Open Collections

BC Sessional Papers

PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL Provincial Game Commission REPORT For the… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1951

Item Metadata

Download

Media
bcsessional-1.0342774.pdf
Metadata
JSON: bcsessional-1.0342774.json
JSON-LD: bcsessional-1.0342774-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): bcsessional-1.0342774-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: bcsessional-1.0342774-rdf.json
Turtle: bcsessional-1.0342774-turtle.txt
N-Triples: bcsessional-1.0342774-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: bcsessional-1.0342774-source.json
Full Text
bcsessional-1.0342774-fulltext.txt
Citation
bcsessional-1.0342774.ris

Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT   OF   ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Provincial Game Commission
REPORT
For the Year Ended December 31st
1949
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1951  To His Honour Clarence Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the Report of the Provincial Game
Commission for the year ended December 31st, 1949.
G. S. WISMER,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., December, 1950. Office of the Game Commission,
Vancouver, B.C., July 1st, 1950.
Honourable G. S. Wismer, K.C,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—We have the honour to submit herewith our Report for the year ended
December 31st, 1949.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
FRANK R. BUTLER,
JAMES G. CUNNINGHAM,
Game Commissioners. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Reports— Page
Game Commission  7
Officer Commanding "A" Division  11
Officer Commanding " B " Division  14
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson, " B " Division  19
Officer Commanding " C " Division  30
Officer Commanding " D " Division  37
Officer Commanding " E " Division  42
Report of the Division of Biology—Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan and Staff  46
Summary of Investigations Conducted by Fisheries Research Group—Dr.
P. A. Larkin  55
Statistical Reports—
Comparative Statistical Statement of Revenue, etc., 1913-49, Inclusive  62
Summary of Total Revenue Derived from Sale of Various Licences, Collections,
etc., during Year 1949 ._ 63
Revenue—Sale of Resident Firearms Licences  64
Revenue—Sale of Deer, Moose-Elk, and Pheasant (Game) Tags  65
Revenue—Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and Prospectors'
Firearms Licences  66
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Firearms, Non-resident Anglers', and Outfitters'
Licences    67
Revenue—Sale of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers'  (Minors)
Licences    68
Revenue—Sale of Fur-traders', Taxidermists',  and Tanners' Licences  and
Royalty on Fur  69
Comparative Statement of Revenue from Fur Trade, 1921-49, Inclusive  70
Comparative Statement Showing Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals  on Which
Royalty Has Been Collected, 1921-49, Inclusive          71
Statement of Kind of Pelts of Fur-bearing Animals on Which Royalty Was
Collected during Year 1949     72
List of Confiscated Fur, 1949, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated Fur  73
List of Confiscated Firearms, 1949, and Revenue from Sale of Confiscated
Firearms I  73
Bounties Paid, 1949  75
Comparative Statement of Bounties Paid from 1922 to 1949, Inclusive  76
Revenue—Big-game Trophy Fees Paid by Non-resident Hunters, 1949  76
Prosecutions, 1949   77
Hunting and Fishing Accidents, 1949  79
Statement—Trout Liberations, 1949  80
Statement—Returns from Holders of Special (Trapping) Firearms Licences,
Season 1948-49  92
Statement of Vermin Destroyed by Game Wardens, 1949  92
Statement of Game-bird Liberations, 1949  93
Statement—Returns of Game-bird Farmers, 1949  94
Statement—Miscellaneous Receipts  94
List of Resident Guides and Non-resident Outfitters, 1949  95
Personnel of Game Commission as at December 31st, 1949  104  Report of the Provincial Game Commission, 1949
The year 1949, in so far as revenue is concerned, has been the most successful one
in the history of the Department. The total revenue, including $18,148.50 in fines,
reached the figure of $736,689.14, or an increase in revenue of $35,366.50 over the
previous year.
The number of non-resident firearms licences issued showed a reduction over 1948,
and this, of course, resulted in a reduction in trophy fees collected. However, there
was a decided increase in the number of non-resident anglers' licences, which resulted
in the total revenue from the non-resident source being about equal to that of the
previous year. In 1949, trophy fees were collected in the amount of $84,410, compared
to $106,555 in 1948.
From our contacts with the organized sportsmen of the Province, they will no
doubt feel pleased on hearing of the reduction in the number of non-resident hunters
who visited the Province during the year, because these organized sportsmen have from
time to time expressed some anxiety as to the possibility of our big-game resources being
overtaxed. The drop in the number of non-resident hunters also enables us to make
the statement that guides can now satisfactorily cope with our non-resident hunters.
Undoubtedly due to the unsatisfactory fur market, our records indicate that trappers
were not very active, and apparently due to low fur prices, trapping was curtailed to a
great extent because the amount of fur royalties collected was some $10,375.82 less than
in the previous year.
It would appear that this higher revenue has been due to the increased numbers
of resident firearms and anglers' licences issued, along with such innovations as pheasant
and moose-elk tags, which, by the way, were introduced after repeated requests had
been received from the organized sportsmen of the Province. The total number of
resident firearms and anglers' licences issued was 138,193, which, added to the number
of similar licences issued to non-residents, brings the grand total of 162,183, as compared to the over-all total in 1948 of 135,602.
Our scientific management programme has rapidly advanced under the very capable
guidance of Drs. W. A. Clemens and Ian McTaggart Cowan, of the Department of
Zoology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. However, with increased demands
upon the wild-life resources of the Province, increased scientific investigations are a
necessity, and in our plans we feel that we are satisfactorily coping with these scientific
problems, but in this regard increased appropriations for scientific studies are required.
In our last Annual Report, we mentioned various scientific investigations as being under
way, and it is pleasing now to be in a position to advise that these investigations are
proceeding on schedule, and the results obtained so far have been most satisfactory
and encouraging.
We have continued our moose and wild-fowl surveys and, in connection with the
latter, some very important bird-banding work. We have also continued a scientific
study of the Coast or Columbian deer on Vancouver Island, as well as surveys in regard
to pheasants on the Lower Mainland and Okanagan regions; investigations in regard to
pheasants on the Lower Mainland and Okanagan regions; investigations in regard to
mountain-sheep in the Ashnola, Okanagan, and Lillooet Districts; further surveys on
lakes throughout the Interior; a survey in respect to steelhead trout on the Lower Mainland; investigations in regard to the need, if any, of fertilizing lakes; a further survey
on the coarse-fish problem and other game-fish culture surveys on Vancouver Island
have been constantly pressed, and have been greatly assisted through additional appointments of permanent biologists to assist our fisheries biologist, Dr. P. A. Larkin, and W 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
our game biologist, James Hatter. We have, during the past few years, been constantly
acquiring scientists of outstanding ability. Reports on some of our scientific surveys
are contained in this report, but we cannot at this time submit complete reports of all
surveys in progress or that have been undertaken and satisfactorily concluded, but
periodical reports will be prepared and distributed from time to time.
The continued operation of the checking-station at Cache Creek has afforded us
and, in particular, our biologists a splendid opportunity to keep a close check on the
game resources of the vast Cariboo and Chilcotin Districts. This station, under the
capable supervision of Game Warden W. H. Cameron, has become an annual necessity,
and has been the means of providing for the collection of a large amount of valuable
scientific data.
It might be mentioned that similar stations are being considered for the Kootenay
District, and it is possible also that a checking-station may be put into operation somewhere on the Hope-Princeton Highway; that is, of course, if finances at our disposal
will permit. Briefly, our records indicate that 1,153 moose, 876 deer, 96 black bear,
21 grizzly bear, 45 mountain-goats, 10 mountain-sheep, 5,780 ducks, 321 geese, and
8,141 grouse were recorded at our Cache Creek checking-station. Numerous violations
of the " Game Act" and regulations thereunder presented a problem to the checking
officers at this station.
A comparative statement appearing later in this Report will give a more complete
picture of the number of big-game trophies taken by non-residents. Probably more
complete statistical information could have been supplied if our own resident licensed
hunters had submitted the voluntary returns requested of them. This is to be regretted,
but our game biologists are working on some plan whereby we can have a suitable
sample return, which, apparently, is all that is required.
As in past years, a Province-wide Game Convention was held at Harrison Hot
Springs, and, needless to say, the information obtained from the proceedings of this
convention has more than proven invaluable for game-management purposes. We are
satisfied that the elected delegates of the organized sportsmen of the Province who were
present at this convention will agree that only conventions of this kind will furnish
everyone interested in game conservation an opportunity to express their views and secure
information dealing with every phase of our wild-fife resources. The convention was
very well attended by these elected delegates, who were drawn from every section of the
Province. Guides, trappers, farmers, and other representatives in the Province, as well
as representatives and guests from the Province of Alberta and the State of Washington,
were in attendance. Many very interesting and valuable scientific papers were presented,
the particulars of which will be found in the publication " Convention Report Proceedings," which has been printed and is available to anyone desiring same.
As in past years, we have taken every opportunity to be present at meetings of game
associations and farmers' and other organizations in various parts of the Province. We
have again been afforded the opportunity of meeting with the Advisory Board of Farmers'
Institutes and discussing with them matters pertaining to wild-life and its relation to
agriculture.
Due to the greatly increased problems confronting wild-life management that have
been, and still are, confronting us, we have not been in a position to prepare any
additional wild-life films, but we have followed our usual policy of showing the films
we have on hand at schools, game associations, and to many other organizations in the
Province.
REGISTRATION OF GUIDES
We are still confronted with the problem of straightening out the situation prevailing
in the Province in so far as big-game guides are concerned. To say the least, this is
a very perplexing problem, and we are satisfied that it will be some time before we are REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 9
in a position to make the statement that these guides have increased their efficiency to
such an extent that there will be no cause for complaint from any hunter employing
a guide licensed under our " Game Act."
REGISTRATION OF TRAP-LINES
We predicted in our 1948 Report that the Department of Indian Affairs would be
appointing a liaison officer to look into and supervise Indian registered trap-lines in the
Province, and it is with considerable pleasure that we are now in a position to advise that
this liaison officer has been appointed in the person of Robin Kendall, who, since his
appointment, has been working very closely and in full co-operation with your Game
Commission.
During the past twenty-four years the system of trap-line registrations, in so far as
white trappers are concerned, has gradually been producing excellent results, but it is
with regret that we cannot say that the situation is the same in so far as Indian trappers
are concerned, due, undoubtedly, to the lack of proper supervision. However, with the
appointment of Mr. Kendall we are satisfied that this situation will soon be different, and
we look for a steady improvement.
The beaver-tagging regulations which have been in effect for the past few years are
producing results, because beaver are now appearing in areas, especially in the southern
portions of the Province, where prior to these regulations being brought into being they
had been practically exterminated. This very pleasing state of affairs has been brought
about, no doubt, through the inability or the increased difficulty of poachers disposing
of their illegal fur.
BOUNTIES
Some 6,847 coyotes, 1,080 wolves, and 524 cougars were presented for bounty,
indicating an increase of 2,936 coyotes and a decrease of 76 wolves and 201 cougars for
bounty claims.
Needless to say, the control of predators is not only a perplexing problem but
a contentious one as well, and we are satisfied from the investigations that we have made
that the problem of predators will not be settled through the payment of bounties alone.
The employment of scientific personnel and trained predatory-animal hunters is a must
if the demands of the public in general are to be coped with and the welfare of our game
populations is to be protected. There has been some criticism as to the cost per animal
killed by predatory-animal hunters as compared to the number and cost of animals taken
under the bounty system, but it is felt that such criticism has been made without due
regard to the problem because we have had occasions where the taking of one predator
responsible for excessive damage has run the cost to the Department into hundreds of
dollars, and we are satisfied that a bounty—no matter how high—would not have resulted
in the capture of this particular predator. This is only cited as an example, but there
are many similar instances that have been presented from time to time. Chief Predatory-
animal Hunter James Dewar, on reporting that an Indian boy had been killed by a cougar
in the Alberni District, was instructed to proceed to the place by aeroplane, and our
hunters were fortunate in being at the scene and in disposing of the cougar responsible
in the matter of a very few hours.
As mentioned in our last Report, a biologist, W. W. Mair, has been appointed to
take charge of our predator-control operations. Mr. Mair will be making a complete
survey of the whole Province relative to the predator situation, and no doubt in the very
near future we will be in a position to advise more fully concerning our predator-control
programme. W 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
UPLAND GAME BIRDS
In 1949, 18,525 pheasants were purchased from resident licensed game-bird farmers
and liberated in many suitable areas in the Province. A summary of these liberations
is contained in the statistical section of this Report.
We are not satisfied with the pheasant situation in the Province, and in view of this
fact, our scientists are continuing to investigate this problem. The Okanagan region was
once an outstanding example of what could be done through the introduction of pheasants,
but we regret to have to advise that in latter years the pheasant population has been
gradually decreasing. At the moment we do not know what is responsible, but probably
the use of toxic insecticides in the orchards of the Okanagan region has had some bearing
on the situation, but our investigations have not proceeded to the extent that we can
make a definite statement that this is the reason for the depletion in pheasants. It might
be stated, however, that weather conditions during the past two winters, coupled with
flood conditions in the spring, have undoubtedly played some part in this decrease.
No doubt the ever-increasing number of hunters, with consequent increased demand for
pheasants, and the decreased suitable land for natural-propagation purposes have also
been responsible for reduced populations. In 1935, some 8,000 hunting licences were
issued throughout the Lower Mainland, where, at that time, large tracts of suitable farm
land were to be found. During that year suitable acreage was under grain, which in
itself is conducive to supporting a fair pheasant population, but in 1949, the picture
presented was entirely the opposite because most of the large farms have been broken
up into small plots, and the amount of grain grown has decreased to a fraction of that
grown in 1935. Then again, where we had approximately 8,000 hunters in the year
1935 over 20,000 licensed hunters were in the field in 1949. Due to these conditions,
it is very difficult and almost impossible to supply or produce sufficient pheasants to meet
the demand.
The grouse season, which had been closed for a number of years, was opened for
a short period in the Cariboo section of the Province, and from results obtained there
and elsewhere we feel that our grouse populations have about reached the peak of their
cycle, and it is expected that much longer open seasons with more liberal bag-limits will
be prevailing during the next year or two. Vancouver Island continues to be the favourite
spot for blue-grouse hunting. The blue grouse on Vancouver Island continue to be fairly
plentiful, and this will no doubt be the case until such time as the logged-off areas again
commence to produce new forests.
MIGRATORY GAME BIRDS
As mentioned in our last Report, requests for what might be termed a " split open
season " on migratory wild fowl were received from the Lower Mainland game associations. This request was granted, but the success obtained by the average hunter as
a result of this split season is somewhat doubtful, because while the first half of the season
was satisfactory, immediately after the opening of the second half of the season severe
frost was encountered, which forced wild fowl to leave the majority of the Lower Mainland and resulted in a limited amount of fair shooting in the tidal areas at the mouth
of the Fraser River. A considerable number of sportsmen do not favour a split season,
because in the first place, in accepting a split season, some fifteen days' less hunting
is allowed than when a continuous open season is permitted. Secondly, during the close
of the first half and the commencement of the second half of the split season excellent
duck-hunting weather was encountered, and, no doubt, during this period some good
shooting was forfeited. However, the season as a whole throughout the Province
compared favourably with previous years. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 11
GAME LAWS ENFORCEMENT
A total of 1,115 prosecutions were conducted and $18,184.50 was collected in fines
during the year.
As indicated in our last Report, the ever-increasing use of aeroplanes for hunting,
fishing, and trapping has been the cause for considerable concern, not only among the
organized sportsmen but also to game administrations throughout the whole of Canada.
There is no question that this use of aircraft from a game-management point of view is
a serious problem, and some action in reference to the control of aircraft should, it is
recommended, be brought into effect without any delay.
GAME-FISH CULTURE
Probably one of the branches of the Department showing the greatest expansion
is our game-fish cultural branch, due, no doubt, to the ever-increasing number of anglers,
which has resulted in a greater demand for more suitable hatchery facilities. In 1948,
there were 51,374 resident and 13,793 non-resident anglers' licences issued, while in
1949, there were 67,371 resident and 21,444 non-resident anglers' licences issued, or an
over-all increase of 23,547 licences.
In view of the above, it was found necessary this year to construct a large modern
trout-hatchery at Smiths Falls on the east shore-line of Cultus Lake, in the Chilliwack
district, and no doubt our next problem will be that of providing a similar hatchery at
some point in the Cariboo or Central Interior section of the Province, and we propose
to make provision for same in our estimates for the coming fiscal year.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
To all game associations, farmers' organizations, and Provincial and Dominion
Government departments we wish to extend our sincere thanks for the very hearty
co-operation extended to all officers of the Game Department during the year 1949.
"A" DIVISION (VANCOUVER ISLAND, THE GULF ISLANDS, AND THE
MAINLAND COAST FROM TOBA INLET NORTH TO CAPE CAUTION,
INCLUDING THE ISLANDS ADJACENT TO THE EAST COAST OF VANCOUVER ISLAND NORTH OF CAMPBELL RIVER).
By G. C. Stevenson, Officer Commanding
I have the honour to submit my annual report covering game and fish conditions in
"A" Division for the year ended December 31st, 1949.
Big Game
Bear (Black).—This animal is still very plentiful and is definitely on the increase.
Some very fine specimens have been observed in the Mount Washington area, a few miles
north-west of Courtenay. As a game animal, the black bear is not hunted to any great
extent.
Bear (Grizzly).—Reports indicate that the headwaters of Toba, Knight, and Loughborough Inlets produce some very fine specimens, but hunting conditions in the areas
mentioned are difficult.
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—These animals will have to be closely watched for
the next few .years, as three consecutive winters of intense severity have taken their toll
of the younger animals. Apart from any climatic hazards, the chief diminishing factor,
in my opinion, is the pressure of hunting, which increases every year. Game clubs and
associations apparently do not.fully realize the latter problem; though their membership
is limited to an active few, the purchasers of hunting licences have increased by a very W 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
substantial margin during the past few years. This, together with the inroads of logging
operations into the heretofore remote areas, is having its effect on the deer population.
Bag-limits and open seasons will have to be reduced in ratio to the increasing volume
of hunting pressure.
Elk (Wapiti).—The number of these animals appears to remain static, in spite of
the fact that a closed season has been in force for a considerable number of years. There
are several well-known herds, such as those at Shaw Creek, Nanaimo Lakes, Oyster
River, Tahsis, and the area south of Englewood.
There are many suggestions put forward as to the reason these animals are not
increasing, and depredation by wolves is the explanation most commonly advanced.
Predation may have a considerable bearing, but there are several other factors that must
be considered in appraising the condition. A scientific survey will have to be undertaken
in order to solve this problem.
FUR-BEARING ANIMALS
Fur conditions in this Division are good, and a substantial increase in the beaver
population is noticeable—the latter being definitely due to the permit and tagging systems
now in effect.
Marten, mink, and otter are plentiful. Muskrats show a decline in many areas, but
these animals are not indigenous to Vancouver Island.
Racoon and skunk are very plentiful, in spite of fairly drastic hunting and trapping
seasons recently put into effect on these animals.
Upland Game Birds
Blue Grouse.—These birds are to be found in good numbers throughout this Division. A considerable number of these birds are taken every year by the ever-increasing
volume of hunters, but, so far, no appreciable reduction in the number of birds is
noticeable.
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—There is a marked improvement in the number of these
birds, and the long closed period would seem to have borne good results.
Pheasants.—These birds cannot be considered plentiful in this Division, but there
are many areas where very fair hunting may be obtained. Sportsmen themselves are
to blame for farmers not granting permission to hunt over their lands due to recent
exhibitions of lack of courtesy and bad manners on the part of some sportsmen.
Migratory Game Birds
There are indications that ducks and geese are holding their own in spite of an
increase in hunters.    Provided natural feeding-grounds are allowed to remain unaltered
and flight-resting stations established, there is no reason to fear any grave depletion of
migratory birds. _. '
°       J Predation Control
A total of 193 cougars and 2 wolves was destroyed in this Division during the
past year. Of this number, thirty-two were destroyed by Government hunters. Many
of the cougar accounted for by our men necessitated long journeys and considerable
time, as the calls were received from widely separated districts.
A very large number of noxious birds, cats, and predatory dogs were accounted for
by Game Wardens while on patrol. The question of dogs running deer is a serious one
in this Division, and requires much time and effort on the part of Game Wardens.
Game Protection
There were 186 prosecutions for infractions of the " Game Act " and contravention
of Game and Fishery Regulations during the year. Of these, 185 were convictions; total
fines being $3,974.50. report of provincial game commission, 1949 w 13
Game Propagation
There were 952 pheasants and 95 quail liberated in this Division during the year.
Releases were made as follows:—
Pheasants:   Alberni, 96; Courtenay, 496; Nanaimo, 160; and Victoria, 200.
Quail:  Denman Island, 6, and Victoria and Saanich, 89.
It is proposed to liberate a further number of quail on Denman Island next year.
Game Reserves
There are several small reserves on the Island, the principal ones being Shaw Creek,
Elk Lake, Elk Falls, Bald Mountain, Strathcona Park, Forbidden Plateau, and China
Creek.
Fur Trade
Practically no raw-fur trading is carried on in this Division. Trappers generally
dispose of their catches at Vancouver or elsewhere.
Registration of Trap-lines
The registration of trap-lines, together with the permit and tagging system for the
taking of beaver, is showing outstanding results. The close check being maintained over
fur-buyers is very gratifying, as few, if any, pelts are not checked at their destination.
Registration of Guides
Guide-registration is a problem that has not as yet reached major proportions in
this Division. In the northern part of the Island the problem is being watched closely,
as the Campbell River district draws many hunters and fishermen, and there may develop
an overcrowding of guides. So far, the registration system is working very well, even
though guides are somewhat tardy in submitting their returns.
Special Patrols
No special patrols were carried out this year, but Departmental predator hunters
brought back very useful information on game which they were able to secure in remote
areas of the Division.
Hunting Accidents
On September 17th, 1949, Robert Berkey, of Ladysmith, was shot by Leslie Wargo,
of Ladysmith, while carelessly shooting at grouse. Charge from shotgun struck Robert
Berkey, necessitating removal of one eye.
On September 19th, 1949, William Loucks, of Nanaimo, shot William Johnstone,
of Nanaimo, mistaking him for a deer. Serious abdominal wound. William Johnstone
charged under section 284 of the Criminal Code of Canada.    Fined $100 and costs.
On October 28th, 1949, H. J. Bush, of Genoa Bay, Vancouver Island, accidentally
discharged shotgun, blowing away left side of chest.    Fatal.
On November 6th, 1949, John Balloni, of Nanaimo, was accidentally shot by
Clarence Cameron, of Nanaimo. Gun, leaning against a fence, fell and discharged on
ground, hitting John Balloni.    Minor injuries.
Game-fish Culture
A total of 249,800 Kamloops trout fingerlings were released in lakes and streams
throughout this Division. Conditions at the Puntledge Park Trout Hatchery were made
difficult during the winter by the exceptionally heavy snowfall that required constant
attention and caused considerable mortality among the fish.
Biological surveys have been commenced on the more important lakes in this
Division, and preliminary steps have been taken at Shawnigan Lake to appraise its value W  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
as to restocking, etc. Fishing in lakes and streams throughout this Division has been
good during the year, but certain waters that are easily accessible to the public, and are
fished intensively, show signs of depletion. The question of restocking lakes and streams
is one that requires considerable study, as the planting of trout fingerlings in some waters
does not meet with the success anticipated, owing to a number of causes that require
biological study. Fish and game clubs would do well to look into this question before
they submit requests to the Department to place more and more fingerlings in certain
lakes and streams.
Summary and General Remarks
In reviewing conditions and operations over the past year, one outstanding feature
noticed on Vancouver Island is the ever-increasing hunting and fishing intensity. Being
in close proximity to the two largest centres of population in the Province, it is inevitable
that more and more hunters and fishermen should seek their sport on this Island. This is
having a marked influence on the game and fish resources, and apart from any biological
or climatic hazards encountered, the mathematical equation of ratio of hunting and fishing
licences to quantity of available game and fish will have to be reviewed from the standpoint of reducing bag-limits and duration of open seasons in proportion to the increase
of licences sold.
The popularity of the aeroplane as a means of transportation by sportsmen will need
attention, and the posting of a substantial bond by all hunters and fishermen entering
the Province to hunt or fish by aeroplane is advocated—the bond to be refunded after
clearance by Departmental officials.
Close co-operation was maintained with the Provincial Police in this Division, and
I wish to thank all members of that force for their kindness and assistance at all times.
My thanks is also extended to all personnel of this Division, who have carried out
their duties to the Commission in a very able manner.
" B " DIVISION (KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS)
By C. F. Kearns, Officer Commanding
I beg to submit herewith my annual report for the year ended December 31st, 1949.
Big Game
Moose.—The moose stand is only fair in the East Kootenay. They are slowly but
gradually extending their range, as has been noted in previous reports. There are a few
moose around the lower end of Kootenay Lake and from Creston to Yahk, also one
moose was reported near Princeton. These animals are heavily hunted by local residents.
Probably a later opening of the season would be advisable, because when moose are
adjacent to the sloughs along the travelled highways there is little sport in shooting them
under such conditions. We have had also too many reports of cows and calves being shot
and left to rot during the earlier part of the season by impetuous hunters. In view of the
above, any time in October would seem to be a more suitable opening for the moose
season in the East Kootenay.
Wapiti (Elk).—The elk are in fair numbers in the East Kootenay and the present
open season is satisfactory. Small introduced bands in Penticton and Princeton districts
appear to show a slight increase, or at least to be holding their own.
Caribou.—Are thinly distributed in the Selkirk Range adjacent to the Arrow and
Kootenay Lakes. A short open season does not result in a very large take of these
animals.
Mountain-goat.—Well represented throughout the district, and plentiful in the East
and West Kootenays. It would appear that there is some decline, for no apparent reason,
in the Golden, Invermere, and Cranbrook areas.
Mountain-sheep (Bighorn).—Continue to recover a good portion of their previous
numbers.   A short open season on these animals would now be in order. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 15
Deer (Mule).—Well distributed and reasonably plentiful throughout the Division,
but there are not as many deer as there were four or five years ago. The winter of
1946-47 was hard on deer; the winter of 1948-49 was worse; and the present winter
has every promise of being a severe one. Due to the prevailing good weather during the
open season, deer were not concentrated on the lower levels and the hunting was not as
good as in previous years. Nevertheless there was a very good stand of mule-deer—in
some cases probably quite as much as the winter range can accommodate.
White-tailed Deer.—Are plentiful in the East and West Kootenays, but fewer in
numbers in the Boundary and Similkameen districts.
Grizzly Bear.—These animals are found throughout the Division, but might be
classed as generally scarce. They are desirable as trophies, and it is felt that a fuller
measure of protection should be given them. The prohibition of spring hunting is a
niatter for consideration.
Black and Brown Bear.—Well distributed and very plentiful. Due to the shortage
of wild berries in the Kootenays, an unusual amount of orchard raiding by bears took
place during the summer. This is a situation that seems to occur about every ten years
or so.. The huckleberry crop fails, and bears go into hibernation in a poor physical
condition with a resultant noticeable scarcity of them the following year.
Fur-bearing Animals
The prevailing low price of fur offers little encouragement for trappers at the present
time. Nevertheless the majority of them are retaining their lines and hoping for better
prices soon.
Upland Game Birds
Blue Grouse.—Well distributed and plentiful in the West Kootenay, and more so
than in other sections of the Division. They are scarcer in the Boundary-Similkameen
than in previous years.
Ruffed (Willow) Grouse.—The stand of these birds is very encouraging, and they
are definitely on the upswing to their former population peak.
Franklin's Grouse.—Well distributed and presumably on the same cyclical upgrade
as the willow grouse.
Sharp-tailed Grouse.-—The open season in the Columbia district resulted in a fair
take of these birds with plenty left for restocking. There are now probably enough in
the Cranbrook district for a short open season.
Ptarmigan.—Well distributed from timber-line to the high peaks, but very little
hunted.
Pheasants.—The situation was quite encouraging in the Creston area, but there were
very few birds in the Grand Forks district. Fair numbers were observed in the Okanagan
and there would appear to be some doubt as to whether the closure of the season was
necessary in the Oliver district.
European Partridge.—These birds are present, but not numerous, at Creston, Grand
Forks, and the Penticton-Oliver districts.
Quail.—Limited to the Penticton-Oliver district, where they are in fair numbers.
Migratory Game Birds
Geese (Canada).—These water-fowl are nesting in good numbers in the flood lands
on either side of the Columbia River from Invermere to near Golden, the sloughs near
Creston, and on the Duncan River north of Kootenay Lake, and also at the north end of
the Upper Arrow Lakes. In the latter place there is a large concentration of Canada
geese, and they are very difficult to hunt because of the open nature of the country.
Goose-hunting in the above areas during the season is quite good. W 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Ducks.—Conditions are normal regarding locally reared ducks, particularly in the
section between Invermere and Golden and the sloughs on the Duncan River north of
Kootenay Lake, which are the heaviest nesting places. Creston is still good, although
the available- locality has been restricted due to reclamation of many sloughs. Ducks,
of course, nest in sundry suitable spots all over the Division, but not in any particular
concentration.
Approximately 1,000 ducks were fed on the West Arm of Kootenay Lake during
the winter. These birds apparently have never migrated, and they lose the urge to do
so as they have been fed more or less continuously at Nelson for twenty years. It is only
in an abnormal winter that icing conditions on the West Arm of Kootenay Lake make
food a necessity. Several hundred water-fowl lurk in the vicinity of the Nelson ferry,
and it is common practice for citizens to feed them while crossing on the ferry. From
40 to 100 geese wintered in the vicinity of Castlegar, where they were fed during the
period that the Columbia River and Lower Arrow Lake were frozen.
Coots.—Plentiful, and of no consequence as a game bird.
Wilson's Snipe.—Are transitory in migrations and not hunted to any extent.
The spring nesting season for water-fowl was favourable, but some sharp weather
in mid-October induced many of the local birds to fly south while the northern flight
did not pause locally. Local duck-hunters were generally disappointed in their shooting
although plenty of birds were present before the season opened.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds
During the year the following vermin were destroyed by the personnel of the Division: Coyotes, 229; cougars, 45; noxious hawks, 52; eagles, 21; owls, 32; ravens, 29;
crows, 257; dogs (wild), 78; cats (wild), 87; magpies, 63; bobcats, 2; skunks, 2;
bears, 20; pack-rats, 20; rattlesnakes, 2.
Game Protection
One hundred and sixty-nine informations were laid under the " Game Act " and the
Special Fisheries Regulations for British Columbia, resulting in 165 convictions and
4 dismissals.
Game Propagation
Three hundred and ninety-nine pheasants were released to supplement existing
stocks in the Oliver-Keremeos area, also at Grand Forks, Creston, and Nakusp.
Game Reserves
The Elk River Game Reserve, comprising portions of the watersheds of the White,
Bull, and Elk Rivers, is the most important reserve in this Division, as it affords protection to deer, moose, elk, sheep, and goats during the open season.
Deer sanctuaries on the Kettle River in the Boundary District and along the Wigwam
River in the East Kootenay are natural concentration points for mule deer and give
them respite during the open season, particularly when the snowfall is early.
Three Brothers Game Reserve, near Princeton, is beneficial during the early part
of the open season.
Game-bird sanctuaries at Vaseaux Lake, Penticton district, and on Kootenay Lake,
near Nelson, continue to meet with general approval.
Revelstoke, Glacier, Kootenay, and Yoho National Parks all lie within this Division,
and no hunting is permitted therein.
Fur Trade
The prevailing low price of furs will probably result in a reduced revenue from this
source, as there is small inducement for trappers while the prices are down so drastically. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 17
Registration of Trap-lines
Although the trapping business is in the doldrums at present, trappers are maintaining their lines in the hope that when fur prices rise that they will have built up an
appreciable stock and can be in a position to take advantage of the rising market. It does
not seem reasonable that the price of prime wild-caught pelts can long remain at the
present rock-bottom level.
Registration of Guides
Our system of registered guides, which is the result of both experiment and expediency during the past few years, seems to be working out fairly well. There is still a lack
of properly qualified men in this field, but it is doubtful if the situation will be remedied
due to the short season a hunting-guide can operate. To be in possession of a first-class
outfit means that a guide must maintain a sizeable amount of equipment as well as
sufficient horses to look after his hunters. A few of the first-class guides have very good
outfits, but they are suffering in competition with second-class guides who take hunters
out on cheaper and shorter trips.
This situation is due to the fact that roads run into much of the good hunting
country, and it is expected that in the next year or two, due to the programme of the Forest
Service in opening up new areas and also the building of truck-roads by mining and
logging companies, actually very little of the East Kootenay can be classed as inaccessible,
that is, requiring exclusive use of horses to reach.
This situation does not work to the advantage of the man with a first-class outfit,
although some guides are lengthening their season by catering to fishing parties and
outdoor vacationists who wish good photographic opportunities, in which the East
Kootenay abounds.
Special Patrols
Although no actual patrols can be classed as special, many horse patrols have been
made by the Wardens to the areas above timber-line, and lasting from a few days to
a week or more.
In addition, most of the Game Wardens hunted cougars as the opportunity offered
during the winter, and they made trips of several days' duration on snow-shoes as a matter
of course. TT .
Hunting Accidents
1. On September 15th, 1949, Avery Blanchard, of Renata, while assisting Charles
Morey to look for a bear in his orchard at night, fired at what he thought was a reflex
from the eyes of a bear, killed Jacob Fehr, and wounded Jacob Friesen, both of Renata.
These men were also hunting in the adjoining orchard, unknown to both Blanchard and
Morey, presumably for the same bear that had been damaging the trees of Charles Morey.
Subsequent action by the police resulted in a charge of manslaughter being laid against
A. Blanchard.   A jury trial at Nelson later resulted in a dismissal.
Jacob Friesen was seriously wounded in the upper left arm, and it is doubtful if he
will regain the full use of his arm.
The hunting licence issued to Charles Morey was cancelled, and both he and
A. Blanchard were advised that they would not be able to obtain firearms licences in
British Columbia until such time as the Game Commission see fit to consider their
application.
2. A. R. Unwin, of Kimberley, was injured when closing a new shotgun, as the shell
exploded before the gun was fully closed, causing painful, but not serious, injury to his
right hand. Presumably this was due to a malfunction of the weapon, which was returned
to the manufacturer for a check.
Summary and General Remarks
As I have previously mentioned in annual reports, we are coasting along very well
so long as the climatic conditions remain benign.   We had a period of very good years, W 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA
mild winters and fair spring nesting seasons which produced the best hunting both for
upland game birds and deer animals that this part of the Province has ever enjoyed.
But the tide has been turning, and it is to be sincerely hoped that the present winter will
mark the full ebb. Three of the last four winters have been most adverse, even calamitous
for deer. Everything has been against them: deep snow which did not crust, thus
making it hard for them to reach their food supply; a fair number of predators; and the
incompatible business of deer seeking a winter range that no longer exists in much of the
West Kootenay, where the lower levels are cultivated. In a mild winter the deer can
range high up behind the homesteads, but when the snows are deep, they come lower,
where they suffer from vehicular traffic, trains, and domestic dogs, as well as their natural
enemies—the cougar and coyote.
What is applicable to the deer, both mule and white-tailed, also pertains in a somewhat less degree to the larger animals—moose and elk. They, too, have their difficulties
during the bad winters. We have been plagued by the complaints of angered farmers
who have seen their haystacks melting away before the hungry attacks of both deer and
elk. This is a very difficult matter to adjust and requires both patience and forbearance
on the part of all interested parties—the sportsman, the landowner, and the Game
Department.
The public have been notified, via the press, that the cutting down of suitable trees,
such as cedar, or in extreme cases, fir, will tide the deer over a tough period, and is better
than providing them with hay. Many interested people have taken the trouble to follow
these suggestions as well as put out hay on their own. Even the farmers who suffer
most from the deer are still as generous as they can be in this regard.
In addition to all the hard winters, the resident hunting population is definitely on
the increase, and the presence of a good many non-resident hunters is felt in the relatively
small and accessible hunting areas of the East Kootenay.
Realizing that the situation is getting serious, the game regulations were curtailed
last year, namely, the deer season was shortened two weeks, and hunters were given their
choice of an elk or a moose, but not both animals. These regulations were very good,
but they should be carried further. It is felt that if the moose season were to open a
month later, hunting would be more of a sport and the animals would have a fair break.
When frost coats the sloughs or small lakes with a skim of ice, the moose go higher and
farther afield, and can be found on the same range as the deer or elk.
For some unaccountable reason, the goat population in the East Kootenay seems
to be declining, and we should recognize that situation by cutting the present bag of two
goats down to one.
The one bright spot in the over-all situation is that the bighorn sheep have definitely
increased during the years of the closed season since the epidemic of 1941. An open
season with a bag-limit of one animal might safely be allowed.
The number of cougars destroyed in the Division by game personnel during the
past years has definitely reduced their numbers, a comparatively smaller number of
cougar tracks being noted than normally. Even so, nineteen cougars have been taken up
to the present time (January 31st, 1950).
Coyotes are now worse predators than cougar and the cautious experiments we have
made to date in using poison indicate that this method has much merit. Two isolated
key points were selected in the late spring, which resulted in some fifty carcasses being
recovered, and presumably a similar amount which were not located.
Strychnine was used and this is not an instantaneous killer. Investigation in the
same areas during the present winter disclosed an almost total lack of coyote tracks,
indicating at least a local success against these animals.
We are experimenting with cyanide, which kills instantaneously, but the effort also
will be local and experimental.   The knowledge gained herein should enable us to conduct REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W  19
a more extensive poisoning campaign against predators in the immediate future, under
the direction and supervision of experienced game personnel. Poison is an agency that
needs careful and complete control, and we mean to employ it with the utmost discretion.
The usual cordial co-operation was received during the year from the organized
sportsmen and various Provincial Government departments, chiefly the Provincial Police,
the Public Works Department, and the Forest Service.
Report of C. H. Robinson, Fishery Supervisor, Covering Game-fish
Conditions in " B " Game Division
Herewith I beg to submit report covering a review of the sport fisheries of " B "
Game Division for the year ended 1949.
Normal weather conditions assisted natural reproduction and ova collections. Most
hatcheries received the full quota of eggs as listed, except Gerrard Hatchery, where the
collections were less than anticipated due to water conditions, and for the same reason
there was a shortage of cut-throat trout eggs for the Cranbrook Hatchery.
In view of the proposed chlorination of the Cranbrook City water-supply, it became
necessary to vacate the Cranbrook District Rod and Gun Club hatchery building and use
a temporary-constructed building adjacent to and below the city reservoir until August
15th. Subsequently the Game Department constructed a new, modern trout hatchery
on the temporary-building site above the point of chlorination. The change-over will
undoubtedly add to the efficiency of seasonal fish-cultural operations. Excellent
co-operation was received from the Corporation of the City of Cranbrook by granting
the Department the privilege of taking water from the reservoir and in approving a lease
of twenty-five years for the hatchery site. Also the Consolidated Mining & Smelting
Company, of Kimberley, kindly donated materials for the pipe-line leading from the
reservoir to the hatchery.
The much appreciated preliminary biological surveys were carried out on Kootenay
Lake, Lardeau River, and Trout Lake, financially assisted by the Consolidated Mining
& Smelting Company, of Trail. Also a preliminary survey was conducted on the Arrow
Lakes. The proposed drawing-off of water from Trout Lake was deferred, due to an
extra two feet of water being stored in Kootenay Lake for hydro-electric purposes on
Kootenay River.
The increasing angling pressure by non-residents in the accessible waters of the
Boundary District remains a serious problem in spite of shorter fishing seasons and
sacrifices made by the resident anglers. The planting of trout fingerlings in place of eyed
eggs and fry would help the situation, which is desired by the organized sportsmen of
Grand Forks, Greenwood, Midway, and Beaverdell. A similar problem exists in the
eastern part of the Division, in the Fernie region, from the increasing influx of Alberta
anglers due to improved highways and the construction of a power-line down the Elk
Valley from Alberta. Shorter fishing seasons and the closure of the upper reaches of the
Elk River and other waters would, therefore, appear necessary.
To conserve and protect the small trout under the legal size of eight inches in small
streams accessible to auto travel, it appears desirable to have a much shorter fishing
season in order to prevent the appalling waste of smaller trout, the future stock, from
being roughly handled and flicked off the hooks by some unscrupulous anglers.
Similkameen and South Okanagan Waters
Princeton District Waters.-—Reports indicated that trout-fishing improved slightly
and the prospects of better fishing were in sight with the planting of Kamloops trout
fingerlings in Otter (Tulameen) and Taylor (Summit) Lakes, also the organized sportsmen hope it will be possible to plant good-sized fingerlings in Wolfe and Lome Lakes,
etc., where the coarse fish (squawfish) predominate. W 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
The success of coarse-fish removal from Borgeson and Dry Lakes and the replacement with rainbow trout, including also experimental plants of fry and fingerlings in
McCaffrey (Blue), Laird, Mackenzie, and Allison Lakes is awaited with interest.
Several lakes yielded the average catches of Kamloops trout, namely, Missezuela,
Murphy (Bear), Lost (Kump), Placer, Tepee, Osprey, and Lightning Lakes, also a few
good trout were taken from Wolfe Lake, not stocked for several years due to the coarse-
fish menace. Harvey Hall Lake, a shallow mud-bottom body of water, accessible by
secondary highway, produced some excellent specimens of Kamloops trout weighing ten
pounds and less. Penask Lake fry were planted in this lake in July, 1947. The lake was
barren of fish-life prior to the planting.
Clearwater Lake.—With improved spawning facilities in the outlet creek prepared
by the organized sportsmen of the Nickel Plate Mine, natural reproduction has been
sufficient the past four years to maintain a well-balanced supply of trout, increasing in
weight from \Vi to 4 pounds. Cathedral Lakes were not fished to any extent and in
some lakes the natural reproduction is in excess of the available food supplies, resulting
in poor-condition fish.
Similkameen River.—Flowing parallel to the highway, it yielded fair catches of
rainbow trout, but the discoloration of the water-flow from gold dredging and surface
water cutting into bentonite deposits during the spring freshets reduced angling and
catches of trout.
Oliver-Osoyoos District Waters
Twin and Horn Lakes.—These lakes continued to produce fair catches of Eastern
brook trout and with the planting of No. 1 fingerlings from the Summerland Hatchery,
improved angling is expected. The speckled trout are consuming goodly numbers of
small carp. This may check the populations of this prolific coarse fish, providing the
public has free access to the lakes.
Madden Lake.—The Eastern brook-trout fishing improved slightly; the millions of
shiners that frequent the lake are now providing some food for the speckled trout
introduced on that account.
Bear Lake.—This lake continued to produce good-conditioned Kamloops, varying
to 6 pounds in weight. To date, there is no information available on the Kamloops trout
introduced in Wolfe Lake in 1947.
Taylor Lake.—This lake produced limited numbers of trout, which are somewhat
sluggish due to the abundant food supplies.
Osoyoos Lake.—Spring and fall fishing improved for Kamloops trout. The
reciprocal arrangement of restocking between the Oroville organized sportsmen and the
Game Commission might be credited to the improvement. In addition to the recorded
plantings effected by the Game Department, the Washington State Game Department
liberated 20,000 four- to six-inch rainbow trout fingerlings in the year 1948 and a similar
allotment in the year 1949 from the allotments of fry supplied from the Summerland
Hatchery.
Vaseaux Lake.—This lake supplied limited numbers of large-mouthed black bass. The
organized sportsmen are desirous of introducing the small-mouthed black bass species into
the lake, which is considered far superior to the large-mouthed black bass.
Penticton District Waters
Skaha (Dog) Lake.—Gratifying reports indicate the best Kamloops trout fishing for
the past twenty-five years. This phenomenal improvement was a pleasant surprise to the
individual and organized sportsmen after an alleged reported depletion of Kamloops trout.
No doubt, with the continued planting of trout fingerlings in place of fry, plus maintaining
the supplies of kokanee and possibly more protection to the parent spawning trout, the
desired results will be achieved. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1949 W 21
Okanagan Lake (South End).—The spring and fall fishing for Kamloops trout has
improved. The continued seasonal liberations of Kamloops trout fingerlings from
the Summerland Hatchery and Kelowna Rearing-ponds should contribute to further
improvement.
Dark (Fish) Lake.—Produced excellent catches of Eastern brook trout. The planting of No. 1 fingerlings should provide further improvement. The several alpine lakes,
namely, Little and Big Eneas, Deer, Island, Munro, Garney, Glen, Peachland, MacDonald,
and Brenda Lakes, continued to yield average catches of Kamloops trout from partial
artificial replenishment with fry and fingerlings.
Chute, Elinor, Cedar, Ratnip, Divide, and Norman Lakes, etc., in the Naramata
region, supplied average catches of Kamloops trout mostly due to restocking with fry.
Boundary District Waters.—The Kettle River and West Fork supplied fair fly-fishing
for rainbow trout the first part of the season from June 1st, but with the influx of
non-resident anglers, it is nearly impossible to cope with this situation, although probably
planting fingerlings in place of fry and eyed eggs would assist in alleviating the problem
with a further reduced period for angling.
Conkle (Fish), Arlington, Bull, Collier, Copper, Clarke, Williamson, and Cranberry
Lakes, etc., supplied the average catches of Kamloops trout, and with the exception of
fry planted in Conkle and Arlington Lakes, natural spawning has maintained the supplies
of trout.
Jewell Lake.—This lake was fairly well patronized by resident and particularly by
the non-resident anglers with fair catches of Kamloops trout taken on fly and troll. The
largest trout caught was about 8 pounds. Due to the presence of shiners, the organized
sportsmen are most anxious to have the lake restocked with fingerlings, as well as Will-
gress (Loon) Lake, where trout fishing has seriously deteriorated since the presence of
the large shiner.
Granby River (North Fork).—Small trout are quite plentiful in the upper reaches
of the river, making it advisable to cancel the closure of certain tributary streams. The
lower part of the river yielded fair catches of rainbow trout on the fly. Reports indicate
that there has been some outward migration of Kamloops trout which were introduced
in 1947 in Zenia Lake by plane, thereby improving fishing in the river.
Lake Christina.-—Supplied fair trolling for Kamloops trout. The largest trout taken
weighed 15 pounds. The kokanee play a very important part for summer fishing. The
planting of fingerlings in place of fry and eyed eggs is warranted and desired by the
organized sportsmen.
Small-mouthed Black Bass.—During the summer, the bass supplied fair fishing,
mostly toward the head of Lake Christina. These fish are not so plentiful and consequently young trout will have a better chance of survival.
West Kootenay Waters
In comparison to the wet season of 1948, reports indicated a slight improvement
in fishing generally. This applies particularly to the West Arm of Kootenay Lake,
extending from Corra Linn dam to Procter. Big Sheep Creek, Beaver Creek, and
Boundary Lake supplied good catches of Eastern brook trout. Rosebud Lake was fair
and Erie Lake poor, where the squawfish predominate. The stretch of Columbia River
flowing between Castlegar and Waneta provided some fair fly-fishing. Coarse fish remain
plentiful from the up-stream migration from Roosevelt Lake.
Lower and Upper Arrow Lakes.—The lower lake is fished steadily by numerous
owners of summer homes in the vicinity of Robson and Syringa Creek. From a recreational standpoint, Kamloops trout fishing is very important, and in consequence the
liberation of trout fingerlings would assist in solving any problem of depletion. The
upper lake did not provide as good fishing for the Kamloops and Dolly Varden trout as
the season of 1948. W 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Whatshan Lakes.—During the first part of the season, fly-fishing was good for
Kamloops trout, mostly under 2 pounds. Trolling remained good throughout the season.
An approximate creel census was taken by the proprietor of the Whatshan Resort, and
accordingly some 24,000 of three species of fish were taken—Kamloops, Dolly Varden,
and kokanee.   Caribou Lake supplied good fly-fishing for Kamloops trout.
Wilson and Box Lakes.—These lakes continued to supply good fly-fishing and
trolling for rainbow trout and kokanee in the first-named lake. The Kamloops trout fry
liberated in Kemball Lake in 1947 produced good fly-fishing for rainbows up to 3 pounds.
Summit Lake, restocked with Kamloops trout fry each year, supplied fair trolling, but
here again the coarse fish (squawfish) is a detriment to trout-fishing.
Slocan Lake, Slocan River, and Kootenay River.—The lake yielded fair catches of
Kamloops trout by trolling, also some good fly-fishing at the mouths of inlet creeks.
Slocan River, toward the early fall, supplied good fly-fishing where the trout are somewhat migratory in their habits. The Kootenay River and Slocan Pool above the Brilliant
hydro dam supplied some good fly-fishing. According to the creel census taken in 1948,
2,100 rainbow trout were caught from the pool, weighing approximately 3,156 pounds.
It is hoped, with the increased yearly grant from the West Kootenay Power and Light
Company in lieu of a fish-way in the Brilliant hydro dam, that rearing-ponds can be
established in order to restock these waters with Kamloops trout fingerlings in place of
fry and eyed eggs.   No marked trout were reported caught during the season of 1949.
Evans, Cahill, and Beatrice Lakes.—These lakes produced fair fly-fishing and trolling
for Kamloops trout. In Hird (Evans) Lake (a few anglers fished the lake by the use of
an aeroplane) the rainbow trout were plentiful but in a thin condition. Heavier cropping
is desired in order to provide a balance with the existing food conditions. Little Slocan
Lakes were not fished very much, but tributary streams to Little Slocan River were
heavily fished.
West Arm, Kootenay Lake.—The continued liberation of Kamloops trout fingerlings
in lieu of fry has no doubt been the principal factor of improved fly-fishing and trolling
for the numerous residents of Nelson and the West Arm. Twenty-five marked fish were
reported caught, possibly from the allotment of 4,720 fingerlings liberated in the early
spring, from 6 to 11 inches in length and marked by the removal of the adipose and left
ventral fins.
Kootenay Lake.—With normal water conditions, the catches of Kamloops and Dolly
Varden trout were well up to the average. With increasing angling pressure by the
non-resident anglers, it might be necessary to shorten the fishing season and reduce the
number and weight limits of trout that can be legally taken in one day or week. Several
marked trout were reported caught in the main lake, which supports the theory of
up-stream migration.
The Nelson Gyro Club conducted their Tenth Annual Kootenay Rainbow Trout
Derby from May 1st to November 16th for resident and non-resident anglers. A total
ol 424 trout of 5 pounds and over were entered and weighed in. The average weight
of fish was nearly 10 pounds. Total weight was 4,197 pounds. The largest fish, winner
of the competition, weighed 20 pounds 12 ounces. In comparison to a similar derby in
1948, when 352 trout were recorded, weighing 3,301 pounds, the largest fish weighed
21 pounds 8 ounces.    The best fishing of 1949 was during May and October.
Press reports indicate that the Gyro Club will discontinue the Kootenay Lake
Rainbow Trout Derby after ten years, during which period some 20 tons of Kamloops
trout were caught and weighed in. Moreover, countless numbers of large trout were not
entered in these competitions, thereby derby records do not give a true picture of large
trout taken from Kootenay Lake. From a conservation standpoint, derbies of long
duration should be discouraged or banned. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 23
Trout Lake.—Reports indicated that the Kamloops trout fishing and catches were
below the average; Dolly Varden remained plentiful; also there was a nice showing of
immature trout. Observations carried out August 18th on Trout Creek, the principal
spawning-stream, revealed that very advanced fry remained in the creek, and it is quite
possible spawning in the upper reaches of the Lardeau River near Gerrard contributes
toward restocking of the lake, which is confirmed by the presence of small fingerlings at
the foot of the lake over a period of years.
The lakes situated in Kokanee Glacier Park supplied fairly good cut-throat trout
fishing, mostly from natural reproduction. The other quite numerous alpine lakes
supplied good catches of small trout; also Clure or Murphy Lakes, north of Kaslo,
supplied excellent fly-fishing for Kamloops trout up to 6 pounds.
Goat River.—The Kamloops (steelhead) trout fishing below the canyon, was below
the average in some respects (this might be attributed to the heavy scouring freshets),
although an attempt is being made to improve the spring runs of trout from eyed-ova
plantings. The cut-throat trout fishing above the canyon and towards the upper reaches
was well up to the average. Meadow Creek, a tributary, produced good catches of
Eastern brook trout under very favourable conditions for that species of trout.
Tam O'Shanter (Plaid) and Baker Lakes, Crawford Bay region, and Arkansas,
Devil's Hole, Bayonne, and Panther Lakes were not fished sufficiently to balance with the
food supplies. Good fishing is also available in St. Almo Lake, resulting from up-stream
migration from Devil's Hole Lake.
East Kootenay Waters
Reports disclosed that trout-fishing improved in few lakes in the Cranbrook district.
Moyie River (Below Lakes).—Running parallel to the highway, it supplied good
fly-fishing for cut-throat, Kamloops, and hybrid trout for the numerous resident and nonresident fishermen. Moyie Lakes produced fair catches of Kamloops and cut-throat
trout, but not in proportion to the numbers of trout planted. The lake lacks good spawning-grounds and restocking is necessary.
Smith Lake.—This productive lake supplied some excellent trolling and fly-fishing
for Kamloops trout up to 14 pounds. No doubt maintaining the natural normal levels of
the lake under licence and improvement by the organized sportsmen have contributed to
the improvement of angling.
Monroe Lake.—This lake is becoming important for summer homes and recreational
purposes. The cut-throat trout fishing remained fairly consistent. Horseshoe, Mirror,
Peckhams, Garbut's, Rock (Stevens), Quartz and New Lakes also continued to supply
average catches of Kamloops trout from plantings of fry and small fingerlings.
Premier Lake.—Was well patronized by the Kimberley anglers, who have taken a
great interest toward road improvements and camping facilities at the lake. The Kamloops trout and kokanee fishing remained fairly good, being taken by fly and troll. St.
Mary Lake and River and tributaries were also fished steadily by resident anglers for
native cut-throat trout, which continued to supply fair fishing, with an occasional Kamloops trout taken in the river.
Skookumchuck River.—The stretch of river extending from the Kootenay River to
the falls supplied fair cut-throat trout fishing, which at certain periods are migratory to
Kootenay River. Restricted access over the new logging road leading to the upper
reaches of the river is the subject of some controversy between the operator and the
anglers, and it may be necessary to close the portion of stream affected for all fishing.
Bull River and Tributaries.—These streams supplied usual fair angling for native
cut-throat trout. The repair and extension of the old logging road leading to Camp 6,
will, when completed, encourage more stream fishing and a heavier drain on the trout
populations. W 24 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Fernie District Waters
Manistee, McBain's (Rosen), Loon, and Surveyors Lakes supplied average catches
of Kamloops trout varying to 12 pounds. Tie Lake also yielded some nice catches of
Kamloops trout up to 7 pounds. This was welcome information after doubtful results
from fry plantings.
Silver Springs Lakes.—Since the presence of shiners, trout-fishing in the first and
second lakes has seriously deteriorated; "the planting of fingerlings in place of fry is
necessary. North Star Lake failed to produce any Kamloops trout so planting of fry or
fingerlings will be discontinued.
Edwards Lake.—This is one of the best lakes in the district and supplied the usual
catches of Kamloops trout by fly and troll. Logging operations in the Gold Creek area
have resulted in more fishing in Cherry Lake, also in Seven and Nine Mile Lakes, and
provisions will be made to stock the latter lakes.
Elk River and Tributaries.—After the high water, average catches of cut-throat
trout were taken by the numerous resident and increasing non-resident anglers from
Alberta. With the improved highway from Lethbridge and extension of the forestry
road up the Elk Valley and the power-line right-of-way under construction by the Calgary
Power Company, the future of the cut-throat fishing in the upper reaches of the river is
a serious matter to contend with and it may be necessary to afford additional protection
to the trout in the way of closures.
Grave (Emerald) Lake.—There was an excellent showing of spawning kokanee,
which were planted as a forage fish. Kamloops trout fishing was fair for trolling and
some fly-fishing. Barnes Lake, near Corbin, is overpopulated with cut-throat trout; more
fishing is desirable to counterbalance the food supplies.
Windermere District Waters
These waters supplied the average trout-fishing.
Columbia Lake.—Increased interest was shown due to more boats being available.
Fair catches of Kamloops trout were taken. One party took seven nice trout in two days
up to seven pounds in weight. In the course of fishing, over 150 squawfish, weighing
from 1 to 7 pounds, were taken on the troll in two days.
Lake Windermere.—This lake yielded average catches of Kamloops trout throughout the season. The fishing is a major attraction to the quite numerous vacationists, and
with the possible reduction of coarse fish, the trout supplies should steadily improve, and
these remarks also apply to Columbia Lake.
Paddy Ryan Lakes.—The four small lakes did not produce the desired catches of
cut-throat trout due to the presence of the large population of shiners. Cartwright and
Lillian Lakes provided some good Kamloops trout fishing by fly and troll from yearly
plantings of fry.
Dunbar, Twin, Bott, Lead, Queen, Halls, and Jeffrey Lakes supplied fair fly-fishing
for cut-throat trout. Due to the extreme fluctuation of water-levels in Baptiste Lake,
drawn off for irrigation, it may be necessary to discontinue cut-throat trout fry plantings.
Deer and Blue Lakes produced the average catches of Kamloops trout. Both lakes are
accessible by secondary roads.
Magog and Cerulean Lakes.—Situated in Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park, these
lakes supplied excellent fly-fishing for cut-throat trout. In course of scientific experiments on delayed fertilization of cut-throat trout eggs, Og, Elizabeth, and Gog Lakes
were each stocked with 15,000 cut-throat trout green eggs. These lakes contained no fish
before planting. Similar allotments of green eggs were planted in Sunburst and Wedge-
wood Lakes on July 3rd, 1950. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 25
Columbia District Waters
Glacier water conditions restrict trout-fishing.
Blackwater Lakes.—These general utility lakes adjacent to the Trans-Canada Highway supplied the usual good fishing for rather small rainbow trout.
Bush Lakes.—These lakes do not produce many Kamloops trout over 2 pounds.
The catches have improved from yearly restocking with eyed eggs, but not in proportion
to the number of eggs planted. However, due possibly to water and feed conditions, a
good percentage of trout move out of the lakes into the Columbia River and work their
way up-stream to Lake Windermere. At certain times, good specimens of trout are taken
from the river toward the early fall.
Cedar and Wiseman Lakes.—From yearly restocking the lakes produced fair catches
of Kamloops trout, also some cut-throat from the latter lake, and in Wiseman and Cedar
Creeks.
Summary of Hatchery Operations
Summerland Trout Hatchery.—This hatchery is operated for waters of Okanagan
and Similkameen Districts, etc. The newly constructed hatchery fulfilled all expectations,
with an abundant and excellent water-supply of approximately 50° F. throughout the
year.
The recorded number of Kamloops trout fingerlings (172,957) carried over from
the year 1948 and retained in the hatchery troughs were subsequently liberated in six
lakes, between March 12th and May 13th. Total distributions were 171,721, varying
from 120 to 35 per pound weight count.
To relieve the congestion at Beaver Lake Hatchery, 872,000 Kamloops trout green
eggs were shipped to Summerland, plus 100,000 eyed eggs; total, 972,000. Resultant
advance fry, 307,000, \lA inches in length, were liberated in twenty-six lakes and
streams, and 238,042 fingerlings, at 517 to 1 pound and less were liberated in eight
lakes, with the transfer of 206,000 fingerlings, at 517 to 1 pound, to the four hatchery
rearing-ponds.
Allotment of 165,000 Eastern brook-trout eyed eggs were shipped from Nelson
Hatchery February 4th, 1949. Resultant fingerlings liberated in seven lakes and streams
totalled 115,655, varying from 398 to 526 to 1 pound.
Scientific Experimental Plantings.—Five lakes on the One Mile Creek system.
Princeton, 50,000 advanced fry and 6,249 Kamloops trout fingerlings, 2lA inches in
length.
Nelson Trout Hatchery.—Hatchery operations are for waters of East and West
Kootenay and Boundary Districts. Kamloops trout eggs received from Beaver Lake
Hatchery, 465,000. Penask Lake Hatchery, 1,000,000 eyed eggs; planted in twenty-two
lakes and streams, 785,000; resultant fry, 404,170, in twenty-one lakes and streams.
Received from Gerrard Hatchery, 70,000 eyed eggs; resultant advanced fry liberated in
the hatchery rearing-ponds, 67,300.    Beaver Lake advanced fry, 67,110, in ponds.
Eastern Brook Trout.—Collection, 500,000 eggs; disposal, 165,000 eyed eggs to
Summerland Hatchery. Resultant fry liberated in ten lakes and streams, 292,240; as
carried over from year 1948.
Collection of Eastern brook-trout eggs, October-November, 1949, Boundary Lake,
Nelway, 560,000 under incubation in hatchery.
Kokanee eyed eggs received from Gerrard Hatchery, 1,960,000. Disposal: Planted
in twenty lakes and streams; 20,000 eyed eggs for scientific experimental feeding; and
pending 50,000 fry for two lakes (Echo and Sugar Lakes) for early spring liberations.
Kaslo Trout Hatchery.—Approximately 72,200 Kamloops trout fingerlings (Gerrard
stock) carried over in troughs from 1948, from 3 to 4 inches in length. Liberated in
Kootenay Lake, March 31st, April 6th, 1949. Subsequently hatchery taken over for
scientific purposes until September, then closed down. W 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Gerrard Trout Hatchery.—Operations from April 1st to first week in November;
approximate collection of eggs, 225,000. Disposal: 100,000 for incubation in hatchery;
resultant No. 1 fingerlings, 97,765, liberated in nursery waters of upper reaches Lardeau
River, September 8th; 70,000 eyed eggs shipped to Nelson Hatchery for rearing-ponds;
approximately 15,000 eggs used for scientific purposes.
The light run of parent trout and rising water-flow curtailed ova collections, which
to some extent were offset by natural reproduction in the river below Canyon Creek due
to clear-water conditions which occasionally happens.
Cranbrook Trout Hatchery.—Operated seasonally. Cut-throat trout eggs collected
at Fish Lakes, 494,000. Test collections at Dunbar Lake, 10,000; Holgrave Lake,
4,500 eggs; total, 508,000. Disposal: 323,000 eyed eggs planted in seven lakes,
134,570 fry planted in eleven lakes and streams, and 20,000 fry for Fernie rearing-ponds.
Hybrid Trout.—Eggs collected at Monroe Lake, 49,000; resultant eyed eggs and
fry planted in five lakes and streams, 43,070.
Kamloops Trout Eyed Eggs.—Received from Beaver Lake Trout Hatchery, 320,000;
Penask Lake Hatchery, 350,000. Disposal: 267,505 eyed eggs planted in six lakes,
384,570 fry planted in thirty lakes and streams; no fingerlings were raised. Hatchery
closed down August 15th to permit the construction of the new hatchery on site of
temporary hatchery.
The collection of cut-throat trout eggs at Fish Lake was the lowest on record since
the inception and test collection of the year 1923, 1,000,000 eggs being collected in 1948,
as compared to 1,637,000 eggs collected in 1947. To supply the increasing demand for
cut-throat eggs, trial collections were undertaken at Dunbar and Holgrave Lakes, Windermere district, for proposed operations in 1950.
Summary of Trout Rearing-pond Operations
Summerland Hatchery Rearing-ponds.—A battery of four ponds was completed and
commenced operations. During October and November, 206,000 Kamloops trout fingerlings, 517 to the pound, were liberated, approximately 51,500 to each pond. Four
subsequent liberations of large fingerlings were made early in the spring of 1950. Indications were that the fish were thriving throughout the winter under ideal water temperatures of 49 and 50 degrees F.
Nelson Hatchery Rearing-ponds.—The allotment of 51,360 Kamloops trout fingerlings (Gerrard stock) carried over from year 1948 and retained in No. 1 circular pond
were liberated April 13th to 15th in the West Arm of Kootenay Lake: Sunshine Bay, 800;
Crescent Bay, 800; Balfour, 800; Procter, 800; Harrop, 1,530; total, 4,720; from
6 to 11 inches in length and marked with the removal of adipose and left ventral fins.
Allotment of eyed Kamloops trout eggs received from Gerrard Hatchery June 12th, 1948,
150,000; resultant fingerlings liberated May 9th to 18th, 1949, as follows:—
From No. 2 pond—
Kootenay Lake, Shutty Bench     8,400
Kootenay Lake, Kaslo Bay _____    8,190
  16,590
(Weight count, 210 to 1 lb.)
Transferred to No. 1 pond     2,000
From No. 4 pond—
Kootenay Lake, Queens Bay  10,180
West Arm of Kootenay Lake, Harrop  10,080
West Arm of Kootenay Lake, Sunshine Bay     3,080
  23,340
Transferred to No. 1 pond     1,000
Champion Lakes, Fruitvale     2,500
(Weight count when fish released (83 lb.), 280 to
lib.) REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 27
From No. 5 pond—
Kootenay Lake, Kaslo    4,200
Kootenay Lake, Mirror Bay     8,400
Kootenay Lake, Queens Bay  10,640
Kootenay Lake, Balfour     8,400
  31,640
(Weight count when fish released (113 lb.), 280
to 1 lb.)
Transferred to No. 1 pond     2,000
Total fingerlings, 5,000, for No. 1 circular pond, for liberation early in spring of
1950.
As the battery of five new concrete ponds was not entirely completed, it was necessary to forego any attempt to raise fingerlings therein.
Kaslo Hatchery Rearing-ponds.—These ponds were not operated, except for scientific experiments with minnows and shiners.
Princeton Rearing-ponds.—These ponds were not operated by the organized sportsmen of Princeton.
New Denver Rearing-pond.-—The continued pollution of Carpenter Creek, resulting
from the operations of the Zincton Mines, Limited, prevented operations by the local
organized sportsmen of New Denver.
Fernie Rearing-ponds.—The Trites ponds were operated fairly successfully, except
the improvements to the No. 3 lower pond which were not completed, nor could the
pond be drained to liberate the resultant cut-throat trout fingerlings raised from 15,000
fry. The semi-natural pond on Brewery Creek raised a fair number of small cut-throat
trout fingerlings from the 5,000 fry allotted to the pond. The fingerlings were raised for
the Elk River, and ponds were operated by the organized sportsmen of Fernie and district.
Trout Foods Used, 1949
Summerland Hatchery.—Raw beef liver, 9,871 pounds; raw pork liver, 1,541
pounds; canned herring, 4,319 pounds; rice polishings, 1,215 pounds; skim-milk, 632
pounds; plankton, 9 ounces; Red-Gil trout food, 5V2 ounces. Supplied to Revelstoke:
Beef liver, 260 pounds; pork liver, 81 pounds; milk, 8 pounds. Supplied to Kelowna:
Beef liver, 134 pounds; pork liver, 45 pounds.
Nelson Hatchery.—Beef liver, 3,740 pounds; powdered milk, 200 pounds; stripped
kokanee, 3,000 pounds. Canned herring shipped to Gerrard Hatchery, 427 pounds, and
to Cranbrook Hatchery, 50 pounds.
Transfer of Natural Foods from Waterton Lakes to Kootenay Lake.—For experimental purposes on October 12th, nineteen fry cans of fresh-water shrimps (Mysis and
Pontoporeia) were released in waters of Crawford Bay, Kootenay Lake.
Miscellaneous Subjects
Salvage and Transfer of Trout.—Fairly normal water conditions throughout the
Division prevented any serious losses of trout, except in Big and Little Sheep Creeks
where some Eastern brook trout became stranded from the lack of water and perished,
which was unavoidable.
Destruction of Coarse Fish.—With the exception of coarse fish taken by fur farmers
under licence, no other operations were conducted in view of a scientific study of the
coarse-fish situation and their relationship with sport fish.
Fish-ways.—The four small fish-ways installed by property owners in small dams
less than 10 feet in height, situated in the outlet dam of Okanagan Lake, outlet of
McBain's (Rosen) Lake, Craig log dam on Alexander Creek, and outlet of Paddy Ryan
Lakes, remained in fair condition and working-order. W 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Obstructions
Lardeau River.—A recently formed obstruction was removed from the river just
below Mile 31 to ensure free passage to spawning Kamloops trout from Kootenay Lake
to their spawning-beds in the vicinity of Gerrard, and their safe return from the lake.
The work was completed with the kind co-operation of the Provincial Department of
Public Works. The complete water-flow of the river now flows on the north side of the
river and the Handy log jam is now high and dry.
Duncan River.—The Department of Public Works of Canada opened up a 40-foot
channel through a major obstruction on the Duncan River approximately 1 mile above
Meadow Creek. This will permit navigation and free passage to spawning Kamloops
trout to the Lardeau River. It is understood that additional attention will be given to
the obstruction during next spring and summer. In the meantime, no obstructions exist
on the Duncan and Lardeau Rivers that would impede the passage of spawning fish.
Hydro-electric Developments
Whatshan Lakes.—From investigations conducted, satisfactory arrangements have
been arrived at in order to protect sport-fishing interests.
Kootenay River—Partial investigation has been carried out from Newgate to Fairmont in view of proposed dam at Libby, Mont., also possible Canadian dams at Plumbob,
Bull River, Torrent, and Fairmont.
Pollutions from Mining Industries, etc.
The continued high prices of base metals, etc., encouraged the operators to step
up production, resulting in the increased pollution of certain lakes and streams frequented
by fish. The usual attention has been given to this perennial problem, and in most
instances we have received co-operation from the managements to prevent serious pollutions, considering the location of the concentrators and very limited suitable ground for
impoundment. If the provisions of the " Fisheries Act " were strictly enforced, it is very
doubtful if these important major industries could efficiently operate.
Similkameen River.—The steady and extensive operations of the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited, of Copper Mountain, required
continued precautionary measures to prevent the escape of concentrator refuse into the
river, also the impoundment of ash from the steam-power plant. Similarly, the Kelowna
Exploration Company, of Hedley, has continued to take effective measures by impoundment of concentrator refuse, with very satisfactory results at considerable expense in
both instances.
Placer Operation.—The Atkinson Dredging Company, of Princeton, operated intermittently on the Similkameen River for gold and platinum. As there was considerable
discoloration of the water-flow extending some 50 miles down-stream, aggravated in the
spring by freshets scouring bentonite deposits, angling was generally affected, but with
no apparent harmful effects on the trout population.
A suction dredge operated on the Similkameen River adjacent to Princeton by T. M.
Grety, of Medford, Ore., during the latter part of November, was of short duration, due
to a wind-storm, when the dredge became loose and drifted down-stream and was partially
destroyed. The suction of fine gravel to a depth of 15 feet from the creek bed did not
seriously affect fish life but retarded angling somewhat.
Okanagan River.—The control of waste fuel-oils has been satisfactorily attended to
by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, Penticton, by filtering in concrete sumps
installed adjacent to the river.
Columbia River.—A certain amount of refuse continued to enter the river from the
major operations of the Trail smelter and fertilizer plants operated by the Consolidated
Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, of Trail.    Every possible precaution is taken REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 29
by the company to prevent the escape of refuse which is considered harmful to fish life
after becoming diffused with the water volume of the river.
Sheep Creek and Salmon River.—With the treatment of some 150 tons of gold-
bearing ores daily, the pollution of the streams continues unabated by the Sheep Creek
Gold Mines Limited, Salmo. With limited and very precipitous ground for impoundment, practically no steps have been taken by the company to prevent pollutions.
Salmon River.—The Canadian Exploration Company, Emerald Tungsten Project,
permitted the discharge of concentrator refuse into ponds, the banks of which collapsed,
thus allowing quantities of refuse to enter the river, and so far not rectified. This
condition has been drawn to the attention of the management on two occasions.
Pend d'Oreille River.—The Reeves MacDonald Mines, Limited, Salmo, commenced
concentrator operations on June 24th in treatment of some 500 tons of silver, lead, and
zinc ores daily, and it is expected that the operations will shortly be stepped up to
treat 12,000 tons of ore per day. A year before operations commenced, the matter of
pollution of the river was taken up with the management, but with the exceedingly
precipitous nature of the ground to control the refuse, it is very doubtful if much can
be accomplished to avoid pollution, although the management has signified its intentions
to do so, but so far the pollution continues.
Kootenay River.—The impoundment of concentrator refuse from gold, silver, lead,
and zinc ores has been fairly satisfactory in areas prepared adjacent to the river at
Taghum. The matter of increasing the capacity of impounding grounds has been
referred to the management to avoid future possible pollution.
Sitkum Creek, West Arm, Kootenay Lake.—Due to the costs of production and
price of gold, the Alpine Gold Mines, Limited, did not resume concentrator operations,
resulting in the creek remaining free of refuse.
Kootenay Lake.—The Kootenay-Florence mines, Ainsworth, continued concentrator operations by the treatment of about 100 tons of silver, lead, and zinc ores daily.
As there is no available ground for impoundment, the tailings are discharged on the
shore of the lake, which results in a slight pollution of the lake in close vicinity of
discharge.
Kaslo Creek, Kootenay Lake.—-After intermittent pollution of the creek during the
year, the Kootenay Belle Gold Mines, Limited, operating the Whitewater mine and
concentrator, has completed arrangements to impound the tailings at a suitable location,
and so far Kaslo Creek has been free of refuse. Further, I might say that this company
has in the past been most sincere in their efforts to avoid pollution, which to some
extent might affect fish-cultural operations at Kaslo.
Seaton and Carpenter Creeks, Slocan Lake.—The Zincton mines, operated by the
Sheep Creek Gold Mines, Limited, continued operations, with the treatment of approximately 350 tons of lead and zinc ores daily. The placing of a dam on Seaton Creek
some distance below the concentrator caused a percentage of tailings to settle, but with
very little attention given to the impoundment, the pollution to a large extent continues.
Slocan Lake.—The Western Exploration Company, Limited, Silverton, operated
intermittently, with the treatment of some 100 tons of silver, lead, and zinc ores daily
from the Standard, Mammoth, and Enterprise mines locally. Due to the location of
the mill, the tailings are discharged into the lake, which does not seriously affect fish
life in a rather confined area.
St. Mary River.—A certain amount of discoloured water and refuse enters the
river from the extensive concentrator operations of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company, Kimberley, in treatment of some 6,000 tons of silver, lead, and zinc ores
daily. The practical impoundment of refuse has proven satisfactory, and with the
exception of extreme low water, fish life in the river remained unaffected.
Toby Creek, Columbia River.—The resumed operation of the Paradise mine on
Toby Creek resulted in the construction of a concentrator by the Sheep Creek Gold W 30 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Mines, Limited, located at Jackpine. Several months before the mill was constructed,
the matter of controlling the resultant tailings from the mill was referred to the management, and with ample space for refuse, the operations so far have been satisfactory
from a fishery, water-fowl, and fur-bearing animal standpoint.
Kicking Horse and Columbia River.—The necessary attention given to the waste
fuel-oil sumps at Field and Beavermouth by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company
has presented serious pollution.
Michel and Coal Creeks, Elk River.—The discharge and impoundment of coal-dust
sludge from the washing plants at Michel and Coal Creek has been effectively attended
to by the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited, Fernie. The discarding of old
mine timbers and debris in Michel Creek also was rectified after being drawn to the
attention of the management at Michel.
Lumber Industries.—The disposal of sawmill refuse and slash has been satisfactorily attended to by the numerous stationary and portable sawmill operators from a
sport-fishery standpoint.
Diseases.—From personal contact and reports from the public and Game Wardens,
there was no apparent occurrence of losses from disease or other causes during the year.
Sport Fisheries.—With the increasing fishing pressure and auto travel, and in order
to reasonably maintain the supplies of trout in large accessible lakes and streams, it is
imperative and essential that provisions be carried out forthwith to raise and liberate
more trout fingerlings.
The excellent assistance and co-operation rendered by the organized and individual
sportsmen, the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and other Governmental departments is gratefully acknowledged.
" C " DIVISION (KAMLOOPS, YALE, OKANAGAN, CARIBOO,
CHILCOTIN, AND SQUAMISH DISTRICTS)
By R. M. Robertson, Officer Commanding
I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on game conditions in
" C " Game Division during the year ended December 31st, 1949.
Big Game
Moose.—The following statistics indicate the extent of big game, principally the
moose kill, passing through the Cache Creek checking-station, which largely covers the
Cariboo and Chilcotin areas from Quesnel in the north to Clinton in the south, as far
west as Kleena Kleene, and east to the North Thompson watershed, an area of roughly
45,000 square miles:—
Non-resident moose kill  641
Visiting resident moose kill  512
  1,153
Potential Cariboo resident kill  1,240
Total .  2,393
The resident Cariboo kill includes holders of special firearms licences, general
firearms licences, guides, Indian families, etc., and allowing for a substantial reduction
in the non-success ratio, the above figures would not be at all excessive. The pronounced
and widely believed idea that the depletion of our big-game resources is largely due to
the presence of non-resident hunters is, to some extent, erroneous. There is, however,
a very uneven distribution of non-resident hunters, and most of these are concentrated
in this 45,000-square-mile area in a quest for big game, mainly moose.
It is not because there are too many non-resident hunters, but the fact that they
are mainly concentrated in a relatively small portion of the Cariboo region which probably REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 31
cannot afford too heavy a concentration of outside resident and non-resident hunters. For
instance, during 1949 approximately 80 per cent of the moose taken from the Cariboo
were killed west of the Fraser River and 20 per cent were taken east of this river. By far
the largest concentration of non-resident hunters killed moose east of the Fraser River
during the years following World War II.
Moose have been observed in different parts of the Okanagan during the past
season, and appear to be increasing to a great extent, especially on the west and east
sides of Okanagan Lake.
According to reports from trappers around Lower Bowron River and Indian Lakes,
moose appear numerous enough except for a noticeable shortage of calves.
Visiting resident hunters had some success around Quesnel, as the country has not
been as heavily hunted as in other game detachments. Overbrowsing of the food supply
has been noted, which will eventually result in further movement and possible reduction
of the moose population. In the Quesnel Detachment deep snow formed a heavy crust
during the early spring, which enabled predators to hunt moose with ease.
No moose were found dead from tick-infestation around Quesnel during the spring
of 1949, and few reports were received. According to the Warden stationed at Quesnel,
on March 26th a cougar had killed a large bull moose. This animal, which was in very
poor condition and covered with ticks, was easy prey to a lone cougar. Very little of the
moose was eaten. It is evident that predators play a useful part in the elimination of unfit
animals. Moose are reported scarce around the Williams Lake area. Around Kamloops
the season was a poor one, due no doubt to unsuitable climatic conditions. Moose,
however, are increasing east of the Thompson River as far as the Revelstoke area. Trappers report these animals as wintering well in the Goldstream District and in the Jordan
River region. Moose have been seen as far south as Princeton, Penask Lake, and
Woodward Valley, and are increasing and extending their range in a southerly as well as
an easterly direction. Pemberton, on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, is another area
where moose are reported. As the food supplies diminish, they are forced to extend their
range.   Wolves invariably accompany moose as they move to new areas.
The following are statistical records of big game passing through the Cache Creek
checking-station for the seasons 1946 to 1949:—
Big Game
1946
1947
1948
1949
50
4
1,058
3
16
12
1,234
114
10
1,272
2
43
21
1,364
78
3
1,013
1
38
7
1,173
117
2
876
Wapiti (Elk)                                                                               	
45
10
1,153
Mountain-sheep.—It is estimated that from 150 to 400 mountain-sheep exist in the
Taseko Mountain Range. Several days were spent by the writer, accompanied by Game
Warden R. H. Haynes, in this region during last summer. The patrol was made to an
elevation of 8,000 feet, but few signs of sheep were seen. A further patrol arranged at
that time for a winter count was delayed owing to the illness of Game Warden Haynes.
A count of mountain-sheep taken during one day's patrol over Moon's Range, Gang
Ranch Range, and other areas in proximity, revealed the following numbers: Rams, 6;
ewes, 30; lambs, 23; yearlings, 16. A census taken of the sheep during two days at
Squilax showed the following: Rams, 13; ewes, 25; lambs, 2. This count was made
by Game Wardens H. J. Lorance and J. P. C. Atwood. Twenty-one sheep, mainly from
the Cariboo, were taken as trophies in 1947, and ten during 1949. At least three sheep
were found dead at Shorts Creek, north end of the Okanagan Valley, after the severest
winter on record.    These sheep were examined by Dr. F. A. Humphreys, Bacteriologist, W 32 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Dominion Department of Hygiene at Kamloops, but owing to discoloration and other
deteriorating factors, a thorough analysis was impossible. There were, however, clear
indications that these sheep suffered from malnutrition, as there was very little flesh on
them. This is not at all surprising considering the low extremes of temperature and
possible limited food supplies. It is also reported that eight cougars were taken from
the Squilax area during the winter of 1949-50.
It would indeed be a mistake to declare an open season on mountain-sheep in such
limited areas as Shorts Creek and Squilax. Their natural habitat is too limited to expect
any large increase in numbers. The fencing off of their wintering grounds by agricultural
interests has been partly responsible for the stationary population, as little or no increase
is reported from year to year.
Caribou.—There is an urgent necessity for a survey of caribou over the entire Division. Not nearly enough is known of the habits of this species, and their numbers are an
enigma at present. Where moose and wolves moved in on one area formerly frequented
by caribou, those left of the former numbers of caribou appear to have sought refuge in
a comparatively safe area a few miles to the west. This information came to light as a
result of a lone patrol made by a former lodge-owner in the Kamloops-Cariboo area. At
least fifteen caribou were counted, and there is a possibility that there may be greater
numbers.   Caribou are reported by guides to be on the increase in the Itcha Mountains.
Grizzlies.—Five grizzlies were taken in the Quesnel Detachment during the year,
although they are not by any means abundant. In the Revelstoke district very few
hunters were unsuccessful in getting a trophy. This district retains its reputation as an
attractive field for hunters seeking a trophy under this heading. These animals are
numerous around Bowron Lake and also in the Lillooet district, especially so around
the head of Texas, Whitecap, and Bear Creeks. In the Taseko Mountain area, numerous
grizzlies were seen last summer. Seventeen grizzlies passed through the Cache Creek
checking-station in 1947 and twenty-one during 1949.
Mountain-goat. -— The Revelstoke Detachment reports that these animals range
around Albert Canyon and also in the La Forme Creek area. Sixteen goats were taken
out of the Cariboo in 1946 and forty-five in 1949.
Deer.—Deer appear to be decreasing in the Lillooet district. The past season gave
no indication of heavy kills. The comparatively mild fall kept the bucks on very high
ground. The deer situation throughout the Division is normal, and the recent mild
weather served to protect them against unusually heavy slaughter.
Wapiti (Elk).—Wapiti are on the increase around Kelowna. They seem to have
spread farther afield north of Adams Lake. None passed through the Cache Creek
checking-station during the open season.
FUR-BEARING ANIMALS
Low prices for fur have had a good effect on fur-bearers. The quantity of fur
trapped was indeed limited. Nearly all Wardens report a success of beaver-tagging
regulations, which are popular with trappers. All Wardens have a record of the previous
numbers of beavers taken, and they use these figures as a yardstick in determining the
numbers of tags to issue.
Nevertheless, Wardens, as far as time permits, and it is indeed limited considering
their manifold duties, should have some idea of the extent of the beaver population on
most of the more important trap-lines. Only long acquaintance with these conditions
can enable a Game Warden to judge how well trappers are looking after their fur, especially beavers. It is manifestly impossible for a Warden in charge of a Detachment to
cover even remotely by means of inspection the numerous trap-lines within his Detachment boundaries.
Many Detachments cover an area of from 4,000 to 7,000 square miles. This work
entails long, strenuous patrols, and it would seem that men especially engaged for this REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION.  1949 W 33
work should be considered. Natural resources of this kind are well worth insuring by
means of detailed, periodic check-ups. To do this as it should be done would entail the
services of men especially detailed for this work. A survey of trap-lines involving a study
of beavers was carried out during the summer months by university students. It is hoped
that something in the line of a better fur-management programme will evolve from these
studies.
Upland Game Birds
European Partridge.—These birds are on the increase in the Merritt and Vernon
areas. Very few were taken around Kamloops. At Wells, it is reported that willow and
Franklin grouse supplied good hunting, and were more numerous than in previous years.
Willow, Franklin, and blue grouse have increased in numbers in the following districts:
Merritt, Williams Lake, Vernon, Quesnel, Lillooet, Kamloops, Revelstoke, Kelowna, and
Salmon Arm. This is the first occasion in many years that we have received independent
reports of an increase in grouse everywhere. One possible exception to this is reported
from the Chilcotin country, where the cyclic increase does not apply in the same degree.
It has been stated that the upward trend of cyclic increase in grouse comes at a later
period. This statement is interesting, but unfortunately comparative records may not be
available from the same source of information for future reference owing to the possible
transfer of the Warden.
In the Kelowna area an increase in California quail is reported.
Migratory Game Birds and Non-game Birds
Ducks have increased in the Merritt, Williams Lake, Vernon, Quesnel, Kamloops,
Kelowna, and Salmon Arm areas. The long season and favourable conditions gave better
satisfaction to the hunters generally. In most parts of the Interior, with the possible
exception of the Northern Cariboo, the year was a dry one, with rivers and creeks at their
lowest ebb during the late summer. Due to open weather, ducks were late during the
fall migration. Fifteen hundred mallards wintered around Shuswap near Chase on the
Thompson River. The principal attraction was roughly 30 acres of standing corn which
had not been harvested. The winter of 1949-50 was one of the severest on record.
Ducks rising from open water had balls of ice form on their feet during blizzards, and a
few were found dead with their feet in this condition.
The only winter record of whistler swans in the Southern Interior is on the Thompson River east of Kamloops. From fifty to seventy-five winter here every year, but this
year the number was increased to approximately 150, with a substantial showing of
cygnets. At times, the severe weather made it impossible to keep track of their movements. Small numbers, frantically searching for open water, which was rapidly freezing
over, were seen on Shuswap Lake during heavy blizzards. I am afraid that many of these
swans died from the results of adverse weather conditions. A check-up as to their
whereabouts and condition will be made during the spring of 1950.
Predatory Animals and Noxious Birds
The following predators were killed by twelve Game Wardens and three predatory-
animal hunters:—
Bears        31 Eagles   47
Cougars        31 Hawks  268
Coyotes       516 Owls   107
Wolves         18 Magpies  744
Crows   1,401 Bobcats   11
The number of complaints of damage to stock was not as heavy this year as in
previous years. What appears to be the peak of a cyclic increase in field-mice took
place in 1949.    The increase was so remarkable, and the reports of damage to fruit- W 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA
trees so numerous, that a resolution was passed by the Associated Fruit Growers of the
Okanagan asking the Government to discourage the shooting of hawks, owls, crows,
and magpies, etc., some of which prey on field-mice.
It is true that a predator campaign has been in steady progress for years, and has
been encouraged through Governmental channels at the request of game protective
associations. It is difficult to say whether such an apparent cyclic increase would be
controlled to normal proportions through the limitation of predator control. We have
met many farmers in the past who have been quite outspoken against indiscriminate
slaughter of hawks, owls, crows, and magpies, etc., and I feel that their requests and
comments should not be passed over since it concerns their own property and its
protection.
Predator control requires more scientific consideration, and I am glad to learn
that steps toward this end are now being taken, and that a well-balanced plan of action
will be shortly formulated.
Wolves this year were not as much in the limelight as formerly, and fewer reports
of damage were received. Guide Roy Hargreaves, of Mount Robson, in the northeastern part of this Division, blames wolf predation for the decrease in big game in
certain districts surrounding Mount Robson.
Game Protection
In the matter of prosecutions, the following statistics are for " C " Game Division:
Prosecutions, 245, with 5 dismissals.
Complaints have been made in the past that fines for serious violations under the
" Game Act" and regulations were far too light, but recently severe fines have been
imposed on particularly bad offenders.
While road inspections are necessary, it is felt that the examination of hunting
camps should not be overlooked. The concentration of non-resident hunters demands
additional enforcement protection.
Game Propagation
The following are the beaver liberations from the Bowron Lake Game Reserve
during the year 1949:—
Place Liberated Number Liberated
Allen Fletcher, Smithers  2
A. J. Harrison, Wistaria^  2
J. Gray, Prince George  2
F. C. Hooker, Horsefly  2
Fritz Van Horlick, Squamish  2
Herbert Cullis, Revelstoke  2
William Dunlop, Barriere  4
Total   16
Game Reserves
Bowron Lake, Yalakom Reserve, and numerous closed areas of lesser importance
are still in operation. Requests have been made in some districts for sanctuaries.
Since these areas are small and in settlements close to farming and other centres, they
were not considered suitable.
Fur Trade
A regular check-up of fur-buyers' records at Vancouver has now been put into
effect, thus providing better enforcement of the trapping regulations. Only one official
book should be kept by each fur-buyer. Travelling fur-buyers use a substitute notebook in some cases, with the official book at Vancouver or elsewhere. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1949 W 35
Registration of Trap-lines
This system, now long established, is a success. Liaison between the Department
and the trapper, and especially the biologist representing the Department, should be
established to encourage better fur-conservation. This final step would be the culmination of a long-needed plan which would cover every operation from trap to marketing
the produce.
Registration of Guides
The problem of registered areas in the form of individual hunting-grounds is still
a very contentious one. Practically little or no reduction in the number of guides has
taken place. To give some idea of the congestion which was evident before we put
this system into effect, we have taken 100 square miles as a convenient yardstick.
Apart from a slight increase in the area during 1949, twenty-two guides operated within
this block. The following figures show the kill of moose taken by these guides from
1946 to 1949, inclusive: 1946, moose, 114; 1947, moose, 112; 1948, moose, 44;
1949, moose, 30. In 1949 thirty hunters were successful, while our records show
that fifty-three were unsuccessful in this area. That is, out of a total of eighty-three
hunters thirty took moose, or 36.14 per cent hunters were successful, which gives indication of a relative reduction, and need for serious biological consideration. The
factors apparently responsible are as follows:—
(1) Food shortage.
(2) Overcrowding of guides and hunters;  uneven distribution.
(3) Severe winters and tick-infestation.
(4) Possible enforced movement of big game through predator and hunter
pressure.
This example confirms to some extent the fact that 80 per cent of the moose kill
took place west of the Fraser River during the open season, according to the Cache
Creek records. The greater moose population drew hunters to the western portion of
the Cariboo.
A determined effort should be put forth to prevent too many guides from operating
in limited areas, especially where big game exist. Moose cannot last forever as a
yearly crop where too many guides operate and feed becomes scarce. Mountain-sheep
in these limited areas will be a convenient target once the scarcity of moose becomes
apparent.
Special Patrols
A special patrol to the Batnuni Lake country to attend to several complaints and
to interview Indians was made by Game Warden W. J. Hillen, accompanied by Constable
G. Hacking.    The work was carried out without much difficulty or hardship.
A special patrol was made by Inspector Robertson, accompanied by Game Warden
R. H. Haynes, to the Taseko Mountain area on a general survey of game conditions,
especially mountain-sheep. Grizzlies were seen, but moose and deer were scarce.
Little indication of large numbers of sheep were observed. Mountain-sheep in this
part of the country do not winter in the Churn Creek basin as do the Big Creek sheep.
Most of the Taseko mountain-sheep winter on the wind-swept slopes at higher elevations,
and in the Yohetta Valley. Our patrol took us to the 8,000-foot level and into areas
where sheep were previously reported. Little sign of these animals was seen. A
winter count was planned, but had to be given up due to severe winter conditions and
the illness of the Warden chosen for the task. An attempt will be made next winter
to secure some idea of the numbers alleged to exist in that district. One guide,
familiar with the areas, says there are around 400 sheep in the vicinity of Taseko Lake
and Yohetta Valley. W 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Hunting Accidents
There were no hunting accidents in " C " Division in 1949, the first time this has
occurred since 1931.
Summary
Only limited success attended the efforts of hunters in the field in search of big
game, due to unfavourable conditions and lack of snow. In fact, taken as a whole, in
the more settled districts hunters were far from satisfied with results obtained. It was,
in one sense, just as well it turned out that way as some cold-storage plants had little
room for game.
Ducks and grouse were better established, and hunters enjoyed shooting of a
nature more resembling that of past years. The winter of 1949-50 will long be remembered as one of the worst on record. Blizzards with below-zero temperatures were
common in January and, combined with snow and snowslides, almost stopped the
movement of big game.
One fortunate feature, in many places, was the lack of a crust on the snow, which
gave big game a chance to move with greater freedom when necessary. Mountain-sheep
came down to lower elevations and few died from malnutrition. Even bobcats were
seen in greater numbers along lake-shores and on highways, which seemed to indicate
a lack of food. Snowy owls were observed in normal numbers, but large numbers were
reported as far south as Illinois in the States, which gave vent to the belief that lemmings
and other similar food-supplies were on the decline in their natural habitat to the north.
The whistler swans remaining along the Thompson River and large numbers of
mallards farther east had tough going during January, and small numbers of these swans
were seen flying low in the teeth of winter blizzards in a frantic search for food and open
water. Little could be done for the swans, as they seldom remained for any length of
time in one place.
The guide situation is giving us considerable concern, as we have too many operating
in some areas. The non-success ratio this year seems to have increased, especially east
of the Fraser River, in the non-resident quest for big game, principally moose.
West of the Fraser one travels over comparatively virgin country, a great deal of
which cannot be reached except by aeroplane or pack-horse. The hunting there should
continue much longer, provided the food-supply for moose lasts.
It is true that moose east of the Fraser River were continually on the move,
especially in areas similar to the one quoted in this report. West of the Fraser River,
moose had greater freedom of movement without the same heavy hunting pressure in
the more inaccessible portions. We have taken precautions in the Chilcotin district
to prevent overcrowding of guides.
In conclusion, our thanks are extended to the Forestry Department, under Colonel
Parlow at Kamloops, for assistance in maintaining contact with our men in the field
through short-wave radio. The Water Rights Branch has been instrumental in helping
in a variety of ways, and thanks are extended to A. G. Hatton for this assistance. To
the Provincial Police, under Inspector Mansell, we are indebted for assistance rendered
in the course of our duties.
Game associations have also been instrumental in helping officers in this Division,
all of which has been greatly appreciated. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 37
" D " DIVISION (ATLIN, SKEENA, OMINECA, PRINCE RUPERT, FORT
GEORGE, PEACE RIVER, AND YUKON BOUNDARY DISTRICTS)
By W. A. H. Gill, Officer Commanding
Big-game Animals
Moose.—Approximately the same number of non-resident hunters visited this
Division as in 1948. A number of moose killed were found to be infected with tapeworms and in many cases they were very thin. Ticks are also a noted menace in this
Division.
The 1949 winter has been very suitable to moose, the snow being deep and
powdery, making travel very easy for them and very difficult for predators. All moose
seen during the winter have been in fine condition and a great many more calves have
been noticed than in past years.
On one direct air flight along the Nechako River from Vanderhoof to Ootsa Lake
102 moose were counted. On three different flights in the Tweedsmuir Park circle area
over 100 moose were counted each day and all were in very good condition.
From reports received, it appears that the moose population is decreasing steadily
north of the 56th parallel, and south of it they are holding their own, if not slightly
increasing. I have examined the marrow in several leg bones of moose killed this winter
and have found the marrow a nice clear colour with no pinkish tint, which indicates that
moose are not suffering from malnutrition.
Deer.—These animals are not plentiful anywhere in this Division, although an
increase has been noted at Telegraph Creek, Prince Rupert, Pouce Coupe, Burns Lake,
and in the Smithers areas.
I believe, in the interests of conservation, the limit should be cut to one buck
throughout this whole Division.
Caribou.—These animals are very scarce except in the area north of the 56th
parallel, where there are still a considerable number. Large bands are also reported in
the Cold Fish Lake area.
Black and Brown Bear.—These animals are still very plentiful and have caused a
great deal of damage, according to numerous complaints received from farmers and cattlemen. Predatory-animal Hunter Denison destroyed forty-nine black and brown bears.
During one night, G. Striegler, of Vanderhoof, lost five head of cattle, two being three-
year-olds and two yearlings. In three days, twelve bears were snared at carcasses of
these animals.
Owing to the poor berry crop this year, the bears were very thin when going to den,
and it is believed a great number will not survive this very severe winter. In view of this,
I feel that each hunter should be limited to three bears per season.
Grizzly Bear.—Sportsmen obtained a lot more of these game animals than in previous years. This, I believe, was due to natural feed conditions, as a large number of
grizzly were taken at moose kills along the rivers. In past years, the grizzly did not seem
to bother with the offal left at a moose kill. This year, every kill was cleaned up in a very
short time and grizzly tracks were present in practically every instance.
Mountain-sheep.—Mountain-sheep are still fairly plentiful north of the 56th parallel.
In the Sheep Creek Pass area, near McBride, they are very scarce, and I feel that the
season should be closed south of the 56th parallel to allow these animals to increase or
otherwise they will be reduced in numbers to the point of extinction.
Mountain-goat.—These animals are still plentiful through the Division wherever the
terrain is suitable. I believe a record billy-goat head was taken in the Smithers area by
a non-resident hunter, E. W. Haase, of Ney, Ohio, guided by Allen Fletcher, of Smithers.
The base circumference of each horn was 6Vi inches. The left horn measured 11%
inches and the right horn 12 inches in length. W 38 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Fur-bearing Animals
Marten.—There is no noticeable change in the numbers of marten, except in the
Lower Post, Atlin, and Telegraph Creek areas, where it is reported they decreased greatly
in 1948 and have not recovered to any extent. Over the rest of the Division they are
holding their own. Due to low prices in the fur market, very few trappers have gone
after these animals and it is felt this will give them an opportunity to build up.
Beaver.—Beaver are increasing throughout the whole Division and there is no doubt
the population is far greater than it has been in the past fifty years. This is, I believe, due
to trappers realizing the value of not overtrapping these animals. The beaver-tagging
regulations are also assisting the trappers to build up their beaver areas, as it is much
harder for poachers to dispose of beaver pelts illegally taken.
The Department of Indian Affairs should be encouraged to set aside more beaver
preserves in areas wherein there are large numbers of Indian trappers, as these are the
only areas now where the beaver are not plentiful.
It is hoped that live-beaver traps will be supplied this Division, as several complaints
are received each year of beaver causing dangerous flooding conditions to railway tracks
and highways. By the use of such traps, beaver could be removed to more suitable areas
instead of having to destroy them, as in the past years.
A sick beaver was found at Beaverly Creek near Prince George and was shipped to
Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan, who found it had been suffering from bacteria of the genus
shigella, the first time such a disease was known to attack a beaver. The rest of the
colony seems to be healthy.
Fox.—If any of these fur-bearers are taken, it is only accidental, as the value of the
pelt is so low the trappers do not bother skinning them. They are plentiful throughout
the Division.
Mink.—These fur-bearers are on the increase throughout the Division. Only a
few trappers have been active this fall and each of these obtained a larger catch of mink
than in the past several years.
Fisher.—There was a definite increase in the fisher population in 1948, but during
1949 no noticeable increase has taken place. However, due to the over-all low price of
pelts, it is felt these animals will increase, as they are not being heavily trapped.
All other fur-bearers are reported to be quite plentiful and no doubt are increasing by
the lack of interest of trappers due to the prevailing over-all low prices.
Upland Game Birds
Pheasants.—Forty-eight of these birds were again released in the Vanderhoof area
and, from personal observation, they are doing very well. Farmers in the area are
showing a great interest and are doing everything possible to protect them.
Three broods were counted from birds released in 1948 and were found to be excellent broods, there being twelve, thirteen, and fifteen young. I would recommend that
at least 100 birds be liberated in this area in 1950.
The pheasants released in the Fort St. John and Pouce Coupe districts are reported
as holding their own, and it is the wish of the local rod and gun clubs that another
allotment be released in these areas during 1950.
Grouse (Willow).—-These birds are very plentiful in all areas except Prince Rupert
and Lower Post. A great many birds were taken during the open season. However,
this did not appear to make any noticeable difference in their numbers. I believe we
should raise the daily bag-limit to six and allow a six-week season, as there is no doubt
these birds are on the increase and I feel they should be taken by sportsmen rather than
by disease.
Grouse (Blue).—These birds are very.scarce. Practically no blue grouse were
taken in this Division this year. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 39
Grouse, Franklin (Fool Hens).—These birds, plentiful in previous years, appear to
have been replaced by willow grouse.    They have decreased very rapidly.
Prairie Chicken (Sharp-tailed).—These birds are also increasing, but due to their
habits are all concentrated in small areas.
Migratory Game Birds.—Both ducks and geese are found in larger numbers in this
Division. They are feeding in grain-fields a great deal.more than in past years and,
consequently, they remain in these areas longer, and the sportsmen secured more than
in past years.
Destruction of Vermin
Timber Wolves.—There are still far too many wolves in certain sections. A very
heavy toll of moose was taken by wolves in the spring when the deep snow had a hard
crust. This enabled the wolves to travel with ease, whereas the moose had a very hard
time making progress. However, this fall and winter, conditions have been reversed.
It has been practically impossible for wolves to travel due to very deep, dry, powdery
snow. This type of snow does not appear to hinder the moose whatsoever. Predatory-
animal Hunters Denison and Harrison have produced very good results and have cut
down the wolf population to where they are no longer a major menace in areas that can
be reached by our present mode of travel.
It is hoped that by the use of aircraft we will be in a position to reach the heavy
concentration of wolves in the remote areas, where they are reported as destroying large
numbers of caribou and sheep.
Coyotes.—They are plentiful throughout the southern part of the Division, but I do
not believe they are a particular menace to any of our game. A considerable number are
being presented for bounty, and it is felt that a decrease in their numbers will be seen next
year due to the very deep, powdery snow and the year-round bounty.
Magpies and Ravens.—These birds are greatly on the increase in this Division.
Magpies were first reported seen at Lower Post in 1947 and very few were found in Pouce
Coupe and Fort St. John areas four years ago.    Now they are quite plentiful.
Eagles.—These birds are destroying a considerable number of swans in the areas
where the trumpeter swans congregate during the winter.
Game Protection
At least three more Wardens are required in this Division, as the areas now covered
are far too great to make even a pretence of patrolling.
Due to the fact that an increasing number of non-resident sportsmen are travelling
by aircraft, we must have more Game Wardens and faster means of transportation if we
hope to carry out game protection properly in this vast area.
A game patrol-boat should be stationed in the vicinity of Bella Bella for the purpose
of checking fishermen poaching in the many hundreds of miles of Coastal inlets and
islands.
Game Propagation
Beaver.—Reports have been received stating that all the live beaver trapped by the
Department and supplied to trappers have established homes and are doing well. No
report on beaver released on Queen Charlotte Islands.
Pheasants.—Pheasants released at Vanderhoof appear to have become acclimatized
and are doing well.
Pheasants released at Fort St. John and Pouce Coupe areas are still surviving, but
do not appear to be making any noticeable increase.
Game Reserves
There are only three game reserves in this Division and they are all very small.
I believe we should declare an area, one mile deep, on each side of the Haines Cut-off
Road as a closed area for game, and also the same on the new road just opened from the W 40 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Yukon border to Atlin. The Nechako Migratory Game Bird Sanctuary at Vanderhoof
has proven a great asset to these birds. Many thousands of geese rest on this sanctuary
during the spring. Several hundred remain there during the hunting season, leaving each
morning and evening for a few hours to feed on the near-by grain-fields.
Fur Trade
Due to the over-all low prices of pelts, a further decline in bag has taken place,
except in the case of beaver. These fur-bearers were taken in fairly large numbers, but
they are now very plentiful and a far larger catch could be taken without any appreciable
loss. A few more mink were taken than in 1948. Squirrels were taken in the usual
number.
Registration of Trap-lines
Owing .to the vague details on reference maps, it is felt that considerable trouble will
arise when aerial-survey maps are put into service. However, by getting adjoining
trappers together, I do not believe too much difficulty will be encountered.
There are very few trap-line border disputes, this being due to the trappers respecting
their known boundaries.
There are a great many trap-lines in the Hay River area (Fort Nelson Detachment)
that have never been registered. Arrangements have been made for Game Warden
McCabe and Special Game Warden Villeneuve (interpreter) to meet trappers of the area
at Hay Lakes for the purpose of registering trap-lines. Aircraft is being used for this
purpose.
Registration of Guides
This is working out satisfactorily. Very few complaints have been received of
guides operating outside their boundaries and all established guides appear to be satisfied
with the area allotted.
The Fort St. James and McGregor River area are slightly overcrowded but not too
seriously.
Guides are being encouraged to form a strong association.
Special Patrols
1. Two special patrols were made by Game Wardens Stewart and McCabe, of Lower
Post and Fort Nelson, into Haines Cut-off for the purpose of studying game conditions in
this remote area.    Some 2,196 miles were covered in these patrols in ten days.
2. A special patrol was made to Fort Liard, N.W.T., by Game Warden McCabe, of
Fort Nelson, by aircraft, to check fur-buyers' books for British Columbia fur and to
interview Royal Canadian Mounted Police for the purpose of having them seal British
Columbia beaver pelts and collect British Columbia royalties.
3. A special patrol was made by Game Wardens Stevenson and Haines, of Burns
Lake and Alexis Creek, from Alexis Creek to Bella Coola to gather data on game conditions in the area.
4. A special patrol was also made by Game Warden Stevenson around the circle in
Tweedsmuir Park, which lies within the Burns Lake Game Detachment, so that information could be supplied to visitors contemplating such a trip.
Hunting Accidents
I am very sorry to report that ten persons were wounded as result of nine hunting
accidents in this Division, of which none were fatal.   They are as follows:—
Harry Capotblanc, an Indian, age 16 years, was accidently shot in the leg and thigh
by a .22-calibre rifle on May 17th, 1949. Same was only a flesh wound and he has
completely recovered. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 41
Leonard Kercher, of Arras, was carelessly shot by Maurice Edinger when he mistook
Kercher for a moose.   Kercher was wounded in the stomach, but has fully recovered now.
Kenneth Fossum of Prince Rupert, age 13 years, was accidently shot with a .22-
calibre rifle while target shooting. Bullet entered ankle of leg coming out instep of foot.
Completely recovered.
Howard Lavigne, of Prince Rupert, was accidently shot while pulling shotgun from
rowboat.    Flesh wound in palm of left hand.    Completely recovered.
Thomas H. Wilford, of Prince Rupert, was accidently injured in right eye when the
recoil of his rifle caused the telescope sight to break his eye-glasses. Right eye removed,
permanent injury.
James Flewin, of Port Edward, was accidentally injured when right index finger was
placed in barrel of shotgun to ascertain whether or not there was any dirt in the barrel.
Index finger on right hand amputated above second joint.
William Nikolaychuk, of Perow, was accidentally shot in the right thigh when a
30.30 Winchester carbine, carried by Lester Laverne, accidentally discharged. Completely recovered.
James Henry and Thomas Graham, of Fort St. James, were wounded by a 12-gauge
shotgun fired by Harold Illebrun when he mistook their dog for a grouse. The shot was
fired from about 60 feet, causing numerous lacerations of the face and body, which
necessitated them being hospitalized for some time. They have recovered from the
wounds with no ill-effects.
George Shires, Prince George, was accidentally wounded when he picked up his
shotgun by the muzzle from a boat. The shotgun suddenly discharged, the shot striking
his left arm and left side. He was rushed to the Prince George Hospital, where his arm
was later amputated above the elbow, after an unsuccessful attempt to save it.
Game-fish Culture
Kamloops trout eggs totalling 455,000 were supplied to rod and gun clubs in this
Division as follows: Terrace Rod and Gun Club, 50,000; Bulkley Valley Rod and Gun
Club, 60,000; Prince George Rod and Gun Club, 150,000; North Peace Rod and Gun
Club, 20,000; Prince Rupert Rod and Gun Club, 100,000; and Ocean Falls Rod and
Gun Club, 75,000.
Very good results were obtained by all clubs except the Prince Rupert Rod and Gun
Club, which had a total loss of the 100,000 eggs, as shown in Game Warden K. R.
Walmsley's report of July 11th, 1949.
Fifty thousand kokanee eggs were planted in Cluculz Creek in the Vanderhoof area
on November 8th with very good results.
Two coarse-fish traps were operated by Game Wardens and rod and gun club
members of Prince George in West Lake outlet and inlet. Over 8 tons of squawfish and
suckers were destroyed.
Summary and General Remarks on Game and Fish
From personal observations at the end of 1949, the moose population in the southern
portion of this Division is very satisfactory. The moose calf crop appears to be much
larger than it has been for several years past and the moose appear to be in a much
healthier condition. In the northern portion, the moose population is not satisfactory
and I believe this has been brought about by disease and predators.
Mule-deer are very scarce throughout the whole Division and I would recommend
that only one buck be allowed each hunter.
Now that there is a closed season on caribou south of the Canadian National Railway tracks, Jasper to Prince Rupert line, these animals appear to be holding their own.
It is felt, however, that wolves are causing heavy loss in the calf crop. W 42 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Two predatory-animal hunters are employed in this Division, one permanent
employee at Prince George and one part-time (winter) employee at Burns Lake. Both
of these hunters have carried out very satisfactory work.
Owing to the number of non-resident hunters who now travel to and from the
hunting-grounds by aircraft, and the vast area (approximately two-thirds of the Province)
which is covered by this Division, a Departmental aircraft for use in checking hunters,
controlling predatory animals, and patrolling the Alberta, Alaska, and Yukon borders
for smuggling of pelts of fur-bearing animals and game is very urgently required.
In closing, I wish to thank all Wardens, British Columbia Police officers, and clerks
for their very fine co-operation.
" E " DIVISION (MAINLAND COAST NORTH TO TOBA INLET AND
LOWER MAINLAND AS FAR INLAND AS NORTH BEND)
By R. E. Allan, Officer Commanding
I beg to submit herewith my annual report covering game conditions in " E"
Division for the year ended December 31st, 1949.
Big Game
Deer (Coast or Columbian).—Increased hunting pressure in this Division during
the past year does not appear to have greatly affected the stand of deer. A sportsman,
hunting diligently, could obtain a deer in almost any district. Wardens, with the
exception of those covering North Vancouver and Burnaby-Delta, report good hunting
during the past open season. Game Warden H. P. Hughes, of Cloverdale, states in
his report that deer are increasing in the Surrey and Langley areas, and he recommends
an open season on both sexes in that district. As this area is becoming increasingly
cultivated and more crops are being damaged by deer, it might be advisable to follow
this suggestion.
Mountain-goat.—Heavy hunting of these animals in the past several years in the
easily accessible areas has resulted in their now frequenting the Divisional mountainous
reaches. However, anyone willing to do arduous climbing can take one of these trophies.
Favoured hunting spots continue to be in the Pitt Lake, Mission, Chilliwack, and up-
Coast districts. In the Harrison and Chehalis Lakes areas they are reported to be
increasing in number.
Bear (Black and Grizzly).—Black bear continue to be quite common throughout
the Division, and although they have been subjected to a continuous open season, they
are still a source of considerable nuisance in the settled districts. This Division is not
considered a good one in which to hunt grizzly bear. However, a few are taken each
year from the isolated mountain areas.
Wapiti (Elk).—Patrols made to the McNab Creek area of Howe Sound indicate
that the elk planted at that place have spread over and into the Potlatch Creek Valley.
An attempt to obtain an accurate count of the number of animals in the herd was unsuccessful, due to the presence of heavy timber and brush. A further effort will be made
this year to obtain the desired information.
Fur-bearing Animals
Muskrats.—These animals continue to be plentiful throughout the Fraser Valley.
The easing of restrictions on the taking of them in the dyked areas has alleviated the
damage they create without any noticeable decrease in their numbers.
Red Fox.—Although a fur-bearer under the " Game Act," this animal is looked
upon as a pest and predator in the area south of the Fraser River between Ladner and
Hope. Constant hunting by Game Wardens and organized parties has had no apparent
effect in limiting their number. Litter found outside their dens indicates they take a
considerable toll of domestic and game birds. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 43
From reports received from Wardens and trappers, mink, marten, beaver, squirrel,
and otter appear to be holding their own and are not in any great danger of being
overtrapped.
Racoon.—These animals are increasing throughout the whole Division and will,
no doubt, continue to do so until such time as their pelts become of higher commercial
value. The fur crop for the Division as a whole will probably be down as compared
with previous years, due to an unusually severe winter and the resultant difficulty of
trapping in heavy icing conditions.
Upland Game Birds
Grouse (Blue).—On the Lower Mainland, blue grouse are scarce. In the more
recently logged-off areas of the Coast Mainland and adjacent islands they are still fairly
plentiful, and good bags of these birds were obtained.
Grouse (Willow or Ruffed).—Though not plentiful, coveys of these birds are to
be found almost everywhere throughout the Division. Game Wardens R. S. King and
H. D. Mulligan, of Burnaby and North Vancouver respectively, both report these birds
to be on the increase in their districts. Good reports have also been received from the
Surrey district.
European Partridge.—Coveys have been observed on Matsqui Prairie, East Chilliwack, Surrey, and Ladner. They have disappeared entirely in the other areas of the
Fraser Valley where they were liberated. The covey of California quail at Ladner
showed no increase over the year.
Pheasants.—Heavy hunting pressure and ever-decreasing suitable habitat is preventing pheasants from becoming plentiful in the Fraser Valley—the only area in this
Division in which these birds are to be found. As previously reported, a step-up in the
liberation of farm-raised birds, together with closer co-operation between farmers and
sportsmen, appears to be necessary in order to supply the demand for this species of
game bird. Qf these two, the latter seems to me to be the most important, for without
co-operation we cannot expect to improve the existing habitat so very necessary if
heavier plantings of farm birds are to be made.
Migratory Game Birds
Ducks.-—During the first half of the 1949 split season on ducks, hunting throughout
the whole of the Division was the best enjoyed for a good many years. Mallards, pintail, teal, and widgeon were plentiful, together with a fair number of scaup and sea ducks.
Early in December, severe freezing weather caused most ducks in the inland areas to
move to the open waters of the sea-coast, with the result that exceptionally good shooting
was to be had in such areas as the Fraser River delta during the second half of the season.
At Pitt Meadows, Mission, Chilliwack, and other up-valley areas, ducks were either
scarce or non-existent during that period.
Geese.—Canada geese were observed in their usual numbers and fair bags were
taken. Several flocks of Hutchison's geese were observed in the Ladner area. Snow
geese (lesser) again were plentiful along the foreshore of the delta, but were difficult
to obtain, as they would remain well out at sea until after dark. Many night patrols
were made to their feeding-grounds on shore in order to prevent them from being taken
by moonlight. Although black brant were fairly plentiful at Boundary Bay, weather
conditions were such that very few birds were taken.
Small shore-birds have increased considerably during the last.few years, particularly yellowlegs and killdeer plover. Wilson's or jack-snipe continue to be fairly
plentiful.
Band-tailed pigeons, except in a few scattered areas within the Division, are not
very plentiful.    A continued short open season is indicated.
A few swans were observed in several districts of the Division during their fall
migration. W 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Vermin
Cougars, red foxes, and the common house-cat are the most troublesome predators
in this Division, and Wardens, with the co-operation of many interested local sportsmen,
hunt them continuously.
Crows, wild dogs, hawks, owls, and the occasional wolf and coyote are being kept
well under control in most districts. A female coyote brought to the Coast from the
Interior of the Province and liberated on Lulu Island by a spiteful game-law violator
has not yet been destroyed. A hunter on the island discovered her den last spring and
destroyed twelve pups before reporting same. Traps were set, but as expected, she did
not return to the den.
Red foxes are reported to be present in the Sturgeon Slough area. No doubt they
came across the frozen Fraser River from Langley or Surrey.
Game Protection
With the exception of the up-Coast area, where the services of a Game Warden
are greatly needed, the Division has been under constant supervision. An increase in
prosecutions is noted for the year in review. As you are aware, the opening of the
Hope-Princeton Highway has made a large game and fisheries area between Hope and
Manning Park easily available to the public. The patrolling of this area by Game
Warden A. J. Butler, of Chilliwack, in addition to his former district, has become too
great a task. I would respectfully recommend that he either be supplied with an assistant
or a new Game Detachment be established at Hope.
Game Propagation
A total of 15,438 pheasants were liberated in this Division during the year. With
the exception of a few surplus breeders released in the early Spring, they were all 12 to
16 weeks of age.    These birds were distributed throughout the Division as follows:.—
Agassiz      600                Matsqui  754
Burnaby         29                Mission (Hatzic)   2,106
Chilliwack    1,558 Pitt Meadows ___..    .... 2,783
Delta   2,532                 Sumas Prairie  1,992
Lulu Island      630                 Surrey   2,454
Game Reserves
The several game reserves within this Division are beneficial as breeding and
resting areas for both big game and game birds.
Fur Trade
The fur market was at a particularly low point during the season 1948-49. The
trade reported an over-all decrease of 29 per cent as compared with the previous year.
Predictions for the season 1950-51 are a little brighter. The following is a list of fur-
bearers together with their respective percentage decrease:—
Per Cent Per Cent
Beaver   35 Weasel   28
Mink  20 Muskrat   44
Otter   22 Squirrel  _■_  61
Marten   42
Registration of Trap-lines
This system continues to operate smoothly. Complaints of either trespassing or
overtrapping are rarely reported. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1949 W 45
Registration of Guides
There are very few registered guides operating in this Division, and as previously
reported, they all operate in the district patrolled from Chilliwack. No complaints or
disputes have been received in regard to their operations.
Special Patrols
Corporal Game Warden L. R. Lane and Game Warden R. S. King made a special
patrol by launch and plane to the Goat Island Game Reserve on Powell Lake, with good
results; namely, Rex vs. Amondus Anderson, " Game Act."
Following numerous complaints to the Game Commission concerning the lodge of
Canadian Rainbows Unlimited in the Interior of the Province, Game Warden Frank
Urquhart and Corporal Game Warden L. R. Lane, proceeding incognito, visited at the
lodge for a week. This patrol resulted in several prosecutions under both Dominion
and Provincial regulations and a total of $1,300 in fines was collected.
Game Warden A. J. Butler, of Chilliwack, made a special patrol into Chilliwack
Lake by aeroplane and, as a result obtained several convictions under the " Game Act."
Hunting Accidents
I regret to report that the number of hunting accidents has increased over the
year. It was hoped, in view of the many showings of Departmental educational films,
that accidents would be fewer or none at all.
Robert J. Singer, of 995 Roosevelt Crescent, North Vancouver, using a .22-calibre
rifle, shot at a duck on the water. The bullet ricocheted, injuring David C. Hobbs, of
North Vancouver, in the right leg.    Recovered with no ill effects.
Ronald Kolb, of New Westminster, received shotgun-pellet wounds in the left leg
when one John D. Scott, 1828 Edinburgh Street, New Westminster, fired across a
travelled road at a pheasant.    Not serious.
Clarence Roy Gassman, age 16 years, was accidentally shot and killed by a
juvenile companion carrying a .30-30 calibre rifle. This accident occurred in the
Langley district when several youths were walking in single file down a steep trail.
Robert Dowding, 2805 Eighth Avenue West, Vancouver, received six shotgun
pellets in the face from the discharge of a shotgun in the hands of one George Tarlier,
3511 Fourteenth Avenue West, in the same city. The injured man and Tarlier were
members of a party hunting pheasants in the Ladner area, and while working a field
together, Dowding was too far ahead of the others when a bird was flushed. Not
serious.
Joseph T. Meraw, 460 Sixty-seventh Avenue East, Vancouver, lost his right arm
following the accidental discharge of his shotgun, which he had leaning against his car.
Roy Woods, age 16 years, and residing at 2127 Marine Drive, West Vancouver,
received a very serious chest wound from a .22-calibre rifle in the hands of a juvenile
companion. The boys had been plinking at trees, etc., and the injury was caused by
a ricocheting bullet.    Recovered.
Trueman H. Oliver, of Ladner, received a shotgun-pellet wound in the left hand.
Person responsible is one Gordon Houston, of 2228 Fourth Avenue East, Vancouver.
It is not known whether Houston fired too low at a duck or if a pellet had deflected.
Game Fish Culture
The distribution of Kamloops trout fingerlings from the Cultus Lake and Smiths
Falls Hatcheries were as follows:—
Coquitlam district     12,000
Surrey and Langley districts     36,000
Chilliwack district     93,000
Howe Sound (Petgill Lake) district       1,000
Total  142,000 W 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Fingerlings liberated in Silver and Kakawa Lakes in the Chilliwack district were
marked by the removal of both ventrals fins on Silver Lake fish and adipose and dorsal
fins for those in Kakawa Lake.
A new and modern hatchery has been completed on the site of the old Dominion
Fisheries Hatchery at Smiths Falls.
The Cultus Lake Hatchery, also a former Dominion unit, is being abandoned, except
for use as a general storehouse and its refrigeration facilities. The new hatchery is in
charge of Fishery Officer Frank Pells, who is assisted by Hatchery Officer C. O. Mellor.
As with hunting, fishing pressures are extremely heavy in the non-tidal waters of this
Division. However, due, no doubt, to the Department's restocking programme, there is
no indication of the many lakes or streams being depleted. The steelhead runs in several
streams have held up particularly well, and the feeling of many sports-fishermen is that
a large number of these fish originated from our local hatcheries.
Summary
With approximately 50 per cent of the licensed hunters and fishermen of the Province residing within this Division, it is becoming increasingly difficult to supply them with
local returns on their licences. The hunting of pheasants in the Mission, Matsqui, Chilliwack, Langley, and Surrey districts was fairly good. In the Ladner and Pitt Meadows
districts, it was very disappointing. Big-game animals appear to be holding their own
and in many areas show indications of an increase.
In my request to the Wardens in this Division for the submission of their annual
game report, I asked that some mention be made of observations in the relationship
between farmers and sportsmen. Game Warden Percy Cliffe, of Mission, in his report,
summed up the situation very briefly by stating: " The only trouble is that there are not
enough sportsmen." From my own observations, I can only conclude that he is quite
correct. More sportsmen, in the true sense of the word, would mean that fewer hen
pheasants and does would be taken. Fishermen would more often use barbless hooks
and whip a stream for aesthetic pleasure rather than greed for as many fish as the law will
allow; permission would be asked of the landowner to hunt or fish off his land; fewer
fences would be knocked down and fence wires cut. I have seen several instances of the
latter. There are numerous other points that could be mentioned, which, when added
together, total good game conservation and continued pleasure in both hunting and
fishing.
In conclusion, I again wish to extend by sincere thanks to the many individuals in
ours and other Governmental departments, game associations, and sportsmen who so
generously assisted me throughout the year.
REPORT OF THE DIVISION OF BIOLOGY, 1949
By Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan and Staff
Throughout the year the Division functioned under the general direction of Dr. W. A.
Clemens and Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan, in collaboration with the Commissioners. Biologists James Hatter, M.A., and Peter Larkin, Ph.D., devoted almost full time to the field
and laboratory studies of the Division. During the summer months sixteen assistant
biologists were employed upon field studies, and many of them devoted much time and
energy during the remainder of the year in the analysis of data and preparation of reports.
It is a pleasure to acknowledge this and much other honorary assistance given with energy
and enthusiasm by the graduate and undergraduate students in wildlife management at
the University of British Columbia. Without their help, little could have been accomplished. It is a pleasure also to acknowledge assistance rendered by Dr. Irvin Moynihan,
of the Dominion Health of Animals Laboratory, Vancouver, and by many of the officers
of the Enforcement Branch of the Game Department. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 47
The work of the Division falls naturally into three main phases: research, management studies and practices, and " trouble shooting." With our small staff there is a very
real danger of the last category occupying too large a place in the Division's activities to
the detriment of substantial progress in improved wildlife conservation and management.
Game Research and Management
1. The Biology and Management of the Ringneck Pheasant in
Coastal British Columbia
E. Taylor continued his pheasant studies throughout the year, but concentrated
on the period from May to November, comprising the period of reproduction and that of
harvest. This year's investigations fell into two main phases. One concerned with the
factors affecting increase in the wild populations, and the other concerned with developing
techniques for improving the survival of farm-reared birds after liberation. The study
was carried on again in the 65-square-mile area of Delta Municipality.
Cock densities were determined and found to excel those of the previous year by
almost two cocks per square mile. The hen population, however, was lower than in
1948. The breeding population was determined to be 3,035 birds, as opposed to 3,070
birds in 1948.
The breeding season made a good start, and until mid-July the broods averaged
larger than in the previous year. Then they began to suffer losses to some influence We
were unable to determine, with the consequence that the average brood size in late August
was 1 Vi chicks lower than in the previous August.
The slightly smaller breeding stock, coupled with smaller size of broods, reduced
the autumn population from an estimated 11,093 in 1948 to 8,669 in 1949.
As in the previous year, mowing was the most serious cause of loss to nesting hens.
This one source accounted for the deaths of 11.3 per cent of the nesting hens, while
destroying 38 per cent of the nests. Under existing circumstances, about half the
autumn population of hens is lost before the onset of the next breeding season.
Careful analysis of the factors apparently restricting the pheasant population leads
to the conclusion that the best immediate opportunities for increasing the wild stock lie
in reduction of mowing loss and reduction of the loss of hens during the hunting season
and subsequent winter.
Experiments with liberated, farm-reared pheasants this year was designed to test
the effectiveness of the night gentle-release method against the conventional release
method, and to study the survival of birds liberated at different ages.
Twenty-four hundred and ninety-two marked birds were liberated on the study area,
about half of them cocks.
The night gentle-release birds were found to suffer less than half the discoverable
post-release mortality than did the control group released by conventional methods.
Similarly, the gentle-release technique was found to give a 50 per cent better return
of birds brought to bag. This technique has been recommended for use in all liberations
in 1950.
Birds were liberated at ages of from 9-10 weeks to 18-19 weeks. Two lots of
birds liberated at ages of 16 to 18 weeks gave the highest returns, almost three times as
high as those of the younger birds. The results will be subjected to a further testing in
in 1950. A study of the results obtained with pheasants raised on different farms gives
a strong indication that there are important differences in the survival of birds arising
out of rearing conditions.    This too is to be given further study.
2. A Preliminary Study of the Effects of Orchard Spraying upon Pheasants
A. Benson undertook this study during the period from May to November. The
experimental work was conducted in the Kelowna district, where we enjoyed and appre- W 48
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ciated the co-operation and assistance of many orchardists and sportsmen, most especially
F. Pridham, who supplied facilities for our field station, and A. Blackie, who assisted in
many ways.
Experimental birds were exposed in orchards to the normal spraying routine. Where
possible, pens of birds were subjected to the spray on their food only, and to spray by
inhalation only, in order to investigate the relative toxicity of some sprays entering the
bird through the two different routes.
Control birds were not sprayed and were maintained in pens adjacent to the orchards.
The results of these experiments are outlined on the accompanying table.
It is planned, in 1950, to give more detailed study to the minimum toxic concentrations under field conditions and to add some of the more recently developed chemical
sprays to the group.
As a general conclusion to be drawn from our studies to date it can be said that only
MonoDN of the sprays tested is not toxic to pheasants in the concentrations applied.
Results of Spraying Various Insecticides on Pheasants
Insecticide and Concentrations Used
How Applied
Death
Due to
Spraying
Age at
Spraying
9 lb./A. Parathion and 18 lb./A. DDT.
75 lb./A. Parathion and 15 lb./A. DDT..
18 lb./A. DDT     -_
18 lb./A. DDT ._ 	
15 lb./A. DDT  	
10 lb./A. DDT   	
MonoDN (DDT sprayed three days previously, approximately 15-20 lb./A.) _ 	
MonoDN   „   	
16 lb. /A. Parathion __     	
12 lb./A. Parathion 	
75 lb./A. Parathion   __
10 pt. /A. Hexafoss    _ 	
5 lb./A. Lindane _   __ __
Control No. 1_   	
Control No. 2 	
Control No. 3      	
Control No. 4 	
As a fog on food and birds .
As a fog on food and birds...
As a fog on food and birds.
As a fog on food only	
As a fog on food and birds _
As a mist on birds only	
As a fog on food only	
As a fog on food and birds .
As a fog on food only	
As a mist on birds only	
As a fog on food and birds.
As a fog on food and birds .
As a fog on food and birds.
Not sprayed __ _	
Not sprayed   	
Not sprayed 	
Not sprayed. _ 	
Per Cent
100
100
78
100
50
100
100
50
50
30
60
5 days
15 days
15 days
4 days
14 weeks
25 days
4 days
15 weeks
4 days
25 days
15 weeks
10 weeks
10 weeks
3. Water-fowl Breeding-grounds and Migration
The study of water-fowl breeding-grounds in British Columbia and the winter distribution of the populations nesting in the Province was begun in 1948. In that year an
exploratory party operated in the Chilcotin district from Riske Creek through to Anahim
Lake. In that year also, banding operations were conducted in July and August in the
Cariboo district and to a very minor degree in the vicinity of Kamloops.
In 1949 exploratory work was undertaken in the region west of Quesnel during
May and June in combination with some beaver studies. Banding was again undertaken
on all the important water-fowl lakes in the Cariboo between Williams Lake and Clinton.
In addition, operations were also undertaken on several lakes in the vicinity of Riske
Creek, on the Horsefly Road, and on lakes lying south-east and south-west of Kamloops.
During the year, 2,289 water-fowl were banded on the nesting-grounds. In this
sample, Barrow's goldeneye made up 43.5 per cent; bufflehead, 13.1 per cent; lesser
scaup, 11.9 per cent; baldpate, 7.7 per cent; blue-winged teal, 6.9 per cent; redhead,
5.3 per cent; canvasback, 1.8 per cent; mallard, 1.3 per cent; pintail, 1.1 per cent;
ruddy, 3 per cent; and other species, 1 per cent.   Twenty-six Canada geese were banded.
The first results of the 1948 banding came in during the winter of 1948-49. In all,
174 of the birds banded were reported shot. Of this group, 65 per cent were shot in
the Province by resident sportsmen and the remainder were shot in the United States or up
REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 49
in Mexico. The longest flight recorded was made by a lesser scaup banded on August
7th, 1948, at Westwick Lake, and shot at Parral, in the State of Chihuahua, Mexico, on
November 21st, 1948. During the banding operations in 1949, thirteen birds banded the
previous year were taken. In every instance the recaptured bird was taken on the same
lake as originally.
These water-fowl studies have already yielded a most useful body of data on the size
and distribution of the nesting population of water-fowl in the most important nesting-
grounds in the Province. With subsequent years, the data will also provide a reliable
means of appraising the fluctuations in water-fowl populations and the factors that
influence nesting success.
Also arising from these studies is information upon the degree to which the various
species of ducks nesting in the Province remain in, or leave, the Pacific fly-way during
the winter season. Already it is apparent that the canvasbacks raised in Central British
Columbia move south-eastward into the Central fly-way to winter in Texas, whereas the
majority of the other species remain in the Pacific fly-way.
4. Beaver Trap-line Survey
A survey of thirteen Interior trap-lines was carried out in May and June to determine
some of the problems relative to the management of beaver in the Cariboo District.
Trap-lines inspected were of the more accessible type, found in the Horsefly, Lac la
Hache, and Quesnel areas. Members of the survey party consisted of J. Hatter, W. H.
Cottle, and C. F. McLeod.
Although the survey was of a preliminary type and not sufficiently intensive or
comprehensive to form a basis for a general beaver-management policy, certain observations are noteworthy at this time. These, together with several pertinent recommendations, are presented briefly as follows:—
(a) The trap-lines sampled reveal that, for the most part, the beaver population
of the Cariboo District has been overharvested. Only one of the thirteen
trap-lines reconnoitred was stocked to capacity with beaver.
(b) A major problem confronting the registered trapper in settled areas has
been the alienation of Crown land for ranching purposes. In many
instances this is a poor marginal or submarginal agricultural land and its
use as such is questionable from the standpoint of proper land usage.
Drainage of beaver-inhabited swamps has resulted and the land turned to
the production of sedges (Carex) for cattle food. Conservation of beaver
on adjoining trap-lines frequently results in redamming of the original
stream and reflooding of the " wild-hay " meadows.
(c) Due to alienation of Crown land and the growth of homesteads, trap-lines
which were formerly more extensive have been reduced in size and not
infrequently divided by private property. This presents the problem
of ownership of beaver inhabiting streams which pass through private
lands and animals which have dispersed from an adjacent trap-line on to
private property. It is felt that few, if any, permits should be issued to
owners of private property to trap beaver unless the animals are actually
established on such property. Removal of transient beaver along streams
by owners of the adjoining land should not be permitted. Similarly,
permits should not be issued to private owners to remove nuisance beaver.
Removal of such animals should be authorized by the local Game Warden
and the task delegated to the local registered trapper or other individual
selected at the discretion of the Game Warden.
(d) Beaver trap-lines should not be so subdivided as to constitute units
of land which are too small to provide a livelihood for the trapper. In
some instances there is little encouragement for the trapper to conserve W 50 BRITISH COLUMBIA
his beaver because the limited amount of suitable habitat on the trap-line
will not permit a sizeable population of these animals. Trap-lines
should be large enough to constitute management units. It is felt that
larger trap-lines would provide more incentive to the part-time trapper
to practise sustained yield.
(e) It is felt that more attention should be given to trap-line boundaries and
that the height of land should be used in preference to lakes and streams
and artificial boundaries. It is obviously not good management policy
to allow two trappers to harvest muskrats and beaver on opposing banks
of the same watercourse.
(/) Reports of poaching were frequently brought to the attention of the survey
party and, in some instances at least, such complaints were justified.
(g) It is felt that better water-rights protection should be afforded the trapper
of aquatic fur. The use of water for fur production should receive wider
recognition and, where possible, water for irrigation purposes should be
put not only to this use but also to encourage the production of beaver and
muskrats.
(/.) The present regulations governing the harvesting and tagging of beaver
pelts is a good conservation measure. However, an important consideration is the problem of determining how many beaver a certain trapper
should harvest. At present, the potentialities of the habitat are not always
considered and beaver tags may be issued according to the estimated
number of beaver present, without recognizing the fact that the particular
area in question may be understocked. In this connection the services
of a fur-management biologist are recommended.
5. Beaver Transplantation to Queen Charlotte Islands
During the period from June 22nd to July 12th, beaver live-trapping operations were
carried out by L. G. Sugden and Game Warden R. S. Hayes. Trapping was done on the
Little Oyster River in the Campbell River area of Vancouver Island. By the use of
Bailey live-traps, eleven beaver were taken. This number consisted of one mature female,
two mature males, one two-year-old male, two yearling females, three yearling males, and
two kits.
During the operation, the beaver were held in wire-mesh pens built partially in the
water. On the morning of liberation, they were sexed, sacked, weighed, and flown to
Sandspit via Vancouver. The animals were transported from Sandspit to Mayer Lake,
Graham Island, and released at the south end of the lake.
Reports from Ranger H. B. Hammer indicate that at least some of the beaver
attempted establishment and commenced to construct a dam in September. However,
this structure was not completed. Further inquiries into the success of the liberation will
be made and reported upon.
6. Examination of Moose Winter Ranges
The writer examined several wintering areas in 1949 not previously covered in the
extensive surveys of the preceding two summers.
Miocene.—The region embraced by the trap-line of J. Wiggins, of Miocene, was
reconnoitred on horseback and observations made on the condition of the moose range.
For the most part, the winter food of moose has been exhausted in this area. Virtually
all the palatable species of forage are now completely polled and a large proportion are
dead from overuse. The carrying capacity for moose has been reduced to a small fraction
of the original condition in the twenties when moose began to increase in the area. No
recent burns were encountered and most of the forest at higher elevations is approaching REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 51
the climatic climax. It is pertinent to recall that large numbers of moose have recently
died in this region from a malnutrition-winter tick complex.
Horsefly Lake.—Conversation with residents of Horsefly indicates that an estimated
three-quarters of the moose food in the Woodjam Range has been exhausted. It is
reported that ten years ago it was possible to select a trophy from thirty bull moose, but
now it is necessary to hunt for days to even find an animal in this particular area. It is
believed that the local decline is primarily attributable to an overpopulation of moose and
the process of conifer succession following the early fires.
Timothy Lake.—A similar condition to that described for the Miocene area was
found to exist in the vicinity of Timothy Lake. Formerly portions of this area were
burned annually and moose food was abundant. For the last fifteen years, however, fires
have been few and the carrying capacity of the area reduced to a low level.
Deadman's Creek.—Overuse of the upland forage species was encountered along the
upper reaches of Deadman's Creek during a brief reconnaissance of that area. This area
is in need of some new burns to provide winter food for moose which winter close to the
Douglas fir-grass land ecotone.
White River.—In late October, five days were spent riding through much of the
valley of the White River, tributary to the Kootenay River. Reports on the history of
moose in this region indicate that the population was formerly much higher. Observation
revealed that the food once available to moose in this valley has been depleted by overuse
and regeneration of dense conifer stands on the old burns. The valley supports a sizeable
population of elk, which has probably competed with moose for such browse species as
willow, aspen, and serviceberry. Owing to a different food preferences, the valley now
appears more suitable to elk. White-tailed deer are also plentiful in the area. Rather than
interspecific intolerance being responsible for the ascendency of elk and deer over moose,
it would appear that differences in food requirements and preferences are responsible.
7. Deer Winter Ranges
Kootenay Lake. — A large population of mule and white-tailed deer occupies the
lowest slopes immediately adjacent to and on both sides of the West Arm of Kootenay
Lake. Small portions of this winter range are overutilized, but food shortage is not
believed to be an important factor, generally, in the welfare of the local deer population.
However, due to a lack of winter investigation in the region, the above conclusion is only
tentative. Samples of bone marrow from several deer killed in mid-winter by dogs,
coyotes, and trains revealed the animals to be in fairly good condition. Marrow from
two white-tailed fawns, however, indicated critical malnutrition.
There is a suggestion in this area that the severe winters of the past two years have
affected the deer population other than in a density dependent manner. Deer losses have
been occasioned largely by harassment from domestic dogs and coyotes, and by death
from being struck by automobiles and locomotives. Few winter kills can be attributed
solely to starvation. However, it must be realized that winter range is very restricted and
that continued increase of the deer population offers a threat to the present carrying
capacity of the area. Probably serious overpopulation has been prevented by a period
decimation of the herd during critical winters. Hunting does not appear to be a constant
limiting factor of importance, because during the open season most of the deer population
is at higher levels in rugged terrain above the lake. Here it is relatively inaccessible.
A sizeable number of deer are killed only during unusual years when early snows force
the population on to low accessible areas. Such years, however, are the exception rather
than the rule.
Considering these circumstances, it is felt that the open season on deer in the
Kootenay Lake area should be so adjusted as to allow for a larger annual harvest. It may
be conservatively estimated that the winter losses from 1948 to 1950 were ten or more
times as great as the hunter harvest for these years. W 52 BRITISH COLUMBIA
During the mid-winter, deer become a nuisance to local inhabitants by browsing
fruit-trees. Although not all complaints of damage are fully justified, it does not seem
practical to undertake costly measures to increase the local deer population, particularly
when there is so much excellent hunting elsewhere in the Kootenay District.
At the request of the Game Commissioners, the loss of deer along the Canadian
Pacific Railway from Nelson to the south end of Kootenay Lake was investigated. Due
to the local topography of the area, it is apparent that little, or nothing, can be done to
attract deer from the right-of-way. Snow depth increases rapidly up-slope from the lake-
shore, so much in fact that only a few hundred feet distant from the lake the range is
untenable during mid-winter. Limitations of the environment in this area are considerable and losses due to physical factors will never be completely removed. The following
management possibilities are recommended for the Kootenay Lake area;.—■
(a) A more liberal season for the harvesting of buck deer, with an unstated
closing date to be set on two days' notice according to weather conditions
and extent of the harvest.
(b) A local permit system for removing a given number of does.
(c) Continued control of domestic dogs that are permitted to run deer.
(d) It is believed that if the Canadian Pacific Railway right-of-way were
cleared of snow (level with the rails) fewer deer would be hit as they
attempt to avoid oncoming locomotives. A type of snow-plough that
scatters the snow farther from the grade might prove helpful in this regard.
Rosebery.—A mule-deer wintering area on the New Denver-Nakusp Road near
Rosebery was examined and found to be heavily utilized. Fifty-one deer were counted
along 4 miles of road by Game Warden Rutherglen in the winter of 1947-48. Further
investigation in this selected study area will be undertaken to determine whether or not
deer populations will shift into adjacent unbrowsed areas. Here, as along Kootenay
Lake, the winter range is restricted to a narrow zone at the base of the steep slopes.
Feeding behaviour in winter is an important and basic problem from a management
standpoint, since the ability of deer to survive and increase will depend, in part, upon the
use of unbrowsed areas once the previous winter yards are depleted of their food
resources.
Pend d'Oreille.—Reports of deer dying along the Pend d'Oreille River led to a brief
investigation in that area. One rancher interviewed stated that he had found numerous
dead white-tails during the previous winter. The location of ten carcasses was named
by this gentleman, but at the time of the investigation most of the remains had been
scattered by coyotes and black bears. The only post-mortem conditions described were
suppurative lesions in the abdominal and thoracic cavities.
A brief reconnaissance of the area revealed no critically browsed winter yards,
although the period of investigation was too short to arrive at sound conclusions regarding
the availability of deer food in as large a section as the Pend d'Oreille area. Trees and
shrubs found utilized were mainly serviceberry, syringa, wild cherry, and Douglas fir.
8. General Observations of Big-game Habitat
Flathead Valley.—Three days in July were spent, in company with Inspector Kearns,
in a survey of a section of the Flathead Valley. Moose are reported to have decreased
in this area, whereas elk have maintained a more stable population. Due to the grazing
habits of elk, this animal is undoubtedly more suited to the Flathead Valley than moose.
It is the concensus of opinion that elk have driven out the moose, although the more
probable explanation is that environmental pressures against elk have been less, and
consequently this species has exceeded in density the population of moose. Very few
moose are taken by hunters. ■
REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1949 W 53
The densest stands of lodgepole pine ever observed by the writer (J. Hatter) occur
in the Flathead Valley and extend uniformly over the greater section of the valley bottom.
In places the younger stands are impenetrable. Upland salix is extremely scarce and
showed signs of chronic overuse. Obviously, the carrying capacity for moose has been
low since the 1920's, when extensive fires burned throughout the mature stands of lodge-
pole pine and spruce. A peak in the moose population, reported to be in the early
1930's, may be attributed to better food that existed for a short period after the fires and
before the pine canopy closed over the resultant increase in the deciduous trees and
shrubs.
Along the Flathead River, where the forest is open and park-like, elk sign was found.
Heavy use of Rocky Mountain juniper was manifest here.
In conclusion, it may be stated that the Flathead Valley, as it presently exists, is of
little value as big-game habitat in comparison with other regions in the Province.
Elko Deer Sanctuary.—Almost everywhere in the Elko Deer Sanctuary there is
evidence of overbrowsed range. Elk were formerly absent from the sanctuary, but now
a winter population is firmly established there. An elk high-line is present on most of
the deciduous trees that increased in density after the fire. Obviously, competition
between deer and elk exists within the sanctuary. More detailed studies are planned for
this area.
Preliminary Survey of the Ashnola River Sheep Range.-—A preliminary survey of
bighorn sheep winter range was carried out in the Ashnola River area in early November.
At this time few sheep were on the winter range. In all, only twenty-four animals were
counted, including seven adult rams, three adult ewes, three lambs, one yearling ram, and
ten sheep (not classified as to age and sex).
Areas most available to the sheep for winter range have been grazed by domestic
stock, and abundant evidence of local overuse of the range was manifest even at this
time of the year.
Further studies of the Ashnola sheep range are required before management
practices can be recommended.   These will be undertaken as soon as possible.
Sayward Forest Deer Study.—Concern over the status of the Coast deer in the
Sayward Forest, near Campbell River on Vancouver Island, led to the inception of
a special study there. It was found that the population of deer had suffered severely
from winter losses resulting from the unusually severe weather of the previous winter.
The sex ratio was also below optimum, probably as a result of the heavy hunting pressure
arising from local conditions of cover and accessibility.
As a result of the preliminary studies made, it was deemed desirable to close the
season on deer temporarily and to introduce certain other management practices designed
to facilitate recovery of the population and to protect it in the future from too intensive
hunting.   It was recommended also that intensive mountain-lion control be applied.
This study is being continued.
9. Checking-stations
Vancouver Island.—Checking-stations for deer and blue grouse hunters were operated in the Cowichan Valley and in the Campbell River area during September 17th and
18th. Graduate students from the university gathered the necessary data on hunter
successes and sex and age ratios of blue grouse killed.
In the Cowichan area, 300 hunters were checked, with a total of 937 grouse and
27 deer. At Campbell River, 828 hunters were checked on the opening day and 656
on the day following, with a total of 3,939 blue grouse and 39 deer. An estimated 1,000
hunters frequented the- Campbell River area on the opening week-end. An accurate
count of hunters was not obtained, due to duplications on the second day. Vv  54 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cache Creek.—Biological information was obtained at Cache Creek by C. Walker,
of Ladner. All moose and deer heads were measured and the necessary data recorded.
In addition, a sample of the water-fowl and grouse kill in the Cariboo and Chilcotin
was obtained.
In general, the moose kill has remained quite constant over the past three years and
the age of animals taken has varied only slightly. This would indicate that the large
populations of moose in the Cariboo and Chilcotin are not generally being overhunted.
10. Moose Tagging
In May and June, eleven calf moose were ear-tagged by R. C. Cleveland at Eagan
Lake. The purpose of this work is to determine the extent to which moose move from
their place of birth, and to provide means of ageing the animals by the study of antlers
and tooth erosion in animals of known age. In 1948, Cleveland tagged three calf moose
in the same area. Tagging operations will be continued in 1950 and until such time as
sufficient moose are tagged and adequate measurements are obtained from bull moose
killed by hunters.
11. Annual Game Returns
In 1949, the licensed hunters of British Columbia were again requested to file
a return of game killed, and a 1.2 per cent return was obtained. This sample has been
found to be biased, and in 1950 a different sampling technique will be used to eliminate
the inaccuracies of the previous compilations.
12. Moose Report Returns
Again, most first- and second-class game guides in the Province were mailed data
sheets on which to record the number of moose seen on each hunting trip and to register
certain additional information needed to detect trends in the populations of moose in the
Province. Returns obtained from the guides were still unsatisfactory, and as a result
a compulsory system of returns is being considered.
13. Nechako River Dam Project
A preliminary brief covering some of the possible influences of this project upon
the wildlife values of Tweedsmuir Park and adjacent areas was prepared and submitted
to the public hearings.
A brief survey of the area will be made next year and, arising from this, it may seem
desirable to undertake more detailed studies.
14. The Libby Dam Project: Summary of Report to Game Commission,
September, 1949
The proposed Libby dam or alternatives will not cause measurable harm to the
wildlife of the area provided that adjacent lands are not alienated to agricultural pursuits
for the purpose of compensation to displaced ranchers. A slight loss of big-game winter
range will occur, but this may be more than compensated for by reduced live-stock
grazing when winter hay land along the Kootenay River is flooded, thus rendering it
impossible for ranchers to grow winter feed. Serious complications could arise, however,
if ranchers are compensated for their loss by establishment on the upper benchlands, with
irrigation facilities and cultivation of previously non-arable land. Under these circumstances, live stock vs. big game competition could become an important problem.
Water-fowl may benefit materially by the flooding of shallow basins and the creation
of adjoining sloughs. This, however, will depend on the extent to which the water-level
is permitted to fluctuate.
The loss of upland bird habitat is considered negligible. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1949 W 55
At least two part-time trappers are affected, but since the Kootenay River itself
forms only a part of their line the loss will not be extensive. Flooding should not impair
the fur resource in the area. In fact, considerable improvement should exist after
a period of years.
15. Watching Creek Experimental Burn
As part of the programme of studies to be undertaken on the experimental burn area
prior to actual burning, two weeks were spent in making an appraisal of the general
conditions of game food and of populations of game birds and of large and small
mammals. This study of the influence of forest burning upon range condition and animal
populations is under the general direction of the Dominion Range Experimental Station
at Kamloops, with the co-operation of the British Columbia Forest Service, the British
Columbia Game Commission, and other interested bodies. Actual burning will be
undertaken in 1950.
16. Correspondence and Public Relations
In addition to the above field studies, research, and investigations, considerable
technical information was supplied to the Game Commission in the form of correspondence from the office of the game biologist at the university. Several game meetings were
attended during the course of the year and every opportunity taken to promote understanding on the part of the sporting public of the problems and needs of wildlife
management in British Columbia. Briefs were prepared for submission to the Second
Provincial Resources Conference in Victoria in February, 1949.
SUMMARY OF INVESTIGATIONS CONDUCTED BY THE FISHERIES
RESEARCH GROUP, ATTACHED TO THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GAME
DEPARTMENT, IN 1949.
By P. A. Larkin, Fisheries Biologist, British Columbia
Game Department
Introduction
The first year of investigation has been part of the five-year survey plan for lakes
and streams of the Province. The object of these surveys, which are conducted in
different major areas in different years, is to outline the most important biological
problems and to provide us with a clear picture of the value of the fisheries resources
and the management that will be required to maintain it.
In its first year, the survey was centred in the West Kootenay area, and investigations
were conducted on Kootenay Lake, the Lardeau River, Trout Lake, the Arrow Lakes,
and some small lakes in this general district. The results of these surveys are summarized
below.
Considerable attention has also been given to fundamental research projects which
are pertinent to the methods and objects of field survey. For example, new techniques
of survey for management practice have been devised, which should allow for more
rapid and more efficient enumeration of fish problems in local areas.
A number of special problems have also been investigated, including the study of
the steelhead in the Lower Fraser Valley; lake shiners in lakes of the Interior; cottids
in the Arrow Lakes; a review of present hatchery methods used in the Provincial trout
hatcheries; problems in the nutrition of trout, both under natural conditions and in the
hatchery; and new methods of egg collection.
A considerable amount of time has been spent in completing the analysis of the
information on Paul Lake, which has been collected over a long period of years (1931-37
and 1946-49).   This most important study is now completed. W 56 BRITISH COLUMBIA
A number of routine investigations have been made of situations where fish
populations have been, or may be, affected. These include preliminary study of the
Tweedsmuir Park area, the Okanagan Flood Control Project, pollution of the Coquihalla
River, and a number of lesser projects.
The increasing demand on the services of the scientific group has necessitated an
increase in the permanent staff and an increase in the moneys to be spent on fisheries
investigations. This expansion had been anticipated in the first formulation of a five-year
plan, and it is with some satisfaction that we report the appointment of S. B. Smith to the
permanent staff and the increase in the scientific budget by approximately 15 per cent.
The staff of the group in the past year included the writer and, as summer assistants,
Craig McPhee, O. Anderson, C. C. Lindsey, I. Barrett, S. B. Smith, R. G. Ferguson,
F. Paul, A. D. Nemetz, T. Northcote, and J. C. Lyons, and, as winter assistants, S. B.
Smith, R. O. McMynn, and R. MacFadden.
Lake Surveys in the West Kootenay Area
Kootenay Lake
Four men were engaged in the survey work on Kootenay Lake. Their investigations
can be summarized under two headings:—
(a) Limnology of Kootenay Lake.
(b) The statistics of the catch on Kootenay Lake.
The work was conducted from the first of May until the first of September and
collections from resort owners were continued until the end of the fishing season in
December. The information collected by this survey group is very extensive and the
analyses of all of the different phases of the work have not yet been completed.
The limnological investigations indicate that the lake is uniformly deep (between
450 and 500 feet). The water is well oxygenated and has a low mean temperature. The
quantity of dissolved mineral elements is small by comparison with lakes in other parts
of North America and more sedimentary parts of British Columbia. The shape of the
lake and its physical and chemical characteristics marked it as a primarily oligotrophic,
or unproductive, type.
The water-masses which enter Kootenay Lake show peculiar characteristics, which
have prompted plans for further investigation in the coming season. The Kootenay
River, which enters from the south, is warmer than the surface water of the lake and
for this reason the Kootenay River waters flow on the surface of Kootenay Lake after
they enter the lake at the south end. The Lardeau River and the many tributary creeks
in the north end of the lake all have temperatures lower than that of the surface of the
lake, and for this reason they " dive " to a considerable depth as soon as they enter
the lake. The distance over which these under-water currents may maintain their
identity is an important factor in the study of the migrations of trout and other species
of fish.
The bottom fauna of the lake is sparse, but compares favourably with the Great
Lakes and the large lakes of Northern Canada, which are similar in type to the Kootenay.
The south end of the lake shows a higher bottom-fauna production than the north end,
and this difference is chiefly apparent at depths below 180 feet. The fertilizing effect
of the Kootenay River is believed to have an important effect in producing this condition.
The production of plankton is moderate and is also greater at the south end of the
lake. The absence of any species of large shrimps from the deep-water bottom-fauna
plankton is a notable deficiency in the fauna of Kootenay Lake as compared to lakes
east of the Rocky Mountains.
Fish production is, to a large extent, related to the abundance of plankton and
bottom organisms.   The list of species of fish which occur in Kootenay Lake is extensive REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 57
so that estimates of fish production in pounds per acre are complex; however, a yield of
approximately 35,000 pounds per year of sport fishes is indicated from the catch returns.
The assistance of approximately thirty resort owners on Kootenay Lake was
invaluable in the collection of statistics pertaining to the catch of game fish in the lake.
The analysis of catch records indicated that flies, gang trolls, wobblers, and spinners
form a group which all yield catches of approximately two fish per hour or better.
Plugs, flatfish, and spoons, which are used extensively in the spring and fall, form a second
group which yield catches in the vicinity of one fish every four hours. The first group
of lures mentioned "are used for catching fish of all sizes, but the second group are used
almost exclusively for trout-fishing during the spring and fall, so that comparison of the
two groups is not entirely justifiable. It is conclusively demonstrated that the group of
lures known as gang trolls select fish of smaller size on both Kootenay Lake and on Paul
Lake. This phase of the work was separately reported to the Game Department and is
available in mimeographed reprint form.
The study of the catch statistics has indicated a period of slow growth in the life
history of the Kamloops trout between the ages of 1 and 3 years. This highly important
feature of the growth-rate reflects the absence of intermediate food items in sufficient
abundance to provide adequate nutrition in the period between plankton-feeding and
fish-eating. The introduction of two species of shrimps (Pontoporeia and Mysis) from
Waterton Lakes, Alta., had been attempted as a first step to improve this condition.
(See " Summary of Investigations of Pontoporeia and Mysis")
Lardeau River and Trout Lake
This investigation has dealt with some of the problems suggested in a previous
report to the Game Department entitled " Preliminary Report on Proposed West Kootenay Power Project at Trout Lake." Moneys for these studies were partially provided
by the West Kootenay Light and Power Company.
It was not possible to construct a counting fence across the Lardeau River to count
daily movements of trout. However, observations of arrival of spawning trout to the
river below the Gerrard fence indicate a correlation with increasing water-levels and
fluctuating temperature as has been recorded previously by Mottley (1933). This would
suggest that volume of flow of the Lardeau River may be an important factor in guiding
the fish in Kootenay Lake to the mouth of the river. Temperature of the Lardeau River
varies sharply over the spawning period and may regulate migration and spawning within
certain limits.
The investigation of the structure of Kootenay Lake indicated that the Lardeau
River maintains its identity for some time as a distinct water-mass while in the lake.
It seems possible that the intensity of the Lardeau River flow determines the distance
to which its effect is felt in Kootenay Lake and hence it bears relation to spawning
migration.
Further investigations of the lake structure are planned for the coming season.
This phase of the study is important to an assessment of the effects of power development
on Trout Lake.
It had been previously observed that the portion of the Lardeau River above Canyon
Creek (which would be by-passed by power development) was the only part of the river
that was suitable for spawning of trout. The explanation for this restriction was the high
turbidity of Canyon Creek, which prevented spawning down-stream. Observations in
1949 indicated that extremely low temperature of this and other creeks in the early
period of the spawning migration might also be an important factor.
In the past season, it was observed that there was evidence of spawning over almost
the entire length of the Lardeau River and that spawning was concentrated toward the
north end. The greater dispersion of the run from that reported for previous years may
have been a factor in the poor egg collection that was taken. W 58 BRITISH COLUMBIA
It has been suggested that in recent years slides causing turbidity in Canyon Creek
may have been washed away to the extent that only in exceptional high water would the
high turbidity recur.
Stream-salvage operations have been suggested as a valuable fish-cultural practice
for the Lardeau in future years, since falling off of water-levels from 7 feet to AV2 feet
(Gerrard gauge) during June results in the stranding of many young fry in side pools.
It is concluded that annual variation in local conditions might result in a variety of
conditions for spawning. In some years at least the upper portion of the river is not the
only spawning-area available.
It is believed that only two streams on Trout Lake are possibly trout-spawning
areas—Trout Creek and Lardeau Creek. A limited spawning may take place at the
Trout Lake side of the Gerrard fence on the Lardeau River. It was suggested that the
effect of lowering Trout Lake 30 feet during winter months might result in the formation
of an obstacle to fish migration at the mouth of spawning-creeks, particularly Trout Creek.
Soundings at the mouth of Trout Creek indicate a broad silt delta and it would be anticipated that lowering of the lake level would not result in obstruction.
No up-stream movements of young trout from the Lardeau River to Trout Lake
were observed in the 1949 survey. Down-stream traps took large numbers of fry. The
dispersion of spawning adults over a large length of the river is undoubtedly a factor
in limiting extensive up-stream movements to Trout Lake.
Considerable evidence suggests that residence of young trout in the Lardeau River
is generally for a very short period after hatching. Down-stream migration begins almost
immediately after yolk-sac absorption.
Trout Lake is extremely deep (over 800 feet), extremely unproductive, and has
very limited areas of shallow productive waters. Bottom-fauna production and aquatic
vegetation in shallow areas are not of great importance in Trout Lake. The effect of
lowering the lake seasonally will be the loss of the few shallow areas in the lake, but this
would not constitute a serious loss.
Arrow Lakes
The Upper and Lower Arrow Lakes were the scene of a three-man investigation
during the summer of 1949. As in the case of Kootenay Lake, data were collected on
physical and chemical conditions, bottom fauna, plankton, food and rate of growth of
species of fish, and general limnological conditions.
The Arrow Lakes differ from Kootenay Lake in many fundamental respects. The'
inlet at the north end of the lake is the only significant feature of the drainage, while in
Kootenay Lake large rivers enter on both the north and the south ends. The Columbia
River is heavily silted during the summer months with fine glacial till.
Distinct and well-defined currents, both surface and subsurface, play an important
role in the ecology of the lake, and in many respects it resembles a moderately enlarged
river channel. Bottom-fauna production and plankton production are moderate and
lower than that of Kootenay Lake. The problem of trout production in the Arrow Lakes
is similar to that of Kootenay Lake in that the rate of growth of trout is slow between the
ages of 1 and 3 years. There is some indication that fewer fish may be affected by this
food situation in the Arrow Lakes than in Kootenay Lake.
Paul Lake Investigations
The findings of the Paul Lake investigations will be published in separate form in
the near future. The study includes information on physical and chemical conditions,
bottom fauna, plankton, rate of growth and survival of the trout, and extensive data on
spawning runs and catch statistics. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1949 W 59
With the annual stocking of approximately 200,000 fry, the production of trout has
remained fairly close to the level of 10,000 fish, averaging 1 pound, since 1936. Some
variation in the average size and growth rate of the fish is indicated in the years between
the two series of investigations. Changes in the egg-size and egg-count of females in the
spawning run were apparently related to changes in the stocking policy, and these were
confirmed by records of large fish in the anglers' catch. However, comparisons of the
rate of growth in recent years with those of 1936 and 1937 show no conspicuous differences except in the first year, indicating that for the recent years the smaller proportion
of older fish in the spawning run is an important factor in causing decreased egg-size and
egg-counts.
Estimates of the population size, based on catch per unit effort data, indicate that
the fishery depletes the older year-classes very markedly, and it was estimated that
there was a removal of 4,700 out of a population of 5,000 to 6,000 2-year-old and older
fish in the summer of 1949. The fishing intensity in 1949 was nearly double that of
1935 and 1936, but the catch was apparently only three-quarters as many fish of approximately the same average weight. These various indices of the trout population indicate
that the lake was being intensively fished in 1949 and that the maximum yield of 10,000
fish, which was achieved in the mid-thirties, is currently not being realized. The difficulty
of complete creel census in recent years is a factor influencing this argument.
In the comparisons between the sizes of fish at different ages in the four recent years
of investigation, the mean lengths and the standard deviations of the mean lengths show
an inverse relation. In comparing fish of the same age in different years if a mean was
higher than another, then its standard deviation was lower. Further, if the rate of growth
from one year to another was fast, then there was a decrease in the standard deviation,
while if it was slow there was then an increase in the standard deviation. This would
indicate that both the mean and standard deviation may be used as indices of competition.
The lack of correlation between growth-rates and variation in the size of year-classes
was marked, and this was attributed to competition among year-classes. The presence
of a dominant year-class in the fishery is considered desirable. In 1945, a large natural
spawning produced a year-class which dominated the fishery for four years. The growth-
rate of all age-classes was affected by the presence of the large year-class.
The increase in numbers of shiners over the recent period of investigation has been
phenomenal. There is little doubt that the first introduction of shiners into the lake took
place before 1948, probably in 1945, so that the period of investigation coincides with
the increase in the shiner population.
The foods of the shiner are chiefly Copepoda, Cladocera, and aquatic insects, the
latter two of which have become the staples for the trout since the depletion of the
Gammarus. A potentially competitive relationship is indicated. Predation by the trout
on the shiners may compensate somewhat for the competition, but local observations on
other lakes indicate that it takes three or four years for the trout to " obtain the habit"
of eating shiners. Stomach contents from Paul Lake trout to date would confirm this
observation, since no consumption of shiners has been found as yet. Apparently certain
densities of the shiner population are necessary before predation by trout is extensive.
The future management of the Paul Lake fishery will require a re-estimation of the
productivity of the lake in terms of trout when the shiner-trout interrelation has been
more clearly studied and when some type of equilibrium in respect to competition and
predation has been achieved. Limitation of the fishery by closed seasons, smaller bag-
limits, etc., might be considered as a means of preventing overfishing of the trout, but
it will be necessary to separate the effects of the fishery, the shiner population, and other
factors on the production of trout. Some consideration must also be given to quality of
fish in the catch. W 60 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Pontoporeia and Mysis Investigations
These two species of shrimps do not occur naturally in British Columbia. In the
past, many authorities have suggested that their introduction into the Province would
be a valuable addition to the fauna; of many of our lakes. These shrimps live in deep
and cold water and afford an excellent food for trout which is always readily available.
Collections of Pontoporeia and Mysis were made on Waterton Lakes, Alta., on
July 17th and October 10th. The first collections were made as a trial to ensure that it
was a practical project to attempt a large-scale introduction. The transport of the
shrimps to Kaslo on Kootenay Lake was successful and, in October, a large transplant
was completed. Twenty fry cans of shrimps were released in Crawford Bay on Kootenay
Lake in October, and within the next few months the area will be revisited to see if the
shrimps are still present and reproducing.
During the winter, investigations on these species have been conducted at the
laboratory at the university. Their oxygen and temperature requirements have been
briefly outlined and this work will continue.    R. R. Wilson is in charge of the work.
Steelhead Investigations
A first report on the investigations of the steelhead in the Lower Fraser River area
has been published in the Annual Report of the Game Department for 1948. Reprints
of this report are available from the Game Department office in Vancouver. In the past
winter season the collection of scale samples and weekly catch records, which list data
on catch per unit of effort, stream-levels, etc., has been continued. For this season to
date, 138 scale samples have been received, and they were distributed as follows: Vedder
River, 69; Coquihalla River, 30; Silver Creek, 6; Wolf son Creek, 9; Alouette River,
2; Seymour Creek, 6; Lois Creek, 1; Kanaka Creek, 2; Campbell River, 13; total, 138.
The examination of the scale samples taken in the Lower Mainland area has suggested a relation between growth-rate and length of time fish spend in fresh water and
a possible relation between growth-rate and tendency to summer run. This research
problem is being investigated carefully.
Plantings of marked Kamloops trout yearlings have been made in the Coquihalla
River, Silver Creek, and Seymour Creek as a part of an investigation of the migratory
habits of the Interior trout and the steelhead. If the Kamloops trout plantings produce
steelhead, the stocking of steelhead streams where necessary might be economical and
simple.
The co-operation of anglers in submitting scale samples is solicited again, as their
assistance is invaluable to the survey.
Redside Shiner Investigations
(By C. C. Lindsey)
The redside shiner (Richardsonius balteatus) occurs in immense numbers in many
lakes also occupied by game fish such as the Kamloops trout. It has been recently introduced into several new localities formerly occupied only by trout, and has multiplied
enormously. This situation has been viewed with alarm by some sportsmen on the
assumption that shiners will seriously compete with trout for food, or that they will
consume young trout. On the other hand, in some lakes shiners have been purposely
introduced as food for game fish.
In order to better understand the relationship of shiners to game species, collections
and experiments have been made during the last two years. It has been shown that
shiners can, and in some cases do, eat trout fry; also, all types of food taken by trout were
also eaten by shiners in those lakes studied, so there is good evidence that shiners and
young trout may compete with each other.    On the other hand, it has been shown that REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 61
larger trout frequently eat shiners. This is true of Kamloops trout, mountain Kamloops
trout, cut-throat trout, and especially of Eastern brook trout.
The degree to which shiners are injurious or beneficial to game-fish production varies
in different lakes. In general, it may be supposed that shiners are harmful to young
trout, but that they serve a useful purpose by converting diffuse microscopic organisms
into readily available food for large trout. Presence of shiners may, therefore, sometimes
tend to produce small numbers of large game fish.
Studies are also being conducted on factors controlling the numbers of fin-rays,
scales, etc., in shiners. These characters are extremely variable in the species, and it
has been shown that they may be controlled by the temperature during hatching of the
eggs. The same is probably true, to a lesser extent, for Kamloops trout. It is hoped
that such studies can be of use in distinguishing wild from hatchery-raised game fish in
order to help determine the effectiveness of present stocking policies.
New Methods of Egg Collection
(By I. Barrett)
The losses attending the transport of newly fertilized eggs from a collecting station to
a hatchery are often of serious concern to hatchery officials. It has been found that
losses are very low when eggs and sperms are put together without water in clean jars
and taken to the hatchery and there placed in a fertilizing pan and subsequently in baskets.
The orthodox method of fertilizing at the place of collection and transporting water-
hardened eggs is much less consistently satisfactory. The new method is considered
to be a safer and quicker technique. The research material will be published and all
hatchery officials will be notified.
Acknowledgments
The fisheries scientific group would like to thank the Game Commissioners, and
Drs. Clemens and Cowan, scientific advisers to the Department, who have handled
administrative problems and details in the past year, and who have been generous in their
assistance in all phases of the work. Inspector C. F. Kearns, of " B " Game Division,
extended every assistance of the Divisional personnel and equipment to the Kootenay
surveys. Without this help our work would have been considerably less extensive. The
assistance of all of the Game Inspectors and Game Wardens has been foremost in all of
the investigations.
The co-operation of anglers in the collection of information, and of resort owners in
collecting and supplying information and lending boats is gratefully acknowledged. W 62
BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATISTICAL STATEMENTS
Comparative Statistics, 1913 to 1949, Inclusive
Prosecutions
Revenue
Derived from
Sale of Game
Licences
and Fees
Calendar Year
Informations
Laid
Convictions
Cases
Dismissed
Firearms
Confiscated
Fines
Imposed
Derived from
Fur Trade
1913....	
1914  	
188
294
279
127
111
194
267
293
329
359
309
317
296
483
518
439
602
678
676
538
498
477
454
451
585
613
547
440
446
409
356
379
652
819
895
1,142
1,115
181
273
258
110
97
167
242
266
312
317
280
283
279
439
469
406
569
636
625
497
474
454
438
436
552
574
526
419
430
392
342
372
632
798
878
1,117
1,099
7
21
21
17
14
17
25
27
17
42
29
34
17
44
49
33
33
32
51
41
24
23
16
15
33
39
21
21
16
17
14
7
20
21
17
25
16
5
36
46
74
44
24
24
43
39
47
29
54
33
40
37
22
4
19
14
20
42
21
18
9
27
18
8
30
39
56
74
86
$4,417.50
5,050.00
4,097.50
2,050.00
1,763.50
3,341.00
6,024.50
6,073.00
6,455.00
7,275.00
5,676.50
4,758.00
5,825.00
7,454.00
10,480.50
7,283.50
9,008.00
9,572.75
8,645.00
5,493.50
3,531.00
5,227.82
4,399.50
3,965.00
5,332.50
5,729.50
4.776.50
5,197.00
4,977.50
5,079.50
5,554.50
5,570.50
8,381.50
10,921.00
11,837.50
17,537.00
18,148.50
$109,600.80
92,034.20
72,974.25
66,186.97
■    65,487.50
75,537.00
116,135.00
132,296.50
114,842.00
127,111.50
121,639.50
125,505.50
123,950.50
135,843.50
139,814.00
140,014.75
142,028.22
147,660.00
137,233.31
141,269.55
135,876.94
149,955.11
148,689.64
157,647.30
177,771.33
192,024.07
193,170.53
188,605.20
213,267.67
205,451.71
207,661.72
238,902.36
352,228.85
502,555.25
597,529.30
610,383.56
656,997.38
	
1915 	
1916 ._.___ •    	
1917  	
1918  	
1919 ______ 	
1920         	
$5,291.39
24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
46,091.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
1921  	
1922 ...	
1923
1924         _
1925   ____	
1926
1927         	
1928 	
1929                        	
1930 _  _	
1931	
1932  	
1933	
1934         	
1935  	
1936
49,831.95
52,196.50
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
63,125.30
68,475.07
58,354.03
70,363.23
104,250.95
107,357.72
99,344.14
73,392.08
61,543.26
1937 ...
1938. _	
1939.	
1940           	
1941	
1942  _	
1943...- _	
1944 _	
1945               	
1946
1947
1948 _ _
1949	
Totals 	
17,575
16,639
916
1,082
$246,910.07
$7,255,882.47
$1,741,667.95 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 63
Summary of Total Revenue Derived from Sale of Various Licences,
Collections, etc., January 1st to December 31st, 1949
Revenue derived from— Total
Sale of resident firearms licences, and deer, moose-elk,
and pheasant tags  $299,325.80
Sale of resident anglers', guides', and prospectors' firearms licences  77,895.00
Sale of non-resident firearms and anglers' licences and
outfitters' licences   191,389.50
Sale of non-resident ordinary firearms and anglers'
(minors) licences   2,124.00
Sale of fur-traders', taxidermists', and tanners' licences,
and royalty on fur  61,543.26
Sale of confiscated and surrendered fur__  437.60
Sale of confiscated firearms  166.58
Collection of big-game trophy fees from non-residents_. 84,410.00
Prosecutions—Fines imposed under the " Game Act " 18,148.50
Miscellaneous revenue  1,248.90
Total  $736,689.14 W 64
BRITISH COLUMBIA
ooooooooooooooooooooocooooooooooooooocooo
i/.in»^in>r.i_^©in©i/.i/.ini/.in©i/.ini/.©©©in'^©©''^©©©'n©©©©0©inOioi/^0|
oa)«f.*Dt.co^r.f^(.^oa;[n--\OhN^fO-^"noOrnOf^O(_*WHr-^mr.*_wo
IT. VI  -t O m  ©" V. VI t  rn"   ©'   t~* C? »4" t-* VI* rn" Tf (S VO *-~ CJ* H  P~' Cl* CO Cl Tf Tj~ CO      tn  00* co" In
Os
OS
H
T-H
cn
s.
w
m
§
W
U
w
O
o
H
H
CO
rH
r*
Pi
<
P
<
cn
W
u
w
o
es
<
W
P.
z
w
a
CO
w
Ih
o
W
w
H
<
H
ft
0
►J
P.
i-l
ft
►J
P.
d
d
o
z
°    !
o
o
1
o   :
o
[  O
o o
! od   !
vo
00
i *■*   :
O O     !
o
© O     !
cs
1
ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo©
i/.ininOWininiinini(ninqininininOOifl/iOOOOin
'-Jd v.    "t^rn«n'vdrH'rifnr^r.--"Vcn-;»-i
en    'rHf-^TisGencATHrHSO    'en
OOOO
o m tn o
Ov t> O \D
imnp-HhrHtnOOwi
E
I
o
o
o o
o   :
m
o
m
Tl
Tl
T)  Tl
tn
!
Ci
a r-
f-    I
VO
"-" cn
60-
i     !     1
i
i
v>
"*    1    1
Ov     !
|
, cn
|8
5
<
ooooooooooo IOOOOCOOOO
ooqqoqooooo joqoqqoqqo
-^r^csvd'^tr^oovo'-i-r^r^ Ir^dzirtrtciddr^
tnsocAoosoc~rtaom<~}<~> '■<Z^ost~-rtooensDmr~-
CAj-HrtCArtCAenrHSOQOen \ rf^      --* cn cn cn o^       q_
tHth"                  t-h" 1-T                                          i-T          CS
ov**r-rn^^-0'-d-,--i---tovoovooovr-
th ci t~~ so r- so oo m oomvocooovcN**
i— ovcscN-~'cNvo,d---'>rjvc      tmrnmH
cnQvocTfr©r^O'*tN---Hir_vOCiOvocn>/-.--.
--'OvfScncMo.t--'-r--'>nvo      -*m"* «n
CN        CN <N i-i
o o
o
Tf CN
VD
cn
ooooooooooo
©oqoqqqoqo©
sCciosCAcirtSLSOrtci rf
OsrHCirHTHCGOsOsOOrHCA
OOOO
OOOO
Ov Tf CN O
oo cn r- vo
• OC OO t- rH  CA       I i-l
! th  Ci  VO Tl
OOOOOOOOOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
oooo OOO qqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqqoo,
v^--tvo'-j;r^t^vd-^'ov-^'-—c«voTf«ocdco*d-^
^vo<o-^t^wOvcn»n^cNl>vocNTJ-Qot---vo---' o.cncNr-vo--icn--t'— mcNvcooc---,-..—■■■tv-.cNooo'-
HN^-tiNoovqooiH^q-H cn cs cn ov »-h m o» m \o m o h w m £^--1 1^ w ^ o t r- m vo m ;
°* CN ^" vo" cn CN cn       rM so       th" rt       sc rS      th" th" ,-T vo" --"
I
\fry
TtinsotnOsooassoinrtrtocAtnrHCGSoc~>osOsassor^t>cnt^soTtcCTtsotneAt^
CN'<-fCNr-O.OvOVOmcN---'0.--i        0"*t^t^rHr-vo^C7\'^OvClCN'--cncvir--cnvOO\Tf CN^CNVO   vo
CNcn        (s--<--.--.cN (^(S^h^^
en en th th
TH TH rH   0C
Tr*^vooor^r^vocN-*or^o.o-r^oovvococ»c>cr^cnr^.r.i»^
oorinHMr.r^r^mtHfsir^--NHn^^ort^woc>a'-cowvOf,r.oo-Hio5,vD hhmo
00VO        cnCNCNCNV0V0Oi,O--i--- ^OOcnO^THrnOv'-^-O-— OsciC>inrtTHTtrtr*-Os<Z>0C kcOthOO
rt THrHcnciooTirHrHTH      tn      in h t- vo m •- in « i^ ro -h" rl m c. th      rn cn" vo vo cn"
oor^cNvoov^r^^oooovcncngvr^cnr^vovovoovrH»-invD-no^
cNOr*oooovr^i>r-~00\t^Ocn»--a}cocnr^^^r^vovoOcvi^>^ot---vDOCNO\ri cnovoo
vocs      T^rtrroococvo^cnrncnOiT^o^cn^cnT--cncnvOt^o^ooocortcNcnOrs Ov •-< o vo
rH th ci th th th r^i th 00 th th th th th CC CA rf
c, j= a •
T-H    tfl   ■*-•
i-i
■    H     B    M    U
' a c  " P
; _   __   •.-  __.
IUUOU
•2*0
O   2   S
ilisslfaliiis.*
leasaiJiii
u 33
g
Oj i^ (U (L) CL>
■3 § € p 9 §
rz  c c o > v-. ^
r ■.- ■_-■ n K ft "*a
& aj d REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 65
Revenue Derived from the Sale of Deer, Moose-Elk, and Pheasant Tags,
January 1st to December 31st, 1949
Government Agency
Moose-Elk Tags
Deer Tags
Pheasant Tags
Totals
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
21
39
4
79
429
546
1,247
135
$21.00
39.00
4.00
79.00
429.00
546.00
1,247.00
135.00
2,646
304
120
279
547
1,554
4,193
1,473
4,025
2,465
1,907
1,405
640
679
3,925
287
1,833
877
360
3,762
1,953
620
10,444
1,253
1,957
2,381
803
1,812
1,613
885
1,096
359
1,906
987
386
3
$661.50
76.00
30.00
69.75
136.75
388.50
1,048.25
368.25
1,006.25
616.25
476.75
351.25
160.00
169.75
981.25
71.75
458.25
219.25
90.00
940.50
488.25
155.00
2,611.00
313.25
489.25
595.25
200.75
453.00
403.25
221.25
274.00
89.75
476.50
246.75
96.50
.75
747
529
$74.70
52.90
$757.20
167.90
Atlin 	
34.00
148.75
565.75
Clinton  	
Cranbrook 	
150
30
1,497
2,005
1,478
15.00
3.00
149.70
200.50
147.80
949.50
2,298.25
652.95
1,206.75
18
568
446
13
5
710
13
241
146
19
65
94
9
2,081
217
154
926
9
1,123
278
24
299
81
65
204
234
18.00
568.00
446.00
13.00
5.00
710.00
13.00
241.00
146.00
19.00
65.00
94.00
9.00
2,081.00
217.00
154.00
926.00
9.00
1,123.00
278.00
24.00
299.00
81.00
65.00
204.00
234.00
782.05
1,044.75
386
2
6,359
6,953
499
939
2,259
138
22
32,830
134
2,425
797.25
38.60
.20
635.90
211.60
Greenwood 	
174.95
2,327.15
84.75
Kelowna	
Lillooet..   _
695.30
49.90
93.90
225.90
13.80
2.20
3,283.00
13.40
242.50
1,394.55
415.15
202.90
Nanaimo  	
Nelson.  	
1,231.40
596.05
166.20
7,975.00
Oliver    	
543.65
885.75
1,521.25
209.75
1,576.00
681.25
151
15.10
260.35
573.00
Revelstoke   	
Rossland  	
318
143
2,786
31.80
14.30
278.60
202.55
555.80
729.35
330.50
.75
23
1,196
226
107
380
23.00
1,196.00
226.00
107.00
380.00
3,312.10
1,184.00
688.80
23.00
Vancouver   __ „ .
Vernon.-   	
Victoria   _—	
9.220
1,956
5,856
1,476
2,305.00
489.00
1,464.00
369.00
33,121
11,840
6,888
6,813.10
1,899.00
2,259.80
749.00
Totals
12,474
$12,474.00
80,247
$20,061.75
114,629
$11,462.90
$43,998.65
Less
refunds	
63.85
$43,934.80 W 66
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Revenue Derived from Sale of Resident Anglers', Guides', Free Farmers', and
Prospectors' Firearms Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1949
Government Agency
Anglers
Guides
Free
Farmers
Prospectors
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
No.
No.
Amount
1,445
268
230
677
927
2,573
1,152
2,588
1,192
1,245
670
511
344
3,108
353
2,687
568
672
2,335
2,917
620
11,556
583
2,246
629
826
1,088
580
1,108
462
528
2,480
1,372
439
10,310
2,000
3,424
558
$1,445.00
268.00
4
2
4
84
179
14
10
14
7
46
71
19
107
3
2
12
2
9
4
1
117
49
8
5
39
7
24
12
8
1
5
1
191
$30.00
14
14
24
8
27
24
49
79
3
18
32
24
112
7
81
3
28
70
24
8
121
6
23
37
9
61
17
76
9
5
108
53
9
189
77
26
11
6
36
33
7
34
5
1
5
1
16
20
11
8
64
2
3
25
3
38
1
6
9
3
41
16
48
52
9
21
8
21
2
10
113
17
12
30
$1,475.00
	
268.00
Atlin 	
20.00
55.00
665.00
1,975.00
140.00
100.00
145.00
70.00
445.00
790.00
175.00
20.00
230.00
677.00
927.00
2,573.00
1,152.00
2,588.00
1,192.00
1,245.00
670.00
511.00
344.00
3,108.00
353.00
2,687.00
568.00
672.00
2,335.00
2,917.00
620.00
11,556.00
583.00
2,246.00
629.00
826.00
1,088.00
580.00
1,108.00
462.00
528.00
2,480.00
1,372.00
439.00
285.00
1,342.00
2,902.00
Cranbrook	
Creston 	
	
2,713.00
1,252.00
2,733.00
1,262.00
1,690.00
1,460.00
Fernie-—	
	
686.00
344.00
Kamloops  -	
1,090.00
25.00
10.00
120.00
5.00
20.00
100.00
$3.00
4,201.00
378.00
Kelowna	
1.00
2.00
2,698.00
690 00
677.00
2,355.00
Nelson _ 	
3,017.00
620 00
55.00
8.00
11,619.00
583.00
Oliver 	
Penticton	
10.00
945.00
2,256.00
Pouce Coupe -	
1,574.00
826 00
Prince George 	
Prince Rupert -
455.00
75.00
50.00
380.00
75.00
5.00
1,548.00
655.00
Princeton.	
Quesnel      __.
Revelstoke   _.
4.00
1,162.00
842.00
603.00
Rossland 	
	
2,480.00
1,602.00
549.00
230.00
110.00
Smithers 	
Stewart. —_	
8.00
4.00
4.00
90.00
10.00
50.00
10.00
2,060.00
Vancouver   	
Vernon  _	
10,310.00
2,000.00
3,424.00
558.00
10,328.00
2,054.00
3,434.00
2,622.00
Totals	
67,271
$67,271.00
1,062
$10,585.00
1,475
748
$39.00
$77,895.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 67
cn
w
O
z
H
u
cn
p.
w
H
H
E
H
P
o
Q
Z
<
"cn
Pi
W
i-l
O
z
<
H
W
B K
cn h
W cn
Ph
ON
P.
w
O   P3
£   S
u_   U
P. P
w
PJ
H "
Z |*
W p.
Q <
55  B
w z
Ph    <
o
Ph
o
w
►J
<
o
P.
q
>
«
w
Q
w
5
z
w
>
w
O
H
«3 8
53
£2 S 2
<3<3
£31
Ma
ShS
c
u
o
DOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO      OOOOOOOOOOO
:qqqq^^qqqo^qino^Ovnq^o-riinoo^inO|ri|n'noiriovo
imOTMinr-oooommooo-— T--rgvooor-i"rirnoCocN^ov^^cNco-—o'^oovo-in
-<ir~'0<r)CNOM>vo,ttOT— in i-Ht-i^o oo t*~i>Tj- TKNOv piOhtJ'i-. oven ^t^r^t Ov ■■tf-vo
oo Ov vo oo vo vo CN cn it oo ^ CN oo th en rt r-r. ot*ir- m -— so ti en Ci <x> co rt     end
cfvOincf      VoVeN       SOj-^Os th*vo"      inr^tn^      rH ci'sO QO
t>CN      U-i
oooio ■
OOO   Ti
©
o
o
sc m ci tn
rtc-rt  CO
OOO .vo
Tl-   Ov
TH     GO
CN  m
CNCN't-tU-h
Ov
0*
eg
r-THrj-vooo-ctovO-nr-cnvorncnO
cn oo m ^t Ov ^f oo oo ©tr-Tj-TH
cn cn mo cn     th
o rr t+ © © oo tn
OOOvCN th hOh
CN      CN      T->ON
-O^OOCCMOO
en-rH TH TH CO Tl TH rH
TH CN
CNVOTj-VDTHr--Tj-©OcNTHOVT-(T-ir
cn as c~ cn rn oo th mc-|Tt
vocn
CNOO
vocn
TfCS
Ttoooc^cnTj-ovO\cn^oovw^THcnTHt^THOrtt>©THrtrncncN,rj-0\r~-
icnooT-i ov
soccn t> vo
soovocn **
^cNOiriCNcNr^^©(j\^«n^oco^-^cnt>©vnr^vot^^cN^c>ov^wnOvcnTHc>T}-cn cn
vovornr^Ttvocn^cnvOTHrnt^rHv^vocNTM^voQoinTHVOw-.«n(NvocoTH -rj-vocnm in
CN^vOcn      r-ti-tm      r-THrn hoo      ^©cni-i csoo TfCNCN
©
Tl
vy
OO
o
o
©o
©
©
mm
Ti
IO©
in
i
rn   ! cn m en en r
TH TH      |HO       \rH
1
1 ]
]     1
j   |  |
©
©
j  1
o
|
©
Ti
1
!
»
!   !
I  j
ill
i
oo©o©oooo
oqqqqqoqo
odo"'i-)©o"-rio1©wS
cn©t~-©or-.m"ncN
cn ov cn ov th th r- o_
cn" CNCN
oooo©
<z>cococ~>com
©ir_oiri©"
OCNOCN<n
■^■CNcNth
OOO©
qqo©
r-cNOt--
VO Os^en if
'•Os^o" en
!CN
'OO
OO
OO    !
OO
oo
HI©
"CN
mo
CNir.   :
CN    '
!*"*
o in </"> oo o O C-
OcNCNVOOOW)
— ov rn en vo
cn cN Ov oo vo l> vo © t*   \soasccmci   ;©cn   .r-r-CNOv   .voce
THmcNcn thoo   Ithtj- \th        loot— wen     ~
TH TH j ItHCN TH
o ° S
1
S3 E
«
h a a
4) ui bC 1h
2"_3.o2"oa «3ij os S3 S3 os § 5 o'E'E'E 3 5 o"a
UOOQ-nOOOa.^jISZZZZOa.PHpH^p.p.C'P.P.w
_E u
m o, __
|2gg
35 a c
H  Q> « <D
1    u
ll
0 W 68
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement of Non-resident Ordinary Firearms and Anglers' (Minors)
Licences, January 1st to December 31st, 1949
Government Agency
Non-resident Ordinary
Firearms Licences
Anglers' Licences
(Minors)
Total
No.
Amount
No.
Amount
1
1
1
1
7
2
11
	
2
3
1
5
88
25
55
42
42
61
38
12
102
13
178
2
7
13
60
5
866
209
27
7
9
1
3
2
5
25
58
34
24
28
$2.00
3.00
1.00
5.00
88.00
25.00
55.00
42.00
42.00
61.00
38.00
12.00
102.00
13.00
178.00
2.00
7.00
13.00
60.00
5.00
866.00
209.00
27.00
7.00
9.00
1.00
3.00
2.00
5.00
25.00
58.00
34.00
24.00
28.00
$2.00
3.00
Barkerville    	
$3.00
3.00
3.00
1.00
5.00
Clinton   	
91.00
28.00
58.00
Cumberland   _____ 	
42.00
	
42.00
61 00
38 00
12 00
102 00
3.00
13 00
Kelowna   -___  	
Lillooet    	
178.00
2.00
7 00
13 00
60 00
5 00
869 00
209 00
27 00
21.00
6.00
33.00
28 00
9 00
3 00
Revelstoke      	
5.00
25.00
67 00
28.00
Totals 	
24
$72.00
2,052
$2,052.00
$2,124.00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1949
W 69
rt
z
o
in
H
i-l
O
Q
Z
<
cn
W
<_>
z
w
o
cn
rt
w
z
z
<
9 5
Z   H
< cn
<" rt
w W
pa
s
w
rt O
w n
BQ
3 o
H
cn
cn
rt
W
Q
<
rt
H
i
rt
P
ft.
ft
o
a
C/_
o
rt
Q
W
>
rt
w
P
w
Z
W
>
o
H
tn
r>
en
T
V
m
rs
in©©inin©©©©©or-©©©enc
T^ooineNCN©q©qqrnt>©vo©TH©
r^^vdvo^'cnTH'bOCNir.H^ir.TtvoT--"^
© oc © c- en nf      mo      ov^-cNoovor-rJ
TT           tH                   rH                   th          tH                   W^hM
t-T                                                               cn tn th"
©voOOCN00©«-
qvD>q'H_ovinif
voT-TinindcNT-rC
in cN ov in cn ^
00         CN VO         t-
th"vo"
cn
O
5
en
VO
CN
en
in
VD
t; »
0 0
-  c
(A   (U
■8 o
I?
si
c
9
0
E
<
©
©
CN
fry
© ©
© o
CN CN
© ©
© ©
vd c4
©
©
©    !
©     !
^     1
O
©
d
cn
d
1
•"*
THTH
cn th
^O
cn   ;
in
c
o
X
rt
H«
*rt
>.
o
3
O
B
<
ininin©©m»no©
hrlT-wmMtNOO
00      ' c~- rt SO so th SO th
i—      <n cn      t- cn vo
fry        o
O l>
cn c^-
cn i-l
Ov Tj"
© © cn
vOOh
en Ov ii
© cn cN
TT Tl 00
t-T in
© vo ©
q vq i>
vd T-5 o
cn
cN oo © in
rn ov m m
m m vd vd
vo vd      cn
«*"«              TH
Tn"ln"
tr,
vo
CN
cn
vD
VD
se
6
enTHOsmcimmc~TH
TH               CA
O Ov
cN t- cn
cn vo cn
cn
CN  TH  t-.
SO tn rt rt      !
en cn      CN    !
CN
en
00
o3
o-
p
Mr?
c
a
o
<
©
©
©
©
CN
tyy
©
©
©
o
CN
6
Z
TH
"»_-'-•
M fl
o fl
a 1
T rt
!__ -*
lb
fl <u
0) u
-o a
s.a
tf.j
c
fl
o
q
<
o
©
d
O
vy
©
©
d
Q
© o o ©
© © © ©
©odd
© © o ©
TT cn CN th
©
©
©
©
CN
o
©
d
o
CN
O
©
©
©
vo
fry
6
~
]
TH
^- en n th
CN
tN
vo
•o
rt
i   a)
fa 3
3 fl
pu B
■a
tf
fl
fl
o
s
<
O
o
<n
«■
SS
d d
in Tl
en
s
tr]
t>
d©
in ©
oooo©
qqqqq
m m rn © m
CA C~ CA m CA
f".T"HM
ggggg
in in in in >n
CN CN CN S CN
tH              cn
8
©
o
d
m
en"
fry
6
7h
cn
rt CA
cn
CN ^r
th in tn vo >n
Ti  th   rH  rH  tH
m
f-
vo
CN
>
c
c
&
<
c
a.
£
c
t
>
c
C
i
<
a
'I
I
r
0
a
i
e
»
a
:
c
c
c
•-
L
c
c
«
i
_
c
V
c
c
s
£
e.
;
c
i
Em
i
C
5
r-
t
c
£
1
z
c
k
c
y
E
|
4
e
a
z
1
t
I
a
c
E
C
L
OJ
u
=
c
a.
a,
ex.
CL
c
a.
c
c
I
c
s
pi
c
«
X
a
I
c
1
C
i
1
r
™
C
1
1
a
a.
a
X
c
a
.
4
z
'B
c
c
>
t
c
F
I
>
j
M
a
w
I
1
e
c
h W 70 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Total Collections from Fur Trade, 1921 to 1949, Inclusive
Year
Fur Royalty
or Tax
Fur-traders',
Tanners', and
Taxidermists'
Licences
Total
1921       ..   - _	
$24,595.80
51,093.89
60,594.18
56,356.68
48,737.78
56,045.13
61,629.96
51,563.07
40,769.89
40,431.11
41,056.08
36,253.79
39,592.48
42,697.81
44,986.95
46,186.50
47,257.48
39,423.87
44,238.00
62,745.33
56,755.30
63,176.07
52,122.03
63,412.23
93,793.40
98,766.72
92,637.14
66,939.08
56,563.26
$6,195.00
6,365.00
6,930.00
6,090.00
7,550.00
6,490.00
9,695.00
7,260.00
6,560.00
4,730.00
4,925.00
4,110.00
4,575.00
4,405.00
4,845.00
6,010.00
6,440.00
5,540.00
4,949.00
5,721.00
6,370.00
5,299.00
6,232.00
6,951.00
10,559.00
8,591.00
6,707.00
6,453.00
4,980.00
$30,790.80
57,458.89
67,524.18
62,446.68
56,287.78
62,535.13
71,324.96
58,823.07
47,329.89
45,161.11
45,981.08
40,363.79
44,167.48
47,102.81
49,831.95
52,196.50
53,697.48
44,963.87
49,187.00
68,466.33
63,125.30
68,475.07
58,354.03
70,363.23
104,352.40
107,357.72
99,344.14
73,392.08
61,543.26
1922              '                 	
1923      _    _	
1924                      	
1925     •       -	
1926                              -     .
1927         	
1928          	
1929                           _                     	
1930   _                       _	
1931.      _ _ _        ...
1932...  	
1933 _	
1934	
1935  	
1936    .    ..            	
1937 ..          _ ___
1938 _                	
1939.. _      _	
1940 _  	
1941 	
1942         _	
1943 _             	
1944._   _	
1945  _	
1946
1947     _	
1948 __.	
1949 _ _	
Totals _ _ _..   .
SI   .80 471.01      1        S.Sl 577 On
$1,761,948.01 Q
W
H
O
W
d
o
U
z
w
w
m
cn
><
H
►J
<
O
P.
SS
U
J? e
cn —■
a ov
z -1
° _
a (N
rt ov
<1 T-H
« e
_L S
oi I—I
5 «
fefH
ft w
O B
cn
H
rt
rt
d.
o
z
o
a
or.
H
z
rt
S
w
H
<
H
on
rt
>
<
rt
<
Ph
S
o
U
REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1949
o .-a
?i_
Era"
3 S u
O S3
|s8
suusaio^v
PSB3M
isurnbs
3iun^s
UOOOB^
J3JJO
JEJ^StlJAI
^uipM
U91JBJAI
xuXq
(pauiJBo;)
3p«ia *xoa
(pauiiBg)
p^H 'XOtf
SSOJQ 'XO;!
J9AtJS 'XOtf
Jsqsiii
J9AB9g
jaSpsg
reag
O Ov 00
OOO0H
»n rn Tt
mom
oocoenvo^ovT^oco.co.^mooor^oenot^cncnocN'tfoovD
vqc^THOvqoov^qt^^cjoovm^cxioencnooc^^t^rHoeN
vdr^mOvcnovrHvdrncNr^vdvdr^cnodmmvdMCNenvdr^
men'5cNvovDrnmmOvOvoooomcNrn'*mt--cNTHCT\voenenvo
w rn t-^ cS vo m t^ T* ©^ cn m vo Ov^ *-« cn <* cn C^_ f*» «-t *h Tf e- r^ vo Ov <n
3 vo" oo vo t-T <h o" o"*-? vo" oC cn" Tf vo" i> oC tj* cn vo rn rT cn" cn oo cn" vo" vo"
3mTtmvomTtTtTtcnenTfTtTtTtenTtvoinvo»nvoavOvOvvo<n
ovoovoHcomc^r^cnTtvovornr--r^r--avinHenvOvDooov©eNTtovcN
cNOvT--m©cN©oocNmoenmocNvot—t—ovT-H^ovcNOvor-voooo
MNcNrviMmin-vtnmMcSMCNtNticNMHCSrirHHcs^tST-iMH
menc«C»OcNr^CNOv©cnt>i-'VO©l>enOvr-.©OVOv^tvDOv'-'CNmOv
oooot^-^mcnooT-rnc^mcNvoTHOTtmovooTi-ovT-icneni-icjvrnvo
cn vo rf oo cn o\ en r* vo^ vo cw rn en so Oa en © r-i ,-. in ov c4 *-. ft <*i oo Th «h t^
vo" Tf t> ov" in" d oo vo" r-" cn cn" oo" en rn" Tf vd" co Tt" © h" cn" r^ ci cn Tt" cn ci co d
cN(NencNC4cnenTtvovoTtTtTtTtcnenTtTtmr~enmincneninincNCN
r-incoinovo.Tto.eNTfc
omti c. h m » m vo h rt j
t> en^Ov Tt oo r. oo ov co tj- i
cNOv©ciino^H--< en m»
vOOOOM-ht>NV.Tj-l
m t vo •* (f| t vo in n t
th m en
vOhh
cn o oo
TH cn oo c
co © Ov c
VO CO t> t
"cnOentNcnooTHmOvTtmr^THCNt^vocNi-Ht
1'rj-'*THVomOOvl>eNCN'__H|^CNCOcNOOrtrnT
imscmmtnrtcnrteeirtrnrttnmrtciTH
«o\ir4'mov©coT^^OT^mTHovenvocNcor--cooom©voooOvr--vDr--
mvooovmcNoo^t^ovt^movT-icomr--r--oov'*cNr*,TtenT-|':J-ovr^
« o (vi vi o\ih tj h ri r-Hinoot^ooovr.TKt^vOTHHvnNOvot^'n
cn vd" m Tt Tt" m t> t> m" en" en en" cn cn *-t tN cn cn cn" h" cn cn en" rn" en en" ci *m th
sOTiCAOsentnoorHsooOT^C^ento>Tirtrtsor^Os^Tic^THmrtrtrnCZ>
vD'-.rnvOTHoovooomm©vDcNr^f>mcNOvvo'TtoooTHCNoo'5tcNmm
voo\ooc^t^t^©ovcococovor~c^mt>comvot^r-Tt->tt^vooot^voTt
mcNvoOvTHVortOvoo©C^OTH(^^\ovornvocNOvT-'CNVDcncncNCO
oornTtovrneNcoenovOeN©rnHrnOvvOHin©cNinenccTtr^enent^
THCNoomenTtooTH^vomovmcN^<rnmTHi/-jinmr*c--Ovi-"^HinTtTtvo
m" ov" i> th x> oo cn" m cn" Tt" vo" ©" th" r-" pi h ©" vd" in" r-~ vo" oC rn co" oo m o" en ©"
I>entNC^VO'rtvOVOmc«000>CN©Ovt^l>OO^THCOOvCOCOVOvOI>00
rncNVDTHirioocooovDmoor^vooorncNOvoovvomrtoor^menm'--tOv
ovrnr^©ovmTtvocNOvcNr^vo©mvorni^tr--oor~cN©ooovr^m,Tt
VO OS CN CN r^ th in 0\ CN Ov_ in Ov^ ©^ tj^ xjs. rn_ o_ -h in Ov^ VO Tf rt^ rn oo VO CN Tt^ CN
o" oo* ov" ©" co rf vo" th" oo" co © ri t- th rn" o co" o r- l> ©" en" d oC m" t-^" rH rn" ov*
HT.iHr.HNHH rHHHCNcNcN'-'CNCNcncN'rtcnmenrnTten
ooT-*rnomoooomcNvo©mr-OvHOvHooco©HOt^mrt-—ooO o
cNoo-rtooencN©HVDt^vDmenTtr^t--rtvoent--omrtr^Tt©r^Ovm m
HHOt^"no^©voc^-^©C^'^tt~;Ov©cort©vocNrnm©rnvoOvi>Ov m
h* CN ©" h" r»" Os rn th h" Ov CO* CO* h Ov CO ©" Ov CO* Ov" OS Ov 00 vd" h" h" HnVlfi"
©mvo©ooomt^rn-Tj-OvenTtrnHr~-HcNmvDinenoovmvocNTto
rtmvornc«mooovoocoovr--vo,Ttvo©mcotNcNOvr**cNi-icnrtovovoo
cn oo vo_ oo^ rt cn en cn in m^ m^ cn ©^ m^ \o m^ i> m h_ cn cn en^ m Tt cn^ ©_ Ov *-" m
h" h" cn Tt" vo oo" vd" Tt" ci h" h h cn" en" en" cn* cN h" h" h" h" h h" cs" en cn" h h
!CNCNCNt^VD©©CNmmTtTtmcN'-<I^CN
!©,rtenooencnvot^mvDmr-cNOCNOcN
:HcncNcNenmmTtmcNcncNcNvoeNi>
r^cn©HCNwO--'c«OvOvTtcNcNencNr^Ocoenrnr^cNoovo©enTtm
OsTtmooovooovencNr-cnTtt--rnHVOCNTtCNenvoTtHOoovenovt>vo
cn Tt vd cn m oo m ©^ ©^ m m vo ov m^ rt vo_ co co vo r- oo Ttm vo^ vo^ vq^ ©^ ov m h
h" th ca cn h h h" cn cn" th h cn" Tt" Ti cn"
OvvocN©mvocNOvoHCNm^tOvoomvocNeNmi>mvOTtvDOv©t-Tt
mmcNCNTtcN'TtHm©enooHTti^vocNc--moovooovenmTtov<Nv-i
r^tri^ovTHc^cnc>ovommt>cNvo-^vovomvomovoc^r^mKt>cn»-.|
h" CN ci       h*
hi t-h m en th
c^coTtOcoe>Ttenvo©r--l>TtOvvo©envocNcNTtHOCNO©0\vOOv
vocoHI-H^i^c^r^c^invO'-ir~voovHOvTHHr-'^_-inrnOvor-avOvrn
rn cn cN Tt vo m cN r-t CN Ov h r- vo o\ vo^ ©^ en^ c\ -m en h 0> m^ m^ m ts      !
ci ci ci CN rn" en" en" ci CN ci ci <-" rn rH h
T^vomt^Ttcoo>r^c>HrnoocNOvHOvocNcocomovvomcocNTti-icNVD
Hirnt^c^cNrnTtoortoovoino©eNvor--OrnmcocoTj'oococoHrnoo   vo
t^mmvom©--^oor^vovomvDr>i>t--vommmmcNTtvor^i>cci>Tt en
cnc>ic^ovT^coc«Mt^r^<^TtHvorno\cNHooc^r^voi>t^ooOvt^
r^iOHHrn^HVOCOrnCNCNTtCNOvvOcnOvTtmOVDmTtvOOvCN
-TtencNVOCN^TtVOC^HiHVOC--COmCSOvCNt>VOHC^CNHOvCOTt
en CN \G_ CN^ TJ£ TT VO_ t^ h th^ \o^ C-; TO m^ P* OV CN P^ VO_ h ts CN h ov^ 00^ Tf
vo ci Tt co co* rf o" tj* r" oo ci t-T o" en" tj* m* m" co* ©" h co i>" co m" ci ©
CNmC^T^V^MCNHlHH^HHHHHHHC^C^T^---l---'C^(SCN
CN O   CO
ov cn m
00 th    (N
W 71
! Tt co h Tt en m cn
ovp*t^ovOvmovmmmHCNHTtooT-fCNmvo©TtcNHTtov©ovenov
cocNovmovocNenvooTtovcomHTtr-©m©ovOvmenooenoi>m
rtHrnen»-'mmr^HHvDmcNCNHHTtTtTi-cN hcshcncnt-ih
I
o
i
T^CNcn,rtmvor*ooovO'-'CNc^,fmvoi>ooov<
c^cNCNCNCNeNCNCNCNrnenrnen^nrnrnenenen'■
OvOvOvOvOvOvOvOvOvOvOvOvOvOvovOvOvOvOvC
v-HCNenTtmvop-coov
TtTtTtTtTt-rtTtTtTt
CKOvOvOvOvOvOvOvOv W 72
BRITISH COLUMBIA
<
Ph
Z
w
w
pq
cn
<
X
H
rt
<
O
SS "*
> ov
O  cn
rH
cn cn
< rt
5  W
a «
< «
O  W
SO
«
<
w
B
rt
a
P-.
rt
o
cn
H
►J
W
An
cn
O
rt
rt
O
cn
rt
■<
rt
5
o
_-.
rt
<
1
^^
.
__,
i
O.
H
00
,_
VC
N
3UTJ9AIO^
Tf   TH
m m    |
CO
!     IVOm     !Oh     !     !     !     [TfTfoo     !     :o©h     !     !
Ov
13SE3yW
co p-
CN            1
oo m vo    :
m h Tt    !    !
VO
vo
rH  O
en CN th     ;
t-_
'en h
o
1-1
CN
! m ©
O     !
h m © Tt
m © hi Ov
©
00
! Tt O
CO vo O CO
oo vo oo r-
Ov
pjjinbs
: ^
Ov_CN^H
oTm"
VO rH
vo en cn
Tf ci cn"
H
CN
m
en
I   1
j   .
hi   :
r-
5tun3is
|   i
1
I   :   I   !   i   i   i   :
tH  CJ
!   : Tt
olr.
UOOOB^
1
!    : vo
m
'^
P-
1
3
"S3
Ah
•*
m vo th
©
5
MWO
i   i
CN CN CN
VO
m
^
m
Tt
«
n
!    ihco    icno    !    icoo\Tfmov    :    immvo    i vo
OO
ffi
IBj^snjv
O   Tf
OV   H
CO
CN
© cs o m
Ci en p- en
! en th r-
f V> tj-4 O
t^
VD
>>
CN  Tt
o"
73
p-
CO
>_
0
PS
Tf
H   f
en
CN 00
CN Tt CO
CN m CN
OV
^UT^
00
m vo oo
VO  VO  Tt
f-
Tt
Hi
cn en m
H   Tf
•—1
c^
■8
II.            1                 II          ^   1
Ov
2
T
m
Tt   Tf
p-    i en
Tt Tt vo Tf      in Tt p-
ri
o
U3JJ^p\|
H
Tf
en
1-1
Tf
p- Tt p-           en © Tt
t~~ en               : h hi cn
*"'
m
0v
o
Tt       '
m
v_
*{_>
CN
m
tH
! © h Ov
en m Tt
o
Ph
xuXq
vo
! tN Ov
en m
oo
m
o
a
rn    • th    <    i    !    icn    iHt--HHm    1        : hi cn  *! cn
m
2
• -a
a
M
<u
X)
i
3
ps^'xoj
I M
H
Tf rn
Tf
vo
rH       iO               !       !       ICN       INrHh-HN       !       ITfHVOHVO
Tf
ssoj^ 'xoj
CN
CN CN
CN
H
fe
en
THTl   TH
00 Ov Tt
hi hi Tt cn   ;
Ov
I3AHS 'xoj
rn
!     leN     i     1     1     ! m          i     lOCNm          ° h o O -—<     !
rs
j3i[s;_J
Tf
Ov VD
TH   TH    SO                     !
]                CN
oo
Tt
VO     :©CN     1 CS     !Tt     ;     l     imTtCN     !     : m Ov rn     1
©
J9AE3g
en       Ti
**
1-1
i oo CN en
: ov Tt cn
oo m rs
: h in m
CN
1 Tt" ci
1               VD*
m"
rt rn    i    .cnhcn    i    :    i    ,' p- en    i    !    !    !•—<m    len
Ov
JT33g
m
cn
"-1
>>
tj
3
(l>
eo
<
c
CU
i
p
tH
cu
>
o
o
b
a
c
4.
tu
61
t
a
CL
i-
c^
0
4
'>
i-
CL
i
a
-
a
c
c
it
c
E
■
f
c
c
1
c
5
C
r
|
i
tS
C
s
4,
L    t-
c
c
9
4,
1 ft
|
1
r
cr
1
0
_=
c
E
t~
u
c
c
c
5
c
c
&
s c
E
5
£
0 3
£ =
,5.c
1
^U   c
p
S
I
t
'_        H.         ■
c
«
"3 i
.© c
i__ z
cu   O   F
a
<
X
3
L
L
B.
c
t*
*
7
2
P.
P.
ft
pe
*
ir
E-
>
>
> REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION, 1949
W 73
List of Fur Confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1949
Confiscated from
Confiscated at
Kind of Fur Confiscated
Date of
Confiscation
S3
OS
S3
m
C
ed
3
a
o
o
u
rt
~S3
SI
"S3
N
a
a-
c/_
Jan.   20
1
2
2
3
2
2
....
4
1
5
9
7
___
20
6
1
3
3
1
77
1
1
1
3
Feb.   14
M. W. Cornish   _ _	
Alert Bay 	
Mar.    7
A. McMillan  __ _
17
„     24
Trail.  _  	
„     25
W. R. Smith _	
Courtenay _
Little Fort 	
25
Bill Hershey __.
26
„     29
H. Krause _	
S. R. Raskellv    ._ .
9
„     29
30
June     1	
3
John Velkin.  	
Hope.  	
11
20
J. Dalrymple —	
P. Cyernicki   	
B. Morgan  	
G.Jones  	
Herbert Ellis _	
Leo T. Jack	
John Thompson  	
July   13 __
„     13	
„     13 _ ...
Waldo.
Ashcroft.  	
Hope	
Ladner	
Tulsequah 	
....
Sept. 20	
Oct.   24	
—
Dec.   30
„     30
30
John Ewert  .
Totals
12
5
54
i
6
46
Note.—The sum of $437.60 was received during 1949 from the sale of confiscated and surrendered fur.
List of Firearms Confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1949
Date of
Confiscation
Confiscated from
Confiscated at
Kind of Firearms
Confiscated
Rifles
Shotguns
Jan.     5
Oliver _.__    _ __ 	
19
William Green 	
Fred Gutshar 	
Keith Ingram   	
P. P. McGee                     	
1
19
1
19
1
19
20
25
25
28
Jack Cummings  __	
28
Willow Point    	
Feb.    9
Ed. Engle   _ _ 	
„    10 	
25
Gordon Grafton __ 	
S. J. Fleming   	
Vancouver 	
-
Mar. 10
1
15
New-Westminster 	
1
15
David Winter _ 	
1        |
18
1        1
21
C F. Webb 	
24
Perow    _  	
Kilgard .  	
Chilliwack ,'. , __	
,,    28             	
Ray Silver 	
1
„    28
.    29
R. J. Singer    _ _ 	
..
Apr.    5   -
5
19
1
27
Harold Wood     ...  _	
1        |
27
1        1          1 W 74
BRITISH COLUMBIA
List of Firearms Confiscated under " Game Act," January 1st to
December 31st, 1949—Continued
Date of
Confiscation
Confiscated from
Confiscated at
Kind of Firearms
Confiscated
Rifles        Shotguns
May 23  _.__	
„    23 	
25
Donald Hanna 	
Herbert Nolan   .__ _ -
E. Tarn __..	
p Truant
Vancouver 	
Vancouver  _	
Trail              ....          	
-
25
Trail         _	
Vancouver   	
1
1
Chilliwack       	
8
,    13
John Tymick    ,.	
1
13
Vancouver  	
,    13
John O. Kelly	
22
Luxton  	
,    22
Victor Skinner	
„    22
,,    27        	
Hespler, Ont    -	
July     4
Pil   Oins
„    13        	
Aug   29
H. W. Wakeman     	
„    31        	
Trenton, N.J.             . .
Sept. 17 __
,,    27        	
T. Tinga _	
Courtenay __ _
„    27
Oct.     7        	
A. Puskas _.	
Donald Hill _ _ _  _ 	
David Stubbs    	
„    24 _
„    24	
,,    24        	
„    24 _
U.S.A.                           	
„    28    .
„    28    .
„    28        	
William Graff    _ _.
Delta
„    28 	
Gerald McMillan „_ _ 	
Delta   	
Nov. 14 ____	
„    14 __.	
Jack V. Miller-     -	
„    15_.___ _.	
M. A. Edinger 	
„    15	
„    15 	
Thomas Wookey.	
„    17	
„     17 	
Steve Kassa    	
„     17 _   	
„    17_ ____	
T. T Batii.
1       |
„    22  _ 	
1        I
„    22 _	
C J. Stewart  _	
„    22   ....
„    22    	
1
„    22.	
O. Wallarf.
„    24 	
,,    28 _	
1
„    28  	
„    28	
B. Mitchell _ 	
„    29 .._	
R. Black  	
W. Koop _	
Delta
Dec.     2	
,,      5  	
E. Ekland	
8 	
I D. A. MacKay
„      8      _	
„    21	
D. Dufault  --  __     _ .
Totals  	
76
10
Note.—The sum of $166.58 was received during 1949 from the sale of confiscated firearms. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 75
Bounties Paid during the Year Ended December 31st, 1949
Government Agency
Wolves
Cougar
Coyotes
Total
$25           $40
$20
$2
$4
42
$840.00
Atlin          	
4
9
136.00
     1          6
6
264.00
195
560
7,115.00
15
34
565
3,540.00
Cranbrook  	
3
21
251
1,499.00
2
44
2
938.00
4
35
800.00
15
7
1
8
4
	
36
196
65
284.00
395.00
944.00
340.00
Grand Forks  _ 	
18
24
38
638
4,722.00
Kaslo    :      	
4
15
140.00
Kelowna 	
4
105
500.00
Lillooet  _	
8
27
78
1,172.00
Merritt _ _ 	
6
659
2,756.00
Nanaimo	
2
17
390.00
21
145
1,000.00
1
6
2
	
18
328
217.00
1,352.00
154
2
125
4,390.00
Powell River 	
11
220.00
308
10
276
9,004.00
64
3
22
1,748.00
50
5
30
1
145
394
682.00
4,176.00
Revelstoke 	
8
32.00
41
	
	
21
109
84.00
1,461.00
4
155
5
111
55
544.00
100.00
4,095.00
Vancouver  —_  	
1
6
60
54
1,681.00
33
211
1,504.00
100
44
—--
1,639
11,436.00
Totals 	
971
209
524
1
6,846
$70,501.00 W 76 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Comparative Statement of Bounties Paid from 1922 to 1949, Inclusive
Calendar Year
Wolves
Cougars
Coyotes
Crows
Magpies
Eagles
Owls
Total
1922.  	
1923 	
303
162
195
291
336
344
452
411
312
310
372
195
173
137
183
372
444
530
491
701
8
628
572
430
599
423
384
366
285
196
261
265
301
472
461
519
725
524
1,092
1,687
5,175
7,276
14,070
20,192
3,672
1,881
1,544
2,864
53,443
2,246
70
7,095
20
89
17,625
172
$60,494.80
14,840.00
1924
172
20,398.40
1925    _
	
24,397.00
1926
5,770
10,046
	
41,077.00
1927
2,487
65,377.95
1928	
1929
	
1,025
1,389
403
1
50,709.25
42,122.00
1930
	
36,090.25
1931
	
3,427
42,036.15
1932   .   ._
80.00
1933
1
221
561
837
828
915
1,159
1,659
1,002
1,039
1,017
1,321
1,202
932
1,102
1,156
1,180
6,285.00
1934  _ __-•- .
	
6,825.00
1935
1,877
1,950
1,400
2,094
1,971
2,038
1,924
1,546
1,221
1,259 '
5,506
2,720
2,976
3,911
6,847
	
12,374.00
1936 	
1937 .—  _ 	
	
	
20,350.00
19,540.00
1938   ._ 	
	
21,018.00
1939  _	
	
26,399.00
1940  	
23,131.00
1941 -	
	
16,868.00
1942
	
17,397.00
1943  	
	
16,587.00
1944  	
20,243.00
1945  __
1946      -
	
	
	
	
46,627.00
22,392.00
1947  	
	
	
36,386.00
1948	
	
58,344.00
1949  .'.   	
	
70,501.00
Totals 	
19,248
11,017
98,693
69,431
8,230
7,204
20,615
$838,889.80
Big-game Trophy Fees Paid by Non-residents, January 1st to
December 31st, 1949
Species
>>
Ih
Name and Address
N
M
o {£
M
(Government Agency)
0
u
OS
S3
m
os G
. °
S3 u
m o
3
o
C<3!
o
0
o
0_)
a
11
a
'«
c
O ol
c
'os
C ii
2-S
S3
o
o
s
B
'5
cd
Barkerville .	
1
3
$65.00
Burns Lake 	
5
15
3
	
4
20
4
32
2,775.00
Clinton    	
17
29
	
72
27
10
550
39,145.00
Cranbrook  	
17
13
	
	
19
26
10
30
3,880.00
Fernie 	
17
15
	
13
24
	
24
37
4,935.00
Golden...  	
15
17
	
—_
27
71
39
34
6,665.00
Greenwood.  	
48
	
1,215.00
Kam loops 	
3
2
3
9
9
9
1,115.00
1
1
1
2
200 00
1
2
1
2
115 00
4
2
2
33
7
4
54
4,610.00
2,645.00
3
	
32
2
30
Penticton  	
1
5
	
	
75.00
Pouce Cou pe	
38
37
62
	
13
55
68
45
3
8,760.00
Prince George  	
12
21
10
	
3
10
2
42
3,645.00
4
3
1
6
525.00
25.00
Princeton 	
1
2
3
2
3
18
1,270.00
280.00
Revelstoke  :.
4
6
1
1
50.00
105.00
Smithers    —
1
8
1
8
3
8
6
3
595.00
830.00
25.00
860.00
1
2
4
11
1
5
1
2
	
4
6
11
Totals 	
151
191
82
2
286
281
98
880
106
$84,410.00 report of provincial game commission, 1949
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st
December 31st, 1949
TO
W 77
Description of Offence
Divisions (see Foot-note)
M
*C3
w.
(A
1
[fl
s
__
c
p
S3
B
o
U
62
M «
0 M
ii
TH     ti
SB
Fines or
Penalties
Imposed
"A"
"B "
"C"
"D "
"E"
Game Animals
1
1
3
1
1
4
2
8
7
1
1
1
1
8
4
16
2
■     2
1
1
45
1
4
1
4
1
4
2
23
2
1
2
2
1
4
37
2
5
3
—
2
2
2
....
1
2
5
104
92
4
2
5
1
22
2
24
2
2
8
7
5
5
20
6
32
3
5
6
7
1
1
9
155
8
9
3
6
15
7
4
3
8
2
1
1
1
3
14
22
265
199
6
15
7
2
27
2
39
7
3
8
8
27
6
1
3
3
$50.00
1,640.00
325.00
1,700.00
20.00
230.00
310.00
500.00
Killing or hunting game animals of female sex 	
Killing, hunting, or in possession of game animals under
j      20
■! 5
32
Killing, hunting, or in possession of game animals dur-
Possession of game animals from which evidence (sex)
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
5
•
1
1
1
154
8
8
3
6
15
7
4
3
8
2
1
1
1
3
14
22
265
199
5
14
7
2
26
2
39
7
3
8
8
27
6
1
3
3
Possession of big game on premises of logging camp,
Keeping big-game animals in captivity without permit....
Firearms
-   - 1 ■•■
I
1 1      2
17  |    33
3  1 —
2 !      2
25.00
95.00
1,927.00
75.00
175.00
30.00
20.00
418.00
70.00
110.00
60.00
130.00
10.00
100.00
10.00
10.00
120.00
570.00
270.00
2,530.00
1,890.00
210.00
140.00
270.00
40.00
612.50
35.00
410.00
142.00
30.00
215.00
70.00
316.50
52.50
10.00
20.00
35.00
Carrying firearms or discharging same in or from auto-
Carrying or in possession of unplugged repeating shot-
Discharging firearms on or across highway in prohibited
I
  I ...._
Discharging firearms in closed areas (Burrard Inlet) —
Minors carrying firearms unaccompanied by an adult...
Fur Trade and Trapping
5
3
3
45
58
4
1
1
1
4
10
1
-
1
1
1
1
9
3
2
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
37
1
1
1
Interfering or trapping on another person's trap-line—
Trapping or in possession of fur during close season	
  1    -
___... |  .....
I          1
S   i        7
Allowing traps to remain set after close of season	
Licences
Non-resident angling without a licence 	
Resident carrying firearms without a licence..— —
Resident angling or  carrying fishing tackle without a
12
16
22
~~
6
2
3
5
4
3
6
2
63
26
2
3
	
10
1
4
Migratory Game or Non-game birds
Hunting migratory game birds during prohibited hours...
Hunting migratory game birds from power-boat	
Hunting migratory game birds with a rifle..	
Hunting or in possession of migratory game birds during close season      	
Hunting or in possession of non-game or insectivorous
Special Fishery Regulations
Angling for trout during close season — 	
Jigging   or   molesting   salmon   or   trout   on   spawning-
Possession of or using salmon roe in prohibited area ...
Exceeding bag-limit on salmon	
  1      6
  1 	
3
1
-.-_ 1 ......
   1    1      2
5 W 78
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Prosecutions (Provincial Game Divisions), January 1st to
December 31st, 1949—Continued
Description of Offence
Divisions (see Foot-note)
'B "
!C" "D
SS
Fines or
Penalties
Imposed
Upland Game Birds
Allowing dogs to hunt game birds during nesting season
Exceeding bag-limit on upland game birds 	
Hunting upland game birds during prohibited hours	
Hunting, killing, or in possession of upland game birds
during close season   _ _	
Possession of untagged pheasants	
Game birds on premises of a shop  	
Hunting pheasants with a rifle _._ 	
Miscellaneous
Making false statement to obtain licence or bounty	
Trespassing upon closed land without owner's permission  -_.-  	
Hunting moose without required big-game licence __ —
Frightening or molesting game birds on game reserve-
Allowing pheasant tags to be used by another person-	
Obtaining a licence while previous licence suspended	
Guiding on other than own territory-   __._
Non-resident hunting big game without a guide 	
Allowing another person to use his big-game tag	
Failing to stop automobile when called upon by officer-
Guide failing to make necessary returns	
Obstructing an officer in the discharge of his duties	
Using tracer shells while hunting big game	
Totals- 	
14
183
163     263
I
99
25
1
407
4
1
2
73
2
1
2
10
14
2
4
3
2
75
3
1
2
10
16
2
16    1,099    1,115    $18,148.50
I
40.00
85.00
20.00
1,285.00
35.00
10.00
20.00
175.00
220.00
20.00
10.00
50.00
50.00
10.00
20.00
25.00
10.00
15.00
10.00
10.00
Gaol Sentences
Possession of upland game birds during close season, one (ten days).
Pitlamping deer, six (total of twenty-three months).
Angling without a licence, one (five days).
Carrying firearms without licence, two (ten days).
Untagged deer, one (sixty days).
Exceeding bag-limit on deer, one (sixty days).
Interfering with another person's trap-line, one (three months), one (seven days).
Angling during close season, one (seven days).
Possessing game animals of female sex, one (thirty days).
Possessing big-game animal under one year of age, one (thirty days).
Note.—"A" Division: Vancouver Island area and part of Mainland. "B" Division: Kootenay and Boundary
areas. "C" Division: Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, Cariboo, and Lillooet areas. "D" Division: Atlin, Skeena,
Omineca, Fort George, Peace River, and Yukon Boundary areas. "E" Division: Vancouver, Coast, and Lower
Mainland areas. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 79
3,3
S3 3
p."
rt
On
H
Z
w
g
u
G
Z
s
a.
Q
Z
<
o
z
H
z
5
DQ B
g 8
B o
OJ    IH
Ah O
O «
"•£
S3
OJ   OJ   S3 "J?
*_■ ^  I_   ft
O   O   O "C
2ZZU
E'g     ft
2   u
>
©
[fl
tt
CO
0
0
«zz
o     o     2,
Z    Z    Q    ZZ«
(A
3
3 "S
"•3
3 *- ,;
o
0 .5
. B o» J?
u
Q.   S3
: 1 * __ 'H
c i *• "h _h f r; a <i r; .__
«oS-S.2oE"ioo
Zj   mqz<   zz
* is o
OOO
tw t-, si
oooo
.3 x: xz xi
c M
a o .»
E oc
O Xi *.
J=    »_    ^ *..
M      ^-       _£_ ^
3  rt  e
rt «-   P
fl a
T3 •
3-
OJ  3
M
-no      "'3     3 -3 e
4_ „.«     Su     *Ppi
S3-" £
I la
ooo
.3 .3 .3
www
.a 3 .s   .9.
v.     www     w w
i. o o o
« ^ j_ j_
H w vi w
J3
« "5
<_> X
—' oj
3 'O
-S
QJ   +.
S3  ss
S3   O
fl. iJ
S o
oo«
0 .s
£ I ^   i
tn ? q-   j
tHtt-'C   j
©  »  ©  g
'-   3   u   O
es,o « 3
w   O   «   rt
•° m* v,
"S  -
.2? ^
«. 9 -     u
i3 « « a a
■—   _0VH   00-3
O 3  «  3
.*•__.*■__ H
n p rt p h
.S3 u .2 bP
s * a *£
Sg|     oSoj.«
8S»
■a
6**9
i-i
cd
rt
a;
d)
TJ
rt
M
«
s
H
in
■ i i
v.
(1)
o^73
©
g
3
a
O
a
■si
•3
b
n
i as
! o *
■a s
<p.<;2
55
^ —. o ^
h 3 E 3
_^ u v. q
rt "^ oa ©
a H S 5
§-< s
3 -3
•3 rt
oisia
DO O I 3 O O
0  o u Ci< aj a>
s J 2 B § .9
3  g   MM
S1 «.S o
O  hS_2
1/3 *M
°s°_
o> o o H
M__. M £?rt
rt       rt rt o
J3 T) J- f= Xi
go
S.S
is
I s
3 <u
XI ^
3 2  «
if*
rt <a M
P   n ____!
*c
S o_2 5
BBSS
us u u
"3 T3 T3 T3
'"  S H '"
-5°°a
rt .5   60 DO  3
I all I
-   «   »   u
c
oi os .L
UUd.
>2.
fl. 2 oo CQ
3      3     -o
a;  v<;
S3 K.
o 2 ,
OS"
2U2
.S  3   3       ■"
^£
i  B -
ft" a
a u &3
O E(1 5
. MUfl,
_J *"* S3 __
t.. t. SB  H
o a) 'o rt
B€s|
hJP^ZW
oj -3
as
SB
•3 3
5<
■S'o
!  <5  B
! H   OS
m 2rt3
_r. fl o
c -^ "5 -^
<u O rt rt
OOOh
Ja
fi ^
C  rt
rt   O
i-lW
O  r
z:
' °;>
'■ tn *
<   £5...
rt      'S      73
«0»     Pi! i-J
73 Tj r-H Tj
on co U 1/3
o*
o      ^ J
&_g i s
z -Is
« 'O >. g
a'SSj
r <S » rt
j
» m
M s:
o u
3   *   fl
I
C
*i
60 E
O rt
•a ^
■a
^   rj   e
_n W   r-t
p.   h
rt rt    .
_> w  _:
rt
>> rt
3  E
QJ   O
IS'i
n.    pa
U-O ;
3^3
,0J o   rt
« So.
o -
<   bSS
§«
^   QJ
>,^J
o o
P.P.
s
rt fe
la
> rt
h ^
__■ E c
MZiiO
■sol
Xa<
rt en CC so
S. 2 < BJ
.3.2
S E
B fl
S «
z.a W 80
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Summary of Game-fish Culture Distributions, Showing Eggs, Fry,
and Fingerlings, 1949
Kind of Game Fish
Eggs
Fry
Fingerlings
Cut-throat trout 	
257,280
219,275
292,240
23,810
3,633,370
417,000
	
19,260
4,393,505
1,920,000
1,041,656
Totals                                                     .     	
6,590,045
4,585,695
1,041,656
Summary of Game-fish Eggs, Fry, and Fingerlings at Departmental
Hatcheries, December 31st, 1949
Hatchery
Cut-throat
Eastern Brook
Kamloops
Kokanee
Eggs or Fry
Eggs or Fry
Fingerlings
or Fry
Eggs or Fry
496,200
129,872
63,906
234,945
204,303
50,000
1,000
Smiths Falls _
18,518
Totals  _ 	
1;000       |       496,200
1
633,026
68,518
Summary
Eggs   6,590,045
Fry   4,585,695
Fingerlings  :  1,041,656
Total distributions  12,217,396
On hand at hatcheries, December 31st, 1949     1,198,744
Total  13,416,140 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 8!
B O
ON
On
aa
O
Z
H
Z
<c
PL.
H
O
H
a.
o
><
«
g
a
v.
a
u
z
3
o.
pq
w
a.
D
H
5
U
11
to
i—»
u.
i
«
<
z
^ O, O ©^ VI o„ o
rs ri in vo vc     »n ri
ooooooooooooooooqooooooooooooooooo o
oooooqoooqoooooooooooooooooooooooo o
inOOn.OOOOcNOOOOi/.OV.OOOV.OmOOOOOOOO'J.O©©   v.
00 in !_tv      rf vi" in vi" c. rin in'o r.ol«)(.-^«rtO(S"n^vi m"o vi v.  Oi
^ cn —      _ . fs, ^
Z    o
u
B'4_ «
rt
rt
ii rt
BBUU
►J ..
aji-.-aj
e■-> g"fts^
rt  ft O
■31 a
© ©    i
.O ,id   W     !
o, « ,£ ©
<a rt
« hJ
OJ
©    OJ
333
§ ^
t« rt cc
Sri u 2 iJ
•O      H
_:_. aj ._ .. ft £ 7. r_
6 5 2
ft 3 -B
cfltoh
« o go
.SS W 82
BRITISH COLUMBIA
vX>
s
•S
o
ON
ON
CO
O
z
z
<
Ph
H
O
B.
H
o
Bi
<
s
D
CO
a
u
z
04
w
B5
D
H
i-l
3
o
w
<
ft
o
o
A
Fi
tb
OS
o
•x
Q
/,
w
.5 b
G 0
ft
X)
ooor-mooooc
OOOOCTsOOOOC.
o qoH» ©^ cd ©^ o^ o^ *
o Tf" ^t \o rn ts r->" rn o" <n i> t- " © ■■*
o r-
o o
O   TH
: © o
! O O
! © ©
© ©
© ©
o o
©"©"
Ti  Ti
© © o
© o o
ooo
o ©*"©*
.5
•rH     r.
0 j--
©-*£
S rt ©
S£*H -
3   oS M   rt
S.I..-.
qj aj
.a m
5
J i.   »
craj*jJ_'^S-2 u tj
O OJ  os  rt ^ -3 — -~ •-
5
rt
Ij! 3 a « J •a •
lalSSeSHV,
fi
rt ""3   O r
Ss.3i2:s\S__JlllpJSH
?-* •-"  rt © rG oji;
cocoon «Ph H
i_2   J5
S%S 2
- rt m  rt  f-1
|4 gH
ca   ?   w
3   rt   3
£id£
3   rt   3
rt
Si
rt M
J MO
■Baa's
rt qj c ^ j. n
l^^g S Sj
GJ
,_. ©
; 63 J"
3—   3>,qjqj330
<<f,<<p_P3Cqcq.
U
OJ   qj
■*!■__
rt  rt REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 83
©
©
o
o"
© p © ©
© o © ©
o © © ©
©" o" o* m
©
© ©
j   Q
o
! © ©
©
©
© ©
; ©
i m o
m
rH  Tl
. (- 00
o © ©
© © ©
ooo
ooo©
oooo
o o © o
ooooo©©
o o Q o o o o
o o © © o o ©
© o
© o
o o
o © o
© © ©
o o ©
; o © o
! O o O
: o o o
Ti O"
<S    TH
! O © © O O O
■o o © © o O
! o^ o_ o^ © ©_ ©
I o~ o" rn m d d
© o o ©
o o © o
oooo
©" o" © ©'
Tj en m c~
_  u rt
N__3a
S3   SS •__
as S3
So
ii rt  rt
fflUU
E.S » <l si S
O XI ^ 3 _. 3
O  H os 3 3 £
>, rt QJ .3 3 o
rt XI £ XI x: C
UOOOUU
S3   QJ
a-jajs
t-i   OS   OS
■a J J
- .3   >
rt  rt
fc «.3'-l
31813
os -5 § jj ja 3 2 -s c.
•£W.w.t_j.<*5(/_Crt
&I"°.2t!!.<Su!j
-Eo.MsSo'.SS
rt  QJ  O  o -g  ra  QJ .3   B,  __   rt 'qj
&^rt
B  rt ^
QJ   « JJ
■a"4   «f
E rt ,§_!§
i33
A 33 J
3 UhJ   rt
C rt rt oi 3 a S rt ~ s5Ca.oo*(i«.-C.5oS3Saa = =o»o.S
QJ qj -_<;
h 11 '   rt
- © J.2
G J-l *3 '> .
rt  C uj
i-l  « ^
w  *J   01 W 84
BRITISH COLUMBIA
-v3
«)
3
•5
S
O
1
Os
ON
m
O
Z
H
Z
<
H
s
O
aj
H
O
>H
flS
<
O
1-0
as
u
z
<_
a.
CQ
w
a!
D
H
i-l
5
U
<
a
.s>>
©^
fl O
! O O O I © O
goo ' © ©
b o_ o^ ; © o,
j in o~ o" : tn ©'
(N    PH ,    CNl   TH
! © © ©
! O © O
: o o o
: o
' o
' o
; o
: "^
o
ooooooooooo
ooooooooooo
© ©„ ©_ o^ o, ©^ © o, © o, ©_
©" in ©" ©" *-< o" © in ©" o* ©"
in      min      vomr-mom
o o o o o o o
o o o o o o o
© © o_ ©^ ©^ o, o_
o in rn in in in"
3
§
1    o
o
.*   QJ
I-l   « 5
*- h. rt t.
- jj s
^QjBflS^cft^Hjjil
.   rt rt ". £ ,. J
E TS g * 1 rt 9
>,  QJ   3   S3   «   3   a
qj j: ja o o. a-3
i/l i/l in i/i X/l VI VI
SS
' 3 n
i-o a
J rt vj
J "3 -3
1-3
■3U0
Oo-
iV •go
2 3   O   c
coSE
3 3 O •a
QJ    QJ
rt  rt
*j  rt
J M   rt
qj   t.
.3 s
^  rt
?■   3
>.'ft
ffio
QJ "O
ft o
3 {X
3   I S
* 2 «
«•$ a.
_.* __
£ fl
3   3   3   >. ±- -i -_* "i   3^;   t* "C 'C   ©   3   «
l_l__d__H*l'Sn
rt
« 5 « C 5
-
©
id
i 1
c
_-
SS.
^.
PC
U
M
©  rt
i>  ©  ©  ra
%#Sh
i23g
• »«&
M   >3.S
OQ00 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 85
l
o © o
ill!
© ©"©"
. m tn ©
: m oo o
©
m
j
I
1
i
i
o©o©©©©©©
OOOOO©©©©
o_ q o ©__ <~i ©^ o_ ©^ o_
©* o" tn m m d m o* o*
tH   CA                               th             tH   tH
© O O O © O o
o o o © o © o
© cn © © o o ©
v"T rn m © m ©* O
o
©
■<*
r-
©     ! O
O     ! ©
o_   ; ©_
©'      ;  IO
OOOOO©©
o o o o o © o
© © © © ©^ © q
>n m ti m rn <o ©
tr,       en en th ca rt
©oooo©
o © o o © ©
©^ ©^ ©^ ©^ © ©_
t] d m T? d m
tn    TH               CA    TH    TH
15,000
20,000
10,000
©
©
©
©
! O
! O
! O
i ©
: °
©
5
5
a'
o
o
o
©
©"
o
©
©
o
©"
r-
©
©
1 !
©*   i
m
25,000
75,000
110,000
230,000
i
|
|
j
«
o
i—
s
c
£
CI
H
o
4
n
—
>
r
c.
a
' 1
I
i
:
s
_
7
C
4
■s
_-
>
I
__
0.
fl
—
-
u
1  C
-
0
C
4
%
H-
1
s
•—
"S
c
-
x 4
ki*
r
-
5
X
4
?■
1
4
ii
-
4
1
T*
4
4
J;
S
1
j.
«
e
»
ft
4
%
r
-
s
t
X
c
!
i
I
4
J-
:
a
-
>
a
-C
(,
J
1
«
>
s,
, x
i
«
U
I
_
i
u
sd
tt
B
0
"©
7.
0
H
«
L.
>
Qg
=Q
4,
a
c
c
'e
c
<
OL
£
>
j  6
z
a
5
e
' c
c
EX
4
a
£
i
4
t
c
(_,
©
a
-
T3
4
M
I
4
~
C
r
-
?
4
C
c
L
4
JM
n
_
c
a.
I
\-
6
4
c
4
0
Cl
c
£
-■
a.
^_
c
S
■c
f2
©
c
£
a
1
t-
u
c
-
!
-
i
„
>
4
c
-
cu
■j
1
1
4
a
4
>
C
£
4
0
H
X
c
c
I
4
J>
-
E
K
j.
a
a
©
i
c
S
h
4
QJ
i-
u
u
C
«
>
4
-
rt
J
5
£
3
U
B
3
0
—
c
Cl
^3
C
0-
(0
c
>
—
C
0
fl.
CO
0
5
QJ
3
0
"qj
PROVINCE ^ -^-   J-IBRART
VICTORIA, B. C. W 86
BRITISH COLUMBIA
v>J
s
■S
s
o
ON
ON
m
O
Z
H
Z
<
►J
H
O
fl.
H
11,
o
>H
Pi
<
D'
c/_>
as
u
z
m
pa
c<
H
_J
D
u
in
i
£>>
SO O O ©
© © o ©
©_o, o_©^©^
©" in o" o" cn
(.ooooor-
: on m ^ cs ov
B.S
©, m
Vl   T*
oo©o©o©ooo
0©©©0m©©00
o o 00 o^ ©^ V© ©^ ©, o^ o^
in ©' Oi ©' ©" vo" in" m" in in
o © © © o
o © © o o
n © © © ©
© o
o o
o ©
©ooo©©o©
o©©©moo©
o^ o^ o^ ©^ cn © o„ ©,
^Hin©ininc.m©
J
Q    *
&■•_=
*£
£ c
=>.a3 "
J _S __   r '5K   -S
5 X  QJ  o   3 T3   3
2-8 =5 §=E
<<
_ ^ fl u
\r~iM2
! o M w
■ .v.    i_    1-
i a « rt
. ~~ © ©
.Si
S3 >,
^MMM^SZ'VXxxiosssMasi
m rt -3 s_S     o2B»iCflc .7
OJ-UiSoljllECB"*
B5UUUUUQWWWWOO
'*?1-1     »•*    QJ
•a-i'S.iI'Sl&.B.S
rt  rt-fl^i^-Js^  w  M -*->
Wj-J-SSSOOOO REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 87
©
1
in
©
o
C3
Ti
©
! O O
: o ©
; © ©
o o
© ©
o o
o © ©
© o ©
moo
mo© ■
Os © in j
sO O tN
SS
! O O
c
©
i o n
so
1
©     i
in    j
j
1
j
1
©
o
o,
in
tn
o © o o
o © © o
© CO ©^ ©^
in vo in m
1
o   :
o   :
©   |
tn    !
tN        ;
©
O
©
©*
©
©
©_
m*
tN
©
©
©
©"
tN
i
j
O
o
©
o"
s
q
in
o
o
o
©*
tn
I
8
©
tn
en
©
©
©
in"
en
©
fN
tN
|
1
|
j
8
O
©
tn
1
QJ   -.
rt E
£ %3 5.3 »^_j S_ «
B.fl.«ia.«cnf-?l>^
_^ QJ
«-3
^3 -
j.  3  «
111
rt j_  O
OsS,S»
J «   QJ   QJ   QJ TS
M U .H qj H rt
qj ^d       J rt
n 3 ._. If <->
M ,~ osm u      ■>     M & 2 «
3 Iii 552 N«rt-3"2 ft ft-S JSOuEEOoi«rtuSh4
|Hla»iiigpll|I,g1?il|l-8||g
:<BBlfflB«fflI»BUUUOUUUUUUUUBBOO0
OK W 88
BRITISH COLUMBIA
3
•5
s
o
g
ON
ON
m
O
z
H
Z
<
Ph
H
D
O
OS
H
Be.
O
><
a!
<
O
v/3
as
o
z
<
as
ffl
BJ
BS
D
H
J
D
u
as
CO
W
o
! O O
. © ©
© O
: o © ©
! © O O
1 o o ©
! © © ©
i © m m
© o
© o
© ©
©"©'
m ©
o
©
o
o*
©
©
©
©
8
ooo
th oo tN
en oo m
W
O
EC
ca
£
o
Q
Z
2
!
i
8
©,
s
fed
11
o'o*
«n m
o ©
o o
c>c5
tN©"
: o o ©
; © O o
; © o o
88
O          !
©          1
m ©
o
TH   Ti
in
88
©©
in in
tN ri
O
o
©
©"
tN
I O
1 ©
; °.
' in
i M
! © © O
! © ©■©
! O O O
© ©
I
S8
i
©     !
°.    1
88
;
m ©
tn    i
© ©
1
i
i
1-1   !
i
cn »-•
x>
3
J
o
a£
IS
©   ©
© '
rt  rt •& lJ
>. >. >,-M
G G G   h
© © ©  G
O O O iS
O 0 O  rt
SH  rr  HH  *
©    ©
'$i$-M ©
; Cn_^ © ©   .  **
I W    »H     ©   -^
1 >h fe C r _ js u
£ A * X « X
© <u fl I rt 2 ^ ° o
■s^o^ £* 8 J J
i M J
: © <u
c «
5 5-^
MS ©
© © u
M -^ T3
rt ca —
jj g
© © o
O  O   U
8 2
o-s
c CQ
QJ J_
Ml
o o
SZ
rtO
—      IH
rt pa ©
CS    ©  (J
Iii
__  rt  rt
Oa.0.
2 (/_.
,    in    rj    U       !    Ci    **
i    ©    ©    © •*  _^
;.a|jj_3^.^,s
... •* * 8
w J  os ox. uH
em
r v *u
U qj ii
S3 rT   S3
a-go
3"° s
!? £ 3 JZ rt  rt  rt .c j. .«,_;__; _z ci- 3
&.05P.A.c/_O-tf_tZ_V.V_C/_c/_tf_c/_c/_c/_
_5 5 __!   Q.MJ   rt  o-2  t-Jj
5§§8U  |~BB  g^S-g
isEEErt|Sgggrt-§|
|Oi3'rt'3^j2.><ooog.rt3
US
= «
•=   rt
3    -
h REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 89
:   i   j© o o
i   i   i tn o m
:   .   i vo cs
on
ii   i T"<
1-1
o o
o o
© ©
188
QO
o   :
O     !
R.  i
O     j
O
cs
j
1
ill
©O
o o
o o
o*e>
j
30,000
10,000
m ©
vo ©
ON  ©
O o
o as
O   TH
09
u
i-l rt 3
a J ■
OS SS n-,
■s ? S
rt ca) ca
XX §
r-i *B "C
©   ©
a g
©  >*
«   ©
WW        ^   «_    ,w
«>u &u & H
c«  __,  rt W   _
list's
.sS ««.?
as fi, M e. l>
si!>££
^rt 2 "
3KKffi
rt qj a E
S3 XI  C  O
Tl si vi IA
J3   OS ~S3 *QJ
kjKZZ
■si
wpa pa
© u *-*
.J op;;
pa PQ CQ
17     ^   h-.
QJ    QJ
P.  ft
O o
.afi
C  3
a w
Si
•x  fl ^
i-J 'g rt
° !__ "3
_£ rt h
£ .o rt
S 5 fe
P     rt     ©    Q    WJ    <H     O "O   i—r   --   ■-(   .-^    -»    ■—     "
BUUUQQOWBWHHOOO
hj -D «
U   3   H;
i-l © •
J >  >  rt
■*_ 2-i__
rt £_■ ,3 w
J 3K  9
-  O
3 s|
i-l h 5i
_]   Ml g
CM   O   O
a;«a:
J a
£ 1
fe-S
QJ    O W 90
BRITISH COLUMBIA
vV>
s
■S
s
ON
ON
o
z
H
z
<
I-l
cm
H
o
a.
H
o
a!
<
as
o
z
<c
CQ
w
a;
p
H
D
U
as
<
.s>>
— <->
©^
00 ____
C O
8
©"
•*
Tt
o"
m
Os
en
1
j
c.5
So © o
o © vc
o m o ■*
o o
o r-
© ■*
g
rt
© © © o
oooo
© o © ©
© in © in o o
o m © tN o o
© Tf ©^ 00 CO o
oo i-T>n on m oo
! © © © ©
! O O O O
: o o o ©
o
o
©^
o"
rs
o o
Os ©
00 «s
oT oo
r-i CS
m
©
CS
88  i
5S   i
in m"   ]
3
0
g      >H
rt a
J rt
_= H
M M
o ". 8 !
as^ 2:
ca   co "3
3 *o-fl J2
S3
k s
QJ  H
i .5 i-l "
»J<   i
3.3J'
-la 8.
•    CO
^SS
o a a
E R >.
.13 o O
J Si   Qjg
j .a S '3
S§<3
SS2
a
_ « 8
rt M >
t-l rt v
©   N n—'
i = -a>3ai.i!
||^SS2§8
ZZfl.fl.fl. a. Op.
_3«
^  ©  ©
" "C ° M « " h
Cj  ~ £  rt V  __  q
©cn g hJ P P £
s •   .____-  rt  >> i-i
Eh ^ *S -A Ns  « rt
5 g § 1 S fc E
P5 c/_ CO v. CO w_ H
3 a u
ia. J3
1       qj      :
M S   «
ss 2 n 5
1 a" 8
h-I © c m
I iii
I*  "__."!__.    <U
F ©   rt
i 2a; 2
<   ^ n
& o
13   ©
_S«
rt a ^
hJ   rt   rt
lH>°_J
>S o
rt a -c
©Go
CQ CO W REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 91
! © o © © m m
ooSor" It
ooooa oi
I o m © ©
i o © o ©
: © r- o ©
y
S3   S3 M   OS Xi *l    £
vg Vj |_1  „ ^ |_J
SflI 82 W 92
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Returns from 2,189 Holders of Special Firearms Licences, Showing Big Game,
Fur-bearing Animals, and Predatory Animals Killed, Season 1948-49
Big Game
Bear   449            Mountain-goat  65
Caribou      27            Mountain-sheep  4
Deer   871            Wapiti (elk)   22
Moose   361
Fur-bearing Animals
Beaver
Fisher .
Fox __.
Lynx
     4,809
        289
        351
345
Marten      3,282
Mink      4,268
Muskrat   40,520
Otter        228
Racoon        730
Skunk        160
Squirrels   67,042
Weasels   16,452
Wildcat        188
Wolverine .  72
Predatory Animals
Cougar       139 Wolves
Coyotes   2,236
674
Statement of Vermin Destroyed by Game Wardens during the Year 1949
Kind of Animals or Birds Destroyed
Game Divisions
Total
"A"
"B"
"C"
"D"
"E"
Animals
1
26
315
113
362
74
61
2
6
61
21
2
50
173
	
235
70
81
86
296
22
61
48
	
23
26
32
11
31
516
20
183
72
18
1,401
47
268
744
107
133
38
2
125
1
29
3
74
253
36
67
40
35
154
3
1
9
21
28
338
40
983
24
63
15
8
21
2
95
118
Fox                              	
236
951
92
Birds
3,295
203
847
2
179
Owls _ j  _	
395 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 93
Summary of Liberation of Game Birds, 1949
Area Pheasants
Vancouver Island—.
Alberni  96
Courtenay  500
Nanaimo-Parksville .._■_ .  182
Victoria (North and South Saanich)  252
Total      1,030
Lower Mainland—
Agassiz  600
Burnaby   29
Chilliwack   1,558
Delta   2,532
Lulu Island  630
Matsqui   754
Mission (Hatzic and Nicomen Island)  2,106
Pitt Meadows  2,783
Sumas Prairie  1,992
Surrey  2,454
Total  15,438
Interior—
Ashcroft   72
Creston  3 7
Dawson Creek   24
Fort St. John  24
Grand Forks  120
Kamloops   705
Kelowna   92
Nelson  48
Penticton  244
Salmon Arm _  321
Summerland   6
Vanderhoof  64
Vernon  300
Total   2,057
Summary
District
Vancouver Island  1,030
Lower Mainland  15,438
Interior  2,057
Total   18,525
Eighty-nine California quail were purchased and liberated in the Victoria district
during the year.
Note.—Total cost covering purchase of all game birds listed was $34,700.15. W 94 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Statement of Game-bird Farmers, 1949
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at January 1st, 1949
Pheasants   6,404 Partridge      31
Quail       99
Number and Kind of Birds Raised, 1949
Pheasants   22,833 Partridge        6
Quail        126
Number and Kind of Birds Purchased, 1949
Pheasants   338
Number and Kind of Birds Sold, 1949
Pheasants   20,575 Partridge      18
Quail  96
Number and Kind of Birds Killed or Died, 1949
Pheasants   3,177 Quail        3
Number and Kind of Birds on Hand as at December 31st, 1949
Pheasants   5,823 Partridge      19
Quail      126
Note.—During the year 1949 there were 124 licensed game-bird farmers in the
Province, but during the year 1949 twenty of these farmers discontinued business. There
were six nil returns. Game-bird bands sold to licensed game-bird farmers during the
year 1949 amounted to $168 (1,680 bands at ten cents each).
Miscellaneous Revenue, 1949
94 game-convention minutes at 75 cents per copy  $70.50
1,680 game-bird bands at 10 cents each  168.00
251 trap-line transfer fees at $2.50 each  627.50
1,029 game maps at 10 cents each  102.90
Proceeds, sale of trout eggs  15.00
Proceeds, export of live fur-bearing animals  160.00
Proceeds, permits export game meat  105.00
Total   $1,248.90 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 95
LIST OF GUIDES AND NON-RESIDENT OUTFITTERS, 1949
Definition of Guide Licence Classifications
A First-class Guide shall be one who has acted as a guide in the Province for a
period of at least three years in the ten years immediately preceding his application for
a guide's licence and who has suitable equipment for outfitting any person desiring to
hunt game.
A Second-class Guide shall be one who has acted as a guide in the Province for a
period of at least three years in the ten years immediately preceding his application for
a guide's licence, but who cannot qualify as a First-class Guide.
An Assistant Guide shall be one who cannot qualify as either a First-class or
Second-class Guide, and shall be entitled to act as a guide in the hunting of game birds
or in angling for trout, and after securing a permit so to do from the Game Commission
when employed by, or under the supervision of a First- or Second-class Guide to guide
big-game hunters.
Lower Mainland Coast and Fraser Valley
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Dennis, James, Hope     1st
Herman, John, 1364 Eleventh Ave. West,
Vancouver Asst.
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Smith, Frank J., Hope  2nd
Wells, Gordon, R.R. 2, Sardis    1st
Wells, Ray, Cultus Lake    1st
Vancouver Island
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Alsdorf, William, Campbell River  2nd
Boyles, Thomas J., Cobble Hill  2nd
Brimacombe, Herbert, Stuart Island  2nd
Burbridge, James, Campbell River Asst.
Carnell, Harvey D., Lake Cowichan  2nd
Cathcart, John, Sayward   2nd
Drummond, Jack, Merville    2nd
Flesher, Eric R., Phillips Arm  2nd
Gillespie, G. K., Lake Cowichan Asst.
Hancock, Arthur, Lake Cowichan  2nd
Hancock, Joseph A., Lake Cowichan    1st
Harding, Richard, Sayward   2nd
Houghton, Lawrence, Nanaimo  2nd
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Kay-Nichols, Caesar, Sayward  2nd
Large, Edwin L., Campbell River  2nd
Marshall, Donald, Campbell River  2nd
Marshall, Duncan, Campbell River  2nd
Palliser, Charles H., Lake Cowichan  2nd
Palliser, W., Lake Cowichan  2nd
Parkin, Alvin, Campbell River  2nd
Robertson,   George,   2329   Blanshard  St.,
Victoria   2nd
Ryan, J., Campbell River  2nd
Welch, Phil, Port Alberni  2nd
Whittaker, Gordon, Upper Campbell Lake 2nd
Wilson, Jack, Sproat Lake, Alberni  2nd
Non-resident Outfitters
Atkinson, Charles, Halcourt, Alberta.
Harrison, George, Banff, Alberta.
McCollough, Henry, Wembley, Alberta.
Phillips, Frank, 1551 St. Andrews, North Vancouver.
Revelstoke-Salmon Arm and Okanagan Districts
Ray, Jack, Beaverlodge, Alberta.
Russell, Andy, Twin Butte, Alberta.
Strom, Erling, Banff, Alberta.
Sunderman, Kelly, Hythe, Alberta.
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Name and Address of Guide
Becker, Johnnie, Sorrento   2nd
Bischoff, Fred, Magna Bay   2nd
Churchill, Thomas, Falkland  2nd
Cullis, Bert, Taft   2nd
De Simone, S. H., Revelstoke __-_    1st
Durrand, W. D., Revelstoke  2nd
Engler, John, Lumby   2nd
Esswein, P. B., Magna Bay  2nd
Gardiner, Robert, Albas  2nd
Hansen, Robert Lee, Salmon Arm    1st
Hanson, Charles E., R.R. 1, Lumby  2nd
King, Edwin I., Westwold   2nd
Laforme, George W., Revelstoke   _    1st
Martin, Pete, Sicamous   2nd
Moser, A., Pillar Lake  Asst.
McBee, Milvin F., Sorrento    1st
McKay, John, Revelstoke Asst.
McLellan, Francis B., Celista 	
MacKenzie, M. M., Lumby	
Nelson, Eric A., Revelstoke     1st
Licence
Grade
____ 2nd
___ 2nd
Newman, Jack, Notch Hill
Oban, Frank, Eagle Bay
Potts, Bill, Sorrento 	
Reese, Richard, Sorrento _.
Reisterer, Lex, Magna Bay
Richards, Ralph, Magna Bay
2nd
2nd
1st
1st
2nd
2nd
Ritchie, Gordon K., Kelowna  Asst.
Softing, Berger, Lumby   2nd
Temple, Glory, Seymour Arm    1st
Walters, Jack, Sorrento     1st
Webber, James G., Vernon  Asst.
Werner, Carl, R.R. 1, Lumby   2nd
Wooldridge, Charles C, Notch Hill Asst.
Young, A., Sicamous  Asst. W 96
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Grand Forks-Greenwood (Including Kettle Valley)
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Abel, Cummin, Kettle Valley  2nd
Acherman, Alfred William, Beaverdell  2nd
Anschetz, Chris, Rock Creek  2nd
Bohnet, James, Rock Creek Asst.
Bradshaw, George A., Westbridge   2nd
Carey, Joe F., Westbridge  2nd
Cochran, Fred M., Westbridge   2nd
Fernstrom, Frederick, Greenwood   2nd
Fernstrom, John A., Kettle Valley  2nd
From, Helge, Westbridge ___:  2nd
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
From, Ingvall, Westbridge  2nd
From, Oliver, Westbridge  2nd
Hall, D. Elmer, Westbridge -_ 2nd
Hollingshead, Gerald, Westbridge  Asst.
Lockhart, Fred, Beaverdell  2nd
Lutner, E. C, Beaverdell  2nd
Petersen, Stanley G., Grand Forks  2nd
Rodwell, Dennis, Westbridge Asst.
Smith, Howard J., Westbridge  2nd
Kamloops District
Licence
Grade
___ 2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Archibald, D. A., Clearwater	
Archibald, David C, Clearwater     ___Asst.
Albrecht, Charles W., Quilchena Asst.
Bell, Dorothy, Clearwater  Asst.
Boule, James, Savona     1st
Boyd, Kenneth G., Kamloops  Asst.
Boyko, John, Savona  Asst.
Brousseau, Clifford, Savona     1st
Burdett, George, Savona     1st
Burdett, Loretta, Savona  2nd
Cahoon, Charles, Westsyde  2nd
Cameron, James B., Savona     1st
Caywood, Phil, Clearwater  2nd
Clearwaters, Ralph W., Westsyde     1st
Cochran, Marvin, Darfield  2nd
Comeau, William L., Savona Asst.
Cooper, Norman T., Savona  2nd
Cooper, Phil, Kamloops     1st
De Lisle, Henry G., R.R. 1, Louis Creek ... 2nd
Dever, Dolly, Savona Asst.
Dexheimer, John, Savona  2nd
Douthwaite, Peter, McLure      1st
Dumont, Pascal, Red Lake Asst.
Dunlop, William, Barriere   2nd
Douglas, K. Ellis, Kamloops    2nd
Felton, E. M., Valemount  2nd
Fennell, A. C, Chu Chua  2nd
Fennell, J. A., Chu Chua  2nd
Gaglardi, Charles, Kamloops Asst.
Genier, Wilfred, Barriere   2nd
Gourlay, James R., Barriere     1st
Grant, Charles, McLure  2nd'
Grant, Gordon, McLure _     1st
Hagen, Harry, Barriere  2nd
Hansen, Howard, Little Fort  Asst.
Helset, Torbjorn, Clearwater     1st
Hogue, Henry A., R.R. 1, Clearwater  2nd
Hoover, Eldred, Black Pines     1st
Houghton, George, Pinantan   2nd
Humphrey, Ashton, Knutsford Asst.
Irving, Frank, McLure  2nd
Johnston, Stan, Black Pool Asst.
Kipling, John, Black Pines  2nd
La Fave, John W., Louis Creek     1st
La Fave, Ted, Agate Bay Asst.
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Latremouille, Joseph L., Little Fort     1st
Lean, Theodore B., Clearwater     1st
Lloyd, William, Red Lake  2nd
Loveway, Thomas V., Little Fort  2nd
Ludtke, Charles, Clearwater  2nd
Ludtke, Laurence, Clearwater __      1st
Marriott, Robert, Heffley Creek  2nd
Marsden, Gladstone, Red Lake  Asst.
Mason, Allen C, R.R. 1, Louis Creek  2nd
Matthews, Maurice, Kamloops  Asst.
Morris, Ian, Red Lake  2nd
Morton, Alf, McLure     1st
Murray, George, Savona     1st
Macabee, Cyril, Savona '. Asst.
McConnell, Ken, Louis Creek  2nd
MacDiarmid, Garfield, Clearwater     1st
MacDougall, Wallace J., Darfield ~  Asst.
McKain, J. W., Renata Asst.
McLennan, Jimmy, Clearwater  Asst.
Nelson, Garald, Black Pines  2nd
Nelson, William L., Savona     1st
Nielson, Rendel, Pinantan  Asst.
Palmer, William F., Darfield  2nd
Peck, Ted., 4563 Third Ave. West, Vancouver  Asst.
Peel, Murrill, Pritchard      1st
Perry, Sam, Kamloops  .—Asst.
Rainer, Karl, Darfield  2nd
Savage, Jack, Kamloops  Asst.
Schreiber, Charles P., Darfield     1st
Scott, Duncan, Barriere      1st
Shook, Charles, Clearwater  2nd
Shook, Frank, Clearwater  Asst.
Small, Reg, Clearwater     1st
Smith, Henry, Barriere  2nd
Smith, John W, Savona  2nd
Thacker, George, Savona  Asst.
Turner, John, Criss Creek  2nd
Tuson, Clifford, Savona     1st
Vinie, Alec, Box 384, Kamloops  2nd
Welland, John, Red Lake  2nd
Woodward, Johnny, Little Fort     1st
Wilson, Don, Vinsulla  2nd
Withrow, Gordon, Valemount Asst.
Wood, Jack, Ladysmith Asst.
Similkameen (Penticton-Princeton-Keremeos)
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Armstrong, Allan C, Keremeos  2nd
Holding, Richard, Bankier P.O.  2nd
Le Lievre, George L., Penticton  2nd
Le Lievre, Lind J., Penticton     1st
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Lewis, James William, Princeton     1st
Manion, Bert Robert, Tulameen  Asst.
Manion, William Bartlett, Tulameen  2nd
Wright, Brian, Princeton  2nd REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 91
Peace River (Including Fort Nelson and Lower Post)
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Anderson, Edward A., Dawson Creek Asst.
Anderson, Stewart B., Dawson Creek     1st
Apsassin, Daniel, Fort St. John Asst.
Artemenko, William, Fort St. John  2nd
Beattie, Robert, Gold Bar  2nd
Bedell, Richard, Rolla Asst.
Behn, George, Fort Nelson Asst.
Belcourt, Adolphus, Hazelmere, Alta. (Big
Slough, B.C.)  2nd
Belcourt, Clarence, Mountain Valley, Alta.
(Big Slough, B.C.)  2nd
Belcourt,  Elbert,   Mountain  Valley,  Alta.
(Big Slough, B.C.) Asst.
Belcourt, Francis, Goodfare, Alta. Asst.
Belcourt,   George,   Lymburn   P.O.,   Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.) Asst.
Belcourt, Magloire, Mountain Valley, Alta.
(Big Slough, B.C.)  2nd
Belcourt,   William,   Lymburn  P.O.,   Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.) Asst.
Brown, Wesley J., Fort St. John     1st
Calliou,   Edward,   Hazelmere,   Alta.   (Big
Slough, B.C.) Asst.
Calliou, Joe, Little Prairie Asst.
Calliou,   Johnny,  Mountain  Valley,  Alta.
(Big Slough, B.C.)     1st
Calliou, Pete, Little Prairie Asst.
Calliou, Sam, Moberly Lake  2nd
Callison, Dennis W., Mile 422, Fort Nelson    1st
Cameron, Patrick, Moberly Lake     1st
Campbell, Alfred, Mountain Valley, Alta.
(Big Slough, B.C.) Asst.
Campbell, Harry, Goodfare, Alta.  (Kelly
Lake, B.C.)  Asst.
Cardinal, Harvey, North Pine Asst.
Clovis, Roy, Baldonnel Asst.
Callison, E. O., Mile 422, Fort Nelson _____    1st
Cooke, Frank, Dawson Creek Asst.
Cottom, Clarence A., Hudson Hope  2nd
Courtepatte, Alfred, Mountain Valley, Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.) Asst.
Courvoisier, Henry, Fort Nelson     1st
Davidson, J. O., Lower Post     1st
Davis, Albert, Moberly Lake Asst.
Desjarlais, lames, Moberly Lake Asst.
Desjarlais, Joe, Moberly Lake . Asst.
Dhenin, Rene G., Fort St. John     1st
Dopp, Bruce D., Bear Flat Asst.
Durney, Laviral, East Pine     1st
Durney, Milo, East Pine     1st
Edzera, George, Lower Post  2nd
Elden, Otto, Moberly Lake Asst.
Fellers, Harold L., Fellers Heights __  Asst.
Fleet, Delbert, Charlie Lake   Asst.
Garbitt, Theophile S., Moberly Lake     1st
Gauthier,   Eugene,   Mount   Valley,   Alta.
(Big Slough, B.C.)  Asst.
Gauthier, Johnny, Moberly Lake Asst.
Gibson, Harry B., Dawson Creek     1st
Gladu, Fred E., Lymburn P.O., Alta. (Kelly
Lake, B.C.)  Asst.
Gladu,   Isadore,   Goodfare,   Alta.    (Big
Slough, B.C.)   2nd
Gladu.   William,    Goodfare,   Alta.    (Big
Slough, B.C.)  Asst.
Golata, Francis W., Dawson Creek    1st
Goodrich, George, Little Prairie   2nd
Gray, George D., Goodfare, Alta. Asst.
Groat, Allen Henry, Sunset Prairie  2nd
Hambler, Elbert, Mountain Valley, Alta.
(Big Slough, B.C.)  Asst.
Hambler,   George,   Lymburn   P.O.,   Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.)  Asst.
Hambler, Joseph, Goodfare, Alta.  (Kelly
Lake, B.C.)  Asst.
Haralson, Lome M., Fort Nelson     1st
Harvey, Tom, Lower Post  2nd
Holly, James, Fort St. John Asst.
Harrold, John, Fort Nelson Asst.
Houle, Joe, Arras   2nd
Hubbard, T. H., Muncho Lake Asst.
Ireland, Guy E., Dawson Creek Asst.
Jensen, Charlie, Fort Nelson  Asst.
Keech, Jack T., Little Prairie Asst.
Kindt, B. R., Fort St. John Asst.
Kruger, Clifford, Gold Bar Asst.
Kruger, William, Hudson Hope  2nd
Lamont, Alexander, Fort St. John  2nd
Larson, Albin, Fort Nelson      1st
Letendre, Fred, Moberly Lake Asst.
Letendre, James, Goodfare P.O., Alta.  Asst.
Letendre, Roland, Mountain Valley, Alta.. 2nd
Longstreet, John, Gold Bar __— Asst.
Longhurst, William J., Fort St. John     1st
Mitchell, Gabriel, Moberly Lake Asst.
Monias, Jim, Moberly Lake Asst.
Mould, Tom, Muncho Lake  2nd
McCIarty, Fred, Dawson Creek Asst.
McDonald, Charlie, Fort Nelson  2nd
McGarvey, George, Hudson Hope Asst.
McGuire, Colum, Rolla  Asst.
MacLean, Arthur J., Bear Flat __ 2nd
McLean, William, East Pine     1st
McLeod, Rene B., Fort St. John Asst.
Napoleon, Thomas, Arras Asst.
Noskey, Narcisse, Goodfare, Alta.  (Kelly
Lake, B.C.)      1st
Paquette, Morris, Moberly Lake     1 st
Parsons, Machelle, Fort Nelson Asst.
Peck, Bruce, Hudson Hope Asst.
Peck, O. Keith, Hudson Hope Asst.
Peck, Donald, Hudson Hope   2nd
Peterson, A. F., Muncho Lake  2nd
Philpott, W. Henry, Montney Asst.
Pitts, Ray W., Charlie Lake  2nd
Powell, Jack K., Bear Flat Asst.
Powell, Pen, Hudson Hope Asst.
Rissling, Peter, Dawson Creek Asst.
Ross, James A., Dawson Creek     1st
Rutledge, Leo G., Hudson Hope     1st
Schatela,   Alfred,   Lymburn   P.O.,   Alta.
(Kelly Lake, B.C.)  Asst.
Sheffield, Callie A., Fort St. John     1st
Sheffield, Garth C, Taylor Asst.
Supranent,  John,  Goodfare,  Alta.   (Kelly
Lake, B.C.)   Asst.
Tipton, Ross, Dawson Creek Asst.
Wanyandie, Paul, c/o W. Gerry, Mountain Valley, Alta. (Big Slough, B.C.).  2nd
Watson, Donald H., Bear Flat Asst.
Watson, James H., Bear Flat Asst.
Warn, W. Francis, Groundbirch  2nd
Wilde, Thomas, North Pine  2nd
Yeager, Daniel, Doe River Asst.
Yeomans, Charles R., Walnut Grove Asst.
Young, Andrew, Dawson Creek Asst.
Young, Louis, Dawson Creek Asst. W 98
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cassiar (Telegraph Creek-Atlin)
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Asp, Phillip, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Ball, George B., Telegraph Creek     1st
Clever, Gene Bryan, Bennett  2nd
Day, Alfred, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Dehnie, Andy, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Dennis, Alex, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Dennis, John Creyke, Telegraph Creek     1st
Hope, J. C, McDame Creek Asst.
Jack, Alex, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Jack, Henry Taku, Atlin  2nd
Jackson, Richard, Telegraph Creek  2nd
Coastal Mainland to Prince Rupert
Licence
Grade
_—Asst.
Name and Address of Guide
Carter, Harold, Bella Coola 	
Casperson, Morten, Hagensborg        _ 2nd
Corbould, Gordon C, Suie, Bella Coola.... 2nd
Edgar, Herbert P., Bella Coola Asst.
Husband, George W., Queen Charlotte City 2nd
King, Wesley C, Hagensborg  2nd
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Lindsay, George, Massett  2nd
Merkel, W., Hagensborg  2nd
Nygaard, Martin, Bella Coola  1st
Robson, Bert, Atnarko  2nd
Stanton, James R., Glendale Cove  1st
Prince George District "A" (East to Mount Robson)
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Berghammer, Joseph, Ware   2nd
Bricker, William J., South Fort George  2nd
Brooks, George, South Fort George     1st
Buchanan, Edward G., South Fort George 2nd
Buchanan, Frank, South Fort George  2nd
Carr, Stanley J., Tete Jaune     1st
Chesser, Charles, Mount Robson  2nd
Corless (Jr.), Richard F., Prince George...    1st
Crate, Harvey, Lucerne Asst.
Crate, Lloyd, Lucerne  2nd
Fraser, Gordon W., Prince George  2nd
Gaugh, Allen H., Prince George  2nd
Hale, Stanley, Dome Creek  2nd
Hansen (Jr.), Anund, Hansard  Asst.
Hansen (Sr.), Anund, Hansard  __    1st
Hargreaves, Roy, Mount Robson     1st
Henry, George R., Prince George Asst.
Henry, Walter J., Prince George      1st
Hobe, Henry, Hansard   2nd
Hooker, James B., Dome Creek     1st
Hooker, Kenneth W., Dome Creek  2nd
Jensen, Arne, Dome Creek  2nd
Jensen, Einer W., Dome Creek   2nd
Jensen, Ernest H, Dome Creek     1st
Johnson, Howard T., South Fort George  2nd
Labonte, Leo, Prince George Asst.
Miller, Sam, Fort Ware Asst.
Mills, Marshall, Tete Jaune     1st
Mintz, Arthur J., Tete Jaune  2nd
Mintz, Carl Ed., Tete Jaune    1st
Mostrom, George, Box 321, Prince George 2nd
New, George, Prince George Asst.
Prather, Oliver J., Longworth  2nd
Prince, Andrew, Fort McLeod Asst.
Sande, Walter J., Sinclair Mills     1st
Senkpiel, Verne, Prince George Asst.
Simmons, Herbert, Prince George  2nd
Smith, James M., Loos     1st
Smith, Roy W., Prince George  2nd
Solonas, David, Fort McLeod  Asst.
Van Somer, James R., Prince George  2nd
Wade, Gordon D., South Fort George Asst.
Witter, Henry L., Prince George Asst.
Zlot, Mrs. Martha, Prince George Asst.
Zlotucha, Antoni, Prince George  2nd
Prince George District " B " (West to Terrace)
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Alec, John Mac, Fort St. James Asst.
Asline, Lawrence, Ootsa Lake Asst.
Bates, George H., Vanderhoof Asst.
Beaver, Albert E., Ootsa Lake  2nd
Bennett, Clifford C, Ootsa Lake Asst.
Bennett, Vernon, Southbank  2nd
Benoit, David, Fort St. James Asst.
Benson, Allen, Hazelton  2nd
Berry, Turner Dennison, Fort St. James ..-Asst.
Bird, Jim, Fort St. James  Asst.
Boyko, William, Finlay Forks  Asst.
Braaten, Edwin, Southbank  2nd
Buck, Earl A., Fort St. James  2nd
Christie, Ellis D., Southbank Asst.
Conlon, Rita, Topley  2nd
Cooke, Ted, Vanderhoof  2nd
Darby, Linzy E., Isle Pierre Asst.
Davidson, Charlie B., Vanderhoof     1st
Donald, Jimmie, Pendleton Bay  2nd
Evans, William Robert, Vanderhoof Asst.
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Fletcher, Allen E., Smithers  2nd
Foote, Charles H., Fraser Lake  2nd
Gardiner, William C, Smithers  2nd
George, Thomas Seymour, Telkwa  2nd
Gilliland, Donald W., Fort St. James Asst.
Granger, Barrington H., Noralee  2nd
Grasser, William, Tatalrose  Asst.
Hamilton, George E., Fort St. James .  ...Asst.
Harding, Clifford R., Fort St. James  2nd
Harlow, Edward S., Fort St. James Asst.
Harrison, Alford J., Wistaria   Asst.
Harrison, Bryan R., Wistaria     1st
Harrison, C. B., Wistaria  Asst.
Harrison, E. M., Wistaria Asst.
Harrison, Robert Owen, Wistaria  2nd
Henry, Stanley, Ootsa Lake    1st
Hensen, Frank E., Marilla     1st
Hindmarch, Floyd Ellis, Vanderhoof  2nd
Hipp, Anthony Julius, Terrace Asst.
Horr, Roswell, Ootsa Lake Asst. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 99
Prince George District " B '
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Hoy, David Henry, Fort St. James Asst.
Hughes, Roland I., Vanderhoof Asst.
Johnson, George M., Vanderhoof  2nd
Johnson, John H., Isle Pierre  2nd
Johnson, John K., Fort St. James  2nd
Jones, David Lewis, Fort St. James Asst.
Knox, John, Ootsa Lake     1st
Kohse, Louis, Vanderhoof   2nd
La Rocque, Leo, Fort Fraser Asst.
Laveck, William J., Prince George  2nd
Lee, John T., Hazelton  2nd
Leon, Paddy, Topley Landing   2nd
Lord, Roy, Tchesinkut Lake  Asst.
Lord, Samuel V., Tchesinkut Lake Asst.
Lord, Walter H., Tchesinkut Lake  2nd
Love, Walter lohn, Hazelton Asst.
Machell, Jack, Ootsa Lake Asst.
Martin, Betty J., Smithers Asst.
Martin, Eric S., Smithers  Asst.
Menard,   Gerard,   728   Tupper   St.,   New
Westminster   2nd
Miller, Sam L., Isle Pierre  2nd
Mitchell, Sam, Williams Lake  Asst.
Munger, F. W. Roy, Houston  2nd
Murray, Alec Ronald, Fort St. James Asst.
McConchie, Harry Russell, Fort St. James Asst.
McDonald, Edward H., Nithi River Asst.
McNeil, Clifford William, Ootsa Lake     1st
McNeil, John William C, Ootsa Lake     1st
Neighbor, Rersch, Tete Jaune      1st
Neighbor, Lorraine Z., Ootsa Lake Asst.
Nelson, George William, Vanderhoof  2nd
Nelson, John Norman, Clemretta  2nd
Olson, John Victor, Summit Lake Asst.
(West to Terrace)—Continued
Name and Address of Guide
Pease, Clarence A., Nithi River .
Mcence
Grade
     1st
Perison, Harold Magnus, Fort St. James.... Asst.
Plowman, Clarence, Endako   2nd
Plowman, Enid Alice, Endako Asst.
Plowman, W. C, Endako Asst.
Prince, Alfred, Fort St. James Asst.
Prince, Benoit, Fort St. James Asst.
Prince, Dixon, Fort St. James  Asst.
Prince, John, Fort St. James  2nd
Prince, Norman, Fort St. James Asst.
Prince, Teddy, Fort St. lames  2nd
Rasmussen, Peter, Mapes  2nd
Ray, Ivan E., Fraser Lake  2nd
Rehill, Manlie, Ootsa Lake     1st
Reynolds, John William, Houston  2nd
Roumieu, David, Burns Lake  2nd
Sam, Duncan, Fort St. James Asst.
Schultz, Albert L., Vanderhoof  2nd
Seyfarth, Joe, Fort St. James  2nd
Shea, James B., Telkwa :     1st
Short, Fay Warren, Colleymount Asst.
Simonson, Edwin, Hulatt  Asst.
Skin, Robert, Ootsa Lake  2nd
Smith, Harold Craig, Fort St. James     1st
Tetreau, Francis W., Southbank Asst.
Tourond, Pete, Francois Lake  Asst.
Van Somer, Art, Ware Asst.
Vantine, Douglas, Ootsa Lake Asst.
Vantine, Edward, Ootsa Lake     1st
Vantine, William, Tatalrose Asst.
Walker, Thomas A., Fort St. James     1st
Wiley, Alvin John, Southbank Asst.
Wiley, Glen, Southbank Asst.
Winsor, William J., Isle Pierre  2nd
Cariboo District "A" (100-Mile House South to Ashcroft and
Including Canim Lake and Lillooet)
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Archie, G., Forest Grove      1st
Archie, Jacob, Canim Lake  —    1st
Archie, Joe, Forest Grove  2nd
Archie, Sam, Forest Grove  2nd
Archie, Tommy, Canim Lake  2nd
Baker, Fred, Ashcroft  2nd
Baker, James A., Ashcroft  2nd
Baker, J. C, Clinton     1st
Baker, R. M., Clinton     1st
Barker, A. S., Canim Lake Asst.
Bayne, Alfred H, Canim Lake  2nd
Begg, Chester M., 70-Mile House Asst.
Bessette, A. J., Ashcroft  2nd
Bishop, J. A., Clinton    1st
Bob, Ed., Canim Lake      1st
Bones, Alex, Clinton    1st
Bones, Frank, Clinton     1st
Bones, Peter, Clinton '.    1st
Bones, Teresa, Clinton   2nd
Bothwick, Hector, Forest Grove   2nd
Bradford, A. N., R.R. 1, Fawn    1st
Brooke, H. A., Cache Creek  2nd
Camille, Francis, Canoe Creek  2nd
Chabara, Anna, 70-Mile House  2nd
Charlie, Jimmie, Forest Grove  2nd
Christopher, David, Canim Lake  2nd
Christopher, Peter, Canim Lake     1st
Christy, Frank, Moha  2nd
Christy, Thomas, Pavilion  Asst.
Cleveland, J. G., Bridge Lake      1st
Cleveland, L. C, Bridge Lake     1st
Cleveland, R. C, Bridge Lake    1st
Coldwell, H. W., Jesmond      1st
Colin, A. A., 100-Mile House Asst.
Colin, Grover, 100-Mile House Asst.
Colin, Victor, 100-Mile House Asst.
Collins, B. G., Ashcroft Asst.
Collins, E. M., Ashcroft     1st
Collins, Jack, Ashcroft   2nd
Collins, M. A., Cache Creek  2nd
Cunningham, Charles B., Bralorne     1st
Dahlgren, C, Bridge Lake Asst.
Daniels, George, Canim Lake   2nd
Deane, J. C, Bridge Lake  2nd
Deker, English, Forest Grove  2nd
Dyer, G. H., 70-Mile House  2nd
Dougall, Vivian, Bridge Lake Asst.
Dougherty, C. A., Ashcroft    1st
Dougherty, E. G., Clinton     1st
Edall, I. K, 100-Mile House  2nd
Edall, L. S., Fawn  2nd
Eden, R. B., 70-Mile House  2nd
Edens, Donald D., Lone Butte  2nd
Emmil, Wilford, 83-Mile House Asst.
Erickson, Steve, Canim Lake  2nd
Faessler, C. J., Fawn     1st
Falkner, Henry, 83-Mile House  2nd
Fenton, Charlie, Clinton    1st W  100
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cariboo District "A" (100-Mile House South to Ashcroft and
Including Canim Lake and Lillooet)—Continued
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Fenton, Henry, Clinton Asst.
Fenton, Walter, Jesmond      1st
Flaherty, R. J., 93-Mile House __      1st
Flaherty, R. W., 93-Mile House Asst.
Fowler, Norman, Clinton     1st
Frost, Freeman, Ashcroft  2nd
Gaines, Clinton, Fawn   2nd
Garrigan, A., Clinton  Asst.
George, Henry, Cache Creek  2nd
Gott, Joe, Clinton  Asst.
Graf, J., Fawn Asst.
Graf, Mike, Fawn       1st
Greenlee, E. L., Canim Lake     1st
Grice, Percy, 70-Mile House   2nd
Grinder, Bert, Clinton  2nd
Grinder, E., Jesmond  2nd
Grinder, Isidore, Clinton      1st
Grinder, Johnny, Jesmond     1st
Grinder, Louise, Clinton  2nd
Grinder, Walter, Big Bar      1st
Grypuik, S., Ashcroft _-_   Asst.
Hall, Marvin T., Bridge Lake  2nd
Hannah, Bruce, Clinton   2nd
Hansen, John F., Bridge Lake     1st
Hansen, Wesley B., Bridge Lake   2nd
Hendricks, I., Loon Lake   2nd
Higginbottom, Alfred, Jesmond   2nd
Higgins, C. L., Bridge Lake     1st
Higgins, E. D., Fawn     1st
Higgins, Elmer, Bridge Lake  Asst.
Higgins, K. E., Fawn : Asst.
Higgins, Marion, Bridge Lake     1st
Higgins, Ronald A., Bridge Lake     1st
Hodges, E. W., R.R. 1, Fawn  2nd
Holbrook, Ned, Moha Asst.
Horn, Walter A., Lone Butte  2nd
Houseman, J. J., 100-Mile House     1st
Huckvale, Jim, Fawn    1st
Hunter, Mickey. Ashcroft  2nd
Hutchison, D. B., 70-Mile House _■___ 2nd
Johnson, Claude, Bridge Lake      1st
Johnson, J. A., 100-Mile House    1st
Johnson, Zale A., Bridge Lake  2nd
Keary, Charles J., Tyaughton Lake  2nd
King, C. J., Fawn   2nd
King, Gordon, R.R. 1, Fawn   2nd
Knauf, H. G., Fawn      1st
Koster, Henry, Empire Valley  2nd
Krebs, L. B., 100-Mile House  2nd
Land, Robert S., Moha     1st
Langley, Arthur L., 70-Mile House  2nd
Larson, J. O., Bridge Lake     1st
Larson, K. I., Fawn  2nd
Larum, S., Fawn   2nd
Leavitt (Jr.), F. W., Fawn     1st
Lebourdais, Joe, Clinton  2nd
Lehman, Albert, Lillooet   2nd
Levick, J. S., Fawn  2nd
Livingston, Niel, 70-Mile House  2nd
Lord, E., Buffalo Creek  2nd
Loring, Edwin, Clinton  2nd
Louie, Freddie, Canoe Creek     1st
Louie, Gavy, Canoe Creek  2nd
Mabbs, Alfred H., 70-Mile House  2nd
Mabbs, W. E., 70-Mile House  2nd
Mackie, lim, Fawn      1st
Maclean, D., Fawn :  2nd
Madden, E. E., Cache Creek  2nd
Marriott, R. H, Clinton  2nd
Mathewson, A. E., Ashcroft _  2nd
Matier, Herb, Clinton  2nd
Martin, R. H., Bridge Lake   2nd
Mooring, Alex, Fawn   2nd
Morris, Daymond L., Forest Grove  1st
Munter, W., Fawn  2nd
Murray, George, Ashcroft   2nd
McMahon, J. C, 70-Mile House  2nd
McKay, John V., Lytton  2nd
McNiel, B. S., Fawn :  1st
McNiel, H. M., Fawn  1st
Odian, E. L, Fawn  2nd
O'Keefe, Wally, Rexmount Ranch  1st
Olafson, H. L, Fawn  2nd
Oldman, Patrick, Shalalth  2nd
Osterlund, Ed., Moha   2nd
Parent, S. J., Fawn   2nd
Park, A. H., 70-Mile House  2nd
Park, J. P., 70-Mile House  2nd
Parkes, L. G., 70-Mile House  2nd
Paul, Louis, Canoe Creek  2nd
Peavler, Wendall C, Jesmond  2nd
Perrault, J., Jesmond  2nd
Petrie, Don, Bridge Lake   2nd
Pierro, J., Cache Creek  2nd
Pigeon, Aure, Clinton  1st
Pigeon, C. L., Clinton  2nd
Pigeon, N. G., Clinton   Asst.
Pigeon, Rosaire, Clinton   1st
Pinkney, Robert O., Canim Lake  2nd
Powell, H. L, Fawn  1st
Powell, T. G., Fawn  1st
Reinertson, R. L, Fawn   1st
Reynolds, Alvin J., Big Bar  1st
Reynolds, H. D., Big Bar  1st
Roberts, R. V., Bridge Lake  2nd
Roper, Alfred, Forest Grove  2nd
Rosette, Augustine, Gang Ranch  1st
Scheepbouwer, J. A., 70-Mile House  1st
Scheepbouwer, John C, 70-Mile House ____ 2nd
Scheepbouwer, William, 70-Mile House ____ 2nd
Schwartz, Tommy, Shalalth   Asst.
Scott, Douglas, 100-Mile House  1st
Sedman, J. E., R.R. 1, Fawn  2nd
Siebert, lohn, Jesmond   2nd
Singleton, Fred, Fawn  2nd
Stanislaus, Pat, Forest Grove  2nd
Thomason, D. M., Bridge Lake  1st
Thorsteinson, Charles, 93-Mile House  2nd
Tompkins, F. L., Clinton  Asst.
Turney, R. J., Fawn   1st
Umphrey, S. T., Fawn  2nd
Van Horlick, Buster, Clinton  2nd
Vecqueray, A. E., Clinton  2nd
Vecqueray, R. J., Clinton      2nd
Walsh, F. C, 70-Mile House  2nd
Watt, Lloyd, Ashcroft  2nd
Westman, James, Forest Grove  2nd
Whitley, W. P., 70-Mile House  2nd
Whittle, Percy, Canim Lake  2nd
Wigley, F. W., 70-Mile House  2nd
Wilkinson, Charles, 70-Mile House  2nd
Wilkinson, T. H., Fawn   2nd
Williams, Antro, Cache Creek Asst.
Winteringham, Frank, Fawn   2nd
Womack, C. B., Lone Butte  2nd
Young, William, Clinton  2nd .
REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,   1949
W  101
Cariboo District "B" (100-Mile House North to Marguerite,
East of Fraser River)
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Abram, H. E., Lac la Hache  2nd
Alexander, Jack, Lac la Hache    1st
Ash, Chris, Big Lake  2nd
Asserlind, H. C., Keithley Creek  2nd
Atkins, Dan, Horsefly  2nd
Barker, Peter, Big Lake  2nd
Barrett, Stanley, Likely  2nd
Barton, Thomas, Lac la Hache     1st
Bathgate, John, Lac la Hache  2nd
Bentley, J. J., Lac la Hache Asst.
Bowe, Alfred, Williams Lake  2nd
Branch, E. J., Miocene  2nd
Brice, Jack, Big Lake  2nd
Brown-John, Victor, Horsefly  2nd
Curtis, Rae, Williams Lake  2nd
Dick, Mathew, Alkali Lake :  2nd
Dixon, Maurice, Lac la Hache  2nd
Eagle, C. B., Lac la Hache    1st
Ewart, D. E., Lac la Hache  2nd
Felker, W. R., Williams Lake  2nd
Ford, Clair, Horsefly  2nd
Forster, H. H., Likely     1st
Gibbons, L. M., Horsefly     1st
Goetjen, Charles E., Horsefly  2nd
Graham, Jack, Horsefly   2nd
Graham, James, Horsefly  2nd
Gunn, John, Horsefly      1st
Haller, August, Lac la Hache  2nd
Hamilton, G. G., Williams Lake  2nd
Hamilton, H. M., Lac la Hache     1st
Hamilton, Peter, Williams Lake  2nd
Hamilton, Rae M., Williams Lake  2nd
Hamilton, Theodore, Lac la Hache     1st
Hamilton, Thomas, Williams Lake   2nd
Hamilton, Thomas Joseph, Ta Ta Creek ___ 2nd
Herber, Archie, 150-Mile House  2nd
Hinsche, Fred, 150-Mile House  2nd
Hockley, George, Horsefly     1st
Hooker, F. C, Horsefly      1st
Hooker, F. P., Horsefly Asst.
Hooker, S. B., Horsefly     1st
Hooker, Thomas, Horsefly  2nd
Hubbard, I. H., Horsefly     1st
lacobson, John, Williams Lake   2nd
Jefferson, Jesse, Big Lake  2nd
Jefferson, Theodore, Big Lake  2nd
Jenner, Ernest, Horsefly     1st
lohnson, Floyd, 150-Mile House  2nd
Jones, Fred, Horsefly        1st
Jones, Lawrence, Horsefly   1st
Junek, Adolph, Horsefly  2nd
Kelly, James A., Soda Creek ;  2nd
Manley, D. V., Horsefly  2nd
Mann, Arnold, Likely  2nd
Mikkelson, Claus, Horsefly  2nd
Moore, John, Williams Lake   2nd
Morgan, D., Likely  1st
McBurney, Aubry, Keithley Creek   2nd
McDougall, Robert, Big Lake   1st
McKenzie, Kenneth, Big Lake  1st
Nicol, Alex, Horsefly     1st
Nicol, Shelley, Horsefly   1st
Oak, Ernest, Horsefly  2nd
Ogden, Lawrence, Lac la Hache   2nd
Ogden, Peter, Lac la Hache Asst.
Otson, Arbor, Horsefly  2nd
Palmer, Norman Robert, Ochiltree  2nd
Patton, H., Big Lake  2nd
Pulver, George, 150-Mile House  1st
Petrowitz, Arthur, 150-Mile House  2nd
Prior, Joe, Hydraulic  2nd
Pulver, William G., 150-Mile House  2nd
Racher, Wilfred, Horsefly  1st
Robertson, A. H., Macalister  2nd
Robertson, H. T., Macalister  2nd
Robertson, Irene, Miocene    2nd
Robertson, Kenneth, Miocene   2nd
Sharp, William, Ochiltree  2nd
Speed, Douglas, Likely  2nd
Thygesen, Julius, Horsefly   1st
Vaness, John, Horsefly   1st
Walters, Glen, Horsefly   1st
Walters, Leonard, Horsefly    1st
Walters, R. I., Likely  2nd
Webster, Alfred, Horsefly .  2nd
Webster, Alister, Horsefly  2nd
Weber, James L., Big Lake  2nd
Westwick, Burton, 150-Mile House  1st
Westwick, Freddie, 150-Mile House   2nd
Westwick, Lawrence, 150-Mile House  2nd
Wiggins, Wiley, Miocene   2nd
Williams, Aubry, Horsefly   1st
Williams, Rex, Lac la Hache  1st
Williams, Thelma, Horsefly  2nd
Wotzke, Herbert, Williams Lake  2nd
Wycotte, James, Williams Lake  2nd
Wynistra, J. W., Horsefly    2nd
Zirul, John, Lac la Hache _.  2nd
PROVING!mu   UBRARt
VICTORIA, B.C W  102
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Cariboo District " C " (Quesnel-Barkerville from
Marguerite North)
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Allen, George Herbert, Quesnel,  1st
Armstrong, Wilfred R., Quesnel  2nd
Becker, Fred W., Wells  1st
Bobb, Edward R., Marguerite   2nd
Cochran, James Dean, Barkerville  1st
Coldwell, Harry, Punchaw  2nd
Cooper, Thomas Hiram, Quesnel   2nd
Dale, Joseph T., Woodpecker  2nd
Ellison, Ray Angal, Quesnel  2nd
Gerwin, Joseph, Nazko  2nd
Harrington, Alexander G., Quesnel  1st
Heaton, William Frank, Narcosli Creek ____ 2nd
Hoffman, Pete, Cinema  2nd
Knudson, Leonard, Quesnel   2nd
Laurent, Louie, Nazko  Asst.
Lavington, Arthur C, Nazko  1st
Lavington, Harold A., Quesnel   1st
Lavoie, George Charles, Batnuni Lake  2nd
Miller, Isaac E., Punchaw  2nd
Moffat, Ronald H., Alexandria  2nd
Morris, Micke, Cinema  2nd
MacKenzie, Albert, Cinema  Asst.
Name and Address of Guide
MacKenzie, James H., Cinema .
McKitrick, Roy D., Wells
Licence
Grade
.-_    1st
____ 2nd
McKort, Clarence C, Alexandria     1st
McKort, Irvine, Alexandria  Asst.
O'Leary, Arthur, Quesnel     1st
Orr, William M., Chilliwack  2nd
Paley, Bob, Quesnel  Asst.
Paley, Harold, Quesnel Asst.
Paley, Wallace, Quesnel  Asst.
Paley, Wayne, Quesnel  Asst.
Quanstrom, Carl, Quesnel   2nd
Quanstrom, Harry, Quesnel   2nd
Quanstrom, Julius, Quesnel   2nd
Rawling, Arden, Quesnel   2nd
Simrose, Martin, Cinema      1st
Sorum, Erick, Cottonwood  2nd
Tibbies, Fred, Quesnel     1st
Tibbies, James, Quesnel  2nd
Vernon, Clifford, Quesnel Asst.
Young, Grover A., Wells    1st
Webster, Jim, Narcosli Creek     1st
Cariboo District " D
(Chilcotin District, Cariboo West of
Fraser River)
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Baker, Clint, Redstone  Asst.
Baptiste, Gabriel, Tatlayoko Lake Asst.
Baptiste, Pete, Alexis Creek   Asst.
Baptiste, Timothy, Kleena Kleene  2nd
Blacknose, Chel, Alexis Creek  2nd
Blatchford, John A., Alexis Creek     1st
Bliss, William M., Alexis Creek     1st
Bryant, Alfred L., Anahim Lake     1st
Bullion, Sammy, Hanceville  2nd
Butler, Lee, Tatla Lake Asst.
Butler, Leonard, Tatla Lake  2nd
Christensen, Andy, Anahim Lake  2nd
Church, R. H., Big Creek    1st
Clayton, John H., Anahim Lake  2nd
Collier, Eric, Meldrum Creek  2nd
Collier, Veasy, Meldrum Creek Asst.
Dester, Baptiste, Kleena Kleene     1st
Diehl, Leo J., Big Creek  2nd
Dorsey, Lester, Anahim Lake     1st
Elkins, Joe, Alexis Creek     2nd
Elkins, Marvin, Alexis Creek  2nd
Elkins, Thomas, Alexis Creek    1st
Erickson, Arthur, Anahim Lake Asst.
Erickson, Carl B., Anahim Lake Asst.
French, Robert, Redstone  2nd
Garland, Ed., Riske Creek Asst.
Gowland, Russell H., Alexis Creek  2nd
Haddrell, George, West Summerland  2nd
Hance, Grover, Hanceville     1st
Haynes, H. K., Tatlayoko Lake  2nd
Haynes, Kenneth W. G., Tatlayoko Lake.___ 2nd
Henderson, John, Tatlayoko Lake    1st
Henry, A. C, Big Creek     1st
Henry, Eagle Lake, Redstone     1st
Holte, Andrew, Anahim Lake   2nd
Holte, Thomas, Anahim Lake   2nd
Howarth, Dewey, Hanceville Asst.
Hugo, Ambrose Mark, Big Creek     1st
Hutchinson, William A., Big Creek  2nd
Jasper, Delmar J. C, Riske Creek Asst.
Jasper, Wesley N., Riske Creek  2nd
lohnson, T. William, Riske Creek     1st
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Knoll, Alvis, Redstone  2nd
Kosmonek, Albert, Anahim Lake Asst.
Lulua, Felix, Tatlayoko Lake  2nd
Lulua, Henry, Tatlayoko Lake  2nd
Lulua, Tommy, Tatlayoko Lake  2nd
Mackie, B. A., Anahim Lake  2nd
Mackill, Clarence, Kleena Kleene     1st
Maindley, lohn, Alexis Creek  2nd
Maxted, William F., Big Creek  2nd
Moore, James, Hanceville  2nd
Moore, K. B., Tatlayoko Lake  2nd
Mullen, Bernal A., Tatla Lake  2nd
Mulvahill, Randolph, Redstone     1st
Mulvahill, William W., Redstone  2nd
Nicholson, Donald R., Tatla Lake  2nd
Nicholson, Terrence, Tatla Lake 2nd
Paxton, Alex Robert, Alexis Creek  2nd
Phillips, P., Anahim Lake  2nd
Quilt, Frederick, Hanceville  2nd
Quilt, Jack, Hanceville  2nd
Quilt, Louis, Big Creek  2nd
Rafferty, Arthur T., Riske Creek Asst.
Roberts, C. F., Riske Creek     1st
Roberts, Johnny, Anahim Lake  2nd
Ross, Eddie, Redstone  2nd
Ross, Peter, Redstone   2nd
Sammy, Danny, Hanceville   2nd
Sammy, Eugene, Hanceville  2nd
Sammy, Jimmy, Tatla Lake   2nd
Scallon, Felix, Big Creek Asst.
Schuk, Edward A., Tatlayoko Lake  2nd
Scotty, Frank, Kleena Kleene  2nd
Sing, Isaac, Anahim Lake  Asst.
Squinas, Thomas, Anahim Lake     1st
Stephenson, Donald, Alexis Creek  2nd
Timothy, Dominic, Kleena Kleene fVsst.
Wier, Donald J., Alexis Creek     1st
Wilson, David F., Tatla Lake  2nd
Witte, Duane, Big Creek    1st
Witte, Frank, Big Creek     1st
Woods, William F., Hanceville     1st
Zulin, Willie, Anahim Lake  2nd REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949
W 103
East Kootenay "A" (Cranbrook-Invermere-Golden Districts)
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Anderson, Charles D., Windermere     1st
Baldry, Charles, Windermere  2nd
Ball, James E., Invermere Asst.
Belchek, Walter L., Canal Flats Asst.
Bergenham, Peter, Beavermouth      1st
Bjorn, Henry Manning, Fort Steele  2nd
Broadfoot, Bruce, Donald Asst.
Boyle, Jack, Golden  Asst.
Boyle, James, Invermere  2nd
Brewer, Carl, Invermere  2nd
Brogan, Alex, Canal Flats   2nd
Burns, Howard, Golden  Asst.
Canning, Lester, Skookumchuck   2nd
Carlson, Stanley, Ta Ta Creek Asst.
Cooper, Albert, Invermere  2nd
Dobbie (Jr.), Alex, Invermere  2nd
Du Bois, Vaughn, Windermere      1st
Engles, Jack, Invermere   2nd
Feuz, Sidney, Golden  Asst.
Feuz, Walter, Golden     1st
Fisher, Tony, Fairmont  2nd
Francis, Nicklos, St. Mary's Reserve, Cranbrook  Asst.
Gabry, Michael, Brisco    2nd
Goodwin, Cecil, Invermere  2nd
Goodwin, Elwood, Edgewater   2nd
Gould, Percy, Canal Flats     1st
Hammond, Lyle, Golden      1st
Hansen, Trygvert, Wilmer   2nd
Hansen, Walter, Edgewater   2nd
Harrison, William O., Edgewater     1st
Hogan, Charles A., Spillimacheen     1st
Hogan, Charles M., Spillimacheen      1st
Hynes, Ben, Spillimacheen  Asst.
Johnson, Alexander, Invermere  2nd
loseph, Camille, Fairmont  2nd
Joseph, Jerome, Fairmont  2nd
Kain, Isidor, Wilmer  2nd
King, Norman, Golden     1st
Lawrence, Charles, Golden      1st
Lindborg, Axel, Golden     1st
Lum, Peter Charles, Fort Steele     1st
Mitchell, Robert, Brisco   2nd
Morigeau, Martin, Fairmont      1st
McClain, less I., Spillimacheen     1st
McClain, Mrs. J. I., Spillimacheen Asst.
Mcintosh, Ewen M., Athalmer  2nd
McKay, Gordon, Invermere     1st
McKay, lames, Invermere  Asst.
Nease, Joe Jimmy, Windermere   2nd
Nicholas, Dominic, Windermere     1st
Nicol, Arthur Henry, Fort Steele     1st
Nixon, Walter J., Invermere     1st
Pelton, Robert Benjamin, Cranbrook  2nd
Philips, Frank,  1551 St. Andrews, North
Vancouver      1st
Phillips, Eclus C, Invermere     1st
Pommier, Emile, Skookumchuck  2nd
Rad, Gordon, Invermere   2nd
Richter, Frank, Invermere     1st
Robinson, Arthur E., Canal Flats Asst.
Romane, William, Golden   2nd
Rutherford, Melville, Invermere   2nd
Schesser, Fred, Golden Asst.
Seward, Arvid, Golden     1st
Sheek, W. P., Spillimacheen     1st
Smith, Harold, Athalmer  Asst.
Sparrow, John H., Windermere  2nd
Sykes, Harry, Spillimacheen     1st
Tegart, George, Edgewater     1st
Tegart, Hiram W., Brisco     1st
Tegart, James, Brisco     1st
Tegart, Robert, Windermere   2nd
Thomas, Orville Edward, Parson Asst.
Thomas, Robert, Parson  2nd
Thompson, James, Brisco     1st
Thompson, Lionel, Edgewater 1     1st
Tyler, Graham, Invermere  2nd
Vernon-Wood, Nello, Brisco      1st
Webber, Sidney, Golden     1st
Weeden, Frederick, Wilmer  2nd
White, lames Freeman, Fort Steele     1st
Wolfenden, Winson, Brisco   2nd
East Kootenay " B " (Cranbrook East to Crow's Nest,
Including Fernie and Natal)
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Anderson, Fred, Wardner     1st
Arbuckle, lohn, Fernie  2nd
Ashman, Levi, Waterton P.O., Alta.  2nd
Baher, Mathias, Natal     1st
Baher, Martin, Natal      1st
Bohning, William, Natal Asst.
Baher, Fred, Natal  Asst.
Barnes, Alfred, Fernie      1st
Barnes, I. N., Fernie     1st
Cults, Jack, Fernie  : Asst.
Cunliffe, Thomas, Fernie  Asst.
Dvorak, Frank, Fernie     1st
Dvorak, Wenzel, Fernie   2nd
Eftoda, Gordon, Natal   2nd
Gorrie, Methven, Flagstone .     1st
Gravelle, Alex, Flagstone Asst.
Gravelle, Nick, Flagstone  2nd
Hammer, Andy, Wardner Asst.
Hicks, Frank, Fernie     1st
Hicks, Philip, Fernie     1st
Kubinec, John P., Fernie Asst.
Kubinec, Pete, Fernie  Asst.
Kobus, Steve, Fernie Asst.
Licen.e
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Letcher, George, Fernie Asst.
Matric, Louis, Natal Asst.
McGinnis, Earl, Natal      1st
McGuire, Albert, Flagstone   2nd
Philips, George, Flagstone  Asst.
Porco, Albert, Michel     1st
Porco, John, Natal  Asst.
Porco, Ralph, Michel      1st
Qualtert, E., Natal Asst.
Reay, Charles Doyle, Jaffray  2nd
Reid, William, Fernie  Asst.
Riddell, Harry Scott, Wardner  2nd
Rosicky, Andrew, Wardner Asst.
Rosicky, Anton, Wardner     1st
Rothel, Malcom, Natal     1st
Siple, Alfred, Wardner     1st
Smalik, Rudolph, Fernie Asst.
Talbot, Percy, Natal  Asst.
Volpatti, Benjamin John, Natal     1st
Washburn, Len, Fernie     1st
Williams, Robert, Fernie Asst.
Williams, Wilfred, Ferni  Asst.
Wise, Charles, Flathead   2nd W   104
BRITISH COLUMBIA
West Kootenay (Including Creston-Nelson-Slocan-Kootenay-Arrow
and Trout Lakes Districts)
Licence
Name and Address of Guide Grade
Abey, Harry Ross, Kaslo   2nd
Besecker, L. D., Kaslo   2nd
Brett, Art, Wynndel Asst.
Brogan, Joseph, Kingsgate  2nd
Carlson, Herman, Kaslo Asst.
Clark, W. F., Howser  2nd
Cummings, Arnold, Boswell  2nd
Cummings, Ray, Boswell  Asst.
Gates, E. B., St. Leon, Nakusp     1st
Hagen, Frank, Wynndel  2nd
Hallgren, Sven, Ainsworth     1st
Hawkins, Sumner, Port Crawford  2nd
Name and Address of Guide
Licence
Grade
Kachuk, J., Trout Lake  2nd
Koch, Charles, Sanca   2nd
MacNicol, J. W., Johnson's Landing  2nd
Newbrand, Emil, Nakusp  2nd
O'Neil, Richard, Sanca  2nd
Oliver, George J., Grays Creek  2nd
Rodgers, Floyd C, Creston  1st
Rodgers, James L., Creston  1st
Schwartzenhauer, Carl, Deer Park   2nd
Small, Roy G., Beaton  1st
Wilkinson, D. D., Howser ____Asst.
PERSONNEL OF GAME COMMISSION AS AT DECEMBER 31st, 1949
Attorney-General (Minister) _Hon. Gordon S. Wismer, K.C Victoria.
Game Commission (members) Frank R. Butler Vancouver.
James G. Cunningham Vancouver.
Chief Clerk	
Intermediate Clerk..
Clerk	
Clerk	
Secretarial Stenographer
Headquarters
_H. D. Simpson Vancouver.
.Miss I. Lawson Vancouver.
_J. McLellan Vancouver.
__W. Fowkes Vancouver.
_ Miss W. Cooper Vancouver.
Senior Stenographer Miss J. Smith , .Vancouver.
Clerk-Stenographer Miss P. Golder Vancouver.
Clerk-Stenographer Miss J. Mortimer Vancouver.
Clerk-Stenographer   Miss R. McKay Vancouver.
Clerk-Stenographer   Miss D. Voldsnes Vancouver.
Game-fish Culture Branch
Fishery Supervisor C. H. Robinson Nelson.
Fishery Officer   E. Hunter   Nelson.
Fishery Officer A. Higgs Summerland.
Hatchery Officer N. Lingford, Summerland.
Fishery Officer R. A. McRae Kaslo.
Fishery Officer F. Pells Cultus Lake.
Hatchery Officer   A. S. Frisby Nelson.
Hatchery Officer I. C. Inglis Courtenay.
Hatchery Officer   J. D. S. Inverarity Courtenay.
Hatchery Officer F. H. Martin . Cultus Lake.
Hatchery Officer C. O. Mellor. Cultus Lake.
"A" Division (Vancouver Island and Portions of Lower Mainland)
Inspector G. C. Stevenson Victoria.
Clerk _ D. Keirs Victoria.
Game Warden J. W. Jones Victoria.
Game Warden R. W. Sinclair Victoria.
Game Warden W.S.Webb Alberni.
Corporal Game Warden O. Mottishaw Alert Bay.
Game Warden JR. S. Hayes Campbell River.
Game Warden M. L. Gardiner Courtenay.
Game Warden F. P. Weir. Duncan.
Game Warden F. H. Greenfield Nanaimo. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL GAME COMMISSION,  1949 W 105
" B " Division (Kootenay and Boundary Districts)
Inspector C. F. Kearns Nelson.
Clerk-Stenographer Mrs. E. H. Edgar Nelson.
Game Warden _R. A. Rutherglen Nelson.
Game Warden J. W. Bayley Cranbrook.
Game Warden JB. Rauch Cranbrook.
Game Warden G. A. Lines Creston.
Game Warden... J. J. Osman Fernie.
Game Warden _N. Cameron Golden.
Corporal Game Warden _. A. F. Sinclair Grand Forks.
Game Warden  H. Tyler Invermere.
Game Warden A. Monks Penticton.
Game Warden A. F. Gill Princeton.
Game Warden _P. D. Ewart 1 Trail.
" C " Division (Kamloops, Yale, Okanagan, and Cariboo Districts)
Inspector R. M. Robertson Kamloops.
Clerk-Stenographer _„__Miss H. Swadling Kamloops.
Game Warden D. Ellis Kamloops.
Game Warden I. P. C. Atwood Kamloops.
Game Warden H. J. Lorance Kamloops.
Game Warden W. T. Ward Kamloops.
Game Warden R. H. Haynes Alexis Creek.
Game Warden .W. I. Fenton Clinton.
Game Warden   .W. R. Maxson Kelowna.
Game Warden R. S. Welsman Lillooet.
Game Warden E. M. Martin Merritt.
Game Warden W. I. Hillen Quesnel.
Game Warden E. D. Cameron Revelstoke.
Game Warden D. Cameron Salmon Arm.
Game Warden R. Farquharson Vernon.
Game Warden E. Holmes Wells.
Game Warden L. lobin Williams Lake.
" D " Division (Atlin, Skeena, Omineca, Fort George, Peace River,
and Yukon Boundary Districts)
Inspector W. A. H. Gill Prince George.
Clerk  R. I. Guay Prince George.
Stenographer Miss F. A. Sutton Prince George.
Game Warden A. J. Jank Prince George.
Game Warden L. G. Smith Prince George.
Game Warden D. G. H. Stevenson Burm Lake.
Game Warden J. A. McCabe Fort Nelson.
Game Warden (Special) B. Villeneuve Fort Nelson.
Game Warden J. D. Williams Fort St. John.
Game Warden I. W. Stewart Lower Post.
Game Warden R. W. C. Tate Pouce Coupe.
Game Warden L. J. Cox Smithers.
Corporal Game Warden E. Martin _ Prince Rupert.
Clerk-Stenographer Miss M. Boulter Prince Rupert.
Game Warden K. R. Walmsley Prince Rupert.
Game Warden R. O. Anderson Vanderhoof.
" E " Division (Vancouver, Coast, and Lower Fraser Valley Districts)
Inspector R. E. Allan Vancouver.
Game Warden R.S.King Vancouver.
Corporal Game Warden L. R. C. Lane Vancouver.
Game Warden F. R. Lobb Vancouver.
Game Warden H. D. Mulligan .__■_ Vancouver.
Game Warden H. L. Rose Vancouver.
Game Warden...... A.J. Butler Chilliwack.
Game Warden H. P. Hughes Cloverdale'.
Game Warden W. H. Cameron Ladner.
Game Warden P. M. Cliffe Mission.
Game Warden F. Urquhart Port Coquitlam. W 106 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Predatory-animal Hunters
Predatory-animal Hunter Supervisor W. W. Mair Vancouver.
Chief Predatory-animal Hunter   J. Dewar. Extension.
Predatory-animal Hunter A. L. Frost Extension.
Predatory-animal Hunter A. W. Hames Extension.
Predatory-animal Hunter K. Moores Extension.
Predatory-animal Hunter. D. H. Denison Fort Fraser.
Predatory-animal Hunter C. G. Ellis Kamloops.
Predatory-animal Hunter G. Haskell Nelson.
victoria, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1951
1,295-1250-4211  

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.bcsessional.1-0342774/manifest

Comment

Related Items