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Railway Department PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ANNUAL REPORT Year ended December 31st 1949 British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1950

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 Railway Department
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
ANNUAL REPORT
Year ended December 31st
1949
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
I'rinl.d liy Don McDiarmid, Printer to tlie King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1950.  To His Honour Charles Arthur Banks,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I have the honour to present herewith the Annual Report of the operations and
activities of the Railway Department for the year ended December 31st, 1949, with
Appendices.
L. H. EYRES,
Minister of Railways.
Victoria, B.C., February 21st, 1950. Victoria, B.C., December 31st, 1949.
The Honourable L. H. Eyres,
Minister of Raihvays, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I beg to submit herewith the Thirty-second Annual Report of the Railway
Department, covering the year 1949, together with Appendices.
Your obedient servant,
V
R. E. SWANSON,
Chief Inspector. Report of the Railway Department.
The Department has supervision of all railways subject to the Provincial Statutes.
The staff of the Department, as of December 31st, 1949, consisted of Chief Inspector, three Inspectors, two draughtsmen, a secretarial stenographer—grade 2, and a
senior clerk-stenographer.
The railways supervised by the Department include common carriers, industrial
railways, and electric interurban and street-railways.
The Civil Engineering Branch continued in charge of the records of the Department, and co-operated with the Construction Department of the Pacific Great Eastern
Railway Company in assisting in right-of-way, land, and other matters.
During 1949 the Mechanical Branch inspected all industrial railways, including
logging and mining railways, in British Columbia. This comprised the inspection of
all rolling-stock, motive power, road-bed, bridges, and structures. The inspection also
covered operation of railway and dispatch systems. A follow-up inspection system was
put into effect during the year, so that where an Inspector made recommendations, the
same Inspector made a subsequent inspection to see that the work recommended had
been carried out.
Due to progress and improvements in motive power, it was found necessary from
time to time to adjust regulations to new requirements.
Current duties, such as approval of location and construction plans, sanction and
filing of tariffs and operating conditions, have been attended to. Other activities are
described in the several sections of this Report.
COMMON CARRIERS.
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
In addition to its functions of inspection, regulation, supervision, and other safeguarding agencies, the Railway Department continued in a consultant capacity for the
benefit of the existing railway. The Department attends to such matters as right-of-
way, agreements, contracts, improvements, replacements, and unusual undertakings.
The surveys, plans, and economic studies made in 1948 have been applied to actual
reconstruction work outlined in the accompanying report of work done in 1949. Work
to be done in 1950 is prescribed under a programme referred to in the Inspecting
Engineer's report.
The field surveys, examinations, tests, research work, and intensive studies pertaining to Northern and Central British Columbia have proved essential. Ensuing
reports deal with such factors as potential resources, use of products and their markets,
transportation methods and routes, settlement and industrial opportunities. All this
data tend toward the development of British Columbia and increase the utility and
value of its Provincially owned railway.
Pursuant to the northern railway-extension surveys under the auspices of the
Railway Department, and mentioned in its 1947 and 1948 Annual Reports, a Pacific
Great Eastern Railway Construction Department was organized early in 1949. Senior
engineers and competent personnel were selected from the Department to form the
nucleus of this new Construction Department, which is now in responsible charge of
proposed and actual work north of Quesnel and south of Squamish.
On the 82 miles from Quesnel to Prince George, the line was rerun or revised, and
contracts awarded on the first 30 miles and last 17 miles. Considering the abnormally
wet weather and mud conditions, fair progress was made on clearing and grading, and JJ  6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
2.8 miles of main line and side-tracks opened for freight traffic. This new trackage
now serves material-yards and new industries in North Quesnel. Revised location
surveys are now being made to eliminate high expensive trestles, avoid unstable ground,
and safeguard the railway line from such hazards as landslides and stream erosions.
Operation—General Manager's Report.
■ The following remarks by the general manager are incorporated in this report:-—
Maintenance of Way.—Our programme for the rehabilitation of the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway, commenced in 1947, was continued through the year 1949, and we
are able to report very decided progress in this regard.
By two large diversions at Mile 130 and Mile 131.6, it was possible to eliminate
two very heavy trestles which required renewal. Concrete walls were constructed and
five bridges eliminated along Seton Lake. These jobs, as well as the filling of other
smaller bridges, undertaken and completed during the year, will greatly reduce the
maintenance charges on the railway in the future.
Heavy tie renewal was continued throughout the year. Buildings were kept in
repair, and work done on the renewal of culverts, widening of cuts, strengthening of
tunnels, and other work necessary to the safety of the railway.
I look forward to completing this work to a very great extent by the end of the
year 1950. We will then reap the benefit financially of the work done in the last three
and one-half years and will have restored the line to a safe condition, overcoming the
nine-year period when the work was not kept up to date.
Maintenance of Equipment.—During the year the following equipment was purchased : Four diesel-electric locomotives, twelve second-hand gondola ballast-cars, forty
second-hand flat cars, a crane, a diesel unit passenger-car for Shalalth service, a new
snow-plough, and three cabooses. Our passenger-coaches are getting very old, but by
putting certain ones through the shop this year and renovating them, we will have
satisfactory equipment.
There is also on order, at the present time for 1950, two diesel locomotives, to be
delivered at the end of February, and we will have to purchase, for 1950, a ditcher.
The present machine is obsolete and worn out and will not pass the boiler test.
Operations.—We have, during the past year, shown a very decided improvement in
the amount of money spent for rental of equipment. This has been due to continually
checking cars and keeping them moving. We have also shown a substantial increase
in the amount of demurrage we have collected, which counterbalances the rental charges.
Savings have been effected in various ways that have reduced our expenses very
considerably, but, in spite of such reductions, we have not as yet offset the increase in
expenses caused by the increased wages granted to all railroad employees in December,
1948. The costs of labour and material have risen so greatly that without a substantial
increase in freight rates it would be impossible to overcome this. Every effort is being
made, and will continue to be made, to take advantage of reductions in all expenses
possible.
Our business during the year has shown an increase of approximately 5 per cent,
over the previous year. This is based on the earnings for the year. In the fall of 1948,
due to the conditions affecting hay and feed in the Cariboo, the ranges were depleted of
all cattle possible, which made a very heavy movement. On this account our movement
of cattle for 1949 was not as large as in the previous year. However, this makes for
a more healthy condition for the future.
Lumber shipments, which comprise our greatest volume of traffic, were slightly
higher than in 1948. This was better than expected, in view of the current lumber-
market situation.
Our passenger service continued at a high point, and, as a result of our advertising
campaign, we have had a large number of American tourists during the past summer RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1949. JJ  7
who will, I feel, be an advertising medium through which our passenger tourist business
will show a gradual increase each year.
Our greatest need is increased population to provide increased business, since, notwithstanding all the reductions which we have been able to effect, we will still require
increased traffic to meet our expenses in a satisfactory manner, and increased population will develop this traffic.
When the power from the Bridge River development of the British Columbia Electric Railway Company was turned on, it disrupted our telephone service. A new line
was constructed to Shalalth from Squamish at the major expense of the British Columbia Electric Railway, and we have had to rewire our line from Quesnel to Williams
Lake during the year. We will have to continue the new line from Williams Lake to
Lillooet this year as a safety measure in the operation of train orders which are taken
over the telephone-line. It is essential that we maintain a clear voice-channel to prevent
errors in train orders.
J. A. Kennedy,
General Manager.
Inspecting Engineer's Report.
Inspections of the properties of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway have been made
pursuant to the terms of the " Railway Act," with special regard to maintenance of way
and structures. Items enumerated in subsection (2) of section 177 of the Act were
inspected, except rolling-stock and floating equipment.
During inspection trips the Railway Department's Inspectors and the Railway
Company's maintenance-of-way officials conferred and made decisions which were afterward included in a joint report of work done in 1949 and to be done in 1950.
The above-mentioned 1950 programme of work comprises a separate report for the
information of the Railway Department, and the information of and action by the management of the Railway Company. Bridge replacements along Anderson and Seton
Lakes must be continued. Around Pavilion Mountain, bridges require careful maintenance, and plans should be made for certain replacements in 1951.
In addition to the regular-maintenance bridge repairs, four pile trestles were
rebuilt, decks were renewed on nine steel bridges and four pile trestles, four frame
trestles were replaced with concrete retaining-walls and embankments, three pile and
frame trestles have been filled, and alignment revisions eliminated high trestles at
Fountain and Fourteen Mile Creeks. Eighty feet of concrete footings were placed in
Soda Creek tunnel.
The 1949 work on buildings and other structures was accomplished according to
the report outlined by this Department. Water-supplies, stockyards, station and
terminal buildings were repaired or replaced, bringing these facilities to a fair physical
condition.
Two hundred thousand track-ties were renewed in 1949, and the track surface
improved to remove most of the temporary slow orders north of Lillooet. Improvements
such as slide-removals, riprapping, retaining-walls, and bridge fills are reducing the
hazards common to previous years. Communications were improved by rebuilding the
telephone-line from Squamish to Shalalth and from Williams Lake to Quesnel.
The Railway Company Construction Department awarded three contracts on the
Quesnel-Prince George extension, Miles 00 to 30 and Miles 65 to 82. Of this new work,
the Railway Department approved the operation of freight traffic on 1.85 main-line and
0.87 siding miles which now provide terminal facilities for material-yards and industrial sites in North Quesnel.
Subject to full precautionary measures, such as track patrols and inspections,
vigilant maintenance work, and careful operation of adequate rolling-stock, the track is JJ  8 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
now in good condition for the safe operation of traffic under present train loadings and
schedule running time.
To maintain this good condition, and to safeguard the employees and the public
using the railway, the improvement programme must be continued, with emphasis on
structures supporting the railway. The Maintenance-of-way Department must be given
adequate co-operation by other departments, and all ranks realize that safe track is of
paramount importance.
C. R. Crysdale,
Inspecting Engineer.
LOCOMOTIVE CRANES.
Inspections of boilers and safety appliances in shipyards and other industrial
plants are continued where cranes and other mobile plants operate on track.
FOREST FIRE PROTECTION.
Inspections for fire-prevention equipment were made on locomotives of all railways,
including those subject to the jurisdiction of the Board of Transport Commissioners for
Canada, this being a requirement of the Forest Service of the Department of Lands
and Forests.
EQUIPMENT INSPECTION BRANCH.
Chief Inspector's Report.
During the year all industrial railways operated to full capacity. The usual and
extensive heavy repairs necessary to keep motive power and rolling-stock on industrial
railways operating were carried on under the advice and supervision of the Department
Inspectors during the year. Several used locomotives and a considerable amount of
used railway equipment were imported by the industrial railways during the year.
This equipment was inspected prior to its importation by the Inspectors so that it could
be approved for operation in British Columbia. In certain cases approval could not be
granted, as some of the equipment did not come up to our standards. Such equipment
was not imported.
Through arrangements made with the Chief Inspector of Mines during 1948, our
Inspectors inspected trackage, locomotives, and cars on mining operations that would
otherwise not have come under the jurisdiction of this Department.
Nine air-locomotives of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company were inspected and
certified during 1949, copies of the reports being forwarded to the Department of
Mines. The steam-locomotives and equipment of this company were also inspected
during the year, as well as the steam and diesel locomotives of Morrissey, Fernie and
Michel Railway.    The trackage and bridges were also inspected.
The mine locomotives, rolling-stock, and trackage of the Britannia Mining and
Smelting Company, Limited, Britannia Beach, were inspected. Copies of these reports
were forwarded to the Department of Mines. The cable of the incline railway of this
company was inspected, and a special inspection was made when it was reported to this
office the cable had been kinked and was somewhat damaged. As passengers are hauled
on this railway, a careful check is being kept on the cable operating the incline railway.
During the year the surface haulage at the Sullivan mine of the Consolidated
Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, Kimberley, was reconstructed so
that there now exists a 2-mile surface haul from the mine to the tipple. New railway
was constructed and new locomotives and equipment purchased for this operation. This
railway and equipment were inspected, and a certificate issued for the operation of the
railway. Rules and regulations to govern this operation are being drafted by the
company under the advice of our Inspectors and Inspectors from the Department of
Mines. When these regulations are submitted to both Departments and approved, such
regulations will govern this operation. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT,  1949. JJ   9
Two inspections were made during the year of the narrow-gauge railway serving
the plant of the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, at
Trail. Several miles of narrow-gauge railway are in operation, and it is constructed in
some cases on quite a heavy grade. The locomotives and equipment were inspected,
and a training programme was set up by our Inspectors whereby the company trains
the operators so they may be certified by this Department. Rules and regulations are
being formulated by the company, and drafts have been submitted to this office. When
these rules and regulations have been approved, such rules and regulations will also
govern this operation, and the operators of the locomotives will be examined and
certified.
The narrow-gauge railway on James Island serving the Canadian Industries,
Limited, was inspected. Several small internal-combustion and electric locomotives
are in operation on this railway. Our Inspectors instructed the company as to safe
practices. It is considered that the certification of the operators will not be necessary.
This company has an excellent safety record. The incline railway and skip at James
Island were also inspected, as well as the standard-gauge track used in conjunction with
the barge-slip.
An inspection was made of the narrow-gauge railway in operation at the B.C.
Cement Company's plant on Texada Island. Several small internal-combustion locomotives, rolling-stock, and equipment were inspected. Arrangements are pending to
have the operators of the locomotives certified under the " Railway Act."
On the standard-gauge logging-railways three new rail power-cars for the transportation of workmen were built in British Columbia during the year. These power-
cars were constructed to the Department's design and were built under the supervision
of Department Inspectors. The power-cars were certified upon completion. During
the year the Inspectors inspected and certified fifty-four rail power-cars used in the
logging industry for the transportation of workmen. This system of certification was
inaugurated in 1947 in an effort to raise the standard of this type of equipment and
thus prevent accidents. This system of certification is working out very well, and I am
pleased to report at this time the equipment is in a much safer condition than before
certification under the " Railway Act " was carried out. Three second-hand steam-
locomotives were imported by various logging companies for operation in British
Columbia. These locomotives required to be overhauled and, in some cases,- rebuilt in
order that they could be approved and certified for operation in British Columbia.
In accordance with the Department's new Boiler Code formulated in 1947, the first
all-welded locomotive boiler in Canada was constructed at the Vancouver Iron Works,
Vancouver, in August and September, 1949, for the Salmon River Logging Company.
The design and construction of this boiler were made possible through research conducted by this Department. The boiler was inspected during construction by our
Inspectors and, upon completion, was X-rayed under the supervision of our Inspectors,
after which it was stress-relieved and hydrostatically tested. We consider this new
all-welded design of locomotive boiler a landmark in the progress of locomotive-boiler
construction and a tribute to research in the field of mechanical engineering.
The common-carrier railways and the street-railways of the British Columbia
Electric Railway Company under Provincial jurisdiction were inspected during the
year. The common-carrier railways were found to be in good condition, the usual
replacements and repairs having been carried out by the companies. The equipment
was periodically inspected, and the locomotives certified. With respect to the street-
railways, several miles of trackage were abandoned during the year as street-cars were
replaced by trolley-buses. Some of the street-railway equipment has been scrapped, but
the equipment kept in service has been periodically inspected, and defects, when found,
reported to the company. Where persons have been seriously injured by street-cars
and interurban cars, the rolling-stock was impounded until inspected and released by JJ  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
our Inspectors. Where fatal accidents occurred, Inspectors attended inquests, and
reports were forwarded to the Deputy Minister. In some cases corrective measures
were imposed upon the company to avoid recurrence of similar accidents.
During the year the British Columbia Electric Railway Company dieselized its
District III line from New Westminster to Chilliwack with respect to freight-haulage.
Three 70-ton General Electric diesel locomotives were procured. These were inspected
and certified before being placed in operation. Certain changes were recommended
with respect to footboards and safety appliances and were carried out by the company
under our Inspectors' advice and supervision.
The standard trackage serving the Nanaimo Pulp and Sulphate Company's new
plant at Nanaimo was inspected. A new barge-slip has been installed at this location.
Good construction is in evidence on the grade, and the track has been properly laid
and ballasted. Close clearances were checked, and as this is new construction, close-
clearance applications were denied, as it was felt where new trackage is being constructed, close clearances could be avoided. A new 45-ton diesel-electric locomotive was
procured for this operation on our recommendation. This locomotive was inspected
and certified.   The operator was also examined and certified.
The standard-gauge trackage recently installed to serve the Columbia Cellulose
plant at Port Edwards was inspected. The construction was found to be up to standard.
A new 45-ton diesel-electric locomotive was procured for this operation. This locomotive was inspected and certified, as well as company equipment operating on the track.
The boilers of all railways operating under Provincial charter were inspected and
certified during the year by Department Inspectors. Internal inspections were made,
as well as hydrostatic tests, and in many cases locomotives were inspected under steam.
Where defects were found, the locomotives were taken out of service until proper
repairs had been made. Where boilers required to be renewed, plans and specifications
were checked by the Inspectors before new boilers were built.
During the year, rules and regulations were made pursuant to the " Railway Act "
covering stationary steam plants, shops, buildings, and structures at terminals of
railways where workmen are employed. These rules and regulations apply more particularly to the Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
Eighty-six inspections were made of fire-protective appliances on steam-locomotives
operating on logging and mining railways. Reports of these inspections were filed with
the Forest Service.
Four hundred and ninety-six inspections covering fire-protective appliances of
locomotives were made on the Canadian Pacific Railway, Canadian National Railways,
and Great Northern Railway. Reports of these inspections were forwarded to the
British Columbia Forest Service and the Board of Transport Commissioners at Ottawa.
Each Departmental Inspector is appointed by the Board of Transport Commissioners in
Ottawa as Board of Transport Fire Inspectors so they may act with full authority of
the Board of Transport Commissioners on the transcontinental railways. Where
defects were found, the Inspectors ordered the locomotives out of service.
In company with the Inspecting Engineer, a general inspection of the Pacific Great
Eastern Railway was made during the year. This inspection covered road-bed, bridges,
structures, and general condition of the railway, as well as mechanical facilities.
A survey was made of the mechanical facilities of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway
during 1948, and a report submitted. I am pleased to report, at this time, conditions
are very much improved in the roundhouse and coach-shop at Squamish. Shop-tracks
and oil-tanks have been installed. A new electrically driven air-compressor has been
installed, and new air-receivers were also installed, as it was necessary to condemn the
old ones. The facilities at Lillooet, as recommended in the 1948 Report, are not yet
completed. At Williams Lake a new boiler was recommended for the roundhouse, as
the old one was condemned.   A small boiler procured for this purpose was not installed RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1949. JJ  H
by December, 1949. It was necessary for an Inspector to make a trip to Williams Lake
to test the old boiler so it could operate on a very much reduced pressure. This was
done to accommodate the railway so it might enjoy the benefits of steam heat during
the cold winter season.
During the year the Pacific Great Eastern Railway procured four new 70-ton
diesel-electric locomotives. These locomotives were inspected and certified before being
placed in operation.
On the Pacific Great Eastern Railway extension, approximately 2 miles of the
newly constructed railway were inspected in December, 1949, and a report made recommending that a certificate be issued so that this portion of the railway could be opened
to freight traffic.
The advent of dieselization on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway, British Columbia
Electric Railway, and the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway on Vancouver Island presented a problem in highway-crossing warning devices, as the conventional horn used
on diesel locomotives does not in any way sound like that of a railway locomotive. The
public mistakes its warning for that of a boat or highway vehicle. The whistles or
horns with which the diesels came equipped were entirely inadequate and could not be
approved under section 185 of the " Railway Act."
A discussion concerning this matter was held in Victoria in December, 1948, and,
as a result, I was instructed to make a research into the effectiveness of warning devices
as used at railway crossings and, if possible, recommend a type of warning device that
could be used on diesel locomotives which would simulate the standard railroad steam-
whistle, as it was felt the public recognizes the standard railway steam-whistle to
herald the approach of a locomotive at grade crossings.
Acting upon these instructions, a research was made into the effectiveness of
warning devices as used on locomotives. The note of the conventional multitoned
steam-locomotive whistle was analysed by recording the note on a recorder, then
analysing the note electronically by the use of an oscilloscope. It was found that the
note of the conventional railroad whistle had a frequency ranging between 256 cycles
per second (middle C) and 1,000 cycles per second; that five or six fundamental notes
were combined to comprise a C sharp diminished chord; and that third, fifth, and
seventh harmonics were superimposed on the fundamental notes comprising the chord.
It was also found that the intensity of the steam-locomotive whistle can be varied at
the will of the operator so as to sound a loud note or a modulated note.
As steam is not available on a diesel-electric locomotive to sound a whistle, the
warning device used must be driven by the compressed-air system as used on the airbrakes; consequently, the air-supply is limited, and if a conventional whistle were
fitted to the air-supply of a diesel locomotive, no compressed air would be available for
the air-brakes. In order to overcome this difficulty, it was decided to make a research
into the construction of a multiple-toned air-horn which could be used on diesel locomotives, and which horn would simulate the sound of a steam-locomotive whistle with
the same intensity of sound and yet use a very limited supply of compressed air. The
research indicated that if five or six suitably designed air-horns were constructed and
arranged for unitary operation so that each individual horn would emit the fundamental
frequencies as emitted by the steam-whistle, and with the horns suitably designed so
that the third, fifth, and seventh harmonics were superimposed upon the fundamental
notes, the tone of the conventional steam-whistle could be simulated by the use of air-
horns. Special diaphragms would be required, and a research was made into diaphragm
materials which would stand up under the severe conditions imposed in railroad service.
A pilot model of such a horn was constructed, using a special type of diaphragm.
This horn was placed in service for two days on the Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway,
where recordings were made of the steam-whistle and the new horn when both were
sounded at grade crossings.   It was generally conceded the new horn sounded so much JJ  12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
like the steam-locomotive whistle that the public could not tell it from a steam-train
approaching a grade crossing. This horn was later applied to the National Harbours
Board diesel in Vancouver, which organization applied to the Board of Transport
Commissioners to have it approved under the Dominion " Railway Act." Inspectors
from the Board of Transport Commissioners ran tests and found our horn to be satisfactory, and it was approved for operation under Board Order No. 72365. This type of
horn was also approved by our Department, and, as a result, several are now in operation on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway and on the British Columbia Electric Railway
diesel-electric locomotives.
It should be mentioned that the British Columbia Research Council was of great
assistance in measuring the consumption of air and sound intensity during the development of this new warning device which was being developed in an effort to prevent
accidents at grade crossings.
In March, 1949, a meeting was held in Victoria concerning tests of Hasler Creek
coal on railway locomotives and in stationary boilers, as it was felt this coal should
be tested under actual operating conditions. Acting in accordance with instructions,
I proceeded to Montreal, where, through the courtesy of Mr. N. R. Crump, vice-president of the Canadian Pacific Railway, a dynamometer car was made available to us
and arrangements made so we could test Hasler Creek coal on the Brooks subdivision
of the Canadian Pacific Railway between Calgary and Medicine Hat.
Two hundred tons of Hasler Creek coal were mined under the supervision of Mr.
N. D. McKechnie, of the British Columbia Coal Control Board, and transported overland to the rail-head, where 50 tons were shipped in closed freight-cars to the Canadian
Pacific Railway at Calgary, Alta. The balance of the 200 tons was shipped to Vancouver, B.C., and to Princeton, B.C., for tests in stationary boilers.
Coal tests were conducted on the Canadian Pacific Railway during May, 1949,
which were run under the supervision of this Department. In addition to Canadian
Pacific Railway officials and employees, Mr. J. W. Millar, chief mechanical officer,
Ontario Northland Railway, formerly an Inspector with this Department, and Mr.
K. C. Gilbart, Chief Chemist, British Columbia Coal Control, Victoria, B.C., were
present at and assisted in these tests.
The tests on the Canadian Pacific Railway were made with both Hasler Creek
coal and the coal normally used by the railway. The tests proved conclusively that
Hasler Creek coal is a good locomotive fuel, and savings as high as 15 per cent, may
be obtained by its use. No trouble was experienced in the firing or handling of the
locomotive while using this coal.
During May, 1949, this Department conducted tests at the University of British
Columbia power plant to determine the quality of Hasler Creek coal in chain-grate
stokers. The tests were conducted for five days, and at the conclusion it was proved
Hasler Creek coal is a suitable fuel to be burned in stationary steam plants using chain-
grate stokers and that savings as high as 20 per cent, may be obtained by its use.
In addition to University of British Columbia faculty and staff, and the staff of this
Department, Mr. K. C. Gilbart, Chief Chemist, British Columbia Control Board, and
Mr. T. A. Wood, Inspector of Boilers and Machinery, assisted during the tests.
The Department made arrangements with Mr. A. C. R. Yuill, consulting engineer,
Vancouver, B.C., to have a test conducted of Hasler Creek coal at the steam plant of
the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power Company, Limited, Princeton,
B.C. The purpose of this test was to prove whether or not Hasler Creek coal could
be successfully burned in pulverized-coal burning steam plants primarily designed to
burn low-rank coals. The test was conducted on June 7th, 1949. Mr. A. R. Eastcott,
power superintendent, Princeton, B.C., conducted the test. It was witnessed by Mr.
A. C. R. Yuill, consulting engineer, Vancouver, B.C., and Mr. K. C. Gilbart, Chief
Chemist, British Columbia Coal Control, Victoria, B.C.    I was also present to witness, RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1949. JJ  13
assist, and advise in conducting the test, and a report was submitted. Mr. A. C. R.
Yuill and Mr. A. R. Eastcott also submitted reports. All reports showed Hasler Creek
coal to be eminently suitable for firing in powdered form, particularly in large boilers
being continuously operated, and that Hasler Creek coal lends itself to pulverized-coal
firing. Its low ash content has no objectionable slagging qualities, and it, being of
a friable nature, pulverizes easily.
A report of the above three tests on Hasler Creek coal was published by the
Department.
In the 1948 Report it was mentioned that a lack of staff prohibited follow-up
inspections, and it was recommended that an extra Inspector be added to the staff. In
June, 1949, applications were received and examinations held at this office. Two
applicants qualified in a four-day competitive examination, and Mr. W. F. Thomas,
locomotive foreman, Canadian Pacific Railway, Vancouver, B.C., was appointed to the
position as Inspector. He commenced his duties with the Department on August
1st, 1949.
The safety-first educational programme instituted by this Department in 1947 on
the logging and industrial railways was carried forward by the Inspectors during 1948
and 1949. I am pleased to report that on the standard-gauge railways there were no
fatalities or serious accidents during the year. There was one fatality on the narrow-
gauge railway in the Trail smelter, where a locomotive operator was fatally injured
when a trolley-pole broke. Since the occurrence of this accident, a training programme
has been set up by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company plant at Trail, as
well as at other narrow-gauge operations, as it is felt the education of workmen as to
safe operating conditions is the cardinal principle of accident-prevention.
Following is a report of the inspection work performed during the year 1949:—
Hydrostatic tests applied to boilers      171
Internal and external inspections of boilers        18
Internal-combustion locomotives inspected and certified        15
Internal-combustion locomotive cranes inspected and certified._ 6
Power rail-cars inspected and certified        54
Diesel-electric locomotives inspected and certified        10
Electric locomotives inspected on narrow-gauge electric railways       16
Locomotives inspected other than hydrostatic tests      152
Number of cars inspected on industrial railways  1,865
Number of cars inspected on common-carrier railways      195
Miles of track inspected  1,450
Locomotive engineers examined and certified         5
Conductors examined and certified        10
Power-car operators examined and certified        12
Locomotive-crane engineers examined and certified  4
Train-dispatchers examined and certified  9
Internal-combustion locomotive engineers examined and certified 3
Engineers examined and certificates issued, B.C. Electric Railway   9
Engineers examined and certificates issued, P.G.E. Railway        18
B.C. Electric Railway street and interurban cars inspected      139
B.C. Electric Railway electric locomotives inspected and certified       15
Accidents investigated on B.C. Electric Railway        28
Fatal accidents on B.C. Electric Railway ....         9
Wrecks investigated on industrial and logging railways  2
Fatal accidents on industrial and logging railways  0
Accidents investigated on narrow-gauge trackage serving industrial plants JJ  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Fatal accidents on narrow-gauge trackage serving industrial
plants  1
Accidents investigated on Pacific Great Eastern Railway  3
Fatal accidents on Pacific Great Eastern Railway  2
Boiler designs approved by the Department  2
Air-reservoir designs approved by the Department  2
New passenger power rail-cars built under supervision of the
Department  3
New diesel-electric locomotives imported  9
Second-hand locomotives imported from United States  3
Number of second-hand locomotives inspected in United States
and approval for operation in British Columbia refused  3
Number of cars inspected in United States for approval to
operate in British Columbia        41
Inspections  made  of  fire-protective  appliances  on  industrial
locomotives        86
Inspections made of fire-protective appliances on P.G.E. Railway locomotives        16
Inspections made of fire-protective appliances on locomotives of
C.P.R., C.N.R., and G.N.R., for Board of Transport Commissioners       496
R. E. Swanson,
Chief Inspector.
LIST OF APPENDICES.
A list of Executive Council certificates issued is given in Appendix A.
Accidents on railways under Provincial jurisdiction are shown in Appendix B.
Industrial railways operating during the year are shown in Appendix C.
A list of locomotive cranes in industrial plants inspected by the Department is
shown in Appendix D.
A summary of the mileage of all railways operating in the Province is shown in
Appendix E. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1949. JJ  15
APPENDICES.
APPENDIX A.
Certificates issued under the Provisions of the " Railway Act."
Certificate No.
Giving consent to the issue by the British Columbia Electric Railway
Co., Ltd., of 3%-per-cent. general mortgage bonds, 1949 series, and
also to the sale of same  744
Appointing William Frederick Thomas, Inspector, to inquire into causes
of accidents, pursuant to section 211 of the " Railway Act"  745
Amending Rules and Regulations, Part III, pursuant to section 289 of
the " Railway Act "  746
Amending Rules and Regulations, Part IX, pursuant to section 289 of
the " Railway Act "  747
Amending Rules and Regulations, Part V, pursuant to section 289 of
the " Railway Act "  748
Approving Rules and Regulations governing Stationary Steam Plants,
Shops, Buildings, and Structures at Terminals of Railways where
Workmen are employed, being Part X  749
Approving standard freight tariffs on the lines of the British Columbia
Electric Railway Co., Ltd  750
Approving standard freight tariffs of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway Company  751
Granting leave to the British Columbia Electric Railway Co., Ltd., to
construct a spur track across the Pacific Highway at Cloverdale, in
the Municipality of Surrey  752
Amending Rules and Regulations, Part III, pursuant to section 289 of
the " Railway Act "  753
APPENDIX B.
Accident Report, 1949.
British Columbia Electric Railway Co., Ltd.— injured.       Killed.
Passengers  56             3
Employees  3
Other persons  34             5
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co.—
Passengers       	
Employees   61
Other persons   1              2
Industrial railways—
Employees      	
Other persons  :  __..
Locomotive cranes—Employees .  __
Totals  155            10 JJ 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX B—Continued.
Accident Report, 1949—Continued.
Persons Injured.
Result.
B.C. Electric Railway Co.
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
3 car passengers	
1 passenger	
1 truck passenger	
1 passenger	
1 car passenger	
1 car passenger	
1 car passenger	
10 passengers	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 motor-cyclist	
1 motor-cyclist	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
3 car passengers	
1 passenger.	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 car passenger	
1 car passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 motor-cyclist	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 passenger-	
1 passenger	
1 truck passenger	
1 employee	
1 passenger	
1 car passenger _	
1 passenger	
1 car passenger. _	
1 passenger 	
2 passengers	
1 passenger	
1 trolley-coach passenger	
1 employee	
1 passenger	
Injury to arm	
Fatal	
Injury to back	
Injury to neck...	
Injury to back	
Minor injuries	
Injury to back	
Minor injuries	
Injury to shoulder	
Minor injuries	
Injury to shoulder	
Minor injury	
Minor injuries	
Fractured rib, injury to shoulder
Injury to arm	
Injury to head	
Injury to hand	
Injury to heel	
Injury to hip....	
Injury to head and shoulder	
Injury to chest	
Minor injury _	
Fractured leg	
Injury to leg	
Fractured ankle	
Minor injuries	
Fractured ribs	
Severe bruises	
Injury to wrist	
Injury to shoulder and back	
Fractured rib	
Injury to hip	
Minor injuries	
Injury to head and arm	
Fractured arms	
Fatal	
Injury to shoulder	
Fractured rib	
Fractured leg	
Minor injuries	
Fatal	
Fatal,	
Injury to head and back	
Injury to spine	
Injury to back	
Injury to head	
Fatal	
Fatal	
Minor injury	
Fractured lower spine	
Injury to knee	
Minor injuries..	
Injury to back	
Fractured arm	
Injury to head	
Injury to back	
Fractured nose	
Fractured ribs	
Minor injuries	
Injury to shoulder and back	
Fractured ribs	
Fractured hand...	
Injury to head and back	
Struck by street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Fell in street-car.
Auto and street-car collided.
Street-car collision.
Truck and street-car collided.
Fell in street-car.
Auto and street-car collided.
Auto and street-car collided.
Auto and street-car collided.
Street-car collision.
Fell alighting.
Fell alighting.
Struck by street-car.
Fell boarding street-car.
Fell alighting from interurban.
Fell in street-car.
Fell in street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Motor-cycle and street-car collided.
Motor-cycle and street-car collided.
Fell alighting.
Fell alighting.
Auto and street-car collided.
Fell in street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Fell alighting.
Fell alighting.
Struck by street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Auto and street-car collision.
Auto and street-car collision.
Struck by street-car.
Fell alighting.
Fell alighting.
Fell alighting.
Struck by street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Struck by street-car doors.
Fell in street-car.
Fell alighting.
Fell alighting.
Motor-cycle and street-car collision.
Struck by train.
Struck by street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Fell alighting.
Fell in street-car.
Truck and street-car collision.
Fell boarding street-car.
Fell alighting.
Auto and street-car collision.
Auto and street-car collision.
Auto and street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Street-car collision.
Fell in street-car.
Trolley coach and street-car collision.
Fell in street-car.
Fell alighting. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1949.
JJ 17
APPENDIX B—Continued.
Accident Report, 1949—Continued.
Persons Injured.
Result.
B.C. Electric Railway Co.—Cont.
1 passenger	
4 passengers	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
1 car passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 cyclist (child)	
1 car passenger	
1 car passenger	
1 passenger	
1 passenger	
1 car passenger	
1 employee	
1 passenger	
2 passengers	
1 passenger	
Pacific Great Eastern Railway.
1 section foreman	
1 deck-hand	
1 machinist	
1 machinist	
1 sectionman	
1 machinist	
1 fireman	
1 locomotive watchman	
1 hostler's helper	
1 blacksmith	
1 machinist	
1 hostler's helper	
1 pipe-fitter	
1 labourer	
1 labourer	
1 labourer	
1 foreman. 	
1 labourer	
1 labourer	
1 labourer	
1 labourer	
1 engineer	
1 trainman	
1 trainman	
1 carman	
1 sectionman	
1 blacksmith	
1 machinist	
1 labourer	
1 labourer..	
1 labourer	
1 labourer	
1 brakeman	
1 trainman _	
1 cook	
1 labourer	
1 boilermaker	
1 labourer	
1 chef :	
1 hostler's helper  	
Injury to chest and knee	
Minor injuries	
Minor injury	
Injury to lower back	
Fatal	
Injury to leg	
Injury to head	
Minor injuries	
Injury to thigh	
Fractured lower back	
Fatal _	
Injury to knee.—	
Fractured rib	
Fractured wrist	
Fractured hand	
Injury to eye	
Injury to back	
Fractured rib	
Minor injuries	
Fractured shoulder-bone	
Injured shoulder and knee....
Injured left wrist	
Cut hand	
Cut hand	
Bruised instep and ligament
Crushed finger	
Injured left shoulder	
Steel in knee	
Left ankle scalded	
Injured toe	
Strained back	
Injured foot	
Strained back	
Multiple abrasions	
Broken wrist and abrasions.
Injured back...	
Broken nose, bruised arm	
Fractured shoulder, bruises._
Fractured wrist	
Injured knee and leg	
Injured face and arm	
General shake-up	
Bruised shoulder	
Turned ankle	
Injured back	
General shake-up	
Crushed thumb	
Injured foot	
Injured knee and shoulder....
Injured foot	
Wrenched back	
Injured wrist	
Strained back	
Cracked ankle	
Infected foot	
Strain	
Damaged nerve in finger	
Injured foot	
Fractured rib 	
Bruised elbow 	
Fell in street-car.
Street-cars collided.
Street-cars collided.
Street-cars collided.
Fell alighting from moving tram.
Struck by street-car.
Struck by street-car.
Auto and street-car collision.
Fell boarding street-car.
Fell alighting.
Bicycle and street-car collision.
Auto and street-car collision.
Auto and street car collision.
Fell alighting.
Fell alighting.
Auto and street-car collision.
Fell alighting.
Street-cars collided.
Street-cars collided.
Fell in street-car.
Slipped from loaded push-car.
Crow-bar broke while handling.
Handling chuck from lathe.
Fitting pin in bearing.
Loading scrap axle.
Bar slipped from compression spring.
Slipped on ice removing ashes.
Steel flew from anvil.
Hot water from hose.
Wrench fell from locomotive.
Lifting 5-gallon bucket of water.
Stepped on rail.
Slipped when babbiting car brasses.
Gas-car hit by truck.
Gas-car hit by truck.
Gas-car hit by truck.
Gas-car hit by truck.
Gas-car hit by truck.
Gas-car hit by truck.
Slipped when nipping up rails to put in tie.
Struck by falling rock.
Jumped from speeder.
Struck by hanging chain.
Slipped on rock.
Lifting car truck.
Fell when scrap car moved.
Lifting plank.
Piece of steel fell on foot.
Hit by rock.
Slipped when handling tie.
Lifting tie.
Wheelbarrow handle struck wrist.
Lifting-coupling.
Stepped on water-hose.
Stepped on rusty nail in board.
Lifting ties.
Vibration from rivet-gun.
Tie fell on foot.
Thrown across table in diner.
Slipped off locomotive. JJ 18
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX B—Continued.
Accident Report, 1949—Continued.
Persons Injured.
Result.
Cause.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway—
Continued.
Injured finger	
Crushed finger	
Injured ankle	
1 pedestrian	
1 pedestrian	
Fatal	
Injured arm, bruises, and shock	
Locomotive hit hand-truck on station platform and truck hit pedestrian.
Locomotive hit hand-truck on station platform and truck hit pedestrian.
Fatal	 RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1949.
APPENDIX C.
List of Railways and Summary of Mileage.
Industrial Railways.
JJ 19
Name.
Operating.
Mileage.
77.0
Begbie	
0 9
3.  B.C. Cement Co., Ltd	
2.5
4. B.C. Forest Products, Ltd	
43.4
5. B.C. Forest Products, Ltd	
18.0
6. B.C. Forest Products, Ltd	
33 0
7. B. & D. Logging Co.
8. Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd	
7 5
9. Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd	
2 0
10. Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd	
67.0
11. Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd	
56 2
4.9
67.9
10.0
13.8
24.3
25.3
Trail            	
20.0
32 3
20. Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd	
7.2
21. Deeks Sand & Gravel Co., Ltd	
2 0
22. Dominion Tar & Chemical Co., Ltd	
6.0
23. Dominion Tar & Chemical Co., Ltd	
1 0
24. Elk River Timber Co., Ltd ..	
50.0
7.5
Paldi	
1.0
27. Morrissey, Fernie & Michel Railway	
28. Northern & Eagle River Co	
7.2
5.1
5.2
30. Powell River Co., Ltd	
16.0
35.0
57.1
14.2
34.0
22.5
778.5
Common Carriers.
349.8
20.3
16.7
3.4
390.2
Tramways.
72.5
109.2
63.6
245.3 JJ 20
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX C—Continued.
List of Railways and Summary op Mileage—Continued.
Summary of Railway Mileage.
Industrial railways	
Common carriers 	
Tramways  (city) 	
Total, all lines	
778.5
563.0
72.5
1,414.0
APPENDIX D.
List of Cranes and other Auxiliary Motive Power inspected by Railway Department.
Alberni Pacific Lumber Co.
Alberta Lumber Co., Ltd..
Ltd Crane No. 40929 B.C.
 Crane No. 42998 B.C.
Anderson Bros. Lumber Co., Ltd.—
Arrowhead Wood Preservers, Ltd—
Associated Foundry, Ltd	
Baxter, J. H., & Co., Ltd	
Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Ltd...
Britannia Mining & Smelting Co., Ltd..
B.C. Cement Co., Ltd.
B.C. Forest Products,
Ltd.
B.C. Pulp & Paper Co., Ltd.
Burrard Dry Dock Co., Ltd...
Canadian Collieries (D.), Ltd.	
Canadian Forest Products, Ltd..
Capital Iron & Metals, Ltd...
Coast Quarries, Ltd.
..Crane No. 11905 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 302.
..Crane No. D.R. 293.
Crane No. D.R. 322.
Crane No. 22633 B.C.
'..Crane No. 21532 B.C.
..Crane No. D.R. 336.
..Crane No. 44666 B.C.
Crane No. 3843.
Crane No. D.R. 340.
Gas Internal-combustion Locomotive
No. 50.
..Electric Locomotive No. 5.
Electric Locomotive No. 8.
..Crane No. 21439 B.C.
-Crane No. 43579 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 320.
Crane No. D.R. 331.
Crane No. D.R. 319.
Unloader No. 44213.
Crane No. D.R. 304.
..Crane No. 50514 B.C.
Crane No. 12370 B.C.
Crane No. 41298 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 292.
Gas Locomotive Crane No. 4.
..Steam-shovel D.R. 301.
..Crane No. 42722 B.C.
Crane No. 43635 B.C.
Crane No. 43973 B.C.
Internal-combustion Locomotive Crane
No. 97.
Diesel Locomotive Crane No. 2338.
Diesel Switcher No. 96.
-Crane No. D.R. 295.
Crane No. D.R. 299.
Crane No. 44386 B.C.
-Crane No. D.R. 342. RAILWAY DEPARTMENT, 1949. JJ 21
APPENDIX D—Continued.
List of Cranes and other Auxiliary Motive Power inspected by Railway Department	
Com.it.Mec..
Columbia Cellulose Co., Ltd Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
Comox Logging & Railway Co Unloader D.R.P. No. 2.
Crane No. 41922 B.C.
Internal-combustion Locomotive Unloader No. 3.
Gas Locomotive No. 20.
Gas Locomotive No. 17.
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.,    Crane No. 12772 B.C.
Kimberley Electric Locomotive No. 1.
Electric Locomotive No. 2.
Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd.,    12 narrow-gauge electric locomotives.
Trail
Deeks Sand & Gravel Co., Ltd Gas Locomotive No. 1.
Dominion Bridge Co., Ltd Crane No. 44129 B.C.
Crane No. 44317 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 347.
Dominion Tar & Chemical Co., Ltd Crane No. 44441 B.C.
Gas Switcher No. 1.
Elk River Timber Co., Ltd . Crane No. 21085 B.C.
Gas Switcher No. 7.
Esquimalt Drydock Crane No. 22582 B.C.
Portable Boiler No. D.R. 314.
Evans, Coleman & Evans, Ltd Crane No. D.R. 316.
Hamilton Bridge Co., Ltd Crane No. 12669 B.C.
Hillcrest Lumber Co., Ltd   Crane No. 40049 B.C.
Crane No. 44315 B.C.
Industrial Peat Co Crane No. 1085A.
Jamieson Construction Co., Ltd Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
King, M. B., Lumber Co., Ltd Crane No. 12430 B.C.
Lions Gate Lumber Co., Ltd Gas Locomotive Crane.
Lumby Timber Co., Ltd Crane No. 21089 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 343.
Mayo Lumber Co. (1943), Ltd Crane No. D.R. 321.
Morrissey, Fernie & Michel Railway Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
Nanaimo Sulphate <__ Pulp, Ltd Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 1.
Northern Construction Co., Ltd Crane No. 12321 B.C.
Osborn Bay Wharf Co., Ltd . Crane No. 21526 B.C.
Pacific Coast Terminals Co., Ltd Crane No. 44440 B.C.
Auxiliary Boiler No. 03301 B.C.
Pacific Great Eastern Railway Co, Pile-driver No. D.R. 312.
Boiler No. D.R. 326.
Power-boiler No. D.R. 341.
Boiler No. 42837 B.C.
Crane No. D.R.P. 8.
Ditcher No. D.R.P. 1.
Boiler N6. 3, D.R. 49.
Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 551.
Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 552.
Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 553.
Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 554.
Diesel-electric Locomotive No. 555.
Point Hope Shipyard     Crane No. D.R. 315.
Powell River Co., Ltd. (Kelley Logging Co., Ltd.) Crane No. 44893 B.C.
Diesel locomotive. JJ 22
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
APPENDIX D—Continued.
List of Cranes and other Auxiliary Motive Power inspected by Railway Department—
Continued.
Prince Rupert Drydock & Shipyard Crane No. D.R. 290.
Robertson & Hackett Sawmill r Crane No. 44584 B.C.
• Crane No. 12545 B.C.
Salmon River Logging Co., Ltd Gas Locomotive No. 8.
Sooke Lake Lumber Co., Ltd Crane No. 22632 B.C.
Timber Preservers, Ltd Crane No. 43807 B.C.
Crane No. D.R. 288.
Timberland Lumber Co., Ltd Crane No. 12368 B.C.
Vancouver Creosoting Co., Ltd Crane No. D.R. 283.
Gas Locomotive Crane No. 6.
Victoria Lumber Co., Ltd Crane No. D.R. 300.
Victoria Machinery Depot, Ltd Crane No. D.R. 291.
Crane No. D.R. 305.
Western Bridge & Steel Fabricators, Ltd Crane No. D.R. 308.
Crane No. D.R. 309.
Western Forest Industries, Ltd. Diesel Locomotive Crane No. CCC 142.
Crane No. 41276 B.C.
Yarrows, Ltd Crane No. D.R. 289.
Crane No. 376.
APPENDIX E.
Mileage of all Railways operating in the Province.
Mainland.
Island.
Total.
Main
Line.
Sidings.
Main
Line.
Sidings.
Main
Line.
Sidings.
Under the jurisdiction of the Board of Transport Commissioners for Canada—-
1,857.4
1,359.0
140.8
42.8
349.8
154.7
54.6
!
1
504.9     |         210.8
328.6     j         102.0
29.8     1
43.2
2.068.2
5dS 1
V.V. & E. Railway (Great Northern)	
140.8
42.8
349.8
154.7
627.5
20.8
37.0
20.8
Under the jurisdiction  of the Provincial Government—
37 0
24.8
36...
24.8
..71. 9
U4.7
Totals _	
3,959.1
982.2
885.7
182.8
4,844.8
1,165.0
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Don McDuhwid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty,
1950.
345-250-6849  

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