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DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY MENTAL HOSPITALS PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT FOR 12… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly [1950]

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 DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL SECRETARY
MENTAL HOSPITALS
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
FOR 12 MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31st
1949
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Don MoDiaemid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1950.  To His Honour C. A. Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned respectfully submits herewith the Annual Report of the General
Superintendent of the Mental Hospitals for the fiscal year ended March 31st, 1949.
GEO. S. PEARSON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office.  TABLE OF CONTENTS.
PART I.—MEDICAL.
Page.
Officers and Staff, List of     7
Report—General Medical Superintendent  11
Report—Laboratory  17
Report—X-ray Department _  20
Report—Physiotherapy  21
Report—Psychologist - .  22
Report—Dentist  23
Report—Optician  24
Report—Beauty-parlour  24
Report—Department of Nursing  24
Report—Occupational Therapy Department  26
Report—Recreational Therapy Department  27
Report—Library  28
Report—Child Guidance Clinics  28
Report—Social Service  36
Statistical Tables—
1. Movement of Population during Year  41
2. Summary of Operations of Hospitals since Inception  43
3. Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths  44
4. Civil State of Patients admitted  45
5. Religious Denominations of Patients  45
6. Educational Status of Patients  45
7. Nationality of Patients  46
8. Districts from which Patients were admitted  47
9. Occupation of Patients prior to Admission  48
10. Age of Patients on Admission  49
11. Number of Attacks at Time of Admission  50
12. Alleged Duration of Attacks prior to Admission  50
13. Table of Heredity  50
14. Alleged Cause of Insanity in Patients admitted    51
15. State of Bodily Health of Patients admitted_  51
16. Form of Mental Disorder in Patients admitted  52
17. Probation, Number allowed out on  52
18. Discharges, showing Alleged Duration of Insanity  53
19. Discharges,  showing Length of Residence in  Hospital and Condition at
Time of Discharge  53
20. Deaths, Cause of, and Length of Time in Hospital, Essondale, New West
minster, and Saanich  54
PART II.—FINANCIAL.
Report—Business Manager______    59
Expense Statement, Psychopathic Department  60
Expense Statement, Headquarters Department  60
5 HH 6 TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Financial Tables— Page-
A. Average Residence, Maintenance, and ver Capita Cost for the Past Ten Years 61
B     .
„'.. V Yearly Gross Expenditure, Analysis of, for the Past Ten Years  62
C. Summary of Gross and Net per Capita Cost in all Hospitals _  64
D. Expense Statement, New Westminster  65
E. Expense Statement, Essondale  66
F. Expense Statement, Saanich  67
Revenue, Table of, for the Past Ten Years  68
PART III.—COLONY FARM.
Report—Financial, General—Business Manager  69
Profit and Loss Account  71
Dairy and Herds Department—Profit and Loss Account  71
Work-horse Department—Profit and Loss Account  72
Hog Department—Profit and Loss Account  72
Cannery—Profit and Loss Account  73
Orchard and Truck Garden—Profit and Loss Account  73
Crop Department—Profit and Loss Account, etc  74
Tractor Account  74
Truck Account  74
Maintenance and Administration, General  75
Miscellaneous Statements, Inventories, etc.—
Produce supplied to Essondale  76
Produce supplied to New Westminster  76
Accounts receivable  76
Remittances to Treasury  76
Equipment  77
Orchards and Small Fruits  77 DEPARTMENT OF THE PROVINCIAL SECRETARY.
Hon. George S. Pearson, Provincial Secretary.
R. A. Pennington, O.B.E., Deputy Provincial Secretary.
A. L. Crease, M.D., CM., Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry.
E. J. Ryan, M.D. CM., Medical Superintendent.
A. M. Gee, M.D., CM., Deputy Medical Superintendent.
Frederick A. Matheson, Business Manager.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, ESSONDALE.
Medical:
U. P. Byrne, M.B., D.P.H., D.I.H., Director of Child Guidance Clinics.
J. M. Jackson, M.D., Radiologist.
A. E. Davidson, B.A., M.D., Clinical
Director.
T. G. Caunt, M.D.
G. McK. Kirkpatrick, M.D.
A. J. Warren, M.D., D.P.M.(London).
B. F. Bryson, M.D.
F. E. McNair, B.A., M.D., CM.
A. L. Swanson, B.A., M.D., CM.
G. A. Nicolson, M.D., Pathologist.
P. D. Croft, B.Sc, M.D., CM.
A. E. Robertson, M.D., CM.
W. D. Love, M.Sc, Ph.D., M.D.
N. L. Richardson, M.D., CM.
W.   P.   Fister,   M.D.,   M.R.CP.(Edin.),
F.R.CP.(Can.).
W. J. S. Edington, M.D.
A. J. Shulman, M.D., CM.
G. H. Stephenson, M.D.
L. I. M. Coleman, B.Sc, M.D., CM.
Milton Jones, D.D.S.
C B. Watson, M.A., Psychologist.
W. R. Brown, Director of Recreation.
K. WOOLCOCK, Pharmacist.
W. Creber, Chief Attendant.
W. Pritchard, Head Male Instructor.
Miss M. Parsons, R.N., Director of
Nursing.
Miss E. M. Pullan, R.N., B.A.Sc, Instructress of Nursing.
Miss J. F. KlLBURN, R.N., Social Service.
Miss G. Barber, B.H.E., Dietitian.
Miss E. Weekes, O.T.R., Charge Occupational Therapist.
Miss J. Irving, B.A., B.L.Sc, Librarian.
Mrs. I. H. Wedge, Branch Secretary.
Miss A. Dingle, Senior Stenographer.
Business:
J. F. Anderson, Assistant Business
Manager.
L. Fox, Paymaster.
G. A. Grieve, Cost Accountant.
Chaplains :
W. E. Skillicorn, Book-keeper.
W. Headridge, Steward.
Miss A. Makita, Stenographer.
Rev. J. Naylor, Protestant.
Rev. Father J. P. Kane, Roman Catholic.
Trades:
H. Lonsdale, Foreman of Works.
J. Wilson, Engineer.
Wm. P. Dodgshon, Outside Overseer.
T. Harrison, Electrician.
G. Matthews, Plumber.
D. Anderson, Laundryman.
A. L. Blair, Barber.
W. A. Wardle, Chief Cook.
J. C. Merrick, Baker.
R.   T.   Hall,   Charge  Occupational
Therapist. HH 8
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
OFFICERS AND STAFF, NEW WESTMINSTER.
Medical:
L. E. Sauriol, M.D., CM., Deputy Medical Superintendent.
C. E. Benwell, M.B.
R. D. B. Herrick, M.D., D.P.H., D.P.M.
A. P. Gould, M.D., CM.
F. Gillard, Receiving Clerk.
E. Jones, D.D.S., Visiting Dentist.
Miss V. M. Sanders, R.N., Superintendent of Nurses.
Miss E. C. Herchmer, R.N., Assistant
Superintendent of Nurses.
Miss E. A. Johnston, R.N., Instructress
of Nurses.
R. Palm, Male Nursing Instructor.
Mrs. E. T. Loree, School Principal.
J. Jackson, Industrial Arts Instructor.
J. Lynes, Recreational Instructor.
Mrs. K. Barnsdale, Occupational Therapist.
Miss M. G. Coulson, Clerk-Stenographer.
Business :
A. Fraser, Steward.
Chaplains :
Rev. P. C. McCrae, Protestant. Rev. Father G. Rogers, Roman Catholic.
Trades:
C. M. Doyle, Foreman of Works.
C. Hauck, Engineer.
C. Stapleton, Head Gardener.
L. S. Da vies, Electrician.
C. M. Doyle, Acting Plumber.
G. Coulson, Laundryman.
J. McMillan, Shoemaker.
L. Arnold, Assistant Barber.
J. Fraser, Painter.
W. Jenkins, Head Cook.
V. G. Copp, Baker.
J. C. Purse, Head Tailor.
COLONY FARM.
John A. Hay, Superintendent.
COLQUITZ.
L. G. C. d'Easum, Medical Supervisor.
T. A. Morris, Supervisor. P. McLeod, Chief Attendant.  HH 10
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Admission Building, Essondale.
Patients under trees near Female Building, Essondale. Report of the Medical Superintendent.
For the Twelve Months ended March 31st, 1949.
PART I.—MEDICAL.
Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, B.C., April 1st, 1949.
The Honourable G. S. Pearson,
Provincial Secretary,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith for your consideration the Seventy-
seventh Annual Report of the Provincial Mental Hospitals at Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich.
The following table gives a brief summary of the movement of the hospital population during the fiscal year April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Movement of Population.
Male.
Female.
Total.
2.493
110
691
1,776
119
569
4,269
On probation, but still remaining on registers 	
New admissions during current year	
229
1,260
3,294
2,464
5,758
523
110
130
442
119
79
965
Continued on probation at end of year	
Died during year	
229
209
763
640
1.403
In residence, March 31st, 1949	
2,631
1,824
4,355
Increase in number of patients admitted this year as compared to last  149
Net increase in population  86
Rate of deaths to total treated  3.63%
Rate of discharges to admissions  (exclusive of deaths)  76.59%
ADMISSIONS.
An analysis of the birth column shows that, of the number admitted, 725 (or 57.54
per cent.) were Canadian born, 305'(or 24.21 per cent.) were from other parts of the
British Commonwealth, and 227 (or 17.19 per cent.) were of foreign extraction.
DISCHARGES.
The following table indicates quite clearly that the earlier cases are brought to the
Hospital for treatment following the onset of mental illness, the greater are the chances
for their recovery:—
Table showing Alleged Duration of Insanity, prior to Admission, in those discharged from the Three Institutions during the Year April 1st, 1948, to
March 31st, 1949.
Less than six months :  336
Over six months  298
Without psychosis     83
Duration unknown  248
Total.
965
11 HH 12 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
During the year a total of 965 patients were discharged in full. Of this number,
137 were discharged as recovered, 345 were discharged as improved, 403 were discharged as unimproved, 78 were discharged as without psychosis, and 2 were discharged
as not insane.
This report will be much more satisfactory to you, sir, for the following reason.
The problem you faced when you took charge was most perplexing. One hardly knew
where to begin. A world war, a period of financial depression, another world war, with
its aftermath, took a great toll. Notwithstanding all this, under your direction the
well-planned moves you instigated are beginning to bear fruit. The great number of
patients, their relatives, together with the staff, are aware of this beneficial progress.
It has been necessary not only to build up the staff and arrange for their tuition, but
also to better their conditions.   It was only possible to accomplish this step by step.
The new clinic you started is well along now. Over the years this will indeed prove
a blessing. The new Act bringing mental illness directly into the field of medicine
cannot be proclaimed before completion of the building programme and arranging for
proper staff.
When a clinic is formed, there is a triad of essentials for which one must plan:
(1) Intensive treatment and rehabilitation, (2) education, and (3) research.
(1) A clinic must meet with the standards demanded of it in the way of building, furnishings, equipment, staff education, together with ample facilities
for the treatment of mental and physical illnesses. It is required to have
the same provisions as are found in a classified general hospital plus the
specialty of psychiatry and that of neurology. These cardinal points have
been arranged for in our programme.
(2) Education has been sufficiently stressed. We now have a graduate librarian and a library for patients and staff. The new England Journal of
Medicine, 1949, said of a library that there were two important factors
that distinguish man from the less elevated animals—the ability to reason
and the capacity of speech. A refinement has enabled each generation of
mankind to profit most fully from the experience of its predecessor.
There has been the setting-down of ideas and the preservation of records,
whether carved in stone, scratched in clay, or impressed on printed page.
It is only by consulting its records that man has been able to build
adequately upon the experience of the past. The library in our clinic is
situated on the ground floor in order that books may be obtained easily
by patients and staff alike. The suite consists of patients' and staff
library, doctors' reading-room, together with a room for the storage of
films for the use of the audio-visual department. The Clinical Director
and Director of Education arrange for an educational programme for
psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, psychologists, social service workers,
and other ancillary services. The university is the seat of learning. Now
that a medical school is contemplated, much study is being directed toward
doing our part to aid in the field of psychological medicine.
(3) Research is extremely important. There is in all an enormous sum of
money spent year after year on the maladjusted in the Avhole of Canada
as well as in British Columbia. When a person breaks, there is a mental
illness for which he is treated medically. When he breaks the situation
and becomes delinquent, he is treated through the Courts. The cost of
either is great. Therefore, it is a " must " to have basic research in
psychological medicine in a university setting. One wonders, why the
delay? In a business establishment of equal proportions, research would
be inaugurated. It cost $50,000 to find penicillin. We are all familiar with
the great saving of expense and human lives that the advent of this drug
has caused. SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT.
HH 13
It is fortunate, indeed, that the nation is growing more conscious how great an
asset health is to society. The Dominion Government is very materially helping along
the different Provinces with the programmes which they already have under way.
Your acceptance of this gracious offer will be of lasting benefit and lends a much more
hopeful outlook to both patient and family.
TREATMENT.
(a) Insulin.—Now that we have provision for more patients under this medication,
it has enabled us to increase the number under treatment. This year the results
obtained are as follows:—
Results  Total. Per Cent.
Recovered -  40 18
Much improved  - 19 8
Improved   108 50
Unimproved  - 46 21
Total
Disposal—
Discharged
213
75
Discharged later  55
Discharge pending -___   21
Transferred to lobotomy  12
Died  2
Remaining in hospital  48
35
25
9
6
1
22
(b)  Convulsive Shock Therapy.—This has been an active item of treatment, showing its beneficial effect in the table below:—
Male.
Female.
Total.
Per Cent.
Results—
10
18
38
22
34
16
131
68
44
34
169
90
13
10
50
26
88
249
337
Disposal—
25
7
1
12
1
41
1
81
16
1
38
6
106
1
106
23
2
50
7
147
2
31
g
14
43
88
249
337
(c) Lobotomy.—There have been a number of patients who have not benefited
from other forms of treatment. After study of these particular cases, our committee on
lobotomy selected fifty-one in all for operation. The record below shows the result
obtained in the various groups of mental illness who were operated on for the relief of
their symptoms. Dr. Frank Turnbull performs this classically accepted type of
operation:— HH 14
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Patients operated on for the Relief of Symptoms.
Result.
Disposal.
Diagnosis.
Number
of
Patients.
Much
improved.
Improved.
Unimproved.
Discharged.
Remaining in
Hospital.
Died
later.
6
14
4
2
4
3
3      .
7
1
3
1
3
6
3
3
8
1
Patients operated on for Improved Hospital Adjustment.
Manic depressive..
Schizophrenia	
Miscellaneous	
1
1
0
1
25
2
12
11
1
24
1
1
1
Total Patients operated
on.
7
39
5
3
6
3
3
19
1
14
2
3
7
3
4
32
2
Schizophrenia	
Totals	
51
12
22
17
13
38
Dr. Milton Jones shows in his report on the dental service a large number of
patients whom he examined and treated. Through great experience this has been
possible. The time has now come for this department to be enlarged and more
assistance made available.
The Optical Department has done well. This department should also be enlarged
and more modern equipment installed. It is an important part of our hospital organization and most exacting in its nature. Further details are given elsewhere in this
Report.
The beauty-parlour, so necessary in a hospital setting, has done much to add to
the comfort and proper feeling of the ladies. Much more work has been accomplished
this year, as may be seen in the attached report.
The nursing in a hospital is a most difficult task to arrange. I am most thankful
that we have, during and since the war, such a competent staff managing this department during these excessively trying times. Mr. Creber and his assistants have
experienced a great inconvenience. Miss Parsons and her staff suffered even more.
Both staffs have done wonders, and much praise is due them.
The Child Guidance Clinic conducts a service which is quite laudable. Deviations
from the normal are met with early, and it is in this stage that future trouble is either
avoided entirely or the case assumes a much less serious character at a later date.
We know this service should have been extended. We were unable to do this on account
of lack of trained personnel. We have been badly in need of accommodation suitably
set out for the observation of certain of the cases with which we have dealt. A most
comprehensive report of the work they have accomplished is found elsewhere in this
Report.
The Social Service and Psychological Departments function both in the Hospital
and Child Guidance fields. They are important members of the working team. It is by
pooling all ohr findings that diagnosis and treatment are facilitated. We are aided in
our work by help received so readily from the Provincial field service.
The Occupational Therapy Department is playing a more and more important role
in the field of hospital life.    We consider this phase both from the standpoint of SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. HH  15
vocation and avocation. Provision is being made to enlarge our facilities and make
them more readily available. It is a splendid section of our programme both from the
point of therapy and also from what is actually accomplished. A detailed report is
added later.
The general laboratory service has been indeed a busy one. The work over the
years has grown tremendously. Dr. Nicolson, our Pathologist, has been away studying,
and Miss Alice Hagen during this time has done a splendid work and has assisted the
medical services at every turn most competently. The laboratory staff is making
every effort to enhance our teaching programme as well as doing the great volume of
work required of a large laboratory.
The X-ray Department has continued to function as well as our somewhat limited
equipment will permit. The X-ray service has increased, and more and more is
required of it. We are looking forward to having additional machines of a more up-to-
date type suitable for the task in hand.
The Physiotherapy Department has done well. However, this study will come
under physical medicine, and will thus be a branch of our medical service. In this
category will be the study of rehabilitation, which will come as a great blessing.
Intensive treatment, combined with rehabilitation, will be an advance to which we have
looked forward for a long time.
The service given by the Psychological Department is gradually accomplishing
more and more. Its director is much concerned in our educational field and our library.
One wonders how we functioned before without this most worthy adjunct in our clinical
field of endeavour.
Recreation is a " must" to us all. It is even more so in the field of mental illness.
The satisfaction to patients and staff is really vivid. The field of application is large.
Hospital life is made much more pleasant. Patients now have their programme well
listed and can run over the time and place where the activities will be held. If, for
some unforeseen reason, an event has to be called off, plenty is heard about it. This,
of course, is an indication of how recreation is going over and what it means to them.
At first it was not realized just how important was our Audio-Visual Department.
Now it is becoming abundantly clear. It not only helps greatly with recreation and
amusement of patients by furnishing large and small movies, but it supplies sound
equipment for special occasions. It comes strongly into the field of education. It
performs a splendid service in all types of photography.
The Social Service Department is a busy section. It aids us in gaining the family
setting as it really exists. It is a good contact between the Hospital and the public.
It is the focal point in rehabilitation, and assistance is received through the Provincial
field service in the many districts. The Social Service Report is found elsewhere in
this issue.
CHANGES IN STAFF.
Dr. Edington joined our staff in May, 1948.
Dr. Nicolson went to study at the Pathological Department at the Vancouver General Hospital in July, 1948.
Dr. Shulman joined our staff in August, 1948.
Miss Shand went to McGill University in September in order to take the Psychiatric Nursing Course.
Dr. Alfred Warren returned to our service from England.
Dr. Coleman became a member of our staff in September.
Dr. Fister went for study to the Montreal Neurological Institute under Dr. Penfield
in November.
Dr. Swanson left for the Northwestern University in Chicago to take his degree in
hospital administration. HH  16 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Miss E. Brown, R.N., went to the Montreal Neurological Institute in order to take
a postgraduate course in neurosurgery.
In July, Miss McLeod was appointed Nursing Counsellor for the Women's Division.
P. H. Moore retired from the service as Superintendent of Government Farms of
British Columbia. A. Hay was appointed to the position rendered vacant by this
retirement.
T. Squires, carpenter, retired from the Public Works Department staff.
William McKay, painter, was also retired from the Public Works.
Reginald Johnston, one of our charge psychiatric nurses, died on December 31st.
He had a long service with the Hospital. He seemed well preserved and in good health,
and his death from a heart ailment came as a shock to us all.
J. Slater, one of our psychiatric nurses, passed away on September 13th. He was
most regular in his attendance over the long years of his hospital service. His illness
came as a surprise both to himself and his friends. He was courageous, indeed, right
up to the end.
COMMENTS.
We went through a small outbreak of diphtheria. During May and June we
experienced a flood which is so familiar to us all, as its effects were widespread.
On July 7th we opened a Home for the Aged unit at Vernon, which accommodated
160 patients. Later, in March, 40 more elderly patients were transferred, so that there
is now a total of 200 patients in residence.
Our Hospital received a temporary recognition by the Royal College of Physicians
and Surgeons of Canada, allowing us to teach.
A very noteworthy privilege was granted to British Columbia, whereby she was
allowed to use the " Ottawa grants " to aid in carrying out what she would have accomplished in the ordinary course of our programme. The Act required for the conducting
of the clinics of psychological medicine was passed but has not as yet been proclaimed.
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.
At the close of this report 1 feel it a privilege to make certain acknowledgments.
It is impossible to mention all who have rendered service toward the Hospital, but they
are remembered.
I wish especially to commend to your favourable attention the splendid help and
co-operation of Dr. Ryan and Dr. Gee. Their task has been great, almost insurmountable at times. The overcrowding and the many distressing calls for assistance have
indeed caused much concern. They have met these trying situations with cheerful
courage, which has aided in no small way the smooth running of the Hospital.
Mr. Matheson, our Business Manager, is worthy of comment. His is a position of
extreme responsibility, and its ramifications many. Careful foresight has to be exercised at all times to see that supplies do not run short, and the trend of the markets
must be watched. Costs are still high, and I feel much credit is due Mr. Matheson and
his staff for the able manner in which their work is carried out.
The returned-soldier organizations still maintain their sympathetic contact with
the Hospital. They are ever ready to lend a helping hand both to those remaining in
the Hospital and those seeking rehabilitation.
The members of the British Columbia Police service aid us materially at all times
and in ways which are not evident to a great many. I may say that their sympathetic
co-operation has eased our task on more than one occasion.
Our branch at New Westminster is a valuable portion of your hospital service and
is under the immediate direction of Dr. Sauriol. The school is conducted by certified
school-teachers, and it is amazing what is done for these subnormal cases. Recreational and occupational activities are important features and are eagerly anticipated.
One feels gratified that so much can be done to make their lives happy and useful. LABORATORY REPORT. HH  17
At Colquitz, as you know, are housed our criminally insane, and they are a more
difficult type to treat. Dr. d'Easum is ably carrying on this work, and one is pleased
to note that more is being done for the patients than was at one time deemed possible.
We are glad, indeed, to report that Mr. Morris has recovered from his severe knee
injury and is back on the staff once again. He has always shown keen interest in the
work of the Hospital and its progress.
I also wish to remember at this time the Department of Public Works, which has
always been ready to assist us, and our demands have been heavy.
Lastly, to you, sir, and to your deputy, I acknowledge with a deep sense of gratitude your efforts to forward the work of the Hospital. Your keen perception of our
problems and sympathetic understanding have done much to mitigate the many difficulties and frustrations that arise. Without your clear insight into our needs, the
Hospital would not have shown the onward progress it has. Mental illness is now
recognized as being in the field of medicine at university level. This recognition is
most encouraging for further effort to round out and complete our programme.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
A. L. Crease,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry.
LABORATORY REPORT.
Provincial Mental Hospital,
Essondale, B.C., March 31st, 1949.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the laboratory at
Essondale from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949:—
Blood—
Kahn, positive   84
Kahn, quantitative   81
Kahn, negative  1,685
Red-blood count and haemoglobin  2,372
White-blood count and differential   2,317
Sedimentation rate  818
Sternal-marrow count  _  2
Coagulation time   67
Bleeding time  77
Prothrombin time  29
Platelet count   38
Reticulocyte count  _  64
Fragility  1
Barbiturate   2
Glucose   188
Glucose tolerance   14
Insulin sensitivity   2 HH  18 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Blood—Continued.
Non-protein nitrogen   163
Urea nitrogen  13
Urea clearance   1
Uric acid   3
Creatinine   2
Cholesterol   52
Bromide    44
Chloride    3
Pot. thiocyanate   3
C02 determination   2
Diastase    1
Serum—
Total protein   11
Alb.-glob, ratio   2
Calcium    4
Icterus index   32
Van den Bergh  24
Hanger flocculation   10
Alkaline phosphatase   4
Thymol turbidity   1
Blood—
Culture  19
Widal   18
Agglutination for B. abortus   11
Paul Bunnell  3
Spinal fluid—■
Kahn, positive   39
Kahn, quantitative   11
Kahn, negative  69
Cell count _■_  165
Colloidal gold  114
Total protein   159
T.B.  .  1
Chloride     2
Glucose   2
Urines—
Routine general  9,164
Acetone    3,471
Quantitative sugar   755
Pentose   2
Levulose   1
B romides  1,165
Bromide, quantitative   1
Iodide   11
Chloride   5
Benzidene    1,182
Quantitative albumin  83
Bence Jones protein   2
Ascheim-Zondek   26
Bile               16
Urobilinogen   26
T.B  11 LABORATORY REPORT. HH 19
Urines—Continued.
Barbiturate ____
P.S.P. 	
24-hour   1
Volhard and Fahr tests  1
Phenylpyruvic acid  2
Urea nitrogen :  3
Diastase   1
Smears—
Miscellaneous    314
G.C.   42
T.B.  35
Vincent's angina  45
Malaria   25
Trichomonas   14
Diphtheria   1,722
Dark field   2
Fontana   2
Leprosy  1
Sputum—
T.B.  211
24-hour for T.B  27
Elastic fibres   1
Cultures—
Miscellaneous    104
Diphtheria   1,432
G.C.   1
Typhoid   1,055
Dysentery   869
T.B.   8
B. abortus  3
F_eces—
Parasites   13
Occult blood   30
T.B.    7
Bile  2
Fat   2
Injections—
Typhoid vaccine   562
Diphtheria vaccine   102
Pollen antigen   35
Scarlet fever toxin   35
Skin tests—
Tuberculin (Vollmer)   174
Undulant fever  3
Schick test   246
Smallpox vaccinations  58
Gastric analysis   15
Gastric for T.B.   27
Vomitus for occult blood  2
B.M.R.'s  :  162
Biopsies   4
Autopsies   70 HH 20 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948^49.
Animal autopsies   53
Sections   1,136
Water for bacterial count  85
E.K.G.  :  225
Agglutination for dysentery  63
Agglutination for typhoid  29
Diphtheria virulence test   4
Ascitic fluid, routine  1
Milk for butter-fat  8
Total number of examinations  33,839
I have, etc.,
G. A. Nicolson,
Pathologist.
X-RAY REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is the report of the work performed in the X-ray Department
of the Hospital from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949 :—
Number of films taken  11,613
Number of patients X-rayed     8,829
Patients. Films.
Chests   6,887 7,045
Extremities      556 1,546
Heads      182 547
Spines       844 1,278
Pelvis         32 38
Shoulders         61 124
Jaws        21 57
Gastro-intestinal         28 294
Nose        17 54
Abdomens        71 103
Ribs        25 50
Teeth          19 57
Sinuses        23 74
Mastoids         6      • 16
Barium enema        16 107
Gall-bladder        14 68
Pyelograms         15 94
Pneumo-encephalograms         6 50
Soft tissue (neck)          2 4
Kidney         2 2
Hard palate          2 5
I have, etc.,
8,829 11,613
J. M. Jackson, M.D.,
Director of Radiology. PHYSIOTHERAPY REPORT.
HH 21
PHYSIOTHERAPY REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of the treatments which were given in the Physiotherapy Department in Essondale from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949 :■—
Male.
Female.
Total.
Continuous maths	
Cold wet packs	
Foam baths	
Electric cabinet baths	
Needle spray, rain spray, douches, etc	
Massage, active and passive movements....
Inductothermy, short wave	
Infra-red radiation	
Ultra-violet radiation (mercury quartz)....
Sitz baths	
Tub baths	
Footbath	
Arm bath	
Chiropody	
Electro-surgery	
Total number of treatments	
Total number of patients treated
2
40
58
740
525
1,064
64
4
287
70
120
74
3,352
409
819
2
209
209
572
477
3,530
182
6,009
663
1,123
2
211
40
267
1,312
1,002
4,594
246
4
287
70
120
74
9
9,361
1,072
I have, etc.,
A. E. Davidson,
Clinical Director. PSYCHOLOGIST'S REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
SIR,—Following is a report of work performed for the fiscal year ended March
31st, 1949:—
Test.
Essondale.
New Westminster.
Boys'
Industrial
School.
New
Haven.
Oakalla.
Total.
Ascendence Submissive Study	
Benjamin Proverbs	
Bennett & Fry Mechanical Comprehension
California Test of Personality	
Casuist Form Board	
Chicago Non-verbal	
Culture Free Test	
Detroit Reading Tests	
Five Figure Form Board	
Gamin	
General Clerical	
Guilford Martin O.Co.Ag	
Hanfmann-Kasanin	
Ingraham Clark Diagnostic Reading	
KentE.Y.G	
Kent Rosanoff	
Kuder Preference Record	
Lee-Clark Reading Readiness	
McQuarrie Test of Mechanical Ability	
Mental Health Analysis	
Minnesota Multiphasic	
Monroe Reading and Arithmetic	
Occupational Interest Inventory	
Otis Self-administering	
P.S. Experience Blank	
Personal Audit	
Porteus Maze Performance Scale	
Purdue Peg Board	
S.T.D.C.R	
Seguin Form Board	
Shipley Hartford Retreat Scale	
Stanford Achievement	
Stanford Arithmetic	
Stanford Binet Form L	
Stanford Binet Form M	
Thermatic Apperception Test	
Thurston Test of Mental Alertness	
Tiegs & Clark Progressive Achievement	
Two Figure Form Board	
Vineland Social Maturity	
Vocational Interest Inventory	
Wechsler-Bellevue Intelligence	
Wechsler Memory Scale	
Totals	
1
22
1
15
2
4
7
2
7
2
1
7
6
1
2
49
4
1
9
1
1
68
1
16
1
1
1
144
24
24
4
2
24
19
31
27
1
1
62
15
24
6
26
528
317
20
15
23
116
1
22
1
35
24
4
2
6
24
7
2
7
2
19
1
7
6
25
2
23
49
4
1
1
114
28
3
27
239
1
1
78
1
1
1
15
24
6
23
301
24
55
46
231
1,177
Psychiatric Nursing Staff.
Test.
Male.
Female.
Total.
129
129
129
165
165
165
165
Guilford Martin Test O.Co.Ag	
129
294
165
129
Totals             	
387
495
882
Grand total:  1,177+882=2,059.
I have, etc.,
C. B. Watson,
Psychologist. DENTAL REPORT. HH 23
DENTAL REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is the annual report of the Dental Department:—
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale.
All newly admitted patients able to present themselves were examined, and dental
charts filed. All acute conditions were given precedence, and relieved the same day as
reported. New dentures were made on recommendation of the medical staff, and other
dentures repaired as needed. Restorations of caropis teeth have been made as far as
time would permit.
Summary.
Examinations   688
Extractions   477
Fillings inserted   151
Treatments   168
Local anaesthetics   296
Dentures repaired      72
Dentures rebased        7
Dentures made     29
Bridges repaired      2
Alveolotomy        6
Prophylaxis     96
General anaesthetics       4
Provincial Mental Hospital, New Westminster.
Summary.
Examinations   524
Extractions   402
Fillings inserted      47
Treatments     63
Prophylaxis and pyorrhoea treatments  125
Dentures repaired —       1
General anaesthetics      17
Local anaesthetics     76
We have, etc.,
Milton Jones, D.D.S.
Emery Jones, D.D.S. HH 24 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
OPTICAL REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Enclosed please find optical report of work done at the Provincial Mental
Hospital, Essondale, from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949:—
Refractions: Male, 41; female, 93; total, 134. Repairs and replacements sent to
J. S. Hudson Optical Supplies, 169.   Minor repairs and adjustments at Hospital, 55.
I have, etc.,
H. H. Woodbridge,
Optometrist.
BEAUTY-PARLOUR REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—The following is a report of the appointments in the beauty-parlour from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949:—
Shampoos  ,  4,822
Finger-waves   4,695
Marcels       107
Haircuts   3,911
Permanents       431
Oil treatments       101
Manicures   1,304
We have, etc.,
E. EMBREE.
M. TOWNSEND.
REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF NURSING.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I respectfully submit the report of the Department of Nursing for the fiscal
year ended March 31st, 1949.
This year ended with the following personnel: Registered nurses, 16; psychiatric
graduates, 53; psychiatric nurses-in-training, 214—making a total staff of 283. Resignations for the year numbered 178, and new appointments, 193. The reasons for
resignations are as follows: 26 to he married, 17 because of ill-health, 49 to continue
education (approximately 30 of these were summer relief), 13 resuming household
duties, 25 to take up some other occupation, 8 found hours too long, 30 unsuitable, 6 at
completion of postgraduate course, 2 superannuated, 1 over age, and 1 death.
This turnover of staff, although great, is not as large as last year. This may be
attributed in part to one of a number of factors, namely, long hours, insufficient number REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF NURSING. HH  25
of staff because of lack of accommodation, overcrowded conditions for patients which
make working conditions more difficult, lack of recreational facilities at Hospital, and
the distance from town. This year greater demands have been placed on head nurses
and students with a still more active treatment programme. With our new nurses' residences, which will allow for the straight eight-hour day, and the new auditorium, we
trust the staff will be a happy, contented, and satisfied one.
The School of Nursing has had another busy and successful year. Thirty-two
nurses received diplomas in psychiatric nursing, having completed the three-year
course; one registered nurse completed the six months' course in postgraduate study
and thirteen male students received certificates, having completed the qualifying course.
The three-year course commenced this year for male staff.
Twenty affiliate students from Vancouver General Hospital and three University
of British Columbia degree students completed their two-month course of experience
and instruction. Nine nurses from the Public Health Division of the University of
British Columbia were given three days' observation and instruction, while special
clinical demonstrations and lectures were provided for 100 social service students, 54
psychology, 20 public health, and 134 educational.
Miss E. Pullan, Head Instructress, obtained her Bachelor of Science degree in the
fall of 1948. To her go the best wishes of all staff members. Miss C. Livingstone
joined the staff in July and is a valuable member in her capacity as clinical and classroom teacher. Miss E. Johnstone returned from McGill University and spent a successful year in organizing and teaching the staff of the New Westminster branch, where the
three-year course for nurses and attendants has been inaugurated. Also this year,
sixteen nurses completed the qualifying course at that branch.
Miss H. Shand is the fourth nurse to go to McGill University to take the course in
teaching and supervision in psychiatric nursing. She will return in July upon completion of her course to assist with the teaching programme. Miss E. Brown at this date
is taking a six months' course in neuro-surgery at the Montreal Neurological Institute.
Miss Brown is preparing to take over the operating theatre in the Crease Clinic. Miss
J. Menzies, from the teaching department, organized the Aged unit at Vernon, which
was opened in July. At this time five psychiatric graduates transferred to this unit,
and we felt keenly the loss of these nurses. The remaining staff are nurses' aides whom
Miss Menzies prepared for their duties before returning to Essondale for the teaching-
year.   Miss L. Whitehead, a psychiatric graduate, is in charge of that unit.
In January, 1949, Miss C. McLeod was appointed Nursing Counsellor. Miss
McLeod has been a member of this nursing staff for almost ten years. We regret losing
Miss McL'eod from the nursing staff; however, her knowledge of staff problems will be
of distinct value to her in carrying out her new duties.
Commencing in the fall of 1948 our health programme for nurses included a complete physical examination within the first month of service. This includes a complete
medical examination with chest X-ray, Kahn, urinalysis, haemoglobin, mantou, and any
inoculations which have not previously been done. This examination is not only of
great value to the staff member, but also to the Hospital. Our registered nurse in
charge of the nurses' infirmary has been of tremendous value.
Again, for the nursing staff, I would like to thank those who have given so freely
of their time and counsel, for their interest and help in the teaching programme
through another difficult year.
I have, etc.,
Mona E. Parsons, R.N.,
Director of Nursing. HH  26 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—In addition to the production reports which appear elsewhere in this Report,
some mention should be made of the activities carried on in the Occupational Therapy
handicraft workshops in the Admitting and also the Female Buildings.
It is the aim of this department to provide suitable employment for as many as
possible of the women patients. Occupations are chosen with the patient's interests
and capabilities in mind. Many women prefer to do household tasks as they would at
home. For these people the sewing, mending, and ironing provide ample opportunity
for them to do work which is useful to the Hospital and beneficial to themselves. These
activities give them a regular routine and the knowledge that they are helping others.
In the handicraft workshops, women are encouraged to learn new arts and develop
new skills. Occupations which are used for therapeutic purposes with good results
include weaving, needlework, knitting, dressmaking, drawing and painting, square
knotting, and rug-hooking.   As much use as possible is made of salvaged materials.
For special occasions such as Hallowe'en, Christmas, Easter, this department has
co-operated with other departments in the Hospital to make and arrange costumes or
decorations for the various recreational and social activities.
During the summer months, certain patients are permitted to make gardens in
space allotted for this purpose. This activity is under the direction and supervision of
Miss Hincks, Assistant Director of this department.
The schoolroom is another feature of the department. Here classes are provided
for younger patients or anyone who is interested in improving his or her academic
standing. Several patients are enrolled for correspondence courses provided by the
Department of Education at Victoria.
An effort has been made to provide opportunities in occupational therapy for
patients confined to the wards at the Home for the Aged as well as in the Admitting
and Female Buildings. In this we have been fortunate in having the co-operation of
the nursing staff for much of the actual supervision of the work, with visits by staff
occupational therapists whenever possible.
During the year, displays of finished articles produced in this department were
shown at the Women's Institute Annual Flower Show at Port Coquitlam, at the opening
of the Legislature in the Parliament Buildings in Victoria, and also at the Hudson's
Bay store in Victoria.   Much public interest was gained by these displays.
I have, etc.,
MlLLICENT E. WEEKES,
Director, Occupational Therapy Department. RECREATIONAL REPORT. HH 27
RECREATIONAL REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit for your information the following report showing attendance figures and the variety of recreational programmes promoted by the Recreation
Department from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949:	
Number of Total
Programmes. Programmes.       Attendance.
Bingo gatherings   9 3,600
Swimming  91 3,640
Dances   73 14,600
Bands and concerts     13 9,100
Inter-ward cribbage and checker tournaments  30 900
Crossword and cryptogram contests  25 *
Physical education periods—•
Outdoor   90 3,150
Indoor   32 832
Picnics   20 800
Music appreciation periods  48 4,800
Variety parties or dances  17 6,800
Totals  448 48,222
* Unestimated.
With reference to the above physical education classes, these include participation
by the patients in such sports as tennis, volleyball, archery, horseshoes, tether tennis,
goal-hi, golf, calisthenics, club swinging, wand and dumb-bell drills, handball, basketball, shuffleboard, badminton, and scrimmage.
The following are special or progressive inaugurated events to our programme
this fiscal year:—
(1) The addition of R. E. Routley, of the male nursing staff, to our recreational staff.
(2) The inauguration of summer staff picnic and sports dances.
(3) The opening annual sports and field day, at which 1,500 patients spent
the entire day outdoors, participating in the events and entertainment.
(4) The formation of fall and winter evening physical education and game
classes for insulin and active treatment patients.
(5) The advancement of our weekly programme bulletin from a one-page
sheet to a four-page weekly booklet, with newsy events and crossword and
cryptogram contests, etc.
(6) Inter-ward chess tournaments were started and will be included with the
regular cribbage and checker tournaments.
(7) Separate ward tournaments of various kinds were organized throughout
the year by the Recreation Department and supervised by and through
the co-operation of the male and female nursing staff on these individual
wards.
With reference to the above figures, may I respectfully draw your attention to the
fact that with the exception of bands, concerts, and music appreciation periods, which
are classified as entertainment periods, the whole of the above programme has required
actual physical and mental participation by the patients. HH  28 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
I feel sure that with the continued support of my staff and the co-operation I have
received from the ward staff, there is no limit to the further progression of the recreational programme.
I have, etc.,
W. R. Brown,
Recreational Director.
LIBRARY REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Following is a report of the medical and patients' libraries for the year
ended March 31st, 1949:—
Medical Library.
Book collection      615
New books added       251
Total      866
Journal collection        61
New journals added        21
Total .        82
Journals bound  (volumes)        49
Patients' Library.
Book collection   2,500
New books added       615
Total  3,115
Number of borrowers      922
Number of books circulated ,  7,750
I have, etc.,
Jean S. Irving,
Assistant Librarian.
CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—Attached herewith are consolidated summaries of the work done in the Child
Guidance Clinics throughout the Province from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
These tables are based on the complete examination or re-examination of each
case. Partial examinations are shown in the reports of psychiatric interviews, psychological examinations, etc. CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS. HH 29
Table 1 shows in summary the general activities of the Clinics. There has been
an increase in the number of Clinics held, in physical examinations, urinalyses, playroom observations, and case conferences. For the first time in its history, a Clinic
was held at Murrayville. All the other places listed have had Clinics on previous
occasions.
Table 2 shows the number, sex, and status of all cases, both new and repeat,
examined at the Clinics. This table reveals an increase in the total number of cases
seen. This increase is accounted for by an increase in the number of new cases, mostly
adult males and female children, and an increase in the number of repeat male cases,
both adult and children.
Table 3 is an analysis of the sources of all cases referred to the Clinics. It is to
be noted that while the largest number of cases are referred by social agencies, a
considerable proportion are from other sources—'Courts, schools, medical and health
agencies, parents, relatives, private physicians, and others. There has been a marked
increase in the number of candidates screened for their, suitability for retraining and
rehabilitation under the Borstal system.
Table 4 is a summary of the problems and disorders presented by the new cases
seen at the Clinics. The two largest groups are the primary behaviour disorders and
cases for adoption.
Table 5 gives an analysis of age-groups and intelligence. It shows that a considerable number of the children seen at the Clinics are in the pre-adolescent or younger
groups and of average or better than average intelligence. In these groups the childhood emotional bonds and influences are still mainly in the home. Therefore, the
greatest possible benefit to the child can be expected from changing attitudes within
the home. This manoeuvre may be too late when the extra-family or social bonds of
adolescence become stronger than the intra-family bonds. This emphasizes the importance of remedying abnormal behaviour in children by working with the parents. The
parents are usually eager for help with the baffling problems the children present.
Table 6 shows the number and types of psychological tests carried out in the
Clinics.
There is much fundamental research to be done concerning normal physical and
emotional development and their interrelationship. The factors of inborn temperament,
parental attitudes, and place in the family in developmental patterns require thorough
investigation.
During the year notable progress has been made in increased accommodation and
equipment. The house next to the Clinic at 445 Thirteenth Avenue West has been
remodelled into eleven offices. This will help in a measure to relieve some of the overcrowding which was interfering with the proper functioning of the Clinic. The provision of extra diagnostic and treatment equipment for all the Clinics will make it
possible to detect physical abnormalities at an earlier date and will be of great
assistance in treating these defects. The teaching equipment will improve the training
given to students in the mental health service.
During the year three members of the Clinic staff have been absent on leave for
postgraduate training. It is hoped that the programme of postgraduate training for
members of the Clinic staff will be continued.
The most important and basic Clinic need is for increased professional staff. Lack
of suitably trained personnel prevents the completion of the present establishment.
This lack of staff is not peculiar to the Province, but it is continent-wide.
Another need, constantly growing more pressing, is the provision of a residential
observation and treatment centre for certain selected cases of emotionally disturbed
children in the pre-adolescent group. Without adequate treatment this group usually
shows an inevitable progression so that permanent institutional care, of one type or
another, is required. HH 30                                       MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
At the Vancouver Clinic, which is under observation during office hours only,
there is an ever-present danger of fire and theft.   The buildings are of frame construc
tion and house, apart from replaceable furniture and equipment, a set of over 8,000
files of patients seen at the Clinic.    If lost or destroyed, these files are irreplaceable.
I would like to express my appreciation of the co-operation of all those who have
made it possible for the Clinics to function in an adequate and satisfactory manner.
Table 1.—Summary of Clinics' Activity, April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
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Table 2.—Number, Sex, and Status of all Cases examined at Child Guidance
Clinic, April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
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Children	
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Females—
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1,025 CHILD GUIDANCE CLINICS.
HH 31
Table 3.—Sources of all Cases referred to Child Guidance Clinic,
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Agency or Source.
Number of
Cases.
Total.
Percentage
Distribution.
321
157
64
36
21
7
1
1
5
5
43
9
7
2
2
1
1
1
2
3
47
13
5
3
43
2
3
119
37
60
2
1
1
608
10
66
73
45
122
37
60
4
59.32
Y.M.C.A	
0.98
6.44
7.12
Public—
Other—
4.39
11.90
3.61
5.85
9. Other    	
0.39
Totals	
1,025
100.00 HH 32
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Table 4. — Problems and Disorders presented by the New Cases given full
Examination by Child Guidance Clinic, April 1st, 1948, to March 31st,
1949.
Children.
Adults.
Total.
M.
F.
M.
F.
1. Primary behaviour disorders—
(a)  Habit disorders—
9
1
4
3
1
3
2
1
1
2
1
2
2
1
3
2
2
22
2
1
10
2
3
6
3
1
1
6
1
3
7
1
3
1
3
5
1
2
1
1
1
7
1
11
1
8
2
6
2
3
3
1
1
....
3
.../
1
....
1
1
1
15
2
7
3
1
Other	
(_)  Personality disorders—
10
3
4
2
3
2
1
Other                            	
13
(.)   Neurotic disorders—
3
Stammering	
2
1
1
1
Other	
(d)  Conduct disorders—
4
2
2
33
3
1
21
3
12
2
12
2
4
Other                                          	
1
2. Psychotic and pre-psychotic—
2
1
Other	
3. Psychoneurosis and neurosis—
1
....      1        1
1 child guidance clinics.
HH 33
Table 4. — Problems and Disorders presented by the New Cases given full
Examination by Child Guidance Clinic, April 1st, 1948, to March 31st,
1949—Continued.
Children.
M. F.
 I
Adults.
Total.
4. Convulsive disorders—
Epilepsy	
Other	
5. Psychopathic personality	
6. Educational disability—
(a)  Associated with dull normal or border-line intelligence..
ib)  Special mental disability—
Writing	
Reading	
Arithmetic	
Other	
7. Mental deficiencies—
(<x)  Famelial	
(_)  Mongolism	
(c) With developmental cranial anomalies	
(d) With congenital spastics...	
(e) Post-infectional	
(/)   Post-traumatic	
(g)  With epilepsy	
(h)  With endocrine disorders	
(.)   With other organic nervous disorders	
(j)   Undifferentiated	
(fc)   Other	
8. Mental retardation	
9. No ascertained mental deviation—
(a)
W
M
(d)
(«)
(/)
(_-)
(ft)
Problem of physical health and development..
Spastics	
Speech problems	
Hearing problems	
School problems	
Social problems ,.	
Placement	
Adoption	
Unmarried mother..
Married mother	
Other	
Unascertained	
Normal personality	
(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
10. Vocational guidance..
11. Borstal	
4 1
2       j 3
12 4
I
....       [ ....
6      j 1
1
1       I
24
15
3
11
14
1
6
5
4
1
3
13
16
91
74
1
87
103
9
16
1
4
1
4
4
1
41
1
2
1   9
11
1   <»
1   <
-
30
| 165
54
62
2
!   2
....
1
22
5
13
75 HH 34
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Table 5.—-Chart comparing Ages with Intelligence Quotients of all New Cases
given Full Examination at Child Guidance Clinic from April 1st, 1948, to
March 31st, 1949.
Males.
Females.
0-19	
     1
     i
20-49	
2    1
5     i
2     !
7     1
2
3
2
6
1
3
1
9
50-69	
25
70-79	
3    !
3    !
7
4
5
1
1
24
80-89	
5    1
"     i
25     |
9     !
9     !
17     |
5
11
11
7
12
13
7
6
6
4
3
2
1
1
38
90-99	
59
100-109	
74
110-129	
22     1
13    [
12
7
7
5
I
67
130-139	
3     1
1
2
1
1
	
8
140+	
     j
      1
1
	
I
Totals	
82    |
61    |
i
53
53
35
17
4
305
Intelligence Quotient.
Age in Years.
1-4.
5-9.
10-14.
15-19.
20-24.
25-29.
30-34. 1 35-39. 1   40-I-.
1             !
Totals.
0 19        	
7
10
3
8
16
27
26
6
5
16
9
19
16
19
8
2
1
2
6
4
13
15
11
111
4
1
1
4
6
7
24
23
17
1
2
3
7
11
15
11
1
	
	
	
1
20 49                    	
15
50-69	
70-79	
80 89    	
38
25
54
90-99	
100-109	
110 129    	
82
95
74
130-139	
140+	
     1     --
     1    	
12
2
Totals	
103
93
66
84
49
1                 j     	
!           i
398 child guidance clinics.
HH 35
Table 6.—Psychologists' Eeport of Tests administered
in Child Guidance Clinics, 1948-49.
Test.
u
V
>
P
o
CJ
c
cd
>
cd
'j.
Q
+_
CJ
i>
d
J
c
cd
z
1
tn
ti
I
55 te
fl
q
+-
CJ
a
OJ
CL.
,2
t
cd
H
3
s
u
cd
2
1 °
'3
H
o
o
u
fl
fi
B
o
c
dj
>
e
<
s
0
S
"cd
o_
13
U
o
1
fl
o
■ji
%
55
"ed
O
H
509
239
67
24
2
3
1
41
206
20
1
26
1
1
3
72
153
77
20
1
4
7
12
15
2
69
11
7
13
1
1
1
2
13
4
19
10
19
21
58
115
70
6
3
3
18
2
3
4
23
13
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
32
4
2
19
2
11
5
1
1
2
2
1
1
15
12
8
8
3
6
1
4
1
4
1
4
3
4
6
1
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
7
6
2
2
1
1
7
4
4
3
4
3
1
1
1
1
7
1
1
2
6
1
1
7
1
2
2
3
658
250
70
27
2
3
1
1
44
280
22
1
29
1
1
3
82
219
114
26
2
5
Iota Word Test	
8
15
16
2
75
12
9
N.I.I.P. Clerical	
14
1
1
Aptitude Test for Teaching	
1
1
9
14
. 4
22
12
19
22
58
115
I have, etc.,
Ultan P. Byrne, M.D., D.P.H.,
Director of Child Guidance Clinics. HH  36 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT.
REPORT OF PSYCHIATRIC SOCIAL WORKERS' PARTICIPATION IN
PROVINCIAL  MENTAL HOSPITALS  AND  HOMES  FOR THE  AGED.
The Social Service Department attached directly to the Provincial Mental Hospitals
and Homes for the Aged has in previous years endeavoured to work as part of the team
assisting in the patients' treatment. In order to do this, there must be an understanding of the needs and the psychiatric factors involved in the illness of the patient, and
an ability to co-operate with the rest of the team and at the same time work within the
limits of our own profession on a case-work level, but maintaining an understanding of
the job of the other team members and how their work dovetails to make a co-operative
plan.
There was a time when most of the energies of the psychiatric social workers were
spent in the taking of social histories. These histories were often so long and involved
that they became of little use to the rest of the team. History-taking without case work
with the patients and their families is fast fading out. We must be able to interpret
the patient's pattern of living, his total environment, and his probable assets for rehabilitation. To do this, the psychiatric social worker is the person who has the contact
with the home and community from which the patient came.
This last year the whole team has been more aware of the needs for rehabilitation.
The Psychological Department has been of great assistance in giving us leads in types
of occupation for which the patient is best fitted. The rehabilitation home, " The
Vista," has been a great help. Through the observation, treatment, and job-finding
carried on in this centre, the female patients have shown a more permanent recovery.
With the male patients, we have one male staff member assigned to work with the
patients who are about ready and are discharged. We hope this will lead to a new
division of rehabilitation within the Social Service Department. There have been 121
patients helped to find jobs. Some of the patients had more than three jobs found for
them before a placement fitted to the patient's needs presented itself.
The help received through the field service embracing all of British Columbia has
been absolutely wonderful. We are indeed fortunate to have the assistance from this
source. Only those of us who worked in this field previously fully appreciate the total
coverage which we now have. From most remote sources, the field submits case-
histories and prepares the ground for the patient's return home, and reports back to us
during the patient's six months' probation. We, in turn, supervise and give as much
guidance as possible. This again is team play. The slow, steady work involved in
education of this group of field workers has paid dividends. It is one of our pleasures
to participate in their training and supervision.
In conjunction with the educational work, we also enjoyed having two social service
students from the University of British Columbia doing field work within the Mental
Hospital setting. There were six clinics given to the whole social service class of the
University of British Columbia at the Mental Hospital. The staff psychiatrist directed
and gave these clinics, and again as part of the team we participated. We have had the
usual number of visitors from other fields and participated in the University lecture
course for the public health nurses, as well as having them for stated periods of orientation.   Our department spoke to eight groups in the community.
The staff of the Social Service Department has been increased and, as a whole, has
been fortunate in receiving more teaching and actual participation in the total planning
for improved treatment for the patients. We are indeed fortunate to be an active and
participating part of the whole Hospital programme. social service report. hh 37
Provincial Mental Hospital and Home for the Aged Statistics,
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Number of New Cases referred to Social Service Department.
In Vancouver :     524
Out of Vancouver     726
  1,250
The number of new admissions was increased by 139 during the past fiscal year.
Disposition.
Discharged on probation—
In Vancouver     244
Out of Vancouver     231
■     475
This is an increase of 75 cases which were referred for probation services.
Report of Social Service Work carried out by Members of the Social Service
Department at Essondale.
Initial interviews to obtain social histories—
In Vancouver 1,364
Out of Vancouver         8*
  1,372
Other interviews entailing case work such as consultations with
other social agencies, public and private, employers, school
authorities, and other resources in Vancouver  1,198
Probation visits—
In Vancouver     725
Out of Vancouver     	
      725
Out-of-town supervisory service by mail—
Letters to the Provincial field staff requesting social
histories and probation visits, and of a general
supervisory nature  2,123
Letters to other social agencies in and out of British
Columbia      287
  2,410
Social histories, probation and other  reports, and
letters of a general consultative nature received
from Provincial field staff 1,531
Histories, reports, and letters received from other
Social Agencies in and out of British Columbia    352
•  1,883    .
Orientation periods for nine public health nurses, one postgraduate nurse, and
fifty-four field service staff.
Special Assignments..
Old-age pension  _      412
Reports on rehabilitation of special cases in Vancouver      432
* These are cases referred to our department for special work by trained psychiatric social workers under the
direct supervision of the psychiatrist. HH  38 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
REPORT OF SOCIAL WORKERS' PARTICIPATION IN THE CHILD
GUIDANCE CLINICAL SERVICES.
During the past fiscal year the social workers in the Child Guidance Clinic setting
have done more intensive work with individual cases. We have tried to give as high-
standard work as possible, and endeavoured to give a quality of service to a limited
number rather than a little work on a quantity of cases. This, of necessity, demands
greater skill, particularly in a public welfare service. The staff have worked to the
limit of their capacity with an enthusiasm and real interest as only can be enjoyed when
there is true team play.
The pre-clinical work with patients has shown what can be done when a child and
his parents have been properly prepared for a clinical examination. We have found that
there has been a more definite acceptance of the psychiatrist's findings and plan of
treatment. In fact, it has shown that this period is most important and in good preparation ; a great deal of team time is saved with a greater real acceptance of the service.
The consultative service given to social agencies has also helped as a time-saver, as
well as a help toward more constructive case work to the whole family group. The
teaching element of the consultative clinic is of great value. Here, mental hygiene
principles are brought out in relation to a specific case, which in turn demonstrates to
the work what can be considered in the treatment of others. The participation of a
social worker in group discussion assists in more logical thinking, readiness to study,
and relate what she has learned to her clients. The Clinic is stationary and travelling,
and has reached a large group of allied professions—teaching, nursing, medical. The
individual case has been used as a basis for this teaching.
In all clinicals, co-operative case work has increased. It is here that the psychiatric social worker acts as a consultative or leader, while not actually devoting the time
to the individual case. This requires greater skills and higher training on the part of
the psychiatric social worker.
In this last year we have had more students for orientation for from one-day to
two-week periods. There is a great deal of planning involved in this sort of work, and
the needs of the patient must always be kept in mind and not neglected. We are conducting the clinic for the treatment of children primarily, and not a teaching clinic.
The latter is incidental but also most important.
We never think of a report of this kind without remembering that each child has
parents, uncles, aunts, etc., and often these persons require quite as much or more help.
We have once again to treat the environment in the broad sense, as well as the patient.
Throughout the-Province the field service has asked for and has worked from
travelling clinical service. The case-loads are all high and valid as to problems, but
they try not to neglect the child that with some help now may prevent years of distress
to the family and to the parents. Prevention, unfortunately, does not show dividends
in dollars and cents—that is, on paper—but we know from a study of our case-histories
that with the assistance of help at a crucial time, there has been a great deal of unhap-
piness, delinquencies, etc., prevented.
The Clinical Director's report should be read in conjunction with this report, as
psychiatric social workers are only a part of the team which participates in the work of
the Child Guidance Clinics. SOCIAL SERVICE REPORT.
IH 39
Statistical Report of the Psychiatric Social Workers, Provincial Child Guidance
Clinics, for the Fiscal Year April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Vancouver.
Victoria.
Total.
Case-work services—
65
102
14
170
100
81
1,121
960
218
297
34
1
21
2
1
59
114
33
48
11
92
58
34
419
57
21
1
12
72
98
Cases referred during the year—
150
25
Total number of cases carried during fiscal year (C.F.+New+R2)	
262
158
115
Total number of interviews  with  and  regarding  patients   (included  are
relatives,  physicians  other than  Clinic  psychiatrists,  social workers
attached   to   other   social   agencies,   school   personnel,   public   health
1,540
1,017
239
Other than case-work services—
Conferences attended—
298
Persons referred for orientation—
Social workers attached to other agencies	
Total	
71
186
Travelling clinics (not including Victoria Child Guidance Clinic) —
32
150
J. F. Kilburn,
Provincial Supervisor, Psychiatric Social Work. HH 40
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
___-9n_H-H8-N-Mn
Hundred-bed unit, Home for the Aged, Essondale.
General view of Colony Farm, Essondale, during flood, June, 1948. STATISTICAL tables.
STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 41
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Hospitals—Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Movement of Population.
In residence, Essondale, March 31st, 1948	
In residence, New Westminster, March 31st, 1948	
In residence, Saanich, March 31st, 1948	
On probation, carried forward from 1947-48, Essondale	
On  probation,  carried forward from  1947-48,  New Westminster	
On probation, carried forward from 1947-48, Saanich	
Admitted during the year 1948-49—
By ordinary forms	
By urgency forms—	
By voluntary forms	
From the Yukon 	
By warrant	
Total  under treatment,   Essondale,   New  Westminster,  and
Saanich, April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949	
Discharged during period of April 1st, 1948, to March 31st,
1949—
(a)   From Essondale—
As recovered—	
As improved :	
As unimproved —	
Without psychosis....	
Not insane	
On probation and still out	
Escaped, but not discharged	
Died  	
(6)   From New Westminster—
As improved	
As unimproved	
On probation and still out.	
Escaped, but not discharged	
Died	
(c)   From Saanich—
As recovered	
As improved	
As unimproved	
On probation and still out	
Escaped, but not discharged	
Died	
Total   discharged  from  Essondale,   New  Westminster,  and
Saanich	
Total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich
Male.
Female.
Total.
1,832
371
295
103
4
1
S3
179
209
61
1
100
731
1,514
262
530
30
110
15
5     [
7    I
503
7
55
1
1
73
162
188
17
1
116
632
3,346
633
290
221
5
1
1,533
37
165
16
1
136
341
397
78
2
216
1,362
1
5
10
S
16
Total.
Male.      Female.     Total
i I
2,603     ;    1,895     ]   4,498
691 569     |   1,260
1,294     I   2,464     j   5,758
I I
763    |      640
1,403
2,531     j   1,824
4,355 HH 42
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Table No. 1.—Showing the Operations of the Hospitals—Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949—Continued.
Movement of Population.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Essondale—
1,935
691
15
1
1,632
569
16
3,567
1,260
31
1
2,642
769
2,217
658
4,859
731
24
14.
632
26
1,362
50
14
1,427
375
24
263
26
638
50
1,873
1,559
3,432
New Westminster—
Total on books, March 31st, 1948	
399
31
289
24
688
16
15
8
16
24
31
55
293
14
293
14
368
265
633
Saanich—
Total on books, March 31st, 1948	
307
17
307
16
1
16
1
17
1,873
368
290
1,559
265
3,432
633
290
290
290
2,531
1,824
Total in residence, Saanich, March 31st, 1949	
Grand total in residence, Essondale, New Westminster, and
Saanich, March 31st, 1949	
4,355
Daily average population 	
Percentage of discharged on admissions  (not including deaths).
Percentage of recoveries on admission 	
Percentage of deaths on whole number under treatment 	
4,313.59
76.59
10.87
3.63 STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 43
Table No. 2.—
Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Hospital since
its Inception.
Year.
n
ti
.2
M
DQ
a
Discharges.
3
a
g
■Ti«M
'5 °
CU   V
K°_]
X  tV<i
E£.s
a__ 2
fit rt at
01
rt
3
u
o
C
6
CO
5
u
ti
_■
a
V
s
3
CD  aj
il
t*H   _
oo  i
8 s I
+J  Ih'S
P.P.-JJ
Percentage of Discharges to Admissions (Deaths
excluded).
Percentage of
Deaths to Whole
Number under
Treatment.
Recovered.
Not
recovered.
1872	
18
1
i
16
1
      1      	
18
5.55
5.55
5.55
1873	
15
10
2
5
14
     I        2
31
66.66
80.00
16.12
1874	
12
4
3
19
5
26
33.33
33.33
11.63
1875	
29
3
3
10
32
13
48
10.34
26.89
20.83
1876	
22
11
3
5
35
3
54
50.00
63.63
9.35
1877	
14
4
4
3
38
3
49
28.57
78.57
6.12
1878	
16
7     1          3
8
36
2
54
43.75
62.50
16.16
1879	
18
4
1
8
41
5
54
22.22
27.77
14.81
1880	
17
5
5
48
7
58
29.41
29.41
8.62
1881	
13
5
3
5
48
61
38.46
61.54
8.19
1882	
7
3
1
2
49
1
55
42.85
57.14
3.63
1883	
8
4
1
3
49
57
50.00
62.50
5.26
1884	
10
2
4
2
51
2
59
20.00
60.00
3.33
1885	
20
5
5
61
10
71
25.00
25.00
6.94
1886	
27
10
6
6
66
5
88
37.03
59.25
6.81
1887	
36
15
5              5
77
11
102
41.66
55.55
4.80
1888	
26
12
6
3
82
5
103
46.15
69.23
2.87
1889	
41
14
5
4
100
18
123
34.15
46.34
3.25
1890	
52
17
6
12
117
17
152
32.69
44.23
7.64
1891	
49
19
4
20
123
6
166
38.77
46.94
11.69
1892	
52
17    |      10
13
135
12
175
32.69
51.92
6.95
1893	
44
14    1      18
14
133
2
179
31.81
72.72
7.60
1894	
80
62
13            19
29    1      11
19
20
162
164
29
2
213
224
16.25
46.77
40.00
64.51
8.92
8.92
1895	
1896	
64
23    |      25
9
171
7
228
35.93
75.00
3.94
1897	
74
81
101
20    |        8
27    |      13
31    1      32
14
19
21
203
221
234
32
18
13
246
285
327
27.03
33.33
30.69
37.83
49.38
62.37
5.69
6.66
6.42
1898	
1899	
1900	
IIS     1       S8            27     1       29
258
284
311
349
24
26
27
38
356
377
413
466
33.63
34.78
24.79
27.34
57.52
62.17
50.41
53.96
8.14
6.63
6.06
5.57
1901	
115     |       40
121     1       30
20
31
25
25
26
1902	
1903	
139     1       38     1       37
1904	
115
46    |      26
26
321
28
480
40.00
62.61
5.42
1905	
123
160
43    |      33
36*         43
27
28
348
388
27
43
505
652
33.33
23.03
61.78
52.06
5.34
5.04
1906	
1907	
221     I       48     I       43
39
57
40
41
60
76
67
74
461
507
536
595
690
752
919
73
666
765
816
896
1,034
1,065
1,264
1,364
1,437
1,527
21.30
28.30
31.00
30.00
19.57
18.90
22.63
14.43
25.00
20.68
41.20
53.90
64.60
59.28
54.42
53.80
62.10
45.77
52.41
47.87
5.08
7.44
6.40
4.57
5.83
7.02
5.30
5.43
6.19
5.24
1908	
230
232
280
332
375
380
68*  |      56
73t          77
46    1    	
1909	
29
48
105
1910	
84
671
82
114
1911	
1912    	
74*  |     128
905   1     146
62    |
167    1    	
1913	
1914    	
402     I       58     I     126
1,027    |    108    |
1.090     1       63     1     	
1916 	
332    |      83    |      91    |      89
353           73t |      96    j      80
1916	
1,205
115    1    	
1917 :	
371    |      88    j      78    j    106
375    1      75    I      95    1    132
1,301
1,347
96    |
46
1,650
1,753
23.72
20.00
44.74
45.33
6.42
7.47
1918	
Jan. 1,1919, to
1               I
March 31,1920	
574    |    116    |    221
132
1,458
111
2,025
20.20
58.71
6.51
1920-1921	
489    |      88    |    173
478     1       96     1     178
122
114
1S3
1,566
1,649
1,697
108
83
48
2,043
2,137
2,180
14.17
20.08
20.77
72.60
67.32
59.36
5.97
5.33
6.10
1921-1922	
1922-1923	
438           91
167
1923-1924	
447
461
475
494
84t
121
163
138
142
161
1,784
1,884
1,995
2,125
87
100
111
130
2,234
2,327
2,434
2,565
18.56
13.66
12.00
15.38
64.20
66.16
62.53
50.00
7.25
5.93
5.83
6.27
1924-1925	
63    |    242
57||  |    240
76g |    171
1
1925-1926	
1926-1927	
* Three not insa
le.             t One not insane.             t Two not insane.             § Four not in
sane.
|| Six not insane. HH 44
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Table No. 2.—Showing in Summary Form the Operations of the Hospital since
its Inception—Continued.
Year.
Discharges.
cd
ti
.2
CQ
to
TJ
0J
tH
V
>
TJ
03
Sh
0)
th
a
■n o
<
PS-
% u
Q
TJ«H
•s °
ti «
a ra oj
ai
CQ
V
ai
CO
o
P
»"g
ili
"ft"
u o j
o oi
si
**H rr)   [fl
_?-8g~
lssB|
•sis
2-8 h 5
c » « g
0-£"5 **
P.1TS8   hoZh
1927-
1928-
1929-
1930-
1931-
1932-
1933-
1934-
1935-
1936-
1937-
1938-
1939-
1940-
1941-
1942-
1943-
1944-
19.5-
1946-
1947-
1948-
1928.
1929
1930.
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940.
1941.
1942
1943
1944
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
1949
542
543
602
632
562
635
610
653
679
783
834
827
869
864
834
803
840
822
834
880
1,111
1,260
75*
92t
118*
70*
581
44§
61.
71*
63*
'78$
74
72t
111**
1071
71tt
91»
87
96§_
H7tt
97§§
124M
137||
252
294
311
235
299
323
309
349
304
300
330
345
455
410
400
443
423
377
352
496
560
748
147
181
223
191
181
195
200
221
291
268
207
208
230
254
255
260
309
300
240
238
240
209
2.269
2,347
2,411
2,550
2,676
2,824
2,960
3,080
3,180
3,301
3,487
3,612
3,710
3,836
3,902
3,925
3.960
4.019
4,110
4,151
4,269
4.355
144
78
64
139
126
148
136
120
100
121
186
125
98
|     126
66
23
35
59
I      01
41
I    118
|       86
2,743
2,914
3,063
3,148
3,214
3,390
3,530
3,721
3,838
4,067
4,255
4,471
4,713
4,781
4,843
4,919
4,965
4,960
5,014
5,174
5,447
5,758
13.28
16.76
19.10
10.60
10.32
6.92
10.00
10.87
9.27
9.96
8.87
8.71
11.39
12.38
8.51
11.32
10.36
10.46
14.02
11.02
11.34
10.87
60.33
71.07
71.26
64.24
63.52
58.42
60.65
64.32
54.05
63.60
67.30
78.72
88.50
79.97
56.46
66.50
61.66
58.39
57.43
68.18
63.64
76.59
5.36
6.21
7.28
6.06
5.63
5.75
5.66
5.94
7.58
6.59
4.88
4.65
4.88
5.31
6.54
5.31
6.02
6.04
5.84
4.59
4.40
3.63
* Three not insane. t One not insane. J Two not insane. § Four not insane. U Five not insane.
** Twelve not insane.       ff Ten not insane.       tt Eight not insane.        §§ Seven not insane.
TT TT Three not insane ; twenty without psychosis. || Two not insane ; seventy-eight without psychosis.
Table No. 3.—Showing the Total Number of Admissions, Discharges, and Deaths
from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Months.
Admissions.
Discharges.
Deaths.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1948.
57
63
51
58
51
48
65
51
58
52
64
73
45
50
49
71
42
43
39
52
38
53
34
53
102
113
100
129
93
91
104
103
96
105
98
126
51
54
37
52
39
47
34
27
40
33
54
55
27
24
35
76
42
30
29
32
35
37
35
40
78
78
72
128
81
77
63
59
75
70
89
95
8
9
11
10
9
17
14
5
9
12
14
12
10
10
9
4
6
6
7
6
9
19
16
14
September	
20
18
November.	
December	
1949.
January	
11
15
19
March	
21
Totals	
691
569
1,260
523
442
965
130
79
209 statistical tables.
HH 45
Table No. 4.—Showing the Civil State of Patients admitted from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Civil State.
Male.
Female.
Total.
214
360
17
49
49
2
243
180
16
93
35
2
142
84
4
Totals	
691
569
1,260
Table No. 5.—Showing Religious Denominations of Patients admitted from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Religious Denominations.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
2
4
2
3
2
1
4
9
7
3
42
5
1
1
2
459
131
1
2
2
5
1
1
1
1
6
1
2
1
2
7
2
5
1
2
24
3
6
406
91
2
1
4
1
2
3
10
1
4
1
3
4
1
11
11
12
1
5
66
8
1
1
8
865
222
1
2
3
6
5
1
Unity                          	
1
1
691
569
1,260
Table No. 6.—Showing the Degree of Education of those admitted from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Degree of Education
Male.
Female.
Total.
14
127
347
140
62
1
9
156
281
78
45
23
283
628
218
N'
107
1
691
569
1,260 HH 46
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Table No. 7.—Showing the Nationality of those admitted from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Nationality.
Male.
Female.
Total.
4
5
2
1
1
14
4
2
85
8
2
4
2
2
5
23
1
6
1
2
1
1
1
6
1
8
2
8
39
1
11
2
44
5
4
1
3
38
138
36
9
16
73
4
13
52
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
2
92
7
2
2
1
1
2
10
3
1
1
5
8
6
32
2
2
1
32
2
1
43
149
33
6
6
60
4
8
37
1
5
6
4
2
1
15
5
4
177
15
4
6
2
Holland                	
1
3
7
33
1
Italy	
9
2
3
1
1
1
11
1
Poland	
16
2
14
71
1
13
2
3
76
7
5
1
3
Canada—
81
British Columbia	
287
69
15
22
133
8
21
89
Totals                            	
961
569
1 260 Table No. 8
statistical tables.
—Showing what Districts contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
HH 47
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
4
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
16
5
1
1
1
5
1
6
2
1
4
1
1
1
1
19
1
1
3
5
8
2
3
1
2
35
11
11
3
2
5
6
1
1
1
6
1
8
3
1
142
2
3
1
1
1
6
1
10
1
9
61
1
11
11
1
1
1
1
5
2
3
2
7
1
1
1
2
1
1
2
6
11
3
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
4
1
2
2
2
1
1
2
1
95
3
1
1
1
1
1
7
-   7
10
46
1
14
2
2
1
1
4
2
0
5
1
1
1
1-
1
1
3
1
7
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
2
3
1
1
| 237
2
6
2
1
1
2
2
13
1
17
1
19
107
1
1
25
11
1
3
2
2
1
1
9
2
5
2
12
2
2
2
1
3
18
Lumby	
Langley Prairie	
Maillardville	
Metchosin	
Michel	
Milner	
Mission	
Mount Lehman	
Nanaimo	
Naramata	
Nelson	
New Westminster	
New Hazelton .•	
North Pender Island	
North Vancouver	
Oakalla	
Oak Bay	
Ocean Falls	
Cobble Hill	
Osoyoos	
       1          1
Parksville	
2
1
8
1
1
1
4
4
3
5
3
1
1
1
4
2
1
3
4
1
2
1
15
9
3
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
3
2
1
1
2
1
1
1
3
1
3
Pender Harbour	
Penticton	
Pitt Meadows	
Port Alice	
Cumberland	
Port Hardy	
Port Kells	
Port Mann	
Port Melon	
Dollarton	
Port McNeill	
Poplar	
Galiano	
Ganges	
Garibaldi	
1
1
2                   6
Princeton	
Progress	
Quatsino	
3
3
1
1
10
5
3
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
6
7
1
1
2
1
1
25
14
3
4
3
1
1
1
4
1
1
2
Greenwood	
Queen Charlotte City	
Haney	
Quesnel	
Quilchena	
Redstone	
Heffley Creek	
Richmond	
Trvings Landing	
Rosedale	
Rossland	
Royston	
Rutland	
Sechelt	
Sidney	
Silverton	
Slocan	
142                95
1
237
339
240
579
1 HH 48
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Table No. 8.—Showing what Districts contributed Patients from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949—Continued.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Place of Residence.
Male.
Female.
Total.
339
1
2
1
9
1
1
5
1
1
268
4
1
240              579
633
5
33
1
3
3
5
5
1
1
1
494
9
46
1
1
1
2
6
1
5
1
1
1
1,127
1
2
1
5
1
244
1
1
4
1
1
9
1
1
10
2
1
512
4
14
Victoria	
Sturdee	
Sointula	
Westbank	
79
Steelhead	
Steveston	
1
1
1
3
9
3
6
Trail	
White Rock	
10
Tranquille	
Thrums	
Williams Lake	
Woodfibre	
2
1
1
2
Totals	
633
494
1,127
691
569
1,260
Table No. 9.—Showing the Occupations of those admitted from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Occupation.
Male.
Female..
Total.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
5
2
2
2
1
3
3
3
1
5
1
2
1
1
1
2
1
20
1
8
1
3
12
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
5
2
2
2
1
3
3
90
29
119
Domestic	
Draughtsman	
1         16
16
1
1
2
3
2
2
51
7
2
1
2
1
1
1
2
4
1
1
1
116
41
5
1
1
5
1
1
8
5
1
11
1
303
13
3
2
1
1
2
Electrician—	
3
2
3
Engineer, marine	
Farmer	
2
3
1
5
3
51
Fireman	
Florist	
Flunkey	
Fruit inspector	
■   ......                  1
3
14
1
4
1
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
20
1
3
22
1
1
3
16
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
9.
Bulldozer operator	
Furrier	
Gardener	
Cabinetmaker	
Hairdresser	
Home-maker	
Hotelman	
Housekeeper	
Janitor	
Labourer	
Laundress	
Logger	
303
Clerk	
Companion	
13
Contractor	
Cook	
116
41
Cutter	
Lumber-grader	
Machine operator	
Machinist	
Master mariner	
Mechanic	
Milkman	
         1             1
1       |         12
90       1         29       1       119
372
368 —■
statistical tables.
HH 49
Table No. 9—Showing the Occupations of those admitted from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949—Continued.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Occupation.
Male.
Female.
Total.
372
1
12
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
96
1   -
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
80
1
1
1
2
17
3
368
1
1
3
106
9
1
1
1
25
1
4
7
740
1
12
1
2
1
2
3
1
1
1
202
9
1
1
7
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
4
1
1
105
1
1
2
6
17
10
614              528
13      |      	
1                 3
1
6
1
1
1
2
1       [
1
1
21
2
1       i       	
10       |          5
1       1       	
2
2
1
2
■         2
1      j          3
1
8
1
1
2
1
5
7
1
2
1,142
13
4
Section foreman	
1
6
1
1
Shoemaker.	
4
1
2
Newspaperman	
Soldier	
1
1
1
21
2
1
15
1
2
Tailor	
Tallyman	
2
Postmaster	
1
2
2
4
Trader	
1
8
1
1
2
1
5
7
1
Welder	
2
School-teacher	
691               569
1,260
Carried forward	
614
528
1,142
Table No. 10.—Showing the Ages of those admitted from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Age.
Male.
Female.
Total.
33
32
58
60
61
49
55
61
36
43
48
48
44
31
32
30
19
34
58
59
56
49
33
37
36
43
31
25
30
29
63
„     20    „          	
51
„     25    „    	
92
30                                                           	
118
„      35    	
120
„      40    „	
105
„     45    „	
104
„     50    „    	
94
„     55    ,  ...
73
„     60    „    	
79
„     65    „    	
91
„     70    „    	
79
„     75    ,	
69
„     80    „     '.	
61
Over    80    ,	
61
Totals	
691
569
1,260 HH 50
MENTAL  HOSPITALS  REPORT,  1948-49.
Table No. 11.—Showing the Number of Attacks in those admitted from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Number of Attacks.
Male.
Female.
Total.
First	
345
89
24
12
2
2
36
64
117
311
96
34
8
5
2
1
36
17
59
656
185
Third                                                   	
58
Fourth                       	
20
Fifth	
7
Sixth                      	
2
3
72
81
176
Totals	
691
569
1,260
Table No. 12.—Showing the Alleged Duration of Attack prior to Admission from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Duration of Attack.
Male.
Female.
Total.
45
173
31
36
24
56
9
5
4
1
67
183
57
43
161
40
36
28
55
16
8
1
1
15
117
48
88
334
6      „     	
71
„    12     ,                       	
72
52
5     „    	
111
„    10     ,             	
25
„    15     „    	
13
5
2
82
300
Life	
105
Totals	
691
569
1,260
Table No. 13.—Showing Statistics on Heredity in those admitted from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Heredity.
Male.
Female.
Total.
1
7
682
1
5
563
1
1
12
1,245
2
Totals	
691
569
1,260 statistical tables.
HH 51
Table No. 14.—Showing the Alleged Cause of Attack in those admitted from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Alleged Cause.
Male.
Female.
Total.
80
1
53
*
4
46
347
3
14
7
1
1
2
19
1
1
5
1
1
1
94
4
1
4
18
3
1
1
23
2
1
3
37
361
1
6
5
1
2
1
4
1
1
88
1
1
4
1
76
2
1
T
83
707
1
9
21
12
1
1
1
4
1
23
1
2
5
1
Post-encephalitic Parkinsonism	
2
1
183
4
2
5
Totals              	
691
569
1,260
Table No. 15.—Showing the State of Bodily Health in those admitted from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Bodily Condition.
Male.
Female.
Total.
321
328
42
246
288
35
567
616
77
691
569
1,260 HH 52
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Table No. 16.—Showing the Form of Mental Disorder in those admitted from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Form of Disorder.
Male.
Female.
Total.
52
3
16
16
42
21
22
9
13
11
16
5
15
2
10
1
221
98
34
2
3
2
3
40
1
2
31
24
3
6
4
31
22
59
14
11
3
12
30
6
7
8
1
202
87
8
4
2
1
1
6
2
1
1
1
12
76
6
22
20
73
43
81
23
24
23
46
11
22
2
18
1
1
423
185
Toxic psychosis—
42
6
5
Pseudotaboparesis	
1
1
2
3
Without psychosis—
46
2
1
2
3
43
691
569
Table No. 17.—Showing the Number allowed out on Probation and Kesults from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Results.
Male.
Female.
Total.
64
182
215
1
61
35
109
73
163
188
1
17
57
119
137
345
403
9
92
228
Totals            	
667
618 STATISTICAL tables.
HH 53
Table No. 18.—Showing the Alleged Duration of Insanity prior to Admission
in those discharged from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Alleged Duration.
Male.
Female.
Total.
52
73
29
21
37
19
23
17
46
61
1
144
43
59
35
24
27
47
12
15
55
20
1
104
95
132
64
„    3      „                                         	
45
„    6      „      	
64
„  12      „      	
66
„    3     ,	
32
101
81
2
248
Totals	
523
442
965
Table No. 19.—Showing the Length of Residence of those discharged from
April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949.
Length of Residence.
Discharged
recovered.
Discharged
improved.
Discharged
unimproved.
Without
Psychosis.
Male.     : Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
Male.
Female.
17                6
10
11
20
67
47
15
3
2
2
5
8
20
17
53
42
10
4
3
1
5
95
4
5  .
12
14
5
4
7
1
68
65
13
6
19
19
9
7
2
2
46
44
5
6
3
3
1
5
,,      2 months	
„      3       „     	
11
11
13
7
4
1
19
13
21
12
2
7
1
6       „     	
3
„    12       „     	
1
3    „    	
„     4    „    .:	
1
5    „    	
Totals	
64               73
182
163
215
188
62
18 HH 54
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich.
Time in Hospital.
Certified Cause.
Sex.
Age.
Years.
Months.
Days.
F.
69
3
10
1
Bronchopneumonia.
f.
64
6
10
12
Lobar pneumonia.
F.
74
2
6
25
Coronary thrombosis ; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
M.
55
27
11
26
Coronary thrombosis ; pulmonary tuberculosis.
F.
64
7
14
Coronary thrombosis ; hypertension ; arteriosclerosis.
M.
63
24
7
Bronchopneumonia due to chronic pyelonephritis.
F.
80
31
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
18
21
Spastic paraplegia.
M.
41
5
2
13
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
77
5
6
10
Coronary thrombosis due to coronary sclerosis.
F.
41
4
6
19
Tuberculosis pneumonia ; bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
53
7
Bronchopneumonia; ulcerative colitis.
F.
83
26
Coronary thrombosis.
F.
55
19
Bronchopneumonia ; adenoma of the thyroid.
M.
90
3
6
30
Senility with dementia.
F.
29
17
Pulmonary tuberculosis—bilateral for advanced.
M.
50
14
4
22
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
65
9
8
10
Lobar pneumonia.
F.
64
9
4
3
Chronic myocarditis ; coronary sclerosis.
F.
28
4
8
27
Diphtheria; rheumatic endocarditis.
F.
67
1
Bronchopneumonia ; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
M.
42
11
9
9
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
69
6
11
30
Pulmonary tuberculosis ; tuberculosis enteritis.
M.
40
4
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
71
1
12
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
58
1
Chronic glomerulonephritis ; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
M.
70
1
10
21
Coronary thrombosis due to arteriosclerosis.
F.
35
20
Terminal bronchopneumonia.
F.
78
1
4
Senility with dementia ; hypertension ; arteriosclerosis.
F.
68
7
9
8
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
61
6
5
16
Exhaustion of general paresis ; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
M.
58
2
16
Peritonitis ; volvulus of the sigmoid with gangrene and perforation.
F.
68
21
Right lobar pneumonia.
M.
69
2
29
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
60
2
19
Extradural abscess due to frontal sinusitis ; terminal bronchopneumonia.
M.
36
14
2
Idiopathic epilepsy.
F.
35
4
6
26
Tuberculosis peritonitis ; bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
F.
83
2
25
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
68
13
3
10
Senility with dementia.
F.
43
2
3
Disseminated sclerosis.
M.
78
13
5
4
Terminal pneumonia due to chronic myocarditis.
M.
71
6
1
18
Senility with dimentia.
F.
28
11
1
2
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
44
7
9
2
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
33
4
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
62
1
16
Gastric haemorrhage.
M.
65
5
Subdural haemorrhage ; acute appendicitis.
F.
62
8
6
18
Bronchopneumonia; angio-edothelial sarcoma.
M.
52
2
5
Shock due to ha.morrhage due to bilateral amputation of both legs.
F.
80
22
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
64
26
10
17
Perforated gastric ulcer.
F.
68
2
25
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
54
14
3
28
Bronchial pneumonia.
M.
63
2
22
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
64
5
6
30
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
64
17
7
15
Coronary thrombosis.
F.
25
1
Cardiac collapse and respiratory failure due to insulin shock treatment
and schizophrenia.
M.
78
29
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
63
29
2
22
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
80
8
8
3
Senility with dementia.
M.
67
2
22
Cerebral haemorrhage. STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 55
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Sex.
Time
in Hospital.
Certified Cause.
Age.
Years.
Months.
Days.
M.
88
2
16
Pulmonary tuberculosis.
F.
88
5
17
Exhaustion of senile dementia; hypertensive cardiovascular disease;
generalized arteriosclerosis.
F.
65
2
7
B ron chop n eu mon ia.
M.
81
14
8
15
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
46
7
29
Strangulation by hanging.
M.
64
6
15
Chronic myocarditis.
F.
75
7
Bilateral bronchopneumonia.
M.
56
16
3
14
General paresis.
F.
69
4
3
Tuberculosis of the adrenals ; miliary tuberculosis.
M.
89
2
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
60
1
4
31
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
55
19
10
29
Coronary occlusion ; coronary sclerosis.
M.
69
4
10
G
Gastric haemorrhage.
F.
50
12
9
Chronic myocarditis due to hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
F.
24
1
8
Tuberculosis peritonitis due to tuberculosis salpingitis due to tuberculosis of the bone (spine).
M.
49
28
4
6
Intestinal obstruction.
F.
62
1
4
8
Mitral stenosis (chronic rheumatic fever) and cerebral haemorrhage.
M.
79
10
3
8
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
35
3
17
Terminal pneumonia.
M.
72
10
15
Senility with dementia.
M.
46
1
26
Hypertensive cardiovascular disease (malignant hypertension).
M.
51
21
11
30
Chronic myocarditis.
F.
71
1
15
Coronary thrombosis.
M.
27
1
8
16
Status epilepticus.
F.
62
8
8
Osteitis deformans ; cerebral atrophy.
M.
61
19
6
20
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
43
4
5
25
Chronic myocarditis ; pleurisy with effusion.
M.
76
3
Chronic myocarditis.
F.
56
4
Toxic psychosis (alcohol) ; diabetes mellitus ; carbuncles.
M.
59
3
20
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
64
22
9
12
Right lower lobar pneumonia.
M.
68
16
11
5
Coronary thrombosis ; myocardial infarction.
M.
35
1
11
28
Disseminated sclerosis.
M.
64
2
8
Generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
74
2
2
23
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
60
16
9
11
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
78
3
17
Senility with dementia.
M.
68
27
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
51
3
25
Pulmonary embolism; lymphosarcoma.
M.
68
5
22
Chronic myocarditis.
F.
62
3
4
Chronic myocarditis ; coronary sclerosis ; fibrosis uteri.
M.
67
5
10
7
General paresis.
F.
48
10
4
10
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
68
1
4
17
Bronchopneumonia; chronic myocarditis.
M.
59
1
2
26
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
64
9
10
Uremia; chronic glomerulonephritis; hypertensive cardiovascular
disease.
M.
62
14
Chronic nephritis ; hypertension and generalized arteriosclerosis.
M.
54
3
9
Aortites with insufficiency (syphilis).
M.
28
5
5
28
Bilateral bronchopneumonia ; bilateral pyelonephritis.
M.
66
9
5
Terminal pneumonia due to cardiovascular syphilis with cardiac
decompensation; chronic nephritis.
M.
57
10
3
30
HEemopericardium due to myocardial infarction due to coronary
thrombosis.
F.
71
4
11
25
Coronary occlusion.
F.
64
5
27
Chronic myocarditis ; hypertensive and arteriosclerotic cardiovascular
disease.
M.
77
26
11
19
Terminal pneumonia ; chronic myocarditis.
F.
63
4
6
Exhaustion and pre-senile dementia ; cerebral arteriosclerosis.
M.
50
2
13
Cerebral haemorrhage due to hypertension and arteriosclerosis. HH 56
IENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Time in Hospital.
Certified Cause.
Sex.
Age.
Years.
Months.
Days.
F.
56
8
30
Lobar pneumonia (right) ; uremia.
F.
54
11
6
5
Carcinomatosis.
M.
50
8
6
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
48
14
Coronary occlusion due to myocardial infarction due to hypertension ;
bronchopneumonia.
M.
28
1
4
15
Epilepsy.
M.
64
14
5
20
Carcinoma of the stomach.
M.
66
1
9
Chronic myocarditis.
F.
59
1
4
29
Coronary occlusion ; cerebral arteriosclerosis.
M.
59
8
5
7
Cerebral haemorrhage.
M.
62
28
Cerebral haemorrhage.
M.
34
5
2
29
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
47
4
7
4
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
F.
21
3
7
15
Uremia ; acute glomerulonephritis.
F.
53
19
5
6
Far advanced bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis; rheumatic endocarditis.
F.
68
28
24
Coronary occlusion ; adenoma of sigmoid colon with intussusception.
M.
59
8
Cerebral haemorrhage ; acute mania.
M.
68
2
16
Bronchopneumonia.
F.
66
3
28
Pulmonary oedema ; bronchopneumonia.
F.
58
1
19
Pulmonary infarct due to pulmonary embolus; amyloidosis, chr.
rheumatoid arthritis.
F.
54
8
11
31
Far advanced bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
82
15
11
6
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
68
8
28
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
58
2
1
27
Pleurisy with effusion.
M.
61
8
1
10
Intestinal obstruction ; tubercular cervical adenitis.
F.
66
10
7
6
Carcinoma of breast (right) ; cardiac decompensation.
M.
57
12
3
9
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
24
3
4
2
Bronchopneumonia ; pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
68
1
10
18
Cerebral embolism and thrombosis.
F.
56
2
Inanition toxemia ; pulmonary tuberculosis.
F.
62
13
Bronchopneumonia : cardiac decompensation ; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease; carcinoma of the cervix with metastasis of right
lung and liver.
F.
81
4
21
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
67
10
2
24
Myocardial infarction.
M.
72
4
9
16
Senility with dementia.
F.
55
1
1
4
Interpeduncular brain tumour.
F.
61
2
19
Chronic myocarditis ; coronary thrombosis.
F.
88
10
26
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
16
2
8
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
48
7
22
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
F.
69
30
Carcinomatosis—intra-abdominal, possibly liver or ovary, primary not
identified.
M.
48
13
5
15
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
F.
71
6
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
62
1
1
21
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
73
3
1
25
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
63
3
10
3
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
61
4
4
7
General paresis.
M.
75
4
31
Cerebral haemorrhage.
F.
43
3
3
22
Bronchopneumonia ; cardiac decompensation ; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease; chronic glomerulonephritis.
M.
56
7
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
65
19
7
10
Chronic myocarditis.
M.
66
9
5
Terminal pneumonia.
F-
20
11
1
15
Haemorrhagic oedema of lungs due to influenza.
F.
71
20
Bronchopneumonia ; cardiac decompensation ; chronic glomerulonephritis.
F.
62
1
1
22
Bronchopneumonia ; influenza ; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
F-
49
21
5
8
Acute coronary occlusion. STATISTICAL TABLES.
HH 57
Table No. 20.—Record of Deaths from April 1st, 1948, to March 31st, 1949,
Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich—Continued.
Time in Hospital.
Sex.
Age.
Certified Cause.
Years.
Months.
Days.
F.
60
6
9
Bronchopneumonia ; cystitis.
M.
61
1
10
24
Epilepsy due to past traumatic epilepsy ; chronic myocarditis.
F.
64
2
10
Bronchopneumonia; cerebral arteriosclerosis.
M.
70
1
10
6
Senility with dementia.
M.
60
8
8
16
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
70
1
6
24
Carcinoma of the tongue; metastasis to cervical lymph nodes and
both lungs.
M.
52
10
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
60
8
2
23
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
65
3
1
28
Lobar pneumonia.
M.
63
6
24
Bronchopneumonia.
M.
25
13
11
20
Bilateral pulmonary tuberculosis.
F.
64
11
8
2
Cerebral vascular accident; hypertensive cardiovascular disease.
F.
60
29
3
Coronary occlusion ; arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease.
M.
87
7
8
25
Terminal bronchopneumonia.
F.
80
5
Acute dilatation of stomach ; senile delirium.
M.
69
2
26
Chronic myocarditis with myocardial degeneration (non-rheumatic).
F.
51
12
Chronic myocarditis and myocardial degeneration due to thyrotoxicosis ; chronic gastric ulcers ; chronic pancreatitis.
M.
66
25
4
8
Cerebral haemorrhage.
M.
49
9
11
16
Tuberculosis of the lungs.
M.
65
18
8
Myocardial degeneration.
M.
64
32
8
8
Coronary thrombosis.
M.
63
24
10
15
Arteriosclerosis.
M.
43
12
4
4
Carcinoma of stomach.
M.
76
23
6
19
Exhaustion of senile dementia.
M.
61
36
20
Myocardial degeneration.
M.
5
'    3
2
17
Toxic anaemia and purpura.
F.
16
2
3
8
Haemorrhage in cerebellar tumour.
F.
39
2
8
11
Myocarditis.
M.
10
4
1
25
Exhaustion of status epilepticus.
M.
28
13
5
11
Acute pulmonary tuberculosis.
M.
21
9
2
15
Acute bronchopneumonia.
F.
5
2
27
Internal hydrocephalus.
F.
52
16
11
26
Bronchopneumonia. HH 58
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Occupational therapy display at Y.M.C.A., New Westminster.
First annual sports day drawing to a close. BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT. HH  59
PART II.—FINANCIAL.
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Provincial Mental Hospital, Essondale, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith for your consideration the financial report of the
Provincial Mental Hospitals of British Columbia for the year ended March 31st, 1949,
which includes various tables and reports.
The daily average population for the three hospitals at Essondale, New Westminster, and Saanich increased by 120—from 4,194 to 4,314—the full increase being
absorbed by the Essondale hospital.
Gross operating costs rose from $3,583,480.50 to $4,319,706.15, an increase of
$736,225.65. This brought our gross per capita cost per day to $2.74, as against $2.33
in the preceding year. The headings under which the heaviest increases occurred were
" Nursing and Ward Service," " Dietary," and " Cost-of-living Bonus." " Nursing and
Ward Service " includes salaries of all nursing staff, both male and female, as well as
clothing, boots and slippers, bedding, hardware and crockery, towels, linen, and sundry
furnishings. " Dietary " covers all foods and salaries of dietitians, cooks, bakers, and
other kitchen staff.
A decrease in expenditure under the heading of " Light, Heat, Water, and Power "
will be noted, as against the year 1947-48. This was due to the transfer of the engineers and other boiler-house staff to the Department of Public Works, and a corresponding increase in the expenditure under the headings of " Buildings, grounds, and general
maintenance " will be noted.
Revenue remitted to the Treasury Department covering maintenance collections
rose from $350,995.41 to $477,680.57.
Purchases from Colony Farm of milk, cream, meats, vegetables, fruit, etc., for the
Essondale and New Westminster hospitals amounted to $246,817.49. This was about
$10,000 less than the previous year but would have been possibly $40,000 more but for
the disastrous floods of May and June, 1948, in which the farm lost its potato, carrot,
beet, onion, and other farm crops.
It had been planned to put the female nursing staff on the eight-hour day, forty-
four-hour week during the year, but shortage of accommodation and inability to recruit
the necessary nurses prevented this from being done.
Buildings, grounds, plant and equipment, and furnishings have been maintained in
a good state of repair and some replacements made where essential.
Plans are being prepared for a new store and laundry building as both services
find their present quarters inadequate. It is planned to service both the Provincial
Mental Hospitals at Essondale and New Westminster as well as the Home for the Aged,
Port Coquitlam, with these facilities when they are completed. Also under consideration is an auditorium and recreation centre, an infectious unit, and additional accommodation for nurses, as well as four 100-bed units at New Westminster.
In closing I would like to express my appreciation of the many courtesies shown
and the close co-operation that has been maintained between the various departments
of the hospital, the Government, and the staff at all times.
All of which is respectfully submitted.
F. A. Matheson,
Business Manager. HH  60 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
PSYCHOPATHIC DEPARTMENT.
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1949.
Salaries   $47,968.81
Office supplies   798.49
Telephone and telegraphs  615.27
Travelling expenses      6,173.34
Fuel    750.98
Water  48.70
Light and power  209.14
Incidental expenses  _'_  3,843.47
Cost-of-living bonus   7,084.22
$67,492.42
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population:  Essondale, 78 per cent.;  New Westminster,
15 per cent.; and Saanich, 7 per cent.
HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT.
Expense Statement, March 31st, 1949.
Salaries   $40,961.05
Office supplies  1       2,551.05
Travelling expenses   831.51
Incidental expenses   149.47
Cost-of-living bonus        6,321.18
$50,814.26
Note.—The above expenses absorbed into the New Westminster, Essondale, and
Saanich statements on basis of population:   Essondale, 78 per cent.; New Westminster,
15 per cent.;  and Saanich, 7 per cent. financial tables.
HH 61
FINANCIAL TABLES.
Table A.—Showing the Average Number of Patients in Residence each Year,
the Total Amounts spent for Maintenance, and Gross per Capita Cost.
(For Past Ten Years.)
Year.
Average
Number in
Residence.
Maintenance
Per Capita
Expenditure.
Cost.
3263,036.99
$436.19
1,044,253.55
373.38
115,171.63
424.43
269,354.39
440.71
1,114,944.32
386.46
114,496.86
408.99
265,107.15
436.46
1,080,329.80
362.93
134,961.02
471.23
286,077.54
472.72
1,167,787.55
380.59
146,898.22
517.14
306,150.79
509.28
1,317,789.96
432.38
163,226.64
583.77
373,672.82
616.37
1,558,923.64
507.32
207,979.27
748.48
433,041.89
709.49
1,769,363.15
559.29
210,798.32
743.11
497,945.37
795.07
2,117,563.62
658.24
231,894.65
809.46
662,357.80
1,054.70
2,622,349.15
800.62
298,773.55
1,029.16
800,776.92
1,267.55
3,162,819.02
931.86
356,110.21
1,237.52
1939-40, New Westminster..
1939-40, Essondale	
1939-40, Saanich	
1940-41, New Westminster..
1940-41, Essondale	
1940-41, Saanich	
1941-42, New Westminster..
1941-42, Essondale	
1941-42, Saanich	
1942-43, New Westminster*.
1942-43, Essondale	
1942-43, Saanich	
1943-44, New Westminster..
1943-44, Essondale	
1943-44, Saanich	
1944-45, New Westminster..
1944-45, Essondale	
1944-45, Saanich	
1945-46, New Westminster..
1945-46, Essondale	
1945-46, Saanich	
1946-47, New Westminster...
1946-47, Essondale	
1946-47, Saanich	
1947-48, New Westminster...
1947-48, Essondale	
1947-48, Saanich	
1948-49, New Westminster...
1948-49, Essondale	
1948-49, Saanich	
$603.03
2,796.69
271.35
611.17
2,884.96
279.95
607.40
2,976.62
286.40
605.17
3,042.06
284.06
601.15
3,047.75
279.61
606.25
3,072.84
277.87
610.36
3,163.61
283.67
626.29
3,217.03
286.48
628.00
3,275.41
290.31
631.75
3,394.08
287.76
I
* Maintenance expenditure includes cost-of-living bonus paid employees,
years' reports.
This is also included in all subsequent HH 62
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
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Table C.—Summary Statement showing the Gross and Net per Capita Cost
of Patients in the Three Institutions.
Gross operating costs—
New Westminster    $800,776.92
Essondale   3,162,819.02
Saanich      356,110.21
Gross cost for the three institutions  $4,319,706.15
Less collections remitted to Treasury        477,680.57
Net cost for the three institutions  $3,842,025.58
Daily average population for the three institutions     4,313.59
Gross per capita cost, one year  $1,001.42
Gross per capita cost, one day  $2.74
Net per capita cost, one year      $890.68
Net per capita cost, one day  $2.44 financial tables.
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mental hospitals report, 1948-49.
Remarks.
New
Westminster.
Essondale.
Saanich.
Total patients in residence, March 31st. 1949
Daily average population for one year	
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one year.
Gross maintenance per capita cost, one day...
633
631.75
$1,267.55
$3.47
3,432
3,394.08
$931.86
$2.55
290
287.76
$1,237.52
$3.39
REVENUE OF MENTAL HOSPITALS FOR PAST TEN YEARS.
1939^0  $245,837.55 1944-45  $317,735.15
1940^1     229,045.45 1945-46  350,163.87
1941-42     238,532.90 1946-47  339,561.71
1942-43     261,986.32 1947-48  350,995.41
1943-44     322,522.87
1948-49     477,680.57 COLONY FARM. HH 69
PART III.—COLONY FARM.
BUSINESS MANAGER'S REPORT ON COLONY FARM.
A. L. Crease, Esq., M.D., CM.,
Director of Mental Hygiene and Psychiatry,
Essondale, B.C
Sir,—Herewith please find profit and loss and various other financial statements
and reports covering operations of Colony Farm for the year ended March 31st, 1949.
The disastrous floods of May and June, 1948, wiped out most of the farm's crops
such as potatoes, carrots, beets, onions, hay, ensilage, and pasture, and resulted in the
Field Crops and Pasturage Department showing a loss of $15,382.47, as against a profit
of $38,369.96 for the year 1947-48. The loss of pasture also affected milk production
and necessitated the purchase of substitute feed for stock. Further additional expenditures were necessary to recultivate and reseed the flooded land. The over-all result of
this is shown in the Profit and Loss Account where a loss of $27,918.19 on the year's
operations is shown, whereas a profit of $59,842.54 was recorded for the year 1947-48.
The Dairy and Herds Department showed a profit of $21,706.60 despite loss of
pasture and feeding and housing problems. Other departments showing profits were:
Hogs, Cannery, and the Orchard and Truck-garden. The orchard and most of the
truck-garden crops were on higher ground and were unaffected by the high water.
Most of the farm's produce was received by the Essondale and New Westminster
hospitals, whose purchases totalled $226,581.77 and $20,235.72 respectively. Lesser
amounts were received by the Boys' Industrial School, Home for the Aged, Colquitz
Mental Home, and Tranquille Sanatorium.
In reviewing the work of the year, I would be remiss in my duty if I failed to
express my appreciation to P. H. Moore, Superintendent of Farms; J. A. Hay and the
farm staff; to H. Lonsdale, Superintendent of Works; S. M. Schofield, Resident
Engineer; and, indeed, the full staff and patients of the Essondale hospital; also the
staff and boys of the Industrial School and many others who so willingly helped during
the flood period. It was only by their day and night efforts that complete flooding of
the Colony Farm was avoided.
In spite of these efforts it was necessary to transfer the 240 patients from the
Farm Cottage and Annex buildings to the hospital proper. It was not, however,
necessary to move any of the live stock. Fortunately, there was no damage to any
of the buildings or equipment on the farm. As a result of this flood extensive work
has been done on the dykes, and it is hoped that a recurrence will not be possible.
Yours truly,
F. A. Matheson,
Business Manager. HH 70
MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
Break in west dyke, Colony Farm, Essondale.
Working on dyke at Colony Farm, Essondale. "■-.-■V '  ■: -.■-. .'■".-"" ■■:■ -'■
colony farm.
Profit and Loss Account, Year ended March 31st, 1949.
HH 71
Department.
Debits.
Credits.
Loss.
Gain.
$125,930.35
75.00
9,042.61
72,868.38
46,842.25
30,093.40
14,434.77
5,507.89
53,026.25
24,912.27
16,536.88
$147,636.95
100.00
9,114.00
92,993.03
54,799.85
36,567.37
14,525.00
5,575.00
510.86
9,529.80
$21,706.60
25.00
71.39
20,124.65
7,957.60
6,473.97
90.23
67.11
$52,515.39
15,382.47
16,536.88
Totals                           	
$399,270.05
$371,351.86    |      $84,434.74
j        56,516.55
$56,516.55
$27,918.19
* Field crops and pasturage suffered heavy loss from flood-water.
DAIRY AND HERDS DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1949.
Receipts.
By sales—
Live animals
$26,699.23
Beef supplied to institutions  1,225.57
Dairy produce  110,032.15
By credit for manure  3,300.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1949  98,384.00
$239,640.95
Expenses.
Salaries and upkeep  $43,959.73
Feed   79,245.62
Horse-labour  500.00
Trucking   1,000.00
Tractor-work   1,225.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1948  92,004.00
Profit for year..
217,934.35
$21,706.60 HH  72 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
WORK-HORSE DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1949.
Receipts.
1 horse sold  $50.00
Horse-labour charged to crops, etc  9,014.00
Credit for manure  100.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1949  1,150.00
  $10,314.00
Expenses.
Salaries and upkeep  $6,962.21
Feed and pasturage     2,105.40
Inventory, March 31st, 1948     1,175.00
     10,242.61
Profit for year  $71.39
HOG DEPARTMENT.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1949.
Receipts.
By sales—
Live hogs     $2,564.88
Pork supplied Essondale Hospital     65,330.13
Pork supplied New Westminster Hospital       5,668.72
Pork supplied Tranquille Sanatorium      1,401.30
  $74,965.03
By credit for manure  600.00
Inventory, March 31st, 1949     17,428.00
$92,993.03
Expenses.
Salaries and upkeep  $7,022.41
Feed  37,608.47
Light and power  800.00
Fuel  100.00
Horse-labour  1,000.00
Truck  1,750.00
Tractor     1,050.00
$49,330.88
Inventory, March 31st, 1948     23,537.50
     72,868.38
$20,124.65 COLONY FARM. HH 73
CANNERY.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1949.
Receipts.
Supplies to—
Mental Hospital, Essondale  $43,017.20
Mental Hospital, New Westminster       8,558.65
Mental Home, Colquitz      2,355.25
Tranquille Sanatorium         823.75
School for the Deaf and the Blind  45.00
  $54,799.85
Expenses.
Salaries _  $4,860.00
Repairs .  334.58
Fruit and vegetables  21,553.33
Sugar, spice, etc   7,721.67
Cans, crates, and containers  8,472.67
Fuel   1,200.00
Water  .  500.00
Light and power  900.00
Tractor-hauling  350.00
Truck-hauling   950.00
46,842.25
$7,957.60
ORCHARD AND TRUCK-GARDEN.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1949.
Receipts.
Produce supplied to—
Mental Hospital, Essondale   $21,836.90
Mental Hospital, New Westminster         640.89
Boys' Industrial School  410.08
Colony Farm cannery        1,168.90
$24,056.77
Inventory, March 31st, 1949  .     12,510.60
Expenses.
Salaries, seeds, etc.  ,  $6,158.80
Fertilizer, spray, and manure   1,500.00
Horse-labour   1,386.00
Tractor-work ___, '_  3,150.00
Trucking   125.00
Fuel   50.00
$36,567.37
$12,369.80
Inventory, March 31st, 1948       17,723.60
30,093.40
Profit for year     $6,473.97 HH 74 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
FIELD CROPS AND PASTURAGE.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1949.
Yield Yield
Crop.                                                                      Acreage.           (Tons).        per Acre. Value.
Potatoes      68.75          53.00 $2,681.00
Oats      34.75                     	
Hay      99.50          12.00           240.00
Ensilage     73.00        255.00           1,147.50
Onions        4.00            1.98           224.30
Mangels        5.00          75.00        15.00 525.00
Turnips         4.00          64.72        16.18 3,612.00
Pasturage and green feed   164.00                     1,100.00
$9,529.80
Costs.
Horse-labour   $2,436.00
Tractor-work   7,353.50
Trucking   1,000.00
Manure   2,500.00
Fertilizer and spray   2,269.73
Seed and sets   8,041.41
Supervision    1,290.00
Sundry expenses   21.63
 ■    24,912.27
Loss   $15,382.47
Note.—Crops were either wholly or partially destroyed by flood-water of May and
June, 1948.
TRACTORS.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1949.
8,300 hours' work at $1.75  $14,525.00
Expenses.
Salaries and upkeep  $13,161.95
Gasoline :       1,272.82
     14,434.77
Profit   $90.23
TRUCKS.
2,230 hours' work at $2.50     $5,575.00
Expenses.
Salaries and upkeep     $4,981.92
Gasoline and oil         525.97
       5,507.89
Profit          $67.11 COLONY FARM. HH 75
GENERAL EXPENSES OF MAINTENANCE AND ADMINISTRATION.
Profit and Loss Account, March 31st, 1949.
Salaries and miscellaneous expenses  $28,195.77
Horse-labour   500.00
Trucking   750.00
Tractor-work        1,050.00
Gasoline and oil         412.25
Sundry   196.50
■  $31,104.52
Proportion, Headquarters expense     $2,100.00
Repairs through Public Works Department     15,186.96
Loss on inventory of equipment      4,141.77
     21,428.73
$52,533.25
Less sundry credits  17.86
$52,515.39 HH  76 MENTAL HOSPITALS REPORT, 1948-49.
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.
Mental Hospital, Essondale—Produce supplied by Colony Farm
for Year ended March 31st, 1949.
Dairy produce—
Milk, 1,217,340 lb  $62,571.19
Cream, 903.5 quarts :_____ 768.01
Table cream, 7,853.4 gallons     16,897.13
Meats—
Beef, 916 1b  $164.88
Veal, 2,972 lb  1,026.20
Hearts, .livers, etc., 118.75 lb  34.49
Fresh pork, 209,043 lb  64,668.53
Pork plucks, 3,308 lb  661.60
$80,236.33
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh   $33,188.54
Canned      43,017.20
66,555.70
76,205.74
Sundries—Horse-labour          3,584.00
$226,581.77
Mental Hospital, New Westminster—Produce supplied by Colony Farm
for Year ended March 31st, 1949.
Dairy produce—
Milk, 47,450 lb     $2,479.62
Cream, 284 quarts  241.44
Table cream, 1,092 gallons       2,348.40
Meats—
Fresh pork, 18,110 lb     $5,602.23
Pork plucks, 332% lb  66.49
$5,069.46
5,668.72
Fruits and vegetables—
Fresh         $938.89
Canned        8,558.65
■         9,497.54
$20,235.72
Accounts Receivable, March 31st, 1949.
Sundry amounts due from live stock, etc., sold  $515.72
Remittances to Treasury.
Sundry remittances to Treasury during year 1948-49 in payment of live
stock and produce  $375,239.67 colony farm.
HH 77
MISCELLANEOUS STATEMENTS, INVENTORIES, ETC.—Continued.
Summary of Equipment Inventories, March 31st, 1949.
Equipment in dairy	
Equipment in cannery	
Horse and cattle barns and piggery__.
Farm implements	
Pumping-stations and land-clearing..
Butcher-shop 	
Carpe*nter-shop 	
Blacksmith-shop 	
$4,276.50
4,542.50
3,475.50
24,501.80
2,188.00
49.00
1,223.75
689.50
$40,946.55
Orchard and Truck-gardens.
Apiary supplies	
Plum-trees  r
Prune-trees	
Pear-trees 	
Apple-trees 	
Cherry-trees 	
Raspberry-canes 	
Rhubarb-clumps 	
Strawberry-plants _
Vegetables on hand—
$152.60
1,806.00
1,950.00
1,523.00
628.00
371.00
1,600.00
3,300.00
100.00
1,080.00
$12,510.60
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
.1950.
520-150-6062   

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