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PUBLIC SCHOOLS OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Seventy-ninth Annual Report 1949-50 By the Superintendent… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1951]

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Full Text

 PUBLIC SCHOOLS
OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Seventy-ninth Annual Report
1949-50
By the Superintendent of Education
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1951  To His Honour Clarence Wallace,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
I beg respectfully to present the Seventy-ninth Annual Report of the Public Schools
of the Province.
W. T. STRAITH,
Minister of Education.
February, 1951.  DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
1949-50
Minister of Education:
The Honourable W. T. Straith, K.C., B.A., LL.B.
Deputy Minister and
Superintendent of Education:
F. T. Fairey, B.A., LL.D.
Assistant
Superintendent of Education:
H. L. Campbell, B.A., M.Ed.
Executive Assistant to the Deputy Minister:
R. C. Grant, B.A.
Municipal Inspectors of Schools:
J. F. K. English, M.A., B.Psed., C. G. Brown, M.A., Burnaby.
Greater Victoria. William Gray, M.A., North Vancouver.
John Gough, M.A., Greater Victoria. R. S. Shields, B.A., New Westminster.
K. B. Woodward, B.A., B.Paed., Surrey.
Inspectors of Schools in School Districts:
J. E. Brown, M.A., Victoria.
J. N. Burnett, M.A., E.D., Vancouver.
C. L. Campbell, M.A., Nanaimo.
T. G. Carter, M.C., Vancouver.
Joseph Chell, M.A., Prince Rupert.
C. E. Clay, B. A., Grand Forks.
H. C. Ferguson, B.A., Telkwa.
C. J. Frederickson, B.A., New Westminster.
S. J. Graham, B.A., Chilliwack.
W. H. Grant, B.S.A., B.Ed., Prince George.
E. E. Hyndman, B.A., B.Paed., Nelson.
I. H. R. Jeffery, B.A., Trail.
F. P. Levirs, M.A., M.S.(Ed-), Cranbrook.
W. E. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed., Trail.
H. McArthur, B.A., Kamloops.
J. J. McKenzie, B.A., Victoria.
F. A. McLellan, M.A., B.Paed., Kamloops.
Earl Marriott, B.A., Dawson Creek.
A. S. Matheson, B.A., Kelowna.
W. A. Plenderleith, M.A., D.Paed., F.R.S.A.,
F.C.P., A.M.R.S.T, Nanaimo.
H. D. Stafford, B.A., Courtenay.
L. B. Stibbs, B.A., Salmon Arm.
C. I. Taylor, B.A., B.Ed., Kimberley.
B. Thorsteinsson, B.A., M.B.A., Abbotsford.
A. S. Towell, M.A., Vernon.
A. Turnbull, M.C., M.M., B.A., Penticton.
R. G. Williston, B.A., Prince George.
STAFFS OF THE NORMAL SCHOOLS
A. R. Lord, B.A., LL.D., Principal.
T. R. Hall, B.A., Vice-Principal.
Mrs. Geraldine Birkett, B.A., B.Ed.
Miss L. G. Bollert, B.A.
F. C. Boyes, M.A.
E. B. Broome, M.A., B.Ed.
L. E. Brown, B.P.E.
Miss F. I. Burnham.
Miss Z. M. Manning.
H. O. English, B.A., B.S.A., Principal.
H. C. Gilliland, B.A., Vice-Principal.
G. A. Brand, B.A.
Miss W. A.. Copeland.
Miss D. M. Daniels, B.A.
M.A.
Vancouver:
H. H. Grantham, M.A.
F. C. Hardwick, M.A.
Miss M. E. Maynard, B.A.
Miss M. E. McManus, Mus.Bac,
E. G. Ozard, B.A.
Miss Stella Shopland, B.A., Librarian.
C. W. Truax, B.A., B.Ed.
Model School:
Miss M. J. Macdonald, A.T.C.M., B.A.
Victoria:
H. E. Farquhar, B.A.
D. B. Gaddes, A.T.C.M., B.Mus.
A. W. Johns.
F. H. Johnson, M.A., B.Psed. O 6 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
SPECIAL OFFICIALS
Registrar: T. F. Robson.
Assistant Registrar: H. M. Evans, B.A.
Director of Technical and Vocational Education: H. A. Jones.
Inspector of Technical Classes: C. J. Strong, M.A.
Director of Home Economics: Miss Bertha Rogers, B.Sc, M.A.
Inspector in Home Economics: Miss M. C. Orr, B.A., B.Sc.
Director, Educational and Vocational Guidance: H. P. Johns, M.A., Ph.D.
Acting Director, Recreation and Physical Education: R. J. Phillips.
Director, Visited Education: J. R. Pollock, B.A.Sc.
Director, School Radio Broadcasts: Philip J. Kitley, M.A.
Director, Educational Reference and School Service: Mrs. Muriel Scace, B.A.
Director, Summer School of Education: H. P. Johns, M.A., Ph.D.
Director, Tests, Standards, and Research: C. B. Conway, B.Sc, M.S., D.Pasd.
Director, School and Community Drama: H. S. Hurn, B.A.
Director of High School Correspondence: Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L.
Director of Elementary School Correspondence: Miss Anna B. Miller.
Officer in Charge of Text-book Branch: P. G. Barr.
Accountant: S. E. Espley.
Chief Clerk: R. D. Smith.
Superintendent, School for the Deaf and the Blind: C. E. MacDonald, LL.B., B.S. in Ed., LL.D. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Report of the Superintendent of Education      9
Report of the Assistant Superintendent of Education     28
Report on Normal Schools—
Vancouver ,     3 2
Victoria     33
Report of the Director of Summer School of Education  34
Report of the Director of Technical and Vocational Education  41
Report of the Director of Home Economics  48
Report of the Director of the Division of Educational Reference and School Service 51
Report of the Superintendent of Schools, Vancouver .  53
Reports of Municipal Inspectors—
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)  63
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)  72
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)  74
School District No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)  75
School District No. 36 (Surrey)  77
Reports of District Inspectors :„    78
Report of the Superintendent, The School for the Deaf and the Blind  104
Reports of the Directors of Correspondence Schools—
High School and Vocational Courses  106
Elementary Correspondence School  110
Report of the Officer in Charge of the Text-book Branch .  112
Report on Adult Education—
Industrial Education  115
Correspondence Instruction—
High School  120
Elementary School  121
Recreation and Physical Education  122
School and Community Drama  125
Report of the Director of Educational and Vocational Guidance  127
Report of the Director of the Division of School Radio Broadcasts  129
Report of the Director of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  131
Report of the Director of Visual Education  136
Report of the Commission on "Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act",_ 138 O 8 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
STATISTICAL RETURNS
Page
Number of Pupils Enrolled by Type of School ,  9
Distribution of Pupils by Grade and Sex  10
Distribution of Teachers and Pupils According to Different Classes of Schools  10
Teachers' Certificates  11
Comparison of Enrolment and Expenditure for Public Education 1  11
Comparison of Enrolment and Cost per Pupil to Provincial Government  12
Cost per Pupil on Various Bases for the School-year 1949-50  13
Children of Foreign Parentage  14
Number of School Districts  14
Number of High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  15
Number of Junior-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District  16
Number of Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District— 16
Number of Superior Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  17
Number of Elementary-Senior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District 1.. 18
Number of Elementary-Junior High Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each
District .  18
Number of Elementary Schools, Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils in Each District  19
Number of District Supervisors, Relieving Teachers, Visiting Teachers  20
Summary of All Schools, Showing Number of Divisions, Teachers, and Pupils  20
Number of Schools, Teachers, Pupils, and Average Daily Attendance in Each Type
of School  22
Teachers' Salaries by Type of School  22
Classification of Teachers' Salaries  23
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1949-50 by Provincial Government  24
Expenditure for Education for School-year 1949-50 by School Districts  25
Summary of Enrolment and Average Daily Attendance by Schools in the Various
School Districts  140
Recapitulation of Enrolment by Sex and Grades  172 Report of the Superintendent of Education, 1949-50
Education Office,
Victoria, B.C., February, 1951.
To the Honourable W. T. Straith, K.C.,
Minister of Education.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Seventy-ninth Annual Report of the Public
Schools of British Columbia for the school-year ended June 30th, 1950.
ENROLMENT
The enrolment in the schools of the Province increased during the year from
155,515 to 164,212, and the average daily attendance increased from 138,941 to
147,583.   The percentage of the regular attendance was 89.87.
The number of pupils enrolled in the various classes of schools is shown hereunder:—
Type of School
Number of Pupils Enrolled
Municipal
Large
Municipal
Large Rural
Rural
Total
7,794
5,475
3,460
6,356
13,900
2,583
1,371
3,093
2,003
51,483
355
3,666
1,531
6,141
31
13,098
237
610
14,505
23,041
6,043
2,902
465
1,656
38,904
9,936
3,690
104,095
Totals                                 	
57,754
80,789
24,822
847
164,212
In addition to the numbers given above, there were enrolled:—
In the High Correspondence School classes, regular students
(exclusive of the 2,352 officially registered in high,
superior, or elementary schools)	
In the Elementary Correspondence School classes, regular
students „	
Under section 13 (g) of the "Public Schools Act," pupils
receiving instruction	
1,282
1,366
51
2,699
Adult education—;
Canadian Vocational Training Programme  2,049
Night-schools   15,494
Vancouver School of Art  153
Vancouver Vocational Institute  1,069
High Correspondence School (adults only)  2,318
Elementary Correspondence School (adults only)  216
Recreational and Physical Education classes  20,714
Summer School of Education (1949 session)  1,308
Carried forward  46,020 O 10
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
Brought forward  46,020
Adult education—Continued
Normal School, Vancouver  371
Normal School, Victoria  182
Industrial and vocational teachers-in-training  80
Victoria College  387*
University of British Columbia  7,572f
* This figure does not include an enrolment of 483 in the special evening courses,
t This figure does not include the following enrolments:    1949 Summer Session,  1,430;
classes, 48;   1949-50 botany evening class, 21;   correspondence courses, 257.
54,612
1949-50 extra sessional
DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS BY GRADE AND SEX
The following table shows the number of boys and girls enrolled in each grade for
the school-year 1949-50:—
Grade
Boys
Girls
Total
790
10,870
9,843
9,218
8,520
7,621
7,460
7.144
6,235
5,300
4,282
3,077
2,657
649
643
9,770
9,061
8,615
7,811
7,421
6,965
6,747
6,185
5,750
4,801
3,675
2,741
361
1,433
20,640
Grade II          	
18,904
Grade III -	
17,833
Grade IV  	
16,331
Grade V .                                    	
15,042
Grade VI '	
14,425
Grade VII                         	
13,891
Grade VIII
12,420
Grade IX                                      	
11,050
Grade X                          "	
9,083
Grade XI
6,752
Grade XII _  	
5,398
Grade XIII. "   	
1,010
83,666
SO,546
164,212
DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS ACCORDING TO
THE DIFFERENT CLASSES OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in the different classes of schools, the number
of pupils enrolled in each class of school, and also the average number of pupils per
teacher are shown in the following table:—
Type of School
Number of Teachers
Total
Pupils
Enrolled
Percentage
of Total
Enrolment
Average
Enrolment
Grade
Teachers
Special
Instructors
Total
per Grade
Teacher
459
732
184
109
341
100
3,186
	
185
247
68
1
29
15
157
60
644
979
252
110
370
117
3,341
60
14,505
23,041
'  6,043
2,902
9,936
3,690
104,095
	
8.83
14.03
3.68
1.77
6.05
2.28
63.36
31.60
31.48
32.84
26.62
Elementary-senior high schools _
Elementary-junior high schools _
29.14
36.63
33.05
5,111
762
5,873
164,212
100.00
32.13 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT                                              0  11
TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES
The following table shows the number of teachers employed and also the number
with or without university degrees:—
Type of School
Teachers
with
University
Degrees
Teachers
without
University
Degrees
Total
524
709
189
19
137
49
337
27
120
270
63
91
233
68
3,004
33
644
979
252
110
370
117
3,341
60
Totals 	
1,991
3,882
5,873
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND EXPENDITURE FOR
PUBLIC EDUCATION
The enrolment in the schools of the Province for various years since 1877-78 and
also the cost of maintaining them are shown in the following exhibit:—
School-year
Number
of
Teachers
Employed
Number
of School
Districts
Aggregate
Enrolment
Average
Daily
Attendance
Percentage of
Attendance
Government
Expenditure
for
Education
Total
Expenditure
for Public
Schools
1877-78 -	
56
69
128
267
429
607
816
1,597
1,859
2,246    '
3,118
3,668
3,784
3,854
3,948
3,959
3,912
3,873
3,942
3,956
4,025
4,092
4,194
4,220
4,248
4,224
4,055
4,162
4,354
4,512
4,833
5,116
5,496
5,873
45
59
104
169
213
268
189
359
374
575
744
788
792
803
811
830
821
827
762
773
763
741
721
720
730
696
661
654
650
86
89
93
97
97
2,198
2,693
6,372
11,496
17,648
24,499
33,314
57,608
62,263
67,516
94,888
108,179
109,588
111,017
113,914
115,919
116,816
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
1,395
1,383
3,093
7,111
11,055
16,357
23,195
43,274
49,377
54,746
77,752
91,760
94,410
96,196
99,375
103,510
104,978
103,389
101,893
101,873
104,044
106,515
107,660
108,826
103,192
102,085
93,473
102,999
107,599
114,590
121,334
129,859
138,941
147,583
63.49
51.36
48.54
61.85
62.64
66.76
69.62
75.12
79.30
81.09
81.94
84.82
86.17
86.65
87.23
89.29
89.86
89.30
86.91
87.27
87.85
88.49
89.02
90.34
86.26
86.22
80.96
86.52
85.99
87.74
88.03
88.51
89.34
89.87
$48,411.14*
60,758.75*
113,679.36*
174,775.43
290,255.26
473,802.29
544,671.60
1,663,003.34
1,885,654.11
1,653,796.60
3,176,686.281:
3,532,518.951:
3,765,920.691:
3,743,317.081:
3,834,727.19t
4,015,074.371:
2,849,972.021:
2,611,937.80t
2,835,040.74t
2,972,385.04t
3,277,660.23*
3,524,962.691:
3,630,670.78t
3,585,769.00t
3,963,848.24$
4,028,397.881:
3,924,243.531:
4,244,898.82t
5,022,534.59}:
5,765,205.501:
9,398,473.461:
12,468,653.18£
17,363,430.941
22,809,631.23t
1SS2-83
1887-RR
$215,056.22t
425,555.10
604,357.86
1,220,509.85
4,658,894.97
4,634,877.56
3,519,014.61
7,630,009.541:
9,261,094.98t
11,149,996.271:
10,008,255.661:
10.061,387.991:
9,719,333.811:
8,941,497.341:
8,213,369.041:
8,458,156.001:
8,775,353.781:
9,593,562.64*
10,193,367.081:
10,640,740.471:
10,521,684.921:
10,982,364.491:
11,120,801.94*
11,502,291.35t
12,231,029.351:
13,683,538.18t
14,818,625.81t
20,176,930.531:
25,768,392.091:
35,538,079.883:
47,726,750.371:
1892-93
1897-98	
1902-03  _   „
1907-08	
1912-13	
1913-14
1917-18
1922-23      .            _
10?7_?8
1928-29  	
1929-30 -     	
1930-31                     	
1031-3?
1932-33     -
1933-34   .     ...
1934-35  -	
1035-36
1936 37
1937-38,- 	
1938 39                   	
1939-40   	
1940-41-	
1941-42      _                _
1942-43. 	
1943-44
1944-45                         .....
1945-46
1946 47                    	
1947 48
1948-49               	
1949 50                           ..   .
* The total expenditure for public schools was borne by the Government.
t This amount does not include the expenditure (not available') made for incidental exp
j This amount includes the annual grant from the Government to the Provincial Univei
enses in city school districts.
sity. O 12
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
COMPARISON OF ENROLMENT AND COST PER PUPIL
TO PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT
The following table shows the enrolment during the last seventeen years and also
the cost to the Provincial Government of each pupil:—
School-year
Total
Enrolment
Cost per
Pupil on
Enrolment
Cost per
Pupil on
Average
Daily
Attendance
1933-34      .	
115,792
117,233
116,722
118,431
120,360
120,934
120,459
119,634
118,405
115,447
119,043
125,135
130,605
137,827
146,708
155,515
164,212
$19.51
20.40
21.35
22.93
24.05
24.85
24.52
27.82
28.51
28.82
29.81
33.97
36.56
58.24
74.54
97.76
124.59
$21.85
1934-35 _  	
23.47
1935-36
24.46
1936-37   . ..    	
1937-38        _	
26.10
27.18
1938-39 	
27.92
1939-40
1940-41	
32.25
1941-42  	
33.13
1942-43	
35.59
1943-44
34.46
39.51
1944-45
1945-46
41.67
66.17
1946-47 	
1947-48   	
84.21
1948-49  .	
109.42
1949-50 	
138.63 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT O 13
COST PER PUPIL, ON VARIOUS BASES, FOR THE
SCHOOL-YEAR 1949-50
Grand total cost of education  $47,726,750.37
Less—
Grant re salaries and enrolment Victoria College _ $22,037.51
Special grant to Victoria College  18,000.00
Grant to University of British Columbia  1,583,499.94
Normal School, Vancouver ..  106,427.25
Normal School, Victoria  77,300.17
Cost of night-schools  25,511.89
Correspondence schools—
High school  143,471.69
Elementary school   55,794.19
Adult education  316,222.39
Special grant under section 13 (g) of Act '___ 1,393.00
       2,349,658.03
Net cost for total enrolment of 164,212 pupils  $45,377,092.34
Cost per pupil for year on total enrolment  276.33
Cost per pupil per school-day (192 days) on total enrolment  1.43
Cost per pupil for year on average daily attendance of 147,583  307.47
Cost per pupil per school-day (192 days) on average daily attendance 1.60
Net cost to Provincial Government for total enrolment of 164,212
pupils for year ($22,809,631.23—$2,349,658.03)     20,459,973.20
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on total enrolment ___ 124.59
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (192 days)
on total enrolment  .65
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil for year on average daily
attendance   138.63
Cost to Provincial Government per pupil per school-day (192 days) on
average daily attendance   .72
Cost per capita for year on population of 1,138,000 (1950 estimate)  39.87*
Cost per capita per school-day (192 days) on population of 1,138,000 .21
Cost to Provincial Government per capita for year on population of
1,138,000   17.98f
Cost to Provincial Government per capita per school-day (192 days)
on population of 1,138,000  .09f
* Computed on the net total cost of $45,377,092.34.
t Computed on the net total cost to the Provincial Government of $20,459,973.20.
* O 14
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
CHILDREN OF FOREIGN PARENTAGE
The number of children of foreign parentage attending the public schools of the
Province during the year 1949-50 was as follows:—
Type of School
a
a
E
Gfl
U
.5
TA
U
o
JO
o
•c
a
3
■   O
M
ja
u
a
08
a
I
to
3
-a
.5
.1
0
a
a
1
3
CO
q
>
C
5
CO
a
a
1
I-,
d
.5?
'53
o
u
5
<
u
Q
B<
a,
o
a
H
Oh
«
w
s
O
H
198
313
7
66
141
240
38
152
149
170
194
1    1
487    261    446
2,864
456
83
164
107
353
874
57
312
296
254
327
1,125
350
964
5,722
Junior high schools 	
132
59
12
33
69
184
10
73
83
104
125
262
188
224
1,558
Superior schools 	
44
2
23
12
50
300
2
18
43      24
24
143
23
277
985
Elementary-senior high schools....
132
57
17
40
173
300
186
201    103
95
338
125
294
2,061
Elementary-junior high schools ...
58
16
10
53
218
3
18
4      36
61
153
31
287
948
1,066
1,160
925
423
1,455
3,166
278
995
75711,010
1,212
4,010
6,518
1,756
2,734
4,105
6,597
22,318
Totals	
2,086
1,690
1.1481   691
2,296
5,282
388
1,754
1.53311 701
2,038
36,456
NUMBER OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS
The following table shows the number and classes of school districts in which
expenditure for school purposes was made during the school-year 1949-50:—
Municipal school districts     7
Large municipal school districts  33
  37
  20
Large rural school districts^
Rural school districts (unattached).
Total number of districts  97 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
O 15
SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in senior high schools during the school-year was 14,505;
of this
number, 6,863 were boys and 7,642 were girls.    The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1949-50
in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
7
13
231
10
12
310
8. Slocan 	
2
2
39
4
4
117
2
2
48
6
9
164
8
6
9
8
265
172
21. Armstrong  	
13
14
19
21
381
463
23. Kelowna.. — 	
34. Abbotsford _	
8
16
296
195
263
6,478
27
36
810
41. Burnaby    _	
15
21
506
3
3
81
24
3
27
3
709
72
46. Sechelt   _	
53. Terrace _  	
2
2
56
3
4
62
61. Greater Victoria  	
69
111
2,260
65. Duncan —   .
2
3
54
68. Nanaimo..   _	
18
29
458
3
13
19
319
1
5
8
154
Totals-
38
459
644
14,505
-.   ■ O 16
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
JUNIOR-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior-senior high schools during the school-year was 23,041; of
this number, 11,351 were boys and 11,690 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1949-50 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
16
20
4
4
38
9
20
29
6
17
24
6
6
46
33
66
13
23
81
27
23
21
22
17
14
15
14
11
17
16
10
10
26
22
6
23
25
4
4
53
12
25
38
11
24
35
7
9
57
43
82
14
30
116
35
32
28
26
26
21
22
19
15
24
19
14
14
35
29
8
517
547
120
8. Slocan   _ 	
85
11. Trail   	
12   Grand Forks              -	
1,318
282
529
826
199
557
863
197
164
33   Chilliwack                                                         	
1,493
987
36. Surrey                 	
2,104
37. Delta                              -
337
38. Richmond                                                                       	
797
2,774
946
789
674
621
47. Powell River	
534
481
447
433
62. Sooke	
318
455
445
290
345
70. Alberni                  	
748
75. Mission 	
660
76. Agassiz   ,              	
159
Totals	
44
732
979
23 041
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in junior high schools during the school-year was 6,043; of this
number, 3,206 were boys and 2,837 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1949-50 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
7. Nelson,        _	
22. Vernon           	
i
i
i
2
1
1
1
13
19
18
70
29
18
17
21
25
23
98
39
24
22
441
648
623
2,491
969
603
Totals -  	
8
184
252
6,043 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUPERIOR SCHOOLS
O 17
The enrolment in superior schools during the school-year was 2,902; of this number,
1,510 were boys and 1,392 were girls. The number of schools, number of divisions,
number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1949-50 in each district are
shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
2
3
1
3
2
2
2
2
1
2
1
1
3
3
7
4
3
3
2
6
7
2
26
8
6
6
6
4
7
3
3
3
3
7
4
3
3
2
6
7
2
27
8
6
6
6
4
7
3
3
80
72
13. Kettle Valley          ....                       	
157
18. Golden       .        ..                                                     	
114
19. Revelstoke          	
58
70
62
26. Birch Island	
122
27. Williams Lake                                    .            .
155
29. Lillooet   	
55
34. Abbotsford  _  	
938
46. Sechelt    ....            , .                                          	
232
47    Pnwdl RivPT
118
184
129
76
72. Campbell River    	
156
73. Alert Bay.               ..             •	
52
74. Quatsino..	
72
Totals     	
32
109
110
2,902 O 18
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
ELEMENTARY-SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-senior high schools during the school-year was 9,936;
of this number, 5,054 were boys and 4,882 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1949-50 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie  	
4. Windermere	
6. Kaslo 	
10. Arrow Lakes	
13. Kettle Valley	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden	
20. Salmon Arm	
21. Armstrong 	
22. Vernon _	
24. Kamloops	
27. Williams Lake	
28. Quesnel	
29. Lillooet	
30. Ashcroft	
31. Merritt  	
32. Fraser Canyon _
39. Vancouver  _.
48. Howe Sound	
49. Ocean Falls 	
50. Queen Charlotte	
53. Terrace 	
55. Burns Lake 	
56. Vanderhoof.	
58. McBride 	
60. Peace River North-
64. Saltspring	
69. Qualicum	
71. Courtenay.. 	
72. Campbell River.	
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino   	
Unattached districts	
Totals	
45
36
6
6
6
7
16
6
6
4
11
12
5
10
7
13
16
9
4
14
17
17
3
3
6
7
6
12
11
21
10
16
5
4
9
341
42
6
6
6
7
16
6
6
4
12
13
5
10
8
14
16
10
4
18
18
19
3
3
6
7
6
14
13
23
10
19
5
4
11
370
1,119
177
170
155
182
450
153
187
85
323
382
123
314
194
381
385
317
97
465
427
551
62
84
179
199
181
398
293
613
308
524
116
105
237
9,936
ELEMENTARY-JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
The enrolment in elementary-junior high schools during the school-year was 3,690;
of this number, 1,869 were boys and 1,821 were girls. The number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1949-50 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
34. Abbotsford   ._ 	
41. Burnaby  	
1
2
2
18
45
36
19
54
41
639
1,656
1,395
Totals	
5
99
114
3,690 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
O 19
The enrolment in elementary schools during the school-year was 104,095; of this
number, 53,813 were boys and 50,282 were girls. The number of schools, number of
divisions, number of teachers, and the enrolment for the school-year 1949-50 in each
district are shown in the following table:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11,
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
66.
67.
68.
Fernie 	
Cranbrook	
Kimberley	
Windermere.~
Creston	
Kaslo	
Nelson	
Slocan 	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes..
Trail 	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan.
Penticton	
Keremeos  —
Princeton	
Golden 	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm.
Armstrong	
Vernon	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Barriere	
Birch Island
Williams Lake.
Quesnel 	
Lillooet 	
Ashcroft	
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon._
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley 	
Surrey -	
Delta	
Richmond _	
Vancouver	
New Westminster..
Burnaby .	
Maple Ridge—1	
Coquitlam.
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt   	
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls __
Queen Charlotte ...
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George	
McBride ._.
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke	
Saanich	
Saltspring	
Duncan	
Lake Cowichan.
Ladysmith	
Nanaimo 	
5
6
6
6
7
7
12
13
12
4
11
3
6
3
3
3
4
4
6
30
8
10
15
27
8
7
13
14
7
5
2
7
14
13
18
34
6
8
48
6
17
8
12
7
4
11
9
5
5
3
2
7
10
6
15
6
32
10
30
18
27
13
10
8
14
5
5
13
6
28
27
8
24
7
40
24
28
10
90
17
7
27
34
5
11
4
17
41
22
45
70
55
8
7
15
21
10
6
3
17
67
38
51
107
20
64
788
63
129
36
54
59
32
18
32
7
5
3
3
29
18
10
17
8
59
11
49
21
222
30
30
9
37
25
20
58
6
29
28
8
27
7
41
24
28
10
96
17
7
28
35
5
11
4
17
41
22
47
71
57
8
7
15
21
10
6
3
17
68
39
51
107
20
65
886
65
134
36
54
60
33
18
32
7
5
3
3
29
18
10
17
8
60
11
50
21
238
30
30
9
38
26
21
62
145
1,046
951
171
724
88
1,280
623
910
331
3,097
557
115
949
1,283
113
339
53
553
1,087
697
1,542
2,488
1,538
127
101
225
509
177
83
43
473
2,432
1,239
1,592
3,841
740
2,391
27,290
2,477
4,920
1,295
1,891
2,297
1,142
460
1,023
136
86
55
48
1,029
475
249
274
134
1,368
158
1,122
372
8,580
777
963
164
1,077
679
735
1,938 O 20
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS—Continued
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
5
8
14
15
8
5
14
3
1
19
7
50
48
16
9
5
34
9
16
30
7
53
48
16
9
5
34
9
16
30
208
70. Alberni -	
1,704
1 559
72. Campbell River	
223
73. Alert Bay  ■  	
163
68
1,054
71
582
583
Totals   	
825
3,187
3,344
104 095
DISTRICT SUPERVISORS, RELIEVING TEACHERS, AND
VISITING TEACHERS
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
	
-—
40
5
1
1
2
10
1
52. Prince Rupert  	
59. Peace River South.	
68. Nanaimo	
Totals _	
—
60
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS
The following table is a summary of all schools, showing number of schools, number
of divisions, number of teachers, and number of pupils:—
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
1. Fernie	
2. Cranbrook
3. Kimberley.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Windermere .
Creston	
Kaslo	
9
10,
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
Nelson .
Slocan..
. Castlegar..
Arrow Lakes-
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong	
Vernon	
Kelowna	
Kamloops	
Barriere  	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake.
Quesnel	
Lillooet	
7
7
7
9
8
16
15
13
7
13
4
10
4
4
5
6
7
8
32
10
13
19
30
9
9
17
16
10
42
35
43
14
47
13
70
30
32
18
128
26
21
47
63
21
23
14
26
53
39
89
119
86
10
13
32
34
25
48
42
51
14
55
13
81
30
32
18
149
29
21
53
73
21
28
14
29
54
42
104
139
100
10
13
32
36
26
1,264
1,277
1,468
348
1,351
258
2,223
747
1,027
534
4,415
839
454
1,478
2,109
563
691
354
775
1,437
1,192
2,953
4,131
2,594
189
223
694
900
613 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT
SUMMARY OF ALL SCHOOLS—Continued
O 21
No. and Name of School District
Number of
Schools
Number of
Divisions
Number of
Teachers
Number of
Pupils
30. Ashcroft-
31. Merritt —
32. Fraser Canyon..
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford	
35. Langley	
36. Surrey	
37. Delta _	
38. Richmond-
39. Vancouver..
40. New Westminster..
41. Burnaby	
42. Maple Ridge	
43. Coquitlam.
44. North Vancouver..
45. West Vancouver	
46. Sechelt 	
47. Powell River	
48. Howe Sound	
49. Ocean Falls	
50. Queen Charlotte..
51. Portland Canal	
52. Prince Rupert	
53. Terrace 	
54. Smithers—	
55. Burns Lake	
56. Vanderhoof	
57. Prince George..
58. McBride	
59. Peace River South...
60. Peace River North..
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke  	
63. Saanich	
64. Saltspring..	
65. Duncan
66. Lake Cowichan .
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay..	
72. Campbell River..
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz..
77. Summerland _.
Unattached districts-
Totals..
3
9
15
18
19
38
7
9
61
9
21
9
15
10
5
14
12
8
7
4
2
8
12
9
16
9
33
11
31
19
33
15
12
9
17
6
6
15
7
9
18
18
10
7
15
4
2
20
997
22
12
27
113
90
84
173
33
87
1,148
119
216
60
78
119
54
29
55
24
22
6
3
43
23
19
23
21
74
17
63
33
309
41
47
20
59
35
30
93
28
76
71
39
17
12
56
15
21
39
5,111
22
13
30
125
101
94
189
34
95
1,421
140
249
68
86
128
59
29
64
25
24
6
3
51
23
20
23
21
82
17
71
35
383
45
54
22
64
40
35
114
30
88
77
42
17
12
63
17
24
41
5,873
468
360
734
3,925
3,112
2,579
5,945
1,077
3,188
39,498
4,256
8,028
2,084
2,646
4,401
1,763
764
1,675
563
637
117
48
1,510
615
495
453
462
1,815
339
1,555
770
11,443
1,095
1,418
457
1,652
969
1,080
2,664
821
2,452
2,186
903
331
245
1,714
230
736
833
164,212 O 22
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
NUMBER OF SCHOOLS, TEACHERS, PUPILS, AND AVERAGE
DAILY ATTENDANCE IN EACH TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the number of schools of each type, the number of
teachers employed, the number of pupils enrolled, and the average daily attendance in
each type of school for the school-year 1949-50:—
Type of School
Number
of
Schools
Number
of
Teachers
Number of Pupils
Total
Boys
Girls
Average
Daily
Attendance
Senior high	
Junior-senior high-
Junior high	
Superior
Elementary-senior high..
Elementary-junior high-
Elementary  	
Not stated 	
38
44
8
32
45
5
825
644
979
252
110
370
114
3,344
60
14,505
23,041
6,043
2,902
9,936
3,690
104,095
Totals.
997
5,873
164,212
6,863
11,351
3,206
1,510
5,054
1,869
53,813
7,642
11,690
2,837
1,392
4,882
1,821
50,282
83,666
80,546
12,543.72
20,487.85
5,746.04
2,576.92
8,894.92
3,324.17
94,010.18
147,583.80
TEACHERS' SALARIES BY TYPE OF SCHOOL
The following table shows the highest, lowest, and average salary (in dollars only)
paid to teachers in each type of school, grouped into grade teachers, supervising principals, and special instructors. Part-time teachers, teachers attached to the Bureau of
Measurements, superintendents and instructors, and teachers showing less than $1,000
are excluded.
Grade Teachers
Type of School
Number of
Teachers
High
Salary
Low
Salary
Average
Salary
Senior high	
Junior-senior high-
Junior high	
Superior
Elementary-senior high..
Elementary-junior high-
Elementary	
454
727
180
105
336
101
3,087
I
$5,071
4,500
4,626
4,275
5,200
4,410
4,900
$1,349
1,050
1,958
1,221
1,190
1,380
1,120
$3,621
2,931
3,211
2,345
2,585
2,461
2,390
Supervising Principals
Senior high	
Junior-senior high-
Junior high..
Elementary-senior high-
Etementary-junior high-
Elementary	
Unclassified	
35
$5,921
$3,570
$4,869
49
5,700
3,900
4,685
11
5,700
3,880
4,941
7
4,992
3,272
4,391
6
4,895
4,310
4,616
49
5,300
2,525
4,633
13
4,626
1,920
3,413
Special Instructors
Senior high	
Junior-senior high-
Junior high..
Elementary-senior high..
Elementary-junior high-
Elementary	
Unclassified  _
144
195
56
17
9
86
3
$4,700
4,500
4,326
4,400
3,520
5,115
3,660
$1,494
1,101
1,864
1,275
1,592
1,180
3,089
$3,305
2,835
3,080
2,734
2,471
2,771
3,436 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT O 23
SALARY CLASSIFICATION
Distribution of teachers by $100 salary-groups, excluding part-time teachers and
teachers earning less than $1,000 per annum:—
Number of Number of
Salary Range                              Teachers Salary Range                               Teachers
$1,000-$1,099  Nil $3,700-$3,799  109
1,100- 1,199  18      3,800- 3,899  87
1,200- 1,299  21      3,900- 3,999  95
1,300- 1,399  28      4,000- 4,099  89
1,400- 1,499  31      4,100- 4,199  44
1,500- 1,599  159      4,200- 4,299  34
1,600- 1,699  212      4,300- 4,399  61
1,700- 1,799  222      4,400- 4,499  84
1,800- 1,899  255      4,500- 4,599  44
1,900- 1,999  291      4,600- 4,699  17
2,000- 2,099 _1  272      4,700- 4,799  12
2,100- 2,199  232      4,800- 4,899  24
2,200- 2,299  243      4,900- 4,999 ;  22
2,300- 2,399  248      5,000- 5,099   9
2,400- 2,499  292      5,100- 5,199  13
2,500- 2,599  237      5,200- 5,299  10
2,600- 2,699  215      5,300- 5,399   8
2,700- 2,799  240      5,400- 5,499   5
2,800- 2,899  308      5,500- 5,599   3
2,900- 2,999  239      5,700- 5,799   4
3,000- 3,099  313      5,900- 5,999   1
3,100- 3,199  174      6,900- 6,999   1
3,200- 3,299  148      7,500- 7,599   2
3,300- 3,399  147      7,700- 7,799   1
3,400-3,499  113      8,000 and over   1
3,500- 3,599 :  111 ——
3,600- 3,699   168 Total 5,717 O 24 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
EXPENDITURE FOR EDUCATION FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1949-50
Minister's office  $ 16,585.62
General office  84,761.84
Text-book Branch L  150,814.20
High Correspondence School  143,471.69
Elementary Correspondence School  55,794.19
Industrial education   57,495.46
Visual education .  43,142.59
Inspection of schools  231,511.62
Normal School, Vancouver  106,427.25
Normal School, Victoria  77,300.17
School for the Deaf and the Blind  195,451.44
Basic grants  '. L  7,822,510.54
Boarding allowances   18,143.69
Dormitory grants - 7,548.16
Special salary grant paid under section 13 (g) of the Act  1,393.00
Teachers' superannuation (7 per cent)  1,106,678.43
Special aid to school districts  5,000.00
Special aid to rural areas  1,681,829.45
School buildings and essential new equipment  8,042,628.69
Education of soldiers' dependent children  13,954.75
Examinations   59,275.12
Conveying children to central schools  801,971.78
Summer School  42,331.64
Adult education—
Extension and adult education  34,811.79
Recreational and physical education  103,483.69
Urban occupational training  16,93 0.42
Rural occupational training  6,718.71
Student-aid bursaries   73,341.00
Re-establishment training  5,258.48
Apprentice-training   14,790.18
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement  60,888.12
School radio broadcasts  21,766.11
Division of Curriculum  11,827.23
Division of Educational Reference and School Service  17,465.46
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research  30,562.98
Educational and vocational guidance  8,839.41
Board of Reference  250.51
Assessment Equalization Board  18,564.24
Incidentals and contingencies  16,611.64
University of British Columbia—
General grant  $1,545,749.94
Teacher-training         16,750.00
University Endowment Lands  21,000.00
       1,583,499.94
Special grant to Victoria College  18,000.00
Total expenditure by Government  $22,809,631.23
Amount expended by districts (including debt charges)     24,917,119.14
Grand total expenditure  $47,726,750.37 REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT O 25
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1949-50
No. and Name of School District
Total
Expenditure*
Government
Grants
District
Expenditure
1. Fernie  	
2. Cranbrook   	
3. Kimberley  	
4. Windermere 	
5. Creston— 	
6. Kootenay Lake   	
7. Nelson :	
8. Slocan	
9. Castlegar	
10. Arrow Lakes	
11. Trail  -  	
12. Grand Forks „ 	
13. Kettle Valley  	
14. Southern Okanagan	
15. Penticton	
16. Keremeos	
17. Princeton	
18. Golden 	
19. Revelstoke   	
20. Salmon Arm _ 	
21. Armstrong-Enderby 	
22. Vernon  	
23. Kelowna  	
24. Kamloops _ _ 	
25. Barriere  	
26. Birch Island   	
27. Williams Lake   	
28. Quesnel-   	
29. Lillooet  	
30. Ashcroft _ 	
31. Merritt... 	
32. Fraser Canyon 	
33. Chilliwack	
34. Abbotsford    	
35. Langley 	
36. Surrey  _ 	
37. Delta     _
38. Richmond   	
39. Vancouver   .
40. New Westminster	
41. Burnaby -   	
42. Maple Ridge  	
43. Coquitlam. _. 	
44. North Vancouver 	
45. West Vancouver  „
46. Sechelt  _.
47. Powell River. 	
48. Howe Sound 	
49. Ocean Falls.-    	
50. Queen Charlotte 	
51. Portland Canal 	
52. Prince Rupert 	
53. Terrace  	
54. Smithers 	
55. Burns Lake 	
56. Vanderhoof 	
57. Prince George   	
58. McBride   	
59. Peace River South	
60. Peace River North	
61. Greater Victoria	
62. Sooke 	
63. Saanich  	
64. Saltspring 	
65. Cowichan — „
66. Lake Cowichan — 	
67. Ladysmith.  	
68. Nanaimo -  	
69. Qualicum 	
70. Alberni- 	
71. Courtenay— 	
72. Campbell River   — 	
73. Alert Bay.- 	
74. Quatsino   	
75. Mission.. 	
76. Agassiz. - 	
77. Summerland .	
* Includes debt and capital charges.
$218,242.07
241,430.19
570,548.66
78,786.21
615,309.88
51,917.38
385,151.76
147,236.37
277,642.99
256,133.38
2,289,173.85
182,001.35
91,185.99
410,079.07
840,268.12
82,583.78
453,808.37
74,181.36
133,290.91
545,583.26
162,196.62
1,231,296.39
1,069,288.71
406,954.05
42,017.48
68,827.02
326,656.92
491,467.87
281,515.51
106,291.10
53,211.00
303,656.35
1,168,989.05
460,722.54
532,211.33
1,239,502.49
142,739.31
414,890.92
10,856,467.57
1,165,487.57
1,530,385.89
306,833.89
401,643.03
762,254.18
575,129.48
125,264.01
876,718.31
137,502.50
249,880.22
20,476.06
10,511.65
241,478.56
150,956.65
134,409.41
88,491.25
187,998.39
407,769.04
78,648.05
541,438.21
158,220.50
2,761,708.78
228,434.91
224,201.95
83,278.39
649,712.70
352,843.05
162,402.91
774,215.28
149,737.15
553,068.97
355,082.02
734,267.17
79,877.96
58,467.39
298,584.74
81,499.27
180,062.66
$125,389.77
124,810.00
265,556.02
49,031.31
350,318.40
33,549.30
163,699.01
86,298.57
113,214.06
139,972.65
1,074,647.35
97,878.35
59,417.97
246,888.56
343,564.14
55,643.08
244,995.13
. 46,947.59
70,380.68
280,606.47
84,832.63
619,519.94
521,436.46
217,677.59
27,591.33
38,714.85
185,587.79
277,750.67
109,724.06
63,624.82
26,044.08
183,307.88
549,986.66
244,853.72
257,117.29
585,798.81
51,675.47
167,385.26
3,265,616.95
400,055.48
643,150.71
139,471.10
158,986.06
343,139.07
201,246.78
57,820.66
393,429.55
45,043.26
93,166.74
7,904.77
2,632.89
79,785.47
99,108.88
82,287.63
75,435.36
115,420.38
172,809.63
53,613.01
318,003.27
100,915.48
877,812.99
119,611.48
98,401.71
51,232.55
312,047.15
172,002.82
75,913.73
375,793.03
86,077.86
256,464.02
215,384.33
372,018.33
36,167.19
13,748.33
131,949.79
41,271.44
83,453.75
$92,852.30
116,620.19
304,992.64
29,754.90
264,991.48
18,368.08
221,452.75
60,937.80
164,428.93
116,160.73
1,214,526.50
84,123.00
31,768.02
163,190.51
496,703.98
26,940.70
208,813.24
27,233.77
62,910.23
264,976.79
77,363.99
611,776.45
547,852.25
189,276.46
14,426.15
30,112.17
141,069.13
213,717.20
171,791.45
42,666.28
27,166.92
120,348.47
619,002.39
215,868.82
275,094.04
653,703.68
91,063.84
247,505.66
7,590,850.62
765,432.09
887,235.18
167,362.79
242,656.97
419,115.11
373,882.70
67,443.35
483,288.76
92,459.24
156,713.48
12,571.29
7,878.76
161,693.09
51,847.77
52,121.78
13,055.89
72,578.01
234,959.41
25,035.04
223,434.94
57,305.02
1,883,895.79
108,823.43
125,800.24
32,045.84
337,665.55
180,840.23
86,489.18
398,422.25
63,659.29
296,604.95
139,697.69
362,248.84
43,710.77
44,719.06
166,634.95
40,227.83
96,608.91 O 26
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
EXPENDITURE BY SCHOOL DISTRICTS FOR SCHOOL-YEAR 1949-50
—Continued
No. and Name of School District
Total
Expenditure*
Government
Grants
District
Expenditure
Unattached
Atlin.. '	
3,629.58
9,380.71
3,269.24
2,730.89
5,119.82
3,336.15
3,851.64
2,960.00
2,829.95
3,064.83
3,421.29
23,567.79
2,744.80
2,113.69
6,612.16
28,937.00
7,388.76
18,394.49
52,341.37
25,442.24
1,501.52
5,467.05
831.89
2,016.96
4,633.26
1,247.69
2,447.63
2,546.78
944.32
2,290.70
2,233.89
21,800.53
300.54
2,079.26
3,869.05
24,869.49
5,077.76
9,183.63
18,057.58
11,185.71
2,128.06
3,913.66
Rufedale.
2,437.35
Camp Mile 163       	
713.93
Camp Mile 300  	
486.56
2,088.46
1,404.01
Fort Nelson..   	
Fort Nelson Airport	
413.22
Kildonan   	
1,885.63
Klahoose.. — „
774.13
Kyuquot.   _.
1,187.40
1,767.26
2,444.26
34 43
Lower Post.—  	
Sarita River	
Sydney Inlet    .. ..
Tahsis River... _ 	
2,743.11
4,067.51
Telegraph Creek	
Torino.   	
Ucluelet 	
2,311.00
9,210.86
34,283.79
14,256.53
University Hill..  _	
Zeballos        „ 	
Totals  	
$43,393,535.73
$18,476,416.59
$24,917,119.14
* Includes debt and capital charges.
REVIEW
A study of the statistical returns on the preceding pages emphasizes the continued
growth of the educational system in the Province. School Boards continue to give
devoted service.
Building programmes, initiated by School Boards, continue to receive substantial
support from the ratepayers, as evidenced by the affirmative vote given to all by-laws. In
nearly all school districts, new schools are being erected. Indeed, the year 1949-50 was
one of building activity.
The general prosperity of the Province is reflected in the growth of the population,
with the consequent increase in the number of children of school age. This, together with
the high birth rate in the years immediately following the close of the war, makes it
imperative that consideration be given now to the provision of additional accommodation
which will be required, particularly in the elementary schools, in the immediate future.
The effect of the great increase in live births in the years 1946 and 1947, with no
appreciable decline in succeeding years, will be to greatly increase Grade I enrolment in
1952 and 1953.   This situation is not being neglected.
The over-all enrolment in the school-year 1949-50 shows an increase from 155,515
to 164,212 and the number of teachers from 5,496 to 5,873.
According to reliable forecasts from our own research department and from the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics, the increase to be expected in the five-year period 1950-55
is 65,000.
CURRICULA CHANGES
The Curriculum Committee, assisted by a large number of special-subject committees, has made important changes in the school programme which will more nearly meet
the needs of the children in our schools and the economy of the various sections of the
Province. The staff of the University of British Columbia has been most co-operative
and helpful.
The Assistant Superintendent, Mr. H. L. Campbell, reports fully on this matter in
the section of this Report which he has prepared.
TEXT-BOOK RENTAL PLAN
Brief mention of this new service was made in my last report. I now have to report
that the most optimistic forecasts of the success of the plan have been fully realized.   The REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT O 27
inauguration of such an entirely new undertaking, without any previous experience anywhere else as a guide, was a remarkable effort. The organization arranged by Mr. P. G.
Barr, officer in charge of the Text-book Branch, and carried out by his staff, was magnificently done. The co-operation of School Boards, school principals, and the teachers
was of a high order and contributed much to the success of the programme.
LEGISLATION
Minor changes, for clarification only, were made in the " Public Schools Act" at the
1950 Session of the Legislature.   Two only need be mentioned.
In previous years, the Superintendent of Education was required to include in his
report the names and salaries of all teachers in the schools of the Province. Obviously
this requirement dated back to the days when the school system was small and the teachers
few. As the years passed, the report included a large number of pages containing long
lists of teachers and their salaries which did not add anything to the value of this report.
The publication of such information has objectionable features and has nothing to recommend it. The Legislature wisely amended section 6 (1) (k) accordingly. Such lists are
not now required.
When a Municipal Council refused to accept the school budget, as presented by the
School Board, provision was made in section 53 of the " Public Schools Act" for arbitration proceedings, but no date was set for the decision of the arbitrators.
The section was amended to require the arbitrators to meet and render a decision
" on or before the thirty-first day of March in that year."
RETIREMENTS
The Department has lost the services of four outstanding officials. During the year
Miss Bollert, for many years a member of the staff of the Vancouver Normal School,
decided to devote her great ability in other fields. Mr. V. Z. Manning, one of the senior
and greatly loved Inspectors of Schools, thought it well to spend some time in leisure
pursuits. He will be greatly missed. We have had to say farewell to Dr. A. R. Lord, for
fourteen years principal of the Vancouver Normal School. It is difficult to think of
teacher-training in this Province without the presence of Dr. Lord. His contribution to
education and his influence on the schools through the thousands of teachers who received
their training under his direction has been truly great.
Finally, Mr. Ernest Lee, Provincial Director of Physical and Recreational Education,
was appointed National Director of Physical Fitness and felt it his duty to accept this
position.   His is a difficult place to fill.
APPOINTMENTS AND PROMOTIONS
Mr. T. R. Hall, vice-principal of the Vancouver Normal School, was the natural
choice to succeed Dr. A. R. Lord as principal. Mr. F. C. Boyes was promoted from the
staff to be vice-principal.
From the staff of Vancouver city schools we welcome Miss A. J. Kilgour and Mr.
John McGechaen.
The staff of Inspectors of Schools welcomes Mr. G. W. Graham, principal of Chilli-
wack Junior-Senior High School; Mr. W. J. Mouat, principal of Coquitlam Junior-Senior
High School; and Mr. C. T. Rendle, principal of Cranbrook Junior-Senior High School.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
F. T. Fairey,
Superintendent of Education. O 28 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION
REPORT OF H. L. CAMPBELL, B.A., M.Ed., ASSISTANT
SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION
The school-year under review in this report was one of steady, yet significant
progress toward the ever-advancing ideal of a school system which meets the needs for
guidance and development of all youth in our democratic society.
In rapidly increasing degree, society is coming to recognize the necessity for a sound
secondary-school education for all children if they are to become happy and effective
citizens who can make their contribution to the common weal. In attendance at
secondary schools, British Columbia leads the way in Canada. Figures released by the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics show that the average school-leaving age for children
in this Province is the highest in Canada.
This demand for universal secondary education means, among other things, that
the secondary schools must provide a wide variety of courses to meet the needs and
capacities of all young people. There must be cultural, academic, and vocational
courses which challenge to the full those of superior ability, who are destined to be the
leaders of to-morrow. For those of lesser academic ability there must be courses which
meet their cultural and vocational needs as citizens of a democracy.
The provision of an educational system which meets such standards is a worthy
challenge to those responsible for giving guidance in education, to principals and teachers
charged with administering it, and to the public, who in the final analysis decide what
they want for their children and provide the necessary funds for it.
Some of the more noteworthy educational advances of a professional nature made
during the year are as follows:—
Reorganization of Inspectorates
The Inspector of Schools is responsible to the Minister of Education for direction
and supervision in respect of the quality and standard of education which prevails in his
inspectorate. Because of increased school population, the inspectorates became too
large to be effectively administered by one Inspector.
A reorganization of inspectorates was effected whereby the size of inspectorates was
reduced and five new inspectorates created. Headquarters of these new inspectorates
were located at Nelson, Williams Lake, New Westminster, Mission, and Duncan.
For administrative purpose the Province is divided into thirty-five inspectorates,
six of which are almost wholly municipal in nature.
Revision of Curriculum
In the thirteen years of the public school system, that is in Grades I to XIII, the
curriculum provides for a total of about 100 courses or subjects. From five to eight
courses are studied by each student in each school-year. Some of these courses are
constants—that is, they are required for study by every pupil, as, for example, the study
of English. Other courses are constant or required only in certain grades and are
elective in others, as, for example, music and art. Some courses are purely elective and
are studied only by those who choose them, as, for example, typing or shorthand. For
each course or subject in each grade a course of studies is provided as a guide to the
teacher, and a text-book may or may not be prescribed, depending on the nature of
the course. EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION O 29
In the process of time all courses of study require revision in order that they may
remain functional and meet the needs of an ever-changing and evolving society. The
Department of Education requires that each of the 100 courses be considered for revision
at least once in each ten-year period and in some subjects more frequently than that.
The following twenty-five courses were revised during the year and curriculum
bulletins issued for them: Social Studies for Grades I to IX, inclusive; Effective Living
for Grades VII to XI, inclusive; Science for Grades VII and VIII; Mathematics for
Grade IX; Languages (French, Latin, Spanish, German) for Grades IX and X; and
Commercial Studies, Grades IX to XII, inclusive.
It is planned that the following subjects, among others, will be revised during the
coming year: Health and Physical Education for Grades I to VI, inclusive; Physical
Education for Grades VII to XII, inclusive; Agriculture for Grades IX to XII, inclusive;
English for Grades X to XIII, inclusive; Science for Grades IX and X; and French,
Spanish, German, Latin for Grades XI to XIII.
Curriculum Adjustment
The recent adjustment of the secondary-school curriculum, as set forth in last year's
Report, is proceeding satisfactorily. It has been accepted by principals and teachers as
holding promise of making the secondary school more functional in the lives of a greater
proportion of high school students. Particularly does it offer a much greater opportunity
than formerly for making provision for individual differences in the scholastic ability
of students.
It is planned to increase the number of alternative courses. For example, Mathematics 10, 20, 30, and 91 are standard courses for those seeking admission to the
university, but there will be Mathematics 11, 21, 31, and 41 for vocational and other
students who have need of them. The same will ultimately be true of English and
possibly of other subjects.
In an increasing degree, principals and staffs of schools in consultation with the
Inspector of Schools are adjusting and modifying the curriculum to meet the conditions
in and the needs of the local community, and of the students who will ultimately form
a part of that community.
Text-books
If only for the freedom which it gives to the Department of Education to discard
obsolete texts, the advent of the Rental Plan is proving itself to be a great boon to education in British Columbia.
Under the former plan, whereby parents were required to purchase texts, a.normal
yearly revision of eight or ten courses with ac'companying new texts produced a storm
of protest. This was natural and understandable because, although the text may have
been prescribed for ten years and might have outlived its usefulness as an educational
instrument, it had been purchased by the parent just one year ago and was in good
physical condition.    From the parents' point of view it was wasteful.
Under the Rental Plan, when texts have been in the schools for a number of years;
when they are almost worn out physically and when better texts are available, they may
be replaced by better and more modern texts at no added expense to parents above the
annual rental charge, which represents but a small fraction of their retail cost.
The institution of the Rental Plan, with its accompanying subsidy by the Government
of this Province, has enabled the Department of Education to prescribe the following new
texts for the current school-year:— O 30 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
Course New Texts
Grade IV Study Arithmetics (Gage).
Grade VI Reader:  Proud Procession (Dent).
Effective Living 10 and 20.- Good Health (Ginn).
Your High School Days (McGraw-Hill).
Personal Problems (Nelson).
4-Square Planning for Your Career
(Gage).
English 7 My Spelling (Ginn).
English 8 Jvly Spelling (Ginn).
English 10 Using Words (Gage).
French 10 and 20 Junior French, Book I (Ginn).
German 10 Graded German Readers, Books I to V
(Copp Clark).
German 20 Graded German Readers, Volume II,
Intermediate (Copp Clark).
Spanish 10 and 20 El Camino Real, Book I (Nelson).
Spanish 20 Graded Spanish Readers, Books I and II
(Copp Clark).
Latin 20 First Year Latin (Allyn and Bacon).
Mathematics 11 Mathematics We Use, Book III
(Winston).
Mathematics 91 Sisam Mathematical Tables (Clarke,
Irwin).
Social Studies 7 '. The Ancient and Medieval World
(Clarke, Irwin).
Social Studies 8 Canada in the World Today (Clarke,
Irwin).
Social Studies 10__ World Geography (Ginn).
Industrial Arts 10, 22, 32,   Farmers' Shop Book (Bruce Publishing
93 Co.).
Industrial Arts 20, 21, 22,    Correction Tables—Mechanical Draw-
30, 31, 32, 91, 92,93 ing (Department of Education).
Home Economics 11 Sewing Standard Operation Sheets
(Longmans, Green).
Home Economics 24 Learning to Care for Children
(Appleton-Century).
Shorthand 31 Pitman Shorthand Dictation Course
(Pitman).
Instruction
The increased enrolments of fine young people in all of our teacher-training institutions and the flood of qualified and experienced teachers who are voluntarily attending
summer schools is a most hopeful sign. The worth of the educational process in schools
must always depend in very large measure on the personality, ability, and skill of the
teacher. No school system can be effective if its teachers are poorly qualified and lack
adequate experience.
The following facts from the latest report of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics
would seem to indicate that the teaching force of this Province compares very favourably
with the rest of Canada:—
(a) 31.5 per cent of the teaching force in this Province are university graduates.
The next Province has only 22 per cent and the lowest has 2.1 per cent. EDUCATIONAL DIRECTION AND SUPERVISION O 31
(b) 77 per cent of the teaching force in this Province has first-class certification
or better. The next Province has 72 per cent and the lowest has 39 per
cent.
(c) 33.7 per cent of the teaching force of this Province are men." The next
Province in order has 27.5 per cent and the lowest has 11.4 per cent.
(d) The median teaching experience of British Columbia teachers is 12.0 years.
For the next Province in order, it is 9.9 years, and for the lowest it is 4.8
years.
(e) British Columbia has only 8.2 per cent of its teachers working in ungraded,
rural one-room schools. The next Province in order has 21.3 per cent
and the highest percentage is 57.0 per cent.
Over and above the foregoing there exists to a high degree in the teaching force of
this Province a sense of responsibility to society, a deep interest in the growth and development of children, and an earnest desire to give of their best. In the educational process,
as in all human endeavour, there is no such thing as perfection, but steady progress is
assured when a teaching force is intelligent, well trained, and enthusiatic. O 32 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS
Provincial Normal School, Vancouver
REPORT OF A. R. LORD, B.A., LL.D., PRINCIPAL
The forty-ninth session of the Vancouver Normal School opened on September 12th,
1949, and closed on June 16th, 1950.   Attendance and results were as follows:—
Men
Women
Total
Enrolled	
111
96
260
249
371
345
Twenty-five students held university degrees, 27 had second- or third-year university
standing, 34 had first year, and 115 had senior matriculation or its equivalent. Ninety-
four had one, two, three, or four senior matriculation subjects, while 76 had only
university entrance.
At the date of registration 213 were residents of Greater Vancouver and 76 of the
Fraser Valley. Forty-four came from the Southern Interior, 8 from up-coast, and 11
from Vancouver Island. Eight were from Saskatchewan, 5 from Ontario, 3 from
England, and 1 each from Alberta, United States, and Poland.
Distinction standing was awarded to David Malcolm Bennett, Vancouver; Jean
Anne Berry, Langley Prairie; Patricia Anne Brown, Aldergrove; Robert Douglas Cleg-
horn, Sacramento, Calif.; Esme Dawn Cruickshank, Vancouver; Grace Mary Gaines,
Selma Park; Paula Louise Gordon, Nanaimo; Audrey Patricia Hines, Vancouver;
Diane Levinson, Vancouver; George Wallace Mulholland, North Vancouver; Marjorie
Watt McRae, Vancouver; Georgena Edith Palmer, North Vancouver; Flora Jacqueline
Pineo, Port Alberni;  Lewis Smith, North Vancouver.
The enrolment was almost the heaviest in the school's fifty years of existence and
much in excess of any year since a full session's attendance became a requirement.
Unfortunately, the school is not adequate for such numbers. As long ago as 1925 the
Putnam-Weir Survey reported " library and toilet facilities are totally inadequate " and
recommended that attendance should be limited to 220.
We were compelled to ask the Vancouver schools for more assistance than ever
before, and their response was generous. The Board of School Trustees and Superintendent MacCorkindale readjusted classes in order to make two temporary buildings
available for our students. The entire staffs of the Model and Simon Fraser Schools
shared in the autumn term's participation and, individually, carried a heavy load. Most
gratifying of all, our request for 190 classrooms 'for the two teaching practica brought
a response of 240 volunteers. Similar help was given with equal cheerfulness by
Inspector R. S. Shields, Inspector C. G. Brown, and New Westminster and Burnaby
staffs.   To all, the Vancouver Normal School extends a sincere " thank you."
Mrs. Geraldine Birkett, formerly Assistant Supervisor of Primary Grades in Vancouver, joined the staff on September 1st. Messrs. C. W. Truax and F. C. Hardwick
also came to our assistance on the same date. All three have proved to be eminently
suited for Normal School work. On the debit side we lost Mr. H. B. MacLean, who
retired on superannuation. Mr. MacLean, in length of service the oldest member of the
staff, was our authority on penmanship, on nature-study, and above all our master of
ceremonies on all occasions.   He is greatly missed. PROVINCIAL NORMAL SCHOOLS
Provincial Normal School, Victoria
0 33
REPORT OF H. O. ENGLISH, B.A., B.S.A., PRINCIPAL
The thirty-sixth session of the Provincial Normal School, Victoria, opened on
September 12th, 1949, and closed on June 16th, 1950. The following table presents
a summary of the enrolment:—
Men
Women
Total
44
4
2
3
117
8
1
3
161
12
3
Failed                        	
6
Totals  	
53
129
182
Six students—Marian Josephine Bundock, Mary Grace Francis, B.A., Patricia
Beatrice Palmer, Mary Geraldine Smith, Anthony Tadey, and Dorothy Excellent White,
B.A., received honour standing. Mary Grace Francis was the winner of the Dr. V. L.
Denton Memorial Award for 1949-50.
The St. John Ambulance Association issued certificates to seventy-six students who
were successful in the course in First Aid.
One new instructor, Miss Dorothy M. Daniels, B.A., joined the faculty September
1st, 1949, and assumed responsibility for instruction in health and physical education.
A special series of lectures on health topics was arranged by Dr. J. L. Gayton.
Those participating in this series included Dr. W. H. Hall, " School Dental Services ";
Dr. E. C. McKay, " School Medical Services and School Sanitation "; Dr. J. L. Gayton,
" Communicable Diseases, Immunization, and Tuberculosis"; Dr. A. B. Sinclair,
" Venereal Diseases "; Miss E. Lawrence, " Mental Hygiene in the School "; and Mrs.
E. Walker, P.H.N., " Public Health Nursing Services."
Dr. J. L. Gayton examined all the students. Most of the students were X-rayed,
and those with hearing defects were tested with the Maico audiometer. Immunization
and skin tests were used, and a very large percentage of the students took advantage of
this opportunity to improve their protection against communicable diseases.
Miss Marie Crickmay, speech therapist, gave two interesting and instructive lectures
on " Speech Defects and Their Correction."
Demonstration lessons were provided in the Normal School auditorium. Classes
required for these demonstrations were transported from schools in the surrounding area.
Either the teachers of the classes or members of the Normal School faculty conducted
the demonstration lessons.
During the 1949-50 session approximately two months were again devoted to
observation and practice-teaching. Almost every classroom in the Greater Victoria and
adjacent areas was used. For their final teaching practicum, many students elected to
teach in schools adjacent to their homes in the other parts of the Province. Altogether
we used 339 classrooms in 102 schools. The effective training of teachers would not
be possible without these periods of teaching practice. To those Inspectors, teachers,
and other educationists who have co-operated with the Normal School to provide the
necessary facilities for classroom experience, we extend our sincere thanks.
An interesting trend is becoming apparent, indicating one healthy change in the
qualifications of students enrolling for teacher-training, for students possessing special
ability in music, art, drama, and athletics are enrolling in increasing numbers. This
trend, coupled with the fact that more and more high school and college students with
superior academic ability are entering our Normal Schools, augurs well for the future of
the teaching profession. O 34 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
REPORT OF HAROLD P. JOHNS, M.A., Ph.D., DIRECTOR
One thousand four hundred and sixty-two (1,462) teachers attended the 1950
session of the Summer School of Education, held in Victoria and Vancouver from July
3rd to August 4th.
The greatly increased interest in in-service training, evidenced by the numbers
enrolled, resulted in a number of excessively large classes. In the Victoria Section there
were, for example, fifteen classes of 100 or more teachers, and ten classes in which 75
to 100 were enrolled. The increase in attendance at the Victoria Section of the school
was 194. Perhaps a better indication of the effect of this growth is given by the number
of individual courses taken by teachers in attendance. In 1945 this total was 2,380;
in 1950 it was 4,443, representing an increase of 86.7 per cent. The increase over the
previous year, 1949, was 21.7 per cent. Many adjustments were necessarily made in
order to accommodate this number of teachers. The co-operation and ingenuity of an
instructional staff faced with such large classes should receive special mention. In the
Vancouver Section of the school, there was a decrease of 40 in enrolment.
There would appear to be ample evidence that teachers will willingly seek training
if it combines a practical application to their work with the theoretical approach that at
times receives an almost exclusive emphasis. Numerous examples of this statement
might be cited. Enrolment in courses in the kindergarten-primary field and in classes
for the intermediate grades was composed almost exclusively of those who were working
for Advanced certification and whose attendance therefore could in no way be explained
by the requirements of Permanent certification. The registration of 93 teachers of
Grades VII to XII in the introductory training programme offered in the new Effective
Living Course is another instance of attendance dictated by professional interest.
Equally so is the attendance of 59 secondary-school counsellors, a good many of whom
had already completed certification requirements and were present at the Counsellors'
Conference arranged at their request.
A major innovation at the 1950 session was the introduction of courses for teachers
of slow learners and of sub-normal children. Conducted by Dr. Edgar A. Doll, these
classes respectively attracted 69 and 20 teachers. Field-trips to Provincial institutions
at New Westminster and Essondale and to the Queen Alexandra Solarium were provided.
The programme, it should be noted, was financed by the Department of National Health
and Welfare and the Provincial Department of Health and Welfare. For the second
year, special classes for teachers of deaf children were conducted at the Vancouver Section of the school. This year's guest instructors were Miss Josephine Bennett and Miss
Beatrice Hodgkins, of the Lexington School for the Deaf, New York.
A growing phase of the Summer School of Education's in-service training programme is to be found in the offering of special classes in professional subjects for
teachers during the winter and spring seasons. Twenty-three courses of this type were
given during the 1949-50 school-year, attracting a total enrolment of 335. The possibilities of this method of in-service training are unquestionably such that it should receive
increased emphasis and encouragement. At the same time, more adequate supervision
and direction by the Summer School of these programmes in local centres might well be
considered a necessity if a wider and completely satisfactory development is to occur.
The co-operation and generous assistance of many Department branches and officers, in particular of Dr. F. T. Fairey and Mr. H. L. Campbell, is gratefully acknowledged. A special word of appreciation is also due to a most enthusiastic and able staff
of instructors at the Summer School. SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Courses and Enrolment (Summer Session Only)
O 35
Courses
Instructors
Enrolment
Victoria Section, 1950 	
56
35.
35
13
1,309
153
Vancouver Section, 1950  _	
Totals for 1950.  ..	
91
85
81
77
73
64
48
52
48
44
43
39
1,462
1,308
Totals for 1949.	
Totals for 1948
1,197
Totals for 1947	
1,027
888
Totals for 1946        .               	
Totals for 1945                  	
830
Victoria Section
Methods and Philosophy of Education: Enrolment
11.    Use of Visual Aids in Classroom Instruction  132
The Modern Curriculum     66
Introduction to Educational Sociology  116
14.
15.
50.
52a.
Techniques of Classroom Management  128
School Organization and Administration in British Columbia      43
66. Organization  and  Administration  of  the  Elementary
Schools     70
67. The School and the Community  118
67a. Home, School, and Community Relations     43
Psychology and Individual Development:
114.    Individual Differences in Children	
127.
132.
150.
152.
156.
159.
710.
135
Education of Exceptional Children  69
Tests and Measurement in the Improvement of Learning 100
Growth and Development of Children  29
Child Guidance  115
Disciplinary Problems in the Elementary School  136
Mental Hygiene  54
Workshop in Education of Sub-normal Children  20
Fine and Applied Arts:
357.    Creative Expression in Elementary-school Art  52
386.    Introductory Lettering _  49
391.    Advanced Drawing and Painting  51
394.    History of Art  56
397.    Constructive Drawing   52
399.    Interior Design and Decoration 1  42
Counselling and Guidance Services:
190x. Counsellors' Conference  30
191. Individual Inventory in Guidance  29
192. The Use and Interpretation of Tests in Guidance  22
Effective Living:
800a. Curriculum in Effective Living  93
800b. Curriculum in Effective Living—Workshop  77
Health and Physical Education:
503.    Tests and Measurements in Physical Education  43
514.    Anatomy and Physiology  60
527.    Elementary-school Physical Education  79 O 36 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
Home Economics: Enrolment
650. Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics  32
651. Clothing Selection and Construction  22
652. Curriculum Workshop in Home Economics  12
Intermediate Grades:
202.    Remedial Reading  138
214.    Dramatic Art in Schools  67
260.    Methods in Arithmetic  116
276.    Materials and Methods in Elementary Science  94
Kindergarten-Primary Grades:
583.    Language and Literature in the Kindergarten  98
585.    Evaluating Learning in the Primary Grades  80
587.    Music in the Primary Grades  88
590. Principles and Practices of Primary Education  103
591. Primary Observation and Laboratory Class  93
592. Social Studies and Science in the Primary Grades  113
593. Reading in the Primary Grades  121
595.    Industrial Arts and Play Materials  49
Library Services:
409.    Orientation to School Library Work  44
411.    Functions of the School Library  38
Music:
441.    School Music in the Secondary Grades  25
443.    Choral Music and Conducting  86
455. Sight Reading and Ear Training  50
456. Introduction to Music Appreciation  82
459.    Orchestral Instruments   18
464.    Advanced Harmony and Counterpoint  10
466.    Instrumentation  .  8
Senior Matriculation:
213.    Senior Matriculation English  147
313.    Senior Matriculation History  114
Typewriting:
604.    Practical Typewriting  54
Vancouver Section
Commercial Education:
623. Typewriting (Teaching Methods)  16
624. Typewriting Practice  20
625. Elementary Book-keeping (Teaching Methods)  21
629. Correspondence and Filing  18
630. Commercial Arithmetic  11
633.    Office Routine, Business Forms, and Secretarial Practice 11
Education for the Handicapped:
703.    Reading for Deaf Children  33
705.    Activities for Deaf Children  30
Industrial Arts Education:
14.    The Curriculum  46
220.    Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Junior High
School
223.    Plane and Solid Geometrical Drawing.. SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION O 37
Industrial Arts Education—Continued Enrolment
227. Elementary Woodwork       7
228. Elementary Wood-turning       3
229a. Farm Mechanics .       2
229b. Farm Mechanics       7
229c. Farm Mechanics     15
231. Elementary Electrical Theory _       8
232. Elementary Electrical Shopwork       8
234. Art Metalwork  3
235. Elementary Sheet-metal Work  4
236. Elementary Machine-shop Work  12
238. Teaching Methods for Industrial Arts in a Senior High
School  18
241. Practical Geometry ,__. 9
242. Freehand Sketching  4
243. Draughting Applied to Woodwork and Metalwork  6
245. Advanced Woodwork (Benchwork)       5
246. Advanced Wood-turning     16
247. Practice in the Use of Wood-working Machinery:  Care
and Maintenance  7
248a. Farm Mechanics  8
248b. Farm Mechanics  8
249. Advanced Sheet-metal Work  14
250. Advanced Machine-shop Work  4
254a. Arts and Crafts...  15
254b. Arts and Crafts  18
Wood-finishing       8
Student Courses
Total in 1950  4,443
Total in 1949  3,649
.      Total in 1948 -  3,618
Total in 1947  3,073
Total in 1946  2,613
Total in 1945  2,380
Courses per Student
Courses in 1950  3.0
Courses in 1949  2.8
Courses in 1948  3.0
Courses in 1947  2.9
Courses in 1946  2.9
Courses in 1945  2.9
Registration
The following tables give an interesting picture of the classes of teachers served by
the Summer School and the type of training sought by them.
Table I.—Teaching Experience of Those Registered
13 or more years  236 1 to 3 years  639
10 to 12 years  97 Less than 1 year.  112
7 to 9 years  123 Unreported     83
4 to 6 years  172 O 38 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
Table II.—Type of School in Which Teachers Taught in 1949-50*
More than 10 rooms  580 3 rooms     81
7 to 10 rooms  197 2 rooms  116
4 to 6 rooms  178 1 room  152
* Certain teachers registered at Summer School had not taught in the year 1949-50;   hence the totals of the above
will not agree with the total enrolment.
Table HI.—Grades Taught by Teachers Enrolled
Grade XIII  8 Grade V  343
Grade XII  162 Grade IV  347
Grade XI  177 Grade III  374
Grade X  192 Grade III  413
Grade IX  237 Grade I  386
Grade VIII  330 Kindergarten   7
Grade VII  345 Special classes  21
Grade VI  304 Unreported  116
Table IV.—Types of Certificates Sought
(Candidates for First-class Permanent Certificates are not shown.)
Art  17               Intermediate  130
Commercial  36                Library  36
Counsellor  58                Music   58
Education for Handi-                             Physical Education  69
capped  17 Primary-Kindergarten __ 229
Home Economics  31                S-A (Instructor)   24
Industrial Arts _..  72
Faculty
Abercrombie, W. T., B.A., Principal, Fairview High School of Commerce, Vancouver.
Amess, Fred A., Dip., V.S.A., Assistant Director, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Andrew, Miss Alma J., B.A., Primary Specialist, Courtenay Schools, Courtenay.
Bakkum, Glenn A., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Professor and Head of Department of Sociology,
Oregon State College, Corvallis, Ore.
Baron, Denis, B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., Assistant Professor and Director, Guidance Clinic
and Testing Bureau, Oregon College of Education, Monmouth, Ore.
Bennett, Miss Josephine, Instructor, Lexington School for the Deaf, New York.
Blake, Miss M. N., Vice-Principal, Provincial School for the Deaf and the Blind,
Vancouver.
Bobak, Bruno S., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Campbell, Miss Mary N. K., B.Sc.(H.Ec), Instructor, Lord Byng High School, Vancouver.
Chambers, Othniel R., A.B., Ph.D., Head, Department of Psychology, Oregon State
College, Corvallis, Ore.
Cottingham, Miss Mollie E., M.A., Instructor, John Oliver High School, Vancouver.
Doll, Edgar A., A.B., Pd.M., Ph.D., Co-ordinator of Research, Devereux Schools, Devon,
Pa.
Foord, Miss Esme, M.A., Counsellor, Kamloops Junior-Senior High School, Kamloops.
Froehlich, Clifford P., M.A., Ed.D., Specialist for Training Guidance Personnel, United
States Office of Education, Washington, D.C.
Gayton, J. L., M.D., D.P.H., Medical Health Officer, Victoria.
Gerletti, John D., M.S., Ph.D., School of Public Administration, University of Southern
California, Los Angeles, Calif. SUMMER SCHOOL OF EDUCATION O 39
Gibson, William Stewart, Machine-shop Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Gilles, John W., M.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., Associate Professor of Education, University of
Alberta, Edmonton, Alta.
Grant, Alastair, B.P.H.E., Instructor, Vancouver School Board, Vancouver.
Grier, Miss Helen McGill, Instructor, Model Rural Demonstration School, Vancouver.
Hardie, William Leslie, M.A., Head of English Department, Victoria High School,
Victoria.
Hatton, Mrs. Evelyn, B.Sc.(HE.), Instructor, York House School for Girls, Vancouver.
Henson, Miss Ethel M., Director of Music, Seattle Public Schools, Seattle, Wash.
Hewson, Alfred T., L.R.S.M., Director of Music, Lord Byng High School, Vancouver.
Heywood, Robert H., B.A., Head of Commercial Department, Victoria High School,
Victoria.
Hodgkins, Miss Beatrice, B.S., Dean, Lexington School for the Deaf, New York.
Jacobson, Miss Ulah B., Primary Specialist, Teacher in Charge, Beacon Hill School,
Victoria.
Johnson, Miss Muriel, B.H.Sc, Dietitian, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Jones, Miss Cathryn M., M.E., Principal, Los Angeles City Schools, Los Angeles, Calif.
Kohler, Miss Barbara E., B.A. of Ed., M.A., Assistant Professor of Education, Central
Washington College of Education, Ellensburg, Wash.
Lampard, Miss Dorothy M., M.A., Lecturer in Education, University of Birmingham,
England.
Lanning, Walter S., B.A., B.L.S., Librarian, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver.
Louis, Mrs. Evelyn, R.N., Public Health Nurse, Victoria.
Lythgoe, E. W., Industrial Arts Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Mahaffy, Miss C. Elizabeth, B.A., M.D., Assistant Medical Health Officer, Victoria.
Martin, Miss May, Vice-Principal and Librarian, Tecumseh Elementary School, Vancouver.
Miller, Edward F., B.A., Principal, Lonsdale School, North Vancouver.
MacDonald, C. E., LL.B., B.S., LL.D., Superintendent, Provincial School for the Deaf
and the Blind, Vancouver.
McKie, Archibald, B.A., B.Ed., Counsellor, Kitsilano Junior-Senior High School, Vancouver.
O'Connell, Miss M. Sheila, Primary Specialist, Vancouver Schools.
Porter, Miss Kathleen L., Primary Teacher, Margaret Jenkins School, Victoria.
Pritchard, Vaughan G., B.A., Commercial Specialist, Central Junior High School, Victoria.
Reid, C. M., Industrial Arts Instructor, Lake Cowichan.
Rickard, V. E., Vocational Instructor, Coquitlam Junior-Senior High School, Coquitlam.
Ridley, J., Industrial Arts Instructor, Britannia High School, Vancouver.
Roberts, Ifor, Assistant Supervisor of Music, Vancouver Schools, Vancouver.
Russell, Albert E., Sheet-metal and Welding Instructor, Vancouver Technical School,
Vancouver.
Smith, Gordon Appelbe, Dip. V.S.A., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Strong, C. J., M.A., Inspector of Technical Classes, Department of Education, Vancouver.
Sutton, Miss Beatrice M, B.A., Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Swainson, Neil A., B.A., Instructor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Wallace, Lawrence J., B.A., M.Ed., Counsellor, Victoria High School, Victoria.
White, John S., Head of Technical Department, Victoria High School, Victoria.
Woods, Leonard A., A.O.S.A., Instructor, Vancouver School of Art, Vancouver.
Woodward, Miss Helen, Vice-Principal, Provincial School for the Deaf and the Blind,
Vancouver.
Wright, Stanley J., B.Sc, Electrical Instructor, Vancouver Technical School, Vancouver. O 40 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
Student Activity Society
The following statement deals with the affairs of the preceding or 1949 session, and
is taken from the report of the auditors, Ismay, Boiston, Dunn & Co., chartered
accountants.
Receipts
Activity fees paid by students (less refunds)  $2,376.00
Additional income (cash receipts, cafeteria, etc.)        539.75
Total i  $2,915.75
Disbursements
Fees and expenses of artists, lecturers, etc  $1,282.80
Social affairs, dances, picnics, teas, etc  864.40
Miscellaneous charges, services, rentals, etc  99.33
Excess of receipts over disbursements  669.22
Total  $2,915.75 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION * O 41
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND
VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
This report is for the school-year 1949-50 and covers the work of the following:—
(a) Industrial Arts (Woodwork and Draughting) in elementary schools.
(b) Industrial Arts (Woodwork, Draughting, Metalwork, and Electricity) in
junior and senior high schools.
(c) Industrial Arts Option Courses in high schools—" A," Woodwork and
Draughting, and "B," Metalwork and Draughting — for University
Entrance.
(d) Vancouver Technical School.
(e) High School Commercial and Agricultural Courses.
(/) Vancouver School of Art.
(g) Night-schools.
(h) Teacher-training.
(0 Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
(/) Vancouver Vocational Institute.
The revised Industrial Arts programme has been tested out in the schools of this
Province during the past year with satisfactory results. The Arts and Crafts Section has
been started in a few schools where Industrial Arts has not been established, and it is
hoped that more of the smaller schools will begin this work during the coming year.
Preparations are now being made to offer Home Mechanics as part of the Arts and Crafts
Course. This will interest boys and girls who are not interested in the more artistic
crafts, but who appreciate practical jobs that apply to the home.
Vocational units have been functioning in the following composite high schools:
Victoria, North Vancouver, Coquitlam, Langley, Chilliwack, Creston, Southern Oka-
nagan, Penticton, and Kelowna.
The Vancouver Vocational Institute offers courses beyond the secondary-school
level on a full-time basis, and the placement has been very good.
The Vancouver Technical School has offered vocational courses with a good general
education, and has given particular stress to Mathematics and Science. The graduates
of this school find employment in the various trades or proceed to the Science Course at
the university.
The reports upon Industrial Arts which follow have been prepared by Lieut.-Col.
C. J. Strong, M.A., Inspector of Technical Classes.
Industrial Arts
Elementary Schools and Junior High Schools
The school-year 1949-50 has been one of progress and expansion for Industrial
Arts. Established centres have increased their enrolment to a point where additional
teachers have been required to handle the classes. Three school districts—Campbell
River, Grand Forks, and Lake Cowichan—have opened new Industrial Arts centres.
Our Vocational and Industrial Arts Teacher-training Unit, operating in the Vancouver Vocational Institute, will graduate the first class of teachers in August, 1950.
All of the graduates will be placed in teaching positions by the time school opens in
September. Half of this class will be required to fill vacancies caused by shop teachers
retiring on pension after many years of satisfactory service. O 42 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
During the past year twenty new schools have been completed, providing excellent
accommodation for Industrial Arts. Our shops are better equipped than at any time in
the past, and our teachers better qualified for their work.
There are fifty-three school districts in which Industrial Arts is established, as
follows: Abbotsford, Agassiz, Alberni, Armstrong, Burnaby, Campbell River, Chilli-
wack, Coquitlam, Courtenay, Cowichan, Cranbrook, Creston, Delta, Fernie, Fraser
Canyon, Grand Forks, Kamloops, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Lake Cowichan,
Langley, Maple Ridge, Mission, Nanaimo, Nelson, New Westminster, North Vancouver,
Ocean Falls, Peace River South, Penticton, Powell River, Prince George, Prince Rupert,
Princeton, Qualicum, Quesnel, Revelstoke, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Saltspring,
Smithers, Sooke, Southern Okanagan, Summerland, Surrey, Trail, University Hill, Vancouver, Vernon, Greater Victoria, and West Vancouver.
Senior High Schools
It is gratifying to note the large number of students taking Industrial Arts in the
senior high school. A more understanding interpretation of the Courses of Study in
Industrial Arts has made it possible to make adjustments to meet the many individual
differences, thus resulting in added satisfaction and a feeling of success on the part of
the students. The interest shown by many of our teachers in their efforts to obtain the
Secondary Advanced Certificate should result in the enrichment of courses and a higher
standard of work.
Industrial Arts Options for University Entrance
The curriculum adjustment of the secondary schools of British Columbia has established Industrial Arts as a Major, having equal status with other subjects for University
Entrance. It is hoped that this will result in still more students taking Industrial Arts
as part of their high school programme. . It is important to recognize that the Industrial
Arts programme of to-day concerns itself with, and draws its subject-matter from, many
sources. Manipulation, though very important, is but a means and can be only one part
of the whole programme which enables the pupil to gain certain abilities, knowledges,
appreciations, and attitudes so vital to modern life.
The total number of individual elementary and junior and
senior high school shops in the Province  (of which
fifty-one are general shops) is        216
The total number of individual elementary and junior and
senior high school instructors is        188
The total number of pupils participating is:—
Elementary school  4,188
Junior high school  9,988
Senior high school  4,280
  18,456
Vancouver Technical School
The report which follows has been prepared by Mr. E. M. White, B.A.Sc, principal
of the Vancouver Technical School:—
" The courses offered at the Vancouver Technical School are as follows:—
(1) Technical Graduation for Boys and Girls: This includes, besides the
academic subjects, courses in Sheet Metal, Printing, Woodwork, Pattern-
making, Machine-shop, Automobile Mechanics, Diesel, Foundry, Building
Construction, Electricity, Draughting, Welding, Hairdressing, Ladies'
Tailoring, Home Economics, and Food Servicing.
(2) University Entrance with Shopwork and Home Economics options.
(3) Special advanced courses in the several shops. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
O 43
" During the past two years we have placed a large number of Grade XII boys and
girls in business and industry. By the end of June we shall have placed all our Grade XII
boys, and there is a steady call from firms which have employed former students. This,
we feel, keeps us in touch with industry and conscious of its needs.
" In September the students of the Grandview High School of Commerce are being
moved to this school. This will give us a strong commercial programme, and will do
much to round out the courses now being offered.
"We intend to plan our courses to suit the new curriculum, although giving more
specialized work and a greater allotment of time to the practical work than is given in the
Industrial Arts, Home Economics, and Commercial options."
The total number of students attending the Vancouver Technical School during the
year 1949-50 was as follows:—
Day-school—-
Boys   617
Girls  209
Night-school—
Vocational  511
Non-vocational     48
826
559
Total
1,385
High School Commercial and Agricultural Courses
Commercial work in the high schools is offered to two types of students, as follows:
(a) Those who wish to take some Commercial work in addition to the courses required
for University Entrance; (b) those who wish to take Commercial-Vocational courses 50
per cent of the school-time in preparation for gainful employment and, in addition, carry
some courses as part of their general education, but who do not wish to enter university.
The placement of Commercial students during the past year has been very good.
The enrolment in the following school districts was as follows:—
Students
Abbotsford  163
Agassiz  68
Alberni  102
Arrow Lakes  10
Burnaby  :  540
Campbell River — 15
Chilliwack ___._  98
Coquitlam   128
Courtenay  :  72
Cowichan   112
Cranbrook  74
Creston .   235
Delta  . - 120
Fernie  61
Grand Forks  76
Kamloops __!  179
Kelowna  251
Kimberley   128
Ladysmith   59
Lake Cowichan  111
Langley   236
Maple Ridge  172
Mission   152
Students
Nanaimo   197
Nelson  .  125
New Westminster _ 173
North Vancouver ..... 240
Ocean Falls .„ , 12
Peace River South _ 135
Penticton _lLZ  140
Powell River*...:  184
Prince George  55
Prince Rupert ._ Ill
Princeton .  42
Revelstoke  39
Richmond  242
Saanich . —-v. .51
Southern Okanagan. 142
Surrey  511
Trail  91
Vancouver _- -.— -. 3,625
Vernon  202
Greater Victoria  928
West Vancouver  136
Total  10,543 Students
Mission 	
48
Nelson	
20
North Vancouver ....
45
Ocean Falls	
30
Peace River South .
49
Penticton 	
66
Prince George	
8
Salmon Arm	
55
Southern Okanagan
..     134
Vernon  	
26
O 44 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
Agriculture is offered to students who wish to have some knowledge of the subject
but who still wish to complete University Entrance.
Other students at a few high schools take Vocational Agriculture as a preparation
for gainful employment in farming. This year a programme of training teachers of
Agriculture was undertaken, and it is expected that in the coming years more high schools
will offer courses in Agriculture.
Students
Agassiz     29
Armstrong     14
Burnaby      54
Chilliwack      80
Cowichan      27
Creston     32
Kamloops      63
Kelowna   125
Ladysmith      65
Langley      39
Maple Ridge     97
Total 1,106
Vancouver School of Art
The following is an excerpt from a report prepared by Mr. F. A. Amess, in the absence of the Director, Mr. Charles H. Scott, A.R.C.A., F.R.S.A.(Lond.), Dip. G.S.A.:—
" During the past year the school was fortunate in securing accommodation in the
new Vocational Institute, and there is a possibility of more adequate space in the School
Board Office Building in the immediate future, which is viewed with enthusiasm by staff
and students alike.
" The Beaux Arts Ball was a successful social feature of the school-year. Under the
joint sponsorship of the Women's Auxiliary to the Art Gallery, it did much, as in past
years, to acquaint the city with the possibilities of its artists. The Persian theme adapted
by the students made a colourful setting. The Commercial students produced a professionally screened and artistic poster, and Design students did an excellent job of designing
and presenting costume sketches.
"A travelling show also has been organized to present the various aspects of the
school work.
" We were pleased to note that Mr. William Calder, a part-time member of our staff,
was awarded the Emily Carr Scholarship.
"The annual closing was held on Friday, May 26th. Mr. Alexis Anfossy, Consul
for France, delivered an inspirational address to a large audience of students and friends.
Thirty-two graduates received their Advanced Diplomas. A large proportion of these
were rehabilitation students.   Twenty-three students received their Elementary Diplomas.
"We are glad to note that two of our former students received a Distinguished
standing in the recent Normal School graduation, adding to the considerable number of
graduates who are making their contribution to the art-teaching field.
" The loyalty of staff and students and the sympathetic interest by the School Board
members and officials make the high standard of our school possible."
The following was the student enrolment during the school-year 1949-50:—
Students
Day-school   153
Night-school and Saturday classes  443 INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION O 45
Night-schools
Night-school classes of three different types are operated in the schools of this Province:  (a) Non-vocational classes, (b) vocational classes, and (c) apprenticeship classes.
School Boards operate the night-schools in response to local needs, and classes must
be approved by the Department of Education before grants are paid. The demand for
night-schools increases year by year, and a great variety of courses are offered.
The non-vocational classes consist of people who wish to further their general education or who wish to take instruction in work for leisure-time enjoyment.
The vocational classes are intended for those people who wish to prepare themselves
for gainful employment or those who wish to improve their knowledge or skill in the trade
or business in which they are engaged.
The apprenticeship classes are reserved for apprentices only.
The enrolment during the year 1949-50 was as follows:— students
Non-vocational  10,154
Vocational*      5,340
Apprenticeship classesf     1,187
Total  16,681
* Also reported under section dealing with Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
t Also reported under section dealing with apprentice-training in the report on adult education.
Training of Industrial Arts and Vocational Teachers
The training of Industrial Arts and Vocational teachers of industrial work has been
conducted on a full-time basis in the Vancouver Vocational Institute under the supervision of Mr. T. Quayle, who conducts the classes for the Department of Education,
Technical Branch. Under the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement the cost of
training has been shared equally by the Provincial Department of Education and the
Dominion Department of Labour. The shop is rented from the Vancouver School
Board, and all equipment is owned by the Department of Education.
Excellent training has been given during the past year, and the first group of graduates have been appointed to various schools in the Province as instructors.
The vocational instructors at the Institute have been given training in trade analysis,
and courses of work have been prepared for the various departments in the Institute.
These trade outlines also are used for apprenticeship training.
In addition, two short courses for teachers of Agriculture were offered at the University of British Columbia. The report which follows has been prepared by Mr. C. J.
Frederickson, B.A., Educational Co-ordinator:—
" For several years there has been felt a need for a realistic approach to the teaching
of Agriculture in British Columbia. A few rural high schools in the Province introduced
Vocational Agriculture and, in the newer schools, facilities for teaching this subject were
provided. There was, however, a lack of a basic programme and the teachers were
untrained.
" In response to the need and in order to remedy the somewhat chaotic situation, a
teacher-training programme was inaugurated on May 15th under the auspices of the
Dominion-Provincial Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
" This training programme was divided into two sections.
"The first section, May 15th to June 30th, provided some of the principles of
education, and additional background work in subject deficiencies in Agriculture, to a
group of carefully selected graduates in Agriculture.
" The second section of the training programme extended from July 4th to August
11th. This section was attended by members of the first group, and by accepted applicants largely composed of those presently teaching Agriculture in the various high schools.
This second section embraced three phases:— O 46
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
(a) Additional background work in a knowledge of Farm Mechanics, and use
and repair of agricultural machinery.
(b) The techniques of teaching Vocational Agriculture, and the development
of the Supervised Farming Programme.
(c) The development of a basic programme for Vocational Agriculture for
British Columbia.
" While it is generally acknowledged that a two-year undergraduate period of training, followed by at least one year of apprenticeship, is necessary to produce an adequately
trained teacher, it was felt a great deal was accomplished in the short period of training
outlined above. This was attested to by the enthusiasm of the students and teachers,
and by the work achieved by them.
" In order to give guidance to the second section of the programme, the services of
Mr. Dean Pence, Vocational Agriculture Instructor, Worden, Mont., and Mr. Arthur W.
Johnson, State Director of Vocational Education, Helena, Mont., were enlisted. Without
the energy and enthusiasm displayed by these men the programme would not have
succeeded.
" The sessions were conducted at the University of British Columbia. All of those
concerned with this initial training programme are deeply indebted to Dean Blythe Eagles
and to the many members of his faculty of agriculture for their services and enthusiastic
interest and support."
The enrolment during the past year was as follows:—
Industrial Arts and Vocational Teacher-training— students
Part-time courses*  34
Full-time courses* _«.  12
—   46
Summer School     90
Agricultural Teacher-training—Part-time courses'1
136
34
Total enrolment  170
• Also reported under section dealing with Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement.
Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement
This year there has been considerable expansion of courses offered under the above
agreement. Vocational courses have been functioning in some secondary schools in the
following areas of training: Industrial, Commercial, and Agriculture. Vocational classes
in night-schools have increased in number.
The Vancouver Vocational Institute has operated under the above agreement beyond
the secondary-school level.
The enrolment in day and evening classes operated under the terms of the Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement, together with the number of Vocational teachers,
is shown below. In addition, nine students were granted bursaries to enable them to
take Vocational Courses.
Number of
Pupils
Number of Teachers
Part-time
Full-time
Day-schools	
Night-schools*	
Teacher-training	
Bursaries to Vocational studentst-
Totals  	
5,104
5,340
80
9
10,533
228
~21
249
80
168
1
249
* Also reported under night-school section.
t Also reported under section entitled " Student Aid " in report on adult education. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION
O 47
Vancouver Vocational Institute
The following report has been prepared by Mr. Sidney V. Clarke, B.A., B.Ed.,
assistant to the principal of the Vancouver Vocational Institute:—
" There have been 1,069 students pass through our hands during the period from
July 1st, 1949, to June 30th, 1950, despite the fact that all the classes were not in
operation until some time in November. The peak enrolment occurred in March, when
we had 468 students enrolled, but during the spring months a large number of placements
were effected, and the present population stands at 267. The next two or three months
will tell us what the student-load in the summer will be.
" It is interesting to observe that 283 students who were already employed took
advantage of the opportunity offered in this school for day-time up-grading training.
The Navigation school, the Steam Engineering school, and the Welding school handled
the largest number of this type.
" The main problem of this school is, and will continue to be, the problem of
satisfactory recruitment. Full classes mean low unit costs and, from the standpoint of
the community as a whole, proves that a training need is being met.
" The following was the enrolment during the past school-year. All classes received
grants under the Dominion-Provincial Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement, with
the exception of the class in Power-machine Sewing, the costs in connection with which
were paid under the Schedules C and M of the Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training
Agreement.
Name of Class
Number of
Instructors
Number
Enrolled
Number
Withdrawn
Number
Completed
Training
Number
Still
Training
Number
Placed
Number
Who Have
Taken
Up-grading
Auto-body repair-
Auto Mechanics	
Barbering.
Building construction..
Chef-training	
Commercial	
Diesel Engineering-
Draughting 	
Electricity	
Hairdressing...
Heating and Refrigeration-
Machine-shop .	
Navigation .
Painting and Decorating-
Plumbing..
Power-machine Sewing-
Practical Nursing	
Shoe-repairing	
Steam Engineering	
Tailoring.
Waitress-training..
Watch-repairing—
Welding..
Woodworking and Joinery-
Totals	
1
2
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
1
2
1
2
1
2
1
1
1
35
23
39
31
20
47
107
22
22
10
33
19
17
208
11
18
65
126
16
86
19
58
14
44
14
1,069
8
3
2
9
29
2
1
~~6
5
4
28
3
3
11
46
2
7
5
17
1
194
14
21
16
16
12
35
10
12
"l5
10
13
15
47
31
7
To
24
3
5
1
325
9
10
10
2
18
34
10
9
10
12
4
~11
7
49
7
24
4
10
10
6
11
267
13
18
15
16
12
30
9
11
_13
7
13
~~8
14
45
31
5
12
8
21
3
306
169
55
7
~ii
283 ' O 48 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS
REPORT OF MISS BERTHA ROGERS, B.Sc, M.A., DIRECTOR
Total number of pupils in elementary and junior high schools taking
Home Economics  13,050
Total number in elementary schools     3,961
Total number in junior high schools     9,089
13,050
Grades V and VI  32
Home Economics I (Grade VII), girls  5,571
Home Economics II (Grade VIII), girls  5,084
Home Economics III (Grade IX), girls  2,334
Junior high school boys  29
13,050
School for the Deaf and the Blind  30
Total senior high school students     5,483
Home Economics HI     1,425
A II and A III (Foods, Nutrition, etc.)        135
B II and B III (Clothing, Textiles, Applied Art,
etc.)         355
CC II (Combination Course)     1,595
CC III (Combination Course)        728
Special " C " Courses        778
Interior Decoration  42
Home Relations .  22
Senior Matriculation .  13
Vancouver Technical       313
Senior high school boys        136
     5,542
Less—
56 students take two courses in Home
Economics   56
1 student takes four courses in Home
Economics  .  3
59
5,483
Private schools;—
Elementary (Grades VII and VIII), girls        163
High school (Home Economics III, CC II, and CC III)        168
331
Total number of students taking Home Economics
Courses   18,894
There are 106 Home Economics centres in public schools and six in private schools
throughout the Province. INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION—HOME ECONOMICS O 49
During the year Home Economics centres were opened for the first time at Campbell
River, Grand Forks, North Surrey, Rutland, and Westbank.
The Home Economics room in the new junior-senior high school at Grand Forks
was opened in September, 1949. This centre presents a challenge to Home Economists,
as an opportunity is offered through the teaching of Homemaking to interpret the customs
of the Canadian home and to mutually accept and appreciate other cultures and customs.
Additional centres in new school buildings, in districts already having Home Economics centres, were opened at Chilliwack, Kelowna, and Vernon. The additional
centres at Chilliwack and Kelowna are in new senior high schools, while that at Vernon is
in the new junior high school.
Renovations at Milnes Landing and Belmont Schools resulted in the facilities of
both centres being expanded to make possible the teaching of combination Home
Economics Courses.
Additional Home Economics rooms were opened at Nanaimo and Creston. A third
combination room was equipped at Thomas Hodgson School in Nanaimo, making this
a three-room centre. A second room was equipped for Clothing and related courses at
Creston, expanding this from a one-room to a two-room centre.
Other new Home Economics rooms in new school buildings, opened during the year,
were as follows: New Westminster Junior High School, West Vancouver Junior-Senior
High School, Princeton Junior-Senior High School, Hope Junior-Senior High School, and
Dawson Creek Junior-Senior High School.
The new four-room centre in the New Westminster Junior High School has replaced
three one-room centres in older elementary schools.
The increase in total enrolment of Home Economics students is accounted for by the
opening of seven additional centres during the past year and by expansion in several
existing centres. However, there are still a number of schools where the Home Economics programme has been curtailed to some extent by the limited facilities and teacher-
time available. As Home Economics rooms are included in many school buildings under
construction, it is hoped this situation will improve during the coming year.
There are 165 Home Economics teachers on the staffs of the schools throughout the
Province, showing an increase of eleven over the total for last year. Of these 44 are
graduates in Home Economics of the University of British Columbia.
The continued expansion of Home Economics in the schools of this Province and
the rate of turnover in the teaching staff continues to tax the teacher-supply, in spite of
the numbers of University of British Columbia Home Economics graduates who join
the teaching ranks each year.
Due to the shortage of teachers, the teacher-training classes offered through Summer
School sessions were continued in 1950. The courses offered at Summer School this
year were Curriculum and Methods in Home Economics, and Clothing Selection and
Construction, with Mrs. Evelyn Hatton, B.Sc.(HE.), and Miss Mary N. K. Campbell,
B.Sc.(HE.), as instructors. Miss Muriel Johnson, B.H.Sc, with Miss Joyce Crabtree,
B.Sc.(HE.), B.Ed., as her assistant, directed the work of the cafeteria.
Home Economics teachers to the number of 45 attended the above-mentioned
courses, which were held in Victoria from July 3rd to August 4th. Of these, 22 were
beginning teachers, who were appointed to Home Economics teaching positions for the
school-year 1950-51.
Throughout the year, work has been continued on revision of the present Home
Economics Courses and the compiling of several new courses. I greatly appreciate the
enthusiasm and interest shown by the committee members, consultants, and the many
teachers throughout the Province who have contributed their help and suggestions.
A workshop in Home Economics was held at the Summer School of Education this
year. Thirteen teachers attended the workshop and assisted in compiling some of the
courses from the materials and suggestions gathered from the committees. O 50 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
It is hoped that the new bulletin, Home Economics, 1950, will be published during
the coming fall term. This bulletin will contain seven revised and two new Hoflie
Economics course outlines. The course outlines are to be published this year in experimental form, in order that teachers may be given the opportunity of offering constructive
suggestions for improvement before these courses are printed in their final form.
The two new courses available for the coming year are Home Furnishing and a
5-credit Home Economics course for boys, both of which are open to Grades X, XI,
and XII students. EDUCATIONAL REFERENCE AND SCHOOL SERVICE O 51
DIVISION OF EDUCATIONAL REFERENCE AND SCHOOL SERVICE
REPORT OF MURIEL A. SCACE, B.A., DIRECTOR
The Division of Educational Reference and School Service is charged with the
responsibility of publishing British Columbia Schools, the official organ of the Department
of Education, which is issued quarterly in elementary and secondary editions. It is also
responsible for the library of the Department of Education and for the preparation of
reference materials for Departmental officials, Inspectors of Schools, teachers, and Curriculum Committees. The activities of this Division for the school-year 1949-50 may be
summarized as follows:—
" British Columbia Schools "
British Columbia Schools, the official publication of the Department of Education,
is sent free of charge eight times during the school-year to all teachers in the Province.
It is designed to provide in-service professional aid, to assist teachers in keeping abreast
of the latest developments in the field of education, to list new teaching aids and materials,
and to acquaint teachers and officials with changes in the Programme of Studies and with
new regulations of the Department of Education.
The publication of a Departmental magazine for teachers was initiated in September,
1944, with the publication of The Rural School, which was sent to both elementary and
secondary teachers in the rural areas. Many requests were made that this magazine be
available to all elementary teachers, and in February, 1946, The Rural School was
replaced by British Columbia Schools, Elementary Edition, which is currently issued on
a quarterly basis to all teachers in the elementary grades. In October, 1946, the publication of a Secondary Edition of the magazine was also undertaken, with a free distribution, on a quarterly basis, to all teachers in secondary schools. During the school-year
1949-50, 12,700 copies of the Elementary Edition were published, and 8,100 copies of
the Secondary Edition. This issue provided a sufficient number of magazines to supply
all teachers and principals, Inspectors of Schools, Departmental officials, and School
Boards throughout the Province. In addition, copies were supplied, upon request, to
teachers in private schools, Indian schools, and schools supported by religious denominations. Copies of each issue of the magazine were supplied to all students of the Victoria
Normal School and of the teacher-training department at the University of British Columbia. Complimentary copies were also sent to all Provincial Departments of Education
throughout Canada, to a number of State Departments of Education- across the Border,
and to numerous educators, educational organizations, and libraries in both Canada and
the United States. Files of the magazine were sent, upon request, to U.N.E.S.C.O. House
in Paris for the use of students at international seminars of education.
It is notable that fewer issues of the magazine were published during the past two
years. Curtailed budgetary appropriations made it necessary to limit the number of issues
to three during the school-year for both the Elementary and Secondary Editions. The
Elementary Edition was published in September, in November, and the February and
May issues were combined in a single issue. Similarly, the Secondary Edition appeared
in October, in a combined December-March issue, and a May issue. Lack of adequate
funds also meant that the use of illustrations was limited.
The substantial increase in school enrolment, now averaging about 10,000 yearly,
with the subsequent increase in the number of teachers, is reflected in the number of
magazines required to supply the teachers of the Province. The following figures are of
interest: In September, 1946, 3,300 copies of the Elementary Edition were printed; for
September, 1950, 5,000 copies of the Elementary Edition were required; in October,
1946, 2,000 copies of the Secondary Edition were printed; for October, 1950, 3,100
copies of the Secondary Edition were required. O 52 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
There has been a marked increase in the number of magazines sent upon request to
private and Indian schools, and to schools supported by religious denominations.
Reference and School Service
Reference Library Services
A reference library is maintained in the Department of Education under the Director
of this Division. The resources of this library are available to all Inspectors of Schools,
Departmental and Normal School officials, and teachers engaged upon special research
projects. It is stocked with a wide range of professional books in the field of education,
and is kept up to date through careful evaluation and selection of the best current literature in the field. During the year 1949-50, 200 new books were added to the collection.
In addition, 135 regularly published educational periodicals, pamphlets, and bulletins are
received annually. Of these, 95 are secured through subscription and 40 upon a free or
exchange basis. The library also contains a wide selection of text-books supplied by
publishing firms.
The Director of this Division is responsible for the selection of books for the
Teachers' Professional Library administered by the Public Library Commission. Through
this library service, teachers in all parts of the Province are provided with free access to a
wide range of the best and most up-to-date professional literature in the field of education.
Text-books and Teaching Materials
This Division maintains contacts with all educational publishers and evaluates new
text-books and supplementary books and teaching materials of all kinds. Notable
materials of this type are brought to the attention of teachers and officials through British
Columbia Schools.
Programmes of Studies and Curricular Materials
The Director of this Division acts as secretary of the Central Curriculum Committee,
and in that capacity is concerned with research in the field of curriculum, with the procuring and the preparation of professional educational materials for use by members of
committees engaged in curriculum revision, and with the editing, final preparation for
printing, and actual publication of all Programmes of Studies and of numerous Departmental reports. SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER)
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER)
O 53
REPORT OF H. N. MacCORKINDALE, B.A., SUPERINTENDENT
OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment (Octob
er of Each Year)
Year
Elementary
Junior High
Senior High
Total
19?9
27,522
27,663
27,953
27,593
26,723
26,335
25,978
25,833
25,348
24,338
23,556
23,032
23,091
22,014
22,383
22,394
22,737
23,338
24,217
25,834
27,410
4,363
4,351
4,382
4,417
4,639
4,635
4,578
4,454
4,266
4,165
4,080
4,149
4,354
4,175
4,540
4,396
4,294
4,113
3,906
3,902
3,984
6,012
6,801
7,614
8,051
8,131
8,493
8,772
9,131
9,506
10,016
9,856
9,471
8,741
7,166
7,139
7,913
8,295
8,375
8,098
7,799
7,721
37,897
1930 ...	
38,815
1931                                                   	
39,949
1937
40,061
1933   .	
39,493
1934
39,463
1935— 	
39,328
1936...	
39,418
1937	
39,120
1938
38,519
1939
37,492
1940 ...                                                -     - .
36,652
1941     	
1947*
36,186
33,355
1943 ..                                          	
34,062
1944...                                               .  	
34,703
1945
35,326
1946... _
35,736
1947
36,221
1948
37,535
1949
39,115
* Japanese withdrawal from Pacific Coast area. O 54
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
Distribution of Pupils by Grades, September 30th, 1949, Vancouver
Number
of Pupils SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39  (VANCOUVER)
O 55
In estimating school population, the influx of pupils from areas outside the school
district must be studied. The table below, prepared by our Bureau of Measurements,
under the direction of Inspector R. Straight, gives the geographical origin of new pupils
enrolled in our city school system between September 6th, 1949, and November 30th,
1949:—
Origin
Elementary
Secondary
Total
838
157
143
118
7
151
41
61
7
109
31
3
2
332
62
46
47
48
13
9
1
10
5
3
1,170
2. Alberta                                                                     	
219
3. Saskatchewan    	
189
165
7
199
54
70
8
10. China                      ..                          	
119
36
6
2
1,668
576
2,244
This influx of school population has been carefully tabulated since 1936.
lowing table shows the trend:—
1936  2,012 1943 _•  2,388
1937  2,249
1938  1,865
1939  1,760
1940  2,294
1941  2,931
1942  3,372
The fol-
1944  2,420
1945  2,008
1946  2,451
1947  2,388
1948  2,340
1949  2,244 O 56
10,500
10,000
9,500
9,000
8,500
8,000
7,500
7,000
6,500
6,000
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
Resident Births in Vancouver, 1918 to 1949, Inclusive
5,500
g
s
5,000
4,500
4,000
3,500
3,000
2,500
2,000
1,500
1,000
500
0
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CNfN^ocscooo   o^f-i   o   T~,^,vo,'Of<'>iS0fO^viim   ovromo   no   no   m   m   wnoo_r-
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en   m   m   m   m   m
>n   «n   no   f*
BIRTHS PER YEAR, 1918-49
Accommodation
During the school-year 1949-50 we have attempted to attain three objectives: First,
to continue our study of school planning; second, to provide additional accommodation
as quickly as possible; and third, to prepare well in advance a tentative building programme for 1950. It has been impossible to accomplish all that we would have liked to
achieve.    However, considerable progress has been made.
The study undertaken in 1948 of the factors involved in the prediction of the future
enrolment in each school district has been continued. The effect of the following factors
has received further investigation:— SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER) O 57
(a) The trend in enrolment in each school district.
(b) The rate of home construction as shown by the building permits issued.
(c) The amount of vacant residential property.
(d) The zoning recommendations of the Town Planning Commission.
(e) The  reorganization necessary following the completion  of Gladstone
Junior-Senior High School and the addition to John Oliver High School.
The scope of the study was widened by the inclusion of a census of pre-school
children.
The danger of overbuilding is always present. Each factor involved in the prediction of the future enrolment in a school district is a variable and hence must be constantly
watched. A sudden change in the rate of building construction or an alteration in zoning
regulations may critically affect the size or priority of a school. Consequently, the building programme was recommended to the Board of School Trustees only after a very careful and cautious investigation which attempted to ensure as far as possible the wise
expenditure of by-law funds.
Last year three methods of providing accommodation for the peak populations
resulting from the high birth rates of the war and post-war years were outlined: the use
of swing shifts, the transportation of pupils to vacant classrooms in other parts of the
city, and the construction of portable classrooms. A careful study of each of the methods
suggested the following general conclusions.
Swing-shift classes may be justified where the overcrowding will last for only a short
period—for example, while an addition is being completed. Transportation of pupils in
this city should not be used as a method of relieving overcrowding, except where the
addition of portables is impracticable and the use of swing-shift classes will not solve the
problem. The purpose of portable schools is primarily the provision of accommodation
for temporary peak enrolments and, secondarily, the provision of additional accommodation at schools where more extensive additions are not at present required. Since a
portable classroom should cost considerably less than a permanent classroom and should
make unnecessary the construction of one or more permanent classrooms, the construction of a number of portable units should result in a considerable saving to the taxpayers.
Following the study, an experimental portable classroom was designed by our
architect, built by our Building Department, and moved. As the result justified its construction, seven improved portable buildings have been constructed.
During the past year, progress has been made in the relief of overcrowded areas.
The number of schools with swing-shift classes has been greatly reduced. At those
schools still operating swing-shift classes, contracts have been let for extensive additions.
A summary of what has been accomplished this year follows.
School Buildings Completed during the School-year 1949-50
Gladstone Secondary: Twenty-two standard classrooms, fourteen special rooms,
four shops, double gymnasium, cafeteria.
John Oliver Secondary (addition): Sixteen standard classrooms, sixteen special
rooms, double gymnasium.
Vancouver Vocational Institute: Seventeen training units (a training unit consists of
a shop, classroom, and storeroom facilities).
Renfrew (addition): First wing—seven classrooms, lunchroom; second wing—six
classrooms and provision for three additional.
Kitchener, Unit II (addition): Two classrooms.
King Edward Secondary:  Gymnasium, cafeteria.
Cecil Rhodes:  Auditorium-gymnasium.
Henry Hudson:  Auditorium-gymnasium.
Portable schools:  Seven classrooms. O 58 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
School Buildings under Construction, 1949-50
Lord Byng Secondary (addition): Five classrooms, four special rooms, library,
auditorium, gymnasium, cafeteria, two shops.
Beaconsfield (addition): Four classrooms, auditorium-gymnasium.
Douglas (addition): Fifteen classrooms, library, auditorium-gymnasium, lunchroom.
Sexsmith (addition):  Two classrooms, auditorium-gymnasium.
Van Home (addition):  Six classrooms, auditorium-gymnasium.
Prince of Wales Elementary and Secondary:  Gymnasium.
Administration building.
School Buildings for Which Plans Are Being Prepared
Moberly, Unit I (addition):  Six classrooms and provision for three additional.
Kitchener, Unit II (addition):  Twelve classrooms.
Kerrisdale, Unit II (University Area):   Eight classrooms, auditorium-gymnasium.
Cavell, Unit II (new building):  Six classrooms.
David Lloyd George, Unit III (addition):  Eight classrooms.
Gladstone Secondary:  Twenty-four classrooms, auditorium-gymnasium.
Wolfe:  Auditorium-gymnasium.
Nelson:  Auditorium-gymnasium.
Selkirk:  Auditorium-gymnasium.
Portable schools:   Three classrooms.
Revision of the By-laws of the Board
Considerable time and study have been devoted to a revision of the by-laws of the
Board. The progress made this year has centred on an analysis of the committee organization of the Board and the administrative organization in the School Board office.
A summary was made of the most recent authoritative publications discussing the
committee organization of school boards. According to this survey, leading educationalists recommend that school boards operate through committees of the whole board
and that the function of committees of less than the whole board be confined to reporting
on matters not of a continuing nature and that the discharge of committees of less than
the whole board should automatically follow the completion of their task.
Each of the senior officials was consulted and contributed to the construction of
a proposed committee organization based on the principles outlined. After very careful
consideration the Board adopted a new committee plan in November.
The study of the administrative organization included a survey of the administrative
plans of the leading cities in Canada and United States and an analysis of educational
theory. The results were discussed with the senior officials, each of whom has had many
years of practical experience. A reorganization was suggested to the Board which
appeared to be supported by educational theory, to be justified on the basis of practical
experience and to take full cognizance of local problems.
In recommending its adoption, the Chairman of the By-laws Committee, Mr. Elmore
Meredith, expressed the following opinion:—
" This by-law is designed to provide fewer channels of authority to the Superintendent than formerly. It establishes two new departments under directorships. Instead
of fourteen different authorities reporting directly to the Superintendent, this by-law
establishes five. This reorganization should reduce the time the Superintendent has
found it necessary to spend in co-ordinating the work of the various departments.
" The by-law takes into account the growth of the system and its greater scope and
resoonsibility. It conforms with good organization, as exists in large military and naval
and company organizations.    It is also consistent with the recommendations made in SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER) O 59
the Winnipeg School Board survey. This reorganization should have the effect of integrating the whole school system and bringing about a valuable cohesion, and serve the
Board to better advantage. It will not cost the Board any additional money. It should
serve the Board's requirements for many years to come and should provide a useful basis
to build upon. A careful study has been made of the organization of many other boards,
and the best has been taken from all to suit our special requirements and situation."
The new administrative organization was approved and instituted in December,
1949.
The Vancouver Vocational Institute
With the opening of the Vancouver Vocational Institute building in 1949, the
Vancouver School Board was able to bring together under one roof several adult classes
that had previously been receiving vocational training in other quarters, either under
the jurisdiction of the Department of Education or of the Board itself. Moreover,
facilities were made available for instruction programmes in other vocational studies.
During the year, training was offered in twenty-four different trades and service
occupations. In three of these—Navigation, Steam Engineering, and Welding—the
work was intended primarily to provide for up-grading of students, while in the remainder,
the emphasis was on instruction on the pre-employment level. Two of the trade-training
courses—Plumbing, and Painting and Decorating—were discontinued temporarily as of
May 31st, 1950, because of peak employment conditions in the trades during the summer
months. It is expected that full classes will again be enrolled in these fields of work in
September.
Throughout the year, Advisory Committees, which gave such valuable assistance
in connection with planning and equipping the various departments in the building as
well as in selecting instructors and determining content of courses, continued to render
extremely useful service.
Teacher-training and preparation of courses of study took a prominent place in
the year's work. An in-service teacher-training course on " Trade Analysis," sponsored
by the Provincial Department of Education and attended by thirty-four members of the
staff, contributed toward better selection of subject-matter in classroom and shop work.
Linked up with the in-service programme, and carrying credit toward Provincial Vocational certification, was the preparation of courses of study for all departments in the
school. Detailed courses, along lines laid down by the Director of Technical and Vocational Education for the Province, have now been completed and are being subjected to
a careful examination.
The first year in the new quarters has brought to the fore many problems—problems
relating to accommodation, equipment, finances, and general administration. Nor have
nearly all the problems been solved. With changes in industrial procedures, the need for
remodelling quarters and installing new types of equipment will ever be present. The
implementation of some plan whereby recognition in salary is given for teaching experience and improved qualifications appears to be a matter worthy of early consideration.
Moreover, the fee situation merits attention. These are but a few of the matters that call
for special study.
The matter of summer attendance is still an uncertain one. Whereas the peak
enrolment for the year was that of March, 1950, with 468 students, the number actually
attending on June 30th was 267. Still, new registrations are being received dailv, and
there is reason to feel that practically all departments will operate successfully throughout
the summer.
During the year a total of 1,069 students enrolled for day training at the institute,
and the nrincipal and staff have done masterful work in preparing these students for tests
set bv different examining boards in the Province, as well as for entering different tyoes
of employment.    Furthermore, the placement record is indeed a creditable one.   The O 60
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
table that follows shows the fields in which instruction was offered, the number of
instructors and enrollees in each, and the disposition of the enrollees.
Table Showing Departments of Vancouver Vocational Institute, Number of
Instructors, Number of Students Enrolled, and Disposition of Students
Number
of Staff
Members
Number
of
Enrollees
Disposition of Enrollees
Department
Withdrew
before
Completing
Course
Completed
Course
Entered
for
Upgrading
Still on
Roll
Job
Placements
by School
Administration   (principal   and
vice-principal)  — 	
3
4*
23
39
31
20
47
107
22
22
10
33
19
17
208
11
18
65
126
16
86
19
58
14
44
14
8
3
2
9
29
2
1
~~6
S
4
28
3
3
11
46
2
7
5
17
1
2
14
21
16
16
12
35
10
12
15
10
13
8
15
47
31
7
10
24
3
5
1
"I1
82
93
169«
~~v
338
9
10
10
2
18
34
10
9
10
12
4
11
7
49
7
24
4
10
10
6
11
—
13
18
Bartering 	
IS
16
12
Commercial    .
Diesel Engineering  	
30
9
11
Hairdressing - _
Heating and Refrigeration	
Machine-shop  	
Navigation     	
15
7
13
~8
Plumbing .  _  .   ....
Power-sewing	
14
45
31
Shoe-repairing    .'
Steam Engineering	
5
12
8
Waitress-training _  „
21
3
Welding —     .
Totals _
39
1,069
194
325
283
267
306
1 Two students completed up-grading;  both placed.
2 Eight tugboat chefs completed up-grading and returned to tugs.
3 One student withdrew, 2 are still training, and 6 have been placed after taking up-grading.
4 Included 2 extra instructors engaged for a short period of time.
6 Of the 169 students completing up-grading, 116 have passed the Department of Transport examinations, 7 failed;
45 took a special course for seamen;   1 did not write gyro examination.
9 Of the 55 students completing their training, 26 have written and passed the following examinations:   Stationary
(steam), 22;  marine (diesel), 2;  marine (steam), 2.
7 Four students have taken up-grading for summer-resort work;   3 have taken up-grading for special employment.
8 Most of the students of this course have taken up-grading in some branch of the welding trade;   9 have been
placed.
Bureau of Measurements
Testing
(a) Number of individual intelligence tests given, 980.
(b) Number of pupils given group intelligence or achievement tests, 11,775.
(This applies to the tests actually administered by the personnel of the Bureau of
Measurements.)
(c) Intelligence tests were given to 212 prospective Grade Ib pupils who were
under 6 years of age prior to December 1st, 1949. (Pupils 6 years of age in December,
1949, were tested.) Eighty-six of the 212 were admitted on trial to Grade Ib, and the
remainder, 126, were rejected as being unlikely to succeed in the work of the first grade.
In September the Detroit Beginning First Grade Intelligence Test (revised) was administered to all pupils of Grade Ib.
(d) For June, 1949, achievement tests in the fundamental subjects were given to
approximately 2,900 pupils of Grades VI and VIII; the Grade VI pupils in junior high SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 39 (VANCOUVER)
O 61
school areas for promotion to junior high school; and the Grade VIII pupils in senior
high school areas for promotion to senior high school. These standardized tests assist
the principals and inspectors in maintaining levels of achievement.
(e) Probationary classes in nursing of the Vancouver General Hospital were given
intelligence tests—one class each in March and October.
(/) Twenty-six pupils of the Provincial Government School for the Deaf and the
Blind were tested during March with the Pintner-Paterson Performance Scale.
(g) Provincial Testing Programme.—(i) During the last week of May, at the
request of the Department of Education, the British Columbia General Science Survey
Test, Form A, was administered to all the pupils in Vancouver schools taking Chemistry
91, Physics 91, or Biology 91. Tests were given by the principal, or under his direction,
and scoring was done by the Department of Education.
(ii) From September 26th to October 7th the following tests were given to Vancouver pupils:—
Grade VIII:  Work-Study Skills Test (British Columbia Work-Study Skills-
Form), Advanced Battery.
Grade IV: Test of Reading Comprehension and Vocabulary (British Columbia
Primary Reading Test, Form E).    Otis Quick-scoring Mental Ability
Tests, Alpha Test, Form A.
The above programme was sponsored by the Department of Education, and the
tests given to the pupils of Grades IV and VIII in selected schools in British Columbia.
In Vancouver the tests were administered by the teachers under the direction of the
principal of each school.    Tests were scored by the Department of Education.
(h) Primary Reading Survey.—In June the Bureau of Measurements, in co-operation with the Primary Department, gave the Haggerty Reading Examination, Sigma I,
to 1,129 Grade Ia pupils and 1,085 Grade IIa pupils in a random selection of fourteen
Vancouver schools. Scores earned on the test and a comparison with scores of 1947
are reported below:—
Year
Number
of Pupils
Tested
Median
Score
Authors' Norm
June, 1949 (14 schools)..
June, 1947 ( 7 schools).
Grade I\
Grade Ilk
June, 1949 (14 schools)..
June, 1947 ( 7 schools).
1,129
412
1,085
393
19.2
19.4
30.0
30.1
6.0 (April-May Testing)
6.0 (April-May Testing)
20.0 (April-May Testing)
20.0 (April-May Testing)
It should be noted with great satisfaction that the median score made by Vancouver
City Grade Ia pupils is 19.2, which is only 0.8 below the authors' norm of 20 for Grade II.
Night-schools
This year marked a record in the number of courses offered and in the total enrolment. Mr. Graham Bruce, Night-school Director, reported that instruction was given in
146 different subjects, in 404 classes, with a total enrolment of 12,953.
It is very gratifying to see this growing interest in adult education. It is bound to
have its effect on the growth and development of education in general in this community.
Health Services
Our school medical health services have been maintained at their usual high standard.
The mental hygiene programme has been extended by the addition of a Mental Hygiene
Co-ordinator, operating in a community consisting of a large secondary school and the O 62
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
seven elementary schools that promote pupils to that school. This approach to the
mental hygiene programme shows promise of being a very effective pattern.
The splendid success of our school health programme could not have been possible
without the co-operation and untiring efforts of the medical, nursing, dental, and teaching
staffs.
To Dr. Stewart Murray, Chief Medical Health Officer of the Metropolitan Health
Board, and his efficient staff, I extend my thanks for their splendid work in connection
with the health services of our school system.
Supervision of Instruction
A high standard of classroom instruction has been maintained. Our special supervisors of music, art, handicrafts, home economics, physical education, and primary grades
have co-operated splendidly with the Superintendent, Inspectors, and principals in promoting teacher growth and development. All principals of primary and secondary schools
must give a large proportion of their time to the supervision of classroom instruction.
All new appointees to the teaching staff have been specially helped by the supervisors and visited at different times by the Inspectors. In-service training classes have
been organized for many teachers requiring help and guidance.
The following members of the staff retired on superannuation. All of them are to
be highly commended for their many years of loyal and efficient service.
Name
School
Years of
Service with
V.S.B.
Appointment
Date
W. S. Ashley
30
4m
23
15
39
27
40
8
35W
23
32
34
37
39
33
37
38
September, 1920.
February, 1908.
H. O. Bell                               	
September, 1927.
H. G. Boltwood  	
September, 1935.
August, 1911.
Miss H. F. Crake
Queen Mary.   	
September, 1923.
September, 1910.
Mrs. H. E. Hill
September, 1942.
February, 1927.
October, 1912, and
September, 1930.
August, 1916.
September, 1913.
Magee (principal) —  	
September, 1911.
August, 1917.
Miss B. H. Reillv           	
Lord Selkirk     ..   .
August, 1913.
October 1912.
I report with regret the death of the following members of the teac
have served the interests of education so faithfully:—
hing staff, who
Teacher
School
Date of Appointment
Date of Decease
F. F. B. Sexsmith   .
Britannia  	
September. 1923 	
November 3, 1949.
R   F, C. Marrinn
September, 1924
April   1949
December 27, 1949.
R. Pilling
Vocation
January 29, 1950.
March 3, 1950.
R. H. Bennett   _
September. 1930	
In concluding this brief report, I wish to thank the Mayor, City Council, Police
Department, Fire Department, Parks Board, Library Board, and all officials of these
organizations for their splendid co-operation at all times.
To the press, I am particularly indebted for good reporting of the many intricate
problems that have been considered during the year.
Needless to say, this excellent year's work could not have been accomplished without
the magnificent support and co-operation of the Board of School Trustees and entire staff.
To you, sir, and other members of your Department I am more than grateful for
your advice, guidance, and help at all times. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS O 63
REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS
School District No. 61 (Greater Victoria)
REPORT OF J. F. K. ENGLISH, M.A., B.P/ed., SENIOR MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR, AND JOHN GOUGH, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
An ever-increasing school population in the Greater Victoria School District continues to tax our accommodation and material equipment. It would appear, however,
that relief is in sight. Early in the present school-year the F. T. Fairey Vocational-
Technical Unit was opened; in March the new View Royal Elementary School provided
additional classroom space; and in September it is expected that the S. J. Willis Junior
High School will open its doors to some 600 pupils of Grades VII, VIII, and IX.
Finally, in June of this year, by-laws for additional school funds to complete the original
building programme of 1947 were submitted to and approved by the taxpayers of the
component parts of this school district. It can be anticipated that by September, 1951,
two or three additional schools will be ready for occupancy. Under these happy circumstances one should not let the opportunity pass to thank the people of Greater Victoria,
especially the ratepayers, for their confidence and co-operation in supporting a building
programme of considerable magnitude, amounting in all to approximately $6,000,000
over the period 1947-50. The School Board, the administrative staff, and committees
of teachers have planned the new schools and additions with considerable care, and it is
hoped that these units, when finally completed, will serve our young people adequately
and that their structural features will be a credit to the area.
In my opinion the education of the youth of Greater Victoria is in the hands of
capable and efficient teachers. The schools, almost without exception, are well organized
and properly administered by their respective principals. Assisting this teaching staff
is a small group of supervisors and consultants whose task it is to advise in the various
instructional techniques. They are doing an outstanding job, not only in their special
fields, but also in their role as public relations servants of the system. During the past
year they have co-operated generously in providing radio programmes devoted to education, by informing the public through the press of the work done in their various departments, and by giving addresses from time to time to Parent-Teacher Associations and
other organizations in Greater Victoria. One cannot speak too highly of this staff of
assistants who give themselves so enthusiastically and whole-heartedly to their work.
Since the formation of District No. 61a number of teachers have retired on superannuation. For various reasons it has not been possible in the past to record publicly
their passing from the scene. All of them in their time have given much to education in
Victoria and in Greater Victoria. We extend to them our very best wishes for a happy
and interesting period of retirement: Mrs. Kate E. Ford, Miss Ethel G. Clark, Miss
Jean G. Roberts, Mr. Alfred Cullen, Miss J. Madeline Clay, Mrs. Margaret O'B. Tod,
Miss Lena Harris, Mr. F. S. Maddock, Miss Annie W. Eaton, Miss G. Constance Wright,
Miss Anna M. Paterson, Miss Winifred M. Fox, Miss Janet Freeman, Miss Jessie M.
Gordon, Mrs. Evelyn L. McDonnell, Miss Gladys W. Beall, Miss Winifred Greig, Mr.
George Anstey.
In concluding this brief report may I express my personal thanks to all members
of the Greater Victoria School Board for their support in the administrative programme;
to the secretary-treasurer, to the superintendent of buildings and grounds, and to the
purchasing agent for their unfailing and efficient co-operation; and to the secretarial
staff for their loyal and very satisfactory services. O 64 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
Victoria College
(John W. Ewing, B.A., D.Paed., Principal)
The session of 1949-50 was marked by no startling developments. It was quiet,
steady, and harmonious.
Three permanent and two temporary appointments were made, as follows: Mr. G.
Reid Elliott, B.A. (Sask.), M.A. (Toronto), as associate professor of commerce and
economics; Mr. Charles H. Howatson, M.A. (Brit.Col.), as assistant professor of
geology and geography; Mr. John L. Climenhaga, M.A. (Sask.), as instructor in physics;
Mr. Claude Treil, Certificats d'Etudes Superieures (Sorbonne), as instructor in French
for two years; Mr. Elvet G. Jones, M.A. (Brit.Col.), as special lecturer in psychology
for one year, to take the place of Prof. W. H. Gaddes who was on leave of absence in
order to do postgraduate work at Claremont University of California.
The difficult problem of accommodation was solved in a variety of ways, among
which was the renting of a classroom at the University School. It is a great relief to
know that a permanent solution will be forthcoming in September, 1951, when an
additional building will have been provided. Very slight modifications were made in
the course offering of the College. The work of the first and second years in Arts and
Science is now very adequately covered.
The evening division of the College was continued and expanded in the 1949-50
session. No fewer than 483 residents of the Greater Victoria area registered for courses,
and there is every reason to expect the Evening Division to give greater service to the
community in the future.
The grand total of regular session and evening division students for the year was 870.
Throughout the session some twenty clubs were in active operation. The O.T.C.
and U.N.T.D. provided excellent military and naval training. Under the presidency of
Mr. Neil Neufeld, the Alma Mater Society carried on in its usual helpful and efficient
manner.
The annual assembly was held on the evening of Friday, October 21st. Mr. J. B.
Clearihue, Chairman of the College Council, presided, and the address was delivered by
Prof. H. T. Logan, head of the Department of Classics at the University of British
Columbia, an old and valued friend of the College. Twenty-six scholarships and seven
prizes were presented to students outstanding in the 1948-49 session.
Victoria High School
(H. L. Smith, M.A., Principal)
With the opening during the fall term of the F. T. Fairey Vocational-Technical
Unit on the grounds of the Victoria High School, all of our teaching facilities are now
concentrated on our own grounds. Much economy in student time and in general
efficiency should result. With the Memorial Stadium completed and the rugby field
seeded, there remains for the cinder track circling the rugby field to be laid down,
a project requiring the co-operative effort of the students of the school, the Board of
School Trustees, and the local Gyro Club, an organization which has offered its support
to this worthy project.
I am happy to pay tribute to the splendid co-operation and invaluable assistance
rendered the young men of this community over a long period by Mr. G. A. Anstey,
Supervisor of Technical Education for this area, now retired. As a technical instructor
and head of that department, and, later, in his supervisory capacity, Mr. Anstey has
always had near his heart the welfare of the boys who came under his wise direction.
During the past year a high standard of academic achievement has been maintained.
The results of the University Entrance examinations found our students well at the top
of the lists.    Nor has the athletic and social work of our school been neglected. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS O 65
Opportunity for participation in athletic games has been made available for an ever-
increasing number of boys and girls.
Oak Bay High School
(D. H. Hartness, B.A., Principal)
The average enrolment for the year stood at 340. There should be a slight but
steady increase in numbers over the next two years. The graduating class was again
large, 85 pupils going out from Grade XII and about that number expected in Grade
LX for September, 1950.
The school population still leans heavily toward the University Programme, though
Industrial Arts, Home Economics, Music, and Typewriting are attracting pupils in
increasing numbers.    A broad choice of optional studies is open to the pupils.
During the year the drama group entered two plays in the drama festival and put
on a spring revue in May; the music class took part in concerts and competitions as
opportunity offered, and the choir had the pleasure of heading its class in the Greater
Victoria Music Festival this spring.
The school has carried on its usual full programme of games and sports and maintains a high level of achievement. In addition to the inter-school programme of games,
an intra-school house league was organized to extend the number of pupils playing.
Last September the Oak Bay High School Parent-Teacher Association was formed.
At present its membership is ninety, and already it has proved its worth as a channel
of education between school and home.
Mount View High School
(J. M. Thomas, M.A., D.Pa;d., Principal)
The attendance for the school-year 1949-50 showed an increase over the previous
year. However, owing to the opening of the S. J. Willis Junior High School, enrolment
in Grade IX will decrease in number.
The staff has given efficient service during the year. There has been a fine spirit
of co-operation among the members of the staff. In many co-curricular activities all
members have carried their load, and in such activities the Industrial Arts and Home
Economics teachers have shared equally.
Music instruction and appreciation have shown much development during the year,
with instructors now in charge of both band and choral music and with both types now
placed on the curriculum as credit courses. The cultural influence of the school will
be greatly increased when proposed alterations to the auditorium have been completed.
Esquimalt High School
(Clive Kelly, B.A., Principal)
The enrolment for this year was 218, compared with 191 for the previous year—
a net increase of 27. However, the number attending showed an extraordinary fluctuation due to temporary homes, such as auto camps, located in the school area, as well as
the transfer of service personnel from one area to another. Regardless of the above
conditions, an increase is anticipated in the school enrolment for 1950-51 and a new
division will be opened in the school in September. This will provide better accommodation for Grade XI, which this year contained 42 pupils as one unit.
The school enjoyed a very successful year in its achievements. It endeavours to
simulate life situations and to duplicate the society into which the students will be
passed on leaving school. As a result, the Students' Council plans and executes the
projects of the school, a Junior Red Cross Council conducts the welfare work, and Hi-Y
clubs are the service organizations. The Drama Club produced " The Wonder Hat,"
which was selected for the honour performance at the Greater Victoria Drama Festival. o 66 public schools report, 1949-50
Mount Douglas High School
(Eric Forster, B.A., B.Ed., Principal)
Although this is our smallest high school, with an enrolment of some 120 pupils,
yet its holding power is very satisfactory. The school provides a liberal programme of
options; Drama, Music, Commercial, Latin, and Art are among the subjects given.
In the extra-curricular field there are a variety of activities to round out the life of the
enterprising student.
This year the Parent-Teacher Association has been very active, thus rendering
valuable and co-operative assistance to the principal and school.
Central Junior High School
(A. T. Hunkin, B.Sc, M.A., Principal)
The enrolment at this school during the past year was the highest on record. Extra
pupils came to this school last September as a result of overcrowded conditions in some
of the outlying schools. Pupils from the Strawberry Vale and Doncaster Heights areas
swelled our numbers to over 600.
In the early fall, parents of the new Grade VII pupils met with the teachers when
the special purposes of the junior high school were explained. Toward the end of the
school-year the new high school course was discussed with parents of the Grade VIII
pupils, when advice was given as to the phoice of suitable courses in Grade IX. On
this same occasion, individual parents met with the guidance and home-room teachers
for specific advice.
Several changes in the staff are taking place this June. One teacher is retiring, two
are joining the staff of the new S. J. Willis Junior High School, and two others are going
to the United Kingdom for one year to further their professional training.
Elementary Schools
(John Gough, M.A., Municipal Inspector of Schools)
With the opening of the school-year in September, the newly built classroom space
at the Craigflower, Gordon Head, McKenzie Avenue, and Willows Schools was brought
into service to accommodate an enrolment that had increased from 7,596 to 8,152 over
the summer vacation period. Additional accommodation resulted from the opening of
the five-room elementary school at View Royal on March 6th, 1950.
Considerable success has attended the conscientious and effective efforts of principals and teachers within the classrooms, all of whom have co-operated whole-heartedly
with the administrative and supervisory staff. Scholastic standards have been generally
maintained, with special attention being given to promoting leisure reading. Physical
growth has been stimulated by the house system and intra-school sports. Co-curricular
activities have been carried on, notably in the fields of Junior Red Cross, drama, and
safety-patrol education. Helpful public relations have been maintained by open days
and various school functions, through the bi-monthly distribution of education news,
and by working with branches of the Parent-Teacher Association.
Kindergarten-Primary Department
(Miss Marian D. James, Director)
During 1949-50 the number of young children enrolled in the primary divisions
of the Greater Victoria schools showed a marked increase over that of the previous
year. New divisions were opened in many schools to take care of the extra number
of children in the first three grades. A number of portable units made attractive classrooms and proved quite satisfactory as temporary additions to the larger schools.
Many classes, however, had to be accommodated in auditoriums for the needs of young REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS O 67
children.    Most of the primary classes were far too big for the classrooms.    Many
classes had between forty and fifty children enrolled throughout the year.
Special features of the year's work:—
(1) A class of non-English-speaking children was established to assist new
Canadians. This class met for two and one-half hours daily from February until June. Most of the pupils gained a great deal from the individual
and class instruction planned for them.
(2) A committee of primary teachers worked with Mr. J. Gough to revise
and simplify the art programme for the first three grades.
(3) At the request of Mr. Kitley a committee studied and reported on the
Provincial radio broadcasts.
(4) Primary teachers assisted the P.-T.A. members in working for the success
of the school by-law.
Primary, Junior, Intermediate, and Senior
Crafts Department
(Miss A. Verna Turner, M.A., Director)
Between fifteen and twenty pupils attended each of the four Crafts classes again
this year. The age-groups represented were: Primary, 7 to 9 years; junior, 9 to 11
years; intermediate, 10 to 12 years; senior, 13 to 17 years. In all four classes, handicrafts played an important part in instruction, and the three " R's " were related to
activities where possible.
Primary
Eighteen pupils attended the class during the term. Readjustment to school routine
and activities was necessary in some individual cases. The regular course of study for
primary grades was followed, with special emphasis on phonics. The class participated
in the school broadcasts and enjoyed the programmes provided for the primary grades.
The children were interested in practical arts.
Junior
This was a boys' class. The basic programme included reading, language, spelling,
writing, and arithmetic. In science, health, and social studies, the teacher selected
activities and units which appealed particularly to boys. In social studies, for example,
the pupils concentrated on the exploration of North America. They began with
Columbus and ended with the founding of Victoria. In science the pupils studied the
Grade III and IV courses as set down in " Science Stories." The handwork included
plaster-of-paris wall plaques, and drawings and paintings related to social studies, health,
and science. For woodwork the pupils went to South Park School, where they began
by making small things like letter and pencil holders, and finished by making wall and
corner shelves. Physical education was an important part of the boys' programme.
There were swimming lessons and supervised baseball and other games.
Intermediate
Mornings were spent on the basic subjects of language and arithmetic. Afternoons
were devoted to social studies, science, practical arts, health, and physical education.
Manual training and home economics were taught to the pupils once a week at South
Park School. The boys made models very successfully. The girls learned cooking
and sewing. Use was made of the intermediate radio music programme. Group games
were popular. Pupils participated in the school sports and played on school teams.
The social development of the pupils was particularly gratifying. O 68 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
Senior
This was a boys' class. There were sixteen boys enrolled. Academic subjects
were related to crafts, games, and activities. The boys worked on a six-day week
platoon system. In their home-room they received instruction in language, arithmetic,
social studies, science, ■ nature study, guidance, and leather-craft. In the shops and
elsewhere the boys had metalwork, woodwork, household science, graphic arts, and
physical education. The boys used sets of books specially chosen for them. They
became really interested in reading. Games and sports were popular. Many films
of an educational nature were shown to the class, along with other Grade VII classes in
the school auditorium.
Department of Physical Education
(George Grant, B.A., Director)
All teachers of physical education from Grades III to VIII are now using the
material-lists resulting from the curriculum studies made by the teachers last year.
This is a trial year, and we hope to have a revision made next year.
Meetings held this year were of a special nature only, such as for teachers new to
the staff, for preparing Grade V teachers for the learn-to-swim programme, and for
discussion and instruction in softball techniques and officiating.
A high-school class on the elementary-school Physical Education course attracted
seven or eight teachers and a large number of Normal School students. Attendance
was high and the calibre of performance and practice teaching very good.
Intra-mural and inter-school sports programme have been carried on smoothly by
the respective organizations.
During the year contact was maintained with the Greater Victoria Recreation
Council and we attended several meetings of a recreation institute held in May. A professional organization for teachers of physical and health education was formed in
Victoria this year. It is the Vancouver Island Branch of the Canadian Association for
Health, Physical Education, and Recreation, and includes in its membership anyone
interested in any of the three fields covered in the title. Eleven teachers are members
at present.
Child Study Department
(Miss A. Verna Turner, M.A., Director)
During the fall term of 1949 several standardized tests were given in various grades.
There were survey tests in reading and arithmetic in Grade IV and a survey test in work-
study skills in Grade VIII. There were scholastic aptitude surveys made in Grades I, IV,
VIII, XI, and XIII. Some of these surveys were made for the Provincial Department
of Education, Division of Tests, Standards, and Research.
During the second term an intensive spring testing programme of achievement was
carried out in various subjects and grades. The major objective of such a testing programme was to identify remedial cases in time to do something for them.
Apart from the achievement tests used by the Child Study Department, there were
tests in reading and arithmetic which were supplied by the Child Study Department to
principals and teachers. These tests were used as teaching aids to diagnose weaknesses
and to improve instruction.
Work-books in reading were made quickly available to the schools for use with
remedial reading cases. Probably the most important contribution made by the Child
Study Department is the emphasis it places on the reading skills and the identification and
treatment of retarded readers before they reach high school. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS O 69
Audio-Visual Department
(Denis W. Brown, B.A., Director)
During the period from September, 1949, to June, 1950, this department has faced
increased requests for teaching aids from both elementary and high schools. The
co-operation of all principals, audio-visual co-ordinators, and teachers, however, has
greatly facilitated the operation of the department.
All elementary and high schools in Greater Victoria now have their own sound
projectors, and the use of circuit machines has ceased. A complete record is maintained
on each projector, and all are serviced during the summer months. The development, in
co-operation with Mr. R. H. Smith, superintendent of building and grounds for the
Greater Victoria School Board, of a new device for daylight projection will achieve
the best use of films in the classroom without the necessity for blackouts.
A completely catalogued and cross-indexed file of some four to five thousand
mounted pictures has been prepared for teacher use, and each staff member will be provided with a mimeographed list of these.
The severe winter curtailed the programme of school journeys to industrial plants,
Museum, Helmcken House, Legislature, post-office, fire station, and so forth. Nevertheless, over 4,000 pupils have been accommodated on school journeys since September.
The number of models on loan has been increased during the past year by several
additions. The Greater Victoria school system owes a debt of gratitude to Dr. Clifford
Carl, of the Provincial Museum, who has provided numerous specimens on loan for
circulation and for museums established by the schools
School Dental Health Services
(Dr. Hugh Clarke, D.D.S., Director)
The following is a summary of the work of this Department for the school-year
ended June, 1950:—
Dental examinations made  14,045
Fillings of all kinds . .     1,603
Teeth extracted        171
Miscellaneous treatments        616
Prophylaxis (teeth cleaned)        877
Parents interviewed       959
The dental clinic in the View Royal School will be in operation some time this fall,
and pupils attending the new S. J. Willis Junior High School will also be visited by the
staff of the Dental Department.
It is a pleasure to report that pupils now entering high schools receive fewer cards
than formerly. The generous ruling of the Senior Municipal Inspector in allowing
elementary-school pupils to visit their family dentists for treatment at 9, 9.30, and 10 a.m.
and the splendid co-operation of the parents and family dentists with this department is,
no doubt, responsible for this improvement. Dental-health films and dental-health talks
have been used to educate the pupils to take a greater interest in their teeth. The bad
effect of sugar on the teeth has been stressed, and a pamphlet dealing with this matter has
been widely distributed to parents.
Speech Therapy Department
(Miss Marie C. Crickmay, Director)
The most outstanding feature of the school-year 1949-50 has been the increasing
use that the general public has made of the services offered at the speech clinic. An
increasing number of parents of children who have speech difficulties are being referred
to the clinic by their doctors, and it is felt that this is a satisfactory development, for it is O 70 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
obviously better to help a child before he reaches school than to wait until he actually
does. A great number of these cases consist of children from 2 to 4 years who are late
in beginning to talk. In the majority of cases there is a definite reason for this, which,
when explained to the parent, relieves the anxiety and tension so often present in these
situations. A number of children who were beginning to stammer have also been referred
to the clinic, and again a thorough investigation and discussion of the home situation has
produced a considerable improvement in the children's speech.
During the year 280 children, both school and pre-school children, have been
examined, and sixty-five interviews have been held with their parents. Seventy-three
children have been treated during the year, each child being treated either individually
or in a small group of not more than four. The children are treated either at the clinic,
if they attend schools within easy distance of it, or at their schools, if these happen to be
in the outlying districts of Greater Victoria. The parents are always interviewed before
a child is admitted for treatment, in order that factors in his environment that might have
contributed to the development of his speech difficulty may be fully discussed and remedied whenever possible. The parent is advised how to help the child during his treatment
and after it is ended. In the same way the teacher is kept informed as to the way in which
he or she can help the child in the difficult speech situations at school. As a result of
the treatment given, forty children have now acquired normal speech, and all have shown
marked improvement.
Mental Health Department
(Miss Edna R. Lawrence, Director)
Progressive school systems of to-day recognize the fact that they must play a major
role in training the child toward social and emotional maturity, as well as providing him
with basic academic knowledge. Keeping pace with this modern trend in educational
thought, the Greater Victoria School Board established a Department of Mental Health
in September, 1949.
As the project was completely new, it has necessarily been a year of interpretation
and liaison work with the community, social, and welfare agencies.
Looking back over the year's work, the results are of an intangible nature. However, we do feel that some progress has been made in certain areas. Excellent relationships have been established with the various agencies. At least a start has been made
toward the directing of public thought along the fines of emotional and social welfare of
children. Through numerous visits to schools, there is a growing awareness of this
department as an added service to the school system. Personal contacts with parents
have helped them to feel the school's interest in children is more than an academic one.
Music Department
(H. J. Bigsby, B.Mus., Acting Director)
The past year has seen the general growth of the music programme in all departments. The classroom work, especially the singing programme, was noticeably more
uniform this past year. The listening phase of the programme advanced, but has not yet
reached the desired level in all cases.
Two in-service training courses were offered at the night-school and were attended
by twenty-seven teachers.
The various schools had numerous music activities during the year, such as concerts,
operettas, etc. Many classes and groups took the opportunity to hear themselves' by
calling on the services of the department's recording equipment. The results continued
to prove the success of these machines as teaching aids.
The schools were very well represented in this year's festival. A total of forty-two
classroom choirs, plus various small ensembles and instrumental groups, bands, orchestras, etc., took part, and presented a high standard of performance. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS O 71
The instrumental (band and orchestra) activities this past year showed perhaps the
greatest expansion of any phase in the music programme. Following the Summer Band
School, the two bands began the fall term ready to carry on the practice of teachings
experienced the previous year.
Home Economics Department
(Miss Beth T. Ramsay, M.A., Director)
During the past year 1,332 girls have attended the Home Economics classes. The
number is made up as follows:  Grades VII and VIII, 794; Grades IX to XII, 538.
In addition, twenty-nine boys and girls from the Crafts classes have been given
instruction.
There are twelve full-time and one part-time instructor in the eight centres.
Monthly meetings have been held throughout the year for mutual help and exchange
of ideas.
The Victoria group took full charge of the Home Economics Section meeting at the
Easter convention.    More teachers were present than had been for several years.
The Standard Furniture Company's competition was held again this year, and I feel
this is a very worth-while project, with much practical information given to the girls.
Open house, teas, and displays were held in most of the centres to acquaint the
parents with the work being done and to interest other students in the work.
Industrial Arts and Vocational Training
(George Anstey, Director)
The opening ceremony of the F. T. Fairey Vocational-Technical Unit took place
on November 7th, 1949. The Right Honourable Humphrey Mitchell was the chief
speaker. Also present were Premier Byron Johnson; the Honourable W. T. Straith,
Minister of Education; Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister; Mr. H. A. Jones, Director
of Technical Education; the chairman and members of the School Board; representatives of employers and labour unions; and a goodly attendance of the general public,
including a group of old students representing the first technical class of Victoria formed
in 1920.
The appointment of Mr. J. S. White as head of the Technical Department of the
Victoria High School, with charge of the organization of classes meeting in the new
building, relieved the supervisor of much of the responsibility which would otherwise
have been undertaken by him.
At the commencement of the year it was found that the majority of the students
wishing to take practical work had enrolled in vocational courses, leaving very few for
Industrial Arts. It was found necessary to adopt a screening process to make a more
satisfactory distribution of shop time.
While there were several students transferred from other high schools to the Victoria
High School for vocational courses, the number is not as large as was anticipated.
With the approval of the Department of Education the first-year vocational courses
have been changed so that now they are of a general nature instead of being for a specific
trade. This is a decided benefit to the students, for very few have come to a definite
decision by the time they reach Grade X. The Industrial Arts programme in other schools
has been little different from former years. The increased enrolment made it necessary
to appoint an extra part-time instructor for Oak Bay.
This being the last report I shall make before my retirement at the end of the term,
I should like to express my appreciation for the happy relationships that have always
existed between all members of the supervisory staff, the principals and teachers of the
schools with whom I have been in contact, the instructors under my charge and myself.
While at times the duties have been strenuous, they have never been irksome.   This is O 72 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
largely due to the co-operation of all my associates. There are many incidents that in
the future I shall recall with pleasure, and especially do I appreciate the many tokens of
friendship that recently have been extended to me.
Evening Classes
(George Anstey, Director)
The enrolment for the session was as follows:—    First Term second Term
Non-vocational courses  1,028 894
Vocational courses      358 305
Apprentice courses      263 252
Totals   1,649 1,451
Despite the severe weather conditions during the months of January and February,
the drop in enrolment was not as large as in former years. While the attendance was
below normal during this period, more came back when the weather improved because
the fee had been paid for the whole session.
There were forty-nine subjects taught, with sixty-four separate classes being conducted. The new courses added were all successful and should be repeated during the
next session.
Two of the new courses were of a type for which no grant was provided by the
Department. These were square dancing and indoor golf. Both secured a very large
enrolment and were self-supporting even without the grant.
Certificates were awarded to those students who had done satisfactory work and
made a total of 70 per cent of the possible attendance for the session. Six hundred and
seventy-one qualified for these certificates, which is about the usual proportion of students.
School District No. 40 (New Westminster)
REPORT OF ROY S. SHIELDS, B.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
The school system of New Westminster functioned smoothly and efficiently throughout the past year, contributing its full share in educating our youth for effective living.
A forward step in school organization was depicted in the opening of the new junior
high school, consolidating as it did three smaller junior high schools into one unit, the
New Westminster Junior High School. Two of the schools closed—the Lord Lister and
the F. W. Howay—had served the needs of education in this city for half a century.
Built at a cost of $1,300,000, the new school embodies all accessories necessary for
the carrying-out of a progressive school programme at the secondary level and is an
institution of which the citizens of this city are justly proud.
The gymnasium, one of the finest, will seat a large number of spectators when the
folding bleachers are in place and, with its automatic doors dividing the playing area into
two gymnasiums, is capable of accommodating 200 boys and girls in gymnastic exercises
at the one time. The auditorium is not only a most important necessity for the carrying-
out of a full school programme but, with the gymnasium, a centre of community activities.
The formal opening of the school took place December 16th, 1949, culminating,
in so far as the junior high school level of the school curriculum was concerned, years of
careful study and hopeful planning on the part of the Board of School Trustees, and made
possible by the practical and sympathetic assistance of the Department of Education. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS O 73
Premier Byron Johnson, member of the Provincial House for New Westminster,
formally opened the proceedings and was ably assisted by the Honourable W. T. Straith,
Minister of Education, who gave the address of the evening; Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy
Minister of Education; Mr. Harold Campbell, Assistant Superintendent of Education;
Mr. W. M. Mott, member of the Federal House for New Westminster; Acting-Mayor
W. Ballantyne and other civic officials; and an overflow crowd of appreciative citizens.
Mr. Alex Christie, chairman of the Board of School Trustees, presided, accompanied by
all members of the Board—-Dr. W. A. Robertson, Mr. B. M. Bowell, Mr. A. W. Mercer,
Mrs. P. Amy, Mrs. I. G. MacFarlane, and Mrs. Harold Culter.
Appreciation is expressed herewith to all who in any way contributed to this
memorable event.
It is with a feeling of keen appreciation of their work throughout the years that
I mention the retirement from active teaching of Mr. Harold L Spurr, who began his
teaching career in this city in 1907 (for forty-one years Mr. Spurr was a member of the
Duke of Connaught High School staff) and Col. W. Williams, of the T. J. Trapp Technical High School staff, who came to us from Trail twenty-five years ago. To both of
these excellent teachers we express the best wishes of their friends for a happy and useful
retirement.
A change was made this year in the working of the Medical Department. By action
of the Board of School Trustees, the City Council, and the Provincial Health Department,
the Medical Department became part of the Simon Fraser Health Unit, comprising
Coquitlam, Port Moody, and the City of New Westminster. From present indications
the move is meeting with the hearty approval of all concerned.
The Dental Clinic has been closed for a year. It is hoped that it will be reopened
September 5th.
Night-school classes in many subjects were carried on successfully and profitably this
past school-year under the principalship of Mr. Ian Douglas. A greater enrolment is
anticipated this coming year. We owe a debt of gratitude to Mr. Harry Jones for
assistance given.
Outstanding events in which the schools play an increasingly important part—
May Day, the Peace Arch Celebration, etc.—were colourful and enthusiastically received
by the people interested.
The standard of work throughout the year has been maintained at a very satisfactory
level, and a goodly share of scholarship awards has been won by the secondary-school
students.
The Board of School Trustees, alert to the growing needs of secondary senior schools,
is considering plans for a new consolidated composite senior high school to replace the
Duke of Connaught and Trapp Technical High. Detailed comments will be made in
a later Report.
The successes of the past year have been due to whole-hearted support of the Department of Education in co-operation with an able and conscientious Board of School
Trustees working harmoniously with principals and teachers, School Board officials, and
interested public bodies. O 74
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
School District No. 41 (Burnaby)
REPORT OF C. G. BROWN, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
The Municipality of Burnaby is experiencing an unprecedented period of expansion,
with very direct implications as to additional school accommodation. The following
tabulation reflects the trend in this direction:—
Year
Number of
New Homes
Number of
Births
Number of
Beginners
(Grade I)
New
Classrooms
Required
1946        	
1,092
1,317
1,453
1,156
1,500*
825
1,015
1,096
1,281
1,400*
720
825
902
1,061
1,120*
18
1947... .            	
1948                             	
21
23
1949	
27
1950                    	
28*
* Estimated.
To cope with this situation, a by-law was submitted to the electorate in December,
1948, for $538,000 and a second by-law in December, 1949, for $375,000. With the
proceeds of these two by-laws and from other municipal revenues, the Burnaby School
Board was able to construct a number of school units, as follows: Clinton Street Elementary, eight rooms; Stride Avenue Primary Annex, two rooms; Capitol Hill Primary
Annex, four rooms; Sperling Avenue Primary Annex, four rooms; Kitchener Street
Primary Annex, four rooms; Edmonds Junior High School, eight rooms; Alpha Junior
High School, twelve rooms.    All these units are at present in operation.
The following units are now under construction and will be ready for occupancy
for the next term: Lochdale Primary School, four rooms; Marlborough Elementary
School, six rooms; Windsor Street Primary Annex, four rooms; Douglas Road Annex,
four rooms; Second Street Annex, two rooms; McPherson Park Junior High School, 22
rooms. These school units, although diversified and widely dispersed over the municipality, barely suffice to meet the immediate needs. The recent development of a number
of large housing projects and the continuing growth of new homes in settled areas are
compelling the Board to consider a building programme of major proportions to meet
adequately the future educational requirements.
The teacher-supply problem was not acute this year. Some sixty teachers from
a large list of applicants were adjusted to the staff, which consisted of 249 teachers.
A programme of in-service training was continued under the direction of Miss Kathleen
Collins and Miss Jean Bailey, curriculum consultants and supervisors for the Burnaby
schools.
The health programme was well conducted by the Metropolitan Unit Director and
his staff of ten nurses. Due to the extensive immunization procedure, the incidence of
diphtheria and smallpox was nil during the past year. Practically 80 per cent of the
school population was immunized against these two diseases. A need is being expressed
for an additional dental clinic to supplement the two which are already in operation,
and increasing use is being made of the eye clinic and other services offered by the
Health Department.
The Burnaby night-schools operated for their second time this year and, in spite
of the severe winter weather, the classes organized maintained a full schedule. A fairly
wide selection of courses was offered, and this will be expanded during the coming term.
An enrolment of 332 students availed themselves of the night-school facilities.
The teaching staff functioned well this year. Included in the educational programme
was a variety of student activities, all designed to effect a full development of the pupils REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS O 75
who engaged in them. Successful sports meets were conducted in North and South
Burnaby, which afforded opportunity for the participation of a large proportion of the
students. During the year an interesting health experiment was conducted at the Gilmore
Avenue School under the direction of Miss Marie Pedley. Of interest also was the
selection by the United States Government of the Burnaby school film, " Investment in
Youth," to show to the youth of Occupied Germany. An extensive survey of spelling
instruction was also conducted through the Inspector's office. Three groups of teachers
were selected to experiment with three types of instructional procedures, and tests were
given to determine the effectiveness of the spelling instruction. The results will be made
available to the teachers for future guidance. A survey, too, was made by a teacher
committee of suitable books and publications to be recommended for library purchases.
The School Board, through its maintenance department, continues to do excellent
work in modernizing and improving the older buildings and in keeping equipment in
good condition. The secretary-treasurer has instituted a system of purchasing school
supplies in bulk lots and storing them in a central distributing depot. Not only does this
method effect a considerable saving to the Board, but also makes it possible to deal with
school requisitions with much more expedition than in the past.
At the conclusion of the present term two veteran Burnaby teachers retired from
the staff on superannuation—namely, Mr. G. W. Sievers, who has been on the Industrial
Arts staff in Burnaby since 1912, and Mr. W. J. McFadden, who was associated with
the Commercial Department since 1925. Both these men pioneered education in
Burnaby in their respective fields and have made a worthy contribution to our system.
During the past year I have had occasion to visit the Department a number of times
in connection with our school building programme and other administrative matters.
In all requests, the School Board and I have met with the utmost courtesy and co-operation from the Minister of Education, the Deputy Minister, and their administrative staff.
For this, I wish to express sincere appreciation.
School Districts No. 44 (North Vancouver) and No. 45 (West Vancouver)
REPORT OF WILLIAM GRAY, M.A., MUNICIPAL INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
There were in operation in this inspectorate during the year 1949-50 fifteen schools,
staffed with 186 teachers—-128 in North Vancouver and 58 in West Vancouver. The
enrolment increased by about 10 per cent over the preceding year, bringing the number
of children attending the schools in this area to 6,025. Of this number, 65 per cent
were enrolled in the elementary Grades 1 to VI and 35 per cent in Grades VII to XIII.
North Vancouver
In order to provide for the anticipated increase in enrolment of more than 400
pupils, a fairly extensive building programme was carried on during the year. This
consisted of a junior high school building of ten classrooms and a gymnasium-auditorium,
an addition of two rooms to Westview School, an addition of two rooms and a lunchroom to Burrard View School, and a large gymnasium-cafeteria adjacent to the senior
high school. This last-mentioned building was officially opened in the spring, and fills
a need long felt by the students of the high school. It is a building which serves the
community in two main ways—as part of the high school during the day and as a community centre at other times.
The policy of providing lunch-rooms was continued, and assistance in supplying
service was generally obtained from the Parent-Teacher Associations. O 76 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
The schools in this district are so located that there is little need of supplying
transportation to school pupils. It is necessary, however, in the case of pupils from
Deep Cove attending high school.
Two additional school patrols were inaugurated during the year—one at Lonsdale
School and a second at Queen Mary School. These were sponsored by the Fraternal
Order of Eagles, who supplied the equipment. One other patrol has been in operation
for some years at Westview School.
Progress was made during the year in library work, under the direction of Mrs.
Dorey, who has an excellent understanding of the problems involved. Physical facilities
are gradually being improved, and teachers are beginning to put into practice proper
library techniques.
As a part of the community centre development, an extensive programme of night-
school activities was carried on, sponsored by the School Board. The response was
excellent, as indicated by the attendance at the wide variety of courses offered. This
phase of adult education has shown marked progress during the past year or two.
Three teachers were on exchange for the year—one in England and two in Toronto.
Benefit should accrue to this district not only from the work done by the three teachers
who spent the year here, but from the experience gained by those teachers who were
on leave.
After many years of devoted service to the schools of North Vancouver, two
teachers retired on superannuation—Miss R. Greenway and Miss E. Williamson. Also
retiring was Mrs. S. Burlock, who had previously been a member of the teaching staff
and had returned to teach during the last few years.
West Vancouver
This school district stretches from the Capilano River to Horseshoe Bay, a distance
of approximately 10 miles. Until this year the children of the area have been accommodated in four schools situated in the eastern section of the municipality, transportation
being provided by arrangement with the municipality's bus system. With the increased
growth of population and the added load on transportation, the School Board has
embarked on a building programme to provide elementary schools in the western section.
One such school, consisting of four classrooms, was opened in the middle of the school-
year at Gleneagles, near the western extremity of the district. Another such school is
planned for the West Bay area, where there are sufficient children in the immediate
vicinity to warrant such a building.
Congestion in the high school was partially relieved with the opening of a building
for the teaching of Home Economics, Industrial Arts, and the Commercial courses.
Plans are under way for the construction of a senior high school to relieve the remaining
overcrowding.
The School Board made considerable progress in its plan to extend and improve
the grounds of the various schools. In particular, the development of the high school
grounds deserves mention. There, two large playing-fields have been completed, and
the larger, with a cinder track around it, has been seeded. With adequate seating
accommodation, this playing-field will supply the needs in physical education not only of
the school itself, but of a large part of the community.
General
Health services are supplied to the schools of both districts by the North Shore
Health Unit, and, with Dr. W. M. Wilson as director and Miss N. Armstrong as supervisor of nurses, the nursing staff carried out a very fine programme of work. Dr. Gundry,
of the Psychiatric Division, examined children referred to him by the teachers or nurses.
Each case included a conference with the teacher, principal, director, nurse, and School
Inspector.    These conferences are proving very valuable. REPORTS OF MUNICIPAL INSPECTORS O 77
Dental services were extended, one full-time dentist being employed in North
Vancouver and a part-time one in West Vancouver.
On the whole the teaching staff of both districts did excellent work. At least one
indication of this was given by the results of the testing programme carried on by the
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research and, in the high schools, by the results of
Departmental examinations.
My work was made easier through the co-operation received from the School Board
and the secretary-treasurer of each school district. Sincere appreciation is expressed
for the splendid efforts made by them on behalf of the school-children of the area.
My thanks are also expressed to the various Parent-Teacher Associations for the interest
in and assistance given to the schools of this area.
School District No. 36 (Surrey)
REPORT OF K. B. WOODWARD, B.A., B.Paed., MUNICIPAL
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
In School District No. 36 the enrolment during the school-year 1949-50 reached
a total of 6,017, an increase of approximately 10 per cent over that of the preceding
year. There were thirty-four elementary schools and four junior-senior high schools in
operation.    The teaching staff numbered 189.
In September the new North Surrey Junior-Senior High School was officially opened
by the Honourable W. T. Straith. During the year there also were opened five new
elementary four-room schools—Bridgeview, Latimer Road, Ray Shepherd, Sunnyside,
and Surrey Centre—and one addition of two rooms to David Brankin. This added
accommodation enabled the double shift to be done away with in several schools, and
the year ended with the shift operating in one high school only and in twelve elementary
classes. Unfortunately, the Johnston Road School burned down in January and the
pupils had to be housed in a hall. When the buildings at present under way are completed, unless something unforeseen happens, there will be only six classes on double
shift in Surrey. This could quite easily be remedied by adding three classrooms to
existing buildings.
The opening of the new high school next year also will mean fewer pupils to
transport and lessen the problem of transportation. For some years past, buses have
been making three trips before and after school. This has necessitated a very long day
for the pupils concerned.    Next year no bus will have to make more than two trips.
The excessive turnover of both pupils and teachers continued to be a problem, but
all signs point to a more stable population and teaching staff in the near future. Indications are that the rapid period of growth is passed and 1950-51 will, with more adequate
accommodation, be much more satisfactory than the immediately preceding years.
In conclusion, I should like to express my appreciation for the co-operation and
help which I have received during the year from the Department of Education, from the
School Board, and from the teaching staff of Surrey. O 78 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
School Districts No. 62 (Sooke), No. 63 (Saanich), No. 64 (Saltspring),
and No. 65 (Cowichan)
REPORT OF J. E. BROWN, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The number of teachers employed in this inspectorate increased during the year from
155 to 184. In three of the four districts there has been a proportionate increase in the
number of children enrolled. In September, 1949, the total enrolment had risen to 4,691.
One exchange teacher from Glasgow, Scotland, served in the North Saanich High School;
a number of special counsellors, supervisors of physical education, and senior principals
have been employed. We have been fortunate in having the services of Inspector J. J.
McKenzie for a portion of the school-year.
School District No. 62 (Sooke)
This district was enlarged to include the former Port Renfrew district and new
schools at Bear Creek and Harris Creek. All buildings were placed under the supervision
of a School Maintenance Department. Increased enrolment and accommodation problems were most pronounced in the Colwood-Langford-Belmont area, where additional
rooms had to be provided and where new buildings are at present being planned under
the direction of the well-known firm of architects, Birley, Wade & Stockdill. A by-law
is being prepared for submission to the ratepayers at an early date.
School District No. 63 (Saanich)
The most outstanding event in this district was the passing of a building by-law for
$750,000 on June 24th, following the defeat of one by a narrow margin in December,
1949. Plans are being completed for the erection of new elementary schools at Sidney,
Brentwood, Royal Oak, and Lochside, and for a new junior-senior high school in the
Elk Lake area, as well as for extensions and repairs to a number of older schools.
School District No. 64 (Saltspring)
This district includes Saltspring Island with its large consolidated elementary-high
school and a number of smaller gulf islands, each with one or two small schools. Difficulties with respect to inter-island transportation is an ever-present problem so far as
high school attendance is concerned.
Equality of opportunity is difficult to achieve, though the Board has done everything
possible for the children of the smaller islands by providing boarding facilities at Ganges
and, where necessary, paying tuition fees of children attending high school in other districts. A new school is being built at Mayne Island, and a site has finally been selected
and plans completed for a school at Fulford Harbour. The need for a new school
building at Saturna Island is also receiving attention.
School District No. 65 (Cowichan)
The new junior-senior high school at Duncan is nearing completion and will be
ready for occupation, it is hoped, by the time school opens in September. Smaller schools
at Malahat Beach, Shawnigan Lake, Bench, and Crofton are at various stages of development. The Board is now planning another by-law to provide for replacing or repairing
some of the older, outmoded schools. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
O 79
As this district is now to become a part of another inspectorate, I wish to take the
opportunity of expressing my sincere appreciation to the Board and teaching personnel
for several happy years of co-operative effort, and to offer them and my successor best
wishes for the future.
School Districts No. 37 (Delta), No. 38 (Richmond), and No. 46 (Sechelt)
REPORT OF J. N. BURNETT, E.D., M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School Organization
Schools
Teachers
District
High
Jr.-Sr.
High
Superior
Elementary
(Graded)
Elementary
(Ungraded)
High and
Jr. High
Elementary
and Superior
No. 37 (Delta)
No. 38 (Richmond)
No. 46 (Sechelt)	
1
1
1
2
3
6
1
2
2
10
14
30
3
20
65
26
Totals	
1
2
2
10
14
47
111
Totals:  Schools, 29; teachers, 158.
Accommodation
(a) In Delta the need for more accommodation became pressing in the Boundary
Bay and Annieville Elementary and the Delta Junior-Senior High Schools. The arrangement with Surrey District for the mutual exchange of students living in the Scott Road
locality was continued this year, but the pupil population has so increased that some
positive plan of school construction by each district, or perhaps a co-operative endeavour,
will have to be undertaken in the very near future.
The two-room Sunbury School is being replaced by a new structure, and a two-room
addition is being added to the Boundary Bay School.
(b) The school population in Richmond is following the pattern of the other Lower
Mainland municipalities. All schools, including outside buildings, were comfortably
filled, but the Richmond Junior-Senior High School was unable to house the Grade VII
students, and these were retained in the various elementary schools. Next year, in
addition to the Grade VII classes, all Grade VIII classes, with four exceptions, will
remain in the elementary schools. These students will not receive the benefits of the
junior high school programme and, in particular, will be denied any training in industrial
arts and home economics. This situation can only be corrected by the provision of
more junior-senior high school facilities.
No new construction has taken place this year. The by-law to provide funds for
a new junior-senior high school was defeated early this year, but a resubmission is
planned for this fall.
(c) Gibsons High, Sechelt Superior, Pender Harbour Superior, and Egmont Elementary Schools showed steady enrolment increases. The by-law providing funds for
the district building programme was resubmitted this year and passed by the ratepayers.
When the programme is completed, this district will have excellent school accommodation.
A two-room school is now being constructed at Egmont to replace the old one-room
structure, and a new portable one-room school is being opened on Nelson Island. Both
of these are of the Quonset type. O 80 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
School Health Services
This year the Richmond Board augmented its health services by establishing a school
dental clinic, employing one full-time dentist and nurse at the Garden City School.
Very commendable progress has been made in examination and treatment, beginning
with the Grade I pupils.
In the Sechelt District provision has been made for a school dentist, but unfortunately it has so far been impossible to procure the services of a person fitted for this work.
Teacher Supply
This year teacher supply appeared to be much better than heretofore. There is
still, however, some difficulty in obtaining and retaining in the smaller centres qualified
instructors in physical education, library, and commercial subjects.
General
At this time thanks are recorded for the sympathetic co-operation of the Deputy
Minister-and his Department officials throughout the year. The assistance from this
quarter has been invaluable in many trying situations. Trustee Boards, secretary-
treasurers, and teachers have carried out their duties in a conscientious fashion, and
their efforts are herewith acknowledged.
School Districts No. 69 (Qualicum), No. 70 (Alberni), and Unattached School
Districts at Bamheld, Clayoquot, Clo-oose, Esperanza, Kildonan, Kyuquot,
Sarita River, Sydney Inlet, Tahsis River, Torino, Ucluelet, and Zehallos.
REPORT OF C. L. CAMPBELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Again this year several new schools were opened in this inspectorate, and although
the Port Renfrew School was taken from the list of unattached schools and added to
School District No. 62 (Sooke), the total number of teachers rose from 126 to 133.
The most significant change this year was the improvement in school plant and
equipment, especially in the rural and unattached schools. Almost without exception,
modern toilet facilities have been or are being installed. Electric lights and pastel
shades of decoration are making the rural one- and two-room schools as attractive
places as the average of the better city schools.
District No. 69 (Qualicum)
This is a large rural district containing nine schools and employing thirty teachers.
The school by-law for a new high school in the district was defeated for the second
time. Rooms in community halls and school basements are in use, and it seems certain
that next year a shift system will have to be resorted to. It is to be hoped sincerely that
a solution will be found soon.
District No. 70 (Alberni)
District No. 70 is classed as a large rural and comprises the two cities of Alberni
and Port Alberni with the surrounding rural area. Its schools range from a thirty-five
teacher senior-junior high school to several one-room rural schools. It employs in all
eighty-seven teachers.
Contracts were let during the year for two new elementary schools and the large
new junior-senior high school.    It is expected that the elementary schools will open in REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 81
September, 1950, and the high school one year later. In spite of numerous setbacks
and disappointments the School Board can now see the goal of its long labours—adequate
accommodation for every school-child in the district.
Unattached Schools
The West Coast of Vancouver Island continues to grow and develop. A new three-
room school was opened at Tahsis River this year, and a new and modern classroom
added to the Zeballos School. Construction was started on a splendid new three-room
school for Ucluelet, and plans are under way for an addition to the school at Tofino.
Clo-oose and Clayoquot Schools have been closed for several years for lack of pupils.
School Districts No. 47 (Powell River), No. 48 (Howe Sound), No. 73
(Alert Bay), No. 74 (Quatsino), and University Hill (Unattached)
REPORT OF T. G. CARTER, M.C., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Powell River
During the past year there has been much progress in this district. New schools at
Blubber Bay, Vananda, and Westview, a three-room annex at Cranberry Lake, and an
extensive addition to the Powell River Junior-Senior High School were completed. Also,
contracts were let for the construction of new schools at False Bay and Lund, which, it is
anticipated, will be ready for use before the end of the summer vacation. A new school
was established at Davies Bay.
In April a fire of undetermined origin razed the old Westview School, but within a
week the five divisions concerned were provided with temporary accommodation and
plans were in motion for the replacement of the lost building. The rapid spread of the
flames along the oil-soaked floors of this school re-emphasizes the hazard created when
floors are thus treated.
Howe Sound
In September one-room schools were established at Creekside and Garibaldi and a
new school building was constructed in each of these communities during the fall term.
On September 24th a by-law was passed for the provision of a new junior-senior high
school at Squamish. At the beginning of the year a public health nurse was stationed in
this district.
Alert Bay
A by-law to provide urgently needed schools at Alert Bay and Port McNeill was
presented to the ratepayers on June 9th and defeated by a very narrow majority.
Quatsino
Plans are under consideration for a by-law to construct a new school at Port Hardy
and an addition to the Winter Harbour School, and also to provide teacherages at Port
Hardy, Coal Harbour, and Quatsino.
University Hill
The population of the area continues to increase and the existing school accommodation has become severely crowded. This year an army hut at Acadia Camp was in use
as a classroom. A considerable addition to the school-grounds here has improved the
play facilities of the pupils immeasurably. O 82 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
School Districts No. 49 (Ocean Falls), No. 50 (Queen Charlotte), No. 51
(Portland Canal), No. 52 (Prince Rupert), and Unattached School District
at Butedale.
REPORT OF J. CHELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The past school-year has seen great interest in this part of the Province. There
has been considerable industrial expansion, with the resultant increase in school population. To meet this, all School Boards have had to plan new buildings or to add to or
modernize existing structures. Further, an increasing number of native Indian children
are attending the public schools, and it is worthy of note that where these pupils attend
regularly there is little or no adjustment problem.
In Ocean Falls District the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education, officially opened the new Sir Alexander Mackenzie Consolidated School in the Bella Coola
Valley. This is a four-room school to serve the local elementary needs and the
secondary needs of the valley. The occasion was darkened by the passing of the principal, Mr. T. L. Davies, a man who had given much to the cultural life of the valley.
In Ocean Falls a start has been made on a new wing to provide gymnasium, home
economics, industrial arts, and administration centres. The school programme at Ocean
Falls serves the community well; it includes kindergarten to Grade XII and night-school
classes.
In the Queen Charlotte District all schools experienced a steady growth. The
School Board made plans for extensive improvements at each centre. The Prince
Rupert Health Unit extended its services to include this district. The service is needed
and appreciated. In June, Masset High School graduation class included in its numbers
Miss Emily Davidson, the first native student to graduate from this school.
Portland Canal District has seen unsettled conditions. At Alice Arm families are
moving to the mine, so that there is every indication a school will be needed in the near
future. The reopening of the Premier mine, near Stewart, has brought new hope to the
area, and the school at Premier, closed for the past two years, is expected to open again
in September.
Prince Rupert District has been active. The construction work at Port Edward,
where the Columbia Cellulose Company, Limited, plans operation, has brought many
people to the district. Steps have been taken to secure a school-site at Port Edward so
that a building may be erected to meet future needs. Construction of the new ten-room
elementary school and first unit of a new high school in Prince Rupert is about to begin.
During the year, night-school classes were organized and well attended. In the year,
also, Booth Memorial High School was again placed on the list of accredited high schools
in the Province.
Due to travel difficulties, it is not possible to hold area conventions. However, the
Prince Rupert Teachers' Association put on a splendid programme for Education Week,
which culminated in a public meeting at which Dr. A. R. Lord was the speaker.
During the year the district received visits from the Superintendent of Education
and the Assistant Superintendent. Boards and teachers enjoyed the opportunity to
discuss problems with these officials.
In conclusion, there are problems in the north but there are opportunities, too.
The problems spring mainly from a feeling of isolation in many school areas. School
Boards are optimistic and conscientious, and parents are interested. I should like to
express my appreciation of the co-operation shown by School Boards, secretary-
treasurers, and teachers during the past year. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 83
School Districts No. 9 (Castlegar), No. 12 (Grand Forks), and No. 13
(Kettle Valley)
REPORT OF C. E. CLAY, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The past year has been one in which the members of two of the School Boards in
this inspectorate have seen the fruits of their labours. In District No. 9 (Castlegar)
the new junior-senior high school is under construction and should be completed, while
in District No. 12 (Grand Forks) the junior-senior high school was completed and
occupied.
District No. 9 (Castlegar)
Continued improvements are being made in the condition of the buildings. A new
one-room school with teacherage attached was built at Renata, while other schools were
redecorated, insulated, and generally improved. As stated above, the new junior-senior
high school is under construction and upon completion will fill an urgent need in this
community.
Communicable diseases affected the attendance during the spring.
As the reorganization of inspectorates means I leave this district, I wish to express
my warmest thanks to the School Board members, the principals, the teachers, and
particularly to the hard-working secretary.
All schools in this district were staffed during the year.
District No. 12 (Grand Forks)
This district has given much attention to the building programme. The Central
Elementary School has been remodelled and is much improved. Of the five schools in
this district, three are new, one remodelled, and the fifth in good condition, except for
lighting.    It is hoped this will be remedied shortly.
The main school plant of three buildings—one for junior-senior high school, one
for intermediate grades, and one for primary grades—all surrounded by spacious and
attractive grounds, offers an excellent opportunity for an educational programme.
Communicable diseases caused the closing of the schools here during the latter
part of the term.
The School Board and Council held discussions regarding the appointment of a
public health nurse for this district. As yet, nothing has materialized, but it is to be
hoped these bodies will plan for this for the next fiscal year.
At the beginning of the year the schools at Fruitova and Outlook (both Doukhobor)
were closed, and arrangements made to transport the pupils to Grand Forks. The
language and attitudes of the pupils have shown a marked improvement, and all concerned are quite happy over the change.
District No. 13 (Kettle Valley)
The housing of pupils in the City of Greenwood still presents a problem. While
the School Board had fluorescent lights installed in the temporary building, other conditions require improvement.
Owing to the limited accommodation and limited offerings available, many Grade
XI and XII pupils from areas distant from the City of Greenwood are finding it necessary
to attend schools outside the district.
The building of a new highway through the district, the availability of electric power
for irrigation along the Kettle River, and the probable development of this area point to
the need of a high school that can serve most of the district.
In the main the rural schools are in good condition and are being improved as rapidly
as possible. O 84 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
All schools in this area were staffed.
The work of the public health nurse, Miss D. Newman, has been much appreciated
by teachers and parents.
In closing, I should like to point out the commendable attitude the School Boards
have taken toward the housing of teachers in outlying districts. Of the nineteen rural
schools in this inspectorate, eleven have teacherages. Where possible they have all
modern conveniences and in all cases they are being comfortably furnished.
School Districts No. 53 (Terrace), No. 54 (Smithers), No. 55 (Burns Lake),
and No. 56 (Vanderhoof)
REPORT OF H. C. FERGUSON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Eighty-seven teachers employed in forty-five schools constituted the staff of this
inspectorate during the past year. School District No. 53 (Terrace) employed twenty-
three teachers and operated twelve schools; School District No. 54 (Smithers) employed
twenty teachers and operated nine schools; School District No. 55 (Burns Lake)
employed twenty-three teachers and operated fifteen schools; School District No. 56
(Vanderhoof) employed twenty-one teachers and operated nine schools. Schools were
opened at Dorreen, Four Mile, Byman's Camp, Southbank, and Nithi River. At Kispiox,
Palling, and Tintagel the schools were closed. Superior status was granted the schools
at Telkwa, Houston, and Fraser Lake.
The operation of more rural schools, the extension of transportation facilities, and
the utilization of assistance given to parents for the education of their children by Boards
and Department have all tended to bring ever-increasing numbers of formerly isolated
children within access of school facilities. These factors, together with the natural
increase in population and the advent of considerable numbers of new Canadians, made
it necessary to increase by eight the instructional staff during the year.
The building of new and modern schools furnished with the latest school equipment,
the gradual improvement of teachers' living conditions, and the adoption of the present
salary schedule have done much to attract and hold fully qualified teachers.
The increased enrolments in the elementary and secondary schools show to what
extent Boards have been successful in bringing educational facilities within reach of the
more remote settlements. It also indicates an awakening interest in secondary education
and the increased holding power of the schools.
In District No. 53 (Terrace) the conversion of two army H-huts to a ten-room
elementary school nears completion and will be ready for occupancy in September. The
rural school at Kitwanga has been enlarged and modernized. At South Hazelton the
school and teacherage have been wired and equipped with electric fittings. Tenders are
now being called for the construction of a one-room school at New Hazelton and a
six-room senior high-elementary school at Hazelton.
In District No. 54 (Smithers) work nears completion on the additions or new buildings at Smithers, Telkwa, and Houston. The addition to the Smithers High School
houses accommodation for both industrial arts and home economics. With the completion of maintenance and repair work this summer, the schools of this district will compare
very favourably with those in other parts of the Province.
In District No. 55 (Burns Lake) considerable work has been done on the many
scattered one-room schools. A good temporary building has been constructed at Ches-
latta. The ratepayers have ratified a by-law calling for an expenditure of $210,000.
The contract for this work was awarded in June. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 85
At Fort St. James, Vanderhoof, Mapes, and Fraser Lake in District No. 56 (Vanderhoof) additions or new constructions have been completed.
In the educational field it is felt that former standards have been well maintained
and good progress made toward the solution of some of the many problems.
With the approval of the Boards of School Trustees, Teachers' Institutes were held
in the fall and spring. These institutes were well attended and appeared to fill a very
definite need.
Following up the district testing programme started last year, teachers, at the
appropriate grade levels, assisted in administering, scoring, and recording the results of
achievement, reading, and mental maturity tests, as well as gaining some experience in
the use of interest inventories.
Teachers were encouraged to make use of the excellent service in visual and auditory
aids provided by the Department of University Extension and the Department of Education.    Many availed themselves of these services.
The assistance given by Inspector J. J. McKenzie during the months of October,
November, and May is sincerely appreciated. His aid, coming as it did during the
busiest months, proved to be most helpful.
Educational activities for the year were suitably climaxed by the visit of the Assistant
Superintendent during the third week in June. Meetings of principals and teachers were
called in all districts for purposes of discussing the adjustment to the secondary-school
programme. At the well-attended meetings, teachers participated freely in all discussions. They have since expressed their gratification at having this opportunity of meeting
the Assistant Superintendent and discussing such a timely topic with him.
Tn closing, I wish to pay tribute to the genuine contribution being made in the
educational field by the Boards, secretaries, principals, and teachers of this inspectorate.
All have given most generously of their time, effort, and training. Appreciation is also
voiced to the officials of the Department, who, through their sympathetic understanding
and unfailing assistance, make considerably lighter the administration of this area.
School Districts No. 42 (Maple Ridge) and No. 43 (Coquitlam)
REPORT OF C. J. FREDERICKSON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The building programme for School District No. 43 was well under way before the
close of the school term. Construction was commenced on the Coquitlam Junior-Senior
High School. Plans were developed for the Port Coquitlam Junior-Elementary School,
for new elementary schools at Mountain View and Port Moody, and for addition to the
Glen School. It is expected that by September, 1951, the onerous shift system will have
come to an end. Plans were also made for extensive improvements to the heating systems
of the loco and Port Coquitlam Elementary Schools. The School Board and its efficient
administration continued its policy of improving the lighting, sanitation, and appearance
of the various existing schools and classrooms.
In School District No. 42 a careful survey was made of the requirements for present
and future school accommodation. The increase in school population has not been as
spectacular as in many other districts, but it has been constant. The present junior-senior
high school, built for a maximum of 600 pupils, is now enrolling 800 pupils. The elementary schools, constructed for the most part a number of years ago, are now no longer
in the centres of population. This shift has increased transportation problems and created
a need for additional schools to service the newly populated areas. The School Board
continued to improve existing facilities. O 86 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
During the year, in both districts, plans were laid and some progress made in
developing art and music as integral parts of the school programme rather than as supplementary activities. It is regrettable that many teachers fail to give these subjects the
important emphasis they require in developing the child's personality.
The Vocational Carpentry and Lumbering class, under the direction of Mr. V. E.
Rickard, successfully designed and constructed a small house. They were also responsible
for the wiring, plumbing, and painting, while the girls of the Home Economics class were
responsible for the decoration. Needless to say, the students participating in this project
were filled with justifiable pride. There can be no doubt but that, for many young people,
educational objectives are most efficiently attained when expressed in terms of concrete
achievements.
Regular meetings were held with the principals. At these meetings continued
emphasis was placed on the importance of supervision with the improvement of instruction as the objective. It has been a gratifying experience to work with the principals, who
have co-operated whole-heartedly in all respects. Various meetings were held with the
teachers, particularly the primary sections.
Principals and teachers continued to work in close co-operation with the health and
social welfare nurses and officials.
School Districts No. 32 (Canyon), No. 33 (Chilliwack), No. 76 (Agassiz), and
Unattached School Districts at Lower Post and Telegraph Creek
REPORT OF S. J. GRAHAM, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Lack of accommodation for the rapidly increasing school population continued to
present difficulties in all districts in this inspectorate during the past year. Further interference with the educational progress resulted from the severe winter weather, which
necessitated the closing of most schools throughout the districts for periods of from four
to six weeks. A pleasing feature of the work in this inspectorate was to witness the
energetic and co-operative efforts of the teachers and the students to overcome these
difficulties. Because of the willingness of all concerned to work diligently during the time
available, the educational standards achieved were much better than might have been
anticipated.
During the year an extensive testing programme was carried out to augment the
testing done by the Department. This testing was carried out under the supervision of
the principals of the districts. During the year regular meetings of all principals were
held to establish standards for their supervisory work.
District No. 32 (Canyon)
New divisions were opened at Yale and Boston Bar. In January the new Hope High
School was completed. With the increasing school population it became necessary to
plan additional extensions to the district's schools. A by-law was approved which provides funds for a gymnasium and three classrooms at Hope, and additional classroom at
Boston Bar, and the installation of a modern heating plant and plumbing for the Laidlaw
School.
District No. 33 (Chilliwack)
The excellent new high school building at Chilliwack was occupied in January.
Until this time the high school had been operating in two shifts. However, because of
the inadequacy of the transportation facilities, it is still necessary to vary the hours of
operation of the high school, with the senior high school opening at 8 a.m. and the junior REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 87
high school at 9 a.m. This district is transporting approximately 1,700 pupils, and
because the lack of buses requires variation in the hours of operation of the schools, considerable inconvenience is caused for many families. The School Board is devoting much
time to finding the solution to the problem of providing transportation for all pupils
requiring it without the necessity of extending the school-day unduly for the children
involved.
With the appointment of Mr. G. W. Graham, principal of the Chilliwack Junior-
Senior High School, to the staff of the Department, a reorganization of the high school
administration took place. The junior and senior high schools have been separated and
a principal appointed to each.
District No. 76 (Agassiz)
A modern one-room school was opened at Harrison Hot Springs and a new Home
Economics and Industrial Arts building occupied at Agassiz.
School accommodation is still inadequate in this district. A new elementary-high
school is required at Agassiz and a second classroom is necessary for Harrison Hot
Springs. During the year the School Board has considered both these projects, and a
by-law is in preparation which incorporates both these projects and will include also the
modernizing of the Harrison Mills two-room school. The co-operative efforts of the
School Board and the district generally are required to carry this necessary programme
to completion.
Unattached Districts
A three-room school was constructed and staffed at Telegraph Creek. A one-room
school with teacherage attached was built at Lower Post.
I would like to thank the teachers, trustees, and school officials who have been so
helpful to me during my first year in this inspectorate.
School Districts No. 28 (Quesnel), No. 57 (Prince George), and
No. 58 (McBride)
REPORT OF WILLIAM H. GRANT, B.S.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
The outstanding feature of the school-year 1949-50 is the fact that Boards of School
Trustees have reached the point where accommodation and facilities for education have
been provided requisite for present enrolments, and they can now give some time and
thought to providing accommodation for future needs.
In February, 1950, the Honourable W. T. Straith and Dr. F. T. Fairey opened a
fine new junior-senior high school in Quesnel to serve the needs of School District No. 28.
Replacing inadequate buildings at Macalister and Castle Rock, two fine one-room schools
of the steel Quonset type were opened in September, 1949, at Alexandria and Castle
Rock respectively. This type of building is somewhat unique in the educational field,
but has proven highly satisfactory throughout the year and functioned well from the
point of view of education. A small portable school was also opened in September at
Ahbau Creek, a small community on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway extension to
Prince George. With eleven pupils varying in age from 5 to 15 years and only two
grades, this proved to be an unusual school during the year. In addition to the new
schools erected, great strides forward have been made in making existing buildings more
functional, comfortable, and efficient.    Having reached this point, the Board is now O 88 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
considering what the future holds, and in a rapidly growing district this is a formidable
problem.
In District No. 57 the Board has continued its policy of improving existing school
buildings and of adapting them to future needs until such time as provision must be made
to replace them. In addition, the Connaught Elementary School in Prince George has
been expanded from three to seven rooms, a second room was added to the Sinclair Mills
school, replacing a dilapidated building that was considered unsafe, and a new one-room
school was opened at Summit Lake on the Hart Highway. Here, also, the Board is
considering plans for the future, when it is anticipated that approximately twenty-five
new classrooms will be required by 1955.
In School District No. 58 the Board has completed a year of surveying and planning,
and is now ready to put a money by-law for a building programme, which will give the
district modern educational facilities in full. That this is necessary is evidenced by the
fact that this Board is renting five inadequate buildings for school purposes, as well as
utilizing two basement rooms in the McBride School for classroom purposes.
The year has seen a distinct improvement in the number and quality of qualified
teachers in the inspectorate. Coincident with this has come an improvement in the
standard of learning. The earnestness and sincere endeavour with which teachers have
worked toward improved standards is to be commended.
Teachers' Institutes in all three districts were again conducted during the fall and
spring. The large percentage of teachers in these districts from other Provinces and of
recent Normal graduates would seem to warrant the continuation of these conferences.
A feature of all institutes has been the alacrity and enthusiasm with which older, more
experienced, or more expert teachers have participated in passing along their knowledge
and skill to others.
The pattern set last year in the area of teaching-supplies, libraries, and equipment
has been followed again this year and, it is anticipated, will become standard practice
in the future. With adequate teaching-supplies, provision, servicing, and extension
of libraries by the Public Library Commission, and a policy of providing essential
equipment, as funds permit, working conditions for teachers are showing a definite
improvement.
In the field of providing living accommodation for teachers and pupils, School
Boards continue to find difficulty. The great divergence of standards in boarding-places
combined with the varying living standards of teachers makes the task of providing
suitable accommodation a formidable one for secretary-treasurers. In the main centres
Boards have succeeded in securing fairly adequate quarters for sub-letting to teachers,
and in the rural areas portable teacherages would seem to be the answer. The Prince
George dormitory has again proven its worth by providing living-quarters for students
from the more distant parts of the school district. That worth is measured in terms of
the better average marks made by dormitory students as compared to the averages for
the school.
The assignment of Inspector R. G. Williston as a part-time Inspector in this district
has been of inestimable value in giving more supervision and assistance to teachers, and
in bringing a greater measure of technical advice and practical experience in the field of
education to School Boards.
The year has not passed by without once again exemplifying the interest, effort, and
enthusiasm with which Board members have attacked the local problems in the field of
education. In closing, I wish to express to them and to the secretary-treasurers my
profound admiration for the spirit they have shown, and my sincere thanks for having
made my task an easier one in this inspectorate. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 89
School Districts No. 6 (Kootenay Lake), No. 7 (Nelson), and No. 8 (Slocan)
REPORT OF E. E. HYNDMAN, B.A., B.Paed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 6 (Kootenay Lake)
As in the previous year, fourteen teachers were employed in this school district.
There have been no changes in the organization of these schools, except that transportation was provided for Grade VIII and high school pupils from Ainsworth to Kaslo. The
decision of the Canadian Mining and Smelting Company to develop the Bluebell mine to
production has resulted in a need for additional school accommodation in Riondel. The
Board of School Trustees has completed arrangements for the construction of one classroom during the summer months.
School District No. 7 (Nelson)
Eighty-one teachers were employed by the Board of this school district, with additional divisions established at Reeves MacDonald, Willow Point, and Hume Elementary
Schools. All the elementary schools in this district except one are now reduced to Grades
I to VI. Pupils from Grade VII and above attend the four secondary schools in this
district. Additional transportation routes were established from Sheep Creek and Remac
to Salmo.
Two one-room additions were planned to meet the expansion in the rural portion
of the district. An addition at Willow Point will replace a temporary building and an
addition at Salmo will meet the rapidly increasing secondary-school population there.
These will be ready for school opening in September and will leave seven divisions in
temporary quarters. The Board of School Trustees is giving consideration to an over-all
building programme for the district.
School District No. 8 (Slocan)
Additional teachers were employed in the high schools in New Denver and Slocan
City, making a total of thirty-one in the district.
In February the ratepayers of this district approved a by-law for buildings and
equipment which will cost a total of $192,000. Construction has been started, and the
following will be ready for occupancy in September: Three-classroom high school and
activity-room in New Denver; two-classroom high school in Slocan City; two-classroom
high school in the South Slocan area; reconstruction of the New Denver Elementary
School; teacherage in Winlaw.
A bus route is planned for September to service the new high school at South Slocan,
transporting high school pupils from Vallican, Passmore, Slocan Park, and Crescent
Valley.   This area previously offered no opportunities for secondary education.
General
It is pleasing to report that there has been a steady improvement in efficiency in most
phases of school administration. New secretary-treasurers have been appointed to these
three districts, and they are to be commended for the rapidity with which they have
grasped the details of this most important position. I am indebted to them and to their
Boards for the high degree of co-operation during the past year.
The principals and teachers in this area are showing a high professional interest, and
to them I owe my thanks for the friendly relationships which I enjoy. O 90 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
School Districts No. 1 (Fernie), No. 2 (Cranbrook), and No. 5 (Creston)
REPORT OF F. P. LEVIRS, M.A., M.S.(Ed.), INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School population continues to increase steadily throughout the inspectorate.
Although most marked in the elementary-school grades, its effect is becoming noticeable
in the junior high schools. The senior high schools, except in District No. 5, have not yet
been affected to any great extent.
School construction continues to be a matter of major concern. The new Mount
Baker Junior-Senior High School at Cranbrook is well under way and should be completed by April, 1951. A two-room school at Camp Lister will be ready for use in
September, 1950. Schools at Erickson and Wynndel have been reconstructed and
modernized. The by-law authorizing the borrowing of funds for completion of the
Creston Valley Junior-Senior High School and the reconstruction of the old building for
use as an elementary school received the assent of the ratepayers by a wide margin.
Preliminary planning of a large construction programme in District No. 1 has been
receiving the attention of the Board there. Special mention should be made of the
splendid co-operation shown by citizens of Newgate who met an emergency by constructing an addition to their school with voluntary labour and some donated materials.
The demand and the necessity for increased transportation facilities have both been
felt. While many buses are now making double trips, Districts No. 1 and No. 2 have
each had to purchase an additional fifty-five-passenger school bus. New routes have been
established from Roosville to Grasmere, from Mayook to Cranbrook, and in the Newgate
area. There are very few pupils left in this inspectorate without the means of attending
secondary schools.
Increased enrolments forced the opening of new divisions at Fernie, Cranbrook,
Creston, and Wynndel. The school at Roosville was closed because of decreased enrolment, as were the second division at Fort Steele and the third division at Canyon. The
status of the Waldo Superior School was raised to that of an elementary-senior high school,
while an additional grade was offered at Crawford Bay Superior School.
Counselling services were introduced at the Creston Valley Junior-Senior High
School. A second year was added to the successful vocational Coal-mining Course at
Fernie High School. The shortage of qualified teachers in languages, physical education,
library work, counselling, home economics, and the commercial studies is severely handicapping secondary schools of this area.
Students from Cranbrook and Fernie High Schools won Senior Matriculation and
University Entrance scholarships respectively. It is hoped that the high standards of
achievement shown by these students will spur others to similar successful effort.
Improvement of school libraries has received some attention during the year. The
appointment of a librarian to the staff of the Creston United Elementary Schools has led
to increased efficiency of library service in that locality.
The Boards of School Trustees continue to discharge their duties most effectively—
an unselfish contribution to community service and to the cause of education in this
Province. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS
School Districts No. 10 (Arrow Lakes) and No. 11 (Trail)
O 91
REPORT OF W. E. LUCAS, B.A., B.P^d., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
In common with the rest of the Province this inspectorate has shown, during the
past four years, a steady increase in school population and teaching personnel. The
following table indicates the growth:—
District No.
10
District No.
11
1946
1949
1950
1946
1949
1950
Enrolment—
Grades I to VIII ...  ~    	
282
48
14
9
414
99
17
10
437
104
18
7
2,703
812
112
13
3,239
948
137
13
3,426
Grades IX to XIII  _.	
989
148
13
Pupil enrolment for both districts has increased from 4,700 in 1949 to 4,956 in
1950. The number of teachers employed during the year was 166, an increase of 12
over the preceding year. It is gratifying to note the continued growth in attendance
at high school in District No. 10 (Arrow Lakes).
District No. 11 (Trail) has already accomplished much in fulfilling the provisions
of By-law No. 2 passed in April, 1949. The four-room school in Sunningdale was completed and occupied in November. It provides this new subdivision with an excellent
primary school. Construction of the new Rossland Junior-Senior High School and the
Trail Senior High School is well under way. The former should be ready for occupancy
early in 1951 and the latter by September, 1951.
The outstanding educational development of the year in School District No. 10
(Arrow Lakes) was the completion of the building programme outlined in By-law No. 4.
The following new schools were occupied in the fall of 1949:—
(1) Nakusp Elementary School—five classrooms with a suitable activity-room.
(2) Nakusp High School—reconstruction of two classrooms with small but
suitable laboratory, library, and commercial rooms.
(3) Arrow Park Elementary-High School—three classrooms.
(4) Burton Elementary School—two classrooms.
(5) Needles Elementary-High School—two classrooms.
(6) Edge wood Elementary School—two classrooms.
Under the direction of the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research two series of
tests were administered. In the fall term, tests of mental ability and work-study skills
were given all pupils in Grade VIII and tests of mental ability and reading were given all
in Grade IV. During the spring term, language tests were administered to all students
taking French and Latin II and III. Test results indicated that pupils in both districts
are, on the whole, well up to standard.
The School Boards have continued to perform their duties in a conscientious and
efficient manner. The various trustees have given unselfishly of their time and energy
in the cause of education. O 92 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
School Districts No. 24 (Kamloops), No. 25 (Barriere), and No. 31 (Merritt)
REPORT OF H. McARTHUR, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
During the past year the energies of the three School Boards in this inspectorate
have been concentrated on problems relating to increased accommodation. In December a by-law for $672,500 was approved by the ratepayers of District No. 24. The passing of this by-law by a large majority was heartening to the Kamloops School Board,
which had seen its first by-law, submitted the previous year, go down to defeat. It is
intended to provide a large junior-senior high school building and a dormitory in Kamloops City, a six-room elementary building at North Kamloops, a new three-room superior
building at Westwold, two-room elementary buildings at Monte Lake and Valleyview,
a one-room building at Westsyde, a remodelled elementary building with a teacherage at
Savona, and two additional classrooms, together with extensive improvements, at Chase.
Tenders on most of these projects will soon be called for.
The Barriere School Board has been faced with serious overcrowding at Barriere
River Superior School, where the enrolment in the senior division has been unexpectedly
large since the superior school was established in September, 1948. There has also
been a demand for better accommodation from ratepayers of Darfield and Cahilty. The
Board proposes to submit a by-law in August to provide a fully modern two-room high
school building at Barriere River and new elementary buildings in the other two
communities.
In District No. 31 the Board included in its budget the sum of $10,000 for the
erection of a one-room modern elementary building at Douglas Lake, where a school has
been needed for at least two years. Plans for this project have been approved and
tenders are being called for. A second division at Brookmere was opened in the community hall in September. Any considerable increase in enrolment in this community
will necessitate the construction of an additional classroom.
The planning of these projects has increased the heavy burden resting on the
shoulders of already overworked trustees and secretary-treasurers. Participation in
frequent Board and committee meetings, most of them long and trying, and conscientious
individual attention to numerous matters entailing much travelling and loss of time from
business testify to trustees' active interest and energy.
Additional transportation has also been, or is about to be, provided in all three
districts. Barriere District has a new bus in operation on the Little Fort-Barriere route;
Kamloops District established a new route for secondary pupils from McLure to Kamloops City, a distance of 30 miles, and supplied a bus for the Westwold area; Merritt
has purchased a bus for the Mamette Lake area.
In the three districts the improvement of existing buildings and equipment continues.
The installing and equipping of a satisfactory science laboratory in the Merritt High and
Elementary School is particularly noteworthy.
School Districts No. 26 (Birch Island), No. 27 (Williams Lake), No. 29
(Lillooet), and No. 30 (Ashcroft)
REPORT OF F. A. McLELLAN, M.A., B.Paed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School District No. 26 (Birch Island)
During the latter part of 1949 the attention of the Board was largely devoted to
completion of new schools at East Black Pool and Upper Clearwater, and new teacher- REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 93
ages at Avola, East Black Pool, and Upper Clearwater. These buildings, all of frame
construction and fully insulated, should take care of the plant requirements of these areas
for some years to come. The year 1949-50 saw some difficulty in satisfying, on a temporary basis, the classroom requirements of Clearwater Superior School. This was
accomplished by opening a third classroom in rented premises, pending the completion of
permanent accommodation on the new school-site at Clearwater, purchased during the
past year. All schools were adequately staffed, and it is gratifying to report that the
majority of the staff are returning to their positions in 1950-51. An innovation was
adopted this past year in showing, in several schools monthly, motion pictures from the
Division of Visual Education, using a rented projector. These films were well received
by all concerned.
This year, also, the Board is making extensive repairs to existing buildings, necessitating the employment of a full-time maintenance-man. It is to be reported that this
method is proving less costly than trying to rely on local labour in each area.
School District No. 27 (Williams Lake)
During the school-year 1949-50 considerable consolidation took place. Nine old
one-room schools were closed and new two-room schools were constructed at Alexis
Creek, Lone Butte, Forest Grove, and Lac la Hache. New one-room schools were constructed at Forest Grove, Bridge Lake, and Dog Creek. A new four-room elementary
school was constructed at Williams Lake. Ten bus contracts were signed for the transportation of pupils to consolidated schools. The consolidation has proved successful and
is popular with pupils and parents in the areas concerned. Despite a severe winter and
bad road conditions, only three days' bus travel were missed due to road conditions.
Some schools were closed for periods of up to ten days due to severe cold weather, but
this was not due to failure of buses to operate.
Mr. R. C. Grant, executive assistant to the Deputy Minister of Education, officially
opened the new schools at Forest Grove, while the Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of
Education, and Dr. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister of Education, officiated at the opening
of the new school at Williams Lake. The Minister and Deputy Minister also attended a
meeting of parents and inspected the new school at Lac la Hache.
New teacherages were constructed at Alexis Creek and Lone Butte and a similar
teacherage has been commenced at Forest Grove. The building programme authorized
by By-law No. 1 will be completed in the fall of 1950, with the finishing of the Forest
Grove teacherage and some work on the interior of the Alexis Creek School.
Special mention should be made of the Bridge Lake School junior choir, which won
the Kamloops Board of Trade Shield for rural and small school choirs. Very successful
zone sports days were held at Lone Butte and Horsefly. A district meet was held in
Williams Lake.
School District No. 29 (Lillooet)
The school-year 1949-50 has seen the main part of its building programme completed—a new four-room high school at Bralorne and Lillooet and a school and
teacherage at Pavilion. The building of a duplex and purchase of a teacherage at Lillooet
has helped toward the problem of teacher accommodation. A new one-room school at
Gold Bridge and the addition of two more rooms at Bralorne will help the ever-increasing
demand for accommodation. The purchase of two new buses—one at Lillooet and one
for the Bridge River Valley—has met transportation difficulties. A slide over the Bridge
River school-ground and flood damage at Minto caused some anxiety. The donation of
library books to the Bralorne, Bridge River, and Lillooet Schools by the respective Parent-
Teacher Associations has given this district libraries of which the people are proud. O 94 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
School District No. 30 (Ashcroft)
During the past year this district has been primarily concerned with an extensive
building programme. A successful by-law for $149,000 was put before the ratepayers on
March 4th, 1950. Four-room high schools are to be built at Ashcroft, Clinton, and
Lytton. Two new one-room schools to replace very old and dilapidated buildings at Big
Bar Creek and Foster Bar are under construction; also two portable one-room schools
are being built in the Green Lake district, where the pupils have previously been completely dependent upon correspondence and home instruction. The by-law also includes
the building of three teacherages in the rural areas of Eagan Lake, Foster Bar, and
Big Bar Creek. In the past years the teachers in these districts have had to put up with
exceptionally poor living conditions. The building programme will greatly improve the
educational standards for the whole district and will serve many more pupils than it has
in the past.
Two new school buses have been purchased to transport pupils to the Clinton and
Lytton Schools, which will improve the efficiency of the transportation and, at the same
time, greatly reduce the cost.
Playground equipment has been purchased for the Ashcroft School with the assistance of the local students' council, and it is hoped that in the near future both Clinton
and Lytton will be able to add this equipment to their playgrounds. Increased attention
is being paid to sports activities. The pupils of the school district held a track meet at
Ashcroft on May 20th to choose representatives for the Kamloops meet, held May 27th.
The representatives of the Ashcroft School District were very proud to receive third
rating at this meet. Other tournaments and sports meets are being organized for the
coming year.
Conclusion
In conclusion, I wish to express my appreciation for the co-operation I have received
from the different School Boards in my inspectorate. The Boards and their secretary-
treasurers are to be congratulated for their successful efforts in bringing about improved
educational facilities in their respective districts.
School Districts No. 59 (Peace River South), No. 60 (Peace River North), and
Unattached Schools at Camp Mile 163, Camp Mile 300, Fort Nelson, and
Fort Nelson Airport.
REPORT OF E. MARRIOTT, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The culmination of many years of planning resulted in the completion of the new
South Peace Junior-Senior High School for the fall term of 1949. This very fine school
provided facilities for a much broadened secondary programme and serves the whole
South Peace River District. Bus transportation for the immediate area and an excellent
fifty-student dormitory make possible its utilization by the students from rural communities.
Also of importance in bettering the outlook of education in this area has been the
marked improvement in staffing the rural schools with trained teachers. The increasing
availability of teachers from our Normal Schools resulted last year in all but a few schools
having the services of fully qualified instructors.
Some forty-three one-room schools were in operation in this area last year. The
large farms, resulting in scattered population, and the difficult road conditions make
consolidation of these small units inadvisable for the present. The problem, therefore,
facing the School Boards is to provide good rural school facilities at a reasonable cost. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 95
A small portable school of modern classroom design was opened at East Pine in January,
1950. This school proved eminently satisfactory and has been adopted by this area as
the answer for school accommodation for small enrolments.
Both school districts received the assent of the ratepayers to by-laws for improved
school facilities. Comprehensive programmes of replacing outmoded rural schools and
the reconstruction of standard small schools are now under way. Provision in the
by-laws was also made for a new sixteen-room elementary school at Dawson Creek,
a new four-room school at Pouce Coupe, and a modern junior-senior high school for the
North Peace River District.
The expansion of the R.C.A.F. airport at Fort Nelson and the maintenance camp at
Mile 300 on the Alaska Highway resulted in the opening of a second division in each
community. A new and satisfactory two-room school was opened at Camp 300 in
January, 1950.
Because of a more fully qualified staff, some progress was apparent in the improvement of educational standards of this area. A testing programme was introduced and
regular conferences of the teachers held. The services of the branches of the Public
Library Commission and the Correspondence School, both located in the Peace River
District, were extended.
Mr. R. G. Williston, Inspector of Schools, was able to devote approximately half
his time in this area. His excellent assistance made possible a more complete inspection
of all school matters.
The fullest co-operation was extended to me and to Mr. Williston by the Boards of
School Trustees. The real contribution to education made by the individual members of
the Boards is most commendable. Their faithful devotion to school affairs is assurance
of continued educational progress in the Peace River area.
School Districts No. 17 (Princeton) and No. 23 (Kelowna)
REPORT OF A. S. MATHESON, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
" It is the function of the school, through carefully selected experiences, to stimulate,
modify, and direct the growth of each pupil physically, mentally, morally, and socially
so that the continual enrichment of the individual's life and an improved society may
result."
As we review the work of another year in this inspectorate, we feel that we can
report with confidence that, by and large, all those charged with responsibility in connection with the operation of the schools have sought to achieve this great objective as
enunciated in " The Aims and Philosophy of Education in B.C." The trustees, the
secretary-treasurers and their office staffs, the principals and the other members of the
teaching staffs all deserve commendation and the thanks of the public for service rendered
beyond the strict letter of their obligations.
In spite of many problems, arising from such circumstances as unsatisfactory temporary accommodation and the inexperience or inadequate training of some of the workers,
a gratifying degree of success has been manifest. Pupils of all grades have been happy
and profitably busy, under competent guidance, in the business of the fourfold development described above. While problems of accommodation, equipment, pupil conveyance, the expansion of curricular offerings, and many other things have occupied our
time and attention, we have not lost sight of the fact that they are important only as they
contribute to the present happy living and the progressive growth of the pupils leading to O 96 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
the end-product sought—namely, good citizens, capable of effective personal living and
of discharging their full responsibility as members of a democratic state.
To achieve these ends, much attention has been given to the improvement of the
daily programme, methods of instruction, classroom procedures, methods of evaluating
pupil growth, the application of corrective instruction, and provision for individual
differences. Meetings with the staffs of the larger schools, regular monthly meetings of
rural teachers, and many conferences with individual teachers have been used to serve
these purposes.
Staffing, while somewhat easier than for a number of years, was still difficult in
respect to assistants in the smaller secondary schools and to specialists in home economics,
physical education, music, and commercial subjects. However, all positions were filled,
but, in a few cases, instructors with less than the desired qualifications were employed.
The health programme throughout the inspectorate is well organized and effectively
carried out. All schools are served by the regional health units, and the co-operation
of the doctors and nurses with the teaching staffs has been excellent.
The following points regarding the individual districts are worthy of report:—
School District No. 17 (Princeton)
The net enrolment for the year was 691 and the teaching staff numbered 28.
Secondary-school work is carried on at Princeton and Copper Mountain, while elementary
schools are conducted at Allenby, Coalmont, Copper Mountain, Princeton, and Tula-
meen. During the year a new eight-classroom elementary-school wing and new secondary-school accommodation, including an auditorium-gymnasium, home economics
laboratory, industrial arts shop, lunch-room, and kitchen were erected in Princeton and
the Coalmont Elementary School was reconstructed. Both are now a credit to the district
and should result in greatly improved educational programmes.
School District No. 23 (Kelowna)
The net enrolment for the year was 4,131 and the teaching staff numbered 139.
Secondary-school work is consolidated at Kelowna, Rutland, and Westbank, while elementary schools are conducted in each of the fifteen attendance areas. High school
accommodation became adequate when the new senior high school building at Kelowna
and the new junior-senior high school buildings at Rutland and Westbank were occupied
last September. Five new elementary-school buildings and two additions to other
elementary buildings which are now under construction and expected to be ready for
use in September will satisfy the need for the present.
School Districts No. 66 (Lake Cowichan), No. 67 (Ladysmith), and
No. 68 (Nanaimo)
REPORT OF W. A. PLENDERLEITH, M.A., D.P^d., F.R.S.A., F.C.P.,
A.M.R.S.T., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Staff and Enrolment
During the school-year 1949-50, 37 teachers were employed in District No. 66,
35 teachers in District No. 67, and 113 teachers in District No. 68, making a total of 185
teachers for the inspectorate.   This is an increase of 22 teachers over last year's total staff. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 97
Buildings
The general policy governing buildings has been to provide instruction for pupils
from Grades I to VI at their home centres, and to centralize instruction for students
from Grades VII to XIII in secondary-school buildings where proper facilities could be
provided.
In all three districts the increased enrolment has resulted in demands for additional
classroom accommodation, and in all three districts money by-laws to provide the necessary school buildings have been approved by the ratepayers.
In District No. 66, in addition to passing a by-law in 1948, which resulted in the
opening of a ten-room elementary school at Lake Cowichan, a one-room rural school at
Nitinat, and a two-room addition to the existing school at Yount, the ratepayers in 1949
voted funds to provide a six-room addition to the new Lake Cowichan High School.
In District No. 67 the passage of the by-law to provide an elementary-junior high
school at Chemainus, an elementary school at Saltair, and a junior-senior high school at
Ladysmith was overwhelmingly approved by the ratepayers. Work on these schools has
already commenced and the Ladysmith District School Board hopes to have the Saltair
School ready for school opening in September, 1950.
In District No. 68 a money by-law for $1,747,000 was approved to provide for the
building of a senior high school, the building of seven small rural elementary schools, and
the reconstruction of several existing schools. Four of the seven elementary schools
approved in the by-law will be in operation in September,. 1950. The other three, together with the new high school, will be built during the following year.
Staff
In Districts No. 66, No. 67, and No. 68 the supply of regular classroom teachers
continues to be adequate. Special teachers in physical education, in commercial work,
and in home economics are still in short supply.
Testing Programme
All schools in this inspectorate continue to participate in the Province-wide testing
programmes directed by the Division of Tests, Standards, and Research. In addition to
the Provincial programme, district testing programmes have been carried out by the senior
principals and local testing programmes by the principals of the larger schools. The
results of these testing programmes continue to indicate that the fundamental skills are
being faithfully taught to the pupils.
Health Service
The health services of all schools in this inspectorate continue to be provided by the
Central Vancouver Island Public Health Unit. In addition to the vast amount of work
done among the pre-school children by the personnel of the health unit, a very thorough
programme of preventive work in immunization, inoculation, and vaccination has been
completed for those in attendance at the public schools.
Conclusion
In conclusion, I would like to express my appreciation to the principals, teachers, and
School Board members in these districts for the harmonious and efficient manner in which
they have worked together to attain the objectives suggested by the Department of
Education. O 98 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
School Districts No. 71 (Courtenay) and No. 72 (Camphell River)
REPORT OF HAROLD D. STAFFORD, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
It is a pleasure to report, with few exceptions, teachers are competent and conscientious in the performance of their duties. The instruction obtainable at all grade levels
is of creditable standard. Attention is drawn to a situation, too frequently common,
that statistical returns are made in a manner which reflects little credit to the teachers.
In School District No. 71 (Courtenay) the defeat of a by-law has seriously retarded
the modernization of the school system. This is especially serious at the secondary level
of instruction. However, the year has found considerable improvements in facilities
and the redecoration of many classrooms. Much work must be done and large sums of
money expended if the district is to provide the school environment and educational
opportunities of a high school.
The Board of School Trustees of School District No. 72 (Campbell River) has
obtained some substantial satisfaction from its work. The new Campbell River Elementary High School and the first Quonset-type school in British Columbia, at Surge Narrows,
were officially opened. New school buildings at Quadra Island, Mansons Landing, and
Squirrel Cove have been completed, while throughout the district there has been a general
improvement in the supply of equipment and through the repainting of classrooms.
I express my appreciation of and my thanks for the work done by many people in
furthering education in both school districts and conclude this report by listing some
successful group activities of the year:—
Tests for physical fitness and athletic competitions.
School dramatic and school music festivals.
Home economics and industrial arts displays.
Exhibitions of school work.
Classes for in-service training of teachers.
Night-school classes in industrial arts and commerce.
High school graduation exercises.
Trips to observe sittings of the Provincial Legislature.
School Districts No. 19 (Revelstoke) and No. 20 (Salmon Arm)
REPORT OF L. B. STIBBS, B.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
School Boards have been untiring in their efforts to bring about better living conditions for the pupils and teachers. Other major problems confronting trustees have been
those relating to personnel, transportation, and the all-important problem of school
finance. Too much credit cannot be given to the men and women who serve their
communities in this important work.
The School Board of District No. 20 is working toward the completion of a long-term
modernization programme that will bring about consolidation in the Carlin, Celista,
Eagle River, Falkland, and Salmon Arm areas. This will eliminate twenty of the twenty-
eight one-room schools presently occupied. It is expected that district-owned buses
will be increased from four to ten, while two areas will be served through private contract
as at present. Work has already commenced on the consolidated elementary and junior-
senior high schools in Salmon Arm. These buildings will be ready for September, 1950,
and it is hoped that the four remaining consolidated schools will be in use early in the REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 99
next school-year.    It is to be noted that a number of one-room schools will be continued
to serve primary pupils as close to their own homes as possible.
In the Revelstoke District there are in operation one high school and two elementary
schools in the city, a consolidated elementary-high school at Arrowhead, and one-room
schools at Albert Canyon, Beaton, Glacier, and Twelve Mile. The trustees have continued this year on their programme of replacing, adding to, and modernizing and
renovating existing structures. A splendid job has been done in this connection, and
the rural schools of this area would compare favourably with any in the Province. Ratepayers of the district approved a by-law recently, and this will enable the school Board
to provide a much-needed gymnasium-auditorium and three new classrooms for the high
school in the near future.
School Districts No. 3 (Kimberley), No. 4 (Windermere), and No. 18 (Golden)
REPORT OF C. I. TAYLOR, B.A., B.Ed., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
Enrolment increased in School District No. 3 by 106, to make a total of 1,424
pupils. District No. 4 increased from 326 to 344 and District No. 18 from 322 to 341.
Three additions were made to the staff in District No. 3. A sixth division was added to
Invermere School, and Galena School was reopened in District No. 4.
The teacher situation for 1949-50 was as follows: Qualified teachers, 74; qualified
but over age, 2; issued temporary certificates, 3. Twelve inexperienced teachers were
employed.
In District No. 3 the new sixteen-room elementary school in Kimberley was opened
for classes in September, the new high school addition was partly occupied in January,
and a new four-room elementary school was ready for use February 1 st. This completes
the building programme for the Kimberley district for the present. School District No. 4
placed a by-law before the ratepayers in November for schools at Invermere, Windermere,
and Brisco. This was passed by a large majority, 191 to 11. Construction commenced
at Invermere in May, and it is hoped to have the school ready for use by September, 1950.
A new classroom addition was made to Edgewater School. District No. 18 opened a two-
room addition to the Golden Elementary-Senior High School in September.
Transportation by contract was replaced by district-owned buses in District No. 4.
This permitted the pupils of Edgewater to attend Invermere High School for the first time.
In District No. 18 pupils were transported from McMurdo Bench and Kimberley increased
its service to Meadowbrook with the purchase of an additional bus.
A testing programme was continued throughout the districts to supplement the Provincial programme. Standards in most schools are good, although appreciable weaknesses
were found in reading in some rural schools. Meetings with teachers were arranged to
discuss ways and means of improving the reading.
Health services in the districts continued to be most efficiently handled by the two
public health nurses.
The first East Kootenay Drama Festival was organized and successfully staged in the
new Kimberley High School auditorium.
I am leaving these districts and would again like to express my gratitude and appreciation for the loyal, conscientious service of the teachers, and for the excellence of the
work of the School Boards in their unstinting efforts to improve education. Principals,
teachers, Boards, and secretary-treasurers have been most helpful and co-operative, and
have made the four years spent in the East Kootenay a memorable and happy experience. O 100 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
School Districts No. 34 (Abbbtsford), No. 35 (Langley), and No. 75 (Mission)
REPORT OF B. THORSTEINSSON, B.A., M.B.A.,
INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
This inspectorate, with offices located at Abbotsford, embraces the Langley, Abbots-
ford, and Mission areas.    As of June, 1950, the following statistics apply:—
District
Pupils
Schools
Teachers
No. 34 (Abbotsford)	
2,990
2,534
1,750
18
19
15
101
No. 35 (Langley)                             ..   —
93
No. 75 (Mission)                     ...
61
7,274
52
255
During the year a steady but diminishing increase occurred in school enrolment.
The valued assistance of Inspector Jeffery, who had been assigned to assist with the
inspections in the larger inspectorates, made it possible to complete all the necessary
inspections for the year.
School District No. 34 (Abbotsford)
In order to meet the increase in school enrolment in this district the Board of School
Trustees submitted a by-law to the ratepayers in the fall of 1949. This by-law was
unsuccessful. A revised plan has been worked out and will be voted upon in October,
1950.
During the year further progress was made in modernizing the old school buildings.
Efficient secretarial and maintenance services have combined to bring fruition to progressive Board policy.
Among other improvements effected in the Abbotsford district are the establishment
of a music-record library, the organization of a new system of distributing films from
a locally established library, the organization of a special-opportunity class for intermediate-grade pupils, the extension of and the improvement in music-teaching, the progress
made in primary reading, the application of the enterprise approach in the social studies,
and the remedial programme worked out in certain schools.
Inclement weather resulted in the closing of schools for a considerable period during
January. In spite of this loss of time, Matriculation scholarships were won by John
Klassen, James Allen Inglis, and Harry Pankratz.
It would be fitting to draw attention to the excellent attitude of the teaching staff in
this district. Their co-operation and active interest has been apparent at all times and
their relationship with the Board of School Trustees has been a very happy one. The
Board, on its part, through constant and considered attention to teacher needs, including
a positive attitude toward the teachers' economic welfare, has ensured a smoothly
operating educational unit.
School District No. 35 (Langley)
A new twenty-three-room high school recently completed was formally opened early
in the school-year by the Minister of Education, the Honourable W. T. Straith. The
school, built to house 750 pupils, opened its doors in September to more than 950.
It had been hoped that the new school would see the successful operation of a course
in Vocational Agriculture but an insufficient number of interested pupils made this
impractical. Much work has since been done to promote more interest and appreciation
in this field, and plans have been laid to establish the course in September, 1950. REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 101
A successful night-school was operated during the winter. There were, in all,
twelve different courses offered.
Junior Matriculation scholarships were won by Robert Gruno and Senior Matriculation scholarships by Frank Powell.
As in the past the teacher-trustee relationship continued to operate on a satisfactory
basis. Staff problems have been seriously and sympathetically met at all times by the
Board.    This has been one of the noteworthy aspects of the activities of this Board.
School District No. 75 (Mission)
This district, in keeping with the other school districts in this area, lacked adequate
school-building accommodation. A building by-law, which failed in its first presentation
in the fall, was resubmitted to the ratepayers in slightly modified form and was finally
approved by them in the spring of 1950. This by-law makes provision for adequate
housing for a satisfactory and complete educational offering in the district.
The success of the by-law was a distinct tribute to the members of the School Board,
who have continued to insist upon providing the necessary funds for an adequate school
programme.
The maintenance and renovation programme, including insulation, has been established on a sound basis, and a five-year redecoration programme has been embarked upon.
During the year, health services in the area were broadened and extended through
the establishment of a health unit and through the extension of the school dental service.
School Districts No. 21 (Armstrong) and No. 22 (Vernon)
REPORT OF A. S. TOWELL, M.A., INSPECTOR OF SCHOOLS
The outstanding event of the school-year 1949-50, as far as this inspectorate is
concerned, was the opening in April, 1950, of several new school buildings in School
District No. 22 (Vernon). This brought a welcome end to the shift system and greatly
relieved overcrowding, besides providing the City of Vernon, at long last, with a school
gymnasium.
The largest of the new buildings, the Vernon Junior High School, provided its 650
pupils with spacious and attractive accommodation, and with adequate and modern
facilities. Nearly 7 acres of grounds, now levelled and grassed, will afford ample space
for physical education activities and games.
This new building has also permitted the achievement of another highly desirable
objective—namely, the separation of the junior high school from the senior high school.
Even by June, 1950, although the separation had been in effect for only a few weeks, the
beneficial effects were very apparent and were appreciated by all concerned.
At the north end of the city a six-room school, specially designed for the primary
grades, was opened. This was named the Harwood School, in memory of the late Joseph
Harwood, who was well known throughout the Province for his long and faithful service
as school trustee.
The opening of this school represents the first step in a planned programme of
decentralization. Through a combination of circumstances the elementary school system
of the Vernon District had become, over the years, very much overcentralized. Young
children were being transported long distances to a central school which, having been
enlarged and then enlarged again, had grown to unwieldy size. It is now hoped that
future increases in enrolment will be accommodated in schools suitably located in the
outlying sections of the city. - r ^ ^ , „
171.:? 4 b
PROVINCIAL  LIBRARY
VICTORIA. B. C. O 102 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
Another new building, located at Lumby, provides that community with a well-
equipped modern high school, accommodating Grades VII to XII. School-population
growth at Lumby has been such, however, that all buildings, new and old, are now filled.
The fourth new school, a one-room building at Cherryville built from the Department's standard plan, gives the district its first modern rural school. It is hoped that at
some time in the near future another room can be added. This would make possible a
small but desirable consolidation and permit the closing of the two adjacent one-room
schools at Medora Creek and Richlands.
Still to be built are a three-room elementary school at Lavington and a gymnasium-
auditorium at Vernon Senior High School. These will complete the district's building
programme.
In School District No. 21 (Armstrong) the pressure from overcrowding continued
to increase during the year, and, while nothing was finalized, a good deal of progress was
made on a programme to meet the situation. It is hoped that late in 1950 or early in
1951 a by-law can be presented to the ratepayers proposing the construction of new high
schools at Armstrong and Enderby and new rural schools at Kingfisher and Trinity Creek,
along with proposals for modernization, reconstruction, and repair of several existing
schools.
In conclusion, it is again my pleasure and privilege to acknowledge the fine work
and faithful service given by the trustees and by the teachers and other employees in both
my districts.
School Districts No. 14 (Southern Okanagan), No. 15 (Penticton),
No. 16 (Keremeos), and No. 77 (Summerland)
REPORT OF ALEX TURNBULL, M.C., M.M, B.A., INSPECTOR
OF SCHOOLS
In September, 1949, I took over the Penticton inspectorate from Lieut.-Col. J. N.
Burnett. The early part of the term was spent in getting established and in the necessary
work of becoming acquainted with a new territory. Attendance at an extensive series of
meetings in connection with by-laws and elections during the fall gave an excellent opportunity to meet a large number of citizens interested in education throughout the district.
In common with most areas of the Province, accommodation problems were of
immediate concern. Plans were generally well advanced to provide for the needs of the
pupils, but many months were to pass before these could be completed.
The Boards throughout the area have devoted much time and thought to the
improvement of educational opportunity. It is a matter of great satisfaction to see these
efforts taking shape. The facilities provided offer a distinct challenge to both staff and
students.
School District No. 14 (Southern Okanagan)
The new school at Osoyoos was occupied in September and formally opened by the
Honourable W. T. Straith, Minister of Education, in May. Plans to extend the school to
serve the junior high school classes have progressed, and Grade VII will open there next
term. Although enrolment steadily increases, an effective school system now offers every
advantage in this enterprising rural area.
School District No. 15 (Penticton)
The school term opened with acute school housing problems caused by the rapid
increase in attendance and the loss of the high school by fire.    Double shifts were in REPORTS OF DISTRICT INSPECTORS O 103
operation for a large part of the year. With the completion of Unit No. 1, Grades VII
and VIII were able to return to normal hours in February, and Grades I and II went back
on full time with the opening of Unit No. 2 of the high school in April.
Extensive building is still under way. A successful by-law for an eight-room
elementary school, a gymnasium, and an auditorium was presented in December.
Construction of the elementary school has begun, and plans for the other buildings are
almost ready. Along with this work, renovation of the old buildings is being thoroughly
done.
School District No. 16 (Keremeos)
This district has made very definite progress in bringing the schools up to modern
standards. Organization and construction of a junior-senior high school received the
strong support of the ratepayers in October. Plans were also approved for a new school
in the rapidly growing district of Cawston. Construction of the high school is well
advanced, and it will be opened early in the fall term.
School District No. 77 (Summerland)
In this district, also, building has been a major issue. In September a building
by-law was passed by an overwhelming majority, and a new secondary school is now
under construction for junior and senior grades. Reorganization of the staff has been
carried out to take advantage of the new facilities early in the fall.
General Remarks
Academic progress has been satisfactory. In University Entrance examinations
David Davenport, of Penticton High School, won recognition by obtaining the district
scholarship. Activities in Junior Red Cross, dramatics, physical education, sports, and
night-schools received adequate attention. The agricultural department is steadily
developing to serve the area.
The regular testing programme was administered under the Division of Tests,
Standards, and Research.
The successful introduction of the Text-book Rental Plan made a valuable contribution to the work of the schools.
The term concluded with suitable and pleasing ceremonies when all schools paid
honour to graduating students.
In closing, may I express my sincere appreciation to trustees, staff, and students
for the friendly welcome and assistance given me during this first year in the district. O 104
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND
REPORT OF C. E. MACDONALD, LL.B., B.S., LL.D., SUPERINTENDENT
Enrolment
The total enrolment in the School for the Deaf and the Blind during the school-year
1949-50 was 134, including 5 students from the Province of Alberta and 1 from the
Yukon Territory.   The following table presents a summary of the enrolment:—
Resident
Day
Total
21
80
6
27
27
107
Totals	
101
33
134
Health
The general health of the students in residence has been excellent. A large measure
of credit for this result is directly attributable to the splendid co-operation which exists
between the Metropolitan Health Services, Children's Health Clinic, and our household
staff in care of our children.
In accordance with our established practice, all children received thorough physical
examinations and specialized treatments or dental services as required.
Staff
A total of forty-two teachers, including a number of teachers from other schools in
Canada and the United States, attended courses offered here by the Summer School of
Education for teachers of the deaf. I am pleased to report that this undertaking was
very successful in every respect. Preparations are now under way to hold another
summer session for teachers and supervisors from July 3rd to August 4th, with Miss
Josephine Bennett and Miss Beatrice Hodgkins, of the Lexington School for the Deaf in
New York, as instructresses. ■
Amongst the staff changes which took place during the term, Mr. Eric Cardinall
was appointed to replace Mr. David Moir in charge of the extra-curricular programme
and Mrs. Ada McGregor was promoted from nurse to nurse-matron.
Training Programme
Continued emphasis has been given in our Deaf Department to the development
of speech and lip-reading skills and in the use of hearing aids by students with a sufficient
degree of residual hearing. Students in our Blind Department have been advanced from
Grade I to Grade II standard Braille with the least possible delay.
Through the close co-operation of teachers, parents, and supervisors, very definite
progress has been achieved in all phases of the training programme. In order to more
adequately present a picture of the child's progress, new-type report cards were introduced
and were favourably received by the parents.
With the voluntary assistance of the Junior League of Vancouver, the Stagette Club,
and other interested organizations, our students have enjoyed an enriched extra-curricular
programme of hobby classes, excursions, and the like. During the spring, for example,
a group of deaf boys were organized into an active Sea Scout troop and, before the close
of school, participated in a week-end camp with hearing boys from other troops in the
district. SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND THE BLIND 0 105
Buildings
A new boiler-house was completed and started operations early in the fall. This
plant has sufficient capacity to care for our present needs and anticipated future
requirements.
I am pleased to say that construction of the new Primary Unit is now well advanced.
Present indications are that it may be ready for occupancy by the end of the year.
General Remarks
Having been deemed to have completed the purposes for which it was organized, the
Management Committee was relieved of its responsibilities by the Superintendent of
Education around the beginning of the year. I wish to express my thanks for the valuable
assistance rendered to me and to the school by the members of this committee. Their
contributions and the whole-hearted co-operation of the vice-principals and staff make
it possible for me to report a year of marked success. O 106 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
High School and Vocational Courses
REPORT OF EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. ES L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence- Branch during the year
1949-50 was 5,993.   This figure exceeds the figure for 1948-49 by 42.
Correspondence courses were taken by students in the following classifications:—
Students registered in schools—■ Per Cent
1. School-age students registered in high and superior
schools. Such students were permitted to take
three courses by correspondence. (Throughout
this report the term " school-age " refers to students
under 18 years of age.)  1,565
2. School-age students registered in elementary schools       91
Total number of school-age students  1,656
3. Students of 18, 19, and 20 registered in their local
schools       677
4. Students of 21 or over registered in their local
schools         19
Total number of students registered in their
local schools taking one or more correspondence courses  2,352      39.2
Students not registered in schools—
1. School-age students unable to attend school because of physical disability         64
2. School-age students gainfully employed      133
3. School-age students studying courses at home because of the distance factor      244
4. School-age students in institutions—Girls' Industrial School, Boys' Industrial School, Oakalla
Prison Farm, British Columbia Penitentiary        38
5. School-age students not registered in schools for
other reasons         56
6. Students of 18, 19, and 20 years not registered in
their local schools      747
Total number of students under 21 not
registered in their local schools and
obtaining their education by correspondence   1,282      21.4
7. Adult students (21 years and over)  2,359      39.4
Total number of students  5,993    100.0 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS O 107
The students enrolled may be classified as to age in the following three groups:—
Per Cent
1. Pupils under 18 years of age ,  2,191      36.5
2. Pupils of 18, 19, and 20  1,424      23.8
3. Pupils of 21 years of age and over  2,378      39.7
Totals  5,993 100.0
Some of these students took a full year's work in six high school courses.   Others
registered for only one or two courses.   The number of students who enrolled in each
of the high school subjects during the year was as follows:—
English Literature III, IV, V, VI  824
English Grammar and Composition III, IV, V, VI  971
Social Studies III, IV, V  569
General Science III, IV, V  561
Mathematics III, IV, V, 91  1,272
Latin I, II, III    :  350
French I, II, III  444
Spanish I, II, III  160
Health and Physical Education III, IV, V  478
Agriculture I, II  163
Geography I, II  67
Home Economics  319
Art III  231
Record-keeping  673
Junior Business .  92
Book-keeping I, II, III  460
Business Arithmetic  81
Shorthand I, II _______ 156
Typewriting I, II _'_  884
Secretarial Practice   1
Business English   74
Journalism  91
Biology 91  - 95
Physics 91  -  76
German 90  118
Chemistry 91   88
Bible Study . 1     69
Total  9,367
This figure is, of course, larger than the figure given for the number of students
enrolled, since the majority of the students were registered for more than one course.
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Senior Matriculation courses
was as follows:—
English Literature _  143
English Composition  133
Mathematics 101   129
French  120
Latin      3 2
World History     85
Chemistry 100     3 5
Physics 100 -     28
Home Economics .     11
Agriculture     14
Total  730 O 108 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
The number of students who enrolled in each of the Technical-Vocational courses
may also be classified in the following table:—
Mechanical Drawing I .  259
Sheet-metal work  17
Steam Engineering Ia, Ib, IIa  437
Metal-mining   7
Automotive Engineering I, II  160
Diesel Engineering  38
Practical Electricity   111
Principles of Radio I, II  73
Aviation  12
Elementary Geology and Mineralogy... _  46
Forestry   56
Commercial Art  64
Building Construction   117
House Painting and Decorating  7
Industrial Mathematics  96
Soils and Field Crops  9
Poultry-keeping  8
Practical Design  33
Glove-making  44
Air Navigation I and II  10
Mathematics for Steam Engineering IIA  39
Fruit-growing  11
Accountancy for Credit Unions  17
Spherical Trigonometry  9
Home Furnishing and Decoration  80
English II for New Canadians  41
Total  1,801
Students in rural elementary schools and superior schools, hospitals, and inmates
of public institutions were not required to pay fees. Students of small high schools were
required to pay an annual fee of $3. Other students paying fees were those who have
the privilege of attending a high school having five or more teachers, employed students
of 16 or over, students enrolled for Senior Matriculation courses, and students living
outside this Province. Discharged service personnel of World War I and World War II,
and their unemployed dependents, were charged half the usual fees. (Such dependents
were charged full fees if they lived in a district having a large high school.)
Most students paid their own fees. However, in the case of 434 students the fees
were paid by their school district office.
The following is a classification of students who were exempted from tuition fees:—
1. Hospital cases  195
2. British Columbia Penitentiary  106
3. Oakalla Prison Farm  65
4. Girls' Industrial Home  11
5. Boys' Industrial Home  9
6. New Haven ..  35
7. On relief or equivalent  7
8. Bible Study  69
9. Disabled students at home  6
10. Students needed at home 1  18
Total  521 CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS O 109
All students were asked to indicate their chosen vocations.   The following summary
shows the choices of those who gave this information:—
Professional—
Teachers  444
Nurses  316
Medicine   91
Science  66
Law  25
Art  86
Theology  20
Pharmacy  44
Miscellaneous   178
Commercial  :  629
Skilled labour (mechanics, technicians, steam engineers, etc.) 240
Aviation  40
His Majesty's Forces  45   •
Civil Service .  12
Agriculture and farming  89
Forestry   66
Mining   7
Journalism   67
Diesel and steam engineering  493
Radio  :  51
Miscellaneous  101
Not given  2,883
Total  5,993
Completion of Courses
A total of 88,089 papers was marked during the-year, which is a substantial increase
over the number of papers marked in the preceding year. This increase is very encouraging to the Director and the staff, who do everything possible to induce students to
complete their courses.
New Courses
The new Latin 10 Course was offered during the year. Other new or rewritten
courses were Agriculture 10 and the Clothing Section of Home Economics CC III.
English for New Canadians
During the year this division supplied 1,490 students with material from our course
in English I for New Canadians. Three hundred and sixty students were supplied with
material from the course in English II for New Canadians. Classes in English were held
in large city night-schools and in small isolated places all over the Province. In isolated
places the neighbours or the employers of the new Canadians gave them instruction from
our English courses. O 110
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
Elementary Correspondence School
REPORT OF ANNA B. MILLER, DIRECTOR
There were 1,366 pupils enrolled in the Elementary Correspondence School for the
school-year 1949-50. Of these, 1,267 pupils were enrolled at Victoria and 99 in the
Peace River Branch at Pouce Coupe. There were 159,952 lessons marked in Victoria
and 9,804 in Pouce Coupe, making a total of 169,756 lessons marked during the year.
The enrolment in the adult class was 216, and 5,584 lessons were marked during
the year.
The tabulation below shows the enrolment by grade for the year:—
Enrolled at Victoria
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Grade
Total
1
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
170
126
129
98
67
64
81
64
799
October   	
203
148
134
113
79
74
90
77
918
November	
222
162
138
126
93
87
97
88
1,013
December	
228
169
146
135
95
96
104
90
1,063
January 	
239
177
149
147
100
99
112
95
1,118
February    	
252
181
153
154
103
104
115
100
1,162
March 	
257
187
155
160
112
108
118
105
1,202
April	
258
193
156
165
119
115
119
110
1,235
May     	
252
199
162
171
124
116
125
113
1,262
June    -  	
243
202
166
174
128
112
128
114
1,267
Enrolled at Pouce Coupe (Peace River Branch)
September-
October 	
November -
December...
January —
February.—.
March	
April—	
May	
June	
13
5
10
5
6
6
17
5
10
6
6
3
7
4
21
6
10
10
10
3
8
7
22
8
10
9
4
8
8
23
9
10
10
5
8
9
24
9
11
10
5
6
11
26
9
11
10
5
7
11
26
8
12
10
5
7
11
28
14
12
11
5
7
11
28
14
12
11
5
7
11
45
58
75
80
85
87
90
90
99
99
The staff consisted of thirteen instructors, six clerical staff, and the Director.
In addition, eleven outside markers were used. These markers were qualified teachers
who marked lessons in their homes when the work at the office became too heavy for
the regular instructors. By this means the marking and returning of lessons were kept
well up to date throughout the year.
Instruction in the regular school subjects based on the British Columbia curriculum
was supplied for all grades. Good progress was made throughout the year by the
majority of pupils.
A visit was made to the Cariboo by the Director in an attempt to contact Elementary
Correspondence School pupils. The use of a classroom at the Williams Lake School
greatly facilitated this project. Tests were administered to the pupils who visited the
classroom, and the personal contact made with the pupils and their parents was valuable.
A number of film-strip viewers were procured for the use of our pupils, and film-strip
was loaned by the Department of Visual Education. The pupils were enthusiastic about
this material.
All pupils were notified of the school radio broadcasts, and the large school radio
calendar was forwarded to each family. Day-time radio reception is not available to
all locations, but a large number of our pupils listen to the broadcasts with interest. CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS O  111
It is the opinion of the teaching staff here at the school that " school by correspondence " is only a substitute for the fuller educational opportunities offered in a regular
classroom, and the pupil who has had to receive all his education by correspondence may
have missed very valuable and satisfying experiences by being denied association with
his contemporaries in a classroom. Fortunately the number of pupils who continue with
us for the eight grades is comparatively small. Most of our pupils have school experience
as well. It may be that a year or two of lessons by correspondence under good supervision is a valuable training to the pupil in self-reliance and also that a better understanding of the child by the parent may result from the supervision of the lessons. Quite
frequently there is evidence of this happening. It is encouraging to see results of this
type. There are many cases of children transferring successfully to a regular school.
Letters like the one that follows will bear this out:—
" I am writing to say thank you for a wonderful course that we had for two years
for John.    I registered John at the School September 5 with high hopes that he
will be able to continue there. It's out of our school district—3 miles to the end of the
school bus route, which is an improvement of 2 miles over other years.
" John likes the new school very well. I had my satisfaction of a job well done and
a pat on the back for the course and myself when his present teacher told me he's her
best Grade III pupil.    She especially praised his reading." O 112 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
TEXT-BOOK BRANCH
REPORT OF P. G. BARR, OFFICER IN CHARGE
The Text-book Branch during the school-year 1949-50, amongst other things,
launched successfully the Text-book Rental Plan, which covers Grades VII to XIII.
While participation in the Rental Plan is voluntary, it is interesting to note that 85 per
cent of the pupils enrolled in these grades participated. The reaction of parents, pupils,
and teachers to the Rental Plan has been good, and from a financial point of view it is off
to a good start.
The operation of this plan threw quite a heavy strain on the office staff, and our
quarters were not large enough to accommodate stocks to the value of about $1,000,000.
Additional space was rented, and the job was done. The older functions of the Branch
have also been carried out.
To purchase and distribute the free supplies, issued during the school-year 1949-50
to public schools and in connection with correspondence courses, required an expenditure
of $150,849.15; 4,874 free requisitions were received and filled.
Combined orders, free and saleable, reached the large total of 18,580. From these
orders the sum of $354,909.72 was collected by us and deposited in the Treasury.
Many of the report forms, etc., issued by the Department of Education were distributed by us to the various School Boards, when and where required.
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OFFICER IN CHARGE, TEXT-BOOK BRANCH,
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1950
Last year it was stated that our operations for the last eighteen years have, in the
main, been the same as any large wholesale house. This report is somewhat different to
those previously given, for our statements now cover sales and rentals.
Stock
The stock on hand, $242,361.55, is the stock in our warehouse which is valued at
publishers' prices, plus incoming freight. Stock on hand, $293,293.77, represents the
books in the schools under the Rental Plan. This figure does not take into account the
expenses involved in the ordering of the books, nor the transportation and other costs
connected with the moving of these books from our shipping-room to the various schools
of the Province.
Sales
Our sales for the year amounted to $405,159.27, and the discount to dealers, School
Boards, etc., was $74,082.36.
Rentals
We received $190,272.07 in rental fees from the various schools. No part of the
Government subsidy was used during the year under review.
General Remarks
My most sincere thanks are extended to a very loyal and efficient staff, and to all
schools, School Boards, and other officials. Only because of their co-operation is
a report of this nature possible. text-book branch o 113
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure, March 31st, 1950
Sales
Revenue—
Sales  $405,159.27
Less discount :      74,082.36
Net sales  $331,076.91
Deduct cost of sales—
Inventory, April 1st, 1949  $176,490.37
Purchases for year (cost, freight, and duty)     352,128.94
Inventory, March 31st, 1950 _.„_.. $528,619.31
Cost of sales     242,361.55
     286,257.76
Gross profit     $44,819.15
Expenditure—
Salaries and wages     $19,899.14
Freight and delivery         4,716.88
Packing and general expenses         3,335.65
       27,951.67
Operating profit for year     $16,867.58
Less bad debts written off  .15
Net profit transferred to Capital Investment Account     $16,867.33
Rentals
Revenue—Rental assessments collected  $190,272.07
Expenditure—
Purchases  for year   (cost,  freight,  and
S.S. & M.A. Tax)  $439,940.66
Depreciation on text-books for rental in school districts $146,646.89
Salaries and wages       29,848.72
Freight and delivery          7,075.31
Packing and general expenses         5,003.47
     188,574.39
Surplus of revenue over expenditure transferred to Capital Investment Account  -      $1,697.68
Certified correct. Certified correct.
W. Crothall, P. G. Barr,
Clerk. Officer in Charge. o 114 public schools report, 1949-50
Balance-sheet, March 3 1st, 1950
Assets
Imprest Account—
Cash on hand  $100.00
Cash in bank ,  350.00
$450.00
Inventory—
Stock on hand  $242,361.55
Consigned text-books  $439,940.66
Less one-third depreciation     146,646.89
     293,293.77
     535,655.32
Accounts receivable -         7,865.34
Suspense Account—Publishers' credits  992.00
Obsolete stock on hand       10,490.74
$555,453.40
Liabilities
Treasury advances  $450.00
Reserve for Text-book Rental Plan subsidy  200,000.00
Reserve for obsolete stock  10,490.74
Capital Investment Account  344,512.66
$555,453.40
Certified correct. Certified correct.
W. Crothall, P. G. Barr,
Clerk. Officer in Charge. REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION O 115
REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION
H. A. JONES, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION
Under the general heading of "Adult Education," two groups of classes are
administered by the Department of Education, as follows: (1) Those that are conducted
in co-operation with the Dominion Government, and (2) those that are the direct
responsibility of the Province. The reports of the responsible officers are grouped here
for convenience.
Industrial Education—H. A. Jones, Director of Technical and Vocational Education.
(1) Canadian Vocational Training Programme—
(a) Classes operated under the Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training
Agreement.
(b) Classes operated under the Dominion-Provincial Apprentice Training
Agreement.
(2) Night-schools (see Industrial Education Report).
Correspondence Instruction—
*High School—Miss Edith E. Lucas, B.A., D. es L., Director.
*Elementary School—Miss Anna B. Miller, Director.
*Recreational and Physical Education—R. J. Phillips, Acting Director.
*School and Community Drama—H. S. Hum, B.A., Director.
(1) CANADIAN VOCATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAMME
During the fiscal year 1949-50 the following schedules of the Dominion-Provincial
Vocational Training Agreement were in operation: Schedule C (Urban Occupational
Training), Schedule E (Rural Training), Schedule H (Student Aid), Schedule L
(Rehabilitation), and Schedule M (Unemployed Workers' Training). In addition,
under the Apprentice Training Agreement training was provided to regularly indentured
apprentices at night-schools and by correspondence.
(a) Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement
Schedule C—Urban Occupational Training
Those eligible to receive training under this schedule of the Vocational Training
Agreement are persons between the ages of 16 and 30 years who have not previously
been employed. The costs are shared equally by the Dominion and Provincial
Governments.
During the past year classes in Automobile and Diesel Mechanics were in operation
at the Dominion-Provincial Vocational School at Nanaimo, which is well equipped for
this type of work. Living-quarters are provided for out-of-town students at no cost.
Due to the close co-operation of the logging companies and garages, the placement has
been 100 per cent. The citizens of Nanaimo are very proud of this school and have
assisted a great deal in providing recreational facilities for the students in their leisure
hours.
In addition, a class in Power-machine Sewing was in operation at the Vancouver
Vocational Institute, which is conducted by the Vancouver Board of School Trustees.
The full costs in connection with this class were reimbursed to the Vancouver School
Board.
: See separate report following. O 116 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
The total enrolment during the fiscal year 1949—50 was as follows:
Men
Women
Total
Diesel engineering	
Nanaimo
29
15
30
29
15
Vancouver
30
Totals   	
44
30
74
Schedule E—Rural Training
The following report has been prepared by Gordon M. Shrum, O.B.E., M.M., M.A.,
Ph.D.(Tor.), F.R.S.C, Director of the Department of University Extension, University
of British Columbia:—
" This year's eight-week Youth Training School, the sixth to be offered to the rural
young people of British Columbia under the joint sponsorship of the Provincial Department of Education and the Federal Department of Labour, was held from January 9th
to March 4th, 1950, at the University of British Columbia. The course, as in the past,
was administered by the University Department of Extension.
"A total of 81 students were enrolled—53 men and 28 women. The students
ranged from 16 to 30 years of age, with an average age of 19.5 years. The average
standard of formal education was Grade IX for the men and Grade X for the women.
" Students were selected on the basis of recommendations submitted by local
organizations or by responsible persons residing in the applicant's district. Information
regarding the school was made available in all rural districts through district agriculturists,
Farmers' Institutes, Women's Institutes, and junior farm clubs, local papers, University
Extension field workers, School Inspectors, churches, social service workers, and several
other agencies. As a result, students came to the school from all sections of the Province,
including the Peace River.
" The school was held at the Youth Training Centre. This self-contained unit, made
available by the University, contains dormitory accommodation, lecture-rooms, shops,
recreation-hall, and kitchen. It is located near the University farm, and the students
were able to use the specialized equipment and resources of the faculty of agriculture.
" No tuition fee was charged for the course, but each student shared in kitchen and
in camp-maintenance duties. Transportation costs in excess of $10 were paid by the
Dominion and Provincial Governments, and thereby made it possible for those living
in the more distant parts of the Province to attend.
" Emphasis was placed on the vocational aspects of the training. The syllabus for
the men consisted of farm mechanics, carpentry, motor mechanics, blacksmithing, welding, farm management, as well as special classes in live stock, soils, dairying, poultry, and
horticulture. The courses for women included sewing, weaving, handicrafts, home
furnishing, home management, and provision was made for the girls to take the special
agricultural subjects if they so desired.
" Instruction also was given in subjects which have a community application.
A course entitled ' Club Organization and Government' presented lectures and discussion
on the conduct of a meeting, municipal, provincial, and federal government functions,
and the responsibilities of Canadian citizenship. Practical application of the principles
of this course was made in the activities of the Student Council, and operation of
a co-operative store, and in the conduct of social functions. Weekly field-trips were
made to outstanding agricultural organizations and to certain of the basic industries
of the Province. Evening classes in hobby subjects such as photography, drama,
publications, as well as instruction in physical education, completed the programme. REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION O 117
" The value of the school cannot be measured merely in terms of actual vocational
training, but must also be considered in terms of personal experience and development
through close association with other young people of similar interests. The school has
sought to emphasize the desirability of rural life and to provide an opportunity to
experience the benefits of community efforts, particularly as applied to rural problems."
Schedule H—Student Aid
For a number of years the Dominion and Provincial Governments have provided
financial assistance to students of academic merit to enable them to proceed with their
education beyond the level of the secondary school. Sixty per cent of the amount
granted in each case is in the form of a bursary (or gift) and 40 per cent is a loan
which the recipient is not required to repay until one year after he or she has entered
employment.
Awards are made by a Selection Committee consisting of the Deputy Minister and
Superintendent of Education, who acts as chairman, the Assistant Superintendent of
Education, the Registrar of the Department of Education, the Director of Technical
and Vocational Education, and representatives of the various institutions concerned.
Applicants are given the opportunity of appearing before the committee, if they so
wish, when their applications are considered.
Each year, as the scheme becomes more widely known, the number of requests for
assistance increases. During the past year 531 awards, ranging from $50 to $350, were
made to students attending the institutions listed below. The total fund available
was $100,000.
Number of Students
Institution Assisted
Section I.—Students in any faculty and in any year—
University of British Columbia  279
Victoria College _  18
Burnaby South High School  2
Langley Junior-Senior High School  1
Powell River High School  1
Duke of Connaught High School, New Westminster  2
University of Alberta  3
McGill University  21
University of Manitoba  1
University of Oregon, Dental School  16
University of Oregon, Medical School  2
University of Ottawa  4
Queen's University  4
University of Toronto  16
University of Western Ontario  1
Ontario Veterinary College  2
Pacific University  1
The Clarke School for the Deaf  1
University of Washington	
383
Section II.—Nurses in training at hospitals—
Vancouver General Hospital  5
Royal Inland Hospital, Kamloops  1
Royal Jubilee Hospital  6
St. Joseph's Hospital  6
Royal Columbian Hospital  9
St. Paul's Hospital  6
33 O 118
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
Section III.—Students attending Normal Schools—
Victoria Normal School     44
Vancouver Normal School     62
Section IV.—Students attending public technical, vocational, or art
schools where fees are charged—
Vancouver School of Art       4
T. J. Trapp Technical High School, New Westminster	
Ontario College of Art..: _■ 1	
King Edward High School, Vancouver	
Provincial Institute of Mining, Haileybury, Ont	
University of Alberta	
106
Total number of awards _•_  531
* Also reported under section dealing with Vocational Schools' Assistance Agreement in report on industrial education.
Schedule L—Rehabilitation
During the present year the training given under this schedule was transferred from
special centres operated under the Canadian Vocational Training Programme to the
Vancouver Vocational Institute, the fees for this instruction being paid to the Vancouver
Board of School Trustees. It is expected that after September 1st, 1950, arrangements
will be made for the Department of Veterans' Affairs to be responsible for the training
formerly conducted under this schedule for former members of the armed services.
The enrolment during the fiscal year 1949-50 was as follows:—
Men
Women
Total
Vancouver
2
3
2
Shoe-repairing _     _ _ _	
3
2
Building Construction   	
Plumbing -	
i
2
1
1
2
1
Auto-body and Fender Repairing   _ 	
Tailoring    _  	
1
3
1
2
2
1
1
3
1
1
2
2
Totals	
20
1
21
Schedule M—Unemployed Workers' Training
Those eligible to receive training under this schedule are young men and women
who have previously been employed, but who wish to take training for a new job which
will better suit their native interests and ability.
During the fiscal year 1949-50 forty women received instruction in power-machine
sewing.
(b) Apprentice-training
The Department of Education, Technical Branch, is responsible for the training of
regularly indentured apprentices who are recommended for training by the Apprenticeship Branch of the Department of Labour. This instruction is given at night classes and
by correspondence, the entire costs being borne equally by the Dominion Department of
Labour and the Provincial Department of Education under the terms of the Dominion- REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION O 119
Provincial Apprentice Training Agreement.   Trade Advisory Committees assist in making
the classes successful.
During the past year 1,302 apprentices received instruction by correspondence or
at night classes operated by local School Boards under the supervision of the Department
of Education.   The enrolment per course was as follows:—
Vancouver  Enrolment
Automobile Mechanics  75
Building Construction  78
Cabinet-making   11
Boat-building  18
Auto-body and Fender Repair  28
Electricity  79
Machine-shop  40
Draughting  '.  142
Industrial Mathematics  144
Applied Mechanics  1
Plumbing jl  44
Pattern-making  13
Marine Engineering  8
Steam-fitting   11
Painting and Decorating  14
Plastering   33
Radio   4
Sheet Metal  104
Book-keeping   1
Oil-burner Service  3
Benchwork Joinery  18
Foundry Technology  1
Welding 1  16
Sign-painting   2
Show-card Writing  1
Diesel Fuel Systems  2
Commercial Art  1
892
Victoria—
Auto-body and Fender Repair  10
Automobile Mechanics  44
Carpentry   38
Plumbing   15
Draughting   47
Electricity  28
Armature-winding   1
Machine-shop  13
Marine Engineering  17
Mathematics  25
Sheet Metal  16
Art Metal  1
Horticulture  1
Steam Engineering _  3
Commercial Art  1
Boat-building  5
Welding :  2
267 O 120 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
New Westminster—
Electricity  9
Sheet Metal  3
Mechanical Drawing  2
        14
Mission—
Industrial Mathematics ____       14
Correspondence Courses—
Automobile Mechanics  23
Building Construction  19
Electricity  22
Sheet Metal  12
Commercial Art  3
Industrial Mathematics  7
Mechanical Drawing  12
Power-house Design and Operation  2
Steam Engineering  6
Painting and Decorating  1
Radio Construction  3
General Science  1
Diesel Engineering  2
Matriculation Mathematics  1
Electric Meters, etc.  1
      115
Total enrolment  1,302
ATTENDANCE SUMMARY
The attendance summary of classes administered by the Industrial Education Branch
during the year 1949-50 is as follows:—
Canadian Vocational Training Programme— Enrolment
Dominion-Provincial Vocational Training Agreement—
Schedule C—Urban Occupational Training _"_    74
Schedule E—Rural Training     81
Schedule H—Student Aid  531
Schedule L—Rehabilitation     21
Schedule M—Unemployed Workers' Training    40
      747
Dominion-Provincial Apprentice Training Agreement __ 1,302
Total enrolment  2,049
High School Correspondence Adult Education
EDITH E. LUCAS, B.A., D. Es L., DIRECTOR
The total enrolment in the High School Correspondence Branch during the school-
year 1949-50 was 5,993. Of this number, 23.8 per cent or 1,424 were between the
ages of 18 and 20, and 39.7 per cent or 2,318 were 21 years of age or over. Thus 63.5
per cent of our students can be classified as adults.   This is a decrease of 2.7 per cent REPORT ON ADULT EDUCATION O 121
over the figures of 1948-49.   There was a decrease of 20 students in the number of
students over 21 and 115 in the number of students between the ages of 18 and 20.
There were adult students among those registered for every course offered by this
department, as indicated in my report of High School and Vocational Courses.
The following is a classification of the occupations of students 18 years of age and
over who gave information as to their employment:—
Apprentices   115
Army, Navy, Air Force  49
Civil Servants .  81
Domestic workers  55
Farming and ranching  58
Firemen, engineers  234
Forestry .  19
Housewives   85
Lumbering   37
Merchants   3
Mining  17
Office-workers   282
Professional—
Teachers  200
Nurses  *     68
Miscellaneous      24
  292
Railroad   27
Skilled labour  196
Unskilled labour :  261
Miscellaneous  27
Total  :  1,838
Elementary Correspondence School Adult Class
ANNA B. MILLER, DIRECTOR
For the school-year 1949-50 the enrolment in the adult class of the Elementary
Correspondence School was 216 students. The enrolment figures for the year are given
below:—
September      68 February  173
October   103 March  187
November  124 April ;  196
December  138 May  210
January  156 June  216 O 122 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
RECREATION AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION BRANCH
REPORT OF R. J. PHILLIPS, ACTING DIRECTOR
This report has been divided into two main sections—(1) relating to School Health
and Physical Education, and (2) relating to Provincial Recreation Programmes.
(1) School Health and Physical Education
(a) Teachers' Sports Coaching School.—The latest coaching techniques and rule
interpretations in basketball, grass hockey, soccer, and track and field were presented at
this school in Vancouver during the last week in August. Instructional staff were
Mr. Arthur Chapman, basketball; Mrs. Margaret McLean, grass hockey; Mr. Murray
West, soccer;  and Mr. James Panton, track and field.
(b) Travelling Clinic on Basketball.—Mr. " Wink " J. A. Willox and Mr. J. Dicker-
son conducted a basketball clinic for referees in Greater Vancouver, Fraser Valley,
Kamloops, Kelowna and Rutland, Victoria, Nanaimo, Alberni, Courtenay and Cumberland. The primary purpose of this tour was to encourage basketball officials to adopt
uniform interpretation of the rules throughout the Province. Approximately 3,000 school
students and 1,000 adults attended the demonstrations of refereeing and 103 referees
attended the clinics.
(c) Inter-high-school Competitions.—A survey of school opinion indicated that
the Provincial inter-high-schools sports competitions which have been held for the past
two years should be discontinued for the present, with the exception of basketball, which
is to continue under the sponsorship of the newly formed B.C. Inter-high-schools Boys'
Basketball Association. The department would, however, continue to encourage zone
competitions, with invitations extended beyond the zone. For example, Nelson sponsored the curling bonspiel in February, and while the competition was intended for the
Kootenay zone, interest in curling at Vancouver resulted in a rink from Magee High
School travelling to Nelson. The same procedure is being followed in ski-ing, hockey,
girls' basketball, and volleyball. The department helps to plan the competitions, issues
invitations, draws up schedules of play-offs, etc., and provides some financial assistance.
Winners were as follows:—
Sport Host Winner
Girls' volleyball Maple Ridge Kelowna.
Boys' volleyball Maple Ridge Maple Ridge.
Curling Nelson Trail.
Ice Hockey Kamloops Kelowna.
Boys' basketball Duke of Connaught and
Trapp Technical Duke of Connaught.
Girls' basketball Powell River King Edward.
(2) Provincial Recreation Programme
The Physical Fitness classes (Pro-Rec) were again very successful. The registration
and attendance figures are as follows:—
Pro-Rec Centres:  Number of centres, 185; registration, 13,707;  attendance,
193,153.
Special Events:  Number of Events, 114; number of members, 5,315; number
of visitors and spectators, 157,377.
Community Centres:  Number of centres, 10; registration, 7,007; attendance,
366,996. RECREATION AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION BRANCH O 123
Location of Pro-Rec Centres
Vancouver and New Westminster.—There are forty-six Pro-Rec centres for women,
thirty-six centres for men, and eight mixed centres in Greater Vancouver and New
Westminster.
Fraser Valley.—Abbotsford, Bradner, Bridgeview, Chilliwack, Fleetwood, Hammond, Haney, Hjorth Road, Kennedy, Matsqui, Mission, South Westminster, Townline.
Okanagan-Kootenay. — Armstrong, Cranbrook, Kamloops, Kelowna, Kimberley,
Summerland, Trail, Vernon.
Victoria.—There are sixteen Pro-Rec centres in Victoria.
Vancouver Island.—Chemainus, Cordova Bay, Esquimalt, Great Central, James
Bay, Ladysmith, Mount View, Oaklands, Port Alberni, Saltair, Sidney.
Northern British Columbia and West Coast.—Bralorne, Fulford Harbour, Francois
Lake, Lasqueti Island, Prince Rupert, Sechelt.
Type of Programme.—Programme includes rhythmical exercises, elementary fight
apparatus, various forms of the dance, swimming, tumbling, vaulting, recreational games,
badminton, basketball, bowling, boxing, fencing, judo, roller skating, ice skating, and
weight-lifting. The programme being carried on in each centre would depend upon the
season, the facilities, and the leadership available.
Names of Community Centres
Cloverdale Recreation Association, Courtenay Recreational Association, Kamloops
Athletic Association, Kimberley Athletic Association, Marpole Community Centre, North
Burnaby Community Association, North Vancouver Memorial Community Centre, Prince
George Recreation Association, Prince Rupert Civic Centre, Trail Recreational Projects
Society.
Fitness Demonstrations
In the spring many Pro-Rec centres throughout the Province held closing demonstrations of their activities. The annual Pro-Rec mass display was replaced this year by
separate demonstrations put on by the women's and men's divisions. In Victoria the
centres held a successful combined display in the badminton hall.
Gymnastic Competition
The Provincial Pro-Rec gymnastic competition was held in Vancouver on the evening following the men's demonstration. Twenty-eight teams (177 individuals) from
Kamloops, Fraser Valley, Kimberley, Kelowna, Victoria, and Vancouver and district
competed in six classes.
Gymnastic Team
A team of expert gymnasts, under the direction of Mr. Sid Greenwood, travelled to
the Okanagan and the Kootenays, putting on displays in several towns for the purpose of
stimulating a greater interest in our programme. This same group performed, upon
request, before many groups and organizations in and around Vancouver.
Leadership Training
Pro-Rec Summer School.—A summer school for Pro-Rec instructors and leaders
was held in Vancouver for both men and women. Pupils were drawn from various parts
of the Province. Arrangements were made for billeting and subsidies were granted to
enable as many as possible to attend from out of town. These instructors carried on the
Pro-Rec activities in their home communities during the fall and winter term. Numbers
trained are as follows:—
Pro-Rec Summer School—
Women      51
Men      24 O 124 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
Pro-Rec Leaders' Classes—
Women      52
Men      20
Teachers' Sports Coaching School—Men and women     42
Travelling Clinic on Basketball—Men and women  103
Recreation for the Blind
During the past year the recreation programme of blind persons was extended to
cover a wide range of activities. The department now employs a full-time Recreation
Director, Mr. Joseph Lewis, who, because of his own blindness, has been able to appreciate the difficulties of other blind folk and therefore arrange the type of programme which
would be most suitable for them. An advisory committee, consisting of a Board member
from the C.N.I.B., a representative from the Department of Education, and a representative from the Community Chest and Council, meet periodically with Mr. Lewis to help
him plan his recreational programme. The following activities were in operation during
the past year: C.N.I.B. White Cane Fishing Club, White Cane Salmon Derby, Second
Annual White Cane Summer Camp, White Cane Club Picnic, Thirteen Alley Bowling
League, Music Appreciation Club, Magic Class, Choral Group, Swimming Classes, Judo
Classes, Literary Discussion Groups, Discus Club, and Gadabouts Club.
Annual Picnic
Those hundreds of Vancouver members who enjoyed the hours of recreation together
during the winter months met again in July for the annual Pro-Rec picnic. The crowning
of Peggy Dunn as 1949 Pro-Rec Queen climaxed an exciting day of races, sports, contests,
and swimming.
Public Relations
This Branch is the distributing centre for all material sent out from the National
Fitness Office. In addition, we mimeograph considerable material on many physical
recreation activities for distribution to individuals, schools, and community groups.
Our organization takes part in a radio programme each Saturday morning at CJOR,
Vancouver. This programme is scheduled at 9.30 a.m. each week and is known by the
name " Your Community."   Time is allotted for Pro-Rec news and interviews.
Sports Promotion
The Branch assisted in the formation and operation of leagues in softball, basketball,
and lacrosse. Softball equipment was supplied to needy teams through the B.C. Softball
Association. The Community Chest and Council of Vancouver was assisted in the
organization of softball play-offs, and a softball referees' school was conducted in Vancouver by Mr. E. Bowering. The development of a higher standard of refereeing in all
sports was encouraged and more refereeing clinics are advocated. SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY DRAMA BRANCH O 125
SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY DRAMA BRANCH
REPORT OF H. S. HURN, B.A., DIRECTOR
Community Drama
This Branch of the Department continued its work along standard lines, and there
was considerable evidence of the growth of the drama movement, as shown by the
demands made upon the office for the various services it renders to community groups.
Organization of new groups was continued, and in all cases keen appreciation was
expressed for the assistance given. These groups invariably make a favourable impression in their respective communities in the first year of operation, and there is no doubt
that it would be to their advantage to receive more assistance than the branch has time
or ability to give them.
As much as possible was done to further the idea of Zone Drama Committees, and
it is expected that before the current year is over, the project will be completed. This
will result in the establishment of approximately ten zones, in each of which there will
be a drama committee of citizens whose efforts will be directed to the development of
dramatic activity, including festival participation. Moreover, each will have a representative on the executive of the Provincial association.
Two new drama festivals for adults were held. The West Kootenay made a good
start, and though the entry list was small, the committee reports that there is every
prospect of a very substantial increase in 1951. Sponsored by the Vancouver Community Arts Council, the Greater Vancouver One-act Play Festival was held during the
spring and attracted seventeen entries.    This festival was full of promise.
Working drama groups carried on their usual programmes. Some were very ambitious, and it is a pleasure to report that audience participation was very satisfactory.
It was evident that there was a desire on the part of these groups to provide varied programmes, with less insistence on the use of " laughable " plays. Occasionally more
serious drama was attempted, and some groups produced plays written by their members
or by other British Columbia playwrights.
The war-time effects on community drama are now almost eliminated, and there is
reason to hope that very soon no community in the Province will be without this form
of recreational activity.
The Dominion Drama Festival at Calgary was most successful. Eight groups from
various parts of Canada were chosen to participate, and among them was one from
British Columbia, the Everyman Theatre. It presented a difficult play, " Noah." This
young group of players has been concentrating on children's theatre in the Greater Vancouver area during the past two years, and its training was evident in its performance,
which was highly commended by the adjudicator.
School Drama
During the past year a committee worked on the course in Drama for Grades IX
to XII. This represented an extension of two grades—IX and X. Three courses—
Drama 10, 20, and 30—will be offered to the students on an elective basis.
School dramatics are carried on in three fields—public performances, class instruction in topics listed in the Drama Course, and festival participation. There has been a
noticeable improvement in the standard of production, and this has resulted in a marked
increase in audience support. The Kamloops High School's production of " H.M.S.
Pinafore " was attended by 4,200 people—quite a high proportion of the population of
the city. The New Westminster Festival, held in the auditorium of the new junior high
school, attracted almost 3,000 people, and at Victoria the honour performance resulted O 126 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
in the turning-away of many people from the auditorium of the high school. This is
encouraging because it indicates that our young people and their directors are doing work
which is a pleasure to watch. The cases mentioned are only a few of those which are
worthy of praise.
The school building programme has resulted in the provision of more suitable
accommodation for the presentation of school drama, and there is no doubt at all that
both school and community groups have benefited materially. In some cases those
responsible for the planning should have made provision for the time when stage equipment would be available. Electrical outlets, grid, pin-rail, and other such facilities should
have been installed even if the equipment was not immediately available. Gradually,
communities will build up their stock of stage equipment, and in the meantime they may
borrow it.
An increasing number of teachers have taken courses in Drama, and their training
and zeal have made development possible.
The Drama Branch desires to pay tribute to the many volunteer workers in the field
of school and community drama. Little can be accomplished without the aid of good
people such as the adjudicators, executive personnel, and teachers, who willingly give of
their time and ability to assist in the development of the living theatre.
I should like to pay tribute as well to the two assistants in this office, who bear a
considerable burden, especially at certain times of the year, and who discharge their
duties cheerfully and efficiently. EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE O 127
EDUCATIONAL AND VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE
REPORT OF HAROLD P. JOHNS, M.A., Ph.D., DIRECTOR
Thirty-six secondary schools operated Provincially approved counselling programmes during the 1949-50 school-year. Of the eighty-nine counsellors involved in
these schemes, eighty were employed as half-time counsellors, teaching regular classes in
the remaining half of their weekly assignment, and nine were assigned full-time counselling
duties. This Division, it should be pointed out, has continued to advise the appointment
of half-time in preference to full-time counsellors, except in cases in which local conditions
appear to suggest otherwise. However, it has been strongly urged that counsellors
employed on a half-time basis should be given an unbroken half-day—morning or
afternoon—if full value for the time so spent is to be realized.
An increased interest is evidenced in the Department of Education's counsellor-
training programme. Because of the numbers seeking advanced training, it was possible
to divide counsellors into two groups—experienced and beginners—at the 1950 session
of the Summer School of Education.    Enrolments in courses offered were as follows: —
Course 159—Mental Hygiene (Counsellors' Section)  21
Course 190x—Counsellors' Conference  30
Course 191—The Individual Inventory in Guidance  29
Course 192—The Use and Interpretation of Tests in Guidance.— 22
Instructors in the above courses were Dr. O. R. Chambers, Head, Department of
Psychology, Oregon State College, Corvallis, Ore.; Dr. Clifford P. Froehlich, Specialist
for Training Guidance Personnel, United States Office of Education, Washington, D.C.;
Miss Esme Foord, counsellor, Kamloops Junior-Senior High School. The Counsellors'
Conference (Course 190x) was restricted to experienced personnel, while Courses 191
and 192 were attended by those beginning their training.
In addition to the summer programme, two in-service courses were offered by the
Vancouver School Board during the winter season under the direction of the Summer
School of Education. Acting as instructors were Messrs. B. E. Wales and Archibald
McKie, counsellors at Kitsilano Junior-Senior High School, both of whom had in previous years given similar courses at the regular sessions of the Summer School of
Education.    Courses offered and enrolments in these classes were as follows:—
Course No. 191—The Individual Inventory in Guidance  22
Course No. 192—The Use and Interpretation of Tests in Guidance   22
An additional evidence of a growing professional consciousness by school counsellors is the formation of district associations in various sections of the Province. The
Okanagan Valley Counsellors' Association and the Greater Vancouver Counsellors'
Association have been carrying on active in-service training programmes for the past
two years. Preliminary steps have been taken to organize similar groups in the following areas: East Kootenay, West Kootenay, Fraser Valley, Greater Victoria, and Upper
Vancouver Island. In addition to frequent local district meetings, it is the intention of
these groups to arrange one or two Province-wide conferences each year.
A major change in the group work carried on in guidance classes will be brought
about by the introduction of the new Effective Living Programme in September, 1950.
As a means of preparing guidance personnel for the amended curriculum, a two-hour
course dealing with various aspects of the Effective Living Programme was offered at
the 1950 session of the Summer School of Education. Ninety-three teachers were
enrolled, and only the inability to provide additional classroom accommodation prevented
a larger number of guidance teachers from seeking training in this particular area of
group work. O 128 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
During the school-year 1949-50 the Division of Educational and Vocational Guidance continued to issue materials of various kinds for the assistance of guidance personnel and students. Six additions to the B.C. Occupations Series were published and
regular issues of " Employment Trends " and " Lists of Guidance Pamphlets Currently
Available " were prepared and sent to all secondary schools. A direct issue of twenty-
eight guidance monographs was made to all secondary schools during the year 1949-50.
Through the co-operation of the Vancouver Board of Trade and the Pacific National
Exhibition the annual vocational guidance job study competition was again conducted
in secondary schools of the Province. A total of 9,381 original studies of occupations
in British Columbia industries were submitted by students. The winner of the Grand
Bursary Award was Ronald Sterne, a Grade XI student of the Britannia High School,
Vancouver. To the school of the winning student was awarded the George Powell
Vocational Guidance Shield.
Bursaries in district competitions were awarded to students in the following schools:
Britannia, Kitsilano, Prince of Wales, Magee, King Edward, Point Grey, and Templeton
High and Junior High Schools, Vancouver; Queen Mary, Ridgeway, and North Vancouver High and Junior High Schools, North Vancouver; T. J. Trapp Technical, Duke
of Connaught, and New Westminster High and Junior High Schools, New Westminster;
Gilmore Avenue and South Burnaby Junior-Senior High Schools, Burnaby; North Surrey, Queen Elizabeth, and Lord Tweedsmuir Junior-Senior High Schools, Surrey; Victoria, Mount View, Esquimalt, and Mount Douglas High Schools, Victoria; Duncan,
Alberni District, Courtenay, Ladysmith, Chilliwack, Agassiz, Hope, Coquitlam, Langley,
Port Coquitlam, Kamloops, Enderby, Armstrong, Southern Okanagan, Penticton, Copper
Mountain, Fernie, Cranbrook, Golden, Rossland, Nelson, Ocean Falls, Terrace, Prince
George, and Lillooet High and Junior High Schools.
As in former years, this Division has been favoured with valuable assistance and
support from a number of business and professional groups, as well as Federal and
Provincial Government agencies. The resulting co-operation between business and
education has made a contribution to the general good of education in this Province,
as well as to the efficient functioning of the guidance services in its schools. DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS O 129
DIVISION OF SCHOOL RADIO BROADCASTS
REPORT OF PHILIP J. KITLEY, M.A., DIRECTOR OF SCHOOL
RADIO BROADCASTS
Committee for Radio in the Schools
With the retirement this year of Dr. A. R. Lord from active service with the British
Columbia Department of Education, a chapter in the history of British Columbia school
radio broadcasts is brought to a close. It is fitting, then, that this report begin with a
tribute to his foresight, energy, and persistence, and to all his other qualities of leadership
which helped ensure that British Columbia school radio broadcasts should pioneer in
this field.
In 1937 a committee was set up by Dr. G. M. Weir, then Minister of Education, to
study school broadcasts. Dr. Lord was made secretary of this committee and, later, its
chairman. From the time that the first experimental series went on the air in the soring
of 1938 till the appointment of a full-time Director in 1940, Dr. Lord was actively
engaged in the preparation of programmes, the promotion of the idea among managers
of radio stations and others of influence, and the encouraging of teachers and classes in
the use of radio.    From then on his interest and advice have been no less valuable.
It has now been felt that the time is past when a full-time Advisory Committee could
justify the time and effort of its members, and the committee has therefore been discontinued in favour of smaller temporary committees as needed.
The Year's Programme
School broadcasts were on the air from October 3rd to May 26th, with breaks for
Christmas and Easter, a total of 145 half-hours. Among programmes and series of
special interest might be mentioned " I Hear British Columbia," a social studies series
for junior grades emphasizing the sounds of various aspects of life in our Province; a
short experimental series of music programmes for Grades III to V; a special ten-minute
programme to commemorate the Blanshard Centenary; and a programme of school
choirs selected from the Vancouver Musical Festival.
Reports from listening schools place the seven music series as most frequently used,
and the art programmes next, followed by social studies, wild-life conservation, and
dramatized stories for junior grades.
During the year, word was received of the winning of another international award
at Columbus, Ohio, by the high school guidance series " My Neighbour and Me," and
of a Canadian radio award by the programme " Listen to the City."
School Listening Reports
For the first time, complete enough returns were received this year to provide significant figures on school listening in British Columbia. Reports show a minimum of 426
listening schools, with a total of 119,448 pupils using school broadcasts. Of these,
Grade I reports the greatest number listening, 10,000, and Grade XI the least, 1,400.
In addition to the annual report, 150 teachers compiled detailed day-to-day evaluation
reports during the year, and special group evaluation projects were undertaken in Victoria
and Burnaby. This latter activity, attempted for the first time, proved most valuable
and merits continuance.
Availability of Programmes
Among the difficulties faced by schools in the use of radio broadcasts, one of the
chief troubles continues to be poor reception. For example, reception is still either
difficult or impossible in over a quarter of the school districts—1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 12, 13, 14, O 130 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
15, 16, 18, 27, 29, 49, 51, 53, 54, 55, 58, 70, and 73. The North Okanagan coverage
was improved considerably by the addition of CJIB, Vernon, to the stations carrying
school broadcasts.
Lack of equipment still presents a difficulty, although the gap is gradually being
filled. Among the schools reporting, 27 per cent still had no receiving equipment. The
use of central sound equipment is growing in the larger schools, and thirty-nine report
using magnetic recorders. To facilitate the efficient installation of central sound equipment, a committee was set up this year to investigate school requirements. The report
of this committee was used in the preparation of a Departmental memorandum to School
Boards setting forth basic essentials on which assistance will be given.
Printed Aids
In addition to 4,300 copies of each of the three issues of the regular Teachers'
Bulletin and the calendar, three other mimeographed bulletins were prepared, and
material for use with the French broadcasts was sent out in hectograph form so that it
could be duplicated for pupil use. Synopses of broadcasts were also prepared for correspondence students. Supplementary printed aids have steadily increased in importance
and show signs of continuing to do so.
Teacher-training
Visits were made to all the teacher-training institutions, but in the case of the
Vancouver Normal School it was possible to give a brief course lasting six weeks and
comprising auditioning and discussion of school broadcast transcriptions as well as
details on the techniques of using the programmes. This new approach proved to be
well worth the extra time entailed. For three days at the Victoria Summer School of
Education, school broadcasts discussions and demonstrations were held with thirteen of
the regular classes.
During the year 142 schools were visited. This includes two major schedules of
visits to schools of the West Kootenay and the Okanagan Valley, and shorter visits to
South Vancouver Island, the Abbotsford area, and the Powell River district.
Mention may be made here of a plan to keep parents better informed regarding the
broadcast services to schools. To this end, ten recordings were made of a brief talk
and selections from school broadcasts, and these were circulated among parent-teacher
groups.
General Remarks
The work of this Division clearly exemplifies the good-will and teamwork necessary
to the proper functioning of a school service. From the general committee planning,
through production stages, to School Board and classroom contacts, and, further still,
to relationships with the other nine Provinces and the C.B.C., a high degree of interest
and co-operation has been shown, and for these go the sincere thanks of this Division. DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH O 131
DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
REPORT OF C. B. CONWAY, B.Sc, M.S., D.P^d., DIRECTOR
The testing programme for 1949-50 consisted of two scholastic aptitude tests in
Grades IV and VIII, six achievement tests in Grades IV, XI, and XII, and a test of the
work and study skills in Grade VIII.
Reading.—The B.C. Primary Reading Test, Form E, was administered to 14,793
pupils at the end of the first month of the fourth grade. The results were similar to those
obtained with the Intermediate test in Grade V in 1947-48. A slightly greater weakness
in the Vocabulary section of the test was evident in both surveys, although the difference
between Word Meaning and Paragraph Meaning was not as great in Grade IV. The
need for emphasis in the vocabulary of pupils in the intermediate grades is particularly
noticeable in rural areas.
Work-Study Skills.—Studying, the solution of problems, and the improvement of
academic work can be carried on efficiently only if pupils are familiar with the tools that
are available and know how to make proper use of them. Some of the most important
are:—
Reading comprehension and speed of reading.
Vocabulary, spelling, and language usage.
Computational ability.
A systematic approach to problem solving.    How to organize data and make
a statement of a problem.
Where and how to obtain information:—
(a) Use of references.
(b) Use of an index.
(c) Use of a dictionary.
(d) Map reading.
(e) The interpretation of charts, tables, and graphs.
" Where and how to obtain information " usually is called the " Work-Study Skills."
They are essentials of the educative processes and make up a much more important part
of a child's education than any factual information that he may acquire.
The B.C. Work-Study Skills Test, Advanced Form O, was used to measure these
abilities among 11,430 pupils at the Grade VIII-1 level. The results indicate that
greater attention should be paid to the development of work-study skills.
Foreign Languages.—Tests in four languages—French (Form S), German (Form
P), Latin (Form N), and Spanish (Form O)—were administered to high school students
taking the second and third years of each subject. Each test covered Vocabulary, Reading, and Grammar. A fourth sub-test, Civilization, was given in French. The function
of the surveys was to establish bases with which comparisons could be made after the
present curriculum revision had been completed. Unfortunately the numbers taking
German and Spanish were so small and were so poorly distributed geographically that
it is doubtful that meaningful comparisons will be possible. Some of the German III
classes consisted largely of students whose home language is German. A bimodal distribution was the result.
Language Course
Number
Tested
Mean
I.Q.
Provincial Means
Vocabulary
Grammar
Reading
Civilization
2,649
3,143
85
138
558
704
74
79
112
112
112
116
114
114
114
114
15.2
9.8
20.8
9.4
27.9
21.6
16.8
11.2
15.2
12.0
21.0
12.4
18.7
14.9
19.4
16.9
14.2
9.8
28.3
13.6
3.5*
2.9*
18.1
13.8
7.9
6.9
German III	
Latin III          -
Latin II       ~            - 	
* Rights minus wrongs. O 132 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT,  1949-50
Satisfactory norms with which comparisons can be made are not available for any
of the language tests at present. While those provided with the tests are somewhat higher
than the British Columbia means, the evidence is inconclusive because of the great effect
of environmental differences. The nature of the home-language background of the
standardization groups is an important factor, as is the selectivity of different courses.
It will be noticed that in British Columbia the students taking French are a less highly
selected group than those taking Latin, Spanish, or the German 90 Course.
Mathematics.—An investigation of the difficulties of students in the fundamentals
of the high school Mathematics V Course has been carried on with the co-operation of
Mr. W. D. Reid, of Esquimalt High School. Two forms of a test have been standardized
and will be combined to provide a test that will be suitable for students taking the new
Mathematics Courses.
The Holding Power of British Columbia Secondary Schools
A factor that is often neglected when comparisons are being made between Provinces
is the holding power of the secondary schools. The number of elementary pupils who
remain in school through the high school grades has a great effect on the costs of education, types of school buildings, the salaries and qualifications of teachers, and examination
results. If a higher proportion of the population is enrolled in secondary schools, a
higher proportion of the students will require technical training, teachers with higher
qualifications must be hired, and more expensive buildings and equipment must be
provided. Standards, also, will appear to be lower in courses in which pupils are less
highly selected on the basis of native ability.
In British Columbia 40 per cent of the children born in the Province in 1918 were
enrolled in Grade XI in 1934-35. The proportion of the corresponding births had
increased to 47 per cent in 1937-38, and to 59 per cent in 1939-40, after allowances
were made for immigration. The Grade XI enrolment dropped sharply to 37 per cent
in 1943-44 because of war-time employment, but it has increased steadily since that time.
It passed 50 per cent during the school-year 1947-48, and at 55 per cent in 1949-50 it is
almost at its pre-war peak.
In the accompanying table, Grade VII has been chosen because most pupils in it
are below the compulsory attendance age, and Grade XI because it is the final grade in
some Provinces. The table indicates that even when generous allowances are made for
immigration to British Columbia and emigration from the three Prairie Provinces, the
holding power of British Columbia schools is distinctly higher than that of any other part
of Canada. In 1947-48, in British Columbia, 52 per cent of the native-born girls and
47 per cent of the native-born boys continued beyond Grade X. The percentages have
increased to 57 per cent and 53 per cent in 1949-50 and are now only slightly lower than
they were in 1939-40. DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
O 133
Enrolment in Grades VII and XI in Different Provinces in 1947-48
in Relation to Provincial Births, 1931-35
Average
Births,
1931-35
1947-48 Enrolment
Province
Grade VII
Per Cent
of Births
Grade XI
Per Cent
of Birtns
Newfoundland   	
6,686
1,961
11,486
. 10,440
78,888
65,000
13,690
4,732
1,532
10,011
7,953
50,103
57,208
10,638
750
11,400
15,394
1,250
16,600
14,234
1,000
15,200
12,626
3,000
9,600
184,431
71
78
87
76
64
88
78
83
76
82
86
92
126
96
78
1,600
469
3,570
1,793
7,389
23,236
4,944
400
5,340
8,003
800
8,800
6,580
600
7,180
6,598
1,600
5,000
64,183
24
24
31
17
Quebec  —  	
9
36
36
20,325
39
39
43
16,557
40
Estimated net emigration	
10,005
43
66
50
235,038
27
Immigration and Enrolment
The post-1945 Canadian birth rates have shown a trend that is entirely different
from that of the rates that followed the war ending in 1918. Instead of a rapid rise
followed by an equally rapid decline that caused a peak enrolment extending over two or
three grades, there has been a rapid rise that has levelled out on a plateau. The effect
on the enrolment in British Columbia schools is shown in the accompanying figures. It
will be noticed that only half of the increase due to the birth rate has affected the primary
grades.    The remainder of the increase has been due to immigration.
Family allowance payments indicate that migrating families tend to have more children of pre-school age than the remainder of the population does. Immigration reached
a peak in 1947, then declined, and emigration seems to have reached a point of balance
with it in 1950. Therefore, the chief effects of the immigration of children should be felt
during the next five years. By that time the enrolment will not be far below 220,000.
Enrolment in Grade I, which is not expected to increase very rapidly between 1949 and
1951, will surge upward again between 1952 and 1955.
Calendar Year
Immigrating Children
Total in
Year, Aged
0-15
Accumulation of
Age-group,
1940-49
B.C. Births
(Thousands)
Total
Age-group
in 1949
Year of
Entry to
School
1949...
1948 ...
1947...
1946...
1945 _
1944...
1943 ...
1942...
1941...
1940 ...
2,150
5,500
9,550
5,670
2,630
2,820
2,420
2,000
1,530
1,390
30
350
1,150
2,240
2,830
2,370
2,540
2,855
2,860
3,060
27.3
26.2
25.8
22.6
18.9
19.0
18.8
16.8
15.0
13.5
27.3
26.6
27.0
24.8
21.7
21.3
21.3
19.6
17.8
16.5
1955
1954
1953
1952
1951
1950
1949
1948
1947
1946
Subsequent increases in total enrolment should be more gradual because large classes
soon will begin to graduate from elementary school. The pressure on secondary-school
accommodation will continue to be severe until 1964 or 1965. O 134
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
IRTHS  IN   BRITISH COLUMBIA 1933 TO  1949*
20 000
■1939 1342
YEAR  OF   BIRTH
250000
225 000
200 000
175 000
150000
125000
o100000
e
ui
ID
s
ENROLMENT   IN
BRITISH COLUMBIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS
     1932-1949    —
PROJECTED to 1962
250 000
225000
200000
175 000
150000
125000
100000
1932        1935 1940
Division of Tests, Standards, and Research
1945 1950
1955 I960
Division of Visual Education DIVISION OF TESTS, STANDARDS, AND RESEARCH
O 135
Teacher-supply
The number of graduates from the three teacher-training institutions in British
Columbia has increased from 324 in 1945-46 to 740 in 1949-50. This is partly due to
the increases in average annual salary, which amounted to $245 for those with elementary
certificates and $230 for those with secondary certificates, between September, 1948, and
September, 1949. It also is due to the number of veterans who received bachelors'
degrees from the University of British Columbia in 1948 and the increasing prestige of the
teaching profession.
It would appear that the number of recruits is increasing at a satisfactory rate.
However, the increasing school population, the number of married women teachers who
may withdraw at any time, and the number of under-certificated or temporary teachers
make the shortage of fully qualified teachers much greater than it would seem to be.
A small surplus of secondary-school teachers may appear in 1951 and 1952. At the same
time, there will be a severe shortage of elementary-school teachers.
Retirements from Teaching Profession
Estimated Replacements Needed
Average,
1943-46
Average,
1947-49
Average,
1950-55
Average,
1956-61
46
17
559
42
17
610
Estimated retirement on pension  .
50
20
550
78
22
450
Totals   .
Totals...	
622
669
620
550
350
970
130
680 O 136
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
REPORT OF J. R. POLLOCK, B.A.Sc, DIRECTOR
Submitted herewith is the circulation report of the Division of Visual Education
covering the period September 1st, 1949, to August 31st, 1950:—
District No. and Name
Motion Pictures
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Film-strips
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.
34.
35.
36.
37.
38.
39.
40.
41.
42.
43.
44.
45.
46.
47.
48.
49.
50.
51.
52.
53.'
54.
55.
56.
57.
58.
59.
60.
61.
62.
63.
64.
65.
Fernie	
Cranbrook ...
Kimberley	
Windermere-
Creston	
Kootenay Lake~
Nelson	
Slocan	
Castlegar	
Arrow Lakes	
Trail	
Grand Forks	
Kettle Valley	
Southern Okanagan..
Penticton	
Keremeos	
Princeton	
Golden	
Revelstoke	
Salmon Arm	
Armstrong	
Vernon 	
Kelowna  	
Kamloops	
Barriere	
Birch Island	
Williams Lake..
Quesnel	
Lillooet 	
Ashcroft	
Merritt 	
Fraser Canyon._
Chilliwack	
Abbotsford	
Langley	
Surrey	
Delta 	
Richmond	
Vancouver	
New Westminster-
Burnaby.
Maple Ridge	
Coquitlam 	
North Vancouver-
West Vancouver	
Sechelt   -
Powell River	
Howe Sound	
Ocean Falls	
Queen Charlotte-
Portland Canal	
Prince Rupert	
Terrace 	
Smithers	
Burns Lake	
Vanderhoof	
Prince George—
McBride.
Peace River South-
Peace River North-
Greater Victoria	
Sooke 	
Saanich	
Saltspring	
Cowichan	
661
64
26
27
134
1,540
295
36
15
621
315
224
107
305
173
191
74
333
459
516
469
434
494
29
41
26
554
266
69
1
673
961
293
487
124
849
10,760
378
1,165
286
977
996
172
116
18
352
486
120
229
8
35
I
29
121
11
3,979
498
423
94
355
284
29
12
6
52
646
104
15
11
288
169
83
74
133
56
90
37
156
223
272
221
213
195
19
22
9
252
81
31
1
278
424
121
208
61
341
5,514
235
592
133
424
540
86
52
14
145
259
Too
99
6
24
3
11
44
4
2,323
177
187
37
156
28
71
80
14
22
78
101
28
22
9
275
83
218
32
4
18
261
1,624
36
85
751
274
80
~~85
11
286
18
264
78
118
22
249
26
27
25
9
34
26
19
20
7
224
55
172
31
4
18
249
1,380
25
80
527
220
67
36
10
246 DIVISION OF VISUAL EDUCATION
O 137
District No. and Name
Motion Pictures
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
Film-strips
Number
Requested
Number
Supplied
66. Lake Cowichan..
67. Ladysmith	
68. Nanaimo	
69. Qualicum	
70. Alberni	
71. Courtenay 	
72. Campbell River..
73. Alert Bay	
74. Quatsino	
75. Mission	
76. Agassiz.
77. Summerland	
Unattached schools-
Totals 	
Miscellaneous	
Grand totals .
167
23
676
332
821
12
214
19
977
63
268
205
37,274
1,213
38,487~
77
10
318
140
314
4
107
10
473
20
111
 103_
~187069~
882
18
"209
30
68
355
26
161
25
~85
119
6,440
96
12
166
24
50
298
21
141
23
54
 119_
5,055~
18,951
6,536
5,143
Three hundred and sixty-two schools registered with the Division for service during
the year 1949-50.    This registration reveals the following:—
Type of Equipment
Schools
Possessing
Projectors
Projectors
Possessed
by Schools
Schools
Borrowing
Projectors
Projectors
Borrowed
by Schools
256
126
59
281
129
87
94
8
2
104
7
1
During the 1949-50 term this Division screened 106 films and 55 film-strips, and
arranged for the screenings of 170 films and film-strips by schools and other branches of
the Department to determine the suitability and subject-grade placement of the material
concerned.
In co-operation with the Provincial Museum and the Provincial Archives, a start
was made on the production of a series of film-strips dealing with the ethnic groups of
the British Columbia Indians and historical sketches of British Columbia localities. Of
these, those illustrating the Coast Salish Indian and the history of the Queen Charlotte
Islands were completed. The rest of the Indian material has been brought to such a
stage that the series will be completed within the next few months.
Another point worth noting with regard to this year was the preparation of a photographic exhibit of " The Story of Education in British Columbia," first shown to the
public in the lobby of the Parliament Buildings during Education Week, 1950. O 138 PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
"EDUCATION OF SOLDIERS' DEPENDENT CHILDREN ACT"
REPORT OF MISS F. M. WHEADON, SECRETARY OF THE
COMMISSION
During the school-year 1949-50, 72 new applications for assistance under the
"Education of Soldiers' Dependent Children Act" were received and 91 applied for
continued assistance. The Commission awarded a total of 146 grants and rejected 17
applications.
Successful applicants each received a total grant of $100 for the year.
The awards were distributed through the grades as follows: 36 students in Grade
IX, 42 in Grade X, 43 in Grade XI, and 25 in Grade XII. During the year 16 students
dropped out of school and the grant, in each case was discontinued.
Of the 21 Grade XII students receiving the full grant, 18 were successful in completing their year. One student from Penticton High School graduated with honours and
was awarded the Henry Meyerhoff Scholarship. STATISTICAL  RETURNS O 140
PUBLIC SCHOOLS REPORT, 1949-50
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w w EXAMINATION PAPERS
Copies of examination papers for University Entrance and
Senior Matriculation, prepared by the Department of Education
for candidates who sat for examination in 1950, may be obtained in
booklet form only from the Officer in Charge, Text-book Branch,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C., at the following prices:—
University Entrance Examination Booklet, June and
August, 1950.    Price, 60 cents, postage prepaid.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, June and
August, 1950.     Price, 50 cents, postage prepaid.
Prices for the examination booklets for previous years still
available are as follows:—
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1947. Price,
60 cents.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1948. Price,
60 cents.
University Entrance Examination Booklet, 1949. Price,
60 cents.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1947. Price,
40 cents.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1948. Price,
40 cents.
Senior Matriculation Examination Booklet, 1949. Price,
50 cents.
IF ORDERING ANY OF THE ABOVE, PLEASE
ENCLOSE THE REQUIRED CASH TO COVER, PLUS THE
3-PER-CENT SOCIAL SECURITY AND MUNICIPAL AID
TAX.
VICTORIA, B.C.
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty
1951
3,095-1050-3062   

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