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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL of the Public Health Branch Department… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1952

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIVISION OF
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
of   the   Public   Health   Branch
Department of Health and Welfare
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year 1950
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1951  Department of Health and Welfare,
Public Health Branch,
Victoria, B.C., May 15th, 1951.
The Honourable A. D. Turnbull,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to December
31st, 1950.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT, M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health. Department of Health and Welfare,
Public Health Branch,
Division of Tuberculosis Control,
2647 Willow Street,
Vancouver, B.C., May 15th, 1951.
G. F. Amyot, Esq., M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to December
31st, 1950.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
W. H. HATFIELD, M.D.,
Director, Division of Tuberculosis Control. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Letter of Transmittal  3
Letter of Transmittal  4
List of Tables  7
List of Charts  9
Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control  11
Introduction  13
(a) Clinics  15
(b) Institutions  16
(c) Nursing Services  17
(d) Social Service  17
(e) Conclusion  18
Statistical Section  19
(a) Clinics  21
(b) New Cases Examined by Clinics  29
(c) General Summaries  35
(d) Institutions  39
(e) Tuberculin Testing  55
(/) Known Cases of Tuberculosis  58
(g) Notifications of Tuberculosis :  63
(h) Tuberculosis Mortality  76
(/) Division of Tuberculosis Control Budget  87  INDEX
LIST OF TABLES
Clinics
Page
Table   1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent at Each Centre,
1950     22
Table  2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1950     24
Table   3.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1950     26
Table   4.—New Examinations and Re-examinations during the Years 1946 to 1950
(Excluding Indians)     27
Table   5.—New Cases Examined by Clinics, by Diagnosis, 1950 (Excluding Indians)    29
Table   6.—New Cases Other than Negative Examined by Diagnostic Clinics, by
Diagnosis, Sex, and Age-groups, 1950 (Excluding Indians)     30
Table   1'.■—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Examined by Clinics, by Infection
and Condition, 1950     31
Table 8.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and
General-hospital Units, 1941-50     32
General Summaries
Table   9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1950  35
Table 10.—Laboratory Report, 1950  36
Table 11.—Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics, 1941-50  37
Table 12.—Dental Report, 1950  37
Table 13.-—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report, 1950  38
Institutions—Summaries
Table 14.—Institutions—General Summary, 1950  39
Table 15.—Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) Given by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1941-50-  40
Table 16.—Institutions—Patient Status, 1950  41
Table 17.—Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions in Each Age-
group, 1946-50  42
Table 18.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1950  43
Table 19.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1950  45
Table 20.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1950  46
Table 21.—First Admissions by Institution and Diagnosis, 1950  46
Table 22.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1946-50  47
Table 23.—First Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Time between Application and
Admission, 1950  49
Table 24.—Institutional Patient-days of the Division of Tuberculosis Control,
1941-50  49
Institutions—Discharges
Table 25.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1946-50     51
Table 26.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length
of Treatment during Previous Admissions, 1950      53
Table 27.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Length
of Last Stay in Institution, 1950     53
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and Home
Condition, 1950     54
7 E 8 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Tuberculin Testing
Page
Table 29.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Racial Origin and Age-groups, 1950     55
Table 30.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Type of Survey, 1950     56
Table 31.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Age-group and Diagnosis, 1950     57
Known Cases of Tuberculosis
Table 32.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1946-50     58
Table 33.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population
of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st,
1946-50     58
Table 34.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1946-50     58
Table 35.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1950 (Excluding Indians)     59
Table 36.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1950 (Indians Only)     60
Table 37.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in British
Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1950 (Excluding Indians)     60
Table 38.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Present Condition,
and Age-group, 1950 (Excluding Indians)     62
Table 39.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-
Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1941-50     63
Notifications of Tuberculosis (Form T.B. 1)
Table 40.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, 1946-50     63
Table 41.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1946-50     64
Table 42.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, 1946-50     64
Table 43.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases of Tuberculosis among
the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than Indian
Population, and the Indian Population, 1950     64
Table 44.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1950 (Excluding Indians)     65
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1950 (Indians Only)     68
Table 46.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1941-50     69
Table 47.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Racial Groups (Including Dead Cases Reported for the First
Time), 1950    71
Table 48.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1950—_ 72
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1950 (Excluding Indians)     73
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1950 (Indians Only)     74
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis and Year
of Arrival in British Columbia, 1950 (Excluding Indians)     75
Table 52.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis in
British Columbia, 1946-50     75 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950 E 9
Tuberculosis Mortality
Page
Table 53.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1946-50     76
Table 54.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Other-
than-Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area,
1946-50     76
Table 55.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Indian
Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1946-50     77
Table 56.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and
Sex, 1950 (Excluding Indians)     77
Table 57.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and
Sex, 1950 (Indians Only)     78
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-groups, 1950     79
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1941-50     80
Table 60.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia
by Age-groups, 1946-50..- .     83
Table 61.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1946-50       83
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by
Age-groups, 1946-50 .........     83
Table 63.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1946-50      84
Table 64.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1946-50     85
Table 65.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by Length
of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1950     86
LIST OF CHARTS
Chart   1.—Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control      11
Chart   2.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics, 1941-50
(Excluding Indians)     28
Chart   3.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics, 1941-50
(Excluding Indians)      29
Chart   4.—X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary
Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1941-50     33
Chart   5.—X-ray Examinations Made by Institutions, Diagnostic and Treatment
Clinics,.Survey Clinics, and Mobile Units, 1941-50     34
Chart   6.—Percentage Distribution of Admissions to Institutions by Age-groups,
1946-50     42
Chart   7.—Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1950—.    44
Chart   8.—First Admissions to Institutions by Institution and Diagnosis, 1950     47
Chart   9.—First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution),
1946-50     48
Chart 10.—Institutional Patient-days of the Division of Tuberculosis Control,
1941-50     50
Chart 11.—Percentage Distribution of Discharges from Institutions According to
Condition on Discharge, 1941-50     52 E 10
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Page
Chart 12.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in British
Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1950 (Excluding Indians)     61
Chart 13.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1941-50     70
Chart 14.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1950—    72
Chart 15.—Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1941-50     81
Chart 16.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population and the
Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1950     82
Chart 17.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1946-50     84
Chart 18.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1946-50     85
Chart 19.—Distribution of the Tuberculosis Dollar in the Budget of the Division of
Tuberculosis Control, Department of Health and Welfare, 1950..-    87 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
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__J  Report of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, 1950
W. H. Hatfield, Director
INTRODUCTION
The year 1950 shows further advance in the tuberculosis-control programme, and
we can now begin to see toward the end of our original planning and the rounding-out of
a complete tuberculosis organization in this Province.
The biggest development during the year was letting the contract for a new sanatorium. The original contract is for central facilities for 528 beds and for construction
of facilities for 264 beds. It is hoped that as soon as finances permit, the institution will
be fully developed to its total bed capacity. This has been the major need of the Division
for a number of-years, and it is gratifying to see this need now being met. When these
facilities are available it is planned to eliminate some of the present beds occupied by
tuberculosis patients in the Vancouver area, such as those beds occupied in the City of
Vancouver Isolation Hospital, St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital, the temporary beds attached
to the Vancouver unit, and, eventually, Jericho Beach Hospital.
Further developments in bed facilities that have been recommended are the complete
modernization of Tranquille Sanatorium and construction of a central unit of approximately 150 beds and clinic for Victoria.
We are very pleased to note that there has been a marked drop in the tuberculosis
death rate throughout the Province. The percentage drop in mortality has been greater
during this year than in any year since the inception of the Division. Along with the drop
in death rate there has been a considerable drop in the number of new cases of tuberculosis
that have developed during the year. The lowered morbidity and mortality rates obtain
through the white, Indian, and Oriental populations.
Relative to case-finding, considerable changes have been made in the programme
during the year. X-ray units to take miniature films have now been installed in the following thirty-four centres: Metropolian Health Unit No. 1, Vancouver; Metropolitan Health
Unit No. 4, Vancouver; Oakalla Prison; Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver; St.
Vincent's Hospital, Vancouver; Grace Hospital, Vancouver; Mount St. Joseph's Hospital,
Vancouver; North Vancouver General Hospital; St. George's Hospital, Alert Bay; Ocean
Falls General Hospital; Powell River General Hospital; Prince Rupert General Hospital;
Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria; St. Joseph's Hospital, Victoria; Nanaimo General
Hospital; Lourdes Hospital, Campbell River; St. Joseph's Hospital, Comox; King's
Daughters' Hospital, Duncan; West Coast General Hospital, Port Alberni; Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster; St. Mary's Hospital, New Westminster; Chilliwack
General Hospital; St. Eugene Hospital, Cranbrook; Creston General Hospital; Fernie
General Hospital; Kimberley General Hospital; Kootenay Lake Hospital, Nelson; Mater
Misericordiae, Rossland; Trail-Tadanac, Trail; Prince George General Hospital; Royal
Inland Hospital, Kamloops; Kelowna General Hospital; Penticton General Hospital;
and Jubilee Hospital, Vernon. Thus it is now possible in these centres to X-ray all hospital
admissions and permit out-patients to be X-rayed on a year-round basis. In addition,
one mobile unit has been turned over to the Metropolitan Health Committee for use in the
City of Vancouver and another knockdown type of equipment with a panel truck is available for areas not served by the thirty-four units. Thus now the responsibility for case-
finding is in the hands of the local health services. All films, however, are interpreted by
the Division of Tuberculosis Control and the results returned to the local health service
13 E 14 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
for follow-up. Cases that are considered suspicious in this general survey programme are
re-X-rayed and referred to the diagnostic facilities of the Division of Tuberculosis Control
for final diagnosis.
As has been previously reported, the problem of obtaining properly trained medical
personnel still remains with us, and the recommendation that there should be some adjustment in salaries paid is still under consideration.
With the advent of an adequate number of beds for the treatment of patients, it is
apparent that the work of the Division will be mainly of a clinical nature. With the large
volume of in-patient care and the advances in scientific treatment of tuberculosis and the
work of the diagnostic clinics and out-patient treatment, a well rounded-out staff of
clinicians is essential.
With more beds there will be fewer patients having to be cared for in the home,
which will lessen the public health problems confronting the local health services. It is
hoped that as time goes on we will be able to give the consulting service to the local
health services through travelling clinics that is necessary. Physicians carrying out this
service should be of consultant status and attached to one or another of the institutions.
The Province in this regard would be divided into four areas, with four consultants
travelling from time to time.
In our general preventive programme, B.C.G. has been introduced and its use is
steadily increasing. Contact children who have negative tuberculin reactions and any
particular group where the tuberculosis rate has tended to be higher than the average,
such as hospital employees, have been offered B.C.G. It is planned to concentrate particularly on the contact group over the next year, and we visualize the gradual extension
of this vaccination programme.
Dominion health grants materially assisted our work during the year, and the following projects, divided into continuing and new, were approved:—
Continuing projects—
Occupational therapy for out-patients.
X-ray pool—purchase of survey X-ray equipment.
Medical library.
Home-care service.
Darkroom equipment for health units.
Nursemaids for Vancouver Preventorium.
Rehabilitation.
Senior intern, Vancouver unit.
Payment for admission X-rays.
Administration of streptomycin to patients in their homes.
Postgraduate training (short-term courses).
Postgraduate training—nursing, medical, laboratory.
Assistant instructor, T.B. nursing.
Clinical research in electrocardiography.
•Equipment for community survey work.
Photographic equipment, Tranquille.
Pathology Department, Tranquille.
Nursing personnel for surgical unit, Vancouver.
Two additional physicians.
New projects—
Bacteriologist, Vancouver unit.
P.A.S. and streptomycin.
Additional nurse for New Westminster Clinic.
Occupational therapy equipment for in-patients.
Additional stenographers. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950 E 15
Sterilizer, Tranquille.
Postgraduate training in hospital administration.
Postgraduate training, X-ray technician.
Expansion of educational programme, tuberculosis nursing.
Additional equipment for Victoria unit.
Art therapy
With the help of Dominion health grants our postgraduate training programme
continues in effect. This year, for example, several physicians have returned after completing their training in internal medicine. The following have taken postgraduate
training during the year, including short courses: Physicians, 7; nurses, 6 (including 1
from the Preventorium); laboratory technicians, 4; X-ray technicians, 1.
During the year the Director was privileged to represent Canada at the meeting of
the International Union against Tuberculosis in Copenhagen, and opportunity was provided for visits to Sweden and England.
The annual meeting of the Canadian Tuberculosis Association was held in Vancouver during the year, with every Province in Canada being represented. This was a very
successful meeting. The Director of the Division was honoured by being made president
of the association for the year 1950-51.
There have been further advances in the treatment of our patients, with a marked
increase in the use of para amino salicylic acid. This, combined with streptomycin, has
allowed many more patients to come to surgery than heretofore. Over the past five
years there has been an increase of approximately 400 per cent in the volume of surgery
done by the Division.
During the year a survey was made of the records of the Division, with some recommendations for simplification. In general, the survey revealed that the records of the
Division are good, and only minor alterations are essential to bring them completely up
to date. It was further recommended that one or more medical-record librarians be
employed to endeavour to generally improve the use of the records. Various other surveys were made during the year, such as a survey of dietary problems.
The number of new cases discovered during the year amounted to 1,699, which is a
decrease from last year. This, broken down into racial groups, shows the following:
Indians, 383; other than Indians, 1,316; and into age-groups:—
Indians
Other than Indians
0-4	
  39
0-4	
35
5-9	
  55
5-9	
51
10-14	
  49
10-14	
29
15-19-    	
  43
15-19	
46
20-24-     	
  45
  33
20-24	
m
25-29
25-29    __ _.
151
30-39	
  29
30-39	
232
40-49	
  33
40-49	
214
50-59	
  25
50-59	
156
60-69 •	
  15
60-69	
166
70-79	
  11
70-79	
77
80 and over     2 80 and over     14
Not stated     4 Not stated    22
CLINICS
There has been no increase in the number of clinics operated by the Division. The
number of people attending the clinics remains approximately the same, but the amount
of diagnostic work per patient has shown a tendency to increase. E 16 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The clinic at Nelson has been notified that it will have to vacate its present quarters
at the Nelson General Hospital, and new accommodation is being sought for this clinic,
which needed more space than it was able to obtain previously.
The New Westminster Clinic continues to be crowded. Either more facilities should
be developed in the present building or new facilities be built in conjunction with a
general health building in that area.
During 1950, 135,271 people were X-rayed in the survey clinics. This shows some
reduction, as the new programme for providing X-ray facilities for local areas has been
developing on a gradual basis and was only beginning to get into proper operation toward
the end of the year. Of the total number of people X-rayed in clinics of the Division,
2,577 were referred to diagnostic clinics.
The sources of reporting of new cases during the year were as follows:-—
„.   .. ... Number of
Stationary clinics— cases
Tranquille        2
Vancouver  516
Victoria     73
New Westminster  130
Travelling clinics—
Interior     62
Coast     94
Island     29
Kootenay     84
Reported from outside the Division of Tuberculosis Control  709
It is noted that in those cases that are reported to and not found by the Division
there is a very high percentage of far-advanced active cases, whereas those found by the
Division show a very low percentage of far-advanced cases, the majority being in the
minimal stage.
The total number of examinations throughout the Province, including survey and
diagnostic clinics and films referred to the Division for interpretation, was 228,753.
INSTITUTIONS
All our institutions have worked at full capacity during the year, and our central
admitting office has felt very heavy pressure from the need of new beds, there still being
a long delay between diagnosis and admission. Every endeavour has been made to
discharge patients from hospital as early as possible, creating in many instances problems
for the Social Service Department.
There has been some increase in rehabilitative work during the year, with more
patients receiving training than heretofore.
In the Vancouver unit a special study has been carried out on the treatment of
tuberculous meningitis. With the long waiting list for admission, the Vancouver unit
has carried out quite extensive out-patient therapy, 108 out-patients having received
streptomycin and 197 para amino salicylic acid. There has been a continuous increase
in the number of patients attending the out-patient clinic, with an average at the present
time of 250 patients receiving pneumothorax, with approximately 40 patients per day
attending the pneumothorax clinic.
At Tranquille there were a great number of changes in the medical staff during the
year. Two physicians have been away on postgraduate work, and another physician was
given leave of absence to assist in the development of survey work in Newfoundland.
Relief doctors were obtained to fill the vacancies. A new pathological department is
being developed and also a photographic department. A new guinea-pig house was built
at Tranquille, and this institution is now supplying guinea-pigs for all the tuberculosis TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950 E 17
institutions, the Provincial Laboratories, and the Royal Jubilee and St. Joseph's Hospitals
in Victoria.
The Interior Travelling Clinic work has been moved from Kamloops to Tranquille.
The modernization of the old buildings is continuing, and extensive work has been done
in the Infirmary Building, giving much more modern wards and providing some extra
rooms.
Facilities at Jericho Beach Hospital were improved during the year, such as subdividing the large wards. It is planned, however, in the future to do only maintenance
work at this unit, as when the new sanatorium has its full bed complement the hospital
will probably be discontinued.
There have been few changes in Victoria, this unit's problem being mainly one of
shortage of medical staff.
NURSING
Expansion in the nursing department has been made possible through assistance
from the Federal health grants during the past year. Projects have included postgraduate
training for four senior nursing positions. Three of these nurses have returned to new or
former positions, and one is currently enrolled at the University of Toronto for a course
in clinical supervision.
Other projects included the appointment of a second instructor for the affiliation
course in tuberculosis nursing at the Vancouver unit and a second nurse in the New Westminster Stationary Clinic, thus providing for increased student enrolment and practice
facilities.
During the year 254 student nurses were enrolled in the tuberculosis affiliation course
at Vancouver, and 90 at the Victoria Section. Two graduate nurses completed the eight-
week postgraduate course offered at the Vancouver unit, and twenty-seven graduate nurses
received field-work experience, including six who completed the affiliation course to
qualify for University Entrance or reciprocal registration. Special programmes of
observation were arranged for nine persons in allied services. Thirty-six practical-nurse
students from the Vocational Institute received a one-month period of supervised practical
training.
A study was made of our institutional nursing service to determine the adequacy of
prevailing staff quotas and standards in relation to desired standards. The findings were
compiled in separate reports for each institution and a comparative statement compiled.
The information will be a useful guide in the development of our programme for the future.
SOCIAL SERVICE
The staff situation in the Social Service Department was more disturbed in 1950 than
it has been for some time, there being five changes among the social workers and two
among the stenographers. The Social Service staff has been reduced by one, as one of
the workers was not replaced when she resigned.
The case-loads for the social workers showed a slight over-all decrease, but the
average case-load per worker for Vancouver and Victoria has increased to 96, and for
Tranquille to 152.
The social worker at the Jericho Beach unit started an intensive research project
during the year, doing detailed case-studies of selected patients. We have no findings to
report yet, but some of the information which has come to light about the difficulties faced
by patients when they have tuberculosis have been most interesting. It has reinforced our
feeling that the patient who is apparently calm on the surface may have things troubling
him with which he needs help.
We have been interested in the success of the Tuberculosis Homemaker Service,
adminstered jointly by the Metropolitan Health Committee and the Family Welfare E 18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Bureau. A great deal of time has been spent in setting up standards for the people who
are to receive the service and in screening the applicants. At the end of the year twenty-
two families were receiving service, seven with a full-time homemaker and fifteen with
part-time help.
CONCLUSION
As has been mentioned, the major need of the Division, an increased number of beds,
is now going to be met. It should be recognized, however, that these facilities will not
be available during the ensuing year, and the problems relative to shortage of beds will
continue until the new institution is completed. The reduction in death rate and morbidity is encouraging, and it is hoped that this will continue.
The British Columbia Tuberculosis Society, the voluntary agency in the tuberculosis
activities, continues as previously to play an important part in our programme. The
assistance that has been received from this source has been most valuable.
The Vancouver Preventorium continues to treat children with tuberculosis, with
certain services rendered by the Division of Tuberculosis Control. We wish to acknowledge the excellent work that is being carried out under the direction of the board of
directors of that institution.
I am pleased to be able to report excellent co-operation with other divisions of the
Department of Health and Welfare and other departments of the Government.
It is expected that the postgraduate training that has been instituted will begin to
bear fruit during the next year, strengthening business administration, medical, nursing,
and other technical services. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
for the year January 1st to
December 31st, 1950  TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
CLINICS
Map of British Columbia Showing Statistical Publication Areas
e 21
Province of British Columbia—
Population, 1,138,000.
Area, 366,255 square miles.
Travelling clinics—
Kootenay Clinic (Nelson)—Statistical Areas 1 and 2.
Interior Clinic (Kamloops)—Statistical Areas 3, 6, 8, 10c, lOd.
Coast Clinic (Vancouver)—Statistical Areas 4, 7, 9c, 9d, 9e.
Island Clinic (Victoria)—Statistical Area 5.
Survey Clinic No. 1—Vancouver and Interior.
Survey Clinic No. 2—Vancouver.
Survey Clinic No. 3—Vancouver Island. E 22
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent
at Each Centre, 1950
Travelling Clinics
Interior
Centre Visited Days
Allenby        2
Armstrong        2
Burns Lake       5
Copper Mountain        3
Dawson Creek
Enderby 	
Fort St. John .
Kamloops 	
Kelowna 	
Merritt 	
McBride  	
Nickel Plate Mine	
Oliver 	
Penticton      16
3
2
1
24
22
1
1
2
8
Centre Visited
Pouce Coupe __
Prince George _
Princeton 	
Quesnel  	
Revelstoke 	
Salmon Arm __
Smithers  	
Summerland 	
Vanderhoof 	
Vernon  	
Wells 	
Williams Lake ..
Days
1
14
7
6
6
6
2
1
4
19
4
5
Coast
Centre Visited Days
Hazelton        2
Marpole Infirmary        3
Ocean Falls        4
Powell River      12
Total (26 centres)  167
Centre Visited Days
Prince Rupert      18
Squamish        6
Terrace         4
Total (7 centres)     49
Fraser Valley
Centre Visited
Abbotsford 	
AUco 	
Ashcroft  	
Chilliwack 	
Days
9
2
2
.    17
Centre Visited Days
Lytton        2
Mission      11
Total (6 centres)      43
Island
Centre Visited Days
Campbell River   9
Chemainus    7
Comox   16
Cumberland   11
Duncan   22
Ladysmith  11
Centre Visited
Lake Cowichan
Mount St. Mary
Days
7V4
3
Nanaimo        37
Port Alberni      29
Qualicum  •       6
Total (11 centres)  158Vi
Kootenay
Centre Visited Days
Castlegar      3Vi
Creston      11V6
Cranbrook 	
       6Vi
Fernie 	
       7
Golden  	
       2
Grand Forks 	
             5
Greenwood  	
Invermere    	
       2
       2
Kaslo         2'/2
Kimberley 	
    m
Centre Visited Days
Michel   6V5
Nakusp   8 VI
  1
  30
  3Vi
  7V*
  6V*
  1
  18V*
Needles 	
Nelson 	
New Denver
Rossland 	
Salmo  	
Slocan City ..
Trail  	
Total (19 centres)  131V* TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1950
E 23
Table 1.—Clinics Held in British Columbia, Showing Time Spent
at Each Centre, 1950—Continued
Centre Visited
Victoria 	
Mobile Units
Vancouver Island
Days
..     5
Centre Visited
Aldergrove 	
Bridgeview	
Cloverdale 	
Fort Langley „
Langley District
Newton 	
New Westminster
Coast and Fraser Valley
Days
2
1
6
1
10
Centre Visited
Ocean View	
Langley Prairie        5
Centre Visited Days
Armstrong        2
Enderby        4
Salmon Arm        2
Interior
Days
  1
Porty Moody  2
Queen Charlotte Islands  19
Sunnyside   1
Vancouver   194
Whalley   2
White Rock   2
Total (15 centres)  248
Centre Visited Days
Vernon       12
Total (4 centres)...
Centre Visited
Trail  	
Kootenay
20
Days
.     11 E 24
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The number of patient-visits to tuberculosis clinics in 1950 increased from 51,605
to 51,845. During 1950, 28,794 re-examinations were completed, showing an increase
of 2,042 over 1949. Those reporting for routine check increased from 32,744 in 1949
to 34,751 in 1950. The greatest increase in patient-visits (695) occurred in the 30-39
age-group; another important increase occurred in the 60-69 age-group, where the
number rose by 306 to 3,923 visits. The number of patients previously diagnosed as
non-tuberculous and later diagnosed as tuberculous increased from 223 in 1949 to 254
in 1950.
Table 2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1950
Item
Total patient-visits	
Total cases examined-
X-ray..
Physical .
Specialist consultation .
Type of case .
New cases	
Re-examinations.
Reason for examination..
Referred from survey,
Symptoms  	
Routine check	
Age-groups examined _
Fishermen	
Hospital-workers _
Housewives	
Labourers—
Common	
Skilled 	
Loggers	
Miners—
Coal	
Hard-rock —.
Nurses—
Graduate	
Student	
Teachers.
26,606 I 1,680
0-4
M.
5-9                 	
F.
 M.
10-14 . .                       	
F.
..  M.
15-19 	
F.
  M.
20-24 	
F.
_ _.M.
25 29
F.
  M.
30 39 ...                      	
F.
 _  M.
40-49 	
F.
   M.
50-59                	
F.
    M.
60 69
F.
 M.
F.
  M.
F.
White	
Other             	
Clerks            .
16,864
3,071
108
16,864
5,363
11,501
16,864
956
2,357
13,551
16,864
124
164
342
262
228
241
264
284
512
967
804
1,281
1,637
2,355
1,491
1,178
1,363
671
1,444
526
542
184
16,864
16,056
47
41
637
43
40
16,864
2,269
126
248
4,031
2,050
1,668
239
35
270
1,680
331
1,680
419
1,261
1,680
315
1,365
1,680
3
3
11
7
6
6
27
58
94
219
128
165
173
239
157
138
106
78
42
19
1
1,680
1,677
1
1,680
228
542
229
129
174
4
6,167
5,924
310
5,924
2,360
3,564
5,924
475
705
4,744
5,924
237
240
347
318
207
153
81
93
97
298
219
433
457
649
361
356
324
245
406
184
148
71
5,924
5,631
254
2
37
5,924
269
9
48
1,562
812
400
2
Other professional..
423 128
247 9
161 |      18
362 j      67
4,032
4,032
5
4,032
1,027
3,005
4,032
439
588
3,005
4,032
205
224
302
254
61
51
47
67
108
179
177
241
337
419
251
236
266
114
224
114
103
52
4,032
4,004
5
1
17
5
4,032
62
24
19
1,029
342
136
7
2
1
78 | 29
39 | 83
49 | 15
121 | 23
2,252
2,252
2,252
622
1,630
2,252
3
209
2,040
2,252
19
34
114
69
107
83
65
101
52
122
71
113
182
258
179
163
'   163
76
119
44
99
19
2,252
2,217
5
18
9
2
1
2,252
142
14
60
617
178
144
14
3,427
3,427
3,427
1,613
1,814
3,427
68
482
2,877
3,427
30
23
77
78
116
107
115
131
127
190
179
186
381
405
377
244
220
126
147
67
72
29
3,427
3,384
1
11
31
3,427
168
1
37
1,026
279
470
29
17
304
58
12
69
42
I    ■        I
3,855  | 3,826 j 51,845
3,855 | 3,826
3,855
1,150
2,705
3,855
3,855
3,855
32
33
127
121
163
152
92
201
108
238
153
250
299
486
338
253
240
151
211
93
80
34
3,855
3,770
3
5
71
6
| 3,855
170
| .......
I 3,826
512
3,314
3,826
3
509
3,314
3,826
31
36
86
71
79
103
96
1-76
97
262
177
265
329
598
284
284
233
161
204
79
124
51
3,826
I 3,643
47
1,150
104 j
79
3,826
153
18
44
1,337
66   148
687 [ 326
32 | 147
2 I
15 |
I
61
20
54 I
86 I
48
2
57
45
44
41,860
3,717
108
41,860
13,066
28,794
41,860
1,944
5,165
34,751
41,860
681
757
1,406
1,180
967
896
787
1,111
1,195
2,475
1,908
2,934
3,795
5,409
3,438
2,852
2,915
1,622
2,797
1,126
1,169
440
41.860
40,382
59
63
1,037
151
168
41,860
3,461
192
1,045
10,981
4,004
4,005
474
105
592
849
414
442
762 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1950 E 25
Table 2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1950—Continued
Item
QJ.S
Usual occupations—Continued
Students—
Normal     	
University	
■    Other 	
Other and unspecified.
Treatments and tests—
Pneumothorax—
Initial	
Refill _.
Oleothorax—
Initial	
Refill	
Pneumoperitoneum—
Initial	
Refill	
Bronchoscopy...	
B.C.G. vaccinations .
Aspirations 	
Fluoroscopes...
Tuberculin tests given
X-rays referred to the Division—
New tuberculous cases	
Other 	
New cases found (tuberculous and non-tuberculous)
Total tuberculous  	
Tuberculous, pulmonary..
Change of diagnosis, non-tuberculous to tuberculous —   —
Primary  	
Minimal 	
Moderately advanced-
Far advanced	
Far advanced with silicosis .
Other pulmonary	
Clinic cases 	
Primary  	
Minimal	
Moderately advanced..
Far advanced	
Far advanced with silicosis..
Pleurisy with effusion	
Pleurisy without effusion...
Other tuberculosis of respiratory system .
Other pulmonary..
Tuberculosis, non-pulmonary	
Intestines and peritoneum..
Vertebral column	
Bones and joints 	
Skin	
Lymphatic system	
Genito-urinary system.
Miliary	
Meninges	
Other	
Non-tuberculous .
Pleurisy	
Empyema .....
Neoplasms...
Silicosis	
Diseases of circulatory system..
Other pulmonary	
Other non-pulmonary	
Undiagnosed. 	
Suspect.
Change of diagnosis, tuberculous to non-
tuberculous   	
Previously known cases re-examined..
193
1,368
3,166
7,559
1
732
166
368
3
8,464
6,192
1,604
516
492
141
5
80
43
12
1
351
36
195
84
31
1
1
24
4
3
3
12
1
1
1,088
283
4
20
18
10
502
32
112
107
2
7,458
2
51
99
643
15
17
982
1,521
6
2,355
307
604
| 398
13
I 2,542
I 3,479
394
186
73
68
20
2
12
5
1
1
49
5
27
48 |
3 I
29 |
12 I
4 I
...... |
80
7
458
1,715
1
1,092
34
9
7
1,132
1,137
268
130
123
26
3
16
3
1
3
97
5
59
21
2
5
1
4
7
1
113 |
29 |
1
138
44
2
1
5
45
12
21
1 |   1
1,967 j 1,818
I
1
423
591
87
2,570
303
94
94
21
6
13
1
1
73 |
19
39
10
2
1
209
69
2
3
2
52
2
29
50
1
556
1
487
427
30
31
1
76
1,626
21
640
179
84
79
17
1
10
1
2
1
2
62
2
52
2
5
1
663
801
61
3,250
180
62
62
1 I
1 I
95 |
16 I
10
16
7
29
2
2
13
1
784
399
1,058
11
2,163
41
29
27
20
3
14
2
1
42
33
9
118
54
33
1
23
866
103
222
4,831
9,378
7
11,679
12
10
1,005
3
1,077
166
806
24
12,818
12,434
180
8,623
2,766
990
947
254
21
151
56
18
1
7
693
65
417
142
49
1
7
1
3
8
43
5
4
3
1
21
6
1
2
1,776
495
4
38
47
25
711
48
170
238
6
14,848 E 26
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
During 1950 a total of 135,271 persons were examined by the survey clinics, including 52,715 examined by Mobile Unit No. 1. The number of referred cases totalled
2,577, and the number of new cases totalled 274. Of the 274 new cases found by survey
clinics, 16 were far advanced, 82 were moderately advanced, 167 were minimal, and 9
were primary.
Table 3.—Report of Survey Clinics, 19501
Item
Vancouver
Victoria
New Westminster
Mobile
Total
Total examined	
Total referred  	
New tuberculous cases.
Primary	
Minimal—
Active
Quiescent.
Apparently arrested .
Apparently cured	
Moderately advanced—
Active  	
Quiescent .
Apparently arrested .
Apparently cured	
Far advanced—
Active  	
Quiescent.
Apparently arrested..
Apparently cured	
Known tuberculous cases	
Minimal—
Active -	
Quiescent.
Apparently arrested..
Apparently cured	
Moderately advanced—
Active	
Quiescent.
Apparently arrested..
Apparently cured	
Far advanced—
Active 	
Quiescent.
Apparently arrested .
Apparently cured __
Cardiac disease  	
Pleurisy	
Suspect 	
Negative 	
Other diagnoses	
Not yet diagnosed.
37,829
1,273
138
9
18
11
22
20
35
4
6
2
10
1
1
1
8
13
2
1
1
2
23
115
72
544
270
80
6,800
476
13
10
14
14
324
65
36
9,956
194
36
9
14
3
15
4
83
44
6
80,686
634
87
10
4
28
14-
16
2
5
6
1
1
92
2
22
44
11
28
19
187
186
24
135,271
2,577
274
9
35
16
61
55
54
6
13
9
14
2
126
1
3
30
60
3
1
10
11
47
172
109
1,138
565
146
1 Excluding general-hospital units. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1950
E 27
During 1950 there were 96,445 examinations in stationary and travelling clinics, of
which 39,713 were new examinations. Re-examinations totalled 56,732, which is a
4-per-cent increase over 1949.
Table 4.—New Examinations and Re-examinations during the Years
1946 to 1950
(Excluding Indians.)
Total Examined
New Examinations
Old Examinations
Year
Total
Stationary1
Travelling2
Total
Stationary
Travelling
Total
Stationary
Travelling
1946	
1947	
1948 	
1949	
1950 	
75,459
79,447
95,237
97,631
96,445
63,405
65,250
81,708
84,042
83,085
12,054
14,197
13,529
13,589
13,360
42,243
37,900
42,800
43,318
39,713
36,848
31,991
36,564
37,553
35,816
5,395
5,909
6,236
5,765
3,897
33,216
41,547
52,437
54,313
56,732
26,557
33,259
45,144
46,489
47,269
6,659
8,288
7,293
7,824
9,463
1 Includes stationary diagnostic and stationary survey.
2 Does not include mobile buses.
Source: Daily Report of Clinics, Form T.B. 71, and Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. E 28                                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 2.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics,
1941-50
(Excluding Indians.)
No. o
(in
9C
80
fCases
00's)
	
70
60
Tot.
Examin
1              i
itions  #
40
4
/
/
/
30
20
/
/
>
/
^^
*****
1           t
New
Examinations
/
/         *
*        /
*
/
•
■
/
/
.***
/
/
t
10
0
Old
Examinatic
na
I--
+.*
m - *
t ^
19'
1
2                          '4
'4
4                            '4
5                         '4
6                           '4
~i                '*
A                           >4
9                           19
50 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 29
Chart 3.—New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics,
1941-50
(Excluding Indians.)
No.  of Case
(in 000's)
TRAVELLING
CLINICS
Total
Examinations
— ZZZ.
:^-
4
**• — „
^,  New Exam
Old Exan-
nations
inations
*-*"
	
	
*-*•
^
The total number of tuberculosis cases diagnosed by clinics decreased from 2,641
in 1949 to 2,285 in 1950. Similarly, cases of pulmonary tuberculosis decreased from
1,125 in 1949 to 947 in 1950.
NEW CASES EXAMINED BY CLINICS
Table 5.—New Cases Examined by Clinics, by Diagnosis, 1950
(Excluding Indians.)
Diagnosis
Number
Per Cent
of
of Cases
Cases
Examined
921
1.90
26
0.05
43
0.09
1,295
2.67
481
0.99
45,802
94.30
Pulmonary tuberculosis  	
Tuberculous pleurisy and other tuberculosis of respiratory system._
Non-pulmonary tuberculosis  	
Other pulmonary diagnosis...
Other (other non-pulmonary diagnoses, undiagnosed and suspect) _
Normal   	
Total new cases examined	
48,568
100.00
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. Table 6.—New Cases Other than Negative Examined by Diagnostic Clinics, by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age-groups, 1950        w
(Excluding Indians)                                                                                                  ©
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0
0 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 31
During 1950 a total of 921 new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis was diagnosed by
clinics. The Vancouver Clinic diagnosed 487 or 52.9 per cent, the New Westminster
Clinic 110 or 11.9 per cent, and the Coast Travelling Clinic 90 or 9.8 per cent. The
Victoria Clinic diagnosed 68 new cases, a decrease of 45.2 per cent over 1949. Of the
921 new cases of tuberculosis found, 444 or 48.2 per cent were classified as active
pulmonary tuberculosis.
Table 7.—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Examined by Clinics,
by Infection and Condition, 1950
Infection and Condition
Vancouver
Tranquille
Victoria
New
Westminster
Coast
Kootenay
Interior
Island
Total
Primary- 	
Apparently cured—
Arrested	
Apparently arrested.
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved-
Active not stated —
Condition not stated
Minimal  	
Apparently cured—
Arrested	
Apparently arrested.
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved...
Active not stated	
Condition not stated
Moderately advanced...
Apparently cured	
Arrested	
Apparently arrested..
Quiescent 	
Active improved	
Active unimproved -
Active not stated	
Condition not stated
Far advanced	
Apparently cured	
Arrested 	
Apparently arrested
Quiescent 	
Active improved	
Active unimproved._
Active not stated	
Condition not stated
Totals	
41
2
7
7
18
7
275
33
34
85
44
76
3
127
5
4
13
12
2
91
44
2
1
2
38
1
487
1
41
2
13
8
17
2
75
39
11
2
12
24
4
3
2
8
7
3
25
1
7
13
1
52
18
6
11
1
1
2
2
62
30
7
15
3
1
6
47
10
12
7
5
3
11
4
2
1
1
68
110
90
76
62
14
3
2
3
5
26
86
2
5
16
24
1
25
13
568
135
87
128
78
5
110
25
198
14
14
20
21
3
117
9
69
4
3
4
1
55
921
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. E 32
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The number of X-ray examinations in stationary diagnostic clinics increased from
27,695 in 1949 to 28,500 in 1950. X-rays in institutions and travelling clinics showed
slight decreases over the previous year. Stationary survey clinic X-rays also showed
a decrease from 56,374 in 1949 to 54,585 in 1950. X-rays taken in general hospitals,
shown for the first time this year, were 45,210.
Table 8.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, Travelling Clinics, Mobile Units, and
General-hospital Units, 1941-50.
Year
Institutions
Stationary
Travelling
Mobile
Units
General-
hospital
Units
Diagnostic
Survey
Diagnostic
Survey
Total
1941 _	
3,825
3,692
4,121
3,881
3,858
6,667
5,196
6,111
6,432
6,412
17,162
20,135
24,199
14,315
11,075
16,781
20,986
24,144
27,695
28,500
12,353
12,323
13,329
12,124
12,613
11,289
12,996
13,399
13,508
13,360
	
33,340
1942 ._.	
36,150
1943  _
4,374
26,173
28,850
45,810
44,196
57,428
56,374
54,585
46,023
115,275
146,939
1944	
2,914
764
763
1,063
91
55,868
89,779
99,103
155,674
127,081
140,722
80,686
1945 ..._..
1946   	
180,413
240,111
1947	
1948 _ _	
228,254
1949 	
45,210
244,731
228,753
1950	
Source: X-ray Ledger T.B. 73 and Clinic Ledgers T.B. 71 and T.B. 41. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 33
Chart 4.—X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) Made by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1941-50
No. of X-raj
(in 000's)
Total
Mo
Stati
«,                 #
	
-■—-
/
*
.>*
.'
.'
	
*
^^ *• ^^^
.^
Trav
Cli
ics
r-i E 34
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 5.—X-ray Examinations Made by Institutions, Diagnostic and
Treatment Clinics, Survey Clinics, and Mobile Units, 1941-50
Number
260 r
/ / s-
Total*            *^
Survey^^        ^
Total     M
/
t
1
t
I  !
\
*
^	
•
\
/
t
*
1
*
1
9
\
*
>
y
/
0
t             Mobile
Units
1
*
/
\
»
\
/    i
*
< /
*•'
»
\
1    *
//
/
•
/
m
i
/     f
IT
s
Survey
Clinics
Dia
gnostic and Tre
atment Clinics
1
~ ~
V
Institutions
'42 '43 '44 '45 '46 '47
'49 1950
♦ Includes General Hospitals,   1950 only TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 35
GENERAL SUMMARIES
Table 9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1950
St.
Vancou
Tran
Victoria
Joseph's
New West
Jericho
Total
ver
quille
Oriental
minster
Beach
Hospital
93 950              4.987               fi 817
795            4.1fi9
802
39,613
Chest X-rays—
Flat—
1,858
2,178
437
243
507
5,223
17,124
1,704
5,881
52
4.149
241
29,151
V.D. Division	
742
7
-    [   -—
749
Stereoscopic—
53
23
2
4
82
62
10
134
3
209
Planograph—
243
36
20
299
303
1
23
327
Other chest—
419
97
19
7
542
1,304
26
217
2
2
1,551
Gastro-intestinal—
12
3
5
1
21
15
15
Bones and joints—
93
56
10
23
182
60
52
28
|
4
144
V.D. Division.. 	
25
25
Other—
28
25
2
8
63
11
10
2
23
Fluoroscope—
In-patient..  	
3,343
7,464
1,695
952
834
14,288
8,464
604
2,542
43
1,175
12,828
V.D. Division  	
237
237
Electrocardiogram—
331
56
1
388
37
6
43
253
253
Indian Department examinations -
204
31
11
246
Lipiodol injection—
7
3
10
66
1
       |       ........
1
67
Source:  X-ray Ledger T.B. 73. E 36
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 10.—Laboratory Report, 1950
Vancouver
Tranquille
Victoria
St.
Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital
New Westminster
Jericho
Beach
Total
Sputum tests—
Routine—
1
3,625
372
374
23
415
203
1,606
311
855
232
599
59
620
53
615
56
136
767
308
113
2,066
135
115
21
437
2
504
3
877
1,865
1,313
2
2
62
100
19
266
1,849
372
64
304
56
309
65
309
69
39
24
61
5
347
13
2
2
1
72
293
9
11
27
434
3
5
98
2
166
6
167
6
57
2
54
3
47
2
12
1
56
1
373
1
9
8
47
1,354
801
8
8
389
27
73
41
69
4
72
3
67
3
13
64
24
405
21
10
10
2
3,100
10,659
3,813
3
305
566
305
566
1,202
15,804
11,976
Concentrated—
In-patient 	
7,445
377
Stomach washings—
In-patient 	
847
738
Guinea-pig inoculation—
In-patient  —
728
788
Blood tests—
Sedimentations—
3,629
19,351
Haemoglobin—
1,781
660
18
500
165
8
829
172
4
624
146
2
382
566
3,248
1,003
V.D. Division	
Red-blood count—
18
1,529
286
V.D. Division	
White-blood count—
8
1,884
296
4
Differential—
1,662
276
V.D. Division	
2
582
V.D. Division	
Other special blood tests	
1,358
Kahn—
310
125
2,594
718
799
268
Urinalysis—
Routine—
In-patient-	
5,785
888
Quantitative—
100
53
112
53
161
15
260
299
208
161
132
260
278
Basal metabolism	
Smear '	
Cultures—
Sputum—
36
707
389
503
Other-
In-patient  	
674
148
1,164
Source:  Daily Laboratory Ledger T.B. 72. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 37
There was a decrease in the number of bronchoscopies performed at Tranquille and
Victoria. Bronchoscopies performed at Tranquille decreased from 210 in 1949 to 146
in 1950; Victoria bronchoscopies decreased from 36 in 1949 to 21 in 1950. However,
bronchoscopic examinations performed in Vancouver increased from 437 in 1949 to
485 in 1950.
Table 11.—Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics, 1941-50
Total
Institutions
Clinics
Year
Total
Tranquille
Vancouver
Victoria
Total
Tranquille
Vancouver
Victoria
Total
Tranquille
Vancouver
Victoria
1941 	
1942 	
163
206
184
243
285
353
452
700
683
652
26
18
26
31
9
3
72
258
210
146
135
188
157
204
274
334
366
415
437
485
2
1
8
2
16
14
27
36
21
116
148
117
143
127
174
297
552
554
486
26
18
26
30
9
3
72
252
210
146
88
130
90
10.8
117
160
211
273
308
319
2
1
5
1
11
14
27
36
21
47
58
67
100
158
179
155
148
129
166
1
6
	
47
58
67
96
157
174
155
142
129
166
1943	
1944 	
1945	
3
1
1946 	
1947 _	
5
1948
1949 	
1950	
Source:  Institutional Ledger T.B. 70 and Clinic Ledger T.B. 71.
Patient-visits to dental clinics showed no substantial change from the previous year.
The total number of dental X-rays shown for the first time this year, was 6,994.
Table 12.—Dental Report
Vancouver1
Tranquille
Victoria
Jericho Beach
Total
Patient-visits—
1,553
575
201
61
65
20
595
204
754
418
119
28
21
1
514
195
3,562
86
1,539
14
90
3
634
1
501
244
3
85
2,463
872
397
18
139
2
11
2
134
119
21
26
2
24
130
1
221
57
414
1
62
52
1
142
130
27
2
207
748
10
3,903
Out-patient 	
Examinations—
608
492
66
Consultations—
128
23
Extractions—
1,505
205
Fillings, including cement bases—
1,504
439
Prophylactic treatment—
416
33
Surgical removal, impacted teeth—
47
1
Denture fittings—
936
196
X-rays 	
Other   .   .   	
6,994
1,025
1 Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source:  Ledger T.B. 74. E 38
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Treatments for eye refractions increased from 153 in 1949 to 171 in 1950.    Other
treatments and examinations for eye, ear, nose, and throat showed decreases.
Table 13.—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report
Vancouver
Tranquille
Victoria
Total
Patient-v-sits—
248
42
146
6
91
1
104
1
2
99
39
1
2
2
28
198
115
46
51
4
91
4
68
38
14
15
7
2
484
42
Eye—
Examinations—
275
6
Prescriptions—
In-patient    	
137
1
Refractions—
170
1
Other treatments—
13
Consultations—
Out-patient.  	
Ear, nose, and throat—
Examinations—
192
43
Treatments—
69
2
Consultations—
2
28
Source: Ledger T.B. 75. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
INSTITUTIONS
E 39
The number of patient-days in tuberculosis institutions increased from 266,894 in
1949 to 273,962 in 1950. The number of pneumothorax treatments decreased from
ll-,066 in 1949 to 9,174 in 1950. There was a considerable decrease in the number of
light therapy treatments, from 1,388 in 1949 to 778 in 1950.
Table 14.—Institutions—General Summary, 1950
Item
Vancouver
Tranquille
Victoria
St. Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital
Jericho
Beach
Total
78,380
371
370
82
2,182
116.932
322
303
144
5,019
27,348
108
110
30
966
10
469
43
18,315
64
57
9
524
32,987
66
67
14
483
273,962
Admissions. ..   —-	
Discharges 	
Treatments—
Pneumothoraces—
Initial	
Refill.-..  	
Oleothorax—
931
907
279
9,174
Refill
11
295
20
Pneumoperitoneum—
Initial   —	
Refill 	
43
1,051
126
72
64
22
1
2
4
29
1
7
22
9
319
112
491
148
14
189
1
40
90
28
30
20
8
2
7
399
15
72
2,254
Aspirations	
Thoracoplasties—
Stage 1
294
100
Stage 2
94
	
42
Stage 4
	
9
J4
2
21
	
4
4
Phrenic—
	
29
	
1
7
92
20
146
8
128
Thoracoscopy	
658
31
486
778
3
1
494
83
8
52
	
232
22
18
5
264
Source:   Clinic Ledgers T.B. 71 and T.B. 41 and Institutional Ledger T.B. 70;   Admission Form T.B. 78 and
Discharge Form T.B. 79. E 40
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
A decrease in the total number of pneumothoraces occurred during 1950. The
number of pneumothorax refills given in the stationary clinics accounted for the only
increase noted—that is, from 10,873 in 1949 to 11,649 in 1950.
Table 15.—Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) Given by
Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1941-50
Total
Initial
Refill
Year
Total
Initial
Institutions
Stationary
Clinics
Traveling
Clinics
Total
Refill
Institutions
Stationary
Clinics
Traveling
Clinics
1941       	
14,975
12,766
14,937
372
299
401
344
327
413
354
339
334
286
369
295
392
337
325
397
350
336
328
279
3
4
5
2
1
5
1
2
5
7
14,603
12,467
14,536
16,484
16,794
21,470
21,565
21,449
22,059
20,853
9,250
7,293
9,132
10,375
9,678
12,347
12,698
12,745
11,066
9,174
5,074
5,092
5,255
5,841
6,892
8,799
8,616
8,617
10,873
11,649
279
1942
82
1943
4
5
1
11
3
1
1
149
1944	
16,828
17,121
268
1945   	
224
1946.. 	
1947	
1948 „,
1949.	
1950   -
21,883
21,919
21,788
22,393
21,139
324
251
87
120
30
Source: Clinic Ledgers T.B. 71 and T.B. 41 and Institutional Ledger T.B. 70. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 41
Table 16.—Institutions—Patient Status
(As of December 31st, 1950.)
Item
Cases on pneumothorax—
In-patients  	
Out-patients	
Status of patients in residence—
Patients in residence, December 31st, 1950 ...
Cases with effusion with pneumothorax _	
Cases with effusion without pneumothorax „
Cases of tuberculous empyema with pneumothorax	
Cases of tuberculous empyema without
pneumothorax..
Cases with positive sputum with collapse
therapy
Cases with positive sputum without collapse
therapy
Cases with negative sputum with collapse
therapy
Cases with negative sputum without collapse
therapy.—   	
Cases receiving occupational therapy _
Cases supervised by teacher	
Total
Number
Per
Cent
250
367
33.2
Number
752
14
2
4
152
296
129
172
401
136
Tranquille
Number
Per
Cent
102
21
31.7
Number
322
39
130
59
94
171
66
Vancouver1
Number
101
271
Per
Cent
38.3
Number
264
4
2
3
79
77
52
54
142
34
Victoria
Number
31
75
Per
Cent
41.3
Number
75
2
18
28
12
16
48
34
Jericho Beach
Number
16
Per
Cent
17.6
Number
91
1
16
61
6
8
40
2
1 Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source: Clinic Ledgers T.B. 41 and T.B. 71 and Institutional Ledger T.B. 70. E 42
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
In 1950 there were 928 admissions in the five institutions, compared with 973 in
1949. As in 1949, the majority of those admitted were in the 20-29 age-group. There
was an increase in the percentage of admissions in the 40-60 age-group.
Table 17.
—Admissions by Age and Percentage of
in Each Age-group, 1946-50
Total Admissions
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
Age-group
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
0- 9	
59
314
217
105
79
61
14
2
6.9
36.9
25.6
12.4
9.4
7.3
1.3
0.2
1
53
333
241
120
82
51
17
0.1
5.9
37.1
26.8
13.4
9.1
5.7
1.9
56
287
214
115
68
49
22
3
6.9
35.2
26.3
14.1
8.4
6.0
2.7
0.4
2
56
328
243
157
89
70
25
3
0.2
5.8
33.7
25.0
16.1
9.1
7.2
2.6
0.3
18
61
312
224
131
87
70
25
1.9
10-19	
6.6
20-29       .. _               	
33.7
30-39  	
24.1
40-49	
50-59	
60-69-	
70 and over- -
14.1
9.4
7.5
2.7
Totals	
851
100.0
898
100.0
814     1   100.0
973
100.0
928
100.0
Source:   Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78.
Chart 6.—Percentage Distribution of Admissions to Institutions
by Age-groups, 1946-50
Lllll TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1950
E 43
As was the case in 1949, females predominate in the earlier age-group, while males
exceed females in all other age-groups. For both sexes the majority of admissions
occurred in the 30-39 age-group and were moderately advanced cases. There were six
times the number of admissions for far advanced cases among males than for those among
females in the 40-and-over age-group.
Table 18.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1950
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78.
Diagnosis
Age-group
M-5
ll
3 xfi
2$ a
Pi
y
X
u
"rt
O
H
§
a
2
18
iiii
3.-!*-
HB.W
S'gw
Hb o
>- a
a, oo
53
*c5
0
H
T3
C
rt
Ih
0
0- 4 years _.	
 M.
F.
3
2
-----
~~~
3
2
5
5-9    „     	
 M.
9
2
l
1
10
3
F.
13
10-14   „     -	
.  M.
2
3
2
—
7
F.
7
15-19    „    _	
 M.
11
11
10
16
3
3
24
30
F.
54
20-24    „    	
 M.
1
12
25
9
i
48
F.
1
44
33
13
1
i
93
141
25-29    „     	
 M.
1
15
25
10
2
53
F.
46
47
24
1
118
171
30-39    „	
       ■ M.
1
19
45
25
1
91
F.
1
43
63
24
2
133
224
40-49   „   	
 , M.
22
35
30
1
1
89
F.
13
19
10
42
131
50-59    „	
- M.
13
39
25
77
F.
4
4
2
10
87
60-69    „     	
 M.
1
1
28
8
29
3
58
12
F.
70
70 years and over	
 M.
5
9
7
	
1
22
F.
1
1
1
	
3
25
 .....M.
F.
 M.
15
8
98
166
217
193
138
81
1
1
1
6
3
475
453
F.
23
264
410
219
2
1
9
928 The largest group entering sanatoria in 1950 were those with a moderately advanced
condition.   This group consisted of 410 patients, comprising 44.2 per cent of the total
admissions.
Chart 7.—Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1950
20       40        60        80       100       120       140      160       180 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1950 E 45
Table 19.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1950
Diagnosis
Racial Origin
Primary
Minimal
Moderately
Advanced
Far
Advanced
Tbc.
Pleurisy
with
Effusion
Tbc.
Pleurisy
without
Effusion
Other
Diagnoses
Total
_M.
4
4
56
90
121
109
76
52
1
1
2
2
260
F.
258
T.
8
146
230
128
2
4
518
European races 	
 M.
3
23
50
38
2
116
F.
2
52
53
18
1
126
T.
5
75
103
56
1
2
242
Chinese 	
 M.
5
22
14
1
42
F.
2
8
3
13
T.
7
30
17
1
55
 M.
5
5
2
5
2
1
1
10
F.
11
T.
10
7
3
1
21
Hindu	
 M.
1
1
2
F.
1
	
1
T.
1
1
1
3
Half-breed and Indian	
 M.
6
2
2
1
.
11
F.
1
7
9
4
21
T.
7
9
11
5
32
Other  	
 M.
1
1
1
1
2
F.
2
T.
2
2
4
Not stated 	
 M.
2
1
6
8
18
8
6
3
1
32
F.
21
T.
.. _ M.
3
14
26
9
1
53
Totals	
15
98
217
138
1
6
475
F.
8
166
193
81
1
1
3
453
23
264
410
219
2
1
9
928
1 Includes United States.
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. E 46 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 20.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1950
Diagnosis
Type of Case
Primary
Minimal
Moderately
Advanced
Far
Advanced
Tbc.
Pleurisy
with
Effusion
Tbc.
Pleurisy
without
Effusion
Other
Diagnoses
Total
by Sex
Total
New case     M.
F.
Review M.
F.
Readmission  M.
F.
2
12
6
1
1
76
123
9
17
13
26
115
93
14
27
88
73
71
36
7
6
60
39
1
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
269
257
43
57
163
139
526
100
302
Totals            M.
F.
15
8
98
166
217
193
138
81
1
1
1
6
3
475
453
Grand totals
23
264
410
219
2
1
9
928
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78.
Of the total first-admission cases, Tranquille admitted 222 or 42.2 per cent, Vancouver 205 or 39 per cent, and Victoria 65 or 12.2 per cent. 'Tranquille admitted 54.3
per cent of the total 199 minimal cases. Vancouver admitted 42.8 per cent of the total
208 moderately advanced cases and 46.7 per cent of the total 107 far advanced cases.
Table 21.-
—First Admissions
by Institution and Diagnosis,
1950
Total
Institution
Diagnosis
Tranquille
Vancouver1
Victoria
Jericho Beach
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Primary   	
Minimal	
Moderately advanced	
3
199
208
107
3
6
0.6
37.8
39.6
20.3
0.6
1.1
1
108
74
34
1
4
0.5
48.6
33.3
15.3
0.5
1.8
1
61
89
50
2
2
0.5
29.7
43.4
24.4
1.0
1.0
1
21
30
13
1.5
32.3
46.2
20.0
9
15
10
26.5
44.1
29.4
Tuberculous pleurisy.	
Other diagnoses ... 	
Totals 	
526
100.0
222
100.0
205
100.0
65
100.0
34
100.0
1 Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source:  Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1950 E 47
Chart 8.—First Admissions to Institutions by Institution and Diagnosis, 1950
No.  of First
Admissions
250
200
150
100
50
Tranquille
Vancouver
Victoria
MINIMAL
MOD.  ADV.
FAR ADV.
OTHER D1AG.
Table 22.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution), 1946-50
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
Diagnosis
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
Number
Per
Cent
3
156
228
130
6
11
0.6
29.2
42.7
24.3
1.1
2.1
5
137
241
145
6
12
0.9
25.1
44.1
26.6
1.1
2.2
3
148
226
98
4
7
0.6
30.5
46.5
20.2
0.8
1.4
1
174
242
117
6
7
0.2
31.8
44.2
21.4
1.1
1.3
3
199
208
107
3
6
0.6
Minimal     	
Moderately advanced ...
37.8
39.6
20.3
0.6
Other diagnoses —	
1.1
Totals ,.-.	
534
100.0
546
100.0
486
100.0
547
100.0
526
100.0
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. E 48
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 9.—First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis
(Percentage Distribution), 1946-50
60
y
•
X
.» -"^'"
v-^
^. ^ ^c
*
/
1
+ ^
^. •*
Mir"™^     ,
Far Advanced
^™    ^^™»    ■
 *N
•**
*N^
Other
0
1941 Mi
• 43 '44
'46 '47
'49 1950 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 49
There were 526 first admissions to tuberculosis sanatoria during 1950. Of the
total minimal cases, 64.3 per cent were admitted within two months after application.
Similarly, 48.1 per cent of the total moderately advanced cases and 68.2 per cent of the
total far advanced cases were admitted within one month after application.
Table 23.—First Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Time
between Application and Admission, 1950
Length of Time between Application and Admission
Diagnosis
1
18
SS
4
W
X!
C
<N O
n
X!
a
m O
AS
Cfl
XI
a
?j
cn<,
CO
x!
a
m 0
4S
0
MD O
eft
n
e
r- o
Cfl
X!
0
CO O
riS
CO
x;
Q
ON   O
coS
Cfl
onx:
o2
Hi
o
H
i
2
5
11
7
14
3
2
i
24
29
50
36
36
20
22
46
29
26
10
4
1
1
1
1
16
24
16
11
5
4
7
5
4
11
4
3
3
6
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
-—
2
1
76
123
115
93
71
36
1
1
1
4
2
F.
3
F.
Moderately advanced  M.
F.
Far advanced  M.
F.
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion  M.
F.
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion  M.
F.
Other diagnoses M.
F.
199
208
107
2
1
6
Totals   M.
F.
30
15
113
87
62
78
37
40
15
19
5
8
3
5
1
2
1
1
1
3
269
257
—
Grand totals  	
45
200
140
77
34 I 13
8
3
1
1
4
526
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78.
Table 24.—Institutional Patient-days of the Division of
Tuberculosis Control, 1941-50
Year
Total
Tranquille
Vancouver
Victoria
Jericho Beach
1941   	
1942 	
231,953
223,331
230,561
222,822
226,994
244,264
269,495
305,169
266,894
273,962
120,604
116,823
123,280
122,298
117,866
121,197
118,545
115,819
114,610
116,932
85,912
81,441
79,935
75,562
83,111
96,503
110,584
128,825
92,664
96,695
25,437
25,067
27,346
24,962
26,017
26,564
26,559
27,463
26,993
27,348
	
1943  	
1944 	
1945
1946   ...
1947..   -	
1948	
13.8071
33,062
1949 	
1950 	
32,627
32,987
1 As the Jericho Beach unit opened in July, 1947, this figure is for part of the year only.
Source:  Institutional Summary, 1950. E 50
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 10.—Institutional Patient-days of the Division of
Tuberculosis Control, 1941-50
Days
(in 000's)
M
Total      ^f
Tranquille
*
\_
~"~"
*^
^
-^--
+
-.— *
	
Vancouver   -—
..''
S
\
« ^^~
wmmm'
Victoria
*
Jericho Beach
*
*
1941 '42
■45 '46
'48 '49 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 51
Table 25.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition
on Discharge, 1946-50
Condition
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number 1 Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Number
Per Cent
Arrested 	
Apparently arrested—.
Quiescent  	
29
79
269
154
88
188
32
3.5
9.4
32.0
18.4
10.5
22.4
3.8
28
125
265
79
89
195
29
3.5
15.4
32.7
9.8
11.0
24.0
3.6
20 | 2.5
112 j 13.7
313 1 38.4
106    |      13.0
86 | 10.5
148    j      18.1
31    j        3.8
26
151
377
114
131
149
33
2.7
15.4
38.4
11.6
13.3
15.2
3.4
23
135
385
125
118
99
18
2.5
15.0
42.6
13.8
Active unimproved
Dead 	
Other diagnoses	
13.1
11.0
2.0
Totals	
839
100.0
810
100.0
•
816    |    100.0
981
100.0
903
100.0
Source:  Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79. E 52                                 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart 11.—Percentage Distribution of Discharges from Institutions
According to Condition on Discharge, 1941-50
Per
50
Cent
45
4
/
40
4
i
/
•
35
/
/
/
"^
^             Quie.
"••• —
cent
«•   —   ""
/
/
/
/
/
N
\
Dead
               >
/
/
25
/""
V
1*
•
\
U           *
•
\
20
1             \
•
\
^
\  /
\"
15
V
\
\
^"'
.   Improve
*
*
1
\
\
>,       ^'
'A
m           \
*^^
^^Hr^^^par
ently Arrested
/<
^^^ Active T
■nimproved
^
f
Arrested
0
19
41                        '4
2                         '4
!                          '4
)                          '4
5                          '4
■<
7                            '4
8                          M
9                        19
50 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 53
Table 26.-
-Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and
Length of Treatment during Previous Admissions, 1950
»rge
Length of Treatment during Previous Admissions
Condition on Disch
Not
Under 1
1-4
4-8
8-12
1-2
2-3
3-5
Over 5
Admit
Total
Total
Month
Months
Months
Months
Years
Years
Years
Years
ted
by Sex
Before
Apparently cured
_..M.
F.
—
	
1
1
—
2
2
3
3
6
Arrested 	
M
3
1
1
1
5
11
F.
1
1
4
1
5
12
23
Apparently arrested .
M
1
3
3
9
7
7
4
38
72
F.
1
3
5
3
11
3
2
35
63
135
Quiescent ~	
M
4
13
14
14
11
4
6
5
114
185
F.
5
8
14
10
31
7
9
4
112
200
385
Active improved	
M
3
4
4
3
3
1
1
40
59
F.
2
1
5
3
4
3
2
46
66
125
Active unimproved ..
M
3
11
3
5
11
4
3
2
37
79
F.
1
7
2
3
3
1
5
1
16
39
118
Dead _	
M.
2
3
7
2
1
4
41
60
F.
4
3
1
6
2
2
21
39
99
Non-pulmonary  	
_._.M.
1
2
1
3
1
F.
4
Non-tuberculous
M.
F.
6
2
6
2
8
Undiagnosed 	
M
......
	
F.
M
	
Totals 	
8
33
27
43
35
20
18
9
285
478
......
F.
9
24
30
20
60
11
21
10
240
425
17
57
57     1       63
95
31
39
19
525
	
903
Source:  Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79.
There were 903 discharges from tuberculosis institutions in 1950. Slight increases
occurred in the number discharged quiescent and active improved. Of those discharged,
99, or 11 per cent, were dead. This is a decrease of 33.6 per cent over the previous
year.   The average length of stay was ten months.
Table 27.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and
Length of Last Stay in Institutions, 1950
irge
Length of Last Stay in Institution
Condition on Disch
Under 1
1-4
4-8
8-12
1-2
2-3
3-5
Over 5
Not
Total
Total
Month
Months
Months Months
Years
Years
Years
Years
Stated
by Sex
Apparently cured
M.
F.
2
1
1
2
—
3
3
6
Arrested 	
...M.
1
1
5
3
1
11
F.
3
1
2
3
3
12
23
Apparently arrested .
... M.
7
8
17
18
13
6
3
72
F.
12
3
20
12
12
1
3
63
135
Quiescent	
.. M.
37
18
53
29
38
7
3
185
F.
36
24
42
48
36
10
3
1
200
385
Active improved	
M
3
6
16
5
12
22
16
15
9
14
4
3
59
66
F.
125
Active unimproved ..
___.M.
15
24
16
7
10
3
3
1
79
F.
13
8
12
2
3
1
39
118
Dead    	
.  M.
21
10
2
9
5
6
4
3
60
F.
6
7
5
5
8
2
3
3
39
99
Non-pulmonary  	
.. M.
1
2
1
3
1
F.
4
Non-tuberculous 	
M.
4
1
2
1
	
6
2
F.
8
Undiagnosed 	
M.
F.
___.M.
	
—
Totals   	
91
82
105
82
76
22
16
4
....    |    478
...._
F.
78
50
104
86
76
18
9
4
._...    |    425
169
132
209
168
152
40
25    1        8
     1       ...
903
Source:  Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79. E 54
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge,
Sex, and Home Condition, 1950
Condition on Discharge
Active
Inactive
Eft
3
_o
3
Home Condition
C
a
•a
u
O
O
o
■*-
E
u
o
u
■o
CO
c
c
>
o
P.
E
Cfl
U
Cfl
U
0,8
0J
■o
D,
C
3
C
(90
cd
3
«
|
3
D. tH
o
p
a
<
«
<Q
Q
Z
Z
D
H
H
Satisfactory	
M
40
45
159
ll
65
3
1
1
5
330
F.
55
28
188
12
62
2
l
2
350
680
Unsatisfactory   	
M
1
7
8
F.
3
6
1
10
18
Unknown .	
M
18
27
26
7
59
2
1
140
F.
M
8
5
11
1
1
39
....
65
205
59
66
79
39
185
200
11
12
72
63
3
3
60
39
3
1
6
2
—
478
425
F.
	
125
118
385
23
135
6
99     1       4
8
903
Source:  Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1950
E 55
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t E 58
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
KNOWN CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS
There were 19,428 known cases of tuberculosis on register at the end of 1950.
This represents an increase of 945 cases over 1949. Of the total known cases, 16,438
were other than Indians and 2,990 were Indians.
Table 32. — Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of
British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1946-50
Year
1
Area   1   Area
1              2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area      Area
8      1      9
1
Area
10
Area
Not
Stated
Total
Total, 1946...   	
1947  ' .
1948  -
1949    .
238
250
287
313
315
622
743
768
802
807
586
739
767
871
913
8,251
8,802
9,399
10,038
10,337
1,976
2,230
2,447
2,641
2,742
743
795
832
908
930
274
302
364
404
430
529    |    525
513    |    596
662        719
822    j    896
854    [    975
57
63
79
141
153
268
375
488
647
972
14,069
15,408
16,812
18,483
1950	
19,428
Table 33.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1946-50
Year
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Area
Not
Stated
Total
Other than Indians—
1946  	
184
616
540
7,875
1,653
501
137
217
229
48
254
12,254
1947  •
205
739
687
8,385
1,867
516
157
237
231
48
358
13,430
1948 __	
239
764
714
8,978
2,018
546
179
285
274
57
474
14,528
1949 	
260
798
799
9,607
2,152
573
179
330
327
76
637
15,738
1950 	
264
802
827
9,887
2,183
584
190
335
374
77
915
16,438
Table 34. — Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of
British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 3 1st, 1946-50
Year
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Area
Not
Stated
Total
Indians only—
1946	
54
6
46
376
323
242
137
312
296
9
14
1,815
1,978
2,284
19471   	
45
4
52
417
363
279
145
276
365
15
17
19481 __ 	
48
4
53
421
429
286
185
377
445
22
14
19491	
53
4
72
431
489
335
225
492
569
65
10
2,745
19501 _	
51
5
86
450
559
346
240
519
601
76
57
2,990
1 These figures include:   1947, 141 Indians of white status;   1948, 84 Indians of white status;   1949, 93 Indians of
white status; 1950, 160 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 59
Table 35.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1950
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
135
1
25 .
37
18
54
428
7
18
10
4
105
35
25
22
9
3
7
86
97
431
13
4
8
29
6
102
13
7
4
51
3
18
64
109
5,486
23
213
33
56
246
22
1
3
18
1
8
12
70
61
21
14
18
349
152
27
2
12
11
83
4
4
129
2
38
27
20
42
374
8
21
8
3
95
32
16
39
3
3
8
69
69
396
9
1
5
1
23
6
92
10
7
4
50
1
25
76
86
4,401
31
163
51
81
187
28
4
10
7
14
45
35
19
23
16
344
111
13
8
18
11
83
6
4
264
3
63
64
38
96
802
15
39
18
7
200
67
41
61
12
6
15
155
166
827
22
5
13
1
52
12
194
23
14
8
101
4
43
140
195
9,887
54
376
84
137
433
50
1
7
28
1
15
26
115
96
40
37
34
693
263
40
10
30
22
166
10
8
Area No. 4—Continued
Surrey	
Vancouver- 	
152
3,690
79
101
1,202
20
7
9
6
19
12
26
40
20
10
89
14
60
5
50
5
172
1
421
216
315
121
7
10
6
.24
13
134
99
2
7
90
184
5
5
36
24
3
7
8
96
196
141
3
10
42
35
11
3
4
17
552
109
2,841
54
85
981
33
5
7
4
13
15
35
32
23
8
62
18
34
3
53
3
115
1
331
186
269
112-
5
4
11
11
18
5
103
91
3
6
82
151
10
4
33
14
16
6
6
62
178
114
1
16
47
42
17
5
3
17
363
261
Cranbrook. - 	
6,531
133
Kimberley-.- -	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 2  	
Unorganized parts 	
Area No. 5	
Alberni	
186
2,183
53
12
Creston -	
Kaslo - 	
Campbell River -	
Comox 	
16
10
32
Cumberland  	
Duncan - 	
Esquimalt _•- : -
Ladysmith _	
Lake Cowichan— 	
Nanaimo   -
North Cowichan 	
27
61
Revelstoke-— • 	
72
43
Salmo 	
18
151
32
Trail
Oak Bay	
94
Unorganized parts   ....
Area No. 3 —	
Armstrong- 	
Coldstream  —	
Enderby   -	
Parksville  	
8
103
Qualicum Beach 	
Saanich  	
Tofino 	
Victoria- -	
8
287
2
752
Unorganized parts 	
402
584
Kamloops  - -	
233
12
Lytton — 	
Merritt   	
4
21
17
42
18
.237
190
5
Abbotsford —-	
Westview  —
13
172
Chilliwack City	
335
15
9
Delta                  	
69
District Lot 172       	
38   .
19
Vanderhoof    ■ 	
13
14
158
Kent                                 	
374
255
4
Terrace    -
26
89
Area No. 10    -	
77
28
Fort St. John —
8
7
34
915
9,063
7,375
16,438
503
457
960
1 E 60
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 36.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1950
(Indians only.1)
Place of Residence
Male     Female     Total
Place of Residence
Male     Female     Total
Area No. 1 	
Cranbrook 	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 2	
Creston- 	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 3  	
Enderby  	
Kelowna 	
Oliver 	
Osoyoos 	
Penticton- 	
Vernon 	
Unorganized parts-	
Area No. 4  	
Burnaby  _	
Chilliwack City 	
Chilliwhack District	
Coquitlam 	
Delta   	
Harrison Hot Springs	
Hope	
Kent	
Langley	
Maple Ridge 	
Matsqui  _.
Mission City 	
Mission District 	
New Westminster _
North Vancouver City	
North Vancouver District
Pitt Meadows 	
Richmond 	
Squamish	
Sumas  —
Surrey  	
Vancouver	
West Vancouver- 	
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 5  	
Alert Bay— 	
24
7
17
5
4
1
51
10
1
1
9
12
18
226
1
11
28
1
4
4
37
4
3
3
1
1
23
3
1
3
2
3
12
1
80
249
34
27
11
16
35
9
1
1
6
7
11
224
6
18
5
2
3
36
5
3
1
1
1
34
5
1
1
3
1
11
2
85
310
41
51
18
33
5
4
1
86
19
2
1
1
15
19
29
450
1
17
46
6
4
6
3
73
9
6
1
A
1
2
57
8
1
4
3
6
1
23
3
165
559
75
Area No. 5-
Alberni	
-Continued
Campbell River-
Comox	
Duncan 	
Esquimau	
Ladysmith	
Lake Cowichan..
Nanaimo 	
North Cowichan..
Port Alberni	
Saanich	
Tofino	
Victoria.~	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 6 	
Kamloops 	
Lillooet	
Lytton 	
Merritt  	
Salmon Arm City.-.
Unorganized parts -
Area No. 7 	
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 8	
McBride	
Quesnel.. 	
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake	
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 9	
Prince Rupert	
Unorganized parts -
Area No. 10.	
Fort St. John	
Unorganized parts-
Not stated 	
Totals for Province-
Ex-Province  	
22
3
3
19
2
2
1
6
5
8
10
3
131
177
17
8
13
3
8
128
113
113
251
1
3
12
235
288
4
284
43
7
36
26
1,453
17
3
3
20
12
1
13
10
2
177
169
18
11
15
10
9
106
127
127
268
1
1
11
255
313
5
308
33
5
28
31
1,537
39
6
6
39
2
2
4
14
17
9
23
13
2
308
346
35
19
28
13
17
234
240
240
519
1
1
4
23
490
601
9
592
76
12
64
57
2,990
1 These figures include 160 Indians of white status.
Source:  Case Examination, Form T.B. 1.
Table 37.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis
in British Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1950
(Excluding Indians.)
Population
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
Total
Total	
Male	
Female	
74.6
64.2
85.9
327.5
344.7
310.0
395.4
396.0
394.8
477.2
449.2
505.0
1,052.5
844.8
1,250.9
1,961.1
1,796.9
2,116.1
2,314.6
2,048.2
2,578.1
2,303.3
2,425.3
2,167.5
2,004.5
2,503.2
1,425.9
2,080.9
2,649.1
1,342.3
1.650.6 1 1,369.3
1,997.4 | 1,757.0
1.077.7 |    908.5
1
1,482.2
1,578.9
1,000.0 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 61
Chart 12.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in
British Columbia, by Age-groups and Sex, 1950
(Excluding Indians.)
S5S
Mi E 62                                  DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Increases are noted in all types of infection in all age-groups, with the exception of
the 0-4, 15-19, and 20-29 age-groups.   For primary cases the 5-9 age-group showed
a 26-per-cent increase over 1950, the increase being most apparent in the arrested group.
For minimal cases the 30-39 age-group and the 60-69 age-group showed the largest
increases from 1949 to 1950.   In the moderately advanced cases the 50-59 age-group
showed the largest increases.   No important changes are noted in the far advanced cases.
Table 38.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Present
Condition, and Age-group, 1950
(Excluding Indians.)
Age-group
w
w
w
co
Diagnosis
O
rt
rt
a
C3
rt
a
>H
>-
tH
><
><
>H
>>
*
>H
>
><
ft
Os
12
_
•ct
1
ON
1
©
i
a
CS
rn
2
©
o ci
o
o          m
*""
OJ
Ol
Cl
*F
VO
i>
S5«
Primary 	
73
194
1
166       76
76
53
36
11
6
5
3
5
704
2
17
20
ii
6
2
8
3
2
2
73
Arrested- _	
13
52
52
31
46
32
8
3
1
2
1
241
Apparently arrested-	
15
41
26
8
5
4
2
3
1
105
Quiescent  	
16
30
21
7
1
1
76
3
3
5
4
2
3
1
1
22
11
22
24
3
5
1
66
Active not stated	
1
1
Condition not stated	
13
29
18
12
11
10
17
5
1
1
1
2
120
2
21
27
123
420
944
2,241
1,771
1,331
1,290
475
122
76
8,843
1
6
46
199
715
682
519
530
203
44
26
2,971
Arrested  	
9
20
116
321
758
580
483
441
151
37
16
2,932
Apparently arrested  .   „
1
12
6
30
110
209
360
238
148
141
55
21
14
1,345
Quiescent 	
2
4
23
66
79
146
88
60
51
25
3
2
549
1
1
15
26  !       77
56
36
38
6
2
4
262
Active unimproved	
1
1
20
48
76
90
52
37
29
11
3
2
370
Active not stated	
2
1
4
1
2
1
2
13
Condition not stated	
6
6
21
19
33
91
74
46
60
23  1    12
10
401
Moderately advanced _. _
1
7
14
49
200
452
990
728
602
552
241
51
37
3,924
4
20
97
102
93
68
29
8
1
422
Arrested 	
3
25
'     95
282
245
198
192
82
23
7
1,152
Apparently arrested	
2
2
6
46
124
223
126
97
71
34
6
5
742
Quiescent 	
1
2
2
12
52
88
174
97
86
91
39
1
3
648
1
6
31
46
26
24
19
9
2
2
166
2
20
55
82
134
96
80
82
34
9
8
602
3
1
7
7
3
•   9
12
2
32
1
35
3
21
29
1
13
1
1
1
10
13
179
Condition not stated   .    ■
1
9
5
13
64
122
340
314
213
172
82
19
15
1,369
Apparently cured ,
1
3
45
38
27
15
7
2
138
1
7
13
65
76
57
39
24
4
286
Apparently arrested	
1
7
21
55
42
20
12
7
1
1
167
2
8
21
54
47
23
41
9
1
206
Active improved	
1
5
10
22
13
7
6
6
1
71
Active unimproved	
1
2
1
4
30
44
89
82
67
49
24
5
5
403
Active not stated	
2
2
1
1
2
8
Condition not stated	
6
4
2
5
9
9
14
12
10
5
6
8
90
Pulmonary tuberculosis
1
13
16
16
31
48
54
61
60
51
16
15
18
400
1
2
4
20
28
39
21
10
10
3
1
139
Pleurisy without effusion	
1
2
3
4
11
7
2
30
Far  advanced  tuberculosis
with silicosis	
1
4
11
6
1
23
Non-pulmonary 	
Totals	
•
5
41
50
54
71
128
236
163
102
73
45
14
24
1,006
83
286
281
337
885
1,779
3,947 13,077
1        '
2,330
2,164
871*
221
177
16,438
Source:  Case Examina
ion, F
orm T
.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 63
Table 39. — Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis  AMONG  THE  TOTAL  POPULATION   OF   BRITISH  COLUMBIA,   THE   OTHER-
than-Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1941-50.
Total
Other than Indian
Indian
Year
Known
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Known
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
Known
Cases1
Deaths2
Ratio
1941 	
7,836
533
14.7:1
7,069
359
19.7:1
767
174
4.4
1
1942  	
8,511
558
15.2
1
7,597
388
19.6:1
914
170
5.4
1
1943	
10,260
613
16.7
1
8,914
405
22.0:1
1,346
208
6.5
1
1944^  _	
11,469
517
22.2
1
9,861
346
28.5:1
1,608
171
9.4
1
1945 _	
13,116
525
25.0
1
11,212
363
30.9:1
1,904
162
11.8
1
1946.   	
14,069
576
24.4
1
12,254
369
33.2:1
1,815
207
8.8
1
1947  .	
15,408
536
28.7
1
13,430
362
37.1:1
1,978
174
11.4
1
1948  	
16,812
442
38.0
1
14,528
286
50.8:1
2,284
156
14.6
1
1949   -
18,483
406
45.5
1
15,738
295
53.3:1
2,745
111
24.7
1
1950- 	
19,428
309
62.9
1
16,438
240
68.5:1
2,990
69
43.3
1
1 These figures include:   1947, 141 Indians of white status;   1948, 84 Indians of white status;   1949, 93 Indians of
white status;  1950, 160 Indians of white status.
2 These figures include deaths of:   1947, 9 Indians of white status;  1948, 12 Indians of white status;   1949, 8 Indians
of white status;  1950, 4 Indians of white status.
NOTIFICATIONS OF TUBERCULOSIS
The total number of new tuberculosis cases (1,699) registered during 1950 showed
a marked decrease over the previous year, when 2,202 new cases were recorded. This
is the lowest recorded since 1943, when 1,688 new cases were reported. The number
of other-than-Indian new cases decreased from 1,624 in 1949 to 1,316 in 1950, while
the number of Indian cases decreased from 578 in 1949 to 383 in 1950.
Table 40.-
-New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1946-50
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
86
110
105
1,308
320
170
54
80
66
25
9
40
43
'    163
192
1,087
416
168
71
175
201
34
10
56
44
78
71
988
382
93
74
179
139
35
7
18
39
62
125
1,019
298
95
69
210
191
75
1
18
27
83
889
259
69
41
120
Area 10    '	
34
15
Totals      __.__	
2,373
2,616
2,108
2,202
1,699 E 64
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 41.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1946-50
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
82
110
97
1,266
269
133
29
41
31
12
7
40
34
162
171
989
327
83
30
50
45
16
10
54
40
78
58
913
276
50
24
50
36
14
3
13
30
61
102
988
219
41
19
62
57
27
1
17
27
71
64
853
144
27
18
35
54
Area 10                     	
15
3
15
Totals     ... _ _ _ _	
2,117
1,971
1,555
1,624
1,326
Table 42.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of
British Columbia by Statistical Area, 1946-50
1946
19471
19481
19491
19501
4
8
42
51
37
25
39
35
13
2
9
1
21
98
89
85
41
125
156
18
2
4
13
75
106
43
50
129
103
21
4
5
9
1
23
31
79
54
50
148
134
48
1
19
36
115
42
23
53
66
Area 10  _	
19
Totals   _	
256
645
553
578
373
1 Includes notifications of:   1947, 21 Indians of white status;
white status;  1950, 10 Indians of white status.
1948, 27 Indians of white status;   1949, 34 Indians of
Table 43.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases of Tuberculosis
among the total population of british columbia, the other-than-indian
Population, and the Indian Population, 1950.
Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Total   ...
1.09
1.11
1.29
1.29
1.12
0.88
15.47
1.33
1.28
9.71
1.34
0.77
21.88
1.78
0.79
9.26
2.73
1.38
11.88
2.65
1.24
10.71
5.35
3.31
10.79
2.51
1.18
24.11
1.49
1 20
Indian __	
12.86 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 65
Table 44.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1950
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence
Alive
Male
Female        Total
Dead
Male
Female Total
Area No. la	
Unorganized parts .
Area No. lb 	
Cranbrook.
Kimberley.-
Unorganized parts.
Area No. lc 	
Fernie	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 2a	
Revelstoke  —
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 2b	
Castlegar 	
Kinnaird	
Rossland	
Salmo _. -
Trail _  	
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 2c	
Creston 	
Kaslo	
Nelson	
New Denver .
Silverton-	
Slocan 	
Unorganized parts -
Area No. 3a	
Armstrong _
Coldstream ...
Kelowna	
Peachland —
Summerland -
Vernon	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 3b -	
Oliver	
Osoyoos —
Penticton -
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 3c _—	
Grand Forks	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 4a	
Abbotsford	
Chilliwack City	
Chilliwhack District.
Coquitlam	
Delta	
Fraser Mills ....
Hope	
Kent   	
Langley	
Maple Ridge-.
Matsqui.
Mission City—	
Mission District	
New Westminster.
Port Coquitlam	
Port Moody	
Surrey-
Unorganized parts.-
1
1
10
6
3
1
4
3
1
3
3
30
1
2
3
4
12
8
14
1
1
1
2
1
15
1
4
1
6
3
6
1
1
4
2
2
99
3
5
18
1
2
1
2
2
2
23
2
1
17
6
1
14
26
1
1
7
10
2
3
2
1
1
85
6
6
6
11
4
1
1
5
3
2
1
20
2
1
11
5
1
1
18
9
6
3
7
5
2
4
3
1
44
1
2
6
6
20
9
21
1
1
12
2
1
3
1
41
1
1
11
1
1
13
13
14
4
1
2
7
4
1
3
184
6
9
11
29
5
2
2
1
11
11
2
4
3
43
4
2
28
11 E 66
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 44.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1950—Continued
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence
Alive
Male
Female Total
Dead
Male
Female        Total
Area No. 4b .
Burnaby-
Gibsons Landing	
North Vancouver City-
Richmond  	
Squamish..
Vancouver	
West Vancouver-
Unorganized parts -
Area No. 5a	
Duncan  	
Esquimau..
Nanaimo—.
North Cowichan
Oak Bay	
Saanich	
Victoria	
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 5b	
Unorganized parts ..
Area No. 5c	
Alberni	
Port Alberni-
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 5d	
Campbell River-
Courtenay	
Cumberland	
Unorganized partS-
Area No. 5e   	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 5f 	
Alert Bay-
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 6a  	
Unorganized parts ..
Area No. 6b	
Salmon Arm City-
Salmon Arm District-
Unorganized parts	
Area No. 6c	
Kamloops.
North Kamloops -
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 6f	
Lillooet  —
Unorganized parts -
Area No. 7a -
Unorganized parts -
Area No. 7b   —
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 7c	
Cranberry Lake~
Westview _	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 8a 	
Prince George.
Unorganized parts _
Area No. 8c  	
Unorganized parts -
Area No. 8d	
Quesnel	
Area No. 8e	
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 8f	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Unorganized parts-
362
23
1
16
7
1
300
8
6
67
4
1
13
1
4
9
28
7
270
16
5
6
3
234
2
4
45
2
7
1
1
7
22
5
632
39
1
21
13
4
534
10
10
112
6
1
20
2
5
16
50
12
12
3
6
3
6
1
1
2
2
1
1
4
3
1
1
1
10
3
2
5
9
5
1
3
4
2
2
6
6
2
2
10
2
4
4
12
10
2
2
2
3
3
8
8
7
2
1
4
25
22
I
1  I
1
30
27 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 67
Table 44.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1950—Continued
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence
Alive
Male
Female Total
Dead
Male
Female Total
Area No. 8g 	
Unorganized parts -
Area No. 9b  _...
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 9c 	
Unorganized parts -
Area No. 9d	
Prince Rupert-
Terrace —	
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 9f 	
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 10a	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 10c	
Fort St. John -
Unorganized parts -
Area No. lOd	
Dawson Creek-
PouceCoupe.
Unorganized parts..
Area not stated	
Totals for Province..
Ex-Province	
19
12
3
4
6
6
710
2
2
1
1
1
1
24
21
1
2
3
3
1
1
3
1
2
6
5
1
8
2
2
1
1
1
1
43
33
4
6
9
9
1
1
6
3
3
8
5
2
1
3
543      |     1,253
15
45
13      |
58 E 68
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1950
(Indians only.1)
Place of Residence
Alive
Male
Female Total
Dead
Male
Female Total
Area No. 3a.-.
Enderby-
Vernon—
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 3b	
Penticton-
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 3c	
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 4a 	
Chilliwack City	
Chilliwhack District..
Coquitlam-
Harrison Hot Springs_
Kent	
Langley..
Pitt Meadows-
Unorganized parts.-
Area No. 4b	
North Vancouver City-
Vancouver	
West Vancouver _
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 5a	
Duncan 	
Lake Cowichan..
Nanaimo 	
North Cowichan..
Saanich	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 5b  	
Unorganized partS-
Area No. 5c	
Alberni  _..
Port Alberni 	
Area No. 5d  —
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 5e	
Tofino 	
Unorganized parts _
Area No. 5f	
Alert Bay-
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 6a	
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 6b  —
Salmon Arm City-
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 6c — 	
Kamloops..
Lytton -	
Merritt —
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 6d	
Unorganized parts ..
Area No. 6e  	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 6f	
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 7a  	
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 7b   -	
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 7c 	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 8a 	
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 8c. 	
Unorganized parts ..
2
2
1
1
3
6
1
1
4
15
3
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
12
2
10
16
3
13
2
2
3
1
2
10
1
3
1
5
2
2
4
4
1
1
7
7
1
2
3
2
1
1
1
12
1
1
1
4
2
6
17
3
1
1
1
20
4
16
20
5
15
3
4
6
5
1
1
1
21
1
1
1
2
6
3
1
6
14
2
1
1
10
32
6
2
1
1
3
19
1
1
6
5
1
1
1
32
6
26
36
8
28
2
2
6
2
4
19
1
5
3
10
5
5
6
6
2
2
13
13
9
9
1
1
5
5
7
7 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 69
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and
City of Residence and Sex, 1950—Continued
(Indians only.1)
Place of Residence
Alive
Male
Female Total
Dead
Male
Female Total
Area No. 8d	
Williams Lake-
Area No. 8e..
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 8f._
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 8g-
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 9a..
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 9b .
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 9c.
Unorganized parts-
Area No. 9d-
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 9e..
Unorganized parts.
Area No. 9f~
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 10a.
Unorganized parts..
Area No. 10c.
Fort St. John-
Unorganized parts-
Area No. lOd .
Unorganized parts..
Totals for Province..
1
1
11
11
1
1
6
6
1
1
4
4
5
5
10
10
9
9
2
2
4
4
7
3
4
1
1
171
3
3
10
10
13
13
6
6
2
2
3
3
2
I
178
I
3
3
20
20
2
2
10
10
1
1
7
7
15
15
23
23
15
15
4
4
7
7
9
3
6
1
1
349
13
11-
24
Includes notifications of 10 Indians of white status.
Table 46.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1941-50
Racial Origin
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
Total -
1,342
945
270
66
61
1,451
1,016
327
59
49
1,688
1,163
419
62
44
2,153
1,446
558
108
41
2,079
1,519
417
111
32
2,373
1,973
256
120
24
2,616
1,864
645
81
26
2,108
1,448
553
88
19
2,202
1,491
612
78
21
1,699
White	
1,210
Indiani 	
Chinese —	
Japanese 	
383
86
20
1 Includes notifications of:   1947, 21 Indians of white status;
white status; 1950, 10 Indians of white status.
1948, 27 Indians of white status;   1949, 34 Indians of E 70
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Chart  13. — Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial
Groups (Including Dead Cases Reported for the First Time), 1941-50
No. of C
4.000
1.000
900
800
700
600
S00
100
90
80
Total^^^^
V
White
^\
s
S
/
" —
\
*
\
V
/
\
V
_^*
^
*
\
\
/
/
>
**^
V
/
z
Chinese
_.
N
*
V
/
N
^^ ^ .,
^_«
/
■"■
^ * _
—
/
•-<
■*  *■
--^
•**-.
Japanese
N
V TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 71
The highest percentage of new cases in the white population occurred in the 30-39
age-group (18.5 per cent), whereas in the Chinese population the highest percentage
occurred in the 60-69 age-group, in the Japanese population the greatest number of new
cases occurred in the 20-24 age-group, and in the Indian population the largest concentration of new cases (14.4 per cent) occurred in the 5-9 age-group. In the total
population the highest percentage (15.4 per cent) of new cases occurred in the 30-39
age-group.
Table 47.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Racial Groups (Including Dead Cases Reported for the First
Time), 1950.
ge and Sex
White
Chinese
Jap
anese
Indiani
Total
A
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
Number
Per
Cent of
Total
0- 4 years  M.
14
2.1
1
7.7
22
11.8
37
3.9
F.
20
3.8
	
17
8.7
37
4.9
T.
34
2.8
1
5.0
39
10.2
74
4.4
5- 9
,    — M.
27
3.9
2
3.0
1
7.7
22
11.8
52
5.5
F.
21
3.9
33
16.8
54
7.2
T.
48
3.9
2
2.3
1
5.0
55
14.4
106
6.2
10-14
,  M.
13
1.9
3
4.4
24
12.9
40
4.2
F.
12
2.3
1
5.5
25
12.7
38
5.0
T.
25
2.1
4
4.6
49
12.8
78
4.6
15-19
,      M.
16
2.4
7
10.3
20
10.8
43
4.6
F.
21
4.0
2
11.1
23
11.7
46
6.1
T.
37
3.1
9
10.5
43
11.2
89
5.2
20-24
,        M.
35
5.2
4
5.9
2
15.4
20
10.8
61
6.4
F.
76
14.3
3
16.7
3
42.8
25
12.7
107
14.2
T.
111
9.2
7
8.1
5
25.0
45
11.8
168
9.9
25-29
,      M.
61
9.0
3
4.4
2
15.4
12
6.4
78
8.2
F.
82
15.4
3
16.7
21
10.6
106
14.1
T.
143
11.8
6
7.0
2
10.0
33
8.6
184
10.8
30-39
,    - - -M.
103
15.2
4
30.7
16
8.6
123
13.0
F.
121
22.8
4
22.2
13
6.6
138
18.3
T.
224
18.5
4
4.7
4
20.0
29
7.6
261
15.4
40-49
,    -- -M.
128
18.9
6
8.8
19
10.2
153
16.2
F.
73
13.7
5
27.8
2
28.6
14    |        7.1
94
12.5
T.
201
16.6
11
12.8
2
10.0
33
8.6
247
14.5
50-59
,      -—M.
104
15.3
11
16.2
13
7.0
128
13.5
F.
41
7.7
12
6.1
53
7.0
T.
145
12.0
11
12.8
25
6.5
181
10.7
60-69
, - M.
117
17.2
18
26.5
	
10
5.4
145
15.3
F.
31
5.8
5
2.5
36
4.8
T.
148
12.2
18
20.9
15
3.9
181
10.7
70-79
, M.
45
6.6
10
14.7
2
15.4
5
2.7
62
6.6
F.
20
3.8
6
3.0
26
3.5
T.
65
5.4
10
11.6
2
10:0
11
2.9
88
5.2
80 years
and over M.
9
1.3
1
1.5
1
0.5
11
1.2
F.
4
0.8
1
0.5
5
0.7
T.
.      13
1.1
1
1.2
2
0.5
16
0.9
:d M.
7
9
1.0
1.7
3
4.4
1
2
7.7
28.6
2
2
1.1
1.0
13
13
1.4
F.
1.7
T.
otals  M.
16
1.3
3
3.5
3
15.0
4
1.0
26
1.5
T
679
100.0
68    |    100.0
13
100.0
186
100.0
946
100.0
F.
531
100.0
18    |    100.0
7
100.0
197
100.0
753
100.0
G
1,210
100.0
86    1    100.0
20
100.0
383
100.0
1,699
100.0
1 Includes notifications of 10 Indians of white status.
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. E 72
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
The greatest percentage of notifications continues to be diagnosed as minimal for
both the other-than-Indian and the Indian population. There was a slight increase over
last year in the number of other-than-Indian cases diagnosed as moderately advanced,
while the greatest increase in the Indians occurred in those cases diagnosed as minimal.
Chart 14.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia
by Diagnosis, 1950
INDIANS ONLY
Dead
Tuberculous Pleurisy 0.3%
Dead
Non-Pulmonary 1.6%
Not Stated 0.8%
Dead Non-pulmonary 0.8
Tuberculous Pleurisy 1.6%
Table 48.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1950
Diagnosis
Excluding Indians
Number
Per Cent
Indians Only
Number
Per Cent
Primary—
Minimal-
Moderately advanced-
Far advanced	
Dead, pulmonary-
Tuberculous pleurisy	
Dead, tuberculous pleurisy..
Non-pulmonary..
Dead, non-pulmonary..
Not stated	
Totals-
102
644
282
118
47
21
90
10
11
1,326
7.7
48.5
21.3
8.9
3.5
1.6
0.1
6.8
0.8
0.8
100.0
95
100
56
40
17
24
1
34
6
373
25.5
26.8
15.0
10.7
4.6
6.4
0.3
9.1
1.6
TooX TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1950
E 73
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1950
(Excluding Indians.)
Age-group
Diagnosis on Notification
co
7 «
a§
7 a
-a- 2
7 a
As
ON   g
ON <«
cc,^
fa
CT\  £
7 "
as w
NO)*
ON   jj
ci <o
So
0 a
Zw
"3
0
H
Pulmonary—
M.
F.
M
12
19
23
17
2
13
9
1
1
i
2
15
11
5
5
1
1
15
50
12
20
7
6
1
1
1
2
1
i
64
21
30
8
9
2
1
1
59
15
36
12
23
	
54
48
Minimal   -- - -	
30
53
19
19
7
4
49
79
31
22
12
9
74
61
28
6
14
5
18
15
14
2
10
4
2
3
1
1
2
3
6
3
1
1
333
F.
M
311
184
F.
M.
F.
M.
1
98
1
1
1
85
	
2
30
2
1
3
F.
...M.
1
1
1
2
2
1
7
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
...M.
F.
M.
     ---
4
Dead1	
2
5
4
7
10
~"1
11
1
2
38
9
Total  pulmonary   -	
14
20
34
25
17
42
14
11
25
21
20
41
36
79
115
58
77
135
96
110
206
123
76
199
112
31
143
131
28
159
55
18
73
10
3
13
9
10
19
704
500
1,204
Tuberculous pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion
1
1
2
2
1
41	
21       1
I
4|-	
-1      1
	
11
2
9
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion
Dead1    	
	
	
1
	
	
1
1
F.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
M.
F.
-M.
 |	
	
	
Total   tuberculous   pleurisy 	
	
1
1
2
2
2
3
2
5
4
2
6
1
1
4
4
1
1
2
	
	
	
13
9
22
Non-pulmonary—
Meninges   	
Intestines   and  peritoneum	
	
1
1
1
 3
2
1
3
1
—...
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
6
1
1
2
1
3
2
5
5
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
...M.
3
4
2
1
—   I       5
1
1
1
2
6
Skin	
Lymphatic  system 	
Genito-urinary system 	
	
1
1
1
2
1
9
1
1
1
6
3
1
2|.	
2|      3
41       1
 1	
-       |   ,„
li- -
11.	
 _..|	
16
11
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
--.I .—-
3
12
Miliary    -	
1
1
	
1
1
2
1
4
4
•8
1
zifz:
~~7~\~~
Other respiratory system	
1
4
8
12
- I
11
H       1
21—.
1|	
1
111      8
2
1
2
3
5
2
1
3
3
2
2
2
?
 1	
7.
4
Dead1      - -
2
4
 1 -~-
.—1   1
21	
6
F.
-M.
4
45
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
14|      51      9
25|    13|    11
3
7
135
31
166
21    11   2
4|      1|      4
55
100
Total notifications 	
15|    30|    17|    23
21|    22|    13     25
361    52|    30|    48
I        1   !     1   :
41
82
123
66
87
153
107| 133] 115
125|    811    41
232| 216| 156
1        1
57|    101    11
201      4|    12
771    14|    23
I      !
762
564
1,326
1 Dead on notification.
Source:  Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. E 74
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1950
(Indians only.1)
Age-group
Diagnosis on Notification
to
7 u
7-
7 °>
as g
75
as £
73
7 a
7«
o £2
*>3
ov 2
73
5 a
cs s>
So
T3
O rt
rt
O
H
Pulmonary—
M.
17
9
1
2
13
21
2
1
1
2
2
11
12
2
3
1
2
2
3
2
6
9
5
3
1
2
1
4
10
7
3
4
5
1
1|.--
11..	
9
8
6
3
2
1
1
45
F.
M.
1
3
4
5
2
5
2
3
2
2
50
5
7
2
6
2
6
6
4
5
2
2
4
1
~  1
49
Moderately advanced —,	
Far advanced   -—	
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
51
25
2
2
31
21
29
2
3
1
1
1
1
:::::
1
1
2
~12
12
24
~To
4
14
—
1
Type not stated '    . 	
Dead2                  ....         . .         	
1
9
F.
M.
F.
T.
.M.
F.
_.M.
F.
M.
8
Total  pulmonary 	
18
11
29
16
28
44
19
20
39
13
17
30
16
20
36
8
16
24
12|    17
12[    12
24|    29
51      1
6|.	
11[      1
2
1
3
149
159
308
Tuberculous pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion —
	
3
1
2
1
3       2
21      4
2
1
1
1
1
	
1
—
	
12
9
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion
2
	
	
1
Dead2
F.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
_.M.
 j
1
1
Total  tuberculous  pleurisy	
	
3
1
4
2
2
3
2
5
2
4
6
2
1
11      1
ll
1
1
i
1
14
11
3|      2|      1
25
Non-pulmonary—
Meninges       	
1
1
1
	
1
1
1
1
1
....
	
1
1
1
	
	
	
	
	
1
1
Vertebral column  	
F.
M.
F.
-M.
i
2
i
2
1
___
2
1
1
2
	
	
1
	
	
~2
2
	
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M
I-- !—-
1      5
Skin      	
Lymphatic  system  - 	
Genito-urinary system	
Miliary     - —
2
2
1
1
1
	
	
~
	
—
9
7
3
1
F.
_M.
F.
M.
2
Other non-pulmonary 	
	
	
	
	
—
	
1
Dead2  	
2
2
4
5
9
"~1
6
"~2
1
2
2
4
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
	
	
—
	
4
Total  non-pulmonary   	
F.
M.
F.
T.
M.
F.
T.
-     -I	
4|     2
2       1
6|      3
2
21
19
40
Total notifications	
22
16
38
221    23
32 j    25
54|    48
1
201    20
21     25
411    45
!
12
19
31
16
13
29
18
13
31
13
12
25
10
5
15
5
6
11
1
1
2
2|   184
1|   189
31   373
1
1 Includes notifications of 10 Indians of white status.
2 Dead on notification.
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1950
E 75
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis
and Year of Arrival in British Columbia, 1950
(Excluding Indians.)
Diagnosis on Notification
Prior
to
1939
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
Not
Stated
Total
Primary  —   	
5
239
150
67
2-
5
7
3
32
25
2
8
1
1
1
1
1
4
8
3
5
1
-
3
4
7
3
1
I
1
1
12
3
5
4
2
11
6
2
2
4
9
3
2
1
4
7
10
1
2
1
1
7
13
5
1
2
1
5
26
11
1
1
5
27
9
5
1
1
3
2
4
46
12
7
1
1
1
1
4
2
5
44
21
8
6
3
41
192
49
12
1
4
6
1
22
20
102
644
282
115
3
11
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion
Other tuberculosis of respiratory sys-
20
1
5
85
58
Totals
535
15
24
19
27
21
19  1 26
29
44
53
79
87
348
1,326
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1.
Table 52.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
in British Columbia, 1946-50
Total
Other than Indian
Indian
Year
New
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
New
Cases
Deaths
Ratio
New
Cases1
Deaths2
Ratio
1946 - —	
2,333
2,560
2,090
2,184
1,699
576
536
442
406
309 3
4.1:1
4.8:1
4.7:1
5.4:1
5.5:1
2,077
1,917
1,542
1,607
1,326
369
362
286
395
240
5.6:1
5.3:1
5.4:1
4.1:1
5.5:1
256
643
548
577
373
207
174
156
111
69
1.2
3.7
3.5
5.2
5.4
1
1947 	
1
1948  	
1949  .
1
1
1950- — 	
1
1 Includes notifications of:   1947, 21 Indians of white status;   1948, 27 Indians of white status;   1949, 34 Indians of
white status;  1950, 10 Indians of white status.
2 Includes deaths of:   1947, 9 Indians of white status;   1948, 12 Indians of white status;   1949, 7 Indians of white
status;   1950, 4 Indians of white status.
3 1950 tuberculosis death figures are preliminary only.
Note.—Notifications and deaths of ex-Province residents excluded. E 76
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
TUBERCULOSIS MORTALITY
Table 53.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1946-50
Total Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality—
1946	
3
9
9
2
4
12.4
35.6
37.0
8.3
16.2
22
22
10
11
11
42.3
41.3
18.9
20.4
19.9
26
30
20
24
15
38.4
42.3
30.3
33.0
20.2
266
249
184
207
162
46.6
41.9
29.1
31.7
24.3
77
65
72
61
42
43.2
34.6
3?.5
32.5
21.7
40
35
30
20
18
117.3
100.1
74.9
52.9
46.5
17
18
12
12
4
119.4
123.1
85.9
81.7
26.6
63
56
58
40
33
213.6
185.0
183.3
122.9
99.3
43
35
33
19
17
203.2
159.6
158.4
86.7
75.8
19
17
14
10
4
177.0
153.6
107.8
75.4
29.5
576
1947     	
1948	
536
442
1949 - 	
406
1950	
3101
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1946 - - - 	
1947         	
57.4
51.3
1948
40.9
1949 -	
1950   -—	
36.4
27.2
1 Excludes death of 1 ex-Province resident.
Preliminary figures for 1950.
Table 54.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area,
1946-50.
Other-than-Indian Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality-
1946—-
1947	
1948 -	
1949 -	
1950	
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1946  	
1947.  - 	
1948  	
1949 	
1950 	
8.4
24.1
29.3
4.2
12.4
22
22
9
11
11
42.3
41.4
17.0
20.4
20.0
19
21
15
12
12
28.5
30.1
23.1
16.8
16.4
244
53
12
1
229
49
13
174
51
11
2
196
40
13
4
160
31
6
1
43.0
30.6
40.2
8.0
38.8
26.8
42.4
27.7
28.0
30.9
16.5
30.2
21.7
38.9
31.3
24.1
16.5
17.6
7.6
7
9
7
6
11
27.8
51.1
34.8
30.7
25.9
46.8
21.7
37.6
38.9
30.7
9.9
77.3
24.5
48.2
7.8
369
362
286
295
241!
37.8
35.6
27.1
27.2
21.7
1 Excludes death of 1 ex-Province resident.
Preliminary figures for 1950. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 77
Table 55.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1946-50
Indian Population
Area
1
Area
2
Area
3
Area
4
Area
5
Area
6
Area
7
Area
8
Area
9
Area
10
Total
Mortality—
1946-   - -	
19471	
19481  - -	
1
3
2
1
1
277.8
835.7
540.5
266.7
245.1
1
1315.7
7
9
5
12
3
634.6
797.2
426.6
944.9
244.3
22
20
10
11
2
628.6
536.4
275.3
301.8
54.0
24
16
21
21
11
492.6
320.3
405.9
400.8
209.3
28
22
19
7
12
661.2
508.1
428.1
157.3
264.6
16
18
10
8
3
918.0
1010.1
541.7
422.2
155.0
56
47
51
34
22
1295.1
1062.6
1092.7
702.5
444.4
35
30
26
13
12
634.5
531.6
443.4
217.8
196.2
18
9
11
4
3
2682.5
1262.3
1547.1
490.8
380.7
207
174
156
19491  	
111
19501.     •   	
69
Mortality rate per 100,000 population—
1946	
784.1
1947 	
1948 -- 	
644.4
557.1
1949 	
388.4
1950    	
237.9
1 Includes deaths of:   1947, 9 Indians of white status;
1950, 4 Indians of white status.
Preliminary figures for 1950.
1948, 12 Indians of white status;   1949, 8 Indians of white status;
Table 56.-
-tuberculosis mortality by statistical area and clty of residence
and Sex, 1950
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
6
1
3
2
5
3
2
6
2
1
3   .
14
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
3
85
4
4
1
73
3
13
1
1
1
z
z
2
1
1
1
1
12
_
1
1
3
2
3
.-
2
48
4
1
43
1
11
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
8
1
2
3
2
5
3
2
6
2
1
3
1
1
26
1
2
1
3
4
3
5
1
1
5
133
8
5
1
116
3
1
24
2
1
1
Area No. 5a—Continued
Oak Bay   	
4
5
1
1
1
4
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
5
4
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
....
1
Saanich   	
8
9
2
Area No. 2a  	
Area No. 5b  	
1
1
Area No. 5c  -	
Parksville ,-'  	
Area No. 5d 	
1
1
Area No. 2c  -
4
1
3
Area No. 5f   - 	
1
1
Area No. 3a	
Area No. 6b-   	
1
1
Area No. 6c  	
Kamloops-  	
Merritt  —	
4
Area No. 3b  	
Oliver—  	
Penticton	
1
1
2
1
Area No. 3c -	
Lillooet — 	
Area No. 7c   	
1
1
1
4
4
Area No. 8b	
Unorganized parts	
1
1
Maple Ridge	
Area No. 8d	
Quesnel 	
Williams Lake	
Area No. 8e  - - 	
Smithers	
5
4
1
1
1
Surrey -  	
Area No. 4b   	
1
1
Area No. 9d	
4
3
North Vancouver District _
Terrace ,. 	
Area No. lOd 	
Unorganized parts— —•
1
1
1
Area No. 5a	
156
85
241
Duncan -	
Ladysmith—	
North Cowichan -—
1
1
Source: Death registrations, 1950 (preliminary figures). E 78
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 57.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1950
(Indians only.1)
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Area No. la	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
3
3
2
2
4
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
3
9
1
1
7
2
2
1
1
Area No. 7a —    	
....
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
6
6
3
3
2
2
4
4
1
1
2
2
Area No. 7b  	
1
1
2
2
Area No. 3c —  	
Area No. 8c   	
Unorganized parts _ 	
Area No. 8e _ 	
3
3
Area No. 4a 	
13
13
4
4
Area No. 9c  -	
1
1
Area No. 9d  -   	
5
5
Area No. 9e	
Unorganized parts - 	
Area No. 9f  -	
5
5
Area No. 5e  —	
Area No. 5f —	
Area No. 10a	
Area No. 10b     	
Lytton — -	
Area No. 10c - - -	
Area No. 6d — -	
29
40
69
Area No. 6f 	
1 Includes 4 Indians of white status.
Source: Death registrations, 1950 (preliminary figures). TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 79
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-groups, 1950
Excluding Indians
Age-groups
"3
o
H
o
<H  CS  r-
o.b S
. a a>
«8g
H««
'5c
CQ <u
T.B. of
Intestines
and
Peritoneum
•" n 5
CQSo
H>U
T.B. of
Bones and
Joints
o
rt
■ cS
HhJ!«
T.B. of
Genitourinary
System
O v. O
hOO
0JT3 ^-j
isa
Under 1 year	
6
3
3
8
15
33
40
38
61
27
8
2
1
1
7
15
29
37
34
57
26
6
i
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
5- 9    „    	
10-14    „     	
15-19    „     —	
20-24    „    	
1
25-29    „    	
30-39    „ 	
40-49    „    	
2
2
50-59    „	
60-69    „     —
2
70-79    „     —
1
80 years and over	
1
Totals	
242
215
6
1
2
1
	
1
5
11
Indians Only1
Under 1 year,.-	
1- 4 years —
5-9
2
14
8
5
8
11
7
3
4
3
3
1
4
6
1
7
11
6
2
3
3
3
1
2.
9
2
1
1
	
	
	
	
1
2
1
1
1
10-14   ,
1
15-19    ,
20-24    ,
25-29    ,
30-39    ,
40-49    ,
50-59    ,
60-69    ,
70-79    ,
80 years
Totals  	
69
47
15
6
1
1 Includes deaths of 4 Indians of white status.
Source: Death registrations, 1950 (preliminary figures). £ 80
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Tuberculosis deaths in British Columbia during 1950 numbered 311, compared to
406 in 1949. The over-all death rate declined from 36.4 to 27.3 per 100,000 population.
The percentage drop in mortality has been greater during this year than in any other since
the inception of the Division. The Indian mortality rate in 1950 was 237.9, compared
to 389.5 in 1949. The death rate for the other-than-Indian population, excluding
Chinese and Japanese, declined from 25.2 in 1949 to 19.5 in 1950.
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1941-50.
Total Province
Indians
Excluding Indians
Year
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
1941   	
533
558
613
517
525
576
536
442
406
311
817,861
870,000
900,000
932,000
949,000
1,003,000
1,044,000
1,082,000
1,114,000
1,138,000
65.2
64.1
68.1
55.5
55.3
57.4
51.3
40.9
36.4
27.3
174
170
203
169
173
207
1741
1561
1111
69 >
23,628
24,080
24,522
25,139
25,758
26,400
27,000
28,000
28,500
29,000
736.4
705.9
848.2
672.2
671.6
784.1
644.4
557.1
389.5
237.9
359
388
405
348
352
369
362
286
295
242
794,233
845,920
875,478
906,861
923,242
976,600
1,017,000
1,054,000
1,085,500
1,109,000
45.2
1942    	
45.9
1943   	
46.3
1944    -	
38.4
1945    .	
38.1
1946	
1947    	
37.8
35.6
1948 	
1949    	
27.1
27.2
1950              	
21.8
•
Chinese
Japanese
Excluding Indians and
Orientals
Year
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rale
per
100,000
Number of
Deaths
Population
Rate
per
100,000
1941    	
23
44
36
41
40
44
40
33
22
23
18,619
17,767
16,915
16,063
15,848
15,600
15,400
15,200
14,900
15,000
123.5
247.6
212.8
255.2
252.4
282.1
259.7
217.1
147.7
153.3
15
24
24
10
16
13
12
8
5
7
22,096
19,100
16,103
15,610
14,695
7,000
7,000
7,000
7,500
8,000
67.9
125.6
149.0
64.1
108.9
185.7
171.4
114.3
66.7
87.5
321
320
345
297
296
312
310
245
268
212
753,518
809,053
842,460
875,188
892,699
954,000
994,600
1,031,800
1,063,100
1,086,000
42 6
1942    	
39.6
1943    	
41.0
1944 	
1945  	
1946   	
33.9
33.2
32.7
1947    	
31 2
1948
23.8
25 2
1949	
1950    	
19 5
1 Includes deaths of: 1947, 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 8 Indians of white
status;   1950, 4 Indians of white status.
Note.—"Indian deaths" includes all deaths of persons of Indian racial origin, whether they were Indians under the
meaning of the "Indian Act" or not, except in 1943 to 1950 deaths, where the term applies only to deaths of Indians
under the meaning of the " Indian Act."
Source: Mortality—Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1941 to 1949, inclusive (1950 death registrations preliminary
only).
Estimated population (1941 census figures): Dominion Bureau of Statistics estimates of total population. Division
of Vital Statistics estimates of Indian population. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1950
E 81
Chart 15.—Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population Excluding Indians and Orientals,
1941-50.
RATE
1.000
900
800
700
600
Indians     ^^
/
^
^
/
S
• Chinese
^	
^*	
^
\
/
/
/  .
/
4
\
\
\    .
/
/
/
/
/
Japanese
\
\
\
\
\
— r
/
\
/
\
/
\
/
\
y
f
/
\
/
\
^^             *
t
Total
>
*
	
Excluding In
dians
«■»   ^»    ^m
Excluding I
and Orienta
dians     -   «.
s
'—"**
X
v V
.--'
s
* E 82
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
There was a slight increase in the number of deaths in general hospitals for the other-
than-Indian tuberculosis cases. The distribution of deaths in homes and other institutions remained substantially the same. During 1950, Indian deaths in tuberculosis
institutions increased 23 per cent while deaths in homes declined 16 per cent.
Chart 16.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population and
the Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1950
Deaths in
Hospitals
39.7%
96 Deaths
__—f                     Deaths in
A                          T-B*
/    \                 Institutions              J
)eaths in the
/      \                      33.1%                  /
lorne    16.9%
/         \                80 Deaths             /
41 Deaths
/ Deaths     \                                      /
in Mental \                                    /
Institutions \                          S
10.3%        \                 c/
25 Deaths     \   ^^^
Excluding Indians          S^
Deaths in
T.B.   Institutions
50.7%
35 Deaths
Deaths in
the Home
ii.sic
19 Deaths
Deaths in
Mental Institutions
1.5%
1 Death
Indians Only TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
E 83
Table 60.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1946-50
Year
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
1946	
1947 	
1948. 	
1949  	
1950                	
22
27
17
17
9
10
10
12
9
6
9
7
5
5
2
18
16
11
12
5
26
21
21
13
8
16
27
15
6
8
37
38
29
25
15
46
45
42
34
21
53
50
52
45
30
69
62
43
56
50
27
26
27
24
27
5
3
6
7
5
Source: Annual Reports of Vital Statistics (1950 figures preliminary only).
Table 61.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of
British Columbia by Age-groups, 1946-50
Year
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
1946	
16
21
12
11
13
16
9
12
5
5
18
11
8
8
3
20
26
17
8
6
42
31
22
16
11
19
25
18
20
14
51
37
25
36
21
23
19
16
15
23
10
7
13
19
11
15
7
13
11
14
6
9
4
4
1
2
1947 	
1948         	
2
2
1949                	
1950                     -	
3
Source:  Annual Reports of Vital Statistics (1950 figures preliminary only).
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1946-50
Year
0-4
Years
5-9
Years
10-14
Years
15-19
Years
20-24
Years
25-29
Years
30-39
Years
40-49
Years
50-59
Years
60-69
Years
70-79
Years
80 and
Over
1946   	
1947 ...— 	
1948                       	
38
48
29
28
22
26
19
24
14
11
27
18
13
13
5
38
42
28
20
11
68
52
43
29
19
35
52
33
26
22
88
75
54
61
36
69
64
58
49
44
63
57
65
64
41
84
69
56
67
64
33
35
31
28
28
7
5
8
1949 - '.	
1950
7
8
Source: Annual Reports of Vital Statistics (1950 figures preliminary only). E 84                                   DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
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OS o ov ov ov E 86
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE
Table 65.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by
Length of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1950
Length of Residence in British Columbia
Place of Death
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Source:  Death registrations, 1950. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT,  1950
DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL BUDGET
E 87
Chart 19.—Distribution of the Tuberculosis Dollar in the Budget of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, Department of Health and Welfare, 1950
victoria, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1951
470-651-7183 

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