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PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL Reports of the Commissioner of Provincial… British Columbia. Legislative Assembly 1950

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Full Text

 PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL
Reports of the
Commissioner of Provincial Police
.
for the Year
1948
and
Inspector of Gaols
for the Year ended
March 31st, 1949
VICTORIA, B.C.:
Printed by Don McDiahmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1950.  Colonel the Honourable C. A. Banks, C.M.G.,
Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia.
May it please Your Honour :
The undersigned has the honour to submit the reports of the Commissioner of
Provincial Police for the year ended December 31st, 1948, and the Inspector of Gaols
for the year ended March 31st, 1949.
C. S. WISMER, K.C.,
Attorney-General.
Attorney-General's Department,
Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1949. Victoria, B.C., December 1st, 1949.
The Honourable G. S. Wismer, K.C.,
Attorney-General for British Columbia,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
Sir,—I have the honour to submit my annual report for the year ended December
31st, 1948, and report on the Provincial Gaols for the year ended March 31st, 1949.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. SHIRRAS,
Commissioner of Provincial Police and Inspector of Gaols. Report of the Commissioner of Provincial Police, 1948.
STRENGTH AND DISTRIBUTION.
As at midnight, December 31st, 1948, the strength of the Force consisted of 18
officers, 454 non-commissioned officers and men, and 27 stenographers.
Statement op Strength as at Midnight December 31st, 1948.
Headquarters.
"A"
Division.
"B "
Division.
"C"
Division.
Division.
.. E„
Division.
Fort
George
Subdivision.
Peace
River
Subdivision.
Total.
Commissioner	
Deputy Commissioner
1
1
3
2
3
2
4
1
1
3
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
19
1
1
4
5
30
5
20
5
1
1
3
1
4
2
1
1
1
3
4
33
7
15
3
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
4
3
39
8
19
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
2
3
14
5
9
1
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
1
2
5
14
51
13
26
1
1
1
1
1
1
3
1
1
2
1
1
9
1
7
1
1
1
1
S
2
1
1
1
1
8
8
5
21
Corporals	
First-class Constables
Second-class Constables..
Third-class Constables....
33
188
41
96
12
Chief Clerks	
1
Assistant Chief Clerks....
6
3
1
1
2
Second-class Skippers
Third-class Skippers	
First-class Engineer
Second-class Engineer
Third-class Engineer
Radio Supervisor	
Chief Radio Operator
Senior Radio Operators..
First-class Radio Oper-
1
6
1
1
1
1
1
4
12
Second-class Radio Oper-
2
Third-class Radio Oper-
5
Chief Mechanical Super-
1
Mechanical Supervisor....
Assistant Mechanical
1
2
1
Supervisor, Finger-
1
Senior Finger-print
1
Photographer (studio)...
1
1
Stenographers	
27
Totals     	
49
84
74
86
44
127
21
14
499 T  6 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
ENGAGEMENTS, DISCHARGES, PROMOTIONS.
Engagements  - _._ 64
Discharges—
By purchase   22
By invaliding  _______ 1  2
By expiration of agreement  1
By transfer to another branch of the Government service 3
By death   1
Unsuitable   6
35
Promotions—
Inspector
Sub-Inspector      3
Staff-Sergeant      3
Sergeant   _     2
Detective-Corporal  _=     1
Corporal ,  12
First-class Constable  14
Second-class Constable   43
The gross strength of the Force increased by thirty-five over 1947. As has been
our policy, ex-service personnel were at all times given preference—providing, of
course, they met with the qualifications for enlistment as laid down in the regulations.
COMMENDATIONS AND AWARDS.
Fourteen members of the Provincial Police were commended in General Orders
for outstanding work and devotion to duty. In eight instances cash awards were
given from the Police Reward Fund. The exceptional performance of duty by some
fifty members of the Force during the disastrous flood period experienced by this Province resulted in their commendation and awards from the Police Reward Fund ranging
from ?50 to $100.
DISCIPLINE.
The conduct of the members of the Force as a whole was very satisfactory. Esprit
de corps is exceptional. However, in twenty-two instances it was necessary to discipline
members by way of reprimand. Two were reduced in rank and two in seniority. Seven
members were fined and five were assessed damages for careless operation of Departmental vehicles.
POLICING OF MUNICIPALITIES.
The British Columbia Provincial Police, under agreement, polices forty-two municipalities and has supervision over four areas—Coldstream, Glenmore, Greenwood, and
Slocan.
Municipal contracts were again reviewed in 1948 as a result of the increased costs
of policing.   New contracts will take effect in January, 1949.
Thirteen municipalities requested and received extra policing personnel during
1948.
Copper Mountain Detachment was opened during the year with the assignment
of one constable.
POLICE TRAINING-SCHOOL  (VICTORIA).
Sub-Inspector C. Ledoux, officer in charge of police training, reports:—
" Three basic-training classes were held during the year.   Each class was in session
for thirty days.    Specialists in many fields lectured and acted as instructors. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1948. T  1
"A class was also held on Criminal Investigation. This class consisted of members
of the Force who held special requirements.   This course .-lasted for five weeks.
"As a measure of co-operation with other forces, the course was open to candidates
from municipal police forces. The City of Victoria, Municipality of Saanich, and the
Municipality of Esquimalt availed themselves of the opportunity by sending a member
of their respective police forces.
" During the year, forty-six Provincial Police constables and nine municipal police
constables passed through the training-school.
" One promotional examination was held in May when ten constables sat for examination for the rank of corporal.    Eight of this number qualified."
MARKSMANSHIP.
One hundred and sixty members qualified this year for recognition in the various
grades, the top shooters being Constable J. Gibault, Master Class, with a score of 295;
Radio Supervisor W. F. Conlan, Expert Class, 274; Constable E. Murphy, Marksman
Class, 247; Constable J. H. Bishop was high Tyro in the Force and Constable W. Stark
was high Tyro in the Vancouver Island Division for the Sandys-Wunsch rose-bowl.
Members also competed with American police forces at Seattle. They brought home
some twenty-four medals, a fine average for a four-man team. Participation with the
Victoria City Police in their annual shoot was also another occasion where members
enjoyed a two-day shoot.
ACCOUNTS BRANCH AND QUARTERMASTER STORES.
Inspector D. D. Moses, officer in charge, reports:—
" The report for the calendar year 1948 on Police and Quartermaster Stores
Accounts shows 19,795 expense vouchers totalling $2,017,084.55 were checked, recorded,
and passed through the Accounts Branch.
" Collections for police services from cities and municipalities and other branches
of the Government amounted to $462,126.40.
" The Quartermaster Stores received and filled 2,185 requisitions consisting of
9,274 articles. The supply situation is now improving, although some articles are still
unobtainable under the present austerity programme—as an example,  Stetson hats."
TRAFFIC BRANCH.
Sergeant J. G. M. Lock, in his third report, states:—
" Highway-patrol mileage increased from 189,096 miles in 1947 to 225,289 miles
in 1948—an increase of 36 per cent. A total of 156,372 routine check-ups were made
during the year. This is an increase of 22 per cent over the previous year. A total
of 1,050 accidents was investigated by this Branch—an increase of 68 per cent, over
1947.
" Revenue resulting from the issuance of check-up slips decreased from $11,203.86
in 1947 to $9,635.60 in 1948. Funds from prosecutions increased 110 per cent, while
costs were more than double those shown the preceding year."
Highway Patrol, 1948.
Total mileage   225,289
Total check-ups   156,372
Accidents investigated        1,050 T 8   ,
british columbia.
Check-ups according to Divisions.
"A"
Division.
"B"
Division.
"C"
Division.
" E "
Division.
Total.
4,957
119
433
1,538
5,553
1,170
192
5,526
1,095
4
3,149
1,248
5,673
1,265
1,404
1,307
5,934
66
807
1,610
6,010
249
147
5,984
1,007
516
1,758
948
5,952
3,460
822
1,046
5,680
128
757
2,347
5,852
2,210
182
5,856
4,273
1,291
1,541
1,355
2,730
1,189
3,249
724
452
8,606
46
1,308
2,157
9,371
218
529
8,035
234
124
615
842
7,959
3,969
1,222
372
25,177
359
3,305
7,652
26,786
Operation of motor-vehicles	
3,847
1,050
25,401
6,609
1,935
7,063
4,393
22,314
Miscellaneous regulations	
9,883
6,697
" Motor Carrier Act " and regulations	
3,449
452
Totals	
14,633
36,316
39,816
45,607
156,372
Convictions obtained under the Following.
Convictions.
Fines.
Costs.
723
206
106
172
37
18
62
18
12
6
$9,166.85
1,854.00
1,325.00
7,214.00
472.50
653.80
502.00
345.00
280.00
87.50
$1,666.75
454.55
291.50
703.50
Pattullo Bridge	
100.00
101.75
110.25
56.50
26.20
13.25
Totals	
1,360
$21,900.65
$3,524 25
Revenue Result of Check-ups.
Revenue collected as a result of check-ups under the
Motor Carrier Act " amounted to $9,635.60.
Motor-vehicle Act " and the REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1948.
TRANSPORT BRANCH.
T 9
Chief Mechanical Supervisor J. F. McNaught reports:—
" The following report pertaining to British Columbia Police transportation for
the calendar year 1948 is respectfully submitted:—
" Mileage.
Railway.
Cars.
Launch.
Horse.
Foot.
Aeroplane.
Miscellaneous.t
Police.
Other.
Police.
Other.
4,857
828
88,334
109,626
20,788
9,342
321
15,064
82,837
459,784
471,005
457,511
120,492
65,089
92,544
1,052,654
35,095
13,002
16,883
16,957
3,260
6,966
3,713
11,913
1,248
17,413
375
72
1,158
40
25
1,777
2,338
45
70
139
1,025
75,045
113,160
109,830
45,660
23,055
12,279
92,778
19,514
595
20,747
3,472
4,500
38,096
27,972
6,444
13,951
56,417
48,043
14,395
68,617
1,251
804
86,388
158,527
648,307
759,357
713,754
" A " Division	
25,183
785
114
17,038
1,830
283,851
145,674
137,795
1,273,733
92
3,198
5,155
Totals	
249,160
2,801,916
107,789
50,105
23,556
4,434
472,832
121,340
289,866
4,120,998
* Including Criminal Investigation Branch.
t Steamship, public conveyances, dog, etc.
" Comparative Mileage.
* Included in " Miscellaneous," 1947.
t An increase of 504,701 miles in 1948 over 1947.
" Comparative Mileage by Divisions.
1947.
1948.
More.
Less.
310,368
2,429,826
70,879
45,363
15,825
3,485
425,810
249,160
2,801,916
107,789
50,105
23,556
4,434
472,832
121,340 )
289,866 j
61,208
372,090
36,910
4,742
7,731
949
47,022
96,465
314,741
3,616,297
4,120,998
565,909t
1947.
1948.
More.
Less.
128,641
644,416
649,767
620,868
220,549
172,625
143,913
1,035,518
158,527
648,307
759,357
713,754
283,851
145,674
137,795
1,273,733
29,886
3,891
109,590
92,886
63,302
26,951
6,118
238,215
Totals	
3,616,297
4,120,998
537,770*
33,069
* An increase of 504,701 miles in 1948 over 1947. T 10
british columbia.
" Comparative Mileage, Police Motor-vehicles.
1947.
1948.
More.
Less.
1948 Additional
Motor-vehicles.
86,010
409,684
425,219
383,168
106,592
71,761
84,268
863,124
82,837
459,784
471,005
457,511
120,492
65,089
92,544
1,052,654
3,173
1
50,100
45,786
74,343
13,900
2
2
1
Nil
Fort George Subdivision	
6,672
Nil
8,276
189,530
Nil
3
Totals	
2,429,826
2,801,916
381,935*
9,845
9
* An increase of 372,090 miles in 1948 over 1947.
" From the foregoing comparative statements it will be seen that the total mileage
travelled in 1948 increased 504,701 miles, of this amount 373,090 miles was accounted
for by Departmental motor-vehicles.
" There were 171 pieces of equipment in operation during 1948, being allotted as
follows:—■
Cars.
Motor-cycles.
Jeeps.
Total.
Headquarters	
8
27
35
30
11
5
6
41
1
	
	
	
	
5
2
8
30
"B" Division _	
" C " Division                                                                	
35
30
" D " Division _..	
11
5
6
" E " Division	
48
Totals                                         	
163
6
2
171
" During the calendar year fifty-eight new motor-vehicles were purchased, which
included replacements and new operations, the latter being for areas lacking sufficient
transportation.    Our fleet increased from 162 to 171.
" Makes of motor-vehicles on charge to this Department are:—
Ford  ;_______    46
Chevrolet      36
Dodge     30
Plymouth  ;_     17
Pontiac     17
Mercury     11
G.M.C. ...
Buick __
Fargo _
Meteor ...
Monarch
Jeeps
163
2
Harley-Davidson motor-cycles
165
6
171 REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1948.
T  11
" Mechanical inspections on which reports were written during the calendar year
1948 were as follows:—
Police
Cars.
Game
Cars.
School
Buses.
Total.
J. F. McNaught, Victoria	
H. D. Macdonald, Vancouver	
32
108
57
98
145
9
2
19
46
36
88
17
51
222
77
198
74
168
T. Scales, Nelson	
413
Totals	
440
76
414
930
" Mechanical Supervisor Macdonald's reports include those made in Peace River
Subdivision of Game and Police cars, and Assistant Mechanical Supervisor Fiander's
on Game and Police cars, also school buses, in " D " Division and Fort George subdivision.
"As stated in the preceding table, account is only taken of the number of written
inspection reports, in many instances repairs are recommended and completed but
inspection report not made out. The responsibility of the Mechanical Supervisor does
not cease with the inspection of the vehicle, he is expected to see the necessary work
is carried out satisfactorily and costs kept as low as possible.
" During the year 1948, working in conjunction with the Badio Branch, thirty-four
Leece-Neville high-output generators were installed, ten on Vancouver Island and
twenty-four on the Lower Mainland, to maintain satisfactory performance in cars
equipped with two-way F-M radios. In addition to the installation of generators, considerable time is required in maintaining these special units. It is anticipated during
the coming year, 1949, at least twenty more cars will be so equipped, mostly in the
Okanagan Valley and on the Hope-Princeton Highway and Vancouver Island.
" When our present staff of Mechanical Supervisors was inaugurated in 1937 our
fleet consisted of 123 motor-vehicles, in 1948 the fleet numbered 171, and increase of 48
Police cars or 39.02 per cent. During the same period the mileage increased from
1,757,641 to 2,429,826, that is, 672,185 miles.
" With reference to the school-bus inspections, the Mechanical Inspector must
follow through and be sure his instructions are carried out and the vehicles kept up
to the standards as laid down in regulations. Assistance is rendered the School Boards
dealing with proposed new equipment and replacing of present contractors' worn-out
units. In 1948 there were sixty-seven of these units put in service. The number of
school-bus inspection reports written was 414, as compared with 218 in 1939, the first
year a record was kept.
" In addition to the foregoing duties of the Mechanical Supervisors, they are from
time to time instructed by the Department of the Attorney-General, through this office,
to inspect confiscated motor-vehicles, vehicles of the Fire Marshal's Branch, the Borstal
Home, Oakalla Prison Farm, and advise re Game Department vehicles, the latter being
inspected and repairs recommended in seventy-six instances in 1948..
" Marine Section.
Name. Station.
*P.G.D. 1 - Alert Bay.
*P.G.D. 2 - Powell River.
*P.G.D. 3 - Vancouver.
P.M.L. 6 1 Ganges.
P.M.L. 7 Ocean Falls.
P.M.L. 9 Campbell River
P.M.L. 10   Port Alice.
* Dual operation—Police and Game Departments. T 12 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Name. Station.
P.M.L. 11 : Kootenay Lake (Kaslo).
P.M.L. 15 Prince Rupert.
P.M.L.  16 Alberni.
*R-8 riverboat McDame Creek.
R-13 rowboat and inboard Lake Cowichan
R-14 riverboat and outboards (2) Fort St. James.
R-15 rowboat and inboard Atlin.
R-16 rowboat and outboard Prince George.
R-17 rowboat and inboard, with trailer Kamloops.
R-18 lifeboat and inboard Ucluelet.
Outboard motor only Fort St. John.
Outboard motor only Stewart.
Outboard motor only Terrace.
* Dual operation—Police and Game Departments.
" During the year plans and specifications were prepared for a new boat, to be
known as the P.M.L. 17, to replace the P.M.L. 7 at Ocean Falls. Tenders were called
and the contract let the latter part of February. Actual construction was commenced
May 17th, the delay of laying the keel being due to non-availability of materials
required. The vessel was officially launched on December 7th, 1948, by Mrs. Gordon
Wismer, wife of the Honourable the Attorney-General. It is anticipated it will be
commissioned in the early part of 1949.
" On September 16th, 1948, approval was given for the supply and installation of
a new Vivian engine for the P.M.L. 16 and on September 21st purchase order was
issued. The boat was brought into Vancouver and work commenced on the 1st of
November, but owing to delay in the delivery date of the new engine, which was not
supplied until December 3rd, the P.M.L. 16 at the end of the year was still there.
Consideration should be given in the future that when contracts are let a penalty
clause for non-fulfilment of delivery dates be included in same.
"From April 1st to the end of May the P.G.D. 1, Alert Bay; P.G.D. 2, Powell
River; P.M.L. 9, Campbell River; P.M.L. 15, Prince Rupert; and in October, the
P.M.L. 6, Ganges, were in Vancouver for annual overhauls.
" The aforementioned work in connection with our Marine Branch necessitated
the undersigned to make twenty-two trips to Vancouver and one to Prince Rupert;
in all, sixty-one days were spent away from Headquarters in this connection.
" Inspections were made by Assistant Mechanical Supervisor Scales of the P.M.L.
11 at Kootenay Lake, and by Assistant Mechanical Supervisor Fiander of the small
boats and motors in "C" and "D" Divisions and Fort George Subdivision.
"As previously reported, the Game Commission are still most anxious for the return
of their boats, the P.G.D. 1, Alert Bay, and P.G.D. 2, Powell River, for exclusive Game
work, and efforts are being made to accede to their request in 1949."
POLICE RADIO.
Radio Supervisor W. F. Conlan reports:—
" The medium-frequency radio network handled approximately one million words
during the past twelve months. Banks of fixed-frequency receivers were installed at
Vancouver, Prince Rupert, Prince George, Nanaimo, and Port Alberni so all channels
could be monitored. A phone/CW medium-frequency station was installed at Nanaimo
to give more adequate coverage of Vancouver Island.
" F.M. stations were installed at Duncan, Nanaimo, Richmond, Chilliwack, North
Vancouver, and a remote-control station was installed at the New Westminster Provincial Police office to actuate the Burnaby transmitter. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1948. T  13
" Thirty-five police vehicles were radio-equipped during the year. An interesting
feature is the fact that most of them were equipped during the disastrous Fraser
River flood. While most of the equipment had been received and was to be placed in
police cars in the area when time permitted our radio technicians to undertake this
work, the flood situation changed the picture entirely. Working at top speed during
this emergency it is worthy to note installations were made in some four vehicles each
day.
" I would like to stress also that radio-equipped police cars in the Fraser Valley
during the flood period saved countless lives, not to mention property. In one particular case alone, had it not been for this radio equipment in police cars, a number of
people would have been trapped by escaping waters from broken dykes. Numerous
incidents could be mentioned, but it is sufficient to say that F.M. radio has proven its
worth.
" During the year a radio survey was made of the Okanagan and Kamloops areas
to determine the feasibility of extending the F.M. network to all vehicles in those areas.
The survey showed this to be quite practical and plans are under way for the extension
in 1949.
"A remote-control site 7 miles north of Nanaimo was obtained, and the F.M.
equipment from the Nanaimo office will be moved there. From this point complete
coverage to a vehicle on any part of the highway system of Vancouver Island will be
obtained."
ASSISTANCE TO FEDERAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.
Our assistance to the many Federal departments and their branches increased
steadily during the year. The Provincial Police have undertaken many investigations
for Federal Government departments. Assistance has been willingly rendered when requested, and on many occasions appreciation has been expressed for this help. It is
quite safe to assume that the Federal Government would, in many cases, require to
place additional personnel at many points in British Columbia were the Provincial
Police unable to assist.
ASSISTANCE TO PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENTS.
Officers commanding the various police divisions and subdivisions all stress the
assistance rendered by this Force to the numerous branches and departments of the
Provincial Government.    Excerpts from their remarks follow:—
"A" Division, Vancouver Island (Inspector R. Owens) :—" Departments of the Provincial Government have received assistance from this Force, and we are ever ready
to help them when occasion requires. In all domestic, family, and juvenile matters
we co-operate closely with the Department of Welfare, Social Assistance Branch, and
others."
"B" Division, South-eastern British Columbia (Sub-Inspector R. S. Nelson).—
Eighty-five reports on fires to buildings and automobiles were made and forwarded
to the Provincial Fire Marshal at Vancouver, a decrease of fifty-three from the
previous year. Assistance was rendered to the Inspector of Municipalities—in some
instances it was necessary for our constables to arrange for the renting, sale, or care
of property and chattels, as requested by the Inspector."
" C" Division, Central British Columbia (Inspector H. H. Mansell).—"Assistance
has been given to all Provincial Government departments. The most cordial relations
exist between members of this Force and officials of other Government departments
and branches."
" D " Division, Northern British Columbia (Sub-Inspector F. B. Woods-Johnson).—
"Assistance was rendered to the Department of Health, Social Welfare Branch, Old
Age Pensions Branch, Inspector of Municipalities, Superintendent of Child Welfare,
. T  14 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
Department of Finance, Official Administrators, mental hospitals, Coroners, Superintendent of Motor-vehicles, British Columbia Game Commission, and many others."
"E " Division, Lower Mainland (Inspector C. Clark).—" During the year we gave
assistance to practically every department and branch of the Provincial Government.
We received the fullest co-operation when we called on them for information." "
Peace River Subdivision (Sub-Inspector G. J. Duncan).—"As in the past, we
extended the fullest co-operation to all departments of the Government."
Fort George Subdivision (Sub-Inspector G. H. Clark).—" Close co-operation exists
between the various departments and ourselves. In detachments where no Game
Warden is stationed, our men handle the trap-line and licence work. Assistance has
been given to all departments—in particular, the Social Service Branch, Provincial
Fire Marshal, Forestry, Provincial Secretary, Health, Superintendent of Motor-vehicles,
Public Works, and Labour."
OTHER FORCES.
A close bond exists between the British Columbia Provincial Police, the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police, other Provincial forces, city and municipal forces across
Canada, railway police, and the Customs and Immigration Service. We are in constant
touch with, and on equally amicable terms with, our American counterparts.
YOUTH AND THE POLICE.
Members of the British Columbia Provincial Police may well be proud of another
successful year in their dealings with the youth of our Province. Notwithstanding
their increased duties, constables and N.C.O's found time in their off-duty hours to
organize clubs, sponsor sports, coach, and lecture.
Numerous members are club leaders, leaders of Scout troops, Cub packs, etc.
At many detachments police personnel organized summer and winter sports and
coached the various boys' and girls' teams. Much time has .been spent at schools
throughout the Province in giving lectures on traffic safety and other subjects. Their
close association with the many fine adult organizations has done much to eliminate
juvenile delinquency in British Columbia.
A great deal could be written on the excellent activities promoted by the purely
voluntary efforts of the police, but suffice it to say that results speak for themselves.
PROVINCIAL POLICE LONG SERVICE AND GOOD CONDUCT MEDAL.
Provincial Police long service and good conduct medals were awarded to the
following members of the Force who completed twenty years' continuous police service
with unblemished records:—
Regimental No. 524—Sub-Inspector J. A. Young.
Regimental No.   33—Staff-Sergeant A. Fairbairn.
Regimental No. 352—Sergeant C. W. A. Barwis.
Regimental No. 278—Sergeant 0. L. Hall.
CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION BRANCH.
Inspector R. Harvey, in charge Criminal Investigation Branch, reports:—
" I respectfully submit the annual report of the Criminal Investigation Branch,
British Columbia Provincial Police, for the year ended December 31st, 1948.
" Statistical compilations indicate a considerable increase in the volume of work
throughout the year. There were 20,947 indictable and summary prosecutions instituted in Provincial Police Courts, resulting in 20,009 convictions, an advance of 2,714
cases entered over the year 1947. REPORT OF PROVINCIAL. POLICE, 1948. _D  15
" Violations of certain Dominion and Provincial Statutes, -were notable, particularly under the ' Indian Act' with 3,224 charges, the ' Government Liquor Act' with
3,687, and the ' Motor-vehicle Act' and regulations with 2,968.
" There were fourteen homicide cases investigated during the year. Four persons were convicted, five acquitted, and five are awaiting trial.
" Breaches of the law involving juveniles continue to give concern; 1,045 cases
were entered in Juvenile Courts, resulting in 999 convictions.
" Total figures comprise all offences under the Criminal Code, Dominion and Provincial Statutes, and city and municipal by-laws- of organized areas policed by this
Force.    Full details are shown in the Appendix.
" For convenience the total figures are broken down under the respective Statutes
as follows:—
Statute. Cases entered.        Convictions.
Dominion Statutes __,,.___     5,037 4,906    ",., .
Provincial Statutes 1     8,151 ,    7,955
By-laws .......    2,378 2,358
Totals . .... 20,947 20,009
" In addition, a brief history of cases of an outstanding nature appears at the end
of the report.
" Finger-print and Photographic Section.—A total of 3,913 finger-prints were
received during the year for classification and filing. Of these, 1,125 were identified as
persons with criminal records and previously registered at this Bureau. Quite a
number of criminal identification records were mailed or transmitted by radio to the
various divisional and district headquarters of the Force. The number of records sent
out for Court use totalled 569.
" The Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm, was supplied with 179 complete records, and
a number were forwarded to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Washington, D.C.
On exchange with other police departments we supplied prints and records as follows:
R.C.M.P., Ottawa, 2,119; Calgary Police, 1,656; Vancouver City Police, 1,656; New
Westminster Police, 1,656.
" The R.C.M.P. at Ottawa were furnished with 255 sets of single finger-prints,
while a like number were added to our own file.
" For immigration purposes and entry to the United States, 1,272 persons were
supplied certificates on search by name and prints, while 289 applicants for enlistment
in the Force were finger-printed and checked.
"At the close of 1948 the number of persons with criminal records registered at
the Finger-print Section of the Criminal Investigation Branch totalled 36,925, an
increase of 2,687 over the previous year.
" Finger-print Exhibits.—During the year thirty miscellaneous articles were
received for examination as to latent prints. Three were identified for this Force, one
for Victoria City Police, and the remainder enabled us to render assistance to the
Saanich and Oak Bay Police Departments and to the R.C.M.P.
" Photographs.—Photographs of convicted persons processed in the Finger-print
and Photographic Section during the year 1948 amounted to 15,601. We furnished
photographs to law-enforcement bodies with whom we exchange finger-prints, also to
the Provincial Gaols of the Province. Included in this total were photographs of 269
discharged prisoners, which were sent out to our police circuit. This required 27
photographs of each person, making a total of 7,256. Miscellaneous photographs supplied totalled 2,477 prints and included enlargements in all sizes. For this work 368
new negatives were necessary. Included were 795 prints and 21 negatives for the
office of the Superintendent of Motor-vehicles;  238 cheques in fraud and false pretences T 16 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
cases were photographed; the balance of the prints were distributed to the Attorney-
General's office, adjacent police departments, Court Registry, and associate Government
departments.
" Ballistics.—In this field of endeavour Sub-Inspector Young continues to search
for new methods and information on the technique of firearms identification. During
the year fourteen tests and examinations were made in connection with serious crimes,
that is, murder, cattle-killing, maiming, and other offences of a violent nature.
In six of the cases identification was made, and valuable information and assistance
rendered in the remaining number to the point where prosecution was successful.
" Scientific Examination.—Under this heading sixty-seven cases were handled by
the Laboratory Section in the year under review, sixteen of which required examination by a pathologist. These were submitted to Dr. R. B. D. McNeeley, director of
pathology, Royal Jubilee Hospital, Victoria. Fifty-eight cases called for either chemical or physical analysis and were disposed of with satisfactory results by T. W. Mc-
Connell Davis, Senior Analyst, and his efficient staff, Department of Mines, Victoria.
" Firearms Registration Section.—This section of the Criminal Investigation
Branch has continued to maintain a close check on registration, sales, and transactions
pertaining to small arms and concealable weapons through advice, correspondence, and
the issuing of the necessary permits. The following table denotes the volume of permits issued during 1948:—
Permits.
Form 76: To carry  667
Form 76b :   Aliens—resident  317
Aliens—non-resident      93
Form 76c:   To sell  580
Form76D:   Dealers—purchase and resale     19
Form 76e : Purchase  931
Form 76f : Minors     16
" We are constantly in communication with the R.C.M.P. Firearms Registration
Bureau, Ottawa, and their co-operation and assistance has been invaluable.
" Missing Persons.—On requests from relatives and other sources, inquiries as to
the whereabouts and welfare of 1,921 missing persons were conducted by the Force
throughout the Province during the year. Of this number 981 were located, and in
the remainder useful information was secured and passed on to the relatives or agencies
seeking our assistance.
"Accidents.—Each year brings its toll of fatalities, and in the year past the Force
investigated 365 sudden deaths, all of which were attributed to natural causes. There
were 538 fatal accidents, as follows: Automobile, 113; mining, 25; logging, 77; drowning, 150.    The remaining 173 deaths resulted from various extraordinary happenings.
" Outstanding Cases.
" Rex vs. Gustav Wiegner (Murder).—This murder had an international aspect in
that the principals, consisting of John Austin McComas and his 13-year-old daughter,
Louise, together with Gustav Wiegner, 24, of Dayton, Ohio, set out for Alaska via the
Alaska Highway, travelling in Wiegner's car. Some 160 miles north of Dawson Creek
McComas was shot through the back of the head by Wiegner with a .22 rifle and he,
with Louise McComas, immediately returned to the United States, arriving in Kimball,
Nebraska, a few days later. In this small western town Wiegner purchased a restaurant with money taken from the deceased, McComas, and with Louise as a partner
commenced business.
" With the same rifle that he shot McComas, Wiegner became involved in a local
shooting affray when he injured a local resident by shooting him in the leg.    The local REPORT OF PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1948. T 17
publicity given to this shooting incident brought an inquiry from Dayton, Ohio, where
relatives of the now missing McComas became interested. The police investigation
that followed at Kimball brought an admission from Wiegner that he had accidentally
killed McComas somewhere along the Alaska Highway.
" This was the first information received by this Force that a murder had been
committed in British Columbia some sixteen days previous, With the aid of a dog
the body of McComas was found about 100 yards from the Alaska Highway and about
160 miles north of Dawson Creek.
" Weigner was returned to British Columbia on his voluntary waiver of extradition
rights and was taken to Fort St. John to attend a Coroner's inquest. He was subsequently charged with murder, and on October 8th at Prince George an Assize Court jury
brought in a verdict of manslaughter.    He was sentenced to two years in prison.
" James Watson (Murder of).—Two boys, aged 13 and 11, having previously stolen
a rifle from a parked vehicle, attempted to hold up the occupants of a car on the highway
near Dawson Creek on November 12th, 1948. A shot was fired in front of the car, and
as it did not stop, one of the youths then discharged the rifle at the back of the
departing vehicle, wounding Mr. Watson, a local farmer, who died from the injuries
three days later. Both boys were dealt with in Juvenile Court and, in view of their ages
and other circumstances, the elder was committed to the Boys' Industrial School and the
younger to the care of the Superintendent of Child Welfare.
" Rex vs. Irene Louise French, Sidney Robert Bruce Paul, and Carl Harold Shank
(Robbery with Violence).—In April, 1948, a young man entered the police office at
Prince George and informed the Officer Commanding he had just been released from
the Penitentiary, where he had served a sentence of three years, that he desired to go
straight, and that he hoped the police would not interfere with him obtaining employment. He was assured that the police would be most anxious to assist him in securing
an honest livelihood.   He stated his name was Sidney Paul.
"A few days later Oscar Currie, aged 66, complained he had been taken in a taxi to
a remote road in South Fort George where he was severely beaten and thrown out in the
bush. When he regained consciousness he discovered he had been robbed of his wallet
containing over $200.
"As the victim had lost considerable blood Constables Olson and Weeks, British
Columbia Police, immediately instituted a search, finding a taxi with blood-stains.
Further investigation revealed that at the time of the offence it had been driven by
Sidney Paul. The victim later identified Paul as the driver of the taxi. He also
identified a man and a woman, named Carl Shank and Irene French. It appears that
the latter two persons had been picked up at a beer-parlour by Paul prior to the assault
and were present at the scene of the crime. A subsequent search of premises occupied
by Shank disclosed part of a wallet and zipper in the ashes of a stove.
"All three were charged and at the trial Paul and the woman French testified
against Shank. The two men were found guilty and the woman acquitted. They were
sentenced to two years and three years respectively. Both men had long criminal
records.
" Rex vs. Victor Kellerman, Robert Ivans, Leonard Gabel, and Rudolph Motz
(Rape).—This was one of the most revolting cases that came before the Courts during
the year and commenced during the early hours of Sunday, July 4th, following a dance
at Kelowna, when these four men, who had picked up three strange girls at the dance,
drove them to their cabin located in near-by Glenmore, where they were viciously raped.
Realizing what they had done, they immediately left the district together by car, and
one week later were taken into custody at Brooks, Alta.
" They were returned to Kelowna to stand trial. At the Vernon Fall Assize they
were all found guilty. Ivans, Gabel, and Motz were each sentenced to seven years and
to be whipped.   Kellerman was sentenced to five years and to be whipped. T 18 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Rex vs. Charles F. Haines (Arson).—This man was convicted on two charges of
arson arising from two bunk-house fires that occurred at the British Columbia Forest
Products operations at Youbou, B.C., May 8th and 28th respectively. In the first fire,
a serious one, two persons lost their lives and fourteen were injured. Property damage
only resulted from the second fire. Very good investigation work was done by the
Duncan district headquarters in conjunction with the Fire Marshal's office. From the
evidence and clues uncovered, Haines was a definite suspect, and he finally made a
complete confession of both crimes. He was brought to trial in County Court and
sentenced to three years and five years concurrent, but on an appeal by the Crown
that sentence was too lenient the Court of Appeal increased the same to fifteen years.
"Rex vs. Mirko Vitkovich (Defamatory Libel).—During the month of April, 1948,
instructions were received from the Department of the Attorney-General to investigate
a complaint of defamatory libel committed by the publication of mimeographed circulars
in the Croatian language. The victim of the alleged libel was one Dr. Mladen Guino
Zorkin, a Croatian, recently arrived in this Province, and a former leader in Yugoslavia
of the Croatian Peasant Party.
" The circulars alleged that Dr. Zorkin, among other things, was a traitor to Yugoslavia, was a rogue and a criminal, and was a representative of and advocated a Fascist
form of government.   The circulars were signed by one Mirko Vitkovich.
"After a preliminary hearing at Nanaimo, Vitkovich was committed for trial on
June 2nd, 1948, and on October 18th, 1948, appeared at the Nanaimo Assize for trial.
He was found guilty and sentenced to six months.
" This case was of special interest in view of the present world situation. The
circulars, which were an attempt to discredit Dr. Zorkin, an anti-Communist, were
Communist inspired and followed the regular party line. Another interesting point
was that the defence applied for and was granted permission for evidence to be taken
on commission in London, Eng., and this evidence was presented at the trial."
CONCLUSION.
The Province of British Columbia, in the past year, has experienced a growth which
has taxed the resources of the Provincial Police to the utmost—an increase in population, traffic, industry, and tourists. Together with the Doukhobor radical sect trouble
and the disastrous flood, our men, with little increase in strength, were called upon to
shoulder these added burdens. In the face of this tremendous increase in duties, the
men of this Force have willingly and whole-heartedly striven to give the citizens of this
Province the best possible protection and co-operation. For their loyalty and unswerving devotion to their duties I tender my most grateful thanks.
I would like to express my appreciation to you for your invaluable help and guidance; to my Deputy Commissioner, Roger Peachey, who has so ably assisted me
throughout the year; and to the Deputy Attorney-General, Col. E. Pepler, K.C., and
other members of his office for their able and willing assistance.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. SHIRRAS,
Commissioner of Provincial Police. REPORT OP PROVINCIAL POLICE, 1948.
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EH Report of the Inspector of Gaols, 1948-49.
The Honourable G. S. Wismer, K.C.,        ,     .....
.Attorney-General, Victoria,-B.C. ,   v.
SIR,—I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report on the four Provincial gaols for the year ended March 31st, 1949.
OAKALLA PRISON FARM.
Report of Warden J. Millman:—
"General.—The statements of revenue and expenditure, together with the Summarization of the bursar, indicate that although we have suffered an over-all loss on
farm operations for the year, mainly due to poor crop conditions during the summer of
1948, a marked improvement has been shown in every department, and I am confident
that the 1949-50 fiscal year will present a much different picture.
" The new tractor is giving excellent service and is responsible in no small degree
for the splendid condition of the farm lands this year. Other additions during the year
include the replacement of the obsolete coke-burning bake-oven with two modern
oil-fired bake-ovens with excellent results, a new oil-fired heating plant in the Warden's
residence, and a chicken-coop.
" Overcrowded conditions last fall compelled us to renovate the west wing of the
old gaol building and occupy it with some seventy-odd inmates. While this relieved
the situation somewhat, it is hoped that renovation of the other wing of the old gaol
building and construction of a new cell-block in the near future will still further
alleviate the situation.
" Erection of two Quonset huts for the purpose of accommodating the sheet-metal
plant, carpenter shop, and vegetable room has been carried out, and it is hoped the
installation of heating and wiring facilities, which has been delayed, will be completed
shortly and these huts put into use.
" Our road-building programme is progressing favourably, and we are gradually
acquiring some excellent hard-surfaced roads leading into the grounds. This work will
be continued during the next fiscal year as funds permit.
" Many compliments have been received on the pleasing appearance, both exterior
and interior, of the entire institution, resulting from the progressive redecorating
programme which is continuing under the supervision of the painter-guard.
" The behaviour of the inmates is much the same as the previous year. The
women's gaol, on the other hand, displays a much more desirable picture, it not having
been found necessary to charge any female inmate with any offence throughout the year.
" In the matter of escapes, although eight inmates escaped from the west wing and
two breaks occurred in the women's gaol, the number is below average. Increased
staffs in both the men's and women's gaols have materially improved our custodial
arrangements and permitted us to institute additional preventive measures.
" The population, both male and female, is still on the increase. Contingents of
female prisoners are still being transferred to the women's gaol at Prince George from
time to time in order to relieve the situation here."
WOMEN'S SECTION.
Miss Mona Russell, R.N., matron in charge, reports:—
" Our female population averaged 49.652 daily throughout the year, and a total
of 57,690 meals were served during that time.
23 T  24 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
"Approximately 202 one-half gallons consisting of carrots, beets, pickles, jelly, and
mincemeat were canned.
" Due to the employment of an extra matron to supervise the sewing-room and
second floor of the women's gaol, there has been a very outstanding increase in the
amount of mending done, especially for the men's gaol; some 11,402 articles were
repaired; 1,949 articles of wearing apparel made from new material; 1,265 articles
repaired for the women's gaol and eighteen rugs made, in addition to some minor
articles.
" Laundry:  Some 24,524 articles were laundered and mangled during the year.
" Health: The gaol surgeon visits regularly and whenever called upon. A doctor
and nurse from the Provincial Venereal Disease Clinic make weekly visits and attend
to those requiring treatment. The general health of inmates throughout the year was
excellent.
" Mrs. Sr. Major Martin of the Salvation Army has been most helpful. Two
Sisters of Service held classes each Wednesday and the response from the inmates has
been rather outstanding.
" I also wish to thank the Elizabeth Fry Society for their continued interest in our
institution and also for the lovely drapes donated to our dining-room."
JUVENILE OFFENDERS.
Senior Guard T. A. Camm reports as follows:—
" Work among the young offenders has continued during the past year in spite of
the difficulties inherent in an overcrowded institution. Although present accommodation
limits the Star class to twenty members, there are many eligible for this class scattered
throughout the main building. Contact has been kept with these lads and such
assistance rendered them as possible under existing conditions.
" In February this year the practice of screening this pool of young offenders for
selection for New Haven Borstal School was discontinued, owing to the operation of an
Act permitting Magistrates to sentence direct from the Courts.
" Close co-operation is maintained with E. G. B. Stevens, Chief Probation Officer,
and arrangements made for the screening of these lads by the Provincial Psychiatric
Clinic headed by Dr. U. P. Byrnes.
"About November, 1948, owing to the increase in population, it was found necessary
to utilize the Star class workshop and gymnasium, situated in a wing of the old gaol,
for living-quarters. Our workshop was moved to temporary, restricted quarters, but
no room, was available for a gymnasium. Thus an important phase of our recreation
period was lost and the services of the Pro-Rec instructors discontinued.
" Our little shop has continued its excellent work of furniture renovation and maintenance work under the guidance of Guard Berkey, and an outside working party under
the direction of Mr. Wilson has done much useful labour.
" We have carried on directing educational courses as well as advising on many
personal problems with the younger group. During the year inmates have taken up
courses ranging from aviation and navigation to lower elementary studies; languages,
general science, engineering, electricity, book-keeping, and art are among the many
courses applied for and successfully tackled.
" Service is still given by the probation staff to our group by taking them from
Oakalla on expiration of their sentences, and an endeavour is made to place them after
consultation with Mr. Stevens."
NELSON GAOL.
Warden R. S. Nelson reports:—
"Although this institution retains its status as a common gaol, it has, since June,
1942, been used mainly as a lockup and for prisoners sentenced up to three months, and REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1948-49. T 25
I am happy to report that our statistics show a decrease in the gaol population for the
year ended March 31st, 1949.
" The inmates not working with the outside gang are allowed the freedom of the
large cell-block during the day and, when weather permits, one hour in the exercise
yard daily, except Sunday. There is a well-stocked library for the use of prisoners,
and radio programmes, controlled from the gaol office, are periodically given.
" The Salvation Army holds a service every Sunday morning at 10 o'clock, and
occasionally the Pentecostal Assembly hold meetings. The Roman Catholic Church has
also been holding meetings each Sunday morning in the past few months.
" The general health of the prisoners has been good, with only three cases having
to be hospitalized on instruction from the gaol surgeon. We have been very free from
infectious or contagious diseases this past year.
" Prison labour is used for tending to the garden, and produce this past year was
slightly higher than in the previous year.
" Discipline has been maintained throughout the year, and although some twenty-
one breaches of the prison regulations occurred, they were of a very minor nature."
KAMLOOPS GAOL.
Warden H. H. Mansell reports:—
" Conditions respecting the operation and administration generally of affairs in
connection with the gaol during the past year have been satisfactory. For the last
three months of the year our constable-gaoler has had the assistance of a special constable, which has materially improved conditions in the gaol and the handling of
inmates. Gaol rules and regulations have been strictly adhered to, and it was not
necessary to reprimand any prisoner during the year.
"All inmates, except those awaiting trial, have been regularly employed with janitor work and other services required in the police office, quarters, gaol, gaol garden,
around the heating plant, and the grounds around the Provincial Home and Government
buildings.
" I regret to report that two prisoners escaped from the gaol during the year.
On November 4th-5th John Ronald Roan and Albert Suetta, both awaiting trial for a
breaking and entering and theft charge, made their get-away by opening the lock on
one of the gaol doors by use of metal which got into their possession and which they
made to fashion into a key. Both men were apprehended later and received further
sentences for this offence. Four custodial officers were reprimanded for failure to
properly carry out their duties during the night of the escape.
" Constable-Guard W. T. Teal has carried out his duties in a most satisfactory
manner, and his interest in the administration of the gaol is worthy of commendation."
PRINCE GEORGE GAOL.
Warden G. H. Clark reports:—
" Men's Gaol.
" The men's gaol has been fully occupied throughout the year and at times overcrowded so that prisoners are frequently sent on to Oakalla Prison to serve their sentences there .
" There were no escapes during the year, and prisoners are employed cutting wood
and caring for the garden of the women's gaol and janitor duties.
"Women's Gaol.
" The number of inmates in the women's gaol now averages forty, and several
batches which Oakalla Prison is unable to care for have been sent here to serve their
sentences. T 26 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
" Gaol discipline has been maintained, only a few breaches of the regulations
having occurred and which were of a minor nature.
" Inmates are kept occupied with work in connection with maintenance such as
sewing, washing, and cleaning. They also engage in handicrafts such as shell work,
leather work (purses and hand-bags), and knitting. During 1948 there was an excellent garden which was highly commended by visiting officials. An exhibit in the fall
fair elicited many favourable comments—in the display were vegetables (fresh and
canned), wool garments, and socks knitted by inmates.
"An attempt was made last fall to establish a branch of the John Howard Society,
but was not entirely successful owing to the reluctance of local people to consent to
take office. However, local women's organizations take quite an interest in the gaol
and encourage inmates in handicrafts.
" Sunday services are held in which ministers of various denominations take turns
in visiting on Sunday afternoon. The Salvation Army takes a prominent part in seeking to be of service—Captain Watson and his good wife have been, and are, of the
greatest service in promoting the welfare of the inmates."
LIBRARIES.
During the year some 42,977 books were circulated in the men's gaol (almost
double of the previous year) and 2,221 books in the women's gaol at Oakalla Prison
Farm. This continued circulation increase in the prison libraries at Oakalla is very
gratifying and is clearly indicative of the response and general appreciation of the
excellent facilities available to all inmates.
Mrs. Clucas, of the Library Commission, has continued to provide this spleadid
service, and her personal interest in the prisoners and the appearance of the library is
much appreciated.
At Prince George, libraries are in operation in the men's and women's gaols, and
we are indebted to Miss Sergeant, the head of the local Provincial Library Commission,
for her interest in supplying and renewing books.
To Mr. C. K. Morison, Provincial Librarian, who inaugurated this library service,
and his staff throughout the Province, we are much indebted.
CONCLUSION.
Appended hereto is a statistical report covering the movement of population;
commitments; sex; educational status; habits as to use of intoxicants and drugs;
occupation of prisoners; racial and civil status; ages; creeds; duration of sentences;
previous convictions; offences for which prisoners were committed and sentenced;
employment of prisoners; number of officers and employees; statement of revenue and
expenditure;   covering the four provincial gaols in the Province.
To the Salvation Army, the various denominational churches, the John Howard
Society, the Elizabeth Fry Society, and more recently the Alcoholics Anonymous group,
who have given unselfishly of their time and efforts for the betterment of our inmates,
both socially and spiritually, I am very grateful.
Also to the Warden, Oakalla Prison Farm, as well as the wardens at the other
minor Provincial gaols, the matrons and guards, whose loyalty and efforts toward
improving conditions in our custodial institutions have continued, I express my sincere
appreciation of their work.
I have the honour to be,
Sir,
Your obedient servant,
J. SHIRRAS,
Inspector of Gaols. REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1948-49.
APPENDIX.
T 27
ANNUAL REPORT ON GAOLS FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31st, 1949.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
1. Total mimber of county gaols in B.C	
2. Total expenditure for gaol maintenance
in B.C.—
Year ended March 31st. 1949	
Year ended March 31st, 1948	
3. Average total maintenance cost per day
per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1949	
Year ended March 31st, 1948	
Average dietary cost per day per prisoner—
Year ended March 31st, 1949	
Year ended March 31st, 1948	
4. Number of prisoners committed—
Year ended March 31st, 1949	
Year ended March 31st, 1948	
S589.035.98
411,477.88
$2,25
1.73
$0.44    ]
.37    |
3,678
3,375
$26,842.92
21,138.50
$2.67
1.64
$0.64
.34
203
229
$7,103.36    |  $45,338.97 $668,321.23
6,341.15     I     25,296.41     I       464,253.94
$1.22    | S3.44
1.17     I 2.73
$0.52    | $0.70
.36    | .48
I
463 747
330 924
$2.39
1.75
$0.55
.37
5,091
4,8'58
I. Movement of Population, Year ended March 31st, 1949.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
On register, April 1st, 1948	
Received—
From gaols and lockups 	
By transfer	
By recapture	
By revocation of licence	
By forfeiture of ticket-of-leave	
By internal movements	
Insane 	
Juveniles	
Deportation	
From bail	
Committed for trial	
Sentenced	
Discharged—
By expiry of sentence	
By ticket of leave	
By deportation	
By pardon	
By escape	
By death	
By payment of fines	
By release of Court order (including bail)
By transfer	
By internal movements	
To asylum	
On register March 31st, 1949	
678
3,678
18
16
628
2,782
36
25
22
16
2
113
379
275
628
4,278
230
11
279
173
2
17
3
758
60
2
73
39
401
300
1
78
24
61
635
789
250
222
127
109
41
466
5,736
12
926 T 28
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
II. Commitments.
1947-48.
1948-49.
Decrease.
Increase.
13
12
216
1,224
127
2,924
416
15
4,585
264,266
21,913
719
19
21
4
14
9
243
1,294
152
3,181
442
26
4,989
286,811
23,275
778
18
18
2
1
3
Crimes—
27
70
25
257
26
11
404
22,545
1,362
59
1
3
2
III. Sex.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
3,305
373
195
8
430
33
639                4,569
Totals	
3,678
203
463
7_.7                       .. 091
IV. Educational Status.
190
2,333
1,093
62
21
120
59
3
132
255
75
1
80
517
142
8
Elementary	
3,225
1,369
74
Totals	
3,678
203
463
747
5,091
V. Nationality.
(Place of Birth.)
British—
2,765
410
39
152
16
395
8
1
579
45
3,891
40
Totals	
Foreign—
3,214
122
302
24
16
168
11
12
12
404
2
57
624
24
96
3
4,410
27
3,678
203
463
747
5,091 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1948-49.
VI. Habits as to Use of Intoxicants.
T 29
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
217
1,263
2,198
21
182
74
41
348
53
346
348
344
1,671
3,076
Intemperate	
Totals	
3,678
203
463
747
5,091
VII. Habits as to Use of Drugs.
3,395
283
203
	
463
	
717
30
4,778
Addicts	
313
Totals	
3,678
203
463
747
5,091
VIII. Occupations.
152
392
381
1,435
370
50
112
786
37
4
39
104
19
79
1
30
275
65
7
6
15
410
98
150
18
44
12
283
807
548
1,964
472
101
130
Student	
786
Totals	
3,678
203
463
747
5,091
IX. Racial.
White                	
3,268
38
326
26
20
177
26
301
162
613
2
132
4,359
40
646
Mongolian	
26
Totals	
3,678
203
463
747
5,091
X. Civil State.
2,265
847
139
427
116
65
4
18
330
72
41
20
451
220
30
46
3,162
1,204
214
511
Totals   	
3,678
203
463
747
5,091 T 30
BRITISH COLUMBIA.
XI. Ages.
.   •                   .....,,;
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
448
554
436
769
780
496
195
10
36
'    ■        30
40
54
19
14
46
72
42
79
119
67
38
67
138
93
144
178
81
46
571
21 to 25 :	
800
25 to 30	
601
30 to 40	
1,032
40 to 50	
1,131
50 to 60	
663
Over 60... '. ...: :: .:............-	
293
Totals	
3,678
203
463
747
5,091
XII. Creeds.
100
742
3
51
4
297
37
560
1,248
422
54
57
103
11
23
11
3
15
13
21
75
25
1
5
10         j
59
	
19
         1
34
8         i
62
234
27
7
7
79
2
72
18
40
383
29
90
27
128
903
14
75
Hebrew	
4
418
76
683
1,940
503
148
96
103
Totals	
3,678
203
463
747
5,091
XIII. Duration of Sentences.
1,533
296
205
448
461
244
90
135
89
34
15
120
2
6
72
35
35
28
19
5
1
8
196
79
34
21
7
5
1
23
17
78
1
	
1
615
43
23
33
20
7
6
	
	
2,416
453
297
3 months and under 6 months	
530
507
261
91
142
112
51
15
78
1
128
2
6
1
Totals	
3,678
203
463
747
5,091 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1948-49.
T 31
XIV. Previous Convictions.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
None	
1         ; :  ::..:::..: :.:	
1,413
480
321
220
159
126
113
79
77
56
37
43
39
32
31
39
34
23
38
218
52
20
20
8
117
41
23
8
4
1
2
4
2
1
227
56
37
20
13
12
23
10
15
12
9
6
2
4
2
1
1
2
2
9
552
95
46
16
19
11
2
2
2
1
1
	
	
2,309
*~     672
2	
427
3       	
264
4	
195
5	
150
6	
140
■7 ...- .,.-.: .........
8 ;	
91
98
9 :	
71
10	
47
11                      	
49
12 :	
42
13 !	
36
14	
33
15... '.,-. '..	
40
16 : ...':. : :	
35
17                	
25
18 and 19 •.	
40
20 to 29	
227
30 to 39	
52
40 to 49	
20
SO to 59.. ,.., -	
20
60 to 69	
8
70 to 79	
80 to 99	
Over 100	
Totals :	
3,678
203
463
747
5,091
Per cent, of recidivists	
61.58
42.46
50.3
26.1 T  32 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
XV. Offences for which Prisoners were committed and sentenced during the Year.
Commitments.
Sentences.
Male.
Female.
Total.
Male.
Female.
Total.
(a)  Crimes against the person—
Oakalla        	
192
16
11
16
1
1
3
193
17
11
19
209
10
10
16
3
209
10
10
19
235
5
240
245
3
248
(6)  Crimes against property—
Oakalla  	
1,080
57
73
44
26
1
2
13
1,106
58
75
57
1,610
45
72
44
35
2
13
1,645
45
74
57
Totals	
1,254
47
1,296
1,771
50
1,821
(c)   Crimes against public morals and decency—
Oakalla	
98
8
6
10
15
1
11
US
9
6
21
101
7
6
10
12
1
11
113
8
6
21
Totals	
122
27
149
124
24
148
(d)  Crimes against public order and peace—
1,683
215
320
505
317
12
31
81
2,000
227
351
586
1,785
182
306
505
325
8
25
81
2,110
190
Kamloops	
331
586
Totals	
2,723
441
3,164
2,778
439
3 217
365
14
379
414
12
Grand  totals   (totals of   (a),
(b),  (_),  (d),and <_))
4,699
529
5,228
5,332
528
5,860
XVI. Employment of Prisoners.
(Per Cent, of Population.)
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
.710
29.387
2.928
2.524
7.846
13.554
1.240
41.811
28.0
11.0
21.0
40.0
24.0
7.0
60.0
9.0
82.03
2.79
Sick	
.70
14.48
100.000
100.0
100.0
100.00 REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF GAOLS, 1948-49.
XVII. Number of Officers and Employees on March 31st, 1949.
T 33
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
1
1
1
2
7
1
1
3
3
8
77
1
1
3
8
3
4
1
1
1
5
1
1
2
1
1
1
Kitchen Chef	
Matrons	
11
Totals	
125
9
4
16
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditures for Year ended March 31st, 1949.
Oakalla.
Nelson.
Kamloops.
Prince
George.
Total.
Expenditure.
Library	
Salaries	
Office supplies	
Travelling expenses	
Uniforms and clothing	
Janitors' supplies	
Farm operations	
Upkeep of grounds	
General equipment	
Laundry operations	
Fuel, water, and light	
Provisions (upkeep of prisoners)	
Medical attendanceand hospital supplies...
Good Conduct Fund	
Sheet-metal plant	
Incidentals and contingencies	
Totals	
Public Works expenditures	
Gross expenditure	
Revenue.
Rental of quarters, etc., and maintenance
of prisoners	
Net expenditure	
$2,016
274,480
3,640
4,124
31,234
6,574
28,444
872.
16,135
7,387
56,100
116,169
6,256
13,501
38,982
684
58    |
$606,605.49
$665,434.58
I
I
$76,398.60    |
$589,035.98
-I-
$51.95
14,754.05
176.77
79.28
1,206.77
405.29
135.05
152.19
2,678.06
6,013.10
685.66
422.50
134.31
$26,894.98
319.44
$27,214.42
$371.50
$26,842.92
$4,307.30
53.56
33.88    j
153.39    |
190.55
513.40
!,023.39
53.56
320.10
5.23
$21,412.62
227.03
1,172.19
303.30
912.19
38.48
3,020.37
3,626.51
8,483.24
1,026.22
613.30
77.99
1,654.36
200.00
$40,913.44
4,526.00
$8,854.36
$45,439.44
$1,751.00
$100.47
$7,103.36
$45,338.97
$2,067.98
314,954.40
4,097.92
5,410.28
32,897.99
8,082.84
28,579.35
910.56
19,307.58
7,387.42
62,918.06
133,689.15
8,021.92
14,857.75
38,982.96
902.11
$683,068.27
63,874.53
$746,942.80
$78,621.57
$668,321.23 T 34 BRITISH COLUMBIA.
XVIII. Statement of Revenue and Expenditure for Year ended March 31st, 1949—Cont'd.
Total Gross Expenditure.
Total Revenue.
1948.
1949.
1948.         j
1949.
$467,298.99
22,307.15
7.575.15
25,296.41
$665,434.58
27,214.42
8,854.36
45,439.44
1
$55,821.11    j
1,168.65    j
1,234.00
I
$76,398.60
1,751.00
100.47
Totals	
$522,477.70
58,223.76
$746,942.80
78,621.67
$58,223.76    |
1
$78,621.57
$464,253.94
$668,321.23
•      1
VICTORIA,  B.C.:
Printed by Don McDiarmid, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty.
1950.
645-1249-5392  

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