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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION FOR THE YEAR… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1951

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FIFTH  ANNUAL  REPORT
OF THE
BRITISH  COLUMBIA
POWER COMMISSION
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st
1950
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Don McDiarmiDj Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1950.  To Lieutenant-Colonel the Honourable Charles Arthur Banks, C.M.G.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to present the Annual Report of the British
Columbia Power Commission for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1950.
BYRON I. JOHNSON,
Premier.
Victoria, B.C.,
June 30th, 1950. The Honourable Byron I. Johnson, M.B.E.,
Premier, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—The Annual Report of the British Columbia Power Commission, covering the
fiscal year 1949-50, is respectfully submitted herewith in accordance with section 93 of
the " Electric Power Act."
We have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servants,
F. L. SHAW,
Commissioner.
W. W. FOSTER,
Commissioner.
S. R. WESTON,
Chairman.
Victoria, B.C.,
June 15th, 1950. TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Section.       •                                                                                                       ,.                                     Page.
I. General Review     7
II. Legal—■
1. Legislation .  18
2. Compensation—Expropriated Properties .  18
3. Acquisition of Electrical Properties 1  19
4. Rights-of-way and Sites  19
5. Contracts j,  20
6. Water Licences  20
7. Insurance  20
III. Construction—
1. Production Plant I ._  21
2. Transmission Plant  25
3. Distribution Plant 1  26
IV. Operation—■
1. Production 1  33
2. Transmission - _:  37
3. Distribution . r  38
4. Rate Schedules  41
V. Surveys and Investigations—
1. Power Projects •  51
2. Transmission Projects  51
3. Distribution Projects  51
VI. Financial  54
LIST OF DIAGRAMS.
Customer Growth, 1945-50 .    8
Yearly Power Production in Kwh, 1946-50  11
Average Consumption and Kwh Charges by Fiscal Years—
Residential Classification, 1946-50  16
Commercial Classification, 1946-50  17
Sources and Disposition of Energy Requirements, 1949-50  35
Disposition of Revenue by Functions, 1948-50 p L  60
Disposition of Revenue by Expense Classifications, 1948-50  61
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
John Hart Development—Interior of Power-house     6
Transmission Substation at Nanaimo  22
John Hart Development—Ladore Falls Dam on Opening Day  24
Alberni Substation and Somass River  24
Transmission Substation near Vernon  30
North Okanagan Power District—Rural Electrification Development  32
Whatshan Development—
Power-house under Construction, Arrow Lake  39
Tunnel Crew on Completion of 12,000-foot Break-through  39
Dawson Creek—Dual-fuel Diesel Generator  40
Williams Lake—Typical Diesel Plant  40
MacMillan Pulp-mill near Nanaimo, V.I  53
Map of British Columbia, showing Commission's undertakings After 70
5 JOHN HART DEVELOPMENT.
Four Generators represent 112,000 Horse-power.
Second phase of construction of the John Hart Development at Campbell River,
Vancouver Island, was completed during the 1949-50 fiscal year. Interior of the
power-house, shown here, contains four Westinghouse turbo-generators, each of
28,000 horse-power installed capacity. Fifth Annual Report of the British Columbia Power
Commission, Fiscal Year ended March 31st, 1950.
I. GENERAL REVIEW.
The British Columbia Power Commission had been in existence for nearly five
years by the end of the fiscal year, having been appointed April 17th, 1945. Actual
operations, however, were not commenced until August 1st, 1945, so that a record of
five complete years of progress will only be available after next year.
The following table is a concise record of previously existing services acquired and
new services installed by the Commission during the past four and one-half years:—
Period ended March 31st.
Services
acquired.
Services
installed.
Total for
Period.
Cumulative to
End of Period.
1946	
1947	
1948	
1949	
1950	
13,270
7,151
1,000
831
4,686
832
1,786
3,431
3,318
3,321
14,102
8,937
4,431
4,149
8,007
14,102
23,039
27,470
31,619
39,626
Totals ,	
26,938
12,688
39,626
This growth has been accompanied by a corresponding increase in generating
capacity. At March 31st, 1946, the end of the first fiscal year after the inception of
the Commission, the capacity of acquired plants totalled 10,355 kva. During the next
four years the generating capacity was increased by 111,500 kva, reaching 121,855 kva
by March 31st, 1950. In the same period the number of power districts rose from
twelve to twenty-three. There was also a large increase in the line mileage in
operation.
Further expansion by the Commission is contemplated during the coming year.
The Houston plant will commence operation in the early summer of 1950, bringing
electrical power to many inhabitants of that area for the first time. Negotiations have
been completed for the acquisition of the municipal distribution system at Merritt.
Provision for the Tofino-Ucluelet area has also been made.
Comparative figures for the years ended March 31st, 1949 and 1950, illustrate the
progress made during the year in accomplishing the purpose of the " Electric Power
Act"—" An Act to provide for improving the Availability and Supply of Electrical
Power." F 8
: ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
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lO" REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.                      F  9
Year ended
Year ended
March 31st,
March 31st,
1949.
1950.
Number of generating units in operation
58
62
Generating capacity  kva
69,583
121,855
Transmission-line  (over 23 kv) miles
285
365
Primary distribution circuits miles
1,389
1,958
Number of power districts in operation..
19
23
Kwh generated or purchased  	
132,685,512
168,683,738
Number of customers—
Residential 	
25,991
32,688
Commercial 	
4,911
6,070
Power 	
677
816
Street-lighting    	
40
52
Total number of customers	
31,619
39,626
Average monthly consumption—
Residential customers  kwh
96
110
Commercial customers „ kwh
382
420
Power customers  kwh
3,294
3,347
Average charge per kwh paid by—
Residential customers    .
4.0c.
3.7c.
3.6c.
3.6c.
Commercial customers 	
Power customers 	
1.7c.
1.7c.
Revenue—                        :  i '.
Power districts—
Electrical-energy sales 	
$2,404,671.87
$3,080,389.22
Miscellaneous 	
26,636.59
31,190.75
$2,431,308.46 $3,111,579.97
Special-contract sales 	
Operating expenses—
118,954.82
155,889.18
$2,550,263.28 $3,267,469.15
Labour  	
$416,672.97
$446,636.49
Fuel 	
216,549.44
298,762.52
Other direct operating expenses 	
110,351.41
118,063.93
Customer accounting and collecting
157,311.86
177,764.18
3-per-cent. gross revenue assessment
71,044.90
91,796.70
Administration and general expense
155,928.48
170,293.51
Purchased power 	
35,427.03
93,377.51
$1,163,286.09
$1,396,694.84
Interest on capital in operation
Total direct expenses 	
Operating surplus  (excluding provision
517,720.32
670,814.45
$1,681,006.41 $2,067,509.29
for reserves) 	
Provision for reserves—
$869,256.87 $1,199,959.86
Maintenance and renewals   	
$418,323.58
$554,416.69
Sinking fund
258,860.74
335,406.29
Contingencies 	
Net operating surplus   (transferred to
154,769.86
157,484.88
$831,954.18 $1,047,307.86
Stabilization Reserve)
$37,302.69
$152,652.00 F  10 "ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
While the expansion of the Commission's operations as a whole has been significant, the striking improvement experienced in many of the smaller areas during the past
four years is only apparent from an examination of results by individual power districts. The table " Statistics relating to the Supply of Electrical Energy " details the
progress achieved in reducing the average charge per kwh and increasing the consumption per customer in each power district during the past four years. Nineteen out of
the present twenty-three power districts are now operating under the uniform rate
structures introduced by the Commission late in 1946.
Although the net operating surplus is considerably greater than last year, the
ravages of British Columbia's most severe winter on record had a serious effect on both
revenues and expenditures. In January, 1950, freezing of the water-flume supplying
the Barriere hydro-plant caused its complete shut-down. Practically at the same time,
power production at the Shuswap Falls plant was seriously curtailed by the burning-out
of the No. 1 generator, the result of a transmission-line disturbance indirectly attributable to winter conditions. *
With hydro-power production thus impaired, increased production at the more
costly Kamloops steam plant was called for in an endeavour to meet consumer demands.
Despite this and the purchase of power from West Kootenay Power and Light Company,
Limited, the total supply was still insufficient and costly. Accordingly, it became necessary to restrict the supply of power in both the North Okanagan and Kamloops Districts, with a resultant loss of revenue. To these various factors must be added the
heavy increase in line-maintenance costs. Had it not been for the cumulative effect of
these conditions, the net operating surplus would have been appreciably greater.
In the coming fiscal year, heavy carrying charges on the Ladore Dam and other
parts of the John Hart Development will be levied against operations for the first time.
This, together with considerable capital additions in various sections of the Province
which will not produce, by March 31st, 1951, a proportionate increase in revenue, may
be expected to result in a much reduced operating surplus for the year ending on that
date.
During the year the second stage of the John Hart Development was officially
declared completed in October by Premier Johnson, thus increasing its capacity by
56,000 to a total of 112,000 horse-power.
Good progress was made at the Whatshan Development during the winter, with the
driving-through of the 12,500-foot-long tunnel occurring shortly after the end of the
fiscal year. The first of two 33,000-horsepower stages is expected to be in operation by
the end of 1950. This source of power will supply the North Okanagan and Kamloops
areas, allowing present uneconomical plants to be closed down. It will also provide
power for any communities in the Arrow Lake Valley in which it may be economically
feasible to construct distribution facilities.
Initial survey work on the Quesnel River was made in the summer of 1949, indicating a potentiality of some 400,000 horse-power.
Plans for an administrative building in Victoria were completed during the year,
and construction commenced. These offices should be completed late in 1950, at which
time the administrative staff will move into permanent quarters.
This Fifth Annual Report describes in detail the year's activities under functional
headings—Legal, Construction, Operation, Surveys and Investigations, and Financial. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
F  11
British Columbia power Commission
GRAPHIC   REPRESENTATION  OF TOTAL  YEARLY
PRODUCTION  OF ELECTRICAL  ENERGY   FOR THE
A YEAR  PERIOD   1946-1950. SHOWING   PROPORTIONS
PRODUCED  BY   COMMISSION PLANTS  AND PURCHASED POWER.
K.W.H. G£/VE/1ATEO
K.w.H. Purchased
Totals
LEGE NO:
Generated
Purchased STATISTICS RELATING TO THE
ec
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Commercial
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Kwh.
Kwh.
$
c.
$
Kwh.
1947
29,556.13
662,644
2,474
90
4.00
4.5
18,405.25
530,739
1948
122,940.07
2,907,171
2,938
90
3.80
4.2
77,132.03
2,010,020
1949
136,368.13
3,765,710
3,208
102
3.70
3.6
81,429.61
2,901,691
1950
147,834.51
4,961,178
3,354
125
3.75
3.0
83,036.08
3,218,867
1947
5,858.78
53,000
110
43
4.70
11.0
9,219.72
119,000
1948
6,848.87
96,520
132
68
4.85
7.1
10,076.96
199,110
1949
8,896.85
194,099
169
108
4.95
4.6
10,817.20
356,670
1950
11,880.90
312,594
179
151
5.75
3.8
10,458.64
319,851
1948
2,567.51
14,660
66
48
8.35
17.5
2,488.95
17,195
1949
5,917.23
32,646
109
34
6.15
18.1
7,293.14
49,924
1950
5,102.24
77,432
186
53
3.45
6.6
7,367.02
174,199
1949
6,543.76
91,199
713
64
4.60
7.2
4,812.59
75,319
1950
36,238.20
668,051
794
72
3.95
5.4
24,327.20
563,367
1947
1,255.30
21,247
93
76
4.50
5.9
1948
28,846.60
381,012
837
45
3.40
7.6
9,409.21
221,106
1949
37,677.14
521,950
860
51
3.70
7.2
11,632.05
270,818
1950
108,602.24
2,059,626
2,371
77
4.05
5.3
59,351.00
1,548,844
1950
37,671.29
576,005
1,031
72
4.70
6.5
53,373.83
839,652
1947
6,275.26
44,200
124
31
4.35
14.2
7,513.21
74,000
1948
6,855.41
53,994
141
34
4.30
12.7
8,488.36
98,407
1949
6,846.84
102,008
158
57
3.80
6.7
8,098.93
210,186
1950
8,692.40
168,454
173
84
4.35
5.2
9,876.01
290,431
89
4.45
5.0
1950
1,676.35
33,625
109
1,490.47
31,659
1947
11,103.42
107,300
269
37
3.80
10.3
10,076.62
141,300
1948
11,470.01
184,792
342
51
3.20
6.2
12,647.95
291,137
-
1949
16,558.16
349,212
398
78
3.70
4.7
15,721.28
497,161
1950
20,696.73
544,149
468
102
3.90
3.8
17,673.17
579,248
1947
29,586.47
835,165
2,354
118
4.25
3.6
34,612.54
656,614
1948
113,315.36
3,176,827
2,588
107
3.80
3.6
136,481.20
2,647,482
1949
124,136.04
3,717,417
2,778
116
3.85
3.3
157,761.03
3,034,725
1950
148,675.32
4,512,023
3,257
124
4.10
3.3
189,534.87
3,815,925
54
4.70
8.7
1950
9,645.54
111,310
412
8,351.60
110,564
68
5.35
7.9
1948
3,643.72
46,091
82
3,872.34
109,177
1949
5,782.38
83,536
81
83
5.75
6.9
6,714.59
192,801
1950
7,769.87
98,745
150
70
5.50
7.9
8,205.45
248,445
1947
7,952.72
75,000
217
30
3.20
10.6
3,804.34
48,400
1948
9,347.76
99,211
230
37
3.45
9.4
5,317.30
79,093
1949
11,278.30
203,261
272
66
3.65
5.5
5,399.76
129,445
1950
13,435.91
288,992
285
86
4.00
4.7 |
6,761.13
168,762
* Denotes total number of customers at respective dates of acquisition.
Note.—The average monthly consumption and the average monthly bill are based on the average number of customers for
the whole year rather than on the actual number shown, which is at thf> end nf th*» fisr-al v^r SUPPLY OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY.
Service.
Power Service.
Street-lighting Service.
Totals.
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427
484
534
526
120
151
75
75
352
284
84
91
117
609
650
710
779
72
45
40
45
52
65
65
Kwh.
425
365
472
509
180
274
409
344
126
130
255
311
324
14.70
14.00
13.25
13.10
13.95
13.80
12.40
11.25
18.30
19.00
10.80
19.90
14.00
3.5
2.8
2.6
7.7
5.1
3.0
3.3
14.5
14.6
4.2
3,456.37
15,913.73
24,387.59
31,175.68
3,734.55
2,610.06
1,547.41
3,638.55
392.85
1,675.04
912.12
Kwh.
32,633
431,583
1,028,897
1,944,961
73,700
54,640
54,202
173,343
10
c.
10.6
3.7
2.4
1.6
5.1
4.8
2.9
2.1
1,732.96
6,776.41
6,376.81
7,284.06
180.00
134.00
169.02
750.15
Kwh.     | $ Kwh.
(Date of acquisition : Jan. 1, 1947.)
26,148
134,571
154,383
173,894
53,150.71  | 1,252,164
222,762.24 | 5,483,345
248,562.14  I 7,850.681
269,330.33 10,298,900
(Date of acquisition: Aug.
3,600
300
3,800
28,796
18,993.05
19,669.89
21,430.48
26,728.24
1, 1945.)
249,300
350,570
608,771
834,584
(Date of acquisition: Burns Lake, Nov. 1, 1947 ; Decker Lake, Feb. 15, 1950.)
6.4
4.3
944.98
5,745.58
2,803
4
14.0
18,801
8
8.9
47,738
5
3
1.9
3.5
26,896
163,895
9
3.5
125.00
362.98
618.16
77.65
671.54
(Date of acquisition: Royston, Jan. 1, 1947 ;
5,574.31  | 38,520
15,248.39 |       118,915
13,999.54  |       321,670
(Date of acquisition :  Jan. 1, 1949.)
3,872
1
17,544
1
22,301
1
1,553 |
27,019 j
12,378.98
66,982.52
I
295
12.50
4.3
298
12.80
4.3
395
15.15
3.8
370
23.50
6.4
135
13.75
10.2
162
14.00
8.6
317
12.25
3.9
428
14.55
3.4
204
9.60
4.7
284
20.20
7.1
316
13.75
4.4
436
13.80
3.2
440
13.40
3.1
392
20.60
5.3
335
18.25
5.2
363
18.90
5.2
423
21.00
5.0
287
23.35
7.6
316
11.20
3.5
358
12.45
3.5
471
15.55
3.3
76
6.00
7.9
114
7.70
6.7
167
7.00
4.2
211
8.45
4.0
2,021.40
2,547.31
10,727.61
25,294.65
861.04
745.06
417.82
510.46
252.60
195.04
1,678.91
3,814.88
11,258.70
72,421.50
70,700.45
99,468.88
16.00
781.38
1,696.03
2,166.62
529.68
383.11
361.70
421.08
78,362
95,115
373,740
455,775
8,700
5,914
5,631
7,940
26,128
4,800
5,437
75,516
200,091
Cumberland, June 5, 1947 ; Courtenay-Comox, Apr.
1,255.30 ]
1,422.52 |     40,175       2
2,598.61 |     77,731       2
7,040.13 I   211,374       4
2
2.6
3
2.7
43
2.9
38
5.6
7
9.9
6
12.6
5
7.4
6
6.4
1
2.5
4
5.3
2
3.6
4
2.2
8
1.9
41,699.73 |
54,455.11  |
194,967
1,422,332
1, 1949.)
21,247
720,655
965,614
185,720.98 |    4,193,584
2,576.25
954.60
500.45
796.76
1,302.00
286.00
749.00
1,110.00
1,190.50
(Date of acquisition : June, 30, 1949.)
36,968 I    2 I    118,916.02  |    1,908,400
I I I
(Date of acquisition : Sept. 1, 1945.)
25,000
33,104
41,899
15,604.11
16,589.28
16,160.35
20,380.87
151,900
158,315
350,929
508,724
(Date of acquisition : Nov. 1, 1949.) 1
3,810.30  I 91,412  I
(Date of acquisition:  Aug. 1, 1945.)
27,676
27,867
52,680
54,195
1
1
1
1
(Date of acquisition : Kamloops, Jan. 1, 1947
1,553.75
4,809.85
4,772.75
3,687.81
452,823
116
2.5
3,473,306
120
2.1
3,164,181
118
2.2
4,723,241
118
1
2.1
9
13,545
14
5.8
33,621
14
5.0
83,936
15
12
2.6
7.1
7,500
2,440
5
15.7
5,195
8
7.0
6,860
7
6.1
9.76
351.40
301.79
360.00
62,870
199,320
197,149
1
1
1
170,104
2
21,718.64  ] 281,076
25,062.00  [ 509,233
35,068.35   | 974,569
43,375.28  | 1,377,683
I
Chase, Sept. 30, 1949.)
77,011.46 | 2,007,472
327,027.91  | 9,496,935
357,370.27   | 10,113,472
441,366.88 I 13,221,293
(Date of acquisition :  Sept. 30, 1949.)
2,992 |    1 |     18,102.90 I       224,875
(Date of acquisition : Jan. 31, 1950.)
I        I I
(Date of acquisition : Aug. 1,1947.)
8,297.44 |       168,813
14,193.00  |    .  309,958
18,493.34  |       447,086
15,960
2,877
2,943
3,464
3,790
3,934
152
191
205
255
269
116"
99
154
262
831
837
956
2,593"
93
916
940
2,770
.,278
1,355
158
177
201
218
242
151
190
322
429
494
594
3,101*
3,080
3,359
3,607
4,156
467
486
104
135
141
135
211
(Date of acquisition : Sept. 1, 1945.) I  250
6,314
7,690
12,286.74
15,048.17
17,341.55
20,978.12
130,900
180,744
344,215
472,304
281
300
346
361
4.2
4.1
3.2
2.6
7.6
5.6
3.5
3.2
14.5
12.8
4.4
4.7
5.9
5.8
5.6
4.4
6.3
10.2
10.5
4.6
4.0
4.2
7.7
4.9
3.6
3.1
3.9
3.5
3.5
3.3
8.0
4.9
4.6
4.2
9.4
8.4
5.0
4.5 F 14
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
STATISTICS RELATING TO THE SUPPLY
rH
d       r-
to d
»•£
"si
£ S
Residential Service.
Commercial
Power District.
oj
s
£
>
OJ
tf
c
to
HH
fl
£
c
0
u
*8g
QJ  C
ll
xt o
x4S
a °
sg
.• E
ho
<o
t»
hS
c
o
s
r*S
CJJ3
3 £
£«
QJ S
tf fl
QJ
c
QJ
>
CJ
tf
i
0
HH
fl
£
3
0
O
$
Kwh.
Kwh.
$
c.
$
Kwh.
1947
72
3.65
(Dati
5.1
j of acquisition
140,757.69
299,777.93
5,933,381
7,477
3,506,220
1948
378,033.10
7,839,393
8,278
83
4.00
4.8
188,970.81
4,394,887
1949
377,682.07
9,802,055
9,102
94
3.60
3.8
230,543.15
7,473,774
1950
439,755.84
13,787,333
10,696
116
3.70
3.2
269,599.68
9,910,654
North Okanagan	
1947
173,236.77
4,169,895
4,167
87
3.60
4.2
112,465.09
2,715,790
1948
203,025.85
5,242,519
4,791
97
3.75
3.9
133,269.83
3,107,124
1949
256,731.80
7,034,583
5,660
111
4.05
3.6
158,666.22
3,772,011
1950
315,280.21
9,163,547
6,296
125
4.30
3.4
170,180.39
3,937,094
1947
5,984.54
68,059
244
36
3.15
8.8
3,212.77
41,002
1948
11,098.89
180,318
312
53
3.25
6.2
5,943.78
116,398
1949
15,424.04
331,954
360
80
3.75
4.6
7,444.17
172,653
1950
18,778.35
445,273
398
96
4.05
4.2
9,135.29
255,698
1947
9,856.63
127,000
252
45
3.50
7.7
13,962.69
171,200
1948
11,726.60
172,363
312
51
3.50
6.8
15,086.51
316,178
1949
15,435.00
273,872
403
66
3.70
5.6
17,464.16
458,739
1950
22,004.89
430,700
510
78
4.00
5.1
24,771.04
708,675
30
3.40
11.2
1947
15,609.09
139,159
423
5,747.09
70,300
1948
20,850.30
255,328
628
40
3.25
8.2
7,488.11
139,777
1949
30,391.53
446,248
763
52
3.55
6.8
10,946.95
315,380
1950
39,875.07
591,434
892
55
3.70
6.7
12,007.80
409,694
1947
10,920.33
102,000
245
36
3.85
10.7
9,737.67
75,000
1948
10,577.48
158,769
308
49
3.30
6.7
10,867.63
247,854
1949
15,814.70
333,809
369
83
3.90
4.7
14,248.84
445,398
1950
20,670.41
567,052
396
123
4.45
3.7
17,006.03
528,626
1947
26
4.30
16.7
2,850.84
17,100
62
3,692.31
33,100
1948
4,736.81
52,155
186
38
3.50
9.1
5,984.98
93,072
1949
9,853.09
136,816
261
50
3.55
7.2
6,649.24
133,184
1950
14,296.73
256,957
328
73
4.05
5.6
8,667.07
228,086
1947
49
5.00
10.2
4,462.45
43,800
78
7,917.34
70,000
1948
4,424.41
64,373
106
60
4.15
6.9
6,138.75
101,171
1949
5,858.85
114,864
125
84
4.25
5.1
6,608.10
177,005
1950
7,325.58
173,711
144
109
4.60
4.2
7,784.69
217,696
1947
66
5.70
8.6
7,324.45
85,300
116
11,386.30
150,600
1948
7,184.58
126,285
157
76
4.30
5.7
13,546.73
292,938
1949
9,625.70
197,675
202
90
4.35
4.9
16,069.72
432,245
1950
12,718.04
292,533
259
103
4.45
4.4
19,239.98
568,683
Totals	
1947
74
3.70
5.0
621,611.11
12,484,250
18,705
392,510.63
8,403,265
1948
957,493.33
21,051,771
22,434
84
3.80
4.5
653,211.43
14,482,126
1949
1,096,821.61
27,732,914
25,991
96
3.80
4.0
778,320.73
21,099,129
1950
1,448,626.62
40,120,724
32,688
110
4.00
3.6
1,018,198.44
28,674,720
* Denotes total number of customers at respective dates of acquisition,
f See Statement 2,  "Combined Operations—Financial Summary."
Note.—The average monthly consumption and the average monthly bill are based on the average number of customers for
the whole year rather than on the actual number shown, which is at the end of the fiscal year. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
OF ELECTRICAL ENERGY—Continued.
F 15
Service.
Power Service.
Street-lighting Service.
Totals.
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Kwh.
$
c.
$
Kwh.
c.
.
Kwh.
$
Kwh.
c.
Duncan, etc.
Aug. 1
1945;
Parksville-Qualicum, Jan. 1,
1947;
Chemainus
Mar. 15,1947 ; Ladysmith, Nov. 1, 1949.)
8,608*
1,048
310
12.45
4.0
198,306.40
13,187,560
294
1.5
12,563.58
446,398
4
651,405.60  | 23,073,559
8,823
2.8
1,203
320
13.80
4.3
223,901.54
14,448,894
307
1.5
13,680.38
474,242
5
804,585.83  |  27,157,416
9,793
3.0
1,503
444
13.70
3.1
213,174.35
15,227,253
131.
1.4
13,940.97
467,616
4
835,340.54 1 32,970,698
10,740
2.5
1,684
511
13.90
2.7
180,688.34
14,405,610
149
1.3
16,476.86
610,789
13
906,520.72 | 37,831,986
12,542
2.4
1
4,477
795
303
12.55
4.2
125,087.98
7,566,512
226
1.7
9,571.83
434,708
8
420,361.67
14,886,905
5,196
2.8
889
306
13.15
4.3
138,914.71
8,205,735
244
1.7
9,900.79
449,066
8
485,111.18
17,004,444
5,932
2.9
976
335
14.10
4.2
142,438.12
7,959,110
244
1.8
10,672.98
489,535
13
568,509.12
19,255,239
6,893
2.9
1,031
325
14.05
4.3
158,882.09
8,936,704
249
1.8
12,034.99
490,284
8
656,377.68
22,527,629
7,584
2.9
288
45
114
8.90
7.8
2,841.19
79,335
12
3.6
325.01
10,952 |    2
12,363.51 |        199,348
303
6.2
55
192
9.80
5.1
4,372.84
297,533
15
1.5
660.00
23,946  |    2
22,075.51 |        618,195
384
3.6
64
245
10.55
4.3
6,594.36
368,399
16
1.8
730.00
27,291 |    2
30,192.57 |        900,297
442
3.4
71
320
11.40
3.6
8,529.56
433,152
20
2.0
870.00
34,070 |    2
37,313.20  |    1,168,193
491
3.2
I.I
289
85
174
14.20
8.2
3,451.98
104,260
22
3.3
374.00
50,808
1
27,645.30
453,268
360
6.1
101
279
13.30
4.8
2,315.88
102,581
13
2.3
518.40
50,112
1
29,647.39
641,234
427
4.6
115
358
13.60
3.8
2,533.81
165,523
17
1.5
776.80
40,006
-
36.209.77
938,140
536
3.9
151
442
15.45
3.5
4,317.93
282,410
25
1.5
1,059.18
25,625
2
52,153.04
1,447,410
688
3.6
1
337
74
91
7.40
8.2
2,228.27
83,400
4
2.7
23,584.45
292,859
501
8.1
94
139
7.45
5.3
776.33
11,993
6
6.5
38.50
1,500
2
29,153.24
408,598
730
7.1
120
235
8.15
3.5
3,382.78
97,746
8
3.5
306.28
11,498
2
45,027.54
870,872
893
5.2
126
272
7.95
2.9
887.78
11,526
7
7.7
504.22
16,503
2
53,274.87
1,029,157
1,027
5.2
1 Datp
nt. 1. 1945.)
293
66
88
11.40
12.9
3,178.94
47,000
28
6.8
684.00
8,758 |    1
24,520.94 |        232,758
340
10.5
102
237
10.40
4.4
3,343.17
154,791
15
2.2
707.00
13,580 |    1
25,495.28 |       574,994
426
4.5
108
356
11.40
3.2
6,234.69
478,732
17
1.3
1,078.00
33,415 |    2
37,376.23 |    1,291,354
496
2.9
117
380
12.25
3.2
9,862.89
428,428
21
2.3
1,204.65
43,400 ]    2
48,743.98 |    1,567,506
536
3.1
1                                  1
59
93.00
9 000 |    1
6 636.15  |          59,200
98
11.2
56
149
9.60
6.5
279.98
6,145
3
4.6
152.50
7,450  |    1
11,154.27  |        158,822
246
7.0
66
170
8.50
5.0
1,033.73
30,494
7
3.4
497.27
20,530 |    1
18,033.33  |        321,024
335
5.6
73
267
10.15
3.8
2,391.44
154,869
11
1.5
522.00
18,140  |    1
25,877.24  |        658,052
413
3.9
1                                  1
106
45
129
14.65
11.8
1,008.31
12,200
4
8.3
180.00
3,285
1
13,568.10  |        129,285
128
10.5
52
168
10.20
6.0
621.87
9,106
5
6.8
180.00
2,250
1
11,365.03  |       176,900
164
6.4
57
278
10.35
3.7
560.09
9,884
6
5.7
446.50
16,140
1
13,473.54 |        317,893
189
4.2
62
310
11.10
3.6
637.83
11,221
6
6.7
577.60
22,160
1
16,325,70 |       424,788
213
3.9
(Date
161
64
207
15.20
7.6
3,059.51
53,000
22
6.8
452.00
3,689
1
22,222.26
292,589
203
7.6
86
311
14.40
4.6
1,269.63
38,452
10
3.3
461.40
8,400
1
22,462.34
466,075
254
4.8
102
385
14.30
3.7
1,813.19
64,472
14
2.8
792.00
29,297
1
28,300.61
723,689
319
3.9
110
439
14.85
3.4
2,867.45
99,413
15
2.9
792.00
26,321
1
35,617.47
986,950
385
3.6
278
13.00
4.7
816
1.7
(Atr
1,112,892
icquisition.)
43,713,830
26,938
23,039
3,494
359,255.52
21,713,423
28,950.73
24
1,402,327.99
3.2
4,188
308
13.90
4.5
471,260.08
27,343,260
818
1.7
40,816.20
1,436,651
30
2,122,781.04
64,313,808
27,470
3.3
4,911
382
14.10
3.7
483,722.36
28,909,668
677
1.7
45,807.17
1,679,586
40
2,404,671.87
79,421,297
31,619
3.0
6,070
420
14.90
3.6
553,600.90
32,970,990
816
1.7
59,963.26
2,080,484
52
3,080,389.221
103,846,918
39,626
3.0 F 16
ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
British Columbia Power commission
GRAPH  SHOWING   INCREASE   IN   RESIDENTIAL   CONSUMPTION
AND   REDUCTION  IN   KWH  CHARGE TO   CUSTOMERS
I946-I9SO.
125
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1347-8
1348-3
■ 349 SO
Zt REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
F 17
British Columbia power Commission
GRAPH   SHOWING   INCREASE   IN   COMMERCIAL   CONSUMPTION
AND   REDUCTION IN  KWH CHARGE   TO   CUSTOMERS
I94G-I9SO.
•i
<
1
8
450
435
420
405
390
375
360
345
330
315
300
285
270
255
240
225
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1340- 9
1943 -50
3t F  18 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
II. LEGAL.
1. LEGISLATION.
With certain exceptions, the " Electric Power Act" does not apply to a corporation
that owns or operates a power plant primarily for the generation of power for its own
industrial purposes. By the " Electric Power Act Amendment Act, 1950," it was provided that the Commission might, by agreement, and with the approval of the Lieutenant-Governor in Council, acquire real or personal property of such a corporation.
Where such property is purchased, the amendment also provides a means of determining the purchase price if not agreed upon.
The Amending Act also provides that the moneys raised under the " Central
Interior Development Act" and paid to the Commission shall be excluded from the
amount fixed by the " Electric Power Act " as the limit of the Commission's borrowing
power.
2. COMPENSATION   FOR   THE   EXPROPRIATED   PROPERTIES OF   WEST
CANADIAN   HYDRO   ELECTRIC   CORPORATION   LIMITED, NANAIMO-
DUNCAN   UTILITIES   LIMITED,   AND   COLUMBIA   POWER COMPANY,
LIMITED.
The reasons for judgment of the Honourable Mr. Justice Wilson were handed down
on February 13th, 1950. The matter of costs has not yet been determined, and, until
decided, judgment cannot be entered. Accordingly, the time limited for an appeal has
not yet begun to run, and it cannot be said at this time whether appeals will be taken.
Subject to appeal, the reasons for judgment of the Honourable Mr. Justice Wilson
determine important matters of law, but for the purpose of this Report, reference is
made only to the amount of the awards.
By the " Electric Power Act " an appellant is required, by his notice of appeal
from the valuation found by a valuator, to set out the amount of compensation deemed
proper. The Commission and the companies each appealed in all three appeals and
" compensation set out " in the tabulation below has reference to the appellant's opinion
of proper compensation.
West Canadian Hydro Electric Corporation Limited and Subsidiaries.
Compensation found by valuator  (The American Appraisal Company)   $3,462,020.05
Compensation set out by Commission     2,700,000.00
Compensation set out by company     4,500,000,00*
Compensation awarded by the Honourable Mr. Justice
Wilson     3,289,700.10
Nanaimo-Duncan Utilities Limited.
Compensation found by valuator  (The American Appraisal Company)   $1,878,325.66
Compensation set out by Commission     1,250,000.00
Compensation set out by company    2,100,000.00
Compensation awarded by the Honourable Mr. Justice
Wilson     1,706,586.29
Columbia Power Company, Limited, and Subsidiary.
Compensation found by valuator  (The American Appraisal Company)       $334,268.71
Compensation set out by Commission        200,000.00
Compensation set out by company       364,000.00
Compensation awarded by the Honourable Mr. Justice
Wilson        226,916.89
* Approximate. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50. F  19
3. ACQUISITION OF ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES.
During the year April 1st, 1949, to March 31st, 1950, the Commission acquired the
following properties:—
(1) April 1st, 1949: By purchase, the electrical distribution system of The
Corporation of the City of Courtenay serving the City of Courtenay, the
Village of Comox, and adjacent areas. The City supplied a total of 1,723
customers with 25-cycle power purchased from the Canadian Collieries
(Dunsmuir), Limited, plant on the Puntledge River.
(2) June 30th, 1949: By expropriation from Northland Utilities (B.C.),
Limited, its electrical distribution system, serving 1,088 consumers at
Dawson Creek, 137 consumers at Pouce Coupe, and 53 consumers at Rolla.
(3) September 30th, 1949: By expropriation from Lake Cowichan Electric
Company, Limited, its hydro-electric and diesel-electric generating plant
and electrical distribution system at Lake Cowichan. This system served
467 consumers.
(4) September 30th, 1949: By purchase from Carlin Bros., Limited, its hydroelectric generating plant and electrical distribution system at Chase.
The plant and system were purchased in 1948, but were not taken over
until the above date, at which time 147 consumers were being served.
(5) November 1st, 1949: By purchase from The Corporation of the City of
Ladysmith, its electrical distribution system, serving 871 customers in
the City of Ladysmith and adjacent areas.
(6) November 1st, 1949: By purchase from Kitanmax Water and Power
Company, Limited, its electrical distribution system at Hazelton. The
company supplied 68 consumers.
(7) December 9th, 1949: By purchase from War Assets Corporation, two
diesel-electric generating plants at the former airport at Long Beach and
electrical distribution-lines part way toward both Tofino and Ucluelet.
In addition, a quantity of power-plant equipment and distribution-lines
was acquired at Ucluelet.
(8) January 31st, 1950: By purchase from Invermere Contracting Company,
Limited, its distribution system at Invermere, serving 63 consumers.
(9) January 31st, 1950: By purchase from Simon Ronacher, his electrical
distribution system and a diesel-electric generating unit at Athalmer.
Twenty customers were connected to this distribution system.
(10) January 31st, 1950:   By purchase from H. H. Moore, his distribution
system at Edgewater, serving 21 customers.
(11) February 15th, 1950:   By purchase from S. Anderson & Company, its
distribution system at Decker Lake.    This system served 28 consumers.
In addition to these acquisitions, a small distribution system at Louis Creek, near
Barriere,  north of Kamloops, was taken  over  from the  Glenburn  Power & Light
4. RIGHTS-OF-WAY AND SITES.
During the fiscal year the following progress was made in the acquisition of
right-of-way easements along the Commission's three main transmission systems:—•
(1) The 132-kv transmission-line from the Whatshan Development to Vernon
required the acquisition of a right-of-way 130 feet in width over a distance of 67 miles. The line crossed 226 parcels of land, registered in the
names of 85 owners. The acquisition of this right-of-way was commenced
on February 1st, 1950, and by the end of the fiscal year easements over
48 parcels had been completed with 44 owners, negotiations with the
remaining 41 owners being in various stages of completion.
(2) There are 8 outstanding right-of-way claims on the 63-kv transmission-
line from Vernon to Kamloops.   The right-of-way in connection with this F 20 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
line crossed 224 parcels of land registered in the names of 114 owners,
and settlements covering these 8 claims are still outstanding.
(3) In the course of the year, 16 of the 28 outstanding right-of-way claims
on the 138-kv transmission-line from the John Hart plant to Nanaimo
and Port Alberni were completed.   The remaining claims are proceeding
toward completion.    This line crossed a total of 414 parcels of land,
registered in the names of 115 owners.
Survey plans required in connection with the acquisition of easements by way of
right-of-way over private property for the Kamloops-Chase distribution-line, Hope-
Flood line, and the Nanaimo sulphate-pulp mill line were completed.   The preliminary
work of contacting the private-property owners prior to  acquiring the necessary
easements was begun early in January, 1950.
Other distribution-line extensions in rural areas of the Province necessitated the
acquisition of numerous easements by way of right-of-way over private lands.
The surveys necessary to acquire the remaining privately owned lands for the
Whatshan Lake- Development were completed, and negotiations with the respective
owners are progressing. This development necessitated the purchase of some 200 acres
of privately owned land and 112.79 acres of Crown land, together with the occupation
of 1,515.32 acres of vacant Crown land, which will be flooded when the level of Whatshan
Lake is raised.
Survey plans were completed for both the overhead cable crossing of the Fraser
River at Hope and the construction of a wharf on Lower Arrow Lake near the Whatshan
power-house site. The plans have been deposited with the Dominion Department of
Public Works, and applications made under the provisions of the " Navigable Waters
Protection Act " for approval of the work.
Sub-station sites were acquired at the following places:—
(1) Saltspring Island, by purchase from A. L. Young.
(2) Kamloops, by easement agreement from Tetsuo Sakaki.
Diesel power-house sites were acquired at the following places :■—
(1) Athalmer, by purchase from Simon Ronacher.
(2) Houston, by purchase from The Director, The Veterans' Land Act.
(3) Burns Lake, by lease from Canadian National Railways.
5. CONTRACTS.
Contracts have been drawn and settled covering all major construction projects
undertaken during the year, together with numerous contracts for the supply of plant
and equipment required in connection therewith.
Apart from the ordinary service contracts, agreements were completed for the
supply of industrial power in power districts and for the supply of street-lighting
service in certain incorporated villages and unorganized communities.
6. WATER LICENCES.
Application was made to the Comptroller of Water Rights for a licence to divert,
use, and store water out of Clowhom River for power purposes on the Salmon Arm
of Seechelt Inlet. ?   msURANCE_
Comprehensive insurance coverages on all phases of the Commission's operations
were maintained in force. There were certain rearrangements and deletions of some
types of coverage effected in order to meet the needs of the Commission.
No major claims under any of the coverages arose during the course of the year's
operations. There was, however, one fire claim for the approximate sum of $400
covering damage to an operator's cottage at the John Hart Development, Campbell
River, which is in the process of adjustment. A number of small claims, under fleet
coverage, public-liability and property-damage coverages, were reported and satisfactorily settled. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50. F 21
III. CONSTRUCTION.
1. PRODUCTION PLANT.
Alert Bay.
The diesel-electric installation at Alert Bay was increased by the substitution
of a 312-kva unit for a 62.5-kva unit, making the total installation at this plant 687 kva.
Athalmer.
A new diesel-electric generating-station was completed at Athalmer during the
winter of 1949-50 to supply electrical energy to the Windermere area. The initial
installation consisted of one 312-kva and one 250-kva diesel-electric generating unit,
making the total capacity 562 kva.
Burns Lake.
A new three-unit diesel-electric generating plant was constructed during the
autumn of 1949 to replace the old plant which contained three 31-kva portable generating units, being removed to Houston. The installation in the new plant consisted
of two 125-kva diesel-electric generating-sets, one of which was in stock and the other
released from Smithers, thus making the total plant capacity 250 kva. The design of
the new plant provides for considerable expansion of capacity as may be required.
Dawson Creek.
Dawson Creek diesel-electric generating plant, acquired from War Assets Corporation in March, 1949, and leased to Northland Utilities (B.C.), Limited, was taken
under Commission operation in July, 1949. The installed capacity at that time was
1,150 kva. An additional diesel-electric generating unit having a capacity of 750 kva
was added in November, 1949, making the total capacity 1,900 kva. The new unit
is a dual-fuel type engine capable of operating mainly on natural gas if such should
become available at Dawson Creek.
Hazelton.
Following completion of an agreement between the Commission and the Wrinch
Memorial Hospital, the existing diesel-electric direct-current generating system at the
hospital was replaced by installing two new 125-kva alternating-current generating
units.
Hope.
Following interconnection with the British Columbia Electric Railway Company,
Limited, and conclusion of arrangements for purchase of power for distribution in
Hope from that company, all generating units, with the excepiton of one 250-kva
stand-by, were removed from the Hope power plant for use in other areas.
Houston.
Construction was started during February, 1950, on a diesel-electric generating-
station in which three 31-kva portable diesel-electric generating-sets released from
Burns Lake will be installed. This work was still progressing at the end of the
fiscal year.
John Hart Development, Campbell River.
The installation of four 28,000-horsepower units at the John Hart hydro-electric
development was completed and the plant was inspected and officially opened by the
Premier, the Honourable Byron I. Johnson, M.B.E., on October 21st, 1949. The same
occasion marked the completion of the storage-dam at Ladore Falls, below the outlet
of Lower Campbell Lake. F 22
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
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REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50. F  23
Previous to the formal opening, sufficient water had been impounded in the lake
to safeguard the required production of electrical energy during the dry period which
occurred in September and early October, 1949. While the extremely snowy winter
interfered to some extent, the work of clearing land to be flooded by the raising of the
lake has continued. Floating equipment has been constructed for the purpose of
removing the fallen timber and trash from the lake as the water is being raised during
the coming summer.
Work was completed on 5% miles of secondary-road diversion, replacing an
existing road to the Brewster Lake area which will be flooded when the ultimate level
of Lower Campbell Lake is reached.
Lillooet.
The temporary diesel-electric installation was increased by the addition of a
125-kva portable unit released from Hope. The total installed diesel-electric capacity
of the plant is now 312.5 kva, since one of the smaller units has been withdrawn from
service and stored.
Nakusp.
Improvement of the water-supply to the reconstructed hydro-electric plant at
Nakusp was ensured by construction of a low storage-dam, complete with fishway, at
the outlet of Box Lake.
Quesnel.
The diesel-electric installation at Quesnel was changed by removing one 63-kva
unit, which was sent to Whatshan for temporary use for generation of construction
power, and installing a 312-kva unit from Hope. The total capacity of the plant is
now 936 kva.
Smithers.
The diesel-electric installation at Smithers was changed by removing one 125-kva
unit to Burns Lake and installing a 312-kva unit from Hope. The total capacity of the
plant is now 936 kva.
Westbank.
A 50-kva diesel-electric generating unit was transferred from Westbank to
temporary use for generation of construction power at Whatshan and a 312-kva
additional generating unit was installed during the early summer. The capacity of
this plant is now 926.5 kva.
Whatshan.
The excavation of the 12,500-foot tunnel was within 500 feet of completion by the
end of the fiscal year. Owing to the nature of material encountered, the amount of
concrete lining required had to be increased. The amended schedule indicates the
completion of the development toward the end of 1950.
Prior to the end of 1949 a concrete control-dam at the outlet of Whatshan Lake
approximately 30 feet high, a low earth-fill cut-off dam, an intake structure at the
Whatshan Lake end of the tunnel, and the power-house substructure had been substantially completed.    The power-house superstructure steel work had also been erected. F 24
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
LADORE FALLS STORAGE-DAM.
View of up-stream face on opening day, October 21st, 1949.    Water-level is
gradually being raised as more power is required.
ALBERNI SUBSTATION COMPLETED.
Increased distribution voltage and a capacity three times beyond Alberni's peak
load for last winter have been achieved with completion of the transformer substation
on the Somass River. REPORT OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA POWER  COMMISSION,  1949-50.
F  25
The following is a summary of the additions and changes to generating plants
made during the year:—
Type of
Prime
Mover.
Generating Units Installed.
Generating Units Removed.
Net
Additions.
Plant Location.
Number.
Capacity,
Kva.
Total
Kva.
Number.
Capacity,
Kva.
Total
Kva.
Diesel
Diesel
Diesel
Diesel
Diesel
Diesel
Hydro
Diesel
Diesel
Diesel
Diesel
1
{.
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
1
312
250 1
312  f
125
750
125
312
562
250
750
250
1
3
fl
I1
1
1
1
1
62.5
62.5
249.5
562
31
93
157
750
250
312
125
624 1
125 j
— 71,9
John Hart Development,
25,000
125
312
312
312
50,000
125
312
312
312
50,000
Lillooet	
Quesnel	
62 5
63
125
50
62.5
63
125
50
62.5
249
187
262
Totals	
14
53,185
11
1,205
51,980
2. TRANSMISSION PLANT.
Vancouver Island System.
The 10-mile 60-kv transmission-line from Nanaimo substation (TS 3) to Nanaimo
sulphate-pulp mill, together with the installation of three 4,000-kva 60/13.8-kv transformers at the pulp-mill, was completed, and the line was energized on December
28th, 1949.
In the autumn of 1949 a contract was made covering excavation and concrete work
for the addition of three 5,800-kva 138/69-kv transformers and switch gear at Nanaimo
substation. Part of this work was completed before the winter and was resumed
following drying out of the ground toward the end of March, 1950. Contracts had also
been arranged for steel work and electrical installation, and it is expected that this
programme will be completed by the end of June, 1950.
In addition to this increased transformer capacity, the electrical contract included
work in connection with the installation of 138-kv circuit-breakers, disconnects, and
metering equipment for interconnecting with the British Columbia Electric Railway
Company, Limited, 138-kv line from Nanaimo to Victoria. The contract with the
British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited, provides for delivery of power
over this line commencing September 1st, 1950.
Arrangements were completed for acquiring land adjacent to the Puntledge hydroelectric generating-station of Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, for installation
of a substation to supply 60-cycle power to the Comox Valley area. Orders were placed
for three 5,000-kva 138/13.8-kv transformers, and at the end of the year a call for
tenders for clearing the site had been issued. The work of installing this substation
and of connecting lines within the area of supply will be proceeded with during the
coming year.
Vernon-Kamloops.
Construction of the 63-kv Vernon-Kamloops transmission-line, together with
terminal facilities at Vernon and Kamloops, was completed early in the summer, and
this line has since been in operation on interchange of power between the two areas.
Work was commenced in December, 1949, on the construction of a 1,500-kva substation F 26 "ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
taking power from this line to serve a new distribution system serving Falkland,
Westwold, and Monte Lake.
Whatshan-Vernon.
Construction of the 138-kv Whatshan-Vernon transmission-line was nearly complete at the end of the year. The galvanized-steel switching structure at the Whatshan
end, together with foundations for transformers and other equipment, had also been
constructed and installation of electrical equipment was in progress.
Concrete foundations for transformers and other equipment at the Vernon end
were also completed. The initial installation at this substation will consist of three
8,333-kva 138/63-kv transformers with a spare unit.
3. DISTRIBUTION PLANT.
During the year the distribution system was increased by 414.1 circuit-miles,
which compares with 257.9 miles in the previous fiscal year. The extensive programme
of improvement by replacing overloaded lines and increasing transformer capacity was
continued.
Entirely new systems were constructed in the Hazelton and Lake Windermere
Power Districts and the Houston area. Major extensions include the connection of
Decker Lake to the Burns Lake distribution system, the Kamloops-Chase line, and
rural electrification in the North Okanagan. The Campbell River and Lillooet distribution systems were rebuilt during the year.
Street-lighting additions and improvements were made in a number of communities, including Alberni, Campbell River, Courtenay, Hope, Lillooet, Nanaimo,
Sechelt, and Vanderhoof.
The more significant items of distribution-plant construction are described under
the various power districts.
Alberni.
Increasing demands made it necessary to improve 12.04 miles of secondaries and
add 232x/2 kva in distribution transformer capacity. The conversion of the Alberni
system from 2,300 volts to 6.9/12.0 kv was commenced in the latter part of the year.
Alert Bay.
Minor improvements only were required following the complete reconstruction of
the distribution system during the previous year.
Burns Lake.
The Decker Lake system acquired by the Commission in February, 1950, was
reconstructed and connected to the Burns Lake system by a 2.3/4.0-kv line. Some
minor additions were also built in the Burns Lake area.
Campbell River.
Conversion from 25-cycle to 60-cycle operation of all services north of the south
boundary of the Village of Campbell River, totalling 534, was affected. This portion of
the system is now fed from the John Hart Development. The distribution system
which was acquired by the Commission on January 1st, 1949, was reconstructed and
extended as far as Painter's Lodge.   Transformer capacity of 115 kva was added.
Comox Valley.
With the acquisition on April 1st, 1949, of the distribution plant previously owned
by the City of Courtenay, the areas of Courtenay, Cumberland, Royston, and adjacent
territory were combined to form the new Comox Valley Power District. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50. F  27
The capacity of 6.8 miles of conductor was increased and 146 kva of transformer
capacity was added to improve the distribution system.
A house-to-house canvass was carried out to determine the amount of customer-
owned equipment which would be affected, and plans for conversion to 60 cycles were
completed by the end of the fiscal year.
Dawson Creek.
This distribution system was acquired by the Commission on June 30th, 1949.
Only minor improvements and additions have been made to date.
Golden.
Three short extensions were constructed in this district during the year.
Hazelton.
Following acquisition by the Commission of the Kitanmax Water and Power Company, Limited, serving part of Old Hazelton, the system was completely rebuilt and
extended to include communities in New Hazelton and South Hazelton. The area is
served by a new diesel-electric generating plant located in the grounds of the Wrinch
Memorial Hospital.
Hope.
The distribution-line to serve the area from Hope to Laidlaw was completed during
the year. This line is 11.7 miles in length, voltage being 6.9/12.0 kv. The street-
lighting system was also extended.
Houston.
Houston is the first isolated community in which the Commission has installed an
entire electrical plant. Construction of the distribution system was completed at the
end of the fiscal year and service will be commenced shortly after, following completion
of the generating plant. A street-lighting system and 3.4 miles of distribution-line,
however, was authorized.
Kamloops.
An 11.5-kv distribution-line was constructed for a distance of 32 miles eastward
along the Thompson River from Kamloops to Chase, and the Chase system, purchased
September 30th, 1949, was rebuilt and extended. It is proposed to improve and
augment the supply of power to this extension by means of a substation taking energy
from the 60-kv Vernon-Kamloops transmission-line near Monte Creek. Until this is
constructed, power will continue to be fed to this system from Kamloops.
Three extensions in Kamloops and North Kamloops requiring 127 poles added a
further 4.7 miles of primary lines to the system.
Lake Cowichan.
This power district was acquired and operation by the Commission commenced on
October 1st, 1949. Since that date the distribution system of 2.3/4.0 kv has been
extended by the addition of 1.2 miles of line, some conductor was increased in size to
provide greater capacity, and 55 kva of additional transformer capacity was put in
service.
Shortly after acquisition the distribution plant was surveyed with a view to
determining future requirements.
Lake Windermere.
This new power district covers a group of communities in the Upper Columbia
Valley, including Athalmer, Edgewater, Invermere, Wilmer, Windermere, and Radium
Hot Springs, which were only in part provided with restricted and spasmodic service. p  28 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
This area will be served from a new diesel-electric generating plant at Athalmer
through 31.6 miles of 6.9/12.0-kv distribution-line, part of which was placed in operation on March 1st, 1950, and the balance of which will be completed at an early date.
Lillooet.
During the fiscal year the distribution system in Lillooet was entirely rebuilt.
Eighty-one new services, an increase of over 50 per cent., were added to the system
during the year.   A street-lighting system was also installed.
Nakusp.
Minor additions only were made to this distribution plant.
Nanaimo-Duncan.
A number of projects in this large power district were completed during the year.
Notable among these are:—
(a) The construction of a 14,000-foot 23-kv submarine cable across the northerly entrance to Sansum Narrows, south of Crofton, greatly improving
conditions on Saltspring Island.
(6) A 60-kv interconnection at the south end of the system, together with a
substation-capacity increase, improving voltage conditions in the Duncan
area.
(c) Extensions in the Errington-Coombs area, along the Alberni Highway,
and in the Hilliers area were made, thus bringing service to many Vancouver Island residents for the first time.
(d) Extension of the 23-kv line from Qualicum north to Bowser, to serve the
Dashwood, Qualicum Bay, and Bowser areas, was commenced, and by the
close of the year was nearing completion.
The capacity of existing distribution-lines throughout the district was increased
by the addition of 1,114 kva in transformer capacity and the change to larger sizes of
26.6 miles of conductor. Distribution voltage conditions were improved in many localities, particularly in the Somenos area where a new substation was built and at Qualicum where voltage regulators were installed. A fourth conductor was added to the
13.2/23.0-kv line between Craig's Crossing and Qualicum.
The distribution system serving Ladysmith, which was previously owned by that
city, was acquired on November 1st, 1949, and immediately surveyed to determine
requirements as to increased capacity and extension.
North Okanagan.
The rural electrification scheme was actively pursued during the year, particularly
at the northern end where the system has now been extended toward Sorrento and
Malakwa. These additions required the use of 2,700 poles to build over 120 miles of
primary and nearly 25 miles of secondary lines.
Construction of a 6.9/12.0-kv distribution system to supply the Falkland-Westwold-
Monte Lake area was well advanced at the end of the year.
Peachland-Westbank.
A 2.1-mile 2,300-volt extension was constructed on sixty-seven poles in this area
during the year.
Quesnel.
Two short primary extensions added 1 mile of line to the system. The line, acquired
from the Department of Transport, 1.2 miles in length, was connected to 4-wire 2.3/4.1
kv.   Twenty-six distribution transformers were added to the system. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50. F  29
SECHELT.
Over 6 miles of new distribution-line was built in this area during the year. The
street-lighting system was considerably augmented. A total of 1.3 miles of conductor
was changed to provide increased capacity, while 30 kva of additional transformer
capacity was installed.
Smithers.
The Smithers-Telkwa line was converted from 2.3/4.1 kv to 6.9/12.0 kv, provision
for which had been made when the line was first constructed. A 3-mile single-phase
extension to this line was built, and 1 mile more added to the 2,300-volt portion of the
system during the year.
Terrace.
An extension to Braun's Island, 4.2 miles in length, was built, and 1.1 miles of
secondary line were added to the system. In this rapidly growing area the number
of customers increased by about 25 per cent, during the past year.
Vanderhoof.
Two short extensions and other minor additions, totalling 6.5 miles of line, were
constructed in this area.
Williams Lake.
This system was increased by the addition of 6.5 miles of single-phase 2,300-volt
line and 1.75 miles of secondary line. The construction required the setting of 127
poles. F 30
ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
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report of british columbia power commission, 1949-50. f 31
Distribution-line Construction during Fiscal Year ended March 31st, 1950.
Power District.
Voltage,
Kv.
Miles of Line added.
Primary. Secondary.
Total.
New
Services
added.
Streetlights
added.
Alberni	
Alert Bay	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River	
Comox Valley	
Dawson Creek	
Golden	
Hazelton	
Hope	
Houston	
Kamloops	
Lake Cowichan	
Lake Windermere:	
Lillooet	
Nakusp	
Nanaimo-Duncan	
North Okanagan	
Peachland-Westbank
Quesnel	
Sechelt	
Smithers	
Terrace	
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake	
Totals	
2.3
6.9
6.9/12.0
2.3
2.3/4.0
13.2
2.3
8.0
4.0
2.3
2.3
6.9/12.0
6.9/12.0
11.5
2.3
2.3/4.0
6.9/12.0
2.3
2.3
2.3
6.9
13.2
6.9
2.3
2.3/4.0
2.3
6.9/12.0
6.9/12.0
2.3
2.3
2.3
2.3
0.4
1.4
1.0
0.5
0.3
33.5
4.0
2.8
0.3
10.3
8.3
3.3
0.8
0.3
8.2
11.7
1.6
37.5
1.0
31.6
1.9
1.3
0.7
23.9
60.4
121.6
2.1
2.1
0.1
2.2
3.0
1.0
4.0
4.2
6.4
6.5
330.5
1.7
0.2
2.0
2.7
2.2
Nil
0.1
2.7
2.5
1.8
5.1
0.2
8.0
1.0
NU
20.8
23.6
Nil
1.4
3.9
Nil
1.1
4.5
0.5
12.3
11.0
5.5
0.8
0.4
10.9
14.2
3.4
42.6
1.2
39.6
2.9
1.3
81.2
145.2
2.1
3.5
6.2
4.0
5.3
7.2
8.3
166
32
121
153
123
73
26
158
118
Nil
585
35
104
81
24
54
122
62
80
25
75
59
NU
Nil
Nil
NU
Nil
Nil
12
15
NU
Nil
Nil
17
Nil
95
Nil
Nil
NU
NU
Nil
2
NU
4,389
226 F 32
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
PROBLEMS IN RURAL ELECTRIFICATION.
Aerial photographs assisted engineers in the North Okanagan Power District
in solving problems of approach to hidden farms when extending rural distribution
system. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
F 33
IV. OPERATION.
1. PRODUCTION.
The largest single increase to the system generating capacity was the addition
of two 25,000-kva generators at the John Hart Development power-house. Two new
generating-stations were brought into operation during the year—Hazelton, with
250 kva, commenced operation November 3rd, 1949, and Athalmer, with 562 kva, went
on the line March 1st, 1950. One small diesel set, rated at 93.7 kva, acquired with the
property purchased from Lake Cowichan Electric Company, Limited, is used temporarily
as a stand-by.
After August 20th, 1949, when purchased power from the B.C. Electric system
began to be supplied to the Hope Power District, the generating capacity at the Hope
plant was reduced to 250 kva. Net additions to other existing generating-stations are
fully set out elsewhere in this Report.
Generating Capacity in Operation, March 31st, 1950.
Plant Location.
Type.*
Number of
Units.
Capacity
in Kva.
D
D
H
D
D
D
D
D
H
S
D
D
HD
D
HD
H
D
D
D
D
D
3
2
2
2
5
3
2
1
4
4
1
3
2
3
4
2
3
3
3
6
4
1,695.0
1,900.0
Golden	
100,000.0
3,375.0
312 5
325 0
Sechelt	
6,500.0
437 5
926 5
Totals	
62
121,854.7
* Note.—D = diesel ;  H=hydro ," S=steam.
Power was purchased from Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, to supply
the Comox Valley and Campbell River districts, the latter in part only as the 60-cycle
conversion work was under way.
Subsequent to August 20th, 1949, power was purchased from the British Columbia
Electric Railway Company, Limited, for distribution in the Hope District. Following
the acquisition of the system operated by the Lake Cowichan Electric Company, Limited,
on October 1st, 1949, power was purchased from the Hillcrest Lumber Company,
Limited, for distribution in the Lake Cowichan area. The sum of the maximum
demands of purchased power was 2,540 kva.   Accordingly, the system capacity was:—
Kva.
Commission's generating capacity  121,854.7
Purchased power        2,540.0
Total
124,394.7 F 34
ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
Power Generated and Purchased.
/. Generated (Kwh).
Fiscal Year ended March 31.
Difference.
Station.
1950.
1949.
1,061,710
10,295,905
398.470
2,299,040
637,185
106,240
668,960
101,482,000
4,487,030
4,560
538,544
572,157
767,044
9,346,210
142,792
294,666
949,695
255,678
2,299,040
480,662
156,523
106,240
1,358,450
82,089,400
3,409,950
—689,490
19,392,600
Kamloops	
1,077,080
4,560
452,680
456,855
262,430
49,048
1,206,375
1,222,261
23,903,090
1,403,997
422,031
456,079
1,133,462
901,460
85,864
115,302
—262,1,30
—1,9,01,8
1,824,875
1,348,663
26,194,710
1,894,385
822,045
616,769
1,514,255
1,178,570
618,500
Sechelt	
126,402
2,291,620
490,388
400,014
160,690
380,793
277,110
Totals	
157,946,073
129,464,276
28,481,797
//. Purchased (Kwh).
Fiscal Year ended March 31.
1950.
1949.
807,250
17,600
28,990
1,470,996
896,400
—807,250
— 17,600
—28,990
4,951,206
2,038,200
1,116,543
264,320
Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd.                     	
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd	
6,422,202
2,934,600
1,116,543
264,320
B.C. Electric Railway Co., Ltd	
Totals	
10,737,665
3,221,236
7,516,429
Summary.
Total generated and purchased..
Less station services	
Totals	
168,683,738
2,085,557
132,685,512
1,865,162
35,998,226
220,395
166,598,181
130,820,350
35,777,831
Sources of Power, 1950.
Hydro-electric energy
Diesel-electric energy _
Kwh.
138,640,900
14,818,143
Steam-electric energy       4,487,030
Purchased power      10,737,665
Totals  168,683,738
Per Cent.
82.3
8.8
2.5
6.4
100.0 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
F 35
5/eam, 4.487. Q3Q KWH 2 5X
BSSSB
X^lk^\^^'AiA^iA^kkkk^>,^\^iA^^^^'A^*A^^^^«,v.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
POWER COMMISSION
6RAPHIC   REPRESENTATION   OF
SOURCES   AND   DISPOSITION OF
TOTAL   ELECTRICAL     ENER6Y
OUTPUT   FOR   FISCAL YEAR
1949-SO.
% Domestic W//M
40.1Z0, 724 K. W.H. {
23-87-W-
ol Contracts
835.120 K.w.H
cl 2/97.
%% Power '',,
35.OS 1.474 K.W.H.
'W/////>.zo-Z7-W/////,
^Commerciol SJcS
28.674, 720 KrV.H.%^
Losses S Station Services'^
'////28.00I.700 KWH////A F  36 " ELECTRIC  POWER ACT."
Disposition of Power.
Kwh.
Net generated and purchased, 1949-50   166,598,181
Transmission and transformation losses (8.3 per cent.)..    13,880,047
Delivered, wholesale   152,718,134
Special-contract sales—
West Kootenay Power & Light Co., Ltd.- 15,600
Construction, John Hart Development _       100,040
B.C. Electric Railway Co., Ltd     8,544,000
Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd  26,879,000
Nanaimo sulphate-pulp mill     1,296,480
     36,835,120
Delivered to power districts and municipalities for distribution   115,883,014
Distribution losses (10.4 per cent.)     12,036,096
Distribution-system sales : c  103,846,918
The 1949 spring run-off created difficult operating conditions at both Barriere and
Shuswap hydro-plants. At the former a slide washed away part of the flume, disrupting service from July 16th until July 23rd. On the Shuswap River, freshet conditions
in May, which deposited silt and debris in the forebay and partly blocked the intake,
reduced capacity of the Shuswap Falls generating-station well into June.
Abnormally low temperatures for prolonged periods in January and February,
1950, resulted in the complete shut-down of Barriere generating-station from January
18th to February 6th and the near collapse of generating facilities at the Shuswap Falls
generating-station from January 15th. Under these circumstances a strict curtailment
of power was imposed in the North Okanagan and Kamloops Power Districts, notably
street and store-front lighting. By the exercise of such economies and by taking full
advantage of all possible interconnections, which had been designed in part to meet
such an emergency, not only were essential services maintained, but individual customers suffered little inconvenience through restricted consumption.
At Shuswap, frazil ice formed in the open river above the head-pond and nearly
filled the confined area between the river-bottom and the surface ice, thus restricting
the flow of water to the turbines. On January 21st one generating unit burned out
and was withdrawn for repairs of a major nature, including complete rewinding.
Limited service in the North Okanagan was maintained by means of the reduced output
of the second generator and by power purchased from the West Kootenay Power and
Light Company, Limited.
In order to sluice out the accumulation of silt and debris, the forebay was
unwatered as much as the headworks would permit. Advantage was taken of this,
the first opportunity in several years, to make repairs to the No. 2 intake grill, the
intake-gate mechanism, and the trash-racks. Service was resumed by this unit on
February 28th.
The effect of the abnormal winter at Barriere caused ice to form in the open flume
above the siphon section, blocking the flow through the siphon. During this critical
period, with the Barriere generating-stations shut down until February 9th, when
normal conditions were restored, the Kamloops steam plant became the sole source of
supply for Kamloops.
One turbine generator was repaired following an insulation failure at the Kamloops steam plant, while at Barriere hydro-plant constant surveillance and repairs
to the flume were necessary. ^
REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
F 37
Diesel generating plants at various locations were given routine repairs, mostly
in the nature of main-bearing replacements.
The third and fourth generating units at the John Hart generating-station were
available for service on October 21st, following which Generators No. 1 and 2 were
dismantled for cleaning and final check-up.
Stream-flow in the Campbell River reached a maximum for the year of 18,200
cubic feet per second following heavy precipitation on November 26th. The maximum
and minimum flows for the year were:—
Max.
Min.
Max.
April, 1949	
May, 1949	
June, 1949	
July, 1949	
August, 1949	
September, 1949
C.F.S.
4,925
9,050
5,850
3,025
3,210
1,665
C.F.S.
2,165
3,305
3,210
2,105
1,715
October, 1949	
November, 1949
December, 1949.
January, 1950....
February, 1950..
March, 1950	
C.F.S.
3,460
7,410
18,200
5,560
5,310
4,540
C.F.S.
930
1,500
1,700
2,000
720
2,210
2. TRANSMISSION.
132-kv System.
There were no complete interruptions to the 132-kv transmission loop on Vancouver Island and only one generating system interruption for a duration of three
minutes on August 15th because of governor trouble at the John Hart generating-
station, which, at the time, was undergoing construction.
Unusually severe weather conditions were experienced in the Coastal area during
the months of December and January, when wet snowfalls accompanied by high winds
affected the operation of the 132-kv transmission system on Vancouver Island and did
extensive damage to distribution-lines on Vancouver Island and in the Hope area.
The worst conditions were experienced on December 17th and 26th, 1949, and on
January 10th, 1950, when the conductors of the lines in the Campbell River and Courtenay areas became loaded with ice. While no total interruptions resulted, a number of
momentary disturbances were caused as the ice dropped off individual span conductors.
Following investigations of experience elsewhere, chemical treatment of regrowth
on transmission-line rights-of-way on Vancouver Island was undertaken. About 77
miles of the right-of-way on the 132-kv line between Nanaimo and Port Alberni and
Campbell River were treated, as well as some sections along the 60-kv Nanaimo-Duncan
line.
Inspections made subsequent to the treatment showed the method to be effective
and the cost to be considerably lower than that of hand-clearing.
Periodic inspections of oil circuit-breakers, transformer and oil-switch bushings,
and other station equipment were organized.
The F.M. communication system between the John Hart generating-station and
Port Alberni and Nanaimo required adjustments to improve reliability and quality of
transmission. Following the relocation of the aerial at Nanaimo and the adoption of
a different design for the directive array at the generating-station, operating results
were greatly improved.
Sub-transmission Systems.
Parallel operation of the Commission's Vancouver Island system with that of the
British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited, was initiated on November 24th
and was maintained thereafter.    The company's 60-kv Victoria-Duncan line was used F 38 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
for the purpose, pending completion of its two 132-kv lines between Victoria and
Nanaimo.
The rapid growth of load in the Nanaimo-Duncan district indicated the need for
an engineering study of the 60-kv transmission system and substation facilities in
order that the demands of the future may be met.   This study has been undertaken.
A new 63-kv transmission-line connecting the North Okanagan transmission
system with the Kamloops steam plant and the Barriere hydro-electric plant was placed
in operation on June 24th, 1949. This improved the flexibility of the combined systems
and permitted a reduction in the use of fuel at the steam plant.
In addition, the improvement in system power factor created better operating
conditions for the Shuswap Falls generators.
A few momentary and one long accidental interruption affecting the sub-transmission-lines occurred. The 60-kv line from Nanaimo to Duncan was out of service for
fifteen hours on January 10th during a very heavy snow-storm which blocked roads
and interfered with communications.
The interconnection between the North Okanagan transmission system and that
of the West Kootenay Power and Light Company, Limited, at Winfield was utilized
to considerable advantage on several occasions.
Tests were conducted in the Kamloops-Vernon-Whatshan area to determine the
practicability of using radio-telephone communication for the operation of the transmission system in the territory.
Maintenance of the lines included some insulator replacements, pole renewals, and
pole stubbing.    No substation maintenance of any significance was required.
3. DISTRIBUTION.
As referred to in section II-3 of this Report, the Commission acquired a number
of distribution systems during the year.
These acquisitions, together with extensive rural line additions in the North
Okanagan Valley and line extensions elsewhere, resulted in an addition of 8,007 services,
to bring the total number being supplied on March 31st, 1950, to 39,626 customers.
The Commission was operating twenty-three power districts on March 31st, 1950,
an increase of four over the previous year—Dawson Creek, Hazelton, Lake Cowichan,
and Lake Windermere.
Weather conditions during November and December, 1949, and January and
February, 1950, were extremely unfavourable and produced an abnormal number of
service interruptions due to falling trees and ice-loading on conductors.
Loads continue to grow and to require added transformer and conductor capacity,
largely in acquired systems which had not been reconstructed by the Commission.
Of these, the distribution systems at Alberni, Port Alberni, Nanaimo-Duncan, Kamloops, and the North Okanagan Valley are examples.
Distribution-system maintenance included the butt treatment of the poles set in
1946, 1947, and 1948 during the reconstruction of local systems. In all, about 2,200
poles were treated.
The system acquired from the Heffley Irrigation Company, north of Kamloops, was
rebuilt, requiring the setting of 100 poles.
Reclearing, stubbing, additional guying, cross-arm replacement, and resagging of
conductors were carried out as required, except at Dawson Creek where a major reconstruction operation was in the planning stage. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
WHATSHAN DEVELOPMENT.
F 39
.'    «, -. :      : :
Power-house under construction near Needles, Lower Arrow Lake.
Hard-rock crew of Miners Western, Limited, at the completion of the break-through
are pictured above at the Whatshan Lake tunnel entrance.
. F 40 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
POWERFUL GAS-DIESEL GENERATOR AT DAWSON CREEK.
Six-cylinder dual-fuel diesel generating unit, installed at Dawson Creek, is to be
duplicated in this plant.    This generator is of 750 kva capacity.
WILLIAMS LAKE, TYPICAL DIESEL PLANT.
This diesel generator, developing 375 horse-power, is one of the
major generating units in Williams Lake plant. H^SSS!!^^
REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
F 41
Summary of Circuit-miles of Distribution-lines and Number of Customers
as at March 31st, 1950.
Power District.
Miles of
Line.
Number of
Customers.
Customers
per Mile.
93.0
4.2
15.3
48.4
98.3
66.8
10.4
10.9
28.9
116.1
13.7
39.6
8.7
19.0
643.0
550.9
32.2
25.9
41.8
42.4
17.7
11.7
19.6
3,934
269
262
956
2,770
1,355
242
151
594
4,156
486
42.3
Alert Bay           	
64.0
17.1
19.8
28.2
20.3
23.3
13.9
20.6
35.8
35.5
211
361
12,542
7,584
491
688
1,027
536
413
213
385
24.3
19.0
19.6
13.8
15.2
26.6
Sechelt           	
24.6
12.6
23.3
18.2
19.6
Totals	
1,958.5
39,626
20 2
4. RATE SCHEDULES.
In the twelve-month period ended March, 1950, not only were promotional schedules
extended to additional power districts, but the rates for primary power were reduced
in four areas where Regulation No. 5 had already been introduced. This downward
revision was made effective in Hope and those power districts served by the John Hart
Development so as to encourage further industrial growth.
During the year, revised schedules in accordance with the provisions of Regulation
No. 5 were approved for the Burns Lake, Dawson Creek, Hazelton, and Lake Cowichan
Power Districts, the latter three having been acquired during the period under review.
Promotional rates have now been adopted in nineteen out of the twenty-three operating
power districts. In addition, the rates for the Houston Power District, where construction was still under way at the end of the fiscal year, were also established.
On Vancouver Island, only the Comox Valley Power District supplied through
purchases of 25-cycle current from the Canadian Collieries plant at Puntledge and those
customers of the Campbell River Power District still being served from that source
remain on rates not yet revised.
In the Interior the three areas where general revisions have not yet taken place
are Lillooet, Kamloops, and the North Okanagan Power Districts. In the two latter
the use of electricity cannot be encouraged by more attractive rates until the existing
generating capacity is augmented by the development at Whatshan. However, both
these power districts have extensions where the promotional rates of Regulation No. 5
are in effect. These areas are the community of Chase, together with the line from
Kamloops—all part of the Kamloops Power District, and the Falkland-Monte Lake-
Westwold area of the North Okanagan Power District. F 42
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
The promotional rates now in effect are contained in the following tables:—
A. Residential Service Rates.
Available for residence lighting, heating, cooking, and single-phase motors individually rated at 2 horse-power or less used for domestic purposes.
Power District and
Rate Zone.
Monthly
Minimum
per Kw of
Demand.
Block I
(First 20 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand).
Block II
(Next 60 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand).
Block III
(Balance of
Monthly
Consumption).
Alberni (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Alert Bay	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River*	
Dawson Creek	
Golden (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Hazelton	
Houston	
Hope	
Kamloops (Chase extension only)	
Lake Cowichan	
Lake Windermere	
Nakusp	
Nanaimo-Duncan (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
(Zone 3)	
North Okanagan (Falkland, etc., only)
Peachland-Westbank	
Quesnel (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Sechelt	
Smithers	
Terrace (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Vanderhoof (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Williams Lake (Zone 1)	
„     (Zone 2)	
Cents per Kwh.   I   Cents per Kwh.
.55
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.50
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
.55
l.OO
1.00
t
1.00
1.00
1.25
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.25
1.00
1.25
1.00
1.25
12
12
10
10
12
12
12
12
10
10
10
12
12
10
12
10
10
12
12
10
12
12
12
12
10
12
2
2
2%
2%
2
2%
2%
2%
2%
2%
2»/3
2%
2%
2%
2
2
2y2
2%
2%
2y2
2y2
2%
2%
2%
2Vi
2V-,
2V2
2%
2'/2
Cents per Kwh.
%0
%o
%o
%0
§'io
§io
9io
%o
%o
%0
§io
§io
Sio
lio
§io
%o
%0
§io
%0
%0
%0
* Available to consumers of 60-cycle power only.
t $5 is the full minimum, irrespective of kw demand rating.
Note.—Minimum demand rating, 2 kw.    Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
F 43
B. Summer Service Rates, Residential and Commercial.
Available for summer cottages, hotels, tourist camps, refreshment booths, and
other commercial premises which normally require service during summer months only.
Available May 1st to September 30th.
Power District and
Rate Zone.
Annual
Fixed Charge
per Kw of
Demand.
Block I
(First 50 Kwh
per Season per
Kw of Demand).
Block IT
(Next 150 Kwh
per Season per
Kw of Demand).
Block III
(Balance of
Consumption
per Season).
Alberni (Zonel)	
(Zone 2)	
Alert Bay	
Burns Lake.	
Dawson Creek *...
Golden (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Hazelton	
Houston	
Hope	
Lake Cowichan	
Lake Windermere	
Nakusp	
Nanaimo-Duncan (Zone 1)
(Zone 2)
(Zone 3)
Peachland-Westbank	
Quesnel (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Sechelt	
Smithers	
Terrace (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Vanderheof (Zonel)	
„ (Zone 2)	
Williams Lake (Zone 1)	
„     (Zone 2)	
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
6.00
Cents per Kwh.
12
12
10
12
12
12
12
10
10
12
12
10
10
12
12
10
12
12
12
12
10
12
Cents per Kwh.
2
2
2%
2V-z
2y2
2%
2y2
2%
2%
2%
2V2
2%
2%
2
2
2%
2%
2y2
2y2
m
2%
2V2
2%
2y2
2%
21/.
2%
Cents per Kwh.
%
y2
y2
y2
y2
%
%
%
y2
y2
%
%
y2
y2
%
%
y2
%
%
y2
%
Note.—Minimum demand rating, 2 kw.    Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent. F 44
: ELECTRIC POWER ACT.
C.   COMMERCIAL SERVICE RATES.
Available for lighting,  heating, cooking,  and single-phase motors  in business
premises and any other premises used for commercial purposes.
Power District and
Rate Zone.
Monthly
Minimum
per Kw of
Demand.
Block I
(First 30 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand).
Block II
(Next 60 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand).
Block III
(Balance of
Monthly
Consumption).
Alberni (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Alert Bay	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River*	
Dawson Creek	
Golden (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Hazelton	
Houston	
Hope	
Kamloops (Chase extension only)	
Lake Cowichan	
Lake Windermere	
Nakusp	
Nanaimo-Duncan (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
(Zone 3)	
North Okanagan (Falkland, etc., only)
Peachland-Westbank	
Quesnel (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Sechelt	
Smithers	
Terrace (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Vanderhoof (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
Williams Lake (Zone 1)	
(Zone 2)	
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.50
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
t
1.00
1.00
1.25
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.25
1.00
1.25
l.OO
1.25
Cents per Kwh.
12
12
10
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
10
12
12
10
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
12
Cents per Kwh.
4
4
4
4
Cents per Kwh.
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
y2
%
V2
y2
* Available to consumers of 60-cycle power only.
t $5 for 2-kw demand plus ?1 for each additional kw.
Note.—Minimum demand rating, 2 kw.    Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
D. Power Service Rates.
f 45
Available for motors and other electrical equipment used for commercial, manufacturing, and processing purposes where the minimum demand is not less than 3% kw
(5 horse-power), single- or three-phase, at available secondary voltages (550/220/110
volts).
Power District.
Monthly Service Charge
per Kw of
Demand.
Block I
(First 50 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand).
Block II
(Next 50 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand).
Block III
(Balance of
Monthly
Consumption).
Alberni*	
Alert Bay	
Burns Lake	
Campbell River*t-
Dawson Creek	
Golden	
Hazeltont	
Houston*	
Hope*	
Kamloops (Chase extension only).
Lake Cowichan	
Lake Windermere	
Nakusp	
Nanaimo-Duncan*	
North Okanagan (Falkland, etc., only).
Peachland-Westbank-
Quesnel	
Seehelt	
Smithers	
Terrace	
Vanderhoof	
Williams Lake..
1.00
l.OO
1.00
l.OO
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
l.OO
l.OO
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
Cents per Kwh.
Cents per Kwh.
iy2
i%
m
m
iy2
iy2
3
3
m
i%
iy2
iy2
iy2
iy2
i%
iy2
i%
iy2
m
x%
i%
iy2
Cents per Kwh.
y2
y2
%
%
%
%
i
i
y2
y2
%
%
y2
y2
%
%
y2
y2
%
%
* Power loads in these districts are subject to the following quantity discounts:—
Up to 100 kw of billing demand	
From 101 to 200 kw of billing demand	
From 201 to 500 kw of billing demand	
From 501 to 1,000 kw of billing demand	
t Available to consumers of 60-cycle power only.
t No prompt-payment discount granted in these districts.
Note.—Minimum demand rating, 4 kw.    Discount for prompt payment, 10 per cent.
Discount.
  Nil
  10%
  15%
  20% F 46
' ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
E. Primary-power Service.
Available for industries, commercial establishments, institutions, and others
requiring power at primary distribution voltage (2,300 volts or higher) in excess of
50 kw at a single point of delivery.
Power District.
Monthly Service Charge
per Kw of
Demand.
Block I
(First 50 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand).
Block II
(Next 50 Kwh
per Month per
Kw of Demand).
Block III
(Balance of
Monthlv
Consumption).
Cents.
50
85
85
50
85
85
50
85
85
50
85
85
85
85
85
85
85
85
Cents per Kwh.
2%
3
3
2%
3
3
2y2
3
3
2V-
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Cents per Kwh.
iy2
iy2
i%
iy2
iy2
iy2
iy2
iy2
m
iy2
iy2
i%
i%
m
m
iy2
iy2
Cents per Kwh.
y2
y.
y2
Vi
V-
Golden	
y2
y-
y2
y2
%
y2
Ms
y2
y2
%
y2
y2
North Okanagan (Falkland, etc., only)	
Sechelt	
Smithers	
* Power loads in these districts are subject to the following quantity discounts :— Discount.
Up to 100 kw of billing demand  Nil
From 101 to 200 kw of billing demand  10%
From 201 to 500 kw of billing demand  15%
From 501 to 1,000 kw of billing demand  20%
t Available to consumers of 60-cycle power only.
Note.—Minimum demand rating,  50 kw.     Discount for prompt payment,  10 per cent. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
F 47
F.   STREET-LIGHTING SERVICE RATES.
A uniform street-lighting schedule, based upon the capacity of the lamp ratings,
is available in all power districts where Regulation No. 5 is in general use, namely:
Alberni, Alert Bay, Burns Lake, Campbell River, Dawson Creek, Golden, Hazelton,
Houston, Hope, Lake Cowichan, Lake Windermere, Nakusp, Nanaimo-Duncan, Peach-
land-Westbank, Quesnel, Sechelt, Smithers, Terrace, Vanderhoof, and Williams Lake.
Two types of street-lighting service have been made available:—
(a) Overhead.—Under which the Commission installs, owns, operates, and
maintains overhead street-lighting equipment and supplies energy for
the operation of lights daily from one hour after sunset until one hour
before  sunrise.    The  customer municipality pays  the  actual  cost of
materials for renewal of lamps and glassware.
(6) Ornamental.-—Under which the street-lighting equipment is owned by
and maintained at the expense of the customer municipality.   The Commission supplies energy for the operation daily from one hour after sunset
until one hour before sunrise.
The schedule of charges under each of these types of service for various lamp
capacities is as follows:—■
System of Wiring.
Capacity Rating of Lamp.
Net Rate per Lamp per Month.
Overhead.
Ornamental.
100 watts	
$1.50
2.00
2.50
3.50
6.00
1.30
1.75
2.10
2.60
$0.75
200 watts	
1.25
300 watts	
1.75
500 watts	
2.75
1,000 watts	
5.25
.55
1 00
1.35
1 85
G. Irrigation Service Rates.
Available for motor-driven pumps used for irrigation purposes, including testing
of pipe-lines.
The following rate is available in the North Okanagan and Peachland-Westbank
Power Districts:—■
Rate:   $5 per thirty days per horse-power of maximum demand.
Minimum contract period:  90 days.
Prompt-payment discount:  10 per cent. F 48
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
In the areas where a general rate revision has not yet taken place and the schedules
in force at acquisition are still in effect, there is, of course, no uniformity of structure.
The main schedules operative in these several power districts are summarized below.
1. Campbell River Power District.
(Applicable to consumers of 25-cycle power only.)
Residential. Commercial.
Service charge
$1.00
First 30 kwh at  8c. per kwh
Next 30 kwh at  5c. per kwh
Next 40 kwh at ..  4c. per kwh
All over 100 kwh at  3c. per kwh
Service charge
$1.50
First 100 kwh at       8c. per kwh
Next 200 kwh at  _ 7%c. per kwh
Next 200 kwh at      6c. per kwh
All over 500 kwh at      4c. per kwh
2. Comox Valley Power District.
Courtenay.
Cumberland.
Royston.
Residential.
First  .
City.     Outside.
30 kwh at   8c.        10c.
30 kwh at    4c.          5c.
60 kwh at 2%c.        3c.
$1.25      $1.50
10% penalty
NU
$3.00
$4.00
30 kwh at 10c.
270 kwh at 4c.
300 kwh at   3c.
$1.10
Nil
20c.
No flat rates.
No flat rates.
Next  	
All over_    ..
Minimum  	
30 kwh at   3c.
$2.00
Nil
Discount  	
Meter rent 	
25c
Flat rates for water-heater—
750 watts	
1,000 watts	
No flat rates.
Since the above rates practically precluded the use of electric hot-water heaters
for household purposes in Cumberland and Royston, the following rate, based on
Regulation No. 5, has been made available.
First 60 kwh at ..
Next 180 kwh at
Balance at 	
Monthly minimum
10c. per kwh
2%c. per kwh
%0c. per kwh
  $3.00
The established meter rentals to apply.   No prompt-payment discount.
In Cumberland and Royston the regular residential schedules described above apply
to commercial service as well.   There are no power-rate schedules in these areas.
For the Courtenay-Comox portion of the power district the commercial and power
rates are as below.
Commercial.
First 100 kwh at
Next 100 kwh at _	
All over 200 kwh at  .
Minimum—
2 kw or less.... 	
Over 2 kw   	
First 500 kwh at	
Power.
Next 500 kwh at    ..
All over 1,000 kwh at	
Minimum—
2 horse-power or less	
2 to 10 horse-power	
Over 10 horse-power....      .
City.
8c.
4c.
2%c.
$1.25
3.00
City.
4c.
3c.
2c.
Outside.
10c.
5c.
3c.
$1.50
3.00
Outside.
5c.
4c.
3c.
$2.00
3.00
5.00 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50. F 49
3. Kamloops Power District.
Residential.
City. Outside.
Service  charge       _ 25c. 25c.
First 12 to 40 kwh (depending on area of residence) at—      7c. per kwh        9e. per kwh
Next 200 kwh at  2%c.perkwh       3c. per kwh
Balance of monthly consumption at  l^c. per kwh '  l%c. per kwh
Monthly minimum charge.....     $0.75 $1.00
Flat rates for water-heater—-
750 watts  $3.00
1,000 watts    4.00
Commercial.
First 65 kwh per kw of demand at    7c. per kwh        9c. per kwh
Next 65 kwh per kw of demand at    5c. per kwh        7c. per kwh
Balance of monthly consumption at..—   3c. per kwh       5c. per kwh
Minimum—■
First kw or 2 horse-power     $1.00
Each additional M\ kw or 1 horse-power  .50
Power.
Service charge         25c.
Demand charge      50c. per horse-power connected at 220 volts
First 50 kwh per month at      5.4c.    per kwh
Next 100 kwh per month at   3.6c.    per kwh
Next 1,350 kwh per month at    2.7c.     per kwh   ■
Next 1,000 kwh per month at           2.025c. per kwh
Next 4,000 kwh per month at     2.25c.   per kwh
Next 5,000 kwh per month at      1.8c.    per kwh
Next 10,000 kwh per month at      1.35c.  per kwh
Balance of monthly consumption at      1.125c. per kwh
Monthly minimum charges—
For 2,200-volt loads 30c. per horse-power connected, plus service charge
For    220-volt loads  ...50c. per horse-power connected, plus service charge
Jr. Lillooet Power District.
Residential and Commercial.
First 35 kwh at           l5c. per kwh
Balance at           2%c. per kwh
Minimum bill     $2.00
Power.
All energy at.... —       2%c. per kwh
Minimum bill $2.50, or $1.25 per horse-power connected F  50 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
5. North Okanagan Power District.
Residential.
First 30 kwh at      -      10c. per kwh
Next 60 kwh at          3c. per kwh
Next 100 kwh at  .      2%c. per kwh
Balance at  ....      IMiC. per kwh
Monthly minimum          $3.00 net
Or
First 30 kwh at       12c per kwh
Next 30 kwh at         10c. per kwh
Balance at    .       5c. per kwh
Monthly minimum—
Within city limits of Vernon, Armstrong, Enderby, or Salmon Arm  $1.00 net
Elsewhere      $2.00 net
Prompt-payment discount—
Within City of Vernon      20%
Elsewhere         10%
Flat rates for water-heater—
750 watts         $3.00
1,000 watts          $4.00
Commercial.
Demand charge $1.00 per kw of maximum demand
First 60 kwh at        6c. per kwh
Next 440 kwh at      5c. per kwh
Next 1,000 kwh at       4c. per kwh
Next 1,000 kwh at.....         3c. per kwh
Next 1,000 kwh at      2c. per kwh
Balance at   l%c. per kwh
Monthly minimum  Demand charge, but not less than $2.00
Prompt-payment discount     10%
Power.
1 to 20 horse-power—-
First 200 kwh at            5c. per kwh
Next 800 kwh at  .  3%c. per kwh
Next 1,000 kwh at       3c. per kwh
Next 1,000 kwh at  2y2c. per kwh
Balance at    IVzQ. per kwh
Monthly minimum $1.00 per horse-power connected, but not less than $3.00 net
Over 20 horse-power—
First 500 kwh at          3c. per kwh
Next 800 kwh at   .    2y2c. per kwh
Balance at      iy2C. per kwh
Monthly minimum .    75c. per horse-power connected
Prompt-payment discount       10% REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50. F 51
V. SURVEYS AND INVESTIGATIONS.
1. POWER PROJECTS.
, The principal survey work carried out during the past year has been an investigation of hydro-electric power-development possibilities on Quesnel River. This investigation included topographical surveys and geological investigations at five separate
power-sites and a storage-dam site at .the outlet from Quesnel Lake. Studies of the
data obtained indicate a potentiality of at least 400,000 horse-power on Quesnel River.
The most suitable power-site for initial development appears to be at Little Canyon,
about 16 miles from Quesnel. A detailed report on these investigations has been
prepared and will be submitted to the Government early in the forthcoming fiscal year.
Studies based on surveys made during 1948 for a proposed hydro-electric power-
development at Clowhom Falls were continued and indicated the possibility of installing
initially two 2,000-horsepower generating units and delivering power to Sechelt at an
estimated cost of $965,000. The proposed power plant would be designed for future
expansion, up to at least 12,000 horse-power if required. The undertaking of the
initially proposed power-development was approved by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council on January 20th, 1950, following which certain supplementary surveys were
undertaken and the detailed preparation of plans and specifications was commenced.
Tenders for the supply of turbines and generators had also been invited before the end
of the fiscal year.
Surveys for a small hydro-electric development on Sugsaw Creek to supply Bam-
field, at the entrance to Alberni Inlet, were completed. Surveys were also made covering
a power-site on Scuzzy Creek, near North Bend in the Fraser Canyon. The preliminary
estimates indicated that neither of these projects was economical.
2. TRANSMISSION PROJECTS.
Preliminary surveys and engineering studies have been made covering a 60-kv.
transmission-line from Duncan to Cowichan Lake. It is probable that this transmission-line, if constructed, will be operated initially at 23 kv until load requirements are
more clearly defined and demand is sufficient to require 60-kv operation.
Preliminary studies have also been made covering construction of a 60-kv line
between Vernon and Armstrong to replace the existing 33-kv line which is becoming
inadequate to meet load requirements. The investigations, which will be continued
during the coming year, include extension of this projected line northward to Enderby
and Salmon Arm and later connecting to Kamloops, thus providing a duplicate to the
transmission-line between'Vernon and Kamloops completed early this year and which
followed a more direct route through Falkland and Westwold.
3. DISTRIBUTION PROJECTS.
Surveys were made during the year for distribution projects to serve the following
communities: Alert Bay, extension to Sointula; Hazelton; Houston; Ucluelet-Tofino;
Windermere, including Athalmer, Wilmer, Invermere, Edgewater, and Radium Hot
Springs. Construction of these projects was authorized during the year and, except for
the Sointula extension and the Ucluelet-Tofino area, work is now well advanced.
Surveys were also made in respect of a number of extensions, among the larger of
which may be mentioned Gabriola and Quadra Islands, Savona near Kamloops, 150-Mile
House from Williams Lake, the Lakes District near Vanderhoof, and the Nakusp-
Edgewood area. Improvements and reconstruction, where necessary, of the recently
acquired distribution systems at Ladysmith, Lake Cowichan, and Merritt were also
studied preparatory to undertaking work in these communities during the coming fiscal
year. F 52 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
Customer appliance surveys and complete engineering studies were made covering
the rather intricate problem of converting the Comox Valley area from 25-cycle to
60-cycle power. It is believed that a sound scheme which will result in the minimum
possible inconvenience to customers has been developed. This will be proceeded with
during the forthcoming year. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
F 53
tf
tn
ui
Q
o
fH
«t
tn
Pi
o
Pt F 54 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
VI. FINANCIAL.
The following statements are presented to show the financial results of the operation of the undertakings of the Commission for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1950,
and the financial position of the Commission at March 31st, 1950:—■
1. Balance-sheet.
2. Combined Operations: Financial Summary—Revenue and Expenses.
3. Power Distribution—All Districts: Summary of Revenue and Expenses.
4. Power Distribution by Districts:—
(a)  Summary of Revenue and Expenditure.
(&) Accumulated Stabilization Reserve.
5. Plant and Related Reserves.
6. Construction Work in Progress.
Condensed comparative summaries showing revenue, operating expenses, operating
surplus, provisions for reserves, and net operating surplus are shown in the General
Review section at the beginning of this Annual Report. Further details relative to
total operating costs, allocation of cost of power, distribution expenses by separate
power districts, customers, etc., are shown on Statements 2, 3, and 4.
The wholesale cost of power delivered to individual districts is determined by the
Commission in accordance with section 26 of the " Electric Power Act," separate cost
records being maintained for each generation and transmission unit operated. From
the total cost of generation and transmission thus obtained, special power sales (sections 21 and 22, "Electric Power Act") are deducted (see Statement 3), and the
combined net cost of power is determined. This is distributed at the resulting average
kwh rate to each power district on the basis of the kwh volume of power received into
the district distribution system. Statement 4 shows the detailed distribution of the
cost of power to all power districts operated.
The values shown on the balance-sheet for plant and equipment in operation include
valuations established by the Commission in respect to properties acquired by expropriation proceedings in August and September, 1945, the compensation for which has not
yet been finally determined.
Capital funds for construction purposes and for refunding of previous Governmental borrowings during the year under review were obtained by an issue of $7,000,000
3-per-cent. 1967 bonds and by borrowings on notes from a chartered bank in the amount
of $7,075,000. Both these borrowings are guaranteed as to principal and interest by
the Government of the Province of British Columbia. The amount of $6,500,000 was
paid to the Minister of Finance, Province of British Columbia, to refund a like amount
of Treasury bills issued by the Province on behalf of the Commission.
Full provision has been made for interest on all borrowings.
Requirements of the sinking fund for retirement of capital borrowings have been
met in full to date as provided by the " Electric Power Act" and are on deposit with
the Minister of Finance.
The maintenance and renewals reserve was increased during the year by
$159,924.81, representing the difference between $570,893.67 provided by charges to
operation and $310,968.86 actually expended, leaving a balance of $679,490.34 at credit
of this reserve account as at March 31st, 1950.
Details of the individual amounts of both maintenance and renewals reserve and
sinking fund reserve balances applicable to the individual undertaking operated by the
Commission at March 31st, 1950, are set out in Statement 5.
Included in "Accounts receivable—Other" is an amount of $10,559.55, representing
accounts which are over ninety days old. REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50. F  55
In connection with "Accounts receivable—Light and Power Customers," a reserve
for bad debts in the amount of $5,752.36 was provided at March 31st, 1950. This
amount has been deducted to produce the total shown on the balance-sheet under this
heading.
In addition to the $10,000 contractors' deposits shown on the balance-sheet, the
Commission holds $200,000 in bonds from Miners Western, Limited, and $30,000 in
bonds from Northern Construction and J. W. Stewart, Limited, These bonds, guaranteeing performance of contracts, are held in safe-keeping by The Canadian Bank of
Commerce, Victoria.
The total of organization expense carried forward at April 1st, 1949, has been
reduced by write-off of $15,906.03 to $127,248.22 at March 31st, 1950.
Provision has been made for amortization of bond discount over the term of the
bonds.   The amount of $2,650.28 was written off in the period under review.
The balance in the employer-employee contributory superannuation fund was
$473,469.83 as at March 31st, 1950, according to the records of the Superannuation
Commissioner appointed as administrator of the fund and the trustees in control of the
relative investments.
In accordance with the provisions of the " Electric Power Act," the accounts of the
Commission have been verified by auditors appointed by the Lieutenant-Governor in
Council, and their certificate, relative to the financial records for the year, balance-
sheet as at March 31st, 1950, and supporting statements, is included in this section.
AUDITORS' REPORT.
We have examined the balance-sheet of the British Columbia Power Commission as at
March 31, 1950, and the attached statement of combined operations for the year ended on
that date, and have obtained all the information and explanations we have required. In connection therewith we examined or tested accounting records of the Commission and other
supporting evidence but we did not make a detailed audit of the transactions.
Proceedings are still in progress under the terms of the " Electric Power Act" to determine the compensation to be paid for certain properties expropriated and at this date
judgment has not been entered. However, reasons for judgment have been handed down and
the compensation awarded therein exceeds by $1,099,532 the estimated liability contained in
the balance-sheet. The matter of costs and certain aspects affecting interest have yet to be
determined.
Negotiations are now being conducted with a view to obtaining the authorization of the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council for deferment of sinking fund payments, as provided under
Section 53 of the " Electric Power Act," with respect to sums borrowed during the year
ended March 31, 1950.
No provision has been made for any additional liability that may be incurred as a result
of certain claims submitted by contractors and suppliers.
Subject to the foregoing comments, we report that, in our opinion, the attached balance-
sheet and related statement of combined operations have been drawn up so as to exhibit a true
and correct view of the state of the affairs of the British Columbia Power Commission as at
March 31, 1950, and the results of its operations for the year ended on that date, according to
the best of our information and the explanations given to us and as shown by the books of the
Commission.
ISMAY, BOISTON, DUNN & CO.
Chartered Accountants.
Victoria, B.C.,
June 12,1950. F 56 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
BALANCE-SHEET AS
Assets.
Capital assets—
Plant and equipment in operation at values estimated by the Commission
at dates of acquisition plus rehabilitations and additions at cost—
Generation   $18,081,013.84
Transmission      5,484,615.25
Distribution       7,182,200.02
General   660,875.56
$31,408,704.67
Construction work in progress—
Generation   $3,479,400.09
Transmission      1,499,764.53
Distribution       859,835.88
General          84,632.53
5,923,633.03
Total plant and equipment ,  $37,332,337.70
Purchase of acquired properties (pending classification)  54,658.75
Surveys and investigations   57,119.81
Plant-acquisition adjustments   474,283.38
Total capital assets  $37,918,399.64
Current assets—■
Cash on hand and in banks .-.  $1,108,499.08
Accounts receivable—
Light and power customers .  $215,559.94
Other  .      35,823.38
       251,383.32
Inventories of construction and operating stores and supplies       614,801.26
Unexpired insurance and sundry prepaid items  38,784.79
Total current assets        2,013,468.45
Deferred charges, less amounts written off—
Organization and preliminary expenses     $127,248.22
Bond discount            92,759.72
220,007.94
Sinking fund for retirement of capital borrowings, deposited with Minister of
Finance          857,826.03
$41,009,702.06 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50. F 57
AT MARCH 31st, 1950. Statement 1.
Liabilities.
Capital liabilities—
Bank loans  $7,075,000.00
Advances from the Government of the Province of British Columbia  21,895,800.00
Bonds payable (3%, 1967)  7,000,000.00
Estimated liability in respect to acquired tangible plant and equipment for
which compensation has not been finally determined  358,671.44
Deferred agreement payable—purchased plant  247,563.23
Total capital liabilities   $36,577,034.67
Current liabilities—
Accounts payable and accrued charges  $705,298.09
Gross revenue taxes in respect of light and power service in
municipal areas (section 62) ■.  64,343.90
Accrued interest on capital borrowings  125,360.29
Contractors' deposits   10,000.00
Customers' deposits   158,624.57
Total current liabilities        1,063,626.85
General reserves—
Maintenance and renewals     $679,490.34
Gross revenue assessments, unorganized areas (section 64)      87,515.18
Interest     354,070.42
Contingencies     557,506.26
1,678,582.20
Stabilization reserve—
Balance April 1st, 1949  $679,980.31
Surplus from operations, year to March 31st, 1950    152,652.00
832,632.31
Sinking fund reserve  .         857,826.03
$41,009,702.06 F 58 " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
Statement 2.
COMBINED OPERATIONS:  FINANCIAL SUMMARY—REVENUE AND EXPENSES—
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1950.
Revenue—
Power districts— Total.
Electrical-energy sales           $3,080,389.22
Miscellaneous revenue              31,190.75
$3,111,579.97
Special-contract sales and related revenues           155,889.18
$3,267,469.15
Expenses— Operating Costs.
Direct— Generation. Transmission. Distribution.
Labour     $287,353.32      $8,836.79 $150,446.38 $446,636.49
Fuel         298,762.52           298,762.52
Other operating expenses    70,684.73        4,337.43      43,041.77 118,063.93
Customer accounting               177,764.18 177,764.18
Gross revenue, 3% assessments               91,796.70 91,796.70
Administration and general expenses...  77,929.20       2,218.17     90,146.14 170,293.51
Purchased power           93,377.51           93,377.51
$828,107.28    $15,392.39 $553,195.17 $1,396,694.84
Interest on investment in operated plant       327,432.49    151,960.17    191,421.79       670,814.45
$1,155,539.77 $167,352.56 $744,616.96 $2,067,509.29
Operating Surplus (excluding provision for reserves)      $1,199,959.86
Provision for reserves—
Maintenance and renewals    $195,090.84 $94,728.79 $264,597.06 $554,416.69
Sinking fund      163,715.79 75,980.06      95,710.44 335,406.29
Contingencies     68,062.44 16,479.00      72,943.44 157,484.88
$426,869.07 $187,187.85 $433,250.94 $1,047,307.86
Net Operating Surplus, year ended March 31st, 1950 (transferred to stabilization reserve)     $152,652.00 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50. F 59
Statement 3.
POWER DISTRIBUTION—ALL DISTRICTS:  SUMMARY OF REVENUE AND
EXPENSES FOR THE TWELVE-MONTH PERIOD ENDED MARCH 31st, 1950.
Revenue—
Electrical-energy sales   $3,080,389.22
Miscellaneous revenue          31,190.75
Total power district revenue  $3,111,579.97
Expenses (detailed on Statement 2)—
Cost of power—
Direct expenses—
Generation   $1,155,539.77
Transmission        167,352.56
 $1,322,892.33
Provision for reserves—■
Generation      $426,869.07
Transmission        187,187.85
 ■ ■      614,056.92
$1,936,949.25
Less special-contract sales and related revenues        155,889.18
Cost of power delivered to distribution systems  $1,781,060.07
Distribution services—
Direct expenses—
Operating and administrative ...      $553,195.17
Interest on distribution plant       191,421.79
Provision for reserves—
Maintenance and renewals   $264,597.06
Sinking fund    95,710.44
Contingencies   72,943.44
$744,616.96
433,250.94
Total distribution services      1,177,867.90
Total expenses   $2,958,927.97
Net Operating Surplus (transferred to stabilization reserve)     $152,652.00 F 60
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
British Columbia Power Commission
DISTRIBUTION   OF   REVENUE   BY  FUNCTIONS
FUNCTION
Generation
Tronsmiss ion
Distribution
Power  Purchased
Net  Surplus
Total
1948 -9
/.253.98Q.34
281.243.20
942,310. 02
35.427.03
37.3Q2.69
2.550,26328
19-49-5Q.
1,469,031.33
354,540-41
1.177. 867. 90
93.377-51
15 2.652. OO
3.267.469.15
1948-9
1949-50 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
F 61
British Columbia power commission
disposition of revenue
Fixed  Charges-.
Maintenance t, Renewals
Interest
Sinking Fund
Contingencies
Total
Salaries, Wages * Welfare
Materials, Fuel s, Lube.
Other  Expenses
Taxes
Purchased Power
Net Surplus
Total
1948-9.
418,370 .03
519,378 .47
260.036 .65
154.769 .66
1.352,555.Ol
62l.490.86
249.348.29
173,315.08
80,024.32
35,427-03
37,302.69
2.55Q.263.28
1949-50.
554. 416 .69
670.8/4 .45
335.406.29
I57.AQ4.8Q
1.7 IB, 122.31
676,869.06
337.777.41
106,709.37
101.361.29
93.377.51
l52.652.QO
3.267.469.15
1948-9
1949-50 F 62                                                        " ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
POWER DISTRIBUTION
(a) Summary of Revenue and Expenditure for the
(6) Accumulated Stabilization
The
Albernis.
Alert Bay.
Burrs Lake.
Campbell
River.
Revenue—
$147,834.51
83,036.08
$11,880.90
10,458.64
$5,102.24
7,367.02
$36,238.20
24,327.20
7,192.38
3,638.55
912.12
5,745.58
23,983.30
7,284.06
750.15
618.16
671.54
Sub-total	
$269,330.33
4,660.08
$26,728.24
326.84
$13,999.54
160.97
$66,982.52
463.34
$273,990.41
$27,055.08
$14,160.51
$67,445.86
Expenses—
$172,786.60
46,652.24
16,324.93
$15,079.20
7,328.50
1,121.07
$5,849.03
4,432.15
1,038.73
$27,960.64
Distribution expenses, direct—
13,848.76
6,219.51
Operating surplus before provision for distribution
$235,763.77
$23,528.77
$11,319.91
$48,028.91
$38,226.64
$3,526.31
$2,840.60
$19,416.95
Provision for distribution reserves—
$27,069.61
8,162.43
7,439.28
$1,229.74
560.53
268.80
$1,155.87
519.31
72.36
$5,576.24
3,109.78
$42,671.32
$2,059.07
$1,747.54
$8,686.02
—ti.tU4.68
49,949.16
$1,467.24
24,308.64
$1,093.06
12,715.43
$10,730.93
4,596.87
$45,504.48
$25,775.88
$13,808.49
$15,327.80
Customers—
Residential	
3,354
526
52
2
179
78
10
2
186
70
5
1
794
151
9
Kwh—
3,934
269
262
956
4,961,178
3,218,867
1,944,961
173,894
312,594
319,851
173,343
28,796
77,432
174,199
47,738
22,301
668,051
563,367
163,895
27,019
10,298,900
834,584
321,670
1,422,332 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50. F  63
Statement 4.
BY DISTRICTS.
Twelve-month Period ended March 31st, 1950, and
Reserve as at that Date.
Comox
Valley.
Dawson
Creek.
Golden.
Hazelton.
Hope.
Kamloops.
Lake
Cowichan.
Lillooet.
$108,602.24
59,351.00
$37,671.29
53,373.83
$8,692.40
9,876.01
$1,676.35
1,490.47
$20,696.73
17,673.17
$148,675.32
189,534.87
$9,645.54
8,351.60
$7,769.87
8,205.45
10,727.61
7,983.35
510.46
643.48
3,568.82
77,781.92
17,038.65
4,648.31
3,687.81
16.00
2,166.62
17,311.30
2,576.25
246.06
1,190.50
7,040.13
1,302.00
89.76
351.40
$185,720.98
1,727.50
$118,916.02
921.89
$20,380.87
335.53
$3,810.30
33.94
$43,375.28
996.57
$441,366.88
881.01
$18,102.90
77.87
$18,493.34
1.63
$187,448.48
$119,837.91
$20,716.40
$3,844.24
$44,371.85
$442,247.89
$18,180.77
$18,494.97
$87,597.89
40,018.14
11,002.23
$33,916.54
16,443.95
3,909.65
$8,839.92
7,474.21
1,686.98
$1,602.28
1,429.67
434.14
$26,887.59
10,495.78
3,442.28
$228,717.39
63,234.35
18,325.01
$4,132.54
3,270.06
814.78
$7,993.97
6,928.56
888.73
$138,618.26
$54,270.14
$18,001.11
$3,466.09
$40,825.65
$310,276.75
$8,217.38
$15,811.26
$48,830.22
$65,567.77
$2,715.29
$378.15
$3,546.20
$131,971.14
$9,963.39
$2,683.71
$14,580.31
5,501.10
1,108.08
$4,688.99
1,954.78
$1,795.61
843.47
968.64
$457.66
217.07
$3,710.60
1,721.13
1,321.32
$30,540.80
9,162.45
6,452.16
$1,350.28
407.37
$1,333.82
444.43
91.08
$21,189.49
$6,643.77
$3,607.72
$674.73
$6,753.05
$46,155.41
$1,757.65
$1,869.33
$27,640.73
16,685.85
$58,924.00
—$892.43
16,137.41
—$296.58
—$3,206.85
17,141.55
$85,815.73
150,222.48
$8,205.74
$814.38
—6.50
$44,326.58
$58,924.00
$15,244.98
—$296.58
$13,934.70
$236,038.21
$8,205.74
$807.88
2,371
352
43
4
1,031
284
38
2
173
62
6
1
109
41
1
468
117
8
1
3,257
779
118
2
412
72
1
1
150
45
15
1
2.770     j               1,355
242
151
594
4,156
486
211
2,059,626
1,548,844
373,740
211,374
576,005
839,652
455,775
36,968
168,454
290,431
7,940
41,899
33,625
31,659
26,128
544,149
579,248
200,091
54,195
4,512,023
3,815,925
4,723,241
170,104
111,310
110,564
9
2,992
98,745
248,445
83,936
15,960
4,193,584
1,908,400
508,724
91,412
1,377,683
13,221,293
224,875
447,086 F 64
' ELECTRIC POWER ACT.
POWER DISTRIBUTION
(a) Summary of Revenue and Expenditure for the
(6) Accumulated Stabilization
Nakusp.
Nanaimo-
Duncan.
North
Okanagan.
Peachland-
Westbank.
Revenue—
$20,516.00
439,430.33
269,599.68
325.51
42,384.28
$13,435.91
6,761.13
$315,280.21
170,180.39
$18,778.35
9,135.29
421.08
150,573.01
8,309.08
6,623.68
1,905.88
117,788.06
16.476.Rfi
360.00
12,034.99
870.00
$20,978.12
329.73
$906,520.72
10,483.53
$656,377.68
6,501.17
$37,313.20
240.61
$21,307.85    | $917,004.25
$662,878.85
$37,553.81
Expenses—
$8,707.16
8,102.94
2,285.42
$654,075.32
145,030.33
60,527.28
$363,529.83
107.564.90
$22,008.80
Distribution expenses, direct—
9.721.12
40,526.53    |        3,929.42
$19,095.52
$859,632.93
$511,621.26    |    $35,659.34
Operating surplus before provision for distribution
$2,212.33
$57,371.32
$151,257.59
$1,894.47
Provision for distribution reserves—
$2,438.98
1,142.66
1,258.08
$100,343.92
30.263.56
27,482.64
$43,850.18
20,263.26
16,715.16
$4,153.19
1,964.68
2,262.00
$4,839.72
$158,090.12
$80,828.60
$8,379.87
—$2,627.39
907.26
-$100,718.80
120,449.03
$70,428.99
164,013.36
—$6,485.40
—$1,720.13
$19,730.23
$234,442.35
—$10,044.46
Customers—
285
68
7
1
10,696
1,684
149
13
6 s>9fi                  aos
1,031
249
8
71
20
2
361    |            12,542
7,584
491
Kwh—
288,992
168,762
6,860
7,690
13,787,333
9,910.654
14,405,610
610,789
9,163,547
3,937,094
8,936,704
490,284
445,273
255,698
433,152
34,070
472,304
38,714,386
22,527,629
1,168,193 REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50. F 65
Statement 4—Continued.
BY DISTRICTS—Continued.
Twelve-month Period ended March 31st, 1950, and
Reserve as at that Date—Continued.
Quesnel.
Sechelt.
Smithers.
Terrace.
Vanderhoof.
Williams
Lake.
Totals.
$20,516.00
$22,004.89
24,771.04
$38,794.26
12,007.80
1,080.81
716.13
$20,670.41
17,006.03
$14,296.73
8,667.07
$7,325.58
7,784.69
$12,718.04
19,239.98
1,447,220.30
1,018,198.44
1,406.32
2,853.83
9,862.89
2,391.44
637.83
2,867.45
340,218.51
27,253.61
1,464.10
171.65
504.22
165,612.78
1,059.18
1,204.65
522.00
577.60
792.00
59,963.26
$52,153.04
931.59
$53,274.87
609.00
$48,743.98
468.91
$25,877.24
373.68
$16,325.70
206.47
$35,617.47
458.89
$3,080,389.22
31,190.75
$53,084.63
$53,883.87
$49,212.89
$26,250.92
$16,532.17
$36,076.36
$3,111,579.97
$26,046.63
10,738.16
3,672.22
$19,629.81
14,208.65
6,307.83
1
$28,498.45      |      $11,615.24
12,135.08                8,252.41
4,243.36                  1,732.46
$8,401.12
7,150.81
1,237.31
$17,184.12
8,734.40
1,751.92
$1,781,060.07
553,195.17
191,421.79
$40,457.01
$40,146.29
$44,876.89              $21,600.11
$16,789.24
$27,670.44
$2,525,677.03
$12,627.62
$13,737.58
$4,336.00
$4,650.81
—$257.07
$8,405.92
$585,902.94
$3,980.65              $6,686.53
1,836.08                3,153.87
594.60                  2,549.04
$4,480.38
2,121.68
2,013.24
$1,919.20
866.23
894.84
$1,331.05
618.62
725.04
$1,923.45
875.95
727.08
$264,597.06
95,710.44
72,943.44
$6,411.33              $12,389.44
$8,615.30      |        $3,680.27    •
$2,674.71
$3,526.48
$433,250.94
$6,216.29
34,397.60
$1,348.14
11,086.88
—$4,279.30                  $970.54
20,586.58                  6,131.36
—$2,931.78
8,736.74
$4,879.44
25,479.67
$152,652.00
679,980.31
$40,613.89             $12,435.02
$16,307.28                $7,101.90
$5,804.96              $30,359.11
$832,632.31
510
151
25
2
892
126
7
2
396
117
21
2
328
73
11
1
144
62
6
1
259
110
15
1
32,688
6,070
816
52
688
1,027
636
413
213
385
39,626
430,700
708,675
282,410
25,625
591,434
409,694
11,526
16,503
567,052
528,626
428,428
43,400
256,957
228,086
154,869
18,140
173,711
217,696
11,221
22,160
292,533
568,683
99,413
26,321
40,120,724
28,674,720
32,970,990
2,080,484
1,447,410
1,029,157
1,567,506
658,052
424,788
986,950
103,846,918 F 66
" ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
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♦ REPORT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION, 1949-50.
F 69
Statement 6.
STATEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION WORK IN PROGRESS AS AT
MARCH 31st, 1950.
Generation Plant.
Bamfield (survey) 	
Dawson Creek
Houston 	
John Hart	
$2,075.67
9,306.65
7,271.79
86,496.72
Quesnel (survey)-—" Central Interior Development Act "  57,863.74
Sechelt  7,946.56
Vanderhoof .'  703.14
Whatshan   3,282,357.63
Preliminary charges, surveys, and investigations, including
sundry maintenance 	
Diesel engine not yet placed	
Total	
Transmission Plant.
Kamloops-Okanagan	
Vancouver Island	
Vernon-Whatshan 	
Preliminary charges, surveys, and investigations
Total.
Albernis 	
Alert Bay 	
Burns Lake 	
Campbell River
Comox Valley _
Distribution Plant.
9,635.26
15,742.93
$3,479,400.09
$31,833.73
395,194.85
1,071,254.54
1,481.41
$1,499,764.53
$41,565.50
8,878.29
42,006.90
114,695.05
2,210.88
Dawson Creek
Hope 	
Houston 	
Kamloops 	
Lake Windermere
1,336.46
4,291.76
23,918.14
167,712.22
143,059.65
Nanaimo-Duncan 	
North Okanagan 	
Peachland- Westbank
Quesnel  	
Smithers	
257,559.48
22,917.34
2,883.78
841.08
7.97
Sechelt _
Terrace
594.78
8,386.71
Preliminary charges,  surveys, and investigations, including
sundry maintenance          16,969.89
Total-
Administration building
Tools and equipment 	
General Plant.
$859,835.88
$82,682.21
1,950.32
Total..
$84,632.53 F 70
ELECTRIC POWER ACT."
Statement 6—Continued.
STATEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION WORK IN PROGRESS AS AT
MARCH 31st, 1950—Continued.
Generation plant ___
Transmission plant
Distribution plant _
General plant	
Summary.
Total
$3,479,400.09
1,499,764.53
859,835.88
84,632.53
$5,923,633.03
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiaemid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1950.
2,795-650-8812 S6oa
29V
LEGEND .-
GENERATING       STAT IONS      -       HYDRO  D
DIESEL.  -f
STEAM  X
SUBSTATION
high   voltage:   transmission     line       -■■
(under   construct/on) •.-» —
distribution    system    °~~
\r\
-gsAtha/mer
InvcrmereQTiQW/ndermere
\
v
ISH COLUMBIA POWER COMMISSION
GENERATING    STATIONS,
TRANSMISSION    LINES   AND
DISTRIBUTION     CIRCUITS.
■IONS      ENGINEER
date:      31st  March, 1950
DRWG.   No.
G -98.
G -189
Es
45£
095.  

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