
4
4
64
6
4
74
61
69
518
48.32
123
0.37
11.47
138
12.87
70
78
61
69
11
6.53
7.28
5.69
6.44
1.03
1,072
100.00 REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
O 81
Table No. 4.—Problems and Disorders Presented by the New Cases Given
Full Examination by Child Guidance Clinic, April 1st, 1950, to March
31st, 1951
Children
M.
F.
Adults
M.
Total
Primary behaviour disorders-
Co) Habit disorders—
Nail-biting	
Thumb-sucking...
Enuresis	
(6)
Masturbation-
Tantrums	
Soiling	
Feeding	
Other..	
Personality disorders—
Seclusive states	
Depressed states..
Day-dreaming..
Excessive introspection.
Sensitiveness	
Phantasy. 	
Aggressiveness-
Feeling of inadequacy-
Negativism   ...
Other 	
(c) Neurotic disorders—
Tics, habit spasms..
Sleep-walking	
Stammering	
Overactivity...	
Fears	
Nightmares...
Nervousness _
Anxiety	
Other	
(d) Conduct disorders—
Truancy-
Fighting and quarrelling _
Stealing-
Destruction of property-
Use of alcohol	
Cruelty   	
Disobedience	
Setting fires	
Untruthfulness	
Sex offences  	
Vagrancy 	
Running away-
Staying out late 	
Breaking and entering-
Bullying  	
Assault	
Other  —
Psychotic and prepsychotic-
Manic depressive	
Schizophrenic—
With juvenile general paresis.
With epidemic encephalitis .—
Undifferentiated	
Other	
Psychoneurosis and neurosis—■
Hysterical type..
Psychasthenic type..
Anxiety type	
Other	
4. Convulsive disorders—
Epilepsy  	
Other	
5. Psychopathic personality	
6. Educational disability—
(a) Associated with dull normal or border-line intelligence..
(6) Special mental disability—
Writing-
Reading	
Arithmetic-
Other	
(c) Social adjustment-
13
2
2
10
6
2
4
4
2
2
3
5
10
1
6
5
71
2
1
16
17
14
1
1
15
7
2
11
3
1
11
16
10
4
9
2
3
~~I
4
14
7
2
5
4
5
7
6
11
19
1
6
6
98
3
3
"24
2
3
19
2
18
6
5
4
3
1
23
18 O 82
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 4.—Problems and Disorders Presented by the New Cases Given
Full Examination by Child Guidance Clinic, April 1st, 1950, to March
31st, 1951—Continued
Children
M.
Adults
M.
Total
7. Behaviour disorder associated with somatic disorder—
(a) Habit disorder	
lb) Personality disorder	
(c) Neurotic disorder	
(rf) Conduct disorder 	
8. Mental deficiencies—
(a) Familial..
(6) Mongolism..
(c) With developmental cranial anomalieS-
(d) With congenital spastics	
(e) Post-infectional	
(/) Post-traumatic	
(g) With epilepsy..
(/.) With endocrine disorders..
(i) With other organic nervous disorders..
(/) Undifferentiated	
(/.) Other forms	
9. Mental retardation	
10. No ascertained mental deviation—
(a) Problem of physical health and development-
(b) Spastics.
(c) Speech problems	
(_.) Sight problems	
(e) Hearing problems..
(/) Social problems..
(1) Placement..
(2) Adoption..
(3) Unmarried mother-
(4) Married mother	
(5) Other......
(g) Unascertained-
(h) Normal personality..
11. Vocational guidance	
12. B orstal 	
2
3
1
2
1
2
2
12
1
1
2
2
2
37
4
7
9
1
5
20
82
1
11
1
2
1
23
1
1
8
2
2
18
85
1
5
41
2
7
	
1
—
2
1
	
3
2
1
24
	
1
	
1
2
5
4
	
3
2
64
T
—j
7
i
16
	
11
1
7
38
167
7
8
2
2
15
3
13
	
45
Totals-
457 287
74 28
846 REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
O 83
Table No. 5.—Chart Comparing Ages with Intelligence Quotients of All
New Cases Seen at Child Guidance Clinic from April 1st, 1950, to March
31st, 1951.
Males
Intelligence Quotient
Age in
Years
1-4
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-24
25-29 I 30-34 I 35-39
1              1
40+
Total
0-19 — 	
2
9
8
6
14
25
25
28
4
2
6
27
9
20
19
22
16
4
1
" 3
10
12
28
41
24
14
1
2
13
4
20
30
26
20
2
1
2
4
3
5
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
20-49	
50-69   	
70-79	
80-89 	
18
62
33
86
90-99 	
100-109 	
110-129 	
130-139	
140+	
120
101
84
10
5
Totals  —	
123
124
135
113
•
18
3
2
1
2
521
Females
0-19  	
20-49	
3
6
2
4
15
50-69	
6
16
7
6
1
36
70-79	
5
13
7
9
1
35
80-89 ,  	
12
12
7
3
34
90-99 	
15
14
9
14
1
1
1
55
100-109—  	
26
8
12
7
53
110-129  	
40
16
6
12
1
75
130-139
2
1
1
3
1
1
7
140+ 	
2
Totals 	
110
86
54
56
3
2
1
312 O 84
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
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O 85
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P-. O 86 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT
The fiscal year 1950-51 has been one in which there has been a continuance of
the growth in services offered to the public by the psychiatric social workers as a part
of the clinical team This increase in services is in response to the demands of the
community resulting from growing awareness of the Clinic's work by professional
people, parents, and community groups It has been possible because of some increase
in staff in the Vancouver Clinic, which at the end of the year had a total of nine social
workers.    Two social workers were in the Victoria Clinic at that time.
These developments have made it possible to co-ordinate and consolidate our work
to a greater degree. There is also evidence of continuing growth in quality of work as
time and organization, as well as growing professional skill, have made it possible. The
latter is an even more important part of development than increasing number of cases,
and it is linked with the growing emphasis placed upon case-work treatment of children
and parents over the past few years.
Particularly during the latter part of the year the numbers of parents and children
seeking help themselves or being referred by private physicians were so great that some
had to wait for service for as much as several months. While such a wait may be
unfortunate, it is necessary if standards of work are to be upheld. With highly disturbed
children it is particularly important that intensive and well-organized case-work services
be available over a period of time, and the effectiveness of treatment is lost if it is spread
too thinly. On the whole, people seeking help are able to understand this and, unless
the problem is especially urgent, they are able to wait for a period in order that they can
be given maximum help.
The expansion of other services of the Clinic has resulted in some changes in the
organization of the social-work department. The more extensive use of Travelling
Clinics in all the main centres of British Columbia has made it necessary for one social
worker to give full time to the work of this team. Also, with an increase in services
to the " correction agencies," including the Juvenile Detention Home, Boys' Industrial
School, Girls' Industrial School, and the Young Offenders Unit at Oakalla, a psychiatric
social worker has been attached to this team almost exclusively, both in the area of
giving diagnostic and consultative service and in sharing in treatment of individuals
referred by these agencies. The work of the psychiatric social workers has always
included participation in diagnostic and consultative services to social agencies who
bring children for clinical examination and consult with the team around psychiatric
and emotional problems in their case-loads. Considerable thought has been given to
the organization of these services by the whole staff in order to make them as effective
as possible.
The Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry, outlining the functions of psychiatric social workers in Child Guidance Clinics, placed the interpretive and informative
job high on the list of responsibilities. This involves making known the work of the
Clinic and Mental Health Services and sharing knowledge and ideas on mental health
and social problems with community and professional groups. Our psychiatric social
workers have participated in this through such varied activities as speaking to parents
groups, taking part in discussions within community organizations, introducing other
professional people to the work of the Clinic, writing material for newspaper articles,
and participating in training programmes for personnel in other services.
During this year two Master's Degree students of the University of British Columbia
School of Social Work took field-work training within the Clinic. This teaching function
is not new, as other students have been trained in the Clinic over the years. It is a
part of the Clinic's work which takes time and effort, but the students, under careful
supervision, also make a real contribution to our services. More important than this
is the fact that the student programme is the source of professionally qualified psychia- REPORTS OF CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
O 87
trie social workers who will afterwards be available for our own staff as well as for other
agency staffs. The quality of our work is dependent upon well-trained workers, and
we are, at present, much in need of more qualified psychiatric social workers and
supervisors if our present standards of services are to be maintained or increased.
Because of the difficulty of finding qualified people, particularly experienced supervisor
personnel, some concern is felt about staff positions which are likely to become vacant
very soon. It is therefore hoped that the student teaching programme can be expanded
in the near future to make available the kind of staff the Clinic and other agencies need
now and will always be needing.
The following annual statistics give some indications of the services of the social
workers in the Child Guidance Clinic during 1950-51. Cases carried during the year
by the social workers increased 28 per cent (33 per cent in the Vancouver Clinic) over
the previous year. The increase of 12 per cent in case-work interview (23 per cent in
the Vancouver Clinic) is also indicative of increased services. It is impossible to
show much of the quality of work from such statistics, but the great increase in inter-
team conferencing and consulting (71 per cent increase in conferences on "private"
cases) does reflect an aspect of our work that has importance in growing standards. The
57-per-cent increase in cases closed also seems to reflect some gain in quality of work,
since it indicates a higher proportion of cases where services were completed in a
shorter time.
It is noted that the increase in services has been largely in the Vancouver Clinic,
where staff has been increased. Intake of cases in the Victoria Clinic has been somewhat smaller, and while total cases carried have gone up, there was a reduction of about
10 per cent in case-work interviews. This is, in part, a reflection of a shift of emphasis,
since the Travelling Clinics on Vancouver Island have been handled this year from
Victoria rather than Vancouver, and much of the work entailed in preparation for and
taking part in these clinics has fallen to the social-work supervisor of that Clinic.
At the present time the social workers and public health nurse at the Victoria Clinic
are the only members of the team on a full-time basis. It is hoped that staff for a full
team can be available soon in order that the services there may be developed more fully.
Social Services of Provincial Child Guidance Clinics, April 1st, 1950,
to March 31st, 1951
Case-work Services
Vancouver
Victoria
1950-51
Totals
1949-50
Totals
Total
Increase
Vancouver
Increase
Victoria
Increase
Cases brought forward from previous fiscal year	
New cases ..  	
Reopened in present fiscal year  	
Reopened from previous fiscal year	
Total intake   _ — -
Total cases carried (298+198—15=481)	
Cases closed during fiscal year	
Cases carried over to next fiscal year— —	
Total case-work interviews with and regarding clients....
Conferences attended in clinic diagnostic service.—	
Conferences attended on cases carried by clinic psychi
atric social workers  	
Consultations with psychiatrist	
Periods of supervision 	
Other interviews and contacts 	
Travelling Clinics (total clinics held) 	
Cases given service	
129    |       69
205
13
20
238    |
354
208
146
3,351
1,077
320
249
499
89
42
193
54
2
4
60
127
73
54
852
48
48
59
87
67
15
49
198
259
15
24
298
481
281
200
4,203
1,125
368
308
586
156
57
242
118
235
18
24
277
377
179
198
3,659
958
215
208
576
186
43
223
Per Cent j Per Cent
10
22
24
28      |      33
57      |      50
1 14
12
17
71
48
102
36
Per Cent
-20
-29
18
80
— 11
23 | -10
24 -47
-26
136
Respectfully submitted.
Miss Alice K. Carroll. O 88 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
REPORT OF RESEARCH DIVISION
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Simultaneously with the development of the Medical Faculty of the University of British Columbia, there has been a development in the field of research by the
Mental Health Services of the Province. In July, 1949, President N. A. M. MacKenzie,
on the request of Dr. A. L. Crease, set aside space for an office and a small laboratory for
Dr. W. C. Gibson in the annex to the Chemistry Building. On June 13th, 1950, an
agreement was concluded at a meeting at Essondale between the Mental Health Services of British Columbia, represented by the Honourable W. T. Straith, R. A. Pennington, Dr. A. M. Gee, and F. A. Matheson, and the University of British Columbia,
represented by Dean M. M. Weaver.
The substance of the agreement was that with Federal mental-health grants, supplemented by Crease Clinic funds, the Mental Health Services of British Columbia would
establish a research " colony " on the University campus. The appointment of personnel to the unit was to be made with the concurrence of the University, and the Dean
of Medicine was to act as the University's representative in the supervision of the
research unit. The assigning of teaching duties in the Medical School was also envisaged
for the research personnel.
Over the first year of operations, this arrangement has worked well. In the interim
period of equipping the laboratory, housed in the south end of Hut S-4 on the University
campus, Dr. Gibson has taught the first term of the histology course in the Medical School
and has given both the neuro-anatomy and neuro-physiology in the second term of the
first-year course. In the future it is expected that Dr. Kennard and Dr. Harvey, respectively, will give these courses.
An appropriation of $17,542.03 was made from Federal mental-health grants for
the year ended March 31st, 1951, the bulk of which was designated for laboratory equipment.   A small amount for travel was also earmarked.
The objectives of the laboratory are the investigation of cerebral dysfunction in the
lobotomized and non-lobotomized individuals. At the cellular level, it is desired to study
the deranged metabolism of the central nervous system and, at the same time, to trace
interneuronal connections by studying microscopically the degenerating axones interrupted by lobotomy operations. Through electroencephalographic and behavioural
studies in experimental animals, it is hoped that the relationships of the frontal and
temporal lobes to the general organization of the cerebral cortex may be elucidated.
Prior to the appropriation of the Federal funds for the work on November 7th, 1950,
the first part of the study on the interneuronal connections was undertaken by our first
Research Fellow, E. Morrison, B.A., working in the Department of Biology through the
kindness of Professor A. H. Hutchinson. This work is proceeding, and will constitute
Mr. Morrison's M.A. thesis material. Mrs. Purkis came on as secretary-technician in
February, 1951.
The work of the laboratory was described during the year to three groups in Vancouver and one in California. Of considerable interest and assistance was the visit of
Dr. R. R. Struthers of the Rockefeller Foundation. .     . . ■
Respectfully submitted.
Wm. C. Gibson, M.D. . STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
O 89
MENTAL HOSPITALS STATISTICAL TABLES
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Mental Hospitals—Essondale,
New Westminster, and Colquitz—from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st,
1951
Movement of Population
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male      Female     Total
In residence, Essondale, March 31st, 1950 —   —
In residence, New Westminster, March 31st, 1950  	
In residence, Colquitz, March 31st, 1950   —	
On probation, carried forward from 1949-50, Essondale	
On probation, carried forward from 1949-50, New Westminster
On probation, carried forward from 1949-50, Colquitz	
On escape, carried forward from 1949-50, Essondale	
On escape, carried forward from 1949-50, New Westminster.	
On escape, carried forward from 1949-50, Colquitz 	
Admitted during the year 1950-51—
By ordinary forms. 	
By urgency forms    	
By voluntary forms   	
From the Yukon... _.  	
By warrant — 	
By Order in Council..     	
Total  under  treatment,  Essondale, New Westminster,  and
Saanich, April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951	
Discharged during the period of April 1st, 1950, to March
31st, 1951—
(a) Essondale—
As recovered -  —
As improved  	
As unimproved , 1_	
Without psychosis   	
On probation and still out  	
Escaped but not discharged 	
Died    	
(6) New Westminster-
As improved...
As unimproved	
On probation and still out—
Escaped but not discharged-
Died _.. 	
(c) Colquitz—
As recovered.
As improved..
As unimproved	
Without psychosis. .	
On probation and still out —
Escaped but not discharged..
Died 	
Total  discharged  from  Essondale,  New  Westminster,  and
Colquitz _   —
Total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz..
Essondale—
Total on books, March 31st, 1950..
Admitted during 1950-51..
Received from New Westminster-
Received from Colquitz _	
Discharged during 1950-51	
Transferred to New Westminster-
Transferred to Colquitz 	
Total in residence, Essondale, March 31st, 1951-
1,968
390
291
96
3
3
3
494
39
292
5
1
13
77
192
308
228
97.
5
112
1,019
16
23
18
2,067
844
14
3
1,019
73
9
1,649
304
105
1
507
25
121
92
221
101
55
149
2
70
690
26
1,755
655
. 3
690
85
3,617
694
291
201
4
3
1,001
64
413
5
1
15
169
413
409
283
246
7
182
1,709
34
49
18
3,822
1,499
17
3
1,709
158
9
2,755
2,060
4,815
844
655
1,499
3,599
2,715
6,314
1,060
716
1,776
2,539
1,999
4,538
2,928
1,101
2,413
775
5,341
1,876
1,827
1,638
3,465 O 90
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT,  1950-51
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Mental Hospitals—Essondale,
New Westminster, and Colquitz—from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st,
1951—Continued
Movement of Population
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
New Westminster—
Total on books, March 31st, 1950. _	
393
73
305
85
698
158
466
37
390
29
856
Discharged during 1950-51       _ 	
23
14
26
3
49
17
66
295
9
295
9
Total in residence, New Westminster, March 31st, 1951 	
429
361
790
Colquitz—
Total on books, March 31st, 1950	
304
21
Received from New Westminster.  	
304
18
3
	
18
3
21
1,827
429
283
1,638
361
3,465
790
283
Total in residence, Colquitz, March 31st, 1951—..	
283
283
Total in residence, Essondale, March 31st, 1951 	
Total in residence, New Westminster, March 31st, 1951	
2,539
1,999
Grand total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and
Colquitz, March 31st, 1951      	
4,538
Daily average population      	
Percentage of discharges on admissions (not including deaths)..
Percentage of patients recovered and improved to admissions-
Percentage of deaths on whole number under treatment	
4,637.11
67.04
39.35
3.53
Table No. 2.-
-Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Mental
Hospitals since Inception
,
a
.9
1
•a
<
Discharges
,3
%
a
3
1*8
CD U
■__«>£
E-3-g
Z3«
a.
ed
0>
e.
3
0.
fl
C.
OJ
H
U
0.
Q
Whole Number
Treated
oS
s>_.3
etf) 0. 3
3 s. &
ill
Percentage of
Discharges to
Admissions (Deaths
Excluded)
o
Year
S
(0
>
0
o
V
•a
o
H
_>
>
0
^ ej
O oj
Zal
0 .
**_ ,3 <0
Oj>TJ
0.^5*.
Mo 3 3
SHI
B.QZH
1872  	
18
15
12
29
22
14
16
18
17
13
7
8
10
20
27
36
26
41
52
49
1
10
4
3
11
4
7
4
5
5
3
4
2
5
10
15
12
14
17
19
2
3
3
4
3
1
3
1
1
4
6
5
6
5
6
4
i
5
3
10
5
3
8
8
5
5
2
3
2
5
6
5
3
4
12
20
16
14
19
32
35
38
36
41
48
48
49
49
51
61
66
77
82
100
117
123
5
13
3
3
5
7
1
2
10
5
11
5
18
17
6
2
2
18
31
26
48
54
49
54
54
58
61
55
57
59
71
88
102
103
123
152
166
5.55
66.66
33.33
10.34
50.00
28.57
43.75
22.22
29.41
38.46
42.85
50.00
20.00
25.00
37.03
41.66
46.15
34.15
32.69
38.77
5.55
80.00
33.33
26.89
63.63
78.57
62.50
27.77
29.41
61.54
57.14
62.50
60.00
25.00
59.25
55.55
69.23
46.34
44.23
46.94
5.55
1873 	
1874..	
1875 	
1876    	
1877    -
1878 	
1879 __....
1880   	
16.12
11.53
20.83
9.35
6.12
16.16
14.81
8 62
1881 	
1882.	
1883	
1884 	
1885.. 	
1886     	
8.19
3.63
5.26
3.33
6.94
6 81
1887	
1888  - 	
1889 	
4.80
2.87
3 25
1890 	
1891	
7.64
11.69 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
O 91
Table No. 2,
-Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Mental
Hospitals since Inception—Continued
Discharges
U
■3
c.
0.
0
0
S n
Year
efl
3
O
1
■o
<
•o
IH
>
o
(J
K
•0
0.
Vh
O
>
O
O 0.
Zet
Cfl
.3
"e.
0.
D
pJ  CO u
Ss_
J_ -_ e.
0.
c.
0.
O
3
ID
(/}
Ct)
CJ
u
0
0)
Q
E
3
O rt
-> ■» a
rt i_ ....
a " 8
§11
Percentage 0
Discharges t
Admissions
Excluded)
Percentage 0
Deaths to W
Number unc
Treatment
1892    	
52
44
17
14
10
18
13
14
135
133
12
2
175
179
32.69
31.81
51.92
72.72
6.95
1893   .
7.60
1894......	
80
13
19
19
162
29
213
16.25
40.00
8.92
1895  	
62
29
11
20
164
2
224
46.77
64.51
8.92
1896  	
64
23
25
9
171
V
228
35.93
75.00
3.94
1897 	
74
20
8
14
203
32
246
27.03
37.83
5.69
1898     	
81
101
27
31
13
32
19
21
221
234
18
13
285
327
33.33
30.69
49.38
62.37
6.66
1899..	
6.42
1900	
113
38
27
29
258
24
356
33.63
57.52
8.14
1901	
115
40
20
25
284
26
377
34.78
52.17
6.63
1902 	
121
30
31
25
311
27
413
24.79
50.41
6.06
1903 	
139
38
37
26
349
38
466
27.34
53.96
5.57
1904 —-
115
46
26
26
321
28
480
40.00
62.61
5.42
1905 	
123
43
33
27
348
27
505
33.33
61.78
5.34
1906	
150
361
43
28
388
43
552
23.03
52.06
5.04
1907  	
221
48
43
39
461
73
666
21.30
41.20
5.08
1908  _	
230
681
56
57
507
46
765
28.30
53.90
7.44
1909 	
232
732
77
40
536
29
816
31.00
64.60
6.40
1910  	
280
84
82
41
595
48
896
30.00
59.28
4.57
1911     	
332
67 3
114
60
690
105
1,034
19.57
54.42
5.83
1912.. 	
375
741
128
76
752
62
1,065
18.90
53.80
7.02
1913.. 	
380
90*
146
67
919
167
1,264
22.63
62.10
5.30
1914	
402
58
126
74
1,027
108
1,364
14.43
45.77
5.43
1915 	
332
83
91
89
1,090
63  1
1.437
25.00
52.41
6.19
1916 	
353
732
96
80
1,205
115 |   1 1,527
20.68
47.87
5.24
1917
371
88
78
106
1,301
1,347
96
1,650
1,753
23.72
44 74
6.42
1918 	
375
75
95
132
46
20.00
45.33
7.47
Jan. 1,1919, to
March 31, 1920.	
574
116
221
132
1,458
111
2,025
20.20
58.71
6.51
1920-1921	
489
88
173
122
1,566
108
2,043
14.17
72.60
5.97
1921-1922 —	
478
96
178
114
1,649
83
2,137
20.08
57.32
5.33
1922-1923	
438
91
167
133
1,697
48
2,180
20.77
59.36
6.10
1923-1924 	
447
842
121
163
1,784
87
2,234
18.56
64.20
7.25
1924-1925.	
461
63
242
138
1,884
100
2,327
13.66
66.16
5.93
1925-1926 	
475
575
240
142
1,995
111
2,434
12.00
62.53
5.83
1926-1927. 	
494
76*
171
161
2,125
130
2,565
15.38
50.00
6.27
1927-1928.. 	
542
751
252
147
2,269
144
2,743
13.28
60.33
5.36
1928-1929	
543
922
294
181
2,347
78
2,914
16.7/5
71.07
6.21
1929-1930 	
602
1181
311
223
2,411
64
3,063
19.10
71.26
7.28
1930-1931— -	
632
701
235
191
2,550
139
3,148
10.60
64.24
6.06
1931-1932 	
562
58"
299
181
2,676
126
3,214
10.32
63.52
5.63
1932-1933	
635
44*
323
195
2,824
148
3,390
6.92
58.42
5.75
1933-1934	
610
- 613
309
200
2,960
136
3,530
10.00
60.65
5.66
1934-1935._  	
653
711
349
321
3,080
120 I .	
3,721
10.87
64.32
5.94
1935-1936 — 	
679
631
304
291
3,180
100
3,838
9.27
54.05
7.58
1936-1937	
793
78s
300
268
3,301
121
4,067
9.96
63.60
6.59
1937-1938...	
834
74
330
207
3,487
186
4,255
8.87
67.30
4.86
1938-1939 	
827
72_
345
208
3,612
125
4,471
8.71
78.72
4.65
1939-1940 	
869
864
111'
107"
455
410
230
254
3,710
3,836
98
126
4,713
4,781
11.39
12.38
88.50
79.97
4.88
1940-1941 	
5.31
1941-1942 	
834
803
718
91°
400
443
255
260
3,902
3,925
66
23
4,843
4,919
8.51
11.32
56.46
66.50
6.54
1942-1943 ..- -
5.31
1943-1944...	
840
87
423
309
3,960
35
4,965
10.36
61.66
6.02
1944-1945	
822
9610
377
300
4,019
59
4,960
10.46
58.39
6.04
1945-1946  -
834
117s
352
240
4,110
91
5,014
14.02
57.43
5.84
1946-1947 	
880
1,111
9710
12411
496
560
238
240
4,151
4,269
41
118
5,174
5,447
11.02
11.34
68.18
63.64
4.59
1947-1948 	
4.40
1948-1949	
1,260
137"
748
209
4,355
86 | ......
5,758
10.87
76.59
3.63
1949-1950 	
1,415
195
787
202
4,602
247 | --
1
5,999
13.78
69.40
3.37
I Three not insane. 2 One not insane.
0 Five not insane.           7 Twelve not insane.
II Three not insane; 196 without psychosis.
3 Two not insane. * Four not insane. 5 Six not insane.
8 Ten not insane. 9 Eight not insane. 10 Seven not insane.
12 Two not insane; seventy-eight without psychosis. O 92
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Mental
Hospitals since Inception—Continued
Discharges
n
03
U
Number Resident
at the Close of
Each Year
u
ca
a
a
i-i
U
CO
m
u
u
u
Q
6
e
a
Ob
Percentage of
Patients Recovered
and Improved to
Admissions
Percentage of
Discharges to
Admissions
(Deaths Excluded)
u
■S3
Year
V
8
<
•o
u
>
o
o
q.
>
o
M
ft
•a
u
>
o
ft
1
'3
P
1°
1"
B 8
°?§
too <a
§«■§
ft.0 s
1950-1951	
1.499
169
421
414
284
223
4,538
64
4,815
39.35
67.04
3.53
Table No. 3.—Showing the Total Number of Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths
in the Mental Hospitals from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Admissions
Discharges
Deaths
Months
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
1950
70
84
76
76
65
83
84
71
77
63
41
54
70
69
74
53
59
70
69
58
50
25
37
21
140
153
150
129
124
153
153
129
127
88
78
75
49
58
56
39
59
63
195
68
70
59
45
57
29
35
41
27
35
36
37
55
55
41
49
30
78
93
97
66
94
99
232
123
125
100
94
87
11
14
10
10
7
9
14
16
6
13
14
11
7
8
10
5
6
11
4
6
9
7
5
10
18
22
20
July.      ._.. ..   _	
15
13
20
October 	
November. 	
December.	
1951
18
22
15
20
February	
19
21
Totals	
844
655
1,499
818
470
1,288
135
88
223
Table No. 4.—Showing What Districts Contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
A-.h-itsfr.rd
8
1
2
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
22
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
2
1
___
1
11
i
l
13
1
1
2
2
2
33
49
8
1
4
2
1
3
1
2
1
__
3
2
1
2
5
26
1
1
1
1
3
......
3
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
5
75
1
Chapman Camp	
Chemainus ~  .
Cherry Creek	
1
1
Alberni	
1
1
Chilliwack	
11
1
Armstrong _	
Cloverdale	
Cobble Hill. 	
Coombs	
7
2
Balfour _ _
1
5
Courtenay	
2
2
Black Creek  _
Cranbrook	
3
Blubber Bay 	
1
1
1
Cumberland  _	
5
5
Dawson, Y.T.
2
Castlegar	
1
Dewdney. 	
2
Cecil Lake	
10
49
26
73
89
53
142 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
O 93
Table No. 4.—Showing What Districts Contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951—Continued
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
89
1
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
11
6
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
5
1
1
5
1
1
2
......
58
1
14
4
1
3
1
1
53
1
1
2
1
7
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
5
1
1
i
l
l
U
9
1
1
5
1
1
5
1
2
1
1
3
1
2
1
4
1
6
1
7
2
47
	
2
17
1
1
1
1
142
11
2
3
2
4
7
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
22
15
1
1
4
2
7
2
1
2
9
3
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
1
4
1
1
4
1
1
9
1
2
11
1
2
9
2
105
1
2
31
5
1
1
1
4
1
1
258
6
1
3
3
1
1
1
4
2
5
5
1
4
5
1
1
3
9
6
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
5
1
2
5
1
1
1
1
424
8
40
1
1
7
3
4
2
1
1
1
1
228
1
1
1
11
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
5
6
1
1
1
2
2
11
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
1
4
1
4
6
1
1
1
2
1
272
5
43
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
486
Palrii
Elko _	
Peachland	
Penticton	
17
Field 	
Port Alberni	
Fort St. John   .	
PortKells..   ...
Port Mellon	
Port McNeill	
11
Harewood 	
Progress	
Procter 	
Quesnel—  —	
Renata	
Rossland	
5
20
2
8
Sarita—     - _
Shutty Bench
Smithers	
2
Sooke 	
2
2
Spallumcheen.	
2
2
Lillooet	
Squamish	
Lund  _  _
Sumas   	
Summerland—	
Maillardville __
11
Ta Ta Creek 	
Tahsis.. 	
Telkwa 	
Thrums 	
Trail 	
Mission_ 	
Murrayville	
Tupper Creek —   _
Vananda —
Nanaimo	
Natal
Vancouver	
696
13
Needles	
Victoria	
Westbridge 	
West Summerland	
83
2
1
New Westminster  	
West Vancouver	
11
5
North Bend
White Horse, Y.T	
5
White Rock — 	
3
Whonnock...
1
Wildwood Heights 	
2
WyattBay.. 	
1
Okanagan Landing	
Osoyoos.. _	
Wynndel... 	
2
1
Yarrow	
Youbou   .
1
Oyster Bay 	
4
Carried forward	
258
228
486
Totals  	
844
655
1,499 O 94
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 5.—Showing the Number of Attacks in Those Admitted from
April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Number of Attacks
Male
Female
Total
First                                  -        -
213
85
17
10
4
2
1
64
324
124
185
114
40
10
5
2
1
1
1
72
144
80
398
199
Third                                  -    	
57
20
Fifth                                               	
9
Sixth                                    - -	
4
2
Eighth                           _ - - 	
1
1
136
468
204
Totals	
844
655
1,499
Table No. 6.—Showing the Reported Duration of Mental Illness Prior to
Admission in Those Admitted from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Duration of Attack
Male
Female
Total
49
139
27
29
24
28
17
3
324
200
4
42
152
34
32
18
36
19
5
1
144
165
1
91
291
6     „                                                         _	
61
12                                                            _ _	
61
42
„     5    „    .   — -
64
„   10   „   .      -	
36
„   15    „	
5
Over 15   „ -	
4
468
365
Life    j. - -	
11
Totals                                  _   —
844
655
1,499
Table No. 7.—Showing the Reported Cause of Attack in Those Admitted
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Alleged Cause
Male
Female
Total
Alcohol. 	
Alzheimer's disease..
Arteriosclerosis	
Auricular fibrillation..
Brain tumour. 	
Bronchopneumonia—
Cerebral atrophy	
Cerebral thrombosis-
Congenital.	
Constitutional 	
Drugs	
Epilepsy-
Heredity, inferred	
Huntington's chorea.—
Intracranial neoplasm..
Lobar pneumonia	
Lues (syphilis)	
Meningitis..
Post-encephalitic Parkinsonism..
Pregnancy-
Retinitis pigmentosa.
Senility	
Trauma	
Tuberculosis  _
Unknown	
Without psychosis-	
Totals	
212
1
52
3
100
312
2
17
1
2
1
1
12
2
87
5
3
1
26
844
37
2
28
1
4
1
~95
378
9
11
1
2
1
53
2
4
20
655
249
3
80
1
7
1
1
3
195
690
11
28
1
2
1
1
18
2
1
2
1
140
7
3
5
46
1,499 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
O 95
Table No. 8.—Showing the Number Discharged on Probation and Results
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Results
Male
Female
Total
Discharged recovered 	
Discharged improved	
Discharged unimproved	
Discharged without psychosis.
Totals	
77
199
313
229
818
Disposition of discharges—
Discharged to Homes for the Aged-
Discharged to Crease Clinic—	
Total discharges to community	
Totals	
104
30
684
Returned to hospital from probation	
On probation and still out at end of year..
46
107
92
222
101
55
43
46
381
470
54
158
169
421
414
284
470 1,288
147
76
1,065
1,288
100
265
Table No. 9.—Showing Reported Duration of Mental Illness Prior to Admission in Those Discharged from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Alleged Duration
Male
Female
Total
59
113
73
32
34
31
42
16
59
229
130
30
72
78
34
51
34
22
17
42
55
35
89
185
151
„    3      „ 	
66
„    6      „                                  ... 	
85
„ 12      „ 	
65
64
„    3    „     	
33
101
284
165
Totals      	
818
470
1,288 O 96
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951,
in the Mental Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz
Time in Hospital
Sex
Age
Certified Cause
Years
Months
Days
M.
63
16
Ruptured aorta; arteriosclerosis.
F.
5
4
7
5
Bronchopneumonia; measles; congenital heart defect.
F.
41
13
8
8
Carcinoma of the stomach; terminal bronchopneumonia.
F.
79
7
9
Bronchopneumonia; senile dementia.
F.
68
13
Chronic myocarditis; arteriosclerotic dementia; syphilis.
M.
70
21
5
25
Coronary thrombosis; arteriosclerosis.
M.
43
1
2
30
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
3
29
Tracheo-bronchitis; measles.
M.
73
14
1
8
Cerebral and mesenteric embolism due to hypertensive heart-disease
with cardiac thrombosis; hypernephroma of left kidney.
M.
63
27
11
15
Primary hepatoma.
M.
1
	
27
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
44
16
9
23
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
F.
1
1
1
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
53
	
	
20
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
62
22
3
28
Coronary thrombosis.
F.
6
1
7
30
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
59
—
14
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; chronic cardiovascular degeneration
with hypertension.
F.
49
23
6
14
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
61
25
9
9
Carcinoma of the stomach with metastases.
M.
63
4
23
Bronchopneumonia; cardiovascular degeneration.
M.
13
3
9
17
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
47
19
5
4
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
68
32
2
7
Coronary thrombosis.
F.
37
13
6
2
Acute pulmonary oedema due to aortic stenosis; chronic pyelonephritis.
M.
13
3
9
11
Bronchopneumonia; measles.
M.
67
4
21
Coronary thrombosis; bronchopneumonia.
M.
70
....
1
Pulmonary embolism with infarction of lower lobe of left lung; thrombosis of left iliac vein;  acute exacerbation of pyelonephritis.
M.
66
17
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
1
8
30
Bronchopneumonia; measles.
M.
68
18
1
28
Coronary thrombosis with myocardial infarction.
M.
69
25
1
21
Cerebral haemorrhage; cerebral arteriosclerosis.
M.
69
17
Bronchopneumonia; chronic pyelonephritis; generalized arteriosclerosis.
F.
14
5
27
Pulmonary oedema; acute rheumatic fever.
F.
65
9
3
9
Bronchopneumonia; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
M.
23
1
Acute pulmonary oedema after insulin shock therapy.
F.
74
1
6
Bronchopneumonia; diabetic mellitus with gangrene left foot.
F.
68
8
Cerebral haemorrhage; hemiplegia.
F.
43
7
7
14
Bronchopneumonia; lung abscess.
F.
83
2
14
Bronchopneumonia; fractured hip.
F.
64
7
1
2
Uraemia; chronic pyelonephritis; left pyonephrosis; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
F.
23
15
11
2
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
60
1
5
23
Drowning in Pitt River due to mental depression; suicide.
M.
69
1
4
12
Bronchopneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis.
F.
51
22
2
26
Cerebral haemorrhage.
M.
63
4
27
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral thrombosis.
M.
70
2
5
17
Terminal bronchopneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
80
6
3
24
Chronic myocarditis.
F.
75
20
Bronchopneumonia; hypertension.
M.
37
14
3
13
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
F.
18
6
22
Acute pulmonary oedema; amytal, sodium poisoning.
F.
1
1
24
Hydrocephalus.
M.
52
9
11
4
Acute pulmonary oedema; portal cirrhosis; left kidney tumour with
secondary infection.
M.
63
27
3
6
Coronary thrombosis; arteriosclerosis.
F.
83
-
28
Cardiac decompensation; coronary thrombosis.
F.
64
13
1
3
Pneumococcal meningitis; lobar pneumonia.
F.
68
22.
2
24
Carcinoma head of pancreas; generalized peritonitis.
M.
33
26
Pulmonary embolism due to cystitis; subacute pancreatitis.
F.
66
26
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
50
3
....
Cerebral oedema due to brain tumour.
F.
60
26
9
24
Acute coronary thrombosis.
M.
30
11
10
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
53
17
6
5
Pulmonary embolism; coronary thrombosis; pyelonephritis.
M.
64
11
6
6
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral haemorrhage.
F.
80
_
4
Cerebral haemorrhage; cerebral arteriosclerosis. STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
O 97
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951,
in the Mental Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz—
Continued
Sex
Age
Time in Hospital
Years    Months     Days
Certified Cause
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
F.
F.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
60
45
3
81
83
69
41
59
48
62
60
3
41
55
5
71
54
60
49
16
31
45
65
61
87
2
37
20
72
69
68
65
70
64
40
36
67
67
89
45
68
65
58
60
18
76
80
1
31
11
78
66
M.
73
M.
62
F.
60
M.
71
M.
65
M.
69
M.
74
14
2
2
20
10
27
36
10
19
5
6
14
10
2
21
1
47
1
11
11
10
30
4
16
1
6
14
2
34
4
26
2
39
11
5
2
3
11
4
1
4
2
4
6
10
6
5
6
7
10
10
4
10
20
21
24
2
22
4
3
7
1
23
7
16
2
12
1
12
28
3
6
4
20
6
29
4
4
3
18
8
13
16
8
9
5
28
19
7
20
4
2
15
15
11
19
4
13
1
5
12
10
7
5
13
23
Acute pulmonary oedema; rheumatic heart-disease.
Bronchopneumonia.
Bronchopneumonia; congenital heart-disease (tetralogy of fallot).
Chronic myocarditis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Coronary thrombosis; chronic myocarditis; toxic psychosis (bronchopneumonia).
Bronchopneumonia; chicken-pox.
Lung abscess; lobar pneumonia.
Strangulated inguinal herniawith general peritonitis.
Myocardial degeneration.
Pulmonary embolism due to bronchogenic carcinoma.
Chicken-pox.
Bilateral, active, pulmonary tuberculosis, far advanced.
Uraemia; left pyelonephritis and bilateral hydroureter; carcinoma of
cervix.
Exhaustion of idiocy; cerebral damage.
Carcinoma of the stomach.
Carcinoma of cervix uteri.
Lobar pneumonia.
Lobar pneumonia; marked degeneration of brain cortex—repeated
cerebral vascular accidents.
Internal hydrocephalus with arrested development; terminal bronchopneumonia.
Congenital cardiac defect.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Bronchopneumonia.
Acute pulmonary oedema; epilepsy.
Acute pulmonary oedema; hypertension.
Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage due to septicaemia; bronchopneumonia.
Acute pulmonary oedema; rheumatic heart-disease; acute pyelonephritis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Cerebral haemorrhage with left hemiplegia; bronchopneumonia; C.N.S.
arteriosclerosis.
Bronchopneumonia associated with arteriosclerosis.
Encephalomalacia; cerebral thrombosis; generalized arteriosclerosis.
Chronic myocarditis.
Pulmonary embolism; coronary occlusion.
Uraemia;  acute pyelonephritis;  bronchopneumonia.
Empyema; rupture of the oesophagus.
Miliary tuberculosis due to pulmonary tuberculosis.
Terminal lobar pneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis.
Cerebral haemorrhage; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
Chronic myocarditis; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; multiple sclerosis.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; recurrence of carcinoma of breast with
metastasis to liver.
Chronic myocarditis; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
Coronary occlusion; coronary sclerosis.
Chronic myocarditis; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease; rheumatoid
arthritis.
Epilepsy (status epilepticus); birth injury with right hemiplegia.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; arteriosclerosis.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; arteriosclerosis.
Exhaustion of hydrocephalus; ulcerations of scalp; internal hydrocephalus.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Bronchopneumonia, anaemia.
Arteriosclerotic heart-disease.
Chronic myocarditis.
Chronic myocarditis; arteriosclerosis.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; cerebral thrombosis; hypertensive heart-
disease and generalized arteriosclerosis.
Cerebral haemorrhage; hypertensive cardiovascular disease; bronchopneumonia.
Coronary occlusion; arteriosclerosis.
Terminal bronchopneumonia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Coronary thrombosis.
1 Months.
4 O 98
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951,
in the Mental Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz—
Continued
Sex
Age
Time in Hospital
Years
Months
Days
Certified Cause
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
F.
F.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
54
6
48
52
81
73
70
35
44
55
58
65
1
64
69
61
66
67
56
66
62
31
68
64
67
87
66
64
72
76
22
3
65
55
76
57
77
4
50
62
60
64
68
81
67
71
71
46
47
58
56
69
63
64
63
19
2
5
1
2
21
17
37
5
4
1
33
21
33
10
3
3
13
20
19
4
7
3
24
19
4
6
3
1
9
3
11
4
10
4
3
6
5
2
6
4
2
10
6
1
4
6
1
10
29
19
8
14
26
17
17
6
9
17
20
28
30
24
27
8
10
28
26
11
12
25
5
2
13
8
5
18
5
16
12
16
5
11
1
25
24
23
20
11
12
26
22
22
15
11
23
27
14
7
27
24
18
Coronary thrombosis; arteriosclerosis.
Bronchopneumonia, terminal; chronic intestinal obstruction.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
Cerebral haemorrhage; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
Bronchopneumonia;  uraemia;  acute pyelonephritis and benign hypertrophy of prostate; cerebral arteriosclerosis and diabetes.
Rupture of oesophageal varicies;   primary carcinoma of liver;   portal
cirrhosis; diabetes.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
Cerebral thrombosis; cerebral arteriosclerosis.
Bilateral bronchopneumonia;   generalized arteriosclerotic cardiovascular
disease.
Bronchopneumonia; epilepsy; chronic myocarditis.
Chronic myocarditis;   arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease;   bronchial
asthma.
Bronchopneumonia and pleurisy.
Arteriosclerotic heart-disease; premature senility.
Bronchopneumonia.
Myocardial degeneration.
Bronchopneumonia; syphilis.
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral thrombosis; cerebral arteriosclerosis.
Cerebellar herniation; pituitary adenoma.
Lobar pneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis.
Subarachnoid haemorrhage; venous thrombosis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Myocardial degeneration.
Pulmonary embolism; bronchogenic carcinoma.
Coronary occlusion; arteriosclerosis.
Coronary occlusion; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
Coronary thrombosis.
Peritonitis; bladder calculus—perforation through bladder.
Chronic myocarditis;  coronary sclerosis;  pernicious anaemia;  cystocele
and rectocele (old); rectovaginal fistula (recent).
Pulmonary oedema;   hypertensive heart-disease;   generalized arteriosclerosis.
Double bronchopneumonia;   subacute appendix;   adhesions around py-
loris and gall-bladder.
Cavernous sinus thrombosis; cellulitis of scalp; cerebral spastic infantile
paraplegia.
Generalized peritonitis; perforated duodenal ulcer.
Myocardial infarction;  coronary thrombosis;  chronic bilateral subdural
haematoma. , ■
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Bronchopneumonia.
Coronary occlusion;  pulmonary oedema;   arteriosclerosis;  diabetes mel-
litus.
Acute tracheo-bronchitis; cerebral palsy.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Uraemia, chronic pyelonephritis; taboparesis.
Bronchopneumonia; taboparesis.
General peritonitis due to perforated gastric ulcer; pulmonary embolus;
coronary thrombosis.
Bronchopneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis.
Bronchopneumonia; chronic myocarditis; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular
disease.
Coronary occlusion; arteriosclerotic heart-disease.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis.
Coronary occlusion; generalized arteriosclerosis.
Coronary thrombosis; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
Bronchopneumonia; supracellar meningioma; brain tumour.
Brain tumour.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
Left-sided heart-failure (pulmonary oedema); hypertensive cardiovascular
and cerebralvascular disease.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; cerebral haemorrhage; generalized arteriosclerosis.
Bronchopneumonia. STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
O 99
Table No. 10.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1950, to March 3 1st, 1951,
in the Mental Hospitals, Essondale, New Westminster, and Colquitz—
. - ■ . Continued
Time in Hospital
Sex
Age^
Certified Cause
Years
Months
Days
M.
66
9
Glioblastoma of right frontal lobe.
F.
23
2
9 .
17
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
66
22
10
27
Coronary occlusion; generalized arteriosclerosis.
F.
1
5
21
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
51   -
1
20
Bronchopneumonia; hydrocele and spinal bifida.
M.
3
1
9
24
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral thrombosis; meningitis in infancy.
F.
76
2
13
Coronary thrombosis; bronchopneumonia.
M.
67
4
4
12
Coronary thrombosis; generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
81
3
16
Bronchopneumonia; epilepsy and spastic paraplegia; birth injury.
M.
53
10
5
Bronchopneumonia; chronic pyelonephritis.
M.
69
28
Bronchopneumonia; lung abscess.
M.
58
5
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral haemorrhage.
F.
73
1
12
Coronary thrombosis; arteriosclerosis; hypernephroma, left kidney.
F.
30
2
3
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
70
1
9
18
Primary carcinoma of the liver; portal cirrhosis of the liver.
F.
65
1
11
Coronary occlusion; upper respiratory infection.
M.
83
43
24
Terminal bronchopneumonia.
M.
15
1
2
4
Encephalomalacia.
M.
51
4
21
Early bronchopneumonia; haemorrhage due to chronic duodenal ulcer.
F.
76
7
6
Coronary thrombosis.
M.
70
30
3
26
Carcinoma pancreas.
M.
72
3
6
5
Coronary occlusion; generalized arteriosclerosis;
M.
70
6
6
23
Terminal bronchopneumonia; chronic pyelonephritis with generalized
arteriosclerosis.
M.
65
4
Bronchopneumonia; malnutrition; advanced Parkinsonism.
F.
65
1
2
Bronchopneumonia; encephalomalacia.
M.
80
3
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
4
12
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral agenesis.
F.
68
1
9
Bronchopneumonia; chronic myocarditis; coronary sclerosis.
F.
65
6
9
27
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
63
3
13
Cerebral vascular accident; cerebral arteriosclerosis.
M.
7
2
6
19
Terminal bronchopneumonia.
F.
. 70
7
1
3
Bronchopneumonia; influenza.          .-                                     -
M.
39
16
9
4
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
F.
86
9
Bronchopneumonia; influenza; chronic myocarditis.
M.
60
 i
1
25
Bronchopneumonia; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
F.
43
1
5
Cerebral haemorrhage; hypertension.
M.
55
40
7
17
Myocardial infarction; coronary thrombosis.
F.
61
3
Septicaemia; acute tracheo-bronchitis; pyelonephritis; epilepsy with deterioration.
F.
64 -
23
Chronic pyelonephritis; congenital cystic kidneys.
M.
65
	
2
1
M.
76
2
2
22
Cerebral thrombosis; cerebral arteriosclerosis.
M.
87
1
25
Coronary occlusion; coronary arteriosclerosis.
M.
76
31
1
26
Lobar pneumonia—pleural effusion; pernicious anaemia.
M.
74
■5
21
Coronary thrombosis.
M.
16
9
28
Tuberculous meningitis; pulmonary tuberculosis. O 100
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 11.—Showing Psychoses of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Totals-
Schizophrenic disorders, total _
(a) Simple type..
(_>) Hebephrenic type..
(c) Catatonic type	
(d) Paranoid type	
(e) Others-
Manic-depressive reaction, total-
fa) Manic and circular..	
(b) Depressive	
(c) Other..
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states.
Senile psychosis..
Pre-senile psychosis  —
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology, total-
(a) Resulting from brain tumour-
fa) Resulting from epilepsy and other convulsive disorders	
fa) Psychosis secondary or due to infective or parasitic diseases	
(..) Psychosis due to allergic, endocrine, metabolic, and nutritional diseases..
fa) Psychosis due to diseases of circulatory system..
(/) Psychosis due to diseases of nervous system and sense organs	
fa) Psychosis due to drugs and other exogenous poisons	
(A) Psychosis due to accidents and violence. 	
(0 Psychosis due to other conditions  	
Other and unspecified psychoses, total-
fa) Psychosis with psychopathic personality-
fa) Psychosis with mental deficiency	
fa) Other unspecified- _. 	
Psychoneurosis, total-
(a) Anxiety reaction _
fa) Hysterical reaction.
fa) Phobic reaction-
fa) Obsessive-compulsive reaction,
fa) Neurotic-depressive reaction-
(/) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—circulatory system-
fa) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—digestive system—
(ft) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—other systems	
(0 Psychoneurosis—other types	
Syphilis and its sequelae, total. 	
fa) Congenital syphilis	
(b) Tabes dorsalis 	
fa) General paralysis of insane..
(d) Other syphilis of central nervous system..
Undiagnosed ..
Without psychosis, total .  	
Disorders of character, behaviour, and intelligence, total.
(a) Psychopathic personality	
fa ) Immature personality  	
Alcoholism, total  	
(a) Acute..
(b) Chronic.
fa) Unspecified-
Drug addiction-
Primary childhood behaviour disorders..
Mental deficiency, total	
(a) Idiocy..
(b) Imbecility	
fa) Moron	
(d) Border-line..
(e) Mongolism..
(/) Mental deficiency with epilepsy..
(g) Other and unspecified types..
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders .
Epilepsy, total-
fa) Petit mal_.
(b) Grand mal-
(c) Status epilepticus-
(_.) Other and unspecified..
632
128
21
2
24
73
8
13
12
7
81
6
50
19
25
3
3
4
2
6
2
40
9
2
" 4
17
7
12
12
2
232
12
11
1
113
113
2
100
30
33
15
16
2
Observation without need for further medical care^—mental-
484
147
20
4
19
58
46
23
14
8
1
17
9
52
10
25
6
16
1
3
1
1
2
5
2
1
8
1
7
46
18
5
~3
13
2
117
15
14
1
J/
11
85
30
35
10
1
1,116
275
41
6
43
131
54
36
22
13
1
29
16
133
16
75
25
41
4
6
5
2
1
8
7
6
2
13
3
10
~86
27
7
7
30
14
18
18
~i
349
27
25
2
124
124
2
185
60
68
25
1
24
2
5
1
7 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
O 101
Table No. 12.—Showing Psychoses of Readmissions from
April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Psychosis
Male
Total
Totals .
Schizophrenic disorders, total.
(a) Simple type 	
fa) Hebephrenic type	
(c) Catatonic type	
fa) Paranoid type	
fa) Others..
Manic-depressive reaction, total-
fa) Manic and circular	
(b) Depressive	
fa)  Other	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states .
Senile psychosis..
Pre-senile psychosis	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology, total-
fa) Resulting from brain tumour.
fa) Resulting from epilepsy and other convulsive disorders	
fa) Psychosis secondary or due to infective or parasitic diseases	
fa) Psychosis due to allergic, endocrine, metabolic, and nutrition diseases .
fa) Psychosis due to diseases of circulatory system...
(/) Psychosis due to diseases of nervous system and sense organs .
fa) Psychosis due to drugs and other exogenous poisons „
(h) Psychosis due to accidents and violence	
(i) Psychosis due to other conditions  	
Other and unspecified psychoses, total 	
(a) Psychosis with psychopathic personality  	
fa) Psychosis with mental deficiency -	
fa) Other unspecified 	
Psychoneurosis, total.
(a) Anxiety reaction	
(b) Hysterical reaction.
(c) Phobic reaction-
fa) Obsessive-compulsive reaction .
(e) Neurotic-depressive reaction_
(/) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—circulatory system-
fa) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—digestive system	
fa) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—other systems..	
(i) Psychoneurosis—other types 	
Syphilis and its sequelae, total—   	
(a) Congenital syphilis   	
fa) Tabes dorsalis.
(c) General paralysis of insane  	
fa) Other syphilis of central nervous system.
Undiagnosed 	
Without psychosis, total.
Disorders of character, behaviour, and intelligence, total.
(a) Psychopathic personality 	
fa) Immature personality 	
Alcoholism, total  .-.	
(a) Acute —   	
(b) Chronic	
fa) Unspecified	
Drug addiction-
Primary childhood bebaviour disorders _
Mental deficiency, total	
(a) Idiocy	
(b) Imbecility  	
fa) Moron	
fa) Border-line-
fa) Mongolism ..
(/) Mental deficiency with epilepsy-
fa) Other and unspecified types	
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and intelligence disorders _
Epilepsy, total—   _.
(a) Petit mal    	
fa) Grand mal 	
fa) Status epilepticus-
fa) Other and unspecified-
212
58
16
7
31
4
19
14
5
2
3
6
1
3
9
8
Observation without need for further medical care—mental-
92
9
9
72
72
1
5
2
1
1
1
5
2
3
171
'80
19
4
11
24
22
20
12
3
1
2
1
4
2
10
2
3
2
1
1
19
6
27
6
6
16
16
383
138
35
4
18
55
26
39
26
13
5
4
8
2
7
11
18
2
3
3
2
3
1
2
28
9
3
12
119
15
15
88
10
2
5
1
i
l
5
2
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MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 15.—Showing Economic Status of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Psychosis
Total
Dependent
Marginal
Comfortable
M.
F.
1
1   T.
1
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
1
F.   1   T.
1
Schizophrenic disorders	
128
13
12
7
81
6
50
19
25
2
3
40
12
2
11
1
113
2
100
2
3
147
23
17
9
52
10
25
6
16
1
7
46
6
2
14
1
11
85
1
5
275
36
29
16
133
16
75
25
41
3
10
86
18
4
25
2
124
2
185
1
7
3
9
2
1
35
16
3
2
93
1
8
2
1
24
2
4
3
3
1
4
82
1
17
2
3
1
59
2
20
1
4
1
4
2
1
1
4
3
2
175
2
117
13
8
6
34
6
28
18
24
1
2
37
10'
1
11
1
108
7
1
3
138
20
15
9
22
8
19
6
13
1
4
45
6
2
10
1
11
3
1
4
255
33
23
15
56
14
47
24
37
2
6
82
16
3
21
2
119
10
1
5
3
2
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6
2
1
2
1
1
1
6
2
3
1
3
18
8
Alcoholic psychosis  	
Psychosis with psychopathic personality 	
	
2
Syphilis and its sequelae   ....
1
Without Psychosis
Immature personality	
2
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
Epilepsy   	
Observation without need for further medical
Totals       	
632
484
1,116
169
135
304
436
338
774
27
11
38
Table No. 16.—Showing Use of Alcohol of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Psychosis
Total
M.      F.
Temperate
M.      F
M.      F.
Intemperate
M.
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reaction..	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis 	
Pre-senile psychosis ..
Psychosis with cerebral arteriorsclerosis.
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology-
Psychosis with psychopathic personality „.
Psychosis with mental deficiency	
Psychoneurosis-
Syphilis and its sequela...
Undiagnosed	
Without Psychosis
Psychopathic personality-
Immature personality.-	
Alcoholism  	
Drug addiction-
Primary childhood behaviour disorders-
Mental deficiency-
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
and intelligence disorders	
Epilepsy-
Observation without need for further medical
care—mental  	
128
13
12
7
81
6
50
19
25
2
3
40
12
2
11
1
113
147
23
17
9
52
10
25
6
16
1
7
46
6
2
14
1
11
2
100
85
2
1
5
3
275
36
29
16
133
16
75
25
41
3
10
86
18
4
25
2
124
2
185
Totals..
632
484
1,116
63
7
7
3
62
1
32
12
2
1
18
7
2
2
99
1
1
320
123
21
15
6
50
6
23
11
1
7
32
4
1
84
390
186
28
22
9
112
7
55
23
3
8
50
11
3
2
183
5
1
710
47
4
5
4
16
5
14
11
2
8
5
128
58
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w
14
6
1
113
1
1
W
36
24
2
1
3
1
5
25
4
16
10
1
124
220 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
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Table No. 20.
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
—Showing the Nativity of First Admissions by Age-groups
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Age-group
Total
Canadian Born
British Born
Foreign Born
Unknown
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Under 15 years  	
15-19 years.  	
20-24    ..    	
77
26
33
35
51
62
53
51
35
24
36
49
100
67
20
32
46
40
47
36
34
23
22
42
21
54
144
46
65
81
91
109
89
85
58
46
78
70
154
75
26
28
27
43
50
37
29
13
5
13
11
36
67
20
29
37
33
38
26
11
9
7
15
5
21
142
46
57
64
76
88
63
40
22
12
28
16
57
2
2
2
4
5
5
9
10
10
18
24
42
5
2
5
5
10
5
11
16
11
29
2
2
7
6
10
10
19
15
21
24
35
71
3
6
3
7
10
13
12
9
15
14
21
3
4
5
4
5
13
9
4
10
5
3
6
10
8
11
15
26
21
13
25
19
24
1
1
1
1
1
	
___
1
1
~2
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69
70 years
and over	
Totals	
632
484
1,116
393
318
711
123
99 | 222
1
113
65
178
3
2
5
Table No. 21.—Showing Country of Birth of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Country
Male
Female
Total
1
4
12
2
3
81
1
6
2
1
2
1
1
1
12
4
1
1
1
10
5
1
5
28
1
9
3
1
31
3
3
2
37
151
38
17
3
15
71
2
14
43
2
1
2
1
2
65
1
2
3
2
8
1
1
1
1
3
9
1
3
22
3
1
26
2
1
4
32
157
30
2
3
39
4
2
49
2
6
13
4
3
146
2
6
2
1
4
4
3
1
20
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
13
14
1
1
8
50
1
12
3
2
57
5
4
6
69
308
68
19
3
18
110
6
16
92
2
Czechos
lovakia	
Holland
dy  	
Poland.
Porto R
- 	
South A
United .
Wales...
Canada-
Alb
Brit
No\
Ont
Prir
ce Edward Island
Que
Sas
Yui
632
484
1,116 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
O 109
Table No. 22.—Showing the Citizenship of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Citizenship
Male
Female
Total
Canadian by birth..
British born who have resided in Canada five years or more-
British born who have resided in Canada less than five years..
Alien born (naturalized)..
Alien born who have resided in Canada five years or more (not naturalized)..
Alien born who have resided in Canada less than five years	
Unknown	
Totals-
393
115
6
39
63
9
7
318
92
7
20
34
10
3
632
414
711
207
13
59
97
19
10
1,116
Table No. 23.—Showing the Religion of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Religion
Male
Female
Total
Anglican .
Baptist...
Buddhist.
Christian Science-
Confucian 	
Doukhobor	
Father Devine's Faith..
Four-square Gospel	
Greek Catholic	
Greek Orthodox	
Hebrew... 	
Jehovah's Witness.
Latter-day Saints...
Lutheran	
Mennonite	
Methodist	
No religion	
Pentecostal	
Plymouth Brethren-
Presbyterian	
Protestant	
Rosicrucian	
Roman Catholic .—
Russian Orthodox..
Salvation Army.
Seventh-day Adventist.
Spiritualist  ..	
United Church	
Unknown	
Totals-
135
16
40
3
6
9
2
1
42
140
1
117
82
632
123
10
1
2
1
2
6
2
2
1
2
19
5
4
3
4
32
103
78
1
1
1
1
75
5
I
484
258
26
1
5
7
3
1
1
10
7
5
1
2
59
8
10
12
6
1
74
243
1
195
1
7
1
1
157
13
1,116
Table No. 24.—Showing Age-groups of First Admissions from
April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Age-group
Under 15 years..
15-19 years	
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45^19
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69 ,
70 years and over
Totals.-
Male
77
26
33
35
51
62
53
51
35
24
36
49
100
632
Female
67
20
32
46
40
47
36
34
23
22
42
21
54
484
Total
144
46
65
81
91
109
89
85
58
46
78
70
154
1,116 O 110
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 25.—Showing Age-groups of Readmissions from April 1st,
1950, to March 31st, 1951
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
Under 1
15-19 ye
20-24    ,
2
1
11
19
22
31
28
32
21
17
8
11-
9
~ 1
10
15
24
36
23
20
8
11
11
9
3
2
2
21
25-29    ,
34
30-34    ,
46
35-39    ,
67
40-44    ,
51
45-49    ,
52
50-54    ,
29
55-59    ,
28
60-64   ,
19
65-69    ,
20
70 years
12
Totals
212
171
383 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS                               0 111
Table No. 26.—Showing the Previous Occupations of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
-
Occupation
Male
Female
Total
Occupation
Male
Female  1
1
Total
Accountant	
6
2
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
11
1
1
1
1
1
9
7
9
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
9
3
1
27
1
3
1
8
1 .
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
5
3
91
1
1
1
40
1
1
2
1
9
1
1
37
......
2
2
237
1
1
2
6
2
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
11
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
18
1
7
10
1
2
1
37
2
1
1
1
9
5
1
29
1
3
1
8
1
1
1
1
3
1
237
1
1
1
5
3
1
91
1
3
1
40
283
1
1
8
6
1
1
8
7
1
1
105
1
1
1
1
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
2
1
1
1
97
23
1
7
3
2
3
1
1
3
1
3
8
1
1
1
2
1
9
1
1
1
1
1
5
298
1
1
1
95
1
1
7
2
	
35
2
3
12
6
1
1
1
1
3
8
4
581
1
1
8
1
6
1
1
9
7
1
1
1
200
1
1
8
2
1
1
1
10
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
2
1
1
1
132
25
1
7
3
3
2
3
1
1
12
3
1
3
14
1
2
" 1
1
1
1
2
1
9
1
3
1
9
1
1
9
Longshoreman	
Lumber inspector	
Machinist	
Manager	
Mechanic	
Apprentice	
Artist	
Bacteriologist	
B aker     	
Mill-worker 	
Miner	
Musician	
Music-teacher	
Bar-tender	
Blacksmith.... 	
Bodyman	
Broker	
Business-man	
Butcher  	
Nurse, dental	
Nurse, practical	
Nurse	
Nurse's aide ... 	
Office-boy..	
Carpenter. 	
Caterer	
Caterpillar operator	
Painter	
Checker  	
Peddler 	
Pensioner....
Physician	
Pile-driver..
Clerk	
Coffeeshop-owner	
Pipe-fitter 	
Plasterer	
Plumber.	
Cook
Printer.-..	
Custodian   ...
Decorator	
Deck-hand	
Domestic. 	
Driller	
Prospector._	
Radio officer	
■Railroad agent
Salesman	
Egg-grader  	
Seaman	
Engineer	
Factory-worker	
Faller
Secretary _   .
Shoemaker
Smelter-man.	
Soldier.	
Fireman	
Steam-cleaner
Stenographer 	
Steward	
Stoker  .
Storekeeper	
Forester   	
Student	
Tailoress    _
Gardener  	
Telegrapher   .
Teletypist	
TeleDhone operator	
Tireman 	
Janitor... 	
Kitchen-helper.. 	
Trainman      ■  	
Tug-boat dispatcher	
Labourer  	
Landlady —       	
Typist   -
Veterinary surgeon	
Waiter.	
Warehouse-worker ...
Locksmith.. _	
Logger 	
Welder....  .
Unknown	
Totals	
283
298
581
632
484
1,116
- O 112
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 27.—Showing the Method of Commitment of First Admissions
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Method of Commitment
Male
Female
Total
409
178
9
31
5
394
74
1
15
803
252
Otherwise—
10
46
5
Totals.       	
632
484
1,116
Table No. 28.—Showing the Method of Commitment of Readmissions
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Method of Commitment
Male
Female
Total
85
114
1
4
8
113
47
1
10
198
161
1
Otherwise—
5
18
Totals _   _   	
212
171
383
Table No. 29.—Showing Rural-Urban Status of First Admissions by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Psychosis
M.
F.
Rural
M.
Urban
M.
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholi a	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis 	
Pre-senile psychosis...
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis..
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology	
Psychosis with psychopathic personality	
Psychosis with mental deficiency	
Psychoneurosis..
Syphilis and its sequela...
Undiagnosed. 	
Without Psychosis
Psychopathic personality-
Immature personality	
Alcoholism  _
Drug addiction...
Primary childhood behaviour disorders-
Mental deficiency __
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
and intelligence disorders	
Epilepsy  	
Observation	
Totals	
128
13
12
7
81
6
50
19
25
2
3
40
12
2
11
1
113
2
100
2
 3_
632
147
23
17
9
52
10
25
6
16
1
7
46
6
2
14
1
11
85
484
275
36
29
16
133
16
75
25
41
3
10
86
18
4
25
2
124
" 2
185
1
7
 3_
1,116
24
4
4
3
16
1
7
6
1
19
109
20
5
5
1
7
1
3
1
2
i
10
i
4
1
16
1
44
9
9
4
23
2
10
7
10
3
17
2
1
35
188
104
9
8
4
65
5
43
13
17
2
1
33
11
2
10
1
108
1
81
2
3
523
127
18
12
8
45
9
22
5
14
1
6
36
5
2
10
1
10
69
405
231
27
20
12
110
14
65
18
31
3
7
69
16
4
20
2
118
7
150
1
6
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114 STATISTICAL TABLES—MENTAL HOSPITALS
O 115
Table No. 32.—Showing Conditions of Patients on Discharge by Psychoses
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Pyschosis
Total
Recovered
Improved
Unimproved
Without
Psychosis and
Unclassified
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Schizophrenic disorders	
245
29
10
20
108
2
27
26
25
9
5
51
18
1
27
1
191
1
1
13
2
4
2
176
46
22
5
39
4
8
3
18
6
10
67
4
2
20
1
29
6
4
421
75
32
25
147
6
35
29
43
15
15
118
22
3
47
2
220
1
1
19
2
8
2
32
7
5
3
17
37
21
9
2
2
8
1
' 2
10
......
69
28
14
3
3
19
12
2
3
14
1
1
94
16
3
8
1
1
5
8
12
7
2
33
9
107
20
11
3
2
2
4
1
7
5
7
49
3
1
......
201
36
14
11
3
3
9
9
19
12
9
82
12
1
119
6
2
9
107
1
21
1
9
1
2
14
8
13
32
5
2
2
37
2
2
3
1
8
1
1
5
151
11
4
11
144
3
23
1
12
1
3
22
9
1
18
27
1
191
1
1
2
4
2
20
1
29
1
_..._
	
Senile psychosis ___'	
Pre-senile psychosis _	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis...
Alcoholic psychosis    	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology
Psychosis with psychopathic personality..
	
Syphilis and its sequela.	
	
Without Psychosis
Psychopathic personality  	
47
2
Alcoholism—  	
Drug addiction 	
Primary childhood behaviour disorders...
220
1
1
1
Other  and unspecified  character,  behaviour, and intelligence disorders....
2
8
Observation without need for further
2
Totals  —
818
470
1,288
77
92
169
199
222
421
313
101
414
229
55
284
Table No. 33.—Showing Age-groups of Patients who Died
from April 1st, 1950, to March 31st, 1951
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
13
2
2
2
4
2
7
9
7
23
32
32
15
3
3
3
2
6
3
5
5
11
14
18
28
5
20-24    „         .             	
5
25 29                                                                    _	
30 34    „
5
35 39    ,                                                  	
6
40-44    „                       	
8
45 49    „	
10
50-54    „          -        	
14
55-59     „    ...
12
60-64    „                                                  	
34
65-69    „        - -
46
50
135
88
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. statistical tables—crease clinic
CREASE CLINIC STATISTICAL TABLES
O 117
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operation of the Crease Clinic from
January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Movement of Population
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male    Female   Total
Admitted   during   three   months,  January,  February,   and  March,
1951—
By special Order in Council from the Provincial Mental Hospital,  Essondale	
By ordinary forms.
By voluntary forms..
14
54
41
26
79
50
40
133
91
Total number under treatment, January 1st,  1951, to March 31st,
1951  	
Discharged during January, February, and March, 1951-
Recovered	
Improved..
Unimproved	
Without psychosis..
Died	
9
16
11
4
17
22
12
3
26
38
23
7
Total in residence, Crease Clinic, March 31st, 1951..
109
40
155
54
264
94
69
101
170
Daily average population	
Percentage of discharges on admissions (not including deaths)..
Percentage of patients recovered and improved to admissions ...
Percentage of deaths on whole number under treatment	
129.04
35.61
24.24 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Percentage
of Deaths
to Whole
Number
under
Treatment
Percentage
of
Discharges
to
Admissions
(Deaths
Excluded)
vo
»ri
cn
Percentage
of Patients
Recovered
and
Improved
to
Admissions
•**
CN
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ii STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
O 119
Table No. 3.—Showing Total Number of Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths
from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Month
Admissions
Discharges
Deaths
Male    Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
1951
53
27
29
81
44
30
134
71
59
5
16
19
10
13
31
15
29
50
—
February    _	
109
155'
264
40
54
94
1
Table No. 4.—Showing What Districts Contributed Patients from
January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
24
3
4
1
2
1
3
1
2
30
4
2
6
1
4
1
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
4
1
1
2
54
Brought forward
McBride  .
McGregor, Man	
Nanaimo  	
Nelson 	
Newton.	
24
1
2
8
3
2
2
1
1
1
2
53
1
6
1
1
30
1
1
3
1
1
11
6
1
2
1
3
1
3
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
62
2
11
2
54
2
1
Chemainus 	
3
3
1
19
North Vancouver..	
6
1
Penticton  	
5
1
3
PortKells ___	
1
Enderby	
5
Prince Rupert  	
Quesnel 	
4
Gibsons	
2
1
Richmond 	
1
2
Harewood	
Sardis  	
Sicamous      ...
South Wellington	
Steveston. •	
Surrey 	
Trail „	
2
1
Hazelton  	
1
2
2
2
115
Kelowna	
Kimberley 	
Vernon  „	
Victoria   	
3
17
2
White Rock   ....
1
Yarrow 	
1
Mission City 	
109
155
Carried forward.	 O 120
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 5.—Showing the Number of Attacks in Those Admitted
from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Number of Attacks
Male
Female
Total
First   .      . 	
34
33
9
1
8
7
17
51
43
6
10
2
1
18
6
18
85
76
Third            —	
15
Fourth        	
11
Fifth                                          .       	
Sixth           .  	
2
1
Eighth   .                                                 	
Ninth       -.          _	
26
13
35
Totals 	
109
155
264
Table No. 6.—Showing the Reported Duration of Mental Illness Prior
to Admission from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Duration of Attack
Male
Female
Total
Under 1 week.
3 months-
6      „     ..
„   12      „       	
,,     2  years  	
„     5      „       	
„   10      „ 	
„   15      „       	
Over 15      „        	
Without psychosis (including mental deficients).
Unknown  	
Life  	
7
12
19
35
47
82
7
18
25
6
10
16
3
4
7
3
8
11
2
6
8
2
2
7
.6
13
37
44
81
Totals..
109
155
264
Table No. 7.—Showing the Reported Cause of Attack in Those Admitted
from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Alleged Cause
Male
Female
Total
6
3
87
1
4
1
7
2
1
136
2
4
1
3
6
6
5
1
223
3
4
5
3
1
13
Totals	
109
155
264 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
O 121
Table No. 8.—Showing the Number Discharged and Results
from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Results
Male
Female
Total
Discharged recovered —
Discharged improved—
Discharged unimproved..
Without psychosis	
9
16
11
4
Total discharges-
Discharged to Mental Hospital..
40
6
Total discharged to community..
34
17
22
12
3
54
6
48
26
38
23
7
94
12
82
Table No. 9.—Showing the Reported Duration of Mental Illness Prior to
Admission in Those Discharged from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st,
1951
Alleged Duration
Male
Female
Total
Less than 1 week	
1 month	
2 months..
3 „    __
6      „     -
12      „     _
2 years _
3 ,,    ..
3 years and over	
Without psychosis....
Unknown	
Totals	
3
2
6
5
5
1
4
3
7
3
1
2
3
2
4
3
19
21
40
54
10
5
10
3
1
2
5
7
40
~94~ O 122
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 10.—Showing Psychoses of First Admissions from January 1st,
1951, to March 31st, 1951
Psychosis
Male
Female
Total
Totals-
Schizophrenic disorders, total-
fa) Simple type..
(_>) Hebephrenic type-
fa) Catatonic type	
fa) Paranoid type	
fa) Others.
Manic-depressive reaction, total-
(a) Manic and circular	
(b) Depressive	
fa) Other..
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis-
Pre-senile psychosis	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis.
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology, total-
(a) Resulting from brain tumour-
fa) Resulting from epilepsy and other convulsive disorders	
fa) Psychosis secondary or due to infective or parasitic diseases	
fa) Psychosis due to allergic, endocrine, metabolic, and nutritional diseases..
fa) Psychosis due to diseases of circulatory system-
(/) Psychosis due to diseases of nervous system and sense organs..
(g) Psychosis due to drugs and other exogenous poisons	
(h) Psychosis due to accidents and violence	
(j) Psychosis due to other conditions  	
Other and unspecified psychoses, total-
(a) Psychosis with psychopathic personality „
(b) Psychosis with mental deficiency 	
fa) Other unspecified	
Psychoneurosis, total-
fa) Anxiety reaction  	
fa) Hysterical reaction 	
fa) Phobic reaction	
fa) Obsessive-compulsive reaction..
(e) Neurotic-depressive reaction..
(/) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—circulatory system-
fa) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—digestive system	
(ft) Psychoneurosis with somatic symptoms—other systems	
(i) Psychoneurosis—other types	
Syphilis and its sequela., total _	
fa) Congenital syphilis .	
(6) Tabes dorsalis-
(c) General paralysis of insane..
(d) Other syphilis of central nervous system..
Undiagnosed..
Without psychosis, total-
Pathological personality.-
Immature personality	
Alcoholism, total	
(a) Acute-
(b) Chronic-
(c) Unspecified-
Drug addiction.
Primary childhood behaviour disorders-
Mental deficiency, total	
(a)  Idiocy..
(6) Imbecility	
(c) Moron	
(d) Border-line-
lie) Mongolism..
(/) Mental deficiency with epilepsy-
(g) Other and unspecified types	
Epilepsy, total.
(a) Petit mal..
(b) Grand mal„
(c) Status epilepticus-
(d) Other and unspecified-
108
56
16
8
25
7
1
1
29
14
755
70
10
2
9
18
31
9
6
3
7
1
1
2
49
20
2
12
1
1
9
1
263
126
26
2
17
43
38
10
7
3
~7
1
~1
5
6
9
3
1
2
~78
34
4
2
18
1
2
1
16
5
12
7
2
1
Observation without need for further medical care—mental.. IT.
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123 O 124
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 12.—Showing Economic Status of First Admissions by Psychoses
from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Psychosis
Total
M.
Dependent
M.      F.
Marginal
M.      F.
Comfortable
M.
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis	
Pre-senile psychosis	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis-
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology-
Psychosis with psychopathic personality	
Psychosis with mental deficiency	
Psychoneurosis..
Syphilis and its sequela...
Undiagnosed	
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality 	
Immature personality	
Alcoholism- 	
Drug addiction _
56
1
3
6
1
2
29
4
Primary childhood behaviour disorders-
Mental deficiency-
Other and unspecified character, behaviour, and
intelligence disorders 	
Epilepsy.
Observation without need for further medical
care—mental	
70
9
7
. 1
1
2
Totals..
108
126
10
7
1
1
5
6
9
1
2
78
5
1
1
155     263
13
65
48
1
119
9
7
1
1
5
6
9
1
2
75
5
102
146
248 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
O 125
Table No. 13.—Showing Conjugal Conditions of First Admissions by Psychoses
from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Psychosis
Total
Single
Married
Widowed
Divorced
Separated
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Schizophrenic disorders
Manic-depressive reaction..
Involutional melancholia...
Paranoia and paranoid
56
1
3
6
1
2
29
4
4
1
1
70
9
7
1
i
2
8
1
49
1
3
2
1
126
10
7
1
1
5
6
9
1
2
78
5
7
2
1
1
1
41
6
1
2
10
1
2
....„
28
2
2
1
6
2
2
1
69
2
6
3
1
2
16
1
4
2
1
1
11
1
2
13
3
1
1
35
5
5
• 6
"41
1
46
6
5
2
6
54
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
2
i
2
1
1
3
2
1
4
2
3
4
2
1
1
4
1
2
1
i
i
6
1
2
1
Pre-senile psychosis	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis	
	
Psychosis of other demon-
Psychosis with psycho-
Psychosis with mental deficiency. 	
Psychoneurosis	
Syphilis and its sequela.
2
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality	
Immature personality	
2
Primary childhood behaviour disorders  	
Mental deficiency	
Other and unspecified
character, behaviour,
and intelligence disorders
	
Observation without need
for further medical care
Totals	
108
155
263
64
44
108
32
93
125
3
6
9
5
2
7
4
10
14 O 126
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 14.—Showing Education of First Admissions by Psychoses from
January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Psychosis
Total               Illiterate
Reads and
Writes
Common
School
High School
University
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
Schizophrenic disorders
Manic-depressive reaction..
Involutional melancholia—
Paranoia and paranoid
states 	
Senile psychosis 	
56
1
3
6
1
2
29
4
4
1
1
70
9
7
1
1
2
8
1
49
1
3
2
1
126
10
7
1
1
5
6
9
1
2
78
5
7
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
l
l
l
4
2
1
1
2
1
1
6
1
3
1
1
32
1
3
3
1
21
3
1
29
3
4
1
1
1
7
1
30
1
2
1
1
61
4
4
1
1
4
3
7
1
1
51
1
5
1
1
1
13
2
1
4
2
1
32
3
2
1
1
15
1
1
45
3
2
1
2
2
19
2
2
1
7
2
6
2
3
13
2
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis _
	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology	
Psychosis with psychopathic personality.-	
Psychosis with mental deficiency 	
5
Syphilis and its sequelae.
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality.
Immature personality	
	
Primary childhood behav-
Other and unspecified
character, behaviour,
and intelligence disorders
_
Observation without need
for further medical care
Totals     .
108
155
263
3
2
5
8
4
12
65
82
147
23
56
79
9
11
20 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
O 127
Table No. 15.—Showing the Nativity of First Admissions by Age-groups
from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Age-group
Total
M.
F.
Canadian
Born
M.
F.
T.
British
Born
M.
F.
Foreign
Born
M.
F.      T.
Unknown
M.
Under 15 years.
15-19 years	
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45^19
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-69
70 years and over-
Totals	
2
5
20
20
33
22
14
14
10
2
6
7
108  155  263
2
4
20
14
26
19
10
5
4
1
4
4
3
10
33
29
35
29
16
11
7
2
5
5
72  113  185
12 I 23
I
35  23
19
42
Table No. 16.—Showing Country of Birth of First Admissions from
January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Country
Male
Female
Total
Austria-
China—
Czechoslovakia-
Denmark	
England.—.
Estonia	
Finland	
Ireland	
Italy	
Latvia	
Mexico	
Norway—
Poland	
Roumania-
Russia	
Scotland..
Spain-
Sweden	
Switzerland-
Ukraine	
United States-
Unknown	
Wales	
Canada—
Alberta...
British Columbia-
Manitoba 	
New Brunswick	
Newfoundland	
Nova Scotia	
Ontario 	
Prince Edward Island..
Quebec.
Saskatchewan.
Totals	
24
1
10
1
4
15
108
1
19
2
13
54
10
1
15
3
17
155
1
3
1
1
26
2
2
2
1
1
1
6
5
2
4
6
1
2
1
2
6
1
1
21
78
18
2
1
25
1
7
22
263 O 128
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 17.—Showing the Citizenship of First Admissions from
January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Citizenship
Male
Female
Total
Canadian by birth-
British born who have resided in Canada five years or more-
British born who have resided in Canada less than five years..
Alienborn (naturalized)..
Alien born who have resided in Canada five years or more (not naturalized)..
Alien born who have resided in Canada less than five years	
Unknown    	
Totals..
72
12
~9
10
4
1
108
113
20
3
11
2
6
155
185
32
3
20
12
10
1
263
Table No. 18.—Showing the Religion of First Admissions from
January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Religion
Male
Female
Total
19
5
3
1
1
2
9
2
1
2
"   3
27
22
1
8
2
33
8
1
" 2
11
3
~~i
i
8
35
23
2
26
52
13
1
3
2
1
1
2
20
5
1
4
1
11
62
45
3
34
2
Totals                      .           	
108
155
263
Table No. 19.—Showing Age-groups of First Admissions from
January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Age-group
Male
Female
Total
Under 15 years..
15-19 years.. _.
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
45-49
50-54
55-59
60-64
65-«9
70 years and over-
Totals	
1
1
2
6
6
12
16
20
36
19
20
39
13
33
46
11
22
33
8
14
22
14
14
28
8
10
18
5
2
7
2
6
8
5
7
12
	
■—
108
155
263 STATISTICAL TABLES—CREASE CLINIC
O 129
Table No. 20.—Showing the Previous Occupations of First Admissions from
January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Occupation
Male
Female
Total
Artist, commercial  _	
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
5
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
27
9
2
2
1
1
1
2
3
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
......
2
1
2
2
1
15
1
......
107
1
5
5
7
4
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
Book-keeper     	
1
Butcher  	
1
3
1
2
Clerk	
7
1
3
1
Conic-
1
1
15
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
107
1
27
1
9
2
2
1
1
1
2
3
1
5
5
1
2
I
2
1
2
2
2
2
7
1
Student                   —	
9
1
Tailor                     —                                       	
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
Totals       _ _  *	
108
155
263
Table No. 21.—Showing the Method of Commitment of First Admissions
from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Method of Commitment
Male
Female
Total
By special Order in Council from the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale	
14
54
40
26
79
50
40
133
90
Totals         - 	
108
155
263 O 130
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 22.—Showing Rural-Urban Status of First Admissions by Psychoses
from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Psychosis
Total
M.      F
Rural
M.      F.
Urban
M.      F.
Schizophrenic disorders	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states..
Senile psychosis ..
Pre-senile psychosis  	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis-
Alcoholic psychosis.
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology..
Psychosis with psychopathic personality...
Psychosis with mental deficiency	
Psychoneurosis.-
Syphilis and its sequelae .
Undiagnosed 	
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality-
Immature personality	
Alcoholism 	
Drug addiction.
Primary childhood behaviour disorders-
Mental deficiency-
Other and unspecified character,  behaviour,  and intelligence
disorders— —   	
Epilepsy-
Observation without need for further medical care—mental-
Totals  	
70
9
7
1
1
2
49
1
108
155
126
10
7
1
1
5
6
9
1
2
78
5
263
1
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52
64
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C O 132
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table No. 24.—Showing Duration of Last Hospital Residence of Discharged
Patients by Psychoses from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Psychosis
Totals
M.
F.
T.
15
23
38
4
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
6
6
1
1
13
15
28
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
1
2
....
....
2
40
54
94
Less than
1 Month
M. | F.  | T.
I        I
Less than
2 Months
M.
Less than
3 Months
M.
Less than
4 Months
M.
Schizophrenic disorders    _	
Manic-depressive reaction	
Involutional melancholia  	
Paranoia and paranoid states 	
Senile psychosis  	
Pre-senile psychosis  	
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis	
Alcoholic psychosis __ 	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology	
Psychosis with psychopathic personality	
Psychosis with mental deficiency	
Psychoneurosis   _.__
Syphilis and its sequelae   	
Undiagnosed 	
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality   	
Immature personality 	
Alcoholism   	
Drug addiction  	
Primary childhood behaviour disorders _	
Mental deficiency  	
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
and intelligence disorders  	
Epilepsy    	
Observation without need for further medical
care—mental.. ___ —	
Totals — -
11 i
i
10 | 24 J 34
1  I
...  |
1
16
38
Table No. 25.—Showing Conditions of Patients on Discharge by Psychoses
from January 1st, 1951, to March 31st, 1951
Psychosis
Total
M.
F.
Recovered
I
M. I F.
I
Improved
I       I
M. I F. I T.
Unimproved
M. I F.
I
T.
Without
Psychosis and
Unclassified
M. I F.
I
Schizophrenic disorders 	
Manic-depressive reaction _	
Involutional melancholia	
Paranoia and paranoid states .
Senile psychosis  	
Pre-senile psychosis _
Psychosis with cerebral arteriosclerosis ,
Alcoholic psychosis	
Psychosis of other demonstrable etiology..
Psychosis with psychopathic personality—
Psychosis with mental deficiency	
Psychoneurosis.
Syphilis and its sequela..
Undiagnosed	
Without Psychosis
Pathological personality„
Immature personality	
Alcoholism   	
Drug addiction.
Primary childhood behaviour disorders .
Mental deficiency-
Other and unspecified character, behaviour,
and intelligence disorders  	
Epilepsy.
Observation without need for further medical
care—mental 	
Totals-
40
15
54
94
17
26
10
16
22
14
38
11
12
23 statistical tables—crease clinic
Table No. 26.—Showing Readmissions from January 1st, 1951, to
March 31st, 1951
One male readmission from Nelson, B.C.
.   Border-line intelligence.
Age, 14 years.
Single.
Voluntary commitment.
O 133
Patients' Christmas dance, Essondale. O 134
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Construction of Pennington Hall, Essondale. BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT O 135
PART II.—FINANCIAL
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith for your consideration the financial reports of the
Provincial Mental Health Services of British Columbia for the year ended March 31st,
1951, which includes various financial statements and tables.
It will be noted that while the medical section of the Provincial Mental Hospitals
Report shows the daily average population as 4,637.11, as against 4,495 during the
previous year, the financial section uses a population figure of 4,476.61. This difference
is due to the transfer of Mental Hospital patients to wards of the Crease Clinic for
various periods to enable us to make necessary alterations and redecorate some of the
Mental Hospital wards. In order to secure an accurate figure of per capita costs, it was
therefore necessary to subtract the transferred number of patients from the population
figure of the Mental Hospitals and add them to the population figure of the Crease Clinic
during their period of residence at the Clinic.
Gross operating costs for the three Mental Hospitals amounted to $4,889,119.57,
as against $4,777,770.92 in 1949-50, resulting in the average daily per capita cost rising
from $2.91 to $2.99. This increase of 8 cents per day is considered as being well within
the confines of generally increased costs due to rising prices.
Patients' maintenance collections, including collections for the Crease Clinic,
amounted to $556,193.50, as compared with $542,137.14 collected during the previous
year.
Dairy produce, meats, fruits, and vegetables to a value of $281,027.14 were purchased during the year from Colony Farm.
A total of $343,668.98 was expended on equipment, personnel, and staff training
under projects approved by the Dominion mental-health grants for the Province of
British Columbia, the major portion being expended for staff and the training of staff.
A statement detailing this expenditure is given in the financial statement.
On January 1st, 1951, the Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine was opened to
patients under the new " Clinics of Psychological Medicine Act." Included in the
financial report is a summary of costs for the year covering the operation of the Clinic.
As mentioned above, four wards of the Clinic were in use from April, 1950, until
December, 1950, to house patients from the Mental Hospital, while renovations were
being made to their quarters. While these patients were not officially patients of the
Clinic, they are included in the population figures used in the financial tables, as all the
costs for their maintenance and treatment while at the Clinic were borne by that
institution.
As is usual in the opening of a new unit, the initial per capita costs are somewhat
high, and in the case of the Crease Clinic the gross per capita cost amounts to $7.47 per
day. It is anticipated that this will level off somewhat as the population increases.
However, the very active treatment programme being carried out for the patients in the
Clinic will no doubt tend to keep the per capita costs comparatively high.
The financial statements and tables covering the operations of the Homes for the
Aged at Port Coquitlam, Vernon, and Terrace are also included in this report.
On October 3rd, 1950, 153 male patients were transferred from Essondale to the
new 300-bed Home for the Aged at Terrace.   This former military hospital had been O  136 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
completely renovated to meet our needs. As a result of opening this new institution, our
average daily population for the Homes for the Aged increased from 582.72 in the
previous year to 690.23. The gross maintenance expenditure for the three institutions
increased from $589,103.21 in 1949-50 to $821,151.49 for the year under review,
while the daily per capita cost increased from $2.77 to $3.26. This sharp rise was in
part due to the initial expenses incurred in the opening of the Terrace unit, which also
includes the cost of the special train required to transfer the patients.
The over-all gross per capita cost for the treatment and care of patients in the
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale; The Woodlands School, New Westminster;
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz; Crease Clinic; and the three Homes for the Aged
amounted to $3.19 per day, while the net per capita cost was $2.80 per day.
The year under review has been a most active one, and one I feel in which we have
made considerable progress. At Essondale the main items of interest were the opening
of the Crease Clinic for the treatment of patients under the " Clinics of Psychological
Medicine Act " on January 1st, 1951; the commencement of construction on the recreation building and on the new coal-storage facilities at the boiler-house; the installation
of a new and modern dental clinic in the West Lawn Building and the completion of an
extension to the bake-shop. The Centre Lawn Building was completely renovated, and
a new tile floor was laid and dish-washing facilities installed in the dining-room on
Ward C 4. Plans are being prepared for a new infectious unit and a new stores and
laundry building. It is hoped that work on these two new units will start in the next
fiscal year. Also at Essondale we started a new cooks' training programme that is
working out most satisfactorily.
At The Woodlands School, New Westminster, the new 100-bed unit was opened
on April 1st, 1950, and on February 5th, 1951, work was started on three new 100-bed
units. A small modern Radiology Department was installed in the Administration
Building, and work was started on converting the patients' old dining-room into a
modern cafeteria for the staff.
At the Homes for the Aged work began on a new 100-bed unit at Port Coquitlam
during the year, and, as already mentioned, the military hospital at Terrace was completely renovated and opened as a Home for the Aged on October 5th, 1950. W. E.
Skillicorn, cashier in the business office at Essondale, was appointed supervisor of this
unit.
I regret to advise that T. A. Morris, Deputy Business Manager at the Provincial
Mental Home, Colquitz, retired on April 30th, 1950, owing to ill-health. Mr. Morris
was succeeded by S. A. Inrig.
F. Gillard, of the business office at The Woodlands School, retired on superannuation on May 31st, 1950.   He was succeeded by W. O. Booth.
A separate report has been prepared covering the operation of Colony Farm.
In closing, I would like to express my appreciation of the many courtesies shown
and the close co-operation that has been maintained between the various departments
of the Government and of the hospitals at all times.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
F. A. Matheson,
Business Manager. BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT O 137
PSYCHOPATHIC DEPARTMENT
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1951
Salaries  $45,364.73
Office supplies  1,551.81
Telephone and telegraphs  1,082.73
Travelling expenses  7,503.09
Fuel, water, light, and power :  1,019.11
Incidental expenses  2,197.41
Cost-of-living bonus  10,409.16
$69,128.04
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population; Essondale, 76.53 per cent; New Westminster,
17.06 per cent; and Saanich, 6.41 per cent. • •
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1951
Salaries . .  $55,655.00
Office supplies  3,035.38
Travelling expenses :  657.45
Incidental expenses  130.05
Cost-of-living bonus .  11,822.16
$71,300.04
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population: Essondale, 76.53 per cent; New Westminster,
17.06 per cent; and Saanich, 6.41 per cent. O 138
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
FINANCIAL TABLES
MENTAL HOSPITALS
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each Year,
the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and Gross per Capita Cost
(For Past Ten Years)
Year
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Per Capita
Cost
1941^12,
1941-42,
1941^.2,
1942-43,
1942-43,
1942-43,
1943-44,
1943-44,
1943-44,
1944-45,
1944-45,
1944-45,
1945^16,
1945-46,
1945^(6,
1946^17,
1946-47,
1946-47,
1947-48,
1947-48,
1947^18,
1948-49,
1948^19,
1948-49,
1949-50,
1949-50,
1949-50,
1950-51,
1950-51,
1950-51,
New Westminster..
Essondale 	
Saanich	
New Westminster1
Essondale	
Saanich 	
New Westminster..
Essondale	
Saanich	
New Westminster..
Essondale	
Saanich	
New Westminster-
Essondale — _
Saanich	
New Westminster..
Essondale— 	
Saanich- 	
New Westminster..
Essondale	
Saanich	
New Westminster...
Essondale	
Saanich	
New Westminster.
Essondale	
Saanich	
New Westminster..
Essondale..	
Saanich	
607.40
2,976.62
286.40
605.17
3,042.06
284.06
601.15
3,047.75
279.61
606.25
3,072.84
277.87
610.36
3,163.61
283.67
626.29
3,217.03
286.48
628.00
3,275.41
290.31
631.75
3,394.08
287.76
650.83
3,556.78
287.02
763.81
3,425.98
286.82
$265,107.15
1,080,329.80
134,961.02
286,077.54
1,157,787.55
146,898.22
306,150.79
1,317,789.96
163,226.64
373,672.82
1,558,923.64
207,979.27
433,041.89
1,769,363.15
210,798.32
497,945.37
2,117,563.62
231,894.65
662,357.80
2,622,349.15
298,773.55
800,776.92
3,162,819.02
356,110.21
891,944.27
3,500,902.41
384,874.24
1,081,062.76
3,419,312.37
388,744.44
$436.46
362.93
471.23
472.72
380.59
517.14
509.28
432.38
583.77
616.37
507.32
748.48
709.49
559.29
743.11
795.07
658.24
809.46
1,054.70
800.62
1,029.15
1,267.55
931.86
1,237.52
1,370.55
984.29
1,340.93
1,415.35
998.05
1,355.36
1 Maintenance expenditure includes cost-of-living bonus paid employees,
years' reports.
This is also included in all subsequent FINANCIAL TABLES
O 139
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o\ ^ ^ O 140 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Table C.—Summary Statement Showing the Gross and Net per Capita
Cost of Patients in the Three Institutions
Gross operating costs—
New Westminster  $1,081,062.76
Essondale     3,419,312.37
Saanich        388,744.44
Gross cost for the three institutions  $4,889,119.57
Less collections remitted to Treasury       512,176.64
Net cost for the three institutions  $4,376,942.93
Daily average population for the three institutions     4,476.61
Gross per capita cost, one year  $1,092.15
Gross per capita cost, one day         $2.99
Net per capita cost, one year.      $977.74
Net per capita cost, one day         $2.68 FINANCIAL TABLES
O 141
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■3*2 O 144
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
Remarks
New Westminster        Essondale
Saanich
Total patients in residence, March 31st, 1951..
Daily average population for one year	
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year-
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day	
790
763.81
$1,415.35
$3.88
3,465
3,425.98
$998.05
$2.73
283
286.82
$1,355.36
$3.71
Revenue of Mental Hospitals for Past Ten Years
1941-42  $238,532.90
1942-43     261,986.32
1943-44     322,522.87
1944-45     317,735.15
1945-46     350,163.87
1946-47  $339,561.71
1947-48     350,995.41
1948-49     477,680.57
1949-50     542,137.14
1950-51     534,185.06
Expenditures Made under Dominion Mental-health Grants for Province
of British Columbia, Year Ended March 31st, 1951
Crease Clinic—
Equipment   $48,643.52
Staff and personnel training     75,297.26
  $123,940.78
Mental Hospital, Essondale—
Equipment  .  $22,071.30
Staff and personnel training     73,993.90
Mental Hospital, New Westminster-
Mental Home, Colquitz—
Equipment
-Equipment
Staff and personnel training
Child Guidance Clinic, Vancouver—Staff ._
University of British Columbia—Training equipment
National Film Board mental-health film	
Vancouver General Hospital
$918.07
6,756.00
City of Vancouver—Staff and supplies
City of Victoria—Staff and supplies ...
General personnel training—
Teachers 	
Social service	
Short-term postgraduate
$7,030.50
12,428.54
287.23
96,065.20
7,328.98
7,674.07
5,826.00
25,375.30
4,158.11
3,695.82
11,094.53
4,402.42
19,746.27
Total
$309,307.48 FINANCIAL TABLES O 145
CREASE CLINIC OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
Summary of Costs for Year Ended March 31st, 1951
Salaries and Per Capita
Expenses Cost
Office, stores, and general       $6,814.72 $35.40
Medical care      38,093.83 197.87
Nursing and ward services     245,662.80 1,276.04
Dietary       111,638.66 579.88
Light, water, heat, and power      21,300.00 110.63
Laundry  :         6,000.00 31.16
Cars and trucking         2,471.40 12.84
Occupational and recreational therapy            480.93 2.50
Miscellaneous          2,411.88 12.53
Maintenance and repairs       18,605.72 96.64
Cost-of-living bonus        71,776.93 372.83
Gross cost  $525,256.87 $2,728.32
Less revenue, maintenance collections       22,008.42 114.32
Net cost  $503,248.45 $2,614.00
Remarks
Total patients in residence, March 31st, 1951  170
Daily average population for year 1950-51        192.52
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year  $2,728.32
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day  $7.47
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year  $2,614.00
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day  $7.16 O 146
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT. 1950-51
HOME FOR THE AGED, PORT COQUITLAM
Summary of Costs for Year Ended March 31st, 1951
Office, stores, and general
Medical care	
Salaries and
Expenses
  $400.86
  13,934.42
Nursing and ward services  181,675.40
Dietary    114,363.67
Light, water, heat, and power  37,181.64
Laundry   4,920.00
Cars and trucking  3,536.01
Incidentals and unforeseen .  1,957.62
Maintenance and repairs  23,143.88
Cost-of-living bonus   56,168.70
$437,282.20
Gross cost	
Less revenue, maintenance of patients       128,034.26
Net cost   $309,247.94
Per Capita
Cost
$1.04
36.22
472.20
297.25
96.64
12.79
9.19
5.09
60.15
145.99
$1,136.56
332.78
$803.78
Remarks
Total patients in residence, March 31st, 1951  385
Daily average population of year 1950-51 _.  384.74
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year  $1,136.56
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day  $3.11
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year  $803.78
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day  $2.20
Average Number of Patients in Residence, Total Amount Spent
for Maintenance, and Gross per Capita Cost, 1941-51
Year
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Gross per
Capita Cost
1941^12    _	
125.42
130.32
129.78
132.25
137.10
202.44
326.75
372.03
380.15
384.74
$71,757.77
83,029.63
81,597.78
103,626.48
114,337.96
138,802.91
243,861.27
339,606.91
374,093.25
437,282.20
$572.14
1942-43     	
1943-^4 _            	
1944-45 ....                           	
1945-46
833.87
685 65
1946-47
1947-48
1948-49    	
1949-50             	
912.85
984 07
1950-51  	
1,136 56 FINANCIAL TABLES
O 147
HOME FOR THE AGED, VERNON
Summary of Costs for Year Ended March 31st, 1951
Salaries and
Expenses
Office, stores, and general  $3,573.49
Medical care  12,678.88
Nursing and ward services  69,212.06
Dietary  .  73,293.40
Light, water, heat, and power
Laundry 	
Incidentals and contingencies _
Maintenance and repairs	
Cost-of-living bonus	
Gross cost	
  12,537.61
  20,941.58
  4,539.90
  22,589.26
  25,486.84
  $244,8 5 3.02
Less revenue, maintenance of patients  77,018.09
Net cost
$167,834.93
Per Capita
Cost
$15.44
54.79
299.08
316.71
54.18
90.49
19.62
97.61
110.13
$1,058.05
332.81
$725.24
Remarks
Total patients in residence, March 31st, 1951.
Daily average population for year 1950-51	
  221
        231.42
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year  $1,058.05
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day  $2.90
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year      $725.24
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day  $1.99
Average Number of Patients in Residence, Total Amount Spent
for Maintenance, and Gross per Capita Cost, 1948-51
Year
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Gross per
Capita Cost
1948-49 _ _	
119.68
202.57
231.42
$150,706.50
215,009.96
244,853.02
$1,259.24
1949-50     _    . . _	
1,061.41
1950-51  _ 	
1,058.05 O 148 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
HOME FOR THE AGED, TERRACE
Summary of Costs for Year Ended March 31st, 1951
Salaries and Per Capita
Expenses Cost
Office, stores, and general       $6,417.97 $86.65
Medical care        ,3,048.14 41.15
Nursing and ward services       29,629.80 400.02
Dietary ....       31,007.44 418.62
Light, water, heat, and power       14,973.40 202.15
Laundry  .         2,660.95 35.93
Cars and trucking         1,234.09 16.66
Incidentals and contingencies       21,552.10 290.97
Maintenance and repairs       18,062.41 243.86
Cost-of-living bonus       10,429.97 140.81
Gross cost  $139,016.27 $1,876.82
Less revenue, maintenance of patients       24,646.71 332.75
Net cost  $114,369.56 $1,544.07
Remarks
Total patients in residence, March 31st, 1951  150
Daily average population for year 1950-51  74.07
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year  $1,876.82
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day  $5.14
Net maintenance per capita cost, one year  $1,544.07
Net maintenance per capita cost, one day  $4.23
SUMMARY STATEMENT SHOWING THE GROSS AND NET PER CAPITA
COST OF PATIENTS IN THE THREE INSTITUTIONS
Gross operating cost—
Port Coquitlam   $437,282.20
Vernon      244,853.02
Terrace     139,016.27
  $821,151.49
Less collections remitted to Treasury     229,699.06
Net cost of the three institutions  $591,452.43
Daily average population of three institutions  690.23
Gross per capita cost, one year  $1,189.68
Gross per capita cost, one day < .... $3.26
Net per capita cost, one year  $856.89
Net per capita cost, one day  $2.35 COLONY FARM
PART III.—COLONY FARM
O 149
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT ON COLONY FARM
A. M. Gee, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Health Services,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith please find profit and loss account and other financial statements
and reports covering the operation of Colony Farm for the fiscal year ended March 31st,
1951.
Farm profit for the year, after providing for all operating costs, amounted to
$11,887.09, as compared to a profit of $32,671.03 for the previous year. The decrease
in profit, amounting to $20,783.94, is made up primarily of a reduction in revenue from
the potato-crop due to decreased prices and to an increase in Farm maintenance expenditures and additional cost-of-living bonus payments.
A considerable amount of maintenance and repair work was again done on the
farm dykes, and they are now considered to be in fairly good condition.
I am pleased to report that in March, 1951, tenders were called for the new dairy
and milking barn. When this building is completed, the Colony Farm will once more
be in a position to adequately look after our very valuable dairy herd.
Colony Farm continues to supply Essondale and The Woodlands School with a high
quality of milk, vegetables, pork products, and canned goods of all kinds.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
F. A. Matheson,
Business Manager.
PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT FOR YEAR
ENDED MARCH 31
st, 1951
Department
Debits
Credits
Loss
Gain
$129,382.14
5,242.23
90,171.92
53,993.26
24,030.53
11,970.99
5,284.12
74,081.78
29,299.35
26,971.25
$136,636.73
5,534.00
123,063.37
61,956.87
48,099.35
17,026.00
5,342.50
3,080.22
61,575.62
$7,254.59
291.77
32,891.45
7,963.61
24,068.82
5,055.01
Trucks                                	
58.38
$71,001.56
32,276.27
26,971.25
Totals   _	
$450,427.57
$462,314.66
$97,972.81
$109,859.90
97,972.81
Profit for trip year
	
$11,887.09 O 150 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
DAIRY AND HERDS DEPARTMENT
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1951
Receipts
By sales—
Live animals  $24,136.02
Beef supplied to institutions  3,580.06
Dairy produce  106,921.65
By credit for manure  3,350.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1951  89,279.00
Expenses
Salaries and upkeep  $46,921.81
Feed .  80,415.33
Horse-labour  493.00
Trucking  1,090.00
Tractor work  462.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1950  90,630.00
$227,266.73
220,012.14
Profit      $7,254.59
WORK-HORSE DEPARTMENT
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1951
Receipts
Two horses sold        ...
      $150.00
Horse-labour charged to crops, etc.—
     5,334.00
Credit for manure    	
          50.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1951	
        550.00
Expenses
$6 094 no
Salaries and upkeep   .   . .   ...   ..
  $3,470.23
Feed and pasturage. .. 	
...     1,382.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1950	
        940.00
c 7rp o5
Profit                    	
      $291.77 COLONY FARM O 151
HOG DEPARTMENT
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1951
Receipts
By sales—
Live hogs  $11,483.66
Pork supplied Essondale Hospital     79,542.82
Pork supplied New Westminster Hospital (Woodlands
School)        6,540.49
     $97,566.97
By credit for manure  600.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1951 ......      24,896.40
Expenses
Salaries and upkeep  $9,064.39
Feed . .  52,027.53
Light and power  800.00
Fuel   200.00
Horse-labour  1,094.00
Truck r  1,170.00
Tractor .'.  1,824.00
$123,663.37
$66,179.92
Inventory, March 31st, 1950     23,992.00
90,171.92
Profit .     $32,891.45 O 152
MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
CANNERY
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1951
Receipts
Supplies to—
Mental Hospital, Essondale  $48,082.60
       9,057.51
       4,356.95
  459.81
Woodlands School, New Westminster.
Mental Home, Colquitz	
Tranquille Sanatorium	
Salaries	
Repairs	
Fruit and vegetables	
Sugar, spice, etc	
Cans, crates, and containers.
Fuel	
Water	
Light and power	
Tractor-hauling	
Truck-hauling 	
Expenses
$4,980.00
485.39
24,243.95
8,527.32
9,635.10
1,300.00
500.00
1,200.00
1,934.00
1,187.50
$61,956.87
Profit
53,993.26
$7,963.61
ORCHARD AND TRUCK GARDEN
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1951
Receipts
Produce supplied to—
Mental Hospital, Essondale	
Woodlands School, New Westminster
Boys' Industrial School	
Colony Farm cannery	
Inventory, March 31st, 1951
Salaries, seeds, etc.	
Fertilizer, spray, and manure
Tractor work	
Trucking 	
Fuel	
Inventory, March 31st, 1950
Expenses
$29,295.95
3,396.70
30.00
3,428.10
$36,150.75
11,948.60
$48,099.35
$7,018.53
1,500.00
2,820.00
117.50
50.00
$11,506.03
12,524.50
24,030.53
Profit
$24,068.82 COLONY FARM O 153
FIELD CROPS AND PASTURAGE
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1951
Crop Acreage
Potatoes .:  72.0
Turnips  7.0
Oat hay  39.5
Silage  125.0
Onions ... 4.0
Pasturage   235.5
Costs
Horse-labour  $3,326.00
Tractor work .  9,042.00
Trucking   1,297.50
Manure   2,500.00
Fertilizer and spray  6,639.22
Seed and sets  5,174.63
Supervision   1,320.00
     29,299.35
Yield (Tons)
Yield per Acre
Value
1,019.00
14.14
$40,742.47   •
283.00
40.43
7,188.98
140.00
3.54
3,080.00
1,153.00
9.22
6,918.00
19.05
4.76
1,291.17
2,355.00
$61,575.62
Profit  $32,276.27
TRACTORS
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1951
8,513 hours' work at $2  $17,026.00
Expenses
Salaries and upkeep .  $10,236.36
Gasoline and oil       1,734.63
11,970.99
Profit. .     $5,055.01
TRUCKS
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1951
2,137 hours' work at $2.50     $5,342.50
Expenses
Salaries and upkeep .     $4,846.91
Gasoline and oil         437.21
      5,284.12
Profit  $58.38 O 154 MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES REPORT, 1950-51
GENERAL EXPENSES OF MAINTENANCE AND ADMINISTRATION
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1951
Salaries and miscellaneous expenses  $32,141.65
Horse-labour  627.00
Trucking   480.00
Tractor work  786.00
Gasoline and oil  316.49
Sundry  13.35
  $34,364.49
Proportion, Headquarters expense     $2,100.00
Repairs through Public Works Department     37,157.89
     39,257.89
$73,622.38
Less sundry credits  $10.50
Less gain on inventory of equipment _—       2,610.32
       2,620.82
$71,001.56
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.
Mental Hospital, Essondale—Produce Supplied by Colony Farm
for Year Ended March 3 1st, 1951
Dairy produce—
Milk, 855,695 lb  $49,501.73
Cream, 209.5 qt  180.19
Table cream, 1,658 gal      4,148.96
Meats—
Veal, 8,004 lb  $3,457.70
Hearts, livers, etc., 315 lb _.  122.36
Fresh pork, 226,136 lb  78,674.52
Pork plucks, 3,958 lb  868.30
$53,830.88
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh  $64,037.23
Canned     48,082.60
83,122.88
112,119.83
$249,073.59 COLONY FARM O 155
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES ETC.—Continued
The Woodlands School, New Westminster—Produce Supplied by Colony Farm
for Year Ended March 31st, 1951
Dairy produce—
Milk, 47,450 lb     $2,766.79
Cream, 104 qt  89.50
Table cream, 1,141 gal      2,839.72
      $5,696.01
Meats—
Fresh pork, 18,587 lb     $6,456.50
Pork plucks, 381 lb  83.99
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh  .  $10,659.55
Canned       9,057.51
6,540.49
19,717.06
$31,953.56
Accounts Receivable, March 31st, 1951
Sundry amounts due from live stock, etc., sold       $1,875.25
Remittances to Treasury
Sundry remittances to Treasury during year 1950-51 in payment of live
stock and produce  $368,989.42
Summary of Equipment Inventories, March 31st, 1951
Equipment in dairy  $4,430.50
Equipment in cannery —. 7,023.30
Horse and cattle barns and piggery  3,825.00
Farm implements   28,917.00
Pumping-stations and land-clearing  2,188.00
Butcher-shop  20.00
Carpenter-shop   1,047.05
Blacksmith-shop   825.00
$48,275.85
Orchard and Truck-gardens
Apiary supplies  $121.60
Plum-trees   1,715.00
Prune-trees   1,776.00
Pear-trees   1,523.00
Apple-trees   574.00
Cherry-trees   371.00
Rhubarb-clumps   3,000.00
Strawberry-plants   320.00
Vegetables on hand  960.00
Garden tools and equipment  1,588.00
$11,948.60 VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1951
520-1151-9892

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