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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL Provincial Game Commission REPORT For the… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1952

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Provincial Game Commission
REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1950
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game
Commission for the year ended December 31st, 1950.
G. S. WISMER,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., December, 1951. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., July 1st, 1951.
Honourable G. S. Wismer, K.C,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir, — We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended
December 31st, 1950.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
JAMES G. CUNNINGHAM,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
Game Commissioners. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Reports—
Game Commission     7
Officer Commanding "A" Division  11
Officer Commanding " B " Division  13
Officer Commanding " C " Division  18
Officer Commanding " D " Division  25
Officer Commanding " E " Division  30
Report of the Division of Biology—Game Management and Research, Chief
Game Biologist James Hatter  34
Report of Predator-control Branch—Supervisor of Predator-control W. W.
Mair  38
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-50, Inclusive  41
Summary of Total Revenue Derived from Sale of Various Licences, Collections,
etc., during Year 1950  41
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences    42
Revenue—Sale of Deer, Moose-Elk, Goat, and Pheasant (Game) Tags  43
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences  44
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms and Outfitters' Licences  45
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Anglers' Licences :  46
Revenue—Sale of Fur-traders', Taxidermists', and Tanners' Licences  and
Royalty on Fur  47
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-50, Inclusive  48
Comparative Statement Showing Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on Which
Royalty Has Been Collected, 1921-50, Inclusive  49
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on Which Royalty Was
Collected during Year 1950  50
List of Confiscated Fur, 1950, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur  51
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1950, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated
Firearms  52
Bounties Paid, 1950  53
Comparative Statement of Bounties Paid from 1922 to 1950, Inclusive  54
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees Paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1950  55
Prosecutions, 1950 . _• •_  56
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1950  58
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1950  59
Statement—Returns from Holders of Special (Trapping) Firearms Licences,
Season 1949-50  71
Statement of Vermin Destroyed by Game Wardens, 1950  71
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1950  72
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1950  73
Statement—Miscellaneous Receipts  73
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1950  74
Personnel of Game Commission as at December 31st, 1950  83  Report of the Provincial Game Commission, 1950
It is with considerable satisfaction that we submit this, our 1950 Annual Game
Report, because during the past year there has been a decided improvement in many
species of game and a very substantial increase in revenue. The total revenue was
$800,849.50. This sum includes an amount of $22,923.50 in fines, being an increase of
$4,775 in fines and an over-all increase of $64,150.36 compared to the revenue in the
calendar year of 1949.
The increase is due to several factors, but the bulk of it was brought about through
increased licence sales, as roughly set out hereunder:—
Kind of Licence Number Issued      Revenue Received
Non-resident anglers' licences  23,622 $142,614.00
Non-resident firearms (hunting) licences 2,634 64,174.00
Resident anglers' licences  76,934 76,934.00
Resident firearms (hunting) licences  73,022 270,185.50
Totals  176,212        $553,907.50
To say the least, these figures are alarming from a game-management standpoint,
because they show an increase of 14,029 licences over the previous year 1949 and a little
over 40,000 licences over 1948.
The big-game trophy-fee collections and royalties on fur were greater. No doubt
this was caused through a considerable improvement in the big-game situation and in the
fur market.
Needless to say, this increase in revenue is very gratifying, but along with increased
hunting and fishing pressure comes a very great need for further scientific control of our
game resources. Your Game Commission's programme along these lines, it might be
said, has been advancing very rapidly under the capable guidance and advice of Drs.
W. A. Clemens and Ian McTaggart Cowan of the Department of Zoology, University of
British Columbia, coupled with an increased appropriation for scientific work, which has
enabled us to enlarge the scientific branch of the Department. Dr. P. A. Larkin, Chief
Fisheries Biologist, and James Hatter, our Chief Game Biologist, have been provided with
assistants, and we have also made provision for the appointment of Regional Game
Biologists for Vancouver Island and the Interior. No doubt these appointments will be
made in the fiscal year 1951-52. There would appear to be no question that the appointment of biologists to carry out the many and varied problems confronting us is of the
utmost necessity.
Requests from Game Associations and other similar organizations for scientific
investigations are increasing. We have, wherever and whenever possible, published and
distributed copies of all scientific reports submitted by our biologists, and in these reports
are to be found scientific presentations under various headings.
Our Predatory-animal Control Branch, under the supervision of W. W. Mair, has
conducted a campaign against predators, but particularly coyotes, in the Southern Interior
sections of the Province, and the results obtained have been very gratifying. Your attention is drawn to the presentation made by Mr. Mair to be found later on in this report.
The game-checking station at Cache Creek, which has been operated for a number
of years, again provided us with a great deal of important information along with scientific
7 T 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
data that was exceptionally useful to our biological staff.   The 1950 records for Cache
Creek show that the following game animals, etc., were checked:—
Moose  1,589 Mountain-sheep  8
Deer  1,139 Ducks  7,134
Bear (black)   87 Geese  417
Bear (grizzly)  12 Grouse   6,442
Mountain-goat  47 Trout  11,805
The value of this checking-station is important, not only from a game-management
point of view, but also as a means of cementing more cordial relations with the general
public. The officers who were on duty at this checking-station were in a position to supply
valuable information, not only to the non-resident and resident sportsman, but to the
tourist as well. This checking-station has operated so satisfactorily that recently a strong
recommendation has been made for the placing of a similar station on the Hope-Princeton
Highway, as well as in a section of the East Kootenay District. Present finances, however,
will not permit any expansion along these lines.
The Department's relations with the organized sportsmen continue to be on a very
friendly basis. Every opportunity is taken to attend meetings of Game Associations, as
well as their regional conventions. As in past years, the Annual Provincial Game Convention was held, for the first time at the University of British Columbia, and it is felt
that we are on safe ground in saying that more than ever the value of this convention has
been quite apparent, because during the convention we were in a position to receive
representations not only from Game Associations, but from agriculturists, trappers, and
others. The complete minutes of the Annual Game Convention have been printed, and
each high school in the Province has been supplied with a copy of these minutes, as well
as the minutes of the past Provincial Game Conventions. The correspondence we have
had from a number of the principals from the various high schools would indicate that
these minutes have been very well received. It might be mentioned that, in addition to
supplying these minutes, we have accepted every opportunity to speak at different schools
in the Province, and also to show our wild-life pictures. There is a growing demand for
this form of wild-life education, and we have reason to believe that several additional films
will soon be donated for such use by the organized sportsmen. The films we have, and
the additional ones we hope to secure, will be used not only in connection with educational
work amongst the school-children of the Province, but will also be used by the Canadian
Forestry Association for showing to Junior Forest Wardens in different sections of British
Columbia. It might be mentioned that members of the Game Commission are on the
directorate of the latter-mentioned association.
PREDATORY ANIMALS
As previously stated, this Branch of the Department is now under the supervision of
W. W. Mair. The total predatory animals killed during the year amounted to 9,822
coyotes, 991 wolves, and 395 cougars. These figures show an increase of 2,975 coyotes
and a decrease of 89 wolves and 129 cougars from the previous year. The decrease in
cougars has been quite substantial since 1948, when the bounty claims on cougars reached
an all-time high of 725.
UPLAND GAME BIRDS
In 1950 there were 19,437 pheasants purchased from licensed game-bird farmers,
and a summary of the liberations made will be found in the statistical portion of this
Report. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 9
The advisability of extending or continuing the policy of purchasing and liberating
pheasants is being carefully studied and, as a matter of fact, at present is the subject of
a very extensive survey by our game biologists. The pheasant situation during the past
year has not been satisfactory. The pheasant population has been steadily decreasing,
not only in sections of this Province, but in other parts of the continent. We are, however,
not as yet in a position to give any satisfactory answer for the reason of this decrease.
Numerous causes have been suggested, however, such as over-shooting, poor hatching
conditions, loss of suitable habitat, inbreeding, disease, insecticides, and in some instances
it has been suggested that pheasants are also the subject of cyclic trends in the same
manner as grouse. As previously stated, we are exerting every effort to learn the cause of
this decrease.
On the Lower Mainland there are about 300 sections of suitable land for pheasants,
and when one considers that we have been attempting to provide pheasants for over
20,000 licensed hunters, this, no doubt, is the contributing factor to decreases in
pheasants.
The grouse season, as expected, was above average and will, we believe, continue so
for another season or two, as these birds are cyclic and have now about reached the peak
of the cycle.
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS
We had an average season for hunting of ducks and geese throughout the Province.
The split open season on the Lower Mainland was again in effect, and, no doubt, those
sportsmen frequenting the Lower Fraser River marshes and the Gulf shore enjoyed some
fair shooting, but there are growing objections from many sources, particularly in the
inland section of the Fraser Valley, against a split season. With these growing objections,
and the fact that the sportsmen are beginning to realize that split seasons deprive them of
fifteen days of hunting, there is reason to believe that the split season will not be
recommended next year.
Every indication points to a good season on brant along the coast. This game bird
is only found along the coast-line wherever suitable food is abundant, the principal places
being Boundary Bay, east and west coast of Vancouver Island, and a few isolated spots in
the Gulf of Georgia.
BIG GAME
Big-game conditions throughout the Province have shown improvement. Deer,
owing to improved winter conditions, came through the winter fairly well, and the hunter-
kill was much more successful than during the past season or two. However, as yet, deer
have not been as plentiful as in the past, and there is growing agitation among the organized sportsmen for a Province-wide one-deer bag-limit until such time as our deer
population returns to normal.
Moose have been fairly plentiful, but in some areas, forage is being overtaxed, and
a reduction in the number of moose in these areas would seem to be desirable.
Reports received from guides and trappers would indicate improvement in caribou
numbers to the south of the Canadian National Railway. These reports are encouraging
in view of the fact that caribou have not been too plentiful during recent years, and at
the moment the situation has not improved sufficiently to warrant an open hunting season.
The big game of the Province, as usual, was the attraction or the cause for bringing
into the Province a very desirable class of tourist. A total of some 90 grizzly bear, 123
black bear, 60 caribou, 379 deer, 238 mountain-goat, 90 mountain-sheep, 1,012 moose,
and 109 wapiti (elk), making a grand total of 2,101 big-game animals, was taken by
non-resident sportsmen, and this resulted in the sum of $88,145 being paid in trophy fees,
or an increase of $3,735 over the previous year. T 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
GAME-LAWS ENFORCEMENT
With increased hunting pressure, naturally comes a corresponding increase in
violations of the various Acts pertaining to game and fish, and this has resulted in 1,359
prosecutions being conducted, of which 1,337 were successful, and a total of $22,923
was collected in fines. A perusal of the statement on prosecutions appearing later on
in this Report will show that in spite of intensive patrols and checking on the part of
our field staff, there are a great many residents who will still insist on taking a chance
in hunting or fishing without licences, because prosecutions under this heading resulted
in some 265 charges being laid in regard to hunting and 249 for angling. The charge of
carrying loaded firearms in or discharging same from an automobile resulted in some 160
successful prosecutions. Speaking of prosecutions, we are very pleased indeed to advise
that increased support is being received from most Magistrates in the Province, who have
been assisting us admirably in our attempt to stamp out Game and Fishery Act violations.
In our last Report we mentioned the necessity of having regulations to control the
use of aircraft in hunting, fishing, or trapping, and we are very pleased to be able to report
that suitable regulations have been passed and have become law. It is too early as yet
to submit any report or opinion on the effectiveness of these regulations, but there is no
doubt that we will find it necessary from time to time to request amendments in order to
cope with the many problems that crop up in connection with the use of aircraft. It might
be mentioned we have had many requests from Game Departments across Canada and
in the United States for copies of these regulations, and there would appear to be no doubt
that the need for control of aircraft in the taking of game and sport fish is universal.
GAME-FISH CULTURE
This branch of the Department continues to expand. An idea of the importance
of maintaining our present supply of sport fish may be gained when one studies the licence
figures found later in this Report. During the year 1950 some 76,934 resident and 23,622
non-resident anglers' licences were issued, or a total of 100,556 licences against a total of
75,656 firearms or hunting licences. These totals show an increase of 11,841 anglers'
licences issued over the year 1949.
As suggested in our previous Report, provision was made in our appropriation for
1950-51 for the construction of a trout-hatchery in the Lower Cariboo section of the
Province, in the vicinity of Loon Lake, so that we could take care of the ever-increasing
demand upon the sport-fish resources of the Cariboo and Lillooet Districts. This hatchery
has been built and will be in production in the summer of 1951.
There is a growing demand for heavier liberations of fingerling trout in the Koote-
nays, Okanagan and Shuswap Lake areas, and we are endeavouring to take the necessary
steps to increase facilities at the Summerland and Nelson Trout-hatcheries to take care of
these demands for heavier stocking. Provision for constructing an independent water-
supply from that of the Summerland domestic supply will be taken care of during the
coming year in order to cope with the proposed output of our Summerland Hatchery.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Game Associations, farmers' organizations, Provincial and Dominion Government
Departments have been most helpful in our game-management work during the year, and
we wish to express our sincere appreciation for their co-operation. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 11
"A" DIVISION (VANCOUVER ISLAND, THE GULF ISLANDS, AND THE
MAINLAND COAST FROM TOBA INLET NORTH TO CAPE CAUTION,
INCLUDING THE ISLANDS ADJACENT TO THE EAST COAST OF VANCOUVER ISLAND NORTH OF CAMPBELL RIVER).
By G. C. Stevenson, Officer Commanding
I have the honour to submit my annual report covering game and fish conditions in
"A" Division for the year ending December 31st, 1950.
Big Game
Elk (Wapiti).—These animals continue to maintain their numbers without any
appreciable fluctuation. In the Oyster River area they are causing a certain amount of
damage to oat-crops. Strangely enough the bands of elk on the Island appear to limit
themselves to comparatively small areas and do not show an inclination to spread. The
food factor may be the limiting influence, but with the protection afforded these animals,
it appears strange that they do not widen their habitat. When a biological survey can
be made of elk, a better management programme can be arrived at. A survey will require
considerable time, as the animals are in widely separated bands. Shaw Creek Game
Reserve contains a very fair number of these animals, and facilities for observation there
are not too difficult.
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—Though many reasons have been advanced for the
decline in numbers of these animals, including predation by cougars (with emphasis on
increased bounties), the fact that three consecutive winters of exceptional severity,
coupled with the ever-increasing yearly hunting pressure, is, in my opinion, the principal
reducing factor.
I fail to see how our Island stand of deer can be increased except by much shorter
open seasons and a minimum bag-limit. The problem of winter range depends to a large
extent on logging operations and snow conditions, and little can be done in either case.
Bear (Black).—These animals are plentiful throughout the Island and have caused
considerable damage to orchards and stock in the Courtenay District. There is little
interest shown in hunting them.
Bear (Grizzly).—Quite numerous at the head of Knight and Loughborough Inlets.
Being somewhat off the beaten track for the average hunter, and the terrain being difficult,
they are not hunted to any extent in this Division.
Fur-bearing Animals
Fur-bearers in many parts of the Island are on the increase, especially marten,
weasel, and racoon. Snow conditions during the past three winters have prevented many
trappers from taking marten, hence a noticeable increase. Beaver show a definite increase
under the controlled method of trapping. Muskrats are not plentiful (not indigenous to
the Island), but show signs of multiplying in protected areas. Mink are plentiful, and
otter, though not plentiful, are in fair numbers.
Upland Game Birds
Blue Grouse.—These birds continue in considerable numbers in such areas as
Sayward Forest and the adjacent logged-off lands. Cowichan District and that part
known as Hillcrest, also contain large numbers of these birds. Hunting pressure on
blue grouse is increasing every year, but so far the harvest has not been affected.
A biological study of these birds was conducted during the early part of the year to study
parasitic diseases noticed in some of these grouse.
Willow Grouse.—Certain areas show an increase in the number of these birds, but
they are by no means plentiful. T 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Pheasants.—To be found in fair numbers, especially in the Saanich, Comox, and
Courtenay Districts. Owing to the limited areas where these birds may be released, it
is difficult to build up a large stock. Many farmers object to pheasants being liberated
on their lands, and others will not permit hunting over their fields. Much of the difficulty
has been caused by the hunting public, many of whom do not observe even elementary
courtesy toward the farmers, and in many cases go so far as to insult and abuse the landowners, to say nothing of damaging their property. The Game Associations are endeavouring to cope with the question by closer co-operation with the farmers.
Migratory Game Birds
This has been a good season for ducks and geese in this Division, and very fair bags
were obtained by hunters, considering the limited areas open to them. Brant were
showing up in moderate numbers toward the end of the season. The latter birds are to
be found in fair numbers in areas such as Sidney Spit, Qualicum, and Parksville.
Predator-control
A total of 191 cougar and 14 timber-wolves were destroyed during the year in this
Division. Of this number, 40 cougar were accounted for by Departmental hunters. The
latter answered many calls to destroy cougar in remote and sparsely settled areas. One
Departmental hunter destroyed 24 cougar, many of which were obtained in very difficult
and hazardous terrain.
Game Wardens, in the course of their patrols, destroyed many cats, hawks, owls,
crows, ravens, and a large number of racoon, the latter causing much damage to poultry-
farmers.   Many dogs found in the act of running deer were also destroyed.
Game Protection
There were 228 prosecutions under the " Game Act" and Fishery Regulations
during the year; of these, 226 were convictions, and 2 were dismissed.
Game Propagation
Pheasants were released in Saanich, Metchosin, Alberni, Nanaimo, Courtenay, and
Comox Districts during the year, but, as mentioned elsewhere, release areas are becoming
more difficult to find owing to the objections by many land-owners.
Game Reserves
Reserves are established at Strathcona Park, Shaw Creek, Bald Mountain, Elk Lake,
Elk Falls, and China Creek.   Of these, Shaw Creek contains a large band of elk.
Fur Trade
There is very little trading in raw fur carried out in this Division. Practically all
wild and fur-farmed pelts are disposed of in Vancouver and elsewhere.
Registration of Trap-lines
The system of beaver-tagging, together with the permit requirement for taking these
animals is showing excellent results. Trappers are becoming more and more conscious
of the beneficial results of controlled trapping and registration to protect their own
interests.
Registration of Guides
There are comparatively few registered guides in this Division, but indications are
that in the Campbell River and Cowichan areas more persons will be applying for guides'
licences, especially as the tourist industry increases. report of provincial game commission, 1950 t 13
Special Patrols
No special patrols were made during the year, but Game Wardens and predatory-
animal hunters covered several remote areas with good results in regard to enforcement
and predator destruction.
Hunting Accidents
July 28th, Merle Shaw, Alert Bay, accidentally shot herself with a .22 rifle in the
shoulder.   Not serious.
September 17th, Harold M. Hames, Courtenay, accidentally shot by Stan Cresswell
during grouse-shooting.   Pellets in face, leg, and arm.   Not serious.
October 8th, Charles R. Gilmore, Chemainus, accidentally shot by companion in
mistake for a deer.   Fatal.
November 19th, George Tabbenner, Duncan, accidentally shot himself by dragging
gun toward himself in rowboat.   Shattered right arm.   Serious.
November 23rd, William W. Barker, Sidney, aged 16, accidentally fell with shotgun,
blowing off part of finger.   Not serious.
December 9th, Kenneth Gouthier, Campbell River, accidentally shot in hip by .410
shotgun, when latter was knocked off shelf in camp.   Serious.
December 10th, Ronald Hilton, Courtenay, aged 16, accidentally shot by Laurence
Grey, aged 17. Dropped shotgun which discharged, striking Hilton in calves of leg.
Serious.
Game-fish Culture
Liberations of Kamloops trout were made from the Provincial trout-hatchery at
Courtenay in all lakes requiring restocking.
Summary and General Remarks
Game conditions in this Division during the past year have been good, considering
the hunting pressure. There was a general complaint regarding the scarcity of deer, and
there is no doubt these animals are not as numerous as formerly, due to a very large
extent to three consecutive winters of exceptional severity and the ever-increasing hunting
pressure. Sportsmen must reconcile themselves to the fact that as the number of hunters
increases and settlement takes place, so will the game decrease, unless much shorter open
seasons are recommended and bag-limits cut to a minimum. There is no magic formula
that can be adopted to make the deer population increase, and we must face the fact that
the day of long open seasons and big bag-limits has ended.
This Division has had excellent co-operation from the Provincial Police, and later
from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and I wish to express my appreciation to all
ranks for their unstinted assistance. The Game Wardens, Fishery Officers, and predatory-
animal hunters have carried out their duties to the Commission in a very thorough manner,
and to them I am duly grateful.
" B " DIVISION (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS)
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding
I beg to submit herewith my annual report for the year ended December 31st, 1950.
Big Game
Moose.—The hunting pressure on these animals is increasing and some alternation
in the open season is in order. Due to the accessibility of the moose areas by road and
the fact that moose frequent swampy areas, moose-hunting in the East Kootenay is on the
order of shooting domestic stock in a pasture. Setting back the season for two weeks or
more—when the valley swamps would be frozen and the moose have sought the uplands—
would give these animals a sporting chance and actually promote better recreation for the T 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
hunter. The East Kootenay can afford a fairly generous open season if it is not too early
in the fall.
Wapiti (Elk).—In good numbers in the East Kootenay and extending their range
westward to Kootenay Lake and the western slope of the Selkirks. These animals, due
to their high range, can stand a fairly long open season, as, similar to the mule-deer, they
do not seek the valleys until forced down by deep snow.
The planting of elk made at the north end of Kootenay Lake in 1948 appears to be
doing well, with an increase noted in the number of young animals. However, it is still
too early to say whether or not, due to snow conditions in that area, these animals have
become firmly established. Small elk populations exist as the result of plantings in the
Princeton area, and near Naramata at the south-eastern end of Okanagan Lake. The
open season was not productive of a large bag in either locality, although there is a fair
stock of animals at these points.
Caribou.—Little change is noted in the caribou stand in the Division, and in spite
of the six weeks' open season the bag was very light. This is accounted for to some extent
by the difficulty in hunting caribou at the higher elevations. Caribou appear to be confined to the areas contiguous to the Arrow Lakes and Kootenay Lake, and their lack of
numbers is somewhat of a problem. Neither scarcity of range nor the incursion of predators would seem to be the correct answer for no sign of substantial increase. Possibly
their numbers may be considered static for this Division.
Mountain-goat.—Well distributed and indicating a slow increase in the Boundary
and Similkameen Districts, particularly the Ashnola watershed, where a short open season
might be in order.
Mountain-sheep.—Still comparatively scarce in their former ranges of the East
Kootenay, and a very small number were taken in the open season. The two isolated
bands in the Vaseaux Lake area and along the Ashnola River do not present any marked
change, although a few rams might well be taken in either of these bands either by a short
open season or by a permit system.
Deer (Mule).—In spite of not being present in their former numbers, mule-deer are
well distributed throughout the Division. The same remarks apply to white-tailed deer.
Due to the toll of the last two severe winters, our deer population is probably lower than
at any time in the past twenty-five years. It is to be fervently hoped that we will be
favoured by favourable weather conditions for a sufficient period to build up their numbers again.   Of the two species, the white-tailed have been depleted most.
Bear (Black or Brown).—May be regarded as plentiful and well distributed throughout the Division. To a lesser extent the same notation would apply to the grizzly, although
they are not in such numbers as the black or brown bears.
Fur-bearing Animals
There has been little change in the registered trap-lines; any that have become
vacant have been promptly applied for; in fact, there is no vacant territory to be had, and
this in spite of the fact that for some years the prices of wild-caught fur have been very
low. It is noted that during the past year the price of most furs is on the up-grade.
Previously prevailing low prices did not offer any inducement for trappers to trap heavily,
and many of them have permitted their lines to replenish themselves. Lynx, marten,
mink, weasel, muskrat, and beaver are the most common fur-bearers, but fisher, wolverine,
otter, skunk, badger, and fox are comparatively scarce.
Upland Game Birds
Blue Grouse.—Quite plentiful during the past season.
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—Again seem to be on the up-grade, although it is not to
be expected that they will regain their former numbers in the vicinity of settlements.
Good roads, heavy hunting pressure, and the clearing of suitable cover, all contribute to
the depreciation of willow grouse. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 15
Franklin's Grouse.—Show little change, being fairly well distributed, with the
exception of the Cranbrook area.
Sharp-tailed Grouse.—These birds have shown a decided increase in the East
Kootenay, particularly in the Cranbrook to Windermere areas, and could again stand a
short open season. They are still scarce in the Boundary-Similkameen Districts, and it
does not appear as though they would again attain their former numbers in these localities.
Ptarmigan.—Found on the high mountains throughout the Division, but are negligible as game birds.
Pheasants.—A general and marked decline in the stand of these birds, particularly in
such former noted areas as Creston, Grand Forks, and the Similkameen Districts, is still
much of a mystery. If the prevailing impression is true that modern sprays and insecticides account for the depletion of pheasants, then the outlook is somewhat dismal.
Partridge.—Not very plentiful, although a few birds are present in the Similkameen,
Grand Forks, and Creston Districts. These birds also—like the pheasants—are not in
the abundance of former years.
Quail.—Fairly plentiful from Penticton to the United States Boundary, but this is
the only part of the Division where their introduction has been successful.
Migratory Game Birds
Geese (Canada).—The locally reared geese seem to remain late in the season, very
often after the freeze-up, a few remaining in the open water throughout the winter, presumably having lost their tendency to migrate. These have been fed by the Game
Department with apparent success.
Ducks.—Nested in considerable numbers in the Creston area and also in the
Windermere and Golden Districts. Possibly a thousand mallards, scaups, redheads, and
golden-eyes, and a few coots, winter in the Kootenay River at Nelson, being fed in severe
weather by the Game Department and local residents.
Coots.—Nested throughout the Division in large numbers. They are not sought by
hunters to any extent.
Snipe (Wilson's).—Migratory and present only for a few days each fall. Not
popular as a game bird.
Swans.—Occasional, remaining around the West Arm of Kootenay Lake or at Duck
Lake near Creston for a few days in spring, presumably en route northward.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds
Game wardens, during the year, accounted for 84 cougars, 172 coyotes, 8 bobcats,
38 domestic dogs, 101 wild domestic cats, as well as numerous crows, ravens, hawks, and
magpies, and also two predator bears.
Two predator-hunters, G. Haskell and M. Morigeau, have been specializing during
the year on coyote-control. Both of these men have been very successful cougar-hunters,
but it was felt that the coyote menace was in definite need of control; consequently, the
bulk of the cougar-hunting was left to the Game Wardens, while experiments were made
in controlling coyotes with traps, coyote-getters—a poison-container that works on the
principle of a trap—and outright poison.
Previous poison experiments with strychnine and cyanide were quite successful, and
accounted for a large number of coyotes, but with the use of 1080 a wider programme
was instituted.
Horses were slaughtered and treated with 1080, a new poison which is effective
among members of the canine family. These treated baits were placed throughout the
Division in various localities recommended by the local Game Warden where coyotes
were known to frequent. In any organized campaign of poisoning, the co-operation of
everyone is most necessary; consequently, no poison was put out except on private lands
with the consent and co-operation of the owner or on remote Crown lands.   In all cases, T 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
poison notices were displayed, and the poison baits were put in such a manner as to attract
only coyotes. These baits were kept under constant surveillance by Game Wardens or
interested individuals. All baits that were not consumed by predators were taken up and
destroyed by burning. To date we have not any specific figures to prove the success of
this method of coyote-control, but in every instance where coyotes have had access to
these poison baits, the absence of coyote tracks in the snow is fairly conclusive proof that
having once had a meal at the bait, the coyote was finished. In some cases the poisoned
coyotes have been found, but as the poison does not take effect immediately, although
it is ultimately certain, these animals are able to travel quite a way from where the bait
was taken. No doubt the Supervisor of Predator-control, W. W. Mair, will cover the
subject in more detail.
Game Protection
There were 209 prosecutions under the " Game Act" and the Special Fisheries
Regulations during the year, of which 10 prosecutions were initiated by the Provincial
Police.
Game Propagation
As usual, pheasants were released for restocking purposes in the Similkameen, Grand
Forks, and Creston areas, as well as a few birds at Nakusp. Feed was put out during the
winter in areas where pheasants, Hungarian partridge, or quail required assistance. Hay
was also distributed to deer in various localities, and in some cases cedar-boughs and
brush were provided in areas where the deer had browsed off the trees as high as they
could reach. This work was done by the Game Wardens during the winter, and much
gratuitous help was received from interested sportsmen.
Game Reserves
The Elk River Reserve, comprising the watershed of Elk and Bull Rivers, also the
White River, is the most important one, as it is situated in the heart of the big-game
country.
Game-bird sanctuaries adjacent to Nelson and at Vaseaux Lake, south of Penticton,
are also beneficial, and their establishment continues to meet with general approval.
Deer sanctuaries exist at Elko, Canal Flats, and in the Kettle River district. These
are located on the winter yarding-grounds of the mule-deer and serve as a haven for these
animals during unusual winter conditions late in the season, when they might otherwise
be too easily taken.
Fur Trade
While there are resident fur-buyers at various points in the Division, the bulk of the
raw-fur trade goes to Vancouver, very little being exported directly out of the Province.
Registration of Trap-lines
Nothing more clearly demonstrates the value of Provincial administration of trap-
lines than the number of applications that are continually being received at every Game
Office for trap-lines. These are at a premium at the present time, and no doubt will
continue to be so, as few trappers are willing to relinquish their trap-lines, which are, in
effect, large-scale fur-farms, even though the fluctuation in fur prices is sometimes
disappointing to the trapper.
Registration of Guides
There were 166 registered guides in the Division throughout the year. Most of them
reported a very successful season, and they were able to satisfy their clients, who are
nearly all from the United States. It is felt that there are now as many registered guides as
this area can well accommodate. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 17
Special Patrols
No outstanding patrols were made during the year, although routine patrols were
quite extensive. Patrols were carried out by car, launch, rowboat, horse-back, and on
foot continually during the year. A good many patrols to remote areas were in connection
with the liberation of trout fry or the planting of trout eggs.
Hunting Accidents
In May- 1950, C. M. Kirkendall, aged 16, of Deer Park, while hunting coyotes, accidentally shot himself in the hand with a .22 while climbing up some rocks. This wound
was not serious.
A. G. Ozjust, of Trail, accidentally shot himself in the toe while hunting near Nelson.
He claimed the rifle discharged accidentally, and this wound was not serious.
On November 5th, 1950, while hunting near Ta Ta Creek, Peter Ritco, of Oliver,
laid a gun in the back of the truck and it went off, the bullet going through the cab and
striking his hunting companion, Frank Howlett, in the back. Howlett died on the way to
hospital, and police action is pending against Ritco for negligence.
Summary and General Remarks
The game situation generally in this Division is not as good as it has previously been.
We have had three severe winters out of the past four, and two very severe winters in
succession. The winters of 1948-49 and 1949-50 were both very severe, due to heavy
snowfalls and continued cold weather. The deep heavy snow caused the deer to concentrate very closely, prevented their roaming freely in search of foliage, and made them
easy prey to coyotes and, in some cases, domestic dogs. The continued sub-zero weather
in many localities also contributed to the decline of these animals already weakened by
insufficient food. ; The Game Wardens reported numerous reports of both mule and white-
tailed deer that had died, in some cases, in small bands. We still have a lot of deer, but
probably not more than half as many as we possessed five years ago.
It is gratifying to report that the present winter of 1950-51 shows every indication
of being a very mild one, and at the present writing, February 28th, 1951, the prospect
of any inclement weather seems very remote.   All deer animals have wintered very well.
For some reason, mountain-goat appear to have suffered a decline. This is not
confined to any one locality, but has been reported from various parts of the Division.
Mountain-goat are still plentiful, but are not as readily observed as during the past few
years.   One suggestion is that the winters have also had their effect on these animals.
The stand of both moose and elk is still good and compares very favourably with
former years, in spite of a generous open season.
The decline of the pheasants has caused much concern, as these birds furnish a great
deal of sport in the Okanagan, Grand Forks, and Creston areas. However, we take some
consolation from the fact that the decline of pheasants is general over all the continent,
and if this is a cyclical recession, it is hoped that these fine sporting birds will soon be
on the up-grade again.
While this summary appears to be pessimistic, the case is not quite as black as one
might fear. Grouse are on the up-grade again, and during the year, although the open
season was short, good bags of grouse were obtained.
It should be remembered that in making annual reports in the past, attention has been
drawn to the fact that we had enjoyed climatic ranges that were most favourable—that is,
we had a series of mild winters and much freedom from fire, drought, floods, and
pestilence.
It is regrettable that during the years since World War II we have been visited with
climatic vagaries that were extremely hard on wild life. It is to be fervently hoped we
are now entering on a cycle of some beneficial seasons.   If so, our deer herds will rapidly T 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
replenish themselves because we have been waging war on the chief predators—cougars
and coyotes—during the past few years, and the depletion of these particular predators
should assist in the rapid recovery of our deer herds.
The hunting pressure increases yearly, and will probably continue to do so due to
the increasing population of the Province. Probably we can no longer afford to be so
free with both bag-limits and open seasons as in the past. We have already made a start
in reducing the elk-moose bag, and very likely in the future we will be compelled to ration
our game to a greater degree. A limited bag of game animals on a rotation basis would
be the most satisfactory solution.
The interest taken by the organized sportsmen's associations and their desire to lend
an attentive ear to the problems of game-laws enforcement is a very healthy augury that
we can work out a programme that will permit us to have a lengthy season during which
some species of game will always be open, even though we may not be able to take the
liberal bags of other days.
" C " DIVISION (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO,
CHILCOTIN, AND SQUAMISH DISTRICTS)
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in " C "
Game Division during the year ended December 31st, 1950.
Big Game
Moose.—This species is slowly but surely moving south into the Merritt district.
Several have been seen at Ludwig Lake, Siwash Meadow, and Burns Hill, 40 miles south
of Merritt on the Princeton Highway. In the Penask Lake area, Woodward Valley, and
along Guichon Creek, mostly cow moose with calves have been seen. From the winter
of 1949-50, which was one of the severest on record, moose emerged in fairly healthy
condition.   Wood-ticks did not appear to affect the big game.
Up to the time of writing this report, snowfall was normal on higher levels during the
open season and up to January 31st, 1951.
A report from the Wells Detachment indicated a shortage of calves during the late
summer months. Approximately twelve bulls were taken in this Detachment during the
open season.
In the Quesnel area, moose are in abundance in certain portions. Thousands of acres
of scrub timber and windfalls have been burned out, thus providing a possible additional
food-supply. A great deal of overbrowsing is still reported in parts of the Cariboo.
Perusal of questionnaires received from twenty guides in the Cariboo on the moose
situation indicates:—
(1) A lack of disease in moose.
(2) Scarcity of ticks.
(3) Conflicting reports of abundance of moose.
(4) Increased hunting pressure.
(5) Increased crop of calves.
(6) General scarcity of wolves in most areas.
(7) Moose moving in from one area to another in search of food.
(8) Overbrowsing prevalent in some areas.
In summing up these reports it would seem that the ecological factor is the all-
important one. Hunting pressure was more evenly distributed, but far from ideal. Owing
to the high cost of meat, large numbers of resident hunters visited the Cariboo, but confined their hunting activity to roadside search for big game. Where resident hunters hired
guides—and they are now doing so in increasing numbers—greater success was assured. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 19
One guide, spending much of his time in the hills, reported seeing black-bear cubs
feeding on moose calves in the Lac la Hache area. The majority of guides make the usual
report of fairly good hunting conditions for the first few days, but for the rest of the season
it has been described as from poor to mediocre hunting. One guide and assistants took
as high as 50 moose in one season and always in bottle-neck country, and other guides
took from 20 to 30 moose. In many cases it simply means that a good percentage of those
moose are prevented from reaching new areas where food-supply is more abundant.
Wolves scatter and drive more game than they actually kill into new areas where food
is more abundant.
Besides a southern movement of moose, there is also a heavier movement to the east
of the Cariboo, extending into the Salmon Arm area, especially around Lichen Mountain.
While the statistics gathered at the Cache Creek Checking-station are valuable, they do
not give or describe the continual trend in moose movement except during the open
season. Some interesting figures are furnished herein for 100 square miles around the
Sheridan Lake area in the Cariboo. These figures are for moose taken by clients under
guide control. Twenty-two guides obtained the following numbers of moose each year
from 1946 to 1950, inclusive: 1946, 114; 1947, 112; 1948,44; 1949,30; and 1950, 60.
During the last year, 1950, only seventeen guides operated within the 100 square
miles. The other five did not operate due to lack of business. There may be several
factors responsible for the decline in moose-kill:—
(1) Lack of food and consequent shift of moose in search of new browsing
areas.
(2) Non-resident hunters going to the Chilcotin country, where moose are
more numerous.
(3) Reduced number of American hunters due to economic and war developments.
The majority of moose killed to-day are small in antler spread as compared with
those killed seven years ago.   This year the average was 33.2 inches.
The percentage of success kills of moose by both residents and non-resident hunters
hiring guides was 64.4 and 62.2 per cent respectively for the entire Cariboo region. For
the Chilcotin country the success ratio was higher still, according to statistics compiled
by Lawson Sugden from the Cache Creek Checking-station records.
Resident hunters operating without a guide were less successful. The ratio dropped
to 21.9 per cent. The total moose-bag amounted to 1,591 for transient hunters. Due to
the increased hunting population of the Cariboo, a total of 4,000 animals would be an
all-round conservative figure for transient and resident hunters' kill, mainly in the Cariboo
region. In the Gang Ranch Block, comprising 120 square miles, with eleven guides and
eight assistants operating therein, a total of 113 moose was taken during the open season.
Bears.—From Cache Creek records 12 grizzlies were taken, mainly from the Cariboo
and Chilcotin country. Black bears were not quite so prevalent during the past year,
and few complaints were received from beef-growers of damage to stock. Around the
Batnuni Lake area in the Quesnel Detachment, grizzlies are prevalent. Guides are
available in this comparatively virgin area. Guides for grizzly-hunters around Quesnel
are limited in number.
In the Revelstoke area one guide counted 27 grizzlies in one locality. In the Big
Bend district a fair number has been seen.
Mountain-sheep.—This species was driven from high levels during 1949-50 because
of deep snow. No crust developed, but feed conditions were poor. Bobcats and other
short-legged predators were greatly handicapped. In some cases, mountain-sheep came
on to the highways followed by bobcats. In two or three cases, bobcats were seen attacking rams in their weakened condition. These predators seemed to seize sheep by the
throat, who were no match for the powerful bobcat.    Several bobcats were shot and T 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
trapped in the vicinity of Squilax and other areas. In the Squam Bay area at Adams Lake
a sheep-count has never been made with any degree of accuracy, due to the rough terrain.
Three rams were taken during the hunting season by hunters, one having a horn base of
16 inches.
In the Churn Creek basin, mountain-sheep should receive greater protection. It has
been suggested that two weeks be cut off the end of the season to give these sheep a chance
to come down to their wintering-grounds without, during the open season, being hounded
daily by hunters.
Wapiti. — In the Upper Adams River basin the numbers of wapiti are largely
uncertain. In the lower portion of this river this species winters with little interruption
or interference. A few have been seen at Albas and Malakwa. In the Paradise and Big
Gun areas of the Lillooet Detachment a few specimens are reported.
Deer.—In the Merritt area deer were scarce, due principally to the severity of the
previous winter. Kamloops area showed an increase, but in the Vavenby district a heavy
loss of fawns was reported. Two thousand deer-tags were sold in the Kamloops district,
where approximately 300 deer were taken.
In the Kelowna district the success ratio in the kill of deer was below normal, due
to adverse climatic conditions. In the Quesnel area it has been stated that deer are
definitely not as numerous as they were ten years ago. This part of the Division is being
slowly opened up for agricultural development, and not as many deer are seen. Around
Williams Lake deer are very scarce, but it seems that snow in all sectors of this Division
was late in arriving, and consequently deer remained almost everywhere on higher levels
until quite late in the season. During the severe winter conditions of 1949-50 the
powdery condition and considerable depth of the snow rendered ample protection to all
species of big game, with the possible exception of sheep and goats. Predators had a hard
time and no doubt suffered considerably.
Caribou. — There is a very definite need for a survey on caribou over the entire
Province. The strange lack of increase and the well-known tendency of the species to
keep out of reach of civilization still leaves the welfare of this species a largely enigmatical
problem.
In the Turn Turn Lake area, in the Upper Adams River district, a few have been
seen at timber-line east of the lake. In the Stevens Lake-Phillip Mountain region a few
were reported. The Upper Swift and Sovereign Creek areas in the Quesnel district have
a few remaining bands, and even in all the open-season areas very few of these animals
are ever taken. Only six caribou trophies passed through the Cache Creek Checking-
station from the entire Cariboo district during the open season.
There is a possibility that adverse weather conditions of a cyclic nature affecting the
food-supply plus the appearance of wolves and possible destruction of calves and, last
but not least, the intrusion of moose may play a part in the possible decline of the caribou
population. It is definitely known that caribou have largely disappeared from the Battle
Mountain country. This area is in the direct line of wolf travel, and more moose are
reported to the east of Battle Mountain, where caribou had very largely predominated in
the past.
Mountain-goat.—In the Shuswap-Columbia River divide, small bands are to be
found but are seldom hunted. They are fairly plentiful in the Cayoose and Tommy Creek
areas of the Lillooet Detachment. In the eastern part of the Williams Lake Detachment,
goats are quite prevalent. In the Albert Canyon area near Revelstoke the country is a
bit too rugged for the average non-resident hunter for goat-hunting. They are quite
numerous, according to reports.
Fur-bearing Animals
Beavers are showing an increase in numbers, due in a measure to the Beaver-tagging
Regulations and price medium.    All fur-bearers have shown an upward trend.    The REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 21
snowshoe rabbit is reported to be well on the up-swing, and it would appear that we are
entering a period of cyclic increase. In the Vernon District an estimate of 1,060 live
beavers on registered trap-lines is given.
In this Division we have followed the policy of granting beaver-tags to registered
trappers showing a population of more than 10 beavers. Trap-lines showing 10 beavers
and under but having a considerably greater potential do not enter the scheme until the
beaver population has increased. Beyond this limit we grant beaver-tags to cover 25
per cent of the live beaver population left on each line. Where the live beaver population
count is in doubt, the average catch over a period of five years is taken as an index figure.
The take of weasels in the Kamloops area has dropped from 2,000 during 1945 to
1,003 in 1949. The catch in squirrels has taken a considerable jump, due perhaps to the
price factor. From Divisional statistics the numbet of beavers trapped amounted to 833
over approximately 60,000 square miles.
A count of the number of active colonies of beavers would admittedly be a more
accurate estimate. It is extremely difficult or impossible to estimate transient beavers
on, say, a river. A consistent catch of beavers over a period of years might indicate the
extent of the transient beaver population.
Restocking the headwaters of streams flowing into our trout-fishing lakes with
beavers would soon produce bigger and better trout. Except during the spring freshets,
our streams to-day contain very little trout-food. The result, especially in our deeper
lakes, is smaller fish and a considerable dearth of larger aquatic insect life. The restoration of beaver-ponds at the headwaters of our streams would materially improve our
trout-fishing.
Upland Game Birds
The open season on pheasants in this Division produced the poorest results, relatively
speaking, in my thirty years' experience.
In this Division a census was taken during the winter of cock and hen pheasants
in the Kamloops, Vernon, and Salmon Arm districts. With the exception of Salmon Arm,
dogs were used to flush the birds. From two to three days were spent on each count and
eight Wardens were employed. The statistics are as follows, and are closely approximate:—
Kamloops
Salmon Arm
Vernon
42
5.12
4.00
1.12
163
53
52
7.101
4.401
2.701
229
140
100
7.17
Hens per square mile   —    	
6.03
4.14
603
114
1 Taken without use of dogs at feeding points.
To combat possible error, we should allow an increase of 25 per cent for Kamloops
and Vernon. The proportions of cocks to hens would be normal for these two districts.
Owing to the depth of snow at Salmon Arm, it was impossible to use dogs with satisfaction, especially in dense cover.
Approximately between 5,000 and 6,000 pheasants would be, in previous years,
a conservative figure in the Vernon district for a winter-time census. The Salmon Arm
and Kamloops districts would be in relative proportion in previous years to the figures
given for Vernon.
This startling situation is not due to hunting pressure, which has admittedly increased
in the last two or three years. Hen pheasants have, relatively speaking, largely disappeared, and no open season has ever been declared on these birds. Disease of some kind
may be responsible, possibly due to numerous factors, but more strongly suspected as T 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
a possible cyclic development. The bag-limit was disappointingly poor for cock pheasants,
and many hunters at the end of the season still retained their full quota of pheasant-tags.
A series of wet years with long periods of cloudy weather, followed by severe winters,
was more than any artificially raised birds could be expected to endure.
Birds raised in the coastal region are not accustomed to the type of winter we had
in the Interior during 1949-50, which was the severest and longest on record. Some 500
pheasants were banded and liberated in the Kamloops district from coastal areas. Only
two of these banded birds were killed by hunters.
Perusal of the grouse-kill taken from the Cache Creek Checking-station records
reveals a somewhat curious situation.   The count of kill taken by hunters is as follows:—
Ruffed grouse  4,653 Dusky blue grouse  298
Franklin's grouse  1,251 Sharp-tailed grouse  368
One would expect after a closed season, especially on blue grouse and including other
species, that the kill on blue grouse would be considerably greater. It seems evident that
the cycle as it affects blue grouse does not operate at the same time as for willow and
Franklin's grouse. I doubt if there is a scientific explanation covering a phenomenon of
this nature. However, reports of the Wardens seem to indicate that blue grouse and other
species were plentiful. Approximately 8,000 hunters visited the Cariboo region during
the open season for game. In other parts of this Division, grouse-shooting ranged from
good to mediocre.
Thirteen chukar partridges were released east of Kamloops early in September. Up
to the present (December 31st, last) none has been found by our Wardens.
Prairie-chickens show no appreciable increase.   A few scattered coveys are reported.
Migratory Game Birds
During the winter of 1949-50 approximately 4,000 mallards remained around the
Thompson River at Shuswap. Had it not been for a 30-acre field of corn left during the
winter, most of the ducks would have perished. Even as the ducks rose from the waters
of the Thompson River during the severe blizzards, ice began to accumulate on their feet,
and many were seen and found with chunks of ice attached. Feeding was carried out, but
the severe weather killed many of the ducks remaining. During the fall of 1950 around
2,000 mallards remained around the Thompson River. Some feeding was carried out
during the winter. A winter count of approximately 400 mallards was made at Shuswap
during November.
Waterfowl-hunting in the Cariboo was fair but not as good as 1949. A total of 7,134
ducks was taken by transient hunters passing through the Cache Creek Checking-station
from the Cariboo region during the entire open season. In other parts of this Division the
hunting was not at all good.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds
Eleven Game Officers killed the following noxious animals and birds:—
Coyotes   496 Crows  621
Wolves      12 Owls      60
Cougars     11 Magpies  328
Dogs (Wild)      57 Bobcats      10
Cats (Wild)   102 Bears     16
Hawks  118 Ravens      51
Eagles      33
Poison of the 1080 variety, which has been used in the United States for a number of
years with considerable success, was used in British Columbia this year for the first time.
This poison has no taste or aroma. Full details of its success will no doubt be published
by Supervisor W. Mair, who is in full charge of the predator-control in British Columbia. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 23
Favourable reports of the effectiveness of 1080 poison are slowly coming to our notice.
A few scattered bands of wolves are reported, but their numbers are not increasing.
Game Protection
Two hundred and ninety-seven prosecutions and 294 convictions were obtained by
seventeen Game Officers and personnel at Cache Creek Checking-station during the year.
Jeeps are now required to visit the out-of-way places. Hunters are presently using
these vehicles in ever-increasing numbers. Less road checking and more bush work
should be carried out. Camps used by guides should be marked on our maps and visited
regularly. Extensive checking of anglers took place everywhere. The Cache Creek
Checking-station is doing valuable work in accumulating statistics on hunting pressure,
bag-limits, antler spread, success ratio, etc. It is to be hoped that an up-to-date checking-
station will be established adjacent to the highway during the forthcoming open season.
Game Propagation
Chukar partridges were liberated east of Kamloops for the first time this year. Their
progress will be watched with interest.
Thirteen live beavers were shipped from the Bowron Lake Game Reserve for
liberation in various parts of this Division.
Game Reserves
Bowron Lake and Yalakom Game Reserves and Tranquille Sanctuary, and many
others of a lesser nature, are the stand-bys in an ever-increasing atmosphere of hunting
pressure. Additional parks are needed. The Forestry Service is apparently alert to this
need, and very definite progress is now being made by that department.
Fur Trade
The bulk of the fur trade goes to Vancouver. Some educational work could be
carried out by means of personal contact between trapper and fur-buyer. A convention
of trappers and fur-buyers should be held in the Interior. These two factions never meet
to discuss fur problems. Fur-buyers should take a greater interest in fur conservation.
Their interest should go beyond what passes over the counter in their business premises.
There is considerable room for development of this industry. Eight hundred and thirty-
three beavers were taken from this Division during the open season. Kamloops, Quesnel,
Vernon, Merritt, Wells, and Williams Lake supply the bulk of this catch.
Registration of Trap-lines
The system is comparatively trouble-free from confliction. A study of fur conditions
as they affect beavers has been carried on by students from our University. The idea is
a good one, involving a study of habits of those animals, food-supply, distribution, and
water-storage which to-day is a very important problem. I sincerely hope that further
studies under supervision of University authorities will continue and increase in volume.
Registration of Guides
While the registered areas, both individual and group, have passed their initial test
quite satisfactorily, there are still many problems to be settled. Control of the kill by
guides is imperative. There is too much lop-sided pressure despite readjustment of the
seasons, although it must be admitted that opening the season a few days ahead in one
district and late in another has helped. The system of reporting to the Game Department
before going on a hunting-trip by guides is one for administration, but up to the present
we have had considerable difficulty with failure on the part of guides to comply with
this section of the guides' regulations.   Where guides provide accommodation for non- T 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
resident hunters, they should by law be compelled to provide a register of all non-resident
and resident hunters.   This would simplify the difficulty to some extent.
We should, for the protection of non-resident hunters, ask that non-resident hunters
declare which guide they have hired. Eighty-five per cent of the non-resident hunters
arrange to engage a guide in advance, and it would be an easy matter to have these hunters
report either by mail on a simple form or leave same at the nearest Game Warden's office.
Special Patrols
No special patrols of any importance were carried out in this Division during the
year.
The use of aeroplanes could be encouraged, as against the older-fashioned and more
strenuous use of horses. Time is an important factor, and with no increase in staff on the
field over a period of twenty years at least, the problem of getting to one's destination
quickly is one of primary importance.
More non-resident hunters and anglers are now using aeroplanes. We should keep
abreast of the times in this respect. Jeeps are required to enable us to follow hunters
now making use of this type of vehicle.
Hunting Accidents
I am glad to report that there were no hunting accidents in " C " Game Division
during 1950.
Summary
The dry summer limited the food-supply for game on the lower elevations. Nesting
conditions were nearer ideal than in previous years, when wet years were the rule. Grouse
were more abundant than usual, especially the willow and Franklin's.
It seems evident, in the Cariboo at least, that the cyclic nature of blue grouse does
not coincide with those of the willow and Franklin's, which were comparatively abundant.
The fact that only 298 blue grouse were taken from the Cariboo region, in contrast with
4,653 willow and 1,251 Franklin's grouse, seems a bit difficult to understand. It is quite
true that willow grouse are largely roadside birds, and Franklin's to a considerably lesser
extent. However, the discrepancy in numbers between the kill of blue grouse and that
of willow and Franklin's is far too widely divergent to be passed over lightly.
A catastrophe happened this year to our pheasant population, which has never
occurred before in the experience of the Game Department. In the Vernon District, which
is typical of all other areas, relatively speaking, the winter-time census on pheasants was
reduced from thousands to mere hundreds. Several wet and cloudy years in a row, with
poor food-growth, in large sections of the Province, followed by prolonged and severe
winters, created a situation of a most unusual nature which, in one sense, could hardly
be called cyclic, since it is the first time a disaster of this kind has ever taken place. There
is a possibility, however, of periodic repetitions, since the phenomenon is Dominion-wide.
Newcastle disease took a toll of thousands of domestic chickens in coastal areas, but
there is no evidence that this disease ever hit pheasants in the Interior. A possible chemical deficiency in food-supply may have had a cumulative effect over the years on the
pheasant population.
Some very interesting statistical data have been compiled by Lawson G. Sugden
from the kill of moose and mule-deer passing through the Cache Creek Checking-station
from 1946 to 1950.
The moose situation showed some improvement in most areas. The wolf reports
are fewer, and only stray bands are reported. Disease in moose was seldom observed, and
ticks were few and far between. The season was a considerable improvement over that
of 1948. With the possible exception of pheasants and water-fowl, the season in the year
past was considered above average. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 25
In conclusion, I would like to thank the members of the Forest Service under Colonel
Parlow for valuable assistance rendered from time to time. To the Water Rights Branch,
Game Associations, R.C.M.P., and sportsmen interested in the welfare of our game
resources, may I extend my sincere thanks for co-operation and help in the manifold
duties on which we are engaged.
" D " DIVISION (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, PRINCE RUPERT, FORT
GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS)
By W. A. H. Gill, Officer Commanding
Big-game Animals
Moose.—A considerable number of moose killed in this Division were found to be
infected with tapeworms, but on the whole these animals were in much better condition
than in 1949. Due to ideal conditions throughout most of the winter, such as deep
powdery snow and continued cold weather, the moose came through exceptionally well,
and in their healthy condition seemed little affected by ticks.
For only a very short period in the spring the snow was crusted over sufficiently to
carry the weight of the timber-wolves, and other than during this period the moose had
no trouble in moving from one feeding-ground to another.
An extensive wolf-poisoning programme was carried out this year in an area extending approximately 300 miles north and 200 miles west of Prince George, resulting in a
great decrease in the wolf population. Trappers and a great many sportsmen have
reported a considerably larger crop of moose calves in the area mentioned than has been
observed for several years.
A number of aeroplane flights into the area in question were made during the spring,
but very few wolf kills were found. From the tracks observed, it was noticed that all of
the large bands in the locality covered by our poisoining operations had greatly been
reduced in their numbers.
In the district which is north of the 56th parallel of north latitude, moose do not show
any marked increase. This, no doubt, is because of migration and an increasing wolf
population. Up to the present time we have been unable to carry out any predator-control
measures in this area, as without the use of an aeroplane the poisoning of wolves cannot
be done effectively.
Deer.—These animals are still very scarce in this Division. However, from observations, and from information obtained, they are believed to be increasing slightly, especially
in the Burns Lake, Smithers, Vanderhoof, and Prince George areas, where the wolf
population has been greatly reduced.
Deer are reported to be holding their own in the Pouce Coupe and Telegraph Creek
areas, but farther north they are exceptionally scarce.
A great many deer died in certain parts of the Queen Charlotte Islands due to the
very severe weather in January, thus reducing the over-all population.
Caribou.—In the area south of the Canadian National Railway (Prince Rupert to
Jasper line), caribou are still very scarce and should be protected by a closed season as
in the past. From all observations it would appear that they are increasing very slowly
in this district.
In the Peace River and Cold Fish Lake areas, caribou are still fairly plentiful and the
usual open season is recommended.
Black and Brown Bear.—There is a slight decrease in the numbers of black bear,
but we are still receiving many reports of damage caused to game and domestic animals,
and, therefore, the year-round open season on black bear should be maintained.
An exceptionally good wild-berry crop no doubt accounted for a reduction in the
number of complaints received of depredation by these animals. T 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Grizzly Bear.—Grizzlies are still plentiful throughout most of this Division. A great
many tourists spend a considerable amount of time and money in endeavouring to obtain
these prize trophies. These bears inhabit remote and difficult terrain, and a fairly lengthy
hunt is usually required in order to bag one.
Mountain-sheep.—These animals are still fairly plentiful north of the 56th parallel,
especially in the Fort Nelson, Fort St. John, Atlin, and Telegraph Creek areas.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are plentiful throughout the whole Division, with
the exception of the Queen Charlotte Islands.
Wapiti (Elk).—Elk are scarce in this Division, but are increasing slightly in the
Peace River District.
Fur-bearing Animals
Marten.—A good catch of marten is reported, and it is believed that these fur-
bearers are increasing very rapidly since their decline in 1948.
Beaver.—These valuable fur-bearers are very plentiful on the trap-lines of the white
trappers throughout the whole Division.
The beaver-tag system has been working satisfactorily, but it is felt that if the fur-
trader who purchases the beaver directly from the trapper would keep a record of the
beaver-seal numbers, it would be of great assistance in the prevention of illegal trafficking
in beaver-seals.
The Department of Indian Affairs could assist the Indian trappers greatly if they
would compel them to make a return of catch each year. Such information would be of
great assistance to our Game Wardens when checking the Indians who have cleaned out
their lines and are poaching beaver from other Indians who are trying to conserve their
breeding stock.
Fox.—Due to the fact that the pelts of foxes are practically of no value, very few of
these animals are being trapped. This, no doubt, would account for their increase during
the past few years.
Mink.—Returns show that exceptionally good catches of mink have been made, and
there is every indication that these fur-bearers are increasing. Prices have been very
satisfactory.
Fisher.—Because of an uncertain market, very few of these fur-bearers have been
taken.   Reports indicate that they are increasing gradually throughout the Division.
All other fur-bearers are reported to be quite plentiful and no noticeable change is
taking place.
Upland Game Birds
Pheasants.—The Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun Club purchased 96 pheasant eggs,
and same were distributed for hatching among interested members and some of the local
farmers. However, due to the poor hatch resulting from unfertile eggs, very few birds
were raised.   Eight of these birds were observed in good condition late in the fall.
Due to circumstances unforeseen, no additional pheasants were released in the Vanderhoof district. A few of the old birds are surviving.
Pheasants released in the Fort St. John and Pouce Coupe areas during 1947, 1948,
and 1949 are not showing any noticeable increase. No doubt a considerable number of
the birds liberated died during the extremely cold weather in January, when the temperature dropped to 70 degrees below zero. This, together with the exceptionally heavy snowfall, would account for the greatest loss.
Grouse (Willow). — The grouse population showed a sharp decline over 1949.
However, it is believed that this is due to the extreme cold during the month of January.
It is felt that these birds will be fairly plentiful again next year, as they are nearing the peak
of their cycle. The following year will probably show a sudden decrease in their numbers,
and they will gradually become more scarce, as has been the case in the past. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 27
Grouse were exceptionally plentiful in the Fort St. John and Pouce Coupe Districts,
and did not decline in 1950 as they did in the remainder of the Division.
Grouse (Blue).—Very few of these birds are found in this Division.
Grouse (Franklin's).—These birds decreased in 1949, and so far have not commenced any upward trend.
Grouse (Prairie-chicken or Sharp-tailed).—Prairie-chicken are exceptionally plentiful in the Fort St. John and Pouce Coupe areas. They are abundant in the Vanderhoof
District, but due to the fact that only a small portion of the district is suitable for these
birds, no increase in the daily or season bag-limit is recommended.
Migratory Game Birds
Ducks and Geese.—These birds are reported on the increase in the Vanderhoof, Fort
St. John, and Pouce Coupe Detachment areas. In the remainder of the Division they are
reported to be holding their own.
Vermin
Timber-wolves.—Very good results were obtained in areas where our poison programme was put into effect, but due to lack of equipment, such as a suitable aircraft, we
were unable to cover the more remote areas.
Game Wardens, predator-hunters, and trappers all report a great decline in the wolf
populations in the Prince George, Vanderhoof, and Burns Lake Districts.
The greatly increased moose-calf crop reported by the trappers and sportsmen is
believed to have resulted from the Department's poisoning operations, as the increase is
especially noticeable in those areas where poison has been used extensively.
Personally, I believe that if we had at our disposal an aircraft suitable for use in
setting out poison for three successive winters, we could easily reduce the wolf population
to a point where it would no longer be a major menace to our big game.
Because of the great many complaints received from stockmen regarding losses
caused by predatory animals, permits were issued authorizing farmers and ranchers to
set out poison on private property. The use of poison in such cases is strictly supervised
by members of this Department, and good results have been obtained in most instances.
In my opinion, the bounty system is not satisfactory, but until such time as the
Department is in a position to employ a sufficient number of predator-hunters and obtain
the necessary equipment for efficient predator-control, the bounty system will have to
remain in effect.
I am certain that with proper equipment and a sufficient number of predator-hunters,
we could control the wolf population more efficiently and more cheaply than by the
present bounty system.
Coyotes.—These predators are plentiful in the Vanderhoof, Burns Lake, and Pouce
Coupe Districts, and are reported to be causing considerable losses to sheepmen and
poultry-farmers. I hope that during the year 1951 we will be permitted to set out a few
" 1080 " stations in the above areas for the destruction of these animals.
Cougar.—Very few cougar are destroyed in this Division. They are increasing
slightly, but are still not numerous enough to cause alarm. Due to the severe winters, I
do not think they will ever become very plentiful this far north.
Magpies.—From information received, there are indications that magpies are increasing and gradually moving farther north.
Eagles.—These birds have increased noticeably during the past few years, and we
have received several reports of eagles killing ducks and trumpeter swans.
Game Protection
A launch is required in the Bella Bella, Ocean Falls, and Bella Coola areas for the
purpose of checking poaching on trap-lines and other game infractions.   I would recom- T 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
mend that two men be stationed on such a launch in order that one may look after the
boat while the other is ashore doing game work.
Due to the aluminium-manufacturing plant being established at Kitimat where this
company is planning a townsite of 50,000 population, it will be necessary to have a Game
Warden stationed either at Kitimat or Terrace. A highway is being constructed between
these two points in the spring of 1951.
On checking American sportsmen it was noted that in many instances they stated
that Customs officials had not advised them of the necessity of securing licences before
motoring through British Columbia with firearms in their possession. If the co-operation
of the Customs could be secured in this connection, there would be fewer violations of the
" Game Act."
Game Propagation
Pheasants.—Ninety-six pheasant eggs were obtained by the Bulkley Valley Rod and
Gun Club at Smithers, but few of these hatched as most of the eggs were not fertile.
However, eight pheasants were released, and up until the end of the year they were
known to have survived.
Pheasants released at Vanderhoof in 1948 and 1949 have survived, but have not
increased in numbers.   There were no pheasants liberated in this Division during 1950.
Beaver.—Beaver were released on the trap-lines of Alfred Harrison and Jack Gray.
Both trappers report that these animals are in good condition and have established houses.
No information has been received regarding the beaver liberated on the Queen
Charlotte Islands in 1949.
Game Reserves
There are only three small game reserves in this Division. These are more for the
protection of the public than of game, as they cover areas surrounding cities or villages.
The Nechako Migratory Game-bird Sanctuary is proving to be a great asset, and is
providing sportsmen with very good hunting in near-by grain-fields in the mornings and
evenings.
Fur Trade
A slight increase in the over-all fur-catch in this Division is recorded for 1950. As in
1949, catches made were only fair, due to the fact that trappers have been conserving their
fur because of poor prices.
Registration of Trap-lines
Practically all trap-lines in this Division are now registered. A large number of trap-
lines in the Fort Nelson Detachment which have been pending for several years are nearly
all registered, due to the greater efforts of Game Warden McCabe and to his untiring
patrols and interviews.
The registration of trap-lines in this vast northern territory has been greatly
handicapped owing to lack of accurate maps.
Registration of Guides
We have had very few complaints of guides infringing on the territories of other
guides. Maps of the guiding areas have been supplied and overcrowding has practically
been eliminated.
Special Patrols
Game Warden J. McCabe and Special Game Warden B. Villeneuve made a patrol
into Hay Lakes on the Alberta Border, and were successful in settling several trap-line
disputes and in completing a number of trap-line registrations.
Game Wardens McCabe and Stewart made two special patrols into Haines Road and
into the Atlin area to check hunters and guiding activities. The distance covered by car
and on foot was approximately 3,000 miles. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 29
Hunting Accidents
I am sorry to report that five persons were injured in hunting accidents in this
Division during 1950.   These were as follows:—
John Croken, Prince George, suffered injuries to his left hand and slight facial
abrasions when the shotgun he was using exploded at the breech. He has completely
recovered.
Edward Sampson, of Port Simpson, was accidently wounded by Vernon Dudoward
while they were hunting geese. Sampson sustained a fractured leg just above the ankle,
and is still in hospital; however, it is expected that no amputation will be necessary.
Edward Pritchard Williams, of Dawson Creek, accidently shot the ring finger and
knuckle off his left hand with a .270 Winchester rifle while trying to remove the hood
from the front sight.   Mr. Williams has completely recovered.
Roy Douglas Morrow, of Dawson Creek, was accidently wounded by shotgun pellets
fired by Jack Franklin Wood while they were out hunting prairie-chicken. Mr. Morrow
received approximately twelve pellet wounds about the head and shoulders, from which
he has recovered.
John Caputo, a non-resident hunter from New York, suffered a fractured leg when
he fell between two fallen trees while running to get a shot at a grizzly. He recovered in
the Fort St. John Hospital after being flown out of the hunting territory.
Game-fish Culture
One hundred and fifty thousand eyed Kamloops trout eggs were supplied to the
Prince George Rod and Gun Club. These were placed in the local hatchery, and approximately 113,000 fry liberated in the following lakes: Ness Lake, 20,000; Bednesti Lake,
15,000; Summit Lake, 8,000; Chief Lake, 10,000; Nadsilnich (West) Lake, 30,000;
and Cluculz Lake, 30,000.
There were 50,000 eyed kokanee eggs planted in Cluculz Creek. These eggs arrived
very late, and it was necessary to chop the ice in the stream before planting could be
carried out.
In the Vanderhoof Detachment area, Kamloops eyed trout eggs were planted, under
ideal conditions, in Deep, Sinkut, and Stony Creeks.
Sixty thousand Kamloops trout eggs were supplied to the Bulkley Valley Rod and
Gun Club and placed in its hatchery. A very good hatch was obtained, but because of
a break in the hatchery dam, all but approximately 2,000 fry died. These were liberated
evenly in Ross and Kathlyn Lakes.
In the Prince Rupert area 75,000 Kamloops trout eyed eggs were planted in Rainbow
Creek, and from reports received, a very successful hatch was obtained. This planting
was carried out by Rod and Gun Club members and the local Game Wardens.
Forty thousand eyed trout eggs were planted in the Pouce Coupe Detachment area,
and a good hatch resulted. Members of the Dawson Creek Rod and Gun Club assisted
in these plantings.
Coarse-fish traps were again operated in both streams flowing into and out of Nadsilnich (West) Lake. Approximately 3 tons of coarse fish were removed. This was a
marked decrease from 1949 when over 8 tons were taken out. Unfortunately, high water
hindered the placing of traps in the creeks at an early date, and a considerable number
of coarse fish had returned to the lake before the traps were installed. However, the
coarse fish taken in 1950 were much smaller than those taken out in 1949.
Beaverley Creek, which flows out of this lake, was poisoned with fish tox, and very
good results were obtained. A great many of the poisoned fish were shipped to Dr. P. A.
Larkin, Fisheries Biologist, for investigation.
A coarse-fish trap was also installed on Cluculz Creek, the outlet of Cluculz Lake,
and several tons of coarse fish were removed.   In 1951 we hope to install coarse-fish T 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
traps in all creeks flowing into and out of Cluculz Lake. Fish tox was also used in this
creek, and thousands of coarse fish were destroyed, along with countless thousands of
coarse-fish fry. Very few trout were killed by these poisonings, due to the fact that not
many trout inhabit these streams in the late spring. The Prince George Rod and Gun
Club members assisted us in this work.
Under the supervision of the local Game Wardens, a few coarse-fish traps were
installed by the following Rod and Gun Clubs: The Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun Club
at Smithers, Tweedsmuir Rod and Gun Club at Burns Lake, and the North Peace Rod
and Gun Club at Fort St. John.
Summary and General Remarks on Game and Fish
From personal observation and reliable information, the 1950 moose-calf crop is
by far the largest seen in a good many years, and this is especially noticeable in the areas
where the wolf-poisoning programme was carried out extensively.
Visiting and local sportsmen were very successful in obtaining big-game animals.
It is expected that moose will still be more plentiful in the southern portion of this
Division for the 1951 harvest.
In this Division deer are still fairly scarce on the Mainland, and it is recommended
that the season bag-limit of one remain in effect.
From reports received, caribou are increasing slightly, and a close season is again
recommended for that portion of the Division lying south of the Jasper to Prince Rupert
line of the Canadian National Railways.
In closing, I wish to thank all Wardens, clerks, officers of the B.C. Police and
R.C.M.P., and Rod and Gun Club members for their co-operation, which contributed to
more efficient administration in this vast Division, comprising approximately two-thirds
of the Province.
"E" DIVISION (MAINLAND COAST NORTH TO TOBA INLET AND
LOWER MAINLAND AS FAR INLAND AS NORTH BEND)
By R. E. Allan, Officer Commanding
I beg to submit herewith my annual report covering game conditions in " E " Game
Division for the year ended December 31st, 1950.
Big Game
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—There has been no appreciable change in regard to
the stand of deer in this Division during the past year. In some districts, such as that
area between Squamish, North Vancouver, and the head of Burrard Inlet, they continue
to be quite scarce. This is due more to the lack of suitable deer habitat than over-
hunting. There are many similar areas in this Division, particularly in the inlets of the
up-coast regions. Game Wardens F. Urquhart and H. P. Hughes, of Port Coquitlam and
Cloverdale Districts respectively, report these animals to be on the increase. The latter
has again recommended an open season on both sexes in the Langley and Surrey Municipalities. I concur with this recommendation, as it has been necessary to destroy large
numbers of deer found doing damage to growing crops in these areas each year. In one
instance, seven animals—mostly does—were destroyed on one farm within a period of a
few days. Due to insufficient Departmental personnel and equipment, it was impossible
to trap and move the animals elsewhere.
Mountain-goat.—These animals continue to be fairly plentiful in the Coquitlam,
Mission, Chilliwack, and Powell River Districts.
Bear (Black or Brown).—Continue to be common throughout this Division and a
source of considerable nuisance in the settled areas of the Lower Mainland.
Bear (Grizzly).—A few grizzly bear were taken throughout this Division. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 31
Elk (Wapiti).—Owing to heavy timber and brush in the McNab Creek area of
Howe Sound, a satisfactory check on the stand of elk, conducted on foot and by the use
of B.C. Police aircraft, was not obtained. I would suggest that an elk survey of this area
might be a suitable project for coverage by a summer group working under the supervision of our biological staff.
Fur-bearing Animals
Fur returns from this Division show no change from previous years—a good indication that the majority of trappers are "farming" their trap-lines. A non-existent
market for racoon pelts has resulted in these animals being very numerous throughout the
Division. They and the red fox continue to be bothersome and destructive, and should
be considered as predators in the Lower Mainland District.
Upland Game Birds
Grouse (Blue).—Reported to be increasing on the several islands in Howe Sound
and on many recently logged-off areas in the upper reaches of the Fraser Valley, where
numerous bag-limits were obtained during the past open season. However, considering
the Division as a whole, these birds are not plentiful. Reports received from Texada
Island indicate that the Departmental planting of these birds on that island has been
successful.
Grouse (Willow or Ruffed).—Reports received from most sections of the Division
indicate that these birds have increased in numbers during the past year. Willow grouse
are gradually supplanting blue grouse in many logged-off lands which are fast becoming
reforested.
California Quail and European Partridge.—Very sparsely scattered coveys of these
birds are to be found in the Fraser Valley and Delta areas. It would appear that there
is little hope of them ever increasing in numbers to a point which would warrant an open
season on them.
Pheasants.—The past open season on these birds was very disappointing. The
breeding season was good, and this, coupled with a generous Departmental liberation of
farm-raised birds, should have provided a normal Lower Mainland crop. Up to a few
weeks prior to the opening day there was every promise of good hunting. At the present
time I cannot offer any explanation as to why these birds should suddenly disappear in
such great numbers. However, as this phenomenon occurred in other Game Divisions
within the Province, no doubt our Departmental biologists will have a solution, be it
cyclic decline or otherwise.
Migratory Game Birds
Ducks and Geese (Canada).—Plenty of ducks and a fair number of geese were in
evidence during both halves of the split season on water-fowl. The better shooting was
to be had during the first half of the open season. During the second half the weather
was generally calm and mild, which caused the birds to " raft up " and rest on waters
difficult to reach during the shooting-hours. The same weather conditions were responsible for fewer snow-geese being taken. Until late spring there were thousands of the
latter off the Delta and Lulu Island foreshores.
Black Brant.—Late in arriving, but when they did put in an appearance, they were
more than plentiful. Game Warden W. H. Cameron, of Ladner, in the Delta area where
the best shooting is to be had, reported, " The last two weeks of the season is something
to remember. There has been nothing like it for the past twenty-eight years." This
abundant supply of brant created an abnormal interest on the part of sportsmen to hunt
these birds. This in turn resulted in no little friction and ill-feeling in the scramble for
the very limited number of suitable areas over which the birds can be successfully hunted.
This situation reached such a degree that it was deemed advisable to call a meeting of the T 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Lower Mainland brant-hunters, at which it was hoped a solution would be found to the
problem of too many hunters being crowded into a very confined area.
Band-tailed Pigeons.—Showed a slight increase in numbers this year. Pigeon Cove,
in the Port Moody District, was again the favoured shooting area, and a fair number of
these birds were taken.
Vermin
Game Wardens in this Division are constantly on the alert for predators, and fair
numbers of red foxes, cougars, house-cats, crows, etc., were destroyed by them during the
past year. Game Wardens A. J. Butler and P. M. Cliffe continue to be most active in
this regard. The latter, in addition to his routine Detachment duties, has done excellent
work in keeping a check on cougars in many parts of the Division. On one hunt,
conducted in severe weather and in answer to a complaint received from the Seechelt
Peninsula, Game Warden Cliffe, accompanied by Corporal Game Warden L. R. Lane of
the launch P.M.L. No. 3, destroyed three cougars. Chief Predatory-animal Hunter J.
Dewar and Predatory-animal Hunter A. L. Frost have also done excellent work in connection with up-coast complaints of predators.
Game Protection
A total of 429 prosecutions was instituted by officers of this Division during the past
year. Routine work has increased to such a degree in some Detachments that I would
again respectfully recommend that the Commission consider employing Assistant Game
Wardens as funds permit.
Game Propagation
Considerable time was spent picking up and liberating farm-raised game birds by
Game Wardens of the Lower Mainland. These officers made seven trips by night in
Departmental trucks to points as far away as Vernon with birds to be liberated. This
method of Interior pheasant-releases has been quite successful and superior to the former
method of shipping by train.
Fur Trade
Game Warden F. R. Lobb, who covers the fur trade at Vancouver, reports that
there has been a considerable change in the raw fur market since the commencement of
the Korean War in the month of June, 1950. The first movement was downward, but
soon new confidence was restored, and prices have now advanced sharply. This may be
mainly due to, first, large expenditures of dollars for war purposes, thus creating buying
power, and, second, the possibility of imports of fur from Russia and China being either
curtailed or entirely cut off, resulting in anticipation by speculators of a strong demand
by the public for furs. The December, 1950, approximate average prices were as
follows:—
Type 1949 1950
Beaver  $18.30 $24.50
Muskrat   .85 2.10
Otter .:  17.00 26.50
Fisher  29.40 55.00
Fox, cross  2.50 3.00
Fox, red  1.75 2.75
Marten   15.00 28.40
Weasel  1.10 2.20
Mink, wild  16.50 29.50
Lynx   8.75 14.60
Racoon  1.00 1.25
Squirrel   .29 .65
Wolverine  9.10 35.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 33
Registration of Trap-lines
Nothing further to report, except that the system continues to function smoothly
within this Division.
Registration of Guides
There are very few registered guides in " E " Division, and I have nothing to report.
Special Patrols
Although several patrols were made to remote sections of the Division, they were
considered as being merely routine.
Hunting Accidents
It is with regret that I report several hunting accidents in this Division. Details of
these accidents are to be found later on in this Report.
Game-fish Culture
Smiths Falls Hatchery at Cultus Lake operated over the year with good success. The
continued output from this hatchery will undoubtedly contribute considerably toward
maintaining the high standard of sport-fishing presently enjoyed on the many lakes and
streams of the Lower Mainland. The output, as you are aware, is mainly Kamloops trout,
reared from eggs collected from several Departmental stations in the Interior Districts of
the Province. This egg-supply has been augmented by Fishery Officer F. Pells, who,
acting upon his own initiative, trapped and stripped a number of spawning Kamloops
trout from the hatchery creek. It has been learned that the trout from this local stock are
less susceptible to normal hatchery losses and their growth far ahead that of Interior stock.
At the year's end Fishery Officer Pells had on hand, as brood stock, 800 local trout, which
should be ready for stripping early in 1952.
Early in the year under review, thirty-three adult cut-throat trout (native) were taken
alive from Chilliwack Lake and transferred by aeroplane to the ponds at Smiths Falls. All
but one of these trout died within a week or two of their being transferred, due, possibly,
to a fungous growth which appeared over abrasions incurred incidental to their capture.
Saline immersions of varying densities were administered with apparent beneficial results.
At present time there are 1,000 cut-throat trout on hand at the above hatchery. These
fish should be ready for stripping during the spring months of 1952.
Summary
Apart from the disappointing pheasant season, and allowance being made for the
growth in population in the Lower Mainland areas, the past year was quite successful.
Sport-fishing was generally good, and water-fowl were plentiful. Sportsmen found that
generally they had to travel farther afield for deer, the principal big-game animal in this
Division. On the other hand, however, fair numbers of these animals were taken from
the Pitt Meadows, Langley, and Surrey Districts, a few miles distant from the heavily
populated area of Greater Vancouver.
As in recent years, Game Wardens and myself spent considerable time attending
meetings and gatherings of sportsmen and others in an effort to create between the farmer
and land-owner a mutual feeling and understanding of each other's problems.
In conclusion, I wish to extend my thanks and appreciation to the many individuals
and organizations—Governmental and private—who have so generously assisted the
personnel of this Department within this Division during the past year, and also to the
Game Wardens, Fishery Officers, and staff who have carried out their various duties
cheerfully and efficiently. T 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES OF THE DIVISION OF GAME
MANAGEMENT AND RESEARCH, 1950
By James Hatter, Chief Game Biologist
During the year 1950 game research and management studies were undertaken
mainly during the spring and summer months. Students in wild-life management at the
University of British Columbia were employed on a number of projects from May until
September. The nature of our work in the past has been influenced primarily by the
employment of temporary personnel, available only upon close of the University term in
April. The work of these non-permanent student employees has been of a high quality
and has provided the Game Department with information necessary to the requirements
of a well-informed game-management organization.
Although it is anticipated that seasonal employment of wild-life students will continue
in succeeding years, the major part of our management and research will in the future
stem from the services of permanent regional game biologists. Up to the present it must
be admitted that we have been fighting a rear-guard action, awaiting the time until fully
trained personnel is available and funds placed at our disposal for their employment. Up
to now much needed winter studies on big game and upland game birds have not been
possible due to the lack of trained wild-life managers permanently employed by the Game
Department.
The year 1950 has marked an important step ahead in game management and
research in British Columbia. E. W. Taylor entered the services of the Department last
May, to be permanently employed as upland game-bird biologist. In addition, plans
were laid last year for the employment in 1951 of two regional biologists. It is indeed
a pleasure to report that these two positions have recently been filled with the appointment of P. Martin as game biologist for the Interior districts, and D. Robinson as game
biologist on Vancouver Island.
Bighorn Sheep
A Game Survey of the Camel Foot Mountains
Thirteen days were spent in the Camel Foot Mountains, which comprise a vast area
west of the Fraser River from Lillooet north-west to the headwaters of Big Creek. The
primary purpose of the survey was to determine the following:—
(1) Possible competition for food between the native bighorn and domestic
sheep.
(2) General game conditions.
W. O'Keeffe, of Rexmount, guided K. DeBeck, agrologist in charge of the Grazing
Division of the Forest Service at Kamloops, and myself on this inquiry.
On the basis of present information there is no important competition for food among
wild and domestic sheep in the area. For the most part, different types of country are
utilized as summer range by these two animals. Reports that disease has been spread to
the wild sheep by domestic animals could not be investigated in detail. Further opportunities will be taken to obtain information concerning this important subject.
The native sheep in the Lillooet area have suffered a noticeable decline in numbers
during the past fifteen years. The cause for this decline is being investigated, but at
present no conclusive data are available.
The area traversed is excellent big-game summer range. In thirteen days, thirty-six
mule-deer, fourteen moose, fifty-five bighorn sheep, one goat, four black bears, and one
grizzly were seen. So much summer range exists in relation to the restricted carrying
capacity of the winter ranges that the above figures by no means denote a scarcity of big-
game animals, with the possible exception of bighorn sheep and grizzly bears. A summer
range will carry no more animals than the more restricted winter range can support. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 35
Our preliminary investigations of the region in question would indicate that the killing
of grizzly bears which appear near flocks of domestic sheep is detrimental to the conservation of the local grizzly-bear population.
Winter Range of Bighorn Sheep in Churn Creek Basin
A preliminary inspection of Churn Creek basin was made in June. Portions of the
winter range used by bighorn sheep were found to be severely overgrazed. In places
there were indications that domestic cattle had been in competition with the sheep for
winter food.   More intensive investigations are planned for 1951 in this area.
Winter Range of Bighorn Sheep in the Riske Creek Area
L. G. Sugden made a survey of the bighorn sheep which frequent the region between
the Fraser and Chilcotin Rivers. Over a hundred head presently comprise the band of
sheep in this area, and over the years their numbers have apparently remained relatively
stable.
Adequate escape habitat appears to be lacking and likely constitutes an important
factor preventing noticeable increases. Coyote predation has probably been an important
limiting factor, causing escape facilities to be particularly necessary for survival.
Management possibilities appear to centre about intensive predator-control, to be
followed either by a permit system for removing surplus rams or by removal of the
animals for introduction into other areas where opportunities for an increase are greater.
In their present location these valuable sheep have little or no aesthetic value and to date
have not provided a harvest. Further investigation will be undertaken in 1951 to determine the survival of last year's lambs to yearling age and to obtain more detailed information on limiting factors.
Bighorn Sheep of the Ashnola River Area
In May Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan, accompanied by W. W. Mair, and guided by
H. Clarke and Bob Parsons, of Keremeos, made a preliminary inspection of the sheep
range bordering the Ashnola River. A second survey was made in December. In May
a total of 98 sheep was observed. This total was composed of 25 rams, 43 ewes, 14
yearlings, and 16 lambs.
Important limiting factors appear to be predation and illegal killing. Bait-stations
using 1080 poison have been established in order to lower the coyote population.
Portions of the Ashnola range have suffered in the past from overuse by domestic
cattle. Efforts are being made to remedy this situation and in general to bring the sheep
population back to former numbers. Further more intensive studies and investigations
in the Ashnola area are planned for the future.
Elk, Deer, and Moose Studies
Princeton Elk and Deer
A preliminary study of the elk herd at Princeton was made in May by Dr. Ian
McTaggart Cowan.   At this time the population was estimated at 180 head.
Little evidence of important competition between elk and mule-deer was encountered. On the benches along the north side of the Similkameen, west of Princeton, there
was, however, evidence of a shortage of deer-food, but this apparently had resulted from
horses being left on the range all winter. In places along the Tulameen River overbrowsing by deer was evident.
On the basis of 103 adult deer observed, a ratio of 1 buck to 2.7 does indicates that
so far the Princeton deer herd has stood up well to the hunting pressure exerted upon it.
A short open season on bull elk was recommended for the Princeton area. Such
a season was put into effect, and approximately 14 bull elk were killed and about 5 T 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
reported wounded. This high crippling-loss is not good and is partially due to the use of
rifles of inadequate ballistics for the hunting of such large animals. It was estimated from
the survey that 20 bull elk could be removed without damage to the herd.
Carrying capacity of the elk winter range seems adequate to support an elk herd
larger than that now present without serious competition with deer. Those herds wintering on important deer range should, however, be kept down to little more than present
numbers.
Moose South of Canadian Pacific Railway
A reconnaissance of areas reported to be inhabited with moose south of the Canadian
Pacific Railway and west of the Okanagan Valley was undertaken by the writer in
company with L. G. Sugden.
The winter carrying capacity for moose in this southern district is low, and, therefore,
no important population increase is expected. A further small increase will probably
result, but numbers will never approach those found in parts of the Cariboo. Within the
next few years a limited harvest of bulls might be considered under a permit system. An
important consideration, however, is the future aesthetic value of moose about fishing
resorts, such as those on Lac la Jeune, Tepee Lake, and Penask Lake.
Park Mountain Grazing Lease
An inspection of the Park Mountain summer range near Lumby was made in July.
Representatives of the Vernon Fish and Game Association, the Forest Service, and
ranching interests were present on this reconnaissance. Purpose of the study was to
determine the probable effect of putting cattle on Park Mountain, which is credited with
being an important spring, fall, and summer range for mule-deer.
A grazing lease has been granted for Park Mountain, with several important provisions. First, that a proper grazing rotation be maintained so as not to spoil large acreages
of alpine flowers, and, second, that no grizzly bears be destroyed without first notifying
the Game Department. Competition for forage between deer and the 100 head of stock
permitted to graze the area will not be detrimental to the deer population in so far as it
was possible to determine. It will be our policy to inspect the area at a future date to
confirm or disprove the validity of this judgment. In the meantime it is certain that no
irreparable damage can be done by grazing cattle on Park Mountain under terms of the
agreement.
Moose Winter-range Surveys
As part of our programme to maintain contact with the moose populations in the
Interior, several important winter ranges were examined. Information on winter food is
essential before we can recommend the best possible seasons and bag-limits for moose.
Critical overuse of winter food was observed in the Gang Ranch area. In the
vicinity of Bridge Lake also there is every evidence that certain localities are continually
being overbrowsed, and, as a result, winter forage is declining in amount. Further studies
in 1951 will be conducted, with the view to making further recommendations on the management of moose in Central British Columbia. These recommendations will almost
certainly involve the killing of cow moose under a permit system. There is every evidence
that overpopulation is the most serious problem confronting us in the perpetuation of
a large moose population in the future.
Experimental Burning
The Game Department is conducting intensive studies on the effect of burning in an
experimental area set up by the Forest Service near Pass Lake.
Last summer L. G. Sugden and the writer established a large number of plots for
study after burning.   Three weeks were spent in this work. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 37
Initial attempts at burning were made by the Forest Service last summer and fall, but
unfortunately these attempts largely failed. It is anticipated, however, that greater success
will be achieved in 1951.
The area in question is ideal for our purposes, since it is typical of winter range
generally.   It has been heavily browsed by moose during the past six or seven years.
Moose-tagging
R. C. Cleveland, of Eagan Lake, was employed during May to continue our programme of tagging calf moose. To date over 30 young moose have been marked with
aluminium ear-tags, and we anticipate the recovery of several of these in 1951. This will
provide us with information on distance travelled from birthplace and a positive means
for developing methods of ageing moose.
Beaver Habitat Study
During the summer of 1950, W. H. Cottle, a graduate student in wild-life management at the University of British Columbia, made a study of beaver management on the
trap-line of Eric Collier. Information gained from this study will be of much value in
future beaver management in British Columbia. The help and assistance afforded by
Mr. Collier in this project is gratefully acknowledged.
Water-fowl
Water-fowl Banding
Banding operations in 1950 marked the third year in our five-year programme to
determine the migration routes and population behaviour of ducks raised on the breeding-
grounds of Central British Columbia. Banding was done by F. C. Macleod, G. Mitchell,
and L. G. Sugden. From July 1st until August 31st our three-man crew banded over
2,000 ducks from Riske Creek south to Kamloops.
Water-fowl Breeding-ground Survey at Stum Lake
A two-man party consisting of F. C. Macleod and G. Mitchell spent the months of
May and June at Stum Lake in the Alexis Creek area. Purpose of this investigation was
to determine the importance of the Stum Lake region in the production of water-fowl.
It was determined that due to the characteristics of the country the area in question
is inferior in productivity by comparison to areas of equivalent size farther south and at
lower elevations in the grass-land region.
It is now apparent to us that very few good waterfowl-producing areas remain
uncatalogued in Southern and Central British Columbia. The western Chilcotin plateau
is definitely low in water-fowl production as compared to the grass-land areas.
Upland Game Birds
Studies on Toxic Sprays in the Okanagan
In 1950 the testing of toxicity of orchard sprays to pheasants in the fruit-growing
areas of the Okanagan was continued.
D. Rye, student in wild-life management at the University, spent the summer at
Summerland doing research on this subject. Since the work will continue again in 1951,
and further attention given to the use of newly developed sprays, general conclusions will
not be given at this time, except to say that under concentrations currently being applied,
DDT, Parathion, Hexafoss, and Lindane are toxic to pheasants and may result in a high
mortality in birds raised in orchard areas.
However, it is becoming apparent that toxic sprays are not the only source of
pheasant mortality in orchard areas. Mowing of nesting cover under the trees and
sprinkler irrigation are apparently having a pronounced effect on pheasant production. T 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
In 1951 it is our plan to investigate more fully the effect of such relatively new developments in orchard agriculture and to search for possible methods of lessening the tremendous loss resulting to young pheasants as a result of modern fruit cultural practices.
The co-operation of the staff at the Dominion Experimental Station at Summerland
in our pheasant studies in the Okanagan Valley is gratefully acknowledged.
Introduction of Chukar Partridges
The first release of chukar partridges by the Game Department was made in September. Seventeen birds were released between Kamloops and Monte Creek on the
north side of the Thompson River. More chukars will be released in 1951, and the
success of the 1950 plant will be investigated.
Checking-stations
An almost complete check of transient hunters was made at Cache Creek. As a
result of fine co-operation with the enforcement staff, a very gratifying set of records is
now at our disposal.
Other temporary checking-stations were operated on the Ladner Delta, at Campbell
River, and in the Cowichan Valley.
The data obtained from these stations have provided us with pertinent management
information. It is hoped that an additional full-time checking-station on the Hope-
Princeton Highway will be realized in the future.
Game Returns
L. G. Sugden was employed almost full time from December until April, 1951,
compiling and analysing the 5-per-cent sample of hunter returns gathered under the
follow-up system.
Public Relations
In addition to the above projects, a considerable amount of technical information
was supplied to the public in the form of correspondence and lectures. Numerous sportsmen's meetings were attended, and every effort was taken to inform the public of our
game-management activities. Several radio broadcasts at Kamloops were made possible
through the kindness of the station there and the enthusiasm of Bill Ward at the Kamloops
Game Office.
Briefs were prepared for submission to the Fourth Provincial Resources Conference
in Victoria in February, 1950.
The writer wishes to express his thanks to many persons for their assistance in our
work for the year 1950. Dr. W. A. Clemens and Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan, scientific
advisers to the Game Department, rendered advice on many aspects of our work and were
active in various phases of it.
To the Inspectors and Game Wardens of the Province, the biological staff extends
its appreciation for assistance and interest shown in its research and management studies.
It is hoped that in 1951 our contributions to the management of the wild life of the
Province will continue to increase. The Division of Game Management and Research
extends its appreciation to all persons interested and concerned in the wise management of
our game resources.
PREDATOR-CONTROL
By W. W. Mair, Supervisor of Predator-control
During 1950 a revised predator-control system has been effected, following the
appointment, late in 1949, of a biologist as Supervisor of Predator-control. The
predatory-animal hunters, while still working within the various Game Divisions, are now ^^—
REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 39
under central control of the Supervisor at the headquarters of the Game Commission.
Thus, in effect, a Predator-control Branch has been formed to ensure uniformity of control
methods and continuity of planning and supervision. This system, it is believed, will
permit the predator-control programme to be carried out with maximum efficiency and
according to scientifically determined need. Emphasis has been laid upon the need for
each predatory-animal hunter to show a high standard of initiative, responsibility, and
accomplishment.
The control programme has been based on the following plan: To attempt near-
complete control in agricultural and built-up areas; to attempt partial-to-complete control
on game areas, need to be determined by research; and to attempt some light control in
wilderness areas to protect trappers and big-game reserves, at least until such time as
research can demonstrate the exact need. Following this basic plan, the main effort for
the year has been directed toward a coyote-control programme for the Interior. Traps
and coyote-getters (cyanide guns) have been used with success throughout the year. A
survey was carried out during the summer from Quesnel south to the International
Boundary, and from Princeton east to the Alberta Boundary, with a view to establishing
1080 (sodium fluoracetate) poison stations. Baiting of these stations commenced in
November and continued to the end of the year. It is too early to say what the success
of the programme will be, but it is believed it will prove to be the best answer to the
coyote problem in these regions.
It should be noted that any poison programme requires the employment of utmost
caution and supervision. Thus four months were spent in selecting 1080-poison sites,
with a view not only to ensuring efficient kill, but also to providing best possible protection
from the poison to humans, domestic live stock, and beneficial wild life—particularly fur-
bearers. The stations selected and baited have each been marked with at least two poison
warning-signs, placed on trees or posts at the approaches to the areas. If at any time a
poison-station should appear to menace public interests, it will at once be removed. All
baits will be destroyed in the early spring. Coyote-getters are being placed with similar
care and consideration.
Permits to poison predators on registered trap-lines or on private property have been
issued to a few residents of the Province. It is desired to encourage private enterprise in
predator-control, but it should be remembered that the eventual success of any programme
of predator-poisoning rests upon the exercise of utmost caution and supervision in its
operation. Thus it is hoped eventually to have all poisoning done at least under the supervision of Departmental personnel, if not done by them. Such a situation is desirable, since
members of the Predator-control Branch staff are kept constantly informed upon the various types of poisons and their effects, and thus they should be able to avoid the harm,
economically and psychologically, that has in the past arisen from injudicious use of
poison.
Considerable success has been attained in wolf-control by use of poison " pills."
These pills are made up by our own personnel and are placed, for the most part, on lakes,
streams, and open meadows to avoid danger to fur-bearers. In " D " Game Division a
heavy toll of wolves was taken during the winter and early spring months by means of baits
placed from aircraft; it is hoped to carry on this programme in the spring of 1951. A
good kill of wolves was made in the Cariboo area during the early winter, and it is anticipated that there will be further kills. It is felt that with improved transportation methods
for our personnel, the major wolf problem will be readily solved.
It has not been possible to devote much time during 1950 to inventing new methods
in cougar-control. However, certain changes in organization have resulted in increases in
efficiency that are most gratifying. On Vancouver Island the duties of the hunters have
been divided; one hunter is now detailed to do all " call " or emergency hunting. This
permits the other hunters to devote their full time to hunting on specified game areas. This
system has assisted greatly in enabling these predatory-animal hunters to increase their T 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
kills. Game Wardens and predatory-animal hunters throughout other cougar areas of the
Province have been most active and successful in cougar-hunting. For a summary of total
predators taken, see page 71.
An Assistant Supervisor and another predatory-animal hunter have been added to the
staff. This brings the number of personnel on predator-control to eleven, distributed
throughout the Province as follows: Supervisor at Vancouver; four predatory-animal
hunters in "A" Game Division (also operate in "E " Game Division); two predatory-
animal hunters in " B " Game Division; Assistant Supervisor and two predatory-animal
hunters in " C " Game Division; and one predatory-animal hunter in " D " Game
Division. It will be seen that the Predator-control Branch staff is faced with a wide
variety of problems and terrain. Between them, the hunters combine a wide range of
skills and experience. A predator school was held at Kamloops in September, and these
skills were demonstrated, practised, and exchanged. Benefits have already been noted
from this school, and it is hoped to hold further such meetings to ensure a continued
high standard of efficiency.
Considerable equipment has been purchased during the year, and it is hoped to
further increase our equipage in the future. A good man deserves good tools, and personnel of Predator-control Branch, who frequently carry out their work under difficult and
even dangerous conditions, deserve the best in equipment. Several new cougar dogs have
been purchased, one of them an import from the United States. Coyote-getters have been
purchased from the United States, and special snare-wire for bears, cougars, and wolves
has been purchased locally. Some preliminary plans have been laid for the building of
patrol cabins in rough areas to permit better control operations.
It is desired to express thanks to all members of the Game Department for their
whole-hearted and interested co-operation. Likewise, many citizens of the Province have
been most helpful and interested, and our thanks go out to them. To the members of the
Predator-control Branch staff, my " thank you " and congratulations upon a hard job well
done. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS
T 41
Comparative Statistics,
1913 tc
1950, Inclusive
Prosecutions
Revenue
Derived from
Sale of Game
Licences
and Fees
Revenue
Calendar Year
Informations
Laid
Convictions
Cases
Dismissed
Firearms
Confiscated
Fines
Imposed
Derived from
Fur Trade
1913
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
538
498
477
454
451
585
613
547
440
446
409
356
379
652
819
895
1,142
1,115
1,359
W
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
438
436
552
574
526
419
430
392
342
372
632
798
878
1,117
1,099
1,337
7
21
21
17
14
17
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
24
23
16
15
33
39
21
21
16
17
14
7
20
21
17
25
16
22
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
4
19
14
20
42
21
18
9
27
18
8
30
39
56
74
86
69
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,758.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
5,227.82
4,399.50
3,965.00
5,332.50
5,729.50
4,776.50
5,197.00
4,977.50
5,079.50
5,554.50
5,570.50
8,381.50
10,921.00
11,837.50
17,537.00
18,148.50
22,923.00
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
148,689.64
157,647.30
177,771.33
192,024.07
193,170.53
188,605.20
213,267.67
205,451.71
207,661.72
238,902.36
352,228.85
502,555.25
597,529.30
610,383.56
656,997.38
706,591.06
1914       	
1915 .-	
1916       	
1917             	
1918
1919
1920.  	
1921 --	
1922  -	
1923.	
1924   -.-
1925  -	
1926             -	
$5,291.39
24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
1927             	
71,324.96
1928.. .- -
1929    -	
1930 - .
1931 --	
1932  	
1933.  	
1934 	
1935  	
1936      -	
1937  	
1938  	
1939       	
1940 -
1941	
1942   	
1943 : 	
1944   	
1945 : 	
1946 	
1947     -- -
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
46,091.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
52,196.50
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
63,125.30
68,475.07
58,354.03
70,363.23
104,250.95
107,357.72
99,344.14
1948...  	
1949     _
1950	
73,392.08
61,543.26
71,335.44
Totals..._.	
18,934
17,976
938
1,151
$269,833.07
$7,962,473.53
$1,813,003.39
Summary of Total Revenue Derived from Sale of Various Licences,
Collections, etc., January 1st to December 31st, 1950
Revenue derived from—
Sale of resident firearms licences, and deer, moose-elk,
goat, and pheasant tags	
Sale of resident anglers', guides', and prospectors' firearms licences	
Sale of non-resident firearms and outfitters' licences	
Sale of non-resident anglers' licences	
Sale of fur-traders', taxidermists', and tanners' licences,
and royalty on fur	
Sale of confiscated and surrendered fur	
Sale of confiscated firearms	
Collection of big-game trophy fees from non-residents
Prosecutions—fines imposed under the "Game Act"
Miscellaneous revenue	
$321,691.88
86,649.00
64,474.00
142,614.00
71,335.44
255.03
56.65
88,145.00
22,923.00
2,705.50
$800,849.50 T 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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I      UMrT REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 43
Revenue Derived from the Sale of Moose-Elk, Deer, Goat and Pheasant Tags,
January 1st to December 31st, 1950
Government
Agency
Moose-Elk Tags
Deer Tags
Goat Tags
Pheasant Tags
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
Alberni 	
28
39
40
78
518
637
1,436
182
$28.00
39.00
40.00
78.00
518.00
637.00
1,436.00
182.00
2,534
229
$633.50
57.25
1
7
1
11
12
620
46
4
219
334
3
1
73
36
2
54
2
5
68
44
106
37
3
97
3
95
103
6
43
33
9
84
32
78
13
8
21
$1.00
7.00
110
33
$110.00
33.00
$772.50
136 25
40 00
170
430
996
4,344
1,601
3,917
1,975
1,865
1,544
688
802
2,485
300
1,714
448
374
3,572
2,165
568
10,572
1,204
2,384
1,690
744
2,082
1,625
985
821
288
3,126
868
429
2
42.50
107.50
249.00
1,086.00
400.25
979.25
493.75
466.25
386.00
172.00
200.50
621.25
75.00
428.50
112.00
93.50
893.00
541.25
142.00
2,643.00
301.00
596.00
422.50
186.00
520.50
406.25
246.25
205.25
72.00
781.50
217.00
107.25
.50
1.00
11.00
12.00
620.00
46.00
4.00
121.50
636 50
Clinton 	
5
4
223
427
131
5.00
4.00
223.00
427.00
131.00
903.00
3,146.00
851.25
1,410.25
Creston 	
Cumberland	
26
665
567
16
6
797
10
247
75
28
75
113
6
2,341
269
251
1,116
11
1,607
350
132
434
78
126
169
354
30
1,542
230
98
409
26.00
665.00
567.00
16.00
6.00
797.00
10.00
247.00
75.00
28.00
75.00
113.00
6.00
2,341.00
269.00
251.00
1,116.00
11.00
1,607.00
350.00
132.00
434,00
78.00
126.00
169,00
354.00
650 75
219.00
334.00
3.00
1.00
73.00
36.00
2.00
54.00
2.00
5.00
68.00
44.00
106.00
37.00
3.00
97.00
3.00
95.00
103.00
6.00
1,350.25
1,287.00
242.00
212.50
1,893.25
121 00
Grand Forks	
Greenwood 	
51
5
402
51.00
5.00
402.00
Kaslo	
660
24
48
291
5
660.00
24.00
48.00
291.00
5.00
1,337.50
265.00
171.50
1,264.00
727.25
192 00
Lillooet	
Merritt 	
Nanaimo  ..
Nelson—	
New Westminster
4,563
140
365
4,563.00
140.00
365.00
9,653.00
747 00
1,215.00
1,635.50
200 00
Prince George	
2,222.50
14
53
34
34
204
14.00
53.00
873 25
Princeton	
437.25
639.25
43.00
33.00
9.00
84.00
34.00
34.00
204.00
227 00
974 50
599.00
Smithers
545.25
Stewart	
4,491
836
997
4
.50
Telegraph Creek....   .
30.00
1,542.00
230.00
98.00
409.00
32.00
78.00
13.00
8.00
21.00
62.00
9,502
1,671
5,550
862
2,375.50
417.75
1,387.50
215.50
4,491.00
836.00
997.00
4.00
8,486.50
1,496.75
2,490.50
649.50
Vernon 	
15,136
$15,136.00
77,126
$19,281.50
2,314
	
$2,314.00
14,154
	
$14,154.00
$50,885.50
Less refund....
166.92
$14,154.00
50.10
2.30
529.00
132.90
2.50
16.70
54.30
$50,718.58
Pheasant Tags!
	
	
.
787.80
$14,941.80
$51,506.38
i Sold in 1949 but accounted for in 1950. T 44
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Revenue Derived from Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and
Prospectors' Firearms Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1950
Government Agency
Anglers
Guides
Free
Farmers
Prospectors
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
1,641
272
34
221
944
1,008
2,643
1,066
2,448
1,229
1,324
746
521
330
3,394
319
2,593
537
671
2,542
3,132
667
13,613
601
2,478
1,041
821
1,602
1,111
1,512
684
605
2,444
1,342
593
13,358
2,299
3,981
567
$1,641.00
272.00
34.00
221.00
944.00
1,008.00
2,643.00
1,066.00
2,448.00
1,229.00
1,324.00
746.00
521.00
330.00
3,394.00
319.00
2,593.00
537.00
671.00
2,542.00
3,132.00
667.00
13,613.00
601.00
2,478.00
1,041.00
821.00
1,602.00
1,111.00
1,512.00
684.00
605.00
2,444.00
1,342.00
593.00
1
3
6
74
163
15
8
12
5
42
76
18
92
1
2
10
7
3
8
88
44
5
12
40
8
10
13
14
1
5
1
174
$10.00
7
9
32
6
25
22
33
66
2
28
9
20
86
9
63
7
9
66
39
6
132
2
16
64
7
43
9
50
11
14
62
47
5
153
80
17
5
9
12
37
36
10
29
7
5
1
7
8
10
24
15
8
60
2
2
27
7
40
2
8
29
4
29
15
37
47
10
13
5
25
6
5
136
32
15
24
$1,651.00
272.00
Atlin	
30.00
75.00
650.00
1,785.00
125.00
80.00
115.00
50.00
410.00
795.00
170.00
	
64.00
296.00
1,594.00
2,793.00
2,768.00
1,146.00
Cumberland	
Duncan 	
Fernie 	
$1.00
2,563.00
1,280.00
1,734,00
1,541.00
691,00
1.00
4.00
331.00
Kamloops  	
930.00
10.00
20.00
95.00
4,328.00
329.00
Kelowna 	
L:llooet  	
4.00
1.00
2,617.00
633.00
671.00
2,542.00
70.00
	
3,202.00
667.00
30.00
4.00
13,647.00
601.00
Penticton 	
90.00
780.00
1.00
6.00
2,569.00
1,827.00
821.00
Prince George  	
445.00
65.00
100.00
405.00
70.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
4.00
2,048.00
1,177.00
Princeton	
1,613.00
1,093.00
675.00
	
2,444.00
1,447.00
105.00
120.00
713.00
140.00
5.00
50.00
10.00
1,845.00
140.00
Vancouver 	
13,358.00
2,299.00
3,981.00
567.00
1.00
13,364.00
2,349.00
3,991.00
2,417.00
5.00
Totals-. 	
76,934
$76,934.00
961
$9,680.00
1,256
803
$35.00
$86,649.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 45
Revenue Derived from Sale of Non-resident Firearms Licences and Outfitters'
Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1950
Government Agency
General
Firearms
Licences
General
Firearms
Licences
(Alternative)
General
Firearms
Licences
(Special)
Ordinary
Firearms
Licences
Outfitters
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
1
1
1
21
57
152
39
5
7
121
105
5
17
51
6
5
3
3
7
3
1,211
287
39
96
1
45
11
2
3
8
6
1
2
27
150
12
9
13
$25.00
25.00
25.00
525.00
1,425.00
3,800.00
975.00
125.00
175.00
3,025.00
2,625.00
125.00
425.00
1,275.00
150.00
125.00
75.00
75.00
175.00
75.00
30,275.00
7,175.00
975.00
2,400.00
25.00
1,125.00
275.00
50.00
75.00
200.00
150.00
25.00
50.00
675.00
3,750.00
300.00
225.00
325.00
1
1
7
2
1
3
1
21
1
1
7
1
2
2
1
	
$25.00
1
3
2
1
4
4
1
4
1
1
1
1
2
17
4
1
6
1
$15.00
$21.00
61.00
25.00
45.00
570.00
6.00
3.00
1,431.00
30.00
15.00
3,833.00
	
990.00
125.00
60.00
48.00
175.00
$50.00
100.00
3,135.00
9.00
2,782.00
125.00
15.00
60.00
440.00
1,335.00
150.00
15.00
140.00
	
75.00
15.00
15.00
15.00
90.00
190.00
3.00
78.00
$50.00
30,340.00
7,175.00
30.00
255.00
1,005.00
63.00
100.00
2,818.00
25.00
60.00
1,185.00
275.00
50.00
3.00
	
200.00
15.00
165.00
50.00
3.00
78.00
50.00
90.00
21.00
50.00
3,911.00
300.00
15.00
340.00
Totals _..
2,533
$63,325.00
2
$100.00
55
$813.00
44
$132.00
6
$300.00
$64,670.00
Total ..             .
....
~-
—
$64,474.00 T 46
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Revenue Derived from the Sale of Non-resident Anglers' Licences,
January 1st to December 31st, 1950
Government Agency
N.R.AX. (Amer.)
N.R.AX. (Can.)
N.R.A.L. (Minor)
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
53
18
19
8
79
265 ■
473
722
383
41
117
151
350
72
605
107
1,120
11
77
121
858
12
8,009
2,556
318
129
23
48
61
71
23
41
271
669
2
11
520
241
196
66
$371.00
126.00
133.00
56.00
553.00
1,855.00
3,311.00
5,054.00
2,681.00
287.00
819.00
1,057.00
2,450.00
504.00
4,235.00
749.00
7,840.00
■     77.00
539.00
847.00
6,006.00
84.00
56,063.00
17,892.00
2,226.00
903.00
161.00
336.00
427.00
497.00
161.00
287.00
1,897.00
4,683.00
14.00
77.00
3,640.00
1,687.00
1,372.00
462.00
4
$14.00
2
3
5
77
30
78
51
1
37
68
47
5
83
11
163
4
12
4
74
2
1,179
264
46
30
10
8
15
10
23
69
3
$2.00
3.00
$387.00
129.00
157.50
56 00
Atlin       .	
7
10
11
88
69
27
4
778
323
3
54
14
33
1
2
14
100
6
56
5
33
356
30
11
4
3
5
21
6
62
5
24.50
Barkerville  _
35.00
38.50
308.00
241.50
94.50
14.00
2,723.00
1,130.50
10.50
5.00
77.00
30.00
78.00
51.00
1.00
37.00
68.00
47.00
5.00
83.00
11.00
163.00
4.00
12.00
4.00
74.00
2.00
1,179.00
264.00
46.00
30.00
593.00
1,970.50
3,649.00
5,373.50
2,826.50
302.00
3,579.00
2,255.50
2,507.50
509.00
4,507.00
809.00
8,118.50
84.50
558.00
900.00
6,430.00
107.00
57,438.00
18,173.50
2,387.50
2,179.00
266.00
384.50
441.00
515.50
193.50
370.50
1,941.00
4,969.00
34.50
77 00
Clinton.	
Kamloops 	
189.00
49.00
115.50
3.50
7.00
49.00
350.00
21.00
196.00
17.50
115.50
1,246.00
105.00
38.50
14.00
10.50
17.50
73.50
21.00
217.00
17.50
Nelson  	
Oliver  	
Penticton    	
Pouce Coupe  	
Prince George 	
10.00
8.00
15.00
10.00
23.00
69.00
3.00
Princeton   . 	
Revelstoke	
Rossland     	
Smithers...   .	
Telegraph Creek —
Vancouver	
25
16
10
87.50
56.00
35.00
51
10
31
3
51.00
10.00
31.00
3.00
3,778.50
1,753.00
1,438.00
Williams Lake	
Totals	
18,917
$132,419.00
2,196
$7,686.00
2,509
$2,509.00
$142,614.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 47
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3 T 48 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1950, Inclusive
Year
Fur Royalty
or Tax
Fur-traders*,
Tanners', and
Taxidermists'
Licences
Total
1921                                                            	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
47,257.48
39,423.87
44,238.00
62,745.33
56,755.30
63,176.07
52,122.03
63,412.23
93,793.40
98,766.72
92,637.14
66,939.08
56,563.26
65,205.44
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4.575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
6,440.00
5,540.00
4,949.00
5,721.00
6,370.00
5,299.00
6,232.00
6,951.00
10,559.00
8,591.00
6,707.00
6,453.00
4,980.00
6,255.00
$30,790.80
1922   	
1923                	
57,458.89
67,524.18
1924       ..             .. . 	
62,446.68
1925   	
1926   	
1927            	
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
1928 ~                         	
58,823.07
1929  .                 	
47,329.89
1930    ..     .                          	
45,161.11
1931   '  	
1932                            	
45,981.08
40 363.79
1933               	
44,167.48
1934      .  	
1935       	
1936...     .                -                          	
47,102.81
49,831.95
52 196.50
1937    .                          	
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
63,125.30
68,475.07
58,354.03
70,363.23
104 352.40
1938                     ..   .                         	
1939    	
1940                            	
1941...                          	
1942   	
1943  	
1944                                   	
1945   	
1946                           	
107,357.72
99,344.14
73,392.08
61,543.26
71,460.44
1947.        ....  ....  .
1948      .
1949              	
1950    	
$1,645,626.45
$187,782.00
$1,833,408.45 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
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<wuuuUcHOOM^jzzo!ftWawM(H> REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 51
List of Fur Confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1950
Confiscated from—
Confiscated at—
Kind of Fur Confiscated
Date of
Confiscation
H
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1
O. R. Woods	
1
1
1
1
6
i
l
i
i
4
4
30
12
1
5
5
3
2
1
38
11
17
2
5
10
14
4
20
1
1
"    18
Sardis	
Sardis  _
"    18
R. Remple 	
"    20
Feb.   4
Notch Hill 	
"      9
J. E. Stuhl	
"    28
Mar    8
Thor Hird	
"     13	
T. F. Reay.  .
Vernon	
"     20
"    23
Lytton  	
"    29
"     30
Notch Hill 	
"     30
"     30
R. H. Cormier 	
Thor Hird
Apr. 13	
"     13
Miss E. Wendt       	
May   8
Earl Van Gilder	
F. F. Glazier	
K. C. Cameron —
Accidentally  killed by
Game Warden A. Monks
while trapping live bea-
3
"     15
"    15 	
July   4
J. W. Harrold	
Nov 18
Totals  .
10
4
51
62
83
2
3
Note.—The sum of $255.03 was received during 1950 from the sale of confiscated and surrendered fur. T 52
BRITISH COLUMBIA
List of Firearms Confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1950
Date of
Confiscation
Confiscated from-
Confiscated at—
Kind of Firearms
Confiscated
Rifles
Shotguns
Tan  11
„  11
„  12 - 	
„  12.
„  16 . ..	
..  16	
„  23	
„ 23	
	
„ 26	
Feb. 3.
	
•j  "
„  15...	
„  15   _
„  15. .	
„  15	
„  24.	
„ 25 	
., ?R
8
„  16  	
„ 21 	
„  10
Apr. 11
„ 11..	
„  12  ..
„  12  .
.. 21    ... .
„ 22-	
..  22	
	
„ 28	
May 2... ..	
„  10   _.
„  11	
..  11	
..  18	
„  12	
„  22. .
„  10	
„  15	
„  15 	
„  21  .... ..
Sept. 13 	
„  13.	
..  13	
„  13	
Oct. 18	
	
„  18. 	
„  18 .
Nov. 3	
3	
..  13	
	
..   13..    :	
..  13
„  14	
„ 20	
„ 27... 	
„ 28.	
Dec. 11  	
„  12 	
„  12  	
„  12.	
„  12   .
„  12	
„  14	
..  18  -^ 	
R. S. Sheaves	
C. Sheaves	
E, Grinder	
C. Marino _	
Frank Nemoth—
G. J. Stewart	
K. Boubette	
Elmer Roblin	
J. Sambarn	
D. W. Simpson .
Frank Vincen....
A. Johnson	
H. Garner 	
D. Little	
K. Miller	
E. J. Barman	
J. Cenname.	
M. Walters	
John Zogac	
Frederick Houston.
Carl Ostman	
Jacob Mantel	
C. R. Hunt	
R. McMullin	
V. Favro	
John Skillings	
Bob Campbell	
R. McMillan	
R. Knight 	
R. Rise 	
P. J. Jack	
A. M. Groat	
George West	
Roy Theros 	
Ned George	
John Gilman	
N. C Hartbauer..
W. D. McKane...
E. Zalinko	
Unknown	
Ralph Gedak	
Steve Lasota	
Ronald Farrell	
John Chernenkoff....
Robert Hutchinson.
James Rimmer	
Walter Dyck	
E. R. Gehrke	
Arnold Elliott	
R. Shambrook	
John Isaac	
P. Belanger.	
R. F. Walsh _
Edward Ayley 	
Abe Karnelson   *
A. J. Janzen 	
J. A. Johnson	
A. L. Johnson	
A. Advocaat	
W. L. McKinley	
Jack Scommell	
O. Mangnall  	
R. M. Blackmore.	
John Sarich	
Robert Carate	
James Weir	
R. Buckland	
John Gosse 	
Totals..
Sunbury...
Sunbury...
Jesmond.
Jesmond .
Mission...
Northlands	
Lulu Island	
Lulu Island	
Tusiack, Calif..
Langley	
Fernie 	
Hope	
Hope 	
Sardis	
Sardis	
Kimberley	
Youbou 	
Howser 	
Prince George	
North Vancouver^
Vancouver	
Houston	
Victoria	
Chilliwack	
Prince Rupert _
Victoria 	
Victoria —	
Prince George..
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Creston	
Sunset Prairie	
Esquimalt 	
Esquimalt	
Kakawis _
Mission 	
Colville, Wash	
Vancouver	
New Westminster-
California 	
Lulu Island	
Steveston  	
Bowen Island	
Taghum	
Vancouver 	
Vancouver	
Abbotsford	
Port Angeles, Wash.
Manitoba  	
Sooke	
Sooke	
Kitchener	
Kersley. __
Abbotsford....
Yarrow	
Chilliwack	
Rolla 	
Cluculz Lake..
Matsqui
Burns Lake	
Kamloops	
Port McNeill	
Port McNeill	
Port McNeill	
Port McNeill	
Port McNeill	
White Rock	
Red Deer, Alta...
57
12
Note.—The sum of $56.65 was received during 1950 from the sale of confiscated firearms. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 53
Bounties Paid during the Year Ended December 31st, 1950
Wolves
Government Agency
Cougar,
$20
Coyote,
$4 '
Amount
$40
$25
Alberni   	
3
10
$275.00
Atlin 	
4
4
13
7
152.00
188.00
Barkerville .     	
274
5
650
9,550.00
7
15
629
3,096.00
6
526
2,224.00
5
49
1,105.00
2
26
3
95
570.00
440.00
Fernie  	
Golden  	
1
4
225
1,005.00
8
172
848.00
Kamloops  	
17
12
42
1,078
6,132.00
Kaslo   	
	
1
17
88.00
Kelowna   	
3
198
852.00
Lillooet  	
4
5
78
572.00
Merritt   _ -	
	
7
885
3,680.00
Nanaimo..   	
2
22
490,00
Nelson _ 	
13
204
1,076.00
3
18
132.00
Penticton	
6
360
1,560.00
126
2
256
4,214.00
3
60.00
264
4
500
8,680.00
66
8
35
1,950.00
Princeton  	
8
237
1,108.00
58
19
464
4,556.00
56.00
Revelstoke..—   	
1
9
1
47
208 00
Smithers.-..- 	
38
1
145
1,550.00
17
106
764 00
2
50.00
73
37
1,973.00
494.00
Vancouver   	
1
2
10
51
Victoria — 	
2
28
2
618.00
14
278
1,392.00
11,980.00
24
51
2,500
Totals 	
115
876
395
9,822
$73,688.00
' t 54 british columbia
Comparative Statement of Bounties Paid from 1922 to 1950, Inclusive
Calendar Year
Wolves
Cougars
Coyotes
Crows
Magpies
Eagles
Owls
Amount
1972
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
366
285
196
261
265
301
472
461
519
725
524
395
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
1,971
2,038
1,924
1,546
1,221
1,259
5,506
2,720
2,976
3,911
6,847
9,822
53,443
~~Tt2
5,770
10,046
2,246
70
2,487
3,427
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
1,025
1,389
403
1
$60,494.80
1923
14,840.00
19?4
20,398.40
1975
24,397.00
1976
41,077.00
19?7
65,377.95
107R
50,709.25
1929   .
1930
1931
42,122.00
36,090.25
42,036.15
1937
80.00
1933.....	
1034
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
1,659
1,002
1,039
1,017
1,321
1,202
932
1,102
1,156
1,180
991
6,285.00
6,825.00
1035
12,374.00
103fi
20,350.00
1<»7
19,540.00
1038
21,018.00
1030
26,399.00
1940
23,131.00
16,868.00
1041
104?
17,397.00
1943   .
1944
1045
	
16,587.00
20,243.00
46,627.00
1946
22,392.00
1947 ..
1948
	
36,386.00
58,344.00
70,501.00
1940
1950
73,688.00
Totals
20,239
11,412
108,515
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$912,577.80 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 55
Big-game Trophy Fees Paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1950
Species
Government Agency
.1
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Amount
Barkerville-	
3
8
2
10
10
2
4
1
24
9
1
1
5
1
5
2
2
l
5
38
2
1
6
16
3
1
1
6
3
12
12
4
1
2
2
5
2
l
l
43
12
3
3
1
202
17
4
12
40
2
7
1
1
1>
65
2
1
1
11
8
23
10
39
47
3
3
3
49
18
1
1
1
2
19
2
9
2
4
7
4
4
1
45
7
14
2
1
37
707
11
22
49
9
20
33
26
46
2
9
3
1
1
6
7
3
19
16
52
40
1
$65.00
2,595.00
48,605.00
2,505.00
155.00
5,545.00
7,425.00
50.00
Clinton 	
Creston  	
Fernie	
Golden
175.00
Kamloops	
Kaslo.   	
725.00
50.00
75.00
Nelson  _.
5.00
1,745.00
Oliver 	
Pouce Coupe	
Prince George	
3,720.00
5,425.00
4,265.00
160.00
Quesnel 	
Revelstoke 	
Rossland  	
605.00
450.00
80.00
135.00
Smithers  	
400.00
1,125.00
Vancouver	
Williams Lake 	
410.00
1,660.00
Totals 	
90
123
	
60
3
376
238
90
1,012
109
$88,155.00
10.00
Total
|
$88,145.00 T 56
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1950
Description of Offence
Divisions (See Foot-note)
"A"
5
o
U
M c
Fines or
Penalties
Imposed
Game Animals
Allowing dogs to run or hunt deer	
Buying or selling big game illegally	
Exceeding bag-limit on deer 	
Hunting, killing, or possession of big-game animals of
female sex  	
Killing or possession of big-game animals during close
season  - 	
Killing or possession of big-game animals under one year
of age  	
Pit-lamping or hunting deer at night	
Possession of untagged deer or moose 	
Possession of game animals from which evidence (sex)
removed	
Firearms
Carrying firearms or hunting on game reserve	
Carrying loaded firearms or discharging same in or from
automobile 	
Carrying or in possession of unplugged shotgun	
Minors carrying firearms unaccompanied by an adult	
Fur Trade and Trapping
Allowing traps to remain set after close of season	
Baiting traps with game meat 	
Exporting fur without a permit 	
Failing to make returns on trapping licence	
Fur-trader failing to keep proper record-book 	
Interfering or trapping on another person's trap-line	
Possession of untagged beaver-pelts	
Trading in furs without a licence	
Trapping fur-bearing animals without a licence __	
Trapping fur-bearing animals during close season 	
Trapping on game reserve. 	
Licences
Allowing one's licence to be used by another person.	
Non-resident carrying firearms without a licence	
Non-resident angling without a licence  	
Resident carrying firearms without a licence	
Resident angling without a licence  	
Using another person's licence	
Migratory Game Birds
Exceeding bag or possession limit on migratory game
birds	
Hunting migratory game birds from power-boat	
Hunting, killing, or in possession of migratory game
birds during close season	
Hunting, killing, or in possession of migratory non-game
birds 	
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours	
Hunting migratory game birds with a rifle 	
Taking or in possession of migratory game-bird eggs	
Special Fishery Regulations
Angling for trout during close season	
Exceeding bag-limit on trout 	
Jigging fish or illegally taking kokanee '.	
Molesting fish on spawning-grounds 	
Possession of or using fish-roe in prohibited area	
Taking trout otherwise than by angling	
Taking or possession of undersized trout	
Using more than one line	
Using gear designed to catch more than one fish	
22
1
3
1
2
6
54
50
2
2
28
2
1
2
14
_4
1
1
33
4
1
34
30
26
1
1
2
4
2
12
_
3
6
10
1
1
37
3
2
9
14
62
40
22
31
31
5
2
5
97
102
19
3
34
1
39
2
4
5
5
160
10
12
1
17
67
263
247
3
2 I
1
32
6
64
1
1
53
10
16
2
14
9
27
10
7
2
1
27
47
7
4
16
160
10
14
2
1
2
2
2
3
2
3
29
4
1
1
18
67
265
249
3
2  I
M
35 |
I
6 I
64 |
1
1
53 |
10
17
2 I
14 |
9 I
27 |
10 |
7 I
$125.00
30.00
25.00
2,360.00
2,220.00
130.00
2,000.00
190.00
60.00
20.00
2,470.00
120.00
80.00
35.00
10.00
60.00
20.00
100.00
50.00
460.00
75.00
100.00
725.00
715.00
2,881.00
2,345.00
150.00
60.00
100.00
665.00
35.00
635.00
10.00
645.00
165.00
270.00
20.00
220.00
220.00
312.50
115.00
34.50 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 57
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1950—Continued
Divisions
(.See Foot-note)
13
to
6
s
1
o
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a
o
0
3
H B
Description of Offence
"A"
"B "
"C"
"D"
"E"
Fines or
Penalties
Imposed
Upland Game Birds
Allowing dogs to hunt game birds during prohibited time-
Exceeding bag-limit on upland game birds	
11
1
1
4
1
8
7
1
1
2
2
3
6
4
2
2
1
2
4
1
3
3
1
2
2
5
1
1
6
3
1
1
2
1
10
2
2
1
5
To
l
16
2
2
1
1
5
5
4
34
1
2
5
2
2
1
18
7
1
1
3
15
1
1
4
2
2
21
5
5
6
34
1
2
5
2
2
1
20
7
1
1
3
15
1
1
4
2
3
22
20.00
105.00
40.00
Hunting, killing,  or possession of game birds during
close season.    	
Hunting oi killing upland game birds when snow is on
610.00
10.00
45.00
20.00
40.00
Miscellaneous
10.00
Giving false information to a Game Warden in order to
185.00
70.00
25.00
25.00
Guiding without a licence or permit   	
45.00
95.00
15.00
Non-resident hunting big game without a guide 	
Obstructing a Game Warden in the discharge of his duties
Possession of game on premises of an eating-place	
120.00
25.00
125.00
230.00
Totals
225 1 210
312
184
428
22
1,337
1,359
$22,923.00
Gaol Sentences
1—Resident angling without a licence, five days. 2—Killing moose of the female sex, sixty days.
1—Killing big game with a .22 rifle, thirty days. 1—Trapping without a licence, thirty days.
Note.—"A" Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. " B " Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. " C " Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. " D " Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. "E" Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas. T 58
BRITISH COLUMBIA
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T 59
Summary of Game-fish Culture Distributions, Showing Eggs, Fry,
AND FlNGERLINGS, 1950
Kind of Game Fish
Eggs
Fry
Fingerlings
426,155
341,172
443,337
2,369,785
60,952
3,551,500
1,420,000
1,258,710
Totals 	
5,397,655
3,215,246
1,258,710
Summary of Game-fish Eggs, Fry, and Fingerlings at Departmental
Hatcheries, December 31st, 1950
Hatchery
Cut-throat
Eggs or Fry
Eastern Brook
Eggs or Fry
Kamloops
Fingerlings
or Fry
Kokanee
Eggs or Fry
Nelson 	
Puntledge Park-
Smiths Falls	
Summerland	
Totals.
304,300
995
224,490
365,794
393,850
250,367
995
304,300
1,234,501
59,600
59,600
EggS  	
Fry	
Fingerlings
Summary
5,397,655
3,215,246
1,258,710
Total distributions     9,871,611
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1950     1,599,396
Total
11,471,007 T 60
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Loon Creek Hatchery—Continued
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o
h REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 71
Returns from 4,147 Holders of Special Firearms Licences, Showing Big Game,
Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals Killed, Season 1950-51
Big Game
Bear ___
Caribou
Deer	
Moose _
989
37
1,102
566
Mountain-goat _
Mountain-sheep
Wapiti (Elk)	
19
36
Fur-bearing Animals
Beaver  15,570
Fisher  852
Fox  597
Lynx  1,092
Marten   12,393
Mink  11,627
Muskrat   47,039
Otter  622
Racoon  1,107
Skunk  197
Squirrels  303,141
Weasels   38,970
Wildcat   304
Wolverine  236
Cougar _
Coyotes _
Predatory Animals
196 Wolves
465
3,
Statement of Vermin Destroyed by Game Wardens during the Year 1950
Kind of Animals or Birds Destroyed
Game Divisions
Total
Animals
Bear	
Bobcats _
Cougar ...
Coyotes.—
Fox	
Gophers	
Ground-hogs _
Wild cats	
Wild dogs	
Wolves.	
Crows...	
Eagles	
Hawks —
Magpies	
Mergansers..
Owls	
Ravens _.
Starlings .
Birds
3
35
2
175
78
236
43
62
164
32
77
53
306
16
57
41
33
3
28
51
33
28
9
14
577
75
150
67
45
1,217
53
140
790
1
121
148
16
26
1
183
7
27
5
166
250
57
33
22
13
22
164
2
9
4
14
39
337
44
1,117
38
115
1
3
13
44
2
61
26
116
938
46
109
766
247
211
3,126
206
386
846
17
186
440
18 T 72 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Summary of Liberation of Game Birds, 1950
Area Pheasants
Vancouver Island—
Alberni  156
Courtenay  687
Ladysmith   15
Nanaimo-Parksville  276
Victoria (North and South Saanich)  911
Total  J     2,045
Lower Mainland—
Agassiz  711
Chilliwack  1,971
Delta  1,402
Lulu Island  275
Matsqui  980
Mission (Hatzic and Nicomen Island)  2,287
Pitt Meadows  2,533
Sumas Prairie - 2,001
Surrey  1,963
Total   14,123
Interior—
Ashcroft   75
Cache Creek  50
Clinton   50
Creston  246
Grand Forks  211
Kamloops  600
Kelowna  100
Keremeos   150
Lillooet  9 8
Merritt  100
Nakusp  24
Oliver  101
Penticton  350
Salmon Arm  350
Summerland  100
Vernon  700
Total      3,305
District Summary
Vancouver Island     2,045
Lower Mainland  14,123
Interior     3,305
Total   19,473
During the year 127 California quail were purchased, and of these 64 were liberated
in the South Saanich District and 63 in the Metchosin District. Seventeen partridge were
purchased and liberated in the South Okanagan District.
Note.—Total cost covering purchase of all game birds listed was $36,646.70. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 73
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1950
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1950
Pheasants   5,472 Partridge      19
Quail      147
Number and Kind of Birds Raised, 1950
Pheasants   24,228 Partridge   104
Quail  39
Number and Kind of Birds Purchased, 1950
Pheasants   747 Ducks     10
Number and Kind of Birds Sold, 1950
Pheasants   2,618 Partridge      17
Quail      127
Number and Kind of Birds Killed, 1950
Pheasants   4,003 Ducks       1
Quail  3
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand, December 31st, 1950
Pheasants   4,826 Partridge   106
Quail        56 Ducks       9
Note.—During the year 1950 there were 132 licensed game-bird farmers in the
Province, but during the year 1950 ten of these farmers discontinued business. There
were five nil returns, and two farmers did not submit a return. Game-bird bands sold to
licensed game-bird farmers during the year 1950 amounted to $223.20 (2,232 bands at
10 cents each).
Miscellaneous Revenue, 1950
Sale of Lists of Various Licence-holders, etc.
32 Game Convention minutes at 75 cents per copy  $24.00
2,232 game-bird bands at 10 cents each  223.20
322 trap-line transfer fees at $2.50 each  805.00
3,593 game maps at 10 cents each  359.30
Proceeds, sale of trout eggs  1,034.00
Proceeds, export of live fur-bearing animals  145.00
Proceeds, permits to export game meat  115.00
Total   $2,705.50 T 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA
LIST OF GUIDES AND NON-RESIDENT OUTFITTERS, 1950
Definition of Guide Licence Classifications
A First-class Guide shall be one who has acted as a guide in the Province for a period
of at least three years in the ten years immediately preceding his application for a guide's
licence and who has suitable equipment for outfitting any person desiring to hunt game.
A Second-class Guide shall be one who has acted as a guide in the Province for a
period of at least three years in the ten years immediately preceding his application for
a guide's licence, but who cannot qualify as a First-class Guide.
An Assistant Guide shall be one who cannot qualify as either a First-class or Second-
class Guide, and shall be entitled to act as a guide in the hunting of game birds or in angling
for trout, and after securing a permit so to do from the Game Commission when employed
by, or under the supervision of a First- or Second-class Guide to guide big-game hunters.
Cariboo District "A" (100-Mile House South to Ashcroft and
Including Canim Lake and Lillooet)
Name and Address of Guide
Abbs, Richard, Fawn	
Alex, Stanley, Big Bar..
Archie, George, Forest Grove..
Baher, Fred, Ashcroft	
Baher, J. A., Ashcroft	
Baher, R. M., 70-Mile House..
Licence
Grade
 Asst.
. Asst.
__ 1st
.... 2nd
.... 2nd
.....   1st
Barker, A. S., Mahood Lake  2nd
Bayns, A. H., Canim Lake  2nd
Bissette, A., Loon Lake  2nd
Bob, Edward, Canim Lake    1st
Bones, Alex, Clinton    1st
Bones, Frank, Clinton    1st
Bones, Peter, Clinton    1st
Bones, Teresa, Clinton  2nd
Bothwick, Hector, Forest Grove  2nd
Brooke, H. A., Cache Creek  2nd
Camille, Francis, Dog Creek  2nd
Chabara, Anna, 70-Mile House  2nd
Chisholm, I. R., Big Bar Asst.
Christopher, David, Forest Grove  2nd
Christy, Frank, Moha  2nd
Christy, Thomas, Moha  2nd
Cleveland, J. G., Bridge Lake     1st
Cleveland, L. C, Bridge Lake    1st
Cleveland, R. C, Bridge Lake    1st
Coldwell, H. W., lesmond    1st
Colin, A. A., 100-Mile House Asst.
Colin, Grover, 100-Mile House	
Collins, E. M., Ashcroft...     1st
Collins, lack E., Ashcroft  2nd
Cunningham, Charles B., Bralorne    1st
Dahlgren, C, Bridge Lake Asst.
Dean, J. C., Fawn  2nd
Decker, English, Forest Grove  2nd
Dougall, Vivian, Bridge Lake Asst.
Dougherty (Ir.), Charles, Clinton    1st
Dougherty, E. C, Clinton    1st
Duncan, Peter, Clinton Asst.
Dyer, G. H., 70-Mile House  2nd
Edall, I. K., Fawn  2nd
Eden, Donald D., Fawn  2nd
Eden, R. E., 70-Mile House  2nd
Erickson, S. W., Canim Lake  2nd
Faessler, Charles J., Fawn    1st
Farmer, Frank, 70-Mile House Asst.
Fenton, Charlie, Clinton    1st
Fenton, Henry C, Jesmond Asst.
Fenton, Walter, Big Bar Creek    ..   1st
Flaherty, R. J., Fawn    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Flaherty, R. W., 93-Mile House Asst.
Forde, H. D. W., Clinton  2nd
Fowler, Norman A., Clinton :  2nd
Gaines, Clinton, Fawn  2nd
Gammie, H. G., 70-Mile House  2nd
Gammie, Ruth, 70-Mile House Asst.
George, Henry, Cache Creek  2nd
Graf, Joe, Fawn Asst.
Graf, Mike, Fawn    1st
Greenlee, E. L., Canim Lake    1st
Grice, Percy, 70-Mile House  2nd
Grinder, Bert, Clinton  2nd
Grinder, Isidor, Clinton    1st
Grinder, J., Jesmond    1st
Grinder, Mrs. L., Clinton  2nd
Grinder, Walter, Jesmond :    1st
Grypuik, Sam, Ashcroft Asst.
Hall, Marvin T., Fawn    1st
Haller, Francis, Clinton Asst.
Hannah, L. B., Clinton  2nd
Hansen, John F., Bridge Lake    1st
Hansen, Wesley B., Bridge Lake  2nd
Hendricks, Ike, Ashcroft  2nd
Higginbottom, Alfred, Jesmond    1st
Higgins, C. L., R.R. 1, Fawn " 1st
Higgins, Ed, Fawn    1st
Higgins, Elmer, Bridge Lake Asst.
Higgins, K. E., Fawn Asst.
Higgins, Marion, Bridge Lake    1st
Higgins, Ronald A., R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
Hodges, E. W., R.R. 1, Fawn  2nd
Horn, Walter A., Fawn  2nd
Houseman, J. J., 100-Mile House    1st
Hubel, Roy, Mahood Asst.
Huckvale, Jim, Fawn    1st
Hunter, Mickey, Ashcroft  2nd
Johnson, Claude, Bridge Lake    1st
Johnson, J. A., 100-Mile House    1st
Johnson, Wayne C, Bridge Lake Asst.
Johnson, Zale A., Bridge Lake    1st
King, Gordon, Fawn  2nd
King, C. J., Fawn  2nd
Knauf, H. G., Fawn  2nd
Koster, Henry, Canoe Creek  2nd
Krebs, L. B., 100-Mile House    1st
Langley, Arthur L., 70-Mile House  2nd
Larson, John O., Bridge Lake    1st
Larson, Karel J., Fawn  2nd
Larson, L. L., Fawn      1st REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 75
Cariboo District "A" (100-Mile House South to Ashcroft and
Including Canim Lake and Lillooet)—Continued
Licence
Grade
1st
Name and Address of Guide
Leavitt (Jr.), F. W., Fawn	
Lebourdois, Joe, Clinton  2nd
Levick, J. D., Fawn  2nd
Loring, Edwin, Clinton    2nd
Louie, Freddie, Canoe Creek    1st
Louis, Gavy, Jesmond  2nd
MacDonald, J., Big Bar Asst.
McDougall, Robert, Big Lake    1st
McKay, John V., Lytton  2nd
MacKilvington, B. W., Anahim Lake  2nd
MacLean, D., Fawn  2nd
McMahon, Jesse C, 70-Mile House  2nd
McNeil, B. S., Fawn    1st
McNeil, H. M., Fawn    1st
Mackie, J. C, Fawn ...     1st
Madden, E. E., Cache Creek  2nd
Martin, R. H., Bridge Lake  2nd
Matier, H, Clinton     2nd
Mobbs, B. H., 70-Mile House  2nd
Mooring, Alex, Fawn     2nd
Morris, D. L., Forest Grove    1st
Odian, E. J., Fawn   2nd
O'Keefe, Hush, McGillivray Falls  2nd
O'Keefe, Wally, Rexmount Ranch, Shalalth   1st
Olafson, H. J., Fawn   2nd
Oleman, Patrick, Shalalth Asst.
Osterlund, Ed, Moha  2nd
Parent, S. J., Fawn  2nd
Park, Arlie H., 70-Mile House  2nd
Park, Jack P., 70-Mile House  2nd
Parkes, L. G., 70-Mile House  2nd
Paul, Louis, Canoe Creek  2nd
Peavler, W. C, Clinton  2nd
Perault, J., Jesmond  2nd
Petrie, D. M., Bridge Lake  2nd
Pierro, Alex, Cache Creek" Asst.
Pierro, John, Cache Creek  2nd
Pigeon, Aure, Clinton  2nd
Pigeon, C. L., Clinton  2nd
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Pigeon, J. R., Clinton     1st
Pigeon, Norman, Clinton Asst.
Pinkney, Robert, Canim Lake    1st
Powell, H. J., Fawn     1st
Powell, Thomas G., Fawn    1st
Prydatok, S., 70-Mile House  2nd
Reynolds, A. J., Big Bar    1st
Reynolds, H. D., Big Bar Creek    1st
Roberts, Roy K., Ashcroft Asst.
Roberts, R. V., Fawn    1st
Roper, Alfred, Forest Grove  2nd
Rosette, A., Gang Ranch    1st
Rosette, Willie, Gang Ranch Asst.
Scheepbouwer, J. A., 70-Mile House  2nd
Scheepbouwer, John C, 70-Mile House __ 2nd
Scheepbouwer, William, 70-Mile House .  2nd
Schwartz, Thomas, Bralorne Asst.
Sedman, J. E., Fawn  2nd
Siebert, John, Jesmond  2nd
Singleton, Wilfred, Fawn  2nd
Thomason, T. D., Bridge Lake    1st
Thorsteinson, Charles, 9 3-Mile House  2nd
Turney, R. J., Fawn    1st
Umphrey, S. T., Fawn  2nd
Van Horlick, Buster, Clinton  2nd
Vecqueray, A. E., Clinton  2nd
Vecqueray, Richard J., Clinton  2nd
Walsh, F. C, 70-Mile House  2nd
Watkins, Allan, Ashcroft  Asst.
Watt, James D., Clinton  2nd
Watt, Lloyd, Ashcroft  2nd
Whitley, W. P., 70-Mile House  2nd
Wilkinson, Charles, 70-Mile House  2nd
Wilkinson, T. H., Fawn  2nd
Winteringham, Frank, Fawn  2nd
Womack, C. B., Lone Butte    1st
Wrigley, E. W., 70-Mile House  2nd
Young, William, Clinton   2nd
Cariboo District " D " (Chilcotin District, Cariboo West of
Fraser River)
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Baptiste, Peter, Alexis Creek Asst.
Blatchford, J. A, Alexis Creek    1st
Bliss, William, Alexis Creek    1st
Bobb, E. R., Marguerite  2nd
Bonner, James, Big Creek  2nd
Bryant, A. L., Anahim Lake     1st
Bullion, Sammy, Alexis Creek  2nd
Butler, Len, Tatla Lake  2nd
Butler, Lee, Tatla Lake Asst.
Cahoose, Gus, Anahim Lake  2nd
Castleman, Jack, Big Creek Asst.
Cheta, Johnnie, Alexis Creek  2nd
Church, R. H., Big Creek    1st
Clayton, John, Anahim Lake  2nd
Collier, Eric, Meldrum Creek  2nd
Collier, Veasy Mel, Meldrum Creek Asst.
Dester, Baptiste, Kleena Kleene    1st
Dorsey, Lester, Anahim Lake    1st
Elkins, Joe, Alexis Creek  2nd
Elkins, Marvin, Alexis Creek Asst.
Elkins, Thomas, Alexis Creek    1st
Erickson, Arthur, Anahim Lake  Asst.
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Erickson, Carl B., Anahim Lake Asst.
French, Robert, Redstone  2nd
Garland, Ed, Riske Creek Asst.
George, Andy, Alexis Creek  2nd
George, Willie, Alexis Creek Asst.
Hance, Grover, Hanceville
Hansen, Fred, Kleena Kleene _
Haynes, Harry K., Tatlayoko	
Haynes, Kenneth W. G., Tatlayoko
Henderson, John, Tatlayoko	
Henry, Cecil, Big Creek
_ 1st
— 2nd
.... 2nd
.... 2nd
.... 1st
__   1st
Henry, Eagle Lake, Tatlayoko    1st
Holte, Andrew, Anahim Lake  2nd
Holte, Andy, Anahim Lake  2nd
Holte, Thomas, Anahim Lake  2nd
Holtey, Louis, Anahim Lake  2nd
Howarth, Dewey, Hanceville Asst.
Hugo, Mark A., Big Creek    1st
Hutchinson, William, Big Creek  2nd
lack, Johnny, Alexis Creek  2nd
Jasper, Delmer, Riske Creek Asst.
Johnson, William, Riske Creek    1st T 76
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cariboo District " D " (Chilcotin District, Cariboo West of
Fraser River ) —Continued
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Johnston, Victor G., Riske Creek Asst.
Knoll, Alvis, Redstone  2nd
Kosmonk, A., Hagensborg Asst.
Lavington, Arthur, Nazko    1st
Leitz, William, Big Creek Asst.
Le Lievre, Lind, Penticton    1st
Lulua, Felix, Alexis Creek  2nd
Lulua, Tommy, Alexis Creek  2nd
McKill, Clarence, Kleena Kleene    1st
Mack, Maxine, Alexis Creek  2nd
Maindley, John, Alexis Creek  2nd
Maxted, William, Big Creek  2nd
Mecham, Floyd M., Hagensborg  2nd
Moore, Ken B., Tatlayoko  2nd
Mullins, B. A., Tatla Lake  2nd
Mulvahill, R., Redstone    1st
Mulvahill, William, Redstone  2nd
Nicholson, Donald R., Tatla Lake  2nd
Nicholson, Terence, Tatla Lake  2nd
Paxton, Alex, Alexis Creek     1st
Petal, Henry, Alexis Creek  2nd
Phillips, Floyd, Anahim Lake    1st
Quilt, Fred, Hanceville  2nd
Quilt, Jack, Hanceville  2nd
Quilt, Johnny, Hanceville Asst.
Licence
Grade
... Asst.
_   1st
Name and Address of Guide
Rafferty, A. T., Riske Creek	
Roberts, C. F., Riske Creek	
Robertson, Ole, Anahim Lake  2nd
Ross, Eddie, Redstone  2nd
Ross, Peter, Redstone  2nd
Sammy, Eugene, Alexis Creek  2nd
Scallon, Felix, Big Creek Asst.
Scallon, James, Big Creek  2nd
Schuk, Edward, Tatlayoko  2nd
Scotty, Frank, Kleena Kleene  2nd
 Asst.
 Asst.
 Asst.
    1st
 Asst.
Shuttleworth, Gerald, Penticton
Sill, Frank, Anahim Lake ....
Sing, Isaac, Anahim Lake .
Squinas, Thomas, Anahim Lake
Stecyh, Nick, Big Creek.
Stephenson, Donald, Alexis Creek  2nd
Sulin, Sam, Anahim Lake  2nd
Sulin, Willie, Anahim Lake  2nd
Turner, Timothy, Kleena Kleene  2nd
Watt, Bruce, Big Creek Asst.
Weir, Donald I., Alexis Creek    1st
Wilson, David F., Tatla Lake    1st
Witte, D., Big Creek    1st
Witte, Frank, Big Creek    1st
Woods, William F., Hanceville     1st
West Kootenay (Including Creston-Nelson-Slocan-Kootenay-
Arrow and Trout Lakes Districts)
Name and Address of Guide
Brett, Art, Arrow Creek	
Cummings, Arnold, Boswell	
Cummings, Ray, Boswell	
Currie, Haskett S., Ainsworth .
Gimlet, Louis, Salmo
Licence
Grade
... 2nd
Kachuck, J., Trout Lake	
Koch, Charles A., Sanca	
MacNicol, J. W., Johnson's Landing  2nd
Licence
Grade Name and Address of Guide
... Asst. Newbrand, Emil, Box 109, Nakusp .
  2nd Oliver, George J., Gray Creek    .  2nd
 Asst. O'Neil, Richard, Creston  2nd
.... 2nd Rodgers, Floyd C, Creston    1st
  2nd Rodgers, James L., Creston    1st
.... 2nd Schwartzenhauer, Carl, Deer Park  2nd
.. 2nd Small, R. G., Beaton    1st
Grand Forks-Greenwood (Including Kettle Valley)
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Abel, Cummine, Kettle Valley  2nd
Anschetz, Chris, Rock Creek  2nd
Bohnet, James, Rock Creek Asst.
Bradshaw, George A., Westbridge  2nd
Brooke, Ernest C, Westbridge  2nd
Carey, Bertram Charles, Westbridge  2nd
Carey, Joseph, Westbridge  2nd
Cochran, Fred M., Westbridge  2nd
Fernstrom, Fred, Kettle Valley  2nd
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
From, Helge, Westbridge  _ 2nd
From, Ingvall, Westbridge	
From, Oliver, Westbridge	
Hall, Elmer, Westbridge	
Lockhart, Fred, Beaverdell	
Lutner, E. C, Beaverdell	
Noren, C. S., Westbridge	
Smith, Howard J., Westbridge
2nd
2nd
2nd
2nd
2nd
2nd
2nd
Turcotte, James D., Greenwood Asst.
Prince George District "A" (East to Jasper)
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Berghammer, Joe, Fort Graham  2nd
Buchanan, Edward G., South Fort George 2nd
Buchanan, Frank L., South Fort George  2nd
Bricker, William, South Fort George  2nd
Brooks, George, South Fort George    1st
Cannon, Walter, Sinclair Mills Asst.
Carr, Stanley Joseph, Tete Jaune    1st
Chesser, Charles A., Mount Robson  2nd
Corless (Jr.), Richard F., Prince George    1st
Crate, Lloyd, Lucerne  2nd
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Gaugh, Allen H., Prince George    1st
Hansen (Jr.), Anund, Hansard Asst.
Hansen (Sr.), Anund, Hansard    1st
Hargreaves, Roy F., Mount Robson    1st
Henry, G. K., Prince George    1st
Henry, Mack G., Prince George Asst.
Henry, Walter J., Prince George    1st
Hobe, Henry, Hansard  2nd
Hooker, Clarence C, Dome Creek Asst.
Hooker, James B., Dome Creek    1st REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 77
Prince George District "A" (East to Jasper)—Continued
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Hooker, Kenneth W., Dome Creek  2nd
Jensen, Arne, Dome Creek  2nd
Jenson, Ernest H., Dome Creek  1st
Johnson, Howard T., South Fort George.... 2nd
Labonte, Leo J., Prince George Asst.
Lotucha, Antoni, Prince George  2nd
Miller, D. N., Prince George  1st
Mills, Marshall, Tete Jaune  1st
Mintz, Arthur J., Tete Jaune  2nd
Neighbor, Hersch, Tete Jaune  1st
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Olson, John V., Prince George Asst.
Sande, Walter, Sinclair Mills    1st
Shalapata, Joseph, Mount Robson Asst.
Simmons, Herbert J., Prince George  2nd
Van Somer, Art, Ware Asst.
Van Somer, James, Prince George  2nd
Wade, Gordon D., South Fort George Asst.
Warren, Robert O., Finlay Forks Asst.
Williams, John, Mount Robson ■_ Asst.
Witter, Henry L., Prince George Asst.
Cariboo District " C " (Quesnel-Barkerville from
Marguerite North)
Name and Address of Guide
Allen, George H., Quesnel	
Armstrong, Wilfred R., Quesnel.
Bowers, Charlie, Alexandria	
Licence
Grade
....   1st
.... 2nd
..Asst.
Licence
Grade
1st
Cochran, lames D., Barkerville    1st
Cold well, Harry B., Punchaw  2nd
Coldwell, Reg, Punchaw Asst.
Crick, Burton F., Quesnel Asst.
Ellison, Ray, Quesnel  2nd
Forster, Hubert H, Quesnel    1st
Harrington, Alexander, Quesnel    1st
Heaton, William F., Buck Ridge  2nd
Henrickson, Arvid, Wells  2nd
Hortness, Sigurd, Cinema  2nd
Iverson, Otto, Quesnel Asst.
Knudson, Leonard, Quesnel  2nd
Laurens, Louie, Nazko Asst.
Lavington, H. A., Quesnel    1st
La Voie, George C, Batnuni Lake  2nd
McKitrick, Arnold, Wells  2nd
McKort, Clarence C, Alexandria    1st
McKort, Irvine, Alexandria Asst.
McKenzie, Albert, Cinema  Asst.
McKenzie, James, Cinema    1st
Name and Address of Guide
McKitrick, Roy D., Wells	
Marsh, Ruric L., Quesnel    .. 2nd
Merz, Walter C, Quesnel Asst.
Miller, Isaac Edward, Punchaw     1st
Moffat, Ronald H, Alexandria    1st
O'Leary, Arthur, Quesnel    .    1st
Orr, William M., Chilliwack  2nd
Paley, Bob, Quesnel Asst.
Paley, Harold, Quesnel Asst.
Paley, Wayne, Quesnel Asst.
Quanstrom, Carl, Quesnel  2nd
Quanstrom, Harry, Quesnel    1st
Quanstrom, lulius, Quesnel  2nd
Rawling, Arden, Quesnel  2nd
Rawling, Arnold B., Quesnel Asst.
Rogers, Alfred, Moose Heights  2nd
Rogers, Samuel, Moose Heights Asst.
Sorum, Erick, Quesnel   2nd
Tibbies, Fred, Quesnel    1st
Twan, John David, Quesnel     1st
Webster, Jim, Buck Ridge .    1st
Youngs, Grover A., Wells    1st
Cariboo District "B " (100-Mile House North to Marguerite)
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Abram, A. E., Lac la Hache  2nd
Alexander, Norman J., Lac la Hache    1st
Ash, Chris, Big Lake  2nd
Asserlind, H. C., Keithley Creek  2nd
Atkins, Dan, Horsefly  2nd
Barton, Thomas, Lac la Hache    1st
Bowe, Alfred, Williams Lake  2nd
Brown-John, Victor, Likely  2nd
Curtis, Rae, Williams Lake  2nd
Dick, Mathew, Alkali Lake  2nd
Dick, W., Alkali Lake Asst.
Dixon, Morris, Lac la Hache  2nd
Eagle, C. B., Lac la Hache    1st
Eagle, Elsie, Lac la Hache Asst.
Felker, W. R., Williams Lake  2nd
Gibbons, M. L., Horsefly    1st
Goetjen, C. E., Horsefly    1st
Goudie, William J., Lac la Hache Asst.
Graham, James, Horsefly  2nd
Graham, John, Horsefly  2nd
Gunn, John M., Horsefly    1st
Haller, August, Lac la Hache  2nd
Hamilton, G. G., Williams Lake  2nd
Hamilton, Herbert M., Lac la Hache    1st
Hamilton, Peter, Williams Lake  2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Hamilton, Theodore, Lac la Hache    1st
Hamilton, Thomas, Williams Lake    2nd
Hinsche, Fred, 150-Mile House  2nd
Hockley, George, Horsefly     1st
Hooker, F. P., Horsefly  2nd
Hooker, F. C, Horsefly    1st
Hooker, S. B., Horsefly .    1st
Hubard, S. H., Horsefly  2nd
Jacobson, John, Williams Lake  2nd
Jefferson, Jesse, Big Lake  2nd
Jenner, Ernest, Horsefly     1st
Johnson, Floyd, Williams Lake  2nd
Jones, Fred, Horsefly    1st
Jones, Lawrence, Horsefly  2nd
Junek, R., Horsefly  2nd
Kelly, James A., Soda Creek  2nd
Knight, Roy, Likely  Asst.
McBurney, Aubrey, Keithley Creek  2nd
Mann, A. R., Likely  2nd
Mikkelson, Claus, 108 R., 150-Mile House 2nd
Mitchell, Samuel, Williams Lake  2nd
Moore, John, Ochiltree  2nd
Oak, Ernest, Horsefly  2nd
Ogden, Lawrence, Lac la Hache Asst.
den, P. S., Lac la Hache Asst. T 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cariboo District "B " (100-Mile House North to Marguerite )—Continued
Name and Address of Guide
Palmer, R. N., Ochiltree .	
Licence
Grade
.... 2nd
Paxton, H. E., Macalister  2nd
Petrowitz, Arthur, 150-Mile House  2nd
Renner, George, Williams Lake  2nd
Robertson, A. H., Macalister  2nd
Sharp, William, Ochiltree  2nd
Speed, Douglas, Likely  2nd
Thygesen, Julius, Horsefly     1st
McKenzie, K., Big Lake    1st
Morgan, Dallas, Likely    1st
Nicol, A., Horsefly    1st
Nicol, Shelly, Horsefly    1st
Pulver, George, 150-Mile House     1st
Racher, W. J., Horsefly    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Scott, Doug, 100-Mile House
Vaness, John, Horsefly .
Licence
Grade
....    1st
_   1st
Walters, Glen, Horsefly    1st
Walters, I. R., Likely  2nd
Walters, Leonard, Horsefly    1st
Webster, Alister, Horsefly  2nd
Westwick, Burton, 150-Mile House     1st
Westwick, Fred, 150-Mile House  2nd
Westwick, Lawrence, 150-Mile House  2nd
Wiggins, H. W., Miocene  2nd
Williams, Aubrey, Horsefly     1st
Williams, Thelma, Horsefly  2nd
Wotzke, Herbert, Williams Lake  2nd
Wynstra, J. W., Horsefly  2nd
East Kootenay District " B " (Cranbrook East to Crow's
Nest (Including Fernie and Natal)
Name and Address of Guide
Arbuckle, David, Fernie	
Baker, Frederick, Natal	
Baker, Martin C, Natal	
Baher, Mathias, Natal	
Barnes, Alfred, Corbin	
Barnes, J. N., Fernie	
Bower, Glen, Bull River	
Licence
Grade
... Asst.
... Asst.
.... 1st
.... 1st
..... 1st
..... 1st
.... 2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Cloarec, Leon I., Cranbrook Asst.
Cunliff, Thomas, Natal Asst.
Cutts, Jack, Fernie  2nd
Dvorak, Frank, Fernie    1st
Dvorak, Wenzel, Fernie  2nd
Earl, Gordon, Newgate  Asst.
Eftoda, Gordon, Natal    1st
Firstel, Emil, Natal Asst.
Gravelle, Alex, Flagstone Asst.
Gravelle, Nick, Flagstone  2nd
Holly, Tom, Natal  2nd
Hammer, Andy, Wardner  Asst.
Hicks, Frank, Fernie    1st
Hicks, Phillip, Fernie      1st
Kaisner, George, Natal Asst.
Kubinec, Pete, Fernie  2nd
Logan, Doris May, Wardner Asst.
McDonald, Sam, Flagstone   2nd
MacFarlane, Kenneth, Michel  Asst.
McGinnis, Earl, Natal    1st
McGuire, Albert, Flagstone  2nd
McKenzie, Fergus, Fernie Asst.
Matevic, Louis, Natal Asst.
Phillips,   Frank,   1551   St.  Andrew  Ave.,
North Vancouver    1st
Porco, Albert, Box 289, Natal    1st
Porco, lohn, Natal Asst.
Porco, Ralph, Box 289, Natal    1st
Reay, Charles D., Jaffray  2nd
Riddell, Harry S., Wardner  2nd
Rosicky, Andrew, Wardner Asst.
Rosicky, Anton, Wardner    1st
Rothel, Malcolm, Natal    1st
Simmon, Robert, Natal Asst.
Siple, Alfred, Jaffray    1st
Smolek, Rudolph, Fernie Asst.
Talbot, Percy K., Natal  2nd
Travis, Frank, Natal Asst.
Venzi, Guy, Natal . Asst.
Volpatti, Benjamin, Natal     1st
Williams, Robert C, Fernie Asst.
Wiekwier, Merlin, Creston .'.  Asst.
Revelstoke-Salmon Arm and Okanagan Districts
Name and Address of Guide
Akin, Ray, Revelstoke	
Cullis, Bert, Taft
Licence
Grade
 Asst.
  2nd
Durrand, W. D., Revelstoke  2nd
Engler, John, Lumby  2nd
Gardiner, Robert, Albas .     1st
Gordon, William, Kelowna Asst.
Hansen, Lee, Salmon Arm    1st
Hanson,   Charles   E.,   Cherryville,   R.R.I,
Lumby  2nd
Licence
Grade
--    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Laforme, George W., Revelstoke __
Martin, Pete, Sicamous Asst.
Sotting, Berger, Lumby  2nd
Udy, A. E., R.R. 3„ Armstrong  2nd
Wallis, Edward H., Taft Asst.
Werner, Carl, R.R. 1, Lumby  2nd
Young, A. H, Sicamous Asst.
Cassiar District (Telegraph Creek-Atlin District)
Licence
Grade
2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Asp, Phillip, Telegraph Creek	
Bacon, George, Tulsequah      .. 2nd
Brooks, Ned, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Carlick, Walter L., Telegraph Creek  2nd
Clever, Gene B., Bennett   2nd
Day, Alfred, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Dennis, Thomas, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Dennis, Robbie, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Dennis, lohn C, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Dennis, Alex, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Inkster, Charlie, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Jack, Alex, Telegraph Creek     2nd
Jackson, Richard, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Noland, John W., Atlin  2nd
Quock, Charles, Telegraph Creek Asst.
Tashoots, Frank P., Telegraph Creek  2nd
Tashoots, Jack P., Telegraph Creek  2nd
Williams, Mike, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Williams, Johnny, Telegraph Creek  2nd REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 79
Peace River (Including Fort Nelson, Fort St. John, Lower
Post, and Pouce Coupe)
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Anderson, Stewart B., Dawson Creek    1st
Artemenko, William, Fort St. John  2nd
Beattie, Donald, Hudson Hope Asst.
Beattie, Robert, Gold Bar  2nd
Belcourt, Adolphus, Hazelmere P.O., Alta.
(Big Slough, B.C.)   2nd
Belcourt, Muglorie, Mt. Valley P.O., Alta.
(Big Slough, B.C.)   2nd
Belcourt,  William,   Goodfare  P.O.,  Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.)  Asst.
Brady, Otto S., Mile 147, Fort St. John .... Asst.
Brown, Wesly J., Mile 175, Fort St. John _    1st
Calliou, Joe, Little Prairie Asst.
Calliou, John, Goodfare P.O., Alta. (Kelly
Lake, B.C.)   2nd
Calliou, Pete, Little Prairie Asst.
Callison, Dennis W., Fort Nelson     1st
Callison, E. O., Toad River Lodge, Mile
422, Alaska Highway ,     1st
Cameron, Patrick, Moberly Lake     1st
Cameron, Ralph E., Moberly Lake Asst.
Campbell, Lectave, Goodfare P.O., Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.)  Asst.
Cardinal, Joseph H., Mile  147, Fort St.
John Asst.
Clovis, Roy J., Baldonnel Asst.
Courvoisier, Henry C, Fort Nelson    1st
Courvoisier, Lawrence, Bear Flat Asst.
Couterille, Fred, Moberly Lake Asst.
Dahl, Joel O., Fort Nelson  2nd
Dalziel, George C. F., Lower Post  2nd
Davidson, J. O., Lower Post     1st
Desjarlais, Joseph, Moberly Lake Asst.
Dhenin, Rene G., Fort St. lohn     1st
Dopp, Edgar, Fort St. John    1st
Durney, Milo, East Pine     1st
Edzerza, Charles, Lower Post  2nd
Edzerza, George, Lower Post     1st
Elden, Otto, Moberly Lake       Asst.
Ferguson,   Fraser,   Goodfare   P.O.,
(Kelly Lake, B.C.)
Alta.
.Asst.
Fleet, Delbert, Fort St. John Asst.
Fox, Sammy, Mile 147, Fort St. John Asst.
Frank, Ernest, Lower Post Asst.
Gairdner, Edward, Fort Nelson Asst.
Garbitt, Patrick, Moberly Lake Asst.
Garbitt, Theophile S., Moberly Lake    1st
Gauthier,   Eugene,   Goodfare  P.O.,   Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.)  Asst.
Gladu, Isadore, Goodfare P.O., Alta  2nd
Golata, Francis W., Rolla     1st
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Goodrich, George, Little Prairie   2nd
Gray,   George  D.,   Goodfare  P.O.,  Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.)  Asst.
Groat, Allen H, Sunset Prairie Asst.
Hambler,   Albert,   Goodfare   P.O.,   Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.)   2nd
Hambler,  George,  Goodfare P.O., Alta.,
(Kelly Lake P.O.)  Asst.
Haralson, Lome M., Fort Nelson     1st
Henio, Lenord, Lower Post  2nd
Holly, James, Mile 147, Fort St. John Asst.
Houle, Joe, Arras  2nd
Johnson, Freddie, Teslin Lake, Y.T  2nd
Keech, Jack, Little Prairie Asst.
Kruger, William, Hudson Hope  2nd
Lamont, Al, Fort St. John  2nd
La Roche, Robert, Fort Nelson Asst.
Larson, Albin, Fort Nelson     1st
Longhurst, William J., Mile 147, Fort St.
John -    1st
McDonald, Charlie, Fort Nelson  2nd
McGarbey, George, Hudson Hope Asst.
McGarvey, Morris M., Taylor     1st
McLean, William, Little Prairie     1st
MacLean, Arthur J., Fort St. John  2nd
McLeod, Rene, Fort St. John Asst.
McGuire, Colum, Rolla Asst.
Mitchell, Gabriel, Moberly Lake Asst.
Moses, Wokley, Mile 147, Fort St. John ....Asst.
Mould, Thomas John, Muncho Lake     1st
Mykoose, Joe, Moberly Lake Asst.
Napoleon, Felix, Moberly Lake Asst.
Paquette, Mervin, Moberly Lake Asst.
Paquette, Morris, Moberly Lake     1st
Peck, Bruce, Hudson Hope Asst.
Peck, Donald R., Trutch     1st
Peck, O. Keith, Hudson Hope  2nd
Peterson, Adolf F., Muncho Lake    1st
Powell, Gary James, Hudson Hope  2nd
Powell, Hubert L., Fort St. John Asst.
Powell, Jack K., Bear Flat Asst.
Rutledge, Leo, Hudson Hope    1st
Stringer, Clifford G., Fort Nelson Asst.
Supranent,   John,   Goodfare   P.O.,   Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.)   2nd
Tipton, Ross, Dawson Creek Asst.
Varley, James, Coal River Asst.
Warn, William F., Groundbirch  2nd
Watson, Donald H., Bear Flat Asst.
Young, Andrew, Dawson Creek Asst.
Young, Louis, Dawson Creek Asst. T 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Kamloops District
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Archibald, D. A., Clearwater  2nd
Bagg, Melvin, Savona Asst.
Bisehoff, Fred, Magna Bay    1st
Blackman, William, Valemount  2nd
Boule, James, Savona    1st
Brousseau, Clifford, Savona    1st
Brown, Chauncey, Clearwater Asst.
Burdett, George, Savona    1st
Burdett, Loretta, Savona  2nd
Cahoon, Charles, North Kamloops  2nd
Cameron, James B., Savona Asst.
Carter, Cecil, Black Pool  2nd
Clayton, W. A. S., Barriere  2nd
Clearwaters, Ralph, Westsyde    1st
. 2nd
. 1st
. 2nd
. 1st
. 2nd
. 2nd
. 2nd
. 2nd
. 2nd
. 2nd
. 2nd
.Asst.
. 1st
. 1st
. 2nd
. 1st
. 1st
.   1st
Ccchran, Marvin, Darfield
Comeau, William R., Savona
Cooper, Norman T., Savona _
Cooper, Phillip, Westsyde
De Lisle, Henry G., R.R. 1, Louis Creek ...
Dunbar, George R., Mile-High, Kamloops
Dunlop, William, Barriere	
Ellis, Douglas K., Kamloops	
Farquharson, Jim, Kamloops	
Felton, E. M., Valemount	
Fennell, Amos C, Chu Chua	
Gaglardi, Charles, Kamloops	
Gourlay, James R., Barriere	
Grant, Gordon, McLure ...
Hagen, Harry, Barriere .
Haggstrom, Hjalmar, Westbank .
Harrington, McCall, Clearwater
Helset, Ted, Clearwater	
Hogue, John S., Clearwater  2nd
Hoover, Eldred, Black Pines    1st
Humphrey, Ashton, Knutsford Asst.
Irvine, C. A. Princeton Asst.
Johnson,. Jack, Savona    1st
Johnson, Ralph T., Savona Asst.
Johnston, Stanley, Black Pool Asst.
King, Edwin, Westwold  2nd
Kipling, John, McLure  2nd
Korsvick, George, Valemount  2nd
LaFave, John, Louis Creek    1st
LaFave, Ted, R.R. 1, Louis Creek  2nd
Latremouille, Joseph, Little Fort    1st
Lean, Theodore, Clearwater    1st
Name and Address of Guide
Lloyd, Mrs. William, Red Lake
Lloyd, William, Red Lake
Licence
Grade
— Asst.
.... 2nd
Loveway, Thomas V., Little Fort  2nd
Ludtke, Charles, Clearwater  2nd
Ludtke, Laurence, Clearwater    1st
McAbee, Cyril, Walhachin Asst.
McBee, Melvin, Sorrento   2nd
McConnell, K. R., Louis Creek :.  2nd
McDiarmid, Garfield, Clearwater    1st
MacDougall, Harold, Darfield Asst.
MacDougall, Wallace, Darfield Asst.
McGarrigle, William, Little Fort  2nd
McLean, Clifford, McLure Asst.
McLelland, Francis B., Sorrento  2nd
Marriott, Robert, Heffley Creek,   2nd
Marsden, Gladstone, Savona Asst.
Mathews, Maurice, Kamloops Asst.
Morton, Alf, McLure    1st
Mostrom, George, Prince George  2nd
Mason, Allen, R.R. 1, Louis Creek  2nd
Miller, Robert G., Blue River  2nd
Murray, George, Savona    1st
Nelson, Gerald, Black Pines  2nd
Newman, Jack, Notch Hill    1st
Neilson, Rendel, Pinantan Asst.
Peel, Murrill, Pinantan    1st
Petell, Seymour, Savona  2nd
Potts, Bill, Sorrento  2nd
Rainer, Karl, Darfield  2nd
Richards, Ralph, Magna Bay  2nd
Ritcey, Ralph W., Clearwater  2nd
Scott, Duncan, Barriere    1st
Small, Reginald, Clearwater    1st
Thacker, George, Savona  2nd
Threkeld, Richard, Savona  2nd
Turner, John, Criss Creek  2nd
Tuson, Clifford, Savona    1st
Wagner, Martin, Kamloops Asst.
Walters, Jack, Sorrento    1st
Welland, John, Red Lake  2nd
Welland, Thomas, Red Lake Asst.
Whitlock, Phil, X Bar J Ranch, Savona Asst.
Whittaker, John, Lac la Jeune  2nd
Wilson, Don, Vinsulla  2nd
Woodman, W. R., Savona Asst.
Woodward, John, Little Fort Asst.
Similkameen (Penticton-Princeton-Keremeos District)
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Armstrong, Allan C, Keremeos  2nd
Beale, Robert, Princeton Asst.
Clark, Herbert G., Keremeos    1st
Clark, Howard L., West Summerland  2nd
Gold, Robie Booth, Osprey  2nd
Gold, Robin Birch, Osprey Asst.
Holding, Richard, Princeton  2nd
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Lewis, James W., Princeton    1st
MacFarlane, Edward, Hedley Asst.
Mainon, Bert R., Tulameen Asst.
Manion, William B., Tulameen  2nd
Nesbitt, Harry, Princeton Asst.
Tower, Stan, Princeton  2nd
Wright, Brian, Princeton  2nd REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 81
East Kootenay District "A" (Cranbrook-Invermere-
Golden District)
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Alexander, Michael, Spillimacheen  Asst.
Allan, William, Parson Asst.
Anderson, Charles, Windermere     1st
Baldry, Charles A., Windermere  2nd
Barbour, lames A., Wilmer Asst.
Belcher, Walter L., Canal Flats  2nd
Bjorn, Henry Manning, Fort Steele  2nd
Brewer, Carl, Invermere  2nd
Buckonan, Alan, Fort Steele Asst.
Canning, Lester, Skookumchuck  2nd
Capilo, Louie, Shuswap Reserve, Athalmere   1st
Carlson, Stan, Ta Ta Creek Asst.
Coates, Robert F., Spillimacheen Asst.
Cooper, Albert, Invermere  2nd
Dobbie, Alexandra, Invermere  2nd
Du Bois, Vaughn, Windermere     1st
Feuz, Walter, Golden     1st
Fisher, Toney, Fairmont  2nd
Gabry, Michael, Brisco  2nd
Goodwin, Dave A., Invermere Asst.
Goodwin, Ellwood L., Edgewater  2nd
Goodwin, Lester, Invermere Asst.
Gould, Percy, Canal Flats     1st
Hammond, Lyle, Golden     1st
Hansen, Trygvert, Wilmer  2nd
Harrison, William O., Edgewater    1st
Hill, Wallace, Parson Asst.
Hogan, Charles A., Harrogate    1st
Hogan, Charles M., Harrogate    1st
Hunt, Fredric H. A., Invermere Asst.
Hynes, Ben, Spillimacheen Asst.
Jimmie, Joe, Invermere  2nd
lohnson, Alexander, Invermere  2nd
Jorimann, Paul, Golden Asst.
Joseph, Jerome, Fairmont  2nd
Kain, Isidor, Wilmer  2nd
King, Norman, Golden    1st
King, S. R., Golden Asst.
Kohorst, Henry, Edgewater Asst.
Kohorst, William F., Edgewater Asst.
Lindborg, Axel, Golden     1st
Lum, George, Fort Steele Asst.
Lum, Peter Charles, Fort Steele    1st
Licence
Grade
._..   1st
Name and Address of Guide
McClain, J. I., Spillimacheen	
McClain, Mrs. I. I., Spillimacheen    —Asst.
Mcintosh, Ewen, Athalmere  2nd
McKay, Gordon, Invermere    1st
McKay, James, Invermere Asst.
Michel, Abraham, Invermere  2nd
Miller, Roy E., Ta Ta Creek  2nd
Mitchell, Robert, Brisco ...—  2nd
Morigeau, Martin, Fairmont    1st
Morris, Edward, Golden Asst.
Nicholas, Dominic, Fairmont     1st
Nixon, Walter J., Invermere    1st
Pommier, Emile, Skookumchuck  2nd
Rad, Gordon, Invermere    1st
Rauch, Harold, McMurdo Asst.
Richter, Frank, Invermere     1st
Rodgers, James L., Creston Asst.
Romane, C. G., Parson Asst.
Romane, William, Golden     1st
Seward, Arvid, Golden    1st
Sheek, Wesley P., Spillimacheen     1st
Sparrow, John H., Windermere  2nd
St. Eloi, C. D., Brisco Asst.
Stewart, Douglas, Spillimacheen  2nd
Stewart, C. William, Spillimacheen  2nd
Strain, George, Spillimacheen   2nd
Tegart, George, Edgewater     1st
Tegart, Hiram W., Brisco    1st
Tegart, James, Brisco    1st
Tegart, Raymond, Windermere Asst.
Thomas, Robert, Parson    1st
Thompson, James E., Fort Steele Asst.
Thompson, James, Brisco    1st
Thompson, Jack, Edgewater  2nd
Thompson, Lionel, Edgewater    1st
Thornton, George, Invermere Asst.
Tyler, Graham, Invermere  2nd
Vernon-Wood, Nello, Windermere    1st
White, James Freeman, Fort Steele     1st
Wieden, Frederick, Wilmer  2nd
Wiedenman, Otto, Parson  2nd
Wolfenden, Winston, Brisco    1st T 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Prince George District "B" (West to Terrace)
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Alexis, Jimmy, Fort St. John Asst.
Andros, Ralph W., Vanderhoof Asst.
Bennett, Vernon, Southbank  2nd
Benson, Allen, Hazelton    1st
Bird, Jim, Fort St. James Asst.
Bjornestad, Jorgen, Pinchi Lake
Braaten, Edwin, Southbank
Brown, Jack Stewart, Burns Lake
Campbell, Theodor B., Hazelton _
Christie, Ellis D., Southbank	
Conlon, Henry R., Burns Lake	
Cooke, Ted, Vanderhoof
Craker, Ronald J., North Bulkley .
Darby, Linzy E., Isle Pierre	
Davidson, Charlie B., Vanderhoof
Donald, Jimmie, Burns Lake
..Asst.
... 2nd
_ 2nd
_ 2nd
..Asst.
_ 2nd
.. 2nd
.. 2nd
..Asst.
_ 1st
2nd
Erickson, John, Manson Creek Asst.
Evans, William R., Vanderhoof Asst.
Fletcher, Allen E., Smithers  2nd
Foote, Charles H., Fraser Lake  2nd
Freeman, George, Fort St. James Asst.
Gardiner, William C, Smithers  2nd
George, Thomas S., Telkwa  2nd
Gilliland, Donald W., Germansen Landing 2nd
Grainger, Barrington H., Noralee  2nd
Hagen, Norman, Hazelton Asst.
Harding, Clifford R., Fort St. lames  2nd
Harrison, Alford I., Wistaria Asst.
Harrison, Bryan R., Wistaria    1st
Harrison, Robert O., Wistaria  2nd
Henry, Stanley B., Ootsa Lake    1st
Henson, Frank E., Marilla    1st
Hindmarch, Floyd Ellis, Vanderhoof  2nd
Hipp, Anthony J., Terrace  2nd
Hughes, Rolland I., Vanderhoof Asst.
Jaenecke, John, Ootsa Lake Asst.
Johnson, George M., Vanderhoof  2nd
Johnson, John H., Isle Pierre  2nd
Johnson, John K., Fort St. James    1st
Knox, John, Ootsa Lake    1st
Kohse, Louis, Vanderhoof  2nd
Lee, John T., Hazelton  2nd
Leon, Paddy, Topley  2nd
Leon, Wassa, Fort St. James Asst.
Loos, Halmer, Topley  2nd
Lord, Roy E., Tchesinkut Lake Asst.
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Lord, Samuel V., Tchesinkut Lake Asst.
Lord, Walter H, Tchesinkut Lake  2nd
McConachie, Harry R., Fort St. James Asst.
McDonald, Edward H, Nithi River Asst.
McNeil, Clifford, Ootsa Lake    1st
McNeil, John W., Ootsa Lake    1st
Martin, Betty J., Smithers Asst.
Martin, Eric S., Smithers Asst.
Menard, Gerard, Nithi River  2nd
Moran, Thomas E., Vanderhoof
Morgan, James E., Ootsa Lake .
 Asst.
    1st
Murray, Ronald A., Fort St. James Asst.
Murray, Ronald W., Fort St. James Asst.
Nelson, George William, Vanderhoof    1st
Nelson, J. N., Clemretta  2nd
Pease, Clarence A., Nithi River    1st
Plowman, Clarence, Endako  2nd
Plowman, Enid Alice, Endako Asst.
Plowman, William C, Endako Asst.
Prince, Alex, Fort St. James  2nd
Prince, Benoit, Fort St. James  Asst.
Prince, David, Fort St. James Asst.
Prince, Dixon, Fort St. James  2nd
Prince, Jean Marie, Fort St. James Asst.
Prince, John, Fort St. James    1st
Prince, Teddy, Fort St. James  2nd
Rassmussen, Ross P., Vanderhoof  2nd
Sam, Duncan, Fort St. James Asst.
Schultz, Albert L., Vanderhoof  2nd
Seyfarth, Joe, Fort St. James  2nd
Shea, James B., Telkwa    1st
Smith, Harold Craig, Fort St. James    1st
Smith, Richard Herbert, Fort St. James  2nd
Tourond, Pete, Noralee Asst.
Vantine, Douglas, Ootsa Lake Asst.
Vantine, Edward, Ootsa Lake    1st
Vantine, James H, Ootsa Lake Asst.
Vantine, William, Tatalrose  2nd
Van Zanten, James H., Francois Lake  2nd
Walker, Thomas A., Fort St. James    1st
Watson, Paul Eugene, Quick Asst.
Wheeler, William A., Burns Lake  2nd
Wiley, Alvin John, Southbank  2nd
Wiley, Glen William, Southbank Asst.
Winsor, William J., Isle Pierre  2nd
Lower Mainland Coast and Fraser Valley
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Christian, John J., Box 290, Chilliwack Asst.
Herman, lohn, 3064 West Eleventh Ave.,
Vancouver  Asst.
Vancouver
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Alsdorf, William, Campbell River  2nd
Cathcart, John G., Sayward  2nd
Crouch, Alex, Campbell River  2nd
Durrant, Kenneth S., Campbell River Asst.
Flesher, Eric Reed, Phillips Arm  2nd
Gillespie, G. K., Lake Cowichan Asst.
Hancock, Arthur, Lake Cowichan  2nd
Hancock, Joseph, Lake Cowichan    1st
Johnson, Oscar, Allison Harbour    1st
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Gilbert, Walter E., Box 290, Chilliwack       2nd
Wells, Ray E., Cultus Lake    1st
Island
Name and Address of Guide
Kay-Nichols, Caesar, Sayward	
Marshall, Donald, Campbell River _
Palliser, C. H, Lake Cowichan  2nd
Palliser, W., Lake Cowichan  2nd
Robertson, George R., 2329 Blanshard St.,
Victoria
Licence
Grade
_ 2nd
2nd
Stanton, James R., Knight Inlet
Wilson, Jack, Sproat Lake	
2nd
1st
2nd REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950
T 83
Coastal Mainland to Prince Rupert
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Corbould, Gordon C, Bella Coola    1st
Casperson, Morten, Hagensborg  2nd
Mack, Clayton, Bella Coola     1st
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Nygaard, Martin, Bella Coola    1st
Robson, Bert, Atnarko  2nd
Lindsay, George, Masset  2nd
Non-resident Outfitters
Hargreaves, J. A., Box 201, Jasper, Alta.
Harrison, George H., Banff, Alta.
McCullough, Henry, Wembly, Alta.
Ray, Jack, Hinton Trail, Alta.
Russell, Andy, Twin Butte, Alta.
Strom, Erling, Mt. Assiniboine, Banff, Alta.
PERSONNEL OF GAME COMMISSION AS AT DECEMBER 31st, 1950
Attorney-General (Minister) Hon. Gordon S. Wismer, K.C.
Game Commission (members) James G. Cunningham	
Frank R. Butler.
.Victoria.
.Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
Scientific Branch
Scientific Advisers Dr. W. A. Clemens Vancouver.
Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan Vancouver.
Game Biologist J. Hatter Vancouver.
Assistant Game Biologist E. Taylor Vancouver.
Fisheries Biologist Dr. P. A. Larkin Vancouver.
Assistant Fisheries Biologist S. Smith Vancouver.
Supervisor of Predator-control W. W. Mair Vancouver.
Assistant Supervisor of Predator-control— E. Samann Kamloops.
Headquarters
Chief Clerk H. D. Simpson
Intermediate Clerk-
Intermediate Clerk-
Clerk.
Secretarial Stenographer-
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk-Stenographer	
Clerk-Stenographer	
_.I. McLellan .
..Miss I. Lawson	
_W. Fowkes	
.Miss J. Smith	
.Miss P. Golder	
Miss E. Kerr	
.Miss A. Petty	
.Miss J. Mortimer-
.Miss R. McKay -
.Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
-Vancouver.
-Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
Vancouver.
..Vancouver.
.Vancouver.
Game-fish Culture Branch
Fishery Supervisor-
Fishery Officer-
C. H. Robinson .
-E. Hunter	
Hatchery Officer A._S. Frisby..
Hatchery Officer	
Hatchery Officer	
Fishery Officer	
Hatchery Officer	
Hatcherv Officer	
Fishery Officer	
Fishery Officer	
Hatchery Officer	
.J. D. S. Inverarity.
— I. C. Inglis	
—F. Pells	
-F. H. Martin	
—C. O. Mellor	
-R. A. McRae	
...A. Higgs	
_D. E. Agur	
.Nelson.
..Nelson.
.Nelson.
..Courtenay.
. Courtenay.
-Cultus Lake.
..Cultus Lake.
Cultus Lake.
.Kaslo.
Summerland.
Summerland.
"A" Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Lower Mainland)
Inspector	
Clerk	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Game Warden	
Corporal Game Warden-
Game Warden
_G. C. Stevenson..
.Victoria.
—D. Keirs Victoria.
 I. W. lones Victoria.
 R. W. Sinclair Victoria.
....W. S. Webb—         Alberni.
 Alert Bay.
-O. Mottishaw	
JR. S. Hayes	
Game Warden C. E. Estlin	
Game Warden F. P. Weir	
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield .
.Campbell River.
.Courtenay.
Duncan.
..Nanaimo. T 84 BRITISH COLUMBIA
"B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts)
Inspector C. F. Kearns Nelson.
Clerk-Stenographer Mrs. E. H. Edgar Nelson.
Game Warden R. A. Rutherglen Nelson.
Game Warden P. D. Ewart Castlegar.
Game Warden J. W. Bayley Cranbrook.
Game Warden 3. Rauch Cranbrook.
Game Warden G. A. Lines Creston.
Game Warden J. J. Osman Fernie.
Game Warden N. Cameron Golden.
Corporal Game Warden A. F. Sinclair Grand Forks.
Game Warden J. V. Mackill Invermere.
Game Warden A. Monks Penticton.
Game Warden A. F. Gill  Princeton.
"C" Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts)
Inspector R. M. Robertson Kamloops.
Senior Stenographer Miss H. Swadling Kamloops.
Game Warden J. P. C. Atwood Kamloops.
Game Warden H. J. Lorance Kamloops.
Game Warden H. Tyler Kamloops.
Game Warden W. T. Ward Kamloops.
Game Warden K. R. Walmsley Alexis Creek.
Game Warden W. I. Fenton Clinton.
Game Warden D. D. Ellis Kelowna.
Game Warden R. S. Welsman Lillooet.
Game Warden E. M. Martin Merritt.
Game Warden W. J. Hillen Quesnel.
Game Warden E. D. Cameron Revelstoke.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden R. Farquharson Vernon.
Game Warden E. Holmes Wells.
Game Warden L. Jobin Williams Lake.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River,
and Yukon Boundary Districts)
Inspector W. A. H. Gill Prince George.
Clerk R. J. Guay Prince George.
Stenographer Miss F. Sutton Prince George.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Prince George.
Game Warden W. H. Richmond Burns Lake.
Game Warden 1 J. A. McCabe Fort Nelson.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Game Warden J. D. Williams Fort St. John.
Game Warden J. W. Stewart Lower Post.
Game Warden R. W. C. Tate Pouce Coupe.
Game Warden L. J. Cox Smithers.
Corporal Game Warden E. Martin Prince Rupert.
Game Warden J. O. Jamieson Prince Rupert,
Clerk-Stenographer Miss M. Boulter Prince Rupert.
Game Warden L. G. Smith Vanderhoof.
"E" Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley District)
Inspector R. E.Allan Vancouver.
Game Warden R. S. King Vancouver.
Corporal Game Warden L. R. C. Lane Vancouver.
Game Warden F. R. Lobb Vancouver.
Game Warden H. D. Mulligan Vancouver.
Game Warden H. L. Rose Vancouver.
Game Warden A. J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden H. P. Hughes Cloverdale.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden P. M. Cliffe Mission.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1950 T 85
Predatory-animal Hunters
Chief Predatory-animal Hunter I. Dewar Extension.
Predatory-animal Hunter A. L. Frost Extension.
Predatory-animal Hunter A. W. Hames Extension.
Predatory-animal Hunter K. Moores Alert Bay.
Predatory-animal Hunter C. G. Ellis Kamloops.
Predatory-animal Hunter G. Haskell Nelson.
victoria, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty
1952
1,295-1251-2440   

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