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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Department of Labour ANNUAL REPORT For the Year ended December 31st 1949 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1951

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Labour
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year ended December 31st
1949
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1950.  To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor oj the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour:
The Annual Report of the Department of Labour of the Province for the year 1949
is herewith respectfully submitted.
JOHN H. CATES,
Minister of Labour.
Office of the Minister of Labour,
August, 1950.
. The Honourable John H. Cates,
Minister of Labour.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Thirty-second Annual Report on
the work of the Department of Labour up to December 31st, 1949.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
Department of Labour,
Victoria, B.C., August, 1950.
JAMES THOMSON,
Deputy Minister of Labour. SUMMARY OF CONTENTS
Page
List of Acts Affecting Labour Inside front cover
Report of Deputy Minister  7
Statistics of Trades and Industries  8
Employers' Returns  8
Payroll  8
Previous Provincial Payrolls  8
Comparison of Payrolls  9
Industrial Divisions  10
Average Weekly Earnings by Industries  11
Clerical Workers' Average Weekly Earnings  11
Industrial Wage  12
Firms with Large Payrolls  15
Employment  15
Statistical Tables   21
Summary of All Tables  ____ 34
" Hours of Work Act"  36
Average Weekly Hours  36
Statistics of Civic and Municipal Workers  39
Summary of New Laws Affecting Labour  41
" Annual Holidays Act Amendment Act, 1950 "  41
" Boiler Inspection Act Amendment Act, 1950 "  41
" Hairdressers Act Amendment Act, 1950 "  41
" Mechanics' Lien Act Amendment Act, 1950 "  41
" Shops Regulation and Weekly Holiday Act Amendment Act, 1950 "  41
Board of Industrial Relations  43
Meetings and Delegations  43
Orders Made during 1949 1  43
Regulations Made during 1949  45
Statistics Covering Women and Girl Employees  46
Summary of All Occupations  50
Comparison of 1949 Earnings to Legal Minimum  51
Statistical Summary—Hospital Workers (Female)  51
Statistics for Male Employees  52
Inspections and Wage Adjustments  54
Court Cases  56
Special Licences  58
Conclusion  58
Summary of Orders  59
List of Orders in Effect  97
Hours of Work Regulations  98
Control of Employment of Children  106
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "—Report of Labour Relations Board
(British Columbia)  107
Summary of Cases Dealt With  109
Conciliation Procedure under the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration
Act "  110
Boards of Conciliation, 1949  121
Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards  137 L 6 SUMMARY OF CONTENTS
Page
" Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act "—Report of Labour Relations Board
(British Columbia)—Continued
Summary of Disputes  137
Analysis of Disputes in British Columbia, 1935-49  138
Percentage of Total Working-time Lost through Strikes, 1935-49  139
Analysis of Disputes by Industries in British Columbia, 1949  140
Legal Proceedings Involving the Labour Relations Board (British Columbia) 140
Summary of Prosecutions  141
Employers' and Employees' (Labour) Organizations  141
Number of Labour Organizations Making Returns, etc  142
Inspection of Factories  159
Accident-prevention  159
Inspections  159
Factory Conditions  159
Industrial Homework  161
Inspection of Freight and Passenger Elevators  161
Elevator Inspections _'_  162
Elevator Operators' Licences .:  162
New Elevator Installations  162
Prosecutions  162
Conclusion  162
Apprenticeship Branch  164
Trade-schools Regulation Branch  167 REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF
LABOUR FOR 1949
This Annual Report for the year 1949, the thirty-second chronicle of the activities
of the Department, records another year of stability and progress in the march of
industrial development which has become increasingly apparent during the past few years.
While the general rate of expansion was somewhat moderated by less extensive
gains in some industries, a high level of economic activity was maintained throughout
the year, with export demands and domestic needs continuing to prove important factors
in sustaining the general levels of production.
The Provincial estimated payroll continued upward, totalling some $690,000,000
for 1949, an apparent increase of $50,004,021 over the final estimated total of
$639,995,979 recorded for 1948.
The construction industry forged ahead, to complete its most successful year on
record, although some curtailment was noted in the lumber industries, where production
was somewhat hampered under extreme winter conditions experienced during a portion
of the year.
Earnings remained high, with further increases noted in twenty-one of the twenty-
five industrial classifications shown in this Report.
The average weekly industrial wage figure for all male wage-earners included in the
survey reached a new high of $49.21 (an increase of $1.91 over the preceding year)
to establish an all-time record of average earnings in this group.
Twenty of the twenty-five tables relating to the industrial group showed increased
payroll totals for 1949.
The construction industry topped all previous records to lead with the greatest
increase, up over $6,500,000. Metal-trades industries gained by $4,000,000, while the
total covering the group of miscellaneous trades and industries was up over $3,500,000.
For others in order of increase, see " Comparison of Payrolls " in Report data.
The lumber industry, which had reached an all-time high during 1948, showed
decreasing payrolls in 1949, off some $12,300,000 from the peak figure established for
the previous year. With the completion of work at hand, and shortages of new contracts,
the ship-building and boat-building industry continued to decline, to show a further
decrease of over $4,700,000 from the 1948 figure. Pulp and paper manufacturing
recorded a drop of over $1,800,000, while lesser decreases were noted in wood manufacturing (N.E.S.), down some $98,000, and smelting and concentrating, off $64,000.
Employment totals, which had climbed to peak levels during the previous year,
receded somewhat during 1949. Although increases were apparent in thirteen of the
twenty-five industrial classifications, lower levels were evident in many industries, some
of which had previously shown rising totals for some years past. Decreases were noted
in the lumber industries, ship-building and boat-building, pulp and paper manufacturing,
oil-refining and distributing, food-products manufacturing, and other sections. The high
monthly employment figure for wage-earners in 1949 was recorded at 154,753 in August
of that year, compared with a high of 160,002 recorded in the same month of 1948.
Little change was noted in the average weekly hours of work, with slight decreases
in some industries being offset by minor gains in others. The figure representing the
average weekly working-hours for all wage-earners was computed at 42.24, almost
unchanged from the figure of 42.21 established in 1948, and identical with the average
hours worked in 1947. L 8
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
STATISTICS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES
Highlighting the changes in the structure of our economy, the gradual adjustment
in the levels of industrial production and labour income, and the continued development
of our natural resources, the 1949 statistical section records another year of definite
progress in a widening field of activity.
EMPLOYERS' RETURNS TOTAL 9,020
Due largely to increasing coverage of the surveys, and the co-operation of employers
in prompt completion of the returns, the number of firms reporting in time for tabulation
in the tables rose to 9,020 for 1949, compared with 8,736 in 1948, an increase of 284.
With many firms filing reports in more than one industrial classification, the " number of firms reporting " should be properly considered as representing the actual number
of reports tabulated.
PAYROLL
The total industrial payroll, as represented in the amount of salaries and wages
reported by the 9,020 firms filing returns in time for classification in the tables, was
$434,163,795 for 1949. As this total, however, is a summary of industrial payrolls
only, it should not be considered as the over-all Provincial payroll without the addition
of further totals which follow, to give an accumulative estimated total of $690,000,000,
an apparent increase of $50,004,021 over final estimates for 1948:—
Payrolls of 9,020 firms making returns to Department of Labour   $434,163,795
Returns received too late to be included in above summary  -          1,174,584
Transcontinental railways  (ascertained payroll)—          33,998,573
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers covered by the survey but not filing
returns, and additional services not included in the tables; namely, Governmental
workers, wholesale and retail firms, ocean services, miscellaneous (estimated payroll)    220,663,048
Total     -    $690,000,000
PREVIOUS PROVINCIAL PAYROLLS
Provincial payroll totals since 1928 have been estimated as follows:—
1928  $183,097,781 1939  $165,683,460
1929. _   192,092,249 1940.—   188,325,766
1930   167,133,813 1941     239,525,459
1931  131,941,008 1942    321,981,489
1932...  102,957,074 1943  394,953,031
1933   99,126,653 1944     388,100,000
1934    113,567,953 1945...   383,700,000
1935.   125,812,140 1946  432,919,727
1936   142,349,591 1947....    557,075,508
1937.. _   162,654,234 1948   639,995,979*
1938  158,026,375 1949  690,000,000f
* 1948 total revised since 1948 report.
t 1949 preliminary total subject to revision.
In preparing estimates of the Provincial payroll total for the current year, consideration is given to the increase in the numbers of firms reporting in the industrial
section, and due allowance made for relative expansion and development in other payroll
sections and additional services not included in the coverage of the tables.
Preliminary estimated totals are subject to revision from year to year, based on
additional information not available at the time of publication.
The following table shows the relative percentage of the total working-force represented in each class of worker included in the survey:—
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Per Cent
7.95
11.62
80.43
Per Cent
9.07
12.14
78.79
Per Cent
8.75
11.37
79.88
Per Cent
8.95
11.85
79.20
Per Cent
9.29
11 85
Wage-earners     	
78.86
Totals	
100.00
100.00
100.00
100.00
100 00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 9
COMPARISON OF PAYROLLS
The general trend of industrial payrolls continued upward during 1949, some levelling off becoming apparent, however, particularly in those industries wherein continued
rapid expansion over the past few years had forced payroll totals to extreme heights in
1948. Increases were noted in twenty of the twenty-five industrial classifications included
in the survey for 1949.
Leading in the list of increases, construction payrolls advanced by $6,723,686 from
the previous year's total, followed by metal trades, up $4,005,400, and miscellaneous
trades and industries with an increase of $3,618,693; coast shipping increased by
$1,907,747, followed by the cartage, trucking, and warehousing industry, up $1,621,346,
and food-products manufacturing with a gain of $1,517,903; printing and publishing
increased by $1,335,262; coal-mining, up $1,046,188; oil refining and distribution, an
increase of $1,014,908; public utilities, an increase of $987,116; breweries, distilleries,
and aerated-water manufacturers, up $685,712;•metal-mining, $587,906; explosives,
fertilizers, and chemicals, $513,318; laundries, cleaning and dyeing, $371,951; garment-
manufacturing, $330,399; leather and fur goods manufacturing, $173,255; builders'
materials, $133,584; paint-manufacturing, $113,743; house furnishings, $94,551; and
jewellery-manufacturing, up $49,460.
Decreases were noted in five of the industrial classifications. The lumber industries,
which had recorded spectacular increases in recent years, was off somewhat from the peak
figure established in 1948 to show a decrease of $12,377,570 for the year under review.
The ship-building and boat-building industry, continuing a downward trend, decreased a
further $4,702,883 from the 1948 total, while pulp and paper manufacturing showed a
drop of $1,815,183. Other industries recording lesser amounts were wood-manufacturing
(N.E.S.), down $98,708, and smelting and concentrating, off $64,195.
1947
1948
1949
Industry
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
No. of
Firms
Reporting
Total
Payroll
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
37
120
351
26
131
1,978
38
688
93
138
30
156
96
1,869
1,351
167
501
75
12
159
11
73
5
111
194
$3,422,059.00
5,059,252.00
2,818,491.00
5,194,610.00
16,235,547.00
49,585,762.00
5,143,880.00
29,815,029.00
2,620,570.00
3,828,243.00
629,500.00
4,232,696.00
1,553,950.00
84,746,167.00
30,393,381.00
14,924,098.00
15,341,644.00
5,556,201.00
786,731.00
8,182,551.00
14,812,129.00
13,338,436.00
9,723,200.00
27,284,938.00
10,968,089.00
34
132
435
25
127
2,078
35
658
89
137
40
195
106
1,819
1,488
152
559
67
13
153
9
82
5
109
189
$3,609,739.00
6,907,420.00
5,088,317.00
5,288,864.00
17,001,030.00
59,422,935.00
5,485,887.00
33,082,805.00
2,785,209.00
4,183,552.00
769,177.00
4,974,750.00
1,597,353.00
105,152,349.00
35,720,896.00
18,502,053.00
18,669,989.00
6,329,656.00
958,283.00
9,297,215.00
16,664,439.00
12,315,940.00
12,076,589.00
26,758,522.00
13,747,237.00
40
125
484
23
138
2,193
38
667
117
132
37
191
103
1,701
1,583
157
628
70
16
160
8
72
5
115
217
$4,295,451.00
7,041,004.00
6 709 663 00
Co al-mining 	
6,335,052.00
18,908 777 00
66,146,621.00
5,999,205.00
34,600,708.00
3,115,608.00
4,278,103 00
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals	
818,637.00
5,346,701.00
1,770,608.00
92,774,779.00
Leather and fur goods manufacturing	
39,726,296.00
19,089 959 00
22,288,682.00
7,344,564.00
1,072,026.00
10,632,477.00
14,849,256.00
7 613 057 00
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
12,012,394 00
Street-railways,  gas, water, power, tele-
27,745,638.00
13,648,529.00
Totals   -	
8,410
$366,197,154.00
8,736
$426,390,206.00
9,020
$434,163,795.00
. L 10
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
INDUSTRIAL DIVISIONS
Industrial development within the Province is recorded under three main divisional
headings, including Greater Vancouver, Rest of Province, and Vancouver Island. For
purposes of annual comparison, the relative yearly percentage of the industrial payroll in
each division is used to indicate the trend of industrial activity in that section, the concentration of labour force in any portion of the Province being shown by the application of
the yearly percentages to the over-all estimated Provincial payroll.
During 1949 the percentage of the industrial payroll attributable to the Greater
Vancouver area increased to 43.82 per cent from 42.09 per cent previously recorded.
The Rest of Province percentage remained almost unchanged, showing a fractional gain
from 38.17 per cent to 38.91 per cent for the year under review, while the Vancouver
Island percentage decreased slightly to 17.27 per cent compared with 19.74 per cent
recorded for the previous year.
A divisional breakdown of the ■ 1949 Provincial payroll is obtained through the
application of the above percentages to the over-all estimated total, the resultant figures
being shown in the following table, together with comparative data for previous years:—
1945
1946
1947
1948*
1949t
Greater Vancouver
Rest of Province	
Vancouver Island
$189,662,910.00
121,210,830.00
72,826,260.00
$191,480,395.00
158,015,700.00
83,423,632.00
$223,777,232.00
219,933,410.00
113,364,866.00
$269,374,308.00
244,286,465.00
126,335,206.00
$302,358,000.00
268,479,000.00
119,163,000.00
Totals	
$383,700,000.00
I
$432,919,727.00
$557,075,508.00
$639,995,979.00
$690,000,000.00
* 1948 total revised since publication of 1948 Report.
f 1949 preliminary total subject to revision.
In order to record the continued decrease in the numbers of workers employed at
low wages, a percentage distribution has been made by industry to show the proportions
of workers remaining in the bracket at less than $19 per week.
Decreasing percentages of wage-earners in this section were noted in twenty-two of
the twenty-five industrial classifications covered for 1949, the following table showing, in
order of diminishing percentages, the total male wage-earners employed in each industry,
together with the percentage of that number earning less than $19 per week:—
Industry
Printing and publishing
Jewellery manufacturing and repair
Leather and fur goods manufacturing
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing 	
Paint-manufacturing
Miscellaneous trades and industries
Wood-manufacturing   (N.E.S.)   	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing
Food-products manufacturing	
Metal trades  	
Garment-manufacturing   	
Ship-building and boat-building  _ 	
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc	
Builders'   materials     	
Coast shipping	
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals 	
House furnishings   	
Lumber industries 	
Metal-mining
Oil refining and distributing ....
Smelting and concentrating 	
Pulp and paper manufacturing
Coal-mining    _	
Number
Per Cent
Employed
Less than $19
2.130
7.14
203
6.90
512
5.86
888
5.41
226
5.31
8,266
5.24
5,295
4.68
3,070
4.17
13,894
4.10
13,416
3.70
396
3.54
3,739
3.32
1,453
2.48
6,861
2.35
2,875
2.12
7,748
2.01
33,157
1.92
1,751
1.48
1,511
1.32
41,129
1.31
6,613
1.06
1,918
0.99
3,584
0.95
4,311
0.88
2,399
0.00 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS BY INDUSTRIES
L 11
Increases in the average weekly earnings for male wage-earners were noted in
twenty-one of the twenty-five industrial classifications included in the survey for 1949.
Based on the week of employment of the greatest number, the table shows the
average weekly earnings for male wage-earners in each industry for the comparative
years 1942 to 1949.
Average Weekly Earnings
in Each Industry (Male Wage-earners)
Industry
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
Breweries,   distilleries,   and   aerated-
$31.85
30.78
34.56
31.24
36.41
36.45
30.52
27.72
27.76
38.59
28.20
27.80
33.94
34.00
37.19
33.58
33.40
28.73
37.10
33.92
40.32
38.49
32.28
30.24
$33.46
31.61
39.00
33.97
39.60
37.54
32.66
32.03
28.13
41.14
30.39
30.18
37.09
36.37
35.82
34.92
35.52
30.71
38.39
36.41
40.08
38.47
35.01
33.34
$34.72
33.17
42.38
35.86
38.47
36.50
35.06
34.42
31.28
44.64
33.05
32.47
41.28
39.07
39.40
37.21
37.99
33.42
39.47
37.71
40.36
36.74
37.29
34.75
$33.73
34.12
$37.09
37.02
$41.25
40.50
39.55
45.54
38.84
43.08
44.30
40.09
37.03
35.02
40.90
33.51
32.77
47.28
39.90
47.98
37.41
43.80
35.56
43.70
48.10
47.10
45.55
45.04
39.32
$42.67
44.99
43.50
54.40
40.52
48.23
48.78
44.75
41.40
39.07
45.04
36.50
36.87
49.92
43.65
51.72
40.84
50.38
36.13
47.80
51.25
48.79
52.13
47.67
44.27
$44.67
Builders' materials	
48.11
46.41
42.11
36.54
37.50
40.43
35.62
36.11
31.39
41.38
31.34
31.63
41.24
38.41
39.99
35.31
38.71
33.42
41.63
37.88
39.96
41.19
37.21
34.70
43.53
37.27
39.17
38.87
38.00
36.50
33.27
43.00
33.06
34.72
43.20
37.83
42.31
35.23
39.05
33.31
42.12
43.43
40.28
38.70
39.45
37.88
52.68
44.21
Construction  	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals
50.97
49.33
46.47
43.03
House furnishings	
Jewellery manufacturing and repair	
42.41
43.93
41.36
Leather and fur goods manufacturing
38.75
51.40
45.63
53.51
Miscellaneous trades and industries.
42.22
53.90
37.21
50.74
54.10
53.37
51.73
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc 	
51.15
44.07
♦Previous yearly figures for cartage, trucking, and warehousing included with miscellaneous trades and industries.
The increases and decreases in the average weekly earnings for male wage-earners
are as follows:—
Increase
Breweries, distilleries, and aerated-water
manufacturers    	
Builders' materials 	
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing	
Coast shipping  	
Construction	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals	
Food-products manufacturing  —
Garment-manufacturing     	
House furnishings
Laundries, cleaning and dyeing	
Leather and fur goods manufacturing .
Coal-mining
$2.00
3.12
2.91
3.69
2.74
0.55
1.72
1.63
3.34
4.86
1.88
Lumber industries
Metal trades 	
Metal-mining
  $1.48
  1.98
  1.79
Miscellaneous trades and industries  1.38
Oil refining and distributing   3.52
Paint-manufacturing    -.  1.08
  2.94
..... 2.85
..... 4.58
Printing and publishing .
Pulp and paper manufacturing	
Ship-building and boat-building 	
Street-railways, gas, water, power,
phones, etc —.:	
Decrease
  $1.72
Jewellery manufacturing and repair     1.11
Smelting and concentrating 	
Wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.)      0.20
3.48
$0.40
CLERICAL WORKERS' AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS
In addition to wage-earners, the 1949 survey was further extended to cover details
of the weekly earnings of the clerical group. This section is inclusive of clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, the greater earning-power of the latter occupation being largely
responsible for the relatively higher averages in those industries normally employing
considerable numbers of skilled sales personnel.
Increased earnings were, with a few exceptions, generally apparent throughout the
clerical section.   Representing the weekly earnings for clerical workers in all industries, L 12
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
the average figure for male employees increased to $50.55 in 1949 from $48.39 recorded
for the previous year, while for the female workers the average weekly earnings rose to
$31.85, as against $30 noted in 1948.
Figures representing average weekly earnings for clerks, stenographers, and sales-
workers (male and female) in each industry, for the comparative years 1948 and 1949,
are as follows:—
Industry
1948
1949
Males
Females
Males
Females
$48.84
46.69
39.04
55.54
46.87
47.03
54.52
46.90
43.52
45.37
33.53
46.75
43.27
54.03
43.85
59.26
41.98
50.73
44.54
44.81
54.98
51.98
61.13
51.45
54.84
$31.34
30.31
24.84
28.43
32.47
30.02
29.45
29.46
29.02
29.06
23.31
25.43
27.64
31.81
28.62
33.93
28.17
37.03
31.48
28.60
34.48
29.89
36.88
31.61
35.21
$50.46
49.27
42.79
51.81
49.15
50.68
56.65
48.64
45.35
49.83
25.00
47.44
46.15
55.80
45.94
59.15
44.48
53.85
47.83
47.29
58.86
53.26
60.70
51.23
55.58
$34.52
30.67
25.89
27.63
34.67
31.56
31.22
30.95
32.66
31.32
25.88
27.64
29.35
34.37
29.61
34.18
31.09
38.09
32.46
30.12
35.72
32.31
35.49
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc _ —
34.03
36.02
$48.39
$30.00
$50.55
$31.85
INDUSTRIAL WAGE
Continued upward movement in the trend of price levels and the resultant cost of
living forced further wage increases in most industries during 1949.
Indicating the high level of wages for workers in all industrial occupations, the
computed average figure representing the weekly earnings of male wage-earners rose to
$49.21 during 1949, to set a new all-time high average for industrial workers within this
Province.
Average industrial weekly earnings from 1918 to 1949 are as follows:—
1918  $27.97
1919  29.11
1920  31.51
1921  27.62
1922  27.29
1923  28.05
1924  28.39
1925  27.82
1926  27.99
1927  28.29
1928  28.96
1929  29.20
1930  28.64
1931  26.17
1932  23.62
1933  22.30
1934  $23.57
1935  24.09
1936  26.36
1937  26.64
1938  26.70
1939  26.80
1940  28.11
1941  30.67
1942  35.24
1943  37.19
1944  38.70
1945  3 8.50
1946  39.87
1947  43.49
1948  47.30
1949  49.21 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 13
The following chart, based on the above average figures, shows the trend of average
weekly earnings for male wage-earners from 1918 to 1949:—
AVERAGE WEEKLY EARNINGS OF MALE WAGE-EARNERS
1918 - 1949
AVERAGE
WEEKLY
EARNING.
YEAR
1918
1919
1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
192/
1928
19291
1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
19A9
49.00
48.00
47.00
46.00
45.00
44.00
43.00
42.00
41.00
40.00
39.00
36.00
37.00
36 00
35.00
34.00
33.00
32.00
31.00
30.00
29.00
28.00
27.00
26.00
25.00
24.00
23.00
22.00
/
/
/
/
1
1
i
1
/
/
_./
/
/
/
/
A
/
/
f\
/
I
\
/
/
/
\
■—>•
.*.
r-
\
/
^.^
\
/
/
\
\
/
V
/
N
_-
/
V
(1949 figure—$49.21.) L 14
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Percentage
Weekly of
Wages Employees
Under $15      1.81
$15 to 20     1.62
20 to 25-..     3.85
25 to 30    9.89
30 to 35  22.38
35 to 40  19.70
40 to 45  18.97
45 to 50        9.59
50 to 55     5.74
55 to 60    2.08
60 to 65     1.62
65 to 70.    0.77
70 and over     1.98
Under $15 .
$15 to 20.
20 to 25-
25 to 30.
30 to 35..
35 to 40.
40 to 45-
45 to 50..
     2.03
     1.45
    3.22
    7.43
  17.52
  22.43
  19.53
  10.69
50 to 55...      7.52
55 to 60 -:—   2.94
60 to 65     1.77
65 to 70—      0.94
70 and over    2.53
Under $15  2.34
$15 to 20..  1.60
20 to 25—  2.52
25 to 30  4.53
30 to 35._  10.32
35 to 40  17.94
40 to 45   19.05
45 to 50  13.78
50 to 55_   11.56
55 to 60  5.98
60 to 65  3.63
65 to 70   1.92
70 and over  4.83
Under $15    1.97
$15 to 20  1.20
20 to 25   1.93
25 to 30  2.70
30 to 35  5.61
35 to 40.  10.94
40 to 45  18.89
45 to 50  16.62
50 to 55   14.03
55 to 60   9.33
60 to 65   6.74
65 to 70   3.40
70 and over   6.64
Under $15	
     1.59
$15 to 20	
     1.03
20 to 25..-.	
     1.69
25 to 30	
    2.58
30 to 35 	
    4.43
35 to 40	
    7.68
40 to 45	
  16.24
45 to 50 	
  19.48
50 to 55-	
  13.25
55 to 60...	
  10.04
60 to 65 	
     9.03
65 to 70	
    4.78
70 and over	
     8.18
ui             o             C
[\>                    [\J                    Oj
B                    O                    Ol                    5
e              _*              x              -N-
1                                1
T
T____ X
-     ______
—y^—	
cn
±
T             X
■r
■■
■■■
■r
■ ■■r
r^P
urn
■
■ ■r
■ ■r
"
ifei ______.__,
.
_f^
■ ■■■
■■
■ ■■■■
■■
■
■■
■■■
Hl .**
 oo
■ ■■r
■ r
■
■ ■
■ ■r
■ ■■■■
_r                                               tD
|W__________.U_J
The above bar diagrams show the relative percentages of male wage-earners in the
various wage classifications from 1945 to 1949. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949 L 15
FIRMS WITH LARGE PAYROLLS
For some years a record has been maintained of the larger firms reporting payrolls
in excess of $100,000. While the numbers recorded are necessarily restricted to those
firms reporting in time for classification, the annual comparison serves to indicate generally the proportionate concentration of the labour force in the various industries.
Payrolls excluded from the coverage of this survey are those of public authorities
(Dominion, Provincial, or municipal), wholesale and retail firms, transcontinental railways, and vessels engaged in deep-sea transportation.
The over-all total number of firms reporting payrolls in excess of $100,000 remained
at a high of 713 for 1949, unchanged from the same total recorded for the previous year.
Fluctuations, however, occurred in the individual classifications.
The lumber industry continued to lead with the greatest number of firms in the
higher payroll bracket, showing a total of 178 for the year under review, this figure,
however, being somewhat reduced from the high of 203 recorded for the previous year.
In the construction industry a total of 98 was recorded, an increase of 5 over the previous
figure; followed by the metal trades with 81, increased by 5; food-products manufacturing, 73, up 1; miscellaneous trades and industries, 44, unchanged; coast shipping, 31,
increased by 1; metal-mining, 23, unchanged; wood-manufacturing (N.E.S.), 23, a
decrease of 2; printing and publishing, 20, up 1; public utilities, 19, increased by 1;
builders' materials, 17, unchanged; ship-building and boat-building, 15, unchanged;
laundries, cleaning and dyeing, 13, up 1; oil refining and distributing, 13, up 1; breweries,
distilleries, and aerated-water manufacturers, 9, unchanged; coal-mining, 9, an increase
of 1; cartage, trucking, and warehousing, 8 (previously included with miscellaneous trades
and industries); garment-manufacturing, 8, unchanged; pulp and paper manufacturing, 8,
unchanged; house furnishings, 6, an increase of 1; leather and fur goods manufacturing,
6, up 1; explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals, 5, unchanged; smelting and concentrating,
3, unchanged; paint-manufacturing, 2, and jewellery-manufacturing, 1, both unchanged
from the previous year.
Of the 713 firms reporting in the higher brackets, seven had payrolls in excess of
$5,000,000, three between $4,000,000 and $5,000,000, five between $3,000,000 and
$4,000,000, twelve between $2,000,000 and $3,000,000, and thirty between $1,000,000
and $2,000,000.
EMPLOYMENT
Some recession was noted in the peak levels of employment during the year 1949.
Although many industries continued to show increasing monthly totals, the over-all trend
of general employment was lower than the record year of 1948, particularly noticeable in
those industries normally employing the greatest number of workers, and especially so in
industries affected by extreme winter conditions during a portion of the year.
The following table shows, by industry, the variation of employment in 1949 and
comparative data for the previous year, with subsequent charts presenting a graphic
picture of the respective trends in the clerical section, wage-earner group, and total
employment summary for 1949 and past years.
The following table shows the variation of employment in each industry during the
past two years:— L 16
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table Showing the Amount or Variation of Employment in Each Industry
in the Last Two Years*
1948
1949
Industry
iw
°    i.
J3      O
oof?
SSwE
•a
r. u
J.&
E?
ZW
rr
°            rk
■S   2
_§ S E |
■d
-< a
Eft
lg
ZW
tH
1 ii
a t_ as
oocg
£S«E
•a
E a
I6
Zw
Ills
■a
u 0i
Ef
SE
Zw
Breweries,   distilleries,   and  aerated-
water manufacturers 	
Dec.
Sept. and
Oct—
Sept.
Dec.
Sept.
Aug	
July
Sept.
Nov.
Nov.
Nov.
July
Nov.
Aug	
July
July
Sept.
Nov.
July
July
July
Jan.
July
Aug.
Aug	
Aug	
1,671
2,840
2,440
2,251
7,360
27,970
2,185
21,649
1,677
2,150
445
3,214
902
39,888
14,227
6,478
9,336
2,428
396
3,609
5,754
5,890
4,280
11,777
5,838
182,565
Mar.
Apr.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Feb.
Sept.
Mar.
July
June	
Jan	
Dec.
June
Dec.
Jan.
Dec.
Feb
Apr.
Jan..
Apr.
Dec.
Dec.
Jan.
Jan.
Dec.
Dec.
1,338
2,679
1,888
1,112
6,803
19,275
2,025
11,602
1,397
1,939
323
2,900
778
28,061
13,566
5,862
7,537
2,062
334
3,416
5,279
3,290
3,996
10,507
5,488
149,067
July
Aug	
Sept.
Dec.
June
Aug.
May	
Sept.
Apr.
Nov.
Nov.
July
Oct.
Oct.
July
Aug	
Aug... .
Nov.
May
Oct.
Jan..  	
May
Nov.
July
June
Aug	
1,935
2,787
2,902
2,396
7,862
26,854
2,168
21,568
1,970
2,034
445
3,404
916
35,814
15,275
6,429
10,876
2,369
411
3,808
4,935
3,061
4,366
10,746
5,751
176,305
Mar.
Feb.
Jan.
July
Mar.„
Feb.
Dec.
Feb.
July
May.
Mar.
Feb.
Feb.
Jan	
Feb.
Apr.
Feb.
Apr.
Dec.
Mar.
Aug	
Dec.
Feb.
Feb.
Aug	
Feb.
1,535
2,463
Cartage, trucking, and warehousing
2,530
2,226
6,747
Construction.	
Explosives, fertilizers, and chemicals	
Food-products manufacturing	
19,375
1,551
11,051
1,459
1,820
Jewellery manufacturing and repair
360
2,914
Leather and fur goods manufacturing...
786
24,361
14,585
5,902
Miscellaneous trades and industries
7,933
1,966
357
Printing and publishing  , _
3,518
4,069
2,422
4,069
Street-railways,   gas,   water,   power,
9,984
5,389
142,652
* Industrial employment totals include clerical and sales staffs in addition to wage-earners, and are based on the
number of employees reported on the payrolls on the last day of each month or nearest working-date. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949 L 17
Employment of Clerical Workers in Industry, 1948 and 1949*
22,500
22,000
21,500
(1948)
21,000
20,500
(1949)
20,000
19,500
19,000
18,500
18,000
17,500
17,000
1,500
1,000
r^
500
0
<
* Employment as at the last day of each month.    Figures include clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc., but not
salaried officials, executives, or managerial staff.
January _.  20,172
February _ _ _ 20,093
March    _ _  20,219
April   _ 20,340
Clerical Workers, 1949
(Male and Female)
May
June
July
20,691
21,089
21,331
August     21,552
September
October ....
November
December
21,192
21,044
21,005
20,836 L  18
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
AVERAGE  MONTHLY   NUMBER or WAGE-EARNERS    (Male and Female)
1929-31 -32-39 -40-41 -42-43-44-45- 46- 47 — 48 - 49
JAN.      FEB.     MAR.    APR.     MAY   JUNE   JULY     AUG.    SEPT.    OCT.     NOV.     DEC.
16 0.000
155.000
15 0,00 0
145,000
140,000
135,000
13 0,000
125,000
120,000
I 15,OOO
I I 0,000
105,000
100,000
95.000
90.000
85,000
80,000
75,000
70,000
65,000
60,000
55,000
50,000
45,0 OO
40.000
y
y
^
'&
y
y
Ia
y
y
y
y_
s
/
/
____
\
\
\
— REFERENCE -
Employment  in —
1929 shown  thus
1931
1932
1939
1941
1943
1945
1948
1949
^
^^
^;
\
1949
1948
1929
1939
1949
January ..
February
March 	
April 	
123,099
122,559
132,593
137,897
May
June
145,909
148,139
July   151,443
August   154,753
September
October	
November
December
154,147
149,347
143,054
128,108 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
Total Employment in Industry, 1948 and 1949*
L 19
190,000
185,000
180,000
175,000
170,000
165,000
160,000
l(I948)
155,000
■>^
(l949)^\
150,000
145,000
140,000
135,000
130,000
125,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
0
rU
staff.
* Employment as at the last day of each month.   Figures do not include salaried officials, executives, or managerial
January     143,271
February    142,652
March    152,812
April  158,237
Employment, 1949
(Male and Female)
May  166,600
  175,339
June   169,228
July -  172,774
August   176,305
October ._	
November 	
December 	
... 170,391
164,059
  148,944 L 20
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Monthly Variation in the Number of Wage-earners, Clerical Workers,
and Total Employment in Industry, 1949*
Number
Employed
190,000
180,000
170,000
160,000
150,000
140,000
130,000
120,000
110,000
100,000
95,000
90,000
85,000
80,000
75,000
70,000
65,000
60,000
55,000
50,000
45,000
40,000
35,000
30,000
25,000
20,000
15,000
1     1
_■
Tota/ Employment
- Woge
Earners
_sl
. C/er/'i
■a/ Wo
rkers
o
U.
* Employment as at the last day of each month.   Figures do not include salaried officials, executives, or managerial
staff. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 21
CONTENTS OF TABLES
With regard to the tables immediately following, the general
headings of such tables are given hereunder and the trades
included under each heading:—
No. 1. Breweries, Distilleries, and Aerated-water Manufacturers.—Also is inclusive of wineries, and comprises firms in or
incidental to the manufacture, bottling, and distribution of
malt liquors, spirits, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and
carbonated water.
No. 2. Builders' Material, Producers of.—Includes manufacturers of brick, cut stone, Portland cement, lime, tiles, and
firebrick; also stone-quarries and dealers in sand, gravel, and
crushed rock.
No. 3. Cartage, Trucking, and Warehousing.—Comprises
firms engaged in the business of freight and baggage hauling,
moving, storage, packing, shipping, and transfer services.
No. 4. Coal-mining.—This group contains also the operation
of coke-ovens and coal-shipping docks.
No. 5. Coast Shipping.-—Includes the operation of passenger
and freight steamships, stevedoring, tug-boats (both general
and towing logs), and river navigation, but does not include
the operation of vessels in the offshore trade.
No. 6. Construction.—Here are grouped building trades,
painting and paper-hanging, plumbing and heating, aiid sheet-
metal works; also contractors for industrial plants, structural-
steel fabricating, railway-fencing, sewers, pipes and valves,
dredging, pile-driving, wharves, bridges, roofing, and automatic
sprinklers. Firms making returns as building contractors,
constructors of dry-kilns, refuse-burners, mills, brick-furnaces,
electrical contractors, hardwood and sanitary floor-layers, and
bricklayers.
No. 7. Explosives, Fertilizers, and Chemicals.-—Includes all
firms engaged in the manufacture of these commodities.
No. 8. Food Products, Manufacturing of.-—This table includes bakeries, biscuit-manufacturers, cereal-milling, creameries and dairies; fish, fruit, and vegetable canneries; packinghouses, curers of ham and bacon, blending of teas; also manufacturers of candy, macaroni, syrup, jams, pickles, sauces.
coffee, catsup, and spices.
No. 9. Garment-making.—Includes tailoring, the manufacture of buttons, pleating, embroidery, etc., jute and cotton
goods, shirts, overalls, knitted goods, millinery and ladies'
outfitting.
No. 10. House Furnishings.—Comprises firms engaged in
the manufacture of furniture, beds and bedding, springs and
mattresses, upholstering, and carpet and linoleum laying.
No. 11. Jewellery Manufacturing and Repair.—Includes the
repair, as well as the manufacturing of jewellery, watches, and
optical instruments (where same is carried on in a factory).
No. 12. Laundries, Cleaning and Dyeing.—Includes these
industries only.
No. 13. Leather and Fur Goods, Manufacturing of.—Comprises manufacturers of boots, shoes, gloves, harness, trunks,
and leather Indian novelties; also furriers and hide and wool
dealers.
No. 14. Lumber Industries.—In this group are included
logging, logging-railways, planing-mills, sawmills, shingle-mills,
and lumber-dealers.
No. 15. Metal Trades.—This group includes marine black-
smithing, oxy-acetylene welding, boiler-making, iron and brass
foundries,   garages,   vulcanizing,   machine  and pattern  shops,
galvanizing and electroplating;   also manufacturers of handsaws.
nuts and bolts, pumps, marine engines, mill machinery, and
repairs to same.
No. 16.  Metal-mining.—Includes  all metalliferous  mining.
No. 17. Miscellaneous Trades and Industries.—Here are
grouped returns from trades which are not numerous enough to
warrant special categories, and others for which separate tables
are not at present maintained. They include manufacturers of
soap, paper boxes, bags, and containers, brooms and brushes,
tents, awnings, and other canvas goods, aircraft and aircraft
parts, motor and aerial transportation, ice and cold storage.
No. 18. Oil Refining and Distributing.—Includes also the
manufacture of fish-oil.
No. 19. Paint-manufacturing.—Includes also white-lead cor-
roders and varnish-manufacturers.
No. 20. Printing and Publishing.—This table includes the
printing and publishing of newspapers, job-printing, paper-
ruling, bookbinding, engraving and embossing, blue-printing,
lithographing, draughting and map-publishing, and the manufacture of rubber and metal stamps.
No. 21. Pulp and Paper Manufacturing.—Comprises only
firms engaged in that industry.
No. 22. Ship-building and Boat-building.—Comprises both
wooden- and steel-ship building and repairing, also construction
and repair of small craft and salvage.
No. 23. Smelting and Concentrating.—Comprises only firms
engaged in these industries.
No. 24. Street-railways, Gas, Water, Light, Power, Telephones, etc.—This group comprises generating and distribution
of light and power, manufacture of domestic and industrial
gases, operation of street-railways, waterworks, and telephones.
No. 25. Wood, Manufacture of (not elsewhere specified).—
Here are grouped manufacturers of sash and doors, interior
finish, water-proof plywood, veneer, store and office fittings,
barrels, boxes, ships' knees, ready-cut buildings, wooden pipes
and tanks, wooden pulleys, wooden toys, caskets, coffins, and
undertakers' supplies.	
Table No. 1
BREWERIES, DISTILLERIES, AND
AERATED-WATER MANUFACTURERS
Returns Covering 40 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers. —     $465,175
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.-        627,503
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers) „    3,202,773
Total -- - _ - $4,295,451
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
1,108
1,100
1,119
1,199
1,301
1,342
1,352
1,302
1,221
1,143
1,196
1,179
240
235
190
200
205
236
308
254
203
280
346
251
167
169
170
182
201
204
2U
209
202
192
192
191
57
February 	
57
56
57
63
62
July 	
August	
September.	
64
66
64
64
63
December	
62
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $6.00 _
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to 7.99-
8.00 to 8.99..
9.00 to   9.99-
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99-
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99-
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99-
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99.
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99 .
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99-
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners
Males
3
1
7
6
4
11
7
1
1
7
3
18
6
8
2
3
77
143
327
471
193
67
40
14
18
Females
2
20
1
27
131
165
30
2
4
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
6
19
41
29
28
20
13
15
17
2
22
10
2
1 L 22
Table No. 2
BUILDERS' MATERIAL—PRODUCERS OF
Returns Covering 125 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $822,992
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc..        910,561
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers).. —    5,307,451
Total...  $7,041,004
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 3
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January...	
February	
March 	
2,181
2,079
2,206
2,254
2,316
2,324
2,323
2,373
2,330
2,327
2,275
2,176
19
14
20
20
16
12
13
15
15
14
14
12
229
228
234
235
244
240
241
243
247
247
252
253
140
142
137
142
May.. 	
142
152
July..	
151
156
September.	
October	
151
154
150
146
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $6.00.....
$6.00 to $6.99-
7.00 to   7.99...
8.00 to   8.99..
9.00 to 9.99..
10.00 to 10.99.
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99 .
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00 to 14.99-
15.00 to 15.99 .
16.00 to 16.99
17.00 to 17.99.
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99 .
20.00 to 20.99.
21.00 to 21.99.
22.00 to 22.99.
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99.
25.00 to 25.99.
26.00 to 26.99 .
27.00 to 27.99.
28.00 to 28.99.
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99 .
35.00 to 39.99 .
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99 .
50.00 to 54.99 .
55.00 to 59.99 .
60.00 to 64.99
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over
Wage-earners
Males
22
2
4
3
5
1
5
1
3
2
2
7
9
4
3
11
8
11
17
5
66
273
704
599
383
240
213
103
154
Females
2
1
13
1
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
2
13
23
30
31
40
22
26
10
22
1
1
4
3
2
8
5
14
9
14
9
5
38
14
9
CARTAGE, TRUCKING, AND
WAREHOUSING
Returns Covering 484 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers..      $700,347
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        550,290
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)..     5,459,026
Total..
$6,709,663
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
2,206
2,208
2,280
2,348
2,387
2,455
2,475
2,489
2,551
2,518
2,441
2,351
9
7
8
11
12
25
21
22
22
17
9
11
181
183
186
188
189
189
193
197
195
195
195
197
134
February	
133
131
April 	
May 	
June   	
July.  	
August	
September	
128
132
132
141
143
134
134
November..	
138
139
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $6.00   	
53
4
6
7
8
3
5
9
1
6
8
4
9
5
5
10
9
4
5
15
16
10
1
1
3
1
1
4
5
3
2
1
2
2
2
1
2
2
5
1
3
1
4
1
4
$6.00 to $6.99 —
7.00 to   7.99	
1
8.00 to   8.99	
1
9.00 to   9.99	
1
10.00 to 10.99..    _
4
11.00 to 11.99	
3
12.00 to 12.99	
3
13.00 to 13.99..
1
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
1
16.00 to 16.99	
1
17.00 to 17.99	
3
18.00 to 18.99.
3
19.00 to 19.99   .   .
6
20.00 to 20.99.
5
21.00 to 21.99.
22.00 to 22.99
5
23.00 to 23.99...	
7
24.00 to 24.99	
4
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99-	
23
3
27.00 to 27.99 . -   „
9    1          11          3    1        10
28.00 to 28.99	
11
9
184
301
532
506
734
263
135
69
115
9
2
3
1
20
16
17
29
32
31
8
3
2
6
29.00 to 29.99	
4
30.00 to 34.99	
26
35.00 to 39.99	
9
40.00 to 44.99	
4
45.00 to 49.99	
2
50.00 to 54.99 	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99 	
65.00 to 69.99 	
1 Table No. 4
REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1949
Table No. 5
L 23
COAL-MINING
Returns Covering 23 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $386,045
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        121,628
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)     5,827,379
Total..
$6,335,052
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
2,270
2,278
2,273
2,209
2,207
2,216
2,169
2,234
2,212
2,268
2,310
2,337
2
2
2
1
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
3
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
39
40
40
40
40
16
16
March	
16
16
May —  	
June	
July 	
August	
September 	
October 	
November	
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
16
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males     Females i   Males    Females
Under $6.00 ...
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to 7.99..
8.00 to 8.99-
9.00 to   9.99-
10.00 to 10.99
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99-
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99.
16.00 to 16.99 .
17.00 to 17.99 .
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99.
20.00 to 20.99 .
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99.
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99-
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99 .
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99-
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99.
35.00 to 39.99 .
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99 .
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99 .
60.00 to 64.99-
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over.
12
64
101
122
255
1,055
504
101
28
142
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
COAST SHIPPING
Returns Covering 138 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers..       1,555,098
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.       1,388,262
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)    15,965,417
Total ..
$18,908,777
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
6,635
84
335
149
February....	
6,344
81
334
147
6,182
82
335
148
April 	
6,479
87
339
151
May	
6,672
107
344
151
June —
7,224
128
354
156
July	
7,157
134
348
162
August  	
7,171
134
348
157
September	
6,784
105
335
157
October 	
6,421
88
329
150
November 	
6,565
82
326
146
December	
6,482
81
323
143
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males
Under $6.00._
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to   7.99..
8.00 to   8.99..
9.00 to 9.99_
10.00 to 10.99 .
11.00 to 11.99.
12.00 to 12.99 .
13.00 to 13.99-
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99.
16.00 to 16.99.
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99 .
21.00 to 21.99-
22.00 to 22.99 .
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99 .
25.00 to 25.99 .
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99.
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99.
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99-
50.00 to 54.99.
55.00 to 59.99 .
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over
I
18
7
5
16
7
19
4
7
5
10
8
10
20
30
19
24
15
26
448
52
37
40
1,167
1,259
845
828
1,335
455
305
383
294
Females
12
70
15
3
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
1
1
6
1
20
27
46
64
39
33
25
18
22
5
2
3
11
1
44
33
18
20
3
1 L 24
Table No. 6
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
CONSTRUCTION
Returns Covering 2,193 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $5,646,472
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      5,144,240
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     55,355,909
Total-
$66,146,621
Employment
Month
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July    	
August	
September
October.-.
November
December.
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males     Females    Males    Females
17,165
17,164
20,802
21,525
22,924
22,663
22,942
24,404
23,629
22,733
21,101
17,115
91
1
1,409
89
1,393
91
1,427
94
1,434
148
1,447
169
1,466
184
1,489
194
1,500
138
1,498
121
1,464
119
1,457
110
1,450
720
729
719
733
747
755
767
756
749
754
746
748
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $6.00—
$6.00 to $6.99 ..
7.00 to   7.99...
8.00 to   8.99...
9.00 to 9.99-
10.00 to 10.99...
11.00 to 11.99-
12.00 to 12.99-
13.00 to 13.99-
14.00 to 14.99-
15.00 to 15.99-
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99-
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99...
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99...
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99-
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99-
29.00 to 29.99-
30.00 to 34.99.
35.00 to 39.99-
40.00 to 44.99-
45.00 to 49.99-
50.00 to 54.99-
55.00 to 59.99-
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners
Males      Females
89
38
29
43
29
48
25
59
22
38
40
54
34
90
37
109
56
67
53
172
157
106
102
167
96
1,077
2,643
6,144
4,987
2,975
2,799
5,831
2,239
2,702
19
2
2
1
3
2
5
1
2
8
4
10
9
8
13
33
12
9
5
1
29
14
16
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males     Females
2
1
7
4
1
2
2
4
7
5
4
4
6
4
13
6
21
8
12
5
14
71
76
203
227
175
147
107
103
234
14
1
1
1
1
2
10
9
11
8
29
9
26
28
18
46
21
36
31
23
211
120
65
31
18
4
5
1
3
Table No. 7
EXPLOSIVES, FERTILIZERS, AND
CHEMICALS
Returns Covering 38 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers- —-     $405,969
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc. -     1,298,400
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)- __   4,294,836
Total-
$5,999,205
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
1,589
1,590
1,637
1,612
1,664
1,629
1,645
1,604
1,569
1,603
1,560
1,551
35
36
33
36
37
37
35
37
46
38
33
33
361
359
350
343
353
361
362
356
352
358
356
354
109
107
109
April - -.
110
114
Ul
July 	
113
113
113
October— 	
114
109
109
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Males      Females
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to   7.99-	
8.00 to   8.99	
9.00 to   9.99	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99 -	
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99	
20.00 to 20.99	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99..	
35.00 to 39.99..	
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over	
3
5
2
8
4
3
10
10
10
5
20
9
9
87
98
262
304
331
253
147
60
93
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
3
2
1
4
2
19
17
23
34
40
35
94
51
68
10
5
13
10
3
30
17
9
3
1 REPORT OF DEPU'
Table No. 8
FOOD PRODUCTS—MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 667 Firms
rY MINISTER,  1949                                        L 25
Table No. 9
GARMENT-MAKING
Returns Covering 117 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 194'
)
3,614,504
3,895,986
7,090,218
Salary and Wage Payments, 194.
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
>
$397,686
339,185
2,378,737
Clerks, stenographers, salesme
Wage-earners   (including piec.
., etc	
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers
.   2
-workers'
	
Total — 	
  $3,115,608
Total  	
  $3
4,600,708
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
February	
7,125
7,141
7,519
8,239
8,953
9,792
10,809
11,498
11,330
10,200
8,754
7,462
2,349
2,163
2,246
2,662
3,078
4,071
6,467
8,006
8,377
6,588
4,414
2,491
995
1,012
1,014
1,031
1,046
1,062
1,059
1,068
1,057
1,032
1,037
1,017
742
735
731
753
775
789
815
816
804
785
789
761
January	
346
342
354
369
346
343
338
348
345
343
327
341
1,151
1,217
1,340
1,504
1,382
1,178
1,019
1,230
1,243
1,250
1,287
1,253
36
32
35
38
39
43
41
42
47
46
48
52
56
59
59
59
65
62
61
63
62
64
65
69
March-	
April 	
May	
June-	
July	
April...	
May  	
June 	
July      	
September 	
October 	
September 	
October	
November    :
December	
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
106
29
39
35
37
46
26
37
26
28
42
39
36
44
37
37
31
58
50
43
96
47
53
65
97
843
1,554
2,689
2,602
1,801
1,011
787
489
934
212
65
57
68
55
79
86
88
67
96
131
90
178
259
164
349
190
388
256
272
278
535
358
309
312
2,004
1,890
898
518
348
155
156
38
77
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
4
2
1
1
9
2
8
8
4
6
6
103
86
199
183
124
165
65
40
94
4
1
1
3
1
3
3
4
3
5
3
10
8
28
14
11
52
17
50
23
45
57
21
236
120
65
25
4
1
2
Under $6.00	
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
3
3
8
4
8
7
2
17
4
7
6
2
36
44
65
45
45
26
13
12
28
23
8
25
8
12
27
20
72
34
28
40
58
54
83
104
108
52
116
59
96
113
98
71
80
52
237
136
79
50
20
10
4
2
3
1
2
1
1
2
8
3
4
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
3
1
1
8
2
5
12
8
6
4
2
1
2
$6 00 to $6 99
$6.00 to $6.99   	
7 00 to   7 99
7.00 to   7.99	
8.00 to   8.99	
8.00 to   8.99.   	
9.00 to   9.99	
10.00 to 10.99-	
11 00 to 11 99
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99 	
13.00 to 13.99
14.00 to 14.99	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99	
20.00 to 20.99—	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99    	
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99.	
27.00 to 27.99. —
28.00 to 28.99-	
29.00 to 29.99- 	
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99 •
40.00 to 44.99- —
45.00 to 49.99
45 00 to 49.99   	
50.00 to 54.99.	
55.00 to 59.99	
60.00 to 64.99 -	
65.00 to 69.99.	
70.00 and over	 L 26                                                  DEPARTMEN'
Table No. 10
HOUSE FURNISHINGS-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 132 Firms
I OF LABOUR
Table No. 11
JEWELLERY MANUFACTURING AND
REPAIR
Returns Covering 37 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 194
Officers, superintendents, and managers.	
9
$512,401
352,318
3.413.384
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers       $97,842
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc...        _    117.384
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers
Total	
)	
603,411
$818,637
Total    $4,278,103
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
1,308
1,265
1,253
1,228
1,210
1,224
1,258
1,242
1,279
1,289
1,323
1,328
500
484
486
466
462
468
480
479
498
542
555
521
55
56
56
54
58
57
59
59
60
61
60
60
95
96
92
89
90
89
87
92
91
93
96
97
191
188
181
184
183
184
185
183
185
188
198
201
120
103
105
108
122
124
130
138
127
134
160
156
17
18
18
16
17
19
20
20
19
20
20
18
56
55
56
53
52
54
58
55
56
58
67
63
February    _.
March —	
February	
May -	
May 	
June  	
July-- 	
July
August 	
September	
October 	
November 	
December	
August - 	
September- 	
October 	
November 	
December 	
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $6.00
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
3
1
1
16
6
17
7
26
17
24
8
27
19
150
290
292
237
203
66
33
22
31
1
2
1
2
2
3
1
6
7
4
7
35
20
47
27
33
42
37
44
46
16
126
50
28
11
3
2
1
2
1
1
2
2
4
7
6
10
7
4
6
6
1
„
-
_
2
3
4
6
11
4
4
6
4
24
12
7
2
3
Under $6.00	
1
2
1
1
7
2
2
2
6
1
3
3
2
3
22
21
21
28
26
21
12
7
9
2
1
6
1
5
3
2
20
17
6
43
12
20
5
12
4
9
5
1
1
„
1
1
3
1
2
1
1
_.
1
1
1
11
J
2
9
11
3
4
2
10
1
1
1
1
$6.00 to $6.99
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to   7.99- -
7.00 to   7.99	
8.00 to   8.99
8.00 to   8.99 	
9.00 to   9.99
9.00 to   9.99	
10.00 to 10.99
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99..
11.00 to 11.99 	
12.00 to 12.99.
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99
13.00 to 13.99—	
14.00 to 14.99
14.00 to 14.99   „
15.00 to 15.99
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99
16.00 to 16.99-	
17.00 to 17.99
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99   -
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99—	
20.00 to 20.99-   ...
20.00 to 20.99 —-	
21.00 to 21.99
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99
26.00 to 26.99	
27.00 to 27.99
27.00 to 27.99	
28.00 to 28.99
28.00 to 28.99	
29.00 to 29.99
29.00 to 29.99	
30.00 to 34.99
30.00 to 34.99	
35.00 to 39.99
35.00 to 39.99	
40.00 to 44.99
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99
45.00 to 49.99	
50.00 to 54.99    .
50.00 to 54.99	
55.00 to 59.99
55.00 to 59.99	
60 00 to 64.99
60.00 to 64.99 ...
65.00 to 69.99
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over	
70.00 and over.	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 27
Table No. 12
LAUNDRIES, CLEANING AND DYEING
Returns Covering 191 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers       $474,127
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        747,444
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     4,125,130
Total.
$5,346,701
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
763
758
780
798
818
823
845
838
845
816
781
787
1,888
1,829
1,918
1,974
2,044
2,102
2,178
2,163
2,044
1,999
1,900
1,872
136
132
153
155
153
159
154
156
156
155
159
151
202
195
203
April	
May 	
June 	
July 	
211
213
222
227
227
222
October 	
November	
225
212
205
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $6.00   ..
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to   7.99.
8.00 to   8.99 .
9.00 to 9.99..
10.00 to 10.99.
11.00 to 11.99.
12.00 to 12.99.
13.00 to 13.99-
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99.
16.00 to 16.99.
17.00 to 17.99.
18.00 to 18.99.
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99.
26.00 to 26.99.
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99.
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99..
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99.
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99 .
65.00 to 69.99.
70.00 and over
Wage-earners
Males     Females
3
2
1
2
4
7
2
7
12
4
5
3
7
4
20
10
7
13
14
96
139
218
113
■84
41
33
11
18
19
10
11
10
10
16
18
16
10
14
39
27
74
59
97
95
76
173
92
111
132
240
128
194
67
337
100
56
18
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
1
7
17
22
25
16
16
11
4
6
2
6
9
4
24
11
12
22
7
37
13
9
38
22
4
4
1
1
Table No. 13
LEATHER AND FUR GOODS-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 103 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers-
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)..
Total..
$271,323
301,892
1,197,393
$1,770,608
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
425
245
60
65
February 	
410
254
62
60
March    .
420
263
60
59
April —
417
281
60
60
421
308
60
60
June	
404
299
59
58
July  	
412
305
59
64
August	
424
318
58
60
September 	
441
334
57
63
October 	
454
345
55
62
November	
427
325
57
63
December	
397
284
56
59
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $6.00 ...
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to 7.99-
8.00 to 8.99.
9.00 to   9.99-
10.00 to 10.99.
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99 .
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99.
16.00 to 16.99..
17.00 to 17.99.
18.00 to 18.99.
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99.
22.00 to 22.99-
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99.
25.00 to 25.99 .
26.00 to 26.99 .
27.00 to 27.99 .
28.00 to 28.99 -
29.00 to 29.99 -
30.00 to 34.99
35.00 to 39.99 .
40.00 to 44.99 .
45.00 to 49.99 .
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99.
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99 .
70.00 and over
Wage-earners
Males     Females
1
4
2
1
3
4
6
6
6
1
13
7
11
9
9
28
12
47
71
111
65
53
17
7
2
7
2
1
2
2
3
4
6
4
15
13
22
11
20
8
27
18
13
15
54
3
59
33
11
6
3
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
2
1
8
17
7
10
15
6
4
1 L 28                                                   DEPARTMEN'
Table No. 14
LUMBER INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 1,701 Firms
r OF LABOUR
Table No. 15
METAL TRADES
Returns Covering 1,583 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 194
6,383,359
3,808,004
2,583,416
2,774,779
Salary and Wage Paymen
Officers, superintendents, and managers
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc.
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers
Total 	
ts, 1949
     $6,814,383
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc 	
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)    8
Total      ...                                                  $9
- -   2
  $3
7,829,762
5,082,151
9,726,296
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
January  ...
February	
22,952
23,551
28,733
31,150
33,956
34,008
33,806
34,134
33,960
34,140
33,346
27,625
281
285
309
356
398
433
443
447
423
458
393
268
717
727
738
754
771
781
775
776
778
781
780
764
411
403
399
402
414
427
441
436
436
435
431
421
10,792
10,633
10,728
10,802
10,987
11,104
11,131
11,081
10,838
10,794
10,723
10,510
458
425
446
451
495
509
507
485
458
475
488
467
2,209
2,213
2,220
2,240
2,245
2,283
2,305
2,317
2,302
2,299
2,322
2,342
1,337
1,314
1,315
1,314
1,306
1,326
1,332
1,323
1,327
1,315
1,301
1,305
July-	
July- - 	
August	
Septem ber	
October-—	
November	
December	
September 	
October  _
November	
December	
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
<
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $6.00-
78
26
19
65
37
28
24
32
24
25
41
41
55
43
66
61
25
60
76
88
151
58
105
89
108
705
1,466
6,860
11,710
5,076
3,955
3,256
1,956
4,720
5
2
1
1
5
1
2
4
7
3
2
1
4
12
7
4
16
12
23
14
9
20
42
125
73
66
54
48
13
14
4
2
2
2
1
1
3
3
1
1
2
1
8
2
7
3
5
1
1
37
19
62
66
103
68
2
3
3
5
2
7
5
3
19
4
25
12
10
23
5
119
79
41
39
11
9
Under $6.00	
40
22
5
27
24
40
25
36
28
25
61
54
59
51
4
1
1
4
2
3
2
8
2
2
9
28
5
3
2
3
1
4
4
1
2
2
3
4
7
12
8
11
10
24
13
40
12
30
30
11
2
2
3
6
4
10
4
6
7
3
9
6
72
43
45
19
95
43
129
56
93
98
$6.00 to $6.99
$6.00 to $6.99	
7 00 to   7.99
7.00 to   7.99	
8.00 to   8.99   	
8.00 to   8.99
9 00 tn   9.99
9.00 to   9.99
10 00 to 10.99
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99
11.00 to 11.99	
12 00 to 12.99
12.00 to 12.99.	
13 00 to 13.99
13.00 to 13.99 _	
14 00 to 14.99
14.00 to 14.99	
15 00 to 15.99
15.00 to 15.99—	
16 00 to 16.99
16.00 to 16.99	
17 00 to 17.99
17.00 to 17.99	
18.00 to 18.99
18.00 to 18.99..	
19.00 to 19.99
19.00 to 19.99	
57             14
20 00 to 20.99
20.00 to 20.99	
145
52
105
75
129
184
97
114
162
82
33
24
19
23
27
15
11
18
21 00 to 21.99
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99
22.00 to 22.99	
23 00 to 23.99
23.00 to 23.99	
24 00 to 24.99
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99
25.00 to 25.99	
26 00 to 26.99
26.00 to 26.99	
27 00 to 27.99
27.00 to 27.99	
28 00 to 28.99
28.00 to 28.99..	
29 00 to 29.99
29.00 to 29.99	
96    [        11
18    1        36
30 00 to 34.99
30.00 to 34.99	
1,049
1,465
2,032
1,943
1,527
1,944
723
350
670
142
89
44
30
10
31
1
3
302
265
331
323
234
178
104
99
212
335
147
91
38
10
5
3
1
5
35 00 to 39.99
35.00 to 39.99..	
40 00 to 44.99
40.00 to 44.99	
45 00 to 49.99
45.00 to 49.99-	
50 00 to 54.99
50.00 to 54.99	
55 00 to 59.99
55.00 to 59.99	
60 00 to 64.99
77    1          2
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99
76
209
5
3
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over	
70.00 and over—	 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 29
Table No. 16
METAL-MINING
Returns Covering 157 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers.    $1,206,175
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc      2,123,705
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)     15,760,079
Total..
$19,089,959
Employment
Month
January.	
February.—.
March	
April	
May	
June	
July 	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
Wage-earners
Males
5,271
5,269
5,285
5,140
5,516
5,505
5,574
5,648
5,593
5.674
5,578
5,449
Females
92
92
91
96
104
101
102
101
97
83
87
84
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males   | Females
533
526
528
529
538
537
544
536
534
535
533
524
134
135
136
137
137
136
144
144
132
135
135
134
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $6.00	
$6.00 to $6.99	
7.00 to   7.99	
8.00 to   8.99	
9.00 to   9.99	
10.00 to 10.99	
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99	
13.00 to 13.99	
14.00 to 14.99.	
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99 -
18.00 to 18.99	
19.00 to 19.99	
20.00 to 20.99	
21.00 to 21.99	
22.00 to 22.99	
23.00 to 23.99	
24.00 to 24.99—
25.00 to 25.99	
26.00 to 26.99—
27.00 to 27.99-—
28.00 to 28.99-	
29.00 to 29.99—-
30.00 to 34.99—-
35.00 to 39.99—-
40.00 to 44.99	
45.00 to 49.99..	
50.00 to 54.99—
55.00 to 59.99.	
60.00 to 64.99	
65.00 to 69.99	
70.00 and over—-
Wage-earners
Males    I Females
15
6
1
6
2
1
4
3
1
14
4
6
7
5
10
7
6
8
9
14
9
14
11
12
75
160
644
1,558
1,368
788
637
370
838
1
22
14
12
15
2
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males   | Females
5
9
23
73
78
75
97
55
158
2
12
3
37
38
17
8
4
1
Table No. 17
MISCELLANEOUS TRADES AND
INDUSTRIES
Returns Covering 628 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $3,273,507
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       4,034,418
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)„     14,980,757
Total  - - — $22,288,682
Employment
Month
January—
February-
March	
April 	
May	
June	
July-
August	
September-
October	
November-
December—
Wage-earners
Males
5,455
5,289
5,536
5,708
6,541
6,454
6,441
7,394
6,682
6,100
5,938
5,813
Females
1,104
1,069
1,096
1,091
1,197
1,192
1,179
1,494
2,098
1,169
1,187
1,067
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
848
866
875
868
893
927
953
1,134
1,007
998
998
990
Females
708
709
713
727
777
801
819
854
843
824
809
792
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $6.00 —
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to 7.99-
8.00 to 8.99-
9.00 to 9.99..
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99-
12.00 to 12.99-
13.00 to 13.99..
14.00 to 14.99-
15.00 to 15.99-
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99
19.00 to 19.99-
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99-
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24.99-
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99 .
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99 .
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99-
45.00 to 49.99..
50.00 to 54.99-
55.00 to 59.99 .
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99..
70.00 and over.
Wage-earners
Males    | Females
70
23
23
42
14
22
16
28
26
29
28
42
21
49
18
272
24
35
45
74
78
47
72
88
63
804
1,459
1,551
945
962
466
316
170
344
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males   | Females
34
4
5
9
7
22
6
10
6
15
11
14
32
45
39
265
16
61
41
43
65
67
85
122
124
1,273
147
52
19
11
6
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
3
1
2
6
1
6
3
12
9
11
13
8
10
92
5
109
168
126
149
129
70
49
27
98
2
1
1
2
3
6
15
10
34
12
14
32
22
50
32
61
59
12
258
145
47
33
4
3
-
2 L 30
Table No. 18
OIL REFINING AND DISTRIBUTING
Returns Covering 70 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 19
Officers, superintendents, and managers...
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers )..
Total..
$747,786
2,782,486
3,814,292
$7,344,564
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
1,158
1,228
1,035
998
1,062
1,085
1,083
1,084
984
1,314
1,348
1,186
26
27
25
20
27
32
37
43
21
38
25
25
689
688
694
690
698
722
714
710
717
704
713
717
258
February	
253
257
April	
May  	
258
261
277
July —
290
295
September	
October  	
November	
December.- —
293
283
283
274
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $6.00
1
1
1
2
1
5
7
1
2
1
1
2
2
2
1
2
4
3
28
90
302
302
236
338
165
118
300
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
2
21
1
1
3
1
1
1
4
4
1
2
7
1
17
48
72
142
103
88
60
70
114
2
$6.00 to $6.99 —
7.00 to   7.99.	
8.00 to   8.99
9.00 to   9.99
10.00 to 10.99
11.00 to 11.99	
12.00 to 12.99   	
13.00 to 13.99
14.00 to 14.99
15.00 to 15.99
1
16.00 to 16.99
17.00 to 17.99
18.00 to 18.99
1
19.00 to 19.99
2
mOO to 20.99
1
21.00 to 21.99
22.00 to 22.99
23.00 to 23.99	
1
1
24.00 to 24.99	
1
25.00 to 25.99
26.00 to 26.99
27.00 to 27.99
28.00 to 28.99
8
2
3
9
29.00 to 29.99
30.00 to 34.99 -
7
69
35.00 to 39.99	
83
40.00 to 44.99
45.00 to 49.99
33
56
50 00 to 54.99
7
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99
65.00 to 69.99
6
1
1
PAINT-MANUFACTURING
Returns Covering 16 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers...
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc	
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)..
Total...
$236,863
335,294
499,869
$1,072,026
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
184
38
86
52
February.—	
181
38
87
53
March	
194
42
88
56
April  	
208
47
90
54
220
46
92
213
91
July	
198
42
92
52
August   -—
202
42
94
54
September.— -
192
37
91
56
October 	
188
38
91
57
November —- -
184
35
86
57
December 	
185
34
85
53
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $6.00 -
$6.00 to $6.99 .
7.00 to 7.99-
8.00 to 8.99-
9.00 to   9.99..
10.00 to 10.99..
11.00 to 11.99..
12.00 to 12.99
13.00 to 13.99.
14.00 to 14.99 .
15.00 to 15.99.
16.00 to 16.99.
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99.
19.00 to 19.99.
20.00 to 20.99.
21.00 to 21.99 .
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99..
24.00 to 24,99-
25.00 to 25.99.
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99
29.00 to 29.99 .
30.00 to 34.99 .
35.00 to 39.99 .
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99 .
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99 .
65.00 to 69.99 .
70.00 and over
Wage-earners
Males     Females
6
1
3
2
2
1
6
2
34
84
35
13
6
6
3
3
1
5
2
2
3
10
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
6
18
9
11
16
16
5
4
2
4
1
5
6
5
1
10
9
5.
4 Table No. 20
PRINTING AND PUBLISHING
Returns Covering 160 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers    $1,392,308
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc       3,163,515
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)      6,076,654
  $10,632,477
REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
Table No. 21
L 31
Total-
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
February	
1,879
1,868
1,878
1,881
1,959
1,961
1,964
1,975
2,020
2,026
2,010
2,007
340
374
341
353
384
370
355
406
373
389
365
368
749
744
770
757
774
759
775
768
796
790
791
801
573
550
529
April 	
May  	
June  —
July —
560
575
584
592
August 	
September 	
October -
November	
December- -
603
587
603
588
588
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $6.00 ....
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to   7.99.
8.00 to   8.99..
9.00 to 9.99..
10.00 to 10.99.
11.00 to 11.99-
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99
14.00 to 14.99.
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99 .
17.00 to 17.99 .
18.00 to 18.99.
19.00 to 19.99
20.00 to 20.99 .
21.00 to 21.99 .
22.00 to 22.99
23.00 to 23.99 .
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99.
26.00 to 26.99 .
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99 .
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99-
35.00 to 39.99.
40.00 to 44.99-
45.00 to 49.99 .
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99 .
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over
Wage-earners
Males     Females
32
2
3
3
1
9
6
9
8
5
19
18
18
19
17
29
17
40
16
16
45
24
14
16
11
102
104
125
107
158
120
416
255
346
18
3
5
4
4
5
2
4
3
4
7
6
19
29
5
42
16
22
9
17
16
13
4
19
6
46
86
13
6
7
2
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males     Females
1
2
10
1
13
4
1
7
1
6
4
3
23
2
12
3
5
71
89
73
77
87
66
60
41
92
6
4
18
9
15
16
33
30
12
76
16
51
26
14
134
65
23
18
8
7
7
3
1
PULP AND PAPER-
MANUFACTURE OF
Returns Covering 8 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $1,326,816
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        1,796,123
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers).     11,726,317
Total .
$14,849,256
Employment
Clerks,
Wage-earners
Stenographers,
Month
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January	
4,388
135
289
123
February	
4,286
132
284
121
March 	
4,224
131
285
117
April — 	
4,145
121
281
113
May 	
4,094
118
281
114
June 	
4,053
116
284
117
July 	
3,848
112
285
116
August 	
3,567
117
274
111
September	
3,752
116
264
107
October	
3,795
112
254
105
November 	
3,750
118
249
no
December	
3,763
124
252
110
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $6.00 ...
$6.00 to $6.99..
7.00 to   7.99..
8.00 to   8.99 .
9.00 to 9.99..
10.00 to 10.99-
11.00 to 11.99-
12.00 to 12.99-
13.00 to 13.99.
14.00 to 14.99.
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99 .
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99 .
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99..
22.00 to 22.99.
23.00 to 23.99.
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99 .
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99 .
29.00 to 29.99
30.00 to 34.99 .
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99
50.00 to 54.99 .
55.00 to 59.99
60.00 to 64.99
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over
Wage-earners
Males     Females
3
1
1
4
4
6
1
3
4
1
2
1
3
4
1
2
5
5
9
21
8
5
9
5
6
41
65
210
1,160
991
497
426
269
538
1
1
42
53
14
5
10
1
2
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
4
3
17
22
43
54
38
33
76
44
25
17
10
2
2 L 32
Table No. 22
SHIP-BUILDING AND BOAT-BUILDING
Returns Covering 72 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers      $504,399
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc         815,417
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers)    6,293,241
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table No. 23
Total.
$7,613,057
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
J
2,398
2,472
2,585
2,751
2,814
2,704
2,546
2,293
2,249
2,363
2,290
2,174
12
11
11
12
12
14
11
10
10
10
10
11
176
161
157
161
158
163
166
164
162
164
165
162
81
February	
March	
77
78
77
77
78
July.                  	
78
August	
September	
October 	
November —
78
76
74
74
75
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $6.00 ....
$6.00 to $6.99.
7.00 to 7.99-
8.00 to 8.99..
9.00 to   9.99.
10.00 to 10.99-
11.00 to 11.99-
12.00 to 12.99..
13.00 to 13.99.
14.00 to 14.99..
15.00 to 15.99..
16.00 to 16.99..
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99-
19.00 to 19.99.
20.00 to 20.99..
21.00 to 21.99.
22.00 to 22.99 .
23.00 to 23.99.
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99..
26.00 to 26.99.
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99..
29.00 to 29.99-
30.00 to 34.99.
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99.
45.00 to 49.99 .
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99-
70.00 and over
Wage-earners
Males      Females
13
5
2
4
3
2
27
13
9
11
11
4
10
10
11
5
5
19
11
10
21
9
12
26
8
137
132
298
479
321
878
429
271
533
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males    Females
7
14
8
18
21
16
12
22
31
1
3
2
1
1
7
6
2
40
16
5
2
1
1
SMELTING AND CONCENTRATING
Returns Covering 5 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers        $558,302
Clerks, stenographers, salesmen, etc        1,938,348
Wage-earners   (including piece-workers)      9,515,744
Total.
$12,012,394
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
January  —
February 	
3,330
3,305
3,318
3,388
3,500
3,460
3,475
3,454
3,392
3,428
3,579
3,487
50
50
52
50
50
50
54
56
57
54
51
50
560
558
561
559
579
588
591
584
565
571
571
570
159
156
161
April 	
May 	
171
165
171
July 	
177
173
September	
October 	
November	
December	
166
162
165
155
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Under $6.00 -.
$6.00 to $6.99-
7.00 to 7.99..
8.00 to 8.99„
9.00 to 9.99..
10.00 to 10.99-
11.00 to 11.99-
12.00 to 12.99 -
13.00 to 13.99-
14.00 to 14.99-
15.00 to 15.99.
16.00 to 16.99-
17.00 to 17.99..
18.00 to 18.99..
19.00 to 19.99..
20.00 to 20.99-
21.00 to 21.99-
22.00 to 22.99..
23.00 to 23.99-
24.00 to 24.99..
25.00 to 25.99-
26.00 to 26.99..
27.00 to 27.99..
28.00 to 28.99.
29.00 to 29.99..
30.00 to 34.99.
35.00 to 39.99..
40.00 to 44.99..
45.00 to 49.99-
50.00 to 54.99..
55.00 to 59.99..
60.00 to 64.99..
65.00 to 69.99.
70.00 and over
Wage-earners
Males     Females
4
6
3
4
2
3
5
19
9
16
12
17
21
24
30
46
66
69
257
788
801
656
349
142
220
3
1
3
11
2
2
1
1
1
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
4
26
46
63
162
88
83
175
2
3
15
5
3
5
2
40
35
31
14
2 REPORT OF DEPU1
Table No. 24
STREET-RAILWAYS, GAS, WATER, LIGHT,
POWER, TELEPHONES, ETC.
Returns Covering 115 Firms
Y MINISTER, 1949                                        L 33
Table No. 25
WOOD-MANUFACTURING  (N.E.S.)
Returns Covering 217 Firms
Salary and Wage Payments, 194.
Officers, superintendents, and managers     $
1,486,089
5,034,034
3,225,515
7,745,638
Salary and Wage
Officers, superintendents, and
Clerks, stenographers, salesme
Wage-earners  (including piece
Total	
'ayments, 194.
managers    $
>
1,058,700
983,960
1,605,869
3,648,529
Wage-earners  (including piece-workers).           2
Total    $2
^workers!
.    1
  $1
Employment
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Month
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
January 	
February 	
March  	
April—	
May	
June 	
July 	
6,022
5,991
6,127
6,225
6,388
6,385
6,495
6,379
6,354
6,247
6,232
6,026
1,428
1,410
1,296
1,334
1,408
1,459
1,508
1,463
1,451
1,466
1,468
1,461
1,239
1,257
1,263
1,247
1,270
1,307
1,306
1,328
1,275
1,298
1,283
1,237
1,347
1,326
1,342
1,338
1,366
1,422
1,437
1,433
1,384
1,350
1,350
1,363
January 	
February	
March	
4,457
4,400
4,509
4,434
4,473
4,566
4,528
4,330
4,417
4,510
4,599
4,432
804
792
811
831
835
843
818
711
698
755
746
707
217
222
228
222
221
221
222
226
228
225
227
218
116
115
116
115
May 	
June.  ,	
July-	
116
121
124
122
September —
September 	
119
124
November.—	
November „
December—	
125
125
Classified Weekly Earnings
Classified Weekly Earnings
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
For Week of
Employment of
Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks,
Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $6.00
16
8
12
12
17
10
10
10
12
8
12
15
8
11
22
5
11
11
15
17
16
85
34
33
39
243
381
1.002
874
1,038
1,158
590
590
536
20
15
4
1
2
66
5
2
1
2
2
2
12
15
50
146
14
112
174
185
317
38
258
450
409
107
11
10
1
1
1
1
1
4
2
3
2
1
2
2
1
1
9
4
4
1
6
3
15
20
14
76
130
155
172
117
172
115
85
212
4
1
4
3
4
4
2
2
3
8
6
18
28
17
39
36
91
34
79
79
421
262
158
39
22
19
14
9
6
Under $6.00	
55
8
21
38
4
10
7
13
3
6
7
23
41
12
4
14
6
23
5
40
21
29
15
19
9
213
447
1.519
1,677
472
231
140
60
103
2
1
1
1
1
5
1
5
23
1
4
1
6
9
2
4
7
9
7
5
18
3
102
352
259
27
1
2
2
1
1
2
_
4
3
2
12
6
24
18
25
20
20
19
73
1
$6 00 to $6.99
$6.00 to $6.99	
7 00 to   7.99
7.00 to   7.99	
8 00 to   8.99
8.00 to   8.99-	
1
9 00 to   9.99
9.00 to   9.99	
10 00 to 10.99
10.00 to 10.99	
11 00 to 11 99
11.00 to 11.99 -
12.00 to 12.99	
13 00 to 13 99
13.00 to 13.99	
14 00 to 14.99
14.00 to 14.99	
15 00 to 15 99
15.00 to 15.99	
16.00 to 16.99 	
16.00 to 16.99	
17.00 to 17.99—	
18.00 to 18.99	
18.00 to 18.99
1
19.00 to 19.99 -	
1
20 00 to 20.99
20.00 to 20.99 	
21 00 to 21 99
21.00 to 21.99	
1
22.00 to 22.99 -
23.00 to 23.99-	
1
24 00 to 24 99
24.00 to 24.99	
25.00 to 25.99	
5
26 00 to 26 99
26.00 to 26.99 -
1
27 00 to 27 99
27.00 to 27.99	
4
28 00 to 28 99
28.00 to 28.99 -	
6
29.00 to 29.99. -
30.00 to 34.99	
38
35.00 to 39.99	
33
40.00 to 44.99
40.00 to 44.99	
18
45.00 to 49.99 -	
4
50.00 to 54.99	
2
55.00 to 59.99	
3
60.00 to 64.99	
2
65 00 to 69.99  	
65.00 to 69.99
70.00 and over -	
1
2 L 34
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
SUMMARY OF ALL TABLES
Returns Covering 9,020 Firms
Total Salary and Wage Payments During Twelve Months Ended
December 31st, 1949
Officers,  superintendents,  and  managers        _  $40,338,668
Clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, etc        51,440,159
Wage-earners   (including   piece-workers)- _   _ — 342,384,968
$434,163,795
Returns received too late to be included in above summary
Transcontinental  railways   (ascertained  payroll) 	
$1,174,584
33,998,573
Estimated additional payrolls, including employers covered by the survey but not filing returns,
and additional services not included in the tables; namely Governmental workers, wholesale and retail firms, ocean services, miscellaneous (estimated payroll)    220,663,048
255,836,205
Total .
$690,000,000
Employment
Month
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
January	
February	
March-	
April	
May- 	
June	
July	
August	
September-
October	
November-
December.-
111,598
111,340
121,158
125,691
132,912
134,121
134,999
136,386
135,154
132,882
128,835
116,364
11,501
11,219
11,435
12,206
12,997
14,018
16,444
18,367
18,993
16,465
14,219
11,744
12,332
12,350
12,484
12,512
12,710
12,915
13,003
13,206
12,984
12,904
12,917
12,824
7,840
7,743
7,735
7,828
7,981
8,174
8,328
8,346
8,208
8,140
8,088
8,012 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1949
Classified Weekly Earnings
L 35
For Week of Employment of Greatest Number
Wage-earners
Clerks, Stenographers,
Salesmen, etc.
Males
Females
Males
Females
Under $6.00    - 	
649
184
185
312
208
242
201
269
197
215
315
336
353
401
323
789
330
528
459
726
960
1,069
696
874
721
7,413
12,859
27,167
32,596
22,174
16,800
15,107
7,993
13,694
366
117
111
110
96
167
211
222
134
189
276
241
408
559
479
1,127
626
896
721
879
959
1,410
R09
1,182
1,222
5,179
3,275
1,582
794
483
229
181
52
85
30
6
8
6
10
13
24
17
10
13
24
14
33
36
26
44
37
41
92
48
148
54
104
186
73
911
1,065
1,532
1,773
1,541
1,476
1,083
872
1,925
69
$6.00 to $6.99                          —
13
7.00 to   7.99                   ..                                       	
8
8.00 to   8.99  	
9.00 to   9.99                        	
7
17
10.00 to 10.99                                 	
30
11.00 to 11.99            --
19
12.00 to 12.99                     	
32
13.00 to 13.99                      -
10
14.00 to 14.99 —- 	
22
15.00 to 15.99               -	
36
16.00 to 16.99    -                                                     	
25
17.00 to 17.99 	
45
18.00 to 18.99   --	
80
19.00 to 19.99 ---   -
141
20.00 to 20.99 - 	
210
21.00 to 21.99 -  	
145
22.00 to 22.99                    —
177
23.00 to 23.99   	
348
24.00 to 24.99
197
25.00 to 25.99    -
568
26.00 to 26.99 -  	
316
27.00 to 27.99 -   -          	
454
28.00 to 28.99 	
479
29.00 to 29.99 	
232
30.00 to 34.99	
2,252
35.00 to 39.99      .
1,312
40.00 to 44.99                            	
681
45.00 to 49.99   	
365
50.00 to 54.99               	
107
55.00 to 59.99   	
65
60.00 to 64.99                                        	
41
65.00 to 69.99                                              	
26
27
Totals                      	
167,345
25,377
13,275
8,566 L 36
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
"HOURS OF WORK ACT"
As an indication of the trend of industrial hours of work, the Board has shown a
computed figure representing the average weekly working-hours of all wage-earners in
industry for each successive year since the " Hours of Work Act " became effective.
Although some increase was noted during the war years, the record has generally
shown a gradual decline in the weekly hours reported since 1930. Following are the
average weekly working-hours for all employees in the wage-earner section from 1930
to 1949:—
1930	
  48.62
1931	
47.37
1932 .-	
47.69
1933  	
 47.35
1934 	
  47.32
1935 - 	
  47.17
1936  _	
47.63
1937 	
                 47.25
1938 	
  46.84
1939. 	
   47.80
1940
  46.91
1941
  46.90
1942
        48.12
1943
 47.19
1944
    .. .46.02
1945
 45.59
1946
 --43.63
1947
 42.24
1948
  42.21
1949- -
 42.24
By an amendment to the " Hours of Work Act" which became effective during
1946 the legal working-hours for employees in industry was reduced from 48 to 44 hours
per week, subject to certain exceptions. For the subsequent years 1947, 1948, and 1949
the following table shows the percentage of the total wage-earners covered in the survey
who were reported as working up to and including the weekly limit of 44 hours, and the
percentage of those in excess of the legal limit.
Comparative Figures, 1947, 1948, and 1949 (Wage-earners)
Year
Firms
Reporting
Wage-earners
Reported
44 Hours or
Less per
Week
In Excess of
44 Hours
1947	
8,410
8,736
9,020
159,300
165,411
161,945
Per Cent
80.63
81.59
81.86
Per Cent
19.37
1948 _ ..	
18.41
1949	
18.14
In answer to the question regarding hours of work, the 9,020 firms reporting to the
Department of Labour submitted information concerning some 161,945 male and female
wage-earners for the year 1949. The percentage of the total shown as working 44 hours
per week or less continued to increase, the figure reaching 81.86 per cent, while the total
reported in excess of 44 hours decreased relatively to 18.14 per cent for the year under
review.
As in previous years, information was also requested covering the hours worked by
employees in clerical occupations. Under this heading the firms reporting submitted
details of some 21,698 male and female clerical workers for 1949, this total being comprised of clerks, stenographers, and salesmen, etc., but not including officials or executive staff.
AVERAGE WEEKLY HOURS OF WORK, BY INDUSTRIES
Comparative tables follow, under headings of " Wage-earners " and " Clerical
Workers," showing, by industry, the 1949 average weekly hours worked in each classification, compared with similar figures for previous years:— REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
Average Weekly Hours of Work
Wage-earners
L 37
Industry
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
44.64
45.12
47.91
51.13
42.79
44.18
47.36
41.45
43.40
43.09
44.09
43.03
48.13
51.69
44.39
47.72
47.46
45.90
43.26
48.57
46.30
43.93
43.63
41.46
47.97
43.10
48.02
45.18
45.61
43.19
43.87
40.09
50.05
41.58
42.20
45.90
41.13
42.32
42.83
42.77
41.89
43.21
45.88
43.72
44.63
44.02
43.83
42.47
45.31
44.46
43.63
43.51
40.74
44.17
42.02
42.28
44.50
43.32
41.23
42.65
44.76
40.11
47.38
41.36
42.59
44.33
39.43
39.94
41.93
41.60
40.85
41.55
47.55
42.38
41.24
41.25
40.40
42.01
45.19
43.10
44.06
41.59
39.42
44.73
39.46
42.30
43.36
39.78
40.23
43.08
43.67
40.08
48.19
41.15
39.82
45.02
38.46
39.59
41.30
41.29
40.72
41.96
44.62
42.48
41.29
41.23
39.69
42.42
44.72
43.04
44.17
41.69
38.78
44.68
39.64
39.99
42.75
39.72
41.21
43.11
43.91
40.09
Coast shipping  	
48.61
41.90
41.92
44.47   '
38.96
40.21
38.53
41.42
40.71
Lumber industries—
41.66
Logging-railways  	
45.18
43.54
41.24
41.02
39.71
41.96
43.50
42.61
43.94
41.71
38.75
44.51
39.55
42.43
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc	
42.52
39.20
Previous yearly figures for cartage, trucking, and warehousing included with miscellaneous trades and industries. L 38
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Average Weekly Hours of Work—Continued
Clerical Workers
Industry
1947
1948
1949
39.33
40.25
39.58
39.61
41.06
39.69
40.48
42.60
39.62
39.83
36.71
43.44
40.49
42.89
40.55
42.07
40.66
38.31
41.23
42.96
40.59
39.20
38.40
37.35
38.80
39.98
42.36
39.80
38.96
38.92
40.09
41.38
39.77
40.84
38.86
40.02
42.53
37.30
39.65
37.36
43.23
39.76
41.94
38.85
41.46
40.42
39.04
40.97
43.34
40.60
38.46
37.75
37.74
39.67
40.23
41.38
39.21
38.80
40.32
Builders' materials _       , _	
38.20
41.73
39.89
40.27
38.81
39.40
41.82
38.79
39.77
38.65
42.74
39.91
Lumber industries—
42.02
Logging-railways _ _ _ 	
38.31
40.85
40.69
40.72
40.89
42.91
40.98
37.43
37.52
37.18
40.58
38.93
41.25
Street-railways, gas, water, power, telephones, etc. 	
38.19
38.38 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 39
STATISTICS OF CIVIC AND MUNICIPAL WORKERS
Under this heading, statistical tables have been compiled on the basis of information submitted to the Department of Labour by the various cities and municipalities
throughout the Province, reporting on employment and payroll totals of civic and
municipal workers for the year 1949.
The totals quoted in this section are already incorporated in other tables as a portion of the total industrial payroll, and they should, therefore, not be considered as in
addition to previous employment and payroll summaries, but rather as having been
further segregated and here set aside for separate study.
Coverage of the tables includes workers engaged in public works, the construction
and maintenance of waterworks, generation and distribution of light and power, and
similar operations owned and operated by the city or municipality making the return.
Based on 130 returns submitted by civic and municipal administrations, the total
reported payroll was $13,073,570 for 1949, an increase of $1,825,199 over the reported
total for the previous year.
Payroll totals of civic and municipal workers are shown in the following table,
which sets out the comparative figures reported for each class of worker covered in the
survey for the years 1947, 1948, and 1949:—
1947
1948
1949
Officers, superintendents, and managers	
Clerks, stenographers, etc.	
$986,080
900,120
7,296,213
$1,074,817
1,254,191
8,919,363
$1,118,725
1,337,143
10,617,702
Totals   	
$9,182,413
$11,248,371
$13,073,570
Extensive maintenance and repair of existing public works and the continued
development of new projects under civic and municipal administration brought increased
employment in this section, the survey showing an over-all total of 5,964 employees for
the high month of July, 1949, as against a high of 5,585 reported in August of 1948,
these figures being inclusive of both wage-earners and clerical workers.
The table following sets out by sex and occupational group the 1949 civic and
municipal employment totals, together with comparative monthly totals for the preceding
year 1948:—
Employment Totals* of Civic and Municipal Workers, 1948 and 1949
Month
1948
Wage-earners
Males
Females
Clerks,
Stenographers, etc.
Males
Females
1949
Wage-earners
Males
Females
C'erks,
Stenographers, etc.
Males
Females
January	
February...
March	
April —	
May..	
June —	
July. 	
August	
September-
October 	
November...
December...
4,066
4,059
4,243
4,353
4,632
4,843
4,861
4,912
4,482
4,443
4,264
4,149
16
16
16
17
52
54
64
65
21
18
16
17
411
409
419
414
426
441
443
442
444
435
440
438
149
148
150
155
161
165
167
166
164
160
159
163
3,930
4,172
4,506
4,572
4,971
5,181
5,243
5,219
4,954
4,849
4,682
4,420
29
26
28
29
77
94
99
97
44
27
28
28
425
422
424
416
418
427
432
431
434
434
444
447
168
172
172
181
184
187
190
190
188
186
188
194
* Totals represent the number ot employees on payroll on the last day of each month or nearest working-date. L 40
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The distribution of employment in civic and municipal occupations, with relation
to earnings, is clearly indicated in the following table, which shows a percentage breakdown of the male wage-earners in the various wage classifications as noted, for the comparative years 1947, 1948, and 1949:—
Weekly Earnings
Percentage of Employees
1947
1948
1949
Under $15  	
2.38
1.20
2.40
9.27
39.49
30.24
7.85
3.71
3.46
1.57
0.57
1.15
1.48
14.63
19.15
41.77
12.49
7.19
1.39
$15 to $20  	
0.91
20 to   25    .                                	
1.38
25 to   30      	
30 to   35   —  	
35 to   40  	
40 to   45  —
45 to   50	
1.92
5.02
13.72
33.18
25.44
50 and over —  	
17.04
Average weekly earnings for civic and municipal workers in the male wage-earner
group increased to $43.84 in 1949, from an average figure of $40.59 recorded for the
previous year.
Increased earnings were also apparent in the section dealing with clerical occupations, the average figures representing weekly earnings increasing to $46.11 for males
and $33.15 for female workers, compared respectively with $42.16 and $30.09 noted in
these classifications for 1948. The clerical group is inclusive of clerks, stenographers,
and general office employees, but excludes officials and executive staff.
Average weekly hours worked by civic and municipal employees was slightly less
in 1949 than in the previous year, the 1949 average figure for wage-earners decreasing
fractionally to 41.16 hours from 41.57 previously reported, while for the clerical workers
the average declined to 38.28 hours, as against 38.90 recorded in 1948. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949 L 41
SUMMARY OF NEW LAWS AFFECTING LABOUR
(Passed by the Legislature of British Columbia, Session 1950)
"ANNUAL HOLIDAYS ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1950"
Certain amendments were made to this Act in order to clarify its application and
facilitate the computation of the employees' holiday pay. A day of actual work is defined
as "a period of work designated by the employer as the daily working-shift of the
employee," and the definition of "employee" is clarified by making it clear that it
includes an employee whether he is paid by time, piece, or otherwise. The " working
year " was reduced from 250 days of actual work to 225 days of actual work.
A further amendment specifically excludes employees engaged in certain occupations
from the application of the Act and in general such persons as are engaged in professions,
for example, architects, chartered accountants, dentists, engineers, lawyers, doctors, etc.
A computation of the holiday pay to which an employee is entitled is changed from
the basis of one-eighth of a day's pay to 2 per cent of the employee's total wages or
salaries, and the holiday pay applies also to an employee who has worked throughout the
whole calendar year but whose time was broken to such an extent that he has not worked
225 days. In such a case the employee would not have earned an annual holiday but he
will be entitled to pay in lieu of a holiday at the rate of 2 per cent of his total wages or
salary during the calendar year.
A further amendment requires employers to keep a true and correct record, in the
English language, of the amount of holiday pay paid to each of his employees pursuant to
the provisions of the Act.
"BOILER INSPECTION ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1950"
Amendments were made to this Statute in order that its application would include
steam-boilers, hot-water boilers, and pressure-vessels. The Act was originally intended
to apply only to steam-boilers and steam-plants.
In view of its broader application, the name of the Act was changed to "An Act
respecting Steam-boilers, Hot-water Boilers, Pressure-vessels, and the Certification of
Engineers."
" HAIRDRESSERS ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1950 "
Section 10 of this Act was amended to give the Hairdressers' Association authority
to raise the membership fee to a maximum of $5 in order to enable the Association to
carry on certain educational work.
"MECHANICS' LIEN ACT AMENDMENT ACT, 1950"
The " Mechanics' Lien Act" provides that where repairs are done to a motor-vehicle
on credit, the garageman may file a lien with the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles. The
purpose of the amendment is to cut down the amount of paper work required to be done
by the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles.
"SHOPS REGULATION AND WEEKLY HOLIDAY ACT
AMENDMENT ACT, 1950"
Section 5 of the Act regarding the passing of a by-law requiring the closing of automobile garages, etc., was amended because the previous section made it impracticable to
draft a by-law in conformity with the Act which would permit of successful prosecutions
for violations of the by-law.
A further amendment was made prohibiting merchants from accepting orders for
the delivery of goods, wares, or merchandise during the time when they were required to
have the shop closed by reason of this Act. L 42 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Section 31 of the Act provided that in the case of certain public holidays the provisions with respect to the closing of shops and the observance of a weekly holiday would
not apply, but it had been found that during the Christmas season of 1949 difficulties
were encountered and shops were required to stay closed for three days in the week. An
amendment was made to section 31 to eliminate the possibility of such a situation arising
in the future. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949 L 43
REPORT OF THE BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Members of the Board
1. James Thomson, Deputy Minister of Labour, Chairman   Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
2. Christopher John McDowell— -  1000 Douglas Street, Victoria.
3. Fraudena Eaton  _ _ _ 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
4. J. A. Ward Bell   ~ - -    - —789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
5. H. Douglas   789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Secretary
C. R. Margison   -789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Head Office   - —  Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Branch Office _ - - 789 Pender Street West, Vancouver.
Regional Offices  17 Bastion Street, Nanaimo.
Capital News Building, Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
560 Baker Street, Nelson.
220 Third Avenue, Kamloops.
Department of Labour, Prince George.
Department of Labour, Smithers.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the sixteenth annual report of the Board of
Industrial Relations for the year ended December 31st, 1949.
The Board of Industrial Relations was established in April, 1934, and was charged
with the duties and responsibilities formerly connected with the Minimum Wage Board,
the Board of Adjustment, and the Male Minimum Wage Board.
Statistical records have been maintained by the Department in connection with the
work of female employees for the past thirty-two years so that although this is only the
sixteenth report of the Board of Industrial Relations it is the thirty-second annual record
of the Department with respect to female employees.
MEETINGS AND DELEGATIONS
During the year 1949 the Board held sixty-eight sessions on thirty-four different
days.    It held thirty-six sessions in Vancouver and thirty-two sessions in Victoria.
Public hearings were held in connection with the following:—
(1) Proposed minimum wage order to apply to embalmers and undertakers.
(2) Revision of minimum wage orders applying to elevator operators and
starters.
(3) Revision of minimum wage orders applying to the taxicab industry.
(4) Proposed minimum wage order to apply to hospital institutions.
(5) Proposed minimum wage order to apply to machinists.
(6) Revision of minimum wage orders applying to janitors and janitresses.
Following the public hearings and further deliberation by the Board, certain new
minimum wage orders were made to improve the working conditions of the employees to
whom the orders apply. An outline of the orders made during 1949 is provided in subsequent pages of the report.
In addition to these public hearings, forty-one delegations appeared before the
Board in connection with problems regarding hours of work, minimum wages, etc.
ORDERS MADE DURING 1949
During the year 1949 the Board revised two of its Orders, resulting in the promulgation of the following:—
Order No. 53 (1949) with respect to male and female elevator operators and
starters. This Order of the Board superseded Orders Nos. 53 and 54,
it being the Board's opinion that wherever it is practical to do so it is
desirable to establish the same working conditions for both male and
female employees. L 44 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Order No. 24 (1949) with respect to the mercantile industry. This Order of
the Board superseded Orders Nos. 24 and 59. Order No. 59, which had
applied to male employees in the mercantile industry, except for the
20-per-cent increase in the minimum rates provided in General Interim
Minimum Wage Order (1946), had not been revised since 1935. Order
No. 59 had provided for the payment of varying minimum wages according to the ages of the male employees, and although this method of
payment was desirable at the time the Order was put into effect changing
conditions had made the minimum wages provided in the Order entirely
unreasonable. In Order No. 24 (1949) the Board established the same
working conditions for male and female employees in the mercantile
industry and eliminated the principle of establishing minimum wages
according to the ages of the male employees in the mercantile industry.
In addition to the above, entirely new Orders were made with respect to the
following:—
Order No. 11 (1949) with respect to rest periods for female employees. This
Order of the Board was made because it had been brought to the Board's
attention that certain female employees were required to be on the job
eight hours per day without having any period free from duty. Certain
female employees in the mercantile industry and in the office occupation
partook of their lunches during slack periods but were not permitted to
leave their places of employment. This Order provides, in general, that
female employees shall be given at least one-half hour free from duty
after five consecutive hours of work.
Order No. 14 (1949) with respect to the grass-dehydration industry. The
work of employees in this industry had previously been covered by the
Order establishing a minimum wage in the manufacturing industry. There
were, however, certain problems inherent in the grass-dehydration industry
which made it desirable to permit additional hours of work during a
certain season of the year without the necessity of applying for overtime
permits provided the employees were paid the usual overtime rates of pay.
This Order of the Board provides for this arrangement.
Order No. 13 (1949) with respect to the plumbing and pipe-fitting trade. Joint
representations from the Master Plumbers' Association and the Plumbers'
and Pipe-fitters' Union having been made to the Board requesting the
Board to make a minimum wage order to apply to the plumbing and pipe-
fitting trades, a public hearing was held and Order No. 13 (1949) was
made. This Order embodies the principles provided in other minimum
wage orders of the Board applying to the various trades.
Order No. 16(1949) with respect to the business of operating hospital institutions, as defined by the British Columbia " Hospital Insurance Act."
Late in 1947 representations had been made to the Board to have the
Board make an order applying to hospitals and institutions of a similar
nature, as it was considered by the applicants that such institutions should
not be covered by the Minimum Wage Order which applied to the hotel
and catering industry. Further representations were received during
1948 and as a result of a hearing, at which representatives of the Western
Canada Institute for Hospital Administrators and Trustees and representatives of the Hospital Employees Union were present, the Board made
Order No. 16 (1949) which removed certain institutions from the application of the Minimum Wage Order applying to the hotel and catering
industry.    This Order provides for minimum wage rates slightly higher REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949 L 45
than those embodied in Order No. 52 and eliminates the maximum
charges which might be made for board and lodging.
Order No. 15 (1949) with respect to the undertaking business. For a number
of years employees engaged in this business had asked the Board to put
some restriction on their hours of work. The Board had held numerous
inquiries in connection with the matter but due to circumstance present at
the time found it impractical to grant the applicants' request. However,
following several hearings during 1949 the Board made Order No. 15
(1949) which, in general, restricts the working-hours of employees in
the undertaking business in certain areas of the Province to eight in the
day and forty-four in the week, and also provides for a minimum wage.
There is, however, a certain amount of flexibility in the Order regarding
hours of work, and for persons living on the premises arrangements can
be made, with the approval of the Board, whereby the employees are
permitted to work additional hours.
Orders Nos. 59 and 24, Mercantile Supplementary (1949). These Orders
took care of male and female employees in the Christmas period.
REGULATIONS MADE DURING 1949
Regulation No. 4b—Engineers, Operators, Firemen, and Oilers or Greasers.—This
regulation superseded Regulation No. 4a and provided for these employees to work one
hour per day extra to perform preparatory or complementary work in addition to hours
that might have been authorized pursuant to sections 3, 5, 11 (3), or 11 (4) of the
" Hours of Work Act."
Regulation No. 29a—Mercantile Industry.—This regulation added the City of New
Westminster to the list of cities, towns, etc., wherein persons employed in the mercantile
industry were not permitted to work the additional three hours per day on Saturday of
each week, etc.
Regulations Nos. 34b, 34c, and 34t>—Bartenders, Waiters, Utility Men.—These
regulations extended to June 30th, 1950, the time during which the working-hours of
bartenders, etc., working on a split shift could be confined within thirteen hours immediately following commencement of work.
Regulation No. 32v.—Construction Industry.—This regulation permitted persons
employed on the Pine Pass Highway and the Hope-Princeton Highway to work nine
hours per day and fifty-four hours per week for the period April 28th, 1949, to and
including December 31st, 1949.
Regulation No. 35—Grass-dehydration Industry.—This regulation exempted employees employed in the grass-dehydration industry, other than office employees, from
the operation of the " Hours of Work Act " from April 1st to September 30th, inclusive,
in each year.   This regulation is complementary to Order No. 14 (1949).
Regulation No. 36—Hostlers in the Logging Industry.—This regulation permitted
hostlers in the logging industry working on a split shift to confine their hours of work
within sixteen hours immediately following commencement of work.
Regulation No. 36k—Western Forest Industries, Limited.—This regulation permitted the donkey-engine fireman working on a split shift at the Gordon River Camp to
confine his hours of work within thirteen hours immediately following commencement
of work.
Mercantile Industry, Christmas, 1949 (Temporary).—This regulation took care of
the hours of work of employees in the retail establishments in the mercantile industry
during the Christmas period.
(Summaries of the above-mentioned Orders and regulations, together with other
existing and new Orders and regulations made prior to this Report going to press, may
be found in the Appendix to this section of the Report.) L 46
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
STATISTICS COVERING WOMEN AND GIRL EMPLOYEES
The following section is devoted to a statistical summary of employment, earnings,
and hours of work of female workers in those occupations and industries for which
Minimum Wage Orders have been set by the Board.
The number of establishments reporting in this section continued to increase, some
8,220 employers of women and girls filing returns in time for classification in the tables,
as compared with a total of 7,984 for the previous year. With additional firms reporting,
the total reported employment of women workers stood at 61,874, to establish the highest
employment total of women workers yet recorded in the history of the Department.
The tables show a comparative five-year record of employment, earnings, and hours
of work for female workers in various occupations and industries covered by the minimum wage regulations.
Mercantile Industry (Female)
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings  	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week
1949
1948
1947
1,814
12,044
$293,381.00
$24.36
38.65
1,753
12,054
$275,928.00
$22.89
37.27
1,747
11,493
$228,446.00
$19.88
36.48
1946
1,696
10,808
$197,691.08
$18.29
38.46
1945
1,650
11,039
$184,838.18
$16.74
38.02
While the number of firms reporting in the mercantile industry continued to increase,
little variation was noted in the over-all employment total in this section, which remained
almost unchanged at 12,044 for 1949, compared with the previous year's total of 12,054.
With a total amount of $293,381 representing salaries and wages paid to the 12,044
employees reported for the week under review, average per capita weekly earnings for
female workers in this industry increased to $24.36, as against an average of $22.89
recorded for 1948.
A slight increase was noted in the average weekly hours of work in this industry,
the 1949 figure being recorded at 38.65 hours, as compared with 37.27 noted for 1948.
Some fluctuation in the average hours worked in this industry is not uncommon, however,
due to many employers reporting the highest volume of employment during the Christmas
week, in which the total working-hours usually vary considerably from the normal.
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing Industries (Female)
1949
1948
1947
1946
1945
266
2,552
$64,001.00
$25.08
39.33
211
2,652
$58,367.00
$22.01
38.67
206
2,881
$57,784.00
$20.06
38.23
176
2,285
$40,417.75
$17.69
39.01
2,332
$37,965.94
$16.28
A total of 266 firms in this section reported some 2,552 female employees engaged
in laundry, cleaning, and dyeing occupations during 1949.
Although the total reported employment decreased slightly from the previous year,
earnings remained high with a payroll of $64,001 being shown for the weekly period, as
compared with $58,367 reported in 1948. Average weekly earnings in this industry
increased substantially to $25.08, from $22.01 recorded for the year previous.
A fractional increase was again noted in the average hours worked per week, the
1948 figure of 38.67 increasing to 39.33 for the 1949 period under review. report of deputy minister, 1949
Hotel and Catering Industry (Female)
L 47
1949
1948
1947
1946
1945
1,295
10,450
$239,239.00
$22.89
38.24
1,266
10,865
$236,981.00
$21.81
38.50
1,222
10,879
$216,965.00
$19.94
38.54
1,174
9,492
$175,484.81
$18.49
38.93
1,271
Total number of employees  _.
9,553
$162,384.74
$17.00
40.56
A total of 1,295 firms reported in the hotel and catering group for 1949, this figure
being slightly in excess of the number reporting in this classification for the previous year.
Employment totals submitted in this section were somewhat lower than in 1948, however,
the 1949 figure decreasing to 10,450 from 10,865 previously recorded.
Total earnings shown for the weekly period under review were $239,239 as against
$236,981 reported in 1948, with an increase also in the per capita average weekly earnings for female workers in these occupations. Average weekly earnings were computed
at $22.89, an increase from $21.81 shown for the previous year.
Average weekly hours of work for employees in hotel and catering occupations
remained almost unchanged from the 1948 figure of 38.50, the 1949 average decreasing
fractionally to 38.24.
Office Occupations (Female)
1949
1948
1947
1946
1945
3,468
17,137
$525,692.00
$30.68
38.65
3,405
15,721
$461,189.00
$29.34
38.47
3,349
15,368
$423,571.00
$27.56
39.09
3,261
14,296
$346,234.83
$24.22
39.46
3,274
13,790
$318,788.40
Average weekly earnings  	
Average hours worked per week	
$23.12
40.43
The number of firms employing female office-workers continued to increase, with
a total of 3,468 shown for 1949 as compared with 3,405 reporting in this section for the
preceding year.
The highest employment totals for female workers continue to appear in this classification, with the 1949 figures recording a further sharp increase in the numbers of women
and girls employed in clerical occupations. Total employment reported was 17,137, as
compared with a previous figure of 15,721 recorded in 1948.
With a total of $525,692 paid in salaries and wages for the weekly period under
review, the average weekly earnings for female office-workers increased to $30.68 from
$29.34 previously reported.
Little variation was noted in the weekly working-hours of office employees, the 1949
average showing a fractional increase to 38.65 from 38.47 reported in 1948.
Personal Service Occupation (Female)
1949
1948
1947
1946
1945
151
402
$10,637.00
$26.46
38.81
147
446
$10,942.00
$24.53
38.49
152
524
$11,830.00
$22.58
39.48
144
542
$11,435.30
$21.10
40.16
149
535
Total weekly earnings .-.	
$10,350.57
$19.35
39.88
The above table is inclusive of female workers employed as beauty-parlor operators,
chiropodists, and those engaged in similar occupations of personal service. While many
firms in this business are owner-operated without outside assistance, the survey has been
restricted to a coverage of only those establishments employing staff. L 48
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Employment in this occupation continued to show a decreasing trend from the
highest figure recorded in 1946. The total for 1949 stood at 402, as compared with a
figure of 446 reported for the previous year.
Weekly earnings continued to increase, however, the average per capiia earnings for
the weekly period in this section being computed at $26.46, up from $24.53 recorded for
the previous year.
Average hours worked by employees in personal service occupations varied little
from the preceding year, the average figure increasing fractionally to 38.81 from 38.49
noted in 1948.
Fishing Industry (Female)
1949*
1948*
1947*
1946
1945
■   28
1,610
$52,832.00
$32,81
40.56
26
1,650
$49,987.00
$30.30
36.20
22
2,129
$58,775.00
$27.61
37.84
20
774
$18,194.97
$23.51
37.49
17
441
Total weekly earnings   	
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week..	
$9,307.73
$21.11
35.22
* 1947, 1948, and 1949 figures inclusive of all cannery occupations not previously included in the tabulations.
In comparing the yearly totals in the above table, it should be noted that figures
subsequent to 1946 are inclusive of all cannery occupations, some of which had previously been omitted from the tables, being outside the governing Order of the Board.
No direct comparison should be made, therefore, between recent totals and those of
earlier years without this consideration. The more recent years, however, provide a
comparative picture of female workers in this industry.
Although seasonal fluctuations are common in this industry, employment remained
almost at the 1948 level, a total of 1,610 female workers being reported, as against 1,650
shown for the previous year.
Earnings continued to increase for females employed in this industry, the 1949
average figure rising to $32.81 from $30.30 recorded in 1948.
The average weekly hours worked for the period reviewed was, however, somewhat
higher than for the previous year, increasing to 40.56 from a low of 36.20 established for
the previous year.
Telephone ane
Telegraph Occupation (Female)
1949
1948
1947
1946
1945
203
2,999
$89,043.00
$29.69
40.07
179
2,956
$84,007.00
$28.42
40.58
154
2,679
$68,205.00
$25.46
40.08
230
2,720
$61,895.57
$22.76
40.61
Total number of employees   	
2,096
$44,409.74
$21.19
Included in the above table are all types of establishments employing females in
switchboard work and such occupations relating to the telephone and telegraph section.
Some variation of the employment figures in this section has been noted in the past,
apparently due to some employers failing to segregate this class of worker from other
office employees.
With an increase in firms reporting in this section, employment totals continued to
climb, increasing from 2,956 to 2,999 for 1949, to again set a new high mark for employment in this occupation.
A total of $89,043 was paid out in salaries and wages for the weekly period, up from
$84,007 recorded for a similar week during the previous year. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 49
Average weekly earnings in this occupation also increased over the preceding year,
to show a new high of $29.69, compared with $28.42 previously reported.
Although increases were otherwise generally in evidence throughout this section, the
average weekly working-hours for female workers in telephone and telegraph occupations
was slightly less than previously recorded, declining fractionally to 40.07 hours in 1949,
as compared with 40.58 noted in 1948.
Manufacturing Industry (Female)
1949
1948         1         1947
1
1946
1945
778
7,938
$230,328.00
$29.02
38.50
772 |                 794
8,567 |               8,983
$234,410.00 |    $216,668.00
$27.36 j             $24.12
37.89 j               38.19
948
8,757
$189,535.49
$21.64
39.32
1,036
14,016
$321,983.90
$22.97
40.33
Although the number of firms reporting remained at the 1948 level, a considerable
drop in employment was apparent in this section, in line with a downward trend generally
noted in the manufacturing group over the past few years.
With a total amount of $230,328 paid in salaries and wages for the weekly period
under review, the average per capita weekly earnings, however, continued to climb, the
1949 figure being computed at $29.02, an increase from $27.36 in 1948, to again set a
new high mark for earnings in this industry.
Average weekly working-hours for female employees in manufacturing industries,
which had declined steadily since the early post-war years to a low of 37.89 in 1948, registered a slight gain for the year under review, the 1949 average figure increasing to 38.50.
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Female)
1948
1947
1946
1945
Number of firms reporting ..
Total number of employees .
Total weekly earnings 	
Average weekly earnings
Average hours worked per week .
82
6,120
$203,615.00
$33.27  |
45.79  j
71
5,950
$175,673.00
$29.52
43.59
5,940
$154,875.00
$26.07
40.20
72
5,245
$119,587.20
$22.80
42.97
69
4,836
$100,909.15
$20.87
43.01
I
Considerable activity was noted in this seasonal industry during 1949, the number
of firms reporting increasing slightly over the previous year, with a corresponding rise in
total employment from 5,950 in 1948 to 6,120 for the year under review.
Substantial increase was again apparent in the weekly earnings for female workers
in this industry, a total of $203,615 being reported in salaries and wages for the weekly
period, representing a per capita average weekly figure of $33.27, as against average
earnings of $29.52 for a similar period in 1948.
Longer working-hours were evident in the fruit and vegetable industry, the average
hours for the week of greatest employment increasing to 45.79, compared with 43.59
recorded for the previous year.
Transportation Industry (Female)
1949
1948
1947
1946
1945
Number of firms reporting _
Total number of employees .
Total weekly earnings—	
Average weekly earnings
Average hours worked per week..
41
101
$2,571.00
$25.46
42.50
49
124
$3,003.00
$24.22
41.99
27
66
$1,272.00
$19.27
40.74
76
130
$2,065.96
$15.89
36.96
102
227
$3,785.70
$16.68'
37.79 L 50
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Included in the above table are female workers engaged in delivery, truck-driving,
messenger-work, etc.
The sample survey in this classification covered returns from 41 firms employing a
total of 101 female workers in occupations of this nature.
Average weekly earnings in this section again increased, to reach a high of $25.46
recorded for 1949, as compared with $24.22 in 1948.
Contributing factor in the higher earnings during 1949 were the longer hours noted
in this occupation, the average working-time for the weekly period under review rising to
42.50 hours from 41.99 previously reported.
Public Places of Amusement
(Female)
1949                   1948
1
1947
1946
1945
94
521
$8,108.00
105
543
$8,129.00
92
500
$6,788.00
$13.58
25.47
85
283
$2,960.63
$10.46
24.76
91
311
$3,164.58
$15.56
26.50
$14.97
26.69
$10.18
Average hours worked per week	
26.12
This classification is inclusive of female workers employed as theatre ushers, checkroom attendants, and in occupations of a similar nature in connection with bowling-alleys,
swimming-pools, and other such public places of amusement.
Some 94 establishments reported a total of 521 employees in this classification for
1949, and it should be noted that, due to the part-time nature of the occupations covered,
hours of work and weekly earnings are relatively lower than those in other occupations.
The figures submitted should, therefore, not be considered as representative of a full
week's work.
Based on the actual part-time hours worked, the average weekly earnings for female
employees in this group increased to $15.56 in 1949, compared with the previous year's
average of $14.97.
Weekly hours worked showed little change from the 1948 average, the 1949 figure
decreasing fractionally to 26.50 from 26.69 hours previously reported.
Summary of All Occupations (" Female Minimum Wage Act ")
1947
1946
1945
Number of firms reporting	
Total number of employees	
Total weekly earnings 	
Average weekly earnings   	
Average hours worked per week
8,220 | 7,984
61,874 | 61,528
$1,719,447.00 | $1,598,616.00
$27.79 | $25.98
39.32
38.61  |
7,850 7,882
61,442 55,332
$1,445,179.00 | $1,165,503.65
$23.52 |              $21.06
38.33
39.42
8,061
59,176
$1,197,888.63
$20.24
39.94
Summarized in the above table are returns from 8,220 firms reporting actual figures
concerning some 61,874 women and girl employees for the year 1949.
Total aggregate salaries and wages of female workers for the one week of 1949
under review amounted to $1,719,447, compared with $1,598,616, covering 61,528
employees, during a similar week in 1948.
Covering all occupations reported in the survey, the average weekly figure representing earnings rose to $27.79, to record a new high in the average for all females
included in the tabulations, and establishing an increase of $1.81 over the 1948 figure
of $25.98.
Inasmuch as during the 1949 period the legal minimum rates set for female workers
by Orders of the Board ranged from a low of $17 weekly in the mercantile industry to a
high of $20.16 for a 48-hour week in the telephone and telegraph occupation, it is evident REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 51
that the average weekly earnings of female workers in this Province continue well above
the highest minimum set by law.
The average weekly hours worked by the 61,874 female employees reported in all
occupations for 1949 showed a slight increase over the figure for the previous year, the
computed average being recorded at 39.32, up from 38.61 hours noted for the similar
weekly period in 1948.
Only those workers engaged in industries and occupations for which Minimum Wage
Orders have been set by the Board are included in the total of 61,874 reported in the
above table. The summary totals are not inclusive of domestic workers, farm-labourers,
or fruit-pickers, these occupations being excluded from the coverage of the provisions of
the " Female Minimum Wage Act." Bank employees and Federal workers are also
excluded from the coverage of the Provincial legislation.
Table Showing Comparative Relation of
1949 Earnings to Legal Minimum
Industry or Occupation
Number
of
Firms
Reporting
Number
of
Employees
Reported
Total
Weekly
Payroll
Legal
Minimum
Weekly
Wage for
Full-time
Employees
Actual
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Percentage
by Which
1949
Average
Earnings
Exceed
Legal
Minimum
1,814
266
1,295
3,468
151
28
203
778
82
41
94
12,044
2,552
10,450
17,137
402
1,610
2,999
7,938
6,120
101
521
$293,381
64,001
239,239
525,692
10,637
52,832
89,043
230,328
203,615
2,571
8,108
$17.00*
17.60t
18.00J
18.00§
20.00t
19.201!
20.1611
17.601
17.601
f
18.00J
$24.36
25.08
22.89
30.68
26.46
32.81
29.69
29.02
33.27
25.46
15.56**
Per Cent
43.29
42.50
27.17
Office                	
70.44
32.30
70.89
47.27
64.89
89.03
Transportation   	
8,220
61,874
$1,719,447
$27.79
63.47
* Thirty-nine to forty-four hours per week.
t Forty-four hours per week.
t Forty to forty-four hours per week.
§ Thirty-six to forty-four hours per week.
II Forty-eight hours per week.
11n the transportation industry it is impracticable to set a weekly rate, owing to the variation of minimum wages
in the Order, depending on whether the work is done on foot, on bicycles, by motor-cycles, or other types of motor-
vehicles.
** Earnings represent partial week only.
Comparative data covering the various occupational classifications covered in the
survey is set out in the above table, which shows for each industry or occupation the
number of firms reporting, total employment represented, and weekly payroll. The
actual average weekly earnings recorded in each classification is shown in relation to the
legal minimum wage set by the Board in each instance, and is expressed in percentages
in excess of the fixed rate. It is gratifying to note that the figure of $27.79, representing
the average weekly earnings of females in all occupations included in the survey, was
63.47 per cent in excess of the lowest legal minimum shown in the table.
STATISTICAL SUMMARY—HOSPITAL WORKERS (FEMALE)
The following summary represents a sample survey of returns received from 86
public and private hospitals and nursing and rest homes reporting to the Department of
Labour for the year 1949. The data submitted is based on the week of employment of
the greatest number, and shows by occupational classification the employment totals,
weekly earnings, and hours worked by some 3,473 female workers, exclusive of nursing
staff. L 52
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Inasmuch as the totals appearing in identical classifications have already been
incorporated in the main summary of female workers shown elsewhere in this Report,
the figures herein should not be considered as in addition to the previous totals, but
rather here segregated for separate study, together with other occupations not shown
previously in separate tables.
Occupational Classification
Number
Employed
Total
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Earnings
Average
Weekly
Hours
Mercantile  	
Laundry    	
1
442
1,730
448
50
30
1
649
109
13
$38.00
10,632.00
40,449.00
13,886.00
1,473.00
810.00
29.00
15,206.00
4,566.00
468.00
$38.00
24.05
23.38
31.00
29.46
27.00
29.00
23.43
41.89
36.00
44.0
38.7
39.0
Office...     .
40.0
39.6
41.8
Transportation 	
Nurses' aids (inclusive of ward aids, nursemaids, nursery
44.0
41.7
Technicians  (inclusive of X-ray and laboratory technicians ) 	
43.4
42.2
3,473
$87,557.00
$25.21
39.8
The eighty-six hospitals and nursing-homes reporting in time for classification in the
above table showed a total employment of 3,473 female workers, exclusive of nursing
staff.
In the segregation of workers by occupation, only one employee was reported as
engaged in the mercantile classification, receiving $38 for a 44-hour week. Laundry-
workers numbered some 442, and received an average wage of $24.05 for the week under
review. Employees engaged in the housekeeping and catering section numbered 1,730,
their average weekly earnings being $23.38. Office-workers totalled 448, and were paid
an average salary of $31 a week. Female employees in switchboard occupations under
the telephone and telegraph section were 50 in number, receiving an average wage of
$29.46 for the weekly period. Workers engaged in manufacturing occupations numbered 30, their average earnings being computed at $27 for the week. Only one employee
was reported in the section under transportation, this worker receiving $29 for a 44-hour
week. Next to the housekeeping and catering group, the greatest number employed were
reported as nurses' aids, this section totalling 649 for the period reviewed, with average
weekly earnings of $23.43. Technicians, inclusive of X-ray and laboratory departments,
numbered 109, their average earnings for the week being computed at $41.89, the highest
recorded. A group of 13 physiotherapists and occupational therapists were reported as
receiving an average weekly salary of $36.
Average weekly earnings for the total 3,473 female employees reported in all hospital
occupations, exclusive of nursing staff, was $25.21, the average working-week for all
workers being computed at 39.8 hours.
STATISTICS FOR MALE EMPLOYEES
The following tables serve to indicate the general trend of employment'and earnings
in some of the more important occupations covered by the Male Minimum Wage Orders.
In order to show this type of information by occupation, a segregation has been
made from industrial classifications dealt with elsewhere in this Report to isolate male
employees in various occupations within the coverage of the " Male Minimum Wage Act."
While separate information for all occupations covered by the regulations is not
obtainable from this source, the selected occupations shown will provide a comparative
study covering employment and earnings in some of the more important groups of male
workers during the past four years. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 53
Based on returns from industrial firms, the totals are representative of male wage-
earners only as reported on the payrolls during the week of employment of the greatest
number.
Baking Industry (Male)
1949
1948
1947
1946
195
1,386
$61,505.00
$44.38
40.49
197
1,302
$54,987.50
$42.23
40.56
203
1,443
$54,730.50
$37.93
40.91
189
1,478
$54,214.00
$36.68
41.53
Construction (Male)
Number of firms reporting 	
Total number of male wage-earners __
Total weekly earnings	
Average weekly earnings  	
Average hours worked per week	
2,193
33,157
$1,689,947.50
$50.97
41.90
2,078
32,315
$1,558,468.50
$48.23
41.15
1,978
29,077
$1,252,717.00
$43.08
41.36
1,732
22,040
$852,297.50
$38.67
41.58
Fruit and Vegetable Industry (Male)
97    |
3,009    j
$135,553.00    |
$45.05    |
47.98    |
1
97
2,744
$113,192.00
$41.25
47.21
97
3,528
$133,229.50
$37.76
46.41
94
3,223
$111,684.50
Average weekly earnings  	
Average hours worked per week... 	
$34.65
48.34
House Furnishings (Male)
1
132
1,511    1
$64,083.00    |
$42.41    |
40.21
1
137
1,635
$63,878.50
$39.07
39.59
138
1,721
$60,269.50
$35.02
39.94
135
Total number of male wage
-earners 	
1,569
$49,274.50
$31.41
Average hours worked per
A'eek .„	
42.32
Logging (Male)
858
16,682
$935,977.00
$56.11
41.66
893
18,838
$1,026,033.00
$54.47
41.96
952
19,712
$1,029,238.00
$52.21
41.55
816
15,273
$708,840.50
Average weekly earnings  	
$46.41
43.21
Painting and Paper-hanging (Male)
193
1,179
$58,594.00
$49.70
40.09
192
1,151
$53,051.50
$46.09
40.30
190
1,297
$55,232.50
$42.58
40.27
185
Total number of male wage-earners.....	
1,083
$40,262.00
$37.18
41.01
Sawmills (Male)
Number of firms reporting ____ —
Total number of male wage-earners .
Total weekly earnings...
Average weekly earnings	
Average hours worked per week__
653    |
726
744
585
19,781    |
20,360
18,690    |
15,421
$944,062.00    |
$932,133.00
$794,594.50    |
$610,169.50
$47.73    |
$45.78
$42.51    |
$39.57
41.02    |
41.23
41.25    |
44.02 L 54
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Shingle-mills (Male)
1949
1948
1947
1946
47
2,151
$116,861.50
$54.33
39.71
62
3,455
$180,001.00
$52.10
39.69
58
2,198
$105,050.50
$47.79
40.40
45
1,956
$86,380.00
$44.16
43.83
Ship-building and Boat-building (Male)
72
3,739
$199,549.00
$53.37
39.55
82
6,144
$299,772.50
$48.79
39.64
73
6,715
$316,254.00
$47.10
39.46
79
9,217
$369,262.00
$40.06
42.02
WOOD-MANUFACTURING   (N.E.S.)   (MALE)
Number of firms reporting  	
Total number of male wage-earners
Total weekly earnings—	
Average weekly earnings _	
Average hours worked per week-—
217
189
194
181
5,295
5,087
5,497
4,552
$233,326.00
$225,204.50
$216,164.50
$167,409.00
$44.07
$44.27
$39.32
$36.78
39.20
39.72
39.78
43.32
INSPECTIONS AND WAGE ADIUSTMENTS
Through the efforts of the Inspectors of the Department and co-operation of the
employers, collections made during 1949 amounted to $132,118.23. This was an
increase of almost $25,000 over the collections made during 1948, and followed the trend
of the past four years, which is indicated in the accompanying table:— REPORT
OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949                                         L 55
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O L 56
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
COURT CASES
When employers fail to co-operate with the Department in the matter of compliance
with the provisions of the Orders and regulations of the Board, it is necessary to resort
to the Courts in order that the necessary compliance with the legislation will be obtained.
A summary of Court cases during the year 1949 follows:—■
"Annual Holidays with Pay Act "
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
J. H. Kennedy, 611 Third Ave., New West
Failure to pay holiday pay to
an
Suspended sentence; required to sign
minster
employee
six months* recognizance.
Monolithic   Construction   Co.,   16   Hastings
Failure to pay holiday pay to
an
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs;   arrears
St. East, Vancouver
employee
ordered, $47.
Biltmore Cafe (S. Burke), 2555 Eighth Ave.
Failure to pay holiday pay to
an
Suspended sentence;   arrears ordered,
West, Vancouver
employee
$11;  in default, five days.
W. E. Canuel, Maillardville, District of Co
Failure to pay holiday pay to
an
Fined   $25   and   $5   costs;    arrears
quitlam
employee
ordered, $29.55.
W. E. Canuel, Maillardville, District of Co
Failure to pay holiday pay to two
Suspended sentence;   arrears ordered,
quitlam
employees
$40.30.
Devon Cafe (1948), Ltd., 675 Granville St.,
Failure to pay holiday pay to
an
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $23.90.
Vancouver
employee
Glaz-O-Nut (W. Murphy), 1060 Robson St.,
Failure to pay holiday pay to
an
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs;   arrears
Vancouver
employee
ordered, $27.27.
Glaz-O-Nut (W. Murphy), 1060 Robson St.,
Failure   to   pay   holiday   pay
to
Suspended   sentence;    costs,   $15;
Vancouver
employees
arrears ordered, $66.46;   involving
four employees.
Electrometals, 1959 Pandora St., Vancouver
Failure to pay holiday pay to
an
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs;   arrears
employee
ordered, $30.36.
Columbia Furniture,  Ltd., 212 Seventeenth
Failure   to   pay   holiday   pay
to
Fined $175;   arrears ordered, $107.91.
Ave. East, Vancouver
seven employees
Purcell's Trucking Co., Ltd., 340 Fifth Ave.
Failure   to   pay   holiday   pay
to
Fined $50;   arrears ordered, $576.34.
West, Vancouver
fifteen employees
Damon, Roger, 3500 Lonsdale Ave., North
Failure to pay holiday pay to
an
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $3.
Vancouver
employee
Roto Rooter Sewer Service (C. R. Volger),
Failure to pay holiday pay to
an
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $6.12.
2760 Alma Rd., Vancouver
employee
" Control of Employment of Children Act "
Westside Lumber & Box Co., Ltd., West-
bank
Unlawfully employing a child
without first receiving permission in writing from the Minister of Labour so to do
Fined $20 and $2 costs.
" Female Minimum Wage Act "
Flood Realty, 541 Pender St. West, Vancouver
H. G. Milroy, 350 Kerr St., Victoria—	
West  Coast  Purchasing,   193  Hastings  St.
East, Vancouver
Failure to pay minimum wage to
an employee
Failure to pay minimum wage to
an employee
Failure to pay wages to an employee as often as semi-monthly
Fined $25 and $3.75 costs;   arrears
ordered.
Suspended sentence.
Fined $25 and costs.
" Hours of Work Act "
Shone Dry Cleaners, Ltd.,  1122 Kingsway,
Vancouver
Pacific Clothing Co., Ltd., 556 Granville St.,
Vancouver
Owl Cabs, 799 Seymour St., Vancouver	
Leeder's Pacific, Ltd., Maillardville, District
of Coquitlam
Leeder's Pacific, Ltd., Maillardville, District
of Coquitlam
Failure to keep records-
Working in excess of eight hours
in any one day, section 3 (1)
Working  employees in  excess of
eight hours in one day, section
3(1)
Working  employees  in  excess  of
eight hours in one day
Failure to post schedule 	
Suspended  sentence;    involving  two
charges.
Fined $20;   involving two charges.
Fined $20;   involving two charges.
Fined $50 and $6 costs;   involving
two charges.
Dismissed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1949
" Male Minimum Wage Act "
L 57
Name of Employer
Charge
Sentence and Remarks
Elmer Magnus, Boswell-
J. Weltock and J. Nykalyn, 516 Pender St.
West, Vancouver
Failure to pay wages as provided
in Order No. 9 (1948), section 5,
issued pursuant to the " Male
Minimum Wage Act"
Failure to keep true and correct
record of hours worked
Fined $50;   arrears ordered, $250.
Fined $20.
" Semi-monthly Payment of Wages Act "
Louis Fortier, Colville Rd., Esquimalt	
Isle Pierre Sawmill   (Anderson,  Jarvis and
Jarvis), Isle Pierre
H. L. Cave, 388 Nigel St., Vancouver	
Columbia Sawmills, Ltd., Williams Lake	
W. N. Cloutier, Quesnel  	
R.  P.  Sawmill   (Rameo Pelletier), Willow
River
Harrison Mills, Ltd.  (Gail Watson Beach),
91-93 Duncan St., New Westminster
Laurence Haftner, Houston  	
Roto Rooter Sewer Service (C. R. Volger),
2760 Alma Rd., Vancouver
O.K.    Sawmill    (Roy   Adams    and    John
Thompson), Willow River
Peter Veregin, Grand Forks	
Leonard Gaddess, Grand Forks	
H. G. Milroy, 350 Kerr St., Victoria	
H. G. Milroy, 350 Kerr St., Victoria — —
H. G. Milroy, 350 Kerr St., Victoria. _
D. J. St. Louis, Prince George.  	
W. E. Canuel, Maillardville, District of Coquitlam
W. E. Canuel, Maillardville, District of Coquitlam
Ed. Labonte and R. J. Carpenter, Red Rock
Nukko Creek Sawmill (B. F. Hoff), Prince
George
Gus Halvorson, Fort St. John —
Electrometals, 1959 Pandora St., Vancouver
Joncas  Upholstering  Co., 2133  Yukon St.,
Vancouver
Joncas  Upholstering  Co.,  2133  Yukon St.,
Vancouver
Columbia   Furniture   Co.,   212   Seventeenth
Ave. East, Vancouver
Ferndale Lumber Co., Ltd., Ferndale (Prince
George P.O.)
Purcell's Trucking Co., Ltd., 340 Fifth Ave.
West, Vancouver
Andrew   Nelson,   3449   Grandview   Hwy.,
Burnaby
Damon, Roger, 3500 Lonsdale Ave., North
Vancouver
Harrison Mills, Ltd., 49 Duncan St., New
Westminster
H. J. Brissette (White City Amusements Co.,
Ltd.), 1674 Trans-Canada Hwy., Surrey
Gail Watson Beach (Harrison Mills, Ltd.),
91-93 Duncan St., Harrison Mills, and
New Westminster
Failure   to   pay   wages   to   an
employee
Failure to pay wages to thirteen
employees
Failure   to   pay   wages   to   an
employee
Failure to pay wages to twenty-
nine employees
Failure   to   pay   wages   to   an
employee
Failure to pay wages to two
employees
Failure   to   pay   wages   to   an
employee
Failure  to  pay  wages  to  two
employees
Failure   to   pay   wages   to   an
employee
Failure  to pay wages to two
employees
Failure to pay wages to three
employees
Failure to pay wages to five
employees
Failure  to   pay   wages   to   an
employee
Failure  to pay wages to two
employees
Failure to pay wages to five
employees
Failure  to  pay  wages  to  two
employees
Failure to pay wages to employees
Failure to pay wages to employees
Failure  to  pay  wages  to  eleven
employees
Failure   to   pay   wages   to   twelve
employees
Failure   to   pay   wages  to   ten
employees
Failure   to   pay   wages   to   an
employee
Failure   to   pay   wages   to   an
employee
Failure   to   pay   wages   to   an
employee
Failure to pay wages to thirteen
employees
Failure  to   pay   wages  to  an
employee
Failure  to  pay  wages  to  fifteen
employees
Failure  to   pay   wages   to   an
employee
Failure   to   pay   wages   to   an
employee
Failure to  pay wages to two
employees
Failure to pay wages to employees
Failure  to  pay  wages  to  fifty
employees
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $246.40.
Fined $325;   arrears ordered,
$1,794.89.
Fined $25;   in default, ten days.
Fined $25; arrears ordered, $2,420.34.
Fined   $25   and   $3   costs;    arrears
ordered, $105.88.
Fined $50;   arrears ordered, $257.
Fined $500 and $24.80 costs;  arrears
ordered, $174.17.
Fined   $50   and   $7   costs;    arrears
ordered, $409.81.
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $100.
Fined $50;   arrears ordered, $88.88.
Fined $75;   arrears ordered, $199.92.
Fined $125;   arrears ordered, $541.36.
Fined $25 and costs.
Dismissed.
Suspended.
Dismissed.
Suspended sentence;   $20 costs.
Fined $25.
Fined $275; arrears ordered,
$1,350.29.
Fine deferred; ordered to pay $3 per
month to be deducted from all
lumber produced, which $3 is to be
placed to the credit of employees.
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $356.63.
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $89.61.
Charge withdrawn; employee received
wages.
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $14.70.
Fined $325;   arrears ordered,
$1,195.44.
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $259.20.
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $960.64.
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $15.50.
Fined $25;   arrears ordered, $17.
Fined $100 and $12.90 costs; arrears
ordered, $77.45.
Fined $25; arrears ordered, $1,905.12;
seventeen charges, one suspended,
sixteen convictions, involving sixteen employees, for payment of
arrears.
Fined $100; employees paid after
information laid. L 58
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
SPECIAL LICENCES
Provision is made in the majority of the Orders of the Board for a graduated scale
of wages that apply to inexperienced employees for whose employment permits in
writing have been obtained from the Board. In the majority of cases there is a six
months' learning-period for inexperienced employees, during which period they receive
periodic increases until at the expiration of the learning-period they are qualified for
the minimum wage payable to experienced employees. During the year 1949 there was
a further decrease in the number of special licences issued by the Department, compared
with those issued during 1948 and 1947. The following table shows the number of
licences issued in the various lines of work in 1949, 1948, 1947, 1946, and 1945:-—•
1949
1948
1947
1946
1945
3
6
47
22
41
40
136
2
10
17
81
66
61
190
2
6
34
245
173
231
357
21
218
272
270
345
153
1
6
16
Office	
26
43
Practical nurse (students) 	
125
Household furniture...  	
297
427
1,067
1,258
217
During the year 1949, 129 Part-time Employment Permits were issued.
CONCLUSION
In March, 1949, A. M. Whisker, who had been with the Department for a number
of years and had latterly held the position of executive administrative officer, resigned
and in July, 1949, M. H. McGeough, supervisor of the Vancouver Office, was retired
on superannuation after many valuable years of service. The Board wishes to express
its thanks for the excellent manner in which these employees carried out their duties
and responsibilities.
Before concluding this report, the Board would like to express its appreciation to
all those persons who have assisted the Board in its work during the year, and extend
to the officials of the Department and the employers and employees of the Province its
thanks for their co-operation during the year 1949.
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
James Thomson, Chairman.
Christopher John McDowell.
Fraudena Eaton.
J. A. Ward Bell.
H. Douglas.
The statistics of trades and industries provided in the preceding pages were compiled by Harold V. Bassett, Bureau of Economics and Statistics. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 59
APPENDIX
(Compiled August 31st, 1950)
SUMMARY OF ORDERS MADE PURSUANT TO "MALE MINIMUM
WAGE ACT" AND "FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT"
APPRENTICES INDENTURED UNDER THE "APPRENTICESHIP ACT "
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 2 (1946) *
Effective July 1st, 1946
Minimum wages fixed by any Order of the Board shall not apply to apprentices indentured under
"Apprenticeship Act."
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 2a (1947).
AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR AND GASOLINE SERVICE-STATION INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 6 (1948) t
Effective May 1st, 1948
" Automotive repair and gasoline service-station industry " means all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration, repair, overhaul, painting, or reconditioning of any vehicle powered
by an internal-combustion engine, or any part thereof, and the business of operating retail gasoline
service-stations, gasoline-pumps, or outlets where gasoline is offered for sale at retail, including services
and undertakings incidental thereto.
"Automotive mechanic " means any employee doing the work usually done by journeymen, and
without restricting the generality of the foregoing, the work of mechanics, machinists, metal-men,
painters, electricians, radiator-men, battery-men, body-men, forgers, vulcanizers, trimmers, and
welders.
" Other employees " means all other employees, except automobile salesmen, office employees,
watchmen, and janitors.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every employee in the automotive repair and
gasoline service-station industry, except automobile salesmen, office employees, watchmen, and janitors.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Automotive mechanics.— _   —
Other employees  -     	
Learners, parts departments—
First two months    — -	
Second two months  —   	
Third two months    _ —	
Thereafter     — - -
(Permits required to employ learners at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act "
or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose
employment permits in writing have been issued by the Board	
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and
44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work overtime)
90c.
55c.
40c.
45c.
50c.
55c.
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
44
44
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Employees working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to section 5
or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the " Hours of Work Act " until the employee has completed the
hours so established:
(6) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act " pursuant to the
provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
t As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 6a (1950). L 60
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(10) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(11) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(12) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The "Male Minimum Wage Act" and "Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
BAKING INDUSTRY*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 17 (1942)
Effective July 20th, 1942, Superseding Order No. 17
" Baking industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the manufacture of bread, biscuits,
cakes, doughnuts, pies, and similar products.
Occupation
Weekly Hours
Bakers—
21 years of age and over..
Under 18 years of age._
18 years and under 19 years _
19 years and under 20 years .
20 years and under 21 years..
At least 85% of employees to get not less than..
44
44
44
44
44
44
Note.—(1) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Delivery salesmen (see Transportation Order).
(3) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
BARBERING
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 42 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946, Superseding Order No. 42
" Occupation of barbering " means the work of persons engaged in the shaving of the face or
cutting or trimming or singeing of the hair or beard for hire, gain, or hope of reward, or in connection
with any of the foregoing the shampooing or massaging or the treating of the head or face.
" Class A employees," those working from 40 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 40 hours.
Rate
Class A employees .
Class B employees...
Employees classified under section 7 of
working under permit
1 Male Minimum Wage Act'
$25.00 a week
65c. per hour
(See note (2) re daily
guarantee.)
As prescribed in the
permit
Hours
40-44 per week.
Less than 40 per week.
Not more than 44 per
week.
Note.—(1) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent at
place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour
daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" section number referred to in this Order is as it appears in the " Revised Statutes
of British Columbia, 1948." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 61
BOX-MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 55 (1947)
Effective February 1st, 1947, Superseding Order No. 55 (1943)
" Box-manufacturing industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose
of making wooden boxes, box-shooks, barrels, barrel staves and heads, kegs, casks, tierces, pails, and
other wooden containers.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the box-
manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining
their work.
Hourly Rate
Hours per Week
Rate payable to at least 80% of total employees   	
Rate payable to balance, 20% (inclusive of employees in respect of whom
a permit in writing has been obtained)   	
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act "
and section 6 of the  " Female Minimum Wage Act"  for whose
employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime:   Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day or 44
hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work such
overtime)
50c.
40c.
Rate as prescribed in
permit
One and one-half times
regular rate of pay.
44
44
44
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of Work
Act":
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of sections 5 and 11 of the " Hours of Work Act" until the employee has completed the hours
so established.
(2) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Every employer shall post and keep posted In a conspicuous place in his establishment:—
(a) Copy of this Order:
(_>) A schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his
employees.
(4) Records of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English language of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(5) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(6) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" and " Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
BUS-DRIVERS*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 70
Effective March 18th, 1940, Superseding Order No. 31
Includes every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating accommodation
for more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public for which service a charge
is made.
Hourly Rate
Hours
Vancouver Island and Saltspring Island.
60c.
66c.
90c.
40 to 50.
Less than 40.
In excess of 9 hours in
any one day or 50
hours   in   any   one
week.
Note.—(1) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(2) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. L 62
Department of labour
BUS-DRIVERS
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 70a
Effective June 27th, 1940
Provides that the minimum wage mentioned in Order No. 70 shall apply to the time of a bus-
driver while on duty and waiting on call, and shall include all the time occupied by a bus-driver from
the time he reports at his employer's headquarters or garage for duty until he returns again to his
employer's headquarters or garage where he originally reported for duty; and shall include the time
occupied by a bus-driver in dead-heading from his employer's headquarters or garage to the place
where he is to take charge of the bus and vice versa; but the minimum wage shall not apply to
waiting time of a bus-driver when occupied on special trips, charter trips, excursions, and overloads.
BUS-DRIVERS*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 76
Effective September 28th, 1942
" Bus-driver " means every female employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating
accommodation for more than seven (7) passengers used for the conveyance of the public, for which
service a charge is made.
Area
Hourly Rate
Hours
City of Vancouver, together  with all that area known as Point Grey
which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the City of Vancouver;    the  City of New Westminster;    the  Corporation   of The
Township of Richmond;  the Municipality of the District of Burnaby;
Municipality of the District of West Vancouver;   the City of North
Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver     	
60c.
66c.
40 to 48.
Less than 40.
Note.—(1) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(2) Employees required by employer to wait on call shall be paid for waiting time.
(3) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Rest period of 24 consecutive hours from midnight to midnight in each  calendar  week  shall be  given to
employees.
(5) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
'As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
CARPENTRY TRADE
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 58 (1947)
Effective August 4th, 1947, Superseding Orders Nos. 58, 65, 66, 72, 73
" Carpentry trade " means and includes all work usually done by carpenters in connection with
the construction and erection of any new building or structure or part thereof, and the remodelling,
alteration, or repairing of any existing building or structure or part therof.
Weekly Hours Not
to Exceed
Employees in carpentry trade .
44
Note.—(1) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Does not apply to employees permanently employed at maintenance-work, or employees covered by another
Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(3) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay after 8 hours per day and 44 hours per week.   Permits to be
obtained from the Board to work such overtime.
(5) Copy of Order to be posted.
(6) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(7) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(8) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 63
CHRISTMAS-TREE INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 68 (1947)
Effective May 15th, 1947, Superseding Order No. 68 (1943)
' Christmas-tree industry " means all operations in or incidental to the cutting, gathering, hauling,
and shipping of evergreen trees to be used for decorative purposes.
Hourly Rate
Hours per Week
50c.
44
Note.—(1) This Order shall not apply to:—
(a) Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work:
(b) Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act " or section 6 of the " Female
Minimum Wage Act " for whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board:
(c) Employees whose employment is determined by the Board to come under the provisions of section 4 of
the " Hours of Work Act."
(2) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each of his employees to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English language of names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of employees.
(6) Record to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 12 (1940)
Effective November 28th, 1940, Superseding Order No. 12, Order No. 12k,
Order No. 12b, Order No. 45, Order No. 45k, and Order No. 48
" Construction industry " includes construction, reconstruction, repair, alteration, or demolition
of any building, railway, tramway, harbour, dock, pier, canal, inland waterway, road, tunnel, bridge,
viaduct, sewer, drain, well, telegraphic or telephonic installation, electrical undertaking, gaswork,
waterways, or other work of construction, as well as the preparation for, or laying, the foundations
of any such work or structure.
Area
Hourly Rate,
21 Years and
Over
Hourly Rate,
Under 21 Years
Hours per
Week
The City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point
Grey which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the City
of Vancouver;    the City of Victoria;    the City of New Westminster;   the City of Nanaimo;   the City of Prince Rupert;   the
Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt;   the Municipality
of the District of Oak Bay;   the Municipality of the District of
Saanich;   Municipality of the District of West Vancouver;   the
Municipality of the District of Burnaby;   and the Municipality
54c.
48c.
42c.
36c.
44
44
Note.—(1) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. L 64
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
COOK- AND BUNK-HOUSE OCCUPATION
(In Unorganized Territory)
Male and Female Minimum Wage. Order No. 4 (1946)
Effective July 8th, 1946
" Cook- and bunk-house occupation" means any work performed by any male or female
employee in or incidental to operation of any kitchen, dining-room, cook-house, bunk-house, or
recreation-room operated in connection with any industrial undertaking in unorganized territory, and
without limiting the generality of the foregoing description means the work of cooks, dish-washers,
waiters, bunk-house and recreation-room attendants, and others employed in a similar capacity.
Hourly rate:   50c, except to employees working under permit under section 7 of " Male Minimum
Wage Act " or section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act," wage prescribed by permit.
Hours:   Unlimited.
Note.—(1) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) No charge or deductions for accidental breakages.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) This Order is not effective within the following cities, districts, and villages:—
Cities.—Alberni, Armstrong, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Duncan, Enderby, Fernie, Grand
Forks, Greenwood, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Merritt, Nanaimo, Nelson, New
Westminster, North Vancouver, Port Alberni, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Prince George, Prince
Rupert, Revelstoke, Rossland, Salmon Arm, Slocan, Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria.
Districts.—Burnaby, Chilliwhack, Coldstream, Coquitlam, Delta, Esquimau, Fraser Mills, Glenmore, Kent,
Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui, Mission, North Cowichan, North Vancouver, Oak Bay, Peachland,
Penticton, Pitt Meadows, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen, Sumas, Summerland, Surrey,
Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages.—Abbotsford, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Chapman Camp, Comox, Cranberry Lake, Creston, Dawson
Creek, Gibsons Landing, Hope, Lake Cowichan, Lytton, McBride, Mission, New Denver, Oliver, Osoyoos,
Parksville, Pouce Coupe, Qualicum Beach, Quesnel, Silverton, Smithers, Stewart, Terrace, Tofino,
Vanderhoof, Westview, Williams Lake.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 65
DRIVERS, SWAMPERS OR HELPERS IN THE TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY*
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 9 (1948)
Effective September 13th, 1948, Superseding Parts of Transportation Orders
" Transportation industry " means:—
(a) The carrying or transporting for reward by motor-vehicle of any goods, wares,
merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier,
and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods for the
purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place at which
such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates;  and
(_>) The carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material
by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer
therein, but shall not include the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise,
article, articles, or material by any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof,
or dealer therein, by any motor-vehicle of factory rating of 1,000 lb. or less.
This Order applies to every employer and every male and female employee in the transportation
industry, as defined herein, employed as drivers, swampers or helpers, except drivers of vehicles;.—
(a) Designed, constructed, and used primarily for transportation therein of passengers; and
(_>) Employed in the laundry, cleaning, and dyeing industries; the delivery of milk, bread,
and non-alcoholic bottled beverages.
Hourly Rate
Drivers, swampers or helpers..
Overtime
Employees working in excess of 8V_ hours in any one day-
Employees working in excess of 11 hours per day-
Employees working in excess of 47 hours in any one week..
75c.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay for
the first IVi hours,
or part thereof.
Double the employee's
regular rate of pay.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
Note.—(1) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(3) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(4) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(5) Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(6) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime provisions.
(7) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's behalf shall
be in addition to above rates.
(8) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(9) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Orders Nos. 9a (1948) and 9b (1950). L 66 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
ELEVATOR OPERATORS AND STARTERS
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 53 (1949)
Effective January 31st, 1949, Superseding Orders Nos. 53 and 54
Includes every male and female operator and starter.
37J/i to 44 Hours per Week
Less Than 37V^ Hours per Week
$18.00 per week.
50c. per hour.
(See note (5) re daily guarantee.)
Note.—(1) Full week's board of 21 meals, $4 per week.
(2) Individual meals, 20c. each.
(3) Board charges may be deducted only when meals are partaken of by the employee.
(4) Full week's lodging of 7 days, $2 per week.
(5) Employee reporting for work on the call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work,
with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate. Employee commencing work in response
to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at employee's regular rate of pay.
(6) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) The Board may order seat or chair to be furnished the employee.
(9) Employees must be given 32 consecutive hours' rest in each calendar week.
(10) Wage Order and schedule of daily shifts must be posted.
(11) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(12) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
ENGINEERS, STATIONARY STEAM*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 18 (1942)
Effective September 21st, 1942, Superseding Orders Nos. 18, 18k, 18b, and 18c
" Stationary steam engineer" means every employee engaged in producing steam in a steam
plant under the authority of a certificate of competency, or who is in charge of, or responsible for,
any steam boiler or engine while under steam-pressure or in motion. " Special engineer " means
holder of a special or temporary certificate.    (See " Boiler Inspection Act," section 28 (1).)
Occupation
Hours per Week
Engineer	
Engineer, special-
44
44
Note.—(1)  Where engineers do not come within the provisions of the "Hours of Work Act," 44 hours per week
may be exceeded but hourly rate must be paid.
(2) For engineers in apartment buildings see Janitors' Order.
(3) Engineers employed in a plant which does not require a certificate of competency shall be paid 48 cents
per hour.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
: As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 67
FIRST-AID ATTENDANTS
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 39 (1948)
Effective May 31st, 1948
" First-aid attendant " means every employee employed in whole or in part as a first-aid attendant
who is in possession of an industrial first-aid certificate and is designated by his employer as the
first-aid attendant in charge, pursuant to the provisions of the " Workmen's Compensation Act" of
British Columbia.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
75c.
(See note (7) re
daily guarantee.)
Time   and  one-half of
the  employee's  regular rate of pay.
44
Overtime:   First-aid attendants working in excess of 8 hours in any one
day and 44 hours in week  (permits required from the Board to
work overtime)
Note.—(1) Overtime rates of pay shall not apply to: —
(a) First-aid attendants working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to
section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" until the first-aid attendant
has completed the hours so established:
(b) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the "Hours of Work Act" pursuant to the
provisions of section 4 of the said Act:
(c) First-aid attendants while employed making shingle-bolts, or as emergency fire-fighters, or regularly
employed as boom-men or boat-men; and first-aid attendants covered by the Order of the Board establishing a minimum wage in the cook- and bunk-house occupation in unorganized territory.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employees reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
. a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay.    Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) If a higher minimum wage has been fixed for any other occupation in which the first-aid attendant is employed
in addition to his first-aid duties, such first-aid attendant shall be paid the higher minimum wage so fixed.
(10) Actual expenses  and  transportation costs,  in addition to the minimum  wage,  must be paid  any first-aid
attendant while attending a patient being conveyed to the office of a medical practitioner, hospital, or other destination.
(11) See Order No. 11  (1949) re rest periods.
(12) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
FISHING INDUSTRY*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 78
Effective May 3rd, 1943, Superseding Order in Effect Since February 28th, 1920
" Fishing industry " means the work of females engaged in the washing, preparing, preserving,
canning, drying, curing, smoking, packing, labelling and reconditioning of containers, or otherwise
adapting for sale or use or for shipment any kind of fish or shell-fish.
Hourly Rate
40c.
40c. thereafter.
Note.—(1) Above rates do not apply to employees engaged in heading and filling.
(2) Licences shall be obtained from the Board by the employer to employ learners of any age below 40c. per hour.
(3) Employees shall be paid when waiting on call at the request of the employer.
(4) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(5) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. L 68
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 46 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946, Superseding Order No. 46 (1942)
" Fruit and vegetable industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose
of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable.
Hourly Rate
Daily Hours
June 1st to November 30th, Inclusive
Rate payable to at least 90% of female employees..
Rate payable to balance of female employees	
Overtime        	
December 1st to May 31st, Inclusive
Rate payable to at least 90% of female employees..
Rate payable to balance of female employees	
40c.
(Daily minimum, $1.20)
35c.
(Daily minimum, $1.05)
Time and one-half regular rate
Double regular rate 	
Overtime   (permits   required   to   work   overtime   during   this
period)
40c.
(Daily minimum, $1.20)
35c.
(Daily minimum, $1.05)
Time and one-half regular rate
In excess of 9 to 11,
inclusive.
Over 11.
In  excess  of  8   daily
and 44 weekly.
Note.—(1) After 5 hours' continuous employment, employees shall have  1 hour free from duty, unless shorter
period approved by Board on request of at least 75% of employees.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted during period December 1st to May 31st.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INDUSTRY*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 47 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946, Superseding Order No. 47 (1942)
" Fruit and vegetable industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose
of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable.
Hourly Rate
Daily Hours
June 1st to November 30th, Inclusive
Rate payable to at least 85% of male employees	
Rate payable to balance of male employees	
Overtime    	
December 1st to May 31st, Inclusive
Rate payable to at least 85% of male employees...
Rate payable to balance of male employees	
48c.
(Daily minimum, $1.44)
38c.
(Daily minimum, $1.14)
Time and one-half regular rate
Double regular rate...	
Overtime   (permits   required   to   work   overtime   during   this
period)
48c.
(Daily minimum, $1.44)
38c.
(Daily minimum, $1.14)
Time and one-half regular rate
In excess of 9 to 11,
inclusive.
Over 11.
In excess of 8  daily
and 44 weekly.
Note.—(1) After 5 hours' continuous employment, employees shall have 1 hour free from duty, unless shorter
period approved by Board on request of at least 75% of employees.
(2) Order does not apply to employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work or
to persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined by section 4 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(3) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Copy of Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted during period December 1st to May 31st.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by Male Minimum Wage Order No. 47a (1946). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 69
GRASS-DEHYDRATION INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 14 (1949)
Effective June 2nd, 1949
" Grass-dehydration industry " means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose
of dehydrating or processing grasses, clovers, and alfalfa.
Rate
All  employees,  except those  classified  under  section  7   of the   " Male
Minimum  Wage  Act"  and  section  6   of  the   " Female  Minimum
Wage Act"
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act"
and section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act"
Overtime (permits required to work overtime during this period) —
(a) April 1st to September 30th, inclusive  	
(b) October 1st in each year to March 31st, inclusive, in the following year
60c. per hour.
(See note (1) re daily guarantee.)
The wage or rate of pay prescribed in the
permit.
Time and one-half the employee's regular
rate of pay for hours worked in excess ot
8 in the day and 48 in the week.
Time and one-half the employee's regular
rate of pay for hours worked in excess of
8 in the day and 44 in the week.
Note.—(1) Employees reporting for work on the call of the employer to be paid for the entire period spent at the
place of work, with a guarantee of 2 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate if the employee does not commence work
and 4 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate if the employee commences work.
(2) Order does not apply to employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(3) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of
work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work
Act" until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(4) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(5) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, aijes,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed. L 70
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
OCCUPATION OF HAIRDRESSING
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 27 (1947)
Effective May 12th, 1947, Superseding Order No. 27, Partially, etc.
" Occupation of hairdressing " means the work of persons engaged in cutting, dressing, dyeing,
tinting, curling, waving, permanent waving, cleansing, bleaching, or other work upon the hair of any
person, the removal of superfluous hair, and all work in connection with the giving of facials and
scalp treatments, manicuring, and other work in hairdressing as defined and interpreted in the " Hairdressers Act." It shall not include the work of any person the duties of whose occupation or profession require any act of hairdressing to be performed as incidental thereto, nor the work of barbers as
defined in the " Barbers Act."
" Class A employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of 40
hours or more.
" Class B employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of less
than 40 hours.
" Learner " means only a male or female employee of any age for whose employment a permit
in writing has been issued by the Board who becomes employed in the occupation of hairdressing at
a time when the employee has had less than six months' experience in that occupation.
Rate
Hours
Class A employees .
Class B employees._
$20.00 per week
50c. per hour
(_._■_■ note (1) re
daily guarantee.)
40-44 per week.
Less than 40
per week.
Learners (Any Age)
Class A Employees
Class B Employees
$15.00 per week 1st 3 months.
17.50 per week 2nd 3 months.
HVic. per hour 1st 3 months.
44c. per hour 2nd 3 months.
(Permits to be obtained from the Board for learners to be employed at above rates.)
Rate
Hours
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act"
or section 6 of the "Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose
employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 9 hours in one day and 44
hours in week
Wage-rate as set
out in permit
Time and one-half of
the regular rate of
pay.
40-44 per week.
Note.—(1) Employees if called to work by the employer shall be paid not less in any one day than an amount
equal to 2 hours' pay if called to work and not put to work, nor less than 4 hours' pay if put to work.
(2) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Employees to get one-half hour free from duty between the hours of 11 o'clock in the forenoon and 2 o'clock
in the afternoon, to commence not later than 1.30 p.m.
(4) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of employees to be posted.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The "Male Minimum Wage Act" and "Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, .1948." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 71
HOSPITAL INSTITUTIONS
(As Defined by the British Columbia " Hospital Insurance Act")
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 16 (1949)
Effective November 10th, 1949
purposes   of  this   Order  the  following   expressions   shall  have   the  following
the
That for
meanings:—
" Business of operating hospital institutions " means the work of male and female employees
employed in hospitals as defined in the British Columbia " Hospital Insurance Act":
" Class A employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of
40 hours or more:
" Class B employee " means a male or female employee whose working-week consists of
less than 40 hours:
" Learner " means, only, a male or female employee of any age for whose employment a
permit in writing has been issued by the Board.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the business
of operating hospital institutions, except:—
(a) A graduate nurse who is in possession of a certificate showing that she has completed
a course of training in general nursing provided in a hospital and who is employed as
a nurse:
(b) A student-nurse in training in an approved school of nursing as defined by sections 22
and 23 of the " Registered Nurses Act" of British Columbia:
(c) Employees who hold professional positions or positions of supervision or management,
so long as the duties performed by them are of a professional, supervisory, or managerial character. The Board may determine whether or not the position held by any
person or the capacity in which he is employed is such as to bring him within the
scope of this exception:
(_.) Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
Rate
Hours
Class A employees
Class B employees..
$20.00 per week
50c. per hour
40-44
Daily  guarantee of 4
hours at employee's
regular rate of pay.
Learners (Any Age)
Class A Employees
Class B Employees
$14.00 per week 1st 2 months.
16.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
18.00 per week 3rd 2 months.
20.00 per week thereafter.
35c. per hour 1st 2 months.
40c. per hour 2nd 2 months.
45c. per hour 3rd 2 months.
50c. per hour thereafter.
Daily guarantee of 4 hours at the employee's regular rate
of pay.
(Permits required for learners working at above rate.)
Rate
Hours
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act"
or section 6 of the "Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose
employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Wage set in
permit
Not more than 44
per week.
Hours.—That, except as provided in section 5 and sections 11 (3) and 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act," the
hours of work of any employee shall not exceed 8 in the day and 44 in the week, except by written permission of
the Board.
Overtime.—Time and one-half of the employee's regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 8 in the day
and 44 im the week. This clause with respect to overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under
arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or section 11 (3) or
section 11 (4) of the " Hours of Work Act," or section 6 (a) of this Order, until the employee has completed the
hours so established.
Provisions for Variance of Hours of Work.—The Board may, by written authorization, permit the limits of hours
of work contained in section 5 of this Order to be exceeded, provided the hours of work so authorized are not inconsistent with the " Hours of Work Act" and regulations thereunder. L 72
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Where the Board is satisfied that extra working-hours are necessary to overcome emergent conditions that may
arise from time to time and that such extra working-hours are not inimical to the interests of the employees, it may,
by written authorization, permit the working-hours to exceed the limits prescribed in section 5 of this Order. The
minimum wage payable for hours worked pursuant to such written authorization shall be time and one-half the
employee's regular rate of pay.
Daily Guarantee.—An employee reporting for work on the call of an employer shall be paid the employee's regular
rate of pay for the entire period spent at the place of work in response to the call, with a minimum of 2 hours' pay at
the employee's regular rate if the employee does not commence work and 4 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate
if the employee commences work, unless by written permission the Board varies this provision with respect to the daily
guarantee.
Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is approved
by the Board in joint written application of employer and employee.
Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
Uniforms.—See Order No. 3.
Rest-rooms.—Toilet and washroom facilities to be provided for use of employees and suitable rooms for rest and
lunch for the use of employees.
Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
Copy of Order to be posted.
Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted. Record of wages and daily hours of employees
to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
Records to be produced to authorized officials.
"Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
Rest periods as per Order No. 11.
HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY*
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946, Superseding Order No. 52 (1938)
" Hotel and catering industry " means the work of male and female employees employed in:—
(a) Hotels, lodging-houses, clubs, or any other place where lodging is furnished, for which
a charge is made:
(b) Hotels, lodging-houses, restaurants, cafes, eating-houses, dance-halls, cabarets, banquet-
halls, ice-cream parlours, soda-fountains, hospitals, sanatoriums, nursing homes, clubs,
dining-rooms, or kitchens in connection with industrial or commercial establishments
or office buildings or schools, or any similar place where food is cooked, prepared, or
served, for which a charge is made,—
whether or not such establishments mentioned above are operated independently or in connection
with any other business.
" Class A employees," those working from 40 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 40 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry, working
under permit from the Board.
Rate
Hours
Class A employees .
Class B employees ..
$18.00 per week
45c. per hour
(See note (6) re
daily guarantee.)
40-44 per week.
Less than 40
per week.
Learners (Any Age)
Class A Employees
Class B Employees
$12.00 per week for 1st 2 months.
14.00 per week for 2nd 2 months.
16.00 per week for 3rd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
30c. per hour for 1st 2 months.
35c. per hour for 2nd 2 months.
40c. per hour for 3rd 2 months.
45c. per hour thereafter.
(See note (6) re daily guarantee.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Hours
Employees classified under section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act" or
section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act" working under permit
Not more than 44
per week.
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52a (1947). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949 L 73
Note.—(1) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week except:—
(a) When authorized by the Board or by section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act":
(_>) In cases of emergency which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome: —
Not more than 10 in the day or 48 in the week.
(2) Split shifts to be confined within 12 hours of commencing work.    (" Hours of Work Act " provision.)
(3) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5 or
11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
(4) Night-work.—Employment between 1.30 a.m. and 6 a.m. to be continuous. Working shifts not to start or
finish between these hours.
This does not apply to employees:—
(a) In hospitals, sanatoriums, and nursing homes residing on the premises:
(6) In catering where exemption has been granted in writing by the Board:'
(c) On Christmas Day and New Year's Day and any other days declared to be exempt by the Board.
(5) Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by the Board on joint written application of employer and employee.
(6) Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent
at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour
daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of Class B employees.
(7) Board or Lodging.—For meals partaken of or accommodation used by employee, not more than the following
deductions to be made from employee's wages:—
(a) Full week's board of 21 meals, $4 per week:
(_>) Individual meals, 20c. each:
(c) Full week's lodging for 7 days, $2 per week.
(8) Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
(9) Uniforms.—See Order No. 3 (1946) relating to uniforms.
(10) Rest-rooms, Toilet and Wash-room Facilities.—To be provided by employers for use of employees.
(11) Order does not apply to:—
(a) Graduate nurses with certificate of completed training:
(b) Student-nurses in training in approved school of nursing, as defined by sections 22 and 23 of " Registered
Nurses Act ":
(c) Students employed in a school where enrolled:
(d) Pages as far as wages are concerned:
(_) Employees covered by another specific Order of the Board.
(12) Copy of Order to be posted.
(13) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(14) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(15) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(16) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(17) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
RESORT HOTELS IN HOTEL AND CATERING INDUSTRY IN UNORGANIZED
TERRITORY DURING THE SUMMER SEASON
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 52a (1946)
Effective June 15th to September 15th, Inclusive, Each Year
" Resort hotel" means any establishment in unorganized territory wherein meals or lodging are
furnished to the general public for which a charge is made.
" Summer season," that part of each year from June 15th to September 15th, inclusive.
Hours.—Not more than 10 in any one day nor 52 in any one week.
Overtime.—One and one-half times regular rate of pay for all hours in excess of 44 in any one week.
Rest Period.—24 consecutive hours each calendar week, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by the Board on joint application of employer and employee.
Variation of Order No. 52 (1946).—All provisions of Order No. 52 (1946) apply except those relating to hours of
work and rest period.
Note.— (1)  Order to be posted.
(2) Order not effective within the following cities, districts, and villages:—
Cities.—Alberni, Armstrong, Chilliwack, Courtenay, Cranbrook, Cumberland, Duncan, Enderby, Fernie, Grand
Forks, Greenwood, Kamloops, Kaslo, Kelowna, Kimberley, Ladysmith, Merritt, Nanaimo, Nelson, New
Westminster, North Vancouver, Port Alberni, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Prince George, Prince Rupert,
Revelstoke, Rossland, Salmon Arm, Slocan, Trail, Vancouver, Vernon, Victoria.
Districts.—Burnaby, Chilliwhack, Coldstream, Coquitlam, Delta, Esquimau, Fraser Mills, Glenmore, Kent,
Langley, Maple Ridge, Matsqui, Mission, North Cowichan, North Vancouver, Oak Bay, Peachland,
Penticton, Pitt Meadows, Richmond, Saanich, Salmon Arm, Spallumcheen, Sumas, Summerland, Surrey,
Tadanac, West Vancouver.
Villages.—Abbotsford, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Chapman Camp, Comox, Cranberry Lake, Creston, Dawson
Creek, Gibsons Landing, Hope, Lake Cowichan, Lytton, McBride, Mission, New Denver, Oliver, Osoyoos,
Parksville, Pouce Coupe, Qualicum Beach, Quesnel, Silverton, Smithers, Stewart, Terrace, Tofino,
Vanderhoof, Westview, Williams Lake.
(3) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. L 74
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
HOUSEHOLD-FURNITURE MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 51 (1947)
Effective February 1st, 1947, Superseding Order No. 51 (1937)
" Household-furniture manufacturing " means the manufacture of kitchen furniture, dining-room
furniture, bedroom furniture, living-room furniture, hall furniture, and other articles of household
furniture customarily manufactured in a furniture factory.
" Learner " means, only, a male or female employee of any age for whose employment a permit
in writing has been issued by the Board who becomes employed in the household-furniture manufacturing industry at a time when the employee has had less than 6 months' experience as an employee in
that industry.
This Order shall apply to every employer and every male and female employee in the household-
furniture manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically
defining their work.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
50c.
30c.
35c.
40c.
50c.
44
Rate payable to balance of employees—
Learners (any age), not inclusive of apprentices (under section 6 of
" Female  Minimum  Wage Act "  or section 7  of  " Male
Minimum Wage Act ")—
44
44
Third 2  months    	
44
44
(Permits to be obtained from the Board for employees working at learners' rates.)
Employees classified under section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act "
and section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
Overtime:    Employees working in excess of 8 hours in one day or 44
hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work such
overtime)
Wage   prescribed   in
permit
One  and  one-half
times   regular   rate
of pay.
44
Note.— (1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours
of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " until the employee has
completed the hours so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted in the establishment.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his employees.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 75
IANITORS*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 43 (1942)
Effective September 21st, 1942, Superseding Orders Nos. 43, 43k, and 43b
1. "Janitor" means  and includes every person employed as janitor,  janitor-cleaner, janitor-
fireman, or janitor-engineer.
2. Janitor, when employed by the hour, 45c. per hour.
3.  (a)  Resident janitor in apartment buildings of 4 res
(b) Resident janitor in apartment buildings, containing
5 residential suites, $32.40 per month
6 residential suites, $36.00 per month
7 residential suites, $39.60 per month
8 residential suites, $43.20 per month
9 residential suites, $46.80 per month
10 residential suites, $50.40 per month
11 residential suites, $54.00 per month
12 residential suites, $57.60 per month
13 residential suites, $61.20 per month
14 residential suites, $64.80 per month
15 residential suites, $68.64 per month
16 residential suites, $72.60 per month
17 residential suites, $76.56 per month
18 residential suites, $80.52 per month
19 residential suites, $84.48 per month
20 residential suites, $88.44 per month
21 residential suites, $92.40 per month
22 residential suites, $96.36 per month
23 residential suites, $99.00 per month;
24 residential suites, $101.64 per month
25 residential suites, $104.28 per month
26 residential suites, $106.92 per month
27 residential suites, $109.56 per month
dential suites and under, 45c. per hour.
dential suites, $ 114.84 per month
dential suites, $117.48 per month
dential suites, $120.12 per month
dential suites, $122.76 per month
dential suites, $125.40 per month
dential suites, $128.04 per month
dential suites, $130.68 per month
dential suites, $133.32 per month
dential suites, $135.96 per month
dential suites, $138.60 per month
dential suites, $141.24 per month
dential suites, $143.88 per month
dential suites, $146.52 per month
dential suites, $149.16 per month
dential suites, $ 151.80 per month
dential suites, $154.44 per month
dential suites, $ 157.08 per month
dential suites, $159.72 per month
dential suites, $ 162.36 per month
dential suites, $165.00 per month
dential suites, $165.00 per month
dential suites, $165.00 per month
dential suites, $165.00 per month
28 residential suites, $112.20 per month;
(c)  In any apartment building where two or more janitors are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitor, and be recorded as resident janitor on the payroll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (b).
Where more than one janitor is designated and recorded on the payroll as resident janitors, each
janitor so designated and recorded must be paid at the rates fixed in clause (b).
Other janitors in the same apartment building shall be paid 45c. per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for 2 rooms and
bathroom, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed
$25 per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a) In any apartment building containing 20 residential suites and over, every janitor shall be
given 24 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(b) In any apartment building containing not more than 19 and not less than 12 residential
suites, every janitor shall be given 8 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
6. During the rest periods, substitute janitor (including any member of the janitor's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitor may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.—(1)  In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building, the suite occupied by the
janitor shall not be included.
(2) Order does not apply to janitors employed in one-room school-houses.
(3) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
29
res
30
res
31
resi
32
res
33
res
34
resi
35
res
36
res
37
res
38
res
39
res
40
resi
41
res
42
res
43
resi
44
res
45
resi
46
res
47
resi
;             48
res
;             49
res
;             50
res
over 50
resi
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. L 76
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
JANITRESSES*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 44 (1942)
Effective September 21st, 1942, Superseding Orders Nos. 44, 44k, and 44b
1. "Janitress" means  and  includes  every person  employed  as janitress,  janitress-cleaner,  or
janitress-fireman.
2. Janitress, when employed by the hour, 45c. per hour.
3. (a) Resident janitress in apartment buildings of 4 residential suites and under, 45c. per hour.
(b) Resident janitress in apartment buildings, containing:—
5 residential suites, $32.40 per month;
6 residential suites, $36.00 per month;
7 residential suites, $39.60 per month;
8 residential suites, $43.20 per month;
9 residential suites, $46.80 per month;
10 residential suites, $50.40 per month;
11 residential suites, $54.00 per month;
12 residential suites, $57.60 per month;
13 residential suites, $61.20 per month;
14 residential suites, $64.80 per month;
15 residential suites, $68.64 per month;
16 residential suites, $72.60 per month;
17 residential suites, $76.56 per month;
18 residential suites, $80.52 per month;
19 residential suites, $84.48 per month;
20 residential suites, $88.44 per month;
21 residential suites, $92.40 per month;
22 residential suites, $96.36 per month;
23 residential suites, $99.00 per month;
24 residential suites, $101.64 per month
25 residential suites, $104.28 per month
26 residential suites, $106.92 per month
27 residential suites, $109.56 per month
29 residential suites, $ 114.84 per month
30 residential suites, $117.48 per month
31 residential suites, $ 120.12 per month
32 residential suites, $122.76 per month
33 residential suites, $125.40 per month
34 residential suites, $128.04 per month
35 residential suites, $130.68 per month
36 residential suites, $133.32 per month
37 residential suites, $135.96 per month
38 residential suites, $138.60 per month
39 residential suites, $141.24 per month
40 residential suites, $143.88 per month
41 residential suites, $146.52 per month
42 residential suites, $149.16 per month
43 residential suites, $151.80 per month
44 residential suites, $154.44 per month
45 residential suites, $157.08 per month
46 residential suites, $159.72 per month
47 residential suites, $162.36 per month
48 residential suites, $165.00 per month
49 residential suites, $165.00 per month
50 residential suites, $165.00 per month
over 50 residential suites, $165.00 per month.
28 residential suites, $112.20 per month;
(c) In any apartment building where two or more janitresses are employed, at least one shall be
designated as resident janitress, and be recorded as resident janitress on the payroll, and shall be paid
according to the rates fixed in clause (b).
Where more than one janitress is designated and recorded on the payroll as resident janitresses,
each janitress so designated and recorded must be paid the rates fixed in clause <b).
Other janitresses in the same apartment building shall be paid 45c. per hour for each hour worked.
4. Where suite is supplied, not more than $20 per month may be deducted for 2 rooms and
bathroom, and $5 for each additional room, but in no case shall the rental value deducted exceed
$25 per month.
A deduction of not more than $4 per month may be made for electricity and (or) gas.
5. (a) In any apartment building containing 20 residential suites and over, every janitress shall
be given 24 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
(_>) In any apartment building containing not more than 19 and not less than 12 residential
suites, every janitress shall be given 8 consecutive hours free from duty in each calendar week.
6. During rest periods, substitute janitress (including any member of the janitress's family) shall
be paid by the owner or agent of the apartment building according to the provisions of this Order.
7. Where there is no central heating plant, or facilities for supplying central heat to the tenants,
the resident janitress may be paid on an hourly basis according to section 2 of this Order.
Note.—(1)  In computing the number of residential suites in any apartment building, the suite occupied by the
janitress shall not be included.
(2) Order does not apply to janitresses employed in one-room school-houses.
(3) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
'As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 77
LAUNDRY, CLEANING AND DYEING INDUSTRIES*
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 74 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946, Superseding Order No. 74
" Learner" means an employee of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry,
working under permit from the Board.
Rate
Hours
Employees,  any  age     _ _	
Learners, any age—
40c. per hour
(See note (4) re
daily guarantee.)
31c. per hour
34c. per hour
37c. per hour
40c. per hour
8 per day.
44 per week.
'
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act " or
section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act " working under permit
Wage set in permit
Not more than 44
per week.
Note.—(1) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by
section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(2) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5 or
11 of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
(3) Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by the Board on joint written application of employer and employee.    See also Order No. 11 (1949).
(4) Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly up to a day not more than 8 days prior to date of
payment. Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent
at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour
daily guarantee, except on Saturday when 3-hour daily guarantee applies. Daily guarantee may be varied by written
permission of the Board.
(5) Breakages.—No charge or deduction to be made by employer for accidental breakages.
(6) Copy of Order to be posted.
(7) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(8) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(9) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(10) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" and " Female Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 74a (1948). L 78
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
LOGGING INDUSTRY*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 1 (1947)
Effective February 1st, 1947, Superseding Order No. 1 (1943)
" Logging industry" means all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of logging; pole, tie,
shingle-bolt, mining-prop, and pile cutting; and all operations in or incidental to hauling, driving,
fluming, rafting, and booming of logs, poles, ties, shingle-bolts, mining-props, and piles.
This Order shall apply to every employer and every male employee in the logging industry
except:—
(a)  Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(Z>) Watchmen or caretakers employed in logging camps in which operations are suspended.
Hourly Rate
1
Weekly Hours
Male employees  	
60c.
$2.00 per cord.
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
According to official scale of measurement, and such rate or price shall
be paid pro rata, according to the hours worked, to each and every
person   so   engaged   under   a   contract   or   agreement   for   making
shingle-bolts;   that is, felling, bucking, splitting, and piling..	
Employees  classified  under  section 7  of the  " Male  Minimum  Wage
Act " in respect of whom permits in writing have been issued by
44
-Overtime:   Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and
44 hours in week   (permits must be obtained from the Board to
work such overtime)
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to: —
(a) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of Work
Act."
Persons making shingle-bolts.
Employees engaged exclusively in the transportation of men and supplies.
Persons regularly employed as boom-men and boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
Persons engaged in operating light plants in logging camps (Order Id (1948)).
(_•) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work  established  pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " until the employee has completed the hours
so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his employees
to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " section number referred to in this Order is as  it appears in t:e  " Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
* As amended by Male Minimum Wage Order No. Id (1948).
LOGGING INDUSTRY
Charge for Board and Lodging—Male Minimum Wage Order No. 28a (1947)
Effective July 24th, 1947, Superseding Order No. 28
This Order rescinds Order No. 28 of the Board fixing a maximum price to be charged for board
and lodging in the logging and sawmill industry in certain parts of the Province of British Columbia,
as set out in the said Order No. 28. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 79
MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 25 (1948)
Effective August 12th, 1948, Superseding Order No. 25 (1947)
" Manufacturing industry" means the work of employees engaged in the making, preparing,
altering, repairing, ornamenting, printing, finishing, packing, assembling the parts of, or adapting for
use or sale any article or commodity.
" Learner" means employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry
working under permit from the Board.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the manufacturing industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining
their work.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Experienced employees   —-	
Learners (any age) —
40c.
31c.
34c.
37c.
40c.
(See note (7) re
daily guarantee.)
44
44
44
44
44
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose
employment permits in writing have been issued by the Board	
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day
and 44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work
overtime)
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
Note.— (1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours
of work established pursuant to section 5 or 11 of the "Hours of Work Act" until the employee has completed the
hours so established; or to persons exempted from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act " pursuant
to the provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his employees
to be posted in his establishment.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent at
place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour
daily guarantee at employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, Board may vary daily guarantee and overtime provisions.
(9) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(10) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." L 80
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
MERCANTILE INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 24 (1949)
Effective January 1st, 1950, Superseding Orders Nos. 24 (1946) and 59
" Mercantile industry " means the work carried on in establishments operated for the purpose of
wholesale and (or) retail trade.
" Class A employees," those working from 39 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 39 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 6 months' experience in the industry, working
under permit from the Board.
Rate
Hours
$18.00 a week
47 c. an hour
(See note (3) re
daily guarantee.)
35c. an hour.
39-44 per week.
Less than 39 per week,
8 per day;   44 per
week.
Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery.	
Learners (Any Age)
Class A Employees
Class B Employees
$12.00 per week 1st 2 months.
14.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
16.00 per week 3rd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
32c. per hour 1st 2 months.
37c. per hour 2nd 2 months.
42c. per hour 3rd 2 months.
47c. per hour thereafter.
(See note (3) re daily guarantee.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Note.—(1) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by
section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(2) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5 or
11 (3) or 11 (4) of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established. Overtime rate of pay does
not apply to persons exempt from provisions of section 3 of " Hours of Work Act " pursuant to provisions of section 4
of the said Act.
(3) Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly. Employee reporting for work on call of employer
and not starting work to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay.
Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee according to respective hourly rates of
Class B employees. (Note.—Daily guarantee does not apply to bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively
on delivery.)
(4) Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by Board on joint written application of employer and employee.    (See also Order No. 11 (1949).)
(5) Bicycle-riders and Foot-messengers.—That in cases where a bicycle is provided by the employee all reasonable
costs to the said employee in connection therewith, while the bicycle is actually in use on his employer's behalf, shall
be in addition to the minimum wages fixed herein.
(6) Copy of Order to be posted.
(7) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted. Record of wages and daily hours of
employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all
employees.
(8) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(9) See Order No. 3 (1946) re uniforms.
(10) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 81
OFFICE OCCUPATION
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 34 (1948)
Effective September 13th, 1948, Superseding Order No. 34 (1946)
"Office occupation" means the work of females employed as stenographers; book-keepers;
typists; billing clerks; filing-clerks; cashiers; cash-girls; checkers; invoicers; comptometer operators;
auditors; attendants in physicians' offices, dentists' offices, and other offices, and the work of females
employed in all kinds of clerical work.
" Class A employees," those working from 36 to 44 hours.
" Class B employees," those working less than 36 hours.
" Learners," employees of any age with less than 4 months' experience in the industry, working
under permit from the Board.
Rate
Hours
Class A employees-
Class B employees...
$18.00 a week
50c. an hour
(See note (4) re
daily guarantee.)
36-44 per week.
Less than 36 per week.
Learners (Any Age)
Class A Employees
Class B Employees
$14.00 per week  1st 2 months.
16.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
40c. per hour  1st 2 months.
45c. per hour 2nd 2 months.
50c. per hour thereafter.
(See note (4) re daily guarantee.)
(Permits required for learners working at above rates.)
Note.—(1) Order does not apply to employees who hold positions of supervision or management, so long as the
duties performed by them are of a supervisory or managerial character.
(2) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by section
5 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(3) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week, or in excess of hours authorized by the Board.
(4) Reporting on Call.—Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at
place of work, with a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour
daily guarantee at employee's regular rate.
(5) Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases a different arrangement is
approved by Board on joint written application of employer and employee.    See also Order No. 11  (1949).
(6) Uniforms.—See Order No. 3 (1946).
(7) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the daily guarantee and overtime provisions.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 71
Effective June 1st, 1940
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging " means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Rate per Hour
City of Vancouver, including Point Grey, City of New Westminster, the Municipality of the
District of Burnaby, Municipality of the .District of West Vancouver, City of North Vancouver, District of North Vancouver 	
90c.
Note.—(1) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(3) All wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. L 82 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
PAINTING, DECORATING, AND PAPER-HANGING*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 75
Effective June 2nd, 1941
" Painting, decorating, and paper-hanging" means all work usually done by painters, decorators,
and paper-hangers in connection with the construction, erection, alteration, remodelling, or renovation
of any building or structure, or any part thereof.
Rate per Hour
Land   Districts   of   Victoria,   Lake,   North   Saanich,   South   Saanich,   Esquimau,   Highland,
Metchosin, Goldstream, Sooke, Otter, Malahat, and Renfrew    	
90c.
Note.—(1) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(2) Does not apply to those permanently employed at maintenance work in industrial or manufacturing establishments, public and private buildings.
(3) All wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
PATROLMEN*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 69
Effective February 5th, 1940
" Private patrol agency " means every person who by contract or agreement undertakes to watch
or patrol the premises of more than one person for the purpose of guarding or protecting persons or
property against robbery, theft, burglary, or other hazards.
" Patrolman" means an employee (not covered by any other Order of the Board) employed by a
private patrol agency.
Hourly rate   _            42c.
Note.^(I) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) Employees shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every seven days.
(3) Where uniforms are required, these are to be furnished without cost to the employee, except by arrangement
approved by the Board of Industrial Relations.    See also Order No. 3.
(4) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
: As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 83
PERSONAL SERVICE OCCUPATION
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 5 (1947)
Effective August 25th, 1947, Superseding Orders Nos. 27, 27k, 27b, 27t>
'■■ Personal service occupation" means the work of persons engaged in massaging and physiotherapy as defined in the " Physiotherapists' and Massage Practitioners' Act," chiropody, chiropractic,
osteopathy, electrical treatments, general and specialized therapeutics, and all work of a like nature.
Rate
Hours per Week
$20.00 per week
50c. per hour
(See note (1) re
daily guarantee.)
The wage or rate of
pay   prescribed   in
the permit.
40-44
Employees  classified  under  section  7  of  the   " Male   Minimum  Wage
Act " or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose
employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
per week.
Note.—(1) If called to work and not put to work, employee shall be paid for not less than 2 hours at the
employee's regular rate of pay, and if put to work, for not less than 4 hours at employee's regular rate.
(2) Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 8 in a day or 44 in a
week, or hours authorized by the Board.
(3) This Order does not apply to:—
(a) Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work:
(_>) A graduate nurse who is in possession of a certificate showing she has completed a course of training in
general nursing provided in a hospital and who is employed as a nurse:
(c) A student-nurse in training in an approved school of nursing as defined by sections 22 and 23 of the
" Registered Nurses Act " of British Columbia.
(4) Copy of Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) Regarding uniforms, see Order No. 3 (1946).
(9) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Vale Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
PLUMBING AND PIPE-FITTING TRADE
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 13 (1949)
Effective July 25th, 1949
" Plumbing and pipe-fitting trade " means and includes all work usually done by plumbers and
pipe-fitters.
Rate
Hours
$1.00 per hour
(See note (4) re
daily guarantee.)
Rate of pay prescribed in the permit
Employees  class'ned  under  section  7   of the
Act "
' Male   Minimum  Wage
week.
8 per day;   44 per
week.
Note.—(1) Order does not apply to:—
(a) Employees who are permanently employed on maintenance work, etc.; and
(b) Employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
(2) Overtime.—Time and one-half the employee's regular rate of pay for all hours worked in excess of 8 in the
day and 44 in the week.    (Permits shall be obtained from the Board to work such overtime.)
(3) Overtime rate of pay does not apply to:—
(a) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act " pursuant to the
provisions of section 4 of the said Act:
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" until the
employee has completed the hours so established.
(4) An employee reporting for work on the call of an employer shall be paid his regular rate of pay for the entire
period spent at the place of work in response to the call, with a minimum of 2 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate.
(5) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(6) Copy of Order and schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(7) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(8) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(9) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(10) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. L 84
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
PUBLIC PLACES OF AMUSEMENT, ETC.
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 67 (1948)*
Effective September 13th, 1948, Superseding Public Places of Amusement Order
" Class A employee " means an employee whose working-week consists of 40 hours or more.
" Class B employee " means an employee whose working-week consists of less than 40 hours.
" Learner" means an employee for whose employment a permit in writing has been issued by
the Board.
This Order applies to all persons employed in or about the following places to which a charge for
admission or service is made to the public:—
(a) Indoor or outdoor theatres and dance-halls or dance-pavilions, music-halls, concert-
rooms, lecture-halls (excluding in every instance players and artists); and
(b) Shooting-galleries,  bowling-alleys,  billiard-parlours  and pool-rooms,  ice-rinks,  roller-
rinks, amusement parks, golf-courses, sports grounds and arenas; and
(c) Swimming-pools, bathing-pavilions and dressing-rooms, bathing-beaches, steam baths;
and
(d) Veterinary hospitals and establishments or offices where general and special therapeutics
is performed:
(e) Parking-lots, auto camps, shoe-shine establishments, and boat liveries.
This Order does not apply to:—
(a) Employees included in any other Order of the Board:
(_>) Persons employed as caddies on or about golf-courses:
(c) Persons employed exclusively as watchmen; and
(-0 Motion-picture projectionists.
Rate
Weekly Hours
$18.00 a week
45c. per hour
(See note (7) re
daily guarantee.)
40-44
Class  B   employees..  	
Less than 40.
Learners
Class A Employees
Class B Employees
$14.00 per week 1st 2 months.
16.00 per week 2nd 2 months.
18.00 per week thereafter.
35c. per hour during 1st 2 months.
40c. per hour during 2nd 2 months.
45c. per hour thereafter.
(See note (7) re daily guarantee.)
Hourly Rate
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage Act " or section 6 of the
" Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose employment permits in writing have been issued
by the Board	
Rate as set in permit.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
Overtime:   Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and 44 hours in week
(permits required from the Board to work overtime)
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Employees working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 6 (a) of this Order until the employee has completed the hours so established:
(b) Persons holding positions of supervision or management or employed in a confidential capacity, so long as
the duties performed by him are of a supervisory or managerial character. The Board may determine
whether or not the position held by any person or the capacity in which he is employed is such as to bring
him within the scope of this paragraph.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 3-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(10) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
* As amended by Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 67a (1950). REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER, 1949
L 85
RADIO-BROADCAST TECHNICIANS
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 8 (1948)
Effective September 13th, 1948
" Radio-broadcast technician" means any employee engaged in the installation, operation, or
maintenance of radio-broadcast equipment, including television, voice and facsimile, or any rebroad-
cast apparatus by means of which electricity is applied in the transmission or transference, production,
or reproduction of voice and sound, including records, transcriptions, wire or tape recording, and
vision, with or without ethereal aid, including the cutting or processing, or both the cutting and
processing, of records and transcription.
This Order applies to all radio-broadcast technicians and their employers, except operators of
record-playing or transmitting and receiving communications equipment in establishments other than
radio-broadcast stations.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
80c.
(denote (7) re
daily guarantee.)
Rate as set in permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose
employment permits in writing have been issued by the Board	
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and
44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work overtime)
44
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(fl) Radio-broadcast technicians working under arrangements with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 (a) of this Order until the radio-broadcast technician has completed
the hours so established:
(b) Radio-broadcast technicians holding positions of supervision or management or employed in a confidential
capacity, so long as the duties performed by them are of a supervisory or managerial character. The
Board may determine whether or not the position held by any person or the capacity in which he is
employed is such as to bring him within the scope of this paragraph.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names,
ages, occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employees' regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 2 re apprentices indentured under "Apprenticeship Act."
(10) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." L 86
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
RADIO TECHNICIANS
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 7 (1948)
Effective May 31st, 1948
" Radio technician" means any employee engaged in:—
(a) The designing, repairing, adjusting, and installing of radio and electronic equipment,
including home radio receivers, record-playing apparatus, public-address and audio-
amplifier systems, and industrial electronic equipment; and
(b) The designing, repairing, and maintenance of long- and short-wave and ultra-high frequency receiving and transmitting equipment.
This Order shall apply to all radio technicians and their employers, except persons employed as
radio technicians in radio-broadcast stations.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
80c.
(See note (7) re
44
daily guarantee.)
Employees  classified  under  section  7  of the  " Male  Minimum  Wage
Rate  of pay pre
44
Act " or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act" for whose
scribed  in  permit
employment permits in writing have been issued by the Board
Overtime:   Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and
Time and one-half of
44 hours in week (permits required from the Board to work over
the employee's reg
time)
ular rate of pay.
Note.—(1)  Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Radio technicians working under arrangements with respect of hours of work established pursuant to section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the "Hours of Work Act" until the radio technician has
completed the hours so established:
(b) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act " pursuant to the
provisions of section 4 of the said Act.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(10) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
REST PERIODS
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 11 (1949)
Effective March 28th, 1949
This Order applies to every employer and to every female employee in every industry, business,
trade, and occupation to which the " Female Minimum Wage Act" applies.
Every employer shall allow every female employee at least one-half hour period free from duty
after not more than five (5) consecutive hours' employment, provided that if an employee is given a
rest period of not less than ten (10) minutes within the five (5) consecutive hours' employment, the
time within which the one-half hour period free from duty shall be given may be exceeded by not
more than one (1) hour.
Copy of Order to be posted. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 87
SAWMILL INDUSTRY
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 50 (1947)
Effective February 1st, 1947, Superseding Order No. 50 (1943)
" Sawmill industry " means all operations in or incidental to the carrying-on of sawmills, veneer-
mills, lath-mills, and (or) planing-mills.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male employee in the sawmill industry,
except emp'.oyees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Rate payable to at least 90% of total .-..    	
Rate payable to balance of employees (inclusive of employees in respect
of whom a permit has been obtained under section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act") not less than      	
Employees  classified  under  section  7   of  the  " Male  Minimum Wage
Act" for whose employment permits in writing have been issued
by the Board
Overtime:   Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day or
44 hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
such overtime)
50c.
40c.
Rate as set out in
permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
44
44
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to: —
(a) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of Work
Act."
Persons regularly employed as boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the
provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act" or Regulation No. 2 made under the said Act
until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of employees
to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of ages, names,
occupations, and residential adresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" section numbers referred to in this Order are as they appear in the " Revised
Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." L 88
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
SHEET-METAL TRADE
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 10 (1948)
Effective September 13th, 1948
" Sheet-metal trade" means  and  includes  all work usually done  by journeymen  in connection with:—
(a) The fabrication or installation, or both the fabrication and installation, of gravity or
forced air heating, or conditioned-air installation; or
(_>) The fabrication or erection, or both the fabrication and erection, or installation of any
sheet-metal work in connection with any residential, commercial, or industrial building,
plant, or establishment, or ship, boat, or barge.
This Order applies to every employer and every employee in the sheet-metal trade, except
employees employed in the production-line or assembly-line manufacture of sheet-metal products
for resale.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Employees in sheet-metal trade     .
$1.00
(See note (7) re
daily guarantee.)
Rate as set in permit.
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
Employees  classified under  section  7  of the  " Male  Minimum  Wage
Act" for whose employment permits in writing have been issued
Overtime:   Employees working in excess  of 8  hours  in any one day
and 44 hours in week  (permits required from the Board to work
overtime)
Note.—(1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Persons who are exempt from the provisions of section 3 of the " Hours of Work Act" pursuant to the
provisions of section 4 of the said Act:
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or section 11 (3) or section 11 (4) of the " Hours of Work Act" until the employee has
completed the hours so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of the names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) Employee reporting for work on call of employer to be paid for entire period spent at place of work, with
a guarantee of at least 2 hours' pay. Employee commencing work in response to a call, 4-hour daily guarantee at
employee's regular rate of pay.
(8) Under certain conditions, the Board may vary the overtime and daily guarantee provisions.
(9) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(10) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act" section number referred to in this Order is as it appears in the " Revised Statutes
of British Columbia, 1948." REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 89
SHINGLE INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 62 (1947)
Effective February 1st, 1947, Superseding Order No. 62 (1943) and Order No. 77 (1943)
" Shingle industry " means all operations in or incidental to the manufacturing of wooden shingles
or shakes.
" Square" means a roofing square of four bundles of shingles, understood and accepted as a
standard by the industry, and according to specification N.R.C. 5—1936 issued by the National
Research Council of Canada.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the shingle
industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining their work.
Per Square
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Sawyers—
No. 1 shingles   	
Lower grade than No. 1 shingles 	
30c.
24c.
18c.
50c.
50c.
50c.
50c.
44
44
44
Other employees not included in any other Order of
44
(Employees packing or sawing shingles on any other basis than by the square shall be paid on the
same proportionate basis.)
Guaranteed
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Employees classified under section 7 of the " Male Minimum Wage
Act " or section 6 of the " Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose
employment permits in writing have been issued by the Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day and
44 hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
such overtime)
Rate as set out in
permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
Note.— (1) Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to:—
(a) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the "Hours of Work
Act."
Persons regularly employed as boatmen.
Emergency fire-fighters.
(__>)  Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or 11 of the " Hours of Work Act " or Regulation No. 2 made under the said Act
until the employee has completed the hours so established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his employees
to be posted.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, occupations, and
residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act " section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948." L 90
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
SHIP-BUILDING INDUSTRY
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 20 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946, Superseding Order No. 20
" Ship-building industry" means all operations in the construction, reconstruction, alteration,
repair, demolition, painting, cleaning, preserving, reconditioning, putting on or taking off the ways,
or dry-docking of any ship, boat, barge, or scow.
Rate
Hours
Employees doing the work usually done by journeymen, and without restricting the generality of the foregoing, the work of shipwrights,
joiners, boat-builders, caulkers, painters, fitters, electricians, machinists, boilermakers, plumbers and steam-fitters, blacksmiths, sheet-metal
workers, welders, hoistmen, engineers, riggers, and asbestos-workers
Employees exclusive of the  above-mentioned   	
When 90% of total number of emDloyees (exclusive of indentured apprentices) are paid not less than the 90c. or 60c. per hour rate, the
balance may be paid __._  	
Employees classified under section 6 of the Act working under permits 	
90c. per hour
60c. per hour
45c. per hour
Rate set in permit
f   8 per day.
} 44 per week,
j   8 per day.
| 44 per week,
j"   8 per day.
I 44 per week.
8 per day.
44 per week.
Note.—(1) Hours.—Not more than 8 in the day or 44 in the week, except when authorized by the Board or by
section 5 of the " Hours of Work Act."
(2) Overtime.—Time and one-half employee's regular rate of pay for hours in excess of 8 in the day or 44 in the
week. This overtime rate shall not apply to any employee working under arrangement made pursuant to section 5 or 11
of " Hours of Work Act " until he has completed hours so established.
(3) Payment of Wages.—At least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Copy of Order to be posted.
(5) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted.
(6) Record of wages and daily hours of employees to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages,
occupations, and residential addresses of all employees.
(7) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(8) See Order No. 2 (1946) re apprentices.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
TAXICAB-DRIVERS*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 33 (1940)
Effective October 10th, 1940, Superseding Order No. 33, Order No. 33\, and Order No. 33b
" Taxicab-driver" means every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating
accommodation for seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the
public and which is driven or operated for hire.
Area
Drivers
Daily Rate
Working-hours
Vancouver   ;._ _ 	
All ages
$3.30
9 per day; 50
per week.
Note.—(1) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(2) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(3) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 91
TAXICAB-DRIVERS*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 60
Effective November 17th, 1938
" Taxicab-driver " means every employee in charge of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating
accommodation for seven passengers or less than seven passengers, used for the conveyance of the
public and which is driven or operated for hire.
Area
Drivers
Daily Rate
Less Than 10
Hours Per Day
Daily
Minimum
Working-
hours
Victoria, Esquimalt, Oak Bay, Saanich ...
All ages
$3.60
42c. per hour
$1.68 per day
9 per day.
50 per week.
Note.—(1) Permits shall be obtained from the Board before drivers whose days consist of less than 10 hours can
be paid 42c. per hour.
(2) Every hour in excess of 10 in any one day shall be at the rate of 54c. per hour.
(3) Drivers shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(4) Drivers shall be given rest period of 24 consecutive hours in every 7 days.
(5) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(6) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH OCCUPATION*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 79
Effective April 16th, 1945, Superseding Order Effective April 5th, 1920
" Telephone and telegraph occupation" means the work of all persons employed in connection
with the operating of the various instruments, switch-boards, and other mechanical appliances used in
connection with telephony and telegraphy.
Rate
Maximum Hours
Employees, any age—
For first 3 weeks .
For following month .
For following 2 months .
For following 3 months .
Thereafter  _	
$1.80 per day
2.52 per day
2.76 per day
3.00 per day
3.36 per day
8 per day.
48 per week.
J
Note.—(1) Part-time employees' wages shall be prorated.
(2) Employees required to report for work to receive at least 3 hours' pay per day.
(3) In emergencies employees may work up to 56 hours per week, with one and one-half times their regular rate
of pay for hours in excess of 48,
(4) Where employees reside on employers'  premises,  an arrangement may be made for  employees  to  answer
emergency calls between 10 p.m. and 8 a.m., subject to approval in writing by the Board.
(5) Working-hours shall be confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of work.
(6) Every employee shall have a rest period of 24 consecutive hours in each calendar week.
(7) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(8) Where hours of work in bona-fide trade-union agreements differ from those prescribed by the  Order, the
Board may, in its discretion, exempt in writing the union and the employer from sections in the Order pertaining to
.hours, to the extent mentioned in the exemption.
(9) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(10) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(11) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. L 92
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY*
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 26 (1940), Effective October 10th, 1940, and Male
Minimum Wage Order No. 26a (1940), Effective November 28th, 1940
Superseding Order No. 26, Order No. 26b, and Order No. 26c
(This Order does not apply to employees covered by Order No. 9 (1948) of the Board.)
" Transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting
for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise,
article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or
delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public
vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier
of goods by rail, water, air, or road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some
destination other than the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours
Weekly Hours
(1) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 pounds net weight or over, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified in
section 7 hereof
Hourly rate J
(2) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than 2,000 pounds net weight, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, and operators of motor-cycles
with wheeled attachments, exclusive of those specified in section 7
hereof
Hourly rate. 	
(3) Operators of motor-cycles with not more than two wheels and without wheeled attachment
Hourly rate    	
(4) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery
or messenger work (e)
Hourly rate     _	
(5) Swampers and helpers-
Hourly rate. 	
(6) Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than those covered by section
7 hereof
Hourly rate   _   	
Less than 40
54c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
36c.
Less than 40
24c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
54c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
40 and not more
than 50
42c.
40 and not more
than 48
30c.
40 and not more
than 48
20c.
40 and not more
than 50
42c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
(7) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of bread or in the
retail delivery of milk
Hourly rate, 48c.
Note.—-(1) This Order does not apply to drivers, swampers, or helpers covered by Order No. 9  (1948)  of the
Board (see Order No. 26c (1948)).
(2) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's behalf shall
be in addition to above rates.
(3) Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(4) Milk-delivery men may work 15 hours in excess of 44 per week, provided not more than 10 hours are worked
in any one day, nor more than 350 hours over a period of 7 weeks.
(5) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers in mercantile industry, see Order No. 24 (1949).
(6) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) "Annual Holidays Act" to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 93
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY*
Female Minimum Wage Order No. 26b
Effective August 18th, 1941
(This Order does not apply to employees covered by Order No. 9 (1948) of the Board.)
" Transportation industry " includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting
for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise,
article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer,
jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor
thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of
goods by rail, water, air, or road transport for the purpose of being further transported to some
destination other than the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
Weekly Hours
Weekly Hours
(1) Operators of motor-vehicles of 2,000 pounds net weight or over, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified in
section 7 hereof
Less than 40
54c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
36c.
Less than 40
24c.
Less than 40
48c.
Less than 40
54c.
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
(2) Operators of motor-vehicles of less than 2,000 pounds net weight, as
specified on the motor-vehicle licence, exclusive of those specified in
sections 3 and 7 hereof
40 and not more
than 50
42c.
(3) Operators of motor-cycles with not more than two wheels and without wheeled attachment
40 and not more
than 48
30c.
(4) Bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery
or messenger work
40 and not more
than 48
20c.
than 50
42c.
(6) Drivers of horse-drawn vehicles other than those covered by section
7 hereof
40 and not more
than 50
48c.
(7) Drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of bread or in the
retail delivery of milk
Hourly rate, 48c.
Note.—(1) This Order does not apply to drivers, swampers or helpers covered by Order No. 9  (1948)  of the
Board (see Order No. 26c (1948)).
(2) Where vehicle is provided by employee, all reasonable costs while vehicle is in use on employer's behalf shall
be in addition to above rates.
(3) Employees waiting on call to be paid at above rates.
(4) Milk-delivery employees may work 15 hours in excess of 44 per week, provided not more than 10 hours are
worked in any one day, nor more than 350 hours over a period of 7 weeks.
(5) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(6) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(7) See Order No. 11 (1949) re rest periods.
(8) " Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
* As amended by General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946), July 1st, 1946.
TRANSPORTATION INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 26c (1948)
Effective September 13th, 1948
This Order amends Orders Nos. 26 (1940) and 26b by deleting from the application of those
Orders employees in the transportation industry to whom Order No. 9 (1948) applies. L 94
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
UNDERTAKING BUSINESS
Male Minimum Wage Order No. 15 (1949)
Effective February 5th, 1950
"Undertaking business" means work performed in the preparing of the dead for burial and
arranging for and conducting funerals, and, without restricting the generality of the foregoing, includes
the work of funeral attendants and funeral chauffeurs.
" Class A employee " means a male employee whose working-week consists of 40 hours or more.
" Class B employee " means a male employee whose working-week consists of less than 40 hours.
Rate
Hours
Class A  employees .
C'ass  B   employees
Employees  classified under  section 7  of the  " Male Minimum Wage
Act "
$33.00 per week
80c. per hour
(See note (3) re
daily guarantee.)
Rate of pay prescribed in permit.
40-44 per week.
Less than 40 per
week.
Note.—(1) Order applies in the following areas: City of Vancouver, together with all that area known as Point
Grey, which lies to the west of the westerly boundary of the City of Vancouver; the City of New Westminster; the
Municipality of the District of Burnaby; the Municipality of the District of West Vancouver; the City of North
Vancouver; the District of North Vancouver; the City of Victoria; the Municipality of the District of Oak Bay; the
Municipality of the District of Saanich;   the Municipality of the District of Esquimau.
(2) Order does not apply to (a) musicians and vocalists; (6) employees covered by another Order of the Board
specifically defining their work; (c) persons holding positions of supervision or management or employed in a confidential capacity, so long as the duties performed by them are of a supervisory or managerial character.
(3) Daily Guarantee.—A minimum of 2 hours' pay at the employee's regular rate if the employee does not commence work and 4 hours' pay at the regular rate if the employee commences work, unless varied by the Board.
(4) Rest Period.—Thirty-two consecutive hours weekly, unless in exceptional cases different arrangements are
approved by the Board.
(5) Employees Residing on Premises.—The Board may approve an arrangement made between the employer and
the employee for the employee to answer emergency calls. Hours worked under such arrangement are not considered
as hours worked for the purposes of computing overtime, etc.
(6) Overtime.—Time and one-half of the employee's regular rate of pay for hours worked in excess of 8 in the
day and 44 in the week, except as provided in Notes 5 and 7.
(7) Board may vary the 8-hour-day and 44-hour-week provisions of the Order under certain circumstances.
(8) Split Shifts.—Working-hours of employees working on a split shift shall be confined within 12 hours immediately following commencement of work. The time spent by the employee answering emergency calls referred to in
Note 5 is not considered time worked for the purposes of this provision.
(9) Wages to be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(10) Copy of Order to be posted.
(11) Schedule of daily shifts and intervals free from duty to be posted. Record of wages and daily hours of
employees to be kept, together with register in the English language of names, ages, occupations, and residential
addresses of all employees.
(12) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(13) See Order No. 3 (1946) re uniforms.
(14) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 95
COST AND UPKEEP OF UNIFORMS
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 3 (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946
1. Applies to every employer and to every male and female employee in every industry, business,
trade, and occupation to which the Male and Female Minimum Wage Acts apply.
2. (1) Subject to the provisions of subsection (2), when an employee is required to wear a
uniform or special article of wearing-apparel, it shall be furnished, cleaned, laundered, or repaired
free of cost to employee by employer.
(2) Where employer and employee make written application to the Board, the Board may give
written approval to a different arrangement regarding uniforms.
WOOD-WORKING INDUSTRY
Male and Female Minimum Wage Order No. 49 (1947)
Effective February 1st, 1947, Superseding Order No. 49 (1943)
" Wood-working industry" means all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of
manufacturing sash and doors, cabinets, show-cases, office and store furniture and fixtures, wood
furnishings, plywood, veneer products, and general mill-work products.
This Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in the woodworking industry, except employees covered by another Order of the Board specifically defining
•their work.
Hourly Rate
Weekly Hours
Rate payable to at least 85% of total    	
Rate payable to balance of employees (inclusive of employees in respect
of whom a permit has been obtained under section 7 of " Male
Minimum Wage Act " or section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage
Act ") not less than 	
Employees classified under section 7 of " Male Minimum Wage Act "
and section 6 of " Female Minimum Wage Act " for whose employment permits in writing are issued by the Board
Overtime: Employees working in excess of 8 hours in any one day or
44 hours in week (permits to be obtained from the Board to work
such overtime)
50c.
40c.
Rate as set out in
permit
Time and one-half of
the employee's regular rate of pay.
44
44
Note.—(1)  Overtime rate of pay shall not apply to: —
(a) Persons holding positions of supervision or management as defined in section 4 of the " Hours of Work
Act."
(b) Employees working under an arrangement with respect to hours of work established pursuant to the provisions of section 5 or 11 of the "Hours of Work Act" until the employee has completed the hours so
established.
(2) Wages shall be paid at least as often as semi-monthly.
(3) Copy of this Order to be posted.
(4) Schedule setting out the daily shifts and intervals free from duty of each occupational group of his employees.
(5) Record of wages and daily hours to be kept, together with register in English of names, ages, occupations, and
residential addresses of all employees.
(6) Records to be produced to authorized officials.
(7) See Order No. 3 re uniforms.
(8) See Order No. 11  (1949) re rest periods.
(9) "Annual Holidays Act " to be observed.
The " Male Minimum Wage Act " and " Female Minimum Wage Act "■ section numbers referred to in this Order
are as they appear in the " Revised Statutes of British Columbia, 1948."
Note.—The minimum wage-rates provided in the Summary of Orders include the 20-percent increase provided in General Interim Minimum Wage Order (1946) wherever it applies. L 96
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
GENERAL INTERIM MINIMUM WAGE ORDER (1946)
Effective July 1st, 1946
1. That this Order shall apply to every employer and to every male and female employee in every
industry, business, trade, or occupation covered by the following orders, namely:—
Order
No.
Industry
Date of Order
17 (1942)
-*55 (1943)
70
76
•58
*65
*66
*72
•73
*68
12 (1940)
*53
*54
18 (1942)
*39 (1940)
78
*51
43 (1942)
44 (1942)
* 1 (1943)
*25 (1942)
*24
*59
75
71
69
*27
*67
•50 (1943)
*62 (1943)
•77 (1943)
33 (1940)
60
79
T26 (1940)
f26B
•49 (1943)
Baking	
Box-manufacture..
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Saltspring Island)..
Bus-drivers   	
Carpentry (Vancouver and District)..
Carpentry (Kootenay Area)	
Carpentry (Victoria and District)	
Carpentry (Alberni).	
Carpentry (Nanaimo) 	
Christmas-trees 	
Construction... _  	
Elevator Operators	
Elevator Operators	
Engineers, Stationary Steam..
First-aid Attendants	
Fishing..
Household Furniture..
Janitors 	
Janitresses	
Logg
gging..
Manufacturing. 	
Mercantile  	
Mercantile   	
Painters,  Decorators,   and  Paper-hangers   (southerly  portion  of
Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers (Vancouver and District).....
Patrolmen 	
Personal Service	
Public Places of Amusement-
Sawmills	
Shingle..
Shingle..
Taxicab-drivers	
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)..
Telephone and Telegraph	
Transportation 	
Transportation 	
Wood-working  	
July 15, 1942..
July 14, 1943..
March 12, 1940	
September 21, 1942..
September 15, 1938-
June 23, 1939.......
August 16, 1939-
May 14, 1940..
May 14, 1940„
August 31, 1939	
November 26, 1940..
February 28, 1938 ..
February 28, 1938—
September 9, 1942—
October 8, 1940	
April 14, 1943	
November 17, 1937..
September 9, 1942....
September 9, 1942—
July 14, 1943	
October 15, 1942	
May 29, 1935	
October 12, 1938	
April 22, 1941	
April 26, 1940	
January 19, 1940	
August 29, 1935	
August 31, 1939	
June 25, 1943	
July 23, 1943 	
July 23, 1943__	
October 8, 1940	
November 15, 1938...
March 13,1945	
October 8, 1940	
August 12, 1941	
July 14, 1943	
Minimum
Wage
Act
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
2. That on and after the 1st day of July, 1946, all minimum wage-rates fixed by the orders of
the Board, as set out in section 1 of this Order, are hereby increased by adding thereto 20 per cent of
such minimum wage-rates.
3. That the orders as set out in section 1 of this Order are varied accordingly.
4. That this Order, made by the Board at Victoria, B.C., on the 25th day of June, 1946, and
published in The British Columbia Gazette on the 27th day of June, 1946, shall take effect on the 1st
day of July, 1946.
* Orders revised after July 1st, 1946.
t Orders Nos. 26 (1940) and 26b have been revised in part.
See Order No. 26c (1948) and Order No. 9 (1948). BOARD OF INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS MINIMUM WAGE ORDERS
The following is a complete list of all Orders in effect at August 31st, 1950:—
Serial
No.
Industry
Date of
Order
Date
Gazetted
Date
Effective
Minimum
Wage Act
41
2 (1946)
2a (1947)
6 (1948)
6a (1950)
17 (1942)
42 (1946)
55 (1947)
76
70
70a
58 (1947)
68 (1947)
12 (1940)
4 (1946)
9 (1948)
9a (1948)
9b (1950)
53 (1949)
18 (1942)
39 (1948)
78
46 (1946)
47 (1946)
47a (1946)
14 (1949)
27 (1947)
16 (1949)
52 (1946)
52a (1946)
52a (1947)
52b (1948)
51 (1947)
43 (1942)
44 (1942)
74 (1946)
74a (1948)
1 (1947)
Id (1948)
25 (1948)
24 (1949)
34 (1948)
75
71
69
5 (1947)
13 (1949)
67 (1948)
67a (1950)
8 (1948)
7 (1948)
11 (1949)
50 (1947)
10 (1948)
62 (1947)
20 (1946)
33 (1940)
60
60a
79
26 (1940)
26a (1940)
26b
26c (1948)
15 (1949)
3 (1946)
49 (1947)
Apprentices Indentured..
Apprentices Indentured .
Apprentices Indentured _
Automotive Repair and Gasoline Service-
station
Automotive Repair and Gasoline Service-
station
Baking... 	
Barbering.
Box-manufacturing..
Bus-drivers (Vancouver and Vicinity)	
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Bus-drivers (Vancouver Island and Salt-
spring Island)
Carpentry.
Christmas-tree  	
Construction    	
Cook- and Bunk-house Occupation (in
Unorganized Territory)
Drivers, Swampers, or Helpers in Transportation Industry as defined
Drivers, Swampers, or Helpers in Transportation Industry as defined
Drivers, Swampers, or Helpers in Transportation Industry as defined
Elevator Operators 	
Engineers, Stationary Steam	
First-aid Attendants   _
Fishing.
Fruit and Vegetable 	
Fruit and Vegetable.   	
Fruit and Vegetable   	
General  Interim  Minimum  Wage  Order
(1946)
Grass Dehydration  	
Hairdressing
Hospital Institutions-
Hotel and Catering..
Hotel and Catering (Resort Hotels) (Unorganized Territory)
Hotel and Catering  	
Hotel and Catering... _.
Household Furniture   	
Janitors.    	
Janitresses 	
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing .
Laundry, Cleaning and Dyeing .
Logging	
Logging-
Manufacturing -
Mercantile	
Office Occupation  	
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(Southerly Portion Vancouver Island)
Painters, Decorators, and Paper-hangers
(Vancouver and District)
Patrolmen    	
Personal Service 	
Plumbing and Pipe-fitting _	
Public Places of Amusement, etc...
Public Places of Amusement, etc...
Radio-broadcast Technicians	
Radio Technicians 	
Rest Periods	
Sawmills 	
Sheet-metal Trade .
Shingle 	
Ship-building 	
Taxicab-drivers.-
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity).
Taxicab-drivers (Victoria and Vicinity)..
Telephone and Telegraph. 	
Transportation... 	
Transportation ..
Transportation.
Transportation..
Undertaking Business	
Uniforms, Cost and Upkeep of~
Wood-working	
Feb. 3/37...
June 19/46
Nov. 24/47
Apr. 16/48.
May 25/50.
July 15/42..
June 19/46
Jan. 16/47..
Sept. 21/42
Mar. 12/40
June 21/40
July 29/47..
May 9/47...
Nov. 26/40
June 26/46.
Aug. 3/48_.
Dec. 3/48...
Aug. 8/50 .
Jan. 10/49..
Sept. 9/42...
May 20/48.
Apr. 14/43.
June 25/46.
June 25/46
Apr. 18/47.
June 25/46.
May 26/49.
May 2/47 ...
Nov. 4/49._
June 19/46
June 26/46
Nov. 24/47.
Apr. 26/48.
Jan. 16/47..
Sept. 9/42..
Sept. 9/42 ..
June 25/46
Nov. 25/48.
Jan.16/47-
June 4/48-
Aug. 3/48...
Nov. 4/49...
Aug. 3/48...
Apr. 22/41.
Apr. 26/40
Jan.19/40.
Aug. 15/47.
June 16/49.
Aug. 3/48 ..
May 11/50.
Aug. 3/48 _
May 20/48.
Feb.16/49.
Jan. 16/47..
Aug. 3/48...
Jan. 16/47..
June 19/46.
Oct. 8/40...
Nov. 15/38.
Oct. 8/40...
Mar. 13/45.
Oct. 8/40 ...
Nov. 26/40
Aug. 12/41.
Aug. 3/48...
Dec. 9/49....
June 19/46.
Jan. 16/47..
Feb. 11/37.
June 27/46
Nov. 27/47
Apr. 22/48.
June 1/50 ..
July 16/42.
June 27/46
Jan. 23/47..
Sept. 24/42
Mar. 14/40.
June 27/40.
July 31/47-
May 15/47.
Nov. 28/40.
July 4/46....
Aug. 12/48.
Dec. 9/48...
Aug. 17/50.
Jan.20/49-
Sept. 17/42
May 27/48.
Apr. 22/43.
June 27/46.
June 27/46.
Apr. 24/47.
June 27/46.
June 2/49...
May 8/47...
Nov. 10/49.
June 27/46.
July 4/46—
Nov. 27/47.
Apr. 29/48.
Jan. 23/47..
Sept. 17/42.
Sept. 17/42.
June 27/46.
Dec. 2/48-
Jan. 23/47..
June 10/48
Aug. 12/48.
Dec. 1/49...
Aug. 12/48.
Apr. 24/41.
May 2/40...
Jan. 25/40..
Aug. 21/47.
June 23/49.
Aug. 12/48.
May 18/50.
Aug. 12/48.
Mav 27/48.
Feb. 24/49..
Jan. 23/47..
Aug. 12/48.
Jan. 23/47..
June 27/46.
Oct. 10/40.
Nov. 17/38.
Oct. 10/40..
Mar. 15/45.
Oct. 10/40 .
Nov. 28/40
Aug. 14/41.
Aug. 12/48.
Feb. 2/50...
June 27/46.
Jan. 23/47..
Feb.11/37	
July 1/46	
Dec. 1/47	
May 1/48	
June 1/50	
July 20/42 —
July 1/46	
Feb. 1/47	
Sept. 28/42 ....
Mar. 18/40	
June 27/40	
Aug. 4/47—
May 15/47—
Nov. 28/40....
July 8/46
Sept. 13/48—
Dec. 9/48	
Aug. 17/50 .....
Jan.31/49	
Sept. 21/42—
May 31/48.	
May 3/43	
July 1/46-	
July 1/46	
Apr. 24/47	
July 1/46	
June 2/49	
May 12/47 ....
Nov. 10/49—
July 1/46	
July 15 to Sept.
15 each year
Dec. 1/47...	
Apr. 29/48 —
Feb.1/47	
Sept. 21/42 ....
Sept. 21/42....
July 1/46	
Dec. 2/48	
Feb.1/47	
June 10/48	
Aug. 12/48—
Jan.1/50	
Sept. 13/48.	
June 2/41-	
June 1/40...	
Feb. 5/40	
Aug. 25/47—
July 25/49—.
Sept. 13/48 —
May 18/50 —
Sept. 13/48 —
May 31/48	
Mar. 28/49—
Feb.1/47	
Sept. 13/48	
Feb. 1/47	
July 1/46	
Oct. 10/40—
Nov. 17/38	
Oct. 10/40
Apr. 16/45	
Oct. 10/40	
Nov. 28/40....
Aug. 18/41—
Sept. 13/48—
Feb. 5/50	
July 1/46	
Feb.1/47	
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male.
Male and Female.
Female.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and Female.
Male and
Male and
Male and
Male.
Female.
Male and
Male and
Male.
Male.
Male and
Male and
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male and
Male.
Male and
Male and
Male and
Male and
Female.
Male.
Male.
Male and
Male.
Male.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Male.
Female.
Male and
Male.
Male and
Male and
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
Female.
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Female. L 98 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS MADE PURSUANT TO
" HOURS OF WORK ACT "
(And as Amended by Interim Amendments (1946), Effective July 1st, 1946)
Section 3.—" Subject to the exceptions provided by or under this Act, the
working-hours of an employee in any industrial undertaking shall not exceed eight
in the day and forty-four in the week."
E IT KNOWN that the  Board of Industrial  Relations has made the following regulations,
namely:—
Note.—Regulation 1 cancelled by Regulation 30.    Cancellation effective October 31st, 1945.
B
Lumbering, Night Shift
2. Persons employed in sawmills, planing-mills, and shingle-mills on night shifts may work a total
of 44 hours each week in five nights, in lieu of 44 hours each week in six nights, but the number of
hours worked in any night must not exceed 9.
Logging
3. Persons employed in:—
(1) The logging industry in:—
(a) Booming operations; or
(_>) Transporting logs by logging-railway, motor-truck, flume, horse, or river-driving; or
(c) Transporting workmen or supplies for purposes of the said industry;
(d) The occupation of boatman;
(e) The occupation of emergency fire-fighters:
Fish-canning
(2) Canning fish or manufacturing by-products from fish, but not those engaged in salting fish;
and in
Cook- and Bunk-houses
(3) Cook-  and   bunk-houses  in  connection  with  any  industrial  undertaking  in  unorganized
territory,—
are hereby exempted from the limits prescribed by section 3 of the said Act.
Engineers, Operators, Firemen, and Oilers or Greasers
4b. In all industrial undertakings which use steam, gasoline, or diesel engines, or electric energy
as motive power and which are operated with a single shift of engineers or operators, firemen, and
oilers or greasers, the engineers or operators, firemen, and oilers or greasers may work overtime to
the extent of one hour per day to perform preparatory or complementary work in addition to the
maximum hours of work prescribed by section 3, or established pursuant to section 5, 11 (3), or
11 (4) of the Act, with effect from the 13th day of January, 1949.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 11th day of January, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 13th, 1949.)
Note.—Regulation 5 cancelled by 5a, October 9th, 1947.
Emergency Repairs
6. While engaged upon repair-work requiring immediate performance, persons employed in
shipyards, engineering-works, machine-shops, foundries, welding plants, sheet-metal works, belt-works,
saw-works, and plants of a like nature may work such hours in addition to the working-hours limited
by section 3 of the said Act as (but not more than) may be necessary to prevent serious loss to, or
interruption in the operation of, the industrial undertaking for which the repairs are being made.
Seasonal Boxes and Shooks
1'. Persons employed in the manufacture of wooden boxes or wooden containers for shipment
or distribution of fish, fruit, or vegetables may work during the months of June, July, August, and
September in each year such hours in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said Act as
may from time to time be necessary to fill urgent orders.
Note.—Regulation 8 cancelled by 8a, February 13th, 1936.
Note.—Regulation 9 cancelled by 9a, September 26th, 1940.
Seasonal Lithographing
10. During the months of May, June, July, August, September, and October in each year persons
employed in the lithographing industry may work such hours in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said Act as may from time to time be necessary to fill urgent orders. This exemption
shall only apply when sufficient competent help is not available.
J REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949 L 99
Temporary Exemptions
11. Temporary exceptions will be allowed by the Board by the granting of written temporary
exemption permits limiting by their terms the extent thereof, but only upon being satisfied by
application in writing, signed by the applicant or some one thereunto duly authorized, of the urgency
and necessity for the exception, that it is of a temporary nature, and that no other means of adequately
overcoming such temporary urgent condition is, or has been, reasonably available, and that the
additional working-hours applied for will not be more than will suffice for the extra pressure of work
requiring the same.
Overtime Record
12. Every employer shall keep a record in the manner required by subsection (1) of section 9
of the said Act of all additional hours worked in pursuance of section 6 of the said Act or in pursuance
of any regulation.
12a. Every employer shall furnish the Board with a copy of his pay-roll, or record in such form
prescribed by the Board, showing the hours worked and the nature of the work performed by his
employees in respect of section 6 of the Act, or Regulations Nos. 6 and 11 of the Board, not later than
15 days after such hours have been worked.    (Effective December 12th, 1940.)
13. Every employer shall notify, by means of the posting of notices in conspicuous places in
the works or other suitable place, where the same may readily be seen by all persons employed by
him, the hours at which work begins and ends, and, where work is carried on by shifts, the hours at
which each shift begins and ends; also such rest intervals accorded during the period of work as are
not reckoned as part of the working-hours; these hours shall be so fixed that the duration of the work
shall not exceed the limits prescribed by the " Hours of Work Act, 1934," or by the regulations made
thereunder, and when so notified they shall not be changed except upon 24 hours' notice of such
change posted as hereinbefore specified, and in all cases of partial or temporary exemption granted
by the Board of Industrial Relations under sections 11 and 12 of the Act or Regulation 11 above,
a like notice of the change in working-hours shall be posted, which notice shall also state the grounds
on which the exemption was granted.
Made and given at Victoria, British Columbia, this 14th day of June, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 14th, 1934.    Effective June 14th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 14
Occupation of Barbering
The occupation of barbering is hereby added to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 24th day of July, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th day of July, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 2nd, 1934.    Effective August 2nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 15
Mercantile Industry
The mercantile industry is hereby added to the Schedule of the said Act, the approval of the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order
in Council dated the 7th day of August, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 9th day of August, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, August 9th, 1934.    Effective August 9th, 1934.)  •
Regulations Nos. 15a, 15b, 15c, and 15d Cancelled by
REGULATION No. 15e
Mercantile Industry
Note.—Regulation 15e cancelled by Regulation 29, September 30th, 1939. L 100
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Regulations Nos. 16, 16a, 16b, 16c, 16d, and 16e Cancelled by
REGULATION No.  16f
Mercantile Industry—Drug-stores
1. Persons employed in drug-stores as registered apprentices, certified clerks, or licentiates of
pharmacy may work not more than 88 hours in any two successive weeks, but in no case shall the
hours of work of any such registered apprentice, certified clerk, or licentiate of pharmacy exceed 48
hours in any one week, or 9 hours in any one day.
2. Regulation No. 16e of the Board made and given at Victoria, B.C., the 30th day of August,
1938, is hereby cancelled.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 3rd day of April, 1939.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 6th, 1939.    Effective April 6th, 1939.)
REGULATION No.  17
Baking Industry
The baking industry, by which expression is meant all operations in or incidental to the manufacture and delivery of bread, biscuits, or cakes, is hereby added to the Schedule of the said Act,
the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having
been obtained by Order in Council dated the 6th day of November, 1934.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 22nd, 1934.    Effective November 22nd, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 17c
Baking Industry
Be it known that, pursuant to and by virtue of the powers and authority vested in the Board
of Industrial Relations by the " Hours of Work Act," the said Board (1) hereby cancels Regulation
No. 17b of the Board, dated the 13th day of November, 1947, such cancellation being effective as
and from the 29th day of December, 1948, and (2) hereby makes the following regulation, to be
known as Regulation No. 17c:—
With effect from the 30th day of December, 1948, the working-hours of persons employed in the
baking industry as deliverymen may exceed eight (8) in the day and forty-four (44) in the week,
but, subject to the exceptions provided by or under the said Act, in no case shall the weekly limit of
hours of work prescribed by section 3 of the said Act be exceeded by more than four (4) hours.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 15th day of December, 1948.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, December 16th, 1948.)
REGULATION No. 18
Catering Industry
The catering industry, which includes all operations in or incidental to the preparation or to the
serving, or to both preparation and serving, of meals or refreshments where the meals or refreshments
are served or intended to be served in any hotel, restaurant, eating-house, dance-hall, cabaret, banquet-
hall, cafeteria, tea-room, lunch-room, lunch-counter, ice-cream parlour, soda-fountain, or in any other
place where food is served and a charge is made for the same either directly or indirectly, whether
such charge is made against the persons who partake of the meals or refreshments or against some
other person, is hereby added to the Schedule to the said Act, the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the
9th day of November, 1934.
This regulation shall come into force on the 1st day of December, 1934.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th, 1934.    Effective December 1st, 1934.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949 L 101
REGULATION No.  19
Retail Florists
Persons employed in the establishments of retail florists may work such hours in addition to the
working-hours limited by section 3 of the said Act as (but only so many as) shall be necessary to
surmount extraordinary conditions which cannot reasonably be otherwise overcome: Provided that
the working-hours of such persons shall not exceed 88 hours on the average in any two successive
weeks.
In determining extraordinary conditions the decision of the Board shall be final, and where the
Board is of the opinion that, under the provisions of this regulation, the working-hours limited by
section 3 of the Act are being unduly exceeded, the Board shall, by written notification to the management, exclude the employer's establishment from the provisions of this regulation for such period
of time as the Board considers advisable.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 9th day of November, 1934.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, November 15th, 1934.    Effective November 15th, 1934.)
REGULATION No. 20
Occupation of Elevator Operator
The occupation of elevator operator is hereby added to the Schedule to the said Act, the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by
Order in Council dated the 15th day of February, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 28th day of February, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 28th, 1935.    Effective February 28th, 1935.)
Regulations Nos. 21, 21b, 21c, 21d, 21e, 21f, 21g, 21h, 21j, and 21k Cancelled by
REGULATION No. 21m
Fruit and Vegetable Industry
The fruit and vegetable industry, which means all operations in establishments operated for the
purpose of canning, preserving, drying, or packing any kind of fresh fruit or vegetable, is hereby
exempt from the operation of the " Hours of Work Act " from June 1st to November 30th, inclusive,
in each year.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 27th, 1946.    Effective July 1st, 1946.)
REGULATION No. 22
Transportation Industry
The transportation industry, which includes all operations in or incidental to the carrying or
transporting for reward, by any means whatever, other than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares,
merchandise, article, articles, or material the property of persons other than the carrier, and the
carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material by or on behalf of
any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private,
or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the carrying or delivering to or collecting from any
other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or road transport, for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place at which such aforementioned carriage or delivery
terminates, is hereby added to the Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934," the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained
by Order in Council dated the 14th day of June, 1935.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.    Effective June 20th, 1935.)
PROVINCIAL LIBRARY
VICTORIA, B. C. L 102 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
REGULATION No. 23
Transportation Industry
1. That where used in this regulation the expression "transportation industry" includes all
operations in or incidental to the carrying or transporting for reward, by any means whatever, other
than by rail, water, or air, any goods, wares, merchandise, article, articles, or material the property
of persons other than the carrier, and the carrying or delivering of goods, wares, merchandise, article,
articles, or material by or on behalf of any manufacturer, jobber, private or public owner, or by or
on behalf of any wholesale, retail, private, or public vendor thereof, or dealer therein, and the
carrying or delivering to or collecting from any other carrier of goods by rail, water, air, or road
transport, for the purpose of being further transported to some destination other than the place at
which such aforementioned carriage or delivery terminates.
2. That employees in the transportation industry, other than those employed as (a) operators
of motor-cycles, (b) bicycle-riders and foot-messengers employed exclusively on delivery or messenger work, and (c) drivers of vehicles employed in the retail delivery of milk, are hereby permitted
to work 6 hours per week in excess of the hours prescribed by section 3 of the said " Hours of Work
Act, 1934," in accordance with the provisions of Order No. 26 of the said Board of Industrial Relations dated the 19th day of June, 1935, fixing minimum wages in the transportation industry: Provided that no such employee in the transportation industry shall work more than 10 hours in any
one day.
3. That employees in the transportation industry employed as drivers of vehicles in the retail
delivery of milk are hereby permitted to work 15 hours per week in excess of the hours prescribed by
section 3 of the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934 ": Provided that over a period of seven weeks no
such employee shall work more than 350 hours, nor more than 10 hours in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 19th day of June, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 20th, 1935.   Effective June 20th, 1935.)
REGULATION No. 24
Occupation of Hotel Clerk
The occupation of hotel clerk, which includes the work of all persons engaged as room clerks
(day or night), mail clerks, information clerks, cashiers, book-keepers, accountants, telephone
operators, and any other persons employed in clerical work in hotels, is hereby added to the
Schedule to the said " Hours of Work Act, 1934," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the
20th day of September, 1935.
Made and given at Vancouver, British Columbia, this 25th day of September, 1935.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 26th, 1935.   Effective September 26th, 1935.)
Note.—Regulation 26 cancelled by Regulation 30.    Cancellation effective October 31st, 1945.
REGULATION No. 28
Taxicab Industry
The taxicab industry, which includes the work of all employees in charge of or driving a motor-
vehicle with seating capacity for 7 passengers or less than 7 passengers, used for the conveyance of
the public, and which is driven or operated for hire, is hereby added as item No. 12 to the Schedule
of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition
to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the 3rd day of May, 1938.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st, 1938.   Effective September 1st, 1938.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949 L 103
REGULATION No. 28a
Taxicab Industry
Persons employed in the taxicab industry, which includes the work of all employees in charge
of or driving a motor-vehicle with seating capacity for 7 passengers or less than 7 passengers, used
for the conveyance of the public, and which is driven or operated for hire, may work 6 hours per
week in excess of the weekly limit prescribed by section 3 of the Act, but in no case shall the daily
hours worked by any such employee in the taxicab industry exceed 9 in any one day.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 22nd day of August, 1938.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 1st, 1938.   Effective September 1st, 1938.)
Note.—The taxicab industry, having been brought under the " Hours of Work Act," is now
subject to the following provision of that Statute:—
" The working-hours of employees working on a split shift shall be confined within 12 hours
immediately following commencement of work."
REGULATION No. 29a
Mercantile Industry
With effect from the 28th day of February, 1949, persons employed in the mercantile industry,
which includes all establishments operated for the purpose of wholesale and (or) retail trade in the
Province of British Columbia, with the exception of the City of Vancouver, the City of North Vancouver, the Municipality of the District of West Vancouver, the Municipality of the District of
Burnaby, the City of Victoria, the Municipality of the Township of Esquimalt, the Municipality of
the District of Oak Bay, the Municipality of the District of Saanich, and the City of New Westminster, may work 3 hours per day in excess of the limit prescribed by section 3 of the said Act on
Saturday of each week and on the day preceding a statutory holiday when such statutory holiday
occurs on a Saturday, but the total hours worked in any one week shall not exceed 44.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 16th day of February, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, February 24th, 1949.)
REGULATION No. 30
Lumbering East of the Cascades
Be it known that, pursuant to and by virtue of the powers and authority vested in the Board of
Industrial Relations by the " Hours of Work Act," the said Board hereby cancels Regulation No. 1
of the Board, dated the 14th day of June, 1934, and Regulation No. 26 of the Board, dated the 23rd
day of March, 1938, such cancellation to be effective as and from the 31st day of October, 1945.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 24th day of September, 1945.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 27th, 1945.)
REGULATION No. 31
Occupation of Cemetery-workers
The occupation of cemetery-workers is hereby added to the Schedule to the " Hours of Work
Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule
having been obtained by Order in Council dated the 6th day of December, 1946.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 11th day of December, 1946.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 23rd, 1947.) L 104
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
REGULATION No. 32f
Construction Industry
Persons employed on the construction of the project known as the Peace River Highway may
work nine (9) hours per day and fifty-four (54) hours per week from the 27th day of April, 1950,
up to and including the 31st day of December, 1950.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 20th day of April, 1950.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, April 27th, 1950.)
REGULATION No. 33
Occupations of Stationary Steam Engineer and Special Engineer
The occupation of stationary steam engineer, by which expression is meant every employee
engaged in the occupation of producing steam in a steam plant under the authority of a certificate
of competency, as defined by the " Boiler Inspection Act" of the Province of British Columbia, or
who is in charge of, or responsible for, any steam boiler or engine while under steam-pressure or in
motion, and the occupation of special engineer, by which expression is meant every employee operating under the authority of a special certificate or a temporary certificate, as defined by the said
" Boiler Inspection Act," are hereby added to the Schedule to the " Hours of Work Act," the approval
of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by
Order in Council dated the 10th day of October, 1947.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 21st day of October, 1947.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, October 23rd, 1947.)
REGULATION No. 34
Occupation of Bar-tender, Waiter, and Utility Man, within Premises Covered by Beer
Licences Issued Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 28 of the " Government Liquor
Act."
The occupations of bar-tender, waiter, and utility man, within premises covered by beer licences
issued pursuant to the provisions of section 28 of the "Government Liquor Act," are hereby added
to the Schedule of the " Hours of Work Act," the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council to
such addition to the said Schedule having been obtained by Order in Council dated the 16th day of
September, 1947.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 16th day of September, 1947.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, September 18th, 1947.)
REGULATION No. 34e
The Occupation of Bar-tender, Waiter, and Utility Man Within Premises Covered by Beer
Licences Issued Pursuant to the Provisions of the " Government Liquor Act "
The working-hours of persons employed as bar-tenders, waiters, and utility men working on a
split shift within premises covered by beer licences issued pursuant to the provisions of the " Government Liquor Act " shall be confined within' thirteen hours immediately following commencement of
work.
Made and given at Victoria, B.C., this 6th day of July, 1950.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, July 13th, 1950.) REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949 L 105
REGULATION No. 35
Grass-dehydration Industry
Persons other than office employees employed in the grass-dehydration industry, which means
all operations in establishments operated for the purpose of dehydrating or processing grasses, clovers,
and alfalfa, are hereby exempt from the operation of the " Hours of Work Act" from April 1st to
September 30th, inclusive, in each year.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 26th day of May, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, June 2nd, 1949.)
REGULATION No. 36
Logging Industry—Hostlers
That effective from the 21st day of July, 1949, the working-hours of persons employed as hostlers,
working on a split shift, in the logging industry shall be confined within sixteen hours immediately
following commencement of work.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 18th day of July, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, July 21st, 1949.)
REGULATION No. 36a
Western Forest Industries, Ltd.
Effective from the 21st day of July, 1949, the working-hours of the donkey-engine fireman working on a split shift, employed at the Gordon River Camp of Western Forest Industries, Limited,
Vancouver, B.C., shall be confined within thirteen hours immediately following commencement of
work.
Made and given at Vancouver, B.C., this 18th day of July, 1949.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, July 21st, 1949.)
" HOURS OF WORK ACT," " FEMALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT," AND
" MALE MINIMUM WAGE ACT "
The Board authorizes the following persons, namely:—
The Chairman of the Board of Industrial Relations,
The Chief Administrative Officer,
The Supervisor of the Vancouver office,
The Supervisor of Inspectors in the Interior,—
to issue temporary exemptions to industrial undertakings to deal with exceptional cases of pressure
of work, and to issue permission in writing allowing the working-hours of any employee in an industrial undertaking in such exceptional cases to exceed the limit of 8 hours a day or 44 hours a week.
(Published in B.C. Gazette, January 9th, 1947.) L 106                                                DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
CONTROL OF EMPLOYMENT OF CHILDREN
For a commentary in connection with the "Control of Employment of Children
Act," the reader is referred to the report of the Factory Inspection Department under the
heading "Child Employment."
The Schedule to the Act specifies and defines the occupations or industries for which
permits are required; these include:—
(1) Manufacturing industry.
(2)  Ship-building industry.
(3) Generation of electricity or motor-power of any kind.
(4) Logging industry.
(5) Construction industry.
(6) Catering industry.
(7) Public places of amusement.
(8) Mercantile industry.
(9)  Shoe-shine stands.
(10) Automobile service-stations.
(11) Transportation industry.
The following table contains a summary of permits issued and cancelled from
January 1st to December 31st, 1949, inclusive.
Summary of Permits Issued and Cancelled to Year Ended December 31st, 1949
District
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Permits in effect, January
I
1
1st, 1949	
301  |    27
328
35
i
14
26
243
6
3
328
Vancouver.-	
351  |    33
384
28
2
20
17
293
3
1
20
384
339 |    37
376
34
2
18
18
289
2
2
Victoria  	
|
101   |    26
127
10
2
17
30
59
6
3   |  	
127
Cancellations 	
116       33
I
149
10
1
1
19
22
91
3
2 | 149
2  j      4
6
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2
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3  |      3
6
1
1
3
1
6
5   1       5
10
6
1
2
3
5
8
6
1
8
1
1
1
Cancellations	
2
2
1
1      2
10
1
11
1
1
2
1
1               .1
5
1
7
1
2
1  |      7
1   |
1
1
1
Cancellations.	
Permits in effect, Janu
'       1  	
----- 1 -	
1
ary 1st, 1949	
301  |    27
328 |    35
1
14
26 | 243
6
3
328
Total   issued,  January
1
I
1
I
1st, 1949, to Decem
1
I
ber 31st, 1949..	
471  |    69
540
45
2
2
40
53  | 363
3
8
24 | 	
540
Total   cancellations,
1
1
January    1st,    1949,
1
to   December   31st,
I
1        !
1949	
Permits in effect, De
468 |    80
548
51  1
1
3
40
43
388
2
5
15
548
|
|
I
cember 31st, 1949
304 |    16 | 320
1          1
29 |
1
1
14
36 | 218
1  |      9
1
12
320 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 107
REPORT OF LABOUR RELATIONS BOARD  (BRITISH COLUMBIA)
Head Office	
Branch Offlce-
 Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
..570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Members of the Board
J. Pitcairn Hogg, K.C., Chairman	
Lieut.-Col. Macgregor F. Macintosh..
F. W. Smelts, M.B.E 	
George A. Wilkinson  	
Harry Strange _	
...Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
... Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
.570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
....Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
.570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Secretary
Edward A. Jamieson .
B. H. E. Goult.
„570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Chief Executive Officer
Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
Registrar
N. deW. Lyons .
Senior Conciliation Officer
..Parliament Buildings, Victoria.
W. Fraser.
.570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
Assistant Registrar
R. G. Clements .
..570 Seymour Street, Vancouver.
To the Honourable the Minister of Labour,
Province of British Columbia.
Sir,—We have the honour to present the Second Annual Report of the Labour
Relations Board (British Columbia) for the year ended December 31st, 1949.
Industrial organization continued apace during the period under review, and an
upward trend in the work of the Board and its staff was apparent.
The Board held fifty-two full Board meetings during the year 1949; eighteen of
these meetings were held in Victoria and thirty-four were held in Vancouver.
As explained in the Annual Report for 1948, the Board, to expedite its work,
arranged that there shall be a Vancouver Committee of the Board (two members) and a
Victoria Committee (the Chairman and two members). These Committees have held
401 meetings, of which 16 meetings were held at several points in the Okanagan, Quesnel,
Wells, Kamloops, Prince George, Alberni, and Courtenay. The Board and Committees
of the Board have therefore held a total of 453 meetings during the year.
In accordance with the practice established by the Board in 1948, and with a view
to continuing the maintenance of harmonious employer-employee relations, the Board
and Committees of the Board have accorded interested parties every opportunity for
personal appearances, and in consequence a total of 1,109 delegations were heard, when
the parties were given every opportunity of submitting their representations.
During the same period in 1948 the Board held 47 full Board meetings, 167 Committee meetings, and heard 639 delegations.
Much of the work of the Board and Committees thereof has been devoted to mediation, with a view to averting strikes when all other efforts have failed, and in this respect
the Board feels that it has rendered some considerable service to management, labour,
and also the public.
This was particularly so in the cases of the disputes in the lumber industry throughout the Province, Okanagan fruit-packing industry, wooden-boat yards in Vancouver,
various foundries in Vancouver, various glass companies, lithographers in Vancouver,
plumbing and steam-fitting industry, various garages in the Okanagan, cold-storage plants
in Prince Rupert, and many others. L 108 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
The Board was also instrumental in bringing to satisfactory settlement strikes in the
lathing trade; the sign-painting trade; at the Kelowna Exploration Company, Limited, at
Hedley; and at the Western Crown Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of brooms,
wash-boards, and woodenware, in Vancouver.
The Chairman and members of the Board addressed meetings of the following
organizations: Victoria Police Union; University of British Columbia, Department of
Commerce, Personnel Management Class; British Columbia Building Contractors' Association; Vancouver Board of Trade Free Enterprise Club; Victoria Women's University
Club; International Brotherhood of Bookbinders, Victoria; Kimberley Board of Trade;
Quesnel Board of Trade; Duncan Chamber of Commerce; Campbell River Chamber of
Commerce; Kamloops Board of Trade; Trail Board of Trade; Courtenay-Comox Chamber of Commerce and Alberni Chamber of Commerce; Prince George Board of Trade;
Nanaimo Board of Trade; Northern Interior Lumbermen's Association; Okanagan and
District Trades and Labour Council; International Association of Machinists; Kelowna
Auto Workers' Union; United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America,
Kelowna; Saanich Municipal Employees' Association; James Island Chemical Workers'
Union; Kelowna Board of Trade; Victoria and District Trades and Labour Council;
International Woodworkers of America, No. 1-423, Kelowna; Kinsmen Club, Victoria;
Vernon Rotary Club; Kelowna Rotary Club; British Columbia Provincial Council of
Carpenters; International Union of Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers, District Council
Convention.
So that employer and labour organizations may be kept informed of the work of the
Board, publication of a Weekly Summary of Activities has been instituted, with a mailing-
list of 215. This Summary sets out the appointment of Conciliation Officers, reports of
Conciliation Officers, appointments of Conciliation Boards, reports of Conciliation
Boards, and certificates of bargaining authority. On several occasions during this year
the Summary has included Court decisions, and has been sent to all labour organizations
of record.
That the procedure of the Board has been successful in averting time-loss in industry
is apparent when labour disputes beginning during the year are analysed. Eight such
disputes commenced in 1949, involving 15 employers, 625 employees, and causing a
time-loss of 14,772 man-days. Loss from strikes commencing in 1948, but terminated
in 1949, brought the man-day loss to a total of 15,592.
There was an additional strike-loss caused by a dispute in the fishing industry of
16,100 man-days. However, this dispute was not one that was within the jurisdiction of
the Labour Relations Board.
In terms of time-loss, the total for the year is the smallest since 1945. If the time-
loss is compared as a percentage of the estimated total working-time of wage and salary
earnings, the low figure for the year under review (0.034) has not been equalled since
1941.
During the year the Board dealt with a total of 1,330 cases. There were 757 applications for certification, of which 594 were granted, 95 rejected, and 68 withdrawn.
Thirty-nine others were being dealt with at December 31 st.
In addition, there were 119 strike votes supervised and 80 representation votes
conducted, 246 Conciliation Officers named, 97 Conciliation Boards appointed, 7 permissions to prosecute granted, and 12 grievance procedures provided.
The 246 references to Conciliation Officers resulted in the settlement of 108 disputes.
One hundred cases were referred to Boards of Conciliation; two were terminated at the
request of the parties involved; four references were revoked; one withdrawn; and, in
one instance, negotiations were completed, but the agreement had not been received at
the year's end.   Thirty cases were outstanding at December 31 st.
One hundred cases were referred to Boards of Conciliation, but only 97 Boards were
appointed.   The discrepancy is explained by the fact that 15 references did not result in REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949 L 109
Boards in 1949. Two of these references resulted in but 1 Board. Ten Conciliation
Boards established during the year under review resulted from recommendations by
Conciliation Officers in 1948. Three Boards were established without prior referral to
Conciliation Officers.
Summaries of (I) Cases dealt with, (II) Conciliation, (III) Boards of Conciliation,
(IV) Industrial Disputes, (V) Analysis of Industrial Disputes in British Columbia,
1935-49 (with graph), and (VI) Analysis of Disputes by Industries in British Columbia,
1949, follow.
Table I.—Summary of Cases Dealt with in 1949, Showing Comparison
for 1948
1948 1949
Number of applications dealt with      864 757
1948 1949
Certifications granted  670 594
Applications—
Rejected   126 95
Withdrawn      68 68
Representative votes conducted  33 80
Conciliation Officers appointed  212 246
Conciliation Boards established  90* 97*
Prosecutions instituted by Department  24          	
Grievance procedures provided  4 12
Strike votes supervised  34 119
Permissions to prosecute granted  14 7
Industrial Inquiry Commissions  2          	
Referee appointments   3 t
1,280 1,318
* In 1948 seven cases were made arbitral tribunals by the mutual consent of the parties. In 1949 there were four
arbitral tribunals (see section 26, "Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act") and one mediation committee (see
section 27, "Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act"). All are designated as Boards of Conciliation in the
table above.
t The appointment of referees is no longer authorized by the provisions of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act." L 110
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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L 111
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P REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 137
Analysis of Disputes before Conciliation Boards by Predominant Cause
Wages   80
Statutory holidays  22
Union security   21
Annual holidays ".  20
All terms of agreement  16
Hours of work  15
Medical and hospital insurance plans     4
Grievance procedure     4
Overtime regulation, board and lodging, bonus plans, pension
plans      2
Shift differentials, apprenticeship ratio, bonding, show-up guarantee, seniority, daily guarantee, probationary period, job
classifications     1
Table IV.—Summary of Disputes
Industry or
Occupation
Number of
Number of
Time-loss
Particulars
Emnloyers
Employees
in
Affected
Affected
Man-days
Summary of Disputes in Progress
Prior to January 1,1949
Electricians, Victoria-
Commenced October 25,  1948, involving six contractors,
extended to eight additional contractors on November
25, 1948;   for increased wages;   terminated January 14,
1949;   negotiations;   compromise
14
65
650*
Cleaners and dyers,
Commenced December 6,   1948;   for increased wages as
1
17
170*
Vancouver
recommended by Conciliation Board;   terminated January 14, 1949;   negotiations',   in favour of workers
Summary of Disputes Commencing in 1949
Upholsterers, Vancou
Commenced March 10;   refused to accept reduced piece
1
5
10
ver
work rates  on newly designed furniture;   replacement
of  workers;    employment  situation  no  longer   affected
after March 12
Truck-drivers,   Cour
Commenced March 21;   for a new agreement providing
1
50
1,400
tenay, Duncan, Na
for increased wages;   two weeks' vacation with pay and
naimo, Port Alberni,
contributory    medical   hospitalization   plan,    following
and Victoria
reference to Conciliation Board;   terminated April 21;
negotiations in favour of workers
Jewellery-workers,
Commenced March 26;   for a new agreement providing
1
14
1,300
Vancouver
for increased wages and reduced hours following reference  to   Conciliation  Board;    terminated  July  22;    indefinite
.
Gold-miners, Tulse
Commenced April 27;   for a new agreement providing for
1
143
572
quah
increased   wages;    terminated   April   30;    negotiations;
compromise
Department-store
Commenced August 27;   for a union agreement provid
1
80
7,600
clerks, New West
ing for increased wages and other changes, as recom
minster
mended by majority report of Conciliation Board;   un-
terminated as of December 31
Wood-products fac
Commenced August 30;   for a new agreement providing
1
48
840
tory  workers,  New
for  increased  wages  as  recommended by  Conciliation
Westminster
Board;   terminated September  23;   negotiations;   corn-
Salmon fishermen, ten-
Commenced September 26;   for increased prices for fish;
14
2,300
16,100
dermen, etc., British
terminated October 3;   negotiations;   compromise
Columbia
Sign   and   pictorial
Commenced October 5;   for increased wages;   terminated
8
119
2,137
painters, Vancouver
October 31;   in favour of workers
Gold-miners, Hedley.—
Commenced October 24;   for increased wages and reduced
hours;   terminated October 31;   negotiations;   compromise
1
166
913
44
3,007
31,692
* Indicates time-loss in man-days during 1949. L  138 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table V.—Analysis of Disputes in British Columbia, 1935-49
Year
Number of
Disputes
Beginning
During
Year*
Number of
Disputes
During
Year
Number of
Employers
Affected
Number of
Employees
Affected
Time-loss
in
Working-
days
Time-loss as
Percentage
of Estimated
Total
Working-
time of Wage
and Salary
Earnerst
1935   	
1936 	
1937 . 	
1938 	
1939—	
1940—.	
23
16
16
11
4
1
7
50
43
15
18
21
25
8
9
23
16
16
11
4
2
8
50
43
15
18
21
25
10
11
.
32
4
2
8
82
43
15
18
524
65
63
44
7,321
5,741
1,188
837
822
204
1,408
18,804
21,704
6,379
6,810
40,014
6,386
3,216
3,007
140,706
75,311
30,022
8,236
13,803
8,510
7,594
35,024
75,129
4,510
69,595
1,294,202
153,168
106,230
31,692
0.278
0.142
0.054
0.015
0.024
0.014
1941   	
1942 	
1943 ... 	
1944	
0.011
0.040
0.076
0.048
1945	
1946    	
1947 	
0.079
1.589
0.170
1948 	
0.113
1949                    	
0.034
[
* In this table, figures for disputes extending over the year are counted more than once.
t Chart shown below.
t Not available.
Source: British Columbia Department of Labour Annual Reports. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 139
%
1.600
Chart Showing Percentage of Total Working-time
Lost through Strikes, 1935-49
1.550
.250
.150
.000
1935
1937
1939
1941       1943
Years.
1945
1947
1949 L 140 DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Table VI.—Analysis of Disputes by Industries in British Columbia, 1949
Industry
Number of
Employers
Affected
Number of
Employees
Affected
Time lost
in
Man-days
14
14
11
2
2
1
65
2,300
186
309
97
50
650
16,100
4,287
1,485
7,770
Transportation    	
1,400
Totals                         	
44
3,007
31,692
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS INVOLVING THE LABOUR RELATIONS
BOARD  (BRITISH COLUMBIA)
1. Application by the International Woodworkers of America
to the Supreme Court
On February 17th, 1949, the International Woodworkers of America applied to the
Supreme Court of British Columbia for an order to restrain the Labour Relations Board
of British Columbia from certifying any local of the Woodworkers' Industrial Union of
Canada on various grounds, including the ground that the Woodworkers' Industrial
Union of Canada had illegally attempted to disaffiliate the various locals of the International Woodworkers of America from the parent body and was improperly retaining
the moneys and records of the International Woodworkers of America. The Court
refused the application on April 1st, 1949.
2. Application by the Woodworkers' Industrial Union of
Canada to the Supreme Court
An application was made by the Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada asking
the Supreme Court to direct that the Labour Relations Board certify the union as bargaining agent in certain operations. The Board claimed that it could not make decisions
in respect of these applications until it had access to various records and documents that
had been removed from the custody of the International Woodworkers of America. The
Court upheld the position taken by the Board.
3. Application by the Bakery and Confectionery Workers'
Union to the Supreme Court
The Bakery and Confectionery Workers' Union, Local No. 468, applied to the
Labour Relations Board to be certified for the employees of Scott-Bathgate, Limited.
The application was refused on the ground that the union, by the terms of its constitution,
could not accept the employees of Scott-Bathgate, Limited, as members of the union.
Subsequently, an application was made for certification for the same employees by the
International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers. The
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' Union then applied to the Supreme Court alleging
that the Labour Relations Board had no right to inquire into the question of jurisdiction
and asking the Court to order the Labour Relations Board to certify the Bakery and
Confectionery Workers' Union.
At the same time the union asked the Court to prohibit the Labour Relations Board
from adjudicating upon the application made by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers.
The Court upheld the Labour Relations Board in its rejection of the Bakery and
Confectionery Workers' Union as bargaining authority for the employees of Scott- REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949 L 141
Bathgate, Limited, and the Bakery and Confectionery Workers' Union withdrew its
application to prohibit adjudication by the Board of the application by the International
Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers for certification.
4. Application by the Vancouver Island Drivers' Division (C.B.R.E.
and O.T.W.) to the Supreme Court
The Vancouver Island Drivers' Division, No. 234, of the Canadian Brotherhood of
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers applied to the Supreme Court on
August 17th, 1949, for an order to compel the Labour Relations Board to cancel its
certificate of the General Truck Drivers' and Helpers' Union, Local No. 31, as bargaining
authority for employees of Schofield & Malpass, Limited, Nanaimo, on the ground that
there was in existence a collective agreement of which ten months had not expired. The
Board claimed that the action of the Board could not be reviewed by way of a mandamus.
The position taken by the Board was upheld by the Court.
SUMMARY OF PROSECUTIONS FOR 1949
There were no charges laid during the year by the Labour Relations Board (British
Columbia).   However, the Board gave consents to the prosecution of eleven charges.
Nine of these charges were not proceeded with;   one charge was dismissed in Police
Court; and one charge has not been reported upon.
Respectfully submitted.
J. Pitcairn Hogg,
Chairman.
M. F. Macintosh.
F. W. Smelts.
G. A. Wilkinson.
H. Strange.
EMPLOYERS' AND EMPLOYEES'  (LABOUR)  ORGANIZATIONS
Certain information is required annually from associations of employees or trade-
union locals pursuant to section 5a of the " Department of Labour Act." This return
requires the name and address of the organization, its affiliation (if any), and its total
paid-up membership to December 31st, 1949. Members over three months in arrears
are not included in this figure.
The inclusion of the name of any organization does not constitute its recognition as
a " labour organization " within the meaning of the " Industrial Conciliation and Arbitration Act."   Such a determination lies to the Labour Relations Board (British Columbia).
Every care is taken to ensure accuracy in all returns which are compiled by the
Labour Division of the Bureau of Economics and Statistics working in conjunction with
the staff of the Labour Relations Board. Revisions may be made, however, in the light
of later information.
Organizations which have been established since December 31st, 1949, are not
included in this report, but will be shown in 1950.
Table VII shows that organized labour membership has continued to grow during
1949, from 142,989 in 1948 to 146,259 in 1949. This represents an increase of 2.29
per cent over the 1948 membership. Since December 31st, 1939, the reported membership was increased by 225.98 per cent, the membership in that year being 44,867 compared with 146,259 in 1949. In 1949 the reported membership of labour organizations
represents 32.94 per cent of the estimated total labour force in British Columbia. L  142
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Chart I is an attempt to portray the distribution of trade-union membership by major
industrial groups. The various locals have been classified into the category in which the
majority of their members are employed. It indicates what industrial fields have the
greatest number of union members. It does not, however, show which groups are the
most highly organized, as total employment data were not available for each category.
The following indicate the most important unions in the leading categories:—
The " services " group, consisting largely of municipal and Provincial employees, is
the largest category, containing 23.35 per cent of the total membership. Two of the
largest organizations represented are the British Columbia Provincial Government
Employees' Association and the British Columbia Teachers' Federation. Another
organization of considerable size included in this category is the Hotel and Restaurant
Employees and Bartenders' International Union.
Closely following the " services " group in size is the " wood and wood products "
• group, with 20.96 per cent of the total membership.   The International Woodworkers of
America is the largest union in this group.   Others are the International Brotherhood of
Pulp, Sulphite and Paper-mill workers, the Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada,
and the International Brotherhood of Paper Makers.
The " other transportation " group consists of all trades and occupations connected
with transportation other than railway unions. Seamen, longshoremen, electric and
motor coach employees, teamsters, chauffeurs, and warehousemen are represented in this
category.
The largest union in the " construction " group is the Carpenters and Joiners of
America. The remainder includes other " craft" organizations whose members are
chiefly or solely engaged in the building or construction industries.
The " mining and quarrying " group is largely composed of the United Mine Workers
of America and the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers.
The " steam-railway transportation " group includes the four large independent railway unions, as well as the large membership of the Canadian Brotherhood of Railway
Employees and Other Transport Workers.
The " metals " group contains such unions as the Sheet Metal Workers' International
Association and the Shipyard General Workers Federation of the Province.
Table VII.—Number of Labour Organizations Making Returns, Membership,
and Percentage Increase in Membership, 1939-49.
Year
Number of
Organizations
Total
Membership
Percentage
Increase
Over 1939
Percentage
Yearly
Increase
1939                           	
380
404
402
415
473
617
44,867
50,360
61,292
91,618
107,402
110.045
1940  	
1941   	
1942           	
1943  	
1944                          	
12.24
36.61
104.20
139.38
145.27
140.99
165.80
201.60
218.70
225.98
12.24
21.71
49.47
17.22
2.46
1945    .   	
1946        	
1947                                                           	
636          |        108,125
642          |        119,258
715                  135,320
745                  142,989
761                      146259
1.75
10.30
13 47
1948 -
5 67
1949                                                                 	
2 '9 REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 143
Chart I.—Distribution of Trade-union Membership by Industrial
Classifications, 1949
SERVICES
METALS
FOODS
LIGHT, HEAT
& POWER
PRINTING &
PUBLISHING
ALL OTHERS
CONSTRUCTION
MINING &
QUARRYING
CLOTHING &
FOOTWEAR
STEAM RAILWAY
TRANSPORTATION
WOOD & WOOD PRODUCTS
OTHER TRANSPORTATION
Organizations of Employees (Labour Organizations)
This list is arranged by cities and towns in alphabetical order. The names and
addresses of the presidents and secretaries have been revised to the date of publication in
all cases where this information could be obtained.
Post-office addresses of the offices are the same as the heading under which they
appear, unless otherwise stated.
The list of employers' organizations follows that of the labour organizations.
Returns in the former category numbered 25 in 1939 and 1940, 27 in 1941, 32 in 1942,
34 in 1943, 36 in 1944, 37 in 1945 to 1948 inclusive, and 48 in 1949.
The listings have been compiled by the Bureau of Economics and Statistics in conjunction with this Branch of the Department.
Abbotsford
Brick and Clay Workers of America, United, No. 629.—
President, Hugh D. Smith; Recording Secretary, Elgin
F. Ayling, Clayburn.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees' Association.—President, Andrew Spilos; Secretary-Treasurer,
Ernie Prentice, c/o Kelly Douglas, Box 39, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No. 432.—
President, J. Porter; Recording Secretary, C. Epp,
Gladwin Road, R.R. 3, Abbotsford.
Alberni
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, H. Stevenson; Secretary, Robert Macgregor,
c/o Department of Finance, Alberni.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees' Association.—President, Andrew Spilos; Secretary-Treasurer,
Ernie Prentice, c/o Kelly Douglas, Box 39, Vancouver.
Bamberton
Cement, Lime and Gypsum Workers, International United,
No. 277.—President, R. Dale; Financial Secretary, J. A.
McCallum, R.R. 1, Cobble Hill.
Beaverdell
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 900.—President,
Everett E. Lundberg; Recording Secretary, Darrell
Fisher, Beaverdell.
Blubber Bay
Quarry Workers' Union, No. 882.—President, J. C. Bil-
lingsley;   Financial Secretary, C. Simpson, Blubber Bay.
Blue River
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 143.—President, Thomas
Barron;   Secretary, E. Kirk, Blue River. L 144
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
BONNINGTON  FALLS
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, No.
999.—President, R. Crain; Recording Secretary, T. W.
Hunt, Bonnington Falls.
Bralorne
Miners' Union, No. 271.—President, E. P. Geiger; Financial Secretary, L. Larsen, Bralorne.
Britannia Beach
Mine and Mill Workers' Union, No. 663.—President, J. H.
Balderson; Recording Secretary, G. A. Bennett, Box 42,
Townsite, Britannia Beach.
Burnaby
Automobile, Aircraft, Agriculture, Implement Workers of
America, United, No. 432.—President, A. B. Clarke;
Financial Secretary, J. C. Belton, 1862 Venables Street,
Vancouver.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 23.—President, J. O.
Murton; Recording Secretary, John P. Simpson, 955
Eighteenth Avenue, via New Westminster.
Fire Fighters' Association, No. 323.—President, Ernest
Moss; Secretary-Treasurer, William F. Collum, Loch-
dale P.O.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees' Association.—President, Andrew Spilos; Secretary-Treasurer,
Ernie Prentice, c/o Kelly Douglas, Box 39, Vancouver.
School Janitors' Federal Union, No. 224.—President, Jack
Mitchell; Secretary-Treasurer, S. A. Stanley, 2545 Russell Avenue, New Westminster.
Burns Lake
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, S. T. Strimbold; Secretary, Wm. O. Mummery, Burns Lake.
Campbell River
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, No. 1882.—President, Haig A. Douglas; Financial
Secretary, W. Hallowin, Box 100, Campbell River.
Chemainus
Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, International, No. 508.—President, Robert Rae; Secretary-
Treasurer, Henry E. Irving, Box 332, Chemainus.
Chilliwack
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of. No. 1843.—President, James A. Sewell; Recording
Secretary, J. E. Toews, 224 Lewis Avenue West, Chilliwack.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—
President, G. A. Cahill; Recording Secretary, J. P.
Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New Westminster.
Clearwater
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 15.
—President, C. A. Emery; Secretary-Treasurer, J.
Pawson, Clearwater.
Colquitz
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, J. P. Martin; Secretary, E. V. Dye, c/o
Provincial Mental Home, Colquitz.
Comox
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, L. C. Stewart; Secretary, A. H. Turner, Box
58, Comox.
Copper Mountain
Miners' Union, No. 649. — President, Lome Salmon;
Financial Secretary, Geo. W. Anderson, Copper Mountain.
Coquitlam
Municipal Employees' Union, Corporation of the District
of Coquitlam, No. 16.—President, John Mundreon;
Secretary-Treasurer, Miss Marian Frisk, 1111 Brunette
Street, New Westminster.
Courtenay
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, No. 1638.—President, Geo. Couper; Recording Secretary, C. Iverson, R.R. 2, Courtenay.
Civic Employees' Federal Union, No. 156.—President,
W. Frazer; Recording Secretary, K. Bennett, Box 71,
Courtenay.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees' Association.—President, Andrew Spilos; Secretary-Treasurer,
Ernie Prentice, c/o Kelly Douglas, Box 39, Vancouver.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—
President, G. A. Cahill; Recording Secretary, J. P.
Watts, 4100 Grandview Highway, New Westminster.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-363.—
President, S. Wessberg; Recording Secretary, Jacob
Hoist, Courtenay.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No. 363.—
President, A. Armella; Financial Secretary, J. Higgin,
Box 458, Courtenay.
Cranbrook
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 563.—President, C F. Maidment; Secretary-Treasurer, F. R. Mc-
Daniel, Drawer 878, Cranbrook.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No.
559.—President, R. Bartholomew; Recording Secretary,
M. H. John, Box 214, Cranbrook.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, F. G. Hyde; Secretary, Miss M. A. Fyfe,
Government Agent, Court-house, Cranbrook.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees' Association.—President, Andrew Spilos; Secretary-Treasurer,
Ernie Prentice, c/o Kelly Douglas, Box 39, Vancouver.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 588.—President, A. A. Bouchard; Recording Secretary, R. J.
Laurie, Box 544, Cranbrook.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, Buckley Lodge No.
585.—President, H. A. Bradley; Recording Secretary,
H. J. Conroy, Box 817, Cranbrook.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, Kootenay
Lodge No. 173.—President, F. Molander; Recording
Secretary, N. L. Smith, Box 1, Cranbrook.
Railway Conductors, Order of, Division No. 407.—President, Chas. LaFleur; Recording Secretary, H. J. Hux-
table, Box 262, Cranbrook.
Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight-handlers, Express
and Station Employees, Brotherhood of, Baker Mountain Lodge No. 1292.—President, Bruce A. Cameron;
Secretary-Treasurer, Wm. G. P. Brunzel, Box 396,
Cranbrook.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-405.—
President, James White; International Representative,
Peter W. Berkosha, Cranbrook P.O.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No. 405.—■
President, M. B. Kennedy; Recording Secretary, Roy
C. Kretlow, Box 779, Cranbrook.
Creston Valley
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, James Ryley; Secretary, D. O. Young,
Creston.
Cumberland
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island (Cumberland
Branch). — President, John H. Vaughan; Secretary-
Treasurer, A. G. Jones, Box 562, Cumberland.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7293.—President,
J. H. Cameron; Secretary-Treasurer, John Bond, Box
614, Cumberland.
Duncan
Government  Employees'  Association,  B.C.  Provincial.—
President,  D.   H.   Barr;    Secretary,   Wm.   R.   Chester,
Koksilah P.O., Vancouver Island.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 533.
—Secretary-Treasurer, F. W. Costin, Box 460, Duncan.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 2824.
—President, Geo. Warenko;   Secretary-Treasurer, C. S.
Archer, R.R. 3, Duncan.
Municipal Employees, Duncan Civic and North Cowichan,
No. 358.—President, Alex Befus;   Recording Secretary,
Leslie S. Duncan, Box 1418, Duncan.
Woodworkers   of   America,   International,   No.    1-80.—
President, Joseph Morris;   Financial Secretary, E. Lin-
der, Box 430, Duncan. REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER,  1949
L 145
Essondale
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, G. McNiven; Secretary, T. Weeks, Box 74,
Port Coquitlam.
Fernie
Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft Drink and Distillery Workers
of America, International Union of, No. 308.—President, Jack Brown; Secretary-Treasurer, Joe Wasnock,
Box 1071, Fernie.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 921.
—President, H. F. Uphill; Recording Secretary, R. L.
Davis, Elko.
Firebosses, National Union of, No. 4.—President, J.
Sweeney; Secretary-Treasurer, J. Mclsaac, Blairmore,
Alta.
Firebosses, National Union of, No. 6.—President, J. Corrigan; Secretary-Treasurer, R. A. Pasiaud, Box 77,
Local 1, Michel.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, U. (Bennie) Lassalle; Secretary, D. Godfrey,
Box 597, Fernie.
Mine Workers of America, United, No. 7310.—President,
F. Dawson; Recording Secretary, E. G. Boese, Box 486,
Fernie.
Field
Miners' Union, Field and District, No.  807.—President,
J.   C.   McLeod;    Recording   Secretary,   Irvin   Barber,
Field.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No. 1454.
—President, J. Cookson;   Recording Secretary, Wm. M.
Brown, Box 943, Field.
Fraser Valley
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, J. Charles; Secretary, J. M. Oliver, 1121
Stayte Road, White Rock.
Glacier
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 208.
—Secretary-Treasurer, J. Watson, Glacier.
Golden
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, W. Fraser;   Secretary, E. Rankin, Golden.
Grand Forks-Greenwood
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—■
President, J. Roylance; Secretary, J. Rowlandson, P.O.
Box 453, Grand Forks.
Haney
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-367.—
President, R. Wilson; Financial Secretary, Neil E.
Shaw, General Delivery, Haney.
Hazelton
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
No. 898.—President, R. W. Willian; Secretary, J. H.
McGee, Box 16, Hazelton.
Hedley
Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, International Union of,
No. 656.—President, D. K. Hesketh; Financial Secretary, D. B. Hendsbee, Nickel Plate, Hedley.
Houston
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 340.
—President, J. D. Denicola; Secretary-Treasurer, J. E.
Middleton, Houston.
Ioco
Oil Workers' International Union, No. 614.—President,
F. N. Bowering; Recording Secretary, H. M. Beding-
field, 2606 St. John's Street, Port Moody.
Kaleden
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 4.—President,
J. E. Carley;   Secretary, Mrs. E. Nuyens, Kaleden.
Kamloops
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, No. 1540.—President, Chas. W. Woolley; Recording Secretary, William E. Westerman, 1404 River Street,
R.R. 1, Kamloops.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, No. 993.
—President, D. Martin; Recording Secretary, F. J.
Todd, 1044 Dominion Street, Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 821.—Recording Secretary, C. H. Faulkner, 611 Columbia Street,
Kamloops.
Engineers, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No. 855.—President, F. C. Fuller; Recording Secretary, A. J. Mill-
ward, 753 Dominion Street, Kamloops.
Fire Fighters, International Association of, No. 913.—
President, E. Murray; Recording Secretary, M. L.
Murphy, 125 Fourth Avenue, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No.
258.—President, E. W. Rawson; Recording Secretary,
R. S. Perry, R.R. 1, Kamloops.
Firemen and Enginemen, Brotherhood of Locomotive, No.
930.—President, T. E. Tipping; Recording Secretary,
J. H. Worsley, 806 Battle Street, Kamloops.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—■
President, W. J. Stewart; Secretary, Miss E. C. Mac-
kay, c/o B.C. Forest Service, 515 Columbia Street,
Kamloops.
Hospital Employees' Association, No. 361.—President,
Tom Walker; Financial Secretary, William Slater,
R.R. 1, Kamloops.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees' Association.—President, Andrew Spilos; Secretary-Treasurer,
Ernie Prentice, c/o Kelly Douglas, Box 39, Vancouver.
Letter Carriers, Canadian Postal Employees, Federated
Association of.—President, J. H. Brown; Recording
Secretary, Jos. H. Abear, 369 St. Paul Street, Kamloops.
Machinists, International Association of, No. 748.—President, J. H. Blakey; Secretary, L. E. Crowder, 359
Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Mackenzie, White & Dunsmuir Employees' Association.—
President, G. A. Cahill; Secretary, J. P. Watts, 4100
Grandview Highway, New Westminster.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Fraser
Valley Lodge No. 31.—President, E. G. Flann; Secretary-Treasurer, G. R. Mills, Foster, c/o Red Pass.
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, No.
1332.—President, R. J. McMillan; Recording Secretary,
C. Adcock, R.R. 1, Kamloops,
Municipal Employees' Association, No. 310.—President,
Horace Barker; Secretary-Treasurer, William A. Blake,
1227 Battle Street, Kamloops.
Railroad Trainmen, Brotherhood of, No. 519.—President,
G. O. Grant; Secretary-Treasurer, V. H. Mott, 521
Seymour Street, Kamloops.
Railway Carmen of America, Brotherhood of, No. 148.—
President, J. Kitson; Recording Secretary, R. Emery,
33 Alexander Avenue, North Kamloops.
Railway Conductors of America, Order of, No. 611.—
President, A. R. Field; Recording Secretary, H. P.
Battison, 36 Nicola Street West, Kamloops.
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 150.—President, J. E. Davies;
Secretary, J. D. S. Robertson, Box 402, Kamloops.
Telephone Workers of B.C., Federation of (Traffic Division), No. 15.—President, Miss H. Wrenko; Secretary,
Miss Dene Durand, North Kamloops.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-417.—
President, H. C. Hickling; Financial Secretary, W. S.
Lynch, Box 217, Kamloops.
Kaslo
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, Lodge
No. 173.—Secretary-Treasurer, T. H. Horner, Crescent
Road, Kaslo.
Kelowna
Bakery and Confectionery Workers' International Union
of America, No. 355.—President, Robert Kosolofski;
Recording Secretary, Ivan Biro, General Delivery,
Kelowna.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, No. 1370.—President, Wm. F. Mahoney; Financial
Secretary, V. A. Giesinger, 1228 Richter, Kelowna. L  146
DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
Civic Employees' Union, No. 338.—President, R. F.
Marshall; Secretary-Treasurer, Rupert Brown, 901
Bernard Avenue, Kelowna.
Electrical Workers, International Brotherhood of, No.
1409.—President, H. Hughes; Secretary, G. Arcuvi,
1330 Ethel Street, Kelowna.
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 5.—President,
W. E. Darroch; Secretary, Mrs. G. Boyer, 558 Roanoke
Avenue, Kelowna.
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, Wm. N. Talbot; Secretary, Miss M. M. L.
Clew, 230 Mill Avenue, Kelowna.
Hospital Employees' Federal Union, Kelowna General,
No. 322.—President, Joseph P. Stapper; Secretary-
Treasurer, L. L. Howatt, 596 Rowcliffe Avenue,
Kelowna.
Kelly Douglas (Nabob Food Products) Employees' Association.—President, Andrew Spilos; Secretary-Treasurer,
Ernie Prentice, c/o Kelly Douglas, Box 39, Vancouver.
Packinghouse Workers of America, United, No. 339.—
President, Mrs. A. McCulley; Recording Secretary,
Agnes Harrison, 580 Coronation Avenue, Kelowna.
Painters, Decorators and Paperhangers of America, Brotherhood of, No. 1675.—President, W. Love; Special
Organizer, J. Eaves, 307 Broadway West, Vancouver.
School Employees' Federal Union, No. 323.—President,
Cecil Dodds; Secretary-Treasurer, Ralph Prior, 597
Harvey Avenue, Kelowna.
Woodworkers of America, International, No. 1-423.—
President, George E. Walker; Recording Secretary,
Agnes Harrison, 580 Coronation Avenue, Kelowna.
Keremeos
Fruit and Vegetable Workers' Union, No. 9.—President,
Mrs.    M.    McDonald;    Secretary,   Mrs. D.    Proctor,
Cawston.
Kimberley
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of,   No.   1719.—President,  John   Ogbourne;   Recording
Secretary, B. O. Berg, Kimberley.
Hotel and Restaurant Workers' Union, No. 2.—President,
Mrs.    A.    Ordway;     Secretary-Treasurer,    J.    Wilson,
Chapman Camp.
Mine   and   Mill   Workers'   Union,   No.   651.—President,
R. C. Thompson; Financial Secretary, Douglas A. Gold,
Box 627, Kimberley.
Municipal    Employees'    Association.—President,    J.    W.
Broadhurst;    Recording    Secretary,    D.    L.    Musser,
Kimberley.
Ladysmith
Firebosses' Union, Vancouver Island.—President, Joseph
Frew; Secretary-Treasurer, Fred Johnston, 119 Baden-
Powell Street, Ladysmith.
Lake Cowichan
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, No. 1812.—President, Art Lovett; Financial Secretary, A. Mancell, P.O. Box 167, Lake Cowichan.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No. 80.—
President, H. Bergren; Recording Secretary, R. O.
Gibson, Youbou.
Langford
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, J. Paton; Secretary, F. Ericson, R.R. 1,
Victoria.
Langley Prairie
Municipal Employees' Association, No. 10.—President,
R. A. Jensen; Secretary, R. W. Terichow, 919 Hunter
Road, R.R. 2, Langley Prairie.
Marguerite
Maintenance-of-way Employees, Brotherhood of, No. 221.
—President, W. Hinseke; Recording Secretary, Harry
Robinson, Marguerite.
McBride
Railway Employees and Other Transport Workers, Canadian Brotherhood of, No. 247.—President, R. T. Clay;
Secretary, T. M. McDonald, McBride.
Merritt
Government Employees' Association, B.C. Provincial.—
President, Howard MacLean; Secretary, P. C. Currie,
P.O. Box 65, Merritt.
Michel
Firebosses, National Union of, No. 1.—President, Reginald
Taylor; Secretary-Treasurer, Roger A. Pasiaud, Box 77,
Local 1, Michel.
Mission City
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, No. 2213.—President, Elmer A. Hodson; Recording
Secretary, John J. Anutooshkin, R.R.  1, Mission City.
Woodworkers' Industrial Union of Canada, No. 367.—
President, Ray Masse; Recording Secretary, F. O.
Theiss, R.R. 2, Mission.
Nanaimo
Bakery Salesmen's Union, Nanaimo, No. 189.—President,
R. M. Millar; Business Agent, E. Holmes, Room 206,
307 Broadway West, Vancouver.
Carpenters and Joiners of America, United Brotherhood
of, No. 527.—President, Arthur Clark; Financial Secretary, J. E. Oddson, 253 Nicol Street, Nanaimo.
Civic Employees' and Nanaimo District School Janitors'
Association, No. 14.—President, Harris Gill; Recording
Secretary, Wilbur Scurr, 14 Machleary Street, Nanaimo.
Civil Servants of Canada, Amalgamated.—President,
Joseph Bradwell; Secretary-Treasurer, H. W. Spencer,
433 Fourth Street, Nanaimo.
Construction and General Labourers' Union, No. 1095.—
President, Harold Haw