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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL of the Public Health Branch Department… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1951

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIVISION OF
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL
of   the   Public   Health   Branch
Department of Health and Welfare
ANNUAL REPORT
For the Year 1949
VICTORIA, B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiahmjd, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1950.  Department of Health and Welfare,
Public Health Branch,
Victoria, B.C., July 1st, 1950.
The Honourable A. D. Turnbull,
Minister of Health and Welfare, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to
December 31st, 1949.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honur to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
G. F. AMYOT, M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health. Department of Health and Welfare,
Public Health Branch,
: Division of Tuberculosis Control,
2647 Willow Street,
Vancouver, B.C., July 1st, 1950.
G. F. Amyot, Esq., M.D., D.P.H.,
Deputy Minister of Health, Victoria, B.C.
SIR,—I beg to submit the Annual Report on the work of the Division of Tuberculosis Control of the Department of Health and Welfare for the year January 1st to
December 31st, 1949.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
W. H. HATFIELD, M.D.,
Director, Division of Tuberculosis Control. <A
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'ai  TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Page.
Letter of Transmittal  3
Letter of Transmittal  4
Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control  5
List of Tables  9
List of Charts  12
Introduction  15
(a) Clinics :  17
(6) Institutions  17
(c) Nursing Services  18
(d) Social Service  18
(e) Budget  19
(/)  Conclusion .  19
Statistical Section  21
(a.)  Clinics  23
(6)  New Cases examined by Clinics r  33
(c) General Summaries  37
(d) Institutions    '42
(e) Tuberculin Testing  58
(/)  Known Cases of Tuberculosis..;  61
(g) Notifications of Tuberculosis  67
(h) Tuberculosis Mortality .  82
(i)   Division of Tuberculosis Control Budget  99  INDEX.
LIST OF TABLES.
Clinics,   .
Page.
Table   1.—Clinics held in British Columbia, showing Time spent at each Centre,
1949 '___„     24
Table   2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1949     27
Table   3.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1949     29
Table   4.—New Examinations and Re-examinations during the Years 1945 to 1949,
inclusive (excluding Indians)     30
Table   5.—New Cases examined by Clinics, by Diagnosis, 1949 (excluding Indians)     33
Table   6.—New Cases other than Negative examined by Diagnostic Clinics by
Diagnosis, Sex, and Age-groups, 1949 (excluding Indians)     34
Table 7.—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis examined by Clinics, by Infection and Condition, 1949    35
Table 8.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1945 to 1949,
inclusive     37
General Summaries.
Table - 9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1949  37
Table 10.—Laboratory Report, 1949  38
Table 11.—Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics, 1945 to 1949,
inclusive  40
Table 12.—Dental Report, 1949  40
Table 13.—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report, 1949  41
Institutions—Summaries.
Table 14.—Institutions—General Summary, 1949     42
Table 15.—Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) given by Institutions,
Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1945 to 1949, inclusive..,. 44
Table 16.—Institutions—Patient Status, 1949  44
Table 17.—Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions in each Age-
group, 1945 to 1949, inclusive ,  45
Table 18.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1949 .  47
Table 19.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Racial Origin, 1949  48
Table 20.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1949  49
Table 21.—First Admissions by Institution and Diagnosis, 1949  49
Table 22.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution) for the Years
1945 to 1949, inclusive .  52
Table 23.—First Admissions by Diagnoses, Sex, and Time between Application and
Admission, 1949  52
Table 24.—Institutional Patient-days of the Division of Tuberculosis Control for
the Years 1945 to 1949, inclusive  54
Table 25.—Admissions to Institutions by Year of Arrival in British Columbia,
Diagnosis and Type of Case, 1949     54
9 I 10 department of health and welfare.
Institutions—Discharges.
Page.
Table 26.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1945 to 1949,
inclusive     55
Table 27/—Discharges  from  Institutions  by  Condition  on  Discharge,   Sex,   and
Length of Treatment during Previous Admissions, 1949     56
Table 28/—Discharges  from  Institutions  by  Condition  on   Discharge,   Sex,  and
Length of Last Stay in Institution, 1949     57
Table 29.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition  on  Discharge,  Sex,  and
Home Condition, 1949     57
Tuberculin Testing.
Table 30.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Racial Origin and Age-groups, 1949     58
Table 31— Tuberculin Testing Results by Type of Survey, 1949     59
Table 32.—Tuberculin Testing Results by Age-group and Diagnosis, 1949     60
Known Cases of Tuberculosis.
Table 33.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1945 to 1949,
inclusive     61
Table 34.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population
of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st,
1945 to 1949, inclusive _•___    61
Table 35.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1945 to 1949,
inclusive      61
Table 36.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1949 (excluding Indians)     62
Table 37.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence and Sex,
1949 (Indians only)     63
Table 38.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in British
Columbia by Age-groups and Sex, 1949 (excluding Indians)     64
Table 39.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Present Condition,
and Age-group, 1949 (excluding Indians)     65
Table 40.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-
Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1945 to 1949,
inclusive     66
Notifications of Tuberculosis (Form T.B. 1).
Table 41.—New  Cases  of  Tuberculosis  among  the  Total  Population  of  British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1945 to 1949, inclusive     67
Table 42.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of
British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1945 to 1949, inclusive     67
Table 43.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1945 to 1949, inclusive     68
Table 44.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases of Tuberculosis among
the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian
Population, and the Indian Population, 1949     68
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1949 (excluding Indians)     69 TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949. I  n
Page.
Table 46.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1949 (Indians only)     72
Table 47.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British  Columbia by Racial Groups
(including Dead Cases reported for the First Time), 1940 to 1949,
inclusive     75
Table 48.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Racial Groups (including Dead Cases reported for the First
Time), 1949     76
Table 49.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1949____ 77
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1949 (excluding Indians)     78
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Diagnosis, 1949 (Indians only)       79
Table 52.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis and Year
of Arrival in British Columbia, 1949 (excluding Indians)     80
Table 53.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis in
British Columbia, 1945 to 1949, inclusive     82
Table 54.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis among
the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian
Population, and the Indian Population, 1949     82
Tuberculosis Mortality.
Table 55.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1945 to 1949,
inclusive     82
Table 56.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Other-
than-Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area,
1945 to 1949, inclusive    83
Table 57.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Indian
Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1945 to 1949,
inclusive     83
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and
Sex, 1949 (excluding Indians)     84
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence and
Sex, 1949 (Indians only)     85
Table 60.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-groups, 1949     86
Table 61.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Total
Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population excluding Indians and Orientals,
1940 to 1949, inclusive     87
Table 62.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by
Age-groups, 1945 to 1949, inclusive     89
Table 63.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British Columbia by
Age-groups, Averages for Five-year Periods 1941-45 to 1945-49,
inclusive     90
Table 64.—Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1945 to 1949, inclusive     92
Table 65.—Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1945 to 1949, inclusive      93 I  12 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Page.
Table 66.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the Other-
than-Indian  Population  of  British  Columbia  by  Sex and  Age-
groups, 1940 to 1949, inclusive     94
Table 67.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by Length
of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1949    .98
LIST OF CHARTS.
Chart   1.—Showing the Organization of the Division of Tuberculosis Control       5
Chart   2.—Showing New Examinations and Re-examinations by all Clinics during
the Years 1940 to 1949, inclusive (excluding Indians)     31
Chart   3.—Showing New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary Clinics
during the Years 1940 to 1949, inclusive (excluding Indians)     32
Chart   4.—Showing New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling Clinics
during the Years 1940 to 1949, inclusive (excluding Indians)     33
Chart 5.—Showing the Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) made
by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1940 to
1949, inclusive     36
Chart   6.—Showing  the  Number  of  Bronchoscopies  given  by  Institutions  and
Clinics, 1945 to 1949, inclusive     39
Chart 7.—Showing the Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) given by
Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1945 to
1949, inclusive-.     43
Chart 8.—Showing Admissions to Institutions by Age on Admission and Percentage of Total Admissions in each Age-group, 1945 to 1949, inclusive    45
Chart 9.—Showing Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age on Admission, 1949 .     46
Chart 10.—Showing First Admissions to Institutions by Institution and Diagnosis,
1949     50
Chart 11.—Showing First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis  (Percentage
Distribution) for the Years 1945 to 1949, inclusive     51
Chart 12.—Showing the Institutional Patient-days of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control for the Years 1940 to 1949, inclusive     53
Chart 13.—Showing Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, 1945
to 1949, inclusive      55
Chart 14.—Showing the Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in British Columbia, by Age-groups and Sex, 1949 (excluding
Indians)     64
Chart 15.—Showing the Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from
Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia, the
Other-than-Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1945 to
1949, inclusive     66
Chart 16.—Showing Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial
Groups (including Dead Cases reported for the First Time), 1940
to 1949, inclusive     74
Chart 17.—Showing Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1949     77
Chart 18.—Showing the Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from
Tuberculosis in British Columbia, 1945 to 1949, inclusive     81 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949. I 13
Page.
Chart 19.—Showing the Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population for
the Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and
Japanese Populations, and the Population excluding Indians and
Orientals, 1940 to 1949, inclusive     88
Chart 20.—Showing Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, 1945 to 1949, inclusive     89
Chart 21.—Showing Tuberculosis Mortality for the Total Population of British
Columbia by Age-groups, Averages for Five-year Periods 1941-45
to 1945-49, inclusive     90
Chart 22.—Showing Tuberculosis Deaths for the Other-than-Indian Population and
the Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1949    91
Chart 23.—Showing Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population
of British Columbia by Age-groups, 1945 to 1949, inclusive     92
Chart 24.—Showing Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates for the Total Population
of British Columbia by Age-groups, 1945 to 1949, inclusive     93
Chart 25.—Showing Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population
for the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Age-
groups, 1940 to 1949, inclusive     96
Chart 26.—Showing Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population
for the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Age-
groups, 1940 to 1949, inclusive     97
Chart 27.—Showing the Distribution of the Tuberculosis Dollar in the Budget of
the Division of Tuberculosis Control, Department of Health and
Welfare, 1949    99  Report of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, 1949.
W. H. Hatfield, Director.
INTRODUCTION.
The Division of Tuberculosis Control has made some advance in its programme during 1949, but has continued to work under the serious handicap of
lack of sufficient beds. It had been hoped that the new sanatorium planned for
Vancouver would be started during the year, but this hope has not been fulfilled.
It is now expected that it will be sometime in the spring of 1950 before construction gets under way. The other facilities of the Division have now been
quite well rounded out, but until an adequate number of beds is available for the
treatment of all the tuberculous patients who require hospital care, very little
further progress can be made in the control of this disease.
The most outstanding improvement within the Division during the year
was the opening of the new surgical and teaching facilities at the Vancouver
unit. This has provided the Division with the most up-to-date surgical facilities to bring to the patient every modern method of therapy. This addition has
shown the place it can play in the teaching programme of doctors, nurses, and
lay people interested in health work, and the improved set-up for surgery will
allow full opportunities for the newer developments in chest surgery to be
offered to the tuberculous patients in this Province.
At Tranquille further improvements in the physical plant were made during the year.
Considerable thought has been given to the expenditure of money coming
to the Province under Federal health grants. Projects continued from the
previous year were occupational therapy for out-patients, home-care service,
medical library, postgraduate training for members of the medical and nursing
staff.
During 1949, expansion in services of the Division provided by these grants
was as follows:—
Additional staff: Senior intern, Vancouver unit; nursemaids, Vancouver Preventorium; instructor in tuberculosis nursing; senior
executive nurse, surgical department, Vancouver unit.
Payment for the administration of streptomycin.
Payment for admission X-rays in general hospitals.
Rehabilitation programme.
Clinical research in electrocardiography.
In-service training.
The problem of obtaining properly trained medical personnel still remains
with us. It would appear that the main reason for this is the low salary range
paid by the Department for specialists. All our institutions have been somewhat understaffed from the standpoint of physicians, and it has not been possible
to carry out anything except the most essential consulting service in the rural
areas.    It has been previously recommended that there should be a complete
15 I  16 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
review of medical salaries, and it is hoped that some action will be taken in this
regard this year.
Despite the handicap of insufficient beds, there is still some improvement in
the over-all tuberculosis picture in the Province. The total death rate shows
a further drop, although when this is broken down into racial groups, it is found
that there is some slight increase in the white death rate. It is to be noted
further, when this is analysed, that the increase is in the group between 60 and
80 years of age.
The number of new cases discovered during the year amounts to 2,202,
which is an increase over last year.    This, broken down into racial groups,
shows the following:   Indians, 578; other than Indians, 1,624;   and into age-
groups :—
Indians. Other than Indians.
0- 4  79 0- 4     48
5- 9  94 5- 9     42
10-14 -_ 97 10-14     33
15-19  75 15-19 .-    71
20-24 .-.___ 45 20-24  169
25-29  33 25-29  216
30-39  46 30-39  300
40-49  45 40-49  229
50-59  22 50-59  214
60-69  23 60-69  189
70-79  10 70-79     82
80 and over  3 80 and over      13
Not stated  6 Not stated     18
During the year an assessment has been made of the methods of case-
finding, and it is planned to make considerable changes in this regard during
1950. It has been decided to eliminate the mass X-ray survey programme as
presently being carried out by the Division, and in its place to install X-ray
equipment in general hospitals and local health units so that, rather than
sporadic mass X-ray surveys, there will be available X-ray facilities on a day-
by-day basis. The responsibility, then, of the case-finding programme is transferred where it logically belongs—to local health services. It is further planned
to carry out fairly extensive tuberculin-testing programmes in certain areas in
an endeavour to establish the present incidence of infection for comparison with
previous large tuberculin-testing surveys.
The rehabilitation programme which was initiated by the British Columbia
Tuberculosis Society as a demonstration was taken over during the year by the
Division of Tuberculosis Control, this being made possible by the Dominion
health grants.
During the year the Division was pleased to have a number of visitors from
various centres throughout the world, a number of whom spent some time here
looking into our methods of tuberculosis control. These visits usually proved
to be mutually advantageous.
A number of the doctors of the Division attended scientific meetings during
the year, and seventeen papers were prepared for presentation at these meetings. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949. I  17
CLINICS.
The number of clinics operated by the Division remains the same, but the
extent of the work within these clinics continues to grow, and some of them are
becoming distinctly overcrowded. More space is required in both the Vancouver
and New Westminster Clinics. Travelling-clinic work has continued to be carried on mainly by X-ray technicians. A considerable number of X-rays have
been taken throughout the Province and were referred to our main centres for
interpretation. This is not a satisfactory consultative service and can be made
satisfactory only by obtaining specialists who are able to travel to the patient
and consult with local physicians.
During 1949, 197,096 people were X-rayed in the survey clinics. It is
expected that with the new programme at least an equal number will be X-rayed
and that some of the groups that are now missed will be examined. In the mass
X-ray surveys, it has been noted that there are a fair number of people with
heart-disease found. A study made during the year uncovered approximately
four times as much heart-disease as tuberculosis.   This is being studied further.
Of the 197,096 persons examined in survey clinics, 3,196 or 1.6 per cent,
were referred to diagnostic clinics, which is lower than the previous year. Of
the group referred for further study, 523 or 16.4 per cent, were diagnosed as
tuberculous. These tuberculous diagnoses were as follows: Primary, 2.7 per
cent.; minimal, 68.8 per cent.; moderately advanced, 23.3 per cent.; far
advanced, 4.2 per cent.
There were 41,203 examined in the diagnostic clinics, which is an increase
over the previous year. The out-patient pneumothorax work remains about
the same, with 10,993 refills given. The total number of examinations, including both survey and diagnostic clinics, was 238,353. Including out-patient
treatments, the total number of patient-visits to all clinics and survey units
was 248,701, which is an increase from the previous year of 17,580.
INSTITUTIONS.
Certain improvements were made in existing institutions during the year.
Some of these have already been mentioned. The most notable improvement
was in Vancouver, with the opening of the institute provided by the British
Columbia Tuberculosis Society through Christmas seals.
At Tranquille the new home for nurses was opened and is proving a valuable addition. Alternating current has been made available, and a new telephone system with a private switchboard installed. Windows have been placed
in the porches throughout the infirmary building, allowing patients to use this
part of the building during the winter. One section of two porches has been
renovated to form two wards, giving accommodation for nine patients instead
of five. It is planned to continue with the alterations in this building during
the forthcoming year. New furniture has been supplied throughout the staff
quarters, which has made a great difference in the appearance of the accommodation and in the comfort of the employees. The administration building has
been remodelled throughout and is now a modern office building. Over a mile
of cement sidewalks has been laid, and there has been a considerable addition
to the hard-surfaced roads at the institution.    There are further much-needed I  18 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
improvements which have been planned at Tranquille, and it is hoped that at
least some of these will be accomplished during 1950.
It had been hoped that the new sanatorium would at least have been started
during 1949, but there were continued delays, and not until the end of the year
had the specifications been finally written. It is expected that the plans will
go out for tender the first of the year.
Unfortunately, it is necessary to once again report that St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital, which is considered by the Division to be an unsatisfactory
hospital for the care of tuberculous patients, is still in operation.
During the year, due to the epidemic of poliomyelitis, it was necessary for
the Division to remove its patients from the Vancouver Isolation Hospital for
a period of fourteen weeks. This deprived us of thirty-five beds during this
time and was a very disturbing situation to many patients.
NURSING SERVICE.
Tuberculosis nursing, like other specialties and nursing generally, is in a
transitional stage due to the current changes and expanding needs. Encouraging progress is noted as the year's activities are reviewed.
The nursing department will benefit from projects under the Dominion
health-grant plan. Three senior nurses are taking postgraduate courses, and
provision is made for the establishment of two new nursing positions at the
Vancouver unit. These are a supervisor for the new surgical unit and a second
instructor for the affiliation course in tuberculosis nursing. The expansion in
the teaching department is necessary due to the increased number of affiliate
and postgraduate students and to the reorganization of the curriculum and
clinical assignment of the course. The closer integration of theory and practice
throughout the course has resulted in a more confident approach and greater
satisfaction and interest in tuberculosis nursing on the part of the students.
Isolation technique is standardized in the various units, except for a few
minor adaptations to suit local conditions.
Completion of the definition of nursing positions by the Civil Service Commission will be helpful to the Provincial and local administration for purposes
of recruitment and placement. Although the quota of nurses varies, particularly at Tranquille, the nursing service in all of the units met the demands
without serious curtailment or closing of beds. A considerable number of
nurses have come to British Columbia during the past year, but shortages are
general and still acute, particularly in rural and small-town areas.
As there has been an increasing tendency for nurses to be interested in
surgical rather than medical wards, increased attention is being given to
showing the interest and value of nursing care in the non-surgical case.
SOCIAL SERVICE.
During the past year the staff situation improved, and although there were
several changes in social service staff, the numbers remained up to strength.
There have been three major developments due to the Federal health grants
which have affected the social service work. The first was the appointment to
the Division of a full-time rehabilitation officer, who works very closely with the
social workers and has given a great deal of help in the work done with the TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949. I  19
patients. The second was the appointment of a full-time occupational therapist
to the Metropolitan Health Committee staff. Occupational therapy in the home
is now an additional resource for patients when they leave hospital. The third
development is the establishment of a proper home-making service for tuberculous patients. The money for this service was granted to the Metropolitan
Health Committee, but the actual service is administered by the Family Welfare
Bureau. Members of the social service department act on the technical advisory committee. The social workers feel that they benefit from the plan almost
as much as the patients, as the time and energy that used to be spent on makeshift plans can now be used in other ways. At the end of the year there were
seven full-time home-makers and four part-time home-makers in patients'
homes.
BUDGET.
There will be no increase in the services rendered by the Division of Tuberculosis Control during the ensuing year. Any increase in budget is due to
factors beyond the control of this Division, such as increased commodity prices,
increased wages, and cost-of-living bonus.
CONCLUSION.
As has been reiterated on previous occasions, the great need of the Division
of Tuberculosis Control is increased bed accommodation. When this is provided, the programme of the Division will be well rounded out. The other
great problem is obtaining properly trained physicians, and this cannot be
solved until the salary situation with reference to physicians is altered.
The voluntary agency continues to play an important part in the tuberculosis programme in the Province of British Columbia. There has been complete
co-operation between the Division and the British Columbia Tuberculosis
Society, and much has been achieved which would not have been possible without the society. It is felt that the private agency still has an important place
in a programme such as that of the Division of Tuberculosis Control.  STATISTICAL ANALYSIS
for the year January 1st to
December 31st, 1949  TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
CLINICS.
Map of British Columbia, showing Statistical Publication Areas.
I 23
Province of British Columbia—
Population, 1,114,000.
Area, 366,255 square miles.
Travelling clinics—
Kootenay Clinic (Nelson)—Statistical Areas 1 and 2.
Interior Clinic (Kamloops)—Statistical Areas 3, 6, 8, 10c, lOd.
Coast Clinic (Vancouver)—Statistical Areas 4, 7, 9c, 9d, 9e.
Island Clinic (Victoria)—Statistical Area 5.
Survey Clinic No. 1—Vancouver and Interior.
Survey Clinic No. 2—Vancouver.
Survey Clinic No. 3—Vancouver Island. I 24
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 1.—Clinics held in British Columbia, showing Time spent
at each Centre, 1949.
Travelling Clinics.
Interior.
Centre visited.
Allenby                  - -
Bays.
2
Armstrong   .         _ _
      4
Burns Lake - - .
Copper Mountain	
Dawson Creek _   	
__      3
3
       4
Enderby 	
       2
Fort St. John 	
Hedley Mascot Mine
2
1
Kamloops	
     22
Kelowna  _         ...
     23
Merritt  	
       1
McBride
1
Nickel Plate Mine       _
       1
Oliver ...              —_   .
       5
Centre visited.
Alice Arm
Days.
         1
Gibsons   _
         1
Hazelton            . -
         1
Marpole   .
      2
Oakalla Prison       ._   	
1
Ocean Falls	
       4
Centre visited. Days.
Penticton      15
Pouce Coupe        1
Prince George      14
Princeton   	
Quesnel   	
Revelstoke   	
Salmon Arm 	
Smithers   	
Summerland ...
Vanderhoof 	
Vernon   	
Wells   	
Williams Lake
2
6
6
6
4
2
4
15
4
6
Coast.
Centre visited. Days.
Abbotsford     14
Ashcroft   1
Bridge River  1
Chilliwack   30
Total (27 centres)   159
Centre visited. Days.
Port Hardy   3
Powell River  ,  7
Prince  Rupert   13
Sechelt  1
Terrace     2
Total  (11 centres)       36
Fraser Valley.
Centre visited. Days.
Lillooet       2
Lytton        1
Mission       15
Total (7 centres)      64
Island.
Centre visited. Days.
Campbell River        8
Chemainus         6%
Comox   17
Cumberland        9
Duncan   25
Ladysmith   11 %
Centre visited.
Lake Cowichan ..
Mount St. Mary
Nanaimo  	
Days.
Port Alberni and Alberni..
Saltspring Island	
3
42%
32
y2
Kootenay.
Total (11 centres)    163
Centre visited.
Castlegar 	
Cranbrook 	
Creston 	
Fernie 	
Field 	
Golden	
Grand Forks	
Greenwood  	
Invermere         1 %
Kaslo        1
Days.
. 6
. 9
_ 8
.. 7
._ 2
_ 1
._ 7
_ 2
Centre visited. Days.
Kimberley        8
Michel         3V2
Nakusp        6%
Needles        1
Nelson     48
New Denver        1
Rossland   10 %
Salmo __.___. 1       2
Trail    26
Total (19 centres)   151 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 25
Table 1.—Clinics held in British Columbia, showing Time spent
at each Centre, 1949—Continued.
Mobile Units.
Vancouver Island.
Centre visited. Days.
Bevan          V2
Campbell River   4
Colquitz    1
Comox   2
Courtenay   4
Cumberland   2V2
Fanny Bay  1
Headquarters   1
Centre visited.
Iron River 	
James Island .
Nanaimo   	
Royston  	
Union Bay   ...
Victoria 	
Coast.
Centre visited. Days.
Abbotsford   8
Aberdeen   1
Agassiz     2
Arnold  1
Atchelitz    1
Blubber Bay   1
Boundary Bay   1
Bradner   1
Britannia Beach   3
Cedar Valley  1
Chehalis          V2
Chilliwack   12
Coquitlam    1
Cranberry   1
Cultus Lake   1
Deroche           Vz
Dewdney  	
Enderby	
Fraser Mills 	
Gibsons 	
Halfmoon Bay
Hammond  	
Haney        5
Harrison Hot Springs       1%
Harrison Mills
Hatzic 	
Hazelton 	
Ioco 	
Kennedy 	
Kitwanga 	
Ladner 	
Lund 	
%
Total (14 centres)
Centre visited.
Madeira Park _
Days.
. 1
1
1
_ 1
.        1
.    47
.    68
Days.
_    1
Matsqui   2
Mission   6
Mount Lehman   1
New Westminster   16
Pitt Meadows   1
Port Edward   2
Port Mellon   1
Powell River   7
Prince Rupert   14
Roberts Creek  1
Rosedale   1
Ruskin    V2
Ryder Lake   1
Sardis 	
Sechelt 	
Squamish  _.
Stave Falls
Stillwater   ..
Sumas 	
Sunbury   	
Terrace 	
Usk  	
        V2
Vancouver     226 Vz
Webster's Corners          y2
Westview  	
Whonnock  	
Wildwood 	
Woodfibre 	
Yarrow 	
Total  (62 centres)   376y2 I 26
department of health and welfare.
Table 1.—Clinics held in British Columbia, showing Time spent
at each Centre, 1949—Continued.
Mobile Units—Continued.
Interior.
Centre visited. Days.
Armstrong  3
Arras   1
Baldonnel  1
Burns Lake  2%
Cecil Lake  1
Clayhurst  1
Clinton   1
Dawson Creek .  4
Doe River  1
Endako         Yz
Enderby 1  2
Farmington  1
Field         Yz
Fort Fraser         Yz
Fort St. James __. 1
Fort St. John ____ 'L 3
Fraser Lake         Yz
Giscome   1
Groundbirch         Yz
Houston          Yz
Hudson Hope  1
Kelowna  14
Lumby  2
Montney   1
Moricetown         Yz
Naramata . 1
Okanagan Falls  1
Centre visited. Days,
Oliver   5%
100-Mile House   1
Osoyoos  3
Peachland    1
Penny   1
Penticton   9
Pouce Coupe  1
Prince George   9
Quesnel   3
Rolla  	
Rose Prairie 	
Rutland  	
Sinclair Mills ..
Smithers 	
Summerland 	
Sunset Prairie
Tate Creek	
Telkwa 	
Topley	
Vanderhoof  __
Vernon  	
Wells 	
Westbank 	
Williams Lake
Winfield 	
2
10
1
1
1
2
Total (52 centres).__ 110% TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 27
Attendance at the tuberculosis clinics in 1949 rose by 5,087 to a grand total of
51,605 visits, an increase of 10.9 per cent. Those reporting for routine check likewise
increased from 29,053 in 1948 to 32,744 in 1949. The number of persons attending for
re-examination showed a 14-per-cent. increase over 1948, while the number of new cases
increased slightly. The greatest increase in patient-visits (606) occurred in the 5-9
age-group; another important increase occurred in the 30-39 age-group, where the
number of cases rose by 584 to a total of 8,743. A large increase occurred this year in
the number of pneumothorax refills—from 8,704 in 1948 to 10,993 in 1949. New cases
of tuberculosis found by this Division increased from 1,137 in 1948 to 1,192 in 1949.
The number of patients previously diagnosed as non-tuberculous and later diagnosed as
tuberculous increased from 215 in 1948 to 223 in 1949.
Table 2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1949.
Item.
u
>
3
O
u
C
>
'3
»
c
rt
a
"S
o
>
m
9 ^
l.s
.3
to
a
o
0
>.
si
G
<-
^J
O
0
«
O
u
0J
I
a
S
26,409
16,333
2,605
124
16,306
5,447
10,859
16,306
1.283
3,350
11,673
16,306
138
140
268
220
184
210
259
369
602
1,192
865
1,219
1,551
2,192
1,464
1,023
1,330
685
1,242
457
520
176
16,306
15,680
31
30
511
17
37
16,306
1,897
107
279
3,872
1,947
1,431
219
55
413
424
397
1,647
1,647
363
1,647
534
1,113
1,647
1
311
1,335
1,647
11
7
11
11
6
10
33
86
103
221
99
146
184
208
162
134
98
62
45
7
3
1,647
1,638
2
6
1
1,647
175
560
210
116
134
12
1
148
31
5,709
5,383
16
5,383
2,371
3,012
5,383
382
474
4,527
5,383
203
235
276
276
128
116
50
82
130
279
255
427
407
583
274
314
375
201
386
173
139
74
5,383
5,075
1
270
2
35
5,383
186
11
29
1,446
1,120
145
9
2
88
52
4,332
4,332
60
4,332
1,398
2,934
4,332
323
1,053
2,956
4,332
236
218
318
293
78
95
54
64
107
271
130
343
272
486
286
240
242
141
226
95
99
38
4,332
4,312
2
2
13
3
4,332
46
12
23
1,249
318
55
3
1
27
105
2,843
2,843
2,865
848
2,017
2,865
201
295
2,369
2,865
30
36
93
73
109
125
86
131
77
150
127
162
237
325
224
164
186
120
165
74
141
30
2,865
2,798
26
28
11
1
1
2,865
62
12
16
759
215
148
28
6
12
54
11
3,579
3,579
150
3,579
2,441
1,138
3,579
1
209
3,369
3,579
59
54
128
109
83
119
111
223
123
232
157
244
312
477
289
224
193
123
142
78
75
24
3,579
3,430
39
1
57
52
3,579
288
1
57
1,037
190
671
21
46
198
75
10
3,395
3,395
3,454
1,916
1,538
3,454
143
1
3,310
3,454
17
20
125
117
130
134
88
186
77
256
131
267
240
448
289
240
189
144
164
96
68
28
3,454
3,332
10
15
24
64
9
3,454
143
128
1,094
56
493
32
11
93
19
3,691
3,691
3,691
560
3,131
3,691
9
477
3,205
3,691
39
49
75
70
82
123
96
218
103
264
160
292
294
527
275
264
207
132
200
67
105
49
3,691
3,587
5
70
29
3,691
143
15
78
1,221
122
266
135
41
9
77
6
51,605
41,203
3,194
124
Total cases examined—
41,257
15,515
25,742
41,257
2,343
6,170
32,744
0- 4	
 M.
733
5 9	
F.
 M.
F.
 M.
759
1,294
1,169
800
15 19     	
F.
 M.
932
777
F.
 M.
1,359
1,322
F.
 M.
2,865
1,924
30 39           	
F.
 M.
3,100
3,497
40 49      	
F.
 M..
5,246
3,263
F.
 M.
2,603
2,820
1,608
2,570
F.
 M.
F.
M.
1,047
1,150
419
41,257
F.
39,852
109
81
958
142
115
41,257
2,940
158
1,170
10,888
Labourers—
4,084
3,343
459
Miners—
148
647
Nurses—
986
631 I 28
DEPARTMENT OF  HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 2.—Diagnostic and Treatment Clinic Report, 1949—Continued.
Item.
IH
QJ
>
O
a
a
>
a-
S
rt
H
153
10
378
50
6
181
1,031
63
3,516
137
2
6,883
652
13
"360
129
291
19
7,296
615
o
u
o
■fj
c
c
S
i—t
29
39
63
21
1
595
430
698
1,087
102
20
2,657
1,985
267
51
90
32
89
30
16
11
2
3
8
6
4
2
2
1
6
1
4
2
72
13
4
1
53
7
14
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
177
19
55
3
1
4
4
2
1
66
3
1
1
47
8
676
930
Usual occupations—Continued.
Teachers	
Other professional	
Students—
Normal	
University	
Other	
Other and unspecified	
Treatments and tests—
Pneumothorax—
Initial : , .-	
Refill	
Oleothorax—
Initial	
Refill	
Pneumoperitoneum—*
Initial	
Refill ; :...:.......... :.....:.........:......'....
Bronchoscopy	
B.CG. vaccinations	
Aspirations	
Fluoroscopes	
Tuberculin tests given	
X-rays referred to the Division—
New tuberculosis cases	
Other...	
New cases found (tuberculous and non-tuberculous)
Total tuberculous ....
Tuberculous, pulmonary	
Change of diagnosis, non-tuberculous to tuberculous	
Primary	
Minimal	
Moderately advanced	
Far advanced	
Far advanced with silicosis	
Other pulmonary	
Referred from survey clinics	
Primary	
Minimal	
Moderately advanced	
Far advanced	
Other clinic cases .'	
Primary	
Minimal	
Moderately advanced	
Far advanced	
Far advanced with silicosis	
Pleurisy with effusion	
Pleurisy without effusion	
Other tuberculosis of respiratory system...
Other pulmonary	
Tuberculous, non-pulmonary	
Intestines	
Vertebral column	
Bones and joints	
Skin	
Lymphatic system	
Genito-urinary system	
Miliary	
Peritoneum	
Meninges	
Other	
Non-tuberculous	
Pleurisy	
Empyema	
Neoplasms	
Silicosis _	
Diseases of.circulatory system	
Other pulmonary	
Other non-pulmonary	
Undiagnosed	
Suspect	
Change of diagnosis, tuberculous to non-
tuberculous	
Previously known cases re-examined	
6,628
1,749
567
543
111
14
71
15
8
1
2
162
4
102
39
17
270
32
140
71
27
1
1,182
325
7
16
29
39
508
51
132
75
9
6,998
13
1
332
42
38
1
2
716
1,496
3
1,931
49
495
28
1,975
5  | 1,462
3
45
250
127
125
123
24
1,834
12
1
55
46
20
4
2
675
471
1,756
994
1,407
31
7
13
1,445
1,156
89
162
3,778
289
340
146
143
134
141
27
7
2
1
20
5 1
3
1
2
58
95
1
12
47
71
9
11
1
1
49
39
3
32
24
7
7
1
4
3
2
2
1
2
12
2
1
1
8
2
1
1
143
197
30
53
2
1
3
1
4
5
5
1
57
53
14
13
17
20
11
50
1
2
1,872
611
1
534
353
1
120
279
8
160
1,305
18
454
210
71
67
11
4
6
4
1
51
3
37
139
43
6
6
4
46
11
1
781
401
652
190
4,515
10,037
6
10,993
13
440
129
1,072
68
11,491
10,556
232
9,082
3,183
1,192
1,145
223
27
146
31
12
1
6
368
18
262
69
19
554
46
328
123
42
9
2
1
3
47
6
10
1
1,991
535
11
38
48
49
817
93
178
222
14
14,034
Source: Ledger T.B. 71 ; Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 29
During 1949 a total of 197,096 persons were examined by the survey clinics, of
which 56,374 cases were covered by other than mobile clinics and 140,722 cases by
mobile clinics. This latter figure is 11 per cent, higher than the 1948 figure. The
number of new cases of tuberculosis discovered increased by 22 per cent.—from 428 in
1948 to 523 in 1949. Of the 523 new cases found by survey clinics, 22 were far
advanced, 127 were moderately advanced, 360 were minimal, and 14 were primary.
Table 3.—Report of Survey Clinics, 1949.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
New Westminster.
Mobile.
Total.
41,885
5,109
9,380
140,722
197,096
1,161
240
293
1,502
3,196
173
14
45
291
523
13
25
1
14
29
58
5
1
11
17
49
11
4
97
161
17
1
28
78
124
39
4
24
67
2
1
4
7
7
1
-  33
41
2
	
3
7
12
13
7
20
1
	
	
5
1
1
1
38
240
283
1
3
4
4
4
12
2
57
71
14
3
82
11
11
99
11
11
5
31
36
2
27
29
2
2
4
1
3
7
4
7
1
2
3
23
12
7
38
80
102
2
22
84
210
62
11
13
55
141
451
97
130
398
1,076
246
91
65
261
663
66
13
6
135
220
Total examined	
Total referred	
New tuberculous cases	
Primary	
Minimal—■
Active..........	
Quiescent	
Apparently arrested
Apparently cured	
Moderately advanced—
Active	
Quiescent	
Apparently arrested
Apparently cured	
Far advanced—■
Active	
Quiescent	
Apparently arrested.
Apparently cured......
Known tuberculous cases	
Minimal—■
Active	
Quiescent	
Apparently arrested.
Apparently cured	
Moderately advanced—
Active	
Quiescent	
Apparently arrested.
Apparently cured	
Far advanced—
Active	
Quiescent	
Apparently arrested.
Apparently cured	
Non-pulmonary	
Cardiac disease	
Pleurisy	
Suspect	
Negative	
Other diagnoses	
Not yet diagnosed	 I 30
department OF health and welfare.
During 1949 there were 238,353 cases examined by tuberculosis clinics, of which
91,782 (38.5 per cent.) were new cases. The number of new cases showed a decrease
of 6.4 per cent, over the previous year, while the number of re-examinations increased
by 18 per cent, over 1948. The number of cases examined by mobile clinics increased
from 127,081 in 1948 to 140,722 in 1949. This is wholly due to the increase in the
number of re-examinations carried out by mobile clinics.
Table 4.—New Examinations and Re-examinations during the
Years 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
(Excluding Indians.)
Total Cases examined.
New Cases.
Old Cases.
Year.
Total.
Stationary.
Travelling.
Mobile.
Total.
Stationary.
Travelling.
Mobile.
Total.
Stationary.
Travelling.
Mobile.
1945	
144,478
174,571
235,121
222,318
238,353
41,753
63,405
65,250
81,708
84,042
12,706
12,054
14,197
13,529
13,589
90,019
99,112
155,674
127,081
140,722
106,009
119,239
148,651
98,082
91,782
24,088
36,848
31,991
36,564
37.553
7,321
5,395
5,909
6,236
5,765
74,600
76,996
110,751
55,282
48,464
38,469
55,332
86,470
124,236
146,571
17,665
26,557
33,259
45,144
46,489
5,385
6,659
8,288
7,293
7,824
15,419
1946	
22,116
1947	
44,923
1948	
71,799
•1949
92,258
Source:  Daily Report of Clinics, Form T.B. 71, and Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 31
Chart 2.—Showing New Examinations and Re-examinations by all Clinics
during the Years 1940 to 1949, inclusive.
(Excluding Indians.)
NO OF CASES
(IN  000'S)
240
TOTAL     /
CASES    /
i
/
Xs
/-
NEW
CASES
/   i
r
/
TOTAL
r 1
1
§                A
1              /
*              /
v \
/■■'
/
" MOBILE
NEW
/        /
t\
*  \
/
//
//
t
1       A
t     /
'            *
t
/
\l4
A   \
/
t
//
//
f/
OLD
CASES   S
*
r \
/
/
1   1
7
*
ir*
/0
r   mo
t
LD
BILE
--__
	
****
z^
>^
^f
220
200
ISO
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
1940
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
1949 I 32
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Chart 3.—Showing New Examinations and Re-examinations by Stationary
Clinics during the Years 1940 to 1949, inclusive.
(Excluding Indians.)
no. of cases
(IN   OOO'S)
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
-     '
TOT/
CASE
a     /
s     /
t
t
i
t
	
/
S
>
I
t
_ — -
f                t
1
NEW
CASES
/
/   /
/
/
*
**
•
OLD   CA
f
/
/
t
SES
/
,-''
1940 41 42 43 44 45 46 47
48 1949 TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 33
Chart 4.
NQOF CASES
(IN  000'S)
20
-Showing New Examinations and Re-examinations by Travelling
Clinics during the Years 1940 to 1949, inclusive.
(Excluding Indians.)
10
TRAVELLING
CLINICS
TOTAL
CASES
B*"
= _-__
_■ ■■ ** —' "
^ ..NEW   CASES
M   —   ^  mm   !__,,  *»   "*^ ^
OlD    CASES
	
	
1940
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
4B
1949
Although the number of new cases examined by clinics declined from 98,082 in
1948 to 91,782 in 1949, the percentage of cases under the various diagnoses remained
substantially the same. The percentage of those examined showing no evidences of a
tuberculous lesion was slightly less favourable, being 97.3 per cent, in 1948 and 96.5
per cent, in 1949. The greatest increase occurred with the group showing evidences
of nOn-tuberculous pulmonary lesions.
NEW CASES EXAMINED BY CLINICS.
Table 5.—New Cases examined by Clinics, by Diagnosis, 1949.
(Excluding Indians.)
Diagnosis.
Number
of Cases.
Per Cent.
of Cases
examined.
Pulmonary tuberculosis -	
Tuberculous pleurisy and other tuberculosis of respiratory system.
Non-pulmonary tuberculosis	
Other pulmonary diagnoses	
Other (other non-pulmonary diagnoses, undiagnosed and suspect)
Normal	
Total new cases examined	
1,124
■    21
47
1,449
542
88,599
91,782
1.23
0.02
0:05
1.58
0.59
96.53
100.00
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. I
34
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
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mrnc<iOrCo-fi<-arOtr-tx TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 35
During 1949 a total of 1,124 new cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were diagnosed
by clinics. The Vancouver Clinic diagnosed 541 or 48 per cent.; the Coast Travelling
Clinic, 137 or 12.1 per cent.; the New Westminster Clinic, 126 or 11.2 per cent.; and
the Victoria Clinic, 124 or 11 per cent. Of all the cases diagnosed, 55.5 per cent, were
minimal. Of the 1,124 new cases of tuberculosis found, 465 or 41 per cent, were classified as active pulmonary tuberculosis.
Table 7.—New Cases of Pulmonary Tuberculosis examined by Clinics,
by Infection and Condition, 1949.
Infection and Condition.
Vancouver.
Tranquille.
Victoria.
New
Westminster.
Coast.
Kootenay.
Interior.
Island.
Total.
Primary	
Apparently cured	
Arrested	
Apparently arrested..
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved	
Active not stated	
Condition not stated-
Minimal	
Apparently cured	
Arrested	
Apparently arrested..
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved	
Active not stated	
Condition not stated..
Moderately advanced	
Apparently cured	
Arrested	
Apparently arrested-
Quiescent	
Active improved	
Active unimproved	
Active not stated	
Condition not stated-
Far advanced	
Apparently cured	
Arrested	
Apparently arrested..
Quiescent :.	
Active improved	
Active unimproved	
Active not stated	
Condition not stated...
5
20
313
47
43
107
33
81
2
125
1
10
20
7
1
85
1
53
4
44
2
Totals..
15
1
46
19
18
1
12  |
9
19
4
1
4
124
6
13
1
6
1
3
1
3
2
2
99
100
53
46
20
14
5
20
3
1
12
4
18
6
137
47
18
8
5
1
4
9
1
1
4
1
2
1
1
2
62
20
21
7
6
1
3
4
18
17
6
4
4
1
91
1
4
15
32
3
29
7
736
193
158
168
62
7
127
1
20
223
15
30
32
23
2
116
5
74
2
5
1
57
89      29
I I 36
department of health and welfare.
There has been an increase in the number of X-ray examinations made by all the
clinics and institutions. The largest single increase occurred with the mobile units,
where 140,722 X-ray examinations were made—an increase of 13,641. In the stationary and travelling clinics and institutions, there were moderate increases over 1948.
Chart 5.—Showing the Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other)
made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1940 to
1949, inclusive.
NO Of X-RAYS
UN   OOCS)
250
225
200
175
150
125
100
75
50
25
TOTAL   /
MO
Ul>
BILE     /
ITS      /
X
STATI
CL
ONARY
NICS     /
	
**
.**
**
	
I*
-■
m ^^
*""
TR
AVELLINC    (
CLINICS
1940 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 1949 TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 37
Table 8.—Number of X-ray Examinations (Chest and Other) made by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Year.
Institutions.
Stationary.
Travelling.
Mobile
Units.
Total.
Diagnostic.
Survey.
Diagnostic.
Survey.
1945                       	
3,858
6,667
5,196
6,111
6,432
11,075
16,781
20,986
24,144
27,695
28,850
45,810
44,196
57,428
56,374
12,613      |            764
11,289                     763
12,996                1,063
13.399                       91
89,779
99,103
155,674
127,081
140,722
146,939
180,413
240,111
1946
1947	
1948                         	
228,254
1949	
13,508
|        	
244,731
1
Source:  X-ray Ledger T.B. 73 and Clinic Ledgers T.B. 71 and T.B. 41.
There was an increase in the number of flat X-rays made by stationary clinics and
institutions. In the more technical types of chest X-rays, no important changes were
noted.
GENERAL SUMMARIES.
Table 9.—X-ray Report for Stationary Clinics and Institutions, 1949.
Vancouver.
Tranquille.
Victoria.
St.
Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital.
New
Westminster.
Jericho
Beach.
Total.
X-rays taken	
Chest X-rays—
Flat-
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V. D. Division	
Stereoscopic—■
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Planograph—■
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Other chest—•
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Gastro-intestinal—■
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Bones and joints—■
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V. D. Division	
Other-
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Fluoroscope—■
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V. D. Division	
Electrocardiogram-
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V. D. Division	
Indian Department examinations
Lipiodol injection—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
1,771
16,192
643
76
81
271
253
357
1,070
11
27
79
55
30
37
15
3,255
7,296
263
135
44
288
180
11
108
4,347
2,223
1,702
13
10
44
1
77
18
69
59
52
11
!,340
656
49
7
6,062
448
5,192
147
24
22
13
143
21
12
12
1
1,941
1,975
16
286
765
81
4,415
1,449
30
754
497
215
1,047
37,695
5,225
27,767
643
102
244
339
276
454
1,243
22
27
17
186
5
131
30
3
104
27
15,348
11,457
263
184
51
288
226
16
110
Source: X-ray Ledger T.B. 73. I 38
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Some increases were noted this year in the number of laboratory tests performed
for out-patients, and a slight decrease in services rendered to in-patients was noted.
However, generally, no substantial changes occurred in the number of tests performed
during 1949.
Table 10.—Laboratory Report. 1949.
Vancouver.
Tranquille.
Victoria.
St.
Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital.
New Westminster.
Jericho
Beach.
Total.
Sputum tests—
Routine—
In-patient..	
Out-patient	
Concentrated—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Stomach washings—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Guinea-pig inoculations—
In-patient	
Outpatient	
Blood tests—•
Sedimentations—
In-patient	
Out-patient :	
V.D. Division...	
Haemoglobin—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division	
Red-blood count—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division	
White-blood count—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division	
Differential—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division	
Blood chemistry	
V.D. Division	
Other special blood tests
V.D. Division	
Kahn—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Urinalysis—
Routine—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
V.D. Division	
Quantitative—
In-patient	
Out-patient ■
V.D. Division	
Vital capacity	
Basal metabolism	
Smear	
Cultures-
Sputum—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Other—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Other tests	
10,550
108
5
1,640
1,408
3,344
17
3,634
318
214
53
102
445
341
27
23
98
126
451
379
137
1
42
829
14,941
109
1,593
287
1
242
1,849
1,616
697
256
865
208
243
42
431
190
172
682
61
178
42
510
237
175
691
54
180
42
498
232
147
424
2
518
682
54
21
466
181
42
14
9
360
111
342
95
71
4
2,478
521
101
1,615
121
311
2
212
34
10
147
12
372  .
107
16
464
1
3
5
252
65
12
51
167
38
165
165
1
923
4
68
7
379
39
188
2,748
79
267
20
694
24
16
441
28
75
57
70
10
125
6
121
6
72
29
511
34
39
48
2,821
11,963
7,192
388
529
638
523
630
3,293
19,853
110
2,987
1,004
256
1,440
303
172
1,590
339
175
1,560
334
147
487
2
993
938
239
5.182
678
101
295
255
31
850
332
116
340
108
1,102
Source:  Daily Laboratory Ledger T.B. 72. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 39
There was a decrease in the number of bronchoscopic examinations carried out in
the clinics, while the number of bronchoscopies performed in institutions remained
substantially the same as in 1948. The total number in 1949 was 678, compared with
700 in 1948.
Chart 6.—Showing the Number of Bronchoscopies given by Institutions
and Clinics, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
800
750
700
650
600
550
500
450
400
350
300
250
200
150
100
50
TOTAL
n
c
45     46     47     48     49
INSTITUTIONS
IIII
45      46     47     48     49
n
ii
45     46     47    48    49 I 40
department of health and welfare.
Table 11.—Number of Bronchoscopies by Institutions and Clinics,
1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Total.
Institutions.
Clinics.
Year.
Total.
Tranquille.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
Total.
Tranquille.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
Total.
Tranquille.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
1945	
1946	
285
353
452
700
683
9
3
72
258
210
274
334
366
415
437
2
16
14
27
36
127
174
297
552
554
9
3
72
252
210
117
160
211
273
308
1
11
14
27
36
158
179
155
148
129
6
157
174
155
142
129
1
5
1947	
1948	
1949	
Source: Institutional Ledger T.B. 70 and Clinic Ledger T.B. 71.
The number of patient-visits to all clinics increased from 3,281 to 1948 to 3,972
in 1949.   The greatest increases occurred at the Vancouver and Jericho Beach Clinics.
Table 12.—Dental Report, 1949.
Vancouver.*      Tranquille. Victoria.       Jericho Beach. Total
Patient-visits—
In-patient	
Out-patient....	
Examinations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Consultations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Extractions—
In-patient .....
Out-patient	
Fillings, including cement bases-
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Prophylactic treatment—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Surgical removal, impacted teeth—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Denture fittings—
In-patient :	
Out-patient	
Other	
1,382
541
185
72
62
21
406
190
827
379
160
28
421
233
3,383
1,908
16
327
13
78
582
7
SO
168
4
77
1,029
46
355
108
136
928
3,972
570
582
74
207
21
1,194
197
1,755
383
424
24
3
680
235
5,397
* Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source: Ledger T.B. 74. TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 41
There were slight increases in the number of visits to and examinations in the
clinics during 1949.
Table 13.—Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat Report, 1949.
Vancouver.       Tranquille. Victoria.
Total.
Patient-visits—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Eye-
Examinations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Prescriptions—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Refractions—
In-patient	
Out-patient.....	
Other treatments—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Consultations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Ear, nose, and throat—
Examinations—■
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Treatments—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Consultations—
In-patient	
Out-patient	
Surgical procedures	
Source : Ledger T.B. 75
277
62
162
3
108
119
59
14
290
139
1
1
34
163
110
22
10
589
62
311
4
143
1
153
288
59 I 42
department of health and welfare.
INSTITUTIONS—SUMMARIES.
The number of patient-days decreased from 272,107 in 1948 to 266,894 in 1949.
The decrease occurred in all tuberculosis institutions except St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital, which shows a slight increase. One of the main reasons for the decrease in
patient-days was the fact that for a period of fourteen weeks during the year the
thirty-five beds in the isolation hospital in Vancouver were not available to the Division.
During the poliomyelitis epidemic these beds were taken over by the City of Vancouver.
There has been a considerable increase in the number of pneumoperitoneum treatments,
particularly the number of refills. A decrease occurred in the number of phrenic crush
treatments—from 75 in 1948 to 38 in 1949.
Table 14.—
Institutions—General Sum
MARY, 1949.
Item.
Vancouver.
Tranquille.
Victoria.
St. Joseph's
Oriental
Hospital.
Jericho
Beach.
Total.
76,497
340
348
98
2,689
114,610
355
341
169
5,986
26,993
139
135
36
1,175
16,167
92-.
78
16
672
32,627
60
82
9
544
266,894
984
Treatments—
Pneumothoraces—
Initial	
Refill	
Oleothorax—
328
11,066
Refill	
19
5
85
9
Pneumoperitoneum—
19
697
129
56
54
27
1
7
3
23
2
12
41
11
363
83
8
330
40
Refill	
Aspirations	
Thoracoplasties—
Stage 1	
26
112
28
30
27
4
1
1
1,501
373
84
Stage 2	
StageS	
54
Stage 4	
5
Schede	
8
Phrenic—
1
2
12
180
25
Intrapleural pneumolysis	
114
56
210
166
308
164
1
597
19
145
36
554
1,388
343
715
Other treatments	
Other surgical treatments	
93
8
8
690
29
175
1
1
1
15
6
Source:   Clinic Ledgers T.l
Discharge Form T.B. 79.
71 and T.B. 41 and Institutional Ledger T.B. 70 ;   Admission Form T.B. 78 and TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 43
An increase in the total number of refill pneumothoraces occurred in 1949. The
number of pneumothorax refills given in the stationary clinics accounted for the largest
increase. The number of successful initial pneumothoraces decreased slightly from the
previous year.
Chart 7.—Showing the Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) given
by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1945 to 1949,
inclusive.
r
i
9       ■       HTT
IIII
STATIONARY
CLINICS
45  46  47  4B  4.      45  46   47  48  49      45  46  47  48  4.      45  46  47  4B  49 I 44
department of health and welfare.
Table 15.—Number of Pneumothoraces (Initial and Refill) given by Institutions, Stationary Clinics, and Travelling Clinics, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Total.
Initial.
Refill.
Year.
Total
Initial.
Institutions.
Stationary
Clinics.
Travelling
Clinics.
Total
Refill.
Institutions.
Stationary
Clinics.
Travelling.
Clinics.
1945	
17,121
21,883
21,919
21,788
22,393
327
■413
354
339
334
325
397
350
336
328
1
5
1
2
5
1
11
3
1
1
16,794
21,470
9,678
12,347
1? 698
6,892
8,799
8,616
8,617
10,873
224
1946	
324
1947	
251
1948	
21,449     |     12,745
22.0R9     :      11066
87
1949	
120
Source:   Clinic Ledgers T.B. 71 and T.B. 41 and Institutional Ledger T.B. 70.
Table 16.—Institutions—Patient Status.
(As of December 31st, 1949.)
Total.
Tranquille.
Vancouver.*
Victoria.
Jericho Beach.
Item.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Cases on pneumothorax—
222
297
30.7
103
15
32.7
_74
217
28.9
31
64
44.3
14
1
16 9
Number.
Number.
Number.
Number.
Number.
Status of patients in residence—
Patients in residence, December
31st, 1949	
724
14
2
2
9
152
323
118
136
359
152
315
9
2
1
62
144
43
66
.134
66
256
2
9
7
57
R9
70
3
19
32
12
9
43
33
83
Cases with effusion with pneumo-
Cases    with    effusion     without
Cases   of  tuberculous   empyema
Cases  of  tuberculous  empyema
1
Cases with positive sputum with
14
Cases with positive sputum with-
58
60
3
Cases    with    negative    sputum
52
139
48
9
Cases   receiving   occupational
43
5
* Includes St. Joseph's Oriental
Source:   Clinic Ledgers T.B. 4
Hospit
and T
ll-
B. 71 an
d Instit
jtional L
edger T.B. 70. <-    ■■   • :■...  ■-.;.--.-
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 45
In 1949, in the five institutions, there were 973 admissions, compared to 814.in
1948. The majority (33.7 per cent.) of those admitted were in the 20-29 age-group.
There was an increase in the percentage of admissions in the age-groups from 40 to
69 years.
Chart 8.—Showing Admissions to Institutions by Age on Admission and Percentage of Total Admissions in each Age-group, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
20-29
YRS.
30-39
YRS.
\                  40-49
YRS.
50-59   YRS.
10-19     YRS
Dili
ill
60-69   YRS.
■■■ll
70 YRi
AND  OVER
0-9     YRS.
iiiii
HI
Hill
■ll
_
jiiii_
111
illli
Illll
4546474849       4546474649       4546474849        4546474849        4546474849        4546474649        4546474849        45 46 47 48 49
Table 17.—Admissions by Age and Percentage of Total Admissions in each
Age-group, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
1949.
Age-group.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
0-9	
1
67
334
225
114
83
53
11
1
0.1
7.5
37.6
25.4
12.8
9.3
6.0
1.2
0.1
59
314
217
105
79
61
14
2
6.9
36.9
25.6
12.4
9.4
7.3
1.3
0.2
1
53
333
241
120
82
51
17
0.1
5.9
37.1
26.8
13.4
9.1
5.7
1.9
56
287
214
115
68
49
22
3
6.9
35.2
26.3
14.1  .
8.4
6.0
2.7
0.4
2
56
328
243
157
89
70
25
3
0.2
10 19            	
5.8
20-29	
33.7
30-39      .....
25.0
40 49	
16.1
50-59	
9.1
60 69        	
7.2
2.6
0.3
889    1    100.0
851
100.0
898   !   100.0
814
100.0
973
100.0
■
Source:; Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. The number of moderately advanced cases exceeded other conditions in all age-
groups from 15 years and over in 1949. In the younger age-groups (1-14) primary
and minimal stages exceed the more advanced stages.
Chart 9.—Showing Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis and Age
on Admission, 1949.
10-19   YRS
s
^   FAR  A
20-29  YRS.
30-39  YRS.
40-49 YRS.
50-59 YRS.
60-69 YRS
MINIMAL
I
MODERATELY   ADVANCED
DVANCED
MINIMAL
MODERATELY
ADVANCED
MODERATELY ADVANCED
MODERATELY   ADVANCED
MODERATELY   ADVANCED
I
FAR  ADVANCED
tMINIMAL
|    MODER
j    FAR   A
70COVER   Ifgij    MODERATELY   ADVANCED
I I
FAR   ADVANCED
0 20 40 60 60 100 120 140 160 180
NO. OF ADMISSIONS . *
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 47
As was the case in 1948, females predominate in the earlier age-groups, while
males exceed females in all other age-groups. In the female age-range 10-29 years, the
number of minimal cases (22.6 per cent.) was highest, while for the 30 and over age-
range, moderately advanced cases (22.4 per cent.) exceeded all others. Moderately
advanced cases (41.1 per cent.) exceed all other conditions in males for the 10-59 age-
range. The largest number of male admissions were moderately advanced cases in the
40-49 age-group. For females, the majority of admissions occurred in the 30-39
age-group.
Table 18.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Age, 1949.
Diagnosis.
Age-group.
5.
ct
J
tt
S
rt
J
•6
V
u
a
_. a
_! >
rr ct
to
OJ             r.
a  •§
p.
§3
Sri   S
igl
J_stl
En SW
to
QJ
tn
O
u a
2 B
op
i
to
>»
.a
"3
43
O
H
+j
•3
C
ct
rt
C5
 M.
F.
 M.
1
1
2
F.
2
..M.
2
4
1
2
3
1
1
1
1
7
9
F.
16
 M.
3
15
8
10
2
1
1
13
27
F.
40
 M.
1
18
42
26
37
19
13
1
1
1
63
96
F.
159
 M.
25
40
35
37
8
18
1
3
2
71
98
F.
169
M
23
33
49
69
30
35
1
3
103
140
F.
243
.M.
24
11
61
17'
31
10
3
119
38
F.
157
M
1
9
4
38
3
25
3
1
1
4
79
10
F.
89
 M.
4
1
25
9
27
1
3
59
11
F.
70
 M.
F.
1
3
10
9
2
20
5
25
 .....M.
2
1
1
2
F.
M.
3
3
6
108
151
255
185
151
84
2
1
1
2
15
9
535
438
F.
9
259
440
235
3
3
24
973
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. I 48
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
There was an increase in the number of males and females of British origin
admitted in 1949. Increases occurred in the other races with the exception of the
Chinese, which showed a decrease. The largest increase occurred among those of
Japanese racial origin. The increase in Japanese admission was caused by the fact
that for the first time since 1942 Japanese were admitted to Provincial sanatoria.
During the previous seven years all Japanese were admitted to New Denver Sanatorium, which was operated by the Federal Government.
Table 19.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Eacial Origin, 1949.
Diagnosis.
Racial Origin.
Primary.
Minimal.
Moderately advanced.
Far advanced.
Tbc.
Pleurisy
with
Effusion.
Tbc.
Pleurisy
without
Effusion.
Other
Diagnoses.
Total.
F.
T.
4
.4
68
92
160
152
105
258
83
46
129
1
1
2
1
2
3
10
5
15
315
255
570
F.
T.
3
3
29
41
70
85
62
147
50
26
76
1
1
4
3
7
172
132 •
304
Chinese   '. M.
F.
T.
—
7
»
14
10
3
13
1
1
2
18
11
29
F.
T.
2
3
5
3
6
9
17
3
20
22
12
34
Hindu    M.
F.
T.
2
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
5
F.
T.
2
2
5
5
4
8
12
1
8
9
5
23
28
Not stated  M.
F.
T.
2
1
3
2
1
3
Totals  M.
F.
3
6
108
151
255
185
151
84
2
1
1
2
15
9
535
438
9
259
440
235
3
..
24
973
* Includes United States.
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. tuberculosis control report, 1949. i 49
Table 20.—Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Type of Case, 1949.
Diagnosis.
Type of Case.
Primary.
Minimal.
Moderately advanced.
Tbc.
Tbc.
Pleurisy
without
Effusion.
Other
Diagnoses.
Total
by Sex.
vanced.
with
Effusion.
Total.
New case  M.
F.
Review   M.
F.
F.
1
2
5
1
77
97
9
20
22
34
143
99
19
26
93
60
76
41
5
6
70
37
2
1
1
2
5
2
7
5
3
2
304
243
42
62
189
133
547
104
322
Totals   M.
F.
3
6
108
151
255
185
151
84
2
1
1
2
15
9
535
438
9
259
440
235
3
3
24
973
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78.
The situation noted last year, where a large percentage of those admitted were
moderately advanced cases, again prevailed. However, small increases in minimal and
far advanced conditions are noted. Of the total 117 far advanced cases, 60 per cent,
were admitted to the Vancouver institution. Tranquille admitted 45 per cent, of the
total 242 moderately advanced cases.
Table 21.
—First Admissions
by Institution and
Diagnosis, 1949.
Total.
Institution.
Diagnosis.
Tranquille.
Vancouver.*
Victoria.
Jericho Beach.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
Number.
Per
Cent.
1
174
242
117
6
0.2
31.8
44.2
21.4
1.1
1
97
110
33
5
6
0.4
38.5
43.6
13.1
2.0
2.4
50
78
70
1
1
25.0
39.0
35.0
0.5
0.5
21
37
9
31.4
55.2
13.4
6
17
5
21 4
60.7
17.9
7    1        1.3
Totals	
547
100.0
252
100.0
200
100.0
67
100.0
28
loo.o
* Includes St. Joseph's Oriental Hospital.
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. I 50
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Chart 10.—Showing First Admissions to Institutions by Institution
and Diagnosis, 1949.
NO. OF FIRST
ADMISSIONS
250
200
150
100
MINIMAL MOD. ADV. FAR   ADV.        OTHER  DIAC. Chart 11.—Showing First Admissions to Institutions by Diagnosis (Percentage
Distribution) for the Years 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
1945 I 52
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 22.—First Admissions by Diagnosis (Percentage Distribution) for the
Years 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
1949.
Diagnosis.
Num-       Per
ber.    i   Cent.
Num-        Per
ber.     '   Cent.
Num-        Per
ber.         Cent.
Num-  ;     Per
ber.         Cent.
Num-        Per
ber.     !   Cent.
1
181
238
158
8
25
0.2
29.6
39.0
25.9
1.3
4.0
3
156
228
130
6
11
0.6
29.2
42.7
24.3
1.1
2.1
5
137
241
145
6
12
0.9
25.1
44.1
26.6
1.1
2.2
!
3               0.6
1    j        0.2
148
226
98
4
7
30.5
46.5
20.2
0.8
1.4
174    j      31.8
242    1      44.2
117    |      21.4
6    |         1.1
7    j        1.3
Totals    	
611
100.0
534
100.0
546
100.0
486
100.0
547    |    100.0
I
Source : Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78.
There were 547 first admissions to tuberculosis institutions during 1949. Of the
total minimal cases, 54.6 per cent, were admitted within one month after application.
Similarly, 64.9 per cent, of the total moderately advanced cases and 80.3 per cent, of the
total far advanced cases were admitted within the same interval.
Table 23.-
-First Admissions by Diagnosis, Sex, and Time between Application
and Admission, 1949.
Length of Time between Application and Admission.
Diagnosis.
*_i
>
u
O
Zrr
<_ +J
■a a
c o
ED
+J
-fi
fl
CO o
£
-? 0
i g
(fl
rtt
C
io o
4,g
r.
-t->
tJ
kj*5
CO
eoS
m
is
[/_
rfi
"r.    «"
.go.
O
_.
rOrr
Primary   M.
F.
5
8
12
7
16
4
2
3
1
38
44
94
44
50
24
2
1
1
2
1
19
20
22
24
5
8
1
12
13
7
12
3
2
1
1
3
6
2
2
3
1
....
i
i
1
l
1
....
	
1 1    1
1
8
5
1
F.
F.
Far advanced M.
F.
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion M.
F.
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion M.
F.
Other diagnoses  M.
F.
2
77
97
141
101
76
41
2
1
1
2
5
2
174
242
117
3
3
7
....
Totals   M.
F.
36
22
187
113
46
54
22
27
2
13
4
8
3  |    1
3 |    1
2
1
1 1 302 i
1  j 245     	
58
300   1   100   1   49
15
12
R   1      9.   1      9
1
9   1                547
Source: Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.                                              I 53
Chart 12.—Showing the Institutional Patient-days of the Division of
Tuberculosis Control for the Years 1940 to 1949, inclusive.
260
240
220
200
ISO
160
140
120
100
	
TO
.AL
1
....
,—*•
TRANQUI1
LE
y
S
>
y
•y-
.*
*'
\
80
__.__..
^^ ■» ^^
VANCOUVER
+ '
-**"
60
—
40
20
VICTORIA
0
19
40               4
1                   4
2                  4
3                 4
4                 4
5                 4
6                 4
7                    4
8                   1,
149 I 54
department of health and welfare.
Decreases in the number of institutional patient-days are noted in all institutions.
The large decrease which is shown for Vancouver is accounted for in part by the fact
that during the poliomyelitis epidemic thirty-five beds in the isolation hospital were
taken over by the City of Vancouver.
Table 24.—Institutional Patient-days of the Division of Tuberculosis
Control for the Years 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Year.
Total.
Tranquille.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
Jericho
Beach.
1945        .    .                              	
226,994
244,264
255,688
272,107
266,894
117,866
121,197
118,545
115,819
114,610
83,111
96,503
110,584
128,825
92,664
26,017
26,564
26,559
27,463
26,993
1946               	
1947	
13,807*
1948                     	
33,062
1949	
32,627
* As the Jericho Beach unit opened in July, 1947, this figure is for part of the year only.
Source:  Institutional Summary, 1949.
Table 25.—Admissions to Institutions by Year op Arrival in British Columbia,
Diagnosis and Type of Case, 1949.
Diagnosis.
Year and Type of Case.
Primary.
Minimal.
Moderately advanced.
Far advanced.
Tbc.
Pleurisy
with
Effusion.
Tbc.
Pleurisy
without
Effusion.
Other
Diagnoses.
Total.
New—•
Prior to 1941    	
1
118
6
3
5
4
6
12
10
6
1
3
177
4
6
6
8
8
7
13
9
1
3
91
2
2
2
5
2
6
1
4
2
2
1
2
	
1
2
2
1
1
1
393
1941	
12
1942              	
13
1943               	
13
1944	
18
1945	
16
1946	
26
1947	
1948                    	
20
1949                     	
Totals          	
1
174
242
117
3
3
7
547
Review—
Prior to 1941	
6
•     1
23
1
2
2
1
35
2
1
3
1
2
1
11
5
1
1
1
4
80
1941	
1942	
1943	
1944	
1945	
1946	
1947	
1948	
1949	
5
Totals           	
7
29
45
11
	
12
104
Readmission—•
Prior to 1941	
1
38
4
3
1
1
2
3
1
1
	
2
112
7
8
6
2
4
3
2
3
1
5
91
2
2
2
1
1
3
1
1
3
5
	
247
13
1941	
1942	
1943	
9
1944	
1945	
7
9
4
4
2
1946	
1947	
1948 	
1949	
Totals	
1
56
153
107
	
	
5
322
9
259
440
235
3
3
24
973
Source : Institutions, Admissions, Form T.B. 78. TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
INSTITUTIONS—DISCHARGES.
I 55
Chart 13.—Showing Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge,
1945 to 1949, inclusive. '
*
t
(
-UIESCENT
*
*
*
.^_
-»
APR ARRE
•s.
/
STED        X
/
V
ARRESTED
.
OEAD
+ +                    x   IMPROVED
UNIMPRO
\
\
\
'ED ___,
Table 26.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge,
1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Condition.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
1949.
No.
Per
Cent.
No.
Per
Cent.
No.
Per
Cent.
No.
Per
Cent.
No.
Per
Cent.
23
104
269
126
78
182
36
2.8
12.7
32.9
15.4
9.5
22.3
4.4
29
79
269
154
88
188
32
3.5
9.4
32.0
18.4
10.5
22.4
3.8
28
125
265
79
89
195
29
3.5
15.4
32.7
9.8
11.0
24.0
3.6
20
112
313
106
86
148
31
2.5
13.7
38.4
13.0
10.5
18.1
3.8
26
151
377
114
131
149
33
2.7
15.4
38.4
11.6
13.3
15.2
3.4
818
100.0
839
100.0
810
100.0
816
100.0
981
100.0
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79. I 56
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
The number of discharges increased from 816 in 1948 to 981 in 1949. Of those
discharged, 18 per cent, were apparently arrested or arrested, 38.4 per cent, were
quiescent, 11.6 per cent, were active improved, 13.3 per cent, were active unimproved,
and 15 per cent, were dead.
Table 27.-
-Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and
Length of Treatment during Previous Admissions, 1949.
Length of Treatment during Previous Admissions.
Condition on Discharge.
Under 1
Month.
1-4
Months.
4-8
Months.
8-12
Months.
1-2
Years.
2-3
Years.
3-5
Years.
Over 5
Years.
Not ad
mitted
before.
Total
by Sex.
Total.
Apparently cured  M.
F.
Arrested   M.
F.
Apparently arrested ..M.
F.
3
5
2
2
3
2
1
3
3
2
6
2
1
3
2
3
14
11
5
1
8
2
7
1
1
1
4
11
7
18
20
6
3
4
4
6
8
1
1
1
2
5
6
2
5
2
5
5
1
3
4
3
1
1
1
6
6
46
48
101
119
52
33
39
34
62
33
2
3
2
12
6
2
1
12
14
79
72
177
200
72
42
77
54
97
52
3
4
2
14
7
3
26
151
Quiescent    M.
F.
Active improved  M.
F.
Active unimproved ....M.
F.
Dead  M.
F.
Non-pulmonary   M.
F.
Non-tuberculous    M.
F.
F.
13
1
1
9
10
4
1
12
2
2
5
1
8
3
9
2
5
1
4
3
Z
...
6
1
1
2
1
377
114
131
149
3
6
21
Totals    M.
F.
8
10
31
27
35
20
41
18
48
46
27
21
18
12
6
8
323
282
537
444
Grand totals	
18
58
55
59
94
48    [     30
1
14
605
981
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79. tuberculosis control REPORT, 1949.
I 57
Table 28.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and
Length of Last Stay in Institution, 1949.
Length op Last Stay in Institution.
Condition on Discharge.
Under 1
Month.
1-4
Months.
4-8          8-12
Months. Months.
1-2
Years.
2-3
Years.
3-5
Years.
Over 5
Years.
Not
stated.
Total
by Sex.
Total.
Apparently cured          M.
F.
Arrested   M.
F.
Apparently arrested ..M.
F.
Quiescent M.
F.
Active improved  M.
F.
Active unimproved  ....M.
F.
Dead  M.
F.
Non-pulmonary   M.
F.
Non-tuberculous    M.
F.
Undiagnosed    M.
F.
1
4
7
10
10
27
43
4
5
22
19
27
6
3
2
7
4
2
1
13
10
27
23
14
22
9
21
7
3
1
2
1
1
1
2
13
15
36
59
22
15
11
9
11
10
2
1
3
2
11
11
29
26
15
8
5
4
5
11
1
1
2
23
16
42
40
13
7
9
9
14
9
1
2
5
7
9
5
2
2
3
4
12
3
3
2
6
4
1  ■
4
6
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
12
14
79
72
177
200
72
42
77
54
97
52
3
4
2
14
7
3
26
151
377
114
131
149
3
6
21
Totals    M.
F.
105
96
105
56
96
112
68
63
103
83
33
21
22
8
5
4
1
537
444
Grand totals	
201      |    161
1
208
131
186    |     54
1
30
9
If,.
1
981
Source:  Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79.
Table 29.—Discharges from Institutions by Condition on Discharge, Sex, and
Home Condition, 1949.
Condition on Discharge.
Active.
n
CJ
It
0J
'3
a
Inactive.
T3
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9
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Home Condition.
13
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rt
a
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9
43
O
Satisfactory    M.
F.
Unsatisfactory    M.
F.
Unknown    M.
F.
55
34
6
3
11
5
45
36
11
9
21
9
146
193
2
2
29
5
ll
14
1
76
67
3
5
2
1
2
2
95
50
3
2
1
2
1
9
5
1
5
1
351
353
19
15
167
76
704
34
243
Totals    M.
F.
72
42
77
54
177
200
12
14
79
72
2
1
97     |       3
52     j     ....
4
2
14
7
537
444
114     I   131
377
26
151
3
149
3
6
21     I     	
981
Source: Institutions, Discharges, Form T.B. 79. 1 58
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
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rt    rt    OJ   rrt TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 61
KNOWN CASES OF TUBERCULOSIS.
There were 18,483 known cases of tuberculosis on record in 1949. This represents
an increase of 9 per cent, over 1948 and a 28-per-cent increase over 1945. The other-
than-Indian known cases increased 8 per cent.—from 14,528 in 1948 to 15,738 in 1949.
The Indian known cases increased 20 per cent.—from 2,284 to 2,745.
Table 33.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Year.
Area
1.
Area
2.
Area
3.
Area
4.
Area
5.
Area
6.
Area
7.
Area
8.
Area
9.
Area
10.
Area
not
stated.
Total.
Total, 1945    	
173
238
250
287
313
595
622
743
768
802
530
586
739
767
871
7,757
8,251
8,802
9,399
10,038
1,928
1,976
2,230
2,447
2,641
620
743
795
832
908
238
274
302
364
404
535
529
513
662
822
519
525
596
719
896
46
57
63
79
141
175
268
375
488
647
13,116
1946	
14,069
1947	
15,408
1948	
16,812
1949    	
18,483
Table 34.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1945 to
1949, inclusive.
Year.
Area
1.
Area
2.
Area
3.
Area
4.
Area
5.
Area
6.
Area
7.
Area
8.
Area
9.
Area
10.
Area
not
stated.
Total.
Other than Indians—
1945	
115
184
205
239
260
590
616
739
764
798
483
540
687
714
799
7,382
7,875
8,385
8,978
9,607
1,580
1,653
1,867
2,018
2,152
369
501
516
546
573
100
137
157
179
179
181
217
237
285
330
213
229
231
274
327
39
48
48
57
76
160
254
358
474
637
11,212
1946 ....
12,254
1947	
13,430
1948	
1949	
14,528
15,738
Table 35.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, as at December 31st, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Year.
Area
1.
Area
2.
Area
3.
Area
4.
Area
5.
Area
6.
Area
7.
Area
8.
Area
9.
Area
10.
Area
not
stated.
Total.
Indians only—
1945	
58
54
45
48
53
5
6
4
4
4
47
46
52
53
72
375
376
417
421
431
348
323
363
429
489
251
242
279
286
335
138
137
145
185
225
354
312
276
377
492
306
296
365
445
569
7
9
15
22
65
15
14
17
14
10
1,904
1946	
1947*	
1948*	
1,815
1,978
2,284
1949* 	
2,745
* These figures include:   1947, 141 Indians of white status;  1948,
of white status.
Indians of white status ;   1949, 93 Indians I 62
department of health and welfare.
Table 36.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1949.
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
137
1
21
36
16
63
420
2
19
12
1
103
47
26
22
4
5
11
76
92
429
13
3
9
31
9
99
12
6
5
58
3
18
63
100
5,346
24
207
45
60
243
22
1
1
17
7
14
71
70
23
16
19
341
149
31
4
11
13
83
3
4
145
3,538
123
1
38
23
18
43
378
8
21
11
1
93
33
23
34
1
3
11
64
75
370
9
4
22
7
85
7
7
3
51
1
26
69
79
4,261
23
154
45
83
187
25
3
11
10
16
48
46
20
24
17
336
111
14
5
12
9
76
2
7
106
2,738
260
2
59
59
34
106
798
10
40
23
2
196
80
49
56
5
8
22
140
167
799
22
3
13
53
16
184
19
13
8
109
4
44
132
179
9,607
47
361
90
143
430
47
1
4
28
17
30
119
116
43
40
36
677
260
45
9
23
22
159
5
11
251
6,276
Area No. 4—Continued.
76
108
1,191
22
4
2
5
16
12
30
42
18
10
79
16
55
6
50
2
166
3
421
232
305
119
6
11
4
21
10
134
93
5
88
183
7
5
37
24
5
8
9
88
182
136
5
8
33
37
13
1
4
19
388
54
79
961
30
4
7
2
12
14
32
28
24
8
61
18
35
47
3
107
2
324
200
268
111
4
4
12
6
.    16
4
111
86
2
5
79
147
7
1
4
37
12
16
7
4
59
145
92
2
15
36
39
14
7
3
15
249
130
187
2,152
52
8
9
7
28
26
62
70
42
18
140
34
Oak Bay	
90
Parksville	
9
97
5
273
Toflno	
5
745
432
573
230
10
4
Merritt	
23
10
37
Salmon Arm District	
14
245
Area No. 7	
179
2
Westview	
10
167
330
Chilliwack City	
Burns Lake	
14
1
McBride	
9
74
36
21
15
13
Kent..      	
Unorganized parts	
147
327
228
7
23
69
76
27
Fort St. John	
g
7
34
637
8,711
7,027
15,738
419
374
793 TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 63
Table 37.—Known Cases of Tuberculosis by Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1949.
(Indians only.*)
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
25
8
17
4
4
42
8
1
1
4
8
20
217
2
11
27
1
4
1
1
33
3
3
3
1
1
22
4
3
1
4
8
84
225
20
32
2
3
28
11
17
30
10
1
4
4
11
214
1
5
22
2
2
1
1
32
2
4
1
1
31
5
5
2
2
7
2
86
264
13
32
3
1
53
19
34
4
4
72
18
2
1
8
12
31
431
16
49
3
6
2
2
65
5
7
1
3
2
1
53
9
8
3
6
15
2
170
489
33
64
5
4
Area No. 5—Continued.
15
1
2
7
5
6
8
124
168
19
11
9
2
7
120
104
104
237
3
9
225
269
5
264
33
4
29
5
■
1
19
1
8
10
2
16
8
2
148
167
19
15
12
10
8
103
121
121
255
2
1
6
246
300
4
1
295
32
27
5
1
Duncan	
34
2
1
15
15
Port Alberni	
8
24
Toflno	
Victoria	
8
2
272
335
Chilliwack City	
38
26
21
Delta	
12
15
223
Kent	
225
225
492
Quesnel	
Smithers	
2
1
3
15
471
569
9
Terrace	
1
559
65
Fort St. John	
9
56
10
1,329
1,416
2,745
2
5
7
* These figures include 93 Indians of white status.
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1.
Table 38.—Rate per 100,000 Population of Known Cases of Tuberculosis in
British Columbia, by Age-groups and Sex, 1949.
(Excluding Indians.)
Population.
0-4
Years.
5-9
Years.
10-14
Years.
15-19
Years.
20-24
Years.
25-29
Years.
30-39
Years.
40-49      50-59
Years.    Years.
60-69
Years.
70-79
Years.
80 and
over.
Total.
Total	
87.2
90.3
83.8
321.1
346.4
295.4
376.9
352.9
401.3
501.0
452.7
550.4
1,121.8
932.7
1,299.3
1,976.0
1,877.3
2,070.4
2,248.5
1,973.0
2,523.7
I
2,304.3 j 1,829.8
2,458.3 [ 2,272.7
2,130.5 1 1,309.2
1,981.6
2,547.4
1,242.3
1,475.1
1,840.7
985.9
1,301.1
1,702.5
820.9
1,449.8
1,546.5
Female	
1,345.5 I 64
DEPARTMENT  OF  HEALTH AND WELFARE.
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tuberculosis control report,
1949.
I 65
There were increases in the number of known cases for all types of infection in all
age-groups, with the exception of the 15-19 and 20-24 age-groups.   For primary cases
the 0-4 age-group showed the largest increase over the 1948  figure—the increase
occurred in the primary quiescent group.    For the minimal cases the number apparently
arrested increased by 14 per cent, over the previous year, the increase being particularly
noticeable   in   the   40-49   age-group.    The   moderately   advanced   cases   which   were
diagnosed as arrested showed the largest increase in this age-group, while apparently
arrested cases for the same infection showed the largest increase over last year in the
25-29 age-group.   The greatest increase over 1949 for the far advanced cases occurred
in the older age-groups.
Table 39.—Known Cases
of Tuberculosis by Type of Infection, Present
Condition, and Age-group, 1949.
(Excluding Indians.)
: '"' ' ' '■
Agb-croup.
to
M_
Diagnosis.
u
s
><
1
O
h
—
at
1
u.
2S
i 1
■* g
a* rl
==£
MP*
? 1
col*
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ftt
°_s
f 1
8
fl _;
o >
OO  0
4J-*J
O «
rr   W
"3-  .
+j
0
bi
81
154
135
80
76
38
31
11
7
3
3
6
625
Apparently cured	
1
17
13
10
5
3
6
4
2
1
62
11
28
46
34
44
20
7
4
2
1
197
Apparently arrested	
16
26
15
9
3
2
2
3
2
78
19
27
22
8
9
4
3
2
1
2
1
1
81
24
2
4
Active unimproved	
12
27
14
1
5
1
60
Active not stated-	
1
1
Condition not stated	
20
25
17
13
14
9
15
4
1
1
1
2
122
2
23
34
135
452
966
2,124
1,685
1,218
1,182
405
101
62
8,389
Apparently cured	
2
8
55
179
656
631
468
467
168
42
14
2,690
Arrested	
1
10
17
127
345
744
591
455
405
143
26
15
2,879
Apparently arrested:.-.
2
13
8
36
106
202
325
203
130
147
44
17
10
1,243
Quiescent.	
1
4
23
69
86
146
79
49
39
20
4
4
624
Active improved	
1
1
19
22
77
56
34
37
4
2
4
257
Active unimproved	
3
24
55
93
88
49
39
25
8
1
385
3
1
4
2
1
1
2
14
Condition not stated	
8
6
23
20
39
84
74
42
61
18
10
12
397
Moderately advanced	
11
14
50
222
459
954
718
547
522
212
42
31
3,782
Apparently cured	
5
14
92
94
82
61
33
4
385
1
2
6
5
22
45
96
124
258
218
248
113
184
71
187
71
71
23
20
6
7
5
1,099
£84
Apparently arrested	
3
1
13
47
78
153
90
79
84
35
3
586
Active improved	
10
34
51
19
28
14
10
2
2
170
Active unimproved	
4
18
79
99
143
121
78
76
28
8
4
658
1
6
7
1
7
2
12
1
13
2
37
2
31
3
22
29
1
11
1
1
1
9
15
185
Condition not stated:	
2
9
7
1
11
65
120
2
331
45
313
37
200
26
183
14
78
8
16
2
17
1,352
135
Apparently cured	
1
2
4
9
13
22
68
56
76
43
59
15
40
14
21
5
2
1
2
285
168
Apparently arrested	
10
20
43
43
22
36
8
1
183
1
4
10
20
14
7
4
6
1
67
Active unimproved	
2
1
4
30
43
89
81
63
65
25
6
5
414
Active not stated	
1
2
1
1
1
2
8
Condition not stated	
8
4
2
7
9
9
17
8
10
5
5
8
92
Pulmonary tuberculosis
1
19
15
20
29
51
58
77
42
54
14
16
18
414
Pleurisy with effusion.	
2
5
20
22
31
12
13
7
3
1
1
117
Pleurisy without effusion.
2
2
8
10
18
11
2
2
1
56
Far advanced tuberculo
sis with silicosis	
2
5
9
6
2
24
Non-pulmonary	
7
46
47
52
92
139
212
158
88
69
38
12.
19
979
Totals	
93
262
256
355
964       1,805
3.759
2,987
2,122
2.031
759
188
157
15,738
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1.
3 I 66
department of health and welfare.
Chart 15.—Showing the Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from
Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-
than-Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
RATIO
55
in
i
i
i
OTHER THAN INDIAN
n   i
i
The improvement noted in the ratio of known cases to deaths reported last year
again showed encouraging trends. The greatest change occurred with the Indians,
where the ratio increased from 16.8:1 in 1948 to 26.9:1 in 1949.
Table 40.—Ratio of Known Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
among the total population of british columbia, the other-than-indian
Population, and the Indian Population, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Year.
~ I "             ' '
Total.
Other than Indian.
— s=
Indian.
Known
Cases.
Deaths.
Ratio.
Known
Cases.
Deaths.
Ratio.
Known
Cases.*
Deaths.t
Ratio.
1945	
13,116
14,069
15,408
16,812
18,483
525           25.0:1
11,212
12,254
13,430
14,528
15,738
363
369
375
300
302
30.9:1
33.2:1
35.8:1
48.4:1
52.1:1
1,904
1,815
1,978
2,284
2,745
162
207
159
136
102
1
118-1
1946          	
576
534
436
404
24.4:1
28.9:1
38.5:1
45.8:1
8.8
12.4
16.8
26 9
1
1947        	
1
1948    	
1
1949       	
1
* These figures include: 1947, 141 Indians of white status ; 1948, 84 Indians of white status; 1949, 93 Indians
of white status.
t These figures include deaths of: 1947, 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 7
Indians of white status. H^pg
-•■%=*"-"--.
-..;,..~- -
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 67
NOTIFICATIONS OF TUBERCULOSIS.
There was a slight increase in the number of new cases of tuberculosis registered
during 1949 over the previous year. The number of other-than-Indian new cases
increased from 1,555 in 1948 to 1,624 in 1949, while the number of Indian cases
increased from 553 in 1948 to 578 in 1949.
Table 41.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Total Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Year.
Area 1.
Area 2.
Area 3.
Area 4.
Area 5.
Area 6.
Area 7.
Total, 1945                                     	
16
86
43
44
39
140
110
163
78
62
119
105
192
71
125
985
1,308
1,087
988
1,019
393
320
416
382
298
65   .
170
168
93
95
55
1946                                     ....    	
54
1947                	
71
1948    	
74
1949..            	
69
Year.
Area 8.
Area 9.
Area 10.
Not
stated.
Ex-Province.
Total.
Total, 1945   	
108
80
175
179
210
153
66
201
139
191
11
25
34
35
75
14
9
10
7
1
20
40
56
18
18
2,079
1946                                	
2,373
2,616
1947	
1948	
2,108
1949                                                                 	
2,202
Table 42.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Other-than-Indian Population
of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Year.
Area 1.
Area 2.
Area 3.
Area 4.
Area 5.
Area 6.
Area 7.
Other than Indian—■
1945	
1946	
11
82
34
40
30
140
110
162
78
61
112
97
171
58
102
916
1,266
989
913
988
314
269
327
276
219
27
133
83
50
41
18
29
1947	
30
1948	
24
1949    .. .                	
19
Year.
Area 8.
Area 9.
Area 10.
Not
stated.
Ex-Province.
Total.
Other than Indian—
1945	
29
41
50
50
62
66
31
45
36
57
6
12
16
14
27
3
7
10
3
1
20
40
54
13
17
1,662
1946                                                                     	
2,117
1,971
1947	
1948	
1,555
1949                                                             	
1,624 I 68
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 43.—New Cases of Tuberculosis among the Indian Population of British
Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Year.
Area 1.
Area 2.
Area 3.
Area 4.
Area 5.
Area 6.
Area 7.
Indians only—•
1945	
5
4
9
4
9
1
1
7
8
21
13
23
69
42
98
75
31
79
51
89
106
79
38
37
85
43
54
37
1946 .'.	
25
1947*	
41
1948*            	
50
1949*	
50
Year.
Area 8.
Area 9.
Area 10.
Not
stated.
Ex-Province.
Total.
Indians only—
1945	
79
39
125
129
148
87
35
156
103
134
6
13
18
21
48
11
2
4
2
5
1
417
1946                                                        	
256
1947*	
645.
1948*	
553
1949*	
678
♦Includes notifications of:   1947, 21 Indians of white status:
of white status.
1948, 27 Indians of white status ;   1949, 34 Indians
Table 44.—Incidence per 1,000 Population of New Cases of Tuberculosis among
the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian Population, and the Indian Population, 1949.
Population.
Area
1.
Area
2.
Area
3.
Area
4.
Area
5.
Area
6.
Area
7.
Area
8.
Area
9.
Area
10.
Total.
Total	
l.bb
1.22
23.87
1.14
1.12
12.99
1.84
1.53
19.28
1.57
1.53
8.39
1.55
1.17
15.00
2.30
1.02
11.96
4.80
1.52
26.61
6.46
2.23
31.16
8.88
3.67
22.4.5
5.61
2.14
61.94
1.98
1.50
Indian	
20.28 TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 69
Table 45.-
-Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of
Residence and Sex, 1949.
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence.
Alive.
Dead.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
Male.     1   Female.
1
Total.
1
1
14
6
8
6
4
2
4
3
1
7
1
6
18
2
8
1
2
1
4
32
1
1
1
6
1
2
9
11
15
2
1
5
7
4
3
1
137
1
4
13
27
1
1
2
10
8
6
3
36
1
1
20
3
7
1
6
2
2
2
2
14
1
1
1
7
4
14
2
3
4
1
4
35
17
1
3
8
6
9
3
2
3
1
3
1
1
1
143
2
2
24
15
3
1
1
1
4
6
3
3
1
47
1
3
1
2
19
4
1
1
21
7
14
8
4
4
6
5
1
21
1
1
1
8  .
10
32
4
3
12
2
2
1
8
67
1
1
1
23
2
5
17
17
24
5
3
8
8
7
4
1
2
280
3
6
37
42
4
1
2
3
14
14
9
3
4
83
2
3
1
3
39
7
1
1
2
1
1
4
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
Coldstream	
1
1
1
1
5
3
1
Kent                  	
1 i 70                            department of health and welfare.
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of
Residence and Sex, 1949—Continued.
(Excluding Indians.)
Alive.
Dead.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.   1     Total.
!
382
20
1
10
1
11
1
318
8
12
83
5
4
1
11
3
14
39
6
12
3
5
4
9
1
1
1
2
4
4
1
3
1
1
6
4
2
6
2
1
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
7
3
4
297
18
11
1
3
1
247
8
8
90
1
1
1
9
4
7
18
40
9
2
2
8
4
1
3
6
2
1
2
1
2
2
2
2
4
1
2
1
18
7
2
9
2
1
1
3
3
5
1
4
679
38
1
21
2
14
2
565
16
20
173
5
5
1
2
20
4
10
32
79
15
2
2
20
3
9
1
7
15
3
2
3
2
5
2
2
6
1
5
1
1
10
5
2
3
24
9
1
2
12
1
1
4
1
3
6
6
1
1
12
4
8
18
1
16
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
5
5
23
1
21
1
3
1
Oak Bay	
1
1
1
Area No. 7c	 TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 71
Table 45.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of
Residence and Sex, 1949—Continued.
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence.
Alive.
Dead.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
14
11
3
2
2
4
2
2
6
1
5
4
2
2
3
1
2
24
19
4
1
3
3
2
2
9
4
1
4
1
8
7
1
4
2
2
11
2
9
6
1
1
4
2
2
17
15
1
1
3
3
5
5
1
1
3
3
10
6
4
22
18
4
2
2
8
4
2
2
17
3
14
10
3
1
6
2
2
3
1
2
41
34
5
2
3
3
8
8
1
1
5
3
2
19
10
1
8
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1                   2
1
1
1
1
827
738
1,565
33
9
11
6
17 I 72
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 46.—Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of
Residence and Sex, 1949.
(Indians only.*)
Alive.
Dead.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
Male.     1   Female.
\
Total.
1
1
2
1
1
2
1
1
7
2
5
2
2
7
1
1
1
1
1
2
8
1
1
6
14
1
2
2
9
4
4
2
. 1
1
3
1
2
8
8
7
2
5
6
3
3
5
2
3
7
7
3
3
3
2
1
3
3
2
2
7
5
1
1
3
2
1
1
1
11
1
1
3
1
5
3
3
7
3
1
1
2
3
3
3
2
1
1
1
7
7
10
5
5
1
1
2
1
1
8
3
2
3
9
9
4
4
4
4
4
3
1
2
1
1
14
7
1
6
5
4
1
1
1
18
1
2
4
2
1
1
7
11
1
1
9
21
4
2
1
2
1
11
7
7
5
3
2
4
1
3
15
15
17
7
10
1
1
8
4
4
13
5
2
6
16
16
3
3
7
6
1
3
1
1
1
	
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
Penticton	
1
Chilliwack City                          	
Kent	
        1             1
1
Area No. 4b.	
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
4
1
3
1
1
1
2
5
1
Ladysmith	
1
3
1
1
1       [             2
       I      	
1                           9
1
Area No. 5f	
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
Area No. 6f	
1
1 Includes notifications of 34 Indians of white status. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 73
Table 46.
-Notifications of Tuberculosis by Statistical Area and City of
Residence and Sex, 1949—Continued.
(Indians only.*)
Alive.
Dead.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
Male.
Female.
Total:
15
15
3
3
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
18
18
7
7
3
3
2
2
5
5
6
1
2
3
36
36
3
3
12
12
4
4
7
7
14
14
20
20
20
20
16
16     .
1
1
3
3
14
4
10
2
2
33
33
10
10
4
4
4
4
8
8
10
1
4
5
73
73
11
11
28
28
8
8
12
12
25
25
35
35
25
25
24
24
2
2
4
4
37
5
32
2
2
	
	
2
2
1
1
4
4
4
4
1
1
	
	
1
1
1
1
2
2
1
1
	
1
1
2
2
	
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
Area No. 8c	
3
3
2
2
37
37
8
8
16
16
4
4
5
5
11
11
15
15
5
5
8
8
1
1
1
1
23
1
22
 r"
2
1
1
1
i
Area No. 10b	
Area No. 10c	
Fort St. John	
2
2
Totals for Province	
253
278
531
23
23
46
1
        1             1
* Includes notifications of 34 Indians of white status. I 74                                       DEPARTMENT OP HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Chart  16.—Showing  Notifications  of  Tuberculosis  in   British   Columbia  by
Racial Groups  (including Dead Cases reported for the First Time), 1940
TO 1949, INCLUSIVE.
NO OF CASES
3,000
2,000
TOTAL
W
HITE
1,000
900
700
too
500
400
300
200
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
.30
20
i
»-,
S
v.
1
/
«•■••
INDIAN
/
*
\
/
*
^
**
\
\
/
/
"""""* *
\
/
CHINESE
v.
/
X.
'
s
— «__—• —
""■••_ .,
__>
/
^^"
*
«» -^^
*
^<
-■"*«
*-..
* ^ JAPANE
SE
*«.
 ^
- —-'
10
19
40               4
1                 4
2                 4
3                 4
4                 4
5                 4
6                 4
7                4
8                19
49
_____________________________________________„. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I  75
Table 47.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Racial Groups
(including Dead Cases reported for the First Time), 1940 to 1949, inclusive.
Racial Origin.
1940.
1941:
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
1949.
Total	
1,568
1.117
295
74
82
1,342
945
270
66
61
1,451
1,016
327
59
49
1,688
1,163
419
62
44
2,153
1,446
558
108
41
2,079
1,519
417
111
32
2,873
1,973
256
120
24
2,616
1,864 .
645
81
26
2,108
1,448
553
88
19
2,202
White	
1,491
612
Chinese	
Japanese	
78
21
* Includes notifications of:   1947, 21 Indians of white status ;   1948, 27 Indians of white status ;   1949, 34 Indians
of white status.
Source:  Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. I 76                                       DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
In the following table it is noted that in the white population the highest percent
age of new cases occurred in the 30-39 age-group (18.9 per cent.), whereas in the
Chinese population the highest percentage occurred in the 50-59 age-range, in the
Japanese population the greatest number of new cases occurred in the 30-39 age-group,
and in the Indian population the largest concentration of new cases (16.7 per cent.)
occurred in the 10-14 age-group.    This is slightly higher than the 15.7 per cent, for
the 5-9 age-group.
Table 48.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups, Sex,
and Racial Groups (including Dead Cases reported for the First Time), 1949.
Age and Sex.
White.
Chinese.
Japanese.
Indian.*
Total.
Number.
Per
Cent, of
Total.
Number.
Per
Cent, of
Total.
Number.
Per
Cent, of
Total.
Number.
Per
Cent, of
Total.
Number.
Per
Cent, of
Total.
0- 4 years M.
20
2.5
43
14.9
63
5.5
F.
23
3.3
41
12.6
64
6.1
t.
43
2.9
84
13.7
127
5.8
5- 9 years M.
21
2.7
53
18.4
74
6.4
F.
16
2.3
3
15.0
43
13.3
62
5.9
T.
37
2.5
3
3.9
96
15.7
136
6.2
10-14 years M.
14
1.8
1
1.7
42
14.6
57
5.0
F.
12
1.7
1
5.0
60
18.5
73
6.9
T.
26
1.7
2
2.6
102
16.7
130
5.9
15-19 years M.
18
2.3
4
6.9
1
10.0
27    1        9.4
50
4.3
F.
42
6.0
4
20.0
50
15.4
96
9.1
T.
60
4.0
8
10.3
1
4.8
77
12.6
146
6.6
20-24 years M.
67
7.2
5
8.6
1
10.0
17
5.9
80
7.0
F.
95
13.5
2
10.0
1
9.1
36
11.1
134
12.7
T.
152
10.2
7
9.0
2
9.5
53
8.6
214
9.7
25-29 years M
73
9.2
3
5.2
1
10.0
19
6.6
96
8.4
F.
129
18.5
4
20.0
4
36.3
16
4.9
153
14.5
T.
202
13.6
7
9.0
5
23.8
35
5.7
249
11.3
30-39 years M.
139
17.6
3
5.2
4
40.0
29
10.1
175
15.2
F.
143
20.5
5
25.2
3
27.3
20
6.2
171
16.2
T.
,282
18.9
8
10.3
7
33.3
49
8.0
346
15.7
40-49 years M.
136
17.2
3
5.2
17
5.9
156
13.6
F.
85
12.2
1
5.0
1
9.1
31
9.6
118
11.2
T.
221
14.S
4
5.1
1
4.8
48
7.8
274
12.5
50-59 years M.
119
15.0
19
32.8
15
5.2
153
13.3
F.
73
10.4
2
18.2
8
2.5
83
7.9
T.
192
12.9
19
24.4
2
9.5
23
3.8
236
10.7
60-69 years M.
129
16.3
14
24.1
1
10.0
13
4.5
157
13.7
F.
.45
6.4
10
3.1
55
5.2
T.
174
11.7
14
18.0
1
4.8
23               3.8,
212
9.6
70-79 years M.
50
6.3
3
5.2
4
1.4
57
5.0
F.
28
4.0
7
2.2
35
3.3
T.
78
5.2
3
3.9
11
1.8
92
4.2
80 and over M.
7
0.8
2
3.4
3
1.0
12
1.0
F.
4
0.6
4
0.4
T.
11
0.7
2
2.6
3
0.5
16
0.7
Not stated M.
9
1.1
1
1.7
2
20.0
6
2.1
18
1.6
F.
4
0.6
2
0.6
6
0.6
T.
Totals M.
13
0.9
1
1.3
2
9.5
8
1.3
24
1.1
792
100.0
58
100.0
10
100.0
288
100.0
1,148
100.0
F.
Grand totals	
699
100.0
20
100.0
11
100.0
324
100.0
1,054
100.0
1,491     [    100.0
1
78
100.0
21
100.0
612
100.0
2,202
100.0
* Includes notifications of 34 Indians of white status.
Source: Case Exj
imination
, Form T.
8. 1.
> TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 77
The largest increase among both other-than-Indian and Indian population occurred
in the diagnosis for primary tuberculosis. For the population excluding Indians there
was a 61.8-per-cent. increase over 1948, and for the Indians only a 29-per-cent. increase
over 1948. There were slight increases over the previous year in the number of minimal, moderately advanced, and far advanced cases in both the Indian and other-than-
Indian population.
Chart 17.—Showing Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia
by Diagnosis, 1949.
INDIANS ONLY
Table 49. — Notifications of
Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis, 1949.
Diagnosis.
Excluding
Indians.
Indians
only.
No.
Per
Cent.
No.
Per
Cent.
123
884
321
128
35
25
94
7
7
7.6
54.4
19.8
7.9
2.2
1.5
5.8
0.4
0.4
209
122
82
42
30
24
53
16
36.1
21.1
Moderately advanced.
14.2
7.3
Dead, pulmonary	
Tuberculous pleurisy.
Dead, tuberculous
pleurisy	
5.2
4.1
9.2
Dead, non-pulmonary
2.8
Totals	
1,624
100.0
578
100.0
EXCLUDING INDIANS
££/.£ .VOW-fit/*.. 0.4°/£
//or srArso
o.-rye I 78
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 50.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1949.
(Excluding Indians.)
Age-group.
Diagnosis on Notification.
rt
tn
fn
Ts
__ ^
3 2
Six
2   r\
,1 OJ
_w 50
S   rt
f a
CJ r—
g2
°? to
OJ^
Crtr-
fa
CDV*
oj j;
Ts
OO O
0J
+> +J
o cd
"AH
"3
-fa
0
Pulmonary—
F.
9.2
17
17
13
2
4
10
21
5
10
2
2
1
3
22
67
19
20
11
7
1
1
1
7
2
2
61
221     IR
1
62
45
88
15
24
6
12
93
103
30
26
10
11
86
57
37
22
12
7
78
50
32
15
13
3
1
76
30
33
10
14
2
27
14
12
8
6
1
1
5
3
1
449
F.
435
Moderately advanced  M.
F.
186
135
F.
1
1
1
1
2
1
78
48
i 	
2
F.
1
Type not stated  M.
F.
1|        -
1
3
6
1
4
2
1
Dead*    M.
F.
2
1
1
1
6
3
11
1
2
1
28
1
Total pulmonary  M.
F.
T.
24
22
46
18
18
36
17
14
31
19
37
56
53
97
150
69
124
193
134
142
276
136
86
222
131
71
202
137
43
180
50
26
76
9
4
13
13
4
17
810
688
1,498
Tuberculous pleurisy—
Tuberculous pleurisy with effusion M.
F.
2
3
4
1
1
1        1
2]      3
2
1
1
9
10
Tuberculous pleurisy without effusion.-M.
F.
	
2
1
ll.
1
4
Dead*        M.
I
F.
2
•  1
3
4
5
9
1        1
21       4
3!      5
2
2
4
1
1
11
F.
14
T.
25
Non-pulmonary—
]
F.
j
F.
1
1
3
1
1
1
*l -
l!       4
........        4
1
1
2
1
1
10
F.
2
2
1
H
F.
1
1
1
1
Skin    -M.
F.
1
1
1
2
|
1
2
2
2
3
1
1
1
5
F.
1
3
6)      1
3!      6
31      1
2
2
1
19
16
F.
1
1
1
10
Miliary  M.
F.
1
j
1
F.
1
1
1
1
2
F.
1|      1
2
F.
1
1
1
1
Dead*    M.
2
1
1
5
F.
2
Total non-pulmonary  M.
2
2
4
2
6
2
2
3
9
12
6
4
10
7j     Hi       5|       5
13]      8|      2       3
20[    19]      7|      8
6
2
8
3
6
50
F.
T.
1
1
51
101
Total notifications   M.
F.
T.
24
24
48
22|    17
201    16
421    33
24
47
71
63
106
169
77    146;   141    138
139 j  154]'     88      76
216! 300| 229]  214
144
45
189
53j       9|     13
29|       4        5
82|     13|     18
871
753
1,624
* Dead on notification.
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 79
Table 51.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Age-groups,
Sex, and Diagnosis, 1949.
(Indians only.*)
Age-group.
Diagnosis on Notification.
:l
(0
U
<?g
__ 2
V &
SS
_« in
o 0
T ?
»>_!
«>_!
1   fli
°_i
CO.X
-.8
oj £
f 1
»•__
tOrr
o> g
tO.-
°>2
Tg
s _:
© t.
OO O
4J +J
o oi
rr   Ot
o
Pulmonary—
F.
25
29
41
33
1
27
27
2
10
1
3
2
3
7
2
1
1
6
7
3
1
3
1
1
1
13
9
7
2
2
2
1
105
101       3
104
Minimal  M.
F.
6
14
4
9
3
5
6
9
4
9
1
1
7
9
6
8
8
8
3
4
1
1
2
6
3
6
5
1
1
i
1
1
2
57
F.
3
3
1
1
F.
1
2
2
16
F.
F.
Deadt    M.
F.
3
4
3
1
1
4
2
1
1
1
3
1
2
1
2
17
F.
T.
28
33
61
46
36
82
33
47
80
20
40
60
14
22
36
14
11
25
26
14
40
13
27
40
13
7
20
13
9
22
4
6
10
3
3
5
1
6
232
253
485
Tuberculous pleurisy—
1
1
3
2
2
1
2
1
F.
1
2
4
2
8
1
2
F.
Deadt    M.
F.
1     .
i
2
1
3
2
3
5
3
2
5
2
2
F.
4
4
2
2
1
1
T.
2
24
Non-pulmonary—
F.
1
1
2
F.
1
1
1
1
F.
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
5
F.
1
	
Skin                             M.
F.
F.
4
2
2
2
3
3
2
3
1
2
1
1
1
15
F.
F.
1
1
1
F.
Other respiratory system  M.
F.
1
2
Other non-pulmonary  M.
F.
1
1
1
1
7
4
2
1
10
F.
1
6
Total non-pulmonary  M.
F.
11
7
18
4
5
9
5|      6
7]       5
12|    11
3
4
7
2
1
3
1
3
4
2
2
4
1
1
34
35
T.
69
Total notifications  M.
F.
T.
39
40
79
52
42
94
401    26
571    49
97|    75
17
28
45
19
14
.  33
29
17
46
15
30
45
15
7
22
13
10
23
4
6
10
3
3
5
1
6
277
301
578
* Includes notifications of 34 Indians of white status.
f Dead on notification.
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. I 80
department of health and welfare.
Table 52.—Notifications of Tuberculosis in British Columbia by Diagnosis
and Year of Arrival in British Columbia, 1949.
(Excluding Indians.)
Diagnosis on Notification.
Prior
to
1939.
i
1939.(1940.
1        .
I
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
1949.
Not
stated.
Total.
Primary	
16
339
155
68
1
4
9
3
38
23
■
5
7
5
11
6
■
3
13
5
1
5
19
6
1
1
4
1
5
15
5
3
1
1
9
18
9
6
1 .
1
1
1
12
17
4
2
1
....
....
....
7
11
32
8
6
2
1
6
1
11
69
12
3
1
2
5
....
5
60
28
7
2
6
2
8
69
22
7
2
3
1
28
225
61
21
1
4
1
1
16
11
123
884
321
1
126
1
2
1
3
7
Tuberculous   pleurisy  with  effusion	
Tuberculous   pleurisy   without
18
6
Other  tuberculosis   of  respira-
' ' 4
90
Dead	
42
Totals	
656
14
25
22
37
30
46
43
67
93
110
112
369
1,624
Source: Case Examination, Form T.B. 1. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 81
Chart 18.—Showing the Katio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from
Tuberculosis in British Columbia, 1945 to 1949, incluive.
45  46  47  48  49      45  46  47  48  49      45  46  47  48  49 I 82
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
The proportion of new cases of tuberculosis to deaths among the Indian population
has shown a decrease over last year. In 1948 the corrected ratio of new cases to deaths
was 3.5:1, while in 1949 it was 5.7:1. The ratios for the other-than-Indian races have
remained substantially the same.
Table 53.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
in British Columbia, 1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Year.
Total.
Other than Indian.
Indian.
New
Cases.
Deaths.
Ratio.
New
Cases.
Deaths.
Ratio.
New
Cases.*
Deaths, t
Ratio.
1945	
2,059
2.333
2,560
2,090
2,184
525
576
536
442
404t
4.0:1
4.1:1
4.8:1
4.7:1
5.4:1
1,642
2,077
1,917
1,542
1,607
352
369
362
286
302
4.7:1
5.6:1
5.3:1
5.4:1
5.3:1
417
256
643
548
577
173
207
174
156
102
2.4:1
1946	
1.2:1
1947	
3.7:1
1948	
3.5:1
1949	
5.7:1
•Includes notifications of: 1947, 21 Indians of white status; 1948, 27 Indians of white status; 1949, 34 Indians
of white status.
t Includes deaths of: 1947, 9 Indians of white status ; 1948, 12 Indians of white status ; 1949, 7 Indians of
white status.
X 1949 tuberculosis death figures are preliminary only.
Note.—Notifications and deaths of ex-Province residents excluded.
Table 54.—Ratio of New Cases of Tuberculosis to Deaths from Tuberculosis
among the Total Population of British Columbia, the Other-than-Indian
Population, and the Indian Population, 1949.
Population.
Area
1.
Area
2.
Area
3.
Area
4.
Area
5.
Area
6.
Area
7.
Area     Area
8.     \     9.
Area
10.
Total.
Total	
19.0:1
30.0:1
9.0:1
5.6:1
5.5:1
4.8:1
6.8:1
2.1:1
5.0:1
5.1:1
4.4:1
4.7:1
5.5: 1
3.3:1
4.8:1
3.2:1
7.7:1
5.8:1
4.8:1
6.3:1
5.4:1
5.6:1
5.3:1
10.6:1
9.5:1
11.1:1
9.4:1
6.8:1
12.0:1
5.4:1
5.3:1
5.7:1
TUBERCULOSIS MORTALITY.
Table 55. — Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1945 to 1949,
inclusive.
Total Population.
Area
1.
I
Area [ Area
2. 3.
Area
4.
I
Area     Area
5. 6.
Area
7.
Area  [ Area
8.      I     9.
Area
10.
Not
stated.
Total.
Mortality—
1945	
1946	
1947	
1948	
1949	
Mortality rate per 100,000
population—
1945	
1946	
1947	
1948	
1949	
22.4
12.4
35.6
37.0
8.0
18
22
22
10
11
32.7
42.3
41.3
18.9
20.2
20
26
30
20
26
33.3
38.4
42.3
30.3
38.3
242
266
249
184
202
45.6
46.6
41.9
29.1
31.0
87
77
65
72
64
49.6
43.2
34.6
38.5
33.2
35
40
35
30
20
106.0
117.3
100.1
74.9
48.5
12
17
18
12
12
76.2
119.4
123.1
85.9
83.5
50
63
56
58
39
175.0
213.6
185.0
183.3
120.0
44
43
35
33
18
235.4
203.2
159.6
158.4
83.7
12
19
17
14
126.4
177.0
153.6
107.8
59.8
525
576
536
442
404*
55.3
57.4
51.3
40.9
36.3
* Excludes death of 1 ex-Province resident.
Preliminary figures for 1949. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 83
Table 56. — Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area,
1945 to 1949, inclusive.
Other-than-Indian
Population.
Area
1.
Area
2.
Area
3.
Area
4.
Area
5.
Area
6.
Area
7.
Area
8.
Area
9.
[              1
Area  1   Not   1 .,.„!_,
10.     ! stated. 1 Tota1'
1              1
Mortality—
1945    	
4
2
6
7
1
18.3
8.4
24.1
29.3
4.1
18
22
22
9
11
32.8
42.3
41.4
17.0
20.2
14
19
21
15
15
23.7
28.5
30.1
23.1
22.5
223
244
229
174
195
42.3
43.0
38.8
27.7
30.1
55
53
49
51
40
32.2
30.6
26.8
28.0
21.3
16
12
13
11
13
55.5
40.2
42.4
30.9
35.4
2
1
2
4
14.3
8.0
16.5
32.0
8
7
9
7
11
33.8
27.8
34.8
25.9
39.6
9
8
5
7
6
63.2
51.1
30.7
46.8
38.6
3
1
8
3
4
33.4
9.9
77.3
24.5
31.8
2
352
1946	
1947	
369
362
1948    	
286
1949     	
302*
Mortality rate per 100,000
population—
1945	
38.1
1946	
37.8
1947    	
35.6
1948	
1949	
27.1
27.8
* Excludes death of 1 ex-Province resident.
Preliminary figures for 1949.
Table 57. — Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Indian Population of British Columbia, by Statistical Area, 1945 to 1949,
inclusive.
Indian Population.
1
Area   [  Area
1.      1      2.
1
Area
3.
Area
4.    -
Area
5.
Area
6.
Area
7.
Area
8.
Area
9.
Area
10.
Total.
Mortality—
1945    	
1
1
3
2
1
255.1
277.8
835.7
540.5
265.3
6
7
9
5
11
592.9
634.6
797.2
426.6
922.0
19
22
20
10
7
533.4
628.6
536.4
275.3
189.3
32
24
16
21
24
666.1
492.6
320.3
405.9
455.8
19
28
22
19
7
450.3
661.2
508.1
428.1
155.0
10
16
18
10
8
560.2
918.0
1,010.1
541.7
425.8
42
56
47
51
28
855.0
1,295.1
1,062.6
1,092.7
589.5
35
35
30
26
12
784.1
634.5
531.6
443.4
201.0
9
18
9
11
4
1,730.8
2,682.5
1,262.3
1,547.1
516.1
173
1946      	
207
1947*                   	
174
1948*	
1949*    	
1
156
102
Mortality rate per 100,000
population—
1945 	
671.6
1946      	
784.1
1947    	
644.4
1948	
1949       	
1,315.7
557.1
357.9
♦Includes deaths of:   1947,  9 Indians of white status;   1948, 12 Indians of white status;   1949,  7 Indians of
white status.
Preliminary figures for 1949. I 84
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 58.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1949.
(Excluding Indians.)
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
1
3
1
2
4
2
1
1
7
1
1
2
3
1
1
20
2
2
1
2
2
1
1
4
1
1
3
110
6
1
5
1
2
92
1
2
25
1
2
3
2
2
12
2
1
1
2
1
1
5
4
1
1
1
1
1
12
1
1
1
3
3
3
53
5
3
43
2
10
1
1
5
1
1
5
i
2
2
6
1
2
2
1
12
5
1
2
4
2
1
1
]
1
32
2
2
1
2
3
2
1
1
7
1
4
6
163
11
1
5
1
5
135
1
4
35
1
3
4
2
2
17
Area No. 5a—Continued.
3
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
7
3
4
1
1
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
2
1
1
6
1
1
Trail	
Area No. 5c	
Alberni	
3
2
1
1
1
Area No. 6b	
3
2
1
9
4
5
Area No. 6f	
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
Area No. 8d	
2
1
1
Mission Municipality	
2
2
Area No. 8f	
2
2
1
1
Area No. 9d	
4
3
1
North Vancouver District....
1
1
Area No. 10b	
1
1
3
2
1
1
199
102
301
1      j      ....
1
Source: Death registrations, 1949 {preliminary figures). TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 85
Table 59.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Statistical Area and City of Residence
and Sex, 1949.
(Indians only.*)
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
4
4
1
1
2
2
1
1
7
7
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
3
2
2
1
1
5
5
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
, 1
7
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
4
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
9
9
2
2
3
3
4
1
2
1
14
14
1
1
1
1
3
3
5
5
2
2
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
5
5
8
2
6
3
3
1
1
2
2
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
6
6
1
1
1
1
4
4
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
2
3
3
1
1
3
3
11
11
Area No. 8f	
9
2
7
4
4
5
5
4
4
2
2
Area No. 9f	
1
1
1
1
Area No. 10b	
2
2
1
1
51
51
102
* Includes deaths of 7 Indians of white status.
Source: Death registrations, 1949 (preliminary figures). I 86
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 60.—Tuberculosis Mortality by Diagnosis and Age-groups, 1949.
Excluding Indians.
Age-groups.
0
H
T.B. of
Respiratory
System.
-J
'5
b
m £
T.B. of
Intestines
and
Peritoneum.
rt   r<
fflp
Hl>0
T_
c
O   W   03
.  °"h
ca b.S
n o 3
Hffli.
#o
CQ E w
E-iJo.
T.B. of
Genitourinary
System.
°.fe§
M.£_?
H oO
CQ~
Is-
sis
2
4
4
1
9
20
21
48
43
55
64
27
4
1
3
1
1
7
18
21
43
43
53
60
25
4
l
l
3
1
2
1
1
3
1
1
1
2
1
	
	
1
10-14 years	
25-29 years	
30-39 years	
60-69 years	
2
80 years and over	
	
Totals	
302
280
9
4
1
1
1
3
1
2
Indians only.*
4
20
10
12
11
8
6
13
5
7
3
1
2
1
8
9
12
9
8
15
11
3
1
2
1
9
1
2
1
1
1
1
	
1
2
1
15-19 years	
20-24 years	
25-29 years	
30-39 years	
50-59 years	
60-69 years	
70-79 years	
80 years and over	
Totals	
102
81
14
1
2
1
      1           4
* Includes deaths of 7 Indians of white status.
Source: Death registrations, 1949 (preliminary figures). TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 87
Tuberculosis deaths in British Columbia during 1949 numbered 404, compared to
366 in 1948. The over-all mortality rate declined from 40.9 to 36.3 per 100,000 population. The Indian mortality rate in 1949 was 357.9, which figure, although still high,
is an improvement over 557.1, the rate in 1948. While the Indian death rate declined,
the death rate among the population excluding Indians and Orientals increased from
23.8 in 1948 to 25.9 per 100,000 population in 1949.
Table 61.—Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Total Population of British Columbia, the Indian, Chinese, and Japanese
Populations, and the Population excluding Indians and Orientals, 1940 to
1949, inclusive.
Total Province.
Indians.
Excluding Indians.
Year.
No. of
Deaths.
Population.
Rate per
100,000.
No. of
Deaths.
Population.
Rate per
100,000.
No. of
Deaths.
Population.
Rate per
100,000.
1940	
1941	
578
533
558
613
517
525
576
536
442
404
805.000
817,861
870,000
900,000
932,000
949,000
1,003,000
1,044,000
1,082,000
1.114.000
71.8
65.2
64.1
68.1
55.5
55.3
57.4
51.3
40.9
36.3
203
174
170
208
169
173
207
174*
156*
102*
23,538
23,628
24,080
24,522
25,139
25,758
26.400
27,000
28.000
28,500
862.4
736.4
705.9
848.2
672.2
671.6
784.1
644.4
557.1
357.9
375
359
388
405
348
352
369
362
286
302
781,462
794,233
48.0
45.2
1942	
1943	
1944	
845,920
875,478
906,861
923,242
976,600
1,017,000
1.054,000
1,085,500
45.9
46.3
38.4
1945	
1946	
1947	
1948	
38.1
37.8
35.6
27.1
1949	
27.8
1
_.,,-.__,
Chinese.
Japanese.
Excluding Indians and
Oeientals.
Year.
No. of
Deaths.
Population.
Rate per
100,000.
No. of
Deaths.
Population.
Rate per
100,000.
No. of
Deaths.
Population.
Rate per
100,000.
1940        	
45
23
44
36
41
40
44
40
33
22
19,471
18,619
17,767
16,915
16,063
15,848
15,600
15,400
15,200
14,900
231.1
123.5
247.6
212.8
255.2
252.4
282.1
259.7
217.1
147.7
29
15
24
24
10
16
13
12
8
5
22,107
22,096
19,100
16,103
15,610
14,695
7,000
7,000
7,000
7,500
131.2
67.9
125.6
149.0
64.1
108.9
185.7
171.4
114.3
66.7
301
321
320
345    •
297
296
312
310
245
275
739,884
753,518
809,053
842,460
875,188
892,699
954,000
994,600
1,031,800
1,063,100
40.7
1941
42.6
1942	
39.6
1943	
41.0
1944	
1945	
1946	
1947	
1948	
1949	
33.9
33.2
32.7
31.2
23.8
25.9
♦Includes deaths of: 1947, 9 Indians of white status; 1948, 12 Indians of white status; 1949, 7 Indians of
white status.
Note.—" Indian deaths " includes all deaths of persons of Indian racial origin, whether they were Indians under
the meaning of the "Indian Act" or not, except in 1943 to 1949 deaths, where the term applies only to deaths of
Indians under the meaning of the " Indian Act."
Source: Mortality—Annual Reports of Vital Statistics, 1940 to 1948, inclusive (1949 death registrations preliminary only).
Estimated population (1941 census figures) : Dominion Bureau of Statistics estimates of total population.
Division of Vital Statistics estimates of Indian and Oriental populations. i 88 department of health and welfare.
Chart 19.—Showing the Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population
for the total population of british columbia, the indian, chinese, and
Japanese Populations, and the Population excluding Indians and Orientals,
1940 to 1949, inclusive.
RATE
1,000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
90
80
70
60
50
40
30
20
INDIANS     -
\
/
"*x_
CHINESE
„ *"   "^
-;>
** -X
\
\
f
/
1
JAPA
NESE
\
■-   .. «_-._.
/
/
/
/
/
/
/
\
\
\
\
V
\
\
\
V— ~-\
V
\
/
/
...    ^
r*                        ■       -
A
\
\
/
\
/
\
/
N
\
/
\
/
\
\
\
\
\
\
/
\
\
S^ .. >
/
i
"■"" ■» -___.
EXCUDINC
NDlANS	
X
X.
UDINC   INDIj
ORIENTAL
X
x\.
AND
s
--'~
10
1940 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 1949 TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 89
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TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 91
Chart 22.—Showing Tuberculosis Deaths for the Other-than-Indian Population
and the Indian Population of British Columbia by Place of Death, 1949.
^XCLO£>/A/<5  /SV&/AA/S
//VD/AA/S OA/.LY
The number of deaths among other-than-Indian population which occurred in
homes and institutions, including tuberculosis institutions, in 1949 has shown substantially the same distribution as in 1948.
During 1949, 26.5 per cent, of all Indian tuberculosis deaths and 47.4 per cent, of
the other-than-Indian tuberculosis deaths occurred in recognized tuberculosis institutions. I 92
department of health and welfare.
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TUBERCULOSIS  CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 93
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DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 66. — Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Sex and Age-groups,
1940 to 1949, inclusive.
Age-group 0-9 Years.
Male.
Female.
Year.
Deaths.
Population
(000's).
Rate.
Deaths.
Population
(000's).
Rate.
1940	
1941	
1942	
1943   	
8
5
9
4
13
9
9
7
2
7
52.5
54.8
60.6
65.4
71.0
75.7
80.3
87.3
91.7
96.7
15.2
9.1
14.9
6.1
18.3
11.9
11.2
8.0
2.2
7.2
6
3
4
3
3
7
9
2
4
3
50.5
52.9
58.4
62.7
68.4
73.1
77.3
82.7
87.8
91.6
11.9
5.7
6.8
4 8
1944           	
1945	
9 6
1946	
1947      	
11.6
2 4
1948 :: :	
4.6
1949	
3.3
Age-group 10-19 Years.
1940	
3
62.5
4.8
20
61.1
32.7
1941	
10
61.7
16.2
11
60.4
18.2
1942	
13
63.2
20.6
9
62.6
14.4
1943	
11
63.3
17.4
10
63.1
15.8
1944	
6
63.4
9.5
10
63.6
15.7
1945	
8
63.2
12.7
3
63.5
4.7
1946	
2
66.8
3.0
5
66.2
7.6
1947	
5
68.7
7.3
11
67.9
16.2
1948	
4
68.6
5.8
2
66.5
3.0
1949 :	
6
70.1
8.6
4
68.7
5 8
Age-group 20-29 Years.
1940	
21
66.8
|   31.4
41
67.7
60.6
1941	
38
68.3
55.6
37
69.6
53.2
1942.	
46
73.0
|   63.0
42
77.7
54.1
1943	
28
74.6
37.5
39
80.9
48,2
1944	
23
76.0
30.3
33
83.9
39.3
1945	
31
74.5
41.6
34
84.7
40.1
1946	
31
83.0
37.3
33
87.9
37.5
1947...	
38
84.4
45.0
29
90 6
1948	
17
86.8
19.6
22
1949	
15
86.2
17.4
[
26
91.0
28.6
Age-group 30-39 Years.
1940
1941.
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
1949.
31
51.9
28
53.3
21
59.2
33
63.2
26
67.4
27
70.4
33
76.5
26
80.5
19
80.9
31
83.6
59.7
52.5
35.5
52.2
38.6
38.4
43.1
32.3
23.5
37.1 TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 95
Table 66. — Tuberculosis Mortality and Rate per 100,000 Population for the
Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Sex and Age-groups,
1940 to 1949, inclusive—Continued.
Age-group Jr0-b9 Years.
Year.
Male.
Female.
Deaths.
Population
(000's).
Rate.
Deaths.
Population
(000's).
Rate.
1940                        ...          	
43
48
34
40
38
35
36
41
37
31
53.6
52.7
54.9
56.2
58.1
59.1
62.9
66.1
66.9
68.7
1
80.2
91.1
61.9
71.2
65.4
59.2
57.2
62.0
55.3
45.1
18
12
13
14
14
14
15
16
11
12
45.9
45.8
47.6
48.5
49.6
50.3
53.3
56.0
58.6
60.9
39.2
1941
26.2
1942                      ...           	
27.3
1943    ...           	
28.9
1944                     	
28.2
1945                                            	
27.8
1946	
28.1
1947	
28.6
1948
18.8
1949 ....           	
19.7-
Age-group 50-59 Years.
1940	
56
53
53
63
54
48
48
48
46
41
61.5
60.7
61.3
60.6
59.8
58.1
57.9
57.3
62.1
62.7
91.1
87.3
86.5
104.0
90.3
82.6
82.9
83.8
74.1
65.4
16
10
14
11
15
9
9
7
9
14
43.2
43.9
45.4
46.1
46.7
46.9
48.1
48.8
52.8
53.3
37.0
1941	
22.8
1942	
30.8
1943	
23.9
1944  	
32.1
1945	
1946	
1947	
1948	
1949	
19.2
18.7
14.3
17.1
26.3
Age-group 60-69 Years.
1940	
48
39.7
120.9
14
27.4
51.1
1941	
40
41.8
95.7
9
29.0
31.0
1942	
54
44.2
122.2
9
31.6
28.5
1943	
50
46.0
108.7
12
32.7
36.7
1944      	
49
47.8
1945	
47
49.1
95.7
15
35.4
42.4
1946	
65
50.0
130.0
12
36.8
32.6
1947	
59
51.6
114.3
5
37.9
13.2
1948	
43
57.3
75.1
9
42.0
21.4
1949	
55
58.1
94.7
9
44.4
20.3
Age-group 70 Years and over.
1940	
15
20.4
73.5
3
15.6
19.2
1941	
13
21.1
61.6
■
16.4
42.7
1942	
12         I
22.4
53.6
7
17.5
40.0
1943	
27
23.7
113.9
8
18.7
42.8
1944	
22
24.9
88.4
7
19.7
35.5
1945	
25
25.4
98.4
4
20.6
19.4
1946	
24
27.5
87.3
6
22.1
27.1
1947 ,	
27
30.3
89.1
12
23.8
50.4
1948	
30        |
34.3
87.5
6
26.0
23.1
1949	
28
37.3
75.1
3
28.6
10.5 I 96
department of health and welfare.
Chart 25.—Showing Male Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population
for the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Age-groups,
1940 to 1949, INCLUSIVE.
RATE
1949 ^^^^^^™""P
TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949.
I 97
Chart 26.—Showing Female Tuberculosis Mortality Rates per 100,000 Population
for the Other-than-Indian Population of British Columbia by Age-groups,
1940 to 1949, inclusive.
rate
150
1940 41
1949 I 98
DEPARTMENT OF  HEALTH AND WELFARE.
Table 67.—Tuberculosis Mortality for the Other-than-Indian Population by
Length of Residence in British Columbia and Place of Death, 1949.
Length of Residence in British
Columbia
Place of Death.
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Hospitals and other institutions	
1
....
2
1
67
15
2
88
Tuberculosis institutions	
1
2
6
2
1
97
32
2
143
11
11
4
26
1
2
2
24
16
45
Totals	
1
1
l
2
8
4
4
199
74
8
302
Source: Death registrations, 1949. TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL REPORT, 1949. I  99
DIVISION OF TUBERCULOSIS CONTROL BUDGET.
Chart 27 illustrates that the greatest proportion of expenditure during the year
was for institutional care.
Chart 27.—Showing the Distribution of the Tuberculosis Dollar in the Budget
of the Division of Tuberculosis Control, Department of Health and
Welfare, 1949.
/P/ST/?/CT /VC//QS/A/& AMO SOC/AC S£/?ls/C£
jS/=>£C/A/r/^7rS'
^jBAHr'/CjES
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Don McDiae-iid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1950.
495-750-9335 

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