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DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY MENTAL HOSPITALS PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR 12… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1951]

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
MENTAL HOSPITALS
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
FOR 12 MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31st
1950
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1950  To His Honour C. Wallace, C.B.E.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the Director
of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry of the Mental Hospitals for the fiscal year ended
March 31st, 1950.
W. T. STRAITH,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
December 2nd, 1950.  TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART I.—MEDICAL
Page
Officers and Staff, List of '.     9
Report—Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry  15
Report—Laboratory  23
Report—X-ray Department  25
Report—Physiotherapy  26
Report—Psychologist  26
Report—Dentist  28
Report—Optician :  28
Report—Beauty-parlour  29
Report—Department of Nursing  29
Report—Occupational Therapy Department  31
Report—Recreational Therapy Department  32
Report—Library  34
Report—Audio-visual Department  34
Report—Child Guidance Clinics  36
Report—Social Service ,  45
Statistical Tables—
1. Movement of Population during Year  51
2. Summary of Operations of Hospitals since Inception  52
3. Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths  54
4. Civil State of Patients Admitted  54
5. Religious Denominations of Patients  55
6. Educational Status of Patients  55
7. Nationality of Patients  56
8. Districts from Which Patients Were Admitted  57
9. Occupation of Patients Prior to Admission '  58
10. Age of Patients on Admission  59
11. Number of Attacks at Time of Admission  60
12. Alleged Duration of Attacks Prior to Admission  60
13. Table of Heredity  60
14. Alleged Cause of Insanity in Patients Admitted  61
15. State of Bodily Health of Patients Admitted  61
16. Form of Mental Disorder in Patients Admitted  62
17. Probation, Number Allowed Out on  62
18. Discharges, Showing Alleged Duration of Insanity  63
19. Discharges, Showing Length of Residence in Hospital and Condition at Time
of Discharge   63
20. Deaths, Cause of, and Length of Time in Hospital, Essondale, New West
minster, and Saanich  64 V 6 TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART II.—-FINANCIAL
Paoe
Report—Business Manager  68
Expense Statement, Psychopathic Department  69
Expense Statement, Headquarters Department  69
Financial Tables—
A. Average Residence, Maintenance, and per Capita Cost for the Past Ten Years 70
g', j- Yearly Gross Expenditure, Analysis of, for the Past Ten Years  71
C. Summary of Gross and Net per Capita Cost in All Hospitals  72
D. Expense Statement, New Westminster  73
E. Expense Statement, Essondale  74
F. Expense Statement, Saanich  75
Revenue, Table of, for the Past Ten Years  76
Expenditures under Dominion Mental Health Grants  76
PART III.—COLONY FARM
Report—Financial, General—Business Manager  78
Profit and Loss Account  78
Dairy and Herds Department—Profit and Loss Account  79
Work-horse Department—Profit and Loss Account ,.  79
Hog Department—Profit and Loss Account  80
Cannery—Profit and Loss Account   80
Orchard and Truck Garden—Profit and Loss Account  81
Crop Department—-Profit and Loss Account, etc  81
Tractor Account  82
Truck Account  82
Maintenance and Administration, General  82
Miscellaneous Statements, Inventories, etc.—
Produce Supplied to Essondale  83
Produce Supplied to New Westminster  83
Accounts Receivable  83
Remittances to Treasury  8 3
Equipment  84
Orchards and Small Fruits  84 The Honourable W. T. Straith, K.C.,
Provincial Secretary.
Sir,—I have felt justified in this departure from the usual formal procedure governing the submission of the Annual Report of the Mental Hospitals of British Columbia,
for the last day of the period covered by this Report marked the last day of the thirty-five-
year career in the Provincial Government service of Dr. A. L. Crease, Director of Mental
Hygiene and Psychiatry. Although in fact the section that bears his name has been
reviewed by him, the whole Report has, of course, been compiled since he retired.
It will be many years before British Columbia becomes fully aware of its debt to
Dr. Crease. Long ago he realized that the answer to mental illness is not merely an
institution for custodial care into which patients are herded with little hope for recovery.
In the face of many obstacles, mostly fiscal, and with the continuous burden of the
day-to-day operation and almost limitless complexity of a hospital administering to 5,000
patients, he was able to lay the foundation for an enlightened approach to the treatment of
mental illness—the largest single cause of the hospitalization of our people.
A beginning has been made in the fields of research, of prevention, of early treatment,
and of rehabilitation. Without development in these fields, it is inevitable that the future
must hold necessity for vast capital construction (at least a 250-bed hospital each year)
and for maintenance of patients in hospital in ever-increasing degree.
Within a few days of the retirement of Dr. A. L. Crease (whose short biography,
written by Dr. A. M. Gee, appears in this Report), the Honourable G. S. Pearson was
forced, on account of ill-health, to relinquish his portfolios. It is fitting that tribute be
paid to Mr. Pearson for the support that he gave to Dr. Crease in securing the approval
for the completion of the Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine and for the encouragement that, within the fiscal limitations, he was able to give to Dr. Crease in bringing the
care and treatment of the mentally ill out of darkness into light.
Respectfully submitted.
R. A. PENNINGTON,
Deputy Provincial Secretary.
December 1st, 1950.  DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
Hon. George S. Pearson, Provincial Secretary.
R. A. Pennington, O.B.E., Deputy Provincial Secretary.
A. L. Crease, M.D., CM., Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry.
E. J. Ryan, M.D., CM., Medical Superintendent.
A. M. Gee, M.D., CM., Deputy Medical Superintendent.
Frederick A. Matheson, Business Manager.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, ESSONDALE
Medical:
CM.
M.D.,
CM.
M.D., Patholo-
U. P. Byrne, M.B., D.P.H., D.I.H., Director of Child Guidance Clinics.
J. M. Jackson, M.D., Radiologist.
A. E. Davidson, B.A., M.D.,  Clinical
Director.
T. G. Caunt, M.D.
G. M. KlRKPATRICK, M.D.
B. F. Bryson, M.D.
F. E. McNair, B.A., M.D.
A.   L.   Swanson,   B.A.,
M.H.A.
G. A. Nicholson, B.A.
gist.
P. D. Croft, B.Sc, M.D., CM.
N. L. Richardson, M.D., CM.
W. P. Fister, M.D., M.R.CP.(Edin.),
F.R.CP.(Can.).
W. J. S. Edington, B.Sc, M.D.
A. J. Shulman, M.D., CM.
G. H. Stephenson, M.D.
L. I. M. Coleman, B.Sc, M.D., CM.
C E. Derkson, M.D., CM.
J. W. Warne, B.A., M.D.
H. T. Lowe, B.Sc, M.D., CM.
W. C. Gibson, B.A., M.Sc, M.D., CM.,
D.Phil. (Oxon.).
B. W. Murphy, M.B., Ch.B.,(N.Z.).
R. G. E. Richmond, M.D., M.R.C.S.
(London).
W. S. Wilson, M.B., Ch.B.(Glasgow).
J. R. Gosse, D.D.S.
C. B. Watson, M.A., Administrative Assistant.
W. R. Brown, Director of Recreation.
K. Woolcock, Pharmacist.
W. Creber, Chief Male Psychiatric Nurse.
W. Pritchard, Head Male Instructor.
Miss M. Parsons, R.N., Director of Nursing.
Miss E. M. Pullan, R.N., B.A.Sc, Instructress of Nursing.
Miss J. F. Kilburn, Social Service.
Miss M. Allman, B.H.E., Dietitian.
Miss E. Weekes, O.T.R., Charge Occupational Therapist.
Miss J. Irving, B.A., B.L.Sc, Librarian.
Mrs. I. H. Wedge, Branch Secretary.
Miss A. D. Dingle, Senior Stenographer.
Business
J. F. Anderson, Assistant Business
Manager.
L. Fox, Paymaster.
G. A. Grieve, Cost Accountant.
Chaplains:
Rev. John F. O'Neil, Protestant. Rev. Father J. P. Kane, Roman Catholic
W. E. Skillicorn, Book-keeper.
W. Headridge, Steward.
Miss A. Makita, Business Stenographer.
Trades:
H. Lonsdale, Foreman of Works.
J. Wilson, Engineer.
Wm. P. Dodgshon, Outside Overseer.
T. Harrison, Electrician.
G. Matthews, Plumber.
J. C. Purse, Head Tailor.
D. Anderson, Laundryman.
A. L. Blair, Barber.
W. A. Wardle, Chief Cook.
J. C. Merrick, Baker.
R. T. Hall, Charge Occupational
Therapist. V 10
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1949-50
OFFICERS AND STAFF, NEW WESTMINSTER
Medical:
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., CM., Deputy Medical Superintendent.
C. E. Benwell, M.B.
R. D. S. Herrick, M.D., D.P.H., D.P.M.
A. P. Gould, M.D., CM.
F. Gillard, Receiving Clerk.
Kenny & Matheson, Visiting Dentists.
Miss V. M. Sanders, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses.
Miss E. C. Herchmer, R.N., Assistant
Superintendent of Nurses.
Miss E. A. Johnston, R.N., Instructress
of Nursing.
Mrs. A. Cunningham, School Principal.
H. Mercer, Industrial Arts Instructor.
J. Lynes, Recreational Instructor.
Miss M. E. Morison, Occupational
Therapist.
Miss M. G. Coulson, Clerk-Stenographer.
Business:
A. Fraser, Steward.
■ Chaplains:
Rev. P. C McCrae, Protestant. Rev. Father G. Rogers, Roman Catholic.
Trades:
C M. Doyle, Foreman of Works.
C. Hauck, Engineer.
C. Stapleton, Head Gardener.
L. S. Davies, Electrician.
G. Coulson, Laundryman.
J. McMillan, Shoemaker.
L. Arnold, Barber.
J. Fraser, Painter.
W. Jenkins, Head Cook.
V. G. Copp, Baker.
COLONY FARM
John A. Hay, Superintendent.
COLQUITZ
L. G. C. d'Easum, M.D., Medical Superintendent.
T. A. Morris, Supervisor. P. McLeod, Chief Attendant.  V 12
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1949-50
Dr. A. L. Crease DR. ARTHUR L. CREASE
By A. M. Gee, M.D.
Dr. Arthur L. Crease retired from the position of Director of Mental Hygiene
and Psychiatry on March 31st, 1950, after a professional lifetime devoted to the care and
treatment of the mentally ill. Throughout his career, Dr. Crease has been noted for his
outstanding humanitarianism, his great kindliness, and his devotion to the welfare of
others, patients and staff alike.
His early medical training was obtained at McGill University, from which he was
graduated in 1910, followed by four years of postgraduate study in medicine and
pathology in the hospitals of Rhode Island. With this excellent preparation in medicine,
Dr. Crease came to the West and in 1914 joined the staff of the Provincial Mental
Hospital, New Westminster, B.C., as pathologist and physician. Since 1914 he has
devoted his full time to the Provincial Mental Health Service and over the years with his
increased experience he has had greater responsibilities. On the death of the late
Dr. Steeves in 1926, Dr. Crease was given the appointment of Medical Superintendent
and in 1934 he was promoted to General Superintendent and Provincial Psychiatrist, this
latter appointment being redesignated Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry in 1946.
Throughout his long career in the Provincial service, Dr. Crease has had many
interests and all of them have meant better care for the mental patients. He always
insisted upon a high level of competence from the physicians and called for the maintenance of high standards of medical practice. His early training in the hospitals of New
England convinced him of the importance of modern laboratories as an aid in the practice
of medicine. He therefore gave the developments of this department of the Hospital
his full support, thereby laying a firm foundation for improved diagnosis and treatment.
The quarter century of Dr. Crease's administration of the Mental Hospitals was far
from being placid; there was first the great depression of the 30's and then the upheaval
of World War II, both of which placed severe restrictions upon the budget and made it
difficult to obtain personnel. In spite of these difficulties, however, Dr. Crease maintained
his progressive outlook and was able to pioneer in the introduction of many new services
to the Hospitals, which made for better care and treatment of the patients.
The Training School for Psychiatric Nurses graduated the first group of students to
take the postgraduate course for registered nurses in October, 1930, while the first class
of psychiatric nurses was graduated in 1932.
The Psychiatric Social Service Department was established in 1930 and has grown
over the years to meet the increasing demands. This department has played an important
part in spreading the newer ideas concerning mental illnesses and in assisting the patient
and community to achieve a wholesome adjustment to each other when the patient returns
to his home.
The preventive aspects of psychiatry have always been of special interest to Dr.
Crease, and in this connection he was instrumental in the establishment of the Child Guidance Clinics in 1932. He devoted many years to the daily duties of the Child Guidance
Clinic, where he stressed the importance of the early treatment of the behaviour disorders
of children and carried on an informal teaching programme of the principles of mental
hygiene. Many physicians, nurses, social workers, and psychologists of the staff and
workers from referring agencies learned much from his teachings and continued to be
amazed at the wisdom and foresight in human relations that Dr. Crease exhibited.
To provide variety and stimulation in the daily routine of the patients living in the
Hospitals, the occupational therapy department was increased in size and new crafts
introduced, and a diversified leisure-time activities programme comprised of music,
movies, and all types of recreation, was established.
Dr. Crease was always a serious student, devoting many of his evenings to keeping
abreast of advances in medicine and psychiatry.
13 V 14 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1949-50
In 1935 he was granted a leave of absence and went to the University of Colorado,
where, under Dr. F. G. Ebaugh, he took an intensive postgraduate course in psychiatry
with the purpose of learning the latest methods of treatment. Upon his return to
Essondale, Dr. Crease made arrangements for a rotational plan of postgraduate study
for the staff psychiatrists and other key personnel. This policy of postgraduate study
remains in operation to-day, and over the years it has paid increasing dividends in the
high quality of service rendered by the Hospital staff.
Throughout his career, Dr. Crease maintained that psychiatrists should not neglect
the preventive aspects of their science and that they should concentrate on the early,
active, and intensive treatment of the mentally ill. Such an emphasis, he thought,
shortened the duration of the illness, reduced the toll of psychic suffering, and left the
patient with fewer incapacitating " mental scars " when he returned to his home and
community. It is this philosophy that motivated him in his years of planning and striving
for the modern Clinic of Psychological Medicine that so fittingly bears his name.
As an administrator, Dr. Crease was unique. In an age of increasing tension he was
able to maintain a warmly democratic personal relationship with his staff. He respected
the judgment of his associates and gave them his full support in difficult times. He made
it a policy to have the staff come in to his office from time to time " to talk things over,"
and in this fashion he issued the necessary directions for the operation of the Hospitals.
In all matters Dr. Crease was eminently fair and scrupulously honest; the friend of all
and the counsellor of many in their own personal problems.
On the afternoon of Friday, March 10th, a reception for Dr. and Mrs. Crease was
held in the day room of Ward East 2 in the new Crease Clinic. This was definitely
a family affair, with the staff, their wives, and close friends of the Hospital being present
to celebrate along with Dr. Crease his sixty-fifth birthday and to present to him some
gifts for his new home at Ocean Park.
The reception was not an occasion for farewells but rather for congratulations on
a job well done. While Dr. Crease may now put aside the heavy burden of responsibility
that he has borne so capably over the years, to the staff he remains the senior member
of the Mental Hospital family who will always be interested in the welfare of us all and
an inspiration to continued humane care and scientific treatment for the mentally ill. Report of the
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry
For the Twelve Months Ended March 31st, 1950
PART I.—MEDICAL
Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, B.C., April 1st, 1950.
R. A. Pennington, Esq., O.B.E.,
Deputy Provincial Secretary,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith for your consideration the Seventy-eighth
Annual Report of the Provincial Mental Hospitals at Essondale, New Westminster, and
Colquitz.
The following table gives a brief summary of the movement of the Hospital population during the fiscal year April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950:—
Movement of Population
Male
Female
Total
2,531
110
840
1,824
119
575
4,355
229
1,415
3,481
2,518
5,999
593
106
133
389
107
69
982
213
202
832
565
1,397
2,649
1,953
4,602
Increase in number of patients admitted this year as-compared to last
Net increase in population     	
Rate of deaths to total treated 	
Rate of discharges to admissions (exclusive of deaths)-
155
247
3.36%
69.39%
ADMISSIONS
The admission of patients to the Mental Hospital shows a steady and consistent
increase over the past five years.    It is felt that this is in large part due to three factors:—
(1) The general increase in the population of the Province.
(2) Increased facilities for the care of the psychotic aged.
(3) Improved facilities within the Hospital and better community relationships
whereby persons needing treatment are willing to come voluntarily.
These facts are borne out in the following tables:—
Year
Total
Admissions
Admissions
over Age of 65
Voluntary
Admissions
1945 1946                                                                    	
834
880
1,111
1,260
1,415
206
207
225
270
230
33
1946 1947                                                              	
40
1947 1948
91
1948 1949  -    	
1949-1950 - ■    —	
165
297
15 V 16 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
With the opening of the Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine next year, it is
anticipated that admissions to that unit will show a further sharp rise, particularly in
the voluntary admission group. It is, however, hoped that the period of hospitalization
will be shorter and that a large percentage of these admissions may be discharged from
the Clinic as recovered without being admitted to the Mental Hospital.
DISCHARGES
During the year a total of 982 patients were discharged in full from the three
branches of the Mental Hospital. The condition of these patients at the time of discharge
was as follows:—
Recovered   195
Improved  340
Unimproved   251
Admitted without psychosis  196
Total  -«l  982
TREATMENT
In the care of the mentally ill, treatment embraces the whole of physical medicine
and, in many instances, surgery, as well as the more specific therapies peculiar to
psychiatry. In the realm of psychiatry more therapies are being evolved which are
proving beneficial and, in many cases, shortening the duration of the period of hospitalization. However, the main basic principles of psychotherapy in all its forms still provide
the framework of treatment. Into this framework must enter every member of the
treatment team—the physician, the psychiatric nurse, the psychologists, the social worker,
the teacher, and the occupational and recreational therapists—together with all those
who contribute to the well-being and comfort of the patients. A glance through the
reports of these various department will give some idea of the volume of work handled.
While it is not possible to statistically cover all treatment activities, the following
tables will give some idea of the treatment activities as carried out under the supervision
of the Clinical Director, Dr. A. E. Davidson:—
(a) Coma Insulin
Results  Total Per Cent
Recovered      39 18
Much improved     20 9
Improved  101 48
Unimproved      49 23
Total   209
Disposal—
Discharged   123 58
Discharge pending  19 9
Died   2 1
Transferred to lobotomy  2 1
Remaining in hospital  63 30
Total   209 DIRECTOR'S REPORT
V 17
(b) Convulsive Shock Therapy
Results—
Recovered  53
Much improved  52
Improved  195
Unimproved   113
12
12
47
27
TotaL
  413
Disposal—
Discharged   122
Discharged later  34
Discharged pending  4
Transferred to insulin  41
Transferred to lobotomy 1 '.  18
Died later  8
Remaining in hospital  186
Total  413
(c) Lobotomy
Patients Operated On for the Relief of Symptoms
29
8
1
9
4
2
45
Result
Disposal
Diagnosis
Number
of
Patients
Much
Improved
Improved
Unimproved
Discharged
Remaining in
Hospital
Died
Later
3
14
3
1
3
2
2
7
4
1
2
5
2
1
9
1
Miscellaneous 	
Totals   	
20
6
9
5
9
11
Patients Operated On for
Improved Hospital Adjustment
27
4
3
2
12
i
12
l
2
1
25
3
Miscellaneous.	
—
Totals
31
5
13
13
3
28
Total Patients Operated On
3
41
7
1
6
4
2
19
1
16
2
2
7
3
1
34
4
Totals        - .
51                 11
22
18
12
39
The report of Dr. G. A. Nicolson, our Pathologist, gives some idea of the volume
of investigation which this department has carried out during the current year. The
additional work incidental to teaching and to research, as well as the work to be added
next year with the opening of the Crease Clinic, will be very great. I am most pleased
to report that our laboratory service has now been accepted as a training field for the
certification of laboratory technicians.
The X-ray Department continues to show great expansion in the volume of work
carried out.    Dr. Jackson, as Director of this department, has maintained his close V 18 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
association with the Department of Radiology in the Vancouver General Hospital in
order that he may keep up to date with the rapid development in this particular field.
The department has already occupied their new suite in the Crease Clinic where the very
finest of equipment is available. Plans are under way whereby a department will be
created in the New Westminster branch. It is planned to obtain a photo-roentgen chest
unit for installation in the former X-ray suite in the admitting building.
The Physiotherapy Department has continued under the supervision of the Clinical
Director. It is hoped that with the opening of the Crease Clinic this important department
may be expanded.
The report of the Department of Psychology is included. The work of this department continues at a high level of efficiency. This service is one which will be expanded
during the coming years. The relationship existing between the Department of Psychology
and the other members of the psychiatric team is a very happy one due to the capable
supervision of Mr. Watson.
The Dental Department has had a period of transition, and the work this year has
been carried out under difficult circumstances. A new three-chair dental suite is planned
for Essondale, the equipment to be purchased under Federal mental-health care grants.
The former equipment has been transferred to the New Westminster branch where
remodelling has made it possible to install a modern two-chair unit. The unit in New
Westminster is continuing under Dr. Kenny on a part-time basis. In the Essondale
branch, we have been fortunate in securing the full-time services of Dr. J. R. Gosse.
Pending the installation of the new equipment at Essondale, all dental work is being
carried out at New Westminster. On completion of these changes, we will have in both
branches excellent provision for first-class dental care. However, the services of an
additional full-time dentist are needed at Essondale, as well as a full-time dental mechanic,
before really adequate dental treatment can be provided. Some immediate consideration
must now be given to the provision of better dental facilities in the Colquitz branch.
The Optical Department has already moved into the suite in the Crease Clinic.
Here, I am pleased to say, we have very fine equipment which will enable the optometrist
to give more efficient service in this important branch. The report of this department
shows an increase in the volume of work handled.
The report of the beauty-parlour is included under the treatment programme. This
department is very essential in stimulating, personal pride of appearance, so important
to recovery. The department is one which will need further enlargement, and additional
service will be required in the Crease Clinic.
The report of the Director of Nursing gives some idea of the expansion in the nursing
personnel but does not portray the difficulties which this department has experienced
during the last year, both in maintaining a high standard of nursing care and in providing
the necessary educational and training facilities. Progress, however, has been accomplished in the establishment of the three-shift eight-hour day. There are yet many
difficulties to be met before this service will function at maximum efficiency. A good
deal of thought and attention are being given to these matters at the present time. Every
effort is being made to correlate the men's division of nursing and the women's division
of nursing both as to administration and education. We hope to have definite progress
to report in' this regard next year.
A review of the report of the women's division of the Occupational Therapy Department will give an idea of the work done and the number of public displays held at which
exhibits were shown. This latter has done much to promote good community relationships
and has contributed a good deal toward public education.
The men's division of Occupational Therapy Department has been greatly expanded
during the past year with the addition of several new industrial and trades shops, and
a well-equipped therapy shop in the Veterans' Building. DIRECTOR'S REPORT V 19
I would draw your attention to the report of the Director of Recreational Therapy
for an understanding of the activities of this important branch of the hospital treatment
programme. Probably no other department has received so much favourable comment,
both from the patient-population and the many visitors who have come from all parts of
the country to study its application and effects. British Columbia did well to pioneer in
this particular field, which is now universally accepted as an essential part of the mental-
hospital treatment programme.
During recent months, our library has been reorganizing in its new location in the
Crease Clinic, where suitable quarters have been provided. It will take some little time
to build up this important service but a very good start has been made under the Librarian,
Miss Jean Irving.
Mention should be made of the Audio-Visual Department, which has expanded a
great deal during the past year. The department has contributed much to the entertainment field and has played a very important part in the educational activities of our teaching
programme. We are gradually building up an educational-film library which already is in
great demand and is proving of splendid assistance to the doctors and others giving educational talks, both in the hospital and the community. As the educational programme is
enlarged, the demands on the Audio-Visual Department will increase, and we look forward to the day when they will have larger quarters in which to function.
The Child Guidance Clinic continues its work very satisfactorily but under most
adverse circumstances, being located in two adjoining old residences. With the addition
of Dr. R. G. E. Richmond to the staff, a new unit has been created giving service to the
Boys' and Girls' Industrial Schools, the Borstal School, the Juvenile Court, and Oakalla
Prison Farm. A detailed report of the activities of the Child Guidance Clinic is submitted
by the Director, Dr. U. P. Byrne.
The Social Service Department continues to render valuable service to all branches of
the Mental Hospital and Homes for the Aged. This work is essential for the incoming
patient, the patient while in residence, and the outgoing patient. The fine organization,
and the soirit of co-operation existing in the Social Service staff assigned to psychiatric
work and the Department of Welfare with their many workers in the field, is the envy of
all other Provinces.
I am pleased to report the opening for occupancy of the new Veterans' Unit at the
Colony Farm. The veteran patients were moved to their new quarters on August 31st,
1949. The building presents a very fine appearance, and is offering the very best in
comfort and treatment to our veteran group.
I am also pleased to report the erection of much needed new Nurses' Homes, the
first unit being occupied on August 1st.
A very valuable addition has been built to our Fire Hall, whereby an additional
number of volunteer firemen may be housed to give us added fire-protection. This building was occupied on November 1st.
A new two-chair dental suite was completed in the New Westminster branch and was
ready for use on August 1st.
At the Home for Aged at Vernon an additional building was converted for patient-
use to accommodate forty patients.   This was occupied on February 1st.
The Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine was official opened on November 16th.
The formal opening ceremony was well attended. R. A. Pennington, Deputy Provincial
Secretarv. acted as chairman, introducing the Honourable G. S. Pearson, Provincial Secretary. Mr. Pearson paid tribute to the Director and, on behalf of the Province, formally
accented the kev from the contractor. A gold replica of the key was presented to Dr.
Crease. The building was then opened to the public, and tours of the Crease Clinic were
arranged. Refreshments were served. This occasion was a memorable one. which will
remain in the minds of those interested in mental health throughout the Province. V 20 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
MENTAL-HEALTH CARE GRANTS
The mental-health care grants are made available to the Provinces by the Government of Canada through the Department of National Health and Welfare.
The projects submitted this year continue the policy established in 1948-49, the
year in which the grants were inaugurated. The provision of postgraduate training for
members of the professional staff has been continued, and the purchase of additional
equipment to enhance the treatment services has been authorized.
Professional Training
Dr. A. L. Swanson completed the course in hospital administration at Northwestern
University and returned to the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, in August, 1949.
This course was commenced in 1948-49.
Dr. W. P. Fister completed a year of postgradute training in neurology and electroencephalography at the Montreal Neurological Institute and returned to the Provincial
Mental Hospital, Essondale, in December, 1949.
Dr. G. A. Nicolson completed one year of postgraduate training in pathology at the
Vancouver General Hospital in June, 1949. He also had a further postgraduate course
in neuropathology at the University of Toronto, September to November, 1949.
Dr. W. C. Gibson completed a three-month postgraduate course in advanced
medicine at the University of Toronto in November, 1949.
Dr. W. E. Powles commenced a one-year postgraduate course in psychiatry at'the
Allan Memorial Institute of Psychiatry, Montreal, in July, 1949.
Dr. N. L. Richardson commenced a six-month postgraduate course in neurology at
the Vancouver General Hospital on January 1st, 1949.
Dr. L. E. Sauriol, Dr. H. T. Lowe, Dr. C. E. Derkson, and Dr. L. I. M. Coleman
attended the postgraduate refresher course in neurology, psychiatry, and neurosurgery at
the Vancouver General Hospital in February, 1950.
Dr. P. D. Croft attended the short postgraduate course in psychiatry at the University
of Oregon in March, 1950.
Miss E. M. Brown completed a six-month postgraduate course in nuerosurgical nursing at the Montreal Neurological Institute in July, 1949.
Miss A. K. Carroll completed a one-year postgraduate course in psychiatric social
work at the University of Pittsburgh in July, 1949.
Miss H. J. Shand completed a one-year postgraduate course in supervision in psychiatric nursing at McGill University in June, 1949.
Miss M. H. Munro completed a one-year postgraduate course in clinical psychology
at the University of Toronto in June, 1949.
Miss J. MacLean-Bell completed a one-year postgraduate course in public health
nursing at the University of British Columbia in May, 1949.
J. W. Borthwick commenced a one-year postgraduate course in clinical psychology
at the University of Washington in September, 1949.
Miss N. L. Grantham commenced a one-year postgraduate course in supervision in
psychiatric nursing at McGill University in September, 1949.
Miss M. A. Cunliffe commenced a one-year postgraduate course in psychiatric social
work at Smith College in July, 1949.
Equipment
The equipment for a three-chair Dental Clinic at the Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, was approved- as well as occupational and recreational therapy equipment.
The purchase of a bus to be used for transporting patients was also authorized.
At the Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine the equipment for the operating-
room was authorized as well as the diagnostic, surgical, and therapeutic apparatus for the DIRECTOR'S REPORT V 21
wards. Additions to the medical library and to the teaching aids in the Schools of
Psychiatric Nursing were approved. Funds were also made available for the hiring of
additional staff.
CHANGES IN STAFF
It is with sincere regret that I have to report the sudden death of Dr. R. M. Rice
on August 24th. Dr. Rice had been Medical Superintendent of the Home for Aged
at Vernon since its opening.    His sudden passing was a great shock to all who knew him.
Dr. Ardeth Robertson resigned on June 30th, 1949,-to seek further interneship
elsewhere.
Dr. W. Love resigned June 30th, 1949, to re-enter private practice.
H. Lonsdale, Foreman of Works, retired on December 31st, 1949. Mr. Lonsdale
had been closely associated with the Mental Hospital at Essondale since its earliest
inception. As Foreman of Works during this working-lifetime period, he has contributed
a great deal to the entire physical plant. Mr. Lonsdale's last job was to supervise the
furnishing and equipping of the Crease Clinic, a task well done and a fine one on which
to conclude a career.
Dr. A. G. McKinnon joined the medical staff as Medical Superintendent at the
Vernon Home for Aged unit on March 13th, 1950.
Dr. R. G. E. Richmond joined the medical staff of the Child Guidance Clinic on
November 4th, 1949.
Dr. C. E. Derkson joined the medical staff on April 1st, 1949 .
Dr. B. W. Murphy joined the medical staff on August 1st, 1949.
Dr. J. W. Warne joined the medical staff on June 13th, 1949.
Dr. H. C. Lowe joined the medical staff on July 1st, 1949.
Dr. W. C. Gibson joined the medical staff on July 1st, 1949, as Director of Research.
Dr. J. R. Gosse joined the staff as dental surgeon on June 1th, 1949.
Dr. A. L. Crease, your Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry, retired on
March 31st, 1950.
COMMENTS
It is regrettable that throughout the years it has been necessary to delay erecting
buildings to house the increased number of patients resident each year. This has come
about in two ways. First, there have been two world wars and a period of depression;
secondly, there has been some procrastination in the building programme. As a result,
overcrowding has taken place which has mitigated greatly against treatment. It has
also caused both staff and patients much inconvenience and hardship. Lately, considerable construction has been done, and it is further suggested that this building
programme be continued so as to lessen the present overcrowding and prevent further
overcrowding in the future.
The erection of the new Clinic as a barrier against admission to the main Hospital
is certainly a step in the right direction. However, the Clinic of Psychological Medicine
is only the first barrier against Hospital admissions; there should be a further barrier to
handle the great bulk of early cases so that many could be prevented from ever being
admitted to the Clinic of Psychological Medicine or the Mental Hospital. This unit
would be the so-called out-patient department operated by the Government for the
treatment of adults as well as children. These barriers are, of course, places for intensive
treatment. In every way it is felt that eventually a considerable saving of money will
be effected for, as the years go by, expenditure for the care and treatment of patients
in the Hospital itself will be greatly lessened. At the present time the number of admittances to the Mental Hospital has greatly increased, the reasons being that facilities for
even earlier treatment are not available and the housing situation has become more acute.
Diagnosis is now made at an earlier period through increased education concerning
psychological medicine. V 22 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
There has been another outstanding event which has taken place in this field.
Provision for education of staff and students is now under way. It is of the standards
required by the Canadian and American associations—the Canadian National Committee
for Mental Hygiene, the Canadian and American Psychiatric Associations, The American
National Committee for Mental Hygiene, the Canadian and American Hospital Associations, the American College of Surgeons, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons
of Canada. In addition to this, basic research into mental and nervous diseases has
been inaugurated and is housed at the University of British Columbia. Dr. William C.
Gibson has been appointed its Director. This brings the field of mental illness directly
into the realm of medicine at university level. It greatly enhances an intense interest in
the clinical subjects. The more costly continued-treatment idea is rapidly fading, and
the modern intensive-treatment conception is quickly spreading. It has been amply
demonstrated that without the modern application of science, the mounting cost of this
illness could not otherwise have been lessened; mere building is not the answer.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
On the eve of my retirement, I would like especially to voice my appreciation of
the assistance and encouragement given me by our Minister and his most able Deputy,
R. A. Pennington, over the years, one becomes more and more conscious of the necessity
of such close association and the mutual benefit derived from the sharing of our Droblems.
May I bring to your favourable notice the valuable and unceasing efforts of Dr. E. J.
Ryan and Dr. A. M. Gee, whose loval services and keen interest have done so much to
enhance the onward progress of the Hospital.
The returned-soldier organizations and their various auxiliaries continue to do much
for the veterans under our care. They provide extra comforts and entertainment for them
besides making regular personal visits. The veterans are most appreciative of the many
kindnesses shown them by these branches of the services.
Our branch in New Westminster shows good progress under the careful guidance of
Dr. L. E. Sauriol. Regular classes are held in the school under qualified school teachers,
and the children show a remarkable response. Increased entertainment and occupational
therapy have been established, and the children lead a busy and haopy life.
Our patients at Colquitz are under the care of Dr. L. G. C. d'Easum who, with the
able assistance of Mr. Morris, has done much toward the betterment of this particular
type of patient. This unit is not an easy one but progress has been made. There are
more activities and these have been appreciated. One feels that credit is due to those
in charge that this unit runs so smoothly.
I would like to commend our Business Manager, F. A. Matheson, for his careful
handling of the finances and logistics of the Mental Hospitals. With rising costs, his task
has not been an easy one, and it is due to his foresight and interest that we have suffered
little from shortages and have our stocks well in hand.
It is not possible to mention individuals all those with whom I have been so closely
connected during the years. Now, as I retire and look back, I can realize perhaps as
never before how great has been your loyal suooort and co-operation in working for
the progress of the Hospital and the betterment of the patients. Much has been accomplished; much more is still to be done, but if we all work as a team then we will reach
our goal.    I thank you all.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. L. Crease,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry. LABORATORY REPORT V 23
LABORATORY REPORT
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the laboratory at Essondale from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950:—
Blood—
Kahn, positive  70
Kahn, quantitative  67
Kahn, negative  '  1,865
Ped-blood count and haemoglobin  2,394
White-blood count and differential  2,505
Sedimentation rate   _      1,016
Bone-marrow examination  2
Coagulation time  67
Bleeding time  68
Platelet count     12
Reticulocyte count  21
Prothrombin time  17
Glucose               249
Glucose tolerance  9
Tnsulin sensitivity  2
Non-protein nitrogen  124
Urea n;trogen •_ :  1
Creatinine   2
Cholesterol  40
Chloride  _ 4
Bromide   28
Serum—
Total protein  7
Alb.-dob. ratio  2
Phosphorus  1
Sodium     1
Potassium  1
Icterus index     61
Van den Berph   _'  29
Hanger flocculation  9
Thymol turbidity  3
Blood-
Culture   5
Widal       .  1
Agglutination for B. abortus  2
Paul Bunnell  3
Spinal Fluid—
Kahn, positive    — 47
Kahn, quantitative  42
Kahn, negative  72
Cell count        122
Colloidal gold  116
Total protein  122
Chloride   4
Glucose   6 V 24 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Urines—
Routine   8,866
Acetone  3,251
Quantitative sugar  515
Bromides  1,392
Benzidene  713
Quantitative albumin  175
Friedman  28
Bile  21
Urobilinogen   2 3
T.B  1
Iodide .  23
Barbiturate  9
Smears—
Miscellaneous ■. 142
G.C.   40
T.B _'  51
Vincent's angina  41
Malaria  29
Trichomonas   2
Diphtheria  485
Dark field  1
Sputum—
T.B  297
24-hour specimen for T.B  36
Cultures—
Miscellaneous  81
Diphtheria  468
G.C   2
Typhoid  1,194
Dysentery   400
Fasces—
Parasites  18
Occult blood  3 3
Amoebic cysts  1
Urobilin  3
Fat  1
Injections—
Typhoid vaccine  739
Diphtheria vaccine  173
Staphylococcus toxoid  20
Scarlet Fever toxin  5
Skin Tests—
Tuberculin (Vollmer)  266
Dick test  3
Schick test  438
Smallpox vaccinations  121
Gastric analysis  6
Gastric contents for T.B  26
B.M.R.'s.:  121
Biopsies  4
Autopsies  -  79 LABORATORY REPORT V 25
Animal autopsies  51
Sections  1,706
Water for bacterial count  35
E.K.G  73
Agglutination for typhoid  9
Agglutination for dysentery  6
Rumpel-Leed test  1
Diphtheria virulence test  4
Total number of examinations  31,447
I have, etc.,
G. A. Nicolson,
Pathologist.
X-RAY REPORT
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the X-ray Department
of the Hospital from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950:—
Number of films taken 1  12,937
Number of patients X-rayed     9,634
Chests
Patients
______     7,423
Films
7,649
Extremities 	
Barium meals    	
      502
        43
1,452
595
Barium enemas 	
Spines              _ _         . _ _
        19
  1,148
167
1,473
Skulls       ____        	
      178
576
Nose -         _          _
        10
32
Ribs _ _     __    	
        36
68
Shoulders          -
         37
94
Abdomens 	
Teeth                 . .      _____   __
        52
        35
103
156
Pelvis                  —    __
        31
39
Jaws                     _      	
        20
48
Sinuses                           _ _
____            30
112
Mastoids 	
Gall-bladder
          5
____            20
22
96
Intravenous pyelograms	
Pneumoencephalograms 	
Soft tissue (cheek)
        15
        12
____    ______             1
90
99
3
Soft tissue (neck)_
          8
27
Heart examinations
          6
25
(Esophagus examinations
          3
11
9,634
I have, etc.,
J. M. Jackson,
Director
12,937
M.D.,
of Radiology V 26
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1949-50
PHYSIOTHERAPY REPORT
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of the treatments given in the Physiotherapy Department
in Essondale from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950:—
Male
Female
Total
22
19
4
26
68
47
63
9
2
4
1
25
46
77
15
15
14
65
95
15
1
99
34
4
Needle spray, douches, etc    __ 	
41
82
112
158
24
3
4
1
Tub baths      _ .
25
46
2,944
336
5,371
297
8,315
633
I have,
etc.,
A. E. Davidson,
Clinical Director.
PSYCHOLOGIST'S REPORT
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
1950:-
Sir,—Following is a report of work performed for the fiscal year ended March 31st,
Test
P.M.H.
Essondale
Ascendence Submissive Study _'_  1
Arthur Point Scale  4
Attitude Interest Analysis Test  4
Benjamin Proverbs  35
Bernreuter	
Bender Gestalt
California Test of Personality.
Chicago Non-verbal
  3
  3
A.M.T. Number Square Test  1
  12
  1
Detroit Reading Tests.—               3
Gamin (Guilford Martin) ..        2
  2
  1
  1
 .,  .   4
  9
Kent Rosanoff -'_- 38
General Clerical	
Golstein Scheerer Cube Test..
Golstein Scheerer Stick Test.
Guilford Martin O.Co.Ag	
Hanfmann-Kasanin 	 PSYCHOLOGIST'S REPORT V 27
P.M.H.
Test Essondale
Kuder Preference Record  7
McQuarrie Test of Mechanical Ability  2
Manson Evaluation  3
Mechanical Comprehension :  1
Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory  68
N.I.I.P. Clerical Test  2
Otis Self-administering  5
Perdue Peg Board  3
Porteus Maze Performance Scale  172
Prognostic Test of Mechanical Ability  1
Progressive Achievement  1
Progressive Matrices  33
Rapport Word Association  2
Rorschach  10
S.T.D.CR.   1
Shipley Hartford Retreat Scale  140
Stanford Binet Form L  38
Stanford Binet Form M  1
Strong Vocational Interest  1
Thematic Apperception  40
Verbal Absurdities  5
Wechsler-Bellevue Intelligence Scale. .  197
Wechsler Memory Scale  52
Sentence Completion  2
Total       911
Psychiatric Nursing Staff
Female
California Test of Personality  244
Kuder Preference Record  244
Modified Alpha Form 9  244
Total  :      732
Grand total  1,643
I have, etc.,
C. Watson,
Psychologist. V 28 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
DENTAL REPORT
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is the annual report of the Dental Department:—
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, June 1st, 1949, to
March 31st, 1950
Summary
Extractions  1,045
Fillings   244
Prophylaxis   48
Treatments  27
Examinations   107
Dentures made  54
Dentures repaired  78
Dentures relined  11
Bridge repairs ,  3
Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster, April 1st, 1949,
to March 31st, 1950
Summary
Extractions -  511
Examinations   245
Cleanings  58
Fillings   97
Denture repairs  3
Complete dentures  3
We have, etc.,
J. R. Gosse, D.D.S.,
Kenny & Mathisen, D.D.S.
OPTICAL REPORT
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is a report of the optical work done at the Provincial Mental
Hospital, Essondale, from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950:—
Refractions: Male, 58; female, 118; Total, 176. Repairs and replacements sent
to J. S. Hudson Optical Supplies, 160. Repairs and adjustments performed at hospital,
60.
I have, etc.,
H. H. Woodbridge,
Optometrist. BEAUTY-PARLOUR REPORT V 29
BEAUTY-PARLOUR REPORT
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is a report of the appointments made in the beauty-parlor from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950:—
Shampoos  4,340
Finger-waves  4,255
Marcels  75
Haircuts   4,8 8 3
Manicures  .— 1,257
Permanents   446
Oil and scalp treatments  189
I have, etc.,
M. Townsend,
REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF NURSING
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the report of the Department of Nursing for the fiscal
year ended March 31st, 1950.
This year ended with the following personnel: Registered nurses, 18; psychiatric
graduates, 76; psychiatric nurses-in-training, 274; nurses' aides, 9; home supervisors,
15—making a total staff of 392. Resignations for the year numbered 185 and new
appointments 276. New appointments totalling 114 were required for the eight-hour
day. Resignations totalled 7 more than the previous year and reasons for same are as
follows: 44 to be married, 30 because of ill-health, 9 illness in family and services
required at home, 17 services terminated, 26 for a change in occupation, 11 to take general nurse's training, 32 returned to university (most of these were summer relief staff),
13 felt unsuited to this type of nursing, 2 for personal reasons, and 1 at completion of
postgraduate course.
A very important step in the history of nursing was achieved when, on December
1st, 1949, the eight-hour day, forty-four-hour week was instituted for all nurses. This
system, although creating many new problems and adjustments, is welcomed by all nursing
personnel, who generally are enjoying their new hours and finding their work more
enjoyable.
With this change to the eight-hour day, it was necessary to change to a new system of
education. Thus on January 3rd, 1950, the Block System of classes was placed in effect.
With this new system, students are free from ward-service responsibilities during their
course of lectures. This programme is still in its infancy and it is difficult to evaluate or
to compare with our old system at this time! It has, however, entailed a great deal more
work for teaching personnel and much repetition of class work is required. The eight-
hour day has enhanced too the work of those in charge of nursing service.
This year 31 nurses completed the three-year course in psychiatric nursing, 2 registered nurses completed the six-month postgraduate course, and 90 male students received V 30 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
certificates for their course in psychiatric nursing. The affiliating programme entailed
44 students from the Vancouver General Hospital, 4 degree students from the University
of British Columbia, and 2 graduate students were privileged to take this course in clinical
and theoretical instruction. Thirteen nurses from the Public Health Division of the
University of British Columbia spent three days in observation and instruction at the
Hospital. Special clinical demonstrations and lectures were provided for 215 educational
students, 75 social workers, 66 students in abnormal psychology, and 24 public health
nursing students.
Some changes have taken place in the Training School office personnel. Miss Kirk-
ham, Supervisor of Acute Building, resigned to take a position on the staff of the Ponoka
Mental Hospital, Alberta. Miss J. Menzies, from the teaching department, is ably filling
this vacancy. Miss J. Shand returned from McGill School of Nursing and has had a very
busy year in the teaching department. Miss C. Livingstone, who had been with us for
one year in the clinical and teaching department, resigned to return to the University of
British Columbia. This vacancy was filled by Mrs. C Broberg, who in turn resigned in
January to take up her household duties. We were very fortunate to secure the services
of Mrs. E. Paulson to fill this vacancy. Miss N. Grantham, who has been on our night
supervisory staff for some years, is now taking the course in psychiatric teaching and
supervision at McGill University. Miss E. Brown has returned from her six-month
course at the Neurological Institute, Montreal, and is now well prepared to take over her
duties in the operating theatre, Crease Clinic. Until this unit opens, she is acting supervisor in the Women's Building. Miss M. Thiemann returned from her extended holiday
in January and upon her return assumed administrative responsibilities in the office.
We feel, this year, we have progressed in our health programme for nurses. A small
home was renovated for an Infirmary and in October we moved into this unit from our
Infirmary in the Women's Building. This change is a great advantage and an environment which is conducive to " getting well." We have been very fortunate in retaining
the services of a registered nurse. This nurse has done considerable follow-up work on
nurses as well as her regular duties.
More recreational facilities are, this year, added to our staff recreation programme.
During the summer, picnics on the tennis courts were arranged with games, dancing, and
refreshments. During the winter months, classes in swimming were provided twice
weekly. Instruction was also provided in square dancing and folk-dancing once a week.
This addition to our recreation programme was very popular and much enjoyed by all the
staff.    For this added enjoyment, we thank the staff of the recreation department.
In July a personnel committee was formed and set in operation. This committee deals with nursing problems, recommendations to permanent staff, or dismissals.
Through this committee the administrative responsibilities are considerably less heavy.
For all those doctors, nurses, and heads of all departments who have helped in no
small measure with the nursing service and educational programme we are extremely
grateful. Without their help and co-operation, the accomplishments of the past year
could not have been achieved.
We are particularly grateful for the help and co-operation of Dr. Ryan in the many
nursing problems which arise.
I have, etc.,
Mona E. Parsons, R.N.,
Director of Nursing. OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT V 31
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The Women's Occupational Therapy Department at Essondale has developed
considerably during the past year. This is mainly due to an increased staff, which has
enabled us to branch out into new activities and techniques, to increase the output of the
maintenance departments, and to contact a far greater number of patients through an
active ward-treatment programme.
Semi-monthly Occupational Therapy staff meetings have been resumed, at which
time interdepartmental plans and problems are discussed, also several films of special
interest to the therapists have been shown.
In the handicraft workshops and wards, the crafts found to be of most therapeutic
value to psychiatric patients have been weaving, rug-hooking, stuffed-toy making, dressmaking, embroidery, knitting, crocheting, tatting, painting, and paper-constructive work.
The looms and other equipment for the Crease Clinic Occupational Therapy Department were set up in March of this year, and at present a staff of four are conducting
a varied programme in the temporary workshop and wards of that building. Plans for
completing the interior of these workshops have been approved and the completed cupboard units and furnishings are to be installed in the near future.
Finger-painting, a comparatively new technique in psychiatric analysis and treatment, has been undertaken by the department this year with very satisfactory results.
Weekly classes for small groups of carefully selected patients have been conducted under
the close supervision of a therapist and a statistical summary of the findings submitted to
the psychiatrists concerned.
Garden and flower picking, also outdoor sketching classes, have been very popular
and beneficial to many patients.
The hospital schoolroom, with a fully qualified teacher in charge, is a part of the
Women's Occupational Therapy Department and here special classes are held daily for
approximately thirty mentally retarded children. Adult patients desirous of continuing
their academic studies are given tuition and assistance by the school teacher in fulfilling
requirements for correspondence courses arranged through the Department of Education
in Victoria.
The Women's Occupational Therapy Department have been happy to comply with
many and varied requests from the other departments of the Hospital. In this connection, we have worked in conjunction with Recreational Therapy in providing suitable
decorations for special parties and dances at St. Valentine's, St. Patrick's, Easter, Hallowe'en, and Christmas, etc.
Other occasions for which special decorations were provided include graduation
ceremonies, graduating nurses' breakfast, opening of the Crease Clinic, banquets, and
Dr. Crease's farewell reception.
For the Social Service Convention over 500 felt dogwood brooches were made by
the patients.
At Christmastime the department supplied several hundred toys for the children at
Essondale and New Westminster; sufficient candy bags were filled for the entire patient-
population.
During the past summer, three first-year and one third-year occupational therapy
students from the University of Toronto completed a two-month interneship in the
Women's Occupational Therapy Department.
Affiliate nurses from general hospitals and the University of British Columbia all
spend one week of their two-month stay working in the department.    During this time V 32 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
they work closely with the therapist in planning work for the patients, attend lectures, and
learn new craft techniques.
The increasing interest being shown by the general public in the work being carried
out in the Women's and Men's Occupational Therapy Workshops at Essondale has been
evidenced by the numerous requests received for exhibits of finished articles.
The following displays were set up and supervised during the past year:—
May 10th to 14th, 1949:  Industrial fair at Vernon, B.C.
May 12th to 14th, 1949:   Fraser Valley Art Group Annual Exhibition at
Y.M.C.A., New Westminster.
June  3rd,  1949:   Parent-Teacher Association Annual Hobby  Show,  Port
Coquitlam.
August 8th and 9th, 1949:   New Westminster Horticultural Society Annual
Flower Show.
August 18th:  Coquitlam Women's Institute Annual Fair and Flower Show.
August 24th to September 9th, 1949:  Pacific National Exhibition and Hobby
Show at Vancouver, at which time Essondale was given the Bronze Award
Certificate and Medal.
Number of patients admitted for occupational therapy during year, 1,094; patients
discontinued, transferred, or discharged during year, 741; total number of hours spent
by therapists during year, 8,139.
I have, etc,
Millicent E. Weekes,
Director, Occupational Therapy Department.
RECREATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit to you the following report showing programme and attendance figures of the activities promoted by the Recreational Department from April 1 st,
1949, to March 31st, 1950:-                                               Numberot Total
Programmes                                                                                    Programmes Attendance
Bingo gatherings       7 2,560
Swimming .     98 3,388
Dances      78 18,079
Bands and concerts     12 8,400
Inter-ward cribbage and checker tournaments.....    22 660
Crossword and cryptogram, etc., contests     52 *
Physical education periods—
Outdoor     72 2,871
Indoor      48 975
Picnics      14 371
Music-appreciation periods     58 5,300
Variety parties or programmes     10 3,035
" Leader-group " training periods     15 240
                 Totals  486 45,879
Unestimated. RECREATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT V 33
Following are special or progressive inaugurated events to our programme this year,
and additional remarks:—
(1) The opening of the East 1 Crease Clinic recreation-room. The opening
of this room provided the department with space and equipment to promote daily indoor activities for the first time since its inception without
interfering with the regular routine of the wards and day rooms.
(2) Mr. Routley, of the Recreational Therapy staff, attended short refresher
courses given by the Canadian Red Cross and The Royal Life Saving
Society and received his R.L.S.S. bronze medallion and bar and preliminary instructor certificate, and the Canadian Red Cross safety instructor's certificate.
(3) The addition of the latest square, round, and folk-dances to our dance
programmes.
(4) The formation and training of a patient-group to assist in the instructional
work of teaching the others the intricacies and patterns of the square and
folk-dances. This group training, although in its infancy, has proved to
be of great benefit to those chosen as leaders, in restoring their confidence
in themselves, and in the assistance given to this department as coinstruc-
tors. It is hoped that this group will, on completion of the new gymnasium
and auditorium with its increased space and facilities, be enlarged and
expanded to cover leadership in all the phases of physical education and
recreational activities.
(5) On May 26th, 1949, a staff sports and recreation committee was formed
by Dr. A. L. Crease. The committee, consisting of representatives of the
senior administrative staff, the medical staff, the male and female nursing
staff, and the recreational director, meet at the request of the director and
assist him in obtaining facilities and interested leaders to further the programme of staff recreation.
(6) The formation of a staff square and old-time dance group on March 9th,
which met weekly during the winter months with a heavy attendance at all
sessions and a request for more of them next year.
(7) On September 20th, 1949, classes were formed and special attention was
given to swimming and diving instruction for staff during after-hours
activities. This also proved to be a popular activity and will be increased
next year.
(8) During the extreme cold weather of January and February an attempt was
made to clear and flood an area suitable for an ice rink. After much
experimenting in various spots, and with the co-operation of the hospital
fire department, an ideal location was found on the Colony Farm grounds.
Only two days of skating, however, was enjoyed by patients or staff
before the milder weather ruined the ice surface. In future years an
attempt will be made to form a rink at the first sign of zero weather.
In closing, I would like to express my sincere appreciation for the co-operation and
assistance given by the many staff individuals and departments in the promotion and
progression of what is still a new department in its infancy.
I have, etc,
W. R. Brown,
Director of Recreational Therapy. V 34 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
LIBRARY REPORT
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of the medical and patients' libraries for the year ended
March 31st, 1950:—
Medical Library
Book collection      866
New books added (plus two encyclopaedias)      278
1,144
Journal collection (medical and nursing)        55
Others        34
        89
Journals (bound volumes)        71
Patient's Library
Book collection  3,115
New books added      509
Donations      180
  3,804
Number of borrowers  1,187
Number of books circulated  9,531
Expenditures for the Year
Medical library (excluding periodicals)  $1,451.76
Patient's library     1,187.83
Dominion health grant (medical library)        778.15
I have, etc.,
Jean S. Irving,
Librarian.
AUDIO-VISUAL DEPARTMENT
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith is a summary of basic activities of the Audio-Visual
Department for the fiscal year 1949-1950. It can be seen that in regard to staff, equipment, and time considerations, motion pictures is the major function, with photography
and recording following in that order.
It is interesting to note that the department, while originally for the enjoyment of
the patients and still is, is now becoming of equal value to the Hospital and staff, since
the equipment performs equally well for all.
The number of educational films shown and (or) loaned out was rather limited,
since the 16-mm.-film library was not organized until late in the year. This library, in
conjunction with our projection equipment, has now developed into a small-scale film AUDIO-VISUAL DEPARTMENT
V 35
exchange. A minimum average of shipping and receiving either films or machines
amounts to fifteen per week. This phase has been assisted by the department being
located at street level and adjacent to the centre of transportation (garage).
Not shown in the summary, and apart from specially constructed amplifying equipment, is the large amount of maintenance work performed not only on our own equipment but on that of other departments and institutions in connection with intercommuni-
cators, sound systems, projection equipment, and office-type wire-recorders. Assistance
has been given through the business manager's office to patients owning their own radios
and hearing-aids. I am glad to stay that through the completion of this maintenance work
no 16-mm. or 35-mm. motion picture show at this Hospital, or on one of our machines
on loan, has had to be cancelled owning to defective equipment.
The application of photography to the Hospital increases daily, but not without
inherent troubles resulting from cramped quarters and working conditions. This may
also be said for the recording equipment, which for best results must be operated in a
sound-conditioned room. It is hoped that upon completion of the auditorium the
majority of these conditions will be overcome.
During the summer months, music has been played throughout the grounds and has
been enjoyed by both patients and staff. Due consideration is given to what type of
music is selected, and as in the case of motion pictures, we are guided a great deal by
comments from patients, staff, and current literature.
During the year, the department staff was increased to four with the addition of
W. Peters, projectionist, and Miss L. Archibald, stenographer.
In conclusion, the services rendered and the progress made has not been without
growing pains, nor could it have been done without the fortitude and versatility of the
Audio-Visual staff, in conjunction with fine co-operation from many of the departments
throughout the Hospital.
Motion Pictures, Recreational
No. of
Shows
35-mm. presentations at Essondale  186
35-mm. presentations at New Westminster  90
16-mm. presentations at Essondale, Home for Aged, and
Colony Farm  510
Average
Attendance
200
160
90
Total
Attendance
37,200
14,400
14,900
16-mm. Films Shipped to Other Institutions
Colquitz
  104
P.M.H., New Westminster  101
Home for Aged, Vernon :  46
Provincial Home, Kamloops  48
Girls' Industrial School  49
Boys' Industrial School  52
Allco Infirmary, Haney  51
16-mm. projection equipment loaned out  187
Motion Pictures, Educational
No. of
Shows
16-mm. presentations  120
16-mm. films loaned out  122
16-mm. presentations conducted away from hospital by
Audio-Visual staff       5
Average
Attendance
24
20
Total
Attendance
2,880
2,350 v 36 mental hospitals report, 1949-50
Photography
4-by-5 negatives exposed  240
8-by-10 prints produced  550
ll-by-14 prints produced     15
2-by-2 transparencies     18
16-mm. motion picture film exposed (feet)  750
Records and Recordings
Domestic records loaned out  425
Transcribed 30-minute disks of produced music  20
Minutes of recorded material for clinical and miscellaneous
purposes  300
Hours of music played either in dining-rooms or on lawns  110
I have, etc.,
G. H. Walker,
Director.
CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith are consolidated summaries of the work done in the Child
Guidance Clinics throughout the Province from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950.
These tables are based on the complete examination or re-examination of each case.
Partial examinations are shown in the reports of psychiatric interviews, psychological
examinations, etc.
Table 1 shows in summary the general activities of the Clinics. Once again there
has been a noticeable increase in the number of Clinics held, in physical examinations,
and in consulting conferences. Clinics were held for the first time in Nakusp and Powell
River.    All other places listed have been visited on previous occasions.
Table 2 shows the number, sex, and status of all cases, both new and repeat, examined at the Clinics. While the total number of cases seen at the Clinics has shown little
change there has been an increase in the number of male children with a decrease in the
number of adults.
Table 3 is an analysis of the sources of all cases referred to the Clinics. While the
largest number of cases are those referred from social agencies there has been a noticeable
increase in cases from institutions, schools, juvenile courts, and particularly from private
physicians.
Table 4 is a summary of the problems and disorders presented by the new cases seen
at the Clinics.    This table does not reveal any significant alterations in trends.
Table 5 is an analysis of age-groups and intelligence. It again shows that the
majority of cases seen at the Clinics are in the pre-adolescent age-group with average or
better-than-average intelligence.
Table 6 shows the number and types of psychological tests carried out at the Clinics
The most prominent trends in the work of the Clinics have been the increase in the
number of cases handled exclusively by the Clinics, the increase in psychiatric work in the
correctional field, and the increased amount of treatment that is done. ^~
—
CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
V 37
The functions of the Clinic continue as heretofore, namely, diagnosis, treatment,
consultation, training, education, and research. Work in all these fields has been carried
on with increased vigour.
During the year the Vancouver Clinic was inspected by many visitors. Those from
other countries included Moss, of England; Baker, of Australia; Rinne, of Finland; and
Yeo, from Hongkong.    All were laudatory in their remarks following their investigations.
The increased demands for clinic service emphasize the need for more professional
staff. The present staff continue to work to capacity. Each addition to the staff enables
the Clinic to increase its service to the individual case. Therapy is an attempt to modify
the physical situation, the emotional situation, and the understanding of people in contact
with the child, and at the same time an attempt to modify the child by increasing his
understanding of his own reactions. This therapy is usually effective, both in relieving
the immediate problem and, in all probability, in increasing the child's resistance to the
development of symptoms in later difficult situations.
In a certain proportion of cases it is not possible to carry on therapy on an outpatient basis. These unfortunate children show a marked degree of emotional disturbance and are unable to establish an adequate relationship with their parents or selected
foster-parents. Their behaviour is beyond the tolerance of their own families, foster-
homes, schools, and community. They require in-patient treatment in a special home
with a proportionately large, capable, and well-trained staff. This enables each child to
be accepted as an individual in his own right; his capacity to participate in procedures
designed to help him is appreciated; he is given a relaxed home-like experience where
the importance of material things is not stressed but emphasis is placed on flexibility and
tolerance. He is given an opportunity to relate and identify himself with individuals
whom he can admire and at the same time obtain satisfaction and recognition as a member
of the group.
The need for such an observation and treatment home for pre-adolescent children is
becoming more urgent.
I would like to express my appreciation of the co-operation of all those who have
made it possible for the clinic to function in an adequate and satisfactory manner.
Table 1.—Summary of Clinics' Activity, April 1st, 1949, to   .
March 31st, 1950.
u
93
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261
619
488
231
600
225
1,011
9
34
1
37
3
59
1
3
3
6
1
2
1
2
3
5
2
7
6
3
14
1
1
1
2
2
1
5
5
6
2
7
7
10
11
37
5
38
13
66
l
4
4
9
3
11
7
11
7
1
4
2
4
2
7
8
4
13
2
6
4
5
1
8
2
9
9
17
3
11
7
11
3
23
28
98
101
7
183
331
865
515
231
852
271
201      9
1,461 V 38
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Table 2.—Number, Sex, and Status of all Cases Examined at Child Guidance
Clinic, April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950.
SI
T3
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New cases  	
574
w
3
1
7
1
4
6
1%
4
11
3
7
6
8
9
81
783
Males—
Adults 	
65
1
66
298
16
1
1
5
1
2
4
24
3
8
3
6
5
5
4
44
430
Females-
Adults _	
28
8
36
Children  	
183
14
2
2
2
2
4
1
3
1
1
3
5
27
250
206
4
1
1
1
9
1
1
7
^n
246
Males—
Adults	
45
104
3
1
1
1
1
7
1
7,
1
10
47
Children   ...
130
Females—
Adults	
3
54
i
	
—
1
1
3
6
6
Children 	
	
63
Total cases _	
780
34
3
2
7
1
5
7
37
4
11
4
7
6
9
11
101
1,029 CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
V 39
Table 3.—Sources of All Cases Referred to Child Guidance Clinic,
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Agency or Source
Number
of Cases
Total
Percentage
Distribution
1. Social agencies-
Children's Aid Society	
Social Welfare Branch	
Catholic Children's Aid Society__ —
Family Welfare and Children's Aid Society-
Family Welfare Bureau.
City Social Welfare (Victoria)	
City Social Service Department (Vancouver)..
Y.W.C.A 	
Gordon House  	
C.N.I.B  	
2. Institutions-
Fairbridge Farm School-
New Haven	
3. Medical and health agencies-
Public health nurses	
Children's Hospital	
Saanich Health Department	
T.B. Social Service Department...
Metropolitan Health Unit	
Central V.I. Health Unit   -
Health Department-
Child Health Centre, V.G.H.
V.O.N	
School Mental Hygiene Division.
4. Schools _
Public-
Teachers 	
Attendance officer 	
Other-
Boys' Industrial School...
Girls' Industrial School-
Nursery and play schools.
Kindergartens
St. Christopher's School	
School for the Deaf and Blind-
Vancouver College	
Vocational Institute.	
5. Juvenile Court-
Provincial Probation Officer-
6. Adult Court-
Adult Probation Officer-
Borstal 	
7. Private physicians-
8. Parents, relatives, friends, self..
9. Other-
National Employment Service—
Speech therapist-
Rainbow Christian Fellowship Home-
Lawyer 	
Totals-
283
200
31
27
13
5
4
1
1
1
14
41
23
12
3
2
2
5
3
64
18
3
2
2
2
1
1
54
4
3
79
54
59
566
55.00
55
47
5.35
4.57
101
9.81
58
54
59
7
1.029
5.64
5.25
5.73
0.68
100.00 V 40
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Table 4. — Problems and Disorders Presented by the New Cases Given Full
Examination by Child Guidance Clinic, April 1st, 1949, to March 31st,
1950
Children
Adults
Total
M.
F.
M.
F.
1. Primary behaviour disorders—
(a) Habit disorders—
1
7
6
1
2
9
5
1
1
3
6
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
6
1
1
5
58
1
2
7
1
3
4  .
1
3
3
8
1
2
1
2
1
1
3
12
13
7
3
3
2
1
1
4
3
6
2
2
4
4
1
1
5
1
10
1
10
5
5
1
1
4
1
6
	
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
1
14
3
9
1
2
Other    	
(b) Personality disorders—
11
5
1
2
4
10
4
1
Other                                                      	
9
(c)  Neurotic disorders—
Tics and habit spasms..—  	
1
3
4
5
6
6
1
(d) Conduct disorders—
2
6
69
1
2
2-
18
1
4
18
1
8
8
8
1
2
2. Psychotic and prepsychotic—
3
	
2
1
3. Psychoneurosis and neurosis—
2
	
	
4. Convulsive disorders—
3
1
4
3
(a) Associated with dull normal or border-line intelligence—
lb) Special mental disability—
16
13
Other - _ 	
	 CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
V 41
Table 4. — Problems and Disorders Presented by the New Cases Given Full
Examination by Child Guidance Clinic, April 1st, 1949, to March 31st,
195 0—Continued
Children
Adults
Total
M.
F.
M. '
F.
7. Behaviour disorder associated with somatic disorder—
2
5
8
1
2
3
1
17
6
1
3
2
2
1
19
1
1
3
2
1
1
12
3
1
2
2
1
12
1
1
3
46
1
4
1
1
21
3
9
3
1
8. Mental deficiencies—
5
11
2
4
3
2
2
34
10
10. No ascertained mental deviation—
3
5
4
2
1
1
31
120      1        85
205
9
4
13
3
7
1
24
3
(5) Other                                               - 	
16
17
59
411
225
63
51
750 V 42
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Table 5.—Chart Comparing Ages with Intelligence Quotients of All New
Cases Seen at Child Guidance Clinic from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st,
1950.
Males
Females
Intelligence Quotient
Age in
Years
1-4
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-24
25-29
30-34     35-39
40+
Total
0-19 _	
4
3
20
26
35
40
4
2
11
12
8
21
23
21
14
1
2
4
7
14
15
32
27
10
1
2
6
5
17
20
25
30
3
1
1
4
5
4
1
1
1
20--.9   -
50-69  -  	
16
30
70-79-    .:   -
80-89 	
31
73
90-99           -	
105
100-109                           _. .   _	
114
110-129                                  	
98
130-139 - 	
140+    	
10
6
Totals                     	
134
113
112
106
16
1
1
483
0-19 	
20-49  	
4
5
4
1
1
1
1
17
50-69 	
4
4
3
4
15
70-79.    .-_
3
3
4
4
1
1
16
80-89  	
6
9
5
13
2
1
1
37
90-99     	
12
12
4
11
2
1
1
3
46
100-109  	
22
15
11
14
2
2
1
67
110-129    	
30
10
9
6
1
1
1
58
130-139  	
6
1
1
8
140+. _ 	
2
1
	
	
3
Totals 	
89
55
41
53
12
7
5    |        3
1
2
267 CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS
V 43
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MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
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PiPitj SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT V 45
SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT
REPORT OF PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORKERS' PARTICIPATION IN
PROVINCIAL MENTAL HOSPITALS AND HOMES FOR THE AGED
Members of the psychiatric social workers' team attached directly to the Provincial
Mental Hospitals and Homes for the Aged have, as in previous years, endeavoured to
work as part of the team assisting in the patients' treatment. In order to do this, the
psychiatric social worker's headquarters must be at the hospital, with contacts in the
community. Few patients exist by themselves but as a part of a family unit within that
economic and cultural confines or environment. The human relation factor is too often
ignored or insufficiently considered in the quest for a solution and the efficiency of hospital
treatment may easily be undermined by poorly formulated discharge plans.
The social workers attached to the hospital and working with patients and families
of Greater Vancouver have the advantage of keeping the home and hospital patient
closer toegther. The frequent visits of relatives to the hospital and their first-hand
contact with the physician is also an advantage. For the patient who comes to the
hospital from a more remote area every effort must be made to supplement for the latter
advantages. For this reason, in the last year, we have tried to improve our contact with
these patients through more frequent ward visits with the patient and closer contact with
the attending physician and more studied correspondence with the Provincial Welfare
field staff, who have responded by forwarding the required social history with much
greater speed than formerly, and have also shown better-formulated family case-work
plans. About 50 per cent of the patients assigned to the Social Service Department come
from outside of Greater Vancouver.
It must be remembered, however, that the crucial ingredient for a successful programme of this sort is well-trained, experienced, able, and devoted personnel. Mediocre
personnel will not get the job done and are almost bound to waste money in poor
allocation of time, not overlooking the fact of the poor direction that may be given to
the field worker carrying out the plan in the area from which the patient has come and to
which he must return.
With added supervisory personnel appointed this last year, there has been a smoother
functioning of the department and a better evaluation of duties designed to raise the
level of efficiency. In order to broaden our practical teaching, we have held some
conferences at the hospital with outside agencies—Children's Aid Society, etc.—and it
has been found that each of the collaborating social workers taking part has contributed
to the better understanding of the patient and his family needs as well as assisting the
hospital team to broaden their horizons.
There has been twelve clinics for the University of British Columbia social-work
students. These were given practical demonstration of Mental Hospital social services.
Two students from the University of British Columbia social science course received their
field-work instruction at the Hospital. The student nurses of the Provincial Mental
Hospital were given lectures by a member of the Social Service Department. Public
health nurses-in-training each spent a day in our department for orientation purposes.
There has also been social workers assigned from the Social Welfare Branch for
orientation. Time spent in any of these assignments is felt to give ample return, for
without team work from all agencies the work of this department would indeed be
severely curtailed.
The advantages of having a resident rehabilitation centre for women patients cannot
be overestimated. There has been a great satisfaction in the progress made by patients
who have had the extra help afforded by the personal attention given them in more normal V 46 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
surroundings and where they can take their first steps into the community accompanied
by understanding and definite planning. The time involved by the Social Service Department in this project is well justified. The Social Service staff has been particularly
fortunate in having many opportunities for continual education afforded by the other
departments of the Hospital. The psychiatrists on the staff have that happy faculty of
teaching through individual cases and all workers in their contacts have had the benefit.
There is that spirit of team play which makes for easy and continual educational benefits.
In going over the year's work of the Social Service Department, we feel very humble,
because if it were not for the team play within the Hospital and of the community our
efforts would be infinitesimal.
Provincial Mental Hospital and Home for the Aged Statistics,
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Number of New Cases Referred to Social Service Department
In Vancouver       630
Out of Vancouver      774
  1,404
The number of new admissions was increased by 154 during the past fiscal year.
Disposition
Discharged on probation—
In Vancouver      217
Out of Vancouver      279
      496
This is an increase of 21 cases which were referred for probation services.
Report of Social Service Work Carried Out by Members
of the Social Service Department at Essondale
Initial interviews to obtain social histories ;  3,564
Subsequent case-work interviews with patients, families, doctors, and other social agencies during hospitalization of
patients   1,051
Case-work interviews for the purpose of rehabilitation, including follow-up case-work services for patients discharged
on probation   2,122
Out-of-town Supervisory Service by Mail
Letters to the Provincial field staff requesting social
histories and probation visits, and of a general
supervisory nature  2,527
Letters to other social agencies in and out of British
Columbia ..      551
Social histories, probation, and other reports, and letters of a general consultative nature received from
Provincial field staff  1,538
Correspondence received from other social agencies
in and out of British Columbia .....       458
  5,074
Orientation periods for twenty field service staff, twelve public health nurses, one
postgraduate nurse, and one council for handicapped. SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT V 47
Provincial Mental Hospital and Home for the Aged Statistics,
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950—Continued
Special Assignments
Applications taken for old-age pension for patients resident in
Provincial Homes for the Aged      400
Ward rounds and medical staff clinics attended by members
of the Social Service Department        77
Other special assignments, including conferences with other
agencies, lectures to nurses, in-service training groups,
and community groups      354
Training of university students—
Field work, students placed  2
Teaching clinics held at the hospital for social service
students from University of British Columbia  8
REPORT OF SOCIAL WORKERS' PARTICIPATION IN THE
CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICAL SERVICES
In the last year it has been found, as with most Child Guidance Clinics as they age
and progress, that a greater percentage of their clientele come from other than social
agencies. This has been true of our Clinics. In the last year there has been a 30-per-cent
increase in referral from private doctors. In most of these cases it means that the total
case-work falls to the psychiatric social worker attached to the Clinic. This is time
consuming but much more satisfactory, as treatment of the case is initiated in the very
first clinical contact and there is the opportunity to prepare the parents and the child for
the clinical examination. There is timing of the examination. Because a case is referred
does not always mean that either the parents or the child is ready to fully co-operate.
Changes cannot be imported ready-made from the outside but parents have to be ready
and willing to make the effort themselves or there is a waste of expensive Government
services. Good preparation leads to good participation for both the child and parents
and also leads to accepting treatment, which is also carried out through the social worker
from the psychiatrist and other members of the clinical team.
Because of the above increase in doctor referrals, the Clinic has been unable to
accept all social-agency referrals. However, with the added team in the correctional field
more time will be available for these cases.
A full team in the correctional field has made for more time for examination of cases
falling into that category and more consistent follow through. As part of the duties of the
clinical team a social worker has taken on a special role with the Boys' Industrial School
where, as a temporary measure to assist in their growing programme, a Clinic case-work
supervisor has been supervising in the school's social-work department and participating
in their staff meetings.
The staff of social workers at the Vancouver Clinic has been increased but, while at
the end of the fiscal year we had six workers against four workers at the beginning, the
actual increase in regard to time on staff has been less than one worker. The supervisor
was loaned and one other is on educational leave. However, the additional staff during
the latter part of the year, together with the increase in staff of the other professions and
team workers, has made it possible to organize our work more satisfactorily and give better
service to a larger number of clients.   This is clearly indicated by the yearly statistics.
The field training of two male students of social work during their university term
was time consuming but profitable to the Clinic, in that it helped to bridge the Clinic's V 48
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
urgent need for a male case-worker. It is hoped that this need may be filled in the
near future.
The services of the Travelling Clinic have been expanded which, of necessity, calls
for more social-work participation on the team. We hope this year we will be able to
expand in this area. Unfortunately, due to other more pressing demands, a minimum
of social workers' time was devoted to the Travelling Clinic work.
Evaluation of the total programme has to be made from time to time in order to
avoid any one problem from receiving more than its alloted prominence. In order to do
this effectively, the whole staff must be alert and come together to make a sampling
survey. But some of the most effective clinical work that can be done is often of
a character that is so diffuse in its influence to the community that it cannot be traced
to any one case but is a composite of the whole programme.
In a community public service, allied services ask for assistance in evaluating their
client. In this last year, the Spastic Paralysis Society, as well as others, has asked the
Clinic's help in studying their children. The spade work and preparation for Child
Guidance Clinic examination falls on the psychiatric social worker but, because of the
often unusual individual capabilities of the children, this is a service well worth while.
If the psychiatric social worker were not a participating part of the clinical team,
they alone could not enjoy the promising beginning and the additional progress that
is in sight.
The Clinical Director's report should be read in conjunction with this report, as
psychiatric social workers are only a part of the team which participates in the work of
the Child Guidance Clinics.
Statistical Report of the Psychiatric Social Workers, Provincial Child Guidance Clinics, for the Fiscal Year April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Vancouver
Victoria
1949-50
Total
1948-49
Total
Increase
Case-work services—Total number of cases brought forward
84
168
10
15
193
267
138
129
2,722
868
158
183
432
106
87
36
197
34
67
8
9
84
110
41
69
937
90
57
25
144
28
99
7
26
118
235
18
24
277
377
179
198
3,659
958
215)
208]
576
98*
150
25
175
262
158
115t
1,540
1,017
239
298
71
186
32
150
Per Cent
20
Private case-referrals—
57
Total intake                      - 	
58
Total cases carried (84+193—10)                         	
43
72
Total number case-work interviews with and regarding clients
137
—6
77
Consultation with psychiatrist on private cases	
93
88
186
43
223
34
49
* Last year's increase ;n cases.
t This year's increase in canes.
J. F. KlLBURN,
Provincial Supervisor, Psychiatric Social Work.   STATISTICAL TABLES
V 51
STATISTICAL TABLES
Table No.  1.—Showing the Operations of the Hospitals—Essondale, New
Westminster, and Saanich—from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Movement of Population
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
1,873
368
290
100
7
2
........
1
1,559
265
116
3
3,432
633
290
216
10
2
1
2,641
840
1,943
575
In residence, New Westminster, March 31st, 1949 	
On probation, carried forward from 1948-49, Essondale    	
On probation, carried forward from 1948-49, New Westminster
On probation, carried forward from 1948-49, Saanich   _ .....	
On escape, carried forward from 1948-49, Essondale
On escape, carried forward from 1948-49, New Westminster
4,584
Admitted during the year 1949-50—
By ordinary forms    	
570
39
213
6
-----
12
468
20
84
2
1
1,038
59
297
8
13
By Order in Council  	
1,415
Total   under  treatment,   Essondale,   New   Westminster,   and
Saanich, Anril 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Discharged during period of April 1st, 1949 to March 31st,
1950—
(a) From Essondale—
102
148
170
164
96
3
123
92
189
75
32
105
1
67
194
337
245
196
201
4
190
3,481
832
2,518
565
5,999
Without psychosis  	
Died    	
806
561
1,367
(b) From New Westminster—
1
4
3
4
1
1
2
1
5
4
6
Died   	
12
4
16
(c)  From Saanich—
1
2
1
3
1
6
	
1
2
1
3
1
6
Died                                                                 -
14
14
Total   discharged   from   Essondale,   New  Westminster,   and
1,973
840
15
5
1,675
575
5
3,648
1,415
20
5
1,397
Total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich
2,649
1,953
4,602
Essondale—
Total on books, March 31st, 1949  	
2,833
865
2,255
606
5,088
806
42
17
561
45
1,367
87
17
1,471
Total in residence, Essondale, March 31st, 1950
1,968
1,649
3,617 V 52
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Hospitals—Essondale, New
Westminster, and Saanich—from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950^-
Continued
Movement of Population
Male
Female
Total
Total
Male
Female
Total
New Westminster—
Total on books, March 31st, 1949 _ 	
375
42
268
45
643
87
417
27
313
9
730
Discharged during 1949-50 ,,     ...
12
15
4
5
16
20
36
.293
17
293
17
Total in residence, New Westminster, March 31st, 1950	
390
304
694
Saanich—
Total on books, March 31st, 1949  	
310
19
310
14
5
14
5
19
1,968
390
291
1,649
304
3,617
694
291
Total in residence, Saanich, March 31st, 1950 	
291
291
Total in residence, Essondale, March 31st, 1950 	
Total in residence, New Westminster, March 31st, 1950	
Total in residence, Saanich, March 31st, 1950	
2,649
1,953
Grand total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and
Saanich, March 31st, 1950   	
4,602
Daily  average  population    	
Percentage of discharges on admissions (not including deaths).
Percentage of recoveries on admissions
Percentage of deaths on whole number under treatment
4,486.53
69.47
13.71
3.37
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Hospital
since Its Inception  __
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18
1
1
16
18
5.55
5.55
5.55
1873 	
15
10
2
5
14
2
31
66.66
80.00
16.12
1874 ._	
12
4
3
19
5
26
33.33
33.33
11.53
1875 .__	
29
22
3
11
3
3
10
5
32
35
13
3
_    |         48
.         i          54
10.34
50.00
26.89
63.63
20.83
1876   __	
9.35
1877    _	
14
4
4
3
38
3
.... _    |         49
28.57
78.57
6.12
1878	
16
7
3
8
36
2
54
43.75
62.50
16.16
1879	
18
4
1
8
41
5
54
22.22
27.77
14.81
1880  	
17
5
5
48
7
58
29.41
29.41
8.62
1881 	
13
5
3
5
48
61
38.46
61.54
8.19
1882	
7
3
1
2
49
1
	
55
42.85
57.14
3.63
1883	
8
4
1
3
49
57
50.00
62.50
5.26
1884     ■ .
10
20
27
2    1        4
5    1
10    |        6
2
5
6
51
61
66
2
10
5
59
71
88
20.00
25.00
37.03
60.00
25.00
59.25
3.33
1885	
6.94
1886  	
6.81
1887    	
36
15    I        5
5
77
11
102
41.66
55.55
4.80
1888    	
26
12    |        6
3
82
5
103
46.15
69.23
2.87
1889 '	
41
14    |        5
4
100
18
	
123
34.15
46.34
3.25
1890     	
52
17    |        6
12
117
17
152
32.69
44.23
7.64
1891 	
49
19    |        4
1
20
123
6
166
38.77
46.94
11.69 STATISTICAL TABLES
V 53
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operations
of the Hospital
since Its Inception—Continued
Discharges
c
rt
CJ
Q
0 u
■hi: u
Year
a
o
1
<
•a
CJ
CJ
>
o
o
0J
as
V
CJ
u
S3
>
o
as
XI
os
S3
0
cj cj
v-n cj
fa*
Si"
ZaUl
CD
a
0)
u
fl
CJ
rt
CJ
CJ
CJ
Q
S
3
CJ  u
O rt
•fl   <D
u__
ill
c £ !»
88 E
Sj cj'O
P-P.<
Percentage c
Discharges t
Admissions
Excluded)
Percentage o
Deaths to W
Number unc
Treatment
1892 	
52
44
80
17           10
14    1      18
13
14
19
135
133
162
I
12    1    . .
175
179
213
32.69        51.92
31.81    |    72.72
16.25    j    40.00
6.95
1893 ___	
29
2
7.60
1894  	
13
19
8.92
1895  	
62    1      29
11
20
164
2
	
224
46.77    |    64.51
8.92
1896	
64
23
25
9
171    |        7
228
35.93    |    75.00
3.94
1897  ~	
74
81
101
113
20
27
31
38
8
13
32
27
14
19
21
29
203    |      32
221           18
246
27.03    |    37.83
33.33    j    49.38
30.69    1    62.37
33.63    |    57.52
5.69
1898	
285
327
356
6.66
1899 	
234
258
13
24
6.42
1900 ... 	
8.14
1901 	
115
40
20
25
284
26
377
34.78    |    52.17
6.63
1902..... 	
121
30
31
25
311    |      27
413
24.79    |    50.41
6.06
1903   	
139
38
37
26
26
26
349
321
38
466
27.34    !    53.96
40.00    |    62.61
5.57
1904.  	
115    |      46
_.    |      28    |       480
5.42
1905    	
123    |      43
150    |      36*
221     |      48
33
43
43
27
28
39
348
388
461
27
43
73
505
552
666
33.33    |    61.78
23.03    |    52.06
21.30    j    41.20
5.34
1906 	
5.04
1907 __  	
5.08
1908 	
230    |      68*
232    |      73t
56    |      57
77          40
507
536
46    |              |       765
29    1     |       816
28.30    1    53.90
31.00    I    64.60
7.44
1909 _
6.40
1910    •	
280    |      84
82
41
595
48         .             896
30.00    !    59.28
4.57'
1911      __     .
332    [      67$
114
60
690    |    105
     |    1,034
19.57    |    54.42
5.83
1912    „
375           74*
128
76
752    1      62
_     |    1,065
18.90    |    53.80
7.02
1913...... 	
380    |     90§
146
67
919
167
1,264
22.63    |    62.10
5.30
1914 	
402    |      58
126
74
1,027
108
     |    1,364
14.43    1    45.77
5.43
332    |      83
91
89
1,090
63
     I    1,437
25.00    1    52.41
6.19
1916	
353    |      73,
96
80
1.205
115
     1    1.527
20.68    i    47.87
5.24
1917	
371    |      88
78
106
1,301
96
1,650
23.72    1    44.74
6.42
1918        	
375    |      75
95
132
1,347
46
1,753
20.00    1    45.33
7.47
Jan. 1, 1919, to
March 31, 1920
574         116
221
132
1,458
111
2,025
20.20    !    58.71
6.51
1920-1921 	
489    |      88
173
122
1,566
108
2,043
14.17    |    72.60
5.97
1921-1922	
478    |      96
178
114
1,649
83
2,137
20.08    |    57.32
5.33
438    |      91
447    I      84t
167
121
133
163
1,697
1,784
48
87
2,180
2,234
20.77    1    59.36
18.56    |    64.20
6.10
1923-1924   ' _..
7.25
1924-1925.    	
461     |      63
475    |      5711
242
240
138
142
1,884
1,995
100
111
.    |    2,327
     ]    2,434
13.66    |    66.16
12.00    1    62.53
5.93
1925-1976	
5.83
1926 1927 	
494    |      76§
'542    |      75*
171
252
161
147
2,125
2,269
130
144
2,565
15.38    1    50.00
13.28    1    60.33
6.27
1927-1928 —	
2,743
5.36
1928-1929 __	
543    I      92t
294
181
2,347
78
2,914
16.76    !    71.07
6.21
1979-1930 	
602
118*
311
223
2,411
64
3,063
19.10    |    71.26
7.28
1930 1931 	
632
562
70*
5811
235
299
191
181
2,550
2,676
139
126
3,148
3,214
10.60    |    64.24
10.32    |    63.52
6.06
1931-1932	
5.63
1932-1933	
635    I      44§
323
195
2,824
148
3,390
6.92    !    58.42
5.75
1933-1934 	
610    |      61$
309
200
2,960
136
3,530
10.00    |    60.65
5.66
1934-1935 ,.    _..
653    |      71*
349
321
3,080
120
3,721
10.87    '    64.32
5.94
1935-1936 	
679    I      63*
304
291
3,180
100
3,838
9.27         54.05
7.58
'   1936-1937 	
793    I      78$
300
268
3,301
121
4,067
9.96    |    63.60
6.59
1937-1938	
834    |      74
330
207
3,487
186
4,255
8.87    1    67.30
4.86
1938-1939	
827    |      72$
345
208
3.612
125
4,471
8.71    !    78.72
4.65
869    I    111**
864    |    10711
455
410
230
254
3,710
3,836
98
126
4,713
4,781
11.39    I    88.50
12.38    1    79.97
4.88
1940-1941 	
5.31
834    1      71tt
803    |      91$$
400
443
255
260
3,902
3,925
66
23
4,843
4,919
8.51    :    56.46
11.32    |    66.50
6.54
1942-1943 	
5.31
840    |      87
822    i      965§
423
377
309
300
3.960
4,019
35
59
4,965
4,960
10.36    I    61.66
10.46    !    58.39
6.02
1944-1945 -	
6.04
1945-1946	
834    I    117ft
352
240
4,110
91
5,014
14.02    i    57.43
5.84
1946-1947 ,_._	
880    I      97§§
496
238
4,151
41
5,174
11.02    I    68.18
4.59
1,111    |    1241111
1,260    j    13711II
560
748
240
209
4,269
4,355
118
86
5,447
5,758
11.34    |    63.64
10.87    1    76.59
4.40
1948-1949 ____	
3.63
1949-1950 	
1,415    1    195
787
202
4,602    1    247    |
1              1
5,999
13.78    !    69.40
!
3.37
* Three not insane.             t One not insane.             t Two not insane.             § Four not lr
isane.            1] Six nc
t insane.
1 Five not insane.         ** Twelve not insane.         ft Ten not insane.         tt Eight not ins
ane.         §§ Seven nc
t insane.
1i«| Three not ins.
4
ne; 196 i
vithout p
sychosis
1
II Two not
insane;
seventy-
.ight withe
ut psychosis. V 54
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Table No. 3.—Showing the Total Number of Admissions, Discharges, and
Deaths from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Months
Admissions
Discharges
Deaths
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
1949
60
57
73
86
66
46
71
93
66
61
73
88
49
43
52
51
60
56
51
46
42
30
46
49
109
100
125
137
126
102
122
139
103
91
119
137
44
45
42
42
43
51
44
65
53
29
77
58
32
32
26
28
40
24
32
32
34
30
40
39
76
77
68
70
83
75
76
97
87
59
117
97
13
9
15
6
9
11
14
6
10
18
15
3
7
6
5
10
2
3
2
10
9
3
9
16
May 	
June 	
July ...	
16
21
11
19
September ._	
October 	
13
17
8
20
1950
27
February.	
18
16
Totals _.
840
575
1,415
593
389
982
	
133
69
202
Table No. 4.—Showing the Civil State of Patients Admitted from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Civil State
Male
Female
Total
239
412
40
59
88
2
262
157
22
87
47
501
569
62
146
135
2
840
575
1,415 STATISTICAL TABLES
V 55
Table No. 5.—Showing Religious Denominations of Patients Admitted
from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Religious Denominations
Male
Female
Total
1
1
2
4
3
1
4
1
2
14
3
1
6
55
5
6
3
1
537
167
1
5
2
4
1
10
1
1
2
3
4
~~4
~4
33
7
1
2
1
1
404
98
2
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
Buddhist     	
4
7
3
g
1
2
18
3
1
10
88
12
1
8
4
2
941
265
1
2
8
3
Sikh                                     _~ 	
4
1
1
1
11
Totals 	
840
575
1,415
Table No. 6.—Showing the Degree of Education of Those Admitted
from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Degree of Education
Male
Female
Total
20
160
445
121
91
3
7
153
299
73
43
27
313
744
194
134
3
840
575
1,415 V 56
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Table No. 7.—Showing the Nationality of Those Admitted from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Nationality
Male
Female
Total
3
2
1
1
13
5
3
94
3
1
4
3
3
4
5
23
2
1
2
12
10
5
12
1
42
2
9
4
2
52
3
6
3
2
45
189
39
12
2
17
100
28
70
2
1
2
3
2
87
3
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
14
2
2
1
1
6
1
5
2
9
40
1
5
1
33
5
1
2
40
122
32
6
2
3
49
10
71
3
4
1
2
15
8
5
181
6
2
6
4
Holland                    	
4
6
1
6
37
4
2
2
3
18
1
Poland                                 . _                   - -
15
7
21
1
82
3
14
5
2
85
Wales                                    _	
8
6
4
4
Canada—
85
311
71
18
4
20
149
38
141
840
575
1,415 STATISTICAL TABLES
V 57
Table No. 8.—Showing What Districts Contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
4
1
3
2
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
12
3
1
1
1
1
1
6
4
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
3
2
3
2
2
2
9
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
1
3
3
1
1
2
1
2
1
4
1
2
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
13
1
1
2
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
3
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
4
2
1
1
1
6
1
4
4
1
3
4
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
25
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
1
1
1
9
1
1
1
2
1
3
2
1
2
1
5
1
1
2
3
5
1
2
2
12
1
1
1
3
3
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
4
2
1
2
1
2
6
2
1
1
1
5
1
110
1
9
11
1
4
1
1
1
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
4
7
1
5
2
66
1
13
12
3
3
2
3
1
1
3
__
13
1
2
1
3
9
5
4
1
1
1
6
1
2
1
2
1
1
6
74
9
1
5
2
1
2
1
1
2
1
4
1
1
2
1
5
3
2
8
1
1
12
1
37
8
2
1
1
1
5
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
3
6
4
1
2
1
8
184
Agassiz 	
Alberni	
Aldergrove	
Invermere 	
Kamloops  	
Kanaka  	
Kelowna 	
Kimberley  	
Kispiox 	
Ladner	
Ladysmith 	
1
18
1
16
Armstrong	
Ashcroft 	
Atlin	
3
1
6
1
1
Bella Bella	
1
1
1
Brookmere	
Langley Prairie	
Lantzville. _	
Lillooet. __	
Lumby	
9
1
1
5
Canal Flats            _ 	
1
Lytton. 	
Maillardville... 	
Matsqui	
Madeira Park	
Merritt —	
Metchosin 	
Michel.	
Milner 	
Mission	
1
Castlegar 	
1
3
Cheam View	
Chemainus —	
1
1
1
1
Clearwater.	
Clinton	
1
8
1
Mount Lehman 	
Nakusp  	
Nanaimo  	
Naramata.. -
Natal	
4
Colwood	
6
15
Comox	
1
2
Courtenay	
Nelson	
17
3
Cowley, Y.T.
103
1
Cranberry 	
21
Oakalla _	
14
3
3
2
1
Osoyoos. 	
Parksville —	
Peachland  —
4
1
Deroche 	
Dewdney 	
1
1
Penticton	
8
1
2
Edgewood.—  	
1
15
1
Port Kells 	
2
3
1
1
6
Fort St. George	
Prince George	
15
9
Princeton _ 	
Progress.   	
Qualicum _ 	
Quathiaski Cove	
4
Glade           	
1
Glen Valley.	
1
1
6
1
3
3
2
Rosedale   	
Ross River, Y.T	
1
1
1
14
110
74
184
349
229
578 V 58                                       MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Table No. 8.—Showing What Districts Contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950—Continued
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Place of Residence
Male
Female
Total
349
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
6
229
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
11
578
5
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
3
6
1
1
1
1
17
Brought forward	
Tranquille	
Ucluelet  —	
Vancouver.  .
Vanderhoof _ 	
Vernon.	
378
2
1
372
3
6
53
1
1
1
1
1
4
3
2
1
2
6
2
255
255
2
5
46
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
633
2
1
627
5
11
99
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
5
4
3
1
2
7
2
1
1
Salmo  	
Salt Spring Island   .   	
Sardis  _    .
Sechelt          	
Seton  —
Shoreacre _ —   -
Sicamous. 	
Silverdale  	
Waldo	
Wells	
Smithers   ._
Spallumcheen  	
Spillimacheen	
Squamish  _
Steveston. _	
Stewart  	
Summerland  _
Surrey 	
Taghum  —
Tappen  —
Terrace _	
Tofino.l 	
Trail...	
Westbank  _  _
Westholme 	
Westview...	
Whonnock.	
Whalley  _	
White Rock	
Totals _ 	
378
255
633
840
575
1,415
Table No. 9.—Showing the Occupations of Those Admitted from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Occupation
1                  1
Male     1   Female  1    Total
1                  1
Occupation
Male
Female
Total
Accountant    	
Analyst	
12
1
1
1
2   .
3
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
2
14
1
1
1
6
2
1
3
2
19
1
2
1
1
1
2
2
1
4
1
1
4
10
2
1
2
12
1
1
1
1
2
3
8
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
3
14
1
1
4
1
1
16
2
1
3
2
21
1
2
1
1
2
2
4
95
1
2
9
9
6
3
2
1
59
4
5
8
2
2
3
1
1
3
2
1
1
5
1
1
1
1
26
12
2
1
1
2
1
3
334
14
121
12
2
1
2
1
9
1
9
6
3
2
3
59
4
5
8
1
2
2
3
1
1
3
2
3
334
1
14
1
5
1
1
1
1
Dressmaker	
Driller	
Bank manager _
Barber       ~  .
Bar-tender 	
Boilermaker   	
Brakeman 	
Engineer  	
Engineer (marine)   	
Engineer (stationary)	
Engineer (steam)	
Bridgeman	
Bushman	
Cabinetmaker.       — .
Farmer  	
Fireman  	
Caretaker 	
Carpenter  —
Fisherman _   .
Caterpillar operator	
Chambermaid 	
Chemist	
Chimney sweep	
nerk
Florist	
Flunkey	
Gardener   	
Conductor (railway)	
Cook
Housekeeper	
Iron-moulder 	
Janitor	
Jeweller  	
Designer
Blacksmith 	
Carried forward 	
95
26
121
229
396
625
. STATISTICAL tables
V 59
Table No. 9.—Showing the Occupations of Those Admitted from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950—Continued
Occupation
Male        Female       Total
Occupation
Male        Female       Total
Brought forward	
Labourer 	
Landlady	
Landlord !	
Laundress	
Laundryman	
Lawyer	
Logger	
Longshoreman	
Lumber-grader	
Manager	
Machinist 	
Manufacturing agent	
Meat-cutter	
Mechanic 	
Mill-worker.. _	
Millwright '.
Miner	
Mining engineer	
Motorman	
Musician 	
Naval officer 	
Newspaperman 	
News vendor	
None	
Nurse	
Nurse's aide	
Orchardist	
Orderly	
Painter  	
P.B.X. operator	
Physician	
Physiotherapist	
Pipe-fitter	
Plasterer	
Plumber	
Policeman	
Power-machine operator
Practical nurse	
Printer    	
Prospector 	
Radio technician	
Railway worker	
Rancher	
Carried forward	
229
133
3
2
52
4
1
3
3
1
3
19
16
1
8
1
1
1
1
4
116
1
2
13
1
1
1
4
1
2
396
3
4
1
101
6
4
625
133
3
1
4
3
2
52
4
1
3
3
1
3
19
16
1
8
1
1
1
1
4
1
217
6
4
1
2
13
1
1
1
1
4
1
2
4
5
6
2
7
1
3
648
525
1,173
Brought forward
Retired 	
Roofer 	
Sales clerk	
Salesman	
Sales manager	
School-teacher.	
Seaman 	
Sea captain 	
Seamstress _	
Secretary.	
Sectionman 	
Shingle-packer _
Ship-carpenter 	
Shipwright	
Shipper 	
Sign-painter	
Smelter man	
Social worker 	
Spice-grinder	
Steam-fitter 	
Steel-checker— 	
Stenographer- -	
Steward „ -	
Student	
Storekeeper 	
Supervisor  	
Tailor  _ 	
Taxi-driver	
Teacup-reader. 	
Telegraph operator	
Telephone operator...
Timekeeper _	
Tinsmith	
Truck-driver	
Tug-boat operator	
Upholsterer	
Waiter...   _
Waitress	
Warehouseman	
Watchman 	
Welder	
Wireless operator	
X-ray technician	
Totals 	
648
72
2
1
30
1
2
10
1
1
4
3
2
1
1
2
4
13
3
1
2
2
525
12
1,173
80
2
6
30
1
5
10
1
1
3
4
1
3
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
12
4
15
4
1
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
8
1
1
9
9
3
1
4
1
1
840
575
1,415
Table No. 10.—Showing the Ages of Those Admitted from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Age
Male
Female
Total
51
33
43
86
64
92
76
85
72
43
58
39
24
36
38
21
23
29
50
90
60
43
52
47
34
33
41
24
8
20
72
„ 20 „                	
56
25 „ .            -  	
72
30 „                     	
136
35 ,                      	
154
40 ,                      	
152
45                          	
119
50 „                  - 	
137
55                       	
119
6Q                              _	
77
65                      _ _   -
91
70                     _	
80
75                 _ _ 	
48
80                     - -	
44
Over 80 „ -     - -  	
58
840
575
1,415 V 60
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Table No. 11.—Showing the Number of Attacks in Those Admitted from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Number of Attacks
Male
Female
Total
First... 	
378
90
30
9
2
2
39
185
105
289
122
36
7
2
1
34
39
45
667
Second  _            	
212
Third   „ _                  	
66
Fourth      .    _   	
16
Fifth   _                    	
4
Sixth   _  	
3
Eighth    _           	
73
Without psychosis  	
224
150
Totals    	
840
575
1,415
Table No. 12.—Showing the Alleged Duration of Attack Prior to Admission
from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Duration of Attack
Male
Female
Total
Under 1 week—
3 months -
6      „     -_
12      „     __
2 years	
5    „   _
10   „   _	
15    „    -----
Over 15    „    	
Not insane	
Without psychosis-
Unknown  _	
Life	
Totals	
62
40
102
157
160
317
37
44
81
33
29
62
30
29
59
43
60
103
14
28
42
4
6
10
2
6
8
185
39
224
186
96
282
87
38
125
840
575
1,415
Table No. 13.—Showing Statistics on Heredity in Those Admitted from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Heredity
Male
Female
Total
2
653
185
1
2
533
39
1
4
1,186
224
840
575
1,415 STATISTICAL TABLES
V 61
Table No. 14.—Showing the Alleged Cause of Attack in Those Admitted from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Alleged Cause
Alcohol	
Alzheimer's disease .
Arteriosclerosis.	
Brain tumour 	
Cardiovascular disease-
Cerebral damage _..	
Congenital     ...
Constitutional-—	
Drugs	
Encephalitis 	
E pi lepsy 	
Heredity .
Heredity, inferred	
Heredity, paternal  __
Heredity, maternal	
Huntington's chorea 	
Hypertension	
Intracranial neoplasm	
Jacob Creutzfeld's disease..
Lues (syphilis) 	
Myxcedema     .__ _.
Parkinson's disease .
Periosterosis of right tibia..
Pick's disease    .
Post-encephalitic Parkinsonism..
Rh factor   	
Senility      	
Trauma   	
Tuberculosis   	
Unknown  _	
Totals-
Male
116
1
51
6
1
2
87
41
428
382
3
1
1
2
21
14
2
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
17
7
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
90
56
7
1
840
Female
13
7
36
575
Total
129
8
87
6
1
2
128
810
4
3
35
4
1
4
1
1
1
24
1
3
1
2
1
2
146
7
1
2
Table No. 15.—Showing the State of Bodily Health in Those Admitted from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Bodily Condition
Male
Female
Total
394
420
26
283
281
11
677
701
37
840
575
1,415 V 62
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Table No. 16.—Showing the Form of Mental Disorder in Those Admitted from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Form of Disorder
Male
Female
Total
Arteriosclerotic dementia	
Epilepsy with feeble-mindedness.
Epilepsy with psychosis	
General paresis       	
Imbecility and idiocy	
Involutional melancholia	
Manic depressive
Mental deficiency with psychosis.
Moron    	
Paranoia  	
Paranoid state 	
Psychoneurosis . 	
Pre-senile psychosis  	
Psychopathic personality with psychosis.
Psychosis with somatic disease	
Psychosis due to new growth .
Psychosis with neurological disturbance-
Psychosis due to organic disease	
Schizophrenia   	
Senile dementia  	
Toxic psychosis—
Alcohol 	
Drugs -       	
Korsakoff _  	
Toxin unknown  	
Traumatic psychosis _ __	
Undiagnosed psychosis  	
Without psychosis—
Alcoholism    —	
Eoilepsy without psychosis  	
Primary behaviour disorder 	
Psychopathic personality without psychosis.
Simple adult maladjustment    	
Brain tumour without psychosis __	
Totals    _.
51
2
15
17
71
15
29
6
15
3
10
42
4
10
4
6
i
225
91
22
2
3
1
7
3
90
5
83
6
1
38
1
13
7
28
27
61
7
10
10
43
9
7
9
1
1
200
54
4
1
3
7
2
1
28
1
89
3
28
24
99
42
90
13
25
3
20
85
13
17
13
7
1
1
425
145
26
3
6
1
7
5
97
7
1
111
7
1
840
575
1,415
Table No. 17.-
-Showing the Number Allowed Out on Probation and Results
from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Results
Male
Female
Total
103
151
175
164
50
104
92
189
76
32
52
107
195
340
Discharged unimproved  _ _ _ — _ —
251
196
102
211
Totals                               _ -  _  	
747
548
1,295 STATISTICAL TABLES
V 63
Table No. 18.—Showing the Alleged Duration of Insanity Prior to Admission
in Those Discharged from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Alleged Duration
Male
Female
Total
Less than 1 week 	
33
76
39
18
27
25
25
14
30
164
142
30
51
42
26
25
23
23
13
46
32
78
63
,,      ,,    1 month _          	
127
„      ,,   2 months _      	
81
„      „    3      „                        	
44
„      „    6      „       .. .        	
52
„      „ 12      „       	
48
48
„      „    3    „    	
27
76
196
220
593
389
982
Table No. 19.—Showing the Length of Residence of Those Discharged from
April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950
Length of Residence
Discharged
Recovered
Discharged
Improved
Discharged
Unimproved
Without
Psychosis
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Under 1 month     	
15
14
17
32
18
4
1
2
6
17
24
28
15
1
1
7
13
11
55
29
20
6
1
9
7
15
21
60
49
20
7
2
3
5
82
6
3
13
14
13
5
2
2
35
41
5
4
7
8
3
1
2
1
4
111
25
16
9
3
14
8
3      „     _.            -
3
6      „                 ,   -	
3
12      „                      __ _ 	
1
1
„     3    „     _  -
1
4    „                   	
5
5 years and over  —
1
Totals              	
103
92
151
189
175
76
164
32 V 64
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich
Time in Hospital
Age
Certified Cause
Sex
Years
Months
Days
F.
82
2
9
30
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
62
18
8
19
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
18
8
10
Intestinal haemorrhage; tuberculous enteritis.
M.
64
25
Oiabetic coma due to diabetes mellitus.
M.
83
3
2
10
Senility with dementia.
M.
66
1
27
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
67
1
6
t!
Bronchopneumonia; old cerebral haemorrhage; hypertension.
M.
57
27
2
12
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
63
6
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
67
6
10
31
Chronic myocarditis.
F.
81
13
Chronic myocarditis; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
M.
68
15
Cerebral haemorrhage.
,M.
59
5
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
52
15
6
19
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
55
8
Encephalomalacea due to arteriosclerosis.
F.
59
8
2
Acute coronary thrombosis; chronic myocarditis.
F.
64
"l
3
18
Acute decompensation due to chronic myocarditis; hypertension, bilateral, due to renal calculi.
M.
61
10
8
26
Pulmonary embolism with infarction, left lower lobe; mitral stenosis
with cardiac dilatation and hypertrophy.
M.
38
6
5
3
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
70
5
8
9
Coronary thrombosis.
F.
49
5
2
Chronic myocarditis.
F.
45
15
7
16
Cirrhosis of the liver.
M.
51
13
11
12
Bronc'io-neumonia due to cerebral defect due to operation; removal
of brain tumour.
M.
56
5
6
6
Carcinoma of the cecum.
F.
54
11
3
14
Status asthmaticus; bronchial asthma; emphysema.
F.
65
9
24
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
43
	
23
Glioma, left frontal temporal.
M.
66
4
6
19
Senility with dementia.
M.
76
2
11
4
Terminal bronchopneumonia.
M.
67
16
11
7
Tuberculous peritonitis.
F.
77
3
11
24
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
63
7
2
Terminal bronchopneumonia.
F.
61
22
Cerebral haemorrhage; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
M.
59
8
10
23
Cerebral haemorrhage.
M.
65
2
11
30
Right hemiplegia due to cerebral haemorrhage.
M.
49
17
4
30
Pulmonary cedema; arteriosclerotic heart disease.
M.
49
22
5
3
Uremia due to chronic nephritis.
F.
52
1
7
25
C ronic myocarditis; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
F.
62
31
8
1
Bronchopneumonia; arteriosclerosis.
F.
67
38
2
6
Bronchopneumonia; hypochromic anaemia.
M.
55
3
2
27
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
57
3
6
23
Cerebral haemorrhage.
M.
63
36
8
10
Bronchopneumon'a associated with chronic myocardial degeneration.
F.
74
2
7
Bronchopneumonia; chronic myocarditis due to acute failure; fracture
of right hip.
M.
67
3
13
Terminal bronchopneumonia; vascular syphilis.
M.
68
6
8
Ruptured stomach ulcer.
M.
50
5
8
Chronic myocarditis; luetic aortitis.
M.
34
18
Cerebral oedema with cerebellar herniation; encephalitis; pulmonary
congestion and oedema.
M.
68
—
17
Pulmonary tuberculosis; cerebral haemorrhage due to generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
64
12
3
29
Coronary occlusion.
M.
34
3
8
11
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
70
2
8
18
Terminal pneumonia; chronic myocarditis.
M.
82
5
6
17
Senility with dementia.
F.
62
5
6
Bronchopneumonia; carcinoma of the innominate bone.
F.
65
19
Chronic myocarditis due to actue cardiac failure (nephritis and hypertension contributory).
F.
21
6
Cerebral oedema due to acute mania; pulmonary congestion; pyelonephritis.
M.
68
6
Terminal pneumonia; chronic myocarditis, rheumatic.
M.
27
4
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
63
8
10
11
Bronchopneumonia.
M..
84
16
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
51
1
18
Organic psyc .osis (Pick's disease).
F.
67
2
2
Apoplectic stroke; hypertensive heart disease.
F.
36
3
4
21
Generalized carc'nomatosis, primary site upper pole right kidney, probably hypernep roma.
M.
76
1
4
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
58
6
12
Acute septicaemia due to acute pyelonephritis; associated dermatitis. STATISTICAL TABLES
V 65
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued
Sex
Age
Time in Hospital
Years     Months      Days
Certified Cause
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M."
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
63
67
56
69
32
59
83
48
20
54
66
69
55
48
70
68
55
53
67
68
63
67
51
67
69
59
62
67
66
69
69
69
54
70
65
84
51
62
23
30
63
70
63
65
72
66
61
64
61
61
50
49
71
61
41
29
69
49
62
7
69
69
67
53
68
66
14
6
2
9
5
19
15
17
13
6
20
32
2
6
2
2
10
30
4
18
2
18
15
11
12
1
9
2
2
4
4
1
7
5
4
9
6
2
7
5
3
3
10
3
10
2
3
1
3
10
10
1
10
8
11
9
4
7
■
15
7
2
5
34
10
13
3
17
1
3
11
8
2
3
7
~5
10
1
28
—
3
31
5
14
1
14
24
8
14
12
19
11
10
12
23
21
14
15
26
7
7
16
29
10
16
28
20
27
28
13
7
27
18
24
10
9
26
20
26
7
28
16
15
27
24
31
9
20
16
6
5
18
8
24
29
9
28
1
1
22
25
27
4
30
29
Bronchopneumonia.
Coronary thrombosis.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
Apoplectic stroke.
Coronary sclerosis.
Suffocation, hanged by neck.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Bronchopneumonia.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
General paresis of the insane.
Pelvic and bone tuberculosis.
Chronic passive congestion.
Nephrosis.
Hepatic failure; carcinoma of the head of the pancreas.
Epilepsy.
Left subdiaphragmatic abscess with multiple abscesses of the spleen.
Chronic myocarditis.
Terminal pneumonia; senility.
Senility.
Bronchopneumonia; arteriosclerotic heart disease.
Chronic myocarditis; cerebral embolism; haemiplegia.
Chronic myocarditis; cerebral arteriosclerosis.
Chronic myocarditis; auricular fibrillation and cardiac decompensation;   squamous cell carcinoma right cheek and left side of nose.
Cerebral haemorrhage; hypertension.
Perforated gastric ulcer; coronary arteriosclerosis.
Myocardial infarction due to coronary thrombosis.
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
Terminal pneumonia; chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
Bronchopneumonia.
Terminal bronchopneumonia; chronic bronchitis.
Bronchopneumonia.
General peritonitis; perforated gastric ulcer.
Bronchopneumonia; brain tumour.
Terminal bronchopneumonia.
Myocardial infarction due to coronary thrombosis.
Lobar pneumonia due to exhaustion due to acute mania.
Exhaustion due to idiocy.
Asphyxia due to strangulation (suicide).
Bronchogenic carcinoma.
Chronic myocarditis.
Bronchopneumonia due to chronic myocarditis, fatty degeneration (non-
rheumatic).
Coronary occlusion; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
Terminal pneumonia.
Coronary occlusion.
Pyelonephritis due to cystitis.
Massive retroperitoneal haemorrhage due to ruptured arteriosclerotic
aneurysm of abdominal aorta.
Carcinoma of the cervix with infiltration of the bladder and metastasis
of the hip bones and lumbar spine.
Acute pulmonary oedema due to uremia due to chronic glomerulonephritis;   hypertensive heart disease.
Perforation of the colon; adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid.
Cerebral haemorrhage due to arteriosclerosis.
Asphyxia due to strangulation due to hanging.
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis; chronic asthma.
Pulmonary embolism; pulmonary tuberculosis.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
Cerebral haemorrhage, Pons; cerebral oedema, post-encephalitic parkinsonism; inanition.
Bronchopneumonia; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease; inanition.
Cachexia due to carcinoma, right breast, with metastasis to lung and
liver.
Lobar pneumonia; carcinoma of right lung.
Bronchopneumonia.
Coronary thrombosis.
Chronic myocarditis due to arteriosclerosis.
Acute cardiac decompensation; chronic myocarditis.
Cerebral haemorrhage; hypertension.
Coronary thrombosis.
Terminal pneumonia. V 66
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued
Sex
Age
Time in Hospital
Years
Months I   Days
I
Certified Cause
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
M.
F.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
F.
F.
F.
F.
F.
M.
M.
F.
F.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
M.
61
Wt
2
59
68
29
64
71
63
85
77
58
81
65
80
80
62
69
47
60
62
69
60
65
60
81
82
83
65
56
56
59
31
60
63
61
71
75
57
61
61
67
65
35
77
77
71
51
47
76
51
47
48
59
43
64
58
64
21
28
15
62
5*
3
79
66
68
37
63
32
33
1
4
8-
5
24
15
6
3
24
20
3
5
31
15
2
12
31
5
1
17
1
1
42
21
30
4
6
19
16
2
21
23
5
12
8
40
34
24
28
6
27
1
6
11
2
3
3
7
5
9
6
3
1
9
2
10
10
2
3
4
4
10
4
2
3
3
8
11
11
2
23
16
16
31
23
18
3
26
1
16
13
10
9
20
3
13
4
21
27
25
19
9
6
24
3
3
2
11
25
3
12
29
30
6
21
8
21
18
27
16
2
5
1
5
10
16
25
13
3
11
9
10
27
16
9
12
12
7
6
27
7
10
26
12
13
21
21
Bronchopneumonia;   cardiac enlargement and decompensation;   hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral atrophy.
Bronchopneumonia.
Empyema; bronchopneumonia.
Cerebral haemorrhage due to arteriosclerosis.
Asphyxiation due to strangulation.
Bronchopneumonia; haemiplegia.
Lobar pneumonia.
Carcinoma of tail of pancreas with extensive intra-abdominal spread
and metastatic intra-abdominal spread and metastic involvement of
liver and left lung.
Coronary thrombosis; general arteriosclerosis.
Acute pulmonary oedema due to arteriosclerotic heart disease.
Chronic glomerulonephritis with exacerbation.
Senility with dementia.
General paresis of the insane.
Chronic myocarditis.
Chronic myocarditis.
Cerebral thrombosis
Bronchopneumonia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Paralytic ileus due to perforated duodenal ulcer.
Tuberculous pneumonia due to pulmonary tuberculosis.
Bilateral bronchopneumonia.
Cerebral haemorrhage.
Bronchopneumonia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Tuberculous bronchopneumonia; generalized arteriosclerosis.
Tuberculous meningitis;   pulmonary  tuberculosis;    generalized arteriosclerosis.
Bronchopneumonia.
Acute pulmonary oedema due to pernicious anaemia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Uremia due to gangrene of sigmoid colon due to obstruction of the
large bowel.
Acute coronary thrombosis due to chronic myocarditis.
Asphyxiation due to strangulation due to hanging (suicide).
Haemorrhagic pancreatitis due to perforated duodenal ulcer.
Chronic myocarditis.
Pulmonary embalus.
Bronchopneumonia.
Senility with dementia.
Coronary thrombosis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Lobar pneumonia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Bronchopneumonia.
Coronary insufficiency; status asthmaticus.
Bronchopneumonia.
Carcinoma, head of pancreas.
Empyema,  right  side,  due to  bronchopneumonia;   pyonephrosis,  left
kidney.
Chronic passive congestion; rheumatic fever.
Terminal pneumonia.
Pneumococcal meningitis.
Bronchopneumonia; brain tumor (glioma), left frontal lobe.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Cerebral oedema due to equine encephalitis.
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
Asphyxia due to strangulation due to hanging (suicide).
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
Bronchopneumonia.
Cerebral haemorrhage; arteriosclerosis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
Suffocation during epileptic seizure.
Tubercular meningitis.
Dementia praecox, demented; purulent meningitis.
Microcephalic idiocy with epilepsy.
Tracheo-bronchitis due to measles.
Myocardial degeneration.
Carcinoma of nose.
Myocardial degeneration.
Accidental death, fractured skull.
Coronary thrombosis.
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
1 Months. MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
V 67
Day Room, Crease Clinic.
Sun-porch, Crease Clinic. V 68 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
PART II.—FINANCIAL
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit for your consideration the financial report of the Provincial
Mental Hospitals of British Columbia for the year ended March 31st, 1950, which
includes various tables and cost statements.
The daily average population for the three hospitals at Essondale, New Westminster,
and Saanich, for the year under review, was 4,495 as against 4,314 in the previous year.
Gross operating costs rose from $4,319,706 to $4,777,770, with the daily per capita
cost increasing from $2.74 to $2.91. The greater portion of this increase was due to the
increase in the cost-of-living bonus paid to employees, but higher costs are also reflected
in dietary figures as well as nursing and ward supplies, which covers clothing, boots and
slippers, bedding, towels, linen, soap, and such like commodities.
Patients' maintenance collections increased from $477,680 to $542,137.
Purchases of milk, cream, meats, vegetables, fruit, etc., from Colony Farm amounted
to $300,462 for the Essondale and New Westminster Hospitals. This is an increase of
nearly $54,000 over the year 1948-49, when most of the farm crops were destroyed by
flood waters.
During the year a total of $170, 732 was received from the Dominion mental health
grants for equipment and personnel training for the mental health programme of the
Province of British Columbia. Details of this expenditure are given in the financial statement. These funds were of a great assistance to us, as in addition to providing training
for staff members we were able to secure a great deal of necessary equipment and supplies
for the treatment of the patients. The mental health grants were particularly of assistance
in the equipping of the Crease Clinic.
This has been a very active year and one in which considerable expansion has taken
place. The main items of interest at the Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, were the
opening of the new 220-bed unit for veterans at Colony Farm on August 31st, 1949; the
official opening of the Crease Clinic of Psychological Medicine by the Honourable Geo. S.
Pearson, Provincial Secretary and Minister of Health and Welfare, on November 16th,
1949; the completion of three new Nurses' Homes and the conversion of a staff residence
into a Nurses' "infirmary; and the addition of twenty bedrooms at the fire hall in order
to provide accommodation for volunteer firemen. In addition to the above, a new 100-
bed unit was also completed at the Provincial Mental Hospital at New Westminster.
Dr. A. L. Crease, Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry, retired on superannuation on March 31st, 1950, after more than thirty-five years of service with the
Government. In recognition of this long and faithful service on behalf of the mentally ill,
the Government saw fit to honour him by naming the new Clinic of Psychological
Medicine the " Crease Clinic." A reception for Dr. and Mrs. Crease was held in the
Crease Clinic on March 10th, 1950, when they were presented with a grandfathers clock,
an easy chair, and a pair of binoculars by R. A. Pennington, Deputy Provincial Secretary,
on behalf of the staff.
H. Lonsdale, Public Works Superintendent, was also retired on superannuation on
July 31st, 1949. Mr. Lonsdale joined the public works staff at Essondale, March 24th,
1913. S. M. Schofield, Resident Engineer at Essondale, succeeded Mr. Lonsdale as
Public Works Superintendent and Thomas Lamb was appointed Foreman of Works and
assistant to Mr. Schofield. PSYCHOPATHIC DEPARTMENT V 69
In closing, I would like to express my appreciation of the many courtesies shown
and the close co-operation that has been maintained between the various departments of
the Government and the staff of the hospitals at all times.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
F. A. Matheson,
Business Manager.
PSYCHOPATHIC DEPARTMENT
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1950
Salaries   $52,414.79
Office supplies  1,060.86
Telephone and telegraphs  869.36
Travelling expenses  7,008.13
Fuel, water, light, and power  1,063.24
Incidental expenses  1,731.03
Cost-of-living bonus  9,271.68
$73,419.09
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population:  Essondale, 78 per cent; New Westminster,
15 per cent; and Saanich, 7 per cent.
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1950
Salaries  $45,422.40
Office supplies       2,327.16
Travelling expenses  596.19
Incidental expenses  114.60
Cost-of-living bonus       8,776.20
$57,236.55
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population:  Essondale, 78 per cent; New Westminster,
15 per cent; and Saanich, 7 per cent. V 70
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
FINANCIAL TABLES
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence Each Year,
the Total Amounts Spent for Maintenance, and Gross per Capita Cost
(For Past Ten Years)
Year
Average
Number in
Residence
Maintenance
Expenditure
Per Capita
Cost
1940-41,
1940-41,
1940-41,
1941-42,
1941-42,
1941-42,
1942-43,
1942-43,
1942-43,
1943^14,
1943-44,
1943-44,
1944-45,
1944-45,
1944-45,
1945-46,
1945-46,
1945-46,
1946-47,
1946-47,
1946-47,
1947-48,
1947-48,
1947-48,
1948-49,
1948-49,
1948^19,
1949-50,
1949-50,
1949-50,
New Westminster _
Essondale 	
Saanich    ~.
New Westminster-
Essondale 	
Saanich  _
New Westminster*
Essondale	
Saanich .    	
New Westminster.
Essondale 	
Saanich   ..	
New Westminster .
Essondale - 	
Saanich _
New Westminster-
Essondale	
Saanich	
New Westminster.
Essondale _	
Saanich           	
New Westminster-
Essondale	
Saanich _   _ 	
New Westminster _
Essondale - 	
Saanich        . 	
New Westminster -
Essondale — __
Saanich	
$611.17
2,884.96
279.95
607.40
2,976.62
286.40
605.17
3,042.06
284.06
601.15
3,047.75
279.61
606.25
3,072.84
211.fl
610.36
3,163.61
283.67
626.29
3,217.03
286.48
6">8.oo
3,275.41
290.31
631.75
3,394.08
287.76
650.83
3,556.78
287.02
$269.
1,114.
114.
265.
1,080
134.
286
1,157,
146
306
1,317.
163.
373.
1,558.
207.
433.
1,769.
210.
497.
2,117,
231.
662.
2,622.
298.
800
3,162.
356
891
3,500.
384
354.39
944.32
496.86
,107.15
,329.80
,961.02
,077.54
,787.55
,898.22
,150.79
,789.96
,226.64
,672.82
,923.64
979.27
,041.89
363.15
,798.32
.945.37
,563.62
894.65
,357.80
,349.15
,773.55
,776.92
,819.02
,110.21
,944.27
,902.41
,874.24
$440.71
386.46
408.99
436.46
362.93
471.23
472.72
380.59
517.14
509.28
432.38
583.77
616.37
507.32
748.48
709.49
559.29
743.11
795.07
658.24
809.46
1,054.70
800.62
1,029.15
1,267.55
931.86
1,237.52
1,370.55
984.29
1,340.93
* Maintenance expenditure includes cost-of-living bonus paid employees,
years' reports.
This is also included in all subsequent FINANCIAL TABLES
V 71
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Table C.—Summary of Statement Showing the Gross and Net per Capita
Cost of Patients in the Three Institutions
Gross operating costs—
New Westminster  $891,994.27
Essondale   3,500,902.41
Saanich  384,874.24
Gross cost for the three institutions  $4,777,770.92
Less collections remitted to Treasury        542,137.14
Net cost for the three institutions  $4,235,633.78
Daily average population for the three institutions  4,494.63
Gross per capita cost, one year  $1,063.00
Gross per capita cost, one day  $2.91
Net per capita cost, one year  $942.38
Net per capita cost, one day  $2.58 FINANCIAL tables
V 73
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MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
Remarks
New Westminster
Essondale
Saanich
Total patients in residence, March 31st, 1950.
Daily average population for one year	
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year...
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day—-
694
650.83
$1,370.55
$3.75
3,617
3,556.78
$984.29
$2.70
291
287.02
$1,340.93
$3.67
Revenue of Mental Hospitals for Past Ten Years
1940-41  $229,045.45
1941-42  238,532.90
1942-43  261,986.32
1943-44  322,522.87
1944-45  317,735.15
1945-46  $350,163.87
1946-47  339,561.71
1947-48  350,995.41
1948-49  477,680.57
1949-50  542,137.14
Expenditures Made under Dominion Mental'Health Grants
for Province of British Columbia
Crease Clinic—
Equipment   $37,798.98
Staff and personnel training     11,854.21
 $49,653.19
Mental Hospital, Essondale—
Equipment      $6,877.65
Staff and personnel training     60,030.18
Mental Hospital, New Westminster—Equipment	
Mental Home, Colquitz—Equipment _..	
Child Guidance Clinics—•
Vancouver—Equipment      $1,612.08
Victoria—Equipment         1,456.06
University of British Columbia—Training equipment.
Royal Jubilee Hospital—Equipment	
Vancouver General Hospital—Equipment	
City of Vancouver—Staff and supplies	
City of Victoria—Staff and supplies	
General Personnel Training—
Teachers  .'.     $3,283.72
Short-term postgraduate  883.50
66,907.83
4,230.70
3,324.43
3,068.14
22,684.72
77.96
6,652.88
8,555.27
1,410.00
4,167.22
Total  $170,732.34 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
V 77
New Veterans' Unit, Colony Farm.
Dining-room, Veterans' Building, Colony Farm. V 78
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT,  1949-50
PART III.—COLONY FARM
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT ON COLONY FARM
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Herewith please find profit and loss and various other financial statements
and reports covering the operations of Colony Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1950.
It will be noted that the profit for the year amounted to $32,671, after providing
for all operating costs, as against a loss of $15,382 in the previous year, when flood
waters wiped out most of the farm crops. Departments showing substantial profits
were dairy and herds, hogs, cannery, orchard and truck garden, and field crops.
Farm-maintenance costs increased from $52,515 to $63,635, due chiefly to dyke
repairs and improvements.
Farm sales of stock, meats, vegetables, milk, cream, and other produce amounted
to $361,018. Of this amount Government institutions received $330,615 and $30,402
was from sales of breeding stock to sundry persons.
I am pleased to report that on June 1st, 1949, W. P. Richardson, formerly with the
Department of Agriculture, was appointed Assistant Superintendent of Farms.
It should be noted that although some replacements, necessitated by the fires of
1947-48, have been made, our facilities for looking after the dairy herd are still not
adequate. It is hoped that the new dairy, milking and feeding quarters, farm office,
etc., will be provided in the near future, as without these the farm is operating under
very difficult conditions.
AH of which is respectfully submitted.
F. A. Matheson,
Business Manager.
J. A. Hay,
Superintendent of Farms.
Profit and Loss Account, Year Ended March 31st, 1950
Department
Debits
Credits
Loss
Gain
$127,410.45
210.00
7,787.39
69,644.67
58,055.39
24,218.20
13,569.42
5,725.75
64,174.49
26,247.98
21,388.20
$137,301.83
10.00
8,280.00
91,348.64
67,677.20
46,672.65
18,000.00
5,970.00
539.25
75,303.40
$9,891.38
$200.00
492.61
21,703.97
9,621.81
22,454.45
4,430.58
63,635.24
244.25
49,055.42
21,388.20
Totals 	
$418,531.94
$451,102.97
$85,223.44
$117,894.47
85,223.44
$32,671.03 COLONY FARM V 79
DAIRY AND HERDS DEPARTMENT
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1950
Receipts
By sales—
Live animals  $25,619,75
Beef supplied to institutions       3,607.06
Dairy produce  112,529.02
By credit for manure       3,300.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1950     90,630.00
  $235,685.83
Expenses
Salaries and upkeep  $44,066.19
Feed   80,619.26
Horse-labour ._,  600.00
Trucking   1,125.00
Tractor-work  1,000.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1949  98,384.00
     225,794.45
Profit for year       $9,891.38
WORK-HORSE DEPARTMENT
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1950
Receipts
1 horse sold :  $10.00
Horse-labour charged to crops, etc.  8,180.00
Credit for manure  100.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1950  940.00
  $9,230.00
Expenses
Salaries and upkeep  $6,238.89
Feed and pasturage     1,548.50
Inventory, March 31st, 1949     1,150.00
     8,937.39
Profit for year      $292.61 V 80 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1949-50
HOG DEPARTMENT
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1950
Receipts
By sales—
Live hogs     $4,144.96
Pork supplied Essondale Hospital     57,613.83
Pork supplied New Westminster Hospital       4,997.85
 $66,756.64
By credit for manure  600.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1950     23,992.00
$91,348.64
Expenses
Salaries and upkeep  $7,617.60
Feed  38,899.07
Light and power  800.00
Fuel  200.00
Horse-labour  1  1,660.00
Truck   1,040.00
Tractor  2,000.00
$52,216.67
Inventory, March 31st, 1949      17,428.00
69,644.67
Profit for year  $21,703.97
CANNERY
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1950
Receipts
Supplies to—
Mental Hospital, Essondale  $52,575.65
Mental Hospital, New Westminster  9,861.55
Mental Home, Colquitz  4,008.20
Tranquille Sanatorium   1,231.80
Expenses
Salaries   $4,980.00
Repairs  393.99
Fruit and vegetables  27,112.88
Sugar, spice, etc.   9,496.15
Cans, crates, and containers  10,222.37
Fuel  1,200.00
Water   500.00
Light and power  900.00
Tractor-hauling   2,000.00
Truck-hauling   1,250.00
$67,677.20
58,055.39
Profit for year     $9,621.81 COLONY FARM
V 81
ORCHARD AND TRUCK-GARDEN
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1950
Receipts
Produce supplied to—
Mental Hospital, Essondale  $28,661.19
Mental Hospital, New Westminster  3,154.48
Boys' Industrial School  162.83
Colony Farm cannery  2,169.65
Inventory, March 31st, 1950
Salaries, seeds, etc.
Expenses
$34,148.15
  12,524.50
  $6,907.60
Fertilizer, spray, and manure                      1,500.00
Horse-labour  1,000.00
Tractor-work  2,000.00
Trucking   250.00
Fuel  50.00
$46,672.65
$11,707.60
Inventory, March 31st, 1949     12,510.60
24,218.20
Profit for year  $22,454.45
FIELD CROPS AND PASTURAGE
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1950
Crop Acreage
Potatoes  77.0
Mangels  7.0
Turnips   4.5
Hay-
Clover   5.5
Oat   28.0
Silage  .  120.0
Onions  3.0
Pasturage  215.0
Horse-labour
Tractor-work
Trucking 	
Manure 	
Fertilizer and spray
Seed and sets	
Supervision 	
Yield
(Tons)
1,175.00
238.00
152.00
17.00
85.00
1,192.00
18.24
Costs
Yield
per Acre
15.26
34.00
33.77
3.09
3.04
9.90
6.08
Value
$55,225.00
1,428.00
5,350.40
442.00
1,700.00
7,152.00
1,856.00
2,150.00
$2,320.00
9,050.00
1,805.00
2,500.00
3,926.05
5,326.93
1,320.00
$75,303.40
26,247.98
Profit
$49,055.42 V 82 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1949-50
TRACTORS
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1950
9,000 hours' work at $2  $18,000.00
Expenses
Salaries and upkeep  $11,974.08
Gasoline        1,595.34
     13,569.42
Profit     $4,430.58
TRUCKS
2,388 hours' work at $2.50 ...._.    $5,970.00
Expenses
Salaries and upkeep  $5,268.25
Gasoline and oil        457.50
       5,725.75
Profit ,        $244.25
GENERAL EXPENSES OF MAINTENANCE AND ADMINISTRATION
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1950
Salaries and miscellaneous expenses  $27,680.93
Horse-labour .  600.00
Trucking   500.00
Tractor-work  1,600.00
Gasoline and oil  523.74
Sundry  20.25
  $30,924.92
Proportion, Headquarters expense _  $2,100.00
Repairs through Public Works Department     29,196.95
Loss on inventory of equipment       1,479.87
     32,776.82
$63,701.74
Less sundry credits  66.50
$63,635.24 COLONY FARM V 83
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.
Mental Hospital, Essondale—Produce Supplied by Colony Farm
for Year Ended March 31st, 1950
Dairy produce—
Milk, 1,223,662 lb  $67,301.44
Cream, 697 quarts  592.46
Table cream, 6,435.6 gallons     14,160.06
 $82,053.96
Meats—
Veal, 9,949 lb  $3,482.15
Hearts, livers, etc., 432.25 lb  124.91
Fresh pork, 183,761 lb  56,944.12
Pork plucks, 3,444 lb  669.71
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh  $70,593.74
Canned..     52,575.65
61,220.89
123,169.39
Sundries—Horse-labour         2,000.00
$268,444.24
Mental Hospital, New Westminster—Produce Supplied by Colony Farm
for Year Ended March 31st, 1950
Dairy produce—
Milk, 47,450 lb     $2,609.75
Cream, 145 quarts  123.26
Table cream, 1,131 gallons       2,488.51
       $5,221.52
Meats—
Fresh pork, 15,896 lb     $4,930.30
Pork plucks, 347 lb  67.55
4,997.85
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh .  $11,937.52
Canned :       9,861.55
21,799.07
$32,018.44
Accounts Receivable, March 31st, 1950
Sundry amounts due from live stock, etc., sold       $2,523.73
Remittances to Treasury
Sundry remittances to Treasury during year 1949-50 in payment of live
stock and produce  $359,087.53 V 84 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1949-50
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.—Continued
Summary of Equipment Inventories, March 31st, 1950
Equipment in dairy  $4,311.46
Equipment in cannery  4,512.50
Horse and cattle barns and piggery  3,445.50
Farm implements  24,867.80
Pumping-stations and land-clearing  2,18 8.00
Butcher-shop  44.00
Carpenter-shop  1,476.95
Blacksmith-shop  754.50
$41,600.71
Orchard and Truck-gardens
Apiary supplies  $116.00
Plum-trees  1,806.00
Prune-trees  1,842.00
Pear-trees  1,523.00
Apple-trees. :  574.00
Cherry-trees  :  371.00
Rhubarb-clumps   3,000.00
Strawberry-plants  1,600.00
Vegetables on hand  80.00
Garden tools and equipment  1,612.50
$12,524.50
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1950
520-1250-4143

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