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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Eightieth Annual Report 1950-51 By the Superintendent… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1952

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 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Eightieth Annual Report
1950-51
By the Superintendent of Education
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1952  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Eightieth Annual Report of the Public Schools of
the Province.
WM. T. STRAITH,
Minister of Education.
February, 1952.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
1950-51
Minister of Education:
The Honourable W. T. Straith, K.C., B.A., LL.B.
Deputy Minister and
Superintendent of Education:
F. T. Fairey, B.A., LL.D.
Deputy
Superintendent of Education:
H.Ih. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed.
Executive Assistant to the Deputy Minister:
R. C. Grant, B.A.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools:
J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Pasd., C. G. Brown, M.A., Burnaby.
Greater Victoria. William Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
John Gough, M.A., Greater Victoria. R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Surrey.
Inspectors of Schools in School Districts:
J. E. Brown, M.A., Victoria.
J. N. Burnett, E.D., M.A., Vancouver.
C. L. Campbell, M.A., Nanaimo.
T. G. Carter, M.C., Vancouver.
Joseph Chell, M.A., Mission City.
C. E. Clay, B.A., Grand Forks.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Telkwa.
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., New Westminster.
G. W. Graham, B.A., Prince Rupert.
S. J. Graham, B.A., Chilliwack.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Abbotsford
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Paed., Nelson.
I. H. R. Jeffrey, B.A., Kimberley.
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), Cranbrook.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed., Trail.
R. G. Williston,
H. McArthur, B.A., Kamloops.
J. J. McKenzie, B.A., Nelson.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Pasd., Kamloops.
Earl Marriott, B.A., Dawson Creek.
A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
W. J. Mouat, B.A., Williams Lake.
W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A.,
F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T., Nanaimo.
C. T. Rendle, B.A., Cranbrook.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., New Westminster.
L. B. Stibbs, B.A., Salmon Arm.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Courtenay.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., M.B.A., Duncan.
A. S. Towell, M.A., Vernon.
A. Turnbull, M.C., M.M., B.A., Penticton.
B.A., Prince George.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS
T. R. Hall, B.A., Principal.
F. C. Boyes, M.A., Vice-Principal.
Mrs. Geraldine Birkett, B.A., B.Ed.
E. B. Broome, M.A., B.Ed.
L. E. Brown, B.P.E.
Miss F. I. Burnham.
H. H. Grantham, M.A., Ph.D.
Vancouver:
F. C. Hardwick, M.A.
Miss A. J. Kilgour, B.A.
J. McGechaen, M.A.
Miss M. E. McManus, Mus.Bac, M.A.
Miss M. E. Maynard, B.A.
E. G. Ozard, B.A.
Miss Stella Shopland, B.A., Librarian.
Miss Z. M. Manning.
C. W. Truax, B.A., B.Ed.
Model School:
Miss M. J. MacDonald, A.T.C.M., B.A.
H. O. English, B.A., B.S.A., Principal.
H. C. Gilliland, B.A., Vice-Principal.
Miss K. M. Baker, B.A.
G. A. Brand, B.A.
Miss W. A. Copeland.
Victoria:
Miss D. M. Daniels, B.A.
H. E. Farquhar, B.A.
D. B. Gaddes, A.T.C.M., B.Mus.
A. W. Johns.
F. H. Johnson, M.A., B.Paed. K 6 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Registrar:  T. F. Robson.
Assistant Registrar:  H. M. Evans, B.A.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: H. A. Jones.
Inspector of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A.
.    - Director of Home Economics:   Miss Bertha Rogers, B.Sc, M.A.
Inspector in Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.Sc.
Director, Educational and Vocational Guidance: H. P. Johns, M.A., Ph.D.
Acting Director, Recreation and Physical Education:  R. J. Phillips.
Director, Visual Education:  J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director, School Radio Broadcasts:  Philip J. Kitley, M.A.
Director, Educational Reference and School Service: Mrs. Muriel Scace, B.A.
Director, Summer School of Education: H. P. Johns, M.A., Ph.D.
Director, Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed.
Director, School and Community Drama:  H. S. Hurn, B.A.
Director of High School Correspondence: Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence:  Miss Anna B. Miller.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch: P. G. Barr.
Departmental Comptroller: S. E. Espley.
Chief Clerk: R. D. Smith.
Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind:  C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D.
Research Assistant: J. R. Meredith, B.A.
School Planning and Construction: W. F. Marr.
Chairman, Assessment Equalization Board: D. K. Kennedy. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report of the Superintendent of Education  9
Report of the Deputy Superintendent of Education  27
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver. .  31
Victoria  32
Report of the Director of Summer School of Education  34
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  42
Report of the Director of Home Economics  48
Report of the Director of the Division of Educational Reference and School Service 50
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver  52
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)  56
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)  65
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)  67
School District No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)  68
School District No. 3 6 (Surrey)  70
Reports of District Inspectors  71
Report of the Superintendent, The School for the Deaf and the Blind  105
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses .  107
Elementary Correspondence School  111
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch '.  112
Report on Adult Education—
Industrial Education  116
Correspondence Instruction—
High School  121
Elementary School  122
Recreation and Physical Education  122
School and Community Drama  126
Report of the Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance  129
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts  131
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  134
Report of the Director of Visual Education  138
Report of the Commission on " Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act "___. 140
Report of the Secretary, Local Committee, Strathcona Trust  141 K 8 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School  9
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  10
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils According to Different Classes of Schools  10
Teachers' Certificates .  11
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education  11
Comparison of Enrolment and Cost per Pupil to Provincial Government „.. 12
Cost per Pupil on Various Bases for the School-year 1950-51  13
Children of Foreign Parentage  14
Number of School Districts  14
Number of High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  14
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  15
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  16
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  16
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District •  17
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  17
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  18
Number of District Supervisors, Relieving Teachers, Visiting Teachers  19
Summary of All Schools Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils  19
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each Type
of School ;  21
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  21
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  22
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1950-51 by Provincial Government  23
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1950-51 by School Districts  24
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various
School Districts  145
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  176 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1950-51
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1952.
To the Honourable W. T. Straith, K.C.,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Eightieth Annual Report of the Public Schools
of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1951.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
164,212 to 173,354, and the average daily attendance increased from 147,583 to 154,077.
The percentage of the regular attendance was 88.88.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Large
Municipal
Large Rural
Rural
Total
6,053
8,669
5,221
490
939
42,023
	
6,315
14,186
4,721
421
3,244
1,513
53,481
399
3,707
206
269
473
12,767
26,562
9,942
Superior schools      	
1,370
6,537
1,997
10.540
2,452
13,117
109,094
Totals                              '	
63,395
83,881
25,130
948
173,354
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High Correspondence School classes, regular students
(exclusive of the 2,537 officially registered in high,
superior, or elementary schools)     1,081
In the Elementary Correspondence School classes, regular
students      1,415
Under section 13 (g) of the "Public Schools Act," pupils
receiving instruction  28
Adult education—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme
Night-schools  —
Vancouver School of Art	
2,524
2,637
16,778
159
Vancouver Vocational Institute     1,378
High Correspondence School (adults only)     2,223
Elementary Correspondence School (adults only)        209
Carried forward
25,908 K 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Brought forward  25,908
Adult education—Continued
Recreational and Physical Education classes  25,051
Summer School of Education (1950 session)  1,462
Normal School, Vancouver  381
Normal School, Victoria  242
Industrial and vocational teachers-in-training  85
Victoria College --.  317*
University of British Columbia  6,432f
59,878
* This figure does not include an enrolment of 512 in the special evening courses.
f This figure does not include the following enrolments:     1950 Summer Session,  1,098;   1950-51  extra sessional
classes, 59;   correspondence courses, 371.
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade for
the school-year 1950-51:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
652
11,189
10,643
9,879
9,012
8,489
7,662
7,532
6,720
5,791
4,504
3,378
2,622
580
563
9,733
9,603
9,132
8,573
7,808
7,425
7,124
6,621
6,138
5,050
3,819
2,804
308
1,215
Grade I                —                            	
20,922
Grade II                                                       	
20,246
Grade III       , 	
Grade IV  	
19,011
17,585
Grade V        	
16,297
Grade VI                                                                     	
15,087
Grade VII                 	
14,656
Grade VIII                                      	
13,341
Grade IX                                                   .   . ~ - -	
11,929
Grade X                       	
9,554
Grade XI                                                   	
7,197
Grade XII            	
5,426
Grade XIII                         	
888
Totals                                             	
88,653
84,701
173,354
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number
of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per
teacher are shown in the following table:—
Type of School
Number of Teachers
Grade
Teachers
Special
Instructors
Total
Total
Enrolment
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Enrolment
per Grade
Teacher
Senior high schools	
Junior-senior high schools._
Junior high schools	
Superior schools.
Elementary-senior high schools.
Elementary-junior high schools.
Elementary schools	
Not stated _
Totals.
424
846
295
87
366
70
3,342
179
291
108
5,430
33
180
43
842
603
1,137
403
87
399
78
3,522
43
6,272
12,767
26,562
9,942
1,997
10,540
2,452
109,094
173,354
736
1,532
574
115
608
142
6,293
10,000
30.11
31.40
33.70
22.95
28.79
34.69
32.65
31.92 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
K 11
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number
with or without university degrees:—
Number of Teachers
Type of School
With
University
Degrees
Without
University
Degrees
Total
495
858
307
19
149
31
345
22
108
279
96
68
250
48
3,176
21
603
1,137
403
Superior schools  	
87
399
79
Elementary schools     _
3,521
Unclassified 	
43
2,226
4,046
6,272
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR
PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and
also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877-78..
1882-83..
1887-88-
1892-93..
1897-98.
1902-03-
1907-08-
1912-13..
1913-14.
1917-18-
1922-23..
1927-28-
1928-29..
1929-30..
1930-31_
1931-32..
1932-33-
1933-34-
1934-35-
1935-36-
1936-37-
1937-38-
1938-39-
1939-40-
1940-41-
1941^12-
1942-Jt3_
1943-44..
1944-45-
1945-46-
1946-47-
1947-48-
1948-49-
1949-50..
1950-51..
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4,833
5,116
5,496
5,873
6,272
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
98
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173,354
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
154,077
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
$48,411.14*
60,758.75*
113,679.36*
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.28$
3,532,518.95$
3,765,920.69$
3,743,317.08$
3,834,727.19$
4,015,074.37$
2,849,972.02$
2,611,937.80$
2,835,040.74$
2,972,385.04$
3,277,660.23$
3,524,962.69$
3,630,670.78$
3,585,769.00$
3,963,848.24$
4,028,397.88$
3,924,243.53$
4,244,898.82$
5,022,534.59$
5,765,205.50$
9,398,473.46$
12,468,653.18$
17,363,430.94$
22,809,631.23$
25,830,076.88$
$215,056.22$
425,555.10
604,357.86
1,220,509.85
4,658,894.97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014.61
7,630,009.54$
9,261,094.98$
11,149,996.27$
10,008,255.66$
10,061,387.99$
9,719,333.81$
8,941,497.34$
8,213,369.04$
8,458,156.00$
8,775,353.78$
9,593,562.64$
10,193,367.08$
10,640,740.47$
10,521,684.92$
10,982,364.49$
11,120,801.94$
11,502,291.35$
12,231,029.35$
13,683,538.18$
14,818,625.81$
20,176,930.53$
25,768,392.09$
35,538,079.88$
47,726,750.37$
54,195,133.95$
* The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
t This amount does not include the expenditure (not available) made for incidental expenses in city school districts.
$ This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial University. K 12                                          PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL
TO PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT
The following table shows the enrolment during the last eighteen years and also the
cost to the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
School-year
Total
Enrolment
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance
1033-34
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
173.354
$19.51
20.40
21.35
22.93
24.05-
24.85
24.52
27.82
28.51
28.82
29.81
33.97
36.56
58.24
74.54
97.76
124.59
131.15
$21.85
23.47
24.46
26.10
27.18
27.92
27.14
32.25
33.13
35.59
34.46
39.51
41.67
66.17
84.21
109.42
138.63
147.56
1934-35
1935-36      ..   .
1936-37    	
1937-38   	
1938-39
1939-40
1940^11   .   .
1941-42   _ _ 	
1942-43
1943-44
1944-45
1945 46
1946-47
1947-48
1948^19
1949-50    _
1950-51 	
1
I REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT K 13
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE
SCHOOL-YEAR 1950-51
Grand total cost of education , .  $54,195,133.95/:
Less—
Grant re salaries and enrolment Victoria College.— $20,318.56
Special grant to Victoria College  30,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia  2,283,499.99
Normal School, Vancouver  116,031.07
Normal School, Victoria  85,220.33
Cost of night-schools : 1  26,140.76                             ■
Correspondence schools—
High school  159,674.06                            .■
Elementary school 1  61,485.17                    ... !|
Adult education  310,343.46
Special grant under section 13 (g) of Act  2,507.00
 3,095,220.40
Net cost for total enrolment of 173,354 pupils  $51,099,913.55
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  294.77
Cost per pupil per school-day (193 days) on total enrolment  1.53
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 154,077  . 331.65
Cost per pupil per school-day (193 days) on average daily attendance.__ 1.72
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 173,354
pupils for year ($25,830,076.88 —$3,095,220.40)     22,734,856.48
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment  131.15
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (193 days) on
total enrolment  .68
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily
attendance  147.5 6
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (193 days) on
average daily attendance  .76
Cost per capita for year on population of 1,153,059 (1951 estimate)— 44.32*
Cost per capita per school-day (193 days) on population of 1,153,059 .23*
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on population of
1,153,059 -- 19.72f
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day (193 days)
on population of 1,153,059  .10f
* Computed on the net total cost of $51,099,913.55, which includes debt and capital charges.
t Computed on the net total cost to the Provincial Government of $22,734,856.48. K 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the
Province during the year 1950-51 was as follows:—
tfl
1
Type of School
s
'C
s
E
o
as
9
.3
J3
O
a
3
O
CO
g
s
o
co
3
•a
s
o
CO
s
B
a
CO
2
CQ
1
CO
3
>
d
3
a
cS
C
d
I
s
CH
o
to
tH
V
■5
o
<
o
a
A
Bh
o
a
►->
Oh
(K
vs
D
O
H
187
303
54
41
141
340
30
151
143
131
150
445
790
497
2,903
498
114
151
127
657
1,010
73
349
349
301
355
1,468
412
1,138
7,002
162
107
31
53
99
358
36
95
90
147
184
377
255
380
2,374
22
2
24
90
33
40
18
41
6
10
89
14
151
540
Elementary-senior high schools _
104
68
8
39
174
361
2
173
160
100
86
367
159
275
2,076
Elementary-junior high schools _
22
2
6
41
479
2
14
1
28
68
136
27
419
1,245
1,033
1,522
999
389
1,630
3,721
267
1,029
853
889
1,059
3,840
1,679
3,925
22,835
Totals-  .
2,028
2,118
1,267
745
2,775
6,309
410
1,829
1,637
1,602
1,912
6,722 2,836
6,785
38,975
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1950-51:—
Municipal school districts     7
Large municipal school districts  35
Large rural school districts  35
Rural school districts (unattached)  21
Total number of districts  98
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 12,767; of this
number, 6,094 were boys and 6,673 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1950-51 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
5
1
3
10
2
5
2
6
6
15
15
29
8
145
26
17
3
23
4
3
3
68
19
15
12
2
6
2
9
8
23
22
37
17
201
36
24
3
27
4
3
5
110
31
21
312
38
153
40
152
193
27. Vernon
379
33. tDhilliwack
34. Abbotsford-                   	
298
39. Vancouver
4,664
805
584
80
653
87
58
61
2,153
489
332
41. Burnabv
44. North Vancouver
46.  Sechelt
54. Smithers
68. Nanaimo
71. Courtenay
Totals -	
33
424
603
12,767 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
K 15
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 26,562;
of this number, 13,073 were boys and 13,489 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1950-51 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2. Cranbrook-
3. Kimberley—
5. Creston _.
7. Nelson	
8. Slocan	
11. Trail	
12. Grand Forks-
14. Oliver	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
20. Salmon Arm-
23. Kelowna	
24. Kamloops	
28. Quesnel-
32. Fraser Canyon .
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta	
38. Richmond	
39. Vancouver	
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge~
43. Coquitlam-
45. West Vancouver..
47. Powell River	
52. Prince Rupert.
57. Prince George	
59. Peace River South-
62. Sooke	
63. Saanich	
65. Duncan	
66. Lake Cowichan.-
67. Ladysmith	
70. Alberni	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz	
77. Summerland	
Totals.
15
16
21
5
3
38
10
22
30
7
6
14
18
26
8
6
31
70
14
24
146
28
26
27
24
21
14
17
18
13
16
22
11
10
28
24
6
11
846
21
24
26
5
3
54
14
26
40
10
11
18
28
37
10
9
42
92
16
30
200
37
34
33
28
29
21
23
25
16
24
29
15
14
38
31
9
15
1,137
461
574
559
140
102
1,408
291
526
873
196
191
457
581
903
257
170
934
2,236
348
756
4,957
1,007
817
925
667
632
494
508
523
324
456
625
329
335
847
692
162
299
26,562 K 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 9,942; of this
-number, 5,009 were boys and 4,933 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1950-51 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
2
1
13
2
22
20
20
4
112
29
12
11
33
17
21
2
30
26
24
4
158
39
17
11
49
22
459
44
675
616
33. Chilliwack            -        .   —
650
14.   Abhotsfnrd
118
39. Vancouver.    -          ...
3,795
1,003
41. Burnaby. .                -  	
423
390
1,125
644
Totals
15
295
403
9,942
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 1,997; of this number,
1,033 were boys and 964 were girls. The number of schools, number of divisions,
number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1950-51 in each district are
shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
5. Creston.-
7. Nelson—
13. Kettle Valley—
18. Golden	
20. Salmon Arm	
24. Kamloops	
26. Birch Island ..
27. Williams Lake..
29. Lillooet.—	
46. Sechelt...	
47. Powell River	
51. Portland Canal-
54. Smithers	
56. Vanderhoof—	
72. Campbell River_
73. Alert Bay.	
74. Quatsino.-
99. Unattached districts-
Totals	
29
87
87
82
76
172
44
106
67
131
195
37
65
51
51
230
140
153
130
61
206
1,997 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
K 17
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was 10,540;
of this number, 5,385 were boys and 5,155 were girls.   The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1950-51 in each
•district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
4.
6.
10.
13.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
24.
25.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
39.
46.
48.
49.
50.
53.
55.
56.
58.
60.
64.
69.
.71.
72.
73.
74.
99.
Fernie	
Windermere.
Kaslo ._
Arrow Lakes-
Kettle Valley-
Princeton	
Golden —
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Enderby-
Vernon  	
Kamloops	
Barriere	
Williams Lake~
Quesnel	
Lillooet 	
Ashcrof t	
Merritt  -
Fraser Canyon -
Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte	
Terrace	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
McBride	
Peace River North-
Saltspring 	
Qualicum 	
Courtenay..
Campbell River-
Alert Bay	
Quatsino..
Unattached districts.
Totals	
46
36
6
6
7
7
6
7
3
5
11
12
5
4
11
7
19
17
9
4
15
6
19
17
3
6
7
7
7
14
12
23
10
19
5
5
9
366
43
6
6
7
7
6
7
3
5
12
14
5
4
11
7
22
17
10
4
19
6
19
18
3
6
7
7
8
17
12
26
11
22
5
5
12
399
1,141
176
182
149
151
168
196
63
142
372
394
152
77
340
173
418
436
337
91
490
177
455
551
75
129
210
236
218
391
289
640
310
710
122
110
269
10,540
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was 2,452;
of this number, 1,261 were boys and 1,191 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1950-51 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
3
1
44
26
48
30
1,513
939
Totals           	
4
70
78
2,452 K 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 109,094; of this
number, 56,798 were boys and 52,296 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1950-51 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
Fernie 	
Cranbrook.—
Kimberley—
Windermere.
Creston	
Kaslo 	
Nelson..	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes _
Trail.	
Grand Forks...
Kettle Valley-
Oliver	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton ~	
Golden	
Revelstoke 	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Enderby..
Vernon 	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
B arriere 	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake	
Quesnel	
Lillooet 	
Ashcrof t	
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon-
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey  	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver —	
New Westminster..
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge 	
Coquitlam-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver.—
Sechelt 	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte ...
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof—
Prince George..
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Saltspring	
Duncan	
Lake Cowichan .
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
Number of
Number of
Number of
Number of
Schools
Divisions
Teachers
Pupils
5
7
7
153
6
26
28
928
6
29
31
1,021
6
8
8
188
7
24
27
721
7
7
7
98
10
39
40
1,320
14
24
24
569
13
33
33
958
4
10
10
334
11
94
100
3,128
3
15
15
543
7
8
8
137
3
29
30
982
3
35
36
1,252
5
13
13
385
4
11
11
375
5
6
6
118
6
18
20
580
11
30
30
799
7
21
22
692
10
45
47
1,553
16
72
73
2,398
27
57
59
1,630
8
8
8
108
6
6
6
100
16
18
18
262
15
23
23
617
5
5
5
91
7
8
8
104
2
3
3
44
7
17
17
512
13
69
70
2,467
13
41
43
1,321
18
56
56
1,715
33
111
111
4,071
7
23
24
750
8
73
74
2,661
46
800
912
27,158
6
65
68
2,569
18
155
161
5,831
9
38
38
1,358
12
69
69
2,424
10
98
104
3,749
4
35
37
1,339
12
21
21
481
9
34
34
1,097
6
8
8
141
5
5
5
86
3
4
4
70
2
2
2
16
7
30
30
1,064
7
16
16
495
6
11
11
299
11
15
15
312
5
7
7
133
34
60
61
1,468
10
11
11
156
29
50
52
1,252
20
1   22
22
358
26
230
236
8,625
12
1   29
|   29
796
10
I   32
1    32
956
8
1    9
10
165
16
1   41
1   42
\        1,111
6
1   23
23
736
5
1   22
24
|    770
13
1   59
I   63
1,958 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
K 19
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
69. Qualicum..
70. Alberni.	
71. Courtenay .
72. Campbell River~
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino-	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz	
77. Summerland	
99. Unattached districts-
Totals	
14
17
8
5
16
3
1
17
814
6
53
47
19
8
5
36
9
12
24
3,342
6
56
48
19
8
5
37
9
12
24
3,522
191
1,867
1,569
286
113
79
1,119
300
439
473
109,094
DISTRICT SUPERVISORS, RELIEVING TEACHERS, AND
VISITING TEACHERS
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
	
20
1
4
18
Totals    	
	
	
43
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
Fernie	
Cranbrook—
Kimberley—
Windermere..
Creston	
Kaslo	
Nelson..	
Slocan	
Castlegar..
Arrow Lakes.
Trail	
Grand Forks.-.
Kettle Valley-
Oliver	
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke—
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Enderby-
Vernon	
Kelowna  	
Kamloops	
Barriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
Ashcroft	
7
7
7
9
8
14
17
14
7
13
4
11
4
4
6
6
7
8
14
9
13
20
30
9
8
20
17
8
10
43
41
45
14
48
13
70
31
38
19
132
25
23
51
65
20
23
15
27
53
38
94
125
91
12
12
37
38
26
25
50
49
55
14
56
13
81
31
39
19
154
29
23
56
76
23
28
15
32
57
42
114
149
104
12
12
37
40
29
25
1,294
1,389
1,595
364
1,362
280
2,307
753
1,111
523
4,536
834
460
1,508
2,125
581
734
358
795
1,504
1,257
3,001
4,061
2,752
185
231
797
1,047
546
540 K 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
99.
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon .
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam	
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls 	
Queen Charlotte	
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace  	
Smithers	
Burns Lake.	
Vanderhoof-	
Prince George..
McBride	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich 	
Saltspring -	
Duncan	
Lake Cowichan -
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni	
Courtenay -	
Campbell River-	
Alert Bay	
Quatsino	
Mission	
Agassiz 	
Summerland 	
Unattached districts..
Totals-
3
9
15
18
19
38
8
9
59
9
22
10
15
12
5
15
11
9
7
4
3
8
9
9
12
8
35
11
30
21
33
14
12
9
17
7
6
15
6
9
18
20
' 11
7
17
4
2
21
~990~
12
27
118
97
87
181
37
97
1,218
120
238
64
99
132
59
34
58
27
22
7
5
44
25
22
22
20
77
18
68
36
331
42
48
21
63
34
32
95
29
81
72
45
19
13
60
15
23
42
5,430
13
30
131
112
98
203
40
104
1,510
143
273
72
106
142
65
34
66
27
23
7
5
51
25
24
22
20
84
19
77
39
413
45
56
22
71
38
38
116
32
94
80
48
19
13
68
18
27
45
6,272
381
773
3,887
3,250
2,649
6,307
1,098
3,417
41,064
4,377
8,784
2,175
3,429
4,792
2,006
810
1,780
596
637
145
67
1,558
682
590
522
509
1,976
374
1,775
749
11,903
1,120
1,412
454
1,736
1,065
1,105
3,091
831
2,714
2,211
1,149
365
250
1,811
462
738
948
173,354 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
K 21
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of teachers
employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance in each type
of school for the school-year 1950-51:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Average
Total
Boys
Girls
Attendance
Senior high      -	
33
49
15
29
46
4
814
603
1,137
403
87
399
78
3,522
43
12,767
26,562
9,942
1,997
10,540
2,452
109,094
6,094
13,073
5,009
1,033
5,385
1,261
56,798
6,673
13,489
4,933
964
5,155
1,191
52,296
10,868.69
23,225.83
8,842.17
1,772.13
Elementary-senior high   -  	
Elementary-junior high   	
Elementary     	
9,368.51
2,148.86
97,850.86
Totals -    	
990
6,272
173,354
88,653
84,701
154,077.05
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars only)
paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of
Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers earning less than $1,100
are excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Number of
Teachers
High
Salary
Low
Salary
Average
Salary
422
839
293
84
360
70
3,272
$5,495
4,936
6,000
3,900
5,985
4,446
5,350
$1,980
1,140
1,100
1,236
1,230
1,560
1,100
$3,794
3,138
3,314
2,459
2,689
2,502
2,522
Supervising Principals
34
51
16
13
3
58
$6,345
6,000
6,000
5,600
5,160
5,600
$3,164
3,837
4,400
2,400
4,568
2,380
$5,149
4,928
5,196
4,533
4,942
4,866
Special Instructors
143
237
92
19
4
111
42
$5,265
5,200
4,620
3,870
3,600
4,309
12,240
$1,100
1,150
1,560
1,344
2,355
1,100
2,078
$3,504
3,054
3,130
2,822
2,785
2,827
4,407 K 22 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, excluding part-time teachers,
teachers attached to the Bureau of Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and
teachers earning less than $1,100 per annum:—
Number Number
Salary Range                              of Teachers Salary Range                            of Teachers
$1,100-$1,199  13 $3,800-$3,899  162
1,200- 1,299  26 3,900- 3,999  113
1,300- 1,399  22 4,000- 4,099  99
1,400- 1,499  23 4,100- 4,199  103
1,500- 1,599  73 4,200- 4,299  57
1,600- 1,699  175 4,300- 4,399  74
1,700- 1,799  208 4,400- 4,499  50
1,800- 1,899  233 4,500- 4,599  66
1,900- 1,999  260 4,600- 4,699  89
2,000- 2,099  286 4,700- 4,799  52
2,100- 2,199  318 4,800- 4,899  23
2,200- 2,299  243 4,900- 4,999  14
2,300- 2,399  270 5,000- 5,099  19
2,400- 2,499  243 5,100- 5,199  16
2,500- 2,599  257 5,200- 5,299  15
2,600- 2,699  259 5,300- 5,399  13
2,700- 2,799  226 5,400- 5,499  16
2,800- 2,899  210 5,500- 5,599   9
2,900- 2,999  273 5,600- 5,699  13
3,000- 3,099  307 5,700- 5,799   5
3,100- 3,199  208 5,800- 5,899   1
3,200- 3,299  290 5,900- 5,999   4
3,300- 3,399  163 6,000- 6,099   3
3,400- 3,499  167 6,300- 6,399   1
3,500- 3,599  126 6,400 and over   1
3,600- 3,699  112 	
3,700- 3,799  120 Total 6,129 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT K 23
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1950-51
Minister's office  $15,527.07
General office  93,694.40
Text-book Branch (free texts, maps, etc.)  :  188,008.49
High Correspondence School  159,674.06
Elementary Correspondence School :  61,485.17
Industrial Education  67,467.01
Visual Education  57,626.03
Inspection of schools  274,953.11
Normal School, Vancouver  116,031.07
Normal School, Victoria  85,220.33
School for the Deaf and the Blind  197,786.11
Basic grants  8,219,590.49
Boarding allowances   21,345.05
Dormitory grants   8,175.32
Special salary grant paid under section 13 (g) of the Act  2,507.00
Teachers' superannuation (7 per cent)  1,256,118.56
Special aid to school districts      	
Special aid to rural areas  2,376,552.08
School buildings and essential new equipment  8,826,447.83
Education of soldiers' dependent children  13,995.06
Examinations   56,186.15
Conveying children to central schools  937,611.80
Summer School  41,834.43
Adult education—
Extension and adult education  27,109.01
Recreational and physical education  108,509,55
Urban occupational training  8,167.65
Rural occupational training :  6,448.45
Student-aid bursaries   74,386.00
Re-establishment training  6,157.98
Apprentice-training   13,513.50
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement  66,051.32
School radio broadcasts   23,985.85
Division of Curriculum  13,057.35
Division of Educational Reference and School Service  17,385.09
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  32,823.62
Educational and vocational guidance  10,084.27
Board of Reference  241.47
Assessment Equalization Board  17,715.51
Incidentals and contingencies  13,103.65
University of British Columbia—
General grant  $2,241,562.50
Teacher-training  20,937.49
University Endowment Lands         21,000.00
       2,283,499.99
Special grant to Victoria College  30,000.00
Total expenditure by Government  $25,830,076.88
Amount expended by districts (including debt and capital charges)     28,365,057.07
Grand total expenditure  $54,195,133.95 K 24 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1950-51
No. and Name of School District
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
69.
70.
71.
72.
73.
74.
75.
76.
77.
Fernie 	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere..
Creston —	
Kootenay Lake..
Nelson	
Slocan —	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes—
Trail  -
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley  -
Southern Okanagan-
Penticton  	
Keremeos .	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm. 	
Armstrong-Enderby..
Vernon	
Kelowna	
Kamloops 	
Barriere 	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake	
Quesnel	
Lillooet - 	
Ashcroft	
Merritt- 	
Fraser Canyon.-
Chilliwack—	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey -	
Delta 	
Richmond 	
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby 	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver—
Sechelt      _
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls _ -
Queen Charlotte	
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
McBride _ 	
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich —
Saltspring	
Cowichan 	
Lake Cowichan..
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo	
Qualicum	
Alberni 	
Courtenay ~
Campbell River-
Alert Bay- -
Quatsino	
Mission	
Agassiz 	
Summerland
Total
Expenditure1
Government
Grants
$243,471.13
885,915.12
358,415.14
134,225.33
778,763.08
63,692.85
399,154.87
301,402.22
531,948.60
111,202.69
2,314,790.53
153,474.99
91,049.10
322,485.41
679,592.49
456,429.13
191,105.40
69,029.73
155,0S7.31
698,988.53
184,430.77
654,760.29
658,974.30
480,230.09
50,496.72
59,853.83
211,526.31
205,841.91
328,987.59
362,390.32
68,938.06
210,344.38
694,944.44
612,813.75
446,803.39
1,175,672.81
228,193.93
415,213.12
11,685,583.53
826,555.40
2,119,123.74
324,850.93
1,550,007.00
937,908.58
659,636.38
368,995.81
617,663.55
345,165.61
263,649.54
27,588.63
21,706.11
806,438.04
268,269.64
145,500.49
373,988.36
126,241.66
430,095.46
100,746.13
809,037.16
282,601.09
2,995,498.08
239,975.71
259,618.70
117,271.33
671,488.90
332,016.38
397,581.55
1,085,364.39
216,235.22
1,418,318.10
392,519.07
386,345.16
97,453.94
74,695.47
335,256.39
90,432.96
441,293.27
$149,768.25
445,582.93
156,802.03
76,518.78
437,936.61
37,209.46
178,702.69
168,873.32
250,155.11
71,972.20
1,062,965.58
86,229.88
58,156.15
199,710.49
281,725.82
236,458.10
118,608.20
46,677.13
84,050.53
335,640.92
94,793.29
320,161.12
301,046.27
242,131.52
35,244.73
43,002.38
148,547.74
139,351.55
58,252.29
187,306.94
31,224.50
137,499.98
300,838.09
321,909.24
211,180.75
510,977.53
79,631.69
166,056.52
3,346,346.72
221,752.26
888,880.20
143,538.23
740,771.91
389,132.77
225,049.30
181,324.16
242,909.92
141,083.52
87,864.65
13,922.27
7,363.64 •
345,576.60
156,465.24
100,344.83
184,837.28
100,346.40
207,301.23
76,022.11
454,845.90
173,337.04
923,033.66
136,725.80
109,015.11
74,112.24
322,304.65
161,311.85
180,010.52
501,952.62
130,665.59
672,448.54
237,155.95
227,537.46
45,-055.59
18,283.86
156,614.39
42,346.99
204,161.45
District
Expenditure
$93,702.88
440,332.19
201,613.11
57,706.55
340,826.47
26,483.39
220,452.18
132,528.90
281,793.49
39,230.49
1,251,824.95
67,245.11
32,892.95
122,774.92
397,866.67
219,971.03
72,497.20
22,352.60
71,036.78
363,347.61
89,637.48
334,599.17
357,928.03
238,098.57
15,251.99
16,851.45
62,978.57
66,490.36
270,735.30 .
175,083.38
37,713.56
72,844.40
394,106.35
290,904.51
235,622.64
664,695.28
148,562.24
249,156.60
8,339,236.81
604,803.14
1,230,243.54
181,312.70
809,235.09
548,775.81
434,587.08
187,671.65
374,753.63
204,082.09
175,784.89
13,666.36
14,342.47
460,861.44
111,804.40
45,155.66
189,151.08
25,895.26
222,794.23
24,724.02
354,191.26
109,264.05
2,072,464.42
103,249.91
150,603.59
43,159.09
349,184.25
170,704.53
217,571.03
583,411.77
85,569.63
745,869.56
155,363.12
158,807.70
52,398.35
56,411.61
178,642.00
48,085.97
237,131.82
Includes debt and capital charges. REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
K 25
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1950-51
—Continued
No. and Name of School District
Total
Expenditure1
Government
Grants
District
Expenditure
Unattached
Atlin ..
Bamfield  - —
Butedale	
Camp Mile 163 .
Camp Mile 300.
Chezacut	
Esperanza..
Fort Nelson -	
Fort Nelson Airport -
Kildonan 	
Klahoose  	
Kyuquot-
Lower Post	
Sarita River	
Sydney Inlet	
Tahsis River—	
Telegraph Creek-
Tofino  	
Ucluelet	
University HitL
Zeballos  	
Totals-
529.59
,894.65
,598.40
557.25
457.73
,947.49
,586.41
,052.40
352.00
713.75
948.95
,552.52
,280.00
,680.68
,927.78
,083.37
249.27
,777.33
,876.96
605.97
343.30
$2,318.81
10,556.85
318.37
2,557.25
5,457.73
2,232.87
1,324.20
2,528.12
3,889.81
1,117.83
2,394.82*
3,378.15
4,280.00
222.04
2,015.70
10,743.72
12,063.55
6,632.53
32,005.71
22,241.41
5,383.62
$48,883,372.92
$20,518,315.85
$2,210.78
5,337.80
3,280.03
714.62
2,262.21
524.28
6,462.19
2,595.92
554.13
1,174.37
2,458.64
912.08
11,339.65
4,185.72
1,144.80
31,871.25
32,364.56
6,959.68
$28,365,057.07
1 Includes debt and capital charges.
EXAMINATION SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS, 1951
University Entrance
The fifteen General Proficiency Scholarships, each of $175, awarded by the University of British Columbia, with the accompanying fifteen scholarships, each of $225,
generously granted by the Chris Spencer Foundation, were won by the following:—
Name
School
Per Cent
1st inB.C
96.9
2nd in B.C.
96.3
Salmo High— ._	
86.0
94.0
Judith Anne Wilson   	
88.1
93,6
Leslie Blake Janz   	
89,9
John Oliver High (Vancouver) 	
Kitsilano High (Vancouver) _	
Lord Byng High (Vancouver)	
93.6
92.8
94.4
92.0
Area 10
90.3
87.9
Oak Bay High (Victoria) 	
Courtenay High     	
96.1
86.0 K 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Senior Matriculation
The six Royal Institution Scholarships, each of $200, awarded by the University
of British Columbia for general proficiency were won by the following:—
Name
School
Per Cent
Ian Morley Duck   _
William David Samuel Bowering-
William Gregory-
Daniel Benjamin Konrad..
Aiko Hori „	
Kamloops High—	
John Oliver High (Vancouver)..
Trail High .
David Balfour Forrest-
Philip Sheffield High (Abbotsford)..
Kamloops High _ _   _
Trail High ...
94.9
92.7
88.8
88.6
87.6
87.1
REVIEW
It is generally .known that because of the willingness of members of the staff of the
Department of Education to undertake added duties, it was possible for me to accept
an invitation from U.N.E.S.C0. to membership on an Educational Mission to the
Union of Burma, an assignment which took me away from my regular duties for a period
of six months.
The Mission assembled in Paris early in December for briefing and arrived in Burma
on December 17th.
It was our duty to survey the educational system and to make a report to the Union
of Burma and to U.N.E.S.C.O. with recommendations which could be implemented in
the foreseeable future. The task was an education in itself and I feel that it was an
experience of benefit to myself and ultimately to the school system of this Province.
I desire to express my gratitude to the members of the staff who so ably carried on
in my absence and particularly to Mr. H. L. Campbell, who undertook to perform my
duties as well as his own during my absence. I desire also to express my thanks to the
Honourable the Minister of Education for making it possible for me to accept this honour.
It is with satisfaction that I have to report that the progress which we have made
over a number of years in improving the educational facilities for our own people
continued throughout the year under review.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. T. Fairey,
Superintendent of Education. EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION K 27
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION
REPORT OF H. L. CAMPBELL, B.A., M.Ed., DEPUTY
SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION
In general it may be said that the fine progress being achieved in this Province in
providing adequate school accommodation in a physical sense is being paralleled by an
expanding curriculum, designed to meet the needs of all children. The secondary school
of to-day is no longer a selective institution for the education of the few. It is a school
for every man's child, and must attempt to meet the need for that pupil guidance and
development which will result in happy and effective citizenship for all students.
Curriculum Adjustment
For some years the Central Curriculum Committee has been engaged in planning
for a curriculum adjustment on the secondary-school level. This adjustment came into
effect for Grades VII to X during the year under review in this report, and its major
purposes are as follows:—
(1) To make possible in the secondary-school curriculum a greatly increased
offering of elective courses designed to meet student and community needs.
(2) To increase the number of elective courses which may be studied by
those desiring High School Graduation (University Programme).
(3) To give to such fields of study as Art, Music, Drama, Home Economics,
Agriculture, Commerce, and Industrial Arts equal status with other
subjects in respect of High School Graduation (University Programme).
(4) To permit students of high ability to take advanced courses in fields of
special interest and aptitude and to become highly qualified in those fields.
(5) To encourage in all students in secondary schools the development and
pursuit of strong intellectual and vocational interests.
Major Features of the Adjustment
Two Secondary-school Programmes.—In spite of the existing official titles, High
School Graduation without University Entrance and High School Graduation with
University Entrance, teachers and others have continued to think of High School
Graduation as being one programme which students may follow and University Entrance
as being another, a different and a superior programme.
In the future, as in the past, two programmes will be offered in most high schools.
They will carry the official titles of (a) High School Graduation (General Programme),
and (b) High School Graduation (University Programme).
Principals and teachers should studiously avoid giving the impression that the
General Programme is inferior to the University Programme. The two programmes meet
different needs.
Increase in Credits for Graduation.—Subjects studied in Grades VII and VIII do
not carry recorded credits. The secondary-school credit system begins in Grade IX, as
does the course numbering system which yields those credits.
There is an increase from the existing minimum of 112 credits to a minimum of
120 credits for High School Graduation in both the General Programme and the University Programme.
Course-load for Students.—The student must normally carry a course-load of 30
credits per academic year, and may carry up to 35 credits per year if he is capable of
doing so on a satisfactory level of performance. High performance in a limited number
of courses is to be preferred to mediocre performance in a maximum number of courses. K 28
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
The satisfactory completion of more than 30 credits in any one year does not relieve
the student of the necessity for carrying toward High School Graduation a minimum
of 30 credits in each of the other years.
Course Numbering System.—In Grade VII, courses will be referred to as English 7,
Mathematics 7, Social Studies 7, and recorded as En 7, Ma 7, and SS 7. The same
principle will apply in Grade VIII, as Science 8 (Sc 8), Effective Living 8 (EL 8), Home
Economics 8 (HE 8).
In Grades IX to XII, subjects are numbered in decades. First courses in a subject
are numbered in the 10's (unless prescribed for, and first offered in an advanced grade),
second courses in the 20's, third courses in the 30's, and fourth courses in the 40's, as
English 10 for Grade IX, English 20 for Grade X, English 30 for Grade XI, English 40
for Grade XII.
If some of the courses provided in a subject are advanced elective courses, they are
numbered 91 or above, as follows:—
(a) Latin 10, Latin 20, Latin 91, Latin 92.
(b) Mathematics 10, Mathematics 20, Mathematics 30, Mathematics 91.
(c) Science 10, Science 20, Physics 91, Chemistry 91, Biology 91.
Courses in Grade XIII (Senior Matriculation) are numbered in the 100's, except
German 90, Spanish 90, Latin 90, and Greek 90, which are University Beginners' Courses
and normally may not be offered in Grade XII.
Institution of MAJOR Subjects.—In order to ensure that students in high schools
have the opportunity to study intensively one or more fields of academic or vocational
interest, the system of major subjects has been introduced.
A major subject is defined as a subject of the student's choice in which he has
chosen to study the prescribed advanced elective course or courses, numbered "91 " or
above, with their prerequisite courses. For example, the following sequences of courses
would constitute a major in the subject indicated: Mathematics 10, 20, '30, 91; Latin
10, 20, 91, 92; English 10, 20, 30, 40, 91.
For the time being curricular development does not justify the offering of majors
in all subjects. Most majors require the successful completion of some advanced
elective courses. Majors are offered only in the following subjects: English, Social
Studies, Mathematics, Science, French, German, Latin, Spanish, Commerce or Vocational
Commerce, Industrial Arts, Home Economics, Agriculture or Vocational Agriculture,
Vocational Industrial.
For High School Graduation (General Programme).—In order to graduate from
high school in the General Programme, students who complete Grade XII in June, 1953,
and succeeding years, must present 55 credits in prescribed constants, and a minimum
of 65 credits in electives. These constants and/or electives must include one major
subject of the student's choice.
Subjects
Course Numbers
Academic
Years
Credits
Constants—
English.
Social Studies	
Effective Living.
Mathematics..	
Library -	
10, 20, 30, 40 .
10,20,30	
10,20, 30.
10 or alternative -
Electives—a minimum of„
Total.	
20
15
15
5
0
55
65
120+ EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION
K 29
For High School Graduation (University Programme).—In order to graduate from
high school in the University Programme, students who complete Grade XII in June,
1953, and succeeding years, must present at least 85 credits in prescribed minimum
constants, and 35 credits in electives. These constants and/or electives must include
three major subjects of the student's choice.
Subjects
Course Numbers
Academic
Years
Credits
Constants-
English— - 	
Social Studies 	
Effective Living	
Mathematics  	
Science — 	
Languages	
Library _ 	
Electives—a minimum of..
Total	
10, 20, 30, 40..
10, 20, 30	
10, 20, 30 -	
10, 20, 30	
10, 20- 	
10, 20 	
20
15
15
15
10
10
0
85
35
120+
New Text-book Adoptions
Under the direction of the Text-book Branch, the Rental Plan is proving a boon to
parents and to the educational system of the Province. The following new texts were
prescribed and provided during the year:—
Spelling:  The Canadian Spellers, Books 2 to 6.
Arithmetic:   Study Arithmetics, Book 3.
English:
r Modern Literature for Schools.
English Fundamentals.
Social Studies:  Across the Ages.
Effective Living:
You're Growing Up.
Family Living.
Science:  Elementary General Science, Parts I and II.
French:  Cours Moyen de Francais, Part I.
German:  Meyer's Graded German Readers.
Latin:  Second Year Latin.
Spanish:
El Camino Real, Book II.
A New Spanish Reader.
Graded Spanish Readers.
Noche Oscura en Lima .
Home Economics:
Your Home and You.
Butterick Dressmaking Book.
Vitality through Planned Nutrition.
Today's Clothing.
Physical Education (for teachers' use):
Skill in Games.
Folk Dances.
Dance Awhile.
Soccer for School.
Scientific Basketball.
Active Games and Contests. K 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
Alternative Courses
Alternative courses geared to the abilities and interests of the many groups who
enter secondary schools are in process of preparation. Through these effective provision
for individual differences may be made. For example, English 20 is a course designed
for the better-than-average Grade X student in English, while English 21 will be taken
by the student of lesser ability in English who has need of a course which will take him
forward from the existing stage of his development in English.
New Curriculum Bulletins
In order to implement the curriculum adjustments indicated above, the following
new curriculum bulletins were issued during the year:—
Social Studies, 1950:   Including Courses 7, 8, 10, 31, Economics 92, and
Law 93.
Effective Living, 1950:  Including Courses 7, 8, 10, 20, 30.
Mathematics, 1950:  Including Courses 7, 8, 10, 11, 12, 20, 21, 30, 91, 101.
Sciences, 1950:  Including Courses 7, 8.
Languages, 1950:   Including French 10, 20;  Spanish 10, 20, 91, 92, 101;
Latin 10, 20; German 10, 20.
Arts and Crafts, 1950:  Including Courses 7a, 8a, 10a, 23, 33, 43.
Commercial Studies, 1950.
Home Economics, 1951:  Including Courses 7, 8, 10, 11, 20, 21, 22, 23, 26.
Drama, 1951:  Including Courses 10, 20.
Principals' Conferences
It is coming to be recognized to a much greater degree than formerly that the
principal of the school is responsible in large measure for the nature of the educational
enterprise carried out in his school and the service which it renders to the child and to
the community.
For the second time in three years, principals of schools have attended a two-week
conference held in July under the auspices of the Provincial Summer School of Education. PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS K 31
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS
Provincial Normal School, Vancouver
REPORT OF T. R. HALL, B.A., PRINCIPAL
The fiftieth session of the Provincial Normal School, Vancouver, began on September 11th, 1950, and ended on June 15th, 1951. Enrolment and results are indicated
in the table below:—
Men
Women
Total
124
110
257
239
381
349
The number of women enrolled was three below that for last year, and the number
of men thirteen greater. This meant a net increase of ten over the total for the preceding session, which itself constituted a record since a full year of training became compulsory. The general facilities of the school building remained inadequate, although
improvements made during the preceding vacation resulted in a measure of relief.
The following students graduated with distinction standing: Esme Greenwood,
Margarey Jean Hall, Loverna May Linney, Howard Robert Meredith, Harry Nicholas
MacKenzie, Mary Joan Reid, Bill Vellutini, Doreen Lawrie White, Gordon Eugene
Whitney, and Louise Wotherspoon. Although no attempt is here made to interpret
it, there seems to be some significance in the fact that the minimum academic qualification of the distinction graduates was senior matriculation or the equivalent, and that
five were university graduates.
The student-body presented the usual marked diversity in academic qualifications.
Twenty-six persons held university degrees. At the other end of the scale, seventy-two
had only university entrance standing. Between the two extremes were 27 with second-
or third-year university standing, 34 with first-year standing, 101 with senior matriculation, and 121 with partial senior matriculation. Comparison with the past few years
indicates that there is no definite trend upward or downward in the educational background of students entering the school.
No normal school can give a preparation for teaching superior to the facilities
available for observation and practice. This school has often expressed its gratitude
for the willing generosity of the Vancouver School Board, Superintendent McCorkindale
and the officials associated with him, and the teaching staff of the Vancouver system.
During the year we asked for more than ever before and were offered much in excess
of what we asked. We were also under obligation to Inspector R. S. Shields, of New
Westminster; Inspector C. G. Brown, of Burnaby; and Inspector William Gray, of
North Vancouver, for similar co-operation. Various School Boards and Inspectors
throughout the Province were good enough to make it possible for a considerable
number of our students to spend their spring practicum in rural schools. Staff and
students were alike grateful for favours granted.
It goes without saying that during the year we missed the presence of the former
principal, Dr. A. R. Lord, and Miss Grace Bollert. Dr. Lord's contribution in the
general field of teacher-training and Miss Bollert's marked influence on primary
education in the Province are so well knjown that comment regarding them is unnecessary.   The reorganization consequent on their leaving us saw the appointment of Miss K 32
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Jean Kilgour and Mr. John McGechaen. Both have served most acceptably during
the year.
As for several years past, our health services were under the auspices of the
Metropolitan Health Committee. We were indebted to the personnel of this organization for complete co-operation and service of the highest order.
In a day when it is the fashion in certain quarters to deplore the deficiencies of
youth, it is a pleasure to be able to say that the staff of the Vancouver Normal School
has been impressed by the initiative, the sense of responsibility, and the democratic
spirit manifested by the great majority of this year's students. The prospective teachers
of to-day do not suffer by comparison with those of yesterday.
Provincial Normal School, Victoria
REPORT OF H. O. ENGLISH, B.A., B.S.A., PRINCIPAL
The thirty-seventh session of the Provincial Normal School, Victoria, opened on
September 11th, 1950, and closed on June 15th, 1951. The following table presents
a summary of the enrolment:—
Men
Women
Total
66
8
3
2
149
11
1
2
215
Withdrew from course  - —	
Incomplete.- -     	
19
4
4
Totals    -     —      	
79
163
242
Twelve students—Kathaleen Lily Angus, Victoria; Lenore Anne Brunner, Crani-
brook; Owen Sutherland Forsyth, Victoria; Marion Claire Hill, Oliver; Catherine Jean
Kerr, Victoria; Sebastian Nutini, Trail; Audrey Olive Palmer, Victoria; Jessie Weir
Ramsay, Trail; Joan Marie Ranger, Nanaimo; Lorna Jane Skelton<, Salmon Arm;
Norma Vivian Trimble, Victoria; and Frances Ann Waite, Trail—received honour
standing. Murray Fraser Mackintosh, B.A., won the Dr. V. L. Denton Memorial
Award for 1950-51.
During the 1950-51 session the number of students registered was the largest since
1925. The number of men in attendance was the largest ever to register at this Normal
School.
One new instructor, Miss Kathleen Marjorie Baker, joined the faculty on October
1st, 1950, assuming responsibility for the work in " Speech and Drama " and assisting
in the English Department.
The special series of lectures on health topics, which has been a feature of the
school programme for several years, was arranged by Dr. J. L. Gayton. A list of those
who participated and the topics discussed follows: Dr. A. N. Beattie, " School Medical,
Housing, and Sanitation Services "; Dr. J. L. Gayton, " Communicable Diseases, Immunization, and Tuberculosis "; Dr. A. B. Sinclair, " Venereal Diseases "; Mrs. K.
Beard, " Provincial Health Services and Health Material Services."
Dr. J. L. Gayton examin'ed all the students as early as possible in the school-year.
During the year there were many re-examinations and consultations.    Wherever indi- PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS K 33
cated the student was referred to a private practitioner for appropriate treatment. Tests
and immunizations included Schick test (for diphtheria); diphtheria toxoid; smallpox
vaccination; typhoid, paratyphoid A and B tetanus; and X-ray examination. Mrs. J.
A. Walker, P.H.N., Saanich Health Centre, rendered valuable assistance in connection
with the health services offered.
The St. John Ambulance Association issued certificates to eighty-one students who
were successful in the course in First Aid.
Miss Marie Crickmay, speech therapist, again gave two interesting and instructive
lectures on " Speech Defects and Their Correction."
The large student enrolment, coupled with the lack of a demonstration school
adjacent to the Normal School, forced the adoption of a new policy with respect to
demonstration lessons. During September Miss W. A. Copeland, primary specialist,
provided two demonstration sessions with primary classes, using the school auditorium.
For the balance of the year, particularly during the months of October, November,
January, and February, teachers in schools of the Greater Victoria School District and
the surrounding area provided the demonstration lessons. Students in groups of four,
or in pairs, were assigned to classrooms for one-half day each week. During the year
every student had an opportunity to observe the work of at least twelve experienced
teachers. Subsequently, when assigned to classrooms either in pairs or alone, each
student participated in the instruction of pupils for a period totalling two months.
Demonstration lessons were provided by 509 teachers in 147 schools. During the
periods devoted to teaching-practice, we used 379 classrooms in 147 schools on Vancouver Island and other parts of this Province. To all those School Inspectors, principals, and teachers who have co-operated with this Normal School during the past
difficult year, and have provided the necessary facilities for observation and teaching
practice, we extend our sincere thanks. K 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
REPORT OF HAROLD P. JOHNS, M.A., Ph.D., DIRECTOR
The 1951 session of the Summer School of Education, held in Victoria and Vancouver from July 3rd to August 3rd, was attended by 1,465 teachers. Largely due to
the co-operation of the faculty and students, problems that might well have been
expected to arise because of the numbers involved were noteworthy because of their
absence. Enrolment in the Victoria Section of the school again showed an increase,
but this was in part offset by a decrease in registration at the two sections of the school
operated in Vancouver.
As I am retiring as Director of the Summer School at the end of the present
session, perhaps a brief resume of some of the developments during the five years that
I have had the privilege of administering the school will be permitted. Summer School
enrolment rose from 888, in the year 1946, to the present 1,465. This, it will be seen,
represents an increase of 64.9 per cent. But even more, it is indicative of the unfailing
interest and professional virility of the teachers of this Province.
This expansion of student numbers at the school has been accompanied by an
equally important extension of services offered. During the five-year period it has
been possible to add many new courses. In total, seventy-four new courses were
developed and thirty-one others were completely revised.
Below is a summary of the major training projects initiated from 1946 to 1951:
(1) Conferences of principals, dealing with problems of administration,
curriculum offerings, pupil personnel, etc., were held on two occasions,
at the sessions of 1949 and 1951.
(2) In co-operation with the Curriculum Division, special workshops were
organized to develop curricula for British Columbia schools. The introductory effort of this type occurred in 1948, when a group of experienced secondary-school teachers worked on a development of the Effective Living Programme. In the years 1950 and 1951 similar "curriculum workships " were held in the fields of Home Economics and Art
education.
(3) The workshop technique was introduced during this period and was
used widely in a number of fields. In particular, classes of this type
were initiated in the case of what has been described as the " X " courses.
For some time an increasing interest had been expressed by teachers who
had completed specialized training in certain fields of education for
refresher courses of the workshop type. The first experiment of this
kind was made in 1949, when a two-week day-long workshop for certificated and experienced counsellors was held. This programme was
repeated in 1950. In 1951 refresher workshops were held for Home
Economics, primary, and counselling specialists.
(4) Classes in audio-visual education were organized. Perhaps in some
ways more significant is the extent to which lecturers were encouraged
to use this technique in their own classes. As a result, the use of visual
aids for instructional purposes has become an accepted practice throughout the school. For example, a total of 300 films was screened during
the 1951 session.
(5) Of particular interest was the attention given to the education of exceptional children. Special courses were developed for the general classroom teacher.   Two more highly specialized programmes were also con- SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
K 35
ducted. In 1949 and 1950 a branch of the Summer School was opened
at the Provincial School for the Deaf and the Blind, at which experts
conducted demonstration and lecture classes for teachers of deaf children. In 1950 through the co-operation of the Department of National
Health and Welfare and the Provincial Secretary's Department,
specialized training for teachers of subnormal children was given in
Victoria.
(6) Prior to 1948, Summer School training was not available for Art
teachers beyond the junior high-school level. In-service courses were
organized from 1948 to 1951, dealing with Art instruction in Grades X,
XI, and XII. Somewhat paralleling this development were the Arts
and Crafts Courses which outlined a modified programme for general
classroom teachers in small high schools not large enough to employ
an Industrial Arts instructor.
(7) A full counsellor-training programme was initiated in 1948, and offered
each year thereafter. The increasing enrolment in these courses and the
professional calibre of the teacher attracted to them speaks well of the
Department's decision to make this training available.
(8) During the period under review a Physical Education training programme leading to a B.P.E. degree became available at the University
of British Columbia. Because of the obvious advantages to teachers in
being able to work toward a degree in the field as well as teacher
certification, a plan was worked out by which specialized training of this
type was gradually transferred to the University. This transfer was
completed in 1951, at which time the Summer School limited its offerings
to Physical Education Courses for the general classroom teacher.
(9) The supply of teachers in Commercial education has continued to be a
serious problem. In the hope of alleviating this shortage, and at the
same time attracting an increasing number of well-trained young people
to the profession, a programme was organized and will go into operation
in September of 1951 by which training will be offered in co-operation
with the School of Commerce, University of British Columbia.
During my five years as Director of the Summer School, I have had the privilege
on each occasion of working with a group of distinguished and at all times most cooperative educators. The excellence of the various faculties, and the fine enthusiasm
of the teachers who attended, together made possible whatever success the school has
enjoyed. Finally, I should not like to close this section of the Report without acknowledging the kindly, painstaking, and sound advice given so frequently and so unsparingly
out of the wealth of their experience by Dr. F. T. Fairey and Mr. H. L. Campbell. My
professional debt to them is very great.
Courses and Enrolment (Summer Session Only)
The enrolment for all courses and the total enrolment are summarized below.
Instructors who taught for less than one week are not included in the tables.
Courses
Instructors
Enrolment
Victoria Section, 1951	
Vancouver Section, 1951-
Totals for 1951 	
Totals for 1950	
Totals for 1949 	
Totals for 1948 	
Totals for 1947—	
Totals for 1946 	
64
24
881
91
85
81
77
73
46
10
56
48
52
48
44
43
1,371
94
1,465
1,462
1,308
1,197
1,027
1 The smaller number of courses in 1951 as compared to 1950 is explained by the greater number of 2V4-unit
courses, and by the larger number of day-long workshops. K 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
Victoria Section
Methods of Philosophy and Education: Enrolment
1.    Principles and Techniques of Elementary Education  100
11.    Use of Visual Aids in Classroom Instruction  91
14.    The Curriculum:  Its Objectives and Procedures  76
18.    The Radio in Education  92
32.    Intermediate Observation and Laboratory Class  92
35.    The Enterprise in Elementary School  93
50.    Classroom Organization and Management  117
63.    Introduction to Educational Supervision  56
100.    Philosophy and Methods of Secondary Education  54
104x. Secondary-school Principals' Conference  39
Psychology and Individual Development:
110.    Educational  Psychology  67
115.    Psychology of Adolescence  92
126.    Adjusting School Work to Individual Differences  78
151.    Guidance in the Elementary School  92
159.    Mental Hygiene  92
155.    Personality Adjustment of School-children  124
Fine and Applied Arts:
254a. Arts and Crafts  49
254b. Arts and Crafts  15
350.    Curriculum Workshop in Art Education  23
353.    Practical Arts for Rural Schools  62
356.    Modern Art in the Middle and Upper Grades  44
358.    Art Methods and Materials in the Elementary School  56
382.    Introductory Design  36
394b. History of Art  49
400.    Advanced Art Appreciation  33
402. Methods and Materials in Secondary-school Art  23
403. Art in Living  29
Counselling and Guidance Services:
189.    Organization   and   Administration   of   the   Guidance
Services   3 4
190x. Counsellors' Conference  17
193.    Occupational Information Techniques  42
Effective Living:
801.    Workshop in Effective Living  29
Health and Physical Education:
520.    Physical   Education   for   the   Elementary   Classroom
Teacher   130
538.    Personal and Community Recreation for the Elementary
Teacher  67
Home Economics:
650x. Workshop in Home Economics Education  14
650. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  36
651. Problems in Home Economics Education  21 SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION K 37
Intermediate Grades: Enrolment
200.    The Language Arts in the Elementary School  121
214.    Dramatic Art in Schools  34
261.    Arithmetic in the Intermediate Grades  130
345.    Social Studies Workshop ,_  29
Kindergarten-Primary Grades:
543.    Physical Education in the Primary Grades  67
584.    Fine Art for Kindergarten-Primary Grades  54
586. Kindergarten Music and Rhythms  45
587. Primary  Music  45
590x. Workshop in Primary Education  15
590. Principles and Practices of Primary Education  94
591. Primary Observation and Laboratory Class  52
593.    Reading in the Primary Grades  147
595. Industrial Arts and Play Materials  68
596. Language and Literature in the Primary Grades  74
597. Arithmetic in the Primary Grades  144
Library Services:
All.    Children's Literature  41
413.    Cataloguing and Classification  30
Music:
440. School Music in the Elementary Grades  69
441. School Music in the Secondary Grades  16
442. Elementary Harmony  27
444.    Introduction to Music Literature and History  26
447.    Advanced Music Literature and History  5
461. Advanced Sight-reading  22
462. Advanced Music Appreciation  12
465.    Advanced Choral Literature  63
Senior Matriculation:
213.    Senior Matriculation English  93
313.    Senior Matriculation World History  128
Typewriting:
604.    Practical Typewriting  45
Vancouver Section
Commercial Education:
621.    Stenography (Practice and Speed)  15
628.    General Business and Law  21
632.    Accounting —  7
Industrial Arts Education:
14.    The Curriculum:   Its Objectives and Procedures  13
223. Plane and Solid Geometrical Drawing  13
224. Freehand Sketching Applied to Industrial Arts  13
225. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  3
227. Elementary Woodwork -  12
228. Elementary Wood-turning  2 K 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Industrial Arts Education—Continued                                                 Enrolment
229c. Farm Mechanics       4
234. Art Metalwork       4
235. Elementary Sheet-metal Work       5
236. Elementary Machine-shop Work       9
238.    Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in Senior High
School   42
241. Practical Geometry  10
242. Freehand Sketching  10
243. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  2
245. Advanced Woodwork (Benchwork)     11
246. Advanced Wood-turning       6
247. Practice in the Use of Wood-working Machinery; Care
and Maintenance  9
248a. Farm Mechanics  6
248b. Farm Mechanics  11
249. Advanced Sheet-metal Work  8
250. Advanced Machine-shop Work  8
Student Courses
Total in 1951  4,104*
Total in 1950  4,443
Total in 1949 -  3,649
Total in 1948  3,618
Total in 1947  3,073
Total in 1946  2,614
1 The decrease in the number of student courses can be explained by the greater number of two-hour (2Vi-unit)
courses offered in 1951 as compared to 1950, and by the larger number of day-long workshops, each of which
appears as a single course in the above.
Registration
The following tables give an interesting picture of the classes of teachers served by
the Summer School and the type of training sought by them.
Table I.—Teaching Experience of Those Registered
13 or more years  228 1 to 3 years  737
10 to 12 years     90 Less than 1 year  75
7 to 9 years  106 Unreported   69
4 to 6 years  160
Table II.—Type of School in Which Teachers Taught in 1950-5l1
More than 10 rooms  557 3  rooms     75
7 to 10 rooms  177 2  rooms  111
4 to 6 rooms  184 1 room  162
1 Certain teachers registered at Summer School had not taught in the year  1950-51;   hence the totals of the
above will not agree with the total enrolment. SUMMER SCHOOL
OF EDUCATION
K 39
Table III.—Grades Taught by Teachers Enrolled
Grade XIII	
11
Grade V	
. 325
Grade  XII	
150
Grade IV	
. 357
Grade XL      	
182
Grade III	
. 422
Grade X	
193
Grade II	
. 429
Grade IX	
200
Grade  I	
_ 398
Grade  VIII
308
Kindergarten    .
_      5
Grade  VII	
300
Special  classes	
-    20
Grade VI	
336
Unreported 	
_ 101
Table IV,
—Types of Certificates Sought
(Candidates for First-class Permanent Certificates are not shown.)
Art  	
73
Intermediate 	
_ 122
Commercial	
30
Library 	
.    38
Counsellor	
47
Music  	
.    63
Education for Handi
Physical Education	
.    43
capped 	
2
Primary-Kindergarten .
_ 205
Home Economics	
49
S-A   (Instructor)	
_    31
Industrial Arts     73
Faculty
Abercrombie, Miss Mary E., Primary Instructor, Dawson School, Vancouver.
Abercrombie, W. T., B.A., Principal, Fairview High School of Commerce, Vancouver.
Aspell, Peter, Dip., V.S.A., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Bailard, Miss Virginia, M.A., Ed.D., Supervisor of Counselling and Psychological Services, Long Beach, Calif.
Beattie, Lewis S., B.A., Director of Vocational Education and Curriculum Co-ordinator,
Province of Ontario.
Bickell, David E., B.A., M.Sc. in Ed., Principal, Earl Grey School, Calgary, Alta.
Campbell, Miss Mary N. K, B.Sc.(H.Ec), Home Economics Instructor, Lord Byng
High School, Vancouver.
Cottingham, Miss Mollie E., M.A., English and Social Studies Instructor, John Oliver
High School, Vancouver.
Crabtree, Miss Joyce, B.Sc.(H.Ec), B.Ed., Home Economics Instructor,  Oak Bay
High School, Victoria.
Creighton, Miss Ella H., Primary Specialist, Teacher-in-Charge, Bank Street School,
Victoria.
Darley, John G., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Dean of the Graduate School and Professor
of Psychology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minn.
Dee, Henry Drummond, M.A., B.Ed., Vice-Principal, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Dickinson, Miss Emelyn, M.A., Head Teacher, Kitchener-Trafalgar School, Vancouver.
Eaton, Miss Edna M., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Kingsway West School, Burnaby.
Ferguson, H. C, B.A., Inspector of Schools, Telkwa.
Gaddes, Donald Boyce, A.T.C.M., B.Mus., Music Instructor, Provincial Normal School,
Victoria.
Gibson, William Stewart, Machine-shop Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Gilmour, Mrs. Helen M., Music Specialist, Kelowna.
Goldie, James, B.A., Head, Commercial Department, Burnaby North High School,
Vancouver.
Grant, W. H., B.S.A., B.Ed., Inspector of Schools, Abbotsford.
Grier, Miss Helen, Instructor, Model (Rural) Demonstration School, Vancouver. K 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Grossnickle, Foster E., A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Mathematics, State Teachers College,
Jersey City, N.J.
Harris, Robert D., M.A., Assistant Professor of Psychology, Oregon State College,
Corvallis, Ore.
Hartley, Gordon F., B.A., Instructor of Physical Education, Victoria High School,
Victoria, and Director, Victoria City Playgrounds.
Hatton, Mrs. Evelyn, B.Sc.(H.Ec), Instructor in Home Economics, Delta Junior-Senior
High School, Ladner.
Hutchinson, H. F., Industrial Arts Instructor, Trail High School, Trail.
Jackson, Miss Dorothea, Ph.D., Director, Elementary Education, Seattle Public Schools,
Seattle, Wash.
James, Miss Marian D., Primary Specialist, Supervisor of Kindergarten-Primary Education, Greater Victoria Schools, Victoria.
Johnson, F. Henry, M.A., B.Paed., Instructor, Provincial Normal School, Victoria.
Johnson, Heber D., M.A., Principal, Ballard High School, Seattle, Wash.
Johnson, Miss Muriel, B.H.Sc, Dietitian, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Kitley, Philip J., M.A., Director of British Columbia School Radio Broadcasts, Vancouver.
Lane, Edwin I., B.A., Art Instructor, West Vancouver High Schools, Vancouver.
Lanning, Walter, B.A., B.L.S., Librarian, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Lefever, D. Welty, A.M., Ph.D., Professor of Education, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif.
Lucas, W. E., B.A., B.Pasd., Inspector of Schools, Trail.
Lythgoe, E. W., Industrial Arts Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Mahaffy, Miss C. Elizabeth, B.A., M.D., Assistant Medical Health Officer, Victoria.
Martin, Miss May, Vice-Principal and Librarian, Tecumseh School, Vancouver.
Meredith, John, B.A., Research Assistant, Department of Education, Victoria.
Merrick, Charles James, Draughting Instructor, Gladstone Junior High School, Vancouver.
Miller, Edward F., B.A., Principal, Sutherland Junior High School, North Vancouver.
Milley, Chesley E., B.A., Commercial Specialist, Fairview High School of Commerce,
Vancouver.
McCullough, Miss Norah, Executive Secretary, Saskatchewan Arts Board, Regina, Sask.
McKenzie, J. J., B.A., Inspector of Schools, Nelson.
McKie, Archibald, B.A., B.Ed., Counsellor, Kitsilano Junior-Senior High School,
Vancouver.
McLeish, Miss Elizabeth, Supervisor of Art, Brandon Public Schools, Brandon, Man.
O'Connell, Miss Sheila, B.A., Primary Specialist, Vancouver School Board, Vancouver.
Pritchard, Vaughan G., B.A., Commercial Specialist, Central Junior High School,
Victoria.
Radcliff, Mrs. Doreen E., Kindergarten Teacher, Sir James Douglas School, Victoria.
Reid, C. M., Industrial Arts Instructor, Lake Cowichan.
Rickard, V. E., Vocational Instructor, Coquitlam Junior-Senior High School, Coquitlam.
Roberts, Ernest C, B.A., Industrial Arts Instructor, Chilliwack High School, Chilliwack.
Roberts, Ifor, Assistant Supervisor of Music, Vancouver School Board, Vancouver.
Russell, Albert E., Sheet-metal and Welding Instructor, Vancouver Technical School,
Vancouver.
Sanson, Miss Margaret, Primary Specialist, Oaklands Kindergarten, Victoria.
Stevenson, Miss Ailsie M., B.S.(H.Ec), M.A.(H.Ec), Assistant Professor of Home
Economics, Washington State College, Pullman, Wash.
Storr, Carter B., M.A., Ph.D., Principal, Elgin Public School, Ottawa, Ont. SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION K 41
Strong, C. J., M.A., Inspector of Technical Classes, Department of Education, Victoria.
Taylor, C. I., B.A., B.Ed., Inspector of Schools, Courtenay.
Towner, Earl M., B.Sc, M.A., Principal, Whittier School, Seattle, Wash.
Wales, Bert E., B.A., B.Ed., Counsellor, Kitsilano Junior-Senior High School, Vancouver.
Wallace, Lawrence J., B.A., M.Ed., Counsellor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Woods, Leonard A., A.O.C.A., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Student Activity Society
The following statement deals with affairs of the preceding or 1950 session, and is
taken from the report of the auditors, Ismay, Boiston, Dunn & Co., chartered
accountants.
Receipts
Activity fees paid by students (less refunds)  $2,758.00
Additional income (cash receipts, cafeteria, etc.)        799.55
Total   $3,557.55
Disbursements
Fees and expenses of artists, lecturers, etc  $2,065.50
Social affairs, dances, picnics, teas, etc        828.57
Miscellaneous charges, services, rentals, etc  74.93
Excess of receipts over disbursements        588.55
Total   $3,557.55
Winter In-service Courses
Credit-bearing winter in-service courses, under the direction of the Summer School,
were offered in nine centres. A total of 24 courses was given, attracting a total registration of 246. K 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL
AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
This report is for the school-year 1950-51 and covers the work of the following:—
(a) Industrial Arts (Woodwork and Draughting) in elementary schools.
(b) Industrial Arts (Woodwork, Draughting, Metalwork, and Electricity) in
junior and senior high schools.
(c) Industrial Arts Option Courses in high schools—"A," Woodwork and
Draughting, and " B," Metalwork and Draughting—for University
Entrance.
(d) Vancouver Technical School.
(e) High School Commercial and Agricultural Courses.
(/) Vancouver School of Art.
(g) Night-schools.
(h) Teacher-training.
(i) Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
(/') Vancouver Vocational Institute.
The reports upon Industrial Arts which follow have been prepared by Lieut.-Col.
C. J. Strong, M.A., Inspector of Technical Classes.
Industrial Arts
Elementary Schools and Junior High Schools
Industrial Arts has continued in popularity during 1950-51, as indicated by the
increased enrolment. The growth has been consistent, as from twenty-five to thirty
new teachers have been required each year for the past six years. During the summer
of 1951 thirty-one new teachers were required to meet the needs of our expanding
programme. Two school districts, Keremeos and Lillooet, have opened new centres
and are offering Industrial Arts for the first time.
The Vocational and Industrial Arts Teacher-training Unit has graduated some fine
young teachers. These men have fitted quickly into the school system, and the quality
of their training is reflected in the standard of work obtained from their classes in Industrial Arts.
At the conclusion of the present term, two veteran teachers retired on superannuation—namely, Mr. A. H. Marrion, of Victoria, and Mr. T. Chippendale, of Vancouver.
To both of these teachers we express the best wishes of their friends for a happy and
useful retirement.
There are fifty-five school districts in which Industrial Arts is established, as follows:
Abbotsford, Agassiz, Alberni, Armstrong, Burnaby, Campbell River, Chilliwack,
Coquitlam, Courtenay, Cowichan, Cranbrook, Creston, Delta, Fernie, Fraser Canyon,
Grand Forks, Kamloops, Kelowna, Keremeos, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Lake Cowichan,
Langley, Lillooet, Maple Ridge, Mission, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, North
Vancouver, Ocean Falls, Peace River South, Penticton, Powell River, Prince George,
Prince Rupert, Princeton, Qualicum, Quesnel, Revelstoke, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon
Arm, Saltspring, Smithers, Sooke, Southern Okanagan, Summerland, Surrey, Trail,
University Hill, Vancouver, Vernon, Greater Victoria, and West Vancouver.
Six additional school districts will be opening new Industrial Arts centres in September, 1951—namely, Ashcroft, Castlegar, Howe Sound, Peace River North, Sechelt,
and Williams Lake.    In addition to the above, Industrial Arts centres are established INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION K 43
at the Boys' Industrial School, the School for the Deaf and the Blind, New Haven, and
the Provincial Mental Hospital at New Westminster.
Senior High Schools
The number of students taking Industrial Arts in the senior high schools is steadily
increasing. Mass education in the secondary schools presents a challenge to all teachers,
and it is noted that this challenge is being met by shop teachers by varying their courses
to meet individual differences and community needs.
Industrial Arts Option for University Entrance
It is noted that there is a growing appreciation on the part of school principals for
Industrial Arts Courses. Principals of smaller high schools are fully aware of the holding
value of the practical courses and are doing all possible to have facilities provided for
this work where it does not at present exist.
The total number of individual elementary and junior and
senior high school shops in the Province (of which fifty-
one are general shops) is        236
The total number of individual elementary and junior and
senior high school instructors is        204
The total number of pupils participating is—
Elementary school     2,941
Junior high school  11,983
Senior high school     4,247
  19,171
The Vancouver Technical School
The report which follows has been prepared by Mr. E. M. White, B.A.Sc, principal
of the Vancouver Technical School:—
" In September, 1950, the Grandview High School of Commerce was amalgamated
with the Vancouver Technical School. Mr. Thomas Alsbury, vice-principal, and practically all the members of the Grandview High School staff were transferred. This
necessitated changes on the upper floor, where the Commerical Department is for the
most part confined. The School was originally designed for boys, and there have been
certain difficulties of accommodation for such a large influx of girls.
" The Commercial Department will' round out' our programme and enable Technical students, who may require a certain number of Commercial subjects, to obtain them.
Also, the girls and boys in the Commercial Department will have the opportunity of
taking Home Economics and Technical subjects.
" Our graduates are in great demand by both business and industry. The greater
number of our Grade XII and our special students have been placed. The Grade X
and Grade XI students have also fallen prey to the lure of good-paying jobs.
" The total number of students attending the Vancouver Technical School during
the year 1950-51 was as follows:—
Day-SChool  Boys Girls Total
University Entrance      76 45 121
Commercial      47 415 462
Technical   524 137 661
Specials      80 31 111
'    Totals  727 628 1,355
Night-school—
Vocational   744
Non-vocational     74
  818 K 44
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
" Mr. George Price, cooking instructor for the past ten years, retired on superannuation. Miss W. Bracher resigned her position to join the Home Economics staff at
the University of British Columbia."
High School Commercial and Agricultural Courses
The placement of Commercial students during the past year has been very good.
There have been more office positions available than there have been students trained by
the Commercial classes.
The enrolment in the following school districts was as follows:—
Students
Abbotsford  152
Aggassiz  62
Alberni   150
Burnaby   709
Campbell River   39
Chilliwack   179
Coquitlam   123
Courtenay   156
Cowichan   135
Creston   240
Delta   109
Fernie   60
Golden   12
Grand Forks  65
Kamloops  199
Kelowna
296
23
99
64
147
Keremeos 	
Kimberley 	
Ladysmith 	
Lake Cowichan	
Langley        191
Lillooet          15
Maple Ridge       260
Mission       159
Nanaimo       193
Students
Nelson   281
New Westminster  394
North Vancouver  335
Peace River North ____ 34
Peace River South  141
Penticton  220
Powell River  102
Prince George  133
Prince Rupert   110
Princeton  64
Quesnel   18
Revelstoke  29
Richmond   162
Saanich   61
Salmon Arm  65
Sooke  1  64
Southern Okanagan ___ 112
Summerland   69
Surrey   436
Trail  120
Vancouver   3,896
Vernon   210
Victoria   872
West Vancouver  147
Total  11,912
Agriculture classes have increased this year. Some students- have taken Agriculture
as an option and others have taken it as a Vocational Course. The Vocational Agriculture classes have increased also since more Vocational Agriculture teachers have been
available.
Students
Agassiz   48
Armstrong   7
Burnaby   70
Chilliwack   69
Cowichan   33
Creston   38
Kamloops   47
Kelowna    188
Keremeos   31
Ladysmith   40
Langley   177
Students
Maple Ridge  33
Mission   43
Peace River South  34
Penticton  62
Prince George  28
Quesnel   13
Saanich   9
Salmon Arm :  37
Southern Okanagan __ 41
Vernon   41
Total  1,089 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION K 45
Vancouver School of Art
The following report has been prepared by Mr. F. A. Amess, assistant to the
Director, Mr. Charles H. Scott, A.R.C.A., F.R.S.A.(Lond.), Dip.G.S.A.:—
" The student enrolment during the school-year 1950-51 was as follows:—
Girls Boys Total
Full-time day-school students     61 52 113
Part-time day-school students     35 6 41
Rehabilitation students   5 5
Night-school students   157 110 267
Saturday morning junior classes  114 63 177
Summer extension classes     35 22 57
Totals  402        258        660
" The enrolment of students for the day classes was gratifyingly high in spite of
the decrease in Rehabilitation students.
" The Wednesday special classes, held for adults wishing part-time training in Drawing and Painting, were very successful.
" The Design Workshop class, specializing in the training of the student in three-
dimensional design, was commenced this year, with a view to laying a sound basis for
future training in Architecture and Industrial Design.
"An evening class, 'An Introduction to Industrial Design,' was held during the
evening school, under the sponsorship of the British Columbia Industrial Design Committee, and proved a successful and popular study.
" In the field of Design, the school has been highly successful. Mr. Chuck Yip,
a graduate student, won third prize in an international competition of textile designing.
This was the only prize won in Canada.
" Mural projects were undertaken by two of the students as part of their school
programme. Miss Mary Tait decorated the walls of the Children's Preventorium with gay
cowboy scenes, and Miss Shirley Cardwell, sponsored by the Vancouver Park Board,
made an excellent back-drop mural for the Children's Zoo at Stanley Park.
" Graduates from last year are now successfully employed by leading commercial
art firms.
"An open-house exhibition held by the staff and students was attended by 1,400
visitors.
"An excellent article, ' Our School of Art,' which appeared in the magazine section
of The Vancouver Sun on May 26th, spoke highly of the School's contribution to the
Province. The article was illustrated by the winners of The Vancouver Sun Magazine
Cover Competition.
" The Vancouver School of Art Travelling Show, prepared last year, has visited all
the high schools in Vancouver and will continue to circulate during the coming year.
" The annual closing was held on Friday, May 25th, with Mr. H. N. MacCorkindale,
Superintendent of Schools for Vancouver, presiding.   Mr. M. M. Frazer, a member of
the Canadian Industrial Design Committee, gave an inspiring and instructive address to
the students."
Night-schools
There has been an increase in all night-school classes during the past year. Trade
Advisory Committees in Vancouver and Victoria have been very busy preparing trade
analyses so that apprentice, vocational, and up-grading night classes can do a more
effective training job.
The enrolment during the year 1950-51 was as follows:— students
Vocational        5,905
Non-vocational  10,873
Apprenticeship classes      1,158 K 46
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Training of Industrial Arts and Vocational Teachers
The Vocational Teacher-training Department of the Vancouver Vocational Institute
has continued to be the main training project. This unit, under the supervision of
Mr. T. Quayle, has been operated very successfully, and the graduate teachers have done
a very efficient job of shop teaching.
The Dominion Department of Labour and the Provincial Department of Education
share equally in the cost of Vocational Teacher-training. The demand for efficiently
trained Vocational teachers increases year by year.
The Summer School for Industrial Arts teachers, held at the Vancouver Technical
School, provides an opportunity for many teachers to get credit toward obtaining their
Industrial Arts Teacher's Certificate.
Night-school classes were held this year to increase the supply of both Industrial
Arts and Vocational teachers. Despite the extra training, it was necessary to bring trained
teachers from other Provinces to fill the positions available.
It is very difficult to attract a well-educated and efficient tradesman to the teaching
profession because his wages are very much higher than the minimum salary offered to
him by the local School Boards.
Steps were taken this year to train Vocational Commercial teachers to fill the steady
demand for such trained instructors.
The enrolment during the past year was as follows:—
Industrial Arts and Vocational Teacher-training—
Part-time courses     72
Full-time courses     13
Summer School     71
Total
156
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement
Under this agreement between the Dominion Department of Labour and the
Provincial Government, extra grants are paid to School Boards who offer Vocational,
Commercial, Agriculture, and Industrial Courses.
Vocational Courses are offered in day and evening classes. For the year 1950-51,
the enrolment was as follows:—
Number of
Pupils
Number of Teachers
Part-time
Full-time
Day-schools	
Night-schools.-
Teacher-training-
Bursaries to Vocational students..
Totals	
4,851
5,905
85
7
193
4
86
202
1
10,848
197
289
Vancouver Vocational Institute
The Vancouver Vocational Institute is operated by the Vancouver Board of School
Trustees, and the training is designed to prepare young men and women for gainful employment in trade or industry.
Each department has its own Advisory Committee, consisting of representatives of
labour and management. These committees assist and advise in all matters pertaining
to the training programme.
The training at the Institute is of special assistance to four main groups of people:—
(1) Students who have completed their high-school education and who wish
to take short, intensive, practical courses before entering desired trades. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
K 47
(2) People who require up-grading in their own particular trades.
(3) People who, due to injury or lack of interest in their present occupations,
wish to rehabilitate themselves in some new line of endeavour.
(4) New Canadians who wish to familiarize themselves with our local conditions and customs before seeking employment.
Applicants for training in the Institute must be at least 16 years of age and have a
Grade X educational standing or its equivalent.
The Institute operates on a seven-hour day, a five-day week, and a twelve-month
year.   The courses range from ten weeks to eighteen months in length.
In most courses the number of students is limited so that individual attention and
close supervision may be given. All the courses are practical in nature, but all practice
is supplemented by a thorough study of the principles involved.
Each student is interviewed before enrolling and is given guidance in the selection
of a suitable course. While employment is not guaranteed by the Institute, a placement
service is maintained to assist the student to find employment in his particular field of
work when he has finished his training. A student is eligible for placement when he has
reached a sufficiently high standard to hold a position in his own particular trade.
The Vancouver Vocational Institute is established to provide the following service
to the people of the Province of British Columbia—namely, that no young person nor
adult should lack the opportunity to acquire training which will help him earn his living.
The following was the enrolment during the past school-year. All classes received
grants under the Dominion-Provincial Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement with
the exception of the class in Power-machine Sewing, the costs of which were paid under
the Schedules C and M of the Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement.
Name of Class
Number of
Instructors
Number
Enrolled
Number
Withdrawn
Number
Completed
Training
Number
Still
Training
Number
Placed
Number
Who Have
Taken
Up-grading
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
4
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
26
55
33
47
27
83
104
39
37
16
189
56
34
158
8
79
105
18
19
60
13
134
10
28
5
10
4
6
7
30
27
9
8
1
98
24
14
42
3
17
27
7
10
17
19
2
14
11
23
19
28
11
33
61
21
20
12
57
19
8
101
5
50
41
6
3
34
8
92
8
9
10
22
10
13
9
20
16
9
9
3
34
13
12
15
12
37
5
6
9
5
23
5
11
22
17
28
14
44
51
20
21
10
7
20
13
2
43
39
6
4
30
6
15
6
7
2
Commercial Secretarial	
Engineering—	
155
Machine-shop	
Navigation	
143
Shoe-repairing—    . ..
16
59
Totals	
35
1,378
401
680
297
444
376
Note.—It will be noticed that the column entitled " Number Placed " is, in some cases, greater than the column
entitled " Number Completed Training," for example, " Building-construction." This is accounted for by the fact that
some students are unable to complete their course for financial or other reasons, but are placed in jobs they can fill. K 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, B.Sc, M.A., DIRECTOR
Total number of students taking Home Economics:—
Elementary   schools     2,565
Junior high schools  12,248
14,813
In Grade VII     5,982
In Grade VIII     5,907
In Grade IX     2,924
14,813
Elementary-school boys  36
In the School for the Deaf and the Blind  25
In senior high schools     4,885
High-school boys  113
Vancouver Technical students  511
In private schools        323
Elementary (Grades VII and VIII)  166
High school (senior classes)  157
323
Total number of students taking Home Economics
Courses   20,046
There are 112 Home Economics centres in public schools and 6 in private schools
throughout the Province.
Centres Rooms
One-room centres  66 66
Two-room centres  40 80
Three-room centres  7 21
Four-room centres   4 16
Five-room centre  1 5
Totals  118 188
During the year Home Economics centres were opened for the first time at Bralorne,
Lillooet, Keremeos, Smithers, and Salmon Arm.
Home Economics rooms in new school buildings opened during the year were as
follows:—
Abbotsford: Airport School.
Duncan: Cowichan Junior-Senior High School.
Powell River: Brooks Junior-Senior High School.
Summerland: Summerland Junior-Senior High School.
Surrey: Princess Margaret Junior-Senior High School.
Vancouver:  John Oliver Senior High School and Gladstone Junior High
School.
Victoria: S. J. Willis Junior High School. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS K 49
The centre at Michel-Natal was reopened in September, 1950, after being closed
for several years. Renovations were made during the year to the Home Economics room
in the Ocean Fall High School.
There are 183 Home Economics teachers on the staffs of the schools in the Province,
showing an increase of 18 over the total for last year. Of these, 53 are graduates from
the Home Economics Department of the University of British Columbia.
In spite of the number of Home Economics graduates of the University of British
Columbia who yearly turn to teaching, the demand for teachers still exceeds the supply.
This is attributed to the degree of expansion of Home Economics throughout the
Province and the rate of turnover in teaching staffs.
Owing to the shortage of Home Economics teachers, the teacher-training classes
offered through Summer School sessions were continued in 1951. Fifty-seven teachers
enrolled for the two courses which were offered to home economists—Problems in Home
Economics and Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics. Of these, twenty-four
were beginning teachers, who were appointed to Home Economics teaching positions for
the school year 1951-52.
Home Economics teachers of this Province on the staff of the Summer School of
Education during the 1951 session were-—Miss Joyce Crabtree, B.Sc.(H.Ec), B.Ed.;
Mrs. Edna M. Eaton, B.Sc.(H.Ec); Mrs. Evelyn Hatton, B.Sc.(H.Ec); Miss Muriel
Johnson, B.Sc.(H.Ec);  and Mrs. Mary N. K. Reid, B.Sc.(H.Ec).
Miss Ailsie M. Stevenson, B.S.(H.Ec), M.A.(H.Ec), State Assistant Supervisor
of Home Economics Education and Assistant Professor of Home Economics, Washington
State College, Pullman, Wash., directed the Home Economics Workshop. Fourteen
teachers were enrolled in the workshop.
Four courses were revised during the summer session—namely, Child Care and
Home Nursing 24, Homemaking 30, Clothing Selection and Construction 31, and Foods
and Nutrition 32. These course outlines will be printed in experimental form and used
in the schools for a period of time before appearing in the final form. K 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL REFERENCE AND SCHOOL SERVICE
REPORT OF MURIEL A. SCACE, B.A., DIRECTOR
The Division of Educational Reference and School Service is charged with the
responsibility of publishing British Columbia Schools, the official organ of the Department of Education, which is issued quarterly in elementary and secondary editions. It
is also responsible for the library of the Department of Education and for the preparation
of reference materials for Departmental officials, Inspectors of Schools, teachers, and
Curriculum Committees. The activities of this Division for the school-year 1950-51
may be summarized as follows:—
" British Columbia Schools "
British Columbia Schools, the official publication of the Department of Education,
is sent free of charge eight times during the school-year to all teachers in the Province.
It is designed to provide in-service professional aid, to assist teachers in keeping abreast
of the latest developments in the field of education, to list new teaching aids and materials,
and to acquaint teachers and officials with changes in the Programme of Studies and
with new regulations of the Department of Education.
The publication of a Departmental magazine for teachers was initiated in September,
1944, with the publication of The Rural School, which was sent to both elementary and
secondary teachers in the rural areas. Many requests were made that this magazine be
available to all elementary teachers, and in February, 1946, The Rural School was
replaced by British Columbia Schools, Elementary Edition, which is currently issued on
a quarterly basis to all teachers in the elementary grades. In October, 1946, the publication of a Secondary Edition of the magazine was also undertaken, with free distribution,
on a quarterly basis, to all teachers in secondary schools. During the school-year 1950-
51, 14,200 copies of the Elementary Edition were published and 9,915 copies of the
Secondary Edition. This issue provided a sufficient number of magazines to supply all
teachers and principals, Inspectors of Schools, Departmental officials, and School Boards
throughout the Province. In addition, copies were supplied, upon request, to teachers
in private schools, Indian schools, and schools supported by religious denominations.
Copies of each issue of the magazine were supplied to all students of the Victoria Normal
School and of the teacher-training department at the University of British Columbia.
Complimentary copies were also sent to all Provincial Departments of Education throughout Canada, to a number of State Departments of Education across the Border, and to
numerous educators, educational organizations, and libraries in both Canada and the
United States. Files of the magazine were sent, upon request, to U.N.E.S.C.O. House
in Paris for the use of students at international seminars of education.
The substantial increase in school enrolment, now averaging more than 10,000
yearly, with the subsequent increase in the number of teachers, is reflected in the number
of magazines required to supply the teachers of the Province. The following figures
are of interest: In September, 1946, 3,300 copies of the Elementary Edition were
printed; for September, 1951, 5,200 copies of the Elementary Edition were required;
in October, 1946, 2,000 copies of the Secondary Edition were printed; for October,
1951, 3,650 copies of the Secondary Edition were required.
There has been a marked increase in the number of magazines sent upon request
to private and Indian schools, and to schools supported by religious denominations. EDUCATIONAL REFERENCE AND SCHOOL SERVICE K 51
Reference and School Service
Reference Library Services
A reference library is maintained in the Department of Education under the
Director of this Division. The resources of this library are available to all Inspectors
of Schools, Departmental and Normal School officials, and teachers engaged upon special
research projects. It is stocked with a wide range of professional books in the field of
education, and is kept up to date through careful evaluation and selection of the best
current literature in the field. During the year 1950-51 approximately 200 new books
were added to the collection. In addition, 135 regularly published educational periodicals, pamphlets, and bulletins are received annually. Of these, 95 are secured through
subscription and 40 upon a free or exchange basis. The library also contains a wide
selection of text-books supplied by publishing firms.
The Director of this Division is responsible for the selection of books for the
Teachers' Professional Library administered by the Public Library Commission. Through
this library service, teachers in all parts of the Province are provided with free access
to a wide range of the best and most up-to-date professional literature in the field of
education.
Text-books and Teaching Materials
This Division maintains contacts with all educational publishers and evaluates
supplementary books and teaching materials of all kinds. Text-books are secured from
publishers for text-book selection committees and teacher committees engaged in
curriculum revision. Notable materials of this type are brought to the attention of
teachers and officials through British Columbia Schools.
Programmes of Studies and Curricular Materials
The Director of this Division acts as secretary of the Central Curriculum Committee,
and in that capacity is concerned with the procuring and the preparation of professional
educational materials for use by members of committees engaged in curriculum revision,
and with the editing, final preparation for printing, and actual publication of Programmes
of Studies. K 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 39 (VANCOUVER)
REPORT OF H. N. MacCORKINDALE, B.A., SUPERINTENDENT
OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment
The very urgent need for the expansion of our school facilities is the greatest requirement of this district. The number of births resident within this area is by all means
the most influential variable to be considered in predicting school enrolment.
The influx of school population from outside areas, and the considerable movement
of the population within the city itself, tends to produce unpredictable circumstances in
new areas of this school district. By carefully spotting the number and location of the
various building permits issued through the Building Department of the City Hall, certain
pertinent conclusions can be determined.
By the judicious use of portable school buildings, one- and two-room units, splendid
education facilities have been provided economically in areas where the enrolment is at
present abnormally high and which later will tend to decrease.
Let me state briefly the possible trends in school enrolment based on birth rates
annually and divided into three periods.
A. Pre-war Period (1933 to 1939, Inclusive).—The average of the annual births
for this seven-year period, domiciled in the City of Vancouver, was 3,777. It should
be noted that the first year of this period, 1933, is the group which has just graduated
from the senior secondary schools of the Province. The remaining six years of this
period will constitute, for the next school-year, the students in the secondary schools
(Grades VII to XII, inclusive). Consequently, the average annual increase in the
senior secondary schools for the next six years will not be very rapid.
B. War Period (1940 to 1945, Inclusive).—For this six-year period the average of
the annual births domiciled in the City of Vancouver was 6,645. This is an average
annual increase of approximately 76 per cent over the pre-war period. By September
next, practically all the children born in the war period will be enrolled in the first six
grades of the elementary schools. A check on the enrolment shows that this elementary-
school group is approximately 76 per cent above the enrolment of the secondary-school
group referred to above.
C. Post-war Period (1946 to 1950, Inclusive).—The average of the annual births
for this five-year period rose to 9,813, an average annual increase over the pre-war
period of approximately 160 per cent. In September, 1952, those born the first year
of the post-war period will enrol in Grade I. This indicates that the year 1952 constitutes the beginning of a period of the most rapid increase in future school enrolment
in this district. This trend has not been local, but is world wide. The Department of
Education and the various School Boards of the Province and this district must make
every effort to provide the necessary staff, buildings, and equipment to care for the
proper growth and development of these children. This means that the beginning of
the greatest period of overcrowding will likely be in 1953-54.
School Buildings
The following buildings were completed during the school-year 1950-51:—
Beaconsfield Elementary School (addition):   Four classrooms and combined
gymnasium-auditorium.
Douglas Elementary School (addition):   Fifteen classrooms, library, lunchroom, and combined gymnasium-auditorium. -J    lv,l.:
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER) K 53
Gladstone Secondary School (new school):   Twenty-two classrooms, fourteen
special rooms, four shops, cafeteria, and double gymnasium.
King Edward High School  (addition):   Double gymnasium and cafeteria.
John Oliver Secondary School (addition):  Sixteen classrooms, sixteen special
rooms, double gymnasium, and administrative offices.
Prince of Wales High School (addition):  Gymnasium.
Renfrew Elementary School (addition):   Sixteen classrooms and lunchroom.
Sexsmith Elementary School (addition):   Two classrooms, lunchroom, and
combined gymnasium-auditorium.
Van Home Elementary School (addition):   Six classrooms, lunchroom, and
combined gymnasium-auditorium.
Portable classrooms:  Three.
Administration Building of approximately 62,000 square feet in area.
In concluding my comments on the building programme of the Vancouver School
Board for the year 1950-51,1 should like to pay a special tribute to the Board of School
Trustees for providing a splendid new Administration Building, officially opened June
22nd, 1951.
The completion of this project supplied the system with its greatest present need.
By consolidating our headquarters staff in one building, so well planned, it will, I am
sure, mean a great deal to the efficient operation of the school system as a whole. It
is my contention that this new building is one of the best-planned school-administration
units to be found anywhere.
Testing
The following tests were given during the school-year 1950-51:—
(1) Number of individual intelligence tests given, 888.
(2) Number of pupils given group intelligence tests, 10,774. (This applies
to the tests actually administered by the personnel of the Bureau of
Measurements.)
(3) Intelligence tests were given to 239 prospective Grade Ib pupils who
were under 6 years of age prior to December 1st, 1950. (Pupils 6 years
of age in December, 1950, were tested.) Eighty of the 239 were
admitted on trial to Grade Ib, and the remainder, 159, were rejected
as being unlikely to succeed in the work of the first grade. During
September the Detroit Beginning First-Grade Intelligence Test (revised)
was administered to all Grade Ib pupils.
(4) For June, 1951, achievement tests in the fundamental subjects were given
to approximately 3,400 pupils of Grades VI, VII, and VII—Grade VI and
VII pupils in junior high-school areas for promotion to junior high school
and Grade VIII pupils in senior high-school areas for promotion to senior
high school. This type of standardized test assists Principals and
Inspectors in maintaining levels of achievement.
(5) Probationary classes in nursing of the Vancouver General Hospital were
given intelligence tests—one class each in October and March.
(6) Provincial testing programme: In November, at the request of Dr. C. B.
Conway, Department of Education, Victoria, B.C., the British Columbia
tests—Arithmetic Computation III-IV, Form B; IV-V, Form B; V-VI,
Form A; and V-VI, Form B—were given to 2,761 Grade V pupils of a
selection of Vancouver schools, chosen so that the median I.Q. of the
selected schools would be the same as the median I.Q. for all Vancouver
elementary schools. K 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
The programme of testing as listed above was done under the direction of Inspector
R. Straight. It is with regret that I announce the retirement of Mr. Straight, who so
capably organized our testing programme, in the Department of the Bureau of Measurements. The Department of Statistics in Ottawa has been, on different occasions, highly
complimentary of the statistical returns made from our system. Much credit for this
must go to Mr. Straight.
Night-schools
The following table gives the classification of the courses offered during the year,
according to their nature and purpose, and also the number of classes, the number
enrolled, and the number of instructors in each of the major divisions:
Classification
Number
of
Subjects
Number
of
Classes
Enrolment
Number
of
Teachers
Male
Female
Total
Academic  -     .. :..
26
55
18
14
14
17
2
3
7
62
35
98
60
21
61
41
20
8
31
1,436
697
3,460
568
130
92
310
370
197
427
1,145
100
1,171
337
1,672
532
202
169
804
2,581
697
3,560
1,739
467
1,764
842
572
366
1,231
44
(a) Apprenticeship
(b) Non-apprenticeship  - 	
31
83
47
Teacher-training (including kindergarten-teacher training)
Homemaking    .  -
15
34
30
13
2
24
Totals     -	
156
437
7,687
6,132
13,819
323
To Mr. Graham Bruce, Director of Night Schools and Adult Education for the Vancouver School System, much credit is due for the continuous growth and development
in this very important field of education.
Instruction
Special Supervisors of Art, Music, Handicrafts, Home Economics, Physical Education, Industrial Arts, and primary grades, have assisted the Superintendent, principals,
and Inspectors in teacher growth and development.
In both primary and secondary schools, principals have been given time to assist
in the supervision of instruction and pupil-teacher growth. The Inspectors have visited
all new appointees to the teaching staff and have given special assistance by in-service
training conferences.
The consolidation of the supervisory staff in the new Administration Building,
with numerous conference-rooms and workrooms, will do a great deal toward the in-
service training of our teaching staff.
In general, there has been no great shortage of teachers applying for appointment
to the permanent staff. It must be admitted that a large number of applicants are from
outside the Province of British Columbia. I should state, however, that it is not easy to
procure well-qualified teachers in Physical Education for girls and for the primary
grades.
During the year we have been able to curtail, to a marked degree, activities which
originate from outside the school system and interfere with school instructional time.
I have every reason to believe that the standard of classroom instruction has been
maintained at a very high level.
The following members of the staff were granted superannuation. These teachers
are to be highly commended for the splendid and loyal service which they have given
to our system. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER)
K 55
Administration and supervisors—                                 Date of Appointment
R. Straight, Senior Inspector of Schools August, 1907
Miss U. F. Hall, Supervisor of Art January
Miss J. F. Parkes, Supervisor of Manual Arts-September
Secondary schools—
Miss I. M. Bolton, Magee High School September
Miss I. E. Clemens, John Oliver High School-September
Miss K. M. Coates, Kitsilano High School February
Miss F. H. Howden, King Edward High
School  1 September.
Miss F. S. Mulloy, Point Grey Junior High
School  January,
T. Chippendale, Magee High School September,
J. F. deMacedo, Prince of Wales High School-September
W. H. Morrow (principal), Lord Byng High
School  August
E. T. Oliver (vice-principal), Lord Byng High
School  August
G. R. Price, Technical High School November
Elementary schools—
Miss M. L. Johnston, Dawson September,
Miss E. Magee, Lord Roberts October.
Miss V. I. Macaulay, Lord Roberts February,
Mrs. A. C. McLeod, Strathcona September
Miss G. A. Taylor, Visiting Teacher May
Miss E. M. Wiegand, Seymour February
R. Johnson (vice-principal), Laura Secord January
1917
1918
1918
1929
1925
1927
1912
1912
1929
1913
1916
1940
1918
1915
1918
1922
1910
1922
1931
I regret to report the death of the following members of the staff who served the
system so well:—
Teacher
School
Date of Appointment
Date of Death
J. A. McLear.-
Miss W. A. Stearman..
Hastings   — 	
Lord Byng Junior-Senior High
April, 1950   	
September, 1925
March 27, 1951
January 14,1951
May I take this opportunity of thanking the Mayor, the City Council, the Parks
Board, the Library Board, the Fire Department, the Police Department, and all officials
of these organizations for the splendid co-operation they have given the Board and
officials of the Vancouver school system.
To you, Sir, and to every member of your Department, I am most grateful for
the splendid help, advice, and co-operation received at all times. K 56 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)
REPORT OF J. F. K. ENGLISH, M.A., B.P/ED., MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The school-year 1950 was one of the most active periods for District No. 61 since
its inception, not only internally but also from the standpoint of educational conferences.
In the early autumn, Victoria was the host city to the Canadian Education Association.
Almost simultaneously both the British Columbia and Dominion School Trustees Associations met in conference here. Somewhat later in the year the Provincial Parent-Teacher
Convention took place in Victoria. To all of these the school system contributed professionally and to the entertainment of our guests. In June of this year we were also glad
to welcome for a one-day visit the supervisory staff of the Vancouver schools. In addition,
more persons than usual from outside Victoria visited the district, the chief centre of
interest being the new S. J. Willis Junior High School.
Staff changes, for several reasons, were more numerous than usual during the year.
-"However, we were fortunate in securing many outstanding teachers as of last September.
The unfortunate death of Mr. Hugh W. Creelman, Principal of Lampson Street School
in Esquimalt, necessitated the transfer of several principals shortly after the term opened.
However, adjustments were made easily and without incident. At the close of the year
two principals, Mr. Arthur Hunkin and Mr. W. H. Wilson, retired. Both have given
exceptionally good service over a long period of time in the City of Victoria.
Victoria College
(John M. Ewing, B.A., D.Psd., Principal)
The session of 1950-51 opened with a registration of 317, which was substantially
below that of 1949-50. The causes of this reduction were not local, and a similar falling-
off of attendance was experienced in every institution of higher education in the country.
The faculty was at full strength throughout 1950-51, no member being on leave-of-
absence. This was a most satisfactory state of affairs and was reflected in a high level
of achievement on the part of students and faculty alike.
During 1950-51, a start was made on the construction of a new library-
administration building for the College. This building, provided by the Provincial
Government, will be available in the session of 1951-52, and will constitute a first-rate
addition to the academic resources of the College. It will also supply much needed staff
offices.
At the end of the session, the retirement of Jeffree A. Cunningham, Vice-Principal
and Professor of Biology, and of George P. Black, Associate Professor of Classics, made
staff changes necessary. The Council accepted the resignations of these eminent and
greatly respected teachers with the utmost reluctance. The College also lost the services
of Miss Kathleen Mathews, a most efficient Librarian.
The following appointments were made, to take effect in the session of 1951-52:
W. Harry Hickman, M.A.(Brit.CoL), Docteur de 1'Universite de Paris, Associate Professor of French, to be Vice-Principal; John Carson, M.A.(Oxon.), to be Assistant
Professor of Classics; Gwladys V. Downes, M.A.(Brit.CoL), to be Instructor in French;
and Douglas G. Lochhead, B.A.(McGill), M.A.(Tor.), B.L.S.(McGill), to be Librarian. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS K 57
Victoria High School
(H. L. Smith, M.A., Principal)
During the past year the standard of academic achievement at the Victoria High
School has been maintained. For the second successive year one of our students led the
Province in the University Entrance examination in 1950, and a group of excellent
candidates for scholarships are again competing for awards in the examinations now in
progress. During the past year also, former students from this school again achieved
distinction both at Victoria College and at the University of British Columbia in
Vancouver. Numerous other awards in Music, Art, Literature, and Athletics would
seem to be an indication that the function of the school to contribute to the harmonious
development of the student is also being performed effectively.
On June 1st and 2nd the Seventy-fifth Anniversary of the establishment of Victoria
High School was marked by appropriate ceremonies. These celebrations served as a
reminder of the debt we owe to our predecessors for the rich heritage, both material and
intangible, which we enjoy. It was peculiarly appropriate that the Victoria Gyro Club
Cinder Track should be officially declared open for the school and community use on the
occasion of the B.C. Track and Field Championship, held as a special feature of our
anniversary celebrations. The members of the local Gyro Club are to be commended
most heartily for this expression of interest in the welfare of the youth of this community.
Five of our teachers who are leaving the staff were honoured at a special function
at the completion of the school-year: Miss Mary Hamilton, Mr. W. E. Cook, Mr. Hubert
Cumberbirch, and Mr. W. A. Roper, all after many years of devoted service, and Mr. John
Parnall has resigned to accept a position on the staff of the University of British Columbia
as Associate Registrar and Instructor in Mathematics.
Oak Bay High School
(D. H. Hartness, B.A., Principal)
The enrolment remained practically unchanged through the year with 354 pupils
enrolled in September and 352 in June. This is a slight increase over last year's attendance and indicates that an upward trend in numbers may be expected in September.
The school continues to make ample provision for individual programmes through
the variety of courses offered and by the working out of individual time-tables for the
pupils. In spite of very free offerings our matriculation class continues large. Only a
very small group out of the Grade XII class of 87 has elected to follow a general
programme.
The system of prefects, plus a strong elected Students' Council, continues to fill the
needs of student participation in school government well. This year we have been particularly fortunate in our student leaders who have, in their work, shown a full realization
of their responsibilities and that they have the well-being of the school at heart.
Mount View High School
(J. M. Thomas, M.A., D.Paed., Principal)
Enrolment for the year 1950-51 was fairly constant. The opening of the S. J. Willis
Junior High School reduced enrolment in Grade IX by one class. A larger number than
usual left school in Grades X and XI to enter employment. The demand for commercial
help has been great.
A good standard of academic achievement was maintained both in the lower grades
and at University Entrance and Senior Matriculation levels.
There has been a wide range of activity in Music and Drama. Student groups took
part in the Musical and Drama Festivals and many intramural programmes provided.
The interest shown in these two departments is most encouraging and reflects upon the K 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
instructors in this field. The proposed alterations to the school auditorium would make
possible much greater progress at much less effort. The Folk-dancing group and the
Junior Vocal Ensemble won their contests in the Musical Festival.
Esquimalt High School
(Clive Kelly, B.A., Principal)
The school during this year was expanded from seven to eight divisions, the new
division increasing to two the number of Grade XI classes. An additional member was
added to the staff, making the total ten, including the Principal, but excluding Industrial
Arts and Home Economics teachers. The total enrolment was 225, being made up of
108 boys and 117 girls.
Besides offering a full programme of curricular subjects, including such options as
Commercial subjects, Music, Art, Drama, and Journalism, the school participated in
a well-rounded extra-curricular sports programme, including soccer, rugby, basketball,
softball, grass hockey, track, and baseball. Both interhouse and interschool leagues were
in operation.
During the past year, through the co-operation of the Kiwanis Club, of Victoria,
special speakers visited the school to give students first-hand information regarding the
various occupational fields. Each student in Grades XI and XII completed a job study in
one particular field.
Mount Douglas High School
(Eric Forster, B.A., B.Ed., Principal)
There were 125 students enrolled during the year, which was a slight increase over
the two previous seasons. For a small high school, the optional courses offered are
extensive. These include Art, Drama, Commercial subjects, Industrial Arts, Home Economics, and Latin. During the school-year 1951-52, it is proposed to extend this programme to include Music and Physics.
In the extra-curricular field, there is a wide variety of activities, including Girls' and
Boys' Hi-Y Clubs, Junior Red Cross, Dramatics, Drill Team, and Sports.
At this high school the Parent-Teacher Association is making an outstanding contribution. During the year, several meetings were devoted to the purely educational
aspect of the schools. The Parent-Teacher Association expounded so well that a bursary
fund of $2,000 to help needy students was established.
Central Junior High School
(A. T. Hunkin, B.Sc, M.A., Principal)
With the opening of the S. J. Willis Junior High School and the transfer to our
school of the Grade VII pupils from Sir James Douglas Elementary School, the area
served by the Central School has become defined. It does not seem that it will be
necessary in the future to maintain the enrolment by bringing in volunteer pupils from
comparatively great distances.
Again in the fall of 1950 the parents of our pupils met with the teachers in a combined meeting for the purpose of getting better acquainted and for explaining the part
of the junior high school in the new secondary-school curriculum. In the spring, another
parents' meeting was held, when advice was given by the staff as to the choice of suitable
courses for next year in the senior high schools.
As this is the last report I shall write as principal of Central Junior High School,
I wish to express my appreciation of the friendly relations that have always existed between
the members of the School Board and myself. My thanks are also due to Mr. J. F. K.
English, the Senior Municipal Inspector of Schools, for his valued help and encouragement.   Finally, I would like to pay tribute to a loyal, co-operative, and devoted school REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS K 59
staff by expressing my gratitude for the work they have done under difficult physical
conditions, often very disheartening when the weather has been inclement. The loyal
support of the whole staff, teachers, and other members, has been outstanding.
S. J. Willis Junior High School
(B. C. Gillie, B.A., B.Ed., Principal)
The first year of a new school is bound to be one of problems to solve and difficulties
to overcome. Certainly S. J. Willis was no exception to this general rule. Opening some
five weeks late on October 4th, we were confronted with a building still far from complete
and a severely reduced time schedule. However, the five weeks previous to this date had
been spent in laying as careful a foundation for our school as was humanly possible.
As a result of this planning, we feel that we have been able to make up much of the lost
time and to solve many of the difficulties inherent in a new school plant and organization.
Two general objectives for the student-body were set up, which we hope to establish
as a guiding principle of the school through the years to come. They are: (1) That the
students should learn to respect and appreciate the values and satisfactions of hard work
under sympathetic and careful guidance, (2) that they should at all times be expected
to maintain a high standard of discipline and general conduct. The standards for both
of these, set up this year by the staff, have been very high indeed, and have been achieved
to a degree surpassing our fondest expectations. It is hoped that a continuation of this
policy may be successful in making the school an important factor in the educational
pattern of the community.
Elementary Schools
(John Gough, M.A., Inspector of Schools)
The past year witnessed the introduction of a significant trend in the school organization of this district. This involved the transfer in September of pupils in Grades VII
and (or) VIII from five elementary schools to the Central and S. J. Willis Junior High
Schools. It permitted Cloverdale, Oaklands, Quadra, North Ward, and Sir James
Douglas Schools to concentrate on the curriculum for Grades I to VI and also created
more space for the expanding enrolment.
In spite of the adjustment noted, there was a large increase in pupil enrolment in
the elementary schools. The figure for October, 1950, showed that 8,423 children were
in attendance whereas the number one year earlier was 8,198.
The challenge of accommodating the extra pupils was met satisfactorily, although
on a temporary basis, by erecting a one-room annex on the grounds of Doncaster,
Monterey Avenue, and Willows Schools, and by developing classroom space at Cedar Hill,
Kingston Street, McKenzie Avenue, Margaret Jenkins, Tillicum, and Tolmie Schools.
Eleven additional teachers were required, bringing the total number to 241, apart from
those associated with Home Economics and Industrial Arts.
Kindergarten-Primary Department
(Miss Marian D. James, Director)
Throughout the year the Primary Department has carried on its regular programme.
Monthly meetings have been held to discuss problems and to present material intended
to improve the work in the schools.
Kindergarten and primary teachers assisted at the B.C. Parent-Teacher Association
Convention by arranging attractive classroom displays for " Know Your Schools." Miss
Amy Vye, of Quadra Street School, gave a good demonstration of the teaching of primary
reading at this convention.
The kindergartens continued to operate with full classes in each centre. During
the year the teachers of these classes assisted in producing an excellent inventory of the K 60 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
kindergarten materials in use in our schools. This inventory should provide a good
guide for future use in equipping new kindergartens as well as helping keep the present
equipment up to standard.
In March, 1951, the Delta Kappa Gamma—Educational Honour Society of the
United States of America—honoured Miss Marian D. James, Miss Eleanor Bell, and
the late Miss Muriel Anderson by inviting them to become members of the Upsilon
Chapter, Port Angeles, Wash.
I cannot close this report without mentioning the great loss the Primary Department
has suffered this year. Miss Muriel Anderson, who died after a long illness, was a
valued member of our staff and a friend to all of us.
Primary, Junior, Intermediate, and Senior Crafts Department
(Miss A. Verna Turner, M.A., Director)
Between fifteen and twenty pupils attended each of five Crafts classes. The age-
groups represented were: Primary, 7-9 years; Junior, 9-11 years; Intermediate, 10-14
years; and Senior, 13-17 years. In all four classes, handcrafts played an important
part in instruction, and the three " R's " were related to activities wherever possible.
Primary
Eighteen pupils attended the class during the term. Readjustment to school routine
and activities was achieved by adapting the regular course of the primary grades to
meet the needs of the children.
Junior
In this class of twenty boys, the basic programme included reading, language, spelling, writing, and arithmetic. Games, plays, and a store were important aids in the social
development of the boys. Handwork included a puppet show, a moving picture, oilcloth
stuffed toys, aprons, spool knitting, paper-cutting, painting, drawing and illustrating
lessons in science, and social studies.
Once a week the class went to South Park School for cooking instruction.
One boy was on the traffic patrol all year and another played on the school softball
team.    The class saw a number of films on Social Studies with the regular classes.
Intermediate
Twenty-four pupils attended this class from September to December, and twenty-
one were enrolled from January to June.
Individual cases were studied and attention given to problems presented. The age
levels were from ten to fourteen years and grade levels were from Grade I to Grade V
in reading and arithmetic. The basic programme stressed reading, language, spelling,
arithmetic, and writing. In social studies, science, and health, a course of interest to
the children was carried out. Weekly classes in woodwork were held at South Park
School for the boys and sewing taught to the girls by the class teacher.
Senior (Boys)
An average of twenty boys attended this class. Most of the regular school subjects
were taught, with the emphasis being placed on arithmetic, reading, spelling, and writing.
Many educational films were shown to illustrate science and social studies topics. An
attempt was made to link all subjects with the every-day life of the pupils.
Senior (Girls)
Eighteen girls were enrolled in all of the basic subjects. Emphasis was placed
on reading, arithmetic, language, spelling, and writing. Several films were shown and
school journeys arranged. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS K 61
Many types of handcrafts were taught, care being taken to choose those having
either a therapeutic value or an educational objective. Effort was made to correlate
the lessons in handcrafts with those in the basic subjects. Among the handwork
processes which were taught were various types of raffia work, including braided and
woven baskets, dolls, and animals. Other dolls and puppets employed the use of wax
and cloth, papier mache, wax-crayon stencil, and paper folding. A course in dress
design and clothes appreciation was taught, which expanded further to involve the making
and clothing of figures and the use of figures in composition.
Department of Physical Education
(George Grant, B.A., Director)
The year 1950-51 brought thirty-five new elementary and eight (out of nineteen)
new secondary teachers into the physical-education field. In addition to visits, the
elementary teachers were assisted by meetings in November dealing with special activities
for cold weather and some sample lessons of the same. Seventeen teachers (as well as
twenty-three Normal School students) took the complete night-school course in Sports
Education. This course, carrying Summer School of Education credits, consisted of
the techniques of coaching and officiating team sports and was given by men outstanding
in their fields—namely, Art Chapman (basketball), William H. Muncy (grass hockey),
Archie MacKinnon (volleyball), Jim Morrison (softball), Bruce Humber (track and
field), and the Director (soccer).
Revision of our district curriculum for Grades I-VIII did not materialize. However, the director was privileged to give considerable assistance to the Department of
Education in the completion of the tentative new Course of Studies in Physical Education
for Grades I-VI, and it is hoped that we may begin some sort of revision of this material
next year by our own committee.
The School Sports Associations carried on their usual busy schedule of activities.
Enthusiasm, sportsmanship, and calibre of play are of the highest order and a credit to
the coaches and sponsors.
The culminating activity in track and field was the Provincial Inter-high Meet held
on June 1st and 2nd on the new track at Victoria High. This, the third of its kind, was
the largest and most successful ever staged. Winner was Victoria High with King
Edward High, of Vancouver, second.
The Strathcona Trust Shield, awarded for the first time in 1949-50 to Oaklands
School, was won in 1950-51 by S. J. Willis Junior High.
An outstanding part of the entertainment for the C.E.A. Convention in October
was the talented performances put on by dance groups of Miss N. Ferguson, of Central
Junior High, and Miss S. Stanley, of Victoria High. The time and effort of both pupils
and teachers was much appreciated.
Child Study Department
(Miss A. Verna Turner, M.A., Director)
From October, 1950, to June, 1951, standardized survey tests were given in various
grades. There were tests in reading and vocabulary in Grades IV, V, VI, and IX.
There was a test in spelling in Grade IV and a test in work-study skills in Grade VIII.
There were tests in arithmetic computation and reasoning in Grades IV, VI, and VIII.
The reading test in Grade IX was used to help identify remedial reading cases who might
profit from the new course being offered next year in remedial English in Grade X.
Three tests were administered for the Provincial Department of Education, Division
of Tests, Standards, and Research. Two of these were arithmetic tests in Grades V and
VI. The third was a comprehensive examination given to all candidates for junior
matriculation. K 62 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
Scholastic aptitude surveys were made in Grades I, IV, VIII, XI, XII, and XIII.
A great many individual psychometric examinations were administered in order to
distinguish remedial reading cases from candidates for Crafts classes.
The achievement tests above Grade V were part of the regular " spring testing
programme " in the basic skills, the major objective of which continues to be the identification of remedial cases in time to help them.
Apart from the achievement tests used by the Child Study Department, there were
tests in reading and arithmetic which were supplied by the Child Study Department to
principals and teachers. These tests were used as teaching aids to diagnose weaknesses
and to improve instruction.
Audio-Visual Department
(Denis W. Brown, B.A., Director)
A. Projected Aids
1. Films.—In 1948 there were nine motion picture projectors, four of which were
on circuit between schools. By September, 1951, there will be thirty-six in use. The
demand for 16-mm. films has naturally been heavy. As always, the Division of Visual
Education, under its Director, Mr. J. R. Pollock, has been most co-operative and, consistent with Provincial demands, has endeavoured to help meet the needs of the Greater
Victoria area.
All projectors are serviced annually and are carefully and consistently checked for
efficient operation by school co-ordinators. Minor defects are immediately remedied,
thereby cutting maintenance costs.
2. Opaque Projectors.—The value of the epidiascope for use with flat pictures,
music, graphs, text material, essays, and maps has been recognized by a large number
of teachers. The ease with which outlines, art work, and decorative materials can be
traced has improved blackboard presentations and materially lessened the time required
for work on new projects. The three opaques now circuited have been in demand at
schools every day of the term.
3. Film-strips.—Although the majority of schools now have purchased or own strip
projectors, the three loan machines are in constant demand. Fifty-five free film-strips
were obtained and distributed to schools for their permanent use, and the local chapter
of the I.O.D.E. has offered to provide the nucleus of a film-strip library to the Greater
Victoria system. In addition, this organization has presented to our schools a very fine
16-mm. sound film, " The House of Windsor."
4. Radio Programmes.—The calendar of school broadcasts and the radio bulletins
are sent to all schools early in September. From a survey made each June, it has been
found that the elementary grades make effective use of the music, art, and social studies
programmes. Mr. Kitley, Director of School Broadcasts, has made several trips and
interviewed many teachers to determine the requirements of our schools in this field.
B. Non-projected Aids
These will not be covered in detail, but include maps, bulletin-board materials,
school journeys, flat pictures, models, and free materials.
To summarize a few highlights on the non-projected aids, the following facts may
be of interest: Free materials obtained and distributed, including booklets, charts, etc.—
over 14,000 pieces; models loaned—averaged five per week for two-week loan periods;
flat pictures loaned—averaged eight per day for two-week loan periods; school journeys—
6,639 pupils transported. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS K 63
School Dental Health Services
(Dr. Hugh Clarke, D.D.S., Director)
During the past year, certain changes were made in the School Dental Health
Programme, and to implement them Dr. David Parfitt and his dental assistant, Miss
Katherine Fatt, were taken on the staff on a full-time basis. This was made necessary
by the ever-increasing school population, which has now passed the 11,500 mark in
the school district.
The School Dental Health Programme is based on the prevention and control of
dental diseases, rather than the treatment of such conditions after they have developed.
This year the department has stepped up its educational programme, and all operating
time is now used on the younger age-groups (the Kindergarten and Grade I classes and
pre-school children), where the most good can be done for the greatest number.
The following is a summary of the work of the Dental Department during the past
year:—
Dental examinations made   15,043
Fillings of all kinds     2,170
Teeth extracted        242
Miscellaneous treatments _        711
Prophylaxis (teeth cleaned)  i~       575
Parents interviewed        957
Speech Therapy Department
(Miss Marie C. Crickmay, L.C.S.T., Director)
During the school-year 1950-51, approximately 300 children with speech difficulties, ranging from minor articulatory defects to severe cases of stammering, have been
examined. Of these, eighty-five have received treatment, either at the Speech Clinic or
at their schools if these were in the outlying districts of Greater Victoria, while many of
the remainder have been helped by their parents and teachers under supervision. Of
the eighty-five who have received direct treatment, fifty-seven are now speaking normally
and the remainder all show a marked improvement.
It is interesting to note that during the ten years that speech therapy has been in
existence in the schools of Greater Victoria, the age of the children suffering from speech
difficulties has steadily declined. At first, speech defectives were to be found in all
grades of the elementary schools and up to Grade XII in the high schools. During
recent years, however, few cases have been found in the high schools.
Mental Health Department
(Miss Edna Lawrence, Director)
The following is a summary of the activities of the Mental Health Co-ordinator in
the Greater Victoria Schools for the year ended June, 1951:—
Group conferences with Family Welfare and Children's Service,
Health Units, School Personnel, and Child Guidance
Clinic      45
Individual consultations with Family Welfare and Children's
Service, Health Units, Supervisors, Juvenile Officers, City
and Provincial Welfare, and Child Guidance Clinic  261
Visits to schools  296
Teacher interviews regarding mental health problems in the
classroom, information for Child Guidance Clinic, Family
Welfare and Children's Service, and City Welfare  181 K 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Home-visits—
Parent interviews  107
Replacement in Craft classes     64
  171
Student interviews     36
Talks and discussions with P.-T.A. Study Groups and Professional and Service Clubs     41
Films       4
Music Department
(H. J. Bigsby, B.A.(Mus.Ed.), Acting Director)
Early in the school-year the Music Department contributed certain items for a
display of entertainment for The Canadian Education Association Convention, which
was held in this city. The programme was well received and was presented again before
the Board of School Trustees Convention the following week. A music committee of
teachers from this district was again in charge of the music section of the Fall Convention
of Island Teachers and presented a very successful programme of demonstrations, discussions, and exhibits. A highly successful programme of Christmas music was presented on a Parent-Teacher Radio Programme by means of records which were recorded
in the classrooms and then replayed on the air. The Music Department also co-operated
with the P.-T.A. by setting up a music display for the educational exhibit held during
their convention.
The classroom work this past year was encouraging. The teachers of the elementary
grades were more conscious of the remedial work necessary for young out-of-tuners.-
Real interest and activity was noticed in the primary teachers' work in the rhythmic
activities of those grades, and the listening programme showed increased expansion.
Home Economics Department
(Miss Beth T. Ramsay, M.A., Director)
The number of students taking Home Economics this year has remained about the
same as last year, approximately 1,350, with thirteen full-time teachers.
In addition, two Crafts classes have been given work in the clothing and food areas.
The Home Economics teachers have also helped with projects sponsored by the
P.-T.A.—a radio programme and a display for the Provincial P.-T.A. Convention in
March. Some of the teachers have participated in the revision of the Home Economics
at the Victoria Summer School to help compile suggestions for these new courses. In
view of this revision, some new text-books have been authorized for use in the classes,
and I feel this will be of much benefit.
Industrial Arts and Vocational Training
(John S. White, Director)
For the school-year 1950-51 the following report is submitted:—
Vocational-Technical Unit
1. Advisory Committees.—From February to June, thirty-five evening meetings
have been held with members of the various advisory committees on technical education,
to lay out courses of instruction for both pre-employment and apprenticeship training.
A great deal of credit is due these committeemen, as they have served faithfully and
without reward for the betterment of technical training. In addition, they have helped
with placement of the graduating student from day-school into trades.    At the present REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS K 65
time the demand for technical graduates for apprenticeship exceeds the number available.
From these meetings have emerged recommendations to the Department of Education
and Department of Labour on the Apprenticeship Act to meet the present-day conditions
in British Columbia, for the purpose of laying down proper training courses at night-
school for apprentices in these trades.
2. Repair Work.—With the facilities of this unit at hand a good deal of repair-
work has been carried out by both students and instructors on various kinds of electrical
and machine equipment for the Industrial Arts shops in the Greater Victoria area. This
is only carried out on jobs which contribute to the educational growth of the student.
3. New Equipment.—Lathe stands, engine hoists, bin carriers, tank stands, etc.,
were constructed for the school by shop instructors taking a course in oxy-acetylene and
arc welding.    This provided needed equipment and gave the men the training required.
Five drill-presses and three wet grinders (with motors) were built by students for
use in the various Industrial Arts shops in the Greater Victoria area. This was possible
because of the able manner in which Mr. Gibson, our machine-shop instructor, has
fostered and built up the aluminium foundry. Old automobile pistons, engine-heads,
etc., are given to the school for this purpose by the business firms in Victoria, even
though they can sell them for 8 cents a pound. This speaks well of the interest and
attitude that these men have for our educational system.
Evening Classes
(George Anstey, Director)
In preparing the following report—my last, unavoidably—my thirty-eight years'
association with the night-schools of Victoria and district has been uppermost in my
thoughts. During the last thirteen years, I have had the privilege of directing these
activities for the School Board.
The enrolment has increased from 300 in 1913-14 to over 1,500, and from
fourteen courses, mostly of an academic type, to fifty-three courses, none of which are
strictly academic.
Increasing interest is being taken in Vocational Courses, due largely to the activities
of Mr. J. S. White. During the past season, he has been in touch with industrial firms
and trade committees to a greater extent than was possible in former years. It was due
to his influence that two new Vocational Courses were opened in January.
The staff of sixty instructors gave good co-operation and support and, on the
whole, was very satisfactory. All were experts in their subjects. The interest most
instructors took in their students enabled them to give complete satisfaction to the class,
although most of them are not trained teachers. Upon the closing night a good many
students expressed to me the pleasure and profit they had derived from the year's study.
In several cases, this was shown in a tangible form, either by a gift to the instructor or
a closing banquet.
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)
REPORT OF ROY S. SHIELDS, B.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The school-year 1950-51 marked pleasing and progressive efficiency in the school
system of New Westminster. All departments—academic, technical, maintenance, etc.—
functioned smoothly and effectively throughout the year.   Enrolment of pupils showed K 66 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
a normal increase, making the total number 4,300, with a staff of 143 teachers. Each
year we are pleased to record a lightening of teacher-load, especially in the elementary
schools.
As mentioned in a former Report, it is gratifying to realize the broad field of
scholastic development possible within our system at such a comparatively low material
cost. Elementary, junior high, senior academic high (including senior matriculation),
senior technical academic high (including provision for apprenticeship training), and
an ever-growing night-school offer a wide range of important subjects.
It is a pleasure to report the successes of the new junior high school and to express
appreciation to all responsible for its existence, and to Mr. R. W. Adams and his staff
of enthusiastic and capable teachers who, with a purposeful insight into pupil capacities,
interests, and habits, are building such a keen pupil citizenship around present-day
problems, activities, and opportunities. We are pleased at the growing number of
interested parents and others who visit the school daily.
The Board of School Trustees has had under consideration for some time the
building of a new senior composite vocational high school near to the junior high school
—a building capable of enrolling 1,000 pupils. Plans have been drawn and everything
is in readiness for the placing of the necessary by-law when opportune. The needs of the
elementary schools are not forgotten. This year a much needed addition to Lord Kelvin
School has been built at a cost of $30,000, providing a lunchroom with all facilities, a
primary classroom, and a medical-room.
General school maintenance of all schools is reaching a high standard and adds
greatly to the administrative success.
Tests were given in all schools under the direction of Dr. C. B. Conway, and the
results were creditable.
It is interesting to note the continuing success of the elementary-school pool library,
under the direction of Miss Hilda Smith. Its success has invited numerous inquiries
from other school districts.
The Medical Department operating from the Simon Fraser Health Unit, with Dr.
Wylde, Nurses Miss Bews, Miss Engelstad, Miss Radford, and Miss Johnson in charge,
has more than fulfilled its expectations.
The Dental Department, with Dr. Oldfield, and Dental Nurse Mrs. Buckham, has
made a definite contribution toward the health and happiness of our pupils. When the
per capita cost is considered, the operation of these departments justify themselves from
a financial standpoint alone. The preventive work is outstanding, and lectures given and
whole-hearted interest shown in pupil development is keenly appreciated. One cannot
pass lightly over the over-all value of these departments. We realize that the health,
mental and physical, of growing children is the nation's greatest asset, but at times we
may be prone to count material costs rather than anticipating the dividends of pupil well-
being.
Congratulations are due to members of our staff who have been chosen to work
in higher fields of learning—Dr. Campbell Gilmour, Dr. Lorne McAdam, Dr. John
Wilson, and Mr. J. G. Kirk; we wish them well.
Special days during the year were suitably commemorated—the eightieth anniversary
of May Day, celebration at the International Peace Arch, etc.
Mr. W. T. Plaxton, principal of Sir Richard McBride School, and Mr. E. H. Lock,
chairman of the English Department of Duke of Connaught High School, were granted
superannuation. For over forty-five years and thirty-five years respectively these men
have given of their best to the educational needs of this community. Their efforts have
been keenly appreciated by the School Boards and pupils, and they take with them the
best wishes of those with whom they have been associated. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS K 67
I wish to pay tribute to the Parent-Teacher Associations of this city. These groups
have worked diligently in the interests of our schools and have given valuable assistance
to every worth-while project which would make the school-life of the pupils better and
brighter. We owe, also, a debt of gratitude to many organizations who, among other
interests, have donated scholarships to deserving students.
No report on the activities of our schools would be complete without an expression
of appreciation to the members of the Board of School Trustees—Mrs. H. Culter (chairman), Mrs. P. Amy, Mrs. I. G. MacFarlane, Mr. B. M. Bowell, Mr. A. Christie, Mr.
A. W. E. Mercer, and Dr. W. A. Robertson—their officials, and to the Department of
Education for the kindly sympathetic attention to educational necessities and to the staff
of principals and teachers who have worked so efficiently and unselfishly this past year.
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)
REPORT OF C. G. BROWN, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The enrolment in Burnaby continues to expand by approximately 1,000 additional
pupils a year. The present year's enrolment was 8,624, divided as follows: Elementary
school, 5,524; junior high school, 2,084; and senior high school, 1,016. These pupils
were distributed over the various grades in the following order: Grade I, 1,078; Grade
11,1,051; Grade III, 986; Grade IV, 893; Grade V, 796; Grade VI, 720; Grade VII,
731; Grade VIII, 687; Grade IX, 567; Grade X, 460; Grade XI, 282; Grade XII,
235; and Grade XIII, 39.   The instructional staff was composed of 271 teachers.
The completion of a number of new schools enabled the Board to accommodate the
school population without resorting to a double-shift system, except in one or two
instances. Thirty-two new classrooms were put into use during the year, and eighteen
additional rooms are under construction. In December a third School Building By-law
was approved by the electors, and this will involve the construction of sixty-seven instructional rooms, three gymnasium-auditoriums, and four Physical Education rooms. On
May 11th the Honourable W. T. Straith, K.C., B.A., LL.B., Minister of Education, officiated at the opening of the following new schools: Alpha Junior High School, Douglas
Road addition, Second Street addition, Windsor Street primary annex, Marlborough
annex, and Lochdale primary annex. The new by-law will provide schools especially for
the new subdivisions.
The following new areas have developed entire new communities within Burnaby
in the last two or three years:—
Westridge, composed of 475 new homes with 100 additional under development.
Cascade Heights, composed of 339 homes with 40 additional to be constructed.
Suncrest, composed of 312 homes with 100 additional ones planned.
Crescent View, 152 homes under development.
These examples are typical of other large housing developments throughout our
municipality. For a number of years yet the Board will be faced with a serious school-
building programme.
The Metropolitan Health Committee, Unit 5, continues to administer the school
health services. The personnel of the health unit now includes one medical health
officer, one public health nursing supervisor, nine public health nurses, and two sanitarians.
Additional health services are rendered by two dental clinics, a mental-hygiene clinic,
and an eye clinic. During the year, audiometer tests were given to screen out students
with defective hearing.    The services of a nutritionist are contributing to the better K 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
dealing with the food problems of the children. In October, 1,713 students were X-rayed
by the T.B. mobile X-ray unit. An active immunization programme was also carried
out during the year. Through this programme, 6,854 pupils, or 81 per cent of the school
population, were immunized against diphtheria; 6,907, or 82 per cent, received smallpox
vaccination; and 740 pre-school children were immunized against whooping-cough and
diphtheria. In addition to the active school health services, the nurses conduct eight
child-health centres for pre-school children, and very essential services are given to these
future school pupils.
A very extensive programme is being carried out by the School Board to renovate
the older buildings and to improve the school-grounds. The lighting, plumbing, and
redecoration of many of the old buildings have done much to make them serviceable for
a number of years yet. Increased play areas are being brought into use, and considerable
expansion of school lunchrooms is being put into operation. The Board has also made a
survey for future school-sites.
Very amicable relationships exist between the Board and its teaching staff, and
between the administrative staff and the instructional staff. Such relationships are
conducive to a good teaching morale and a good professional attitude.
An active in-service programme was conducted by the primary and intermediate
supervisors, and a successful night-school session was conducted under the direction of
Mr. F. H. Pratt, Director.
During the course of the year there were many occasions when the advice and
assistance of the Department of Education was called upon, and at all times the Board
and its administrative officers received the utmost of courtesy and guidance from the
members of the Department. For these many considerations, I wish to record by sincere
appreciation.
School Districts No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)
REPORT OF WILLIAM GRAY, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
During the year 1950-51, in this inspectorate, a total of 6,578 children attended
school, and 207 teachers were employed to instruct them. Of this number of teachers, 142
taught in North Vancouver and 65 in West Vancouver. The increase in number of
pupils over the preceding year amounted to slightly over 9 per cent. This increase
required additional classrooms, so that much of the work of the two School Boards was
concerned with the provision of new school buildings. Over the past four years the
annual increase in enrolment in each of the school districts has been relatively high,
averaging approximately 10 per cent. As neither district has available vacant classrooms,
each Board must plan for more schools for some years to come.
North Vancouver
Over the past five years the Board of School District No. 44 has added forty-six
classrooms, in the form of new buildings or additions to existing buildings, in order to
provide accommodation for the increased number of children attending school. These
classrooms have been constructed at an average cost of approximately $14,000 each,
exclusive of cost of site and equipment. This is the more remarkable when it is pointed
out that the funds have been provided by the two Municipal Councils and the Provincial
Government without borrowing by local by-law. The School Board and the respective
Councils have agreed to continue this policy so long as it is possible to do so. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS K 69
The junior high-school system was begun in North Vancouver in 1937, but the two
small junior high schools were superimposed on two elementary schools. In September,
1950, however, a forward step was taken with the opening of Sutherland Junior High
School. At present only Grades VIII and IX are accommodated, but as more rooms
are added, all three junior-high grades will be housed in this school or one similar to it.
North Vancouver High School will now enrol only students in Grades X to XIII.
In December last a six-room elementary school, the Highlands, was officially
opened, providing for children of Grades I to VI in the western area of the district.
The building programme for the current year included Norgate School, a four-room
elementary school in the southern Capilano area, a two-room addition to Keith Lynn
Elementary School, and an addition to Sutherland Junior High School to include, as well
as classrooms, complete Home Economics and Industrial Arts Departments.
Steps have also been taken in the present year to plan for further additions for the
following school-year, but whether such plans will be carried to completion will depend
largely on availability of financial assistance from the Government.
The pool library which was begun some three years ago will be expanded, and it
is hoped that out of it will develop information valuable to schools generally. Assistance
is being received from the Public Library Commission, the members of which are
interested in the experiment.
Night-school classes were again carried on in conjunction with the Community
Centre programme and were well attended.   These classes are now very well established.
One teacher, Miss Agnes Hamilton, after marry years of valuable service to the
district, retired on superannuation.
West Vancouver
With the opening of school in September, additional classrooms were available in
Pauline Johnson Elementary School. These, with the new large activity-room, resulted
in a much improved school.   During the year a room was added to Ridgeview School.
Under construction on a site adjacent to the present high school is a new senior
high school. The building presently used as a junior-senior high school will become
a junior high school. Both schools will make use of the Practical Arts Building and the
large playing-field lying between the two buildings. Thus all secondary education for the
entire school district will be carried on in these two schools.
The policy with regard to elementary schools is to place schools throughout the
district so as to reduce or eliminate as far as possible the need for transportation.
Unfortunately plans for constructing a new elementary school at West Bay have been
delayed for a time. For the coming year temporary quarters will be used for the
increased number of pupils.
General
Health services for all the schools in District Nos. 44 and 45 are supplied by the
North Shore Health Unit. During the year seven nurses were employed, and they, with
the unit director, carried out health examinations.
Mental-health clinics were held twice monthly this year and were helpful to parents,
teachers, and nurses in dealing with children's problems.
Dental clinics are established in each district, one dentist being employed full time in
North Vancouver and one part time in West Vancouver.
The teaching staff each year increases in number, and much of the supervision must
rest with the principals of the various schools. The teachers, generally, give excellent
service and appear genuinely interested in the welfare of the pupils.
Thanks are expressed for assistance in my work received from officials of the
Department of Education and from members and officials of the Boards of School
Trustees. K 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
School District No. 36 (Surrey)
REPORT OF K. B. WOODWARD, B.A., B.Pjed., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
In School District No. 36 the period of rapid growth seems to have ceased. In June,
1951, the enrolment stood at 6,055, an increase of 330 only over that of the preceding
year.
In December the new Princess Margaret Junior-Senior High School was officially
opened by the Honourable W. T. Straith, assisted by Dr. F. T. Fairey. A new four-room
school was opened at Johnston Road, and an addition of one room was built by the
Surrey maintenance crew at Tynehead. This addition was in the nature of an experiment,
and it was found that by using their own staff the Board could build a modern classroom
at a cost much below the going rate. The Board now has two additions of two rooms
each under construction to be built by their own crew out of current revenue. It is
expected that when completed they will do away with the necessity for double shifts at
the Grosvenor Road and Fleetwood Schools.
During the year there were thirty-three elementary schools and five junior-senior
high schools in operation. Because of the lack of room in the high schools, it was
necessary to enrol Grade VII classes in the Crescent Park, Latimer Road, Ray Shepherd,
and Sunnyside Elementary Schools. There were eight classes on double shift when
school ended in June.
Schools have now been built to serve all districts of Surrey, so that no elementary
children have far to go. The need now seems to be for larger schools rather than more,
and a few additions such as now are being built at Grosvenor Road and Fleetwood will,
I believe, take care of the increase for some time to come.
The opening of the Princess Margaret Junior-Senior High School helped the
transportation problem somewhat. Queen Elizabeth now is a purely local school. It is
filled by pupils within a 3-mile radius and no longer requires buses. But the bus
problem is still acute, and in spite of staggered hours at some of the schools more buses
are needed to carry the loads.
In conclusion, I would like to express my appreciation for the co-operation and help
which I have received during the year from the Department of Education, from the
teaching staff of Surrey, and from the Surrey School Board. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 71
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
School Districts No. 62 (Sooke), No. 63 (Saanich), and No. 64 (Saltspring)
REPORT OF J. E. BROWN, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Pupil enrolment in all three Districts is increasing at a normal rate, making the need
for additional school accommodation one of the Boards' chief problems.
School District No. 62 (Sooke)
This district extends from the suburban areas of Langford and Colwood to the rural
industrial regions of Port Renfrew, Bear Creek, and Harris Creek. The district includes
twelve elementary schools with twenty-nine teachers, and two junior-senior high schools
with sixteen staff members. At present a by-law is being prepared to provide new
elementary buildings at Bear Creek, Harris Creek, and Saseenos, and additions to schools
in the rapidly-growing centres of Langford and Sooke. The by-law will also provide for
substantial additions to the Belmont and Milnes Landing High Schools. The need for
more practical courses in the Milnes Landing Junior-Senior High School will receive due
consideration.
School District No. 63 (Saanich)
Progress is being made toward the implementation of the by-law which was passed
last year, and which provides for new schools at Sidney, Brentwood, Royal Oak, and
Lochside, an auditorium-gymnasium at Mount Newton High School, and additions to a
number of older schools. It is anticipated that some of these projects will have been
completed when school reopens in September. At the present time the district has eleven
elementary schools with thirty-two teachers and two junior-senior high schools with
twenty-four teachers. Transportation of high-school pupils will continue to be a costly
and irritating problem until projected high-school facilities have been completed.
School District No. 64 (Saltspring)
This district consists of Saltspring Island, with its consolidated elementary-high
school, and several other smaller Gulf Islands, each with one or more elementary schools.
New school-houses have recently been constructed on Saturna and Mayne Islands.
A by-law passed last April provides for additional rooms and facilities to the Ganges
School, a new building at South Galiano, and the improvement and modernization of a
number of smaller elementary schools. The providing of secondary-education facilities
in the more remote areas continues to be a problem in this district. There is a growing
demand that Grades VII to IX pupils be retained in some of the larger elementary schools.
The policy of having children live away from home to attend high school has not proven
very popular, and is not always easy to achieve. The Board hopes to add Commercial
Courses and perhaps Practical Agriculture Courses to the high-school programme. At
present the district has eight elementary schools with ten teachers and an elementary-high
school with twelve teachers. The Saanich Health Unit has recently extended its services
to include this district.
Adjusting the educational programme to individual needs and abilities is an ever-
present problem, nor is it confined entirely to high-school pupils. There are a number
of retarded children for which specialized training should be provided in some of our
elementary schools. The problem is to bring these children together in one centre and
to secure a competent teacher with specialized training and equipment.   This matter will K 72
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
receive serious consideration during the coming year. Consideration will also be given
to adding courses in Practical Agriculture in a number of high schools. During the year
cordial personal relations have prevailed throughout this inspectorate.
School Districts No. 38 (Richmond) and No. 73 (Alert Bay), Unattached School
District at University Hill, and Provincial School for the Deaf and the Blind
REPORT OF J. N. BURNETT, E.D., M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School Organization
Schools
Teachers
District
High
Jr.-Sr.
High
E!em.-
High
Superior
Elem.
(Graded)
Elem.
Ungraded
High and
Jr. High
Elem.
and Sup.
Special
No. 38 (Richmond)
No. 73 (Alert Bay)..
Unattached—
University Hill
Provincial School
for the Deaf
and the Blind	
1
1
1
2
6
2
8
30
2
6
74
17
6
20
Totals
1
2
2       |         6
I
10
38
97
20
Totals:   Schools, 29; teachers, 155.
School District No. 38 (Richmond)
The school population continued to increase this past year, and all schools were
taxed to capacity. In addition to the regular classrooms, two rooms were improvised on
the ground-floor basement of the Mitchell School, and the small outside gymnasium at
Bridgeport was also altered to provide two classrooms. All Grade VII classes and
approximately two-fifths of the Grade VIII students were retained in the elementary
schools to relieve the congestion in the junior-senior high school.
The question of reconstruction of the Bridgeport School was given attention. This
is a very old structure in poor condition. It has been surveyed by the Department Building Committee, and the Board has been given approval to carry out its reconstruction.
During the school-year the R.C.A.F. carried out a new housing programme at the
Sea Island air-base. It was anticipated that this will necessitate another two additional
rooms to house the pupils from this source in September, 1951. To ease the situation,
the Department of National Defence has agreed to turn over to the school district one
wing of a station building which lends itself without excessive alteration to use as a
four-room school unit. This will function in September as a primary unit for the Grade II
and III pupils of Sea Island.
The by-law to provide funds for a new junior-senior high school, which was defeated
early in 1950, was resubmitted and received the assent of the ratepayers. It is hoped
that the plans and specifications will be completed and approved at an early date so that
actual construction may begin by the end of the summer.
School District No. 73 (Alert Bay)
The increase in logging activity necessitated the opening of a new school at Anutz
Lake this year. At Port McNeill, because of lack of classroom space, the senior class
continues to be housed in extremely poor quarters.   A by-law to provide for new schools REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 73
at Alert Bay and Port McNeill and also needed teacherages in some localities was
successful on its third presentation to the ratepayers. However, little progress has been
made toward completion of the building programme because of the unsatisfactory
condition of the bond market at the present time.
In November the basement of the Alert Bay School was badly damaged by fire and
the heating system destroyed. With minor repairs and individual heating units in each
classroom, the classes were carried on without serious loss of school time. During the
spring the necessary reconstruction was effected. The teachers concerned deserve
commendation for their perseverance and patience in carrying on their teaching duties
under these trying conditions.
University Hill
The regular school accommodation plus the use of a converted army hut at Acadia
Camp provided for the slow increase in school population this year. It is expected that
the annex will be moved this summer to the school-grounds.
Work has started on the clearing of a new subdivision in this area, and it is
anticipated that it will be opened to the public within the next two years. This will mean
provision of enlarged school facilities for the future, probably 1954.
General
The dental clinic established in the Richmond District in the school-year 1949-50
has proved a great boon in so far as the dental health of the children is concerned.
Treatment has been completed in Grades I, II, III, and in the greater part of Grade IV
in the short time the service has been available. Dr. A. M. Menzies, Richmond Medical
Health Officer, in his annual report states as follows: " As stated in Dr. Deverall's
remarks, there has been a marked improvement in the dental health of Richmond schoolchildren, and she is to be congratulated in accomplishing so much in such a short period
of time."
The teacher-supply continues to be good, with the exception of the specialist instructors.   No difficulty was experienced in staffing schools this past year.
The usual sympathetic co-operation was received from the Deputy Minister and his
Department officials throughout the year, and is herewith acknowledged. Appreciation
is also extended to all teachers and School Boards and their officials for their work in the
interests of the children.
School Districts No. 69 (Qualicum) and No. 70 (Alberni), and Unattached School
Districts at Bamfield, Esperanza, Kildonan, Kyuquot, Sarita River, Sydney
Inlet, Tahsis River, Tofino, Ucluelet, and Zeballos.
REPORT OF C. L. CAMPBELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
In this inspectorate there were employed 142 teachers teaching in thirty-six schools.
The largest school was a senior-junior high school with a staff of thirty-five, while the
smallest was a one-teacher school enrolling eight pupils.
School District No. 69 (Qualicum)
The big event of the year in this district was the passing, on the third attempt, of a
school by-law to provide a new senior high school and a new junior high school. Overcrowding became so acute this year that eight classes had to be put on a shift system,
and it seems likely that this undesirable situation will continue until the new schools are
constructed. K 74 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
A new and attractive two-room school was opened at Nanoose during the year,
and a large number of children in this district are benefiting by being taught in their own
district. This eliminates for them a long and tiresome bus trip to Parksville and
Errington.
School District No. 70 (Alberni)
New school construction was key-noted this year in the Alberni Valley. A
splendid eight-room elementary school was opened in September at Gill, and about
mid-term the addition to the Alberni Elementary School was occupied. All eyes have
been on the rapid progress being made on the new $900,000 senior-junior high school.
It is almost certain that this building will be ready for occupancy in September, 1951,
thus freeing the high-school children of the district from the old army huts in which they
have been struggling for the last five years.
Unattached Districts
These schools are scattered along 150 miles of Vancouver Island's west coast.
While several of them have grown to three- and four-teacher schools, the majority are
still ungraded one-room schools and, in a number of cases, mail is only received at
eight-day intervals.   Under such circumstances it is difficult to obtain and keep teachers.
A modern and attractive three-room school was opened in September at Ucluelet,
but by June it was badly overcrowded, and plans are in hand to add an additional room.
School Districts No. 37 (Delta), No. 47 (Powell River), and No. 74 (Quatsino)
REPORT OF T. G. CARTER, M.C., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Delta
During the year a new two-room school was opened at Sunbury and a two-room
addition to the Boundary Bay School completed.
The problem of insufficient accommodation in the North Delta area, however,
remained acute, necessitating the use of considerable temporary space and the continuation of an arrangement with Surrey for a mutual interchange of pupils living along the
border between the two municipalities. The severe overcrowding in the Delta Junior-
Senior High School was met through provision of temporary classrooms in the basement
of the near-by Ladner Elementary School.
Throughout the year the School Board has been much concerned over the delay
in solving the school needs of the district, and a by-law has been planned for presentation
to the ratepayers next term. This by-law, it is anticipated, will supply reasonably
adequate facilities for the steadily increasing school population.
Powell River
This year saw the completion of the million-dollar construction programme approved
in June, 1948, thus bringing within reach the avowed goal of the School Board to provide
modern buildings with ample equipment and, in so far as is possible, equal educational
opportunity for all the children of the district. Owing to the limitations imposed by the
first by-law, much still remains to be done, and a second by-law has been prepared for
the ratification of the ratepayers in the early fall. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 75
QUATS1NO
Local problems have delayed a proposed by-law covering the urgently needed new
schools planned for Port Alice and Port Hardy. All difficulties have finally been surmounted, and it is anticipated that this by-law will be passed immediately after the
reopening of school in September.
Generally, the year has been one of steady progress throughout my inspectorate.
Teaching staffs have been strengthened and working conditions improved. Several
teacherages have been built, thus assuring suitable living-quarters where such have not
heretofore existed.
In conclusion, I wish again to express my appreciation to the various School Boards
and secretary-treasurers with whom I have been associated. These have continued their
loyal and enthusiastic co-operation in the discharge of the responsibilities delegated
to them.
School Districts No. 42 (Maple Ridge) and No. 75 (Mission)
REPORT OF J. CHELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This is a new inspectorate made up of District No. 42 (Maple Ridge), formerly
inspected from the New Westminster office by Mr. C. J. Frederickson, and District No. 75
(Mission), previously inspected from Abbotsford office by Mr. B. Thorsteinsson. It is
a privilege to follow these men in office.
School District No. 42 (Maple Ridge)
This rapidly growing district is severely handicapped by the lack of buildings. The
Board of School Trustees has given much thought to this and submitted a by-law in
June, 1951. This by-law received the approval of the ratepayers, and it is hoped that
construction will not be too long delayed, as many classrooms are very overcrowded.
A successful in-service class for teachers was conducted. Eighteen teachers took
advantage of the opportunity to further their professional training, and there was much
evidence of the value of the course in the classrooms of the district.
Principals met regularly, and while the discussion was informal, the exchange of
ideas and the formulation of policy on many routine matters has been helpful.
In September, 1950, a one-room school was opened at the head of Pitt Lake.
The enrolment at present is small, but the school serves the needs of the community.
School District No. 75 (Mission)
On November 13th, 1950, a new one-room school was officially opened at Hatzic
Prairie by Mr. H. S. Hum, representing the Department of Education. This building
replaces one lost in the disastrous Fraser River flood of 1948. On January 10th, 1951,
a new four-room school was formally opened by the Minister of Education, the
Honourable W. T. Straith. This school, named Edwin S. Richards Elementary School,
is already filled to capacity. In June, 1951, the contract was placed for the new junior-
senior high school in Mission. This building is urgently needed; the only regret is that
the period of rising prices has forced the Board to cut off some of the space originally
intended.
There is an expanding night-school programme in operation. k 76 public schools report, 1950-51
General Remarks
Health service in this inspectorate is provided by the North Fraser Valley Health
Unit. Arrangements have been completed to augment this work with a full-time dentist
serving the two districts.
Teacher-supply has been adequate, though some specialist categories are hard to fill.
Related activities have been organized and well received. It is pleasing to note the
growing interest in Junior Red Cross, drama, music, and athletics. The graduation
exercises in both districts were truly grand affairs and reflect highly on the schools
concerned.
It is a pleasure and a privilege to acknowledge the unselfish and conscientious
contribution of trustees, and to express appreciation to them and the secretary-treasurers
for the friendly and co-operative relationships of the past year.
School Districts No. 12 (Grand Forks), No. 13 (Kettle Valley), and No. 14
(Southern Okanagan)
REPORT OF C. E. CLAY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This school-year saw a change in the districts included in this inspectorate. School
District No. 9 (Castlegar) was transferred to a new inspectorate, under Mr. J. McKenzie,
while School District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan) was added to my territory. The
change has given me an opportunity to spend more time in the schools.
During the year a concerted effort to improve the reading at all levels has been
carried out. Grades III to XII were tested in all the large schools. A complete diagnostic
and remedial programme was followed, with very good results. It is hoped that a similar
programme can be followed in the small rural schools next year.
In this, as well as in my other work, I have had the full co-operation of Boards,
principals, and teachers. I should like to take this opportunity of expressing my
appreciation to them.
School District No. 12 (Grand Forks)
For the first time in several years the schools here had an opportunity of functioning
adequately. While the industrial-arts programme has not been carried out in full,
because of lack of equipment, sufficient classroom space and other factors have made this
a very successful year. The importance of the new building as a community centre is
being more fully realized.   It is being used more and more for out-of-school functions.
Night-school classes were held in book-keeping, typing, sewing, and woodwork.
The closing of the smaller schools and transporting the pupils to the larger school
has proven beneficial. The increased number of pupils who are carrying on with
secondary education is quite noticeable.   This is particularly true of the Doukhobors.
School District No. 13 (Kettle Valley)
The accommodation in the City of Greenwood is not yet improved. A by-law is
now being prepared for a school that will serve the elementary pupils of Greenwood and
the high-school pupils in the district from Anarchist Mountain to Greenwood. Staffing
the schools of this district is still a problem, although conditions were improved this year.
Tribute should be paid to the excellent work done in this district by the public health
nurse, Miss Dorothy Newman. She has been untiring in promoting good health throughout the district. Like other districts, this was hit by the influenza epidemic in the late
winter and the attendance suffered severely. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 77
School District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
There were 155 who took advantage of the night-school classes. During the year
several D.P.'s came to this district, and two classes in English were held for adults and
one special class was held for pupils of school age.
The cafeteria was put into operation in the Southern Okanagan Junior-Senior High
School, and has been a boon to those who have lunch at school. It not only serves the
junior-senior high school, but Oliver Elementary School as well.
School Districts No. 53 (Terrace), No. 54 (Smithers), and No. 55 (Burns Lake)
REPORT OF H. C. FERGUSON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The reorganization of inspectorates effected at the beginning of the current school-
year reduced by one the number of districts in this administrative area. Thirty-one
schools staffed by seventy teachers provided elementary and secondary education for the
1,800 school-age children.
This year saw the completion of most building projects authorized in recent by-laws.
In District No. 53 (Terrace), the Terrace Elementary School was moved to the new
ten-room building completed during the summer. The high school was established
in the building vacated by the elementary grades. Considerable maintenance work was
done at Usk, Kitwanga, South and New Hazelton, as well as at Four Mile. As a result
of the co-operation of the Federal and Provincial authorities, the Board of School
Trustees of District No. 53, and the ratepayers of the Hazelton attendance area, a new
six-room senior high-elementary school was opened at Hazelton.
In District No. 54 (Smithers) the new buildings at Telkwa, Houston, and Smithers
High School were in operation. The opening of Industrial Arts and Home Economics
classes at Smithers introduced a new era in the educational life of this community. By
using transportation, the children from Telkwa, Driftwood, and Glentanna were able
to avail themselves of these classes.
The extensive building programme in District No. 55 (Burns Lake) was completed.
New buildings at Rose Lake, Burns Lake, Babine Lake, Francois Lake, Grassy Plains,
Cheslatta, Ootsa Lake, and Wistaria were occupied. Reconstructions or additions were
made at Topley, Decker Lake, and Burns Lake Elementary Schools.
Generally, accommodation in all districts is now well up to standard and adequate
for immediate requirements. Commendation is deserved by Boards for their interest
and effort in providing school plants which compare very favourably with others in the
Province. Special mention should be made of the co-operation of the teaching staffs,
who, in spite of unavoidable interruptions during the construction period, carried out
their duties and responsibilities so capably.
Effective use was made of transportation in all districts. Ten district-owned buses
and five contractual agreements permitted Boards to provide greater educational opportunity for many children living in the more remote areas.
In administering to the educational needs of this inspectorate, the following activities
were carried out.
Teachers' institutes were held in all districts during the months of September and
May. Teachers attended the annual fall convention held at Prince George in November.
A May meeting of primary-section teachers was held at Smithers for purposes of hearing
lectures given by Mrs. T. Gregg, of W. J. Gage & Company, on " Methods in Primary K 78 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Reading." Throughout the year monthly bulletins dealing with administrative and
professional topics were sent to all schools.
All teachers participated in both Departmental and district testing programmes.
Mental-maturity tests were given to all new pupils and those not tested within the past
four years. The Metropolitan Achievement Test was used in Grades I to VIII, while
the Co-operative English Tests were administered in Grades IX to XII. During classroom
visitations, tests in arithmetic fundamentals, English usage, spelling, health, and social
studies ability were given at appropriate grade levels. At the time of final inspections,
written reports were prepared on all learning situations.
Sports-meets were held in all districts at the end of the school term. A very
successful interdistrict sports-day was well attended at Hazelton.
Although no drama festival was organized, several schools held their own " drama
night," while still others prepared pupils in drama, music, and folk-dancing for participation in local talent quests or the Prince Rupert Festival held in May. Almost all schools
participated in the activities of the Junior Red Cross.
The contribution of the following to the educational life of this area is not to be
overlooked:—
(a) The Public Library Commission, through its Prince George office, for a
very valuable service to the small schools and communities:
(b) The Public Health Service for its work among pre-school and school-age
children:
(c) The Social Service Branch for its interest in and care of the less fortunate:
(d) The Parent-Teacher Association for its generous gifts of much needed
school equipment.
In closing, may I state my pleasure at having the opportunity of working with
Boards, secretaries, principals, and teachers in these districts during the past year. To
these and to members of the Department at Victoria, for their co-operation and assistance,
I wish to express my gratitude and appreciation.
School Districts No. 43 (Coquitlam) and No. 46 (Sechelt)
REPORT OF C. J. FREDERICKSON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 43 (Coquitlam)
The school-year 1950-51 was one of constantly expanding school population, and
it was necessary to extend the part-time or " shift " classes to over 1,000 children. This
increase was exactly in line with the forecasts made five years ago. In April additional
" shift " classes were made necessary in the elementary schools and even in the Coquitlam
Junior-Senior High School to accommodate over 700 children who had previously
attended the Catholic Parochial Schools.
The ambitious building programme, providing over sixty-five classrooms, was well
started by the summer of 1950, so that the end of " shift " classes was in sight by June.
The losses which are due to several years of part-time education are difficult to
measure. Testing revealed that the loss in the skill subjects was not great, but there can
be little doubt that the loss in desirable-habit formation and in appreciations and attitudes
was regrettable.
Plans were made by the School Board in conjunction with the newly established
Simon Fraser Health Unit to employ a full-time dentist for preventive dentistry. His
office and headquarters will be located in one of the schools. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 79
The pressure of population from Vancouver, the establishment of large military
depots, and the promise of new industries will bring new problems of school accommodation to this district. There is every indication that additional building will have to be
provided in the near future.
School District No. 46 (Sechelt)
In August of 1950 School District No. 42 (Maple Ridge) was taken from my
inspectorate and added to Mr. Chell's new district, with headquarters in Mission. I then
took over School District No. 46 from Colonel Burnett.
Geographically, School District No. 46 covers an exceedingly large area. While the
number of classrooms is not large, recent developments promise a rapidly expanding
school population. The old paper-mill at Port Mellon, long closed, was purchased by the
Canadian Forest Products, and reconstruction and addition were started immediately.
Construction of a road between Gibsons and Port Mellon was commenced. As this road
will make it possible for employees of the paper-mill to reside in Gibsons, both
communities will see considerable growth.
The commencement of a car-ferry from Horseshoe Bay to Gibsons, with ultimate
service to Powell River, will bring the Seechelt Peninsula within easy reach of both Powell
River and Vancouver. This development will, unquestionably, result in a rapidly
expanding school population.
The school-year saw the completion of two new Quonset schools—a one-room
school at Nelson Island and a two-room school at Egmont. It also saw the completion
of a frame two-room school at Roberts Creek and the commencement of a four-room
superior school at Madiera Park, an eight-room high school at Gibsons, and additions
to the Sechelt School.
During the school-year it was my privilege to have been associated with the training
of teachers of Vocational Agriculture and, to a slight extent, with the supervision of these
teachers. Unfortunately, time and circumstances did not permit me to visit any but a
very few of the established or new centres where this subject is now being taught. I feel
happy, however, in having had any part of this exceedingly important development and
feel confident that the teaching of practical agriculture in our secondary schools will make
a great contribution to this Province and to Canada. I also feel that it will require constant
and sympathetic nurturing to bring the fruits of this subject to a ripened condition.
It may soon be realized that there is plenty of room for both the traditional academic
programme and the newer concepts of vocational education in our secondary schools.
School Districts No. 49  (Ocean Falls), No. 51   (Portland Canal), and No. 52
(Prince Rupert), and Unattached School District at Butedale
REPORT OF G. W. GRAHAM, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Throughout this inspectorate, teaching staffs and School Boards are making a fine
contribution toward maintaining a good standard of education. Unfortunately, because
of the lack of an instructor, Ocean Falls had to omit Industrial Arts from its programme
for the year. A new vocational course in fishing has been initiated in the Prince Rupert
High School. It is hoped that this will prove popular and beneficial in this locality.
The school population shows a steady increase, and school accommodation problems are
being adequately met. K 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Ocean Falls operates seven schools, employing twenty-three teachers. A new
addition of four classrooms, Industrial Arts unit, and gymnasium has been completed at
the Ocean Falls High School, and will be ready for use this fall. Existing schools
throughout this area are well maintained. By purchase of a teacherage at Hagehsborg,
the School Board now has available living accommodation for all teachers in the Bella
Coola Valley. Through the initiative of the Parent-Teacher Association, the schoolchildren received the benefits of the Health Department's dental clinic this year. This
needed service was greatly appreciated by residents of this area.
Portland Canal School Board operates three schools, employing five teachers.
Fluctuation of population creates its problems in this area. Alice Arm School has been
located on the site of the Torbrit Silver Mines. A one-room school was reopened at
Premier Mines. An increase in enrolment has allowed for the employment of a third
teacher at Stewart Superior School. No new building has been undertaken, but needed
maintenance and improvement of older buildings are being carried out.
In the Prince Rupert district there are eight schools operating, with fifty-one
teachers employed. This year's construction includes an addition of three classrooms,
Industrial Arts and Home Economics units, and a gymnasium to the Booth Memorial
High School. A new eleven-room elementary building, replacing the former King
Edward School, will be completed in September. Other schools in this district are kept
in good repair, but new accommodation is now needed at Port Edward.
The death of Alex Charleson, of Ocean Falls, was deeply regretted. Mr. Charleson
has given a decade of good service to the schools of District No. 49.
May I thank the principals and their staffs, the School Boards and secretary-
treasurers of these districts for their co-operation and the friendly relationships I have
enjoyed.
School Districts No. 33 (Chilliwack) and No. 76 (Agassiz)
REPORT OF S. J. GRAHAM, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 33 (Chilliwack)
One hundred and thirty-one teachers were employed during the year to teach 3,780
pupils enrolled in the fifteen schools comprising the district. The enrolment in the senior
high school was slightly down from the previous year, due to the attendance of senior
students from the Yarrow district at a private school. The total enrolment of pupils
throughout the district was substantially greater than the previous year.
The extensive building programme of the district was continued, with the letting of
contracts for an activity-room at the Sardis School, for a gymnasium at the senior high
school, and for two-room schools at Fairfield Island and Cheam.
The transportation of pupils to school has developed into a matter of major
importance in the district. Nine hundred junior-senior high-school students, representing
64 per cent of the total high-school enrolment, use the bus system, and over 800 elementary pupils, or 35 per cent of the total elementary-school enrolment, are carried on the
buses.
The Provincial public health unit continued to give valuable service to the schools
of the area. The district was fortunate in securing the service of a dentist for the coming
year.
The schools generally made satisfactory progress during the year. Much emphasis
was placed upon developing learning habits in the elementary schools.   Monthly meetings REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 81
of the principals and of the primary-division teachers were held. Upon several occasions
we were able to have competent educators visit us to lead discussions at these meetings.
The principals of the district developed an extensive testing programme which, when
used in conjunction with the Provincial programme, provided useful assistance in the
supervision of the classroom work in the elementary schools.
I would again like to acknowledge the helpful co-operation of the members of the
district School Boards and the officials of the Department of Education.
School District No. 76 (Agassiz)
Four hundred and sixty-two pupils attended the three schools in this district.
Eighteen teachers were employed during the year. Lack of continuity in staff and
difficulty in securing teachers for all subjects again hampered the work of the Agassiz
High School. However, some improvement was noted over past years, and it is anticipated that with improved working conditions the staffing of the high school will offer less
of a problem.
In April of this year the ratepayers of District No. 76 gave a substantial vote of
approval to a by-law to build a new elementary-high school in Agassiz and to improve
and increase accommodation at Harrison Hot Springs and Harrison Mills. Unfortunately,
construction of the Agassiz School could not be commenced this year, but as the
accommodation at Agassiz must be as critical as that found anywhere in the Province,
it is hoped that an early start may be made on the new building.
It was possible to provide a more generous issue of equipment and teaching supplies
this year, but an even greater standard of supply must be achieved if this district's schools
are to offer the educational opportunity which is expected of them.
School Districts No. 32 (Fraser Canyon) and No. 34 (Abbotsford)
REPORT OF WILLIAM H. GRANT, B.S.A., B.Ed.
Under the reorganization of inspectorates effected a year ago, this new inspectorate,
comprising the somewhat attenuated and relatively sparsely settled Fraser Canyon School
District and the compact and thickly settled Abbotsford School District, was created.
Because of the distinctly different natures of each district, the problems of each are
different.
School District No. 32 (Fraser Canyon)
During the school-year just passed, good progress has been made in the building
programme that had been initiated previously. The final wing to the Hope Elementary-
High School plant is under way, with good progress being made to date. The careful
scrutiny and amendment of plans leading up to this should, when the building is completed, result in a highly functional plant adequate to meet the needs of the district for
some time to come.
Due to excessively high costs encountered in the fall of 1950, it became necessary
to revise the original plan of the Boston Bar Elementary School, which necessitated the
postponement of building until the spring of 1951. Construction is at present under way.
This building will replace temporary quarters at present in use, and indications are that
it may have to be enlarged within two years.
The St. Elmo School at Laidlaw has been completely modernized by the addition of
a small wing to house a central heating plant and indoor lavatories. The building has also
been painted. K 82 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Elsewhere in the district a strong policy of maintenance is gradually bringing all
school buildings into a high state of repair and adding considerably to their functional
qualities.
All schools were staffed during the year with teachers having the basic qualifications
or better. The Provincial testing programme, supplemented by a district programme
co-operatively carried out by the teaching staff, and augmented by personal observations,
indicates that a sound educational programme is developing well in the district.
During the year the Board of School Trustees has operated harmoniously, and has
co-operated interestedly and enthusiastically with the secretary-treasurer and the Department of Education in establishing and stabilizing the educational programme in the
district.
School District No. 34 (Abbotsford)
The main problem in this district continues to be the provision of adequate and
suitable space to house the increasing number of children that are appearing in the
schools. At present all available space is being utilized. Approximately 33 per cent
of the pupils are in temporary quarters, besides having six divisions running on a double
shift.
In December, 1950, the ratepayers, by a fine majority, authorized a building
programme to add thirteen elementary classrooms and an eighteen-room junior high
school to the system. Restrictions on building and credit have prevented proceeding with
the latter, but progress on the thirteen elementary rooms is such as to indicate they will
be ready for occupancy in September. The generosity of the Dominion Government in
allowing the use of the buildings at the Abbotsford Airport is the only factor which has
prevented even further constriction of the programme. At best, the new buildings will
simply replace some of the temporary quarters now in use.
Despite the inconvenience and the overcrowding caused by lack of space, an
adequate and broad educational programme for the district has been carried out. The
policy of the Board of Trustees in establishing schools eventually in every community
within easy walking distance for elementary-school children, and to establish secondary
schools at central points, together with a vigorous programme of improvement and
maintenance of existing buildings, has gained for them the confidence of the ratepayers.
The excellent relationships already existing between the Board and teaching staff have
been maintained throughout the year, and have resulted in the maintenance and elaboration of the fine educational programme already established. Two events of outstanding
merit, organized and executed almost entirely by the teaching staff, were the school
musical festival and the educational display in lieu of Education Week programme. In
these they had the support of the Parent-Teacher Association and other organizations,
as well as the interest of the public in large numbers.
Conclusion
In conclusion, I wish to extend by thanks to the Board of Trustees and teaching
staffs, and the secretary-treasurers for the unstinted support I have received from them,
and for their patience and understanding in this first year of my work in these districts. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 83
School Districts No. 6 (Kootenay Lake), No. 7 (Nelson), and No. 8 (Slocan)
REPORT OF E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.P^d., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 6 (Kootenay Lake)
The seven scattered schools in this district were ably staffed, employing the same
number of teachers as in the previous year. During this year the development of the
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company project at Riondel has proceeded rapidly
and an additional teacher has been employed. Increased mining activity in Kaslo has
brought increases in the school population there and has made necessary the employment
of one additional teacher. The opening of the road between Kaslo and Lardeau is likely
to bring an increased population in this portion of the school district. The schools at
Ainsworth and Retallack are overcrowded. Faced with the unprecedented development
in all parts of the district, the Board is preparing a building programme for submission to
the ratepayers during the next school-year.
School District No. 7 (Nelson)
Eighty-one teachers were employed in fourteen schools of this district during the
past year. The new classrooms at the Salmo High School and Willow Point were
completed for occupancy in September. An additional division was opened in the Nelson
Hume School. One division was closed at Sheep Creek owing to a shift in the school
population. At the present time, classrooms are being constructed at Remac and
Emerald. The bringing of several exceptionally large-tonnage mines into production in
the Salmo area is taxing school facilities to the utmost and will, without doubt, require
a reconsideration of the over-all school programme. This programme should include
additional classrooms for the Salmo Elementary School, the Salmo High School, as well
as a new high-school building in the City of Nelson.
School District No. 8 (Slocan)
Thirty-one teachers were employed in the seventeen schools of this district. The
new secondary schools were opened in New Denver, Slocan City, and South Slocan, and
Board-owned bus units provide transportation to pupils from Grades VII to XII in the
area between Hunter Siding and South Slocan. The official openings of these schools by
the Honourable Minister of Education were most successful, and the pride of these
ratepayers in the school system of this valley was much in evidence. The practical
demonstration of interest by the ratepayers of the South Slocan area, who, with work-
parties over several months, installed a $10,000 water system, levelled, surfaced, and
seeded the spacious grounds, is something long to be remembered.
An additional classroom is being added to each of the three secondary schools at the
present time and will be ready for occupancy in September. Mining activity in Sandon
has made necessary the opening of a second division there.
General
The administration of school affairs in these three districts has much improved
during the last school-year. Each one of the three secretary-treasurers appointed last
year has more than justified his selection and has brought increased efficiency to the
administration.
Teacher selection reflects the improved condition in the Province. The number of
teachers with temporary certificates was reduced from twelve to three during the last
year. Experience in these areas indicates that the quality of young secondary teachers
entering the profession is particularly commendable. K 84 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
The Senior Matriculation and University Entrance Examination results this year are
indicative of a high standard in this area. Clayton Thomas Crowe, from the small high
school at Salmo, won the district University Entrance scholarship.
The three School Boards in these districts are giving very fine service in the public
interest. The hours of well-planned effort are producing good public relations and
efficiency in the educational pattern. I am indebted to the School Boards, the secretary-
treasurers, the principals, and the teachers for another year of whole-hearted co-operation.
School Districts No. 3 (Kimberley), No. 4 (Windermere), and No. 18 (Golden)
REPORT OF I. H. R. JEFFERY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate, with headquarters at Kimberley, embraces the Kimberley, Windermere, and Golden School Districts.
In Kimberley School District, the Marysville Elementary School, the A. A. Watkins
Elementary School, and the addition to the P. J. McKim Junior-Senior High School were
formally opened by the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education, accompanied
by the Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education, Dr. F. T. Fairey. Provision of
the three modern new structures in the district showed forethought. Because of primary-
grade congestion at Marysville Elementary School, a fourth division was placed in the
spare classroom in January. The loss by fire of the three-room Chapman Camp Elementary School in February necessitated the transfer of pupils to the lunchroom annex of the
A. A. Watkins Elementary School. At the present time all elementary-school classrooms
are required. A Kimberley City population survey early in the school-year indicated a
gradual increase in elementary-school attendance during the next five years. Announced
industrial expansion infers a further population increase. The local school authority is
alert to the need and intends to extend its building programme as needed when sanction
is granted.
In Windermere School District three new school buildings of modern design wer6
opened for use during the school-year. New one-room structures housed their first pupils
at Brisco and at Windermere in December and April respectively. In January a two-
room senior high-school section of the Invermere Elementary-Senior High School was
occupied. This new structure, with the accompanying facilities for secondary education,
is performing a needed function in the part of the district that is served by school-bus
transportation. The School Board conducted formal school openings at Brisco and
Invermere.
In Golden School District there appears to be a growing realization of the great need
for better facilities in each of the seven schools of the area. The School Board is
becoming increasingly progressive in the desire for material improvement when finances
permit. At the Lady Grey Elementary-Senior High School at Golden, enrolment congestion in the primary grades resulted in the opening of an additional division in January.
The adoption of Mountain Standard time throughout the year in School Districts
No. 3 and No. 4 and in part of School District No. 18, together with poor day-time radio
reception, except from the Kimberley booster station in the immediate district, interferes
with the use of school radio broadcasts.
Windermere School Board recently provided a portable sound-projection unit for
audio-visual education in their five electrified schools of a total of seven. Kimberley
School Board is arranging to provide similar equipment for its elementary schools.
A larger unit is in use in the secondary school.    Both Boards encourage teacher- REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 85
committee organization for audio-visual education. Golden School Board houses a unit
at Field and at Golden in the only electrified schools of the district.
There is an extreme shortage of fluency-building and experience-providing supplementary reading materials in the rural sections of the inspectorate. School Boards have
indicated their realization and co-operation by a promise of increased provision according
to financial ability.
All schools in the inspectorate administer the Provincial survey tests. In addition,
the Inspector's Office organizes a minimum testing programme as a teaching aid.
I should like to express my gratitude for the courtesy and co-operation extended to
me by district personnel during my first year in this inspectorate. This includes trustees,
school representatives, secretary-treasurers, teachers, and student-bodies. I appreciate
the whole-hearted leadership and guidance of the officials in the Department of Education.
School Districts No. 1 (Fernie) and No. 2 (Cranbrook)
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Sharp increases in the elementary and junior high school enrolments were again
noticeable in School District No. 2, with slighter increases in School District No. 1.
There is a further trend toward concentration of population in the larger centres, with
the rural-school enrolments remaining stationary or decreasing slightly. Fernie, Elko,
and Cranbrook all added to their teaching staffs in September and the Home Economics
centre at Michel-Natal Elementary-Senior High School was reopened.
Cranbrook's school system was reorganized from an 8-4 to a 6-6 basis as the
necessary accommodation became available. The event of the year was the opening of
the new Mount Baker Junior-Senior High School by the Honourable the Minister of
Education in April.
Miss McNay, of Fernie, brought credit to her school and district by winning the
Provincial competition in public speaking sponsored by the Knights of Pythias. The
School Drama Festival, with ten entries from five secondary schools, was outstanding this
year in the enthusiasm shown both by participants and spectators.
In addition to the testing programme carried out by the Division of Tests, Standards,
and Research, a series of tests in spelling was administered through the teachers to pupils
in Grades VII to IX, and in arithmetic to pupils in Grades III to V. These tests are
designed as aids in teaching rather than for purposes of classification. Some assistance
was also given to teachers in the smaller schools in their standardized testing programme.
Meetings of the principals and vice-principals of the larger schools have been held at
regular intervals throughout the year. These meetings prove most useful in the discussion
of common problems of supervision and administration and in establishing common
policies throughout the East Kootenay in routine administration.
School Board members continue to devote their time and energy to school affairs.
They deserve great credit, not only for their unselfish efforts, but also for the efficiency
with which they have maintained high standards of facilities in the face of rising costs. K 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
School District No. 11 (Trail)
REPORT OF W. E. LUCAS, B.A., B.P^d., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Since September 1st, 1950, this inspectorate has comprised School District No. 11
(Trail). The educational highlight of the year was the opening of the new junior-senior
high school in Rossland. Built at a cost of $973,021, this new school provides all of the
physical facilities for the carrying-out of a progressive school programme at the secondary
level and is an institution of which the citizens of Rossland and of the entire district are
justly proud.
The three-storied classroom wing contains eleven standard classrooms, two social-
studies rooms, a music-room, an art-room, a typing-room, and two general-science rooms.
It also includes a chemistry laboratory and a physics-biology laboratory. The administration suite comprises the general office, principal's and vice-principal's offices, two
counsellors' rooms, one staff-room, a student-council room, and a medical room. An
activity-room, complete with stage and dressing-rooms, has a seating capacity for 670
people. It has a flat floor and will serve as a second gymnasium when the regular
gymnasium is in use.
The two-storied wing of the building contains the combined lunchroom-study hall;
separate rooms for woodwork, metalwork, draughting, sewing, and food preparation; and
an excellent gymnasium complete with bleachers, showers, and change-rooms.
The formal opening of the school took place June 22nd, 1951. Dr. F. T. Fairey,
Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education, gave the address of the evening.
Other speakers on the programme were Mayor J. R. Corner of the City of Rossland; Dr.
R. W. Diamond, general manager and vice-president of the Consolidated Mining
& Smelting Company; the Honourable A. D. Turnbull, Minister of Health and Welfare
and member of the Legislative Assembly for Rossland-Trail; Mr. Arthur Turner of the
School Board; and Mr. D. G. Chamberlain, supervising principal of the Rossland Junior-
Senior High School. Mr. T. H. Weldon, Chairman of the Board of School Trustees,
presided, accompanied by all members of the Board.
In addition to the Rossland Junior-Senior High School, other buildings are under
construction. A new senior high school for Trail will be ready for occupancy in
September of this year, and a substantial addition to the East Trail Elementary School
will be completed by the same time.
No great difficulty was experienced this year in filling vacancies on the teaching staff.
Approximately fifty teachers from a large list of applicants were appointed to the staff,
which now consists of 150 teachers.
All schools in the district were well organized, and the learning situation on the
whole was good. A high standard of academic achievement has been maintained, and
plenty of opportunity for participation in the fine arts was in evidence in all schools.
A class of non-English-speaking children was established during the year to assist
new Canadians to adjust themselves to their changed environment. This class proved of
great value in this respect.
An extensive testing programme was carried out in all elementary schools of the
district. The chief reason for this survey was to identify remedial cases and to attempt
to do something for them.
A successful night-school was operated from October to April. Courses in Political
Science, Psychology, Elementary English, Home Building and Repair, Woodwork,
Draughting, Electricity, Leather Work, Industrial Electronics, Dressmaking, Public
Speaking, Dramatics, and Motor Mechanics were offered to some 300 interested adults.
During the year two members of the teaching staff were granted superannuation-
Mrs. Laura J. Morrish, principal of the East Trail Elementary School, and Miss Ella G. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 87
Martin, Commercial teacher in the Rossland Junior-Senior High School. Both are to be
highly commended for their many years of loyal and efficient service in the cause of
education in this Province.
Tribute is also paid to Mr. J. Lloyd Crowe, who retired from the Board of School
Trustees in December, 1950. Mr. Crowe has been a trustee for many years and Chairman
of the Board of School District No. 11 since its inception in 1946. He has made a
valuable contribution to education in the Trail district. It was fitting that this year's
Board of School Trustees named the new senior high school in his honour.
The School Board, through its Maintenance Department, has continued to do
excellent work in modernizing and improving the older buildings. This has been
especially true of MacLean Elementary School in Rossland and of the rural schools at
Casino and Beaver Falls.
Dr. L. S. Anderson was appointed in November, 1950, as director of the newly
formed West Kootenay Health Unit, and the health programme has been well conducted
by the director and his staff of five nurses and one sanitarian. The immunization status
has been kept at a high level, with approximately 90 per cent of the children immunized
against diphtheria and smallpox. As a result of a request by the Board of School Trustees
for a preventive dental service, a children's dentist may be added to the health unit staff
in 1952.
In conclusion, I should like to express my appreciation for the co-operation and help
which I have received during the year from the Department of Education, from the School
Board and its secretary-treasurer, and from the principals and teachers of School District
No. 11.
School Districts No. 24 (Kamloops) and No. 31 (Merritt)
REPORT OF H. McARTHUR, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 24 (Kamloops)
School population rose by 212 during the year. But the expansion in enrolment
was less noteworthy than that in accommodation. New modern buildings were completed and opened at Valleyview, Monte Lake, and Westsyde. The reconstruction of
the Chase building was finished. The Savona building was moved to a new site and
modernized, and a very satisfactory teacherage was provided. New buildings have been
almost completed at Westwold and North Kamloops. Construction has begun on the
new junior-senior high school and dormitory in Kamloops. A small temporary building
was erected by a logging company at Scuitto Lake, and a new school was opened there
in November.
The bringing to partial completion of plans that have been under discussion for so
long is a source of much gratification to the Kamloops Board, which has been wrestling
patiently with accommodation problems ever since School District No. 24 was formed.
It is clear that, except in isolated districts where road conditions forbid transportation of pupils, the eight-grade one-room school will soon disappear in this district.
A further step toward its elimination was taken in April, when, on the urgent request
of Savona parents, a bus was provided to convey the Savona pupils of Grades VII and
VIII, as well as of higher grades, to Kamloops.
The rejection of the annual budget by both the rural representatives and the Kamloops City Council led to arbitration proceedings, the result of which was a reduction
in the budget of approximately $25,000.    This reduction made it necessary for the K 88 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Board to postpone till next year the erection of a two-room modern building at Heffley
Creek, where the enrolment has become too large for one teacher.
Lack of accommodation finally forced the Board to institute the shift system last
September in the Kamloops Junior-Senior High School and in the North Kamloops
Elementary School. Parents and teachers have been relieved to learn that a return to
regular hours will probably be possible next term.
School District No. 31 (Merritt)
A noteworthy feature of this district is the concentration of the school population
in and near the Municipality of Merritt. This year only two rural schools were open—
one at Brookmere and one at Mamette Lake. However, a new modern one-room
building has almost been completed at Douglas Lake, where there has been a demand
for school facilities for several years.
The rising enrolment in the Mamette Lake area made necessary the purchase of
a new bus. The realization that the school programme was far too restricted and that
enrolment was increasing, caused the Board to plan an addition to the Merritt Elementary-Senior High School building. One classroom as the first unit of this addition will
be constructed immediately. Other units, including rooms for Home Economics and
Industrial Arts, will follow.
Parents were happy to learn at the beginning of the year that the Board had finally
been able to institute nursing services in the district.
In both districts the trustees are conscientious, energetic, and progressive. It is
heartening to proponents of the democratic ideal to realize that men and women will
v/ork so hard and so long for the public good without any financial remuneration.
School Districts No. 5 (Creston), No. 9 (Castlegar), and No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
REPORT OF J. J. McKENZIE, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate comprises School District No. 5 (Creston) with fifty-six teachers,
School District No. 9 (Castlegar) with thirty-seven teachers, and School District No. 10
(Arrow Lakes) with nineteen teachers. Previous to this year each of these districts
formed parts of other inspectorates. I would like to thank my predecessors—Inspectors
Clay, Levirs, and Lucas—for the excellent condition in which each district was handed
over to me. Most of the exacting work associated with new school-building programmes
was completed when I took over.
School District No. 5 (Creston)
The building programme in this district is nearing completion. The reconstruction
of the old building will be completed by school opening, and it is hoped that the new
junior-senior high school will be ready for use. The new two-room school at Lister
was ready for occupancy in September last and was officially opened by the Honourable
W. T. Straith. This district has the assistance of a skilled maintenance supervisor and
staff which keep the buildings in good physical condition.
The junior-senior high school offers a wide variety of courses for the pupils of the
district, who are taking advantage of this opportunity. Educational achievement, as
shown by results, is satisfactory. A full programme of extra-curricular activities is carried
out. :■:"   "■■■■■■'■-. ■ ■■:':.
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 89
The elementary schools functioned smoothly throughout the year under the leadership of a supervising principal. A very full testing programme for diagnostic and
remedial purposes was carried out during the year as a prelude to a reorganization of
the consolidated elementary school in September. The teaching of music throughout
the district benefited from the services of a music supervisor.
School District No. 9 (Castlegar)     i
The school accommodation situation in this district has been greatly eased by the
completion of the new junior-senior high school, which was officially opened by the
Honourable A. D. Turnbull. The use of a number of temporary halls and buildings was
eliminated when the change-over was made in January. The new building will house
approximately 350 secondary pupils and provide educational facilities commensurate
with those in larger centres. The staff will be increased from five to fifteen. The first
unit of the new elementary school and an addition to Kinnaird School are well on the
road to completion, and it is hoped these will be ready for use in September. A considerable amount of renovation has been carried out in other buildings throughout the
district.
During the, past year, in the Kinnaird area, construction of new houses has
increased greatly, as new subdivisions have been created. This rapid increase is continuing and will necessitate more school accommodation in the near future. With this
in mind, the Board of Trustees has secured an additional school-site for future use.
There is prospect of a pulp-mill in the Castlegar area, and this would create further
problems of school accommodation and transportation should it be established.
School District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes)
The building programme in this district has been completed for the present, although the contemplated pupil increase in the Nakusp area will necessitate using one of
the old buildings on the high-school grounds during the coming term.
There are three secondary-school centres throughout the valley, but the limited
enrolment in each curtails the programme which can be offered. The trustees, who are
conscious of this limitation, look forward to the day when some form of consolidation
can take place throughout the valley which will permit a broader programme to include
Industrial Arts and Home Economics. Better roads are necessary before this could be
considered.
A good improvement in library facilities, wall-maps, and globes was made during
the year. The Parent-Teacher Associations throughout the district did much to improve
school-grounds and purchase equipment for the schools.
General
During the year each district has functioned successfully. This has been due in
a very large measure to the fortunate choice of trustees and secretary-treasurers. All
have given unsparingly of their time and energy to improve educational facilities in each
district. A splendid spirit of co-operation existed between this office and the principals
of schools of all districts. K 90 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
School Districts No. 25 (Barriere), No. 26 (Birch Island), No. 29 (Lillooet),
and No. 30 (Ashcroft)
REPORT OF F. A. McLELLAN, M.A., B.P^-d., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 25 (Barriere)
Some progress has been made toward the present over-all objective in this district,
which is to provide high-school education for all the children in the district and to attain
some co-ordination of the small scattered schools.
A by-law was endorsed and a central three-room school is under construction.
A one-room school was included in the by-law and has been completed in an area in
which there was no school.
With sufficient high-school students in the Chu Chua area to warrant transportation,
another bus has been purchased and will serve a double purpose by relieving the
district's only remaining overcrowded ungraded school of some of the elementary grades.
School District No. 26 (Birch Island)
This district has been concerned almost exclusively this year with the preparation,
presentation, and passing of a by-law to construct a $100,000 elementary-high school
at Clearwater to provide in part for the secondary needs of this district. The by-law was
remarkable, in that it was supported by an 83-per-cent majority and enjoyed a favourable
vote in all attendance areas but one. A contract for the construction of the new school
has been let, and construction is proceeding satisfactorily. The plant should be in
operation early in 1952.
Contemporaneous with the opening of the new school at Clearwater will be the
closing of several small worn-out one-room schools which have been in operation for
from twenty to thirty years. The district is taking a keen interest and commendable
pride in this forward step in the provision of educational facilities for the children
of this area.
School District No. 29 (Lillooet)
The new schools at Bralorne, Lillooet, and Pavilion were occupied in September
and were officially opened in November by the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of
Education, and by Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister.
The introduction of Home Economics and Industrial Arts in the new consolidated
schools at Bralorne and Lillooet filled a long-felt need in this district.
Transportation difficulties at Shalalth were overcome by the purchase of a bus.
Pupils from across the Fraser at Pavilion are now being brought to school by ferry and
then by car.
Bralorne won the sports' cup for the district this year, and the track team chosen
from this meet was sent to Merritt, where it placed third.
An automatic clock at Bralorne and a tape recorder at Lillooet were welcome
equipment additions and were supplied through the help of the Parent-Teacher Association.
School District No. 30 (Ashcroft)
During the year 1950-51 this district has completed its extensive building
programme. New four-room elementary-high schools were established at Ashcroft,
Clinton, and Lytton. One-room schools at Big Bar and Foster Bar and two portable
one-room schools at Green Lake were erected. New teacherages were built at Big Bar,
Green Lake, and Foster Bar.
After completion of the building programme, sufficient funds were available to
establish courses in Home Economics and Industrial Arts at the Clinton and the Ashcroft REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 91
High-Elementary Schools. There has been a great need in the past for these practical
courses in the large rural schools, and the district hopes to be able to establish these
courses at the Lytton High-Elementary School within the next year.
In the middle of the last school term it was found necessary to establish a temporary
class at the Spences Bridge School to accommodate the increased number of high-school
pupils. At the end of the school term it was found advisable to close this temporary
classroom and to purchase a district-owned bus to transport these secondary pupils from
Spences Bridge to the Lytton High-Elementary School, thus offering these pupils increased
educational opportunities and eliminating the expense of building an additional room
at Spences Bridge.
Mention should be made of the success of the students and instructors from this
district at the Central Mainland District Track and Field Meet. Here they attained first
place in competition with Kamloops, Kamloops Rural, Lillooet, Merritt, and Birch
Island districts.
In concluding this report I wish to acknowledge with thanks the splendid co-operation
shown by members of School Boards, secretary-treasurers, and teachers throughout the
past year. The trustees in particular have given most generously of their time and effort
in the solution of the many knotty educational problems which have confronted them.
School Districts No. 59 (Peace River South) and No. 60 (Peace River North),
and Unattached Schools at Atlin, Camp Mile 163, Camp Mile 300, Fort
Nelson, Fort Nelson Airport, Lower Post, and Telegraph Creek.
REPORT OF E. MARRIOTT, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Few of the log school-houses which characterized the pioneer stage of development
in the Peace River area now remain. Their replacement with more modern and more
attractive school buildings has paralleled the construction of modern homes and business
blocks, a development which followed the completion of the Alaska Highway.
As a result of the expanding farming community north of the Peace River, new
schools were opened at Pine View, Nu-Point, and Mile 81. As thousands of acres of
new land are being broken each year, the request for additional schools in this area will
continue.
During the past year the building programme of School District No. 59 progressed
favourably. Outmoded buildings were replaced with modern one-room schools at
Willow Valley, Upper Cutbank, Sunset Prairie, and East Pouce Coupe. The Dawson
Creek Elementary School will be completed in the near future, and a start has been made
on the new elementary school for Pouce Coupe.
School District No. 60 faced unfortunate delays in starting construction of the new
junior-senior high school for the north district due to rising building costs, but is now
proceeding with the first unit of the building.
Enrolment continued to increase in the larger centres, forcing the use of temporary
classrooms. Some measure of relief is expected in Dawson Creek upon the completion
of the new elementary school, but no final answer has been found for the situation at
Fort St. John.
The dormitories at both Fort St. John and Dawson Creek were filled to capacity
during the year. Both districts plan additions to their dormitories to accommodate the
increasing anticipated registration by rural students. K 92 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
The qualifications of the teachers employed in this area have improved steadily, and
the need to employ teachers holding temporary certificates has almost passed. The
improved classroom facilities and the better-trained teaching personnel have resulted
in some improvement in the educational standards of this district.
The unattached schools compare favourably in educational standards with the
schools in the organized districts. Much needed equipment and library facilities were
added to many of these schools during the year.
The much appreciated assistance of Mr. C. T. Rendle, Inspector of Schools, made
possible a closer supervision of the standard of instruction in the many small schools as
well as the graded schools of this inspectorate.
I would like to commend the sincere and fruitful efforts of the Boards of Trustees
and their staffs in providing better educational facilities for the district. Their unselfish
devotion to their duties and their willing acceptance of many responsibilities are indeed
noteworthy. I wish also to thank the individual members of the School Boards, the
secretary-treasurers, and the principals for their kind co-operation during the past year.
School Districts No. 23 (Kelowna) and No. 77 (Summerland)
REPORT OF A. S. MATHESON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
In common with other parts of the Okanagan Valley, the area included with this
inspectorate suffered a major economic set-back by reason of the severity of the winter
of 1949-50, when winter-killing of fruit-trees assumed catastrophic proportions for the
basic industry of the region. As a result, the heads of many families who depended for
employment upon the fruit-growing and fruit-processing industries were forced to seek
employment elsewhere and, in many cases, moved their families to other areas.
Consequently, the rise in school enrolment, which had been continuous for the preceding
six years, was halted and gradually reversed, so that the net enrolment for the school-year
was 68 pupils fewer than in 1949—50, and the actual enrolment at the end of the spring
term showed a further drop of about 125 pupils, most of whom were of families who had
returned to the Prairie Provinces, from which they had been attracted to the Okanagan
during the early post-war years.
School District No. 23 (Kelowna)
Most of the shrinkage in enrolment, noted above, occurred in this district. The net
enrolment for the year was 4,061, and the teaching staff numbered 147.
The acute labour shortage at apple-harvesting time created a very serious problem
for the secondary schools. Because such a large percentage of the soft-fruit trees had
been destroyed by the winter frosts, there was not enough employment throughout the
spring and summer to attract and hold orchard labour. When the apple-crop was ready
to harvest, the labour situation was so desperate that, in order to save the crop and
protect the economy of all, it was necessary to release from classes all pupils who were
able and willing to assist in the orchards. Thus hundreds of students were out of school
from four to six weeks. Then in January and February an influenza epidemic caused
further wholesale absence of both pupils and teachers. These two circumstances
seriously retarded the progress of the pupils and markedly lowered their scholastic
attainment.
The demand for the assistance of the pupils in harvesting the fruit is almost certain
to recur each autumn for several years, and the problem created is so serious that it
demands attention at the highest administrative level to find a satisfactory solution. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 93
Progress in the elementary schools was marked by the opening of five new buildings
and additions to two others.   The new buildings are as follows:—
(1) Martin Avenue, in the City of Kelowna—four classrooms, activity-room,
etc.—built according to Standard Plan No. 12 of the Department of
Education and proving very satisfactory. This relieves the long-standing
overcrowding in the Kelowna Elementary School.
(2) The Glenmore School, another four-classroom, Plan No. 12 school. The
opening of this school restores to the Municipality of Glenmore a local
elementary school after twenty-six years of consolidation with the
Kelowna School.
(3) Okanagan Mission—four classrooms, activity-lunch room, etc., replacing
a building destroyed by fire.
(4) Mission Creek—two classrooms, activity-lunch room, etc. replacing
a building lost by fire.
(5) South Kelowna—two classrooms, etc., replacing an old inadequate
building. One of the classrooms in this building is designed to be
a combined classroom and activity-lunch room.
Each of these new buildings has an adequate kitchen, staffroom, and lavatories
with full plumbing.
Two fine modern classrooms were added at Winfield and one at Okanagan Centre.
School District No. 77 (Summerland)
This is a very compact district served by one elementary and one junior-senior high
school. The teaching staff numbers 28 and the net enrolment for the year was 738, an
increase of two pupils over the preceding year. Because of the circumstances noted in
the opening paragraph of this report, it is unlikely that there will be any considerable
increase in enrolment in the near future.
A year ago an addition was made to the elementary school and the original building
was renovated, both the exterior and the interior, to bring it into harmony with the
addition.   The result is a fine modern and functional building.
This year the new junior-senior high-school building was completed and occupied
in February. It is in every way a credit to the school district and to the Province as
a whole. In September, in anticipation of the completion of this building, the 6—3—3
plan of organization replaced the former 8—4 plan. For the first five months of the year
the work was carried on under severe handicaps because of the inadequacy of the
facilities, but adjustments were quickly made when the new quarters were occupied.
As indicated in former reports, the health services of this inspectorate are fully
organized within the South Okanagan Health Unit, and excellent co-operation obtains
between the schools and the health unit.
I am deeply grateful to the members of the School Boards, who serve so faithfully
and so unselfishly, the secretary-treasurers, the principals, and the members of the
teaching staffs for their co-operation. Almost without exception they are all striving
earnestly to promote the best interests of the pupils committed to their charge. I am
also grateful to Inspector Rendle, who assisted me so capably during the month of
February. K 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
School Districts No. 27 (Williams Lake) and No. 28 (Quesnel),
and Unattached School at Chezacut
REPORT OF W. J. MOUAT, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This year the Cariboo area has shown the same marked tendency toward population
increase that has characterized it for the past several years. Perhaps the greatest single
contributing factor has been the expansion of the forest industries. Some of this growth
has been of a nature that promises permanency. Some of it is because of an influx of
small mills that may move again in a year or so. This has created serious problems for
School Districts Nos. 27 and 28 with respect to accommodation and pupil transportation.
Obsolete buildings have had to be reopened or retained in use and new bus routes have
had to be established.   Severe overcrowding has resulted in some instances.
School District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
The outstanding development in this district has been the preparation and approval
of a comprehensive by-law which will improve rural-school facilities and make possible
and available a more adequate secondary-school system. An important feature is the
provision of a dormitory. The district is looking forward to implementing this programme
in the coming year. It was particularly gratifying that the representatives took an active
part in the various phases of the by-law preparation and presentation.
School District No. 28 (Quesnel)
School District No. 28 has made a very good beginning in the task of creating an
adequate secondary-school system. The Board, secretary-treasurer, and staff of the
Quesnel High School have worked together very well, and that school is well on its way
to becoming a modern composite high school. In Wells the Board is reopening Industrial
Arts and Home Economics centres and trying to offer an adequate high-school programme.
This Board has been considering a building programme to provide for the rapid
population growth and to replace obsolete rural schools.   If the proposed by-law secures,
the approval of the ratepayers, Quesnel School District should be able to improve its
educational system still further and relieve its overcrowded schools.
Chezacut School District
Chezacut School was opened this year and is providing a needed service here.
Its new school is quite modern, and the district has provided a serviceable teacherage.
School Districts No. 50 (Queen Charlotte) and No. 68 (Nanaimo)
REPORT OF WILLIAM A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D.P^d.,
F.R.S.A., F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Staff and Enrolment
During the school-year 1950-51 there were 7 teachers employed in School District
No. 50 and 114 teachers employed in School District No. 68. These 121 teachers
enrolled a total of 3,039 students. reports of district inspectors k 95
Buildings, Grounds, and Equipment
In School District No. 50 the ratepayers approved a $200,000 by-law for the
replacement of obsolete school buildings and the purchase of new school-sites at Masset,
Sandspit, Port Clements, and Queen Charlotte City.
In June of this year the Honourable the Minister of Education, together with Mrs.
Straith, visited the remote schools of the Queen Charlotte Islands. On this occasion the
members of the School Board and the residents of the Islands had the opportunity of
meeting the Minister and of appreciating the genuine interest shown by Mr. Straith in
their local educational problems.    .
In School District No. 68 the beneficial results of the $1,747,000 by-law passed
in 1949 are now becoming evident. Twenty-six new elementary classrooms have been
put into operation during the past year. This increased accommodation has resulted
in the abolition of the swing-shift system that has retarded education in this district for
the past several years.
The new schools were officially opened by the Honourable W. T. Straith; Dr. F. T.
Fairey, Deputy Minister and Superintendent of Education; and Mr. H. L. Campbell,
Deputy Superintendent of Education.
In addition to the construction of these elementary schools, tenders have been let for
the large senior high school which the Board hopes to have ready for occupancy in
September, 1952. The honour of turning the first sod for this impressive building was
assigned to ex-Trustee John Barsby, who, as past president of both the British Columbia
and the Canadian Trustees' Associations, has devoted thirty years of his time and energy
to the advancement of education in the Nanaimo district.
Health Service
The health services of all schools in this inspectorate continue to be provided by the
Central Vancouver Island Public Health Unit. In addition to the vast amount of work
done among the pre-school children by the personnel of the health unit, a very thorough
programme of preventive work in immunization, inoculation, and vaccination has been
completed for those in attendance at the public schools.
During the past three years the schools in the Central Vancouver Island inspectorate
have been utilized as an experimental unit for Canada to test the application of the
Wetzel Grid techniques. The experimental work has now been successfully completed,
and the results have been published in the Wetzel Grid Study Report. Commencing
in September, 1951, the Wetzel Grid techniques for the screening of pupils and for the
prevention and correction of mental and physical defects and disabilities will be adopted
as part of the regular health services in this area.
In addition to the regular health services, the Nanaimo District School Board has
appointed a mental-health co-ordinator, who has achieved excellent results during his
first year in this capacity.
Transportation
Conveyance of students to the secondary schools continues to provide a big problem
for the Nanaimo School Board. Out of 1,000 secondary students, more than 600 live
outside the city, in which all the secondary schools are located. In the near future,
consideration must be given to the establishment of one new junior high school in the
city and another in the thickly populated rural area to the north of Nanaimo. If these
two schools were built, the transportation problem would be reduced and the present
obsolete buildings, in which the junior high-school students are housed, could be
abandoned.
Conclusion
In conclusion, I wish to express my gratitude and sincere appreciation to the
principals, teachers,  secretary-treasurers,  and  School Board members  in these two K 96 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
districts for the efficient, energetic, and untiring efforts that they have made to overcome
the difficulties encountered in attempting to achieve the objectives suggested by the
Department. Because of the unselfish and co-operative efforts of these men and women,
the educational levels in both districts have been progressively raised, and the students
are developing under happier and better instructional conditions than they have at any
time in the past.
School Districts No. 35 (Langley) and No. 48 (Howe Sound)
REPORT OF HAROLD D. STAFFORD, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 35 (Langley) is rapidly changing from a rural to a semi-urban
area. The various community centres within the municipality are connected by a network
of good roads. By means of a district-owned bus system, all secondary students have
access to a modern composite junior-senior high school staffed by forty-three teachers.
In the main, the people in School District No. 35 are engaged in growing small
fruits and berries, dairying, and, to a much lesser extent, lumbering and fishing. An
increasing number of people commute daily to the Cities of New Westminster and
Vancouver for employment.
School District No. 35 (Howe Sound) includes Britannia Beach, Squamish, and
Woodfibre on the shores of the Sound and a number of inland communities served by the
Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
Most of the people in this district live in relatively independent communities. They
gain their livelihood by mining, logging, the production of wood-pulp, and by farming
in the rapidly developing section adjacent to Pemberton.
In both school districts there are master teachers and outstanding principals who, by
their initiative, enthusiasm, and leadership, have given excellent service in their school
attendance areas.
The school population consists of normal, wholesome children and a splendid group
of adolescent youths. The abnormal persons, whether deviates in terms of mental ability
or social conduct, are few and are usually identified. The school authorities and other
agencies are doing what they can to meet the needs of all who attend the public schools.
The educational growth of the elementary- and secondary-school students, in my
opinion, is proceeding satisfactorily. That students have won scholarships based on
competitive examinations is indicative that the opportunity for excellence is available
for those who wish to exert themselves. During the next few years, while maintaining
scholarship, it is anticipated there will be increased emphasis upon aesthetic expression
through music, art, and drama. There should be an accompanying broadening of the
health programme, aimed at attaining a high standard in the physical development of
pupils.
It was my privilege to attend several public exhibitions and shows sponsored by the
students and teachers of the Langley Junior-Senior High School. I commend all who
in any way assisted in the preparation and presentation of those excellent performances.
The Boards of School Trustees are served by conscientious and capable secretary-
treasurers. During this past year, in addition to their customary duties, much of their
time has been given to the details connected with the construction of new school buildings
and additions to existing schools. The reconstruction of the Langley Junior-Senior High
School, Industrial Arts Section, destroyed by fire, has proceeded with dispatch. The fact
that the loss of the structure was covered by replacement insurance was indeed fortunate.
All newly built schools in the Howe Sound School District are of sound construction, and ...   -.IJU.-Jii
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 97
it is expected that the new junior-senior high school at Squamish will shortly be opened
for classes.
The Boards of School Trustees have given attention to the dissemination of
information about the schools. In this work they have been assisted by the teachers
and the many active Parent-Teacher Associations.
I conclude this report by expressing my appreciation to all who, in these school
districts, have aided the public-school system in trying to meet its objectives. In
particular I would mention by name Trustees Mrs. M. L. Fougberg, of Pemberton, and
A. T. Smith, of Britannia Mines, who, in the performance of their duties, have accepted
many personal inconveniences and discomforts.
School Districts No. 19 (Revelstoke) and No. 20 (Salmon Arm)
REPORT OF L. B. STIBBS, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate comprises the School Districts of Revelstoke and Salmon Arm.
During the year the School Boards have concentrated on completion of long-term policies
in connection with building programmes. In School District No. 19 (Revelstoke) a bylaw for an addition to the present city high school was approved by the ratepayers of this
district. The addition will include a gymnasium-auditorium and three classrooms. It is
planned to renovate a number of the classrooms and the administrative offices in the old
building. This extension of the high-school facilities is long overdue and will fill a real
need in the education of the pupils and for the community. The Board continued during
the year to renovate and improve the outlying schools. A fine spirit of co-operation exists
between the teachers and the trustees in this area.
In District No. 20 (Salmon Arm), definite progress has been made toward the
completion of a district building programme which was planned several years ago. In
September the consolidated junior-senior high school and the addition to the elementary
school in Salmon Arm were opened officially by the Honourable the Minister of Education
and Dr. F. T. Fairey, the Deputy Minister of Education. This secondary school serves
almost the entire area of the large school district. During the year the Carlin Elementary
School, the Eagle Valley Elementary-High School, and the North Shuswap Elementary
School were officially opened by the Inspector of Schools. These new buildings are of
modern design and have eliminated almost all of the unsatisfactory one-room schools
which were in operation heretofore. The Falkland Consolidated Elementary High School,
which will serve all school-children from Heywood's Corner to Falkland, was well on its
way to completion at the end of June. The opening of these schools has necessitated a
heavy programme of transportation. This district now operates ten school buses, as well
as contracting privately for transportation services in three areas. It would appear perhaps
that this area is overconsolidated, and in the near future the School Board will no doubt
have to decide to reopen some of the former one-room schools so that youngsters in the
primary grades can be accommodated closer to their own homes. It is pleasing to see
the good relations which exist between the School Board and the teachers of this district.
Financial and administrative problems have been especially heavy for the School
Board of District No. 20 (Salmon Arm). Early in 1951 an Arbitration Board ruled that
the ordinary estimates of the district were to be cut by $80,500. This created a serious
situation, and it appeared to be evident that all the schools would be unable to operate for
the remainder of the year unless a solution to the financial problem could be found. K 98 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
In closing, I would take this opportunity to sincerely thank the trustees, the teachers,
and all others directly connected with the schools of my inspectorate for their friendly
co-operation and assistance during 1950-51.
School Districts No. 71 (Courtenay) and No. 72 (Campbell River)
REPORT OF C. I. TAYLOR, B.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment
School District No. 72 continued to show considerable increase in enrolment during
the school-year. The new pulp-mill at Duncan Bay will further aggravate this situation.
The Campbell River School, built in 1949 to accommodate 500 pupils, now has 681
pupils enrolled and will of necessity be on shift again next year. Another by-law to
increase accommodation in this district is essential. A school was reopened at Redonda
Bay in February, two more at Port Neville, and Jackson Bay will be reopened in
September.   Read Island was closed as of June 27th.
In District No. 71 the increase of pupils has been steady. Overcrowding and shifts
will be avoided if the buildings provided in By-law No. 2 can be constructed during the
next year.
Buildings
By-law No. 2, presented to the ratepayers of School District No. 71 on June 9th,
received a good majority. This by-law provides for new elementary schools at Royston,
Courtenay, and Tsolum; additions to elementary schools at Comox and Union Bay;
reconstruction and additions to Courtenay High School, Tsolum Elementary-Senior High
School, and Cumberland Junior-Senior High School.
The Honourable the Minister of Education opened three new schools in School
District No. 72 at Squirrel Cove, Mansons Landing, and Quadra Island. Campbell Falls
School was also opened during the year. A new two-room school at Sayward is now in
the process of construction.
School District No. 71 opened a new school on Hornby Island in September.
Schools in these districts are well equipped, and maintenance is efficiently carried out.
Transportation
x
Transportation in School District No. 72 caused some trouble because of the heavy
increase in enrolment. Transportation will always be a serious problem in this district
until decentralization of elementary schools can be accomplished.
Teaching Staff
A loyal and efficient staff of 128 teachers serve these two districts. A good part of
the work this year involved getting to know these people. Principals' meetings were held
once a month. Meetings were held with the staffs of the various schools, and four
sectional meetings—primary, intermediate, junior high, and senior high—were held with
teachers concerned during the year. All teachers in the district were inspected and
reports issued.
General
I was particularly impressed with the excellence of the two festivals—drama and
music—which took place this year.
A track meet for junior-high grades was introduced. This should prove an annual
event. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 99
Reorganization of the Cumberland school situation to provide for the elementary
Grades I to VI and junior-senior high school Grades VII to XII was completed for next
September.
The two School Boards continue to work hard and to give effective service.
School Districts No. 65 (Cowichan), No. 66 (Lake Cowichan),
and No. 67 (Ladysmith)
REPORT OF B. THORSTEINSSON, B.A., M.B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The general reorganization of inspectorates, which became effective in September,
1950, resulted in the formation of this new inspectorate, with offices established in
Duncan. This area is comprised of School Districts No. 65 (Cowichan), No. 66 (Lake
Cowichan), and No. 67 (Ladysmith). Comparative figures for these school districts
from June, 1950, to June, 1951, are as follows:—
District No. 65  (Cowichan)  Pupils Teachers
June, 1950  1,594 64
June, 1951   1,648 70
District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)—
June, 1950      969 38
June, 1951   1,065 38
District No. 67 (Ladysmith)—
June, 1950 1  1,053 34
June, 1951   1,090 37
Totals—
June, 1950  3,616 136
June, 1951   3,803 145  •
This has been a year of steady and continuous progress. Staffing problems were at
a minimum and co-operation between teachers and Board members has progressed
favourably. A noteworthy development during the year has been the planning of new
school buildings and the completion of others already under way.
School District No. 65 (Cowichan)
On September 15th, 1950, the high-school pupils of the Cowichan district moved
into the new district high school which had just been completed in Duncan. This fine
new school building, with its well-arranged shops, its excellent library, and its ample
gymnasium-auditorium, is filling a long-felt need in this area. For the first time in this
district, secondary pupils were brought together under one roof and were offered a broad
and diversified programme.
This school was officially opened by the Minister of Education, the Honourable
W. T. Straith, on November 15th, 1950. A very large number of citizens attended the
opening. The favourable comments by those present is a tribute to the members of the
School Board, whose constant effort and persistence made the consolidated high school
possible.
During the year the community at large, as well as the pupils, have made good use
of their new building.   The most noteworthy development in this direction was the estab- K 100 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
lishment, for the first time in this area, of night classes, sponsored by the Board of School
Trustees and the Department of Education. The night-school, which was very successfully operated, was enthusiastically received by all concerned.
School District No. 66 (Lake Cowichan)
The continued growth of school population in this area necessitated an addition
during the year of eight rooms to the Lake Cowichan High School. At Gordon River a
one-room school was reopened in temporary quarters. Plans are going ahead to establish
this school on a more modern and permanent basis.
Good progress has been made during the year in general maintenance and in school-
bus housing. All buses are now provided with shelter, and a general shop has been
included where repairs may be efficiently carried on.
The Board of School Trustees, always alert to the needs of the pupils in the area, has
worked most co-operatively and effectively in improving educational facilities for the
pupils in the area. Mr. J. Allan, who had contributed so much as a trustee, found it
necessary, due to ill-health, to relinquish his position on the Board. His place has been
ably filled by Mrs. C. H. McMurtrie, who took office on January 1st, 1951.
School District No. 67 (Ladysmith)
In District No. 67 a new two-room addition was added to the Saltair School, and the
name was changed to Mount Brenton. During the year, work was commenced on the
new junior-senior high school building in Ladysmith, on the new junior high school
building in Chemainus, and on the one-room elementary building on Thetis Island.
It is expected that the Chemainus and Thetis Island schools will be completed and ready
for occupancy by the opening of school in September. The junior-senior high school in
Ladysmith should be ready about the middle of the year.
The Board of School Trustees is to be congratulated for the effective and expeditious
manner in which the building programme has been launched. Successful completion of
these buildings will assure the district of much needed secondary-school accommodation.
School Districts No. 21 (Armstrong-Enderby) and No. 22 (Vernon)
REPORT OF A. S. TOWELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Unlike the previous several years, the school-year 1950-51 brought no major
changes to this inspectorate. The recent rapid rate of increase of enrolment and of
teaching staff slowed down considerably, affording what may be termed a breathing spell
for consolidation of gains.   It was a year of unspectacular but solid achievement.
One very gratifying development was the decision to expand the activities of the
North Okanagan Health Unit by the addition of a school dental clinic. It is expected
that this clinic will begin operation early in the next school-year.
School District No. 21 (Armstrong-Enderby)
For this district, with its acute and worsening accommodation problem, 1950-51
was a year of hope deferred. The School Board's million-dollar building programme
had been brought to the point where it was expected that a by-law could be placed before
the voters early in 1951, but in view of the state of the debenture market, and because
of certain other adverse developments, it was deemed expedient to postpone the vote. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS K 101
This means that present accommodation will have to serve for at least two more
years, for even with the most favourable turn of circumstances it would hardly be possible
to have the new buildings ready before September, 1953.
School District No. 22 (Vernon)
The building programme for this district was brought one further step toward
completion by the erection of a new and modern three-room school at Lavington. The
only major project now left to be done is the auditorium-gymnasium for the Vernon
Senior High School, the construction of which will be started, it is hoped, in the very
near future.
One hears much nowadays about the importance of providing good working
conditions, and this would apply, one would think, at least as much to pupils and
teachers as to workers in industry. It is conceded that the best work cannot be expected
where lighting is poor, where surroundings are dingy and unattractive, where there are
physical discomforts, and where equipment is inadequate. The Vernon School District
is rapidly approaching the point where the working conditions in all its schools will be
very satisfactory.
One more development this year remains to be noted—namely, the establishment
in the Vernon High School of a course in Vocational Agriculture. It is hoped that this
will prove a valuable addition to the curricular offerings.
In conclusion, I should like once more to record my appreciation of the faithful
service rendered by the trustees and by the teachers and other employees, and also of the
fine co-operation I have received from all of them. Such pleasant relationships do much
to lighten the burden of an Inspector's work.
School Districts No. 15 (Penticton), No. 16 (Keremeos), and No. 17 (Princeton)
REPORT OF ALEX TURNBULL, M.C., M.M., B.A.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Since the reorganization carried out last year, this inspectorate now takes in the
following area: School District No. 15 (Penticton), School District No. 16 (Keremeos),
and School District No. 17 (Princeton). The staff consists of 127 teachers—64 in
elementary and 63 in junior-senior high schools—and 3,450 pupils were in attendance,
an increase of 87 over the previous year.
It is evident that the accommodation problem has eased considerably. Sixteen
schools are in operation, and as a result of the intensive work of recent years, proper
classrooms will be available for all pupils this fall. Modern high schools, equipped to
offer a wide range of courses, serve each district.
In September the new school at Princeton was formally opened by the Honourable
W. T. Straith and Dr. F. T. Fairey. At Keremeos, in May, Mr. Straith officiated at
another pleasing ceremony, when the new Similkameen Junior-Senior High School and
the Cawston Elementary School were dedicated. The Carmi Elementary School was
completed at Penticton and occupied in April. Building continues in that district, where
a gymnasium and an auditorium are still under construction.
A very popular service was inaugurated at Penticton in January, when the fine new
cafeteria was ready for operation. Full-course lunches at moderate prices are served to
several hundred pupils daily. The efficiency with which this unit is functioning is proving
of great satisfaction to those responsible for the health of the large number of students
obliged to travel by bus.
PROVINCIAL UBRAftk,
VICTORIA, b. a K 102
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
A definite stabilization of school routine is evident, and the strenuous years of
planning on the part of school authorities are beginning to show results. Community
uses of the new facilities are taxing them to the limit.   The efforts have been worth while.
Academic standards have been maintained and checked by the regular testing
programme. A capable staff is in charge of the schools. Adult education continues to
advance, and night classes prove increasingly popular. During the term Penticton
Elementary staff enjoyed the association with Miss Irma Sherk, an exchange teacher
from St. Catherines, Ont. As usual, the members of the Public Health Department
contributed valuable service to the school system.
Student activities which culminated in appropriate graduation ceremonies received
ample attention. Systematic interschool contacts were organized through athletics,
dramatics, public speaking, music, and conferences. Two successful gatherings promoted
by Penticton Junior-Senior High School brought together student leaders from all sections
of the valley. These very wholesome and inspiring meetings were a great credit to those
who planned the programmes.
Personally it has been a good year, and I wish to express my sincere appreciation
to trustees, teachers, and students who have done so much to make it so.
School Districts No. 56 (Vanderhoof), No. 57 (Prince George), and
No. 58 (McBride)
REPORT OF R. G. WILLISTON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Three tables which appear below give a concise picture of the educational facilities
and organization in this inspectorate. Space does not permit a discussion of the
information presented, but certain conclusions might be drawn from the correlation
which appears to exist.
Grading and Promotion of Pupils
S.D. No. 56
(Vanderhoof)
S.D. No. 57
(Prince George)
S.D. No. 58
(McBride)
A
B
C
A
B           C
A
B
C
Grade I  	
Grade II      	
58
66
46
56
52
52
40
35
3
9
2
1
1
2
2
. 1
3
10
3
15
8
13
9
13
200
207
184
171
147
132
128
103
18    |      30
18    |      48
6           38
8           43
6          29
6    |      29
8          26
12    j      22
52
40
48
34
29
38
24
30
1
1
4
4
6
Grade III	
Grade IV	
Grade V 	
Grade VI                     	
6
Grade VII  	
6
Grade VIII	
Totals. 	
405
21
74
1,272    |      82    |    265
1              1
295
6
50
Legend:—
A—Made normal progress this year.
B—Did not receive grade promotion this year.
C—Repeated at least one grade prior to 1950-51. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
Teachers
K 103
Certificates
Full
Partial
Temporary
Total
Experience
School District No  56
13
52
12
1
26
2
6
5
4
20
83   .
18
2
School District No. 57 	
School District No. 58               	
22
3
Totals  	
77
29
15
121
27
School Buildings
Junior-Senior
High
Elementary-
Senior High
Superior
Graded
Elementary
One-room
Rural
Total
School District No  56
School District No. 57
School District No. 58	
1
1
1
2
2
8
1
3
26
8
8
35
10
Totals 	
1
2
2
11
37
53
A major problem for Boards in this area is to improve school and living accommodations in rural communities so that qualified teachers will wish to remain in a position
for longer than one year. At present annual teacher turn-over in the rural schools
averages approximately 80 per cent.
General
Boards in the three districts are following planned programmes for bringing teaching
supplies and equipment up to a satisfactory standard. During the past year science
supplies, social studies aids, general reference books, and supplementary-reading aids
have received particular attention.
School Districts Nos. 56 and 57 have joined with the Cariboo Health Unit to secure
the services of a dentist, who will concentrate on Grade I and pre-school children in the
areas.   Such a service is badly needed, and the co-operative effort is to be commended.
During the year all districts have taken steps to provide additional accommodation
and facilities. By-law plans have been delayed in Vanderhoof and Prince George until
present restrictions are relaxed, although much of the preliminary detail work has been
completed. McBride passed a by-law for $209,000 in October with a large majority.
Plans are complete for a new secondary school, four rural schools, four teacherages, three
major school reconstructions, and a dormitory.
All rural schools continue to receive good service from the Public Library Commission in Prince George. The number, type, and variety of books distributed has shown
a steady improvement.
The growth and work of the Parent-Teacher Associations throughout the area is to
be commended.
School District No. 56 (Vanderhoof)
Sites have been secured for future school additions at Vanderhoof and Fort
St. James.
Growth in the area is remaining steady. The development on the Nechako River
by the Aluminum Company of Canada has not brought a large increase in school
enrolment.
School District No. 57 (Prince George)
New rural schools and teacherages were constructed at Bud Lake and West Lake.
A new school was constructed at Tabor Creek to replace one destroyed by fire, and
a former school moved and renovated to replace the Salmon Valley School which also K 104 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
burned. Dormitory accommodation in Prince George was doubled by the conversion
of a second army building. Three classrooms were incorporated into this unit. Five
classrooms were added to the Central Fort George School on the edge of the city, making
this a seven-room unit. The Shelley and Buckhorn Schools were completely renovated.
Steps were taken to enlarge the playground of the former, and the latter was moved to
a more central location. Teacherages were built or purchased at Tabor Creek, Aleza
Lake, and Willow River.
Evidences of rapid growth in this area are more marked as the Hart Highway and
Pacific Great Eastern Railway near completion.
School District No. 58 (McBride)
New rural schools were built at Dome Creek and Red Pass to replace old structures.
Schools at Croydon and Goat River were closed, and a school opened at North
Croydon in temporary accommodation.
A high-school dormitory was opened and successfully operated during the year.
Two additional divisions were opened in the McBride Elementary-Senior High
School in temporary accommodation.
School population throughout the area is growing slowly.
I wish to thank all pupils, school trustees, teachers, and school employees for making
my first year as Inspector of this area so pleasant. All those associated with the schools
have worked with a common purpose and have displayed energy and good-will. With the
help of the officials in the Department and the co-operation and understanding of the local
people, the needs of education will continue to receive sympathetic consideration. THE SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND K 105
THE SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND
REPORT OF C. E. MACDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., SUPERINTENDENT
Attendance
Following is a summary of the enrolment for the 1950-51 school-year:—
Day Pupils
Residents
Totals
Deaf or partial hearing    	
Blind or partial sighted   	
29
7
78
27
107
34
Totals   _	
36
105
141
In addition to the above, eight city children of pre-school age have received part-time
instruction and three others have received home-training through our correspondence
course for parents.
The table below indicates the growth in total attendance over the past thirty years
of operation:—
1920-21  51      1940-41  88
1925-26  79      1945-46  111
1930-31  85      1950-51  141
1935-36  92
The median age of the students enrolled during the past year was around 11 years,
Whereas ten years ago it was around 13 years. This reduction in the median age and the
increase in enrolment may be directly attributed to our practice of the past few years of
accepting 5-year-old children in our beginner classes.
Health
In spite of overcrowding in the dormitories, the general health of the children was
very satisfactory.
The assistance of the Metropolitan Health Services, the Children's Health Centre,
and the Child Guidance Clinic has been invaluable in diagnoses, treatments, and guidance
in special situations.
Buildings
The new primary unit for deaf children is near completion and should be ready for
occupancy by the time school reopens in September. It will provide comfortable fireproof living accommodations for approximately sixty children, hospital accommodation
for twenty, and large, well-lighted classrooms for approximately seventy students.
This building is modern in every respect, and has been especially designed for the
purpose of training small deaf children.
We sincerely hope that within a few years a similar building will be erected to meet
the needs of the blind.
With the co-operation of the Public Works Department, the senior boys' dormitory
building and the dormitories in the main building were repainted before the close of
school. All the senior classrooms will have been repainted, refurnished, and equipped
with fluorescent lighting before the fall reopening.
Training Programme
Thirty-nine Canadian and American teachers attended the 1950 Department of
Education summer courses given here by Miss Bennett and Miss Hodgins, of the
Lexington Avenue School in New York City.    Credits earned by our teachers and K 106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
supervisors in these special summer courses are applied toward higher professional
certificates.
One blind student successfully completed the University Entrance requirements and
plans to enrol in the fall term of the University of British Columbia.
A substantial beginning has been made in the introduction of Grade II standard
braille in the junior blind class. As prepared texts for primary grades become available,
this programme will be extended.
Through the untiring efforts of Miss Helen Woodward, vice-principal of the deaf
primary department, and her assistants, marked progress has been achieved in all phases
of the primary programme. The high standards attained in speech and language usage
merit special commendation.
Marked progress is further evidenced in the intermediate and senior deaf classes,
under the capable direction of Miss Mabel Blake, vice-principal.
I am pleased to report that the academic standard of our deaf department has been
advanced by one full year to the completion of junior high school, as prescribed for
regular public schools.
It is hoped that before long it will be possible to institute one or more vocational
courses suitable for senior deaf students.
General Remarks
In submitting this report, I am deeply conscious of the valuable assistance rendered
by the Junior League of Vancouver, the Stagettes, the Quota Club, and other interested
organizations and individuals. Their co-operation has contributed in a large measure
to the progress achieved during the past year and is deeply appreciated.
I wish, too, to express my sincere thanks to Inspectors Gray and Burnett, of our
Management Committee, for their sympathetic understanding and counsel, to the
Department of Education, and to all members of the school staff for their whole-hearted
support. CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS K 107
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
High School and Vocational Courses
REPORT OF EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. £S L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the year
1950-51 was 5,828.   This figure shows a decrease of 165 from 1949-50.
Correspondence courses were taken by students in the following classifications:—
Students registered in schools—
1. School-age students registered in high and superior per cent
schools.      (Throughout   this   report   the   term
" school-age " refers to students under 18 years
of age.)  1,790
2. School-age students registered in elementary schools       97
Total number of school-age students  1,887
3. Students of 18, 19, and 20 registered in their local
schools       637
4. Students of 21 or over registered in their local
schools         13
Total number of students registered in their
local schools taking one or more correspondence courses   2,537      43.5
Students not registered in schools—
1. School-age students unable to attend school because
of physical disability.^        50
2. School-age students gainfully employed      102
3. School-age students studying courses at home
because of the distance factor      265
4. School-age students in institutions—Girls' Industrial School, Boys' Industrial School, Oakalla
Prison Farm, British Columbia Penitentiary        32
5. School-age students not registered in schools for
other reasons         11
6. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years not registered in
their local schools      621
Total number of students under 21 not
registered in their local schools and
obtaining their education by correspondence   1,081      18.6
7. Adult students (21 years and over)  2,210      37.9
Total number of students  5,828    100.0 K 108 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
The students enrolled may be classified as to age in the following three groups:-
Per Cent
1. Pupils under 18 years of age  2,347      40.3
2. Pupils of 18, 19, and 20  1,258      21.6
3. Pupils of 21 years of age and over  2,223      38.1
Totals  5,828 100.0
Some of these students took a full year's work in six high-school courses.   Others
registered for only one or two courses.   The number of students who enrolled in each
of the high-school subjects during the year was as follows:—
English Literature 10, 20, 30, 40  768
English Grammar and Composition 10, 20, 30, 40  833
Social Studies 10, 20, 30 :  613
Science 10, 20, 30  461
Mathematics 10, 11, 20, 30, 91  1,498
Latin I, 10, 20, 30  343
Spanish 10, 20, 30  158
French 10, 20, 30 J  442
Effective Living 10  211
Health III, 20, 30 1 250
Agriculture 10, 20  211
Social Studies 32  37
Geography 91   14
Homemaking 10, 20, 30  382
Art 10  258
Record-keeping 11   629
Junior Business 12  47
Book-keeping 22, 91, 95  468
Mathematics 12  88
Shorthand 21, 31  213
Typewriting 10, 20  904
Secretarial Practice   1
English 93   51
Journalism 31  '  54
Biology 91   55
Physics 91 '_  52
German 90 :  104
Chemistry 91   57
Bible Study  71
Mechanical Drawing  281
Sheet-metal work 52  18
Metal-mining   4
Automotive Engineering 53, 54 ,  177
Diesel Engineering 55 ;  36
Electricity 56  127
Radio 57, 58 ,  84
Elementary Geology 29  50
Forestry 39   51
Art 39  46
Building Construction 51  94
Home Furnishing  45
Total :  io,286 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS K 109
This figure is, of course, larger than the figure given for the number of students
enrolled, since the majority of the students were registered for more than one course.
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Senior Matriculation courses
was as follows:—
English Literature 100  127
English Composition 101—  125
Mathematics 101  114
French 101      88
Latin 101      28
History 101     66
Chemistry 100     20
Physics 100     23
Homemaking 100       6
Agriculture 100 I     13
Total :  610
The number of students who enrolled in each of the non-credit courses may also be
classified in the following table:—
Steam Engineering Ia, Ib, IIa  398
Aviation I  8
House Painting and Decorating  11
Industrial Mathematics  121
Soils and Field Crops  9
Poultry-keeping  :  7
Practical Design   41
Glove-making   31
Air Navigation I, II  6
Mathematics for Steam Engineering IIa  43
Fruit-growing  8
Accountancy for Credit Unions  12
Spherical Trigonometry  7
English 19  '.  76
Total .  778
Students in rural elementary schools and superior schools, hospitals, and inmates
of public institutions were not required to pay fees. Students of small high schools were
required to pay an annual fee of $3. Other students paying fees were those who have
the privilege of attending a high school having six or more teachers, employed students
of 16 or over, students enrolled for Senior Matriculation courses, and students living
outside this Province.
Most students paid their own fees. However, in the case of 665 students the fees
were paid by their school district office.
The following is a classification of students who were exempted from tuition fees:-^
1. Hospital cases  195
2. British Columbia Penitentiary  111
3. Oakalla Prison     65
4. Girls' Industrial Home     13
5. Boys' Industrial Home     20
6. New Haven     31
7. On relief or equivalent     10
8. Disabled students at home     21
9. Students needed at home     20
Total  486 K 110 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
All students were asked to indicate their chosen vocations.   The following summary
shows the choices of those who gave this information: —
Professional—
Teachers   43 8
Nurses  309
Medicine   8 7
Science  52
Law  22
Art  76
Theology  16
Pharmacy  32
Miscellaneous  127
Commercial   596
Skilled labour (mechanics, technicians, steam engineers, etc.) 214
Aviation .  20
His Majesty's Forces  48
Civil Service  9
Agriculture and farming  92
Forestry   48
Mining  1  5
Journalism   55
Diesel and steam engineering  466
Radio  32
Miscellaneous   157
Not given *  2,927
Total I. 5,828
Completion of Courses
A total of 84,402 papers was marked during the year, which is a slight decrease over
the number of papers marked in the preceding year. The Director and staff do everything
possible to induce students to complete their courses.
New Courses
Latin 20, French 10, Spanish 10, Social Studies 10, Effective Living 10, Mathematics
11, and Extra-mural Music were the new courses offered during the year.
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 1,853 students with material from our course
in English 1 for New Canadians; 176 students were supplied with material from the
course in English 19 (for New Canadians); and 76 students took the course in English 11
for New Canadians by correspondence. Classes in English were held in large city night-
schools and in small isolated places all over the Province. In isolated places the
neighbours or the employers of the new Canadians gave them instruction from our
English courses. CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
Elementary Correspondence School
K 111
REPORT OF ANNA B. MILLER, DIRECTOR
During the school-year 1950-51 there were 1,415 pupils enrolled in the Elementary
Correspondence School. Of these, 1,291 were enrolled at Victoria and the remaining
124 were enrolled at Pouce Coupe in the Peace River District. The tabulation below
shows the enrolment by month and grade for each of these localities.
Enrolled at Victoria
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Total
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
September	
132
138
98
102
70
70
67
46
723
October  	
166
156
121
126
89
86
82
69
895
November 	
178
172
128
138
101
95
94
77
983
December	
189
182
133
151
104
105
97
81
1,042
January  	
205
186
148
159
112
106
103
93
1,112
February	
223
197
157
169
121
108
108
96
1,179
March    	
234
202
158
170
126
112
111
99
1,212
April 	
235
211
163
179
131
115
117
109
1,260
May 	
227
222
166
184
131
119
118
115
1,282
June 	
225
217
171
185
132
119
123
119
1,291
Enrolled at Pouce Coupe (Peace River Branch)
September-
October	
November..
December...
January	
February	
March 	
April 	
May	
June	
16
13
8
5
4
3
3
3
21
19
12
7
5
4
3
4
22
20
13
7
7
5
4
4
21
24
17
8
7
6
4
5
29
26
17
13
8
6
4
5
36
26
18
13
6
8
4
5
36
27
20
13
6
8
4
5
36
27
20
14
6
9
4
5
37
28
20
15
6
9
4
5
37
28
20
15
6
9
4
5
55
75
82
92
108
116
119
121
124
124
The number of papers corrected in the two centres was as follows: Victoria,
150,271 papers; Pouce Coupe, 13,992 papers. This makes a total of 164,263 papers
marked during the year.
The staff in Victoria consisted of the Director, twelve full-time instructors, one
part-time instructor, and an office staff of six members. In the Peace River there is
one full-time instructor and one part-time instructor to handle the work involved in that
branch.
When the marking becomes too heavy for the staff at the school, lessons are sent
out to outside markers. These are people qualified to mark papers who do it in their
homes. This is a part-time occupation. The services of eleven outside markers were
used this year.
Adult pupils wishing to complete their elementary schooling are enrolled in the
Elementary Correspondence School. This year the enrolment of adults for the year was
as follows:—
September  73
October  95
November   114
December   126
January   133
February
161
March  179
April   191
May  201
June   209
There were 5,216 papers of adult students corrected during the year. K 112 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE
The year 1950-51 has been one of strain for this office. We continue to suffer from
lack of space, both in the office and shipping-room. The renting of additional storage-
space does nothing to eliminate the many hours of overtime the shipping-room staff is
required to put in to ensure reasonable delivery at school-opening time. The Branch,
nevertheless, continues to operate successfully, and 92 per cent of the public-school pupils
enrolled in Grades VII to XIII participated in the Text-book Rental Plan, which is ample
proof of this voluntary scheme's success.
It is pleasing to record also that the Rental Plan is operating satisfactorily from
a financial point of view. It is an assisted scheme, and part of the $100,000 subsidy
voted was used during the fiscal year. On the whole, the. books in the schools are being
fairly well cared for, but there are classes where more use might be made of the paper
covers which are available. I am pleased to report that arrangements are in hand for the
salvage and repair of some books which otherwise might be destroyed. The thought and
effort given by many teachers and principals to the completion of requisitions and other
forms is appreciated.
The other operations of the Branch were carried on to the satisfaction of the various
dealers, School Boards, etc.
To purchase and distribute the free supplies, issued during the school-year 1950-51
to public schools and in connection with correspondence courses, required an expenditure
of $188,008.49; 4,218 free requisitions were received and'filled.
Combined orders, free and saleable, reached the large total of 17,500. From these
orders the sum of $419,786.66 was collected by us and deposited in the Treasury.
Many of the report forms, etc., issued by the Department of Education were
distributed by us to the various School Boards, when and where required.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OFFICER IN CHARGE, TEXT-BOOK BRANCH,
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1951
In presenting this report, my twentieth and the second to include the operation of
the Rental Plan, I am pleased it is still another of successful operations and sound
financial result, as can be seen from the accompanying statements.
Stock
The stock on hand in our warehouse, $323,646.38, is valued at publisher's price,
plus incoming freight. Rental stock on hand, $356,641.26, is the value of the books
in the schools (Rental Plan), less depreciation, but it does not take into account the
transportation and other costs involved in moving these books from our shipping-room
to the various schools of the Province, nor does it give us an opportunity to cover the
office overhead.
Sales
Our sales to dealers, etc., amounted to $475,459.58, and discount allowed was
$85,671.91.
Rentals
We received $221,915.31 in rental fees from the various schools, an increase of
19 per cent over the previous year, and, in addition, we received $64,497.20 from the
Rental Plan subsidy vote. TEXT-BOOK BRANCH K 113
General Remarks
To a very loyal and efficient staff, and to all schools, School Boards, and particularly the secretary-treasurers, I extend a very sincere thanks. Without their willing
co-operation, reports of this nature cannot be made.
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31st, 1951
Sales
Revenue—
Sales  $475,459.58
Less discount       85,671.91
Net sales  $389,787.67
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, March 31st, 1950  $242,361.55
Purchases for year (cost, freight, and duty)     418,568.26
Inventory, March 31st, 1951 i__ $660,929.81
Cost of sales     323,646.38
337,283.43
Gross profit     $52,504.24
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages     $29,165.05
Freight and delivery         5,764.43
Packing and general expenses         5,311.85
       40,241.33
Net profit transferred to Capital Investment Account     $12,262.91
Rentals
Revenue—
Rental fees collected  $221,915.31
Subsidy, Province of British Columbia (Vote 84 (b),
1950-51)        64,497.20
 $286,412.51
Deduct cost of rentals—
Inventory, March 31st, 1950  $293,293.77
Plus purchases for year     314,991.57
$608,285.34
Inventory, March 31st,
1950  $439,940.66
Less two years'
depreciation
at 33J/3 per
cent per annum      293,293.78
  $146,646.88
Carried forward  $146,646.88 $608,285.34 $286,412.51 K 114 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31st, 1951—Continued
Rentals—Continued
Brought forward  $146,646.88 $608,285.34 $286,412.51
Revenue—Continued
Deduct cost of rentals—Continued
Inventory, March 31st,
1951  $314,991.57
Less one year's
depreciation
at 331/3 per
cent per annum      104,997.19
     209,994.38
     356,641.26
     251,644.08
Gross profit     $34,768.43
Less expenses—
Salaries and wages     $25,198.55
Freight and delivery         4.980.45
Packing and general expenses         4,589.43
       34,768.43
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1951
Assets
Imprest Account—
Cash on hand -  $100.00
Cash in bank  350.00
  $450.00
Inventory—
Stock on hand     323,646.38
Consigned text-books   $608,285.34
*Less depreciation     251,644.08
     356,641.26
Accounts receivable  10,247.90
Suspense Account (publishers' credits)  1,879.74
Obsolete stock on hand  10,376.55
Subsidies provided for Text-book Rental Plan     $64,497.20
Less 1949-50 profit         1,697.68
  62,799.52
Rental Plan profit, 1949-50         1,697.68
$767,739.03
*Second-year depreciation on 1949-50 inventory  $146,646.89
Depreciation on  1950-51  inventory     104,997.19
$251,644.08 TEXT-BOOK BRANCH K 115
Balance-sheet, March 31st, 1951—Continued
Liabilities
Treasury advances  $450.00
Reserve for obsolete stock  10,376.55
Capital Investment Account  756,912.48
$767,739.03
Reserve for Text-book Plan subsidy provided in fiscal year 1949-50, $200,000,
withdrawn as not required. K 116
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION
Industrial Education
H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL
EDUCATION
Under the general heading of "Adult Education," two groups of classes are administered by the Department of Education. These groups are: (1) Those that are conducted
in co-operation with the Dominion Government, and (2) those that are the direct responsibility of the Province. The reports of the responsible officers are grouped here for
convenience.
Industrial Education—H. A. Jones, Director of Technical and Vocational Education.
(1) Canadian Vocational Training Programme—■
(a) Classes operated under the Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training
Agreement.
(b) Classes operated under the Dominion-Provincial Apprentice Training
Agreement.
(2) Night-schools (see Industrial Education Report).
Correspondence Instruction—
* High School—Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L., Director.
* Elementary School—Miss Anna B. Miller, Director.
* Recreational and Physical Education—R. J. Phillips, Acting Director.
* School and Community Drama—H. S. Hum, B.A., Director.
* See separate report following.
(1) CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMME
During the fiscal year 1950-51 the following schedules of the Dominion-Provincial
Vocational Training Agreement were in operation: Schedule " C " (Urban Occupational
Training), Schedule "E" (Rural Training), Schedule "H" (Student Aid), Schedule
" M " (Unemployed Workers' Training). In addition, under the Apprentice Training Agreement training was given to regularly indentured apprentices at night-schools
and by correspondence.
(a) Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement
Schedule C—Urban Occupational Training
During the past year, three classes were in operation under this schedule, which
offers training to persons between the ages of sixteen and thirty years who have not been
previously employed. At the Vancouver Vocational Institute a class in Power-machine
Sewing was held, and two classes, one in Automotive Mechanics and one in Diesel
Mechanics, were in operation at the Dominion-Provincial Vocational School at Nanaimo.
The costs of these classes were shared equally between the Dominion Department of
Labour and the Provincial Government.
The total enrolment during the fiscal year 1950-51 was as follows:—
Men
Women
Total
Nanaimo
15
30
28
15
30
Power-machine sewing	
Vancouver
28
Totals	
45
28
73 REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION K 117
Schedule E—Rural Training
The following report has been prepared by Gordon M. Shrum, O.B.E., M.M.,
Ph.D.(Tor.), F.R.S.C., Director of the Department of University Extension, University
of British Columbia:—
" The seventh annual Dominion-Provincial Youth Training School was held at the
University of British Columbia from January 8th to March 3rd, 1951. As in former
years, this eight-week leadership training school for young people from the rural areas
was sponsored by the Provincial Department of Education, the Federal Department of
Labour, and the Department of University Extension.
" Fifty-nine students, representing most rural districts of British Columbia, including
the Peace River area, attended this year's school. Twenty-four girls received instruction
which placed primary emphasis on sewing, handicrafts, weaving, and cooking, and
secondary emphasis on personal relationships, nutrition, home management, knotting and
braiding, and many practical arts. Thirty-five boys gained, through lectures and laboratory experience, knowledge and skill in agricultural engineering, motors, carpentry, and
blacksmithing. Their study programme also included instruction in welding, plumbing,
painting, electricity, and handicrafts. In addition, students took public speaking, clubs
and government, farm management, record-keeping, soils and crops, home planning, livestock, dairying, poultry, and horticulture. Activities in addition to regular classes included
dramatics, publications, first aid, recreational planning, photography, 16-mm. motion-
picture projection, radio forums, documentary film showings, as well as physical education
and recreation.
" Students attended classes and laboratories during the day and took part in the
recreational programme during the evenings. The school was operated along the lines of
a folk-school, with the staff and students living and taking their meals at the Acadia Camp
Youth Training Centre.
" The staff for the school was drawn from the University Faculty of Agriculture, the
Provincial Department of Agriculture, the Department of University Extension, and
specialized commercial organizations.
" It is felt that this type of training meets a real need in this Province, where so many
of the rural areas are handicapped by a degree of isolation and by inadequate facilities
for vocational farm training."
Schedule H—Student Aid
Under the provisions of the Dominion-Provincial Student Aid Schedule, students of
academic merit who are in financial need can secure financial assistance to enable them to
proceed with their education beyond the level of the secondary school. The awards
granted are in the form of 60-per-cent bursary (or gift) and 40-per-cent loan, which is
repayable one year after the recipient has entered employment.
Awards are made by a Selection Committee consisting of the Deputy Minister and
Superintendent of Education (who acts as chairman), the Assistant Superintendent of
Education, the Registrar of the Department of Education, the Director of Technical
and Vocational Education, and representatives of the various institutions concerned.
Wherever possible, each applicant is interviewed by the committee.
During the past year, 557 awards, ranging from $50 to $400, were made to students
attending the institutions listed.   The total fund available was $100,000. K 118 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Number of Students
Institution Assisted
Section I.—Students in any faculty and in any year—
University of British Columbia  307
Victoria College  16
Burnaby South High School  1
North Vancouver High School  1
John Oliver High School  1
King Edward High School  3
Kelowna High School  1
University of Alberta  1
McGill University  21
University of Manitoba  1
University of Oregon  14
University of Ottawa  4
Queen's University  3
University of Toronto  17
University of Western Ontario  2
Ontario Veterinary College  5
University of Washington  5
University of Saskatchewan  1
St. Michael's College  1
College of Optometry of Ontario  1
Royal Roads  1
University of Minnesota  1
University of California  1
409
Section II.—Nurses in training at hospitals—
Royal Columbian Hospital  10
Vancouver General Hospital  6
St. Paul's Hospital  2
St. Joseph's Hospital  4
Royal Jubilee Hospital  8
Section III.—Students attending Normal Schools—
Victoria Normal School  70
Vancouver Normal School  41
Section IV.—Students attending public technical, vocational, or
art schools where fees are charged—
Vancouver School of Art  3
Burnaby South High School  1
Vancouver Vocational School  2
Institute of Technology and Art  1
Total number of awards  557
30
111
* Also reported under section dealing with Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement in report on industrial education.
Schedule M—Unemployed Workers' Training
Those eligible for training under this schedule are young men and women who have
been previously employed, but who wish to take training for a new job which will better
their native interests and ability. REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION K 119
During the fiscal year 1950-51, forty-seven women received instruction in power-
machine sewing, and forty-one men were instructed in power-saw operation.
(b) Apprentice Training
The Department of Education, Technical Branch, is responsible for the technical
training of regularly indentured apprentices who are recommended for training by the
Apprenticeship Branch of the Provincial Department of Labour. The full costs of the
training are shared on a fifty-fifty basis with the Dominion Department of Labour.
Instruction is given at night classes operated by local School Boards under the supervision of the Department of Education. Apprentices in outlying districts are able to
receive their instruction by correspondence, without cost to themselves.
During the year 1950-51, there were 1,860 apprentices trained either by correspondence or at night-school classes.   The enrolment per class was as follows:—
Vancouver  Enrolment
Advanced Communications   1
Auto-body and Fender Repair  60
Auto Electric  1
Auto Mechanics  118
Automatic Transmission  6
Benchwork and Joinery  47
Boat-building  -  3 5
Book-keeping (small business)  2
Building-construction   150
Bricklaying  13
Diesel Servicing  13
Drafting   163
Electricity  97
Elementary and Advanced Drawing  3
General Science  1
Machine-shop   156
Mathematics  100
Oil Burners  3
Painting and Decorating  24
Plastering   31
Plumbing  97
Radio   2
Refrigeration   1
Sheet Metal  176
Show-card Writing _.  1
Sign-painting   9
Steam-fitting  12
Structural Engineering  2
Television  2
Engine Tune-up  13
Welding—
Arc  9
Gas  3 3
  1,381 K 120
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
Victoria  Enrolment
Auto-body and Fender Repair     13
Auto Mechanics
Carpentry	
Drafting	
Electricity	
Joinery	
Machine-shop	
Marine Engineering
Mathematics	
Plumbing	
Sheet Metal	
Sign-writing	
Welding	
Art Metal	
Boat-building 	
New Westminster-
Electricity 	
Carpentry	
Mathematics
48
39
41
27
15
13
14
22
36
9
1
20
1
2
301
Mission—
Mathematics	
Correspondence Courses—
Automotive Mechanics
Building Construction _
Electricity	
Commercial Art	
Electrical Meters and Measuring Devices.
Diesel Engineering	
General Science	
Mathematics	
Mathematics (Matriculation) 	
Mechanical Draughting	
Painting and Decorating	
Power-house Design	
Sheet Metal	
Steam Engineering	
Radio-construction	
Costs and Specifications for Builders.
Practical Telephones	
Plumbing	
34
18
29
1
4
3
1
16
2
10
4
2
29
5
5
1
1
1
166
Total enrolment
1,860 REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION K 121
ATTENDANCE SUMMARY
The attendance summary of classes administered by the Industrial Education Branch
during the year 1950-51 is as follows:—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme—
Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement— Enrolment
Schedule C—Urban Occupational Training  73
Schedule E—Rural Training  59
Schedule H—Student Aid  557
Schedule M—Unemployed Workers' Training  88
Dominion-Provincial Apprentice Training Agreement  1,860
Total enrolment  2,637
High School Correspondence Adult Education
EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. £S L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the school-
year 1950-51 was 5,828. Of this number 21.6 per cent or 1,258 were between the ages
of 18 and 20, and 38.1 per cent or 2,223 were 21 years of age or over. Thus 59.7 per
cent of our students can be classified as adults. This is a decrease of 3.8 per cent over
the figures of 1949-50. There was a decrease of 95 students in the number of students
over 21 and 166 in the number of students between the ages of 18 and 20.
There were adult students among those registered for every course offered by this
department, as indicated in my report of High School and Vocational Courses.
The following is a classification of the occupations of students 18 years of age and
over who gave information as to their employment:—
Apprentices      108
Army, Navy, Air Force        36
Civil Servants        78
Domestic workers        50
Farming and ranching -        51
Firemen, engineers      240
Forestry        18
Housewives       102
Lumbering        5 3
Merchants   7
Mining         22
Office-workers      232
Professional—
Teachers  183
Nurses     67
Miscellaneous     26
      276
Railroad         29
Skilled labour      158
Unskilled labour      221
Miscellaneous    .  25
Total  1,706 K 122 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
Elementary Correspondence School Adult Class
ANNA B. MILLER, DIRECTOR
In the school-year 1950-51 the enrolment in the adult class of the Elementary
Correspondence School was 209 students. The enrolment figures for the year are as
follows:—
September      73 February  161
October     95 March  179
November   114 April   191
December  126 May  201
January   133 June  209
During the year, 5,216 papers of adult students were corrected.
Recreation and Physical Education Branch
REPORT OF R. J. PHILLIPS, ACTING DIRECTOR
The Recreation and Physical Education Branch has concluded a very successful year
both in its relationship with schools and communities throughout the Province. The
Branch has been able to extend its technical services with regard to the school Physical
Education programmes by giving advice on facilities, equipment, and programme; by
distributing a periodical bulletin giving ideas and general information designed to
stimulate the Physical Education programme; by assisting in organizing and promoting
sports competitions on an invitational basis; and by conducting sports coaching clinics.
The high-school sports programme was greatly stimulated by the invitation competitions
which this Branch assisted in organizing.   The results were as follows:—
Sport Host Winner
Girls' volleyball—Fairview High School of Commerce Kelowna.
Boys' volleyball—Kelowna High School Kelowna.
Curling Nelson High School, Kimberley.
Boys' basketball- University of British Columbia Duke of Connaught.
Girls' basketball _ Trail High School King Edward.
Track and field ..-.Victoria High School Victoria High School.
Sports Clinics
During the past few years there has been an ever-increasing demand for courses or
clinics on major sports by schools and community groups. Clinics have been held with
great success in basketball, soccer, and track and field athletics, but the number being
conducted is limited primarily by the availability of trained personnel who are free to
travel to key points in the Province.
In September, 1950, this Branch conducted a sports clinic in soccer and basketball
at King Edward High School in Vancouver. This particular clinic grew out of a request
from the British Columbia Communities Centres Conference, when community groups
expressed the need for more trained leaders to head their sports programmes. The
courses were divided into three sections—Coaching and Game Skills, Rules and Referee-
ing, and Psychology of Leadership—and were open to all teachers and prospective REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION K 123
community sports leaders. Messrs. Jack Pomfret, J. Willox, Murray West, Dan Kulai,
and Oliver Walling were in charge of the various sections.
From October to March Messrs. J. Willox and J. Dickerson travelled to the Fraser
Valley, Okanagan Valley, Vancouver Island, the Lower Mainland, and Prince Rupert,
conducting basketball refereeing clinics. In most cases, schools were visited and
instruction given to the student-body during assembly or Physical Education periods.
Attendance at the thirty-three clinics held totalled 7,000 students, coaches, and referees.
The result of these clinics is seen in a better interpretation of the rules of the game
and a better standard of basketball throughout the Province.
Adult Physical-fitness Centres
Our experience during the years this Branch has been in operation has amply
demonstrated the need for organized programmes of recreation. Years ago the communities were much smaller and more widely separated than to-day. Much of the
recreation then revolved about the church and family, and seemed to meet the needs of
the people. To-day, however, our society is more complex, more highly industrialized,
more impersonal, and the constantly changing population has made it difficult for
recreation to spring spontaneously from the community. Recreation leaders in Canada
to-day are generally of the opinion that recreation is primarily the responsibility of the
community itself, and that initiative and control should rest in the hands of representatives
of local communities, with assistance provided by municipal, Provincial, and Federal
Governments. It has been our observation that while Recreation Associations are
springing up all over the Province, the majority of these are not sufficiently experienced
to organize themselves effectively and have not sufficient funds to employ qualified
personnel. This has been borne out in the experience of four Greater Vancouver
Community Associations who were unable to continue operation without the financial
assistance of the civic administration. Even the small monthly grants which our Branch
has made to full-time community directors has been most helpful in assisting thirteen
communities to employ full-time people who could organize and co-ordinate community
activities.
In the matter of a physical-recreation programme we have been able to offer a definite
service to over fifty communities. The activities being promoted have been many and
varied, including gymnastics, basketball, dancing, softball, swimming, ski-ing, badminton,
tennis, and others. The physical-fitness centres (240 in all) are mainly promoted on
a request basis. The community requests the service and provides the facilities; we pay
the instructor and supply some equipment. In Vancouver and Victoria, where the
population is relatively larger and more difficult to organize, the Branch provides the
facilities as well as the instruction and equipment.
We have found that when communities request our assistance in establishing
physical-fitness centres, they ask mainly that the children's recreation needs be looked
after. Being an adult-education branch, we are reluctant to step into this field, and do so
only because the insistent demands from Parent-Teacher Associations, church and
community groups cannot be overlooked. We are aware of the child's need for robust
leisure-time activities, participation in which will materially benefit his health and
character, and we subscribe to the opinion of Dr. Karl S. Bernhardt that " some of the
most important features of character and personality are developed mainly through
leisure-time activities. Initiative, intelligent planning, persistence are just a few of the
traits developed in this way." This Branch is in a position to make a great contribution
to the recreational life of the child as well as the adult, and at the same time to realize, in
part, our aim of raising the physical-fitness standard of the people in our Province, and
thus contributing to the total national fitness. K 124 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
The registration and attendance in the Pro-Rec Physical Fitness classes are as
follows:—
Pro-Rec Centres:  Number of centres, 240; registration, 16,921; attendance,
219,325.
Special Events:  Number of events, 120; number of members, 3,863; number
of visitors and spectators, 24,185.
Community Centres:  Number of centres, 13; registration, 8,130; attendance,
383,944.
Location of Pro-Rec Centres
Vancouver and New Westminster.—There are fifty-five Pro-Rec centres for women,
forty centres for men, and eleven mixed centres in Greater Vancouver and New
Westminster.
Fraser Valley.—Abbotsford, Aldergrove, Chilliwack, County Line, Fleetwood,
Hjorth Road, Kennedy, Langley, Matsqui, Mission, Murrayville, South Westminster,
Sunbury, Webster's Corners.
Okanagan-Kootenay.—Armstrong, Cranbrook, Enderby, Fernie, Grindrod, Kala-
malka Lake, Kamloops, Kelowna, Kimberley, Lumby, Naramata, Nelson, Okanagan
Mission, Oliver, Osoyoos, Peachland, Penticton, Summerland, Vernon, West Summer-
land, Westbank.
Victoria.—There are eight Pro-Rec centres for women, six for men, and twelve
mixed centres in Victoria.
Vancouver Island.—Cordova Bay, Franklin River, Great Central Lake, Mount
View, Nanaimo, Oaklands, Port Alberni, Saltair, Sidney.
Northern British Columbia and West Coast.—Bralorne, Dawson Creek, Fulford
Harbour, Prince Rupert, Sechelt, Tucker Bay, Vanderhoof.
Names of Community Centres
Chemainus Community Centre, Courtenay Recreational Association, Kamloops
Athletic Association, Kimberley Amateur Athletic Association, Kitsilano War Memorial
Community Centre, Marpole Community Centre, Nelson Civic Centre, North Vancouver
Memorial Community Association, Prince George Civic Centre Association, Prince
Rupert Civic Centre Association, Sunset Memorial Centre, Terrace and District Civic
Centre Association, Trail Athletic Association.
Leadership Training
In addition to the sports coaching clinics, the Branch conducted separate Summer
School courses for men and women during August and September. Communities were
invited to select suitable adults who could come to Vancouver for training. Arrangements were made for billeting, and subsidies were granted to enable as many as possible
to attend from out of town. On the completion of the course, successful candidates
returned to their communities and carried on a physical-fitness programme. Thirty-two
women and forty-one men were trained at the Pro-Rec Summer School.
Fitness Demonstrations
Demonstrations were held in many communities to mark the closing of the winter
season. In Vancouver the Pro-Rec Women's Division, under the direction of Mrs. Hilda
Keatley, staged a two-day revue, which was highly successful both from a participant and
spectator point of view. The show was a presentation in capsule form of the activities
that attract thousands of stenographers, factory-workers, store clerks, and housewives
into Pro-Rec throughout the Province. report on adult education k 125
Gymnastic Competition
The New Westminster Junior High School was the scene for the Annual Pro-Rec
Gymnastic Competition. Thirty-eight representative teams from Victoria, Kamloops,
Kimberley, Fraser Valley, and Greater Vancouver competed in the two-day meet, which
involved 187 competitors in five classes of competition. The competition was directed
by Mr. Jerry Mathisen.
Gymnastic Display Tour
During the latter part of June and early July, 1951, a team of fifteen excellent
gymnasts toured the Northern British Columbia area, under the direction of Mr. Sid
Greenwood, visiting nine communities and performing before an estimated 12,000
people.   The tour itself had four main purposes to fulfil:—
(a) To demonstrate to the people of each community one phase of the work
being done by the Government through the Physical Education and
Recreation Branch:
(b) To provoke interest and enthusiasm for the future establishment of a
recreation programme in each of the communities visited:
(c) To show the excellent quality of gymnastic performance that many, if not
most, young men are capable of performing when given an opportunity
to train under the direction of competent instructors and coaches:
(d) To outline to the people assembled at each display the main aims and
policies of the Branch and how the Branch, as set up under the Department of Education in Victoria, can assist the people of the community
in setting up a recreation programme; also to emphasize what the people
must do to help themselves establish a recreation programme.
Financially the tour, in the main, paid its own way. Judging from the expression
of enthusiasm and interest shown during and after each display, it seems that the values
of the tour, regarding the Department of Education and the Branch, for arousing the
people's interest in physical recreation has gone beyond anything formerly anticipated.
Recreation for the Blind
We have in British Columbia approximately 1,700 blind men, women, and children,
with about half of this number residing in Vancouver. A full-time employee of this
Branch has organized a broad programme of recreational activities for the blind in
Vancouver, Victoria, New Westminster, Chilliwack, and Kelowna, through social groups
known as the " White Cane Clubs." About 60 per cent of the blind community in
Greater Vancouver participate in the recreation programme, and a lesser percentage
in outlying regions. The programme is dedicated to providing all our blind folk,
ultimately, with a more abundant measure of happy living.
Regional Supervisors
The services of the Branch were expanded in April by the appointment of two
additional Regional Supervisors. Mr. Ed. Kelter was appointed for Vancouver Island
and Mr. Keith Maltman for the Northern British Columbia area. K 126 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
School and Community Drama Branch
REPORT OF H. S. HURN, B.A., DIRECTOR
The Royal Commission
The recently published report of the Royal Commission on the Fine Arts, Letters,
and Sciences is of interest, especially in relation to the work of this Branch. The report
submitted to the Dominion Government makes a strong plea on behalf of the fine arts
for a greatly enlarged share in the pattern of Canadian life. Among the subjects which
engaged the attention of the Commission was drama, and it is pleasing to reflect that
sixteen years ago the British Columbia Government pioneered in this field, with an
emphasis, then, on the value of drama as a wholesome leisure-time activity.
Community Drama
Approximately 250 community drama groups are functioning in the Province.
They range in size, activity, and influence from a few large ones which carry on a heavy
programme, with six or seven major productions a year and " workshop activities " for
the younger and less experienced members, to small groups whose major effort lies in the
direction of play reading and study, with but one public production. The activity is
basically recreational, but it is impossible to keep it on that level; there is ever a striving
to reach a quality of work that will attract, and there is no doubt that these hard-working
citizens are making a valuable contribution to the life of their respective communities.
It is doubtless true that no activity can be correctly designated " community " unless it
touches practically all citizens, and in the realm of dramatic activity this desirable
situation would be reached only, perhaps, with such projects as pageantry. Figures show,
however, that support is constantly increasing for our groups, proof of a growing interest
in drama and improving standards of entertainment. This is particularly evident in the
smaller communities, whose citizens have little or no opportunity to share in any
professional entertainment which might enter the Province. The organization of
professional companies in music, dance, and drama charged with the responsibility
of taking these arts to the small cities is a project much to be desired, and it is hoped
that the recommendations of the Royal Commission are so implemented by the Government that a start on this can be made, for with the professional development will come
an increasingly virile amateur movement.
High-school Drama
High-school drama is divided between the school activity and the classes in
drama. The former is a truly community effort, integrating every department of the
school—literature, social studies, music, dance, workshop, and household science. It
gives wide scope to the talents of children and unites individual effort with sustained
co-operative enterprise, brings together the intellectual and the practical, the artistic and
the homely, and teaches dependence upon others to the gifted and enhances self-respect
of the less gifted.
Accredited courses, Drama 10, 20, and 30, are available to pupils with a flair for
the subject and offer a wide range of activity and study. Reports on the first year indicate
a good response, which would have been much better were there not difficulties of
arranging individual time-tables, while in some of the smaller schools fitting the subject
into the time-table was not easy. The subject will be the object of study during the
coming year.
The statistical report on all school public productions is too long for this report and
has been forwarded separately. REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION K 127
Elementary-school Dramatics
More dramatic activity has been observed in the elementary-school grades. The
activity has been of such a nature as to ensure that it is " drama in education " rather
than " education in drama," the emphasis being placed on the by-products with a substantial effort toward creativeness. With this emphasis there should be a noticeable
improvement in speech, poise, and movement, a vitalization of other subjects, and
attitudes. With wise choice of material and competent guidance, these young pupils,
possessing much acting ability, have given stage performances that were refreshingly
pleasing and competent.
Festivals
Festivals are " peak exercises " for drama groups who, by their participation, invite
criticism of their efforts. This criticism is offered in all festivals, whether or not they are
competitive, and serves a useful purpose. There were twenty-nine festivals held in the
Province last year. This total is divided into the following sections, according to type:
(a) Musical festivals with music, speech, etc., 9; (b) full-length plays (adults), 1;
(c) one-act plays (adults), 4; (d) one-act plays (schools), 8; (e) one-act plays (schools
and adults), 7. The regional festival of the Dominion Drama Festival of full-length plays
was held in Vancouver and attracted seven entries. The Vancouver Repertory Players'
entry, " Therese," was chosen to go to London, Ont., to take part in the final. The
Players are a comparatively young amateur group and did well.
One of the difficulties confronting those who compete in this national festival of
drama is the cost of entry and, if chosen to compete in the final, that of travel. This latter
is accentuated when it is necessary to transport scenery and properties as well.
Sundry Topics
There was a continuing heavy demand upon the facilities of" the Branch—books,
lights, curtains, and pamphlets.
The drama essay contest was won for the fourth consecutive year by the Kitsilano
Junior-Senior High School.
The Trail High School won the prize for the best scrap-book.
The annual magazine was sent to all groups and schools, and a bi-monthly bulletin
was started.
Scholarships to Summer Schools of the Theatre were awarded to Gerald Guest of
Esquimalt High School, Mary Watson of North Saanich High School, Gwen Laurie
of Cranbrook High School, and Arlette Kostyk of Fairview High School of Commerce.
There was some increase in summer drama activity, and it would appear that more
groups will be established with this aim in view. A new professional company opened
this season in Ambleside Park in North Vancouver and met with satisfactory support.
The Theatre under the Stars had a most successful season at Vancouver. Amateurs have
broken into the field of summer production, the Vernon Little Theatre and the White
Rock Players both producing plays. The only professional company in post-war years,
the Everyman Theatre, continued its operations during the past season as an amateur
company, but the increased support for the living stage makes it hopeful that before long
Vancouver will have a good professional repertory theatre. Assistance for such ventures
is hoped for through the efforts of the Royal Commission.
Courses in drama have been offered by the University Summer School and at the
Summer School for Teachers at Victoria. An extension of this service would be of
assistance in developing " theatre in education " by the training of teachers in the work
they will find to do in their schools.
A children's theatre is being operated in Vancouver, and production is being taken
care of by the Everyman Theatre. It is hoped that children in other areas will be able
to benefit from seeing good plays done by adults, and efforts are being made in this
direction. K 128 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
A degree of international co-operation in drama has been established in the
Province. For many years the Portland Civic Theatre has taken part in the festival and
has been very popular. Ketchikan groups came down to the Prince Rupert Festival last
year, and the Tonasket High School participated in the Oliver and District Schools
Festival. In Vancouver a new group known as " Le Cercle Moliere " took part in the
Greater Vancouver One-act Play Festival, acting in French, and in a few of the smaller
festivals, international groups have produced in their own language.
Appreciation
The Branch wishes to express thanks for the work and co-operation of the many
workers in the field of amateur drama, the executives, the back-stage workers, and
players, as well as to the teachers who must spend much time in extra-curricular activity.
The Royal Commission Report says in part, " There are important things in the
life of a nation that cannot be weighed or measured; these intangible elements are not
only essential in themselves; they may serve to inspire a nation's devotion and to prompt
a people's action. ..." These good citizens, believing that drama, a fusion of the
arts, is one of these important things, are doing a fine service to the community, the
Province, and Canada. EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE K 129
EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE
REPORT OF HAROLD P. JOHNS, M.A., Ph.D., DIRECTOR
Approved counselling programmes were in operation in fifty schools during the
school-year 1950-51; 103 counsellors were employed in these schools. As will be noted
by comparison with previous Annual Reports, there has been steady progress in the
development of counselling services in the schools of British Columbia. The present
report is another indication of this growth.
In-service training carried on during the year can be best considered under three
headings:—
(1) Counsellor-training.—Through the Department's Summer School of
Education, a full programme of counsellor-training was again carried on
during July and August, 1951. The following is a list of the courses
offered, together with the names of instructors and the enrolment in each
case:—
No. 189, Organization and Administration of the Guidance Services:
Dr. D. Welty Lefever, University of Southern California (35
enrolled).
No. 190X, Counsellors' Workshop: Dr. John G. Darley, Graduate
School, University of Minnesota (17 enrolled).
No.  193, Occupational Information:   Mr. B. E. Wales, Kitsilano
Junior-Senior High School, Vancouver (38 enrolled).
The assistance of Mr. L. J. Wallace, Boys' Counsellor, Victoria High
School, in organizing the programme of plant visitation conducted as part
of Course No. 193 is gratefully acknowledged.
(2) General Guidance Courses.—Several general or background courses in
various phases of guidance work were also offered at the Summer School
of Education. These were as follows (enrolment in each case shown in
parentheses): No. 115, Adolescent Psychology (92); No. 126, Adjusting
School Work to Individual Differences (78); No. 151, Guidance in the
Elementary School (93); No. 155, Personality Adjustment of School
Children (124); No. 159, Mental Hygiene (92).
It should be pointed out that Course No. 151, Guidance in the
Elementary School, was an initial effort to assist teachers with the
methodology of guidance work at the elementary level. The Department
of Education was fortunate in having the services of Dr. Virginia Bailard,
Supervisor of Counselling and Psychological Services, Long Beach, Calif.,
as the guest lecturer in charge of this course.
In addition to the above, the following courses were offered as winter
in-service classes through the courtesy of the Vancouver School Board
(enrolment in each case shown in parentheses): No. 159, Mental Hygiene
(26); No. 800A, Effective Living''(41); No. 800B, Effective Living (39).
(3) Non-credit-bearing Workshops, etc.—In-service training of a more
informal nature was carried on throughout the year at various centres
in the Province. Three workshops were held for counsellors, one in each
of the following districts: Okanagan Valley, Fraser Valley, Northern and
Central Vancouver Island. In each of these cases, local professional
associations of counsellors rendered valuable assistance in arranging
details of the workshops.
During the school-year 1950-51, the Division of Educational and Vocational
Guidance continued to supply materials to counsellors and others engaged in guidance K 130 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
work. Six issues of B.C. Employment Trends were prepared and sent to all high-school
principals and counsellors. Two Lists of Materials Available were distributed, listing
and classifying 181 monographs. In addition, fifty monographs were distributed directly
to secondary schools. In two cases these were accompanied by film-strips. During the
year, Guidance Bulletin No. VII, The Occupational Information File, was completely
revised and reissued to all secondary schools.
Through the co-operation of the Vancouver Board of Trade and the Pacific National
Exhibition, the annual vocational guidance job-study competition was again conducted
throughout the Province.   A total of 10,078 job-studies was made.
Bursaries were awarded to students in the following schools: Britannia, King
Edward, King George, Kitsilano, Point Grey, Templeton, and University Hill High and
Junior High Schools, Vancouver; North Vancouver, Sutherland, and West Vancouver
High and Junior High Schools, North and West Vancouver; New Westminster Junior
High and T. J. Trapp Technical High Schools, New Westminster; nAJpha Junior High
and South Burnaby Junior-Senior High Schools, Burnaby; North Surrey, Queen Elizabeth, and Princess Margaret Junior-Senior High Schools, Surrey; Cowichan Junior-Senior
High School, Duncan; Mount Newton and North Saanich Junior-Senior High Schools,
Saanich; Stanley Humphries Junior-Senior High School, Castlegar; Alexander Mackenzie High School, Hagensborg; Lady Byng Elementary-High School, Ashcroft;
Victoria, Courtenay, Delta, Port Coquitlam, Coquitlam, Enderby, Vernon, Penticton,
Kelowna, Kimberley, Fernie, Rossland, Nelson, Ocean Falls, Terrace, Prince George,
and South Peace River High and Junior High Schools.
The winner of the grand bursary award of $250 was Carole Dunsmuir. The George
Powell Challenge Trophy was, as a consequence, awarded to Kitsilano Junior-Senior
High School, Vancouver, the school which Miss Dunsmuir attended last term. DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS K 131
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., DIRECTOR OF SCHOOL
RADIO BROADCASTS
Co-ordination with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation
In theory, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation has agreed to provide the
Department of Education with half an hour air-time each required school-day, and the
facilities and technicians needed for the broadcasts. In the original agreement the
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation also held itself responsible for seeing that material
was up to broadcast standard. On its part, the Department of Education is responsible
for the planning and preparation of broadcasts, for the hiring of writers and radio artists,
and for all contacts with schools. In practice, while the above limits are broadly observed,
it has been found valuable to arrange for consultation between both groups at most stages
in the preparation and presentation of a broadcast. *As an illustration, during the past
year this Division arranged for C.B.C. personnel to make several visits to schools to
watch the actual reception and use of a school broadcast. These proved to be very
helpful, and the co-operation of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in this and
similar enterprises is greatly appreciated. As another indication of the degree of cooperation which is enjoyed, through the " CBC Times," the weekly programme schedule
of the corporation, full publicity is regularly given to our school broadcasts at least twice
a year, as well as mention on numerous other occasions.
Through the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and its affiliated private stations,
British Columbia school broadcasts were this year released by eleven British Columbia
stations as well as over thirteen of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's repeater
transmitters. In the coming year it is expected that this number will be increased by at
least four. Even the Peace River area, which has no direct line connection with British
Columbia origination points, is served by school broadcasts through transcriptions, so
that regular British Columbia school broadcasts are received in that area with only
a week's delay.
Programme Offerings
The broadcast-year covered thirty weeks, from the beginning of October to the end
of May, and comprised 151 half-hour periods, or a total of 223 broadcasts. Of these,
forty-one were shared co-operatively with the other three Western Provinces. Twenty-
nine Friday broadcasts were presented as National school broadcasts, originating in
Toronto for the most part. One of these was under the supervision of this Division and
originated in Vancouver. Of the total broadcasts, approximately one-fifth was devoted
to primary grades, two-fifths to intermediate grades, one-quarter to junior-school grades,
and one-tenth to senior high-school grades.
Innovations included the scheduling of a special music-activity broadcast once
a week for Grades III, IV, and V. This has easily lived up to expectations, justifying
for it a permanent place in the British Columbia school-broadcast schedule. An experiment that proved very popular was the presentation in three parts, at two-week intervals,
of the actual preparation and production of a school play. Several hundred schools
accepted the offer of scripts for the play, and a great many actually produced the play
following its radio performance.
Another series in Effective Living was well received by high schools. During the
year the City of Los Angeles made arrangements through this Division to broadcast to
its schools transcriptions of an earlier group of these British Columbia school broadcasts. K 132 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
One other highlight of the year's programmes was the Art series, without doubt the best
of these series so far. From the hundreds of encouraging samples of work received by
this office, effective displays were built up for showing at the Easter Teachers' Convention
and at the Summer Schools in Victoria and at the University of British Columbia.
Three British Columbia school broadcasts this year received awards in national
and international educational competitions.
Teaching Services
(a) Printed Aids.—In addition to 4,600 copies each of two issues of the Teachers'
Bulletin, over 5,500 mimeographed copies of French scripts were sent out to schools,
1,700 copies of the Art Bulletin, 500 copies of the play " The Man in Red," and well over
15,000 copies of the student music guide prepared jointly by the four Western Provinces.
With the regular issues of the Teachers' Bulletin went mimeographed copies of songs
and hectograph map material. This aspect of British Columbia school broadcasts has
unobtrusively reached considerable proportions during the last few years and must now
be considered one of the major activities of the Division.
(b) Teacher-training.—As in former years, contact was maintained with both
Provincial Normal Schools. It is clear that a relatively small amount of time spent at
the teacher-training institutions discussing school broadcasts produces most encouraging
results, and it is hoped that future years will see this service placed on an even more
secure footing. A course in " The Radio in Education " was given at the 1951 Summer
School of Education, ninety-two teachers registering and a great many more showing
interest in it.
(c) School-visits.—With the idea of guiding teachers in the field as well as receiving
their comments, the regular programme of school-visits was continued. In addition to
periodic visits to schools in the vicinity of Victoria and Vancouver, one week of intensive
school-visiting was carried out by the Director and Assistant Director in Districts Nos. 24,
25, 30, 32, 33, 42, and 75. Too little time, relatively, is available for this important part
of the work, but an improvement has been effected this year with the placing of school-
visiting on a more systematic footing than before. One hopeful aspect of the problem
is the valued help that many School Inspectors are giving in including school radio listening
in their school inspections.
(d) Other Assistance.—As in former years, this Division has co-operated with the
Correspondence Branches in preparing special material to go out to correspondence
pupils. There is evidence that this part of the work is a most important one. With
the addition of school sound equipment, school radio workshops are increasing. This
Division has been able to help in a number of such cases in lending material and giving
guidance.
Teachers' Reports
Nearly 200 teachers reported regularly on school broadcasts during the year. In
several places, notably Burnaby and Victoria, valuable group reporting was carried on.
The assistance of administrators in this connection is appreciated; it is an aspect of
school broadcasts which might well grow.
Seventy-three per cent of the schools of the Province made annual returns to indicate
the extent of the year's listening, and this showed a total of 508 schools listening, an
increase of 82 schools over the minimum figure of last year. Of those reporting, 69 per
cent are using school broadcasts, and this means a minimum of 51 per cent of the schools
of the Province. It should be noted that in at least thirty-four districts listening is still
difficult or impossible owing to distances from transmitters. The fact that even these
districts report 21 per cent of their schools listening is encouraging. Sixty-five per cent
of the schools in the remaining forty-three districts are using the broadcasts. DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS K 133
In all, 2,239 classrooms out of a reported total of 4,628 classrooms have been
making use of the broadcasts.
Equipment
Another rapidly growing aspect of the work of this Division is the advising of schools
and School Boards in the matter of equipment. It is gratifying to find an increasing
number of School Boards coming to this Division for advice before preparing specifications.
Of the schools reporting, 18 per cent are still without any radio equipment.
Although this figure seems high, it represents a considerable reduction from the 27 per
cent who were reported to have no receiving equipment last year. From what has been
said above about coverage, it will also be apparent that there would be no point in having
equipment in a number of schools.
The goodwill and co-operation of other members of the Department of Education,
of teachers, School Boards, and broadcasters, are essential to the success of the work
of this Division.   To these go my sincere thanks. K 134 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.Paed., DIRECTOR
The school-year of 1950-51 was a notable one in the life-history of the Division.
A permanent location in the new Douglas Building was obtained after five years in lather
cramped and inconvenient quarters, and the brightness, cleanliness, and arrangement of
the new offices make working conditions much more attractive. The distribution and
scoring of tests and general research should be much more efficiently carried on in the
new building.
The testing programme was combined with the restandardization of six Arithmetic
Computation and three Arithmetic Reasoning tests for Grades III to VII in the fall of
1950. An investigation of achievement at the University Entrance level was carried out
in June, 1951, for the Board of Examiners.
The tests were administered to the following samples:—
B.C. Arithmetic Computation III—IV—
To all Grade III pupils in seventeen school districts.
To all Grade IV pupils in twenty-seven school districts.
To all Grade V pupils in twelve school districts.
B.C. Arithmetic Computation IV-V—
To all Grade IV pupils in eleven school districts.
To all Grade V pupils in seventeen school districts.
B.C. Arithmetic Computation V-VI—
To all Grade V pupils" in eleven school districts.
To all Grade VI pupils in twenty-one school districts.
To all Grade VII pupils in eleven school districts.
B.C. Arithmetic Reasoning IV—
To all Grade III pupils in four school districts.
To all Grade IV pupils in thirteen school districts.
To all Grade V pupils in seven school districts.
B.C. Arithmetic Reasoning V—
To all Grade IV pupils in four school districts.
To all Grade V pupils in eleven school districts.
To all Grade VI pupils in eleven school districts.
B.C. Arithmetic Reasoning VI-VII—
To all Grade V pupils in four school districts.
To all Grade VI pupils in eighteen school districts.
To all Grade VII pupils in seven school districts.
U.E. Composite Achievement Test and the Otis Quick-scoring Test of Mental
Ability, Gamma, to all University Entrance candidates in alternate high
schools throughout the Province.
One to four tests were administered in each school district according to the requirements of sampling.   The Computation tests were based chiefly on the work of the lower
grade mentioned in the title but reviewed the easier processes covered in previous grades.
Two forms were standardized at each grade level.   The Reasoning tests consisted of items
of appropriate problem-solving difficulty in which the difficulties of computation had been
reduced approximately one year.   Both series of tests had been constructed in 1942-43
and had been given preliminary trials in 1943-44.   At that time it had not been possible
to obtain a very accurate geographical sample.   The two sets of norms are quite similar,
nevertheless, although the 1950 Computation norms are somewhat lower.
Eleven scores were obtained for each of the pupils who took the III-IV and IV-V
Computation tests, four scores for V-VI Computation, and one score for each Reasoning -^-.■:.^.
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH K 135
test. This involved the hand-scoring of 31,480 papers and the recording of more than
193,000 scores. A modal-age grade norm-has been calculated for each test for each
grade to which it was administered. This means that a score that is representative of
pupils of normal chronological age has been reported in terms of grade levels. Percentiles
and letter-grades for the 1950 modal-age groups have been calculated so that teachers
may convert raw scores to scores that are more meaningful in terms of the achievement
of normal pupils throughout the Province. Intermediate values have been interpolated
so that the tests may now be used in any month of the school-year. Traditional norms
in terms of percentiles and letter-grades also have been calculated. They are similar to
but slightly lower than the 1944 norms. Norms and standards for sub-scores are now
being derived and will be included in subsequent reports and test manuals.
The University Entrance Composite Examination was a four-hour test of the
achievement of University Entrance candidates in five fields: English, Social Studies,
Mathematics, Science, and French. Scores in English were broken down into Language
and Literature, Punctuation, and Spelling. A test of scholastic aptitude, the Otis Quick-
scoring Gamma Test, also was administered so that subsequent studies might be based
on pupils of equivalent native ability. Students were tested without regard to accreditation or recommendation—i.e., whether or not they were required to write the regular
University Entrance Examinations.   The purposes of the Composite test were:—
(a) To compare the retention of knowledge of University Entrance candidates
who had been recommended with that of those who were required to write
the University Entrance Examinations:
(b) To make comparisons between candidates from accredited and non-
accredited schools:
(c) To provide experimental data upon which possible changes in the
University Entrance Examination system might be based:
(d) To make comparisons between the comprehensive examination scores,
individual subject scores, and principals' letter-grades.
These studies will be continued throughout the winter of 1951-52.
The scaling of Matriculation Examinations was undertaken by the Director for the
•first time in the summer of 1951. Able assistance was given by Mr. Aubrey Hill and
Miss Diane Sawyer. A few changes in procedure were introduced in order to obtain
greater accuracy: 100 per cent samples were used whenever possible, larger graphs were
drawn, and the correction for recommended students was made mathematically. Greater
publicity should be given to this aspect of the treatment of University Entrance and
Senior Matriculation Examinations. A common misconception is that students are being
given marks to which they are not entitled or are being passed or failed arbitrarily.
On the contrary, the purpose of scaling is to eliminate the variation that would occur
from subject to subject and year to year, and to eliminate arbitrariness by reducing all
scores to the same scale or standard of value.
A new Testing Manual and Catalogue of Tests was distributed to schools at the end
of the summer vacation. It has been produced in loose-leaf form so that additional
information in regard to testing programmes and the use of tests can be inserted from
time to time.
Withdrawals from School.—The sociological problem of withdrawal from school
before graduation is receiving increasing attention in Canada. In comparison with some
of the other Provinces, it seems to be a relatively minor problem in British Columbia.
Nevertheless, a study of the data is of value in indicating whether or not students who are
inclined to leave school early consider courses at different levels to be interesting and
valuable. The accompanying figure indicates that drop-outs are relatively heavy at the
end of Grades VIII and X but, when the ages of pupils are taken into consideration, they
are lighter from Grades IX and XI. As Grade IX is the final year of junior high school
and the year in which most pupils reach the minimum school-leaving age of 15, it is K 136
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
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evident that the 6-3-3 system has greater holding power than the 8-4 type of organization. The legal minimum age seems to have little influence on withdrawals. The greatest
weakness in the holding power of our system is at the Grade X level. Most of the
Grade X drop-outs are over age and could have left earlier. But they are not sufficiently
mature to compete with adults in the labour market. Neither have they completed the
terminal courses that would equip them to hold positions or would indicate to them that
they had reached a suitable point for graduation.
Fictitious percentages of enrolment sometimes have been quoted for British
Columbia because allowance has not been made for immigration. The sum of those who
leave and those who remain always is much greater than the original enrolment.
Nevertheless, the facts are that more than half of our 1936 Grade I group reached
Grade XI and 40 per cent reached the high-school graduation level. This is a creditable
showing that has not been equalled in any other Province. Moreover, even if we exclude
students who take commercial courses after graduation, more than half of the Grade XII
students and more than one-quarter of the original group continue into higher education—
i.e., education beyond the University Entrance level. One child in eight reaches the
upper years of college. As 78 per cent of the Grade XII students are taking the University
Programme, it would seem that our problem is not one of retention, but of guiding
students of average or lower ability into courses which they will find to be of the greatest
practical value. K 138
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education
covering the period September 1st, 1950, to August 31st, 1951:—
District Number and Name
Motion-pictures
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Film-strips
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
Fernie	
Cranbrook-
Kimberley	
Windermere-
Creston	
Kootenay Lake-
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar-
Arrow Lakes..
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Pentlcton ..	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong-Enderby-
Vernon	
Kelowna  	
Kamloops—	
Barriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake~
Quesnel	
Ashcroft-
Merritt	
Fraser Canyon.
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta	
Richmond—
Vancouver-
New Westminster-
Burnaby	
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam.-
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
McBride	
555
32
134
1,037
194
30
98
800
314
173
113
188
459
321
182
69
127
1,066
612
684
548
202
8
42
44
497
77
34
234
250
987
386
905
32
86
9,861
509
569
796
813
85
181
150
11
500
478
53
483
23
96
Peace River South-
43
25
488
287
15
2
4
52
448
60
10
42
313
137
76
46
85
249
125
69
35
68
454
275
334
323
138
8
16
28
220
33
7
100
168
501
245
457
15
50
5,333
280
302
402
324
60
119
87
7
231
279
58
211
17
56
17
20
255
202
54
77
15
2
25
4
4
22
18
4
153
86
195
68
316
70
29
861
5
26
91
677
24
102
1
14
4
15
127
15
32
152
43
55
4
2
12
3
4
11
13
2
110
58
155
51
246
51
29
722
4
18
68
459
24
85
1
10
3
11
76
10
21 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION                                      K 139
District Number and Name
Motion Pictures
Film-strips
Number
Number
Number
Number
Requested
Supplied
Requested
Supplied
60. Peace River North  	
47
4,623
25
2 454
183
111
67.  Snnkp.
385
179
111
78
63. Saanich _	
278
141
21
19
64. Saltspring             _	
20
8
2
2
366
193
252
167
66. Lake Cowichan    	
155
86
11
9
53
31
68. Nanaimo             	
784
387
140
114
70. Alberni	
358
180
59
43
71. Courtenay   	
479
171
156
103
77, Camphe.ll River
421
202
107
94
73. Alert Bay            	
220
102
25
19
100
53
137
102
75. Mission   	
900
453
83
36
314
185
94
75
291
169
157
91
6
77
5
77
Totals!
36,659
18,651
4,808
3,573
1,201
1,099
118
115
37,860
19,750
4,926
3,688
Four hundred and fifty-one schools registered with the Division for service during
the 1950-51 school-year.   This registration reveals the following:—
Number of
Number of
Number of
Number of
Type of Equipment
Schools
Possessing
Projectors
Possessed
Schools
Borrowing
Projectors
Borrowed
Projectors
by Schools
Projectors
by Schools
297
136
319
147
133
6
122
6
Others—opaque, etc  	
61
73
1
1
During the 1950-51 term this Division screened 355 films and 11 film-strips, and
arranged for the screenings of 560 films and film-strips by schools and other branches
of the Department to determine the suitability and subject-grade placement of the material
concerned.
In addition to the above, 1,938 items of free pictorial material were distributed to
the schools. K 140 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1950-51
"EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT"
REPORT OF MRS. F. M. KINSMAN, SECRETARY OF THE COMMISSION
During the school-year 1950-51 a total of 199 applications was considered by the
Commission. Of these, twenty-two were refused—nine because the family income was
higher than that set by the Commission for grant purposes, four because the pupils had
not attained Grade LX standing, and nine for various other reasons. One hundred and
seventy-seven applications were approved for grants, ninety-one receiving assistance for
the first time, forty-five for the second year, twenty-six for the third year, and fifteen for
the fourth year. Students were distributed by grades as follows: Grade IX, 48; Grade
X, 52; Grade XI, 33; Grade XII, 32. During the year twelve students dropped out and
grants were discontinued.
Grants paid per student were as follows:—
September 1        $50.00
December  15.00
March .  15.75
Total for the year, per pupil        $80.75
Total for the year, all pupils  13,943.75
Expenses amounted to $51.31, leaving a balance of $4.94 from the total vote of
$14,000 allocated to the "Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act" for the
fiscal year 1950-51. THE STRATHCONA TRUST K 141
THE STRATHCONA TRUST
REPORT OF T. F. ROBSON, SECRETARY, LOCAL COMMITTEE
Physical Training
At a meeting of the Local Committee, held on January 25th, 1951, it was decided
to change the character of the awards for Physical Education. The Committee decided
that, instead of cash awards, suitable shields be provided for competition in each inspectorate, to be awarded to schools judged by Inspectors to have provided the best programme of Physical Education during the school-year. Thirty-five shields were bought
at a cost of $816.03 and awarded on the above basis.
In addition to the awards of shields, it was decided to award six scholarships of $100
each to students doing university work toward teachers' Physical Education certificates.
Awards were made to the following students: Elmer Seymour Matthews, 2536 Prior
Street, Victoria, B.C.; Jean Leiper, 3475 Ash Street, Vancouver, B.C.; John A.
McDiarmid, c/o Y.M.C.A., 955 Burrard Street, Vancouver, B.C.; Lois Evelyn Withers,
1609 Cypress Street, Vancouver, B.C.; Jean Norma Sanvido, 885 Georgia Street East,
Vancouver, B.C.; and Elizabeth Enid Smith, 2716 Thirty-sixth Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C.
Cadet Training
The Area Cadet Officer reported that though all corps showed a decrease in attendance, the standard of training greatly improved. No new corps were formed, but several
applications were received.   Proficiency awards were made as follows:—
Per Cent
1. North Vancouver Senior High School  90
2. Peachland Cadet Corps   85
(Mount Lehman School  84
'{ Queen Elizabeth (Surrey) Junior-Senior High School  84
, (Cranbrook High School  83
'} Rossland High School  83
J (Nelson Junior High School  80
'} Sumas School  80
9 (Nelson Senior High School  79
'{Burnaby South High School  79
11. Armstrong-Spallumcheen  ■.  78
(Enderby School   76
{Merritt School   76
14. Maple Ridge High School  74
15. Salmon Arm High School  73
h , (Summerland High School  70
'{Chilliwack Junior-Senior High School  70
.    18. Philip Sheffield High School (M.-S.-A.)  54
No summer camp was held this year, since it was decided that the time, effort, and
expense involved did not justify its further operation.
Cadet Trades-training
A number of changes were made in cadet trades-training. These included the
inauguration of a two-week refresher course for trades-training instructors, a seven-week
syllabus designed to qualify cadets in one year instead of in two, the new trade instructor
basic training of the Senior Leaders' Course, and the cancellation of the trade of
" operator—fire control equipment." K 142 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1950-51
Of 525 cadets authorized to attend camp, 483 enrolled and 430 completed courses,
with the following results:—
Course Candidates Qualified
Driver-Mechanic   185 140
Operator (R/T)  .'.  101 90
Senior Leader •-  119 96
Medical Assistant  :  25 25
Successful cadets received a bonus of $100. In addition to trades-training, cadets
participated in sports, swimming, and recreational shooting. Because of the higher
standard demanded, examinations for Red Cross certificates were disappointing.
Shooting
The cadet D.C.R.A. team was given a period of coaching at Vernon before going
to Ottawa, and the coaching was reflected in results. All of the five cadets won at least
two prizes.
Two prizes (Parker Hale sights) were offered at camp for the best shot and
runner-up.
Special Dominion Camp
The national cadet camp for senior cadets at Banff, Alta., held from July 25th, 1951,
to August 12th, 1951, was attended by nine British Columbia cadets.
Royal Military Club Interschools Competition
Eighteen teams from British Columbia entered the competition and eleven teams the
D.C.R.A. competition. In first aid twenty-one junior certificates and three special certificates were obtained. In signalling, eleven Morse, five advanced Morse, and three special
certificates were obtained.
Financial Statement
The funds at the disposal of the Committee amounted to $4,016.79, and the expenditures for the year were $2,947.23, leaving a balance of $1,069.56. STATISTICAL RETURNS  STATISTICAL RETURNS
K 145
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