Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA "HOSPITAL INSURANCE ACT" Second Annual Report B.C. Hospital Insurance Service… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1951]

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0342844.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0342844.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0342844-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0342844-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0342844-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0342844-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0342844-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0342844-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0342844-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0342844.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
" HOSPITAL INSURANCE ACT "
Second Annual Report
B.C. Hospital Insurance
Service
JANUARY 1st TO DECEMBER 31st
1950
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1951  B.C. Hospital Insurance Service,
Victoria, B.C., March 7th, 1951.
To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to present the Second Annual Report of the B.C.
Hospital Insurance Service covering the calendar year 1950.
A. D. TURNBULL,
Minister of Health and Welfare. B.C. Hospital Insurance Service,
Victoria, B.C., March 7th, 1951.
The Honourable A. D. Turnbull,
Minister of Health and Welfare,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to present herewith the Report of the B.C. Hospital
Insurance Service covering the calendar year 1950.
Respectfully submitted.
L. F. DETWILLER,
Commissioner, B.C. Hospital Insurance Service. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Pagb
Introduction    7
Eligibility and Coverage   7
Premium Rates   7
Method of Payment of Hospitals  8
Organization and Administration   8
Payroll Division      8
Direct Payment Division   9
Mechanical Tabulation   9
Departmental Comptroller  10
General Office and Supplies Division  10
Registration and Exemption Claims Division  10
Hospital Services Group  11
Hospital Claims Division  11
Hospital Accounting Division   11
Hospital Services Division, Victoria  11
Hospital Services Division, Vancouver  12
Research Division   12
Hospital Construction Division  12
Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements for the Fiscal Year ended March
31 st, 1950  14
Statement Showing Cash Reconciliation with the Public Accounts of the Province of
British Columbia as at March 31st, 1950 , ,  15
General Hospital Care  :  16
Table Ia.—Patients Discharged and Days of Care in B.C. Public Hospitals,
1948-50, and Proportion Covered by B.C. Hospital Insurance Service in
1949 and 1950  16
Table Ib.—Percentage of Patients Covered by B.C. Hospital Insurance Service
during 1950  16
Table IIa.—Patients Discharged, Total Days' Stay and Average Length of Stay
According to Type and Location of Hospital, and Days of Care per.Thousand of Covered Population for B.C.H.I.S. Patients Only, Years 1949 and
1950   17
Table IIb.—Summary of the Number of In-patients and Short-stay Patients,
1949 and 1950  17
Table III.—Patients Discharged, Total Days' Stay and Average Length of Stay
in B.C. Public Hospitals for B.C.H.I.S. Patients Only, Grouped According
to Bed Capacity, Year 1950  17
Table IV.—Percentage Distribution of Patients Discharged and Patient-days for
B.C.H.I.S. Patients Only, in B.C. Public Hospitals, Grouped According to
Bed Capacity, Year 1950  18
Benefits in B.C. Hospitals, 1950  18
Classes of Persons Covered by or Excluded from the Benefits of the Hospital Insurance Service  19
Benefits in Hospitals outside British Columbia  19  Second Annual Report of the B.C. Hospital
Insurance Service
INTRODUCTION
Since January 1st, 1949, the Hospital Insurance Service has paid accounts on behalf
of more than 352,000 beneficiaries who required hospitalization as in-patients. In
addition, some 69,000 persons received benefits as emergency or short-stay patients.
On behalf of these, 421,000 beneficiaries' accounts have been paid, ranging from $20 to
more than $6,000. During this period 682 hospital beds became available for hospital
care. The Service has now completed its second year of operation, during which many
changes occurred both in personnel and administrative procedures. The Service has made
definite strides forward in its development. In the month of November the new administration building was completed and for the first time the organization was able to operate
as a single unit under one roof. With the exception of Vancouver, New Westminster,
and Victoria, district offices throughout the Province were closed and the records formerly
contained therein centralized in Victoria. In conjunction with this move, a simplified
form of billing procedure known as cyclical billing was introduced, which made it
possible to cut down administrative expenses, eliminate delays caused by peak periods,
and facilitate speedier handling of beneficiaries' accounts. It is anticipated that centralization will be completed this year, when the records held in the three city offices will be
transferred to Victoria. Due to the heavy volume of work and changed procedures, the
Service established its own Mechanical Tabulating Division in July. This work was
formerly done by the Department of Trade and Industry. The Hospital Advisory
Council was re-established early in the year and has met at regular monthly intervals.
On November 30th the one-month-in-advance procedure of premium payment was
removed, thereby making due date for premium payment and the penalty date one and
the same.
During the past year many hospitals have installed modern equipment and facilities
which have undoubtedly been of great assistance in providing a higher standard of hospital
care and service. Using the Hamilton Report as a guide, hospital construction has progressed favourably throughout the Province, and it is anticipated that by the end of 1952
there will be an average of more than six beds for 1,000 of population.
Eligibility and Coverage
Under the " Hospital Insurance Act " all persons who are residents of British
Columbia are required to participate in the plan. Exemptions are granted to those who
can show that they and their dependents are protected under Provincial or Federal plans,
or through approved private ones. A private plan, to operate in British Columbia, must
provide hospital benefits and payments to hospitals at least equivalent to those under the
Provincial Government plan.
A detailed description of classes of persons covered by the plan or excluded is
contained in the Appendix.
Premium Rates
Premium rates for 1950 were $21 for a single person and $33 for the head of a
family with one or more dependents. The two principal methods of premium payment
are payroll deduction and cyclical billing. MM 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
(1) Payroll Deduction.—Persons working for firms operating on the deduction
plan have their premiums deducted each month from their pay. Premiums are payable six months in advance in order that the many individuals who are subject to seasonal lay-offs each year may be covered
during these periods.
(2) Cyclical Billing.—Former district-office registrants whose records are now
centralized in Victoria are billed four times a year on a cyclical basis.
In addition, registrants are still billed by the city offices in Vancouver, Victoria, and
New Westminster for semi-annual and annual premiums.
Method of Payment of Hospitals
During 1950, payment to hospitals in British Columbia was on the basis of inclusive
average patient-day costs as determined from estimates submitted by the hospitals after
being reviewed by this Service. The rates differed in each hospital. Their variation was
caused by the extent and character of services given and facilities available, as well as
the number and length of stay of patients admitted to hospital. They were considered
as interim rates and during the year were periodically adjusted, depending upon actual
cost of operation and utilization.
Effective January 1st, 1950, inclusion of a depreciation allowance in per diem rates
paid to hospitals was cancelled. This was substituted by a building and equipment
allowance of 10 cents per adult and child patient-day.
ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION
The accomplishments of the Service's second year can best be outlined by a resume
of the administrative organization.    The organization consists of several divisions.
Payroll Division
In the early part of 1950, sectional organization was perfected, and with the installation of individual account-cards for each payroll deduction registrant, arrangements for
billing for arrears of premium were completed.
The backlog of transfers requested by district offices from Payroll Division, held
over from 1949 in the Suspense Section, was brought under control in July. The number of suspense or unallocated accounts in this section was reduced by 20,000 during
the year.
Payroll Division accepted the responsibility for checking hospital accounts of the
registrants against payroll accounts in 1950. This work was previously done by personnel from the Claims Division attached to Payroll. The change was made possible by
assigning one claims-checker for two payroll sections, and in December payroll claims
at the rate of 250 to 300 per day were being actioned in the Division.
The Manual for Employer Groups was revised in accordance with the amended
" Hospital Insurance Act" of 1950 and the development of new procedures, and redistributed to all employers.
Identification-cards issued in December, 1949, were endorsed with the figures of
the year 1950. The cards prepared and issued in 1951 bear no date and show the registration number, name, and employer code number. They were distributed to all payroll
registrants through their employers as a means of identification on entering hospital and
should not require annual replacement.
The Payroll sub-staff in Vancouver was increased to six in number to accommodate
induction of new firms. Representation was maintained in the Kootenays, the Okanagan,
and Vancouver Island. The field staff assisted in registering employers and bringing
100 per cent of staff on to payroll. Through this personal contact with firms, the work
of the Division was advanced and service to the employer and employee alike was
maintained at a high level. ~-■•■'■< '■:>:,::■<■
HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE REPORT, 1950 MM 9
In conjunction with the preparation of individual record-cards by Mechanical Tabulation, an alphabetic index-card was automatically set up to show the name, registration
number, birthdate, and location of each individual account in the Division.
With the reorganization of the Insurance Service in April, 1950, the Division had
four main tasks to complete. The first stage was the installation of individual account-
cards. Secondly, all employers voluntarily participating in the payroll plan in 1948 and
1949 were required to register under the amended "Hospital Insurance Act" of 1950.
Thirdly, 100 per cent participation of all employees employed in those firms registered
was enforced.
The fourth step was the formation of a new section for the specific purpose of
extending the compulsory features of the amended Act regarding payroll deductions to
new employer groups. This section was formed in November to accommodate employees of the Dominion Government, the Canadian National Railways, and other newly
registered groups.
On December 31st, 1950, the Division held more than 150,000 active accounts and
had some 3,300 firms enrolled and registered for compulsory deductions. During the
year 1950, $4,060,000 was collected by the Payroll Division.
Direct Payment Division
One of the highlights in administration changes during the year was the centralization
of records formerly held in fifty-eight district offices scattered throughout the Province
and the subsequent formation of this branch. This operation was necessarily timed to
coincide with the completion of the new Hospital Insurance Service building. The
Division was also responsible for the operation of the three city offices at Victoria, Vancouver, and New Westminster, whose records will be centralized in this Division this
year. The central office maintains more than 125,000 accounts, involving 275,000
people; city offices, 200,000 accounts, involving 440,000 people. The method of operation known as cyclical billing is similar to that used by large utility and insurance companies, the principle object of which is to avoid peak periods and permit a steady flow of
service throughout the year.
In the month of November the one-month-in-advance method of paying premiums
was cancelled, making premiums due on the last day of the current period. In conjunction with this procedure a simplified billing form was introduced which clearly shows
arrears, current premiums, billing-period dates, and due dates.
In the place of some of the former district offices, collection agencies were established throughout the Province for the convenience of the public in paying their
premiums.
More than two-thirds of the work of this Division was concerned with births, deaths,
marriages, and changes of address. A field staff of eighteen was employed, their duties
including collection, public relations, and registration of persons not registered..
Including the city offices, approximately 1,400,000 pieces of outgoing and incoming
billings, letters, and remittances were handled during the year.
Mechanical Tabulation
Due to heavy volume of work, B.C. Hospital Insurance Service established its own
Mechanical Tabulation Division in July, 1950. This Division has fast become the nerve
centre of the entire organization. The records of approximately 1,150,000 people,
involving 475,000 premium accounts, were summarized on punched cards which were
used as a basis to prepare monthly employer billings, quarterly billings, semi-annual
billings, identity certificates, and statistical studies.
Hospital accounts were also summarized on punched cards, the same cards being
used to prepare hospital remittance lists, municipal billings, patient's statement of pay- MM 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
ment for income-tax purposes, eliminating what would normally be a large manual
operation.    In addition, the cards were available for statistical studies.
Information is transcribed to a punched card by key-punch operators using a
machine with a keyboard similar to a typewriter. The cards are arranged in order by
electrical sorting-machines at the rate of 450 per minute.
Statements, bills, and lists are prepared on electrical accounting-machines from the
cards at the rate of 100 lines per minute. Electrical collating-machines are used to
interfile new cards into a larger group at the rate of 120 per minute.
The time saved by use of mechanical tabulation may be gained from the following
example: More than 147,000 accounts are billed each month through Payroll Division.
Billings are prepared automatically on alphabetical accounting-machines in the Division.
Once an account is established in Payroll and a punched card made up to handle the
billing of that particular account, the same card is used time and time again in the
preparation of monthly billings. Billings are prepared on a machine that fists eighty
items per minute, and it would require the combined efforts of approximately twenty-five
typists to equal this production. Once a card has been set up, it is kept in a permanent
file and the element of human error is eliminated.
Departmental Comptroller
Revenue from every source is channelled through the Departmental Comptroller's
office, where it is checked, audited, and correctly allocated to control accounts. In a
twelve-month period the total revenue so processed may amount to $14,000,000 or
$15,000,000. Expenditures are also controlled, audited, and analysed, and requisitions
for supplies are approved. In addition, vouchers covering administration expense,
refunds of premiums, and payments to hospitals are checked, audited, and approved for
payment. All expense accounts are maintained, both subsidizing and control. In any
one year administration expenditures totalling approximately $1,500,000 and payments
to hospitals of $16,000,000 or more may be approved, checked, audited, and entered;
in addition, premium refunds (which during 1950 totalled approximately $55,000) are
handled.
Monthly statements of revenue expenditure both for fiscal periods and on a calendar
basis are prepared in addition to balance-sheets and revenue and expenditure analyses.
Working with the statisticians, figures for progress, revenue, and expenditure graphs,
charts, and tabulations are provided. Another important function is the internal audit
of all accounting procedures within the Service's divisions and the remaining three district
offices. Periodic visits are made by staff members to other branches of the Service for
the purpose of performing spot checks, interim audits, and giving advice and guidance
on accounting procedures, principles, and practice.
General Office and Supplies Division
The distribution of all mail was handled by this Division, together with the filing of
correspondence.    Five hundred thousand pieces of mail were handled during the year.
Registration and Exemption Claims Division
This Division contains three sections—Registration, Exemption Claims and the
Records Files, and Adjustment. The Records Section has the responsibility of recording
births, deaths, and marriages, and changes of status and employment on the original
registration form completed by the registrant. During 1950, 213,586 alterations were
made to registration forms. There now exists a complete alphabetical index of all registrants and dependents who have registered for B.C. Hospital Insurance Service, including
those covered under the approved plans and the B.C. Indians covered by the Dominion
Indian Health Service. HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE REPORT,  1950 MM  11
Registration Section.—During the year 42,292 new registrants were assigned registration numbers.    This Section is responsible for the administration of registrants who
are exempt under the two approved plans—Canadian Pacific Railway with 13,494 contributing members and the B.C. Telephone Employees' Medical Association with 3,628
contributing members—also for the administration of 27,000 B.C. Indian registrants.
The Exemption Claims Section granted exemptions to the following groups:—
Old-age pensioners and social-assistance and mothers' allowance cases  5,672
D.V.A. students and war veterans' allowance cases  1,351
General       824
Christian Scientists       134
Persons covered by the Saskatchewan Hospital Services Plan     320
Armed Forces       797
Institutional patients, including those in mental homes, T.B.
sanatoria, etc., and general nursing homes      564
In addition to the above, 19,465 adjustments were made.
Hospital Services Group
Hospital Claims Division
The prime responsibility of this Division is payment of hospital accounts and advising hospitals of patient's eligibility. During the year more than 700 admission notices
and account forms were received daily. Each form is checked by the Medical Coding
Section as to diagnosis and is then passed to the Eligibility Determination Section.
During the year payment of more than 177,000 hospital accounts was approved. This
figure includes 1,739 out-of-Province accounts, claims being approved in the United
States, Australia, South Africa, Eire, Mexico, Germany, Switzerland, and Sweden.
Another phase of the Division's work involves the handling of municipal per diem
grants. All account forms are scrutinized to determine the municipality responsible for
paying the per diem grant. Needed space was made available in this Division when the
contents of twenty-eight filing-cabinets, amounting to 112 filing-drawers, were condensed
by microfilm into a cubic area approximately the size of one filing-drawer. A total of
455,882 documents were involved, consisting of admission and discharge forms, correspondence, and eligibility particulars.
The Division also mails out to each patient a statement for income-tax purposes
showing the total amount paid on his or her behalf.
During the year more than 550,000 pieces of incoming mail passed through the
Division and 245,000 outgoing.
Hospital Accounting Division
This Division is primarily concerned with maintaining close working relations with
the hospitals. Frequent inspections are made of hospital accounting systems, hospital
budgets, equipment grants, and hospital rates. The Annual Hospital Report and annual
statistical and financial reports are prepared by this branch. In addition, payment of
grants for capital expenditure made by hospitals for equipment and major alterations
are approved. The staff of inspecting accountants made more than 250 visits to the
hospitals during the year.
Hospital Services Division, Victoria
The primary function of this Division is to advise hospitals on problems related to
general and nursing administration. Special attention is given to the smaller hospital.
During the year all hospitals were visited on at least one occasion.    These visits were MM 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
made to appraise organization and management and the subsequent compilation of
reports on findings, along with recommendations submitted for the guidance of this
Service in dealing with hospitals. Continued effort was made to assist hospitals in
securing and placing personnel such as administrators and technicians.
Hospital Services Division, Vancouver
Problems arising from long-stay cases and medical social work within the hospital
were dealt with and, in addition to administering the " Hospital Act," the department
continued to administer the " Mental Hospitals Act," sections 6 and 7. In the month
of April the administration of the " Welfare Institutions Licensing Act " was transferred
to the Social Welfare Branch, Department of Health and Welfare, thus relieving this
Division of this responsibility.
Research Division
During the year this branch of the Service supplied all statistics necessary to the
Service, which included compilation of progress and annual reports, surveys, and other
information.
Hospital Construction Division
With the passage of the " Hospital Insurance Act" in 1948, the Government not
only introduced an insurance plan, but it provided an authority for financial assistance
to hospitals undertaking hospital-construction projects. The further amendments in 1950
to this Act and the presentation of a Bill establishing a " Hospital Construction Act"
provide the Government with authority to borrow $16,500,000 to assist in financing the
hospital-construction programme. As a result of the activities of this Division, more
than 622 new beds were put in operation by the end of 1950. It is anticipated that 571
more will be installed in 1*951 and 1,050 in 1952. This creates an estimated total of
2,243 new beds installed in the period from January 1st, 1949, to January 1st, 1952.
Primarily, the department operates as an advisory service to hospitals contemplating
construction or remodelling, including the processing and reviewing of plans and inspection of proposed sites. In addition, it is also responsible for the administration of Provincial Infirmaries.  MM 14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE
FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1950
Cash receipts—
Premiums—
General   $10,622,474.15
Social assistance   761,488.50
 $11,383,962.65
Municipal per diem grants        $712,388.19
Provincial statutory grants       1,362,702.60
       2,075,090.79
  $13,459,053.44
Cash disbursements—
Administration—
Salaries   $912,820.05
Advisory Council  894.32
Advertising and publicity... 38,342.47
Hospital survey  54,461.69
Office supplies and general 273,687.73
Office furniture   83,643.40
Postage   53,686.92
Rentals and maintenance... 49,299.16
Retainers and expenses
(sub-offices)   39,729.91
Travelling expenses   35,616.72
     $1,542,182.37
Payments to hospitals—claims     16,532,854.41
     18,075,036.78
Excess of cash disbursements over cash receipts for the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1950 1     $4,615,983.34 HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE REPORT,  1950 MM 15
STATEMENT SHOWING CASH RECONCILIATION WITH THE PUBLIC
ACCOUNTS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA AS AT
MARCH 3 1st,  1950.
Excess of receipts over disbursements
for period ended March 31st,
1949 (Public Accounts, 1948-
49, page 215)  $5,305,908.18
Less loan, Hospital Insurance Stabilization Fund (Public Accounts, 1948-49, page 210)_ 50,000.00
  $5,255,908.18
Less adjustments in fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1950 (Public
Accounts, 1949-50, page
147)—
Amusement tax, 1949  $1,445,573.40
Advances to hospitals     2,939,023.58
     4,384,596.98
Excess of receipts over disbursements for period ended
March 31st, 1949 (adjusted)      $871,311.20
Excess of disbursements over receipts for the fiscal year
ended March 31st, 1950, as per statement attached    4,615,983.34
Available cash balance in Hospital Insurance Fund at
March 31st, 1950 (Public Accounts, 1949-50,
page vii)         755,327.86
  $4,500,000.00
Financed by Provincial loans and grants—
Hospital Insurance  Stabilization
Fund—
Public Accounts,  1948-49,
page 210  1 .       $50,000.00
Public Accounts,  1949-50,
page 134      1,950,000.00
 $2,000,000.00
"Revenue Surplus Appropriation Act, 1950" (Public Accounts, 1949-50, page 134)._.__     2,500,000.00
     4,500,000.00
The Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1950,
together with the Statement Showing Cash Reconciliation with the Public Accounts of the Province
of British Columbia as at March 31st, 1950, show the cash transactions only of the Hospital Insurance
Fund for the period according to the books of the Province.
J. A. CRAIG, C.A.,
Comptroller-General, Province of British Columbia. MM 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA
GENERAL HOSPITAL CARE
Statistical data dealing with the volume of hospital care provided to the population
of British Columbia by the Service is presented in the tables on the following pages.
Seventy-six public hospitals are approved to accept B.C.H.I.S. patients. In addition, a
proportion of care has been given in the Province's licensed private hospitals, including
company-operated hospitals in remote areas. The private-hospital classification in the
tables also includes eleven Red Cross Outpost Units and the Veterans' Hospitals at
Vancouver and Victoria.
To provide comparability between 1949 and 1950, Tables I and II have been
adjusted to exclude from B.C.H.I.S. data the workmen's compensation patients and
patient-days handled by the Service in 1949 and until March 31st, 1950. At the latter
date the agreement with the Workmen's Compensation Board was terminated, and its
payments have since been made direct to hospitals. The B.C.H.I.S. data in Tables III
and IV include Workmen's Compensation Board patients processed by the Service in
1950.
The 1950 data given has been prepared from preliminary unrevised reports submitted by the hospitals of the Province and is subject to minor revision.
In Table II the B.C.H.I.S. average length of stay in public hospitals for 1950 is
slightly lower at 10.16 days than in 1949 (10.21 days) and is below the length of stay
for all patients in public hospitals, which, from preliminary reports, approximates 10.33
days. This difference is due, in part at least, to the fact that since the inception of the
thirty-day waiting period (March 1st, 1950) the Service does not cover the full days of
stay of a patient whose coverage becomes effective while in hospital, whereas the patient
would be included in the numbers of B.C.H.I.S. patients discharged.
Table Ia.—Patients Discharged and Days of Care in B.C. Public Hospitals,
1948-50, and Proportion Covered by B.C. Hospital Insurance Service in
1949 and 1950.
Total Hospitalized
Adults and
Children
New-born
Total
Covered by B.C.H.I.S.*
Adults and
Children
New-born
Total
Patients discharged—■
1948t	
1949	
1950_
Percentage of total..
Percentage of total..
Patient-days—
1948t	
1949	
1950.
Percentage of total-
Percentage of total.
155,894
164,964
172,706
1,475,901
1,682,196
1,784,085
24,704
26,272
26,125
200,180
213,874
213,213
180,598
191,236
198,831
1,676,081
1,896,070
1,997,298
140,168
84.9
145,157
84.0
1,430,646
85.0
1,474,197
82.6
24,640
93.8
23,947
91.7
200,585
93.8
193,675
90.8
164,808
86.2
169,104
85.0
1,631,231
86.0
1,667,872
83.5
* B.C.H.I.S. excludes Workmen's Compensation Board patients and days,
t Amended per final reports received from hospitals.
Table Ib.—Percentage of Patients Covered by B.C. Hospital
Insurance Service during 1950
Per Cent
Patients charged to agencies—Workmen's Compensation Board, approved insurance plans, and
Dominion Government
Self-responsible—non-B .C. residents
Subject to B.C.H.I.S. coverage	
7.7
1.2
91.1
100.0
Percentage of B.C.H.I.S. patients hospitalized in relation to proportion subject to insurance
coverage, 85 per cent. (Table Ia) of 91.1 per cent    93.3 i.,   ..    ■,:,...
HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE REPORT,  1950
MM 17
Table IIa.—Patients Discharged, Total Days' Stay and Average Length of Stay
According to Type and Location of Hospital, and Days of Care per Thousand of Covered Population for B.C.H.I.S. Patients Only, Years 1949 and
1950.
Total
B.C. Public
Hospitals
B.C. Private
Hospitals
Institutions
outside B.C.
Adults
and
Children
Newborn
Adults
and
Children
Newborn
Adults
and
Children
Newborn
Adults
and
Children
Newborn
Patients discharged—•
1949	
149,293
153,484
1,498,538
1,546,952
10.04
10.08
24,991
24,276
■ 203,209
196,152
8.13
8.08
140,168
145,157
1,430,646
1,474,197
10.21
10.16
24,640
23,947
200,585
193,675
8.14
8.09
7,093
6,759
45,960
55,160
6.48
8.16
151
158
1,146
1,119
7.59
7.08
2,032
1,568
21,932
17,595
10.79
11.22
200
1950	
171
Patient-days—
1949  	
1,478
1,358
7,39
7.94
1950  	
Average days of stay—
1949	
1950      	
Days per thousand of population covered by B.C. Hospital Insurance Service:   1949, 1,496.6;  1950, 1,565.6.
1950 data for "institutions outside B.C." are based on payments to December 31st, 1950 only.   Workmen's Compensation Board cases and days excluded.
Table IIb.—Summary of the Number of In-patients and Short-stay Patients,
1949 and 1950
1949
1950
Total
Total adults, children, and new-born in-patients .
Estimated number of short-stay patients	
Total receiving benefits  	
174,284
29,000
177,760
40,000
352,044
69,000
203,284
217,760
421,044
Table III.—Patients Discharged, Total Days' Stay and Average Length of Stay
in B.C. Public Hospitals for B.C.H.I.S. Patients Only, Grouped According
to Bed Capacity, Year 1950.
Bed Capacity
Total
250 and
Over
100 to 249
50 to 99
25 to 49
Under 25      Special
Patients discharged—
146,793
23,947
1,490,804
193,675
10.16
8.09
61,654
9,613
735,786
81,971
11.93
8.53
14,799
2,057
142,320
15,984
9.62
7.77
42,372
8,421
376,903
66,605
8.90
7.91
15,148
2,210
124,853
16,656
8.24
7.54
1
8,775    1      4.045
1,430    |         216
Patient-days—■
1
69,821         41,121
10,968           1,491
Average days of stay—
7.96      1    10.17
7.67      |      6.90
1
Included 1,636 Workmen's Compensation Board patients (January 1st to March 31st, 1950), representing 16,607
patient-days.
Data available from preliminary hospital reports preclude the elimination of these factors according to size groupings
of hospitals. MM 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Table IV.—Percentage Distribution of Patients Discharged and Patient-days
for B.C.H.I.S. Patients Only, in B.C. Public Hospitals, Grouped According
to Bed Capacity, Year 1950.
Bed Capacity
Total
250 and
Over
100 to 249
50 to 99
25 to 49
Under 25
Special
Patients discharged—■
Adults and children  .	
Per Cent
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
Per Cent
42.00
40.14
49.35
42.32
Per Cent
10.08
8.59
9.55
8.25
Per Cent
28.87
35.17
25.28
34.39
Per Cent
10.32
9.23
8.37
8.60
Per Cent
5.98
5.97
4.68
5.66
Per Cent
2.75
0.90
Patient-days—■
Adults and children	
2.77
0.78
In Tables III and IV those public hospitals in which B.C. Hospital Insurance Service
does not cover certain types of hospitalization have been shown under the heading
" Special."    The figures, however, include only B.C.H.I.S. patients.
BENEFITS IN B.C. HOSPITALS, 1950
The general hospital services to be provided shall include such of the following
services as are recommended by the attending physician and as are available in the
hospital to which the person is admitted as an in-patient and when there is definite medical
necessity for in-patient care:—
(a) Public-ward accommodation:
(b) Operating-room facilities, including the use of all equipment and material
required in the proper care of surgical cases:
(c) Case-room facilities, including the use of all equipment and material
required in the proper care of maternity cases:
(d) Surgical dressings and casts as required, as well as other surgical materials and the use of any equipment which may be required while in
hospital:
(e) Anaesthetic supplies and the use of anaesthesia equipment:
(/) All other services rendered by individuals who receive any remuneration
from the hospital, provided that the provision of such services in a par-
particular hospital is approved by the Commissioner. Services which
may be approved by the Commissioner for the purpose of this section may
include:—
(1) Radiological, diagnostic, and therapeutic services, including the
services of a radiologist:
(2) Clinical laboratory and other diagnostic procedures, including
the services of a pathologist:
(3) The services of an anaesthetist:
(4) Physiotherapy services:
(g) Care of the acute stage of chronic diseases where, in the opinion of the
Commissioner, such care is necessary and desirable. Such chronic disease shall include cardiac disease, tuberculosis, mental disease, and acute
anterior poliomyelitis the acute stage of venereal disease only where
general hospital care is recommended by the Division of Venereal Disease
Control; the acute stage of drug addiction where overdosage and poisoning have to be given prompt treatment; and the acute stage of alcoholism,
provided in the case of acute alcoholism that hospitals establish under
their own by-laws the conditions under which such persons may be
admitted to hospital: ———
HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE REPORT, 1950 MM 19
(h) Such drugs and related preparations listed in the British Columbia Formulary and such other preparations as the Commissioner may from time to
time prescribe.
CLASSES OF PERSONS COVERED BY OR EXCLUDED FROM THE
BENEFITS OF THE HOSPITAL INSURANCE SERVICE
A. Covered by the Plan upon Payment of the Required Premium
Every person who is a resident of the Province. Participation in the plan is compulsory, except for those in the far northern areas who may voluntarily pay premiums and
be entitled to benefits.
B. Covered by the Plan as a Result of Payment of Premium by the
Provincial Government
1. Old-age and blind pensioners, and their dependents.
2. Mothers' allowance cases, and their dependents.
3. Social-assistance cases who are the financial responsibility of the Province.
C. Excluded from the Operation of the Plan
1. Members of the Canadian Armed Forces (but not their dependents).
2. Members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (but not their dependents).
3. Students in training under the Department of Veterans' Affairs (but not their
dependents).
4. Veterans in receipt of war veterans' allowance (but not their dependents).
5. Members of the Christian Science Church and residents in certain far northern
regions of the Province who have claimed, and been granted, exemption. Such persons,
if they pay premiums voluntarily, are entitled to the benefits under the Act.
6. A person who is a patient or an inmate of an institution maintained by the
Province.
7. Persons in a Provincial T.B. sanatorium.
8. Employees of the Canadian Pacific Railway and B.C. Telephone Company, who
operate the only private plans approved under the Act.
9. Persons committed to a gaol or penitentiary.
BENEFITS IN HOSPITALS OUTSIDE BRITISH COLUMBIA
Payments for hospital services rendered by hospitals outside the Province of British
Columbia to persons who are beneficiaries under the Act shall be made on the basis of
not more than $6.50 per day (new-borns, $3 per day) and for a period of time not to
exceed thirty days. Payments for a longer period of time than thirty days may be
authorized by the Commissioner where he is satisfied that further care of a type provided
for under the Act is required.
Where a beneficiary produces receipts showing that he has himself paid on account
to a hospital situated outside the Province, he may be reimbursed within the limitations
and subject to the conditions provided in the regulations under the Act.
victoria, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1951
2,295-351-5534 

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            data-media="{[{embed.selectedMedia}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0342844/manifest

Comment

Related Items