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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL Reports of the Commissioner of Provincial… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1951

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Reports of the
Commissioner of Provincial Police
for the Year
1949
and
Inspector of Gaols
for the Year ended
March 31st, 1950
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1950  Colonel the Honourable Clarence Wallace,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The undersigned has the honour to submit the reports of the Commissioner of Provincial Police for the year ended December 31st, 1949, and the Inspector of Gaols for
the year ended March 31st, 1950.
G. S. WISMER, K.C.,
A ttorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 9th, 1950. -
Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1950.
The Honourable G. S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General for British Columbia,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my annual report for the year ended December
31st, 1949.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. SHIRRAS,
Commissioner of Provincial Police.
Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1950.
The Honourable G. S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General for British Columbia,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my
annual report on the Provincial Gaols for
the year ended March 31st, 1950.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
R. PEACHEY,
Inspector of Gaols. Report of the Commissioner of Provincial Police, 1949
STRENGTH AND DISTRIBUTION
As at midnight, December 31st, 1949, the strength of the Force consisted of 18
officers, 502 non-commissioned officers and men, and 26 stenographers.
Statement of Strength as at Midnight, December 31st, 1949
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Commissioner	
Deputy Commissioner _
Inspectors — 	
Sub-Inspectors 	
Staff-Sergeants 	
Sergeants 	
Corporals..
First-class Constables	
Second-class Constables .
Third-class Constables —
Probationer Constables _
Special Constables -
Chief Mechanical Supervisor -
Mechanical Supervisor.
Assistant Mechanical Supervisors-
Mechanic  	
Second-class Skipper.—
Third-class Skippers	
First-class Engineer	
Second-class Engineer,.
Third-class Engineer __..
Radio Supervisor-
Chief Radio Operators __
Chief Radio Technician	
Senior Radio Operators	
First-class Radio Operators	
Second-class Radio Operators..
Third-class Radio Operator	
Stenographers. 	
Totals..
25
58
30
36
49
22
1
1
7
9
7
34
38
201
41
92
46
3
1
1
2
1
1
6
1
1
1
1
2
1
5
12
3
1
26
546
ENGAGEMENTS, DISCHARGES, AND PROMOTIONS
Engagements 	
Discharges—
By purchase
By invaliding
48
21
1
By expiration of agreement  2
By transfer to another branch of Government service— 2
By death   1
Unsuitable   2
By superannuation  4
By dismissal  4
37 U 6 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Promotions—
Sub-Inspector      1
Staff-Sergeant      2
Detective-Sergeant      1
Sergeant T     9
Acting-Sergeant      1
Detective-Corporal      1
Corporal    15
First-class Constable  43
Second-class Constable   44
The gross strength of the Force increased by forty-seven over 1948. Ex-service
personnel were given preference where they met with the necessary qualifications.
COMMENDATIONS AND AWARDS
Forty-three members were commended in General Orders for outstanding work and
devotion to duty. Cash awards from the Police Reward Fund were given in eight
instances.
DISCIPLINE
Nineteen non-commissioned officers and men were reprimanded. Two men were
reduced in rank and two in seniority within their rank; six were fined; and nine were
assessed damages toward repairs to Departmental vehicles.
POLICING OF MUNICIPALITIES
Under agreement the Provincial Police have supervision over forty-three municipalities, and also four areas.
Six municipalities requested and received extra policing personnel during the year.
Municipal contracts were reviewed in 1949 as a result of increased costs of policing.
New contracts will take effect in January, 1950.
POLICE TRAINING-SCHOOL
Sub-Inspector C. Ledoux, in charge, reports: —
" Four basic-training classes, one traffic school, and one traffic refresher course were
held in 1949. Greater Victoria municipalities sent constables to all these classes except
the refresher course.
"A total of eighty-nine men attended these classes, and of this number, thirteen were
from municipal forces.
" Promotional examinations for the rank of sergeant and corporal were held.
Twenty-two constables and twelve corporals sat for the examinations.
" Field training courses were instituted with the dual purpose of instructing junior
members and refreshing the memory of older ones. So far, it is intended to continue this
series."
ACCOUNTS BRANCH AND QUARTERMASTER STORES
Inspector D. D. Moses, in charge, reports:—
"The report for the calendar year 1949 on Police and Quartermaster Stores
Accounts shows 22,134 expense vouchers, totalling $2,240,720.74, as being checked,
recorded, and passed through the Accounts Branch.
" Collections for police services from cities and municipalities and other branches of
the Government amounted to $531,585.36.
" The Quartermaster Stores received and filled 1939 requisitions consisting of 9,261
articles.   This was a decrease of 246 requisitions over 1948.
" The policing of the City of Trail was taken over by the Provincial Police under
contract on February 1st, 1949." REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE,  1949
U 7
TRAFFIC BRANCH
Sergeant J. G. M. Lock reports: —
" In 1949 there were 7,407 reported motor-vehicle accidents in areas policed by this
Force. Of this figure, 103 were fatal, 1,511 personal injury, and 5,793 property damage.
Accident reports were filed according to location and spot-maps were maintained.
" Warning devices submitted for use pursuant to the " Highway Act " were examined
and tested, and recommendations in this respect submitted to the Minister of Public
Works.
" Surveys of individual areas were conducted on request from other departments,
municipalities, and our own commanding officers.
"Assistance was rendered five separate municipalities in the formation of traffic
by-laws.   Effort was made toward uniformity in such by-laws.
" Life-saving equipment in the form of mercy-sleds were ordered for service at Hope
and Princeton Detachments.
"Eight additional highway-patrol cars were added to the traffic detail during the
year.   They were centred at various points in the Province.
"A study was made of traffic control in the vicinity of outdoor theatres with the
co-operation of the Regional Planning Board, Department of Municipal Affairs. As these
theatres are increasing in number throughout the Province, this information is already
proving of considerable value."
TRANSPORT BRANCH
Chief Mechanical Supervisor J. F. McNaught reports:—
" Mileage
Districts
Railway
Cars
Launches
Horse
Foot
Aeroplane
Miscellaneous
Police
Other
Police
Other
15,047
1,180
1,094
38,088
36,057
49,517
99,838
25,745
15,909
11,543
862
6,446
378
96,334
238,443
256,414
338,008
118,215
238,981
297,939
96,043
161,526
115,590
90,564
839,852
292,608
18,989
4,212
8,606
11,127
454
4,629
17,260
1,003
25
1,137
3,136
772
3,202
22,439
63,647
48,192
67,476
49,951
66,016
7,733
41,720
45,801
12,716
66,523
30,375
17,639
2,922
2,914
20,128
21,780
2,207
255
4,300
60,180
18,700
25,285
15,781
120
14,942
32,130
17,617
11,456
16,573
23,079
6,199
2,779
12,393
59,798
1,027
77,537
735
166,632
307,092
Nanaimo 	
Nelson 	
61
370,688
468,835
260,101
6,371
7,641
9,042
10,497
5,471
2,956
15,625
7,014
370,106
478,186
256
42
116
1,657
1,499
58
145
388
2,548
65
2,118
271
145,903
305,875
279,182
133,613
Cariboo-Fort
George 	
Prince Rupert.
1,605
18,232
80
5,852
1,029,734
45
331,546
Totals       	
301,704
3,180,517
107,551
49,371
10,605
3,478
525,791
192,211
276,265
4,647,493
" Comparative Mileage
* An increase of 526,495 miles over 1948.
1948
1949
More
Less
249,160
2,801,916
107,789
50,105
23,556
4,434
472,832
121,340
289,866
301,704
3,180,517
107,551
49,371
10,605
3,478
525,791
192,211
276,265
52,544
378,601
238
734
12,951
956
52,959
70,871
13,601
4,1^0,998
4,647,493*
554,975
28,480 U 8 BRITISH COLUMBIA
" Comparative Mileage by Divisions, 1948, and Districts, 1949
• An increase of 526,495 miles over 1948.
" Comparative Mileage, Police Motor-vehicles
Divisions
1948
Districts
1949
More
Less
158,527
648,307
11,618,785
283,851
137,795
1,273,733
166,632
}    677,780
I
1
1
12,029,006
1
1
279,182
133,613
) 1,361,280
8,105
29,473
410,221
" A " Division 	
" B " Division 	
Victoria 	
Nanaimo - -	
Nelson .„	
Cranbrook -
Penticton 	
Kamloops 	
Cariboo-Fort George	
	
4,669
4,182
" E "Division	
Vancouver	
Chilliwack	
87,547
Totals
4,120,998
4,647,493*
535,346
8,851
Divisions
1948
Districts
1949
More
Less
Number
of Cars
Additional
82,837
459,784
1
V   993,605
120,492
92,544
1,052,654
Headquarters 	
96,334
/     494,857
I
1
[ 1,250,712
r
1
J
115,590
90,564
} 1,132,460
5
13,497
35,073
257,107
4,902
1,980
2
2
" B " Division	
Nanaimo —	
Nelson  	
Cranbrook 	
11
Kamloops	
Ashcroft      -
Cariboo-Fort George
Prince Rupert  —
•' E " Division  	
Vancouver	
Chilliwack 	
79,806
5
2,801,916
3,180,517*
385,483
6,882
20
* An increase of 378,601 miles over 1948.
"Due to the change over from divisions to districts during the calendar year 1949
it has been found necessary to amalgamate mileages, in some instances, for comparative
basis only.
" From the foregoing statements it will be seen that the total mileage travelled in
1949 increased 526,495 miles; of this increase, 378,601 miles were accounted for by
departmental motor-vehicles. In Nelson District, police cars travelled 88,826 miles,
and R.C.M.P. cars temporarily in charge of Provincial Police travelled 7,427 miles on
Doukhobor patrols. An additional nineteen cars were added to our fleet, as well as
one being transferred to Headquarters. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE,  1949
U 9
" There were 190 pieces of equipment in operation during 1949, being allotted as
follows:—
Cars
Motor-cycles
Jeeps
Total
10
13
16
26
7
12      .
18
6
12
10
6
31
15
_
1
4
1
2
10
14
16
26
7
12
18
6
12
10
6
37
16
Totals-  	
182
6
2
190
"During the year fifty-eight new motor-vehicles were purchased, which included
replacements and new operations, the latter being for highway patrol, Radio Branch, and
for areas lacking sufficient transportation.
" Makes of motor-vehicles on charge to this Department are:—
Jeeps        2
Ford     43
Chevrolet      37
Dodge      36
Plymouth      24
Pontiac     22
Mercury        9
Meteor _
G.M.C.  _
Buick
Fargo _
Monarch
6
2
1
1
1
Harley-Davidson        6
Total
190
"Number of Inspection Reports Written during Calendar Year 1949
Mechanical Supervisor
District
Police
Cars
Game
Cars
School
Buses
Miscellaneous
Total
J. F. McNaught, Victoria.-
T. Scales, Nelson..
T. A. Fiander, Kamloops -
H. D. Macdonald, Vancouver..
E. E. Cave, Vancouver -
Totals	
Headquarters 	
Victoria	
Nanaimo	
Prince Rupert	
Nelson	
Cranbrook	
Penticton	
Kamloops	
Ashcroft	
Penticton	
Cariboo-Fort George
Prince Rupert	
Peace River	
Vancouver	
Chilliwack-	
Chilliwack	
Vancouver	
j-   144
126
y 150
]    142
35
21
214
20
94
395
232
290
147
1,158 U 10 BRITISH COLUMBIA
" In addition to the above, in many instances repairs are recommended and completed but no inspection report written. The responsibility of the Mechanical Supervisors is to see the work necessary is carried out satisfactorily, costs of operation kept
as low as possible, and all accounts connected with the cars he is concerned with are
approved prior to payment.
"When the present staff of Mechanical Supervisors was inaugurated in 1937, our
fleet consisted of 123 motor-vehicles; in 1949 the fleet numbered 190, an increase of
67 police cars or 54.47 per cent. During the same period the police car mileage rose
from 1,757,641 to 3,180,517—that is, 1,422,876 miles or 81 per cent.
"During the year 1949, working in conjunction with the Radio Branch, 39 Leece
Neville high-output generators were installed, 10 being transferred from old to new
vehicles and 29 for new two-way radio operation. In all, we now have 66 vehicles so
equipped. In addition to the installation of generators, considerable work is required
to maintain these special units.
"With reference to school buses, the Mechanical Supervisors must approve all
applications for permits prior to their being issued by the Superintendent of Motor-
vehicles, and must follow through on his inspections to be sure the instructions are
carried out and the vehicles kept up to standards as laid down in regulations. Assistance
is rendered the School Boards dealing with proposed new equipment and replacing of
present contractors' worn-out units. During 1949 there were 69 of these new buses put
in service.
" Marine Section
Name Station
*P.G.D. 1 Alert Bay.
*P.G.D. 2 Powell River.
*P.G.D. 3 Vancouver.
P.M.L. 6 Ganges.
P.M.L. 9 Campbell River.
P .M.L. 10 Port Alice.
P.M.L. 11 Kootenay Lake (Kaslo).
P.M.L. 15 Prince Rupert.
P.M.L. 16 Port Alberni.
P.M.L. 17 .' Ocean Falls.
*R-8, riverboat McDame Creek.
R-13, rowboat and inboard Lake Cowichan.
R-14, riverboat and outboards (2) Fort St. James.
R-15, rowboat and inboard Atlin.
R-16, rowboat and outboard  Prince George.
R-17, rowboat and inboard, with trailer ... Kamloops.
R-18, lifeboat and inboard Ucluelet.
Outboard motor only Fort St. John.
Outboard motor only Stewart.
Outboard motor only Terrace.
* Dual operation, Police and Game Departments.
"As advised in my 1948 Annual Report, the P.M.L. 17 was officially launched on
December 7th, 1948. This vessel was commissioned on February 12th, 1949, and
replaced the P.M.L. 7 at Ocean Falls. The latter was sold by public tender for $7,500
on February 21st, 1949.
" Installation of the new engine in the P.M.L. 16 of Port Alberni was completed in
Vancouver, and the boat returned to service on the West Coast, March 23rd, 1949.
" During the year the P.M.L. 6, Ganges; P.M.L. 9, Campbell River; and P.G.D. 2,
Powell River, were in Vancouver for annual overhauls.    The P.M.L. 10, Port Alice, REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE,  1949 U  11
and P.M.L. 15, Prince Rupert, were overhauled at their home ports. A new engine
was installed at Vancouver in the P.G.D. 1 of Alert Bay. All aforementioned launch
repairs, etc., were supervised by the Chief Mechanical Supervisor.
" The annual overhaul of the P.M.L. 11 of Kootenay Lake was supervised by
Assistant Mechanical Supervisor Scales of Nelson. Inspections of the small boats and
outboards in Kamloops, Cariboo-Fort George, and Prince Rupert Districts were made
by Assistant Mechanical Supervisor Fiander of Kamloops.
De Haviland Beaver Seaplane
" In March, 1949, the purchase of a De Haviland Beaver seaplane was recommended, but delivery of same was not obtained until October 27th. Owing to the late
delivery date, the full potentiality of its use has not been realized owing to unfavourable
flying weather. Several patrols were made, and on December 18th an emergency flight
was made from Port Alice to Vancouver with a very ill patient requiring an immediate
operation. This flight was credited with having saved a life. To the end of the year,
77 hours and 55 minutes were flown, covering a distance of 7,960 miles. It is anticipated that 600 hours will be flown during 1950 on police and game patrols in areas not
readily accessible by normal means of transportation and which would require long,
arduous trips by our marine section of transport."
RADIO BRANCH
Radio Supervisor Conlan reports:—
" The network consists of some twenty-three stations and seven boats and handled
approximately one million words of official numbered traffic. This does not include
emergency traffic handled for other departments when normal means of communications
failed; chief among these were the railroads, who called on our help several times during
the year in providing communication until their own facilities were repaired.
" There were numerous power failures due to icing conditions, and our emergency
power plants operated for considerable periods, enabling us to provide communication
during all emergencies.
"A technical staff of one Chief Technician and two Technicians was established in
1949 to cope with the necessary design, construction, and installation of equipment.
" Main stations were established at Port Alberni, Prince Rupert, Kelowna, and Penticton. A total of sixty-one vehicles and eleven main stations are now operated with
three-way radio communication.
"An automatic repeater station was established on Copper Mountain, near Princeton, which provides the Penticton station with communication to vehicles in a westerly
direction of over 100 miles across intervening mountain ranges of 6,000 feet altitude.
" Four portable units, each weighing 7 pounds, were obtained for use in bush
searches."
ASSISTANCE TO FEDERAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS
Our assistance to the many Federal departments and their branches increased
steadily during the year. The Provincial Police have undertaken many investigations
for Federal Government departments.
Assistance has been willingly rendered when requested, and on many occasions
appreciation has been expressed for the effort.
YOUTH AND POLICE
Members of the British Columbia Provincial Police may well be proud of another
successful year in their dealings with the youth of our Province; notwithstanding their
increased duties, Constables and N.C.O.'s found time in their off-duty hours to organize
clubs and sports and to coach and lecture. U  12 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Juvenile delinquency, as a result of their faithful and purely voluntary efforts, has
in many areas rapidly declined and in some cases disappeared entirely. Our fine adult
organizations, too, have gone out of their way to supply recreational facilities, sporting
equipment, and other youthful activities with which to battle delinquency on the part of
our young people.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION BRANCH
Inspector R. Harvey, in charge, reports as follows:—
" I respectfully submit the annual report covering operations of the combined sections of the Criminal Investigation Branch, British Columbia Provincial Police, for the
year ending December 31st, 1949.
" Crime.—There were 24,832 cases, comprising indictable and summary offences,
tabulated during the year, which resulted in 23,885 convictions. Much of the investigation work in connection therewith was directed from this branch of the police service.
Statistics indicate a continued increase in violations of the various Statutes, as they disclose 3,883 more cases entered over that of the previous year's total of 20,949.
" Quite a percentage of the crime index is composed of breaches of Dominion and
Provincial enactments, such as the ' Indian Act' and ' Motor-vehicle Act,' infractions
of the latter Statute and regulations accounting for 3,819 prosecutions, apart from those
instituted under that part of the Criminal Code respecting the operation of motor-
vehicles, a definite indication that this type of law enforcement now requires special
attention.
" Despite the fact that a great deal of police time and consideration are devoted to
juvenile delinquency and juvenile groups, proceedings under the ' Juvenile Delinquents
Act' resulted in 1,212 cases being dealt with, an increase of 170 charges over those of
the year 1948.
" Our files disclose a total of fourteen homicide cases, with six convictions, two
acquittals, and six awaiting trial. Seven of these crimes were investigated by this Force,
with an additional one still unsolved.
" The grand total of 24,832 prosecutions embraces all offences under the Dominion
and Provincial Statutes, city and municipal by-laws, complete details of which are listed in
Appendix I.
" Finger-print and Photographic Section.—The number of finger-prints received for
classification and filing during the year totalled 4,373. Of this number, 1,182 were
identified as persons previously recorded with our Identification Bureau. In the majority
of cases of identification, criminal records were mailed or otherwise transmitted to our
various police districts.
" Certified criminal records prepared for Court use numbered 680.
" The Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm, was furnished with 192 records, and also the
F.B.I, at Washington, D.C.
"As an interexchange of identification data and records is maintained with other
police departments, we supplied information and prints as follows: Royal Canadian
Mounted Police, Ottawa, 2,325; Vancouver City Police, 1,957; Calgary City Police,
1,957; and New Westminster Police, 1,957.
" In addition, the Identification Section, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Ottawa,
was forwarded 220 sets of single finger-prints, while a similar number was added to our
own files.
" For immigration purposes, 1,300 prints were checked, seven being identified, and
certificates for visas issued to persons making application. In addition to this 231 prints
of prospective applicants for enlistment in the Force were classified.
"At the close of the year the number Of persons with criminal records registered
at this Section totalled 37,882, an increase of 957 over the previous year's total.
" Finger-print Exhibits. — Some fifty-two miscellaneous articles were received
throughout the year for examination as to latent prints.   As a result, evidence identifying REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE,  1949 U  13
the culprits in four serious charges was developed and brought about successful prosecutions and convictions. Other findings served to eliminate several suspects and proved of
value in avoiding useless investigations.
"Photographs.—There were 20,162 photographs of convicted persons processed
during the year, a large number of which were furnished to police departments with whom
we exchange finger-print records and to the Provincial gaols of this Province. Included
in these were photographs of 471 discharged prisoners, these being sent out to our police
circuit. This service required 29 photos of each individual, making a total of 13,659.
Miscellaneous photographs prepared for Police Court registrars and other Government
departments amounted to 1,992 and included enlargements in all sizes up to 8 by 10
inches.
" Scientific Examinations. — Chemical and physical examinations connected with
C.I.B. duties made by the Department of Mines laboratory during 1949 consisted of 62
cases, involving 194 exhibits, as follows: Motor-vehicle accidents and resultant manslaughter cases, 12; breaking, entering, and theft, 10; toxicology (human, animal, foods),
16; and other investigations of indictable offences, 24.
" Evidence was given in thirteen Court cases, necessitating the appearance of the
senior analyst on sixteen occasions as a witness.
"In addition, other requests requiring evidence by certificate as to alcohol content
and marker dyes in gasoline, etc., were complied with by the issuance of analytical
findings.
" Other exhibits of a medico-legal nature were handled by Dr. R. B. D. McNeeley,
director of pathology, Royal Jubilee Hospital.
" Ballistics.^—Under this heading, examinations and tests were carried out in eleven
cases involving murder, robbery with violence, and cattle-killing. Of this number, seven
were successfully concluded, three probable identifications were made, and one eliminated.
Sub-Inspector Young carries out this work in addition to his other duties.
"Firearms Registration Section.—During the year 1949 this Section issued permits
with respect to traffic in concealable weapons as follows: Weapon permits (Form 76),
645; vendors' permits (Form 76c), 652; permits to purchase for resale (Form 76d), 25;
permits to purchase (Form 76e), 867; and alien permits in Form 76b for non-residents
and residents, 313.
"Complete co-operation was maintained withjother law-enforcement agencies, our
records being available to city and municipal forces.
"Accidents.—Investigations of 516 accidental deaths were carried out. These
resulted from various causes, such as: Drownings, 182; logging, 70; mining, 12; automobile, 101; miscellaneous, 151. Other sudden deaths inquired into totalled 339, the
Undines attributing these to natural causes.
" Missing Persons.—During the year the police were required to conduct inquiries as
to the whereabouts and welfare of 3,499 persons. These inquiries resulted in locating
1,788. In most instances, in the balance of the inquiries, useful information was passed
to the agencies or relatives soliciting this form of police assistance.
" Outstanding Cases
. " Space does not permit writing the history of many of the criminal cases in this
category. To solve criminal offences, considerable investigation work must be done and
scientific aids employed. Quite a proportion of crimes solved often have outstanding
points; however, it is only possible to summarize a few of the cases considered of a
serious criminal nature.
" Rex vs. Joseph Arthur Oullette (Murder).—This case involved the shotgun slaying
of two aged Chinese farmers in their little farm-house near Vernon in November by their
own employee, who robbed them and then stole their truck and drove to Vernon, where
the truck broke down.   He then made his way to Chase, where he overtook his juvenile U  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA
Indian girl companion, who had also been employed by the Chinamen but had left a short
time before the killing. Oullette and his companion went on to Kamloops, where they
stayed for a short while. They then proceeded to Vancouver, where they registered at
a hotel in Chinatown.
" The bodies of the Chinese were not found for two days, and by the time the local
detachment was advised, Oullette had reached Vancouver.
" Investigations carried out in the Vernon area pointed to Oullette, and sufficient
evidence was soon obtained to charge him with murder, and a warrant for his arrest was
issued. Shortly after, Oullette was taken into custody in Vancouver, and the Indian girl
was held as a material witness.
" The preliminary hearing was held at Vernon, and on December 9th Oullette was
committed to stand trial at the 1950 Vernon Spring Assize.
" Rex vs. Norman W. Patterson, Clare R. Hamilton, Robert J. Norton, and John P.
Ericksson (Rape).—This was a case of four youths in their late teens prowling as a disorderly group in a motor-vehicle in the early morning of October 16th, 1949. A small-
built woman, a " displaced person," who had been in this country but a short time, was
walking along the Island Highway. The woman, in good faith, accepted the invitation of
these men for a ride to her home in Victoria. Instead of taking her there, they proceeded
to an isolated location, and there committed a planned and brutal criminal assault on their
victim, who suffered internal and external injuries. All four were arrested and charged
with rape. On appearance in Court of Assize each changed a " not guilty " plea to one
of " guilty," placing themselves on the mercy of the Court. Each was sentenced to five
years in the Penitentiary.
"Rex vs. Einar Sveinssen (Rape).—This arose out of a complaint of an alleged
criminal assault on a 12-year-old Mennonite girl of Black Creek, north of Courtenay.
After exhaustive police investigation, the accused was arrested and identified as the girl's
assailant. Evidence was carefully gathered, and resulted in Sveinssen being committed
for trial on a charge of rape. The case came up for hearing in the Court of Assize,
Nanaimo. The jury disagreed. On a new trial the prisoner was found guilty and sentenced to five years.
"Rex vs. George Krestnick and Ronald E. Robertson (Shop-breaking).—At 8.15
a.m., September 22nd, 1949, J. C. Douglas, proprietor of the Imperial Garage and Service
Station, Chemainus, reported his premises entered overnight and a quantity of merchandise stolen. An intensive investigation by local detachment constables, in co-operation
with other detachments at points farther north on the Island, resulted in the arrest of the
above-named men, who, on October 8th, pleaded guilty to eight charges of breaking and
entering, the additional offences having been committed at Westholme, Ladysmith, Chase
River, and Nanaimo. Both accused elected summary trial. Krestnick was sentenced to
three years in the Penitentiary and Robertson to one year definite and two years less one
day indefinite at New Haven Borstal Institution. Over $1,000 worth of stolen property
was recovered.
"Rex vs. Woodrow Lambert and Patrick Frakes (Armed Robbery).—On the late
afternoon of August 9th, 1949, while travelling from Westbridge to Rock Creek, Grant
Dudley, a travelling salesman from Penticton, met a car on the narrow highway and, after
passing the car, noticed, through his rear-vision mirror, the car go over the bank. He
stopped and rendered assistance, and found the car little damaged and the occupants
uninjured. He offered to drive them to a near-by sawmill for assistance to get their car
back on the road. Arriving at the road leading into the sawmill, one of the men produced
a pistol and ordered Dudley to drive back the way they had come. Arriving at a side-
road, they turned up this and ordered Dudley out of the car. While one kept him covered
with the gun, the other took Dudley's car to Westbridge and filled it with gas. Returning,
the two men remained with Dudley until darkness, then robbed him of over $400 and
left with his car.   Dudley walked to Westbridge and reported the robbery to the police. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE,  1949 U 15
" Patrols were immediately thrown around the entire area and the American authorities contacted, as the scene of the robbery was only 8 miles from the American Border.
However, there are many roads leading across the Border at this point, and the hold-up
men had at least three hours' start and managed to escape the police net.
" The men were later identified as Woodrow Lambert and Patrick Frakes. A number of business cards from Dudley's car were later found on a side-road across the
Border in the United States. The Mercury coupe the two men were driving at the time
of the accident was stolen from Spokane, Wash.; the American licence-plates had been
removed and a set of British Columbia licence-plates was found on the car.
" On August 22nd Dudley's Dodge sedan was found abandoned in Edmonton, Alta.
The search now centred there and in the Peace River District, where Frakes had relatives
living. On the night of August 31st the Hudson's Bay store at Grand Prairie, Alta., was
forcibly entered and considerable merchandise stolen, including guns and ammunition.
" On September 2nd a Pontiac sedan bearing Washington licence-plates was checked
on the north-west highway system near White Horse, Y.T., by the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police, and the occupants were identified as Lambert and Frakes. The stolen
merchandise from the Hudson's Bay store was found in their car.
" Corporal F. E. Nelson and Constable D. G. Rogers left by aeroplane for White
Horse to return these men for trial, but while in Vancouver they learned Lambert was
ill in hospital with pneumonia, and the escort was delayed to September 21st, when the
men were returned to Grand Forks.
" On September 26th, before L. A. Dodd, Stipendiary Magistrate at Greenwood,
they were committed for trial on a charge of armed robbery, and the following day before
His Honour Judge M. M. Colquhoun, County Court at Grand Forks, they elected speedy
trial and pleaded guilty to a charge of armed robbery. Lambert was sentenced to four
years' imprisonment in the Penitentiary, and Frakes received eighteen months' hard
labour in Oakalla Prison Farm.
" Thus a chase of some thousands of miles through several States and Provinces
ended with the apprehension of these men in the Far North.
"Rex vs. Jimmy Louie (Murder).—The accused, a young Indian, lived with his
aged, blind mother and his stepfather, William Dennis, 70 years of age, whom he is
alleged to have killed by stabbing. Their home was at Bear Lake, located about 230 air
miles north-west of Prince George.
" The offence occurred on the night of April 5th during a family drinking bout,
when, according to the accused, his drunken stepfather was beating his mother and he
interceded and stabbed him.
" The fighting was overheard by Alec Bob, another Indian, who reported to Carl
Hanniwald, the local white trader. Hanniwald investigated and found William Dennis
lying dead on the floor of his cabin with stab wounds in his back. He removed the body
to the local church after searching the cabin and finding a blood-covered hunting-knife.
" Hanniwald is an amateur radio operator and held fortnightly schedules with
Lome Usher of Fort St. James. His next contact was scheduled for April 14th, and he
thought he would then be able to get word relayed to the police. However, when the
time came, he was unable to make contact and made repeated unsuccessful attempts for
the next two days. He advised the Indian chief, Charlie Nicholas, to delay the burial
until he made further attempts at contacting the outside world. The Indians by this time
were becoming impatient and insisted on burying the body. Hanniwald called every
fifteen minutes for nine days, between 5 and 7.30 p.m., but was unable to make contact.
He then attempted to send a messenger out on foot, but the Indians refused without
remuneration.    Finally the Indians buried the body of William Dennis.
" It was not until June 13th, sixty-nine days after the murder, that Jimmie Thomas,
a Bear Lake Indian, reached the police office at Prince George to report the killing. U  16 BRITISH COLUMBIA
"An aeroplane was chartered, and the various witnesses, together with the exhumed
body, were taken to Prince George, where an autopsy was held, followed by a Coroner's
inquest.
" Louie was charged with murder and the preliminary hearing was heard at Prince
George, but because the scene of the murder was in the County of Prince Rupert, it was
necessary to hold the trial at that point. The case was heard at the Prince Rupert Fall
Assize and resulted in the jury returning a verdict of ' not guilty.' "
CONCLUSION
At this time may I express my deep appreciation to the Honourable the Attorney-
General for the confidence he placed in me and for the support and kindness extended to
me during my term of office. My appreciation is also extended to the many departments,
branches, and members of the Provincial Government, and if I may particularly mention
Deputy Attorney-General Colonel Pepler, K.C., who has so willingly co-operated with
us during the past year.
To all members of the Force and particularly to Deputy Commissioner R. Peachey,
M.C., during this time of heavy and onerous duties, I tender my thanks for their
excellent service and whole-hearted co-operation.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. SHIRRAS,
Commissioner of Provincial Police. m
APPENDIX
DETAILS OF CRIMINAL OFFENCES DEALT WITH DURING 1949
Unlawful assemblies, riots, affra;
Offensive weapons	
Offences against Administration of Law and Justice
Corruption, bribery, and disobedience	
7
Offences against Person and Reputation
Non-support and preservation of life
^^^,,^!^^^m,^W'>a^toa"'iKtma
^^J^JSSST10"*Peace officer—
	
Offences against Rights of Property, Rights Aris
of Contracts, Offences Connected with Traa
ngOut
ObS SoSeanI°odging bV fraudJ!	
Wilful and Forbidden Acs
ol'/l
Attempts, Conspiracies, Accessories
Common-lawOffences
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5
	 Report of the Inspector of Gaols, 1949-50
The Honourable G. S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my annual report on the four Provincial gaols for
the year ended March 31st, 1950.
OAKALLA PRISON FARM
Report of Warden J. Millman:—
" The statements of revenue and expenditure, together with the summarization of
the bursar, indicate that we have again suffered an over-all loss on farm operations for
the year under review, although the picture is brighter than the previous year and some
departments have shown a marked improvement.
" The Quonset huts referred to last year have been completed in so far as heating
and wiring are concerned and one is being utilized to accommodate a very much enlarged
carpenter-shop and the Star Class workshop, but owing to various difficulties, such as the
installation of overhead cranes and paint-drying ovens, etc., the sheet-metal plant has not
as yet been moved to its new quarters in the other hut. Other new construction has consisted of the erection of a much improved machine and blacksmith shop and the usual
extensive maintenance work required to our buildings, roads, etc.
" The new block unit is progressing very slowly and many delays occurred due to
inclement weather, difficulty in obtaining the steel grills, alterations in plans, etc., but
assurance has been given that it will be pushed to completion as soon as possible.
" Two new hot-water storage-tanks have been installed in the institution with the
result that our hot-water supply is now adequate to supply all our needs and a decided
improvement over the previous unsatisfactory conditions.
"Roads, buildings (both interior and exterior), and grounds have been well maintained and are the subject of many favourable comments from varied sources.
" The library statistics speak for themselves and the ever-increasing circulation in
all three branches of the library bear mute evidence to the satisfaction and enjoyment
derived by the inmates from this source of education and pleasure.
" General behaviour of all inmates, male and female, has improved despite the overall increase in population. Health of inmates has in general continued normal. Escapes
have been held to a minimum as compared to previous years and reflect our improved
custodial measures emanating from staff increases.
"The male population has once again increased materially, with an-all-time high
of over 900 inmates during March, but the female population has decreased slightly,
although it has still been found necessary to transfer several contingents to the Prince
George Women's Gaol. It is yearly becoming more and more evident that serious consideration will have to be given to the expansion of the gaol accommodation in the
Province in the very near future.
" The report of the matron covering the women's gaol presents a very favourable
picture, and I feel that the female staff as a whole is doing an excellent job there considering the material with which they have to deal.
" The activities of the Star Class, with the exception of the workshop, have unfortunately dwindled in scope, due to lack of accommodation and facilities. It is to be
hoped, however, that a more favourable picture can be presented next year, by which time
our young offenders will be housed in the new unit."
19 U 20 BRITISH COLUMBIA
WOMEN'S SECTION
Miss E. Hill, R.N., acting matron in charge, reports:;—
" The female population shows a daily average of 52.111, a slight increase over the
previous year in numbers but not in length of stay. A total of 57,228 meals were served
during the year.
"Approximately 142 quarts, mainly pickles, were canned during the year.
" The sewing-room reports some 26,943 articles of apparel for the men's gaol were
repaired, and for the women's gaol 465 articles of wearing apparel and equipment made
from new material and 1,408 articles made from old material. Repairs were also made
to 1,489 miscellaneous articles and nine rugs and fourteen blankets (patchwork) were
made during the year.
" The laundry reports some 23,440 articles were laundered.
"Health: The general health of inmates was excellent. Regular visits were made
by the gaol surgeon and weekly visits were also made by a doctor and nurse from the
Provincial Venereal Disease Clinic, Vancouver.
" Recreation: The Elizabeth Fry Society provided a handicraft worker, who paid
regular visits, teaching the girls knitting, crocheting, etc., which was much enjoyed by the
inmates.
" The W.C.T.U. has been giving a movie show once a month and is much
appreciated."
JUVENILE OFFENDERS
Senior Guard T. A. Camm reports as follows:—
" Treatment of young offenders at Oakalla during the past year has been limited by
the curtailed facilities available due to overcrowding and consequent lack of space. A full
quota of twenty lads has been maintained with two officers under my direction.
"After a temporary dislocation of shop activities due to organizational changes, work
was again continued in one of the Quonset huts, under the direction of Guard P. Berkey.
Here, furniture is renovated and upholstered for various Provincial"institutions. An outside working-party has been usefully employed about the prison grounds, under the
guidance of Guard R. Wilson.
" Pro-Rec instruction and gym training has been discontinued owing to lack of
facilities, but the lads have made use of the prison exercise yard for baseball games.
" Educational work has been carried on, not only for members of the Star Class but
for the general gaol population. Courses range from third and fourth grade elementary studies to university entrance. Other courses taken by prison students are geology
and mineralogy, steam and diesel engineering, art, book-keeping, building construction,
glove-making, and shorthand.
" We have continued to maintain contact with the probation staff, under the direction of E. G. B. Stevens, and assistance has been given by taking the lads on discharge and
placing them where possible."
NELSON GAOL
Warden R. S. Nelson reports:—
"'During the past year the number of prisoners has increased, due to the Doukhobor
situation, the daily average being 34.7 as against 28.2 for the preceding year.
" Prisoners are employed in the garden, wood-shed, and on various chores in and
around the building.
"A library is maintained, consisting of various types of literature, which is available
at all times to the inmates. A radio programme is also provided and is under the direction
of the guard on duty.
" The Salvation Army continues to hold a service every Sunday morning, and occasionally the Pentecostal Assembly also visits the institution, and attendance on the whole REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1949-50 U 21
is very good. The Roman Catholic Church has also been holding a service every Sunday
morning.
" Health of the prisoners during the year has been very good with no hospital cases
to report. Dr. F. M. Auld, the gaol surgeon, has regularly attended the gaol and is on call
at all times.
" During the month of March, the former motor-vehicle building, situated in the
same block as the gaol and Court-house, was changed into a gaol annex to hold the rapid
increase in the population, which was brought about by the Doukhobor situation.
" Discipline was very good throughout the year."
KAMLOOPS GAOL
Warden H. H. Mansell reports:—
" Conditions respecting the operation and administration generally of affairs in connection with the gaol during the past year have been satisfactory.
" Gaol rules and regulations, supplemented by orders to govern local conditions,
were strictly adhered to.   It was not necessary to reprimand any prisoner during the year.
"All inmates, except those awaiting trial, have been regularly employed with janitor
work and other services required in the police offices, quarters, gaol, garden, around the
heating plant, and ground in the surrounding area owned by the Provincial Government.
"All prison clothing has been kept clean and in proper repair. There has been no
complaint from prisoners with regard to food supplied from the gaol kitchen.
" Constable W. T. Teal, employed as gaoler, has carried out his duties in a most
satisfactory and praiseworthy manner, especially in view of the continued increase in the
number of prisoners incarcerated in the gaol during the past year. The increase has been
240 over the number who were admitted to the gaol in 1948.
" The previous police experience of Special Constable J. D. H. Stewart, referred to
in my 1949 report, has been invaluable, and as assistant to Gaoler Teal he has carried out
his work in a satisfactory manner."
PRINCE GEORGE GAOL
Men's Gaol
Warden G. H. Clark reports:—
" Conditions in the men's gaol have been satisfactory during the past year. The
number of inmates continues to increase, no doubt due to the influx of newcomers into
the district.
" Health of prisoners has been satisfactory throughout the year and all inmates have
been usefully employed in and around the premises."
Women's Gaol
Miss D. Stewart, R.N., matron in charge, reports:—
" For the past year co-operation with rules and regulations has been generally good.
The few exceptions have lost days of remission, but most of these days were re-earned.
" The matrons supervising the Prince George Gaol are trained to maintain a smooth-
running service that does not overstep the rights of the prisoners. Between matrons and
prisoners, good feeling seems well established.
" Dr. J. G. McKenzie, the gaol surgeon, visits the clinic weekly, and with Miss
Stewart, R.N., the matron in charge, all tests ordered by the Division of Venereal Disease
Control, Vancouver, are carried out. All venereal disease follow-up work is done here
and any necessary treatments administered. All new admissions are checked and the
lists sent to Vancouver. Dr. McKenzie also attends and prescribes for any inmates on
the sick-list. U 22 BRITISH COLUMBIA
" Representatives of the Salvation Army, the United Church, and Roman Catholic
Church hold services at regular intervals. The attendance at church services is very
small, and cannot be forced because of differences in religious belief, if any.
" Recreation
" During the year the following were enjoyed:—
Three visits from the International Film Board with educational films.
Three visits from the Shantymen's Mission with lantern-slides of Canadian
scenery.
A fine Easter song service by the choir of the local United Church.
The inmates have a radio and record-player.
" In September, 1949, a display of work done by inmates was given space at the
fall fair. The display of finely preserved fruits and vegetables, the knitting, sewing, and
exquisite shellwork were seen and admired by thousands of visitors. We expect the
showing from the prison in 1950 to be even better.
" Several patchwork quilts were made for the Red Cross Society. Many new articles
have been made for the Prince George Hospital. Clothes made by the inmates from their
own material. Canning and preserving (381 quarts) by the kitchen staff, under supervision.
" The crowning achievement has been the painting of the interior of the building,
except cells, by the inmates. They have done a most satisfactory work that changed the
former drab interior to something bright and colourful. It was slow action for inexperienced hands and took over two months of real labour to finish. The painting includes
matrons' and inmates' dining-rooms, matrons' quarters, three bathrooms, large kitchen,
laundry, pantry, refrigeration room, sewing and linen rooms, four hallways and two front
offices.
"All members of the staff have been loyal and are commended for their alertness
and interest in their duties. Since the forty-four-hour week has been in operation, the
interest has been more alive, if possible. The extra break in contact with the inmates has
proved beneficial.
" Since the outbreak of a fire in the basement in July, 1949, a new system of electrical wiring was considered necessary. This is nearing completion. The outside of the
building, except the roof, has been doubly shingled, increasing warmth within.
" The roof of the root-cellar has been insulated, ensuring better storage for foodstuffs.
" Water-pipes throughout have been covered with lagging.
" Several other improvements have been made in the interior of the building to save
time and increase efficiency, such as new cupboards, doors, shelves, etc.
" It cannot be overlooked this building was not originally constructed for a women's
gaol. There are so many features that interfere with direct control of all parts at all
times, and many further improvements are needed to bring the institution up to modern
standards."
LIBRARIES
The librarian at Oakalla Prison reports:—
" Some 55,334 books were circulated throughout the gaol during the year, an
increase of 10,136 over the preceding year.
" Regular weekly visits have been made to the library at New Haven for the purpose
of cataloguing the books there and advising on the purchase of new books.
" Subscriptions to magazines have been arranged for the Provincial Gaol at Prince
George, and regulations have been carried on with the Extension Department of the
University of British Columbia and the Film Department of the Vancouver Public Library
for the showing of films at the Prince George Provincial Gaol. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1949-50 U 23
"A number of books, particularly technical and foreign language books for specific
needs, have been borrowed from other libraries. Of these, 340 were obtained from the
Vancouver Public Library, seven from the Provincial Library and Archives, six from the
Public Library Commission, one from the University of Washington Library, and one
from the John Crerar Library, Chicago. The Provincial Library and Archives, through
United States membership in the Pacific Northwest Bibliographic Centre, University of
Washington, has made it possible for the library to call upon the resources of all the
major libraries of the continent for inter-library loans.
" Besides the aforementioned libraries, the thanks of the library are extended to the
following individuals for information and assistance: Miss Helen T. Greer, Librarian,
American Library Association, Chicago; Miss Jessie McAfee, Cataloguing Department,
Vancouver Public Library; Theodore Cutler, Librarian, Leavenworth Penitentiary; and
Stuart M. Boland, one-time Librarian at San Quentin Penitentiary.
" The Public Library Commission at Prince George has sent a new consignment of
books every three months to the Prince George Gaol, a service which is very much
appreciated.
"At the Nelson Provincial Gaol a library is maintained and well supplied with reading material suitable for the needs of the inmates.
" The Kamloops Gaol also keeps on hand suitable reading material for those
interested."
CONCLUSION
Statistical report covering the movement of population, commitments, sex, educational status, habits as to use of intoxicants and drugs, occupation of prisoners, racial and
civil status, ages, creeds, duration of sentences, previous convictions, offences for which
prisoners were committed and sentenced, employment of prisoners, number of officers
and employees, statement of revenue and expenditure, covering the four Provincial gaols
in the Province, are attached hereto.
In conclusion, I wish to take this opportunity to commend the following who have
devoted their time and efforts toward the betterment, both socially and spiritually, of the
inmates in our large institution at Oakalla: The Salvation Army, the Church of England
ministry, the Roman Catholic chaplain, the John Howard Society, the Elizabeth Fry
Society, and the Alcoholics Anonymous group.
To those organizations who have interested themselves in our smaller gaols in the
Interior, I also express thanks.
To the Warden at Oakalla, as well as the Wardens at our smaller institutions, the
matrons, and guards, it is my privilege and pleasure to commend for carrying out their
multifarious duties so loyally and for their interest and efforts toward improving conditions in our custodial institutions.
I have the honour to be.
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
R. PEACHEY,
Inspector of Gaols. U 24
BRITISH COLUMBIA
APPENDIX
ANNUAL REPORT ON GAOLS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st,  1950
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Totals
1. Total number of county gaols in B.C 	
2. Total expenditure for gaol maintenance in B.C.—
Year ended March 31st, 1950..
Year ended March 31st, 1949-
3. Average total maintenance cost per day per prisoner-
Year ended March 31st, 1950  	
Year ended March 31st, 1949  	
Average dietary cost per day per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1950.  _	
Year ended March 31st, 1949  	
Number of prisoners committed-
Year ended March 31st, 1950_.
Year ended March 31st, 1949___
$647,065.15
589,035.98
$2.23
2.25
$0.47
.44
4,279
3,678
$29,974.85
26,842.92
$2.42
2.67
$0.72
.64
244
203
$11,922.65
7,103.36
$1.64
1.22
$0.49
.52
752
463
$56,539.30
45,338.97
$3.82
3.44
$0.70
.70
825
747
$745,501.95
668,321.23
$2.52
2.39
$0.59
.55
6,100
5,091
I. Movement of Population, Year Ended March 31st, 1950
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
On register, April 1st, 1949   	
838
36
12
40
926
Received—•
4,279
22
4
2
1
720
127
183
16
6
51
81
89
663
64
103
3
660
4,615
141
7
2
1
2,043
Juveniles    „
6
127
51
Sentenced  _ „   __	
81
5,993
373
764
870
8,000
Discharged—
3,413
39
17
15
4
8
154
501
269
720
197
	
13
14
63
1
14
371
1
1
184
,    22
141
29
242
2
336
87
146
21
4,223
40
17
4
By death	
687
5,140
302
749
834
7,025
On register, March 31st, 1950  ___	
853
71
15
36
975 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1949-50
II. Commitments
U 25
1948-49
1949-50
Decrease
Increase
Murder   —	
Manslaughter  __ _
Crimes—■
Against the person -—	
Against property— 	
Against public morals and decency -
Against public order and peace	
Other offences not enumerated above -
Insanity-
Number of prisoners sentenced-	
Number of days' stay of prisoners	
Average number of prisoners per month _
Average number of prisoners per day.	
Escapes 	
Escapes and recaptured— 	
Deaths in gaol - -	
14
9
243
1,294
152
3,181
442
26
4,989
286,811
23,275
778
18
18
2
13
7
,      244
1,533
122
3,712
564
30
6,028
325,732
32,467
846
4
4
11
30
14
1
239
531
122
4
1,039
38,921
9,192
III. Sex
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
Male .  	
3,890
389
235
9
677
75
1
711                 5,513
114                   587
Totals    	
4,279
244
752
825
6,100
IV. Educational Status
Illiterate — 	
212
2,783
1,194
90
54
97
91
2
114
525
108
5
135
528
158
4
515
3,933
1,551
101
4.779         1             944
752
825
6,100
V. Nationality
(Place of Birth)
British-
3,233
483
16
198
16
5
673
18
610
69
1
4,714
586
22
Totals  - _ —	
Foreign—
3,732
171
341
5
30
219
9
5
1
10
691
12
43
6
680
32
113
5,322
224
502
12
40
4,279
244
752
825
6,100
VI. Habits as to Use of Intoxicants
VII. Habits as to Use of Drugs
315
1,262
2,702
57
187
25
23
704
24
110
691
364
1,452
4,284
4,279
244
752
825
6,100
3,924
355
244
748
4
784
41
5,700
Addicts     	
400
4,279
244
752
825
6,100 U 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VIII. Occupations
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
199
231
400
1,940
550
46
112
801
61
2
22
128
30
1
122
124
45
446
7
8
72
354
80
251
16
16
36
454
711
547
2,765
603
Professional    —
71
148
801
Totals.  -  —	
4,279
244
752
825
6,100
IX. Racial
White      - - —-	
3,752
42
429
26
30
229
14
1
544
3
199
3
3
688
1
136
5,213
46
778
30
33
Totals              —	
4,279
244
752
825
6,100
X. Civil State
Single     -	
Married    — 	
2,677
744
148
710
150
84
4
6
489
125
65
73
481
261
20
63
3,797
1,214
237
Separated.     	
852
Totals                -
4,279
244
752
825
6,100
XI. Ages
503
558
532
883
921
583
299
26
26
66
35
47
25
19
62
89
95
177
183
107
39
56
132
153
121
319
44
647
21 to 25        	
805
25 to 30
846
30 to 40	
1,216
40 to 50
1,470
50 to 60                                         	
759
Over 60
357
Totals  -- - - -	
4,279
244
752
825
6,100
XII. Creeds
132
2
725
11
59
3
329
43
615
1,519
496
58
47
240
7
18
71
15
10
31
62
20
10
15
5
88
32
49
8
76
441
38
5
104
10
20
32
459
46
128
21
159
Buddhist  	
7
935
82
91
3
403
Methodist- - — - -   -	
81
754
Roman Catholic   	
2,481
600
United Church— - -	
186
78
240
Others 	
No religion - - __   _	
Totals	
4,279
244
752
825
6,100 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1949-50
XIII. Duration of Sentences
U 27
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
Under one month- - -
1,967
336
261
475
519
199
60
140
79
32
12
177
5
17
91
35
14
35
6
1
	
62
228
182
73
47
15
3
1
11
184
7
1
524
131
70
32
52
13
3
2,810
684
418
542
624
227
63
141
Acquitted 	
83
43
12
Sentenced to insane asylum -
184
Released on bail  	
246
5
17
1
4,279
244
752
825
6,100
XIV. Previous Convictions
1,590
602
366
294
188
156
125
95
68
52
53
36
33
32
39
24
22
28
63
281
64
68
177
32
15
6
4
2
2
2
2
1
1
431
90
44
34
29
25
15
6
12
11
6
6
4
5
2
3
3
4
4
18
584
115
57
15
23
11
5
8
3
2
1
1
2,782
839
482
349
244
194
147
1  	
2 	
3  ...
4 	
5                                   	
6	
7    	
8	
111
80
9   	
66
10	
63
11  	
44
12   	
37
13 	
37
14	
41
15 	
27
16	
25
17 	
33
18 and 19 	
68
20 to 29 -	
299
30 to 39    _
40 to 49
64
50 to 59 	
68
60 to 69 	
70 to 79 	
80 to 99 	
Over 100	
	
4,279
244
752
825
6,100
62.841
27.46
57.31
30.50 U 28 BRITISH COLUMBIA
XV. Offences for Which Prisoners Were Committed and Sentenced during the Year
Commitments
Sentences
Male
Female
Total
Male
Female
Total
(a) Crimes against the person—
Oakalla                  	
199
11
9
3
3
1
202
11
9
4
187
8
6
20
6
1
193
8
6
21
222
4
226
221
7
228
(b) Crimes against property—
Oakalla                  .•
1,174
144
80
9
48
2
2
11
1,222
146
82
20
1,611
84
76
63
75
2
2
11
1,686
86
Kamloops	
Prince George. 	
78
74
Totals      	
1,407
63
1,470
1,834
90
1,924
(c)  Crimes against public morals and decency—
Oakalla 	
88
6
12
2
2
1
90
6
14
1
94
6
11
8
4
2
4
98
6
Kamloops  —	
13
12
106
5
111
119
10
129
(d) Crimes against public order and peace—
Oakalla                                                   	
2,187
132
536
6
327
13
71
101
2,514
145
607
107
2,256
122
501
338
337
7
54
116
2,593
Nelson  ,	
Kamloops	
Prince George  - '
129
555
454
2,861
512
3,373
3,217
514
3,731
312
10
322
554
58
612
Grand totals (totals of (a), (b),
(c), (d).and(e))	
4,908
594
5,502
5,945
679
6,624
XVI. Employment of Prisoners
(Per Cent of Population)
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Clerical ,•   	
.873
30.668
1.264
.664
5.812
12.848
2.358
45.513
26.0
24.0
50.0
35.0
3.0
47.0
5.0
10.0
80.5
Sick  	
2 0
2 5
Farm and garden 	
Land and road improvement	
Unemployed  	
2.5
12.5
100.000
100.0
100.0
100.0 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS,  1949-50
U 29
XVII. Number of Officers and Employees on March 31st, 1950
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
1
1
1
1
1
6
6
1
3
9
1
71
1
1
3
10
1
1
1
1
5
1
1
1
2
1
1
Gaol Surgeon - - 	
1
Chief Clerk                        —-	
3
Kitchen Chef                     	
11
118
9
5
16
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditures for Year Ended March 31st, 1950
Oakalla
Nelson
Kamloops
Prince
George
Total
Expenditure
$1,871.70
310,246.11
3,779.58
10,056.88
37,366.50
7,231.16
34,016.97
568.49
12,019.86
10,171.47
49,613.71
137,506.45
25,590.42
16,086.30
24,695.56
832.61
$1,871.70
$15,262.00
462.20
31.28
1,117.55
499.06
149.18
$6,661.97
94.65
$29,218.61
497.95
1,660.88
1,417.92
1,053.63
361,388.69
4,834.38
11,749.04
702.81
159.30
40,604.78
Janitors' supplies 	
8,943.15
34,166.15
177.26
298.76
745.75
686.05
112.72
13,117.39
10,171.47
2,886.32
8,321.07
670.47
471.10
1,327.31
3,577.24
311.95
408.55
5,143.75
13,110.44
3,079.11
746.10
58,971.09
162,515.20
Medical attendance and hospital supplies
29,651.95
17,712.05
24,695.56
189.68
31.12
134.89
1,188.30
Totals 	
$681,653.77
47,168.06
$30,745.96
167.39
$13,387.62
760.03
$56,539.30
$782,326.65
48,095.48
$728,821.83
$30,913.35
$14,147.65
$56,539.30
$830,422.13
Revenue
Rental of quarters, etc., and maintenance
$81,756.68
$938.50
$2,225.00
$84,920.18
Totals	
$647,065.15
$29,974.85
$11,922.65
$56,539.30
$745,501.95 U 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditures for Year Ended March 31st, 1950-
Continued
Total Gross Expenditure
Total Revenue
1949
1950
1949
1950
Oakalla	
1
•   S665.434.58          $728,821.83
$76,398.60
371.50
1,751.00
100.47
$81,756.68
Nelson    	
27,214.42
8.854.36
30,913.35
14.147.65
938.50
2,225.00
45,439.44    |        56,539.30
$746,942.80    |    $830,422.13
78,621.57     |         84,920.18
$78,621 57    |      $84,920.18
I
S668.371.73     I     S745.501.95
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1950
645-1250-3953

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