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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA Department of Trade and Industry REPORT For the Year ended December 31st… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1950

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 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Trade
and Industry
REPORT
For the Year ended December 31st
1949
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Don McDiabmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1950.  To His Honour C. A. Banks, C.M.G.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
I beg to submit herewith the Eeport of the Department of Trade and Industry for
the year ended December 31st, 1949.
LESLIE HAKVEY EYRES,
Minister of Trade and Industry.
Office of the Minister,
Department of Trade and Industry,
Victoria, British Columbia. Honourable Leslie Harvey Eyres,
Minister of Trade and Industry, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Department of Trade
and Industry for the year ended December 31st, 1949.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
EDWIN G. ROWEBOTTOM,
Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry. Report of the Department of Trade and Industry
For the Year ended December 31st, 1949.
Steady progress in many directions was the highlight for 1949 in the industrial
development of the Province. Although indicated expansion possibly was not so spectacular as the previous year, nevertheless the growth was healthy and well in keeping
with the trade outlook for the immediate future. New companies incorporated totalled
1,306, with a total authorized capitalization of $60,932,910.
Manufacturing production for the year is estimated to have a gross value of
$960,000,000. Leaders in this field were sawmilling, pulp and paper, fish curing and
packing, slaughtering and meat-packing, ship-building, fruit and vegetable preparations, fertilizers, veneer and plywoods, petroleum products, and butter and cheese.
The estimated industrial pay-roll for 1949 is $690,000,000, an increase of
$40,000,000 over 1948.
The past few years have seen many new items of manufacture produced in British
Columbia and the year under review was no exception. There is continued interest in
the possibilities for steel production from the iron ore and other essential raw materials
to be found in British Columbia.
An interesting trend in primary production is the increasing tendency to seek
higher values in the finished product. This is illustrated by the great advance made in
the pulp and paper industry. A further advantage of this trend is the opening up of
alternate markets for the products of forest and sea.
The basis of our economy is our primary industries and, while in some cases it is
doubtful if production will reach last year's all-time high, the final value should be
adequate for domestic and export markets. It is difficult to assess the export market
potential in the year ahead but it is certain that some adjustments will be inevitable.
The long-term effect of devaluation may be to restore our traditional markets if we can
absorb essential imports in quantity and without detriment to our own manufacturers.
Power development continues to be an important factor in industrial progress.
Both the British Columbia Power Commission and the British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited, have made an outstanding contribution in making power
available for existing industry as well as for potential new industries. This power
supply and the tremendous reserve available is one of the chief reasons why industry
is developing in many sections throughout the Province. Another reason is better
transportation facilities through improved highways and the extension of the Pacific
Great Eastern Railway.
There is no more optimistic sign of development than that reflected by continued
activity in the construction industry. This is evident throughout British Columbia
and includes new construction for a wide variety of uses. Contracts granted in 1949
are estimated to total $85,000,000, exceeding the record set in 1948 by $14,500,000.
As in past years, the Department carried out an energetic programme of tourist
and industrial advertising in the leading publications of Canada and the United States.
The value of this advertising is evidenced by the number of inquiries received seeking
further information.
Full report of the activities of the divisions of this Department is contained in
the pages following this introduction. DD 6
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SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT.
Interdepartmental Industrial Advisory Committee.
This Committee meets at the call of the Chair to consider industrial problems
which affect various departments of the Government service.    The Committee has been
extremely helpful in furthering industrial development throughout the Province.
The following is the personnel of this Committee:—
E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of Trade and Industry (Chairman).
J. V. Fisher, Deputy Minister of Finance (Vice-Chairman).
H. Anderson, Chief Engineer, Public Works Department.
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
J.  T.  Gawthrop,  Director,  Regional  Development  Division,  Department of
Trade and Industry.
C. Hopper, Assistant Deputy Minister of Lands.
R. Bowering, Public Health Engineer, Branch of Public Health.
James Thomson, Deputy Minister of Labour. DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD  7
J. E. Lane, Deputy Comptroller of Water Rights, Water Rights Branch.
Dr. C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests.
G. Melrose, Deputy Minister of Lands.
Dr. J. B. Munro, Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
W. H. Robertson, Provincial Horticulturist, Department of Agriculture.
E. MacGinnis, Marketing Commissioner, Department of Agriculture.
R. S. O'Meara, Trade Commissioner, Department of Trade and Industry.
T. L. Sturgess, Administrative Assistant, Department of Trade and Industry.
W. A. Carrothers, Chairman, Public Utilities Commission.
G. T. Hatcher, Director, Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Department of
Trade and Industry.
H. Sargent, Chief Mining Engineer, Department of Mines.
G. Alexander, Deputy Minister of Fisheries.
A. G. Graham, Director, Regional Planning Division.
Col. F. T. Fairey, Deputy Minister of Education.
BRITISH COLUMBIA RESEARCH COUNCIL.
Under the chairmanship of the Minister of Trade and Industry the Research
Council held monthly meetings at which were considered many scientific problems of
vital interest to the Province.
Dr. S. E. Maddigan, honour graduate in physics of the University of British
Columbia, is Director of the Research Council.
Industrial advancement is contingent upon scientific research, and it is the hope
of the Government and the Council that industry will take full advantage of the services
which the Council can render.
The Council was organized in order to perform the following functions:—
(1) To co-ordinate the work of existing and prospective research units within
the Province of British Columbia.
(2) To initiate and undertake research work in any field of particular interest
to the Province; to apply the results of research toward the development
of new products, the improvement of industrial processes, and the establishment of new industries based on the resources of the Province.
(3) To assist in the development of the technical status of the industries in
the Province of British Columbia through a fuller utilization of scientific
methods and technical personnel.
(4) To provide fellowships, scholarships, bursaries, and rewards and pecuniary and other aids in order to facilitate and encourage original scientific
and industrial research.
(5) To provide for the publication of the results of the research-work and to
enter into such arrangements as may be necessary with regard to patents
arising out of the work done by or for the Council.
The present board of management consists of the following personnel:—
Chairman—Hon. L. H. Eyres, Minister of Railways, Trade and Industry, and
Fisheries of the Province of British Columbia.
Provincial Government—
G. Melrose, Deputy Minister of Lands.
Dr. J. F. Walker, Deputy Minister of Mines.
Dr. C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests.
Dominion Government—
Dr. W. E. Cockfield, Bureau of Geology and Topography.
Dr. R. E. Foerster, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B.C.
National Research Council—Dr. G. M. Shrum, University of British Columbia. DD  8 BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
University of British Columbia—
Dr. W. A. Clemens, professor and head of Department of Zoology.
Dr. G. M. Shrum, professor and head of Department of Physics.
Prof. F. A. Forward, Department of Metallurgy.
Industry—
G. A. Barrat, British Columbia Fruit Board.
S. H. Hammitt, manager, Morrison Steel & Wire Company, Limited, Vancouver, B.C.
Prentice Bloedel, president, Bloedel, Stewart & Welch, Limited, Vancouver, B.C.
Labour—Birt Showier, president, Vancouver, New Westminster, and District
Trades and Labour Council.
Ex officio—R. S. O'Meara, Trade Commissioner, Department of Trade and
Industry.
INDUSTRIAL ADVERTISING.
As in 1948 the Department continued to advertise the opportunities for new
industrial enterprise in the Province. This advertising stressed the natural resources
of the Province and their relation to secondary production.
The advertisements were placed by our advertising counsellors in selected publications in Canada and United States.
This advertising was supported by an illustrated industrial brochure. The results
of this campaign have been most gratifying, and from the thousands of inquiries
received, it is evident that world-wide attention was drawn to the advantages of British
Columbia.
NEW INDUSTRIES.
During 1949 a consistent effort has been made by the Department to encourage
and foster new industries in the Province. That this effort has borne fruit is evidenced
by the fact that several new industries have been established through the assistance
of the Department.
Continued effort is being made to increase the range of textile products manufactured in this Province. The manufacture of common glassware is a possibility, in
which keen interest is now being shown.
There is definite interest in the possibilities for the expansion of the steel industry
in British Columbia, and the Department is co-operating with interests who are now
exploring the feasibility of producing iron and steel from British Columbia ores.
Adequate supplies of steel would make possible many new items of production and
assure prosperity of existing industries.
While in Eastern Canada on Departmental business the Deputy Minister interviewed the managers and directors of a number of industrial firms and invited them
to survey British Columbia with a view to establishing branch plants. The net result
of these interviews was the securing of three new industries, two of which are making
plans for immediate production, the third company, large in scope, will institute its
final surveys early in 1950.
Early in 1950 construction will start on the new nylon hosiery factory in Burnaby.
This plant, under the direction of W. R. McCurdy, who operates the Lincoln Hosiery,
Limited, in St. Catharines, Ont., will be the first nylon ladies' hosiery mill operating
west of Central Ontario and will produce the finest kind of hosiery manufactured
anywhere in the world.
As noted in the foreword of this report, many new and interesting developments
took place under the general heading of new industries and new products.
In the lumber and wood-working industry new products noted include fire logs
made from mill waste.    No binder is used in this product since they are made under DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 9
high compression, and the natural resin and other constituents in the wood waste are
sufficient to produce a long-lasting, even-burning fuel in a convenient size. Another
development in wood utilization is etch wood. In this process the soft wood between
the annual rings is routed out, resulting in a very attractive panelling for interior
and exterior use. Other enterprises include curved and flat veneer panels for the
furniture industry and box factories in areas previously without these facilities.
In metals, new developments include hard steel bits, metal spinning, mechanical
scaffolding and ladder lifts, sprayers, electric hammers, couplings and cables.
Minerals utilization has not been neglected, as evidenced by the production of clay
pigeons, storage batteries (with separators and acid also of British Columbia origin),
processing of clay for pharmaceutical and cosmetic purposes, rock wool for insulation,
and high-quality clay products for the building trades.
Miscellaneous items of interest are noted in the manufacture of plastic fishing
plugs, invalid chairs, soap, record cuttings and duplicates, canned whale-meat with
cereals for animal food, and many other products which have contributed to the
substantial increase in the value of production of our secondary industries.
CO-OPERATIVE CONTACTS.
The Department has consistently co-operated with the Boards of Trade, Chambers
of Commerce, and the British Columbia Division of the Canadian Manufacturers'
Association, and is grateful for the assistance which these organizations have so
willingly and cheerfully provided.
All branches of the Department have continued their constructive contact with the
Agent-General for British Columbia in London, England.
INDUSTRIAL AND TRADE REPRESENTATIVE, LONDON.
The Department of Trade and Industry's representative in British Columbia House
has interviewed many United Kingdom business-men on the possibility of establishing
branch plants in British Columbia during the year.
It is to be borne in mind that the difficulty of sterling transfer and the dollar crisis
mitigates against many of the branch-plant inquiries being brought to fruition. However, in some cases exploratory parties have made surveys by visits to the Province.
The Department in Victoria rendered every assistance possible to further these surveys.
There have been many inquiries from the smaller type of business-man, tradesman,
craftsman, engineer, research chemist, etc. Many of these cases have proceeded beyond
the inquiry stage and are either making arrangements to emigrate or have already
arrived in the Province.
Many inquiries have been received of a diverse nature, for information on not only
trade and industry, but on other aspects of life in British Columbia.
To immigrants or visitors, letters of introduction have been supplied, not only
to Department of Trade and Industry officials, but to Boards of Trade, business
associations, etc.
It has been found that these introductions are very much appreciated by the
recipients and have had the result of saving them time and assuring them of the best
possible contacts.
Contact with the commercial counsellors at Canada House, Ontario House, and
with other Canadian Government offices in London has been well established.
Relations have been well established with British Government ministeries, and
the assistance given by the Export Trade Promotion Department of the Board of
Trade is most appreciated.
The co-operation of the London Chamber of Commerce, the Federation of British
Industries, the Birmingham Chamber of Commerce, Canadian Trade Commissioners in DD  10 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Liverpool, Glasgow, and Belfast has been a great help in furthering the interests of
our Province.
Many exhibitions or fairs held in London or in other centres, such as Birmingham,
Manchester, Lincoln, were attended by the Industrial and Trade Representative.
One of the most pleasant duties falling to the lot of the office has been the assistance rendered to British Columbia business-men. Visits to trade fairs, introductions
to Canada House and United Kingdom Government departments, itineraries suggested,
and in some cases hotel accommodation and transportation space have been secured.
The office is well organized to cater to the requirements of any British Columbia
buyers, salesmen, etc., who might visit Great Britain or the adjacent Continent.
Since many people in this country wish to emigrate, it will be realized that it is
comparatively easy to convince them that they should settle in British Columbia.
However, the system adopted, not only by the Industrial and Trade Representative, but
by others concerned at British Columbia House, is to tell such applicants that they must
make up their own minds, and when they do, assistance in the way of advice and letters
of introduction will be given to help them become established in their new environment.
It has been established that the majority of business and trade inquiries stem
from an individual's desire to emigrate to British Columbia. For this reason the line
of demarcation between an emigration inquiry and an industrial or trade inquiry is
sometimes hard to define.
STATEMENT OF LOANS OUTSTANDING, DECEMBER 31st, 1949,
DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
Loans. Interest.
B.C. Livestock Producers Co-operative Association $5,000.00        $168.75
Charles Cormack        178.47 14.05 DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD  11
OFFICE OF TRADE COMMISSIONER.
The office was created by amendment to the " Department of Trade and Industry
Act," effective April 1st, 1945. Accordingly, the present Report covers the fourth full
year for operation of the office, which replaced the Bureau of Industrial and Trade
Extension.
PATTERN OF CONTACTS.
The main objective has been co-ordination of interests concerned with, or affected
by industrial and trade development, to prevent duplication, and to present to industry
clearly defined channels for practical action on their particular problems. The office has
continued to act as a clearing-house for industrial application of research results.
In over-all export, and tariff and industrial surveys (the concern of Ottawa), the
office undertakes to collect and present factual data after intimate study of local
situations.
The usefulness of this work has been increased during the last two years by close
co-operation with the office of the Vancouver representative of the Foreign Trade
Service, Ottawa. This position was established April 1st, 1947, and the first incumbent,
H. W. Brighton, died in Vancouver on February 16th, 1949. Everett Leslie, Priorities
Officer, Vancouver, was temporarily in charge, and Colonel L. Moore Cosgrave, D.S.O.,
was appointed to the post in October, 1949, following distinguished service with the
Trade Commissioner Service since 1922, and the military forces during two wars.
He is now styled " Western Representative " of the Foreign Trade Service, with headquarters in Vancouver, and maintains close co-operation with Provincial units through
the Trade Commissioner's Office.
REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT.
During the year under review, further co-ordination was effected with the Regional
Development Division, who are now charged with responsibilities in surveys and
selected phases of industrial development in the outlying areas. The Field Representatives of the Regional Development Division have again rendered very useful service to
the Office, in liaison for contacts with industry, market problems, import surveys,
itineraries, and public relations endeavours referred to elsewhere in this Report. The
distribution and functions of field offices, and of the Regional Development Division
at Victoria are covered in a separate section of the Report.
DOMINION DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND COMMERCE.
This liaison has been maintained, direct and through the clearing-house of the
Western Representative, Foreign Trade Service, to accomplish a number of main
objectives:—
(1) Local planning in production and industry surveys.
(2) Surveys of plant capacities.
(3) Surveys of overseas markets, in direct co-operation with the firms or
industries concerned and the Federal Trade Commissioner Service.
(4) Co-ordinated effort with commodity divisions at Ottawa to indicate
sources of supply in British Columbia.
(5) Co-ordinated planning in two-way trade, in co-operation with Import
Division, Foreign Trade Service; United Kingdom Trade Commissioner
Service; consulates; banks; transportation companies; and importers
in the Province.
(6) Intimate assistance for procurement and routing problems of the foreign
purchasing missions, direct and through the Canadian Commercial
Corporation. DD   12 BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
(7) Surveys and interpretative assistance to the import control units at
Ottawa. Their relation to the Department of Trade and Commerce is
referred to elsewhere in this Report.
(8) Co-operation with Publicity Division in selection and production of industrial films for overseas distribution.
(9) Co-operation with Publicity Division in co-ordinated advertising programmes, and in preparation of special brochures.
(10)  Effective liaison with Commercial Relations and Foreign Tariffs Division
at Ottawa, under two main headings—
(a)  Special tariff information.
(6)   Review and presentation for revised tariff structures affecting British
Columbia industry.
It is gratifying to note the response at Ottawa to the Provincial suggestion of
closer liaison by personal visits of departmental officials, commodity officers, and representatives from the Industrial Development and other divisions. The co-ordinated
programme worked out for the visiting Trade Commissioners from overseas is dealt
with elsewhere in the Report.
OTHER OTTAWA CONTACTS.
Effective liaison has been maintained with:—
(1) Industrial Development Bank, direct and through its regional organization in the Province.
(2) Export Credits Insurance Corporation.
(3) Canadian Standards Association.
(4) Residual timber and steel controls.
(5) National Research Council and Federal Departments concerned with
industrial research.
(6) British Food Mission and purchasing agencies of foreign governments,
to which reference is made elsewhere in this Report.
(7) International Trade Fair Administration and Exhibition Commission,
Toronto and Ottawa.
The Trade Commissioner has organized and maintained this liaison by personal
contacts in Eastern Canada, and by assistance to officials and representatives who have
been encouraged to visit the Province.
The Trade Commissioner has been closely associated with special phases of reorganization in the branches and divisions at Ottawa. This applies especially to the
Industrial Development Division, the Economics and Research Branch for confidential
surveys affecting British Columbia, and the Commodity Officer Branch, with particular
reference to reorganization of the agricultural and foods sections.
NATIONAL DEFENCE PURCHASES.
Mention should be made of contacts maintained with Canadian Commercial Corporation in the matter of National Defence contracts.
In one case the Trade Commissioner's office was able to prevent cancellation of
a contract and thus maintained a continuing off-season pay-roll of 150 people in a
Vancouver plant.
In other cases the office has been successful in arranging extension of time on
tenders and in facilitating British Columbia participation in defence contracts.
The corporation has been helpful in adding British Columbia firms to their tender-
list, but price structures, especially in engineering lines, have limited our opportunities. DEPARTMENT  OP TRADE AND  INDUSTRY. DD   13
NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS PROGRAMME.
The Department, through the Trade Commissioner, subscribed to a resolution at
the Lindsay meeting* which set up a committee to study the place of Provincial Trade
and Industry organizations in the national preparedness programme.
Furtherance of this suggestion would call for close co-operation with the Canadian
Industrial Preparedness Association, or others concerned, for plant production and
industrial planning which might become immediately necessary in the undesired event
of a national emergency.
Any arrangements made for British Columbia would be effected in close co-ordination with the Western Representative of the Ottawa Department of Trade and
Commerce at Vancouver.
IMPORT RESTRICTIONS.
The Trade Commissioner's Office has continued to assist local industry in regard to
dollar quotas and other phases of the conservation programme.
It has given assistance to Ottawa in public relations phases, has helped small
firms to secure urgently needed supplies of restricted materials and parts, and has
surveyed assembly and new production plans directly related to the controls.
Assistance has been given in preparation of data for " project" approval and in
the matter of import permits under Schedule III for capital equipment and selected
stock items.
UNITED KINGDOM SURVEY.
The Office of Industrial and Trade Representative was established at British
Columbia House in London, February, 1947. The work of the office has fully justified
the decision that a liaison would be effective in London to place emphasis on the problems of the Province in its United Kingdom trading structure.
In particular, since devaluation, the London office has been a clearing-house for
a great number of inquiries from exporters in the United Kingdom. It has served
as a liaison point of contact for inspection and survey in the purchase of industrial
equipment to a volume which has materially improved our trading balance.
The overseas Office has been increasingly useful in planning for itineraries
of visitors from British Columbia and in arranging for visits of United Kingdom
industrialists and missions.
The Industrial and Trade Representative is attached to the executive of the Agent-
General.    He reports directly to the Trade Commissioner in many phases of his work.
The surveys and contacts in London are co-ordinated to the over-all planning at
Canada House. The work of the Trade Commissioner at Victoria is welded to the
over-all planning at Ottawa. Effective plans of co-operation have also been worked
out with the Commercial Relations and Exports Department of the British Board of
Trade and the United Kingdom Trade Commissioner Service in Canada.
Further outline of London activities is contained in the general section of this
Report. Following is a summary of those activities directly related to the Office of
Trade Commissioner:—
(1) United Kingdom furtherance of production and other surveys initiated
in British Columbia under wood products, food-stuffs, metals, and other
headings. There is close co-operation with agricultural and timber
specialists at Canada House.
(2) Licensed manufacture where contacts are initiated in the United Kingdom
entailing surveys in the engineering industry there and placement surveys
in British Columbia.
* Interprovincial meeting, Lindsay, Ont., September, 1949, referred to elsewhere in this Report. DD  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
(3) Licensed manufacture in the United Kingdom of British Columbia products—patent disposals.
(4) Furtherance of exports from British Columbia for world markets through
United Kingdom export houses.
(5) Itineraries and United Kingdom contacts for business visitors from
British Columbia.
(6) Itineraries, introductions, and survey plans for industrial visitors or
missions from the United Kingdom. This assistance has been an increasingly important feature of the work during the year under review and
well co-ordinated plans have been worked out between the Trade Commissioner's Office in Victoria, British Columbia House, United Kingdom
Trade Commissioner Service, Department of Trade and Commerce, and
others concerned.
(7) Inquiries for export from the United Kingdom. As noted elsewhere,
these have greatly increased since publication of the last Annual Report.
The general directive calls for close association in the related work of transportation companies, Canadian and overseas banks, and trade organizations here and in the
United Kingdom. This prevents duplication and has resulted in useful exchange of
information.
TRADE AND INDUSTRY BULLETIN.
The increased tempo of the United Kingdom export drive was reflected in the
number of trade inquiries received during the year. Following devaluation of the
pound sterling, many firms contacted British Columbia House, London, seeking agency
and other representation here for the sale of their products.
These inquiries were passed along to the Trade Commissioner's Office in such
volume that it was decided to issue a monthly bulletin and circulate it to importers,
jobbers, agents, manufacturers, Boards of Trade, and other appropriate organizations
throughout British Columbia. This Trade and Industry Bulletin made its first appearance in November. In addition to trade inquiries, it contains information on licensed
manufacture opportunities, new products and manufacturing techniques, and other
items of general interest to those concerned.
The bulletin has had a good reception and much interest has been shown in the
information listed as evidenced by many letters received requesting further information.
EXPORT SURVEYS.
Once again the year has been marked by a series of crises which have had a serious
impact effect on the trading structure of the Province.
One by one our traditional markets have been closed to us under items that in
so-called normal times accounted for a large volume of our export trade. In particular the dollar shortage has been reflected in the loss of United Kingdom foodstuffs
contracts, in the curtailment of lumber and other movements to the United Kingdom,
and in the serious results from bilateral trade agreements between countries in the
sterling area.
New exchange restrictions curtailed or closed export movement to many other
markets, including Argentina, Colombia, South Africa, Malaya, and Hong Kong. At
the close of the year there was indication that the Philippines, a source of dollar earnings for us, would impose severe import control restrictions.
Political developments in China may, in the long run, mean a resumption of volume
trading with that area, but the whole position in the Oriental structure remains
undefined.
The Office has maintained close co-operation with the Asia Section at Trade and
Commerce headquarters in Ottawa.    In particular, for developments in Japan, it has DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD  15
been able to assist selected industry in special surveys and to make early reports of
changes as a result of special arrangements effected with the Liaison Mission in Tokio.
While there is a move toward free exchange, with less control by the military
authorities, our exporters and importers have not yet re-established any clear trading
channels for any volume movement to Japan or from that country. The rayon pulp
export movement in 1949 showed a sharp tonnage drop.
At the close of the year there seemed opportunity of specialty foodstuff lines to
Japan and arrangements were being made for a small movement of shell eggs, increase
of which would assist a serious situation.
CHARTING OF EXPORT MOVEMENT.
The appended charts show all-time record value for export from the Province in
the year under review. Once again the chart does not depict the real effect of the
restrictive conditions to which reference is made elsewhere in this Report.
There is a healthy pattern of increased export trade to the United States, but the
sharp upswing in value movement over the last five years must be partly attributed to
other developments. Principal of these, of course, is the increase in commodity values
as compared with actual volume or tonnage movement.
GRAIN MOVEMENT.
Large volume grain and flour movement through British Columbia ports may
account for most of the value increase shown in total exports through British Columbia
ports in 1949 as compared with the preceding year.
A special tabulation compiled for the Office of Trade Commissioner by courtesy of
the Vancouver Merchants' Exchange, shows grain shipments (for Vancouver only) for
the current year 1949 as 70,700,000 bushels, as compared with 37,400,000 bushels for
the calendar year 1948. The corresponding figure for all British Columbia ports was
75,500,000 bushels in 1949, and 40,700,000 bushels in 1948.
It is not only gratifying to record this resumed use of our terminal and shipping
facilities, but it is interesting to note the geographical breakdown of new grain
markets. India, Palestine, South Africa, Japan, South America, Switzerland, China
and Ireland, all appearing for shipments in the year under review, received no grain
through British Columbia ports during the preceding year. Increases in 1949 were
noted for the United Kingdom, India, Egypt and Arabia.
ASSISTANCE TO PROCESSED FRUIT INDUSTRY.
Special Products Board.
The Trade Commissioner has continued as Agent of the Special Products Board,
Ottawa, for movement of fruit pulps and S02 fruits to the United Kingdom Ministry
of Food, and for local survey and action in regard to market problems of the small fruit
industry.
This arrangement has been in effect now for nine years, and each season has
brought its new and special problems.
At the close of the shipping season in 1947, the Office had handled all procurement,
contractural, warehousing, shipping, and payment arrangements covering more than
13,000 (net) tons of S02 fruits and fruit pulps for the United Kingdom. The dollar
crisis precluded contracts in 1948, and the suppliers and growers were left with a
serious surplus inventory problem, in spite of flood loss in the earlier part of the year.
The growers had been warned that there might be no United Kingdom contracts
in 1948.    However, the Office consistently worked with the authorities at Ottawa and DD 16
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
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X
uj  _i
>|
d °
I O
r- ^_
Z °
O -2
S J
LU  —
r-   _:
< -
Z>
=>
U
480
440
400
360
320
280
240
200
160
120
80
40
CUMULATIVE MONTHLY EXPORTS      /
.. .y     .
19^
5, 19
46, 19
47, 19
48,1<
>49 y
A
1949
1947
I94S
1946
1945
JAN.   FEB.   MAR.   APR.   MAY   JUNE  JULY   AUG    SEPT.   OCT    NOV.     DEC
Source: British Columbia Bureau of Economics and Statistics. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 17
elsewhere to find some solution of the surplus problem. It was actively concerned in
negotiations which led to the purchase of the surplus inventory by the Canadian
Government under Order in Council P.C. 1534 of March 29th, 1949.
In June, 1949, at Ottawa, and in co-operation with the authorities there, the Trade
Commissioner worked out a formula for overseas disposal.    By another Dominion
o
Q
500
450
400
350
300
250
=     200
ISO
IOO
50
/
r-
/
Pas
sing Thr
E
Dugh Bri
1
XPORTS
tish Colu
P30-194
mbia Cu
9'
stoms Pc
rfs
/
1930
1932
1934
1936
1938 1940        1942        1944 1946        1946
Source: British Columbia Bureau of Economics and Statistics.
1950
Order in Council the Special Products Board was authorized to act for the Canadian
Government, and the Trade Commissioner in turn was authorized to complete all
procurement, shipping, delivery, and other arrangements with the British Food Mission.
A total of 6,532 barrels moved out of New Westminster for the' United Kingdom
in two shipments, June 20th and July 19th, 1949. This represented about 1,300 net
tons of fruit and cleared up the inventory position before the new processing season.
The suppliers had already been paid by the Canadian Government. DD 18
british columbia.
Contract Movement.
The following table shows the comparative net fruit tonnage moved to the United
Kingdom by the Trade Commissioner's Office during the years 1941-47 inclusive, when
the British contracted directly with the suppliers through the Special Products Board:—
1941.*
1942.
1943.
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
Tons
112
1,362
821
985
64
Tons
BOO
Tons
	
	
Tons
700
100
	
Tons
1,345
205
	
	
Tons
2,341
374
	
Tons
2,910
450
403
* Tons net fruit content.
E.R.P. Movement to Ireland.
Prior to Government purchase of the inventory, the Trade Commissioner's Office
had initiated intensive negotiations, which were satisfactorily concluded, to move
approximately 600 net tons of fruit pulp to Ireland.
European Kecovery Plan funds to a total of $250,000 had been allocated to Ireland
for processed fruit purchases, after screening in Paris and Washington. With effective
co-operation of the Canadian Commercial Secretary in Dublin, representations were
made to persuade the Irish Finance and Agricultural authorities to use these dollars
for fruit pulp purchases in British Columbia. After intensive survey the matter was
finalized on February 9th. On February 23rd credits to a total of $146,000 (U.S.)
were established in Vancouver, and subsequent allocations brought the amount to
approximately $190,000 (U.S.).
After formalities were completed the business passed to private trading between
the suppliers on this side and their distributors or agents in Ireland. Shipment was
effected during March.
This E.R.P. deal with Ireland was the first favourable turn of events to relieve
a serious inventory position. Small in itself, it eased the bank credit structure in
preparation for the approaching crop season.
This is believed to be the first case where agricultural inventory has moved out of
British Columbia directly on E.R.P. fund authorizations. It resulted from successful
co-ordinated effort between the Provincial Trade Commissioner's Office, the suppliers
concerned, the departments at Ottawa, the Irish Jam Manufacturers Association, and
the Canadian Foreign Trade Service.
Other Market Outlets.
The Trade Commissioner has continued surveys for other market outlets but there
was no surplus inventory in 1949. The grower and processor policy for that year set
limits to S02 packing, prescribed by local requirements and firm inquiries from Eastern
Canada.
There was intimation in August that the authorities in Ireland would allow further
dollars for fruit pulp from Canada. While no offers could be made on small fruit pulps,
the Trade Commissioner's Office conducted an intensive survey in co-operation with
processing plants, and with interior and coast growers to determine the possibility of
moving tree fruit pulps on this dollar allocation. Unfortunately, the authorities in
Ireland were not interested in prune pulp, the main surplus problem. department op trade and industry. DD 19
INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH.
Channels for Secondary Industry.
In direct co-operation with the Engineering and other Divisions of the British
Columbia Research Council, and the Director's Office, the Trade Commissioner has
assisted in providing clear-cut channels for secondary industry to present their research
problems. It is gratifying to note the increased use of Research Council facilities by
secondary industry, the wide range of projects and problems, and the beneficial effect
on new and improved production.
The Trade Commissioner continues to serve (ex officio) as a member of the Board
of Management of the Council. He is also chairman of the Industries Advisory Committee, a cross-section of industrial advice with representation from the Canadian
Manufacturers' Association, Boards of Trade, Canadian Chamber of Commerce, transportation companies, banks, Regional Development Division, and the National Research
Council.
Advisory Committee Structure.
Before the year closed, a new scheme of advisory structure for the Council had
been approved, to become effective not later than June, 1950. Under this proposal, the
five primary industry advisory committees, and the Industries Advisory Committee,
will be replaced by selected panels of advice available to the Director and his staff
under special project headings.
At the outset of the Council work four years ago, the Trade Commissioner was
general convenor of the Advisory Committee structure, and assisted in setting up the
primary industry committees, as well as the Industries Advisory Committee. The
Trade Commissioner has now worked closely with the special committee charged with
the reorganization.
The Office will still be a central point of contact for public relations phases of the
work of the Council. It will co-operate directly in securing and maintaining the support of industry for the work of the Council. It will continue to assist in the practical
application of research results.
INDUSTRIAL DESIGN.
The Honourable the Minister of Trade and Industry announced on September 15th,
the creation of the British Columbia Industrial Design Committee. It is directly
associated with the National Industrial Design Committee, chaired by D. B. Cruikshank
of Ottawa.
The British Columbia Committee is the first regional committee of its kind. The
Trade Commissioner is chairman, and as at December 31st, 1949, the personnel of the
Committee was as follows: Chairman, R. S. O'Meara, Trade Commissioner; secretary,
Paul B. Wisnicki, Department of Architecture, University of British Columbia;
Professor Fred Lasserre, M. M. Frazer, R. V. Robinson, J. Melville, A. C. Foreman,
Dr. S. E. Maddigan, H. A. Jones, C. H. Scott, Colonel L. Moore Cosgrave.
This listing provides representation from Provincial Department of Trade and
Industry, Department of Architecture, University of British Columbia, British Columbia Division Canadian Manufacturers' Association, Vancouver Board of Trade, British
Columbia Research Council, Provincial Department of Education, Vancouver Arts
School, and the Federal Department of Trade and Commerce.
One main objective is the greater use of Canadian talent in the design of all types
of consumer goods.
The formation of the local committee means that British Columbia now recognizes
the growing importance of industrial design as a factor in production and marketing DD  20 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
problems. The Provincial Committee will emphasize the place of our secondary industries in the national programme.
An exhibition of Industrial Design was held in Vancouver during the first three
weeks of December. It was first organized by the Department of Architecture, University of British Columbia, in co-operation with the National Committee, and the
National Gallery at Ottawa. At a later stage of organization the new Provincial
Committee became co-sponsors, and there was gratifying response in actual exhibit and
interest from British Columbia manufacturers.
Two members of the British Columbia Committee are members of the National
Committee at Ottawa. One appointment, that of Mr. M. M. Frazer, came directly as
a result of the local planning. Mr. Frazer is chairman of the Metals Trade Section,
British Columbia Division, Canadian Manufacturers' Association.
HANDICRAFT PRODUCTION.
In order to gauge the interest in handicraft production and to confirm the impression that marketing was a problem to many producers, a questionnaire was prepared
and mailed to all known groups and individuals interested in handicrafts.
The result of this survey was conclusive in that it brought out a definite interest
in increased production if there was some assurance of adequate markets. The survey
also brought to light the fact that the majority of producers would like to see a certain
standard maintained in respect to quality and in some instances with respect to prices.
There is no doubt that many of our tourist visitors are on the lookout for British
Columbia handicrafts and it is the intention of the Department of Trade and Industry
to promote production and sale as far as possible at the present time. Our growing
population and increasing tourist industry warrants investigation of the added potential revenue from the production of handicraft articles.
The plans are welded to instructional and other work already undertaken by the
Department of Education and the University of British Columbia.
At the close of the year the Trade Commissioner's Office was actively in correspondence with the Director of Handicrafts for New Brunswick, who had initiated a
meeting in Fredericton to discuss national planning and interprovincial co-operation.
These meetings were scheduled for January 18th, 19th, 20th, 1950.
INTERPROVINCIAL CO-OPERATION.
The Trade Commissioner represented the Department at the first conference of the
Provincial Government Trade and Industrial Development Agencies of Canada, which
was held at Gil-Mar Lodge, Lindsay, Ont., September 26th, 27th, and 28th, 1949.
The outstanding success of this constructive meeting can be attributed in large
measure to the initiative and planning of the Trade and Industry Branch of the Province of Ontario. All Provinces, except Newfoundland and Prince Edward Island, were
represented. In addition, there was active participation from the Canadian Bankers'
Association, the Department of Trade and Commerce (Ottawa), the Industrial Development Bank, and the railways.
This was a conference of working officials to compare facilities, to establish bases
of co-ordinated effort, and to cement and strengthen the Provincial department co-operation with Ottawa for industrial and trade promotion.
The conference, at its close, was constituted a " Continuing Conference of Provincial Government Trade and Industrial Development Agencies of Canada," with permanent secretariat in Toronto. Working committees will study continuing problems,
and it was decided to hold similar meetings in future years. department of trade and industry. DD 21
CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR.
Co-operation in 1949.
The second Canadian International Trade Fair was held in Toronto, May 30th to
June 10th. Buyers and business visitors from forty-three countries reviewed the
products of thirty-five nations. The Trade Commissioner attended the official opening
of the fair, and in the preceding months was closely identified with the organization
work for exhibitor and visitor participation from British Columbia.
The fair becomes in greater percentage each year a meeting place for those concerned in selling their wares in the dollar market. Canadian exhibitor participation
has decreased. This has been inevitable in view of the restricted export market position for secondary industries, and the position was reflected in a very small exhibitor
interest from British Columbia in 1949. The visitor and buyer participation represented a fair cross-section from the Province.
It has been the policy of the fair administration to limit exhibits to those companies actually prepared and able to offer their goods to foreign markets. For the
fair in 1950, scheduled for May 29th to June 9th at Toronto, a change of policy may
allow so-called " prestige " exhibits.
Co-operation in 1950.
Arrangements for British Columbia participation in the 1950 fair were already
under way at the close of the year. The Trade Commissioner, with the Western Representative of the Foreign Trade Service, Vancouver, is co-convener of a steering committee to discuss participation with interested groups of primary and secondary
industry. At a later stage a larger local committee will clear all phases of British
Columbia buyer and visitor and exhibitor participation. There has been continued an
active co-operation with Boards of Trade, Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Canadian
Manufacturers' Association, and the Regional Development Division of the Department
of Trade and Industry.
During December the administrator of the fair made a survey in the different
Provinces and was in Vancouver and Victoria for some days, working closely with the
Department of Trade and Industry.
The place of Provincial organizations in arrangements for the International Trade
Fair was a subject of special study and recommendations at the Interprovincial Trade
and Industry meeting at Lindsay, Ont., in September.
CO-OPERATION WITH VANCOUVER BOARD OF TRADE.
Co-ordinated effort and happy association with the bureaux of the Vancouver Board
of Trade has been a feature of the period under review. The Trade Commissioner is
a member of the executive of the Foreign Trade Bureau, an active member of the
British Columbia Products Bureau, and represents the Department on the executive of
the Transportation and Customs Bureau of the Vancouver Board of Trade.
While special surveys have centred in Vancouver, sincere tribute is also paid to
the active help and co-operation of the New Westminster Board of Trade, Victoria
Chamber of Commerce, the smaller Boards of Trade throughout the Province, and the
British Columbia representative of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce.
TRANSPORTATION PROBLEMS.
The office can report another active year of effective co-operation with transportation companies through their departments concerned with industrial development,
freight traffic, and public relations. Continued co-operation with the airlines can also
be noted, with special reference to development of air cargo, routing, and special
documentation problems. DD  22 BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
Financial assistance was again extended by grant to the Vancouver Board of
Trade through the Transportation Bureau. This made it possible to cover the outlying
parts of the Province from Vancouver, through the smaller Boards of Trade, in a
number of car loading, routing, and related transportation problems.
PUBLIC RELATIONS, ITINERARIES AND INTRODUCTIONS.
This field has again proved itself to be one of the important functions of the Office
of Trade Commissioner.   Assistance has been given under these main headings:—
(1) Attendance at annual and special meetings of Provincial and National
trade organizations.
(2) Itineraries and other arrangements for business visitors from Eastern
Canada and overseas.
(3) Arrangements for visits of officials from Ottawa and for tours of Federal
Trade Commissioners. Sixteen Foreign Trade Service officials from different parts of the world were on tour in British Columbia during the
year under review. The Department also helped in survey arrangements
for two visiting groups of new assistant trade commissioners, on tour of
industries prior to overseas appointments. The Deputy Minister, Trade
and Commerce, Ottawa, was in Vancouver for two days in November,
following his featured address to the Pacific Northwest Trade Association
Conference at Spokane. The administrative assistant, Office of Trade
Commissioner, attended the Spokane meeting.
(4) Co-operation with United Kingdom and other trade missions. The number of these has increased greatly since devaluation, and in co-operation
with the United Kingdom Trade Commissioner Service and the Office in
London, the Department has been able to render constructive assistance
in surveys and itinerary plans.
(5) Arrangements for visits of diplomatic representatives and High Commissioners of Commonwealth countries.
(6) Co-operation with local consular corps and with offices of Commonwealth
and foreign governments. Special reference is again made to the happy
and effective basis of co-operation maintained with the Vancouver office
of the United Kingdom Trade Commissioner and the Vancouver office of
the Australian Government Trade Commissioner. DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 23
REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF ECONOMICS AND
STATISTICS.
Before proceeding to review the work accomplished by the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics during 1949, it may be useful to explain that the Bureau is, as its name
implies, a fact-finding and advisory body. It has two primary functions: the first is
to provide economic counsel and, when necessary, to conduct investigations into economic
questions affecting the Province; the second function is to collect and compile economic
statistics of interest to the Province.
In order to carry out these objectives, the Bureau is divided into several sections
dealing with statistical services and one section dealing with economic research. To
ensure technical proficiency, the Bureau has endeavoured to follow the policy of building
up a small corps of professionally trained persons who could be relied upon to perform
a variety of difficult economic analyses. It has also been the policy to make the services
of the technical personnel continuously available to all other departments of the
Government.
Since other Governmental agencies are also concerned with the collection of
statistics, a series of working agreements designed to prevent overlapping or duplication
has been arranged in recent years between this Bureau and the Dominion Bureau of
Statistics, Ottawa, as well as with the Provincial Departments of Mines, Labour,
Provincial Secretary, and Health and Welfare. During 1949 the essential statistical
services performed for the other Provincial departments, as well as for the Department
of Trade and Industry, were maintained. A brief description of the research and
statistical services performed during the year has been provided under the appropriate
divisions which follow. DD 24
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
AGRICULTURE
PRODUCTION
(in  Millions  of   Dollars)
4U0
300
200
100
-—
.——\
n
100
400
FORESTRY
.
/
300
/
/
200
100
—
n
1939 1941 1943 1945 1947 1949 1939 1941 1943 1945 1947 1949
PRODUCTION
MIN!NG (in  Millions of  Dollars)
400 r
FISHERIES
1939 1941 1943 1945 1947 1949 1939 1941 1943 '945 1947 1949
PRICES
RETAIL  PRICES (lndex  Nos)
200 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 200'r
WHOLESALE  PRICES
[
	
IS
35-1939--
IOO
1
1926.
OO
|
1939    1941    1943   .1945    1947   1949 1939    1941    1943    1945    1947   1949
CONSTRUCTION
CONTRACTS AWARDED (in  Mlllions of  Dollars)       VALUE 0F  BUILDING  PERMITS
75
50
25
n
1939    1941    1943    1945    1947   1949 1939 1941    1943    1945    1947   1949
YEARS YEARS
1-1939—58   Municipalities  reporting   m  Conoda 1940-1946—2Q4   Mumc.palit.e.   reporting   ,n  Canada 1947-1949—507  Municipalities  reporting  ,n  Canada
1949  Figures Subject to Revision. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 25
240
220
200
_o 180
tt
uj 160
ca
_> 140
Z 120
X ioo
UJ
Q   80
?|60
40
20
0
1000
tt 800
<
o
Q600
Z'400
o
EMPLOYMENT
BANK  DEBITS
I
__:'
z
o
/
1926
■100
t
z
o
1943 1945
YEARS
RETAIL SALES
INTERNAL TRADE
400
1943 1945
YEARS
1947 1949
CONSUMPTION
OF
ELECTRICAL
POWER
^-
?
n
s
Z 200
100
<    90
O
Q
O   *o
z
o
/
^
^s
1943 1945
YEARS
WHOLESALE  SALES
/
-^~
1935-193-
■100
. j
1941 1943 1945 1947
YEARS
SALES OF  LIFE  INSURANCE
s
<*
I
_
1939
1943 1945
YEARS
1939
1943 1945
YEARS
1949
Z
o
z
o
2
FREIGHT
LOADED
0
/
8
/
0
1941
1943 1945
YEARS
1949  Figures  Subject to Revision
1947 DD 26
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
EEVIEW OF BUSINESS ACTIVITY IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
While final statistics are not available, preliminary statistics indicate that British
Columbia's economy is running at about the same high level established during 1948.
Current business conditions can be measured by a variety of indicators, each of which
has its special value. There are, of course, many forces operating in our economy which
may work in opposite directions at the same time. The general trend will move upward
or downward, depending upon which of these forces has the greater strength. The
present situation would seem to indicate that the two opposing forces are not far from
a balance; and it might be expected that the interaction of these forces within the next
few months will suggest which direction business activity will take.
Incomplete returns indicate that the net value of production of primary and
secondary industries amounted to over $910,000,000* in 1948, as compared with
?769,392,150t in 1947 and $583,012,000f in 1946.
* Preliminary estimate.
t Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 19J/-7 and 19A8, with
Preliminary Estimates for 19^9.
Unit or
Base
Period.
1949
Preliminary
Estimates.1"
1948.
1947.
Mining—-
Total value of production1	
Gold production1	
Silver production1	
Copper production1	
Lead production1	
Zinc production1	
Coal production1	
Forestry—
Total value of production2	
Timber scaled2	
Paper production2	
Fisheries—
Total value of production6	
Pack of canned salmon3	
Agriculture—
Total value of production*.	
Apples—
Total shipments5	
Domestic shipments5	
Export shipments5	
External Trade—
Export of canned salmon6	
Export of planks and boards, Douglas fir6	
Export of red-cedar shingles6	
Internal Trade—■
Index of wholesale sales6	
Total retail sales6	
Department stores	
Food-stores	
Gasoline consumed9	
Railway freight loaded in British Columbia6..
Consumption of electric power6	
Sales of life insurance6	
145,000,000
M.B.M.
Ton
Cases
Boxes
Boxes
Boxes
Cwt.
MFt.
Sq.
1935-39-=100
000$
000 $
000 $
Gallons
Tons
000 kwh.
000$
350,000,000
55,000,000
1,435,000
145,000,000
340.0
780,000
142,000,000
10,400,000
3,640,000
107,000
152,524,752
10,603,250
5,038,592
9,616,174
60,072,542
41,234,603
10,854,108
363,786,000
4,293,465
407,210
58,605,619
1,313,909
142,108,000
6,249,429
3,716,845
2,532,584
275,724
802,306
2,323,933
333.S
731,520
102,378
127,260
131,367,552
10,325,427
3,436,778
103,301
113,221,254
8,715,455
4,109,538
8,519,741
41,884,977
30,147,039
8,587,380
282,288,388
4,187,816
410,994
58,764,950
1,527,135
134,508,400
6,792,906
4,838,249
1,954,657
368,143
877,600
2,024,442
314.6
664,470
87,020
115,160
117,557,727
9,904,060
3,011,763
103,104
1 British Columbia Department of Mines.
2 British Columbia Department of Lands and Forests, Forest Service,
s British Columbia Department of Fisheries.
4 British Columbia Department of Agriculture.
5 British Columbia Tree Fruit Board.
6 Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
9 British Columbia Department of Finance.
10 Subject to revision. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 27
Table 1.—Economic Activity in British Columbia, 1947 and 1948, with
Preliminary Estimates for 1949—Continued.
Unit or
Base
Period.
1949
Preliminary
Estimates.10
1948.
1947.
Construction—
000 $
000 $
000$
Number
$
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926=100
1926 = 100
$
85,000
98,000
7,600,000
216,000
35,000,000
200.0
70,584
96,953
7,043,620
191,572
31,292,160
202.6
223.0
285.5
196.3
221.7
240.1
228.7
109.4
207.9
180.1
202.2
154.9
254.5
265.7
650,000,000
39,460
61,228
6,539,916
Tourist trade—
205,216
Estimated expenditure of the United States
33,510,815
Employment—6
193.7
217.0
309.4
172.5
Pulp and paper	
202.6
231.3
233.0
106.1
199.1
168.2
180.8
158.9
247.1
238.1
690,000,000
557,075,508
6 Dominion Bureau of Statistics.
7 Bureau of Economics  and  Statistics,  preliminary estimate:    1947  and  1948,  Dominion  Bureau of Statistics
estimates.
8 Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Labour Division.
10 Subject to Revision.
THE RESEARCH DIVISION.
External Trade of British Columbia.
The agreement between this Bureau and the External Trade Branch, Dominion
Bureau of Statistics, consummated in the fall of 1938, has continued in force. Under
this agreement the Bureau receives monthly a duplicate set of punch-cards showing
in detail the importation and exportation of every commodity normally listed in the
Federal trade reports which has been recorded at customs ports located in this Province.
While these records do not distinguish the exported merchandise originating in British
Columbia nor the imports destined for consumption in this Province from the other
goods passing through these customs ports the records do provide the basis for a very
comprehensive annual report on the foreign trade of British Columbia.
Preliminary statements showing the external trade through British Columbia
customs ports covering commodities with an aggregate value of $50,000 and over are
now published annually. In addition, statements showing the trade through British
Columbia customs ports are prepared monthly. These reports cover all exports valued
at $25,000 and over and all imports valued at $15,000 and over. A brief insight into
the foreign trade of British Columbia for the period 1939 to 1948 can be secured from
Tables 2 and 3.    Only the main commodity groups have been shown in these tables.
From Table 2 it may be seen that exports in 1948 reached an all-time high of
$327,144,239, an increase of 192.21 per cent, since 1939. Table 2 is of further interest
inasmuch as the exports of three of our primary industries—namely, agriculture,
fisheries, and forest products—have diminished, whereas the exports of our more or DD 28
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
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|_    .m     -     w     __i     U     r-    -h DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 29
less secondary industries—fibres and textiles, iron and its products, non-ferrous metals,
chemicals, and miscellaneous products—have increased over the previous year.
From Table 3 it may be seen that imports also reached a new high of $192,413,112,
an increase of 227.27 per cent, since 1939.
British Columbia products were exported to 104 different countries during 1948.
The markets were: United Kingdom, $67,507,805; total British Empire, $98,665,564;
United States, $163,964,425; and total all foreign countries, $228,458,772. In point
of value the most important British Columbia products exported during 1948 were:
Planks and boards, lead, newsprint, red cedar shingles, woodpulp, salmon (canned),
plywood, copper, and railroad ties. Imports were brought into British Columbia from
eighty-three different countries during 1948. The sources of supply were: United
Kingdom, $23,020, 366; total British Empire, $43,102,389; United States, $124,515,912;
total all foreign, $149,310,723.
In point of value the leading products imported for consumption in British
Columbia during 1948 were: Crude petroleum, gasoline and other petroleum products,
sugar, copra, coffee, traction engines and parts, logging machinery, settlers' effects,
and automobiles.
Preliminary statistics for 1949 indicate a decided increase in the value of exports
through British Columbia customs ports.    Imports are also somewhat higher.
COST OF LIVING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA.
In August of 1947 the Bureau of Economics and Statistics discontinued the collection of materia] used in, and the compilation of, the cost-of-living index. It was
decided at this time that the cost-of-food index, being a useful measurement, should
be maintained.
There were two major reasons for discontinuing the cost-of-living index. Primarily, the index was no longer fulfilling the function for which it was organized—
a basis for relief payments. Also, it was being used as a measure of costs in various
labour arbitrations and adjustments in salaries and wages, for which it was not
designed.
Secondly, the index would not stand up under strong statistical analysis, nor could
it be considered to satisfy the standards of economists. The index was based on
nutrition standards, which have not a direct relationship to actual expenditures. For
its originally designed purpose, the index was adequate. When this purpose no longer
existed, it was decided that the measure should be discontinued and the cost-of-living
figures published by the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Ottawa, be the official reference.
The cost-of-food index was continued, and the information is published in the
quarterly report on cost of food in British Columbia.
Table 4.—Dominion Bureau of Statistics Index Numbers of the Cost of Living
in Canada, 1939-49.
Month.
Adjusted
to Base
100.0 lor
August,
1939.
On Bask of Average Prices 1935-39 as 100.
Light and
Fuel.
Clothing.
Home
Furnishings and
Services.
100.7
101.4
100.2
101.7
100.2
101.7
99.9
101.2
99.9
101.1
99.9
101.1
100.1
101.0
100.1
100.9
100.1
100.9
99.6
100.8
99.6
101.0
Miscellaneous.
1939, yearly average
January	
February....	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
100.3
99.9
99.8
99.8
99.8
99.7
100.0
100.0
100.0
102.7
101.5
101.1
100.7
100.6
100.6
100.6
100.5
100.8
100.8
100.8
103.5
100.6
103.8
99.9
103.4
98.7
103.4
98.5
103.4
98.3
103.4
98.2
103.8
98.1
103.8
99.0
103.8
99.3
103.8
99.4
103.8
106.3
104.4
101.2
101.0
101.0
100.4
100.4
100.2
99.8
99.3
99.0
98.9
104.4
101.4
101.1
101.1
101.1
101.4
101.4
101.3
101.3
101.3
101.3
101.7 Table 4.—Dominion Bureau of Statistics Index Numbers of the Cost of Living
in Canada, 1939-49—Continued.
Adjusted
to Base
100.0 for
August,
1939.
On
Base of Average Prices 1935-39 as 100.
Month.
Total.
Food.
Rent.
Light and
Fuel.
Clothing.
Home
Furnishings and
Services.
Miscellaneous.
1939—Continued.
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.0
103.8
103.8
104.1
104.1
104.8
105.1
105.8
106.2
106.9
107.1
107.4
107.3
107.3
107.7
108.5
109.6
111.0
112.8
113.8
114.6
115.4
114.9
114.5
114.8
115.0
115.0
115.2
115.8
117.0
116.8
116.5
116.9
117.7
117.9
116.2
116.0
116.3
116.7
117.2
117.6
117.9
118.3
118.5
118.4
118.5
118.4
	
118.1
118.0
118.1
118.2
118.3
118.1
118.1
118.0
117.9
117.7
118.0
117.6
103.8
103.8
105.6
103.8
103.8
104.6
104.6
104.9
104.9
105.6
105.9
103.6
107.0
107.8
108.0
111.7
108.3
108.2
108.2
108.6
109.4
110.5
111.9
113.7
114.7
115.5
116.3
115.8
117.0
115.4
115.7
115.9
115.9
116.1
116.7
117.9
117.7
117.4
117.8
118.6
118.8
118.4
117.1
116.9
117.2
117.6
118.1
118.5
118.8
119.2
119.4
119.3
119.4
119.3
118.9
119.0
118.9
119.0
119.1
119.2
119.0
119.0
118.9
118.8
118.6
118.9
118.5
107.1
104.7
105.6
104.5
104.5
104.8
104.8
104.4
103.8
105.3
105.4
105.4
106.1
108.7
109.1
116.1
109.7
108.8
109.0
110.1
109.7
112.5
116.6
121.3
123.3
123.2
125.4
123.8
127.2
122.3
123.1
123.7
123.7
124.3
126.2
130.3
129.6
128.5
129.8
132.4
132.8
130.7
127.3
126.7
127.7
128.7
129.9
130.9
131.8
133.2
133.5
132.9
133.1
132.7
131.3
131.5
130.9
131.1
131.5
131.7
131.1
132.0
131.5
131.2
130.8
131.6
130.3
104.4
104.4
106.3
104.4
104.4
104.4
104.4
106.9
106.9
106.9
106.9
106.9
107.7
107.7
107.7
109.4
107.7
107.7
107.7
107.7
109.7
109.7
109.7
109.7
109.7
111.2
111.2
111.2
111.3
111.2
111.2
111.2
111.2
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.5
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.3
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
111.9
112.0
112.0
112.0
105.3
105.4
107.1
105.5
105.8
105.7
105.9
106.1
106.0
107.9
108.4
108.5
108.0
108.5
108.5
110.3
108.6
108.7
108.9
108.9
109.2
110.2
110.5
110.5
110.9
112.1
112.7
112.7
112.8
112.9
112.9
112.9
112.9
112.9
112.6
112.5
112.5
112.5
112.8
112.8
112.8
112.9
112.8
112.7
112.7
112.7
112.7
113.0
113.4
113.4
113.4
113.3
113.3
111.9
110.6
112.7
113.0
113.0
113.0
112.5
112.5
108.9
108.7
108.7
108.7
108.1
108.1
99.6
103.3
109.2
103.3
103.3
107.8
107.8
107.8
109.1
109.1
109.1
113.1
113.5
113.5
113.5
116.1
113.7
114.1
114.2
114.3
114.5
114.9
115.1
115.7
117.4
119.6
120.0
119.9
120.0
119.9
119.8
119.8
119.8
119.9
119.9
120.0
120.1
120.1
120.1
120.1
120.2
120.5
120.2
120.1
120.1
120.2
120.2
120.4
120.5
120.6
120.6
121.1
121.1
121.1
121.5
121.1
121.3
121.3
121.4
121.5
121.5
121.5
121.5
121.5
121.6
121.6
121.6
101.0
104.1
107.2
104.3
104.3
105.9
106.1
106.2
106.5
106.9
106.9
109.4
109.7
110.0
110.7
113.8
110.8
111.5
111.6
111.7
111.8
112.1
113.0
114.3
115.8
117.3
117.9
117.9
117.9
118.0
118.0
118.0
118.1
118.0
117.9
117.9
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
118.0
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.8
117.9
118.2
118.2
118.2
118.8
118.4
118.4
118.4
118.4
118.4
118.5
118.4
118.3
118.5
118.4
118.4
118.4
118.4
101.9
102.0
1940, yearly average.
102.3
101.8
101.9
101.9
101.8
101.8
101 8
July	
102.8
102 8
102 8
1941, yearly average.
105.1
103.1
103.1
102.9
102.9
105.1
105.6
July	
105.6
106.1
106.4
106.5
November	
106.7
103.7
1942, yearly average.
107.1
106.8
108.1
March	
107.1
107.1
May	
107.1
107.1
July	
107.1
107.1
107.1
107.2
1943, yearly average-
108.0
107.5
107.5
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
107.5
107.7
108.6
108.2
108.2
108.2
108.3
108.3
108.3
108.6
1944, yearly average.
108.9
108.9
February	
109.1
109.0
109.0
109.0
109.0
July	
109.0
109.0
109.0
108.9
108.9
108.9 DEPARTMENT OP TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD   31
Table 1*.—Dominion Bureau of Statistics Index Numbers of the Cost of Living
in Canada, 1939-49—Continued.
Month.
Adjusted
to Base
100.0 for
August,
1939.
On Base of Average Prices 1935-39 as 100.
Total.
Food.
Rent.
Light and
Fuel.
Clothing.
Home
Furnishings and
Services.
Miscellaneous.
1945. yearly average.
119.5
133.0
112.1
1
107.0               122.1
119.0
109.4
117.7
118.6
130.2
112.0
109.1               121.8
118.3
109 2
February	
117.7
118.6
130.6
112.0
107.4              121.7
118.4
109.2
117.8
118.7
131.0
112.0
107.3
121.7
118.5
109.2
117.8
118.7
131.0
112.0
106.7
121.8
118.5
109.2
May	
118.1
119.0
131.7
112.1
106.6
122.0
118.9
109.4
June	
118.7
119.6
133.4
112.1
106.6
122.1
118.9
109.4
July	
119.3
120.3              135.6
112.1
106.5
122.2
119.5
120.5              136.2
112.1
106 5
122.1
119 3
109 5
118.9
119.9              134.2
112.1
106.7
122.2
119.4
109.5
118.8              119.7              133.3
112 3
106.7
122.4
109 6
118.9              119.9              134.0
112.3
106.6
122.5
119.4
109.6
119.1              120.1              134.3
112 3
107.1
122.5
119 5
109 6
1946, yearly average..
1
                123.6
140.4
112.7
107.4
126.3
124.4
112.6
118.9              119.9
132.8
112 3
107.1
122 fi
119 5
110 9
118.9   •   |      119.9
132.5
112.3
107.1               122.7
120 1
110 9
119.1              120 1
133.1
119.8               120.8
135.1
112.3
107.2              123.2
111 0
121.0               122.0
137.7
112.6
107.2              123.7
122 1
111 5
122.6              123 6
142.1
107 2              124 3
July	
124.1              125 1
144 2
124.5              125.5
143.2
107.2              129.6
146 5
November	
126.1              127.1
146.6
113.4
108.6              131.1
129.2
114.1
December	
126.1              127.1
146.4
113.4
109.2              131.2
129.4
114.1
1947, yearly average.
               135.5
159.6
116.7
115.9              143.9
141.6
117.0
126.0              127.0
127.9              128.9
145.5
148.7
113.4
113.4
109.0 131.5
109.1 131.9
129.8
130.9
114.7
115.5
February	
127.9
129.6
128.9
130.6
148.7
151.6
113.4
113.4
109.1              133.1
109.1              136.9
133.6
137.2
116.0
116.3
April	
May	
132.1
133.1
164.9
115.4
116.2
140.0
138.6
116.8
133.8
134.9
157.7
159.8
117.8
117.8
116.7
117.3
142.4
143.2
139.8
142.5
117.1
117.2
July	
134.8              135.9
August	
136.5
136.6
160.6
117.8
118.6
145.5
143.7
117.2
138.3
139.4
165.3
117.8
121.1
152.0
147.4
117.5
141.1
142.5
142.2
143.6
171.3
173.6
119.9
119.9
121.9
122.6
154.2
157.0
149.9
151.4
117.6
118.2
144.8
146.0
155.0
178.7
195.5
119.9
120.7
120.3
124.8
159.3
174.4
154.9
162.6
119.8
123.4
1948, yearly average.
147.1               148.3
182.2
119.9
120.4
161.2
158.4
122.6
148.9       i       150.1               186.1
119.9
119.9
119.9
120.1
121.0
165.1
169.9
159.9
161.2
161.9
122.8
122.8
122.9
149.6               150.8
150.4               151.6
185.9
186.8
April	
121.3               172.9
May	
152.1              153.3
191.2
120.9
122.7              173.6
161.9
122.9
June	
153.1              154.3
193.9
120.9
124.3              174.8
162.0
122.7
156.7             156.9
156.3              157.5
201.3
202.6
120.9
120.9
124.5       I       175.4
162.8
161.4
123.1
123.4
August	
127.7
175.9
157.6              158.9
203.9
121.0
128.5
179.9
164.2
124.4
158.3              159.6
205.4
121.0
128.8
181.0
165.1
124.4
November	
158.3              159.6
204.7
121.0
129.0
181.5
166.0
124.6
December	
157.6      1      158.9
202.0
121.7
129.1              181.5
166.2
124.6
1949, yearly average.
158.3              159.6
158.2              159.5
202.2
121.7
130.0
130.8
181.9
181.8
167.0
167.8
126.6
128.1
February	
200.4              121.7
March	
157.0      |      159.2
199.1
121.7
131.0
182.7
167.9
128.1
158.0              159.3
158.2              159.5
159.2             160.5
198.5
199.5
202.9
122.4
122.4
122.4
131.0
129.1
128.7
183.2
183.3
183.3
168.0
168.1
167.7
128.4
128.4
128.4
June	
July	
160.8 162.1
161.5              162.8
161.0      |      162.3
160.9 162.2
        i        	
207.2
209.2
207.0
205.0
123.4
123.4
123.9
123.9
129.1              183.3
129.5              183.2
130.1              183.5
134.1      1      184.1
       1       	
167.5
167.4
167.4
167.2
128.5
128.9
128.9
130.2
November	
       1       	
       1        	 DD  32                                                              BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 5.—Comparative Food Indexes.
The Dominion Bureau of Statistics food index is given below, adjusted to the base
1936 = 100, with comparative figures for British Columbia prepared by the Bureau of
Economics and Statistics.
Month.
Canada.*
British
Columbia.
Month.
Canada.*
British
Columbia.
1939—
August	
First
of Month.
101.53
101.64
108.69
111.15
111.55
106.85
106.85
107.16
107.16
106.75
106.13
107.67
107.78
107.77
Fifteenth
of Month.
94.48
103.90
104.38
104.74
101.51
100.43
100.97
101.22
102.53
101.77
101.51
103.47
103.84
1 03.33
1944—
January	
First
of Month.
134.46
133.84
134.05
134.46
134.66
134.05
134.97
134.46
134.15
133.74
134.56
133.23
133.13
133.54
133.95
133.95
134.66
136.40
138.65
139.26
137.22
136.30
137.01
137.32
135.79
135.48
136.09
138.14
140.80
145.30
147.44
147.96
146.42
149.80
149.90
144.69
148.77
150.31
152.04
155.01
158.38
161.25
163.39
164.21
169.02
175.15
177.51
182.72
186.30
190.29
190.08
191.00
195.50
Fifteenth
of Month.
128.28
1940—
128.42
July	
128.06
July                                 	
127.95
1945—
September	
128.82
108.49                  104.92
111.15                  106.30
129.33
1941—
January	
112.17
111.25
111.45
112.58
112.17
107.03
108.93
109.02
111.42
111.81
130.96
October	
November	
130.17
115.03                   116.09
119.22                   117.07
124.03                   120.55
126.07                   121.10
125.97                   121.24
December	
July         	
1946—
127.87
October	
128.22
126.58
125.05
125.87
123.93
121.57
120.99
122.55
134.98
1942—
July.. .
February	
138.43
126.48                   123.71
126.48
127.10
129.04
133.23
132.52
131.39
132.72
135.38
135.79
130.16
129.55
130.57
131.60
132.82
133.84
134.76
136.20
136.50
135.90
136.09
135.69
125.12
144.64
July                             	
1947—
128.39
152.43
134.63
159.38
1943—
January	
166.07
134.19
September	
182.36
June	
135.46
July	
19 4S—
September	
October	
132.45
February	
189.10
132.05
198.97
* Adjusted to base 1936=
= 100. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 33
Table 5.—Comparative Food Indexes—Continued.
Month.
Canada.*
British
Columbia.
Month.
Canada.'
British
Columbia.
1948—Continued,
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
November	
December.	
1949—
January.	
First
of Month.
198.26
205.83
207.16
208.49
210.02
209.30
206.54f
206.75
Fifteenth
of Month.
207.38t
209.12
1949—Continued.
February	
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September	
October	
First
of Month.
204.91
203.58
202.97
203.99
207.46
211.86
213.91
211.66
209.61
Fifteenth
of Month.
205.57
209.77
* Adjusted to base 1936 = 100.
f Revised since publication of last report.
Table 6.—Comparisons of a Minimum Food Budget* based on the Respective Average
Prices collected in Seattle, Wash., and Vancouver, B.C., November, 1947; May,
1948;  November, 1948;  and May, 1949.
Date.
Total Monthly
Budget* Cost
in Dollars.
Seattle.    Vancou-
ver.
Index of
Average Prices f
Nov., 1947=100.
Seattle.
Vancouver.
Comparison of
Budget Costs
in Dollars.
Seattle.
Vancouver.
Comparison of
Budget Costs
in Percentages.
Seattle.
Vancouver.
November, 1947..
May, 1948	
November, 1948t
May, 1949f	
November, 1949J.
67.42
67.67
68.56
65.10
50.62
51.94
60.49
59.94
100.00
100.37
101.69
96.56
100.00
102.37
119.50
118.41
I
-16.80
-15.73
+ 8.07
+5.16
+ 33.19
+ 30.28
+ 13.34
+8.61
* Budget based on monthly " basket-of-food " used in the British Columbia Cost-of-food Report.
t Dollar information is strictly comparable between May, 1949, and November, 1948. but the index numbers
(November, 1947=100) relative to these two dates are less satisfactory. This slight discrepancy is due to the fact
that price information in May, 1949, was less comprehensive than in November, 1947, and average prices in May,
1949, and November, 1948, used in the above table, were based on information from four stores, rather than five, as
was the case in November, 1947.
t Series discontinued.
Source:   Bureau of Economics and Statistics, Victoria. Table 7.—Index Numbers of the Cost of Living at Vancouver, B.C., at the
beginning of the Months from August, 1939-49.
(Base:  August, 1939=10.)
Year.
Total.
Food.
Rent.
Fuel.
Clothing.
Home
Furnishings and
Services.
Miscellaneous.
1939—
August.	
September.
October	
November.
December..
1940—
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September.
October	
November.
December..
1941—
January	
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August.	
September.
October	
November.
December..
1942—
January	
February-
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August	
September.
October	
November.
December..
1943—
January	
February...
March	
April	
May	
June	
July	
August-	
September.
October	
November..
December..
1944—
January	
February...
March	
April	
May	
June.	
July	
August	
September.
October	
100.0 100.0
106.3
106.0
106.1
106.0
104.5
105.8
105.6
109.0
110.9
112.0
112.7
120.4
124.0
112.4
112.1
112.2
113.3
115.3
115.8
117.2
115.1
117.1
117.3
118.2
118.3
118.1
117.4
117.8
118.1
117.7
118.1
99.1
99.1
99.1
99.1
99.2
99.2
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
99.4
124.1
122.8
123.3
126.0
131.9
133.1
137.5
129.4
135.8
134.7
137.2
135.9
135.5
131.9
133.7
134.2
132.7
133.2
100.0
103.5
103.5
108.8
108.8
108.8
108.8
108.8
108.8
108.8
108.8
108.!
108.8
111.5
99.4
9.4
99.4
100.7
100.7
101.4
101.4
101.4
101.4
102.1
102.1
102.8
102.8
102.8
102.8
100.0
100.6
104.6
104.6
108.1
109.3
109.3
111.2
111.4
112.8
112.9
113.2
114.7
118.3
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
111.5
108.6
103.5
103.5
104.2
113.9
113.9
113.9
113.9
113.9
100.0
100.0
102.0
102.1
103.9
104.0
103.6
105.3
106.9
107.4
107.6
107.9
110.7
112.3
118.8
118.8
118.6
118.6
119.8
119.8
119.8
117.9
120.1
122.1
122.8
123.2
123.3
123.4
123.4
123.3
123.6
124.0
100.0
100.3
100.3
100.2
100.2
99.6
101.0
101.0
101.0
101.3
101.1
104.2
104.7
104.9
113.1
113.1
112.8
113.1
113.0
112.9
113.0
113.0
113.0
113.8
113.8
115.7
115.7
115.5
115.5
115.8
115.8
115.8
100.0
102.1
102.6
102.9
103.4
103.0
103.7
104.0
105.3
106.1
106.5
107.5
110.4
112.3
104.9
105.2
105.2
105.2
105.3
105.3
105.3
107.2
107.2
107.7
107.8
108.5
108.7
109.0
108.6
108.6
108.6
108.7 Table 7.—Index Numbers of the Cost of Living at Vancouver, B.C., at the
beginning of the Months from August, 1939-49—Continued.
Year.
Total.
Food.
Rent.
Fuel.
Clothing.
Home
Furnishings and
Services.
Miscellaneous.
1944—Continued.
1
117.9
132.6
104.2
111.3
114.2
[      124.1
|      115.7
1      	
108.7
1        .
|
1945—
118.4
134.1
104.2
|      124.1
|      115.7
108.8
1
118.6
|      134.8
104.2
114.2
114.2
)      124.4
115.7
108.8
1
May	
120.0
[      138.2
104.9
|      126.1
J       115.8
108.8
1
120.4
119.0
124.7
139.4
104.9
114.2
126.1
|      115.7
I
134.6
105.6
114.2
126.1
|      115.6
108.8
|      136.8
105.6
114.2
|      126.4
115.7
1946—
February	
119.2
134.1
105.6
114.2
|      126.5
117.1
	
109.6
120.4
137.6
105.6
114.5
|      126.5
117.4
123.7
145.3
106.3
114.5
|      127.9
122.3
August	
124.7
145.6
106.3
114.5
|      129.8
124.9
112.3
October	
125.9
126.3
126.6
126.1
127.7
129.0
130.1
132.6
134.3
135.1
135.6
138.2
141.3
143.4
146.0
147.8
148,'7
149.7
151.0
153.5
164.3
159.2
159.5
160.6
161.3
161.1
160.8
160.8
160.8
160.7
160.5
161.1
162.0
163.6
164.2
163.5
148.0
147.7
147.8
146.0
149.6
151.5
152.8
156.9
159.7
161.1
160.5
167.3
175.0
180.1
182.1
184.4
185.1
185.5
187.4
193.7
195.5
207.1
207.1
209.3
210.9
210.0
208.8
207.4
206.7
206.4
205.2
206.8
209.7
214.2
214.4
211.6
107.0
107.0
107.0
107.0
107.0
107.0
107.0
107.9
110.1
110.1
110.1
110.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
112.1
113.2
113.2
113.2
114.8
114.8
115.3
114.5
123.3
126.0
126.0
126.0
126.0
126.0
130.0
130.0
130.0
130.0
130.0
130.9
130.9
127.3
127.3
127.3
129.8
129.8
137.5
137.5
137.9
138.9
138.9
138.9
138.9
138.9
138.9
138.9
138.9
139.7
139.7
139.7
139.7
139.7
139.7
131.8
132.0
132.4
132.7
133.1
134.7
138.7
143.6
145.6
146.6
150.7
154.1
155.7
159.2
164.5
165.9
168.8
174.9
178.5
178.8
180.9
186.8
187.6
190.7
192.3
192.3
192.3
192.9
193.3
193.3
192.3
192.9
193.2
192.9
192.3
192.4
          I
125.6
126.1
126.5
126.4
127.4
131.0
134.1
135.4
135.8
138.9
140.6
141.0
141.5
142.8
148.6
150.5
152.0
153.3
154.8
155.3
155.9
159.9
160.6
161.0
161.0
162.1
162.6
162.6
162.5
162.4
161.8
161.8
161.1
161.2
160.4
160.4
1
112.4
112 4
1947—
1948—
126.7
127.3
128.9
129.8
129.8
130.3
1949—
130.3
July                 	
1
	
1
[
'
Source: The Labour Gazette, Department of Labour, Ottawa, Ont. DD 36 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
THE TOURIST TRADE.
It is generally recognized that the ever-increasing annual revenue from the source
of American tourist travel in British Columbia is of major importance, in so far as it
commercializes the never-decreasing assets of scenic beauty and an equable climate.
The apparent steady growth of this industry in Canada is clearly outlined in the
following estimates of tourist expenditures which have been released periodically by
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in its publication " Canada's International Tourist
Trade " and which are self-explanatory.
Year. Expenditures in Canada.
1941  :  $107,000,000
1942         79,000,000
1943         87,000,000
1944   116,600,000
1945   163,300,000
1946   216,100,000
1947  241,086,000
1948 (subject to revision)     269,760,000
In 1941, this Bureau, after careful investigation, estimated that United States
travellers had expended $12,769,000 in British Columbia, and assuming the all-Canada
trend—as shown by the Dominion bureau figures above—to be also true of British
Columbia, purely tentative estimates have been found for 1942, 1943, and 1944, as follows: 1942, $9,430,000; 1943, $10,400,000; 1944, $13,026,000. The International Payments Branch of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics has estimated that United States
travellers expended $22,000,000 in British Columbia during 1945, $34,576,000 in 1946,
$33,510,815 in 1947, and $31,292,160 in 1948. A comparable 1949 figure could be estimated conservatively at $35,000,000.
In so far as specific figures pertaining to tourist travel to British Columbia are
only available at certain ports of entry where customs offices are established and no
record is kept of interprovincial travel, it is planned in 1950 that this Bureau, in
co-operation with the British Columbia Travel Bureau and the Department of Trade
and Industry, Government of the Province of Alberta, will resume the study of this
additional tourist traffic through the British Columbia-Alberta border, which was
unavoidably interrupted by war-time exigencies.
Preliminary statistics for 1949 indicate that the number of tourists entering
British Columbia from the United States well exceeded the 1948 totals (see Table 8).
Following the practice established in earlier years, American tourists visiting the
Province by automobile in 1948 have been listed in Chart 1 according to their State
origin in the United States. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 37
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0) Q DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD  39
RAILWAY FREIGHT RATE INVESTIGATION.
Under the leadership of the Attorney-General and his counsel, the British Columbia Government, aided by trade organizations and individuals, succeeded in obtaining
complete relief from the freight rate discrimination known as the mountain differential.
British Columbia was supported in its application by Alberta, Saskatchewan, and the
Maritimes.
The removal of the mountain differential culminates a struggle that has been
carried on since before the turn of the century. By 1914 rates were reduced from
2 miles Prairie scale equalling the charges on 1 mile Pacific scale down to 1% to 1.
By 1922, this adverse ratio was again reduced to 1% to 1, and finally, on July 1st, 1949,
equality with the Prairie scale was granted. There still remains, however, the differential between the Prairie and Eastern scales. This discrimination is currently being
pointed out along with other matters before the Royal Commission on Transportation.
In both the mountain differential case and the Royal Commission on Transportation,
members of the Bureau's research and stenographic staff have actively participated in
the preparation and presentation of the briefs. For example, the Assistant Director,
presenting the Provincial brief, was the main witness at the Victoria hearings of the
Royal Commission, and has been requested to accompany the legal counsel to Ottawa,
where he will advise and assist in the final hearings and debate.
The study of freight rates is a large and complicated subject. It has taken up,
over the past three years, a considerable portion of the Bureau's time and has required
from some members of the staff, efforts far greater than the normal call of duty.
Not only have rates cases been prepared but traffic advice has been given frequently
to industrialists investigating possibilities of locating in British Columbia. In this
regard it should be mentioned that the Bureau's library, of over 100 freight rate
tariffs, has proven adequate in dealing with most of the rate problems arising in
Western Canada and is available to any interested party.
PUBLICATIONS.
Business Activity in British Columbia.
In order that business-men would have a comprehensive current report of British
Columbia business activity under one cover, the Bureau now issues a monthly publication entitled " Business Activity in British Columbia." The first issue was released in
July of 1947.
British Columbia Trade Index.
A revised edition of the British Columbia Trade Index has been in preparation
during the last few months and it is expected that the new edition will be published
early in 1950.
British Columbia Facts and Statistics.
This publication was issued for the first time in 1948 and the third edition will be
released early in 1950. It provides statistics and facts relating to British Columbia
under the following headings: Population, education, government, banking, transportation, communication, retail sales, agriculture, fisheries, forestry, mining, manufacturing, tourist, and economic activity.
Monthly Statement of External Trade through British
Columbia Customs Ports.
This publication is released monthly and contains summaries of all exports and
imports through British Columbia customs ports and also detailed statements of all
exports valued at $25,000 and over, and all imports valued at $15,000 and over. dd 40 british columbia.
Annual Report of External Trade through British
Columbia Customs Ports.
This publication is released annually and contains detailed statements of the
exports and imports through British Columbia customs ports by commodities, by
countries, and by main commodity groups.
Co-operative Statistical Agreements.
The two co-operative statistical agreements negotiated in 1945 are now in operation. The Bureau has received most of the 1948 Census of Industry Schedules from
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. The monthly reports covering sawmills statistics
for the Province are received regularly.
The pay-roll statistics co-operative project is under way and monthly statements
are forwarded to Ottawa.
Advisory Services.
In addition to the projects previously outlined, the Bureau has prepared numerous
reports and memoranda for officials of other Provincial Government Departments.
Members of the research staff were again loaned to many other branches of the government, namely: Department of the Attorney-General, Regional Development Division,
and Hospital Insurance Service.
In addition, numerous tabulations and reports have been prepared for corporations, Boards of Trade, and private individuals, covering a wide range of topics.
LABOUR STATISTICS DIVISION.
One of the chief functions of the Labour Division of the Bureau of Economics and
Statistics has been the annual collection and compilation of labour statistics for the
Department of Labour. Under the terms of a co-operative inter-departmental agreement which has been in effect for some years, this survey was again conducted by the
division during 1949, the results of the survey, a summarization of 1948 statistical data
covering workers employed in British Columbia trades and industries, being published
in the Annual Report of the Department of Labour for that year.
In addition to the work of preparing the statistical sections of the above Report,
the Labour Division is currently engaged in the preparation of special compilations,
reports and statistical tables for private industry, Boards of Trade, banking institutions, and various Provincial Government Departments, and continues to prove of
assistance to the Bureau as a source of information and material required in handling
the increasing number of inquiries dealing with labour and its problems, and in the
work of maintaining the British Columbia Trade Index.
The importance of data dealing with wage-rates currently in effect in selected
occupations in the various industries has necessitated the continuance of the occupational wage-rate surveys mentioned as a new project in the previous year's report.
With increasing demand for this type of information, the scope of the surveys has been
enlarged, and with the co-operation of the inspection staff of the Department of Labour,
much valuable data has been obtained and made available to Provincial Departments
requiring this material.
In order to show from year to year the changes in the distribution of the Provincial
industrial pay-roll throughout the Province a regional breakdown has again been presented in the attached Table 9, which sets out the totals attributed to each of the ten
census divisions (see Chart 2) for the years 1944 to 1948. As mentioned in the Department of Labour Report, the industrial totals do not represent the total of all salaries
and wages paid in British Columbia, inasmuch as the industrial survey is not inclusive
of such pay-roll sections as Governmental workers, railways, wholesale and retail firms, department of trade and industry.
DD 41
financial houses, professional and service trades. The totals shown in the table, however, serve to indicate the changes occurring periodically in the different parts of the
Province.
Table 9.—British Columbia Industrial Pay-rolls by Statistical Areas
for the Comparative Years 1944 to 1948.
Regional Area.
Total Pay-bolls (Salaries
_ND Wages).
1944.
1945.
1946.
1947.
1948.
No. 1	
83,374,558
14,346,342
7.463,090
182,191,571
50,899,508
2,611,208
S,645,994
3,297,207
10,439,557
1,070,361
460,300
$8,234,954
13,664,192
8,729,129
169,595,070
52,450,178
2,711,859
9,351,432
3,128,665
7,148,057
551,210
772,126
$8,792,650
15,409,997
11,047,243
158,098,206
52,609,451
4,477,339
10,680,963
4,132,464
5,592,647
1,279,858
835,686
$13,089,910
20,065,572
15,407,310
196,814,172
73,305,625
7,068,034
14,091,695
7,287,683
8,260,298
8,385,552
2,421,303
$13,731,856
No. 2	
23,578,250
No. 3	
16,857,531
No. 4	
245,729,208
No. 5	
85,360,435
No. 6	
No. 7	
No. 8	
6,070,725
15,593,568
8,009,315
No. 9	
No. 10	
7,170,882
1,557,047
2,731,389
Totals        	
,289,799.678
$276,336,872
$272,956,504
$366,197,154
$426,390,206
MINING AND METALLURGICAL DIVISION.
In accordance with the agreement concluded in 1938 between the Provincial
Department of Mines, the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and the Bureau of Economics
and Statistics, all mining production statistics, with the exception of coal, are collected and compiled by this Division. Under this agreement, uniform statistics are
compiled from the one set of returns prepared by operators, and thereby avoids overlapping or duplication of effort involved on the part of the above-mentioned agencies,
which co-operate in the collection and use of mining statistics. The information, when
collected, is made available for general use in a form which preserves the confidential
aspects of individual company's or operator's returns. Mining statistics in detail will
be found in the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines. Numerous special compilations, covering data not readily available in other departmental reports, were compiled
during the period under review by this Division for Governmental Departments, banking and other institutions. Continued close contact with the Department of Mines has
been maintained, and special statistical reports prepared for the internal use of that
Department. Because of the continued interest in regional questions, the Division has
prepared a tabulation of the value of mine production by census divisions (see Chart 2)
covering the calendar years 1946, 1947, and 1948 (see Table 10). In addition, Table 1
of the Annual Report of the Minister of Mines for 1948 is also included in this report
(see Table 11). This gives the Provincial quantities and value of the various classes of
commodities produced by the industry.
The value of British Columbia mineral production in 1948 was $152,524,752. This
record value may be compared with $113,221,254, the 1947 value, and with $60,525,000,
the average value for the preceding twenty-five years. There were moderate increases
in the quantities of all the principal metals and of structural materials in 1948, but the
great increase in value can be traced in a great measure to substantially increased unit
prices for copper, lead, zinc, and coal, and to a moderate increase in the price of silver. DD 42
BRITISH COLUMBIA. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY.
DD 43
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Xt DD 44 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Table 11.—British Columbia Mine Production, 1947 and 1948.
Unit.
Quantity,
1947.
Quantity,
1948.
Value,
1947.
Value,
1948.
Metallics.
$
$
$
Lb.
Fine, oz.
Crude, oz.
$
Lb.
$
Oz.
Lb.
S
Lb.
$
384,255
560,183
941,266
8,519,741
8,514,870
200,585
$
113,173
444,000
1,126,437
41,783,921
243,282
6,969
43,025,388
286,230
20,332
9,616,174
10,018,050
585,200
3,735
306,400,709
332,996,351
41,884,977
59
4,109,538
517,794
680,792
30,147,039
60,072,542
21,175
5,707,691
6,718,122
5,038,592
Tin	
688,567
1,409,297
Zinc                       	
268,450,926
.296,012,941
41,234,603
Totals	
$
96,461,099
130,371,545
Fuel.
Coal (2,000 lb.)	
Tons
$
Tons
Tons
$
s
Tons
Tons
1,923,573
1,809,018
8,587,380
52,362
174,655
19,686
523,298
464
1,793
1,503,714
10,854,108
25,734
NON-METALLICS.
102,918
1,156
83,389
4,958
248,977
68,937
546,707
30,472
Gypsum and gypsum products	
..
163
157,161
144,448
1,409,156
Totals	
$
2,275,972
2,330,877
Clay Products and other
Structural Materials.
Clay Products.
Brick—
Number
Number
$
Tons
$
Number
$
$
4,318,000
1,232,812
■
3,810,000
2,584,752
122,660
64,849
389,899
9,675
158,276
361,975
3,476
9,332
111,300
129,268
392,458
32,922
116,513
597,541
5,138
9,611
Fire-bricks, blocks	
Structural tile—hollow blocks	
	
1,962,583
2,385,470
Pottery—glazed or unglazed    .
Other clay products	
	
Totals	
.
1,120,142
1,394,751
Other Structural Materials.
$
Tons
$
Tons
Tons
1
       1
1,896,772
714,126
1,828,919
119,971
216,873
2,441,304
1.177,632
3,060,535
54,220
839,780
151,671
209,453
Stone	
19,835
222,044
	
3,579
896,780
Totals	
$
4,776,661
7,573,471
.
Total value	
.
113,221,254
152,524,752
* Sulphur content of pyrites shipped  and  estimated  sulphur  contained  in   sulphuric  acid made from  waste
smelter-gases. DEPARTMENT OF  TRADE  AND  INDUSTRY. DD  45
MECHANICAL TABULATION DIVISION.
The year 1949 can be recorded as one of hard work for the Mechanical Tabulation
Division.
The main cause of this heavy schedule has been the work required for the British
Columbia Hospital Insurance Service where changes in policy with resulting changes
in procedure have presented a major problem in maintaining their punched card files
and meeting " dead-lines " on tabulations. A summary of the work completed for this
Department will be covered in a later section of this Report.
We have also been greatly handicapped by poor deliveries of equipment and
inability to obtain experienced staff.
The latter has necessitated the running of a training programme concurrently with
the heavy work schedule.
The moving of our office with all the heavy equipment in the midst of a peak load
presented another serious setback in our production programme.
During the year work was completed for the following Departments:—
(a) British Columbia Hospital Insurance Service.
(b) Surveyor of Taxes.
(c) British Columbia Forest Service.
(d) Civil Service Commission.
(e) Department of Labour.
(/)  Department of Education.
(g)  Motor-vehicle Branch.
(/_) Purchasing Commission.
The biggest of these jobs was of course Hospital Insurance and most of the
others have had to suffer to a certain extent because of the urgency of this work.
However, we still have been able to maintain a fairly reasonable schedule for the other
Departments.    Summary of the work done for each Department follows:—
Hospital Insurance.
A brief resume of the work done for each section of this Department follows.
Registrations.
(a) Completion of 1949 certificates.
(b) Preparation of an alphabetical index of beneficiaries under the plan. This in
itself was a tremendous job, requiring the reproduction of 1,000,000 cards
which had to be sorted alphabetically and required the passing of approximately 20,000,000 cards through the sorters before the final listing of the
names on continuous forms for binding into book form. This job was completed in about three months which is an outstanding accomplishment from a
technical point of view.
(c) Correcting punch card files to cover the 120,000 " Change Notices " that have
been received.
(d) The running of the 1950 combined billing and Certificate for District Offices
involving 700,000 cards which was completed by September 15th.
(e) The printing of ledger cards for the District Offices with a volume of some
700,000 cards.
Hospital Claims.
During the year some 900,000 cards have been punched covering approximately
130,000 claims. These cards have been balanced and the following prepared from
them:—
(a) Hospital remittance listings.
(_>)  Municipal billings.
(c)  Income tax statements. DD 46 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Payroll Deduction.
In the early part of the year payroll deduction listings were being balanced and
remittance listings prepared on our equipment. Following the change of policy to the
dual purpose type of card we were required to reproduce and interpret some 150,000
cards for hand-posting. Since that time billings have only been prepared for a few
specific companies.
Surveyor of Taxes.
The work for the Surveyor of Taxes has been one of consolidating our position
after the advances made last year, and we are glad to report that this job is now in
excellent shape. Early in the year the Land, School, and Improvement District Taxes
were automatically calculated from the assessment cards and approximately 150,000
tax bills prepared to meet the April dead-line. The running of 1950 assessment notices,
which involved 1,500,000 cards, was run most satisfactorily in November. A system
of controls has been effected to give a balance between the running of assessment
notices and the tax bill run, which is working out most satisfactorily. Preliminary
steps have also been taken to prepare a " guide " or index file for the Tax Rolls.
B.C. Forest Service.
No outstanding changes have been implemented in the work for the B.C. Forest
Service, but as we have gained experience we have been able to make a few minor
changes which speed up the routine flow of work. Plans are being progressed to
increase the coding on these records so that they can be utilized for Forest Inventory
purposes in the future.
Other Commitments.
The Civil Service Records, the Annual Report for the Department of Labour, and
the monthly and annual reports for the Motor-vehicle Branch have been continued in
much the same way as previous years.
The procedure in preparing the Annual Report for the Department of Education
has been revised so that data will be supplied monthly rather than annually—this will
of course make certain valuable statistics available monthly and at the same time speed
up the production of the Annual Report at the end of the year.
At the time of writing this report, no actual tabulations have been made for the
Purchasing Commission, but a valuable file is now available for figures on Purchase
Order Control and Furniture Inventory, and it is anticipated that these files will be
used in the very near future.
New Work.
The most outstanding new work developed during the year has been for the B.C.
Liquor Control Board, where a most satisfactory mechanical pay-roll system has been
developed to cover all employees of the Board. The automatic preparation of cheques
with a stub showing the details of earning and deduction is welcomed by the employees,
not to mention the savings established by this type of pay-roll.
Counter slips for beer sales to licensees are now being punched. From these cards
monthly statements as to quantity and value of sales by vendor and licensees with
automatic value checking are being satisfactorily prepared.
Early in the new year it is proposed to establish a system using punched card
counter checks for all sales in Liquor Vendors. By utilizing these cards it is possible
to have an automatic inventory control in both stores and warehouses, not to mention
their value for sales analysis and audit purposes. This job will require additional
equipment and an order has been placed by the Liquor Control Board to meet their
needs.
We have been approached by the Health and Welfare Department with a request
to survey the possibilities of preparing old-age pension cheques on our equipment. DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 47
This is a job that is being carried out most satisfactorily on punched cards by the
Alberta Government.
The work of our own Department suffered most from the heavy demands on our
equipment. The trade index was abandoned for one year, but is now well under way
for the current year. Tabulations on trade statistics were allowed to lag, but are now
being brought up to a current basis.
For the greater part of the year two shifts have been operated, keeping the
mechanical equipment running continuously for fifteen hours a day and on many
occasions special shifts were organized to maintain production for the full twenty-four
hours to meet specified dead-lines. Despite these shifts, the amazing total of 14,561
hours of overtime was accumulated by the staff.
In closing we should pay tribute to our staff, the members of which have accepted
greater responsibility, sacrificed a great deal of their own time, and worked assiduously
as a team in an effort to overcome what at times appeared to be an insurmountable
task. It is only through their unselfish spirit that we have reached the more enviable
position we are in to-day. DD  48 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
REPORT OF REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT DIVISION.
The Division, established by Order in Council October, 1947, has now been in operation two years. This period of time has permitted a pattern of activity to take definite
shape under the Division's general directive of undertaking regional surveys aimed
toward aiding industrial development of the Province.
In reporting the current year's operations it is now possible to break down the
activities of the Division under certain main headings—namely, Area Surveys, Industrial Inquiries and Specific Assistance to Industry, Special Projects, New Industries,
and Activities of Regional Advisory Committees.
LOCATION OF FIELD OFFICES.
Nelson:  Region 1—East Kootenay;  Region 2—West Kootenay.
Kelowna:   Region 3—Okanagan;   Region  6—Kamloops and  South  Central
British Columbia.
Prince   George:    Region   8—Central   British   Columbia;    Region   9—North
Coastal Area (Prince Rupert and Queen Charlottes) ;  Region 10—Peace
River.
Victoria:  Region 4—Lower Mainland;  Region 5—Vancouver Island and Gulf
Islands.
Frequent coverage of the regional areas under the four field offices of the Division
has enabled our field representatives to thoroughly familiarize themselves with the
industrial requirements of their respective territory, also to maintain close liaison
with Boards of Trade and Chambers of Commerce, municipal officers, and all other
agencies in each district. Reports from our field offices during the year under review
indicate continued and steady growth of new enterprises in all sections of British
Columbia.
SURVEYS UNDERTAKEN BY FIELD REPRESENTATIVES.
There follows a summarization, in brief, of special surveys undertaken by the
field offices of the Division during the current year:—
Region One (East Kootenay) and Region Two (West Kootenay) .
Investigations are continuing concerning the establishment of a pulp mill in the
West Kootenay District.
Continuing survey in connection with the establishment of an iron and steel operation in the East Kootenay District.
Assistance provided in arranging for the supply of kiln dried lumber for a wood
stave-pipe operation.
Assistance provided concerning the location of a road and obtaining specialized
machinery for a prospective dry ice plant operation at Kaslo.
Arranging agency and market connections in the United States for a boat-building
industry in the West Kootenay.
Market survey through various Federal Departments for its products arranged for
a gypsum operation (East Kootenay).   Plant to commence shipping this year.
Assistance given to a sporting goods manufacturer in obtaining essential raw
materials.
Survey of possibilities of establishing a propane gas plant at Nelson by United
Kingdom interests.
Continued investigation for the establishment of secondary industries manufacturing tourist souvenirs, utilizing local raw materials. department of trade and industry. dd 49
Special Projects.
Our field office at Nelson has also undertaken during the current year the following
special projects:—
(a) Industrial survey of the Kootenay River area from Wardner south to the
United States border for the International-Columbia River Engineering
Survey Committee.
(b) Under direction of the Regional Advisory Committee a survey of parks,
recreational sites and public beaches has been carried out looking towards
the accommodation of the anticipated greatly increased tourist business
of the Kootenay regions.
(c) Close liaison with West Kootenay Agricultural and Industrial Exhibition
in regard to the reorganization of the Exhibition.
(d) Tourist survey of U.S. entry points, East and West Kootenay, for the
information of a Public Works Conference at Nelson.
Region Three (Okanagan).
Reference was made in last year's report to a special area survey of the Okanagan
District, being undertaken by the Regional Advisory Committee and the completion of
chapter one of the regional brief under the heading of " Population." The second stage
of this survey was concluded during the current year with the publication of chapter
two of the regional brief entitled " Utilization of Land Resources."
The conclusions reached by the regional advisory committee are briefly summarized
as follows:—
(1) Selective broadening of the agricultural base is necessary in order to
establish the increased population. This includes irrigation projects
adjacent to urban centres that have become over-populated.
(2) Region Three is divisible into four climatic zones, each of which has its
own agriculture. Marketing conditions determine in which zones most of
the development should be undertaken.
(3) Owing to possible saturation of the tree fruits markets, new irrigation
developments should be undertaken in localities that are not favourable
for production of tree fruits. New irrigation developments may be
defined as proposals in addition to those for which plans have been
prepared.
(4) A new irrigation policy, tailored for the purpose, is required for the
encouragement of dairying and mixed farming.
(5) Before pumping is undertaken on a project basis, a lower scale of rates
should be negotiated with the power companies.
(6) Owing to its increase, the population has outrun the fluid milk supply in
Region Three. Development of the Armstrong to Pritchard area for
dairying and mixed farming- would satisfy local requirements and supplement the supply of fluid milk for the Coast.
(7) The subdivision of economic farm units into small holdings is viewed with
concern. It is suggested that small holdings should be confined to arable
areas unsuitable for economic farm units. New irrigation projects should
be zoned against the uncontrolled spread of small holdings.
The third stage of this special area survey in Region Three was commenced during
the latter part of the year under review. In this chapter the Advisory Committee will
deal with the subject of parks, recreational sites and tourist facilities of the region.
Continuing surveys supplementing the inquiries already launched under chapters
one (Population) and two (Land Utilization), were further extended in the tree fruit
area in regard to irrigated acreage, additional irrigable acreage, water storage, water DD  50 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
losses, water taxes and tolls, adequacy of water supply, types of systems, power costs,
cost of replacements and expansions, and size of average farms.
Periodical surveys have been made in conjunction with the railways and other
transportation companies for the purpose of checking the inward and outward movement of population in the region.
Assistance to the Department of Transport has been furnished in the matter of
providing information for setting up weather recording stations in the Kettle Valley
and North Thompson areas.
Regional information has been supplied by our field office to several Federal
departments. Direct liaison is maintained with the Okanagan Agricultural Club,
organized to discuss and resolve problems of the region, associated with the agricultural
industry, and exchanges of information made with the British Columbia Power Commission, Veterans' Land Act Authority and P.F.R.A. Some of the questions dealt with
being: Lack of water power and storage, possibilities of the development in the Kettle
Valley-Grand Forks areas, and many other matters.
Specific Assistance to Industry.
Our field office at Kelowna has rendered a wide diversity of assistance to industry
and has handled a large volume of inquiries during the current year, a few of which
are listed hereunder:—
Brick and Tile Plant.—Co-ordination of local effort and market news and information obtained on specialized personnel for the industry. Several clay samples were
submitted to the field office and referred to the appropriate channels for testing.
Ceramics.—Continuing survey on clay samples in connection with the establishment of a ceramic industry for the region on inquiries from large European interests.
Fortified Apple Juice.—Negotiations have been carried on with fruit processors
regarding this product.
Creosoting.—Investigations carried out resulted in a recommendation against a
project of this nature for this area.
Manufacture of Plaster of Paris Ornaments.—Information supplied on certain raw
materials developed in the Okanagan.
Soft Drink Process Utilizing Local Agricultural Product. — Investigations still
continuing which may result in substantial sale of concentrate to Eastern manufacturers.
Manufacture of Specialized Racing Shells. — Source found for large dimension
edge-grain cedar when this firm's supply had dried up, resulting in enabling this firm
to continue successful operation.
Dissemination throughout the region of information on the special bulletin published by the Industrial Development Division, Department of Trade and Commerce,
has resulted in several firm inquiries from commercial operators to European manufacturers.
Information re Princeton coal deposits supplied to railway departments.
The above listing affords a cross-section of the numerous inquiries given attention
during the year by our Kelowna office.
Our field representative has maintained close contact with the Boards of Trade,
secretary-managers of irrigation districts, municipal officials, and officials of the Fruit
Growers Association and fruit and vegetable marketing boards for all centres throughout the region. Our field office, through this constant and continuous liaison effort,
has become a nerve centre in the region for industrial inquiries, and the Division, in
two years' operation, has rapidly built up an efficient service office for this important
regional area of the Province. department of trade and industry. DD 51
Region Four (Lower Mainland) and Region Five (Vancouver Island
and Gulf Islands).
Our field office has been very active during the current year in obtaining statistical
data for the Regional Industrial Index, and surveys were carried out in thirty-four
separate district areas in the region. The metropolitan centres of Vancouver, New
Westminster, and Victoria have also been included in the current issue of the Index
and to which the following additional areas have been added: Agassiz-Harrison, Burnaby, Coquitlam, Delta, Langley, Richmond, Surrey, Parksville-Qualicum, Saanich-
Sidney, Sooke-Port Renfrew, and Lake Cowichan.
Regions Four and Five are the most densely populated and thickly settled areas of
the Province, containing upwards of 75 per cent, of the total population of British
Columbia, and the comprehensive surveys undertaken to gather adequate statistical
data necessary for the current issue of the Index has engaged a large proportion of
the time of our field office. Supplementing this activity, the field office covering these
regions has handled an increasing number of business inquiries of wide variety, ranging from information required by certain European engineers on the possibilities of
establishing a ski lift in the Forbidden Plateau area of Vancouver Island to the utilization of the red skins removed from peanuts during the manufacturing process for
peanut butter.
Many of these inquiries have been referred to the British Columbia Research
Council and Technical Information Service of the National Research Council, and
valuable information has been made available.
Close liaison has been maintained throughout the year with the Boards of Trade
of the Lower Mainland and Vancouver Island, and an increasing number of business
inquiries have been handled by the field office of the Division as a result of these
contacts.
Region Six (Kamloops and South Central British Columbia).
(Under Kelowna office.)
The executive of the Regional Advisory Committee in Region Six has held frequent
meetings during the year under review for the purpose of co-ordinating effort in the
development of industrial areas in various centres of the region and particularly the
Kamloops district. Plans are currently under way in the Division for the preparation
of an industrial map of the Kamloops district and other centres.
An inquiry regarding the establishment of a cold-storage plant for the Lillooet
district has been referred to the Dominion Department of Agriculture for technical
data on refrigeration.
Discussions have been held with the Industries Committee in the region concerning
power and increased dairy production' in the North Thompson Valley.
Our field office has been working with the Industries Committee on the development
of the South Thompson Valley, and preliminary data on a new irrigation district is
expected to be completed in the spring of 1950.
Information has been supplied to a large industrial organization in Eastern Canada
for the setting-up of an agency of the firm in the Kamloops area.
Our field office has been actively engaged in negotiations resulting in the removal
to Kamloops of the headquarters of a large Seed Growers Association, and building
plans for the Kamloops area are completed.
Surveys have been made on direct inquiries from representatives of a large hop-
growing company in the United States to make available suitable land for a hop-
growing industry which will employ upwards of 200 persons. dd 52 british columbia.
Region Eight (Central British Columbia).
Industrial development in the Prince George area has generally speaking showed
a slight decline over the previous year, mainly due to unfavourable weather conditions
for lumbering operations, this industry forming the basis of the economy of the region.
Nevertheless, large-scale civic improvements have been reported from this centre,
including a substantial school-building programme.
Our field office has continued its investigation into the utilization of mill waste,
and a great deal of data has been submitted to Vancouver interests, who are contemplating the establishment of a plant to be located in the region for the construction of
a factory to manufacture many types of materials, utilizing this surplus raw-material
supply.
Investigations have been conducted at the request of the Prince George Board of
Trade and information obtained regarding the operation of a creosoting plant.
Information has been supplied to the New Westminster Board of Trade concerning
opportunities for cabinet-making in the Prince George area.
Assistance given to a local plant interested in manufacturing insulation material
and data obtained on supplies of raw material available in other sections of the
Province.
Information obtained for and at the request of the Pacific Northwest Trade Association relating to North Central British Columbia.
Continuing surveys have been made on the coal deposits of the region, and considerable work has been accomplished on improvement of access to the Bowron River
deposit to facilitate transportation of this coal to the domestic market.
Our field office at Prince George has made extensive surveys of lumber shipments
in the territory—Prince Rupert, east to Red Pass Junction—and has supplied substantial data regarding potential freight shipments from the area concerning the new
Pacific Great Eastern development. Our field office in the region has co-operated with
Pacific Great Eastern officials and engineers in connection with their rail surveys and
construction.
A review of occupational opportunities for the district has been completed during
the current year, and revised lists have been sent forward to Victoria.
During the period under review, contacts were made by our field representative
with prominent geologists employed by American steel interests and with particular
reference to the securing of an adequate deposit of coking coal. Introductions arranged
with the principals of local coal interests.
In anticipation of a large increase in the tourist business for the region, following
the completion of the Hart Highway, a number of inquiries under this heading have
been dealt with and interdepartmental contacts arranged.
In addition to the many industrial inquiries received by our field representative,
some of which are above noted, our field office has dealt with a very large number of
land inquiries from industrialists, commercial interests, settlers, and others, which
have been followed through and completed with the appropriate departments, and is
ah indication of the growing interest in the North Central Interior of the Province.
Region Nine (North Coastal Area (Prince Rupert, Queen Charlottes)).
As noted in last year's report, the establishment of a large rayon-pulp industry in
the Prince Rupert district has been one of the major developments in this region.
Construction of this plant has progressed rapidly during the year under review and
should be brought into full operation next year.
A further major development is now contemplated for this region since the last
annual report in the project contemplated by the Aluminum Company of Canada, on
which large-scale surveys have been carried out during the course of the year.    Two department of trade and industry. DD 53
major operations of this scope have tended to focus tremendous interest on this north
coastal region of the Province, which may be expected to prove of greater significance
as developments progress.
The regional office of the Division is accordingly keeping in close contact with these
developments and their impact on the over-all industrial expansion of this region.
The Terrace district, which is headquarters for logging operations for the celanese
plant at Port Edward, has shown considerable activity during the year under review,
and many inquiries concerning this district have been handled by our field office.
Information concerning the Lakelse Hot Spring area has been obtained and forwarded to American inquirers, who are contemplating a large-scale development.
In the Prince Rupert district, erection of the celanese plant has developed a lively
increase in industrial inquiries and contemplated development, most important being
the prospect of a new modern hotel for this centre and the acquisition of a building
site for this project. Building construction and new housing accommodation will
undoubtedly experience increased activity, and substantial new apartment construction
can be anticipated.
Considerable activity in the Queen Charlottes section of the region has been
reported during the year, and several centres will be covered by our field office during
the coming year for the purpose of bringing our surveys of this section of the north
coastal region up to date.
Region Ten (Peace River Block).
Anticipating the early completion of direct road communication to this region, a
new impetus will be given to the development of the vast and fertile area lying in the
north-eastern section of the Province. The Division is making plans for the current
year for an initial survey of the region in order to adequately take care of the large
number of inquiries that may be expected to develop in the future as soon as direct
communication is established with the rest of the Province.
NEW INDUSTRIES.
A partial list of industries and commercial enterprises which have commenced
operations during the year under review will indicate the continued growth and expansion of industry throughout the Province.
Region One (East Kootenay).
(a) Propane gas plant, Cranbrook, employing 3; (b) manufacturing of oxygen,
plant under construction; (c) motor-car supply-house, Cranbrook, employing 5;
(e.) hotels, Windermere and Radium Hot Springs, both under construction; (e) garage,
Kimberley, employing 5;   (/) auto court, Radium Hot Springs, employing 3.
Region Two (West Kootenay).
(a) Propane gas plant, Nelson, plant under construction; (b) production of cherry
olives utilizing local fruit, Kaslo, employing 2; (c) two new bus lines, Nelson-Spokane
and local stage, Nelson, employing 12; (d) two new dry-kilns, Passmore and Castlegar,
employing 14; (e) sash and door works, Castlegar, employing 8; (/) Building-supply
house, Castlegar, employing 7; (g) soya sauce factory, Revelstoke, employing 6;
(h) boat-building, Revelstoke, employing 3; (i) concrete-block factory, Trail, employing
5; (j) new commercial store construction, Nelson, Rossland, Nakusp; (k) upholstery
and furniture manufacturing, Nelson.
Region Three (Okanagan) and Region Six (South Central British Columbia).
Armstrong:   (a) Cement-block factory, Armstrong, employing 2.
Grand Forks:   (6) Box factory, employing 35.
Hedley:   (c) Saw-mill, employing 7. DD   54 BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
Kelowna: (d) Candy manufacturing, investment $12,000, specializing in use of
local fruit products, employing 7; (e) Venetian blind factory, investment $4,000, employing 1; (/) propane sales agency, investment $50,000, employing 2; (g) chocolate
factory, investment $2,500, employing 3; (/.) sales office and warehouse of large eastern
manufacturer of electric goods, investment $50,000, employing 7; (_) branch chocolate
factory, investment $4,000, employing 2.
Keremeos: (;) Cement-block factory, employing 5; (fc) box shook factory, investment $20,000, employing 6.
Oliver: (.) A total investment of $87,000 in new industries covering orchard-
equipment machinery, house, cabinet shop, propane sales agency, aluminium sprinkler,
joiner's factory, and canning factory manufacturing glace fruit.
Osoyoos: (m) Cement and pumice block works and cold-storage lockers, total
investment, $21,500.
Penticton: (ri) New industry investment totalling $57,500, including three automatic orchard-spraying plants, soft-drink plant and a radiator repair shop.
Princeton: (o) Laundry and vegetable and flower plant and seedlings nursery with
a total investment of $20,000.
Region Four (Lower Mainland) and Region Five (Vancouver Island
and Gulf Islands).
(a) Shingle-mill at Port Moody, employing 40; (b) veneer plant in Richmond
Municipality,  employing 40;    (c)   bakery in Richmond  Municipality,  employing  14;
(d) three lumber mills in Richmond Municipality, employing 60; (e) fish-reduction
plant in Richmond Municipality,  employing 5;    (/)   modern theatre at Chilliwack;
(g) theatre in Sidney, Vancouver Island; (/.) bakery near Nanaimo; (.) soap-manufacturing plant at Port Alberni, authorized capital $100,000; (j) shell-fish processing
plant at Sidney (proposed); (fc) substantial addition to a large cold-storage plant at
Vancouver with a total freezing capacity of 400,000 pounds of fish and farm products
every twenty-four hours, storage 24,000,000 pounds, ice-making capacity 20 tons daily;
(.) nylon hosiery factory at Burnaby, under construction; (rn) artificial insemination
barn  at  Milner,  employing   15;    (ri)   cold-storage  locker  at  Agassiz,   employing  3;
(o) sawmill near Langley Prairie, employing 10.
Region Six (South Central British Columbia).
Ashcroft: (a) Three new building and construction firms with a total of 12
employees.
Clinton:   (b) Lime-production plant, investment $80,000, employing 5.
Kamloops: (c) New industries with a total investment of $412,000 were established during 1949, including two building-supply houses, dairy, frozen-food locker,
cement plant, hop-picking plant and warehouse, and large seed-cleaning establishment.
Salmon Arm: (d) New machine shop with an investment of $25,000 and expansion
of another machine shop.
Region Eight (North Central British Columbia).
(a) Wool insulation plant, utilizing waste paper raw material, Prince George,
employing 4; (b) machinery depot, employing 2; (c) substantial enlargement to existing automotive-supply house;   (d) shoe factory, making hand-made shoes, employing 3;
(e) ply-wood plant at Quesnel, building contemplated in near future, site obtained;
(/) box factory, shipping box shooks to Okanagan, Williams Lake; (g) wallboard plant,
Kidd; (h) tourist lodge, now under construction and should be ready for completion
for current season, Summit Lake. department of trade and industry. DD 55
Region Nine (North Coastal Area).
Prince Rupert: (a) Rayon pulp plant nearing completion ready for operation in
spring, 1951;   (b) new modern hotel, construction contemplated spring of 1950.
REGIONAL INDUSTRIAL INDEX.
The large number of requests received by the Department since the release of the
first annual edition of this publication indicates the information contained in the
Regional Industrial Index has been considerably in demand by industrial organizations
and commercial enterprises. So great was this demand that the whole issue has been
distributed. Due to limitation of staff and time, important centres of industrial British
Columbia were necessarily omitted in the initial issue of this publication, but during
the current year data on these centres has been compiled by the Division and will be
included in the current issue covering the metropolitan centres of Vancouver, New
Westminster, and Victoria, as well as seventy-nine districts in the ten regional areas
of the Province. As previously reported it is the intention to provide broader and more
comprehensive coverage in subsequent issues of the Index, also to maintain the standard
of reference material at the highest possible level as a guide to assist local development
organizations, Boards of Trade, Chambers of Commerce, municipal authorities and
industry generally in appraising the resources, industrial facilities, economic advantages, and social amenities of each community in the Province.
INDUSTRIAL MAPPING OF REGIONAL CENTRES.
Following conferences held during the year with transportation companies, municipal officials, and other organizations, the Division has commenced work on a composite
map of the metropolitan areas embracing Greater Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, and other adjoining municipalities. It is proposed to enlist the assistance of the
various interests mentioned in the preparation of this industrial map and to provide the
most complete and up-to-date information on both existing and potential industrial
sites, rail and water connections, traffic arteries, terminals, and other essential information of main importance to industry. During the ensuing year plans are being made
to map industrial areas in some of the other main centres. DD 56
BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
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DEPARTMENT  OF  TRADE  AND INDUSTRY. DD   57
REPORT OF THE BRITISH COLUMBIA GOVERNMENT
TRAVEL BUREAU.
GENERAL.
The accompanying graph illustrates the steady improvement in British Columbia's
tourist economy. Over the 12 months of 1949 the traffic gain over 1948 was 12.1 per
cent., compared with a Dominion-wide gain of 9 per cent. The standing of the Province
in the tourist field, however, is actually stronger than the figures indicate, as in 1949
there was much less " free spending " money available than in years immediately preceding and the gains were made in face of much greater and wider competition for the
tourist dollar.
Altogether it is estimated that 1,250,000 visitors to British Columbia spent fifty-
three million dollars in 1949 and, in addition, the Bureau has good reason to believe that
its domestic radio and general advertising campaign encouraged a large number of
British Columbians to " See British Columbia First," which would add considerably to
the tourist economy.
No one factor can be credited with the establishment of the Province as a prime
vacation-land but contributing factors are:—
(1) The cumulative effect of a continuity of advertising by the Province.
(2) The regional and national promotions by the Dominion Government Travel
Bureau.
(3) The general improvement in accommodations.
(4) The spectacular highway development programme.
(5) The inspection and grading of accommodations under the " Tourist Camp
Act " which has been widely publicized.
(6) The comparative  abundance of  game  fish and big game through the
Province.
(7) Development of local attractions coupled with promotion from a community level.
PUBLICITY.
ADVERTISING.
The general advertising campaign embraced space in 24 national magazines for
over-all coverage and 47 newspapers in the eleven Western States for emphasis in the
major travel market. Some 62,000,000 impressions brought a deluge of inquiries which,
at the height of the season, averaged 800 per day. These were answered by direct
letter or by a specially prepared form which covered selected folder enclosures. A large
number of appreciative letters has testified the efficiency of the reply system.
In addition to the newspaper and magazine space, the department continued with
the strategically placed highway bulletin boards in Washington, Oregon, and California,
which boards are designed to give suggestion and direction to vacationists already on
the road and serve as a repetitive influence on those planning vacations.
Advertising through the United States was both general and regional in its appeal
but its timing and some of the copy was designed with a view to lengthening the
season. The slight improvement in traffic during May, June, and September may be a
partial reflection of this policy. Meanwhile discussions with other tourist bodies in the
Pacific Northwest and with large employers of labour have been and are being held with
a view to encouraging those without children of school age to take vacations in the offseason.
The Bureau is again able to report a very successful colour-campaign featuring the
Pacific Northwest in Holiday Magazine, in co-operation with the States of Oregon and
Washington. Some successes were also achieved through the continued use of a
specially prepared direct-mail piece. DD  58 BRITISH  COLUMBIA.
A winter advertising campaign was conducted in the Prairie Provinces and Eastern
Canada as in previous years.
In addition to the foregoing the Bureau also acted as clearing house for all
Government advertising, checking for all departments.
With the exception of the San Francisco " Sports and Travel Show," in which
British Columbia was represented by a well patronized booth, no exhibits were made
abroad by the Bureau in 1949. Advantage was taken, however, of Dominion Government displays at sport and travel shows in Los Angeles, Seattle, and other centres in
the United States, adequate supplies of literature being furnished and, in the case of
the Seattle Sports Show, an attendant. The Bureau proposes to continue to co-operate
with the Dominion Government at these exhibits wherever practical.
Radio.
The British Columbia Government Travel Bureau, beginning early in May, broadcast a series of thirty-two spot announcements, the general tenor of which was " Know
British Columbia Better."
The broadcasts were confined to British Columbia stations and directed to the
people of British Columbia, with the idea of inducing them to spend their vacations to
a greater extent within the Province. It was felt that this action was timely as an
amazing number of our own citizens are only vaguely familiar with the Province as
a whole.
The following stations were used: CHWK, CJDC, CKOV, CKLN, CJAV, CKOK
CFJC, CKNW, CKPG, CFPR, CJAT, CJOR, CKMO, CKWX, CJIB, CJVI, and CHUB.
Literature.
Some 35 tons of literature was distributed by the bureau in 1949. This literature,
which is constantly in revision has been designed to meet specific requests and requirements. It is prepared and distributed with a view to giving full information without
wastage. Several pieces, such as the public-carrier map folder, which made its first
appearance last year, are designed for distribution to and through the travel-agents,
oil-company and other directional bureaus, automobile clubs, rail, and air line offices.
Others may be used for more general distribution. A distributing system has been
organized in the Western States through which the bureau is assured of adequate
coverage of all inquiry points and travel-promotion organizations with a minimum of
waste.
To the list of available publications were added, in 1949, a small folder covering
the winter sports activities of the Province, " Ski-ing in British Columbia " and a
regional folder on the Columbia-Kootenay area which was designed for a particular
promotional objective.
The requests for literature increased with the interest in the Province and were
considerably in excess of anticipated demand.
The Bureau has now entered negotiations with the Customs branch for the placement of protected racks at several ports of entry with a view to placing in the hands
of the foreign visitor such literature as will encourage him to spend extra days or cover
extra mileage within the Province.
Field Work.
Contact work through the eleven Western States and Texas was carried out by the
Assistant Commissioner in the early part of the year when he called on practically
every travel agent and directional bureau. The assistance given the travel directors
on the contact trip is appreciatively reflected in their repeated calls for advice through
the year and the amount of traffic they direct to British Columbia as a result of their DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY. DD 59
better knowledge of the Province, its accommodations, roads, and means of access.
Every opportunity was also taken to secure newspaper publicity and address service
and other clubs and gatherings.
ACCOMMODATIONS.
In British Columbia over eight hundred thousand bed-nights are available to the
tourist and traveller each month and, in June, July, August, and September, this
monthly total is increased by over one million. In 1948 the maximum number of beds
occupied by out-of-Province visitors in any one month was 858,992 (August), and the
estimated maximum in 1949 (August), was 987,836.
This means that at the peak of the season over thirty thousand beds were available
in hotels, resorts and stopping places throughout the Province each night in excess of
the demand made by visitors.
The concern of the Bureau was in attempting to improve this situation by relating
it to changing traffic trends. It was noted that in the first 10 months of the year, more
than twice the number of British Columbians visited the United States for longer than
24-hour periods than in 1948. Some 72,795 crossed the border on long or short vacation
and this undoubtedly affected the tourist economy of the country to some extent. The
effect was most noticeable in those districts adjacent to the metropolitan areas which
had catered chiefly to domestic trade in the past.
While a solution to the problem may not lie altogether within the scope of the
bureau, its representatives are in close touch with affected areas and are co-operating
with a view to offsetting any traffic losses in 1950.
Motion Pictures.
The Bureau's photographic branch was very active during the year, several new
16-mm. colour pictures being taken for addition to the film library: The City of Vancouver; Strawberry Festival; Qualicum and Area; and the Peace River Block and
Alaska Highway. Further shooting was also done on the Hope-Princeton Highway
progress film. With the exception of the latter, on which there is further work to be
done, all subjects are now in process of production with a view to completion and
release by the end of May, 1950. A film covering Highway No. 16 was released during
the year.
Distribution and use of the film library attests the quality of films produced by
the Bureau, total audience at 2,132 film showings and television broadcasts in Canada,
the United States and the United Kingdom in 1949 approximating 687,183.
In addition to over 100 travelogues and other films on hand in the home library,
the British Columbia films are also circulated by the National Film Board; National
Film Society; Bell Telephone Company in Montreal; the Canadian Trade Commissioner
in Los Angeles; and the Agent-General in London. Fourteen of the department's films
were used by TV-WBRC at Birmingham, Alabama, which station reached over 25,000
persons through television sets. Considerable use of the Bureau's film was also made
aboard Canadian Pacific and Union Steamships.
More than 7,500 still photograph enlargements, furnished newspapers, magazines,
and other periodicals on request, contributed to the very large amount of helpful
publicity which the Province received during the year.
" Tourist Camp Act."
In 1949, through the co-operation of the Division of Public Health Engineering,
district sanitarians took over the responsibility of inspecting auto courts and resorts
in their respective districts. No tourist camp inspector was appointed as such but all
applications for licences were passed through the area health units and during the year rjD   60 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
all premises coming under the provisions of the Act were inspected, reports made to the
Bureau and any necessary action was taken.
Grading of tourist camps was conducted by trained personnel on the Bureau staff
with temporary assistance over a two-month period. Of the 1,112 establishments
licensed or registered, 73.3 per cent, have been graded, the balance being under repair
or construction, occupied by non-transients or for other reasons not available for inspection or reinspection.
Star ratings were raised in 192 tourist camps, reflecting a definite improvement.
In 29 cases the rating was lowered. Twenty-eight premises earned an improved rate
of two or more stars in 1949.
Individually and through the Auto Courts and Resorts Association the operators
have expressed appreciation of the grading system, and the posting of grading certificates has also been appreciated by the visitor who now travels through the Province
with assurance of clean accommodation of the type he desires.
Through their association with the trade over a number of years, travel bureau
personnel have placed themselves in position to render considerable assistance to those
planning establishment or improvement, and in this way render service which has contributed considerably to the development of the physical properties engaged in the
tourist industry.
All new applications were reviewed by the licensing authority, any refusals being
in the interests of sport fish and game conservation only.
During the year the Bureau enjoyed the full co-operation of the Auto Courts and
Resorts Association and noted a growth and strengthening of local associations which
it has encouraged in every possible way.
Co-operative Activities.
The productive work of the Bureau has been greatly assisted by the advice of the
Tourist Council and by the full co-operation of the Vancouver Tourist Association,
Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau, the Evergreen Playground Association and
chambers of commerce and boards of trade throughout the Province.
In San Francisco the staff of the Canadian Consul-General has worked with the
Bureau to great and mutual advantage and in Los Angeles the office of the Canadian
Government Trade Commissioner has been extremely helpful.
The Bureau has also been able to effectively co-operate with many regional groups
who undertook more and wider promotional efforts in local interest or provided local or
regional events or attractions. These were publicized through a " Calendar of Events "
which was given wide circulation.
Through the co-operation of the Department of Public Works, informative and
accurate road reports were issued as highway conditions warranted and these resulted
in a greater appreciation of work in progress as well as establishing the fact that the
roads in the Province were all safe and negotiable.
Settlement.
By reason of its facilities for the collection and collation of information on every
phase of activity within the Province, the services rendered by the Travel Bureau also
embrace those of a bureau of information. Correspondence with groups and individuals
all over the world has indicated a wider appreciation of the Province and a fast-growing
interest in its affairs.
By many in less-privileged parts of the world, British Columbia is looked upon as
a " Land of Opportunity " and a substantial portion of the Bureau correspondence is
forwarded on letterhead of the Settlers' Information Branch. The restrictions on
currency export from sterling countries reduced the volume of inquiries from these BRITISH COLUMBIA. DD  61
areas during the year but this has been largely compensated by requests for information from expatriates in other parts of the world who wish to return to Canada and
from comparatively new arrivals to Eastern Canada who have heard the call of the
west. While many prospective settlers are tradesmen and artisans a substantial proportion are desirous of following agricultural pursuits and acquiring and developing
land. The Bureau spares no pains in dealing with these inquiries and the utmost care
is taken to present the facts accurately and completely.
In the settlement phase of its work the Bureau receives the full co-operation of the
Agent-General in London and all branches of the Government in Victoria. It also
acknowledges a great deal of assistance from the colonization branches of the Canadian
Pacific and Canadian National Railways, and also the invaluable co-operation of the
immigration and customs branches of the Canadian Department of Mines and Resources.
Tourist Council.
This advisory body held its annual meeting in March when the current situation
was reviewed and plans for the ensuing season discussed both on regional and Provincial levels. The recommendations of the council were largely implemented, and the
members individually rendered considerable service and counsel as called upon during
the year.
The personnel of the 1949 council was as follows: Mr. Sydney J. Smith, Kamloops
Board of Trade; Mr. George I. Warren, Victoria and Island Publicity Bureau; Mr.
Howard Faulkner, Kelowna Board of Trade; Mr. G. C. Lanskail (deceased), Nelson
Board of Trade; Mr. C. D. Orchard, Deputy Minister of Forests; Mr. Elmer Johnston
(deceased), Vancouver Tourist Association; Mr. F. R. Butler, Game Commissioner; Mr.
J. V. Fisher, Deputy Minister of Finance; Mr. E. G. Rowebottom, Deputy Minister of
Trade and Industry; Commissioner J. Shirras, B.C. Provincial Police; Mr. E. Evans,
Commissioner, Government Travel Bureau; Mr. Neil McCallum, Assistant Chief
Engineer, Public Works Department; Mr. P. E. Robertson, Prince George Board of
Trade. Associate members are: Earle Dickey, Revelstoke Board of Trade; W. F.
Cahoun, Auto Courts and Resorts Association, Vancouver; J. S. Brown, Burns Lake
Board of Trade; E. Ely, B.C. Hotels Association, Vancouver; Eric Atkins, Chilliwack;
Les Young, manager, Odeon Theatres, New Westminster; Ralph Williamson, Dawson
Creek Terminal Company;   E. T. Applewhaite, Prince Rupert Chamber of Commerce.
VICTORIA,  B.C. :
Printed by Dox McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1950.
1,495-150-6321   

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